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Sample records for amyloid beta peptide-induced

  1. PARP-1 modulates amyloid beta peptide-induced neuronal damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Martire

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ causes neurodegeneration by several mechanisms including oxidative stress, which is known to induce DNA damage with the consequent activation of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-1. To elucidate the role of PARP-1 in the neurodegenerative process, SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were treated with Aβ25-35 fragment in the presence or absence of MC2050, a new PARP-1 inhibitor. Aβ25-35 induces an enhancement of PARP activity which is prevented by cell pre-treatment with MC2050. These data were confirmed by measuring PARP-1 activity in CHO cells transfected with amylod precursor protein and in vivo in brains specimens of TgCRND8 transgenic mice overproducing the amyloid peptide. Following Aβ25-35 exposure a significant increase in intracellular ROS was observed. These data were supported by the finding that Aβ25-35 induces DNA damage which in turn activates PARP-1. Challenge with Aβ25-35 is also able to activate NF-kB via PARP-1, as demonstrated by NF-kB impairment upon MC2050 treatment. Moreover, Aβ25-35 via PARP-1 induces a significant increase in the p53 protein level and a parallel decrease in the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein. These overall data support the hypothesis of PARP-1 involvment in cellular responses induced by Aβ and hence a possible rationale for the implication of PARP-1 in neurodegeneration is discussed.

  2. DCP-LA neutralizes mutant amyloid beta peptide-induced impairment of long-term potentiation and spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Tetsu; Tomiyama, Takami; Tominaga, Takemi; Mori, Hiroshi; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2010-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) was monitored from the CA1 region of the intact rat hippocampus by delivering high frequency stimulation (HFS) to the Schaffer collateral commissural pathway. Intraventricular injection with mutant amyloid beta(1-42) peptide lacking glutamate-22 (Abeta(1-42)E22Delta), favoring oligomerization, 10 min prior to HFS, inhibited expression of LTP, with the potency more than wild-type amyloid beta(1-42) peptide. Intraperitoneal injection with the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) 70 min prior to HFS neutralized mutant Abeta(1-42)E22Delta peptide-induced LTP inhibition. In the water maze test, continuous intraventricular injection with mutant Abeta(1-42)E22Delta peptide for 14 days prolonged the acquisition latency as compared with that for control, with the potency similar to wild-type Abeta(1-42) peptide, and intraperitoneal injection with DCP-LA shortened the prolonged latency to control levels. The results of the present study indicate that DCP-LA neutralizes mutant Abeta(1-42)E22Delta peptide-induced impairment of LTP and spatial learning. PMID:19716848

  3. DCP-LA neutralizes mutant amyloid beta peptide-induced impairment of long-term potentiation and spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Tetsu; Tomiyama, Takami; Tominaga, Takemi; Mori, Hiroshi; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2010-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) was monitored from the CA1 region of the intact rat hippocampus by delivering high frequency stimulation (HFS) to the Schaffer collateral commissural pathway. Intraventricular injection with mutant amyloid beta(1-42) peptide lacking glutamate-22 (Abeta(1-42)E22Delta), favoring oligomerization, 10 min prior to HFS, inhibited expression of LTP, with the potency more than wild-type amyloid beta(1-42) peptide. Intraperitoneal injection with the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) 70 min prior to HFS neutralized mutant Abeta(1-42)E22Delta peptide-induced LTP inhibition. In the water maze test, continuous intraventricular injection with mutant Abeta(1-42)E22Delta peptide for 14 days prolonged the acquisition latency as compared with that for control, with the potency similar to wild-type Abeta(1-42) peptide, and intraperitoneal injection with DCP-LA shortened the prolonged latency to control levels. The results of the present study indicate that DCP-LA neutralizes mutant Abeta(1-42)E22Delta peptide-induced impairment of LTP and spatial learning.

  4. Silibinin attenuates amyloid beta(25-35) peptide-induced memory impairments: implication of inducible nitric-oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, P; Mamiya, T; Lu, L L; Mouri, A; Niwa, M; Hiramatsu, M; Zou, L B; Nagai, T; Ikejima, T; Nabeshima, T

    2009-10-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the deposition of amyloid peptides is invariably associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Silibinin (silybin), a flavonoid derived from the herb milk thistle, has potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. However, it remains unclear whether silibinin improves amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide-induced neurotoxicity. In this study, we examined the effect of silibinin on the fear-conditioning memory deficits, inflammatory response, and oxidative stress induced by the intracerebroventricular injection of Abeta peptide(25-35) (Abeta(25-35)) in mice. Mice were treated with silibinin (2, 20, and 200 mg/kg p.o., once a day for 8 days) from the day of the Abeta(25-35) injection (day 0). Memory function was evaluated in cued and contextual fear-conditioning tests (day 6). Nitrotyrosine levels in the hippocampus and amygdala were examined (day 8). The mRNA expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the hippocampus and amygdala was measured 2 h after the Abeta(25-35) injection. We found that silibinin significantly attenuated memory deficits caused by Abeta(25-35) in the cued and contextual fear-conditioning test. Silibinin significantly inhibited the increase in nitrotyrosine levels in the hippocampus and amygdala induced by Abeta(25-35). Nitrotyrosine levels in these regions were negatively correlated with memory performance. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR revealed that silibinin inhibited the overexpression of iNOS and TNF-alpha mRNA in the hippocampus and amygdala induced by Abeta(25-35). These findings suggest that silibinin (i) attenuates memory impairment through amelioration of oxidative stress and inflammatory response induced by Abeta(25-35) and (ii) may be a potential candidate for an AD medication. PMID:19638571

  5. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits beta-amyloid peptide-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells and the underlying mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuqin Chen; Jingtian Li; Jinhui Zou; Bailing Li; Meng Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels are 55% lower in brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients than in age-matched normal individuals, which suggests that H2S might be involved in some aspects of AD pathogenesis.OBJECTIVE: To observe the protective mechanisms of varied concentrations of H2S against β -amyloid-peptide (A β) induced apoptosis in pheochromoytoma (PC12) cells, and to analyze the pathway of action.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A controlled, observational, in vitro experiment was performed at Nenrophysiology Laboratory in Zhougshan Medical School, Sun Yat-sen University between July 2006 and May 2007.MATERIALS: PC12 cells were provided by the Animal Experimental Center of Medical School of Sun Yat-sen University. Glybenclamide, rhodamine123, and dihydrorhodamine123 were purchased from Sigma (USA).METHODS: PCI2 cells were incubated at 37℃ in a 5% CO2-enriched incubator with RPMI-1640 medium, supplemented with 5% horse-serum and 10% fetal bovine serum. Cells in logarithmic growth curves received different treatment: The PC12 cells were maintains at 37℃ with the original medium, then incubated in A β 25-35, sodium hydrosulfide (NariS), glybenclamide, NailS+ A β 25-35, or pretreated with glybenelamide 30 minutes prior to administration of and A β 25-35, respectively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) The survival rate of PC12 cells was detected by MTT assay and Hoechst staining. (2) The apoptosis rate of PC12 cells was detected utilizing flow cytometry with propidium iodide staining, and morphological changes of apoptotic cells were observed. (3) The mitochondrial membrane potential was detected by Rhodamine 123-combined flow cytometry. (4) The intracellular reactive oxygen species content was detected by dihydrorhodamine123-combined flow cytometry. RESULTS: A β 25-35 induced significantly decreased viability and increased percentage of apoptosis in PC 12 cells, as well as dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential

  6. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

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    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  7. NADPH oxidase mediates β-amyloid peptide-induced activation of ERK in hippocampal organotypic cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Faridis; Chang, Angela; Hernandez, Caterina; Pautler, Robia G; Sweatt, J David; Klann, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that beta amyloid (Aβ) peptide triggers the activation of several signal transduction cascades in the hippocampus, including the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. In this study we sought to characterize the cellular localization of phosphorylated, active ERK in organotypic hippocampal cultures after acute exposure to either Aβ (1-42) or nicotine. Results We observed that Aβ and nicotine increased the levels of active ERK in distinct cellular localizations. We also examined whether phospho-ERK was regulated by redox signaling mechanisms and found that increases in active ERK induced by Aβ and nicotine were blocked by inhibitors of NADPH oxidase. Conclusion Our findings indicate that NADPH oxidase-dependent redox signaling is required for Aβ-induced activation of ERK, and suggest a similar mechanism may occur during early stages of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19804648

  8. The novel amyloid-beta peptide aptamer inhibits intracellular amyloid-beta peptide toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wang; Yi Yang; Mingyue Jia; Chi Ma; Mingyu Wang; Lihe Che; Yu Yang; Jiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β peptide binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) decoy peptide (DP) can competitively antagonize binding of amyloid β peptide to ABAD and inhibit the cytotoxic effects of amyloid β peptide. Based on peptide aptamers, the present study inserted ABAD-DP into the disulfide bond of human thioredoxin (TRX) using molecular cloning technique to construct a fusion gene that can express the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer. Moreover, adeno-associated virus was used to allow its stable expression. Immunofluorescent staining revealed the co-expression of the transduced fusion gene TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 and amyloid β peptide in NIH-3T3 cells, indicating that the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer can bind amyloid β peptide within cells. In addition, cell morphology and MTT results suggested that TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 attenuated amyloid β peptide-induced SH-SY5Y cell injury and improved cell viability. These findings confirmed the possibility of constructing TRX-based peptide aptamer using ABAD-DP. Moreover, TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 inhibited the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β peptide.

  9. Methyllycaconitine alleviates amyloidpeptides-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XiaoLei Zheng

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder. As the most common form of dementia, it affects more than 35 million people worldwide and is increasing. Excessive extracellular deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ is a pathologic feature of AD. Accumulating evidence indicates that macroautophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of AD, but its exact role is still unclear. Although major findings on the molecular mechanisms have been reported, there are still no effective treatments to prevent, halt, or reverse Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we investigated whether Aβ25-35 could trigger an autophagy process and inhibit the growth of SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, we examined the effect of methyllycaconitine (MLA on the cytotoxity of Aβ25-35. MLA had a protective effect against cytotoxity of Aβ, which may be related to its inhibition of Aβ-induced autophagy and the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Moreover, MLA had a good safety profile. MLA treatment may be a promising therapeutic tool for AD.

  10. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Spuch; Saida Ortolano; Carmen Navarro

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP) has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both...

  11. 葛根素对淀粉样β蛋白所致痴呆模型小鼠学习记忆的影响%Effects of puerarin on learning and memory of model mouse with beta amyloid peptide-induced dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨东旭; 唐玉; 胡小敏; 刘进学; 陈怡; 金有豫

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Puerarin, the main effective component of Chinese herb, Radix puerariae, is isoflavone monomer, which can counteract learning and memory impairment induced by scopolamine or D-galactose etc.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the protective effects of puerarin on β-amYloid peptide-induced learning and memory impairment of model mouse of dementia and the changes of superoxide dismutase activity and malondialdhehyde content in brain and blood.DESIGN: Randomized controlled trailSETTING: Department of Pharmacology, Capital University of MedicalSciencesMATERIALS: The experiment was conducted in Departmentof Pharmacology of Capital University of Medical Sciences from March to June 2002.A total of 40 ICR mice were selected and randomly divided into 4 groups:pseudooperation group, dementia model group, puerarin 25 mg/kg group and puerarin 50 mg/kg group, with 10 in each group.METHODS: ①Model preparation: After anaesthesia with pentobarbital sodium, single intraventricular injection of 3 μL β-amyloid peptide was conducted from right side on each mouse in dementia model group, puerarin 25 mg/kg group and puerarin 50 mg/kg group under aseptic manipulation. The same operation was carried out on the mouse in pseudooperation group but without injection of β-amyloid peptide. ②Giving medicine:10 mL/kg physiological saline was intraperitoneally injected into the mouse in pseudooperation group and model group; 25 mL/kg puerarin was intraperitoneally injected to the mouse in 25 mg/kg puerarin group; 50 mL/kg puerarin was intraperitoneally injected to the mouse in 50 mg/kg puerarin group.The medicines were given to each group from the day of model preparation on and behavioral test was carried out 12 days later. ③ Morris water maze examination was used to detect learning and memory ability of the mice.Time for finding the platform (escape latency) in 2 minutes, swimming distance, original angle and search strategy were recorded as learning results.④When the above

  12. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets — protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores

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    Arbor, Sage C.; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  13. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets - protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbor, Sage C; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  14. Amyloid Beta-peptide (25-35) changes (Ca2+) in hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Beatty, Diane; Morris, Stephen;

    1998-01-01

    neuroscience, Alzheimer, calcium ion, hippocampal neurons, amyloid-beta-peptide, hydrogen ion, rat......neuroscience, Alzheimer, calcium ion, hippocampal neurons, amyloid-beta-peptide, hydrogen ion, rat...

  15. BETASCAN: probable beta-amyloids identified by pairwise probabilistic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen W Bryan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloids and prion proteins are clinically and biologically important beta-structures, whose supersecondary structures are difficult to determine by standard experimental or computational means. In addition, significant conformational heterogeneity is known or suspected to exist in many amyloid fibrils. Recent work has indicated the utility of pairwise probabilistic statistics in beta-structure prediction. We develop here a new strategy for beta-structure prediction, emphasizing the determination of beta-strands and pairs of beta-strands as fundamental units of beta-structure. Our program, BETASCAN, calculates likelihood scores for potential beta-strands and strand-pairs based on correlations observed in parallel beta-sheets. The program then determines the strands and pairs with the greatest local likelihood for all of the sequence's potential beta-structures. BETASCAN suggests multiple alternate folding patterns and assigns relative a priori probabilities based solely on amino acid sequence, probability tables, and pre-chosen parameters. The algorithm compares favorably with the results of previous algorithms (BETAPRO, PASTA, SALSA, TANGO, and Zyggregator in beta-structure prediction and amyloid propensity prediction. Accurate prediction is demonstrated for experimentally determined amyloid beta-structures, for a set of known beta-aggregates, and for the parallel beta-strands of beta-helices, amyloid-like globular proteins. BETASCAN is able both to detect beta-strands with higher sensitivity and to detect the edges of beta-strands in a richly beta-like sequence. For two proteins (Abeta and Het-s, there exist multiple sets of experimental data implying contradictory structures; BETASCAN is able to detect each competing structure as a potential structure variant. The ability to correlate multiple alternate beta-structures to experiment opens the possibility of computational investigation of prion strains and structural heterogeneity of amyloid

  16. Mechanisms of beta-amyloid neurotoxicity : Perspectives of pharmacotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T; Abraham, [No Value; Konya, C; Nyakas, C; Zarandi, M; Penke, B; Luiten, PGM

    2000-01-01

    One of the characteristic neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the extracellular accumulation of beta -amyloid peptides (A beta) in neuritic plaques, Experimental data indicate that different molecular forms of A beta affect a wide array of neuronal and glial functions and ther

  17. Tau/Amyloid Beta 42 Peptide Test (Alzheimer Biomarkers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful? Also known as: Alzheimer Biomarkers Formal name: Tau Protein and Amyloid Beta 42 Peptide Related tests: Phosporylated ... should know? How is it used? Tests for Tau protein and Aß42 may be used as supplemental tests ...

  18. Effects of Yizhi Capsule (益智胶囊) on Learning and Memory Disorder and β-amyloid Peptide Induced Neurotoxicity in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hang-yu; XU Jiang-ping; LI Lin; ZHU Bai-hua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of Yizhi Capsule (益智胶囊, YZC) on learning and memory disorder and β-amyloid peptide induced neurotoxicity in rats. Methods: Various doses of YZC were administered to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for 8 consecutive days, twice a day. On the 8th day of the experiment,scopolamine hydrobromide was intraperitoneally injected to every rat and Morris water maze test and shuttle dark avoidance test were carried out respectively to explore the changes of learning and memory capacities in the rats. Besides, after the cerebral cortical neurons of newborn SD rats aged within 3 days were cultured in vitro for 7 days, drug serum containing YZC was added to the cultured neurons before or after β amyloid peptide25-35 (Aβ25-35) intoxication to observe the protective effect of YZC on neurotoxicity by MTT assay and to determine the LDH content in the supernatant. Results: Compared with those untreated with YZC, the rats having received YZC treatment got superiority in shorter time of platform seeking in Morris water maze test,as well as elongated latent period and less times of error in shuttle dark avoidance test. On the cultured neurons, YZC drug serum could effectively increase the survival rate of Aβ25-35 intoxicated neurons and reduce the LDH contents in cultured supernatant. Conclusion: YZC has an action of improving learning and memory disorder, and good protective effect on Aβ25-35 induced neurotoxicity in SD rats.

  19. Fibrils from designed non-amyloid-related synthetic peptides induce AA-amyloidosis during inflammation in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Westermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mouse AA-amyloidosis is a transmissible disease by a prion-like mechanism where amyloid fibrils act by seeding. Synthetic peptides with no amyloid relationship can assemble into amyloid-like fibrils and these may have seeding capacity for amyloid proteins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Several synthetic peptides, designed for nanotechnology, have been examined for their ability to produce fibrils with Congo red affinity and concomitant green birefringence, affinity for thioflavin S and to accelerate AA-amyloidosis in mice. It is shown that some amphiphilic fibril-forming peptides not only produced Congo red birefringence and showed affinity for thioflavin S, but they also shortened the lag phase for systemic AA-amyloidosis in mice when they were given intravenously at the time of inflammatory induction with silver nitride. Peptides, not forming amyloid-like fibrils, did not have such properties. CONCLUSIONS: These observations should caution researchers and those who work with synthetic peptides and their derivatives to be aware of the potential health concerns.

  20. Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoid reduces neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid beta-peptide (25-35)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruiting Wang; Xingbin Shen; Enhong Xing; Lihua Guan; Lisheng Xin

    2013-01-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoid might attenuate learning/memory impairment and neuronal loss in rats induced by amyloid beta-peptide. This study aimed to explore the effects of Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoid on amyloid beta-peptide-induced neuronal apoptosis and the expression of apoptosis-related proteins in the rat hippocampus. Male Wistar rats were given intragastric administration of Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoid, 50 or 100 mg/kg, once per day. On day 8 after administration, 10 μg amyloid beta-peptide (25–35) was injected into the bilateral hippocampus of rats to induce neuronal apoptosis. On day 20, hippocampal tissue was harvested and probed with the terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotin-16-dUTP nick-end labeling assay. Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoid at 50 and 100 mg/kg reduced neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid beta-peptide (25–35) in the rat hippocampus. Immunohistochemistry and western blot assay revealed that expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax, cytochrome c and caspase-3 was significantly diminished by 50 and 100 mg/kg Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoid, while expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was increased. Moreover, 100 mg/kg Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoid had a more dramatic effect than the lower dosage. These experimental findings indicate that Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoid dose-dependently attenuates neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid beta-peptide in the hippocampus, and it might mediate this by regulating the expression of Bax, cytochrome c, caspase-3 and Bcl-2.

  1. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both proteins are known to localize to mitochondrial membranes, block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins, disrupt the electron transport chain, increase reactive oxygen species production, cause mitochondrial damage, and prevent neurons from functioning normally. In this paper, we will outline current knowledge of the intracellular localization of amyloid-beta. Moreover, we summarize evidence from AD postmortem brain as well as animal AD models showing that amyloid-beta triggers mitochondrial dysfunction through a number of pathways such as impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, elevation of reactive oxygen species production, alteration of mitochondrial dynamics, and interaction with mitochondrial proteins. Thus, this paper supports the Alzheimer cascade mitochondrial hypothesis such as the most important early events in this disease, and probably one of the future strategies on the therapy of this neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Brain beta-amyloid accumulation in transgenic mice expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bradley J; Li, Qiao-Xin; Laughton, Katrina M; Masters, Colin L; Lopes, Elizabeth C; Atkin, Julie D; Cheema, Surindar S

    2004-12-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in both the deposition and pathogenesis of beta-amyloid (Abeta) protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) in neuronal cells and transgenic AD mice reduces Abeta toxicity and accumulation. In contrast, mutations in SOD1 associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) confer enhanced pro-oxidative enzyme activities. We therefore examined whether ALS-linked mutant SOD1 overexpression in motor neuronal cells or transgenic ALS mice modulates Abeta toxicity or its accumulation in the brain. Aggregated, but not freshly solubilised, substrate-bound Abeta peptides induced degenerative morphology and cytotoxicity in motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells. Transfection of NSC-34 cells with human wild-type SOD1 attenuated Abeta-induced toxicity, however this neuroprotective effect was also observed for ALS-linked mutant SOD1. Analysis of the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cerebellum and olfactory bulb from transgenic SOD1G93A mice using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of acid-guanidine extracts revealed age-dependent elevations in Abeta levels, although not significantly different from wild-type mouse brain. In addition, brain amyloid protein precursor (APP) levels remained unaltered as a consequence of mutant SOD1 expression. We therefore conclude that mutant SOD1 overexpression promotes neither Abeta toxicity nor brain accumulation in these ALS models.

  3. Plasma amyloid beta peptides and oligomers antibodies in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, L.; Chu, LW; Kwan, JSC; Ho, JWM; Lam, KSL; Ho, PWL; Chan, KH

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Various forms of amyloid beta (Aβ) including Aβ peptides, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils are thought to be pathogenic in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The exact pathophysiological role of endogenous Aβ autoantibodies (Ab) in healthy subjects and AD patients are uncertain. Potential protective role ...

  4. Distribution of beta-amyloid in the canine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Y; White, R G; Bobik, M; Marks, J S; Russell, M J

    1997-03-01

    The distribution of amyloid-beta protein (A beta) in the canine brain was demonstrated by immunochemistry on serially sectioned tissues from 10 aged mixed breed dogs. Summation of quantitative data and relegation to anatomical sites for the 10 dogs showed A beta to be widely distributed in the cortex and hippocampus while completely absent in the brain stem and cerebellum. The highest density of A beta was in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Cortical areas exhibiting the greatest A beta deposition were the posterior and medial suprasylvius gyrus and the proreus gyrus of the frontal lobe. Unlike humans the canine entorhinal cortex, amygdala, basal ganglia and olfactory bulbs were rarely affected. This suggested that the highly developed olfactory pathways of the canine are generally spared from A beta deposition. PMID:9141082

  5. Cerebral microvascular amyloid beta protein deposition induces vascular degeneration and neuroinflammation in transgenic mice expressing human vasculotropic mutant amyloid beta precursor protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, J.; Xu, F.; Davis, J.; Otte-Holler, I.; Verbeek, M.M.; Nostrand, W.E. van

    2005-01-01

    Cerebral vascular amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) deposition, also known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy, is a common pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease. Additionally, several familial forms of cerebral amyloid angiopathy exist including the Dutch (E22Q) and Iowa (D23N) mutations of Abeta. Incr

  6. Green tea aroma fraction reduces β-amyloid peptide-induced toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans transfected with human β-amyloid minigene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Atsushi; Watanabe, Tatsuro; Fujita, Takashi; Hasegawa, Toshio; Saito, Michio; Suganuma, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Green tea is a popular world-wide beverage with health benefits that include preventive effects on cancer as well as cardiovascular, liver and Alzheimer's diseases (AD). This study will examine the preventive effects on AD of a unique aroma of Japanese green tea. First, a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) CL4176 expressing human β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) was used as a model of AD. A hexane extract of processed green tea was further fractionated into volatile and non-volatile fractions, named roasty aroma and green tea aroma fractions depending on their aroma, by microscale distillation. Both hexane extract and green tea aroma fraction were found to inhibit Aβ-induced paralysis, while only green tea aroma fraction extended lifespan in CL4176. We also found that green tea aroma fraction has antioxidant activity. This paper indicates that the green tea aroma fraction is an additional component for prevention of AD. PMID:25229860

  7. Amyloid-beta Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Probes : A Critical Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C.; Langstrom, Bengt; Zaidi, Habib; Vinters, Harry V.; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Doudet, Doris; Mishani, Eyal; Cohen, Robert M.; Hoilund-Carlsen, Poul F.; Alavi, Abass; Barrio, Jorge R.

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly rising prevalence and cost of Alzheimer's disease in recent decades has made the imaging of amyloid-beta deposits the focus of intense research. Several amyloid imaging probes with purported specificity for amyloid-beta plaques are currently at various stages of FDA approval. However, a

  8. Sulfonated dyes attenuate the toxic effects of beta-amyloid in a structure-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S J; Sadler, I I; Hawtin, S R; Tailor, V J; Shearman, M S

    1995-09-15

    We recently reported that several sulfate-containing glycosaminoglycans, a class of compounds associated with the beta-amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease, attenuate the toxic effects of beta-amyloid fragments beta 25-35 and beta 1-40. The amyloid-binding sulfonated dye Congo Red was shown to have a similar effect. Using two clonal cell lines, we now demonstrate that several sulfonated dyes attenuate beta-amyloid toxicity and that the protective effect appears specific for compounds whose sulfonate groups can interact with the beta-pleated structure of aggregated amyloid. These results suggest that by binding beta-amyloid these compounds may prevent toxic interactions of the peptide with cells.

  9. Neuroprotective approaches in experimental models of beta-amyloid neurotoxicity : Relevance to Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T; Hortobagyi, T; Sasvari, M; Konya, C; Penke, B; Luiten, PGM; Nyakas, C

    1999-01-01

    1. beta-Amyloid peptides (A beta s) accumulate abundantly in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain in areas subserving information acquisition arid processing, and memory formation. A beta fragments are producedin a process of abnormal proteolytic cleavage of their precursor, the amyloid precursor prot

  10. Evidence for Novel [beta]-Sheet Structures in Iowa Mutant [beta]-Amyloid Fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Meredith, Stephen C.; (IIT); (NIH); (UC)

    2009-07-24

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of {beta}-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-A{beta}40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10{sup -3} min{sup -1} and 1.07 x 10{sup -4} min{sup -1} for D23N-A{beta}40 and the wild-type peptide WT-A{beta}40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-{beta} pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 {angstrom} and a broad reflection at 9.4 {angstrom}, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-A{beta}40 fibrils (10.4 {angstrom}). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel {beta}-sheet structure commonly found in WT-A{beta}40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel {beta}-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through 13C-13C and 15N-13C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  11. Complement activation by the amyloid proteins A beta peptide and beta 2-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Nielsen, E H; Svehag, S E

    1999-01-01

    Complement activation (CA) has been reported to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate whether CA may contribute to amyloidogenesis in general, the CA potential of different amyloid fibril proteins was tested. CA induced by A beta preparations containing soluble...... protein, protofilaments and some fibrils or only fibrils in a solid phase system (ELISA) was modest with a slow kinetics compared to the positive delta IgG control. Soluble A beta induced no detectable CA in a liquid phase system (complement consumption assay) while fibrillar A beta caused CA at 200 mg....../ml and higher concentrations. Soluble beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2M) purified from peritoneal dialysates was found to be as potent a complement activator as A beta in both solid and liquid phase systems while beta 2M purified from urine exhibited lower activity, a difference which may be explained...

  12. Modeling Amyloid Beta Peptide Insertion into Lipid Bilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Mobley, D L; Singh, R R P; Maddox, M W; Longo, M J; Mobley, David L.; Cox, Daniel L.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Maddox, Michael W.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2003-01-01

    Inspired by recent suggestions that the Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide (A-beta), can insert into cell membranes and form harmful ion channels, we model insertion of the peptide into cell membranes using a Monte Carlo code which is specific at the amino acid level. We examine insertion of the regular A-beta peptide as well as mutants causing familial Alzheimer's disease. We present our results and develop the hypothesis that partial insertion into the membrane, leaving the peptide in one leaflet, increases the probability of harmful channel formation. This hypothesis can partly explain why these mutations are neurotoxic simply due to peptide insertion behavior, and also explains why, normally, A-beta 42 is more toxic to some cultured cells than A-beta 40, but the E22Q mutation reverses this effect. We further apply this model to various artificial A-beta mutants which have been examined experimentally, and offer testable experimental predictions contrasting the roles of aggregation and insertion with regard ...

  13. A comparative analysis of the aggregation behavior of amyloid-beta peptide variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandersteen, A.; Hubin, E.; Sarroukh, R.; Baets, G. de; Schymkowitz, J.; Rousseau, F.; Subramaniam, V.; Raussens, V.; Wenschuh, H.; Wildemann, D.; Broersen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Aggregated forms of the amyloid-beta peptide are hypothesized to act as the prime toxic agents in Alzheimer disease (AD). The in vivo amyloid-beta peptide pool consists of both C- and N-terminally truncated or mutated peptides, and the composition thereof significantly determines AD risk. Other vari

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Amyloid Beta Dimer Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanc, B; Ding, F; Sammond, D; Khare, S; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E; Dokholyan, N V

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide suggest that formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The toxicity of Abeta oligomers depends on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. Due to limitations of current experimental techniques, a detailed knowledge of oligomer structure at the atomic level is missing. We introduce a molecular dynamics approach to study Abeta dimer formation: (1) we use discrete molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model to identify a variety of dimer conformations, and (2) we employ all-atom molecular mechanics simulations to estimate the thermodynamic stability of all dimer conformations. Our simulations of a coarse-grained Abeta peptide model predicts ten different planar beta-strand dimer conformations. We then estimate the free energies of all dimer conformations in all-atom molecular mechanics simulations with explicit water. We compare the free energies of Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-40...

  15. Interaction of amyloid inhibitor proteins with amyloid beta peptides: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Das

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the detailed mechanism by which proteins such as human αB- crystallin and human lysozyme inhibit amyloid beta (Aβ peptide aggregation is crucial for designing treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Thus, unconstrained, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent have been performed to characterize the Aβ17-42 assembly in presence of the αB-crystallin core domain and of lysozyme. Simulations reveal that both inhibitor proteins compete with inter-peptide interaction by binding to the peptides during the early stage of aggregation, which is consistent with their inhibitory action reported in experiments. However, the Aβ binding dynamics appear different for each inhibitor. The binding between crystallin and the peptide monomer, dominated by electrostatics, is relatively weak and transient due to the heterogeneous amino acid distribution of the inhibitor surface. The crystallin-bound Aβ oligomers are relatively long-lived, as they form more extensive contact surface with the inhibitor protein. In contrast, a high local density of arginines from lysozyme allows strong binding with Aβ peptide monomers, resulting in stable complexes. Our findings not only illustrate, in atomic detail, how the amyloid inhibitory mechanism of human αB-crystallin, a natural chaperone, is different from that of human lysozyme, but also may aid de novo design of amyloid inhibitors.

  16. Binding of fullerenes to amyloid beta fibrils: size matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huy, Pham Dinh Quoc; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-10-01

    Binding affinity of fullerenes C20, C36, C60, C70 and C84 for amyloid beta fibrils is studied by docking and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with the Amber force field and water model TIP3P. Using the molecular mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann surface area method one can demonstrate that the binding free energy linearly decreases with the number of carbon atoms of fullerene, i.e. the larger is the fullerene size, the higher is the binding affinity. Overall, fullerenes bind to Aβ9-40 fibrils stronger than to Aβ17-42. The number of water molecules trapped in the interior of 12Aβ9-40 fibrils was found to be lower than inside pentamer 5Aβ17-42. C60 destroys Aβ17-42 fibril structure to a greater extent compared to other fullerenes. Our study revealed that the van der Waals interaction dominates over the electrostatic interaction and non-polar residues of amyloid beta peptides play the significant role in interaction with fullerenes providing novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Acetylcholinesterase, a senile plaque component, affects the fibrillogenesis of amyloid-beta-peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, A; Bronfman, F; Pérez, C A; Vicente, M; Garrido, J; Inestrosa, N C

    1995-12-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) colocalizes with amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) deposits present in the brain of Alzheimer's patients. Recent studies showed that A beta 1-40 can adopt two different conformational states in solution (an amyloidogenic conformer, A beta ac, and a non-amyloidogenic conformer, A beta nac) which have distinct abilities to form amyloid fibrils. We report here that AChE binds A beta nac and accelerates amyloid formation by the same peptide. No such effect was observed with A beta ac, the amyloidogenic conformer, suggesting that AChE acts as a 'pathological chaperone' inducing a conformational transition from A beta nac into A beta ac in vitro.

  18. Inhibition of amyloid-beta-induced cell death in human brain pericytes in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, A.A.M.; Verbeek, M.M.; Otte-Holler, I.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Waal, R.M.W. de; Kremer, H.P.H.

    2002-01-01

    Amyloid-beta protein (A beta) deposition in the cerebral vascular walls is one of the key features of Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type (HCHWA-D). A beta(1-40) carrying the 'Dutch' mutation (HCHWA-D A beta(1-40)) induces pronounced degeneration of cul

  19. Propionyl-IIGL tetrapeptide antagonizes beta-amyloid excitotoxicity in rat nucleus basalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T.; Abraham, I.; Laskay, G.; Timmerman, W.; Jost, K.; Zarandi, M.; Penke, B; Nyakas, C.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1999-01-01

    A putative tetrapeptide beta-amyloid (A beta) antagonist (propionyl-Ile-Ile-Gly-Leu [Pr-IIGL]) based on the [31-34] sequence of A beta was previously shown to rescue astrocytes from A beta-induced membrane depolarization and subsequent long-term elevations of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in

  20. Beta-secretase-cleaved amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer brain: a morphologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Bogdanovic, N; Volkmann, Inga;

    2004-01-01

    beta-amyloid (Abeta) is the main constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease. Abeta is derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via proteolytic cleavage by proteases beta- and gamma-secretase. In this study, we examined content and localization of beta-secretase-cleaved APP...... the beta-sAPP immunostaining to be stronger and more extensive in gray matter in Alzheimer disease (AD) cases than controls. The axonal beta-sAPP staining was patchy and unevenly distributed for the AD cases, indicating impaired axonal transport. beta-sAPP was also found surrounding senile plaques...

  1. Amyloid-beta(29-42) dimer formations studied by a multicanonical-multioverlap molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Satoru G; Okamoto, Yuko

    2008-03-13

    Amyloid-beta peptides are known to form amyloid fibrils and are considered to play an important role in Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-beta(29-42) is a fragment of the amyloid-beta peptide and also has a tendency to form amyloid fibrils. In order to study the mechanism of amyloidogenesis of this fragment, we applied one of the generalized-ensemble algorithms, the multicanonical-multioverlap algorithm, to amyloid-beta(29-42) dimer in aqueous solution. We obtained a detailed free-energy landscape of the dimer system. From the detailed free-energy landscape, we examined monomer and dimer formations of amyloid-beta(29-42) and deduced dimerization processes, which correspond to seeding processes in the amyloidogenesis of amyloid-beta(29-42).

  2. Amyloid Beta Peptides Differentially Affect Hippocampal Theta Rhythms In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando I. Gutiérrez-Lerma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble amyloid beta peptide (Aβ is responsible for the early cognitive dysfunction observed in Alzheimer's disease. Both cholinergically and glutamatergically induced hippocampal theta rhythms are related to learning and memory, spatial navigation, and spatial memory. However, these two types of theta rhythms are not identical; they are associated with different behaviors and can be differentially modulated by diverse experimental conditions. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate whether or not application of soluble Aβ alters the two types of theta frequency oscillatory network activity generated in rat hippocampal slices by application of the cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists carbachol or DHPG, respectively. Due to previous evidence that oscillatory activity can be differentially affected by different Aβ peptides, we also compared Aβ25−35 and Aβ1−42 for their effects on theta rhythms in vitro at similar concentrations (0.5 to 1.0 μM. We found that Aβ25−35 reduces, with less potency than Aβ1−42, carbachol-induced population theta oscillatory activity. In contrast, DHPG-induced oscillatory activity was not affected by a high concentration of Aβ25−35 but was reduced by Aβ1−42. Our results support the idea that different amyloid peptides might alter specific cellular mechanisms related to the generation of specific neuronal network activities, instead of exerting a generalized inhibitory effect on neuronal network function.

  3. Degeneration of beta-amyloid-associated cholinergic structures in transgenic APP SW mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüth, Hans-Joachim; Apelt, Jenny; Ihunwo, Amadi O; Arendt, Thomas; Schliebs, Reinhard

    2003-07-01

    Cholinergic dysfunction is a consistent feature of Alzheimer's disease, and the interrelationship between beta-amyloid deposits, inflammation and early cholinergic cell loss is still not fully understood. To characterize the mechanisms by which beta-amyloid and pro-inflammatory cytokines may exert specific degenerating actions on cholinergic cells ultrastructural investigations by electron microscopy were performed in brain sections from transgenic Tg2576 mice that express the Swedish double mutation of the human amyloid precursor protein and progressively develop beta-amyloid plaques during aging. Both light and electron microscopical investigations of the cerebral cortex of 19-month-old transgenic mice revealed a number of pathological tissue responses in close proximity of beta-amyloid plaques, such as activated microglia, astroglial proliferation, increased number of fibrous astrocytes, brain edema, degeneration of nerve cells, dendrites and axon terminals. Ultrastructural detection of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT)-immunostaining in cerebral cortical sections of transgenic mice clearly demonstrated degeneration of ChAT-immunoreactive fibres in the environment of beta-amyloid plaques and activated glial cells suggesting a role of beta-amyloid and/or inflammation in specific degeneration of cholinergic synaptic structures. PMID:12788508

  4. Evidence for novel beta-sheet structures in Iowa mutant beta-amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Meredith, Stephen C

    2009-07-01

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of beta-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-Abeta40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10(-3) min(-1) and 1.07 x 10(-4) min(-1) for D23N-Abeta40 and the wild-type peptide WT-Abeta40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-beta pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 A and a broad reflection at 9.4 A, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-Abeta40 fibrils (10.4 A). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel beta-sheet structure commonly found in WT-Abeta40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel beta-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through (13)C-(13)C and (15)N-(13)C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  5. Influence of hydrophobic Teflon particles on the structure of amyloid beta-peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, CE; Norde, W

    2003-01-01

    The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) constitutes the major peptide component of the amyloid plaque deposits of Alzheimer's disease in humans. The Abeta changes from a nonpathogenic to a pathogenic conformation resulting in self-aggregation and deposition of the peptide. It has been established that dena

  6. Identification of a Novel Parallel beta-Strand Conformation within Molecular Monolayer of Amyloid Peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shuai;

    2016-01-01

    technique with force controlled in pico-Newton range, combining with molecular dynamic simulation. The identified parallel beta-strand-like structure of molecular monolayer is distinct from the antiparallel beta-strand structure of A beta(33-42) amyloid fibril. This finding enriches the molecular structures....... In this work, the early A beta(33-42) aggregates forming the molecular monolayer at hydrophobic interface are investigated. The molecular monolayer of amyloid peptide A beta(33-42) consisting of novel parallel beta-strand-like structure is further revealed by means of a quantitative nanomechanical spectroscopy......The differentiation of protein properties and biological functions arises from the variation in the primary and secondary structure. Specifically, in abnormal assemblies of protein, such as amyloid peptide, the secondary structure is closely correlated with the stable ensemble and the cytotoxicity...

  7. Characteristics of Amyloid-Related Oligomers Revealed by Crystal Structures of Macrocyclic [beta]-Sheet Mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Zheng, Jing; Nowick, James S.; Eisenberg, David (UCI); (UCLA)

    2011-09-20

    Protein amyloid oligomers have been strongly linked to amyloid diseases and can be intermediates to amyloid fibers. {beta}-Sheets have been identified in amyloid oligomers. However, because of their transient and highly polymorphic properties, the details of their self-association remain elusive. Here we explore oligomer structure using a model system: macrocyclic peptides. Key amyloidogenic sequences from A{beta} and tau were incorporated into macrocycles, thereby restraining them to {beta}-strands, but limiting the growth of the oligomers so they may crystallize and cannot fibrillate. We determined the atomic structures for four such oligomers, and all four reveal tetrameric interfaces in which {beta}-sheet dimers pair together by highly complementary, dry interfaces, analogous to steric zippers found in fibers, suggesting a common structure for amyloid oligomers and fibers. In amyloid fibers, the axes of the paired sheets are either parallel or antiparallel, whereas the oligomeric interfaces display a variety of sheet-to-sheet pairing angles, offering a structural explanation for the heterogeneity of amyloid oligomers.

  8. Inhibition of cytosolic Phospholipase A2 prevents prion peptide-induced neuronal damage and co-localisation with Beta III Tubulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Last Victoria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2 and the subsequent metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA to prostaglandins have been shown to play an important role in neuronal death in neurodegenerative disease. Here we report the effects of the prion peptide fragment HuPrP106-126 on the PLA2 cascade in primary cortical neurons and translocation of cPLA2 to neurites. Results Exposure of primary cortical neurons to HuPrP106-126 increased the levels of phosphorylated cPLA2 and caused phosphorylated cPLA2 to relocate from the cell body to the cellular neurite in a PrP-dependent manner, a previously unreported observation. HuPrP106-126 also induced significant AA release, an indicator of cPLA2 activation; this preceded synapse damage and subsequent cellular death. The novel translocation of p-cPLA2 postulated the potential for exposure to HuPrP106-126 to result in a re-arrangement of the cellular cytoskeleton. However p-cPLA2 did not colocalise significantly with F-actin, intermediate filaments, or microtubule-associated proteins. Conversely, p-cPLA2 did significantly colocalise with the cytoskeletal protein beta III tubulin. Pre-treatment with the PLA2 inhibitor, palmitoyl trifluoromethyl ketone (PACOCF3 reduced cPLA2 activation, AA release and damage to the neuronal synapse. Furthermore, PACOCF3 reduced expression of p-cPLA2 in neurites and inhibited colocalisation with beta III tubulin, resulting in protection against PrP-induced cell death. Conclusions Collectively, these findings suggest that cPLA2 plays a vital role in the action of HuPrP106-126 and that the colocalisation of p-cPLA2 with beta III tubulin could be central to the progress of neurodegeneration caused by prion peptides. Further work is needed to define exactly how PLA2 inhibitors protect neurons from peptide-induced toxicity and how this relates to intracellular structural changes occurring in neurodegeneration.

  9. Acetylcholinesterase accelerates assembly of amyloid-beta-peptides into Alzheimer's fibrils: possible role of the peripheral site of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inestrosa, N C; Alvarez, A; Pérez, C A; Moreno, R D; Vicente, M; Linker, C; Casanueva, O I; Soto, C; Garrido, J

    1996-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an important component of cholinergic synapses, colocalizes with amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) deposits of Alzheimer's brain. We report here that bovine brain AChE, as well as the human and mouse recombinant enzyme, accelerates amyloid formation from wild-type A beta and a mutant A beta peptide, which alone produces few amyloid-like fibrils. The action of AChE was independent of the subunit array of the enzyme, was not affected by edrophonium, an active site inhibitor, but it was affected by propidium, a peripheral anionic binding site ligand. Butyrylcholinesterase, an enzyme that lacks the peripheral site, did not affect amyloid formation. Furthermore, AChE is a potent amyloid-promoting factor when compared with other A beta-associated proteins. Thus, in addition to its role in cholinergic synapses, AChE may function by accelerating A beta formation and could play a role during amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's brain.

  10. Amyloid Beta Peptide Slows Down Sensory-Induced Hippocampal Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Peña-Ortega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD progresses with a deterioration of hippocampal function that is likely induced by amyloid beta (Aβ oligomers. Hippocampal function is strongly dependent on theta rhythm, and disruptions in this rhythm have been related to the reduction of cognitive performance in AD. Accordingly, both AD patients and AD-transgenic mice show an increase in theta rhythm at rest but a reduction in cognitive-induced theta rhythm. We have previously found that monomers of the short sequence of Aβ (peptide 25–35 reduce sensory-induced theta oscillations. However, considering on the one hand that different Aβ sequences differentially affect hippocampal oscillations and on the other hand that Aβ oligomers seem to be responsible for the cognitive decline observed in AD, here we aimed to explore the effect of Aβ oligomers on sensory-induced theta rhythm. Our results show that intracisternal injection of Aβ1–42 oligomers, which has no significant effect on spontaneous hippocampal activity, disrupts the induction of theta rhythm upon sensory stimulation. Instead of increasing the power in the theta band, the hippocampus of Aβ-treated animals responds to sensory stimulation (tail pinch with an increase in lower frequencies. These findings demonstrate that Aβ alters induced theta rhythm, providing an in vivo model to test for therapeutic approaches to overcome Aβ-induced hippocampal and cognitive dysfunctions.

  11. Amyloid Beta-Protein and Neural Network Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Peña-Ortega

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the neural mechanisms underlying brain dysfunction induced by amyloid beta-protein (Aβ represents one of the major challenges for Alzheimer’s disease (AD research. The most evident symptom of AD is a severe decline in cognition. Cognitive processes, as any other brain function, arise from the activity of specific cell assemblies of interconnected neurons that generate neural network dynamics based on their intrinsic and synaptic properties. Thus, the origin of Aβ-induced cognitive dysfunction, and possibly AD-related cognitive decline, must be found in specific alterations in properties of these cells and their consequences in neural network dynamics. The well-known relationship between AD and alterations in the activity of several neural networks is reflected in the slowing of the electroencephalographic (EEG activity. Some features of the EEG slowing observed in AD, such as the diminished generation of different network oscillations, can be induced in vivo and in vitro upon Aβ application or by Aβ overproduction in transgenic models. This experimental approach offers the possibility to study the mechanisms involved in cognitive dysfunction produced by Aβ. This type of research may yield not only basic knowledge of neural network dysfunction associated with AD, but also novel options to treat this modern epidemic.

  12. Cerebrolysin decreases amyloid-beta production by regulating amyloid protein precursor maturation in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockenstein, Edward; Torrance, Magdalena; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Paulino, Amy; Rose, John B; Crews, Leslie; Moessler, Herbert; Masliah, Eliezer

    2006-05-15

    Cerebrolysin is a peptide mixture with neurotrophic effects that might reduce the neurodegenerative pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously shown in an amyloid protein precursor (APP) transgenic (tg) mouse model of AD-like neuropathology that Cerebrolysin ameliorates behavioral deficits, is neuroprotective, and decreases amyloid burden; however, the mechanisms involved are not completely clear. Cerebrolysin might reduce amyloid deposition by regulating amyloid-beta (Abeta) degradation or by modulating APP expression, maturation, or processing. To investigate these possibilities, APP tg mice were treated for 6 months with Cerebrolysin and analyzed in the water maze, followed by RNA, immunoblot, and confocal microscopy analysis of full-length (FL) APP and its fragments, beta-secretase (BACE1), and Abeta-degrading enzymes [neprilysin (Nep) and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE)]. Consistent with previous studies, Cerebrolysin ameliorated the performance deficits in the spatial learning portion of the water maze and reduced the synaptic pathology and amyloid burden in the brains of APP tg mice. These effects were associated with reduced levels of FL APP and APP C-terminal fragments, but levels of BACE1, Notch1, Nep, and IDE were unchanged. In contrast, levels of active cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (CDK5) and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta [GSK-3beta; but not stress-activated protein kinase-1 (SAPK1)], kinases that phosphorylate APP, were reduced. Furthermore, Cerebrolysin reduced the levels of phosphorylated APP and the accumulation of APP in the neuritic processes. Taken together, these results suggest that Cerebrolysin might reduce AD-like pathology in the APP tg mice by regulating APP maturation and transport to sites where Abeta protein is generated. This study clarifies the mechanisms through which Cerebrolysin might reduce Abeta production and deposition in AD and further supports the importance of this compound in the potential treatment of early AD.

  13. Beta-protein deposition: a pathogenetic link between Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria, F; Prelli, F; Castaño, E M; Larrondo-Lillo, M; Fernandez-Gonzalez, J; van Duinen, S G; Bots, G T; Luyendijk, W; Shelanski, M L; Frangione, B

    1988-10-25

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) refers to a group of hereditary (hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, HCHWA and sporadic (SCAA) disorders characterized by amyloid fibril deposition restricted to the leptomeningeal and cortical vasculature leading to recurrent hemorrhagic and/or ischemic accidents. On clinical and biochemical grounds, two forms of HCHWA can be distinguished. The amyloid subunit of the HCHWA of Icelandic origin is related to Cystatin C, while amyloid from patients of Dutch origin (HCHWA-D) is related to the beta-protein (or A4), the main component of vascular and plaque core amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome (DS) [corrected]. SCAA is an increasingly recognized cause of stroke in normotensive individual amounting to 5-10% of all cerebrovascular accidents. We now report the isolation and partial amino acid sequence of the amyloid subunit from a case of SCAA and a new case of HCHWA-D. The recognition that a heterogeneous group of diseases are linked by similar pathological and chemical features suggests that diversity of etiological factors may promote a common pathogenetic mechanism leading to amyloid-beta (A beta) deposition, and open new ways of research in AD and CAA as they are related to dementia and stroke. PMID:3058268

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-beta Isoforms for Early and Differential Dementia Diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyfs, Hanne; Van Broeck, Bianca; Timmers, Maarten; Fransen, Erik; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; De Deyn, Peter P.; Streffer, Johannes R.; Mercken, Marc; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Overlapping cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers (CSF) levels between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and non-AD patients decrease differential diagnostic accuracy of the AD core CSF biomarkers. Amyloid-beta (A beta) isoforms might improve the AD versus non-AD differential diagnosis. Objective: To de

  15. Absence of beta-amyloid in cortical cataracts of donors with and without Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Ralph; Rosandić, Jurja; Montenegro, Gustavo A; Lobato, Elvira; Tresserra, Francisco; Barraquer, Rafael I; Vrensen, Gijs F J M

    2013-01-01

    Eye lenses from human donors with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD) were studied to evaluate the presence of amyloid in cortical cataract. We obtained 39 lenses from 21 postmortem donors with AD and 15 lenses from age-matched controls provided by the Banco de Ojos para Tratamientos de la Ceguera (Barcelona, Spain). For 17 donors, AD was clinically diagnosed by general physicians and for 4 donors the AD diagnosis was neuropathologically confirmed. Of the 21 donors with AD, 6 had pronounced bilateral cortical lens opacities and 15 only minor or no cortical opacities. As controls, 7 donors with pronounced cortical opacities and 8 donors with almost transparent lenses were selected. All lenses were photographed in a dark field stereomicroscope. Histological sections were analyzed using a standard and a more sensitive Congo red protocol, thioflavin staining and beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry. Brain tissue from two donors, one with cerebral amyloid angiopathy and another with advanced AD-related changes and one cornea with lattice dystrophy were used as positive controls for the staining techniques. Thioflavin, standard and modified Congo red staining were positive in the control brain tissues and in the dystrophic cornea. Beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry was positive in the brain tissues but not in the cornea sample. Lenses from control and AD donors were, without exception, negative after Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid immunohistochemical staining. The results of the positive control tissues correspond well with known observations in AD, amyloid angiopathy and corneas with lattice dystrophy. The absence of staining in AD and control lenses with the techniques employed lead us to conclude that there is no beta-amyloid in lenses from donors with AD or in control cortical cataracts. The inconsistency with previous studies of Goldstein et al. (2003) and Moncaster et al. (2010), both of which demonstrated positive Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid

  16. Structural Transformation and Aggregation of cc-beta Peptides Into Amyloid Proto-fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Yuba; Steckmann, Timothy; Chapagain, Prem; Gerstman, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    The study of amyloid fibrils has important implications in understanding and treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. During the formation of amyloid fibrils, peptide polymers manifest fascinating physical behavior by undergoing complicated structural transformations. We examine the behavior of a small engineered peptide called cc-beta, that was designed to mimic the structural changes of the much larger, naturally occurring amyloid beta proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to uncover the underlying physics that is responsible for the large scale structural transformations. By using implicit solvent replica exchange MD simulations, we examined the behavior of 12 peptides, initially arranged in four different cc-beta alpha helix trimers. We observed various intermediate stages of aggregation, as well as an organized proto-fibril beta aggregate. We discuss the time evolution and the various interactions involved in the structural transformation.

  17. Lipid rafts participate in aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Chun Yang; Yufeng Liu; Peng Li; Huiying Yang; Jingxing Dai; Rongmei Qu; Lin Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide is the main component of amyloid plaques, which are found in Alzhei-mer’s disease. The generation and deposition of amyloid-beta is one of the crucial factors for the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Lipid rafts are glycolipid-rich liquid domains of the plasma membrane, where certain types of protein tend to aggregate and intercalate. Lipid rafts are involved in the generation of amyloid-beta oligomers and the formation of amyloid-beta peptides. In this paper, we review the mechanism by which lipid rafts disturb the aberrant deg-radative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta, which plays an important role in the pathological process of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, we describe this mechanism from the view of the Two-system Theory of fasciology and thus, suggest that lipid rafts may be a new target of Alzheimer’s disease treatment.

  18. Solid-state NMR analysis of the {beta}-strand orientation of the protofibrils of amyloid {beta}-protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Takashi [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Masuda, Yuichi, E-mail: masuda@mail.pharm.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Irie, Kazuhiro [Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Akagi, Ken-ichi; Monobe, Youko; Imazawa, Takayoshi [Section of Laboratory Equipment, Division of Biomedical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Takegoshi, K. [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supramolecular structure of A{beta}42 protofibrils was analyzed by solid-state NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala-21 residue in the A{beta}42 protofibrils is included in a slightly disordered {beta}-strand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The A{beta}42 protofibrils do not form intermolecular in-register parallel {beta}-sheets. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by abnormal deposition (fibrillation) of a 42-residue amyloid {beta}-protein (A{beta}42) in the brain. During the process of fibrillation, the A{beta}42 takes the form of protofibrils with strong neurotoxicity, and is thus believed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of AD. To elucidate the supramolecular structure of the A{beta}42 protofibrils, the intermolecular proximity of the Ala-21 residues in the A{beta}42 protofibrils was analyzed by {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C rotational resonance experiments in the solid state. Unlike the A{beta}42 fibrils, an intermolecular {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation was not found in the A{beta}42 protofibrils. This result suggests that the {beta}-strands of the A{beta}42 protofibrils are not in an in-register parallel orientation. A{beta}42 monomers would assemble to form protofibrils with the {beta}-strand conformation, then transform into fibrils by forming intermolecular parallel {beta}-sheets.

  19. Early Treatment Critical: Bexarotene Reduces Amyloid-Beta Burden In Silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Joseph; Belfort, Georges; Isaacson, David

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptides have long been implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Bexarotene, a drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating a class of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, has been reported to facilitate the removal of amyloid-beta. We have developed a mathematical model to explore the efficacy of bexarotene treatment in reducing amyloid-beta load, and simulate amyloid-beta production throughout the lifespan of diseased mice. Both aspects of the model are based on and consistent with previous experimental results. Beyond what is known empirically, our model shows that low dosages of bexarotene are unable to reverse symptoms in diseased mice, but dosages at and above an age-dependent critical concentration can recover healthy brain cells. Further, early treatment was shown to have significantly improved efficacy versus treatment in older mice. Relevance with respect to bexarotene-based amyloid-beta-clearance mechanism and direct treatment for Alzheimer's disease is emphasized.

  20. Protective effects of Lingguizhugan decoction on amyloid-beta peptide (25-35)-induced cell injury: Anti-inflammatory effects☆

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Feifei; Sang, Feng; Zhou, Chunxiang; Ling, Yun

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) and BV-2 microglia were treated with amyloid-β peptide (25–35), as a model of Alzheimer’s disease, to evaluate the protective effects of 10-3–10-8 g/mL Lingguizhugan decoction and to examine the underlying anti-inflammatory mechanism. Lingguizhugan decoction significantly enhanced the viability of SH-SY5Y cells with amyloidpeptide-induced injury, and lowered levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and ...

  1. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  2. Estrogen protects neuronal cells from amyloid beta-induced apoptosis via regulation of mitochondrial proteins and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwamoto Sean

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease is associated with increased apoptosis and parallels increased levels of amyloid beta, which can induce neuronal apoptosis. Estrogen exposure prior to neurotoxic insult of hippocampal neurons promotes neuronal defence and survival against neurodegenerative insults including amyloid beta. Although all underlying molecular mechanisms of amyloid beta neurotoxicity remain undetermined, mitochondrial dysfunction, including altered calcium homeostasis and Bcl-2 expression, are involved in neurodegenerative vulnerability. Results In this study, we investigated the mechanism of 17β-estradiol-induced prevention of amyloid beta-induced apoptosis of rat hippocampal neuronal cultures. Estradiol treatment prior to amyloid beta exposure significantly reduced the number of apoptotic neurons and the associated rise in resting intracellular calcium levels. Amyloid beta exposure provoked down regulation of a key antiapoptotic protein, Bcl-2, and resulted in mitochondrial translocation of Bax, a protein known to promote cell death, and subsequent release of cytochrome c. E2 pretreatment inhibited the amyloid beta-induced decrease in Bcl-2 expression, translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and subsequent release of cytochrome c. Further implicating the mitochondria as a target of estradiol action, in vivo estradiol treatment enhanced the respiratory function of whole brain mitochondria. In addition, estradiol pretreatment protected isolated mitochondria against calcium-induced loss of respiratory function. Conclusion Therefore, we propose that estradiol pretreatment protects against amyloid beta neurotoxicity by limiting mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of antiapoptotic mechanisms.

  3. Beta amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau deposits in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklossy, J.; Miller, L.; Qing, H.; Radenovic, A.; Kis, A.; Vileno, B.; Laszlo, F.; Martins, R.N.; Waeber, G.; Mooser, V.; Bosman, F.; Khalili, K.; Darbinian, N.; McGeer, P.L.

    2008-08-25

    Strong epidemiologic evidence suggests an association between Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes. To determine if amyloid beta (A{beta}) and hyperphosphorylated tau occurs in type 2 diabetes, pancreas tissues from 21 autopsy cases (10 type 2 diabetes and 11 controls) were analyzed. APP and tau mRNAs were identified in human pancreas and in cultured insulinoma beta cells (INS-1) by RT-PCR. Prominent APP and tau bands were detected by Western blotting in pancreatic extracts. Aggregated A{beta}, hyperphosphorylated tau, ubiquitin, apolipoprotein E, apolipoprotein(a), IB1/JIP-1 and JNK1 were detected in Langerhans islets in type 2 diabetic patients. A{beta} was co-localized with amylin in islet amyloid deposits. In situ beta sheet formation of islet amyloid deposits was shown by infrared microspectroscopy (SIRMS). LPS increased APP in non-neuronal cells as well. We conclude that A{beta} deposits and hyperphosphorylated tau are also associated with type 2 diabetes, highlighting common pathogenetic features in neurodegenerative disorders, including AD and type 2 diabetes and suggesting that A{beta} deposits and hyperphosphorylated tau may also occur in other organs than the brain.

  4. Construction of human Fab library and screening of a single-domain antibody of amyloid-beta 42 oligomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuanning Yuan; Minge Du; Yiwen Chen; Fei Dou

    2013-01-01

    Screening humanized antibodies from a human Fab phage display library is an effective and quick method to obtain beta-amyloid oligomers. Thus, the present study prepared amyloid-beta 42 oli-gomers and constructed a naïve human Fab phage display library based on blood samples from six healthy people. After three rounds of biopanning in vitro, a human single-domain antibody that spe-cifical y recognized amyloid-beta 42 oligomers was identified. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated this antibody bound specifical y to human amyloid-beta 42 te-tramer and nonamer, but not the monomer or high molecular weight oligomers. This study suc-cessful y constructed a human phage display library and screened a single-domain antibody that specifical y recognized amyloid-beta 42 oligomers.

  5. Microscopic factors that control beta-sheet registry in amyloid fibrils formed by fragment 11-25 of amyloid beta peptide: insights from computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negureanu, Lacramioara; Baumketner, Andrij

    2009-06-26

    Short fragments of amyloidogenic proteins are widely used as model systems in studies of amyloid formation. Fragment 11-25 of the amyloid beta protein involved in Alzheimer's disease (Abeta11-25) was recently shown to form amyloid fibrils composed of anti-parallel beta-sheets. Interestingly, fibrils grown under neutral and acidic conditions were seen to possess different registries of their inter-beta-strand hydrogen bonds. In an effort to explain the microscopic origin of this pH dependence, we studied Abeta11-25 fibrils using methods of theoretical modeling. Several structural models were built for fibrils at low and neutral pH levels and these were examined in short molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water. The models that displayed the lowest free energy, as estimated using an implicit solvent model, were selected as representative of the true fibrillar structure. It was shown that the registry of these models agrees well with the experimental results. At neutral pH, the main contribution to the free energy difference between the two registries comes from the electrostatic interactions. The charge group of the carboxy terminus makes a large contribution to these interactions and thus appears to have a critical role in determining the registry.

  6. DNA polymerase-beta is expressed early in neurons of Alzheimer's disease brain and is loaded into DNA replication forks in neurons challenged with beta-amyloid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Copani; J.J.M. Hoozemans; F. Caraci; M. Calafiore; E.S. van Haastert; R. Veerhuis; A.J.M. Rozemuller; E. Aronica; M.A. Sortino; F. Nicoletti

    2006-01-01

    Cultured neurons exposed to synthetic beta-amyloid (A beta) fragments reenter the cell cycle and initiate a pathway of DNA replication that involves the repair enzyme DNA polymerase-beta (DNA pol-beta) before undergoing apoptotic death. In this study, by performing coimmunoprecipitation experiments

  7. TLR2 is a primary receptor for Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide to trigger neuroinflammatory activation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, S.; Liu, Y.; Hao, W.; Wolf, L.; Kiliaan, A.J.; Penke, B.; Rube, C.E.; Walter, J.; Heneka, M.T.; Hartmann, T.; Menger, M.D.; Fassbender, K.

    2012-01-01

    Microglia activated by extracellularly deposited amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) act as a two-edged sword in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis: on the one hand, they damage neurons by releasing neurotoxic proinflammatory mediators (M1 activation); on the other hand, they protect neurons by triggering an

  8. Oxidative stress induces macroautophagy of amyloid beta-protein and ensuing apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Lin; Kågedal, Katarina; Dehvari, Nodi;

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the toxicity of intracellular amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) to neurons and the involvement of lysosomes in this process in Alzheimer disease (AD). We have recently shown that oxidative stress, a recognized determinant of AD, enhances macroautophagy and leads to int...

  9. PEGylated nanoparticles bind to and alter amyloid-beta peptide conformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brambilla, Davide; Verpillot, Romain; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin;

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aß(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs...

  10. Unfolding, aggregation, and seeded amyloid formation of lysine-58-cleaved beta(2)-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Jørgensen, T.J.D.; Rozlosnik, N.;

    2005-01-01

    . Using amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry, we show that Delta K58-beta(2)m has increased unfolding rates compared to wt-beta(2)m and that unfolding is highly temperature dependent. The unfolding rate is I order of magnitude faster in Delta K58-beta(2)M than in wt-beta(2)m....... After a few days at 37 degrees C, in contrast to wt-beta(2)M, Delta K-58-beta(2)M forms well-defined high molecular weight aggregates that are detected by size-exclusion chromatography. Atomic force microscopy after seeding with amyloid-beta(2)m fibrils under conditions that induce minimal fibrillation...

  11. Protective effects of Lingguizhugan decoction on amyloid-beta peptide (25-35)-induced cell injury Anti-inflammatory effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feifei Xi; Feng Sang; Chunxiang Zhou; Yun Ling

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) and BV-2 microglia were treated with amyloid-β peptide (25-35), as a model of Alzheimer's disease, to evaluate the protective effects of 10-3-10-8 g/mL Lingguizhugan decoction and to examine the underlying anti-inflammatory mechanism. Lingguizhugan decoction significantly enhanced the viability of SH-SY5Y cells with amyloidpeptide-induced injury, and lowered levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide in the culture supernatant of activated BV-2 microglia. The effects of 10-3 g/mL Lingguizhugan decoction were more significant. These results suggest that Lingguizhugan decoction can protect SH-SY5Y cells against amyloid-β peptide (25-35)-induced injury in a dose-dependent manner by inhibiting overexpression of inflammatory factors by activated microglia.

  12. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastus Neus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  13. Curcumin Binding to Beta Amyloid: A Computational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Praveen P N; Mohamed, Tarek; Teckwani, Karan; Tin, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Curcumin, a chemical constituent present in the spice turmeric, is known to prevent the aggregation of amyloid peptide implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. While curcumin is known to bind directly to various amyloid aggregates, no systematic investigations have been carried out to understand its ability to bind to the amyloid aggregates including oligomers and fibrils. In this study, we constructed computational models of (i) Aβ hexapeptide (16) KLVFFA(21) octamer steric-zipper β-sheet assembly and (ii) full-length Aβ fibril β-sheet assembly. Curcumin binding in these models was evaluated by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. In both the models, curcumin was oriented in a linear extended conformation parallel to fiber axis and exhibited better stability in the Aβ hexapeptide (16) KLVFFA(21) octamer steric-zipper model (Ebinding  = -10.05 kcal/mol) compared to full-length Aβ fibril model (Ebinding  = -3.47 kcal/mol). Analysis of MD trajectories of curcumin bound to full-length Aβ fibril shows good stability with minimum Cα-atom RMSD shifts. Interestingly, curcumin binding led to marked fluctuations in the (14) HQKLVFFA(21) region that constitute the fibril spine with RMSF values ranging from 1.4 to 3.6 Å. These results show that curcumin binding to Aβ shifts the equilibrium in the aggregation pathway by promoting the formation of non-toxic aggregates.

  14. Nasal administration of amyloid-beta peptide decreases cerebral amyloid burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner, H L; Lemere, C A; Maron, R;

    2000-01-01

    -implicated proteins can induce antigen-specific anti-inflammatory immune responses in mucosal lymphoid tissue which then act systemically. We hypothesized that chronic mucosal administration of Abeta peptide might induce an anti-inflammatory process in AD brain tissue that could beneficially affect......Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease......-Abeta antibodies of the IgG1 and IgG2b classes, and mononuclear cells in the brain expressing the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-4, interleukin-10, and tumor growth factor-beta. Our results demonstrate that chronic nasal administration of Abeta peptide can induce an immune response to Abeta that decreases...

  15. 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR attenuates the expression of LPS- and Aβ peptide-induced inflammatory mediators in astroglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giri Shailendra

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology shows characteristic 'plaques' rich in amyloid beta (Aβ peptide deposits. Inflammatory process-related proteins such as pro-inflammatory cytokines have been detected in AD brain suggesting that an inflammatory immune reaction also plays a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Glial cells in culture respond to LPS and Aβ stimuli by upregulating the expression of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, and also the expression of proinflammatory genes iNOS and COX-2. We have earlier reported that LPS/Aβ stimulation-induced ceramide and ROS generation leads to iNOS expression and nitric oxide production in glial cells. The present study was undertaken to investigate the neuroprotective function of AICAR (a potent activator of AMP-activated protein kinase in blocking the pro-oxidant/proinflammatory responses induced in primary glial cultures treated with LPS and Aβ peptide. Methods To test the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant functions of AICAR, we tested its inhibitory potential in blocking the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS, expression of COX-2, generation of ROS, and associated signaling following treatment of glial cells with LPS and Aβ peptide. We also investigated the neuroprotective effects of AICAR against the effects of cytokines and inflammatory mediators (released by the glia, in blocking neurite outgrowth inhibition, and in nerve growth factor-(NGF induced neurite extension by PC-12 cells. Results AICAR blocked LPS/Aβ-induced inflammatory processes by blocking the expression of proinflammatory cytokine, iNOS, COX-2 and MnSOD genes, and by inhibition of ROS generation and depletion of glutathione in astroglial cells. AICAR also inhibited down-stream signaling leading to the regulation of transcriptional factors such as NFκB and C/EBP which are critical for the expression of iNOS, COX-2, MnSOD and cytokines (TNF-α/IL-1β and IL-6. AICAR promoted NGF-induced neurite growth

  16. Molecular simulations of beta-amyloid protein near hydrated lipids (PECASE).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Han, Kunwoo (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Ford, David M. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2005-12-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations of beta-amyloid (A{beta}) protein and A{beta} fragment(31-42) in bulk water and near hydrated lipids to study the mechanism of neurotoxicity associated with the aggregation of the protein. We constructed full atomistic models using Cerius2 and ran simulations using LAMMPS. MD simulations with different conformations and positions of the protein fragment were performed. Thermodynamic properties were compared with previous literature and the results were analyzed. Longer simulations and data analyses based on the free energy profiles along the distance between the protein and the interface are ongoing.

  17. Cu K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Reveals Differential Copper Coordimation Within Amyloid-beta Oligomers Compared to Amyloid-beta Monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Shearer; P Callan; T Tran; V Szalai

    2011-12-31

    The fatal neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been linked to the formation of soluble neurotoxic oligomers of amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptides. These peptides have high affinities for copper cations. Despite their potential importance in AD neurodegeneration few studies have focused on probing the Cu{sup 2+/1+} coordination environment within A{beta} oligomers. Herein we present a Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic study probing the copper-coordination environment within oligomers of A{beta}(42) (sequence: DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQKLVFFAEDVGSNKGAIIGLMVGGVVIA). We find that the Cu{sup 2+} cation is contained within a square planar mixed N/O ligand environment within A{beta}(42) oligomers, which is similar to the copper coordination environment of the monomeric forms of {l_brace}Cu{sup II}A{beta}(40){r_brace} and {l_brace}Cu{sup II}A{beta}(16){r_brace}. Reduction of the Cu{sup 2+} cation within the A{beta}(42) oligomers to Cu{sup 1+} yields a highly dioxygen sensitive copper-species that contains Cu{sup 1+} in a tetrahedral coordination geometry. This can be contrasted with monomers of {l_brace}Cu{sup I}A{beta}(40){r_brace} and {l_brace}Cu{sup I}A{beta}(16){r_brace}, which contain copper in a dioxygen inert linear bis-histidine ligand environment [Shearer and Szalai, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 17826]. The biological implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. Calcium ionophore A23187 specifically decreases the secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein during apoptosis in primary rat cortical cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, K; Benedikz, Eirikur; Fastbom, J;

    2001-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the degeneration and loss of neurons, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and the accumulation of extracellular senile plaques consisting mainly of beta-amyloid (A beta). A beta is generated from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by sequential beta...

  19. Always around, never the same: Pathways of amyloid beta induced neurodegeneration throughout the pathogenic cascade of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.M. Hoozemans; S.M. Chafekar; F. Baas; P. Eikelenboom; W. Scheper

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing amount of evidence showing the importance of intermediate aggregation species of amyloid beta (A beta) in the pathogenic cascade of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Different A beta assembly forms may mediate diverse toxic effects at different stages of the disease. Mouse models for

  20. All-atom molecular dynamics studies of the full-length {beta}-amyloid peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luttmann, Edgar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Paderborn, Warburgerstr. 100, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Fels, Gregor [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Paderborn, Warburgerstr. 100, 33098 Paderborn (Germany)], E-mail: fels@uni-paderborn.de

    2006-03-31

    {beta}-Amyloid peptides are believed to play an essential role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), due to their sedimentation in the form of {beta}-amyloid aggregates in the brain of AD-patients, and the in vitro neurotoxicity of oligomeric aggregates. The monomeric peptides come in different lengths of 39-43 residues, of which the 42 alloform seems to be most strongly associated with AD-symptoms. Structural information on these peptides to date comes from NMR studies in acidic solutions, organic solvents, or on shorter fragments of the peptide. In addition X-ray and solid-state NMR investigations of amyloid fibrils yield insight into the structure of the final aggregate and therefore define the endpoint of any conformational change of an A{beta}-monomer along the aggregation process. The conformational changes necessary to connect the experimentally known conformations are not yet understood and this process is an active field of research. In this paper, we report results from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on experimental data from four different peptides of 40 amino acids and two peptides consisting of 42 amino acids. The simulations allow for the analysis of intramolecular interactions and the role of structural features. In particular, they show the appearance of {beta}-turn in the region between amino acid 21 and 33, forming a hook-like shape as it is known to exist in the fibrillar A{beta}-structures. This folding does not depend on the formation of a salt bridge between Asp-23 and Lys-28 but requires the A{beta}(1-42) as such structure was not observed in the shorter system A{beta}(1-40)

  1. A Simulation Model of Periarterial Clearance of Amyloid-beta from the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Katharina Diem

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-beta (A-beta in the brain indicates failure of elimination of A-beta from the brain with age and Alzheimer's disease. There is a variety of mechanisms for elimination of A-beta from the brain. They include the action of microglia and enzymes together with receptor-mediated absorption of A-beta into the blood and periarterial lymphatic drainage of A-beta. Although the brain possesses no conventional lymphatics, experimental studies have shown that fluid and solutes, such as A-beta, are eliminated from the brain along 100 nm wide basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries. This lymphatic drainage pathway is reflected in the deposition of A-beta in the walls of human arteries with age and Alzheimer's disease as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA. Initially, A-beta diffuses through the extracellular spaces of grey matter in the brain and then enters basement membranes in capillaries and arteries to flow out of the brain. Although diffusion through the extracellular spaces of the brain has been well characterised, the exact mechanism whereby perivascular elimination of A-beta occurs has not been resolved. Here we use a computational model to describe the process of periarterial drainage in the context of diffusion in the brain, demonstrating that periarterial drainage along basement membranes is very rapid compared with diffusion. Our results are a validation of experimental data and are significant in the context of failure of periarterial drainage as a mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of AD as well as complications associated with its immunotherapy.

  2. [beta subsccript 2]-microglobulin forms three-dimensional domain-swapped amyloid fibrils with disulfide linkages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-08-09

    {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}-m) is the light chain of the type I major histocompatibility complex. It deposits as amyloid fibrils within joints during long-term hemodialysis treatment. Despite the devastating effects of dialysis-related amyloidosis, full understanding of how fibrils form from soluble {beta}{sub 2}-m remains elusive. Here we show that {beta}{sub 2}-m can oligomerize and fibrillize via three-dimensional domain swapping. Isolating a covalently bound, domain-swapped dimer from {beta}{sub 2}-m oligomers on the pathway to fibrils, we were able to determine its crystal structure. The hinge loop that connects the swapped domain to the core domain includes the fibrillizing segment LSFSKD, whose atomic structure we also determined. The LSFSKD structure reveals a class 5 steric zipper, akin to other amyloid spines. The structures of the dimer and the zipper spine fit well into an atomic model for this fibrillar form of {beta}{sub 2}-m, which assembles slowly under physiological conditions.

  3. Individual aggregates of amyloid beta induce temporary calcium influx through the cell membrane of neuronal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Anna; Flint, Jennie; Shivji, Nadia; Jönsson, Peter; Wirthensohn, David; De Genst, Erwin; Vincke, Cécile; Muyldermans, Serge; Dobson, Chris; Klenerman, David

    2016-01-01

    Local delivery of amyloid beta oligomers from the tip of a nanopipette, controlled over the cell surface, has been used to deliver physiological picomolar oligomer concentrations to primary astrocytes or neurons. Calcium influx was observed when as few as 2000 oligomers were delivered to the cell surface. When the dosing of oligomers was stopped the intracellular calcium returned to basal levels or below. Calcium influx was prevented by the presence in the pipette of the extracellular chaperone clusterin, which is known to selectively bind oligomers, and by the presence a specific nanobody to amyloid beta. These data are consistent with individual oligomers larger than trimers inducing calcium entry as they cross the cell membrane, a result supported by imaging experiments in bilayers, and suggest that the initial molecular event that leads to neuronal damage does not involve any cellular receptors, in contrast to work performed at much higher oligomer concentrations. PMID:27553885

  4. S14G-humanin restored cellular homeostasis disturbed by amyloid-beta protein***

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Li; Wencong Zhao; Hongqi Yang; Junhong Zhang; Jianjun Ma

    2013-01-01

    Humanin is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer’s disease, and its derivative, S14G-humanin, is 1 000-fold stronger in its neuroprotective effect against Alzheimer’s disease-relevant insults. Alt-hough effective, the detailed molecular mechanism through which S14G-humanin exerts its effects remains unclear. Data from this study showed that fibril ar amyloid-beta 40 disturbed cel ular ho-meostasis through the cel membrane, increasing intracel ular calcium, generating reactive oxygen species, and decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential. S14G-humanin restored these re-sponses. The results suggested that S14G-humanin blocked the effects of amyloid-beta 40 on the neuronal cel membrane, and restored the disturbed cel ular homeostasis, thereby exerting a neuroprotective effect on hippocampal neurons.

  5. The role of animal models in advancing amyloid-beta immunotherapy to the clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Games, Dora; Seubert, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid-beta (Aβ) hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) causality is now well into its third decade and is finally entering a phase of rigorous clinical testing in numerous late stage clinical trials. The use of Aβ-based animal models of AD has been essential to the discovery and/or preclinical validation of many of these therapeutic approaches. While several neuropathologically based results from preclinical studies have translated nicely into AD patients, the full clinical value of Aβ-...

  6. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters

    OpenAIRE

    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1–40) and Aβ(1–42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, an...

  7. AMYLOID BETA ACCUMULATION IN HIV-1-INFECTED BRAIN: THE ROLE OF THE BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER

    OpenAIRE

    András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    In recent years we face an increase in the aging of the HIV-1-infected population, which is not only due to effective antiretroviral therapy but also to new infections among older people. Even with the use of the antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders represent an increasing problem as the HIV-1-infected population ages. Increased amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition is characteristic of HIV-1-infected brains, and it has been hypothesized that brain vascular dysfunction contr...

  8. P-glycoprotein efflux and other factors limit brain amyloid beta reduction by beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 inhibitors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Jere E; Thompson, Lorin A; Toyn, Jeremy H; Marcin, Lawrence; Barten, Donna M; Marcinkeviciene, Jovita; Kopcho, Lisa; Kim, Young; Lin, Alan; Guss, Valerie; Burton, Catherine; Iben, Lawrence; Polson, Craig; Cantone, Joe; Ford, Michael; Drexler, Dieter; Fiedler, Tracey; Lentz, Kimberley A; Grace, James E; Kolb, Janet; Corsa, Jason; Pierdomenico, Maria; Jones, Kelli; Olson, Richard E; Macor, John E; Albright, Charles F

    2008-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides are hypothesized to cause the initiation and progression of AD based on pathologic data from AD patients, genetic analysis of mutations that cause early onset forms of AD, and preclinical studies. Based on this hypothesis, beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) inhibitors are an attractive therapeutic approach for AD because cleavage of the APP by BACE1 is required to form Abeta. In this study, three potent BACE1 inhibitors are characterized. All three inhibitors decrease Abeta formation in cultured cells with IC(50) values less than 10 nM. Analysis of APP C-terminal fragments by immunoblotting and Abeta peptides by mass spectrometry showed that these inhibitors decreased Abeta by inhibiting BACE1. An assay for Abeta1-40 in mice was developed and used to show that these BACE1 inhibitors decreased plasma Abeta1-40, but not brain Abeta1-40, in wild-type mice. Because these BACE1 inhibitors were substrates for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a member of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of efflux transporters, these inhibitors were administered to P-gp knockout (KO) mice. These studies showed that all three BACE1 inhibitors decreased brain Abeta1-40 in P-gp KO mice, demonstrating that P-gp is a major limitation for development of BACE1 inhibitors to test the amyloid hypothesis. A comparison of plasma Abeta1-40 and brain Abeta1-40 dose responses for these three compounds revealed differences in relative ED(50) values, indicating that factors other than P-gp can also contribute to poor brain activity by BACE1 inhibitors.

  9. Effect of pathogenic mutations on the structure and dynamics of Alzheimer's A beta 42-amyloid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassler, Kristin; Horn, Anselm H C; Sticht, Heinrich

    2010-05-01

    Converging lines of evidence suggest that soluble A beta-amyloid oligomers play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and present direct effectors of synaptic and cognitive dysfunction. Three pathological E22-A beta-amyloid point mutants (E22G, E22K, E22Q) and the deletion mutant E22 Delta exhibit an enhanced tendency to form prefibrillar aggregates. The present study assessed the effect of these four mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and subsequent structural and energetic analyses. Our data shows that E22 plays a unique role in wild type A beta, since it has a destabilising effect on the oligomer structure due to electrostatic repulsion between adjacent E22 side chains. Mutations in which E22 is replaced by an uncharged residue result in higher oligomer stability. This effect is also observed to a lesser extent for the E22K mutation and is consistent with its lower pathogenicity compared to other mutants. Interestingly, deletion of E22 does not destroy the amyloid fold but is compensated by local changes in the backbone geometry that allow the preservation of a structurally important salt bridge. The finding that all mutant oligomers investigated exhibit higher internal stability than the wild type offers an explanation for the experimentally observed enhanced oligomer formation and stability.

  10. Preferential Transport Theory for Beta-Amyloid Clearance from the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloma, Mikhail; Schaffer, David; Chiarot, Paul; Huang, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The failure to clear beta-amyloid from the aging brain leads to its accumulation within the walls of arteries and to Alzheimer's disease. However, the transport mechanism for beta-amyloid clearance is not well understood. In this study, we propose a preferential transport theory for flow within the vascular walls in the cerebral arterial basement membrane. The flow conduit within the arterial basement membrane is modeled as an annulus between deformable concentric cylinders filled with an incompressible, single-phase Newtonian fluid. The transport is driven by arterial lumen deformation induced by heart pulsations superimposed with reflected boundary waves. Our theory predicts that while the overall arterial wave propagation is in the same direction as the blood flow toward the capillaries, a reverse flow in the basement membrane can be preferentially induced toward larger arteries. This has been suggested as a potential clearance pathway for beta-amyloid. We estimate the magnitude of the reverse transport through a control volume analysis which is corroborated by numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Bench-top experiments to validate our computational models are presented.

  11. Interrelation of inflammation and APP in sIBM: IL-1 beta induces accumulation of beta-amyloid in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jens; Barthel, Konstanze; Wrede, Arne; Salajegheh, Mohammad; Bähr, Mathias; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-05-01

    Distinct interrelationships between inflammation and beta-amyloid-associated degeneration, the two major hallmarks of the skeletal muscle pathology in sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), have remained elusive. Expression of markers relevant for these pathomechanisms were analysed in biopsies of sIBM, polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), dystrophic and non-myopathic muscle as controls, and cultured human myotubes. By quantitative PCR, a higher upregulation was noted for the mRNA-expression of CXCL-9, CCL-3, CCL-4, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta in sIBM muscle compared to PM, DM and controls. All inflammatory myopathies displayed overexpression of degeneration-associated markers, yet only in sIBM, expression of the mRNA of amyloid precursor protein (APP) significantly and consistently correlated with inflammation in the muscle and mRNA-levels of chemokines and IFN-gamma. Only in sIBM, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that inflammatory mediators including IL-1 beta co-localized to beta-amyloid depositions within myofibres. In human myotubes, exposure to IL-1 beta caused upregulation of APP with subsequent intracellular aggregation of beta-amyloid. Our data suggest that, in sIBM muscle, production of high amounts of pro-inflammatory mediators specifically induces beta-amyloid-associated degeneration. The observations may help to design targeted treatment strategies for chronic inflammatory disorders of the skeletal muscle.

  12. Effect of copper (II) ion against elongation behavior of amyloid {beta} fibrils on liposome membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimanouchi, T.; Onishi, R.; Kitaura, N.; Umakoshi, H.; Kuboi, R. [Division of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    The fibril growth behavior of amyloid {beta} protein (A{beta}) on cell membranes is relating to the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This growth behavior of A{beta} fibrils is sensitively affected by the metal ions, neurotransmitters, or bioreactive substrate. The inhibitory effect of those materials was quantitatively estimated from the viewpoints of ''crystal growth''. In a bulk aqueous solution, copper (II) ion showed the strong inhibitory effect on the growth of A{beta} fibrils. Meanwhile, the addition of a closed-phospholipid bilayer membrane (liposome) could reduce the above inhibitory effect of copper (II) ion. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Longitudinal assessment of tau and amyloid beta in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Mattison, Hayley A; Liu, Changqin; Ginghina, Carmen; Auinger, Peggy; McDermott, Michael P; Stewart, Tessandra; Kang, Un Jung; Cain, Kevin C; Shi, Min

    2013-11-01

    Tau gene has been consistently associated with the risk of Parkinson disease in recent genome wide association studies. In addition, alterations of the levels of total tau, phosphorylated tau [181P], and amyloid beta 1-42 in cerebrospinal fluid have been reported in patients with sporadic Parkinson disease and asymptomatic carriers of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutations, in patterns that clearly differ from those typically described for patients with Alzheimer disease. To further determine the potential roles of these molecules in Parkinson disease pathogenesis and/or in tracking the disease progression, especially at early stages, the current study assessed all three proteins in 403 Parkinson disease patients enrolled in the DATATOP (Deprenyl and tocopherol antioxidative therapy of parkinsonism) placebo-controlled clinical trial, the largest cohort to date with cerebrospinal fluid samples collected longitudinally. These initially drug-naive patients at early disease stages were clinically evaluated, and cerebrospinal fluid was collected at baseline and then at endpoint, defined as the time at which symptomatic anti-Parkinson disease medications were determined to be required. General linear models were used to test for associations between baseline cerebrospinal fluid biomarker levels or their rates of change and changes in the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (total or part III motor score) over time. Robust associations among candidate markers are readily noted. Baseline levels of amyloid beta were weakly but negatively correlated with baseline Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale total scores. Baseline phosphorylated tau/total tau and phosphorylated tau/amyloid beta were significantly and negatively correlated with the rates of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale change. While medications (deprenyl and/or tocopherol) did not appear to alter biomarkers appreciably, a weak but significant positive correlation between the rate of change in total

  14. MALDI, AP/MALDI and ESI techniques for the MS detection of amyloid [beta]-peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Mineo, Placido; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    Amyloid [beta]-peptides (A[beta]s) are involved in several neuropathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and considerable experimental evidences have emerged indicating that different proteases play a major role in regulating the accumulation of A[beta]s in the brain. Particularly, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) has been shown to degrade A[beta]s at different cleavage sites, but the experimental results reported in the literature and obtained by mass spectrometry methods are somehow fragmentary. The detection of A[beta]s is often complicated by solubility issues, oxidation artifacts and spontaneous aggregation/cleavage and, in order to rationalize the different reported results, we analyzed A[beta]s solutions by three different MS approaches: matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF), atmospheric pressure (AP) MALDI ion trap and electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap. Differences in the obtained results are discussed and ESI is chosen as the most suitable MS method for A[beta]s detection. Finally, cleavage sites produced by interaction of A[beta]s with IDE are identified, two of which had never been reported in the literature.

  15. Time Until Neuron Death After Initial Puncture From an Amyloid-Beta Oligomer

    CERN Document Server

    Horton, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    Hardy and Higgins first proposed the amyloid cascade hypothesis in 1992, stating that the decrease in neuronal function observed in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is due to a process initiated by the oligomerization of amyloid-beta peptides. One hypothesis states that toxicity arises from the aggregation of amyloid-beta into a pore structure, which can then puncture the brain cell membrane; this allow toxic calcium ions to flood through the opening, causing eventual cell death. In 2007, neurobiologist Ruth Nussinov calculated the three pore sizes most likely to occur within the brain. Based on her findings, we constructed a method to determine the time it takes for a cell to die after the cell is punctured by the pore. Our findings have shown that cell death occurs within one second after the oligomer makes contact with the cell. We believe this is important because instant cell death has been one criticism of Nussinov's model, and we have calculated a concrete time value for that criticism. We identify two potenti...

  16. Levels of alpha- and beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, K; Fastbom, J; Blomberg, M;

    2000-01-01

    Alternative cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) results in generation and secretion of both soluble APP (sAPP) and beta-amyloid (Abeta). Abeta is the main component of the amyloid depositions in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using Western blotting, we compared the...... levels of alpha-secretase cleaved sAPP, beta-secretase cleaved sAPP and total sAPP, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 13 sporadic AD patients and 13 healthy controls. Our findings show significant amounts of beta-secretase cleaved sAPP in CSF. There was no statistically significant difference in the...... levels of beta-secretase cleaved sAPP between AD patients and controls. The levels of alpha-secretase cleaved sAPP and total sAPP were, however, found to be significantly lower in the AD patients than in the controls....

  17. Alzheimer's disease amyloid-beta links lens and brain pathology in Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet A Moncaster

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21 is the most common chromosomal disorder and the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability in humans. In DS, triplication of chromosome 21 invariably includes the APP gene (21q21 encoding the Alzheimer's disease (AD amyloid precursor protein (APP. Triplication of the APP gene accelerates APP expression leading to cerebral accumulation of APP-derived amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta, early-onset AD neuropathology, and age-dependent cognitive sequelae. The DS phenotype complex also includes distinctive early-onset cerulean cataracts of unknown etiology. Previously, we reported increased Abeta accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and disease-linked supranuclear cataracts in the ocular lenses of subjects with AD. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that related AD-linked Abeta pathology underlies the distinctive lens phenotype associated with DS. Ophthalmological examinations of DS subjects were correlated with phenotypic, histochemical, and biochemical analyses of lenses obtained from DS, AD, and normal control subjects. Evaluation of DS lenses revealed a characteristic pattern of supranuclear opacification accompanied by accelerated supranuclear Abeta accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and fiber cell cytoplasmic Abeta aggregates (approximately 5 to 50 nm identical to the lens pathology identified in AD. Peptide sequencing, immunoblot analysis, and ELISA confirmed the identity and increased accumulation of Abeta in DS lenses. Incubation of synthetic Abeta with human lens protein promoted protein aggregation, amyloid formation, and light scattering that recapitulated the molecular pathology and clinical features observed in DS lenses. These results establish the genetic etiology of the distinctive lens phenotype in DS and identify the molecular origin and pathogenic mechanism by which lens pathology is expressed in this common chromosomal disorder. Moreover, these findings confirm increased Abeta

  18. Amyloid beta1–42 and the phoshorylated tau threonine 231 in brains of aged cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, Huda Shalahudin; Gjedde, Albert; Sajuthi, Dondin;

    2014-01-01

    Pathological hallmarks indicative of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which are the plaques of amyloid beta1-42 and neurofibrillary tangles, were found in brain of aged cynomolgus monkey. The aim of this study was to investigate if aged monkeys exhibiting spatial memory impairment and levels of biomarkers...... indicative of AD, had brain lesions similar to human patients suffering from senile dementia. Generating immunohistochemistry technique to biomarkers of amyloid beta1-42 and the phosphorylated tau 231, our study assessed the amyloidopathy, such as indicative to the senile plaques and cerebral amyloid......, the amyloids were found to deposit in the small veins and capillaries. In one of the affected individuals, phosphorylated tau was positively stained intracellularly of the neurons, indicating a possibility of an early stage of the formation of tangles. These findings add to the body of evidence of the utility...

  19. Protective effects of BAY 73-6691, a selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 9, on amyloidpeptides-induced oxidative stress in in-vivo and in-vitro models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Liu, Chun-Na; Wei, Ning; Li, Xi-Dong; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Rui; Jia, Yu-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by enhanced oxidative stress and excess free radicals. Phosphodiesterase 9 inhibitors (PDE-9Is) showed memory improving effects in many pharmacological deficit models. However, whether BAY 73-6691 (a selective PDE-9I) may attenuate the oxidative stress during the development of AD is still unclear. For this purpose, primary cultures of SH-SY5Y cells were incubated with 20μM beta-amyloid25-35 (Aβ25-35), followed by exposure to different concentrations (50, 100, 150 and 200μg/ml) of BAY 73-6691. Furthermore, the antioxidant effect of BAY 73-6691 was evaluated in mice subjected to intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ25-35 (day 0) and treatment with BAY 73-6691 by intraperitoneal injection once daily (days 1-10). Our results elucidated that treatment with BAY 73-6691 attenuated the Aβ25-35-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. In vivo, BAY 73-6691 protected Aβ25-35-induced oxidative damage in hippocampus, associated with the attenuation of impairments in hippocampal neurons. Administration of BAY 73-6691 improved learning and memory in the Morris water maze test, and restored several hippocampal memory-associated proteins. Our study identified a neuroprotective role for BAY 73-6691 against Aβ25-35-induced oxidative stress in vivo and in vitro, harboring therapeutic potential for the treatment of AD by alleviating the impairments in spatial memory and hippocampal neurons. PMID:27071547

  20. A 'danse macabre': tau and Fyn in STEP with amyloid beta to facilitate induction of synaptic depression and excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Jannic

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease, with its two most prominent pathological factors amyloid beta and tau protein, can be described as a disease of the synapse. It therefore comes as little surprise that NMDA receptor-related synaptic dysfunction had been thought for several years to underlie the synaptic pathophysiology seen in Alzheimer's disease. In this review I will summarise recent evidence showing that the NMDA receptor links the effects of extracellular amyloid beta with intracellular tau protein. Furthermore, the antagonistic roles of Fyn and STEP in NMDA receptor regulation, synaptic plasticity and induction of synaptic depression will be discussed. PMID:23773061

  1. Inhibition of aggregation of amyloid peptides by beta-sheet breaker peptides and their binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viet, Man Hoang; Ngo, Son Tung; Lam, Nguyen Sy; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-06-01

    The effects of beta-sheet breaker peptides KLVFF and LPFFD on the oligomerization of amyloid peptides were studied by all-atom simulations. It was found that LPFFD interferes the aggregation of Aβ(16-22) peptides to a greater extent than does KLVFF. Using the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we found that the former binds more strongly to Aβ(16-22). Therefore, by simulations, we have clarified the relationship between aggregation rates and binding affinity: the stronger the ligand binding, the slower the oligomerization process. The binding affinity of pentapeptides to full-length peptide Aβ(1-40) and its mature fibrils has been considered using the Autodock and MM-PBSA methods. The hydrophobic interaction between ligands and receptors plays a more important role for association than does hydrogen bonding. The influence of beta-sheet breaker peptides on the secondary structures of monomer Aβ(1-40) was studied in detail, and it turns out that, in their presence, the total beta-sheet content can be enhanced. However, the aggregation can be slowed because the beta-content is reduced in fibril-prone regions. Both pentapeptides strongly bind to monomer Aβ(1-40), as well as to mature fibrils, but KLVFF displays a lower binding affinity than LPFFD. Our findings are in accord with earlier experiments that both of these peptides can serve as prominent inhibitors. In addition, we predict that LPFFD inhibits/degrades the fibrillogenesis of full-length amyloid peptides better than KLVFF. This is probably related to a difference in their total hydrophobicities in that the higher the hydrophobicity, the lower the inhibitory capacity. The GROMOS96 43a1 force field with explicit water and the force field proposed by Morris et al. (Morris et al. J. Comput. Chem. 1998, 19, 1639 ) were employed for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and Autodock experiments, respectively. PMID:21563780

  2. Decrease in the production of beta-amyloid by berberine inhibition of the expression of beta-secretase in HEK293 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Feiqi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Berberine (BER, the major alkaloidal component of Rhizoma coptidis, has multiple pharmacological effects including inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, reduction of cholesterol and glucose levels, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects. It has also been demonstrated that BER can reduce the production of beta-amyloid40/42, which plays a critical and primary role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanism by which it accomplishes this remains unclear. Results Here, we report that BER could not only significantly decrease the production of beta-amyloid40/42 and the expression of beta-secretase (BACE, but was also able to activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2 pathway in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HEK293 cells stably transfected with APP695 containing the Swedish mutation. We also find that U0126, an antagonist of the ERK1/2 pathway, could abolish (1 the activation activity of BER on the ERK1/2 pathway and (2 the inhibition activity of BER on the production of beta-amyloid40/42 and the expression of BACE. Conclusion Our data indicate that BER decreases the production of beta-amyloid40/42 by inhibiting the expression of BACE via activation of the ERK1/2 pathway.

  3. Synthesis, Molecular Modelling and Biological Evaluation of Novel Heterodimeric, Multiple Ligands Targeting Cholinesterases and Amyloid Beta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalina Hebda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholinesterases and amyloid beta are one of the major biological targets in the search for a new and efficacious treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. The study describes synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of new compounds designed as dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Among the synthesized compounds, two deserve special attention—compounds 42 and 13. The former is a saccharin derivative and the most potent and selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (EeAChE IC50 = 70 nM. Isoindoline-1,3-dione derivative 13 displays balanced inhibitory potency against acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE (EeAChE IC50 = 0.76 μM, EqBuChE IC50 = 0.618 μM, and it inhibits amyloid beta aggregation (35.8% at 10 μM. Kinetic studies show that the developed compounds act as mixed or non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. According to molecular modelling studies, they are able to interact with both catalytic and peripheral active sites of the acetylcholinesterase. Their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB was confirmed in vitro in the parallel artificial membrane permeability BBB assay. These compounds can be used as a solid starting point for further development of novel multifunctional ligands as potential anti-Alzheimer’s agents.

  4. Expression of the alternative oxidase mitigates beta-amyloid production and toxicity in model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khoury, Riyad; Kaulio, Eveliina; Lassila, Katariina A; Crowther, Damian C; Jacobs, Howard T; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been widely associated with the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, but there is no consensus on whether it is a cause or consequence of disease, nor on the precise mechanism(s). We addressed these issues by testing the effects of expressing the alternative oxidase AOX from Ciona intestinalis, in different models of AD pathology. AOX can restore respiratory electron flow when the cytochrome segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain is inhibited, supporting ATP synthesis, maintaining cellular redox homeostasis and mitigating excess superoxide production at respiratory complexes I and III. In human HEK293-derived cells, AOX expression decreased the production of beta-amyloid peptide resulting from antimycin inhibition of respiratory complex III. Because hydrogen peroxide was neither a direct product nor substrate of AOX, the ability of AOX to mimic antioxidants in this assay must be indirect. In addition, AOX expression was able to partially alleviate the short lifespan of Drosophila models neuronally expressing human beta-amyloid peptides, whilst abrogating the induction of markers of oxidative stress. Our findings support the idea of respiratory chain dysfunction and excess ROS production as both an early step and as a pathologically meaningful target in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, supporting the concept of a mitochondrial vicious cycle underlying the disease.

  5. Expression of the alternative oxidase mitigates beta-amyloid production and toxicity in model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khoury, Riyad; Kaulio, Eveliina; Lassila, Katariina A; Crowther, Damian C; Jacobs, Howard T; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been widely associated with the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, but there is no consensus on whether it is a cause or consequence of disease, nor on the precise mechanism(s). We addressed these issues by testing the effects of expressing the alternative oxidase AOX from Ciona intestinalis, in different models of AD pathology. AOX can restore respiratory electron flow when the cytochrome segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain is inhibited, supporting ATP synthesis, maintaining cellular redox homeostasis and mitigating excess superoxide production at respiratory complexes I and III. In human HEK293-derived cells, AOX expression decreased the production of beta-amyloid peptide resulting from antimycin inhibition of respiratory complex III. Because hydrogen peroxide was neither a direct product nor substrate of AOX, the ability of AOX to mimic antioxidants in this assay must be indirect. In addition, AOX expression was able to partially alleviate the short lifespan of Drosophila models neuronally expressing human beta-amyloid peptides, whilst abrogating the induction of markers of oxidative stress. Our findings support the idea of respiratory chain dysfunction and excess ROS production as both an early step and as a pathologically meaningful target in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, supporting the concept of a mitochondrial vicious cycle underlying the disease. PMID:27094492

  6. Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Beta-Amyloid Interactions with Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2012-10-01

    Early events of human beta-amyloid protein interactions with cholesterol-containing membranes are critical to understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to exploring new therapeutic interventions of AD. Atomistic molecular dynamics (AMD) simulations have been extensively used to study the protein-lipid interaction at high atomic resolutions. However, traditional MD simulations are not efficient in sampling the phase space of complex lipid/protein systems with rugged free energy landscapes. Meanwhile, coarse-grained MD (CGD) simulations are efficient in the phase space sampling but suffered from low spatial resolutions and from the fact that the energy landscapes are not identical to those of the AMD. Here, a multiscale approach was employed to simulate the protein-lipid interactions of beta-amyloid upon its release from proteolysis residing in the neuronal membranes. We utilized a forward (AMD to CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) strategy to explore new transmembrane and surface protein configuration and evaluate the stabilization mechanisms by measuring the residue-specific protein-lipid or protein conformations. The detailed molecular interactions revealed in this multiscale MD approach will provide new insights into understanding the early molecular events leading to the pathogenesis of AD.

  7. The role of mutated amyloid beta 1-42 stimulating dendritic cells in a PDAPP transgenic mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jia-lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Amyloid plaque is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Anti-beta-amyloid (Aβ immunotherapy is effective in removing brain Aβ, but has shown to be associated with detrimental effects. To avoid severe adverse effects such as meningoencephalitis induced by amyloid beta vaccine with adjuvant, and take advantage of amyloid beta antibody's therapeutic effect on Alzheimer's disease sufficiently, our group has developed a new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating dendritic cells (DC. Our previous work has confirmed that DC vaccine can induce adequate anti-amyloid beta antibody in PDAPP Tg mice safely and efficiently. The DC vaccine can improve impaired learning and memory in the Alzheimer's animal model, and did not cause microvasculitis, microhemorrhage or meningoencephalitis in the animal model. However, the exact mechanism of immunotherapy which reduces Aβ deposition remains unknown. In this report, we studied the mechanism of the vaccine, thinking that this may have implications for better understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Methods A new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating DC which were obtained from C57/B6 mouse bone marrow was developed. Amyloid beta with Freund's adjuvant was inoculated at the same time to act as positive control. After the treatment was done, the samples of brains were collected, fixed, cut. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to observe the expression of the nuclear hormone liver X receptor (LXR, membrane-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45, the ATP-binding cassette family of active transporters (ABCA1, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE and Aβ in mouse brain tissue. Semi-quantitative analysis was used to defect CA1, CA2, CA3, DG, Rad in hippocampus region and positive neuron in cortex region. Results Aβ was significantly reduced in the

  8. Amyloid beta protein and tau in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma as biomarkers for dementia: a review of recent literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankfort, S.V.; Tulner, L.R.; Campen, J.P. van; Verbeek, M.M.; Jansen, R.W.; Beijnen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    This review addresses recent developments in amyloid beta (Abeta), total tau (t-tau), and phosporylated tau (p-tau) protein analysis, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma as biomarkers for dementia. Recent research focused on the protection of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) into de

  9. The coding sequence of amyloid-beta precursor protein APP contains a neural-specific promoter element.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collin, R.W.J.; Martens, G.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The amyloid-beta precursor protein APP is generally accepted to be involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Since its physiological role is still unclear, we decided to study the function of APP via stable transgenesis in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. However, the application of constructs

  10. Protective Effect of Eecdysterone on the PC12 Cell CytotoxicityInduced by beta-amyloid 25-35

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGSu-Fen; WUZhong-Jun; YANGZheng-Qin; LIYu; WuQin; ZHOUQi-Xin; SHIJing-Shan

    2004-01-01

    Objective. To study the effect of ecdysterone (ECR) on beta - amyloid peptide fragment 25-35 ( Aβ25-35 )-induced PC12 cell cytotoxicity, and further to expore its mechanism. Methods: PC12 survial was monitored by LDH release and 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-yl-2, 5-diphenyhetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. The content of malondi-

  11. Protein corona composition of gold nanoparticles/nanorods affects amyloid beta fibrillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsadeghi, Somayeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoudi, Zohreh; Hajipour, Mohammad Javad; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ghavami, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    Protein fibrillation process (e.g., from amyloid beta (Aβ) and α-synuclein) is the main cause of several catastrophic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. During the past few decades, nanoparticles (NPs) were recognized as one of the most promising tools for inhibiting the progress of the disease by controlling the fibrillation kinetic process; for instance, gold NPs have a strong capability to inhibit Aβ fibrillations. It is now well understood that a layer of biomolecules would cover the surface of NPs (so called ``protein corona'') upon the interaction of NPs with protein sources. Due to the fact that the biological species (e.g., cells and amyloidal proteins) ``see'' the protein corona coated NPs rather than the pristine coated particles, one should monitor the fibrillation process of amyloidal proteins in the presence of corona coated NPs (and not pristine coated ones). Therefore, the previously obtained data on NPs effects on the fibrillation process should be modified to achieve a more reliable and predictable in vivo results. Herein, we probed the effects of various gold NPs (with different sizes and shapes) on the fibrillation process of Aβ in the presence and absence of protein sources (i.e., serum and plasma). We found that the protein corona formed a shell at the surface of gold NPs, regardless of their size and shape, reducing the access of Aβ to the gold inhibitory surface and, therefore, affecting the rate of Aβ fibril formation. More specifically, the anti-fibrillation potencies of various corona coated gold NPs were strongly dependent on the protein source and their concentrations (10% serum/plasma (simulation of an in vitro milieu) and 100% serum/plasma (simulation of an in vivo milieu)).Protein fibrillation process (e.g., from amyloid beta (Aβ) and α-synuclein) is the main cause of several catastrophic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. During the past few decades

  12. ToF-SIMS analysis of amyloid beta aggregation on different lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yuta; Aoyagi, Satoka; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Iwamura, Miki; Iwai, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides are considered to be strongly related to Alzheimer's disease. Aβ peptides form a β-sheet structure on hard lipid membranes and it would aggregate to form amyloid fibrils, which are toxic to cells. However, the aggregation mechanism of Aβ is not fully understood. To evaluate the influence of the lipid membrane condition for Aβ aggregation, the adsorption forms of Aβ (1-40) on mixture membranes of lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and cholesterol β-d-glucoside (β-CG) were investigated by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. As a result, Aβ adsorbed along the localized DMPC lipid on the mixture lipid membranes, whereas it was adsorbed homogeneously on the pure DMPC and β-CG membranes. Moreover, amino acid fragments that mainly existed in the n-terminal of Aβ (1-40) peptide were strongly detected on the localized DMPC region. These results suggested that the Aβ was adsorbed along the localized DMPC lipid with a characteristic orientation. These findings suggest that the hardness of the membrane is very sensitive to coexisting materials and that surface hardness is important for aggregation of Aβ. PMID:26822505

  13. Elevation in sphingomyelin synthase activity is associated with increases in amyloid-beta peptide generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hsiang T Hsiao

    Full Text Available A pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD is the presence of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ plaques in the brain. Aβ is derived from a sequential proteolysis of the transmenbrane amyloid precursor protein (APP, a process which is dependent on the distribution of lipids present in the plasma membrane. Sphingomyelin is a major membrane lipid, however its role in APP processing is unclear. Here, we assessed the expression of sphingomyelin synthase (SGMS1; the gene responsible for sphingomyelin synthesis in human brain and found that it was significantly elevated in the hippocampus of AD brains, but not in the cerebellum. Secondly, we assessed the impact of altering SGMS activity on Aβ generation. Inhibition of SGMS activity significantly reduced the level of Aβ in a dose- and time dependent manner. The decrease in Aβ level occurred without changes in APP expression or cell viability. These results when put together indicate that SGMS activity impacts on APP processing to produce Aβ and it could be a contributing factor in Aβ pathology associated with AD.

  14. In vitro screening on amyloid beta modulation of aqueous extracts from plant seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Okada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycation process might contribute to both extensive protein cross-linking and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease (AD. The amyloid-like aggregation of glycated bovine serum albumin induces apoptosis in the neuronal cell. Dietary supplementation of antioxidants, vitamins, and polyphenols are beneficial to AD, and consumption of fruits and vegetables reduce the risk of AD. We conducted a screening of 14 aqueous extracts from plant seeds (PSAE for inhibitory activity on amyloid beta (Aβ. Materials and Methods: To examine the effects of PSAE on the Aβ (1–42 concentration, PSAE were analyzed by Aβ (1–42 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Furthermore, we carried out an antiglycation experiment of PSAE and an antiaggregation experiment of PSAE to confirm the modification mechanism of PSAE. PSAE were added to buffer containing D-ribose and albumins. The solutions were incubated at 37 °C for 10 days. After incubation, the products were assayed on a fluorophotometer. Results: PSAE associated differential reduction in the levels of Aβ (1–42 (lettuce; 98.7% ± 2.4%, bitter melon; 95.9% ± 2.6%, and corn; 93.9% ± 2.1%, demonstrating that treatment with lettuce seeds extracts (LSE effectively decreases Aβ (1–42 concentration. Among the 14 PSAE, LSE exhibited the second greatest potential for antiglycation. Inhibition of aggregates was not recognized in LSE. Conclusion: These results suggest that LSE reduces the toxicity of Aβ by modifying Aβ.

  15. Alzheimer's disease cybrids replicate beta-amyloid abnormalities through cell death pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S M; Cassarino, D S; Abramova, N N; Keeney, P M; Borland, M K; Trimmer, P A; Krebs, C T; Bennett, J C; Parks, J K; Swerdlow, R H; Parker, W D; Bennett, J P

    2000-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition in brain of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides, elevated brain caspase-3, and systemic deficiency of cytochrome c oxidase. Although increased Abeta deposition can result from mutations in amyloid precursor protein or presenilin genes, the cause of increased Abeta deposition in sporadic AD is unknown. Cytoplasmic hybrid ("cybrid") cells made from mitochondrial DNA of nonfamilial AD subjects show antioxidant-reversible lowering of mitochondrial membrane potential (delta(gYm), secrete twice as much Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42), have increased intracellular Abeta(1-40) (1.7-fold), and develop Congo red-positive Abeta deposits. Also elevated are cytoplasmic cytochrome c (threefold) and caspase-3 activity (twofold). Increased AD cybrid Abeta(1-40) secretion was normalized by inhibition of caspase-3 or secretase and reduced by treatment with the antioxidant S(-)pramipexole. Expression of AD mitochondrial genes in cybrid cells depresses cytochrome c oxidase activity and increases oxidative stress, which, in turn, lowers delta(psi)m. Under stress, cells with AD mitochondrial genes are more likely to activate cell death pathways, which drive caspase 3-mediated Abeta peptide secretion and may account for increased Abeta deposition in the AD brain. Therapeutic strategies for reducing neurodegeneration in sporadic AD can address restoration of delta(psi)m and reduction of elevated Abeta secretion. PMID:10939564

  16. Polarization properties of amyloid-beta plaques in Alzheimer's disease (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Ricken, Gerda; Pircher, Michael; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2016-03-01

    In histopathological practice, birefringence is used for the identification of amyloidosis in numerous tissues. Amyloid birefringence is caused by the parallel arrangement of fibrous protein aggregates. Since neurodegenerative processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are also linked to the formation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques, optical methods sensitive to birefringence may act as non-invasive tools for Aβ identification. At last year's Photonics West, we demonstrated polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) imaging of ex vivo cerebral tissue of advanced stage AD patients. PS-OCT provides volumetric, structural imaging based on both backscatter contrast and tissue polarization properties. In this presentation, we report on polarization-sensitive neuroimaging along with numerical simulations of three-dimensional Aβ plaques. High speed PS-OCT imaging was performed using a spectral domain approach based on polarization maintaining fiber optics. The sample beam was interfaced to a confocal scanning microscope arrangement. Formalin-fixed tissue samples as well as thin histological sections were imaged. For comparison to the PS-OCT results, ray propagation through plaques was modeled using Jones analysis and various illumination geometries and plaque sizes. Characteristic polarization patterns were found. The results of this study may not only help to understand PS-OCT imaging of neuritic Aβ plaques but may also have implications for polarization-sensitive imaging of other fibrillary structures.

  17. Alzheimer's disease and amyloid beta-peptide deposition in the brain: a matter of 'aging'?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moro, Maria Luisa; Collins, Matthew J; Cappellini, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    event in AD (Alzheimer's disease) synaptic dysfunctions. Structural alterations introduced by site-specific modifications linked to protein aging may affect Abeta production, polymerization and clearance, and therefore play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of sporadic and genetic forms of AD. Early......Biomolecules can experience aging processes that limit their long-term functionality in organisms. Typical markers of protein aging are spontaneous chemical modifications, such as AAR (amino acid racemization) and AAI (amino acid isomerization), mainly involving aspartate and asparagine residues....... Since these modifications may affect folding and turnover, they reduce protein functionality over time and may be linked to pathological conditions. The present mini-review describes evidence of AAR and AAI involvement in the misfolding and brain accumulation of Abeta (amyloid beta-peptide), a central...

  18. Lower levels of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta (Abeta) in non-demented Indian controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sarada; Sandhyarani, Boya; Shree, A N Divya; Murthy, K Krishna; Kalyani, K; Kumar, S Praveen; Pradeep; Noone, Mohin Jeslie; Taly, A B

    2006-10-23

    Prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in Indian population is lower than in developed countries. To determine whether limitation of amyloid beta (Abeta) concentration may be responsible for lower rate of incidence, we measured the levels of Abeta in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from 72 non-demented individuals ranging in the age from 20 years to 65 years. These samples were segregated into three groups ranging from 20-35 years, 36-50 years and 51-65 years of age. Levels of Abeta could be detected in all the age groups and they were much lower than the values reported in literature from the developed countries. No significant difference in the average level of Ass was observed with increase in age. PMID:16978775

  19. Indirubin-3′-monoxime suppresses amyloid-beta-induced apoptosis by inhibiting tau hyperphosphorylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-gang Zhang; Xiao-shan Wang; Ying-dong Zhang; Qing Di; Jing-ping Shi; Min Qian; Li-gang Xu; Xing-jian Lin; Jie Lu

    2016-01-01

    Indirubin-3′-monoxime is an effective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent protein kinases, and may play an obligate role in neuronal apopto-sis in Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we found that indirubin-3′-monoxime improved the morphology and increased the survival rate of SH-SY5Y cells exposed to amyloid-beta 25–35 (Aβ25–35), and also suppressed apoptosis by reducing tau phosphorylation at Ser199 and Thr205. Furthermore, indirubin-3′-monoxime inhibited phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). Our results suggest that in-dirubin-3′-monoxime reduced Aβ25–35-induced apoptosis by suppressing tau hyperphosphorylationvia a GSK-3β-mediated mechanism. Indirubin-3′-monoxime is a promising drug candidate for Alzheimer’s disease.

  20. Designed amyloid beta peptide fibril - a tool for high-throughput screening of fibril inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphin, Gunnar T; Ouberai, Myriam; Dumy, Pascal; Garcia, Julian

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) fibril formation is widely believed to be the causative event of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Therapeutic approaches are therefore in development that target various sites in the production and aggregation of Abeta. Herein we present a high-throughput screening tool to generate novel hit compounds that block Abeta fibril formation. This tool is an application for our fibril model (Abeta(16-37)Y(20)K(22)K(24))(4), which is a covalent assembly of four Abeta fragments. With this tool, screening studies are complete within one hour, as opposed to days with native Abeta(1-40). A Z' factor of 0.84+/-0.03 was determined for fibril formation and inhibition, followed by the reporter molecule thioflavin T. Herein we also describe the analysis of a broad range of reported inhibitors and non-inhibitors of Abeta fibril formation to test the validity of the system. PMID:17876751

  1. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2010-06-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  2. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2012-02-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  3. Effect of graphene oxide on the conformational transitions of amyloid beta peptide: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baweja, Lokesh; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-09-01

    The interactions between nanomaterials (NMs) and amyloid proteins are central to the nanotechnology-based diagnostics and therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Graphene oxide (GO) and its derivatives have shown to modulate the aggregation pattern of disease causing amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. However, the mechanism is still not well understood. Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) having carbon:oxygen ratio of 4:1 and 10:1, respectively, on the conformational transitions (alpha-helix to beta-sheet) and the dynamics of the peptide was investigated. GO and rGO decreased the beta-strand propensity of amino acid residues in Aβ. The peptide displayed different modes of adsorption on GO and rGO. The adsorption on GO was dominated by electrostatic interactions, whereas on rGO, both van der Waals and electrostatic interactions contributed in the adsorption of the peptide. Our study revealed that the slight increase in the hydrophobic patches on rGO made it more effective inhibitor of conformational transitions in the peptide. Alpha helix-beta sheet transition in Aβ peptide could be one of the plausible mechanism by which graphene oxide may inhibit amyloid fibrillation.

  4. Neuro-inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide causes cognitive impairment through enhancement of beta-amyloid generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Ki

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by extensive loss of neurons in the brain of AD patients. Intracellular accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ has also shown to occur in AD. Neuro-inflammation has been known to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Methods In this study, we investigated neuro-inflammation and amyloidogenesis and memory impairment following the systemic inflammation generated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS using immunohistochemistry, ELISA, behavioral tests and Western blotting. Results Intraperitoneal injection of LPS, (250 μg/kg induced memory impairment determined by passive avoidance and water maze tests in mice. Repeated injection of LPS (250 μg/kg, 3 or 7 times resulted in an accumulation of Aβ1–42 in the hippocampus and cerebralcortex of mice brains through increased β- and γ-secretase activities accompanied with the increased expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP, 99-residue carboxy-terminal fragment of APP (C99 and generation of Aβ1–42 as well as activation of astrocytes in vivo. 3 weeks of pretreatment of sulindac sulfide (3.75 and 7.5 mg/kg, orally, an anti-inflammatory agent, suppressed the LPS-induced amyloidogenesis, memory dysfunction as well as neuronal cell death in vivo. Sulindac sulfide (12.5–50 μM also suppressed LPS (1 μg/ml-induced amyloidogenesis in cultured neurons and astrocytes in vitro. Conclusion This study suggests that neuro-inflammatory reaction could contribute to AD pathology, and anti-inflammatory agent could be useful for the prevention of AD.

  5. A humanin derivative reduces amyloid beta accumulation and ameliorates memory deficit in triple transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Niikura

    Full Text Available Humanin (HN, a 24-residue peptide, was identified as a novel neuroprotective factor and shows anti-cell death activity against a wide spectrum of Alzheimer's disease (AD-related cytotoxicities, including exposure to amyloid beta (Abeta, in vitro. We previously demonstrated that the injection of S14G-HN, a highly potent HN derivative, into brain ameliorated memory loss in an Abeta-injection mouse model. To fully understand HN's functions under AD-associated pathological conditions, we examined the effect of S14G-HN on triple transgenic mice harboring APP(swe, tau(P310L, and PS-1(M146V that show the age-dependent development of multiple pathologies relating to AD. After 3 months of intranasal treatment, behavioral analyses showed that S14G-HN ameliorated cognitive impairment in male mice. Moreover, ELISA and immunohistochemical analyses showed that Abeta levels in brains were markedly lower in S14G-HN-treated male and female mice than in vehicle control mice. We also found the expression level of neprilysin, an Abeta degrading enzyme, in the outer molecular layer of hippocampal formation was increased in S14G-HN-treated mouse brains. NEP activity was also elevated by S14G-HN treatment in vitro. These findings suggest that decreased Abeta level in these mice is at least partly attributed to S14G-HN-induced increase of neprilysin level. Although HN was identified as an anti-neuronal death factor, these results indicate that HN may also have a therapeutic effect on amyloid accumulation in AD.

  6. NO-flurbiprofen reduces amyloid-beta, is neuroprotective in cell culture, and enhances cognition in response to cholinergic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O; Luo, Jia; Ashghodom, Rezene T; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2009-11-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen is a selective amyloid lowering agent which has been studied clinically in Alzheimer's disease. HCT-1026 is an ester prodrug of flurbiprofen incorporating a nitrate carrier moiety that in vivo provides NO bioactivity and an improved safety profile. In vitro, HCT-1026 retained the cyclooxygenase inhibitory and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug activity of flurbiprofen, but at concentrations at which levels of amyloid-beta 1-42 amino acid were lowered by flurbiprofen, amyloid-beta 1-42 amino acid levels were elevated 200% by HCT-1026. Conversely, at lower concentrations, HCT-1026 behaved as a selective amyloid lowering agent with greater potency than flurbiprofen. The difference in concentration-responses between flurbiprofen and HCT-1026 in vitro suggests different cellular targets; and in no case did a combination of nitrate drug with flurbiprofen provide similar actions. In vivo, HCT-1026 was observed to reverse cognitive deficits induced by scopolamine in two behavioral assays; activity that was also shown by a classical nitrate drug, but not by flurbiprofen. The ability to restore aversive memory and spatial working and reference memory after cholinergic blockade has been demonstrated by other agents that stimulate NO/cGMP signaling. These observations add positively to the preclinical profile of HCT-1026 and NO chimeras in Alzheimer's disease.

  7. HIV-1 stimulates nuclear entry of amyloid beta via dynamin dependent EEA1 and TGF-β/Smad signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    András, Ibolya E., E-mail: iandras@med.miami; Toborek, Michal, E-mail: mtoborek@med.miami.edu

    2014-04-15

    Clinical evidence indicates increased amyloid deposition in HIV-1-infected brains, which contributes to neurocognitive dysfunction in infected patients. Here we show that HIV-1 exposure stimulates amyloid beta (Aβ) nuclear entry in human brain endothelial cells (HBMEC), the main component of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Treatment with HIV-1 and/or Aβ resulted in concurrent increase in early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1), Smad, and phosphorylated Smad (pSmad) in nuclear fraction of HBMEC. A series of inhibition and silencing studies indicated that Smad and EEA1 closely interact by influencing their own nuclear entry; the effect that was attenuated by dynasore, a blocker of GTP-ase activity of dynamin. Importantly, inhibition of dynamin, EEA1, or TGF-β/Smad effectively attenuated HIV-1-induced Aβ accumulation in the nuclei of HBMEC. The present study indicates that nuclear uptake of Aβ involves the dynamin-dependent EEA1 and TGF-β/Smad signaling pathways. These results identify potential novel targets to protect against HIV-1-associated dysregulation of amyloid processes at the BBB level. - Highlights: • HIV-1 induces nuclear accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in brain endothelial cells. • EEA-1 and TGF-Β/Smad act in concert to regulate nuclear entry of Aβ. • Dynamin appropriates the EEA-1 and TGF-Β/Smad signaling. • Dynamin serves as a master regulator of HIV-1-induced nuclear accumulation of Aβ.

  8. Aloe arborescens Extract Protects IMR-32 Cells against Alzheimer Amyloid Beta Peptide via Inhibition of Radical Peroxide Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Maria Elisabetta; Tringali, Giuseppe; Triggiani, Doriana; Giardina, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Aloe arborescens is commonly used as a pharmaceutical ingredient for its effect in burn treatment and ability to increase skin wound healing properties. Besides, it is well known to have beneficial phytotherapeutic, anticancer, and radio-protective properties. In this study, we first provided evidence that A. arborescens extract protects IMR32, a neuroblastoma human cellular line, from toxicity induced by beta amyloid, the peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease. In particular, pretreatment with A. arborescens maintains an elevated cell viability and exerts a protective effect on mitochondrial functionality, as evidenced by oxygen consumption experiments. The protective mechanism exerted by A. arborescens seems be related to lowering of oxidative potential of the cells, as demonstrated by the ROS measurement compared with the results obtained in the presence of amyloid beta (1-42) peptide alone. Based on these preliminary observations we suggest that use ofA. arborescens extract could be developed as agents for the management of AD. PMID:26749845

  9. A systematic review of amyloid-beta peptides as putative mediators of the association between affective disorders and Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, L.; Heegaard, N. H. H.

    2014-01-01

    to the application of different assay formats, study results indicate a potentially altered amyloid-beta metabolism in affective disorder. Limitations: Since most studies used a cross-sectional design, causality is difficult to establish. Moreover, methodological rigor of included studies varied and several studies......-beta concentrations change over time and are associated with cognition as well as affective symptomatology, future research should include prospective, longitudinal studies, implemented in large study populations, where peripheral and central amyloid-p ratios are quantified concomitantly and continuously across...... various affective phases. Also, to enable inter survey comparisons, the use of standardized pre-analytical/analytical procedures is crucial. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  10. Overexpression of estrogen receptor beta alleviates the toxic effects of beta-amyloid protein on PC12 cells via non-hormonal ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wang; Lihui Si; Xiaoxi Li; Weiguo Deng; Haimiao Yang; Yuyan Yang; Yan Fu

    2012-01-01

    After binding to the estrogen receptor, estrogen can alleviate the toxic effects of beta-amyloid protein, and thereby exert a therapeutic effect on Alzheimer's disease patients. Estrogen can increase the incidence of breast carcinoma and endometrial cancer in post-menopausal women, so it is not suitable for clinical treatment of Alzheimer's disease. There is recent evidence that the estrogen receptor can exert its neuroprotective effects without estrogen dependence. Real-time quantitative PCR and flow cytometry results showed that, compared with non-transfected PC12 cells, adenovirus-mediated estrogen receptor β gene-transfected PC12 cells exhibited lower expression of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β under stimulation with beta-amyloid protein and stronger protection from apoptosis. The Akt-specific inhibitor Abi-2 decreased the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of estrogen receptor β gene-transfection. These findings suggest that overexpression of estrogen receptor β can alleviate the toxic effect of beta-amyloid protein on PC12 cells, without estrogen dependence. The Akt pathway is one of the potential means for the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of the estrogen receptor.

  11. Inhibitory Effect of Curcumin-Cu(II) and Curcumin-Zn(II) Complexes on Amyloid-Beta Peptide Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Rona Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Mononuclear complexes of Curcumin with Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been synthesized and, characterized and their effects on the fibrillization and aggregation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide have been studied. FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations demonstrate that the complexes can inhibit the transition from less structured oligomers to β-sheet rich protofibrils which act as seeding factors for further fibrillization. The metal complexes also impart more improved inhibitor...

  12. [Noopept improves the spatial memory and stimulates prefibrillar beta-amyloid(25-35) antibody production in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkova, N V; Gruden', M A; Samokhin, A N; Medvinskaia, N I; Morozova-Roch, L; Uudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Seredinin, S B

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the novel proline-containing nootropic and neuroprotective dipeptide noopept (GVS-111, N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) were studied on NMRI mice upon olfactory bulbectomy, which had been previously shown to imitate the main morphological and biochemical signs of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The spatial memory was assessed using the Morris (water maze) test; the immunological status was characterized by ELISA with antibodies to prefibrillar beta-amyloid(25-35), S100b protein, and protofilaments of equine lysozyme, which are the molecular factors involved in the pathogenesis of AD. The control (sham-operated) animals during the Morris test preferred a sector where the safety platform was placed during the learning session. Bulbectomized animals treated with saline failed to recognize this sector, while bulbectomized animals treated with noopept (0.01 mg/kg for 21 days) restored this predominance, thus demonstrating the improvement of the spatial memory. These animals also demonstrated an increase in the level of antibodies to beta-amyloid(25-35)--the effect, which was more pronounced in the sham-operated than in bulbectomized mice. The latter demonstrated a profound decrease of immunological reactivity in a large number of tests. Noopept, stimulating the production of antibodies to beta-amyloid(25-35), can attenuate the well-known neurotoxic effects of beta-amyloid. The obtained data on the mnemotropic and immunostimulant effects noopept are indicative of good prospects for the clinical usage of this drug in the therapy of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:16277202

  13. Enoxaparin treatment administered at both early and late stages of amyloid beta deposition improves cognition of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice with differential effects on brain A beta levels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, N.M.; Dijk, L. van; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der; Kiliaan, A.J.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Enoxaparin (Enox), a low molecular weight heparin, has been shown to lower brain amyloid beta (A beta) load in a mouse model for Alzheimer's disease. However, the effect of Enox on cognition was not studied. Therefore, we examined the effect of peripheral Enox treatment on cognition and brain A beta

  14. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepideh Shokouhi,1 Baxter P Rogers,1 Hakmook Kang,2 Zhaohua Ding,1 Daniel O Claassen,3 John W Mckay,1 William R Riddle1On behalf of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative1Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USABackground: Amyloid-beta (Aβ imaging with positron emission tomography (PET holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2, have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation.Methods: We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2 to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR. For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures.Results: Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2

  15. Multiscale MD Simulations of Folding Dynamics and Mobility of Beta-Amyloid Peptide on Lipid Bilayer Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, Scott; Cheng, Kelvin

    2013-03-01

    Early interaction events of beta-amyloid peptides with the neuronal membranes play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We have used multiscale Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to study the protein folding dynamics and lateral mobility of beta-amyloid protein on the cholesterol-enriched and -depleted lipid nano-domains. Several independent simulation replicates of all-atom and coarse-grained MD simulations of beta-amyloid on different lipid bilayer nano-domains have been generated. Using Define Secondary Structure of Proteins (DSSP) algorithm and mean-square-distance (MSD) analysis, the protein conformation and the lateral diffusion coefficients of protein, as well as the lipid and water, were calculated as a function of simulation time up to 200 nanoseconds for atomistic and 2 microseconds for coarse-grained simulations per replicate in different bilayer systems. Subtle differences in the conformation and mobility of the protein were observed in lipid bilayers with and without cholesterol. The structural dynamics information obtained from this work will provide useful insights into understanding the role of protein/lipid interactions in the membrane-associated aggregation of protein on neuronal membranes. HHMI-Trinity University and NIH RC1-GM090897-02

  16. Determining the Effect of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles on the Aggregation of Amyloid-Beta in Transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Suhag; Matticks, John; Howell, Carina

    2014-03-01

    The cause of Alzheimer's disease has been linked partially to genetic factors but the predicted environmental components have yet to be determined. In Alzheimer's, accumulation of amyloid-beta protein in the brain forms plaques resulting in neurodegeneration and loss of mental functions. It has been postulated that aluminum influences the aggregation of amyloid-beta. To test this hypothesis, transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans, CL2120, was used as a model organism to observe neurodegeneration in nematodes exposed to aluminum oxide nanoparticles. Behavioral testing, fluorescent staining, and fluorescence microscopy were used to test the effects of aggregation of amyloid-beta in the nervous systems of effected nematodes exposed to aluminum oxide nanoparticles. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy was used to quantify the total concentration of aluminum oxide that the worms were exposed to during the experiment. Exposure of transgenic and wild type worms to a concentration of 4 mg mL-1 aluminum oxide showed a decrease in the sinusoidal motion, as well as an infirmity of transgenic worms when compared to control worms. These results support the hypothesis that aluminum may play a role in neurodegeneration in C. elegans, and may influence and increase the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This work was supported by National Science Foundation grants DUE-1058829, DMR-0923047 DUE-0806660 and Lock Haven FPDC grants.

  17. Monomeric Amyloid Beta Peptide in Hexafluoroisopropanol Detected by Small Angle Neutron Scattering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang-Haagen

    Full Text Available Small proteins like amyloid beta (Aβ monomers are related to neurodegenerative disorders by aggregation to insoluble fibrils. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS is a nondestructive method to observe the aggregation process in solution. We show that SANS is able to resolve monomers of small molecular weight like Aβ for aggregation studies. We examine Aβ monomers after prolonged storing in d-hexafluoroisopropanol (dHFIP by using SANS and dynamic light scattering (DLS. We determined the radius of gyration from SANS as 1.0±0.1 nm for Aβ1-40 and 1.6±0.1 nm for Aβ1-42 in agreement with 3D NMR structures in similar solvents suggesting a solvent surface layer with 5% increased density. After initial dissolution in dHFIP Aβ aggregates sediment with a major component of pure monomers showing a hydrodynamic radius of 1.8±0.3 nm for Aβ1-40 and 3.2±0.4 nm for Aβ1-42 including a surface layer of dHFIP solvent molecules.

  18. Analyzing and Modeling the Kinetics of Amyloid Beta Pores Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ghanim; Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individual pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. Towards the end, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability.

  19. Analyzing and Modeling the Kinetics of Amyloid Beta Pores Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Aβ oligomers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individual pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. Towards the end, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability.

  20. Amyloid Beta: Multiple Mechanisms of Toxicity and Only Some Protective Effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Carrillo-Mora

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Aβ is a peptide of 39–43 amino acids found in large amounts and forming deposits in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD. For this reason, it has been implicated in the pathophysiology of damage observed in this type of dementia. However, the role of Aβ in the pathophysiology of AD is not yet precisely understood. Aβ has been experimentally shown to have a wide range of toxic mechanisms in vivo and in vitro, such as excitotoxicity, mitochondrial alterations, synaptic dysfunction, altered calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, and so forth. In contrast, Aβ has also shown some interesting neuroprotective and physiological properties under certain experimental conditions, suggesting that both physiological and pathological roles of Aβ may depend on several factors. In this paper, we reviewed both toxic and protective mechanisms of Aβ to further explore what their potential roles could be in the pathophysiology of AD. The complete understanding of such apparently opposed effects will also be an important guide for the therapeutic efforts coming in the future.

  1. Analyzing and Modeling the Kinetics of Amyloid Beta Pores Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ghanim; Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individual pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. Towards the end, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability. PMID:26348728

  2. Monomeric Amyloid Beta Peptide in Hexafluoroisopropanol Detected by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang-Haagen, Bo; Biehl, Ralf; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Radulescu, Aurel; Richter, Dieter; Willbold, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Small proteins like amyloid beta (Aβ) monomers are related to neurodegenerative disorders by aggregation to insoluble fibrils. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is a nondestructive method to observe the aggregation process in solution. We show that SANS is able to resolve monomers of small molecular weight like Aβ for aggregation studies. We examine Aβ monomers after prolonged storing in d-hexafluoroisopropanol (dHFIP) by using SANS and dynamic light scattering (DLS). We determined the radius of gyration from SANS as 1.0±0.1 nm for Aβ1–40 and 1.6±0.1 nm for Aβ1–42 in agreement with 3D NMR structures in similar solvents suggesting a solvent surface layer with 5% increased density. After initial dissolution in dHFIP Aβ aggregates sediment with a major component of pure monomers showing a hydrodynamic radius of 1.8±0.3 nm for Aβ1–40 and 3.2±0.4 nm for Aβ1–42 including a surface layer of dHFIP solvent molecules. PMID:26919121

  3. Nanoscale-alumina induces oxidative stress and accelerates amyloid beta (Aβ) production in ICR female mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shahid Ali; Yoon, Gwang Ho; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ullah, Faheem; Amin, Faiz Ul; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-09-01

    The adverse effects of nanoscale-alumina (Al2O3-NPs) have been previously demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies, whereas little is known about their mechanism of neurotoxicity. It is the goal of this research to determine the toxic effects of nano-alumina on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and mouse hippocampal HT22 cells in vitro and on ICR female mice in vivo. Nano-alumina displayed toxic effects on SH-SY5Y cell lines in three different concentrations also increased aluminium abundance and induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells. Nano-alumina peripherally administered to ICR female mice for three weeks increased brain aluminium and ROS production, disturbing brain energy homeostasis, and led to the impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory. Most importantly, these nano-particles induced Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology by enhancing the amyloidogenic pathway of Amyloid Beta (Aβ) production, aggregation and implied the progression of neurodegeneration in the cortex and hippocampus of these mice. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that nano-alumina is toxic to both cells and female mice and that prolonged exposure may heighten the chances of developing a neurodegenerative disease, such as AD.

  4. Association of cardiovascular factors and Alzheimer's disease plasma amyloid-beta protein in subjective memory complainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Kristyn A; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Rodrigues, Mark; Beilby, John; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Taddei, Kevin; Criddle, Arthur; Wraith, Megan; Howard, Matthew; Martins, Georgia; Paton, Athena; Mehta, Pankaj; Foster, Jonathan K; Martins, Ian J; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Mastaglia, Frank L; Laws, Simon M; Gandy, Samuel E; Martins, Ralph N

    2009-01-01

    A strong link is indicated between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), which may be exacerbated by the major AD genetic risk factor apolipoprotein Eepsilon4 (APOEepsilon4). Since subjective memory complaint (SMC) may potentially be an early indicator for cognitive decline, we examined CVD risk factors in a cohort of SMC. As amyloid-beta (Abeta) is considered to play a central role in AD, we hypothesized that the CVD risk profile (increased LDL, reduced HDL, and increased body fat) would be associated with plasma Abeta levels. We explored this in 198 individuals with and without SMC (average age = 63 years). Correlations between Abeta40 and HDL were observed, which were stronger in non-APOEepsilon4 carriers (rho = -0.315, p association between HDL and Abeta, which if demonstrated to be causal has implications for the development of lifestyle interventions and/or novel therapeutics. The relationship between HDL and Abeta and the potential significance of such an association needs to be validated in a larger longitudinal study.

  5. Insulin Attenuates Beta-Amyloid-Associated Insulin/Akt/EAAT Signaling Perturbations in Human Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaojuan; Yang, Liling; Du, Heng; Sun, Qinjian; Wang, Xiang; Cong, Lin; Liu, Xiaohui; Yin, Ling; Li, Shan; Du, Yifeng

    2016-08-01

    The excitatory amino acid transporters 1 and 2 (EAAT1 and EAAT2), mostly located on astrocytes, are the main mediators for glutamate clearance in humans. Malfunctions of these transporters may lead to excessive glutamate accumulation and subsequent excitotoxicity to neurons, which has been implicated in many kinds of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Yet, the specific mechanism of the glutamate system dysregulation remains vague. To explore whether the insulin/protein kinase B (Akt)/EAAT signaling in human astrocytes could be disturbed by beta-amyloid protein (Aβ) and be protected by insulin, we incubated HA-1800 cells with varying concentrations of Aβ1-42 oligomers and insulin. Then the alterations of several key substrates in this signal transduction pathway were determined. Our results showed that expressions of insulin receptor, phospho-insulin receptor, phospho-protein kinase B, phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin, and EAAT1 and EAAT2 were decreased by the Aβ1-42 oligomers in a dose-dependent manner (p  0.05), and the mRNA levels of EAAT1 and EAAT2 were also unchanged (p > 0.05). Taken together, this study indicates that Aβ1-42 oligomers could cause disturbances in insulin/Akt/EAAT signaling in astrocytes, which might be responsible for AD onset and progression. Additionally, insulin can exert protective functions to the brain by modulating protein modifications or expressions. PMID:26358886

  6. Nano-biosensors to detect beta-amyloid for Alzheimer's disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Tiwari, Sneham; Vashist, Arti; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-06-15

    Beta-amyloid (β-A) peptides are potential biomarkers to monitor Alzheimer's diseases (AD) for diagnostic purposes. Increased β-A level is neurotoxic and induces oxidative stress in brain resulting in neurodegeneration and causes dementia. As of now, no sensitive and inexpensive method is available for β-A detection under physiological and pathological conditions. Although, available methods such as neuroimaging, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detect β-A, but they are not yet extended at point-of-care (POC) due to sophisticated equipments, need of high expertize, complicated operations, and challenge of low detection limit. Recently, β-A antibody based electrochemical immuno-sensing approach has been explored to detect β-A at pM levels within 30-40 min compared to 6-8h of ELISA test. The introduction of nano-enabling electrochemical sensing technology could enable rapid detection of β-A at POC and may facilitate fast personalized health care delivery. This review explores recent advancements in nano-enabling electrochemical β-A sensing technologies towards POC application to AD management. These analytical tools can serve as an analytical tool for AD management program to obtain bio-informatics needed to optimize therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases diagnosis management.

  7. MD-simulations of Beta-Amyloid Protein Insertion Efficiency and Kinetics into Neuronal Membrane Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kwan

    2011-03-01

    Early interaction events of beta-amyloid (A β) peptides with the neuronal membranes play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We have used all-atom MD simulations to study the protein insertion efficiency and kinetics of monomeric A β40 and A β42 into phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers (PC) with and without 40 mole% cholesterol (CHOL) that mimic the cholesterol-enriched and depleted lipid nanodomains of the neuronal plasma membranes. Independent replicates of 200-ns simulations of each protein pre-inserted in the upper lipid layer were generated. In PC bilayers, only 25% of A β40 and 50% of A β42 in the replicates showed complete insertion into the lower lipid layer, whereas the percentages increased to 50% and 100%, respectively, in PC/CHOL bilayers, providing evidence that cholesterol improves the protein insertion efficiency into the bilayers. The rate of protein insertion was proportional to the hydrophobic, transmembrane helix length of the inserted peptide and depended on the cholesterol content. We propose that the lysine snorkeling and C-terminus anchoring of A β to the PC headgroups at the upper and lower lipid/water interfaces represent the dual-transmembrane stabilization mechanisms of A β in the neuronal membrane domains.

  8. Insights into the molecular interactions between aminopeptidase and amyloid beta peptide using molecular modeling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanavade, Maruti J; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2014-08-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The accumulation of Aβ peptides in AD brain was caused due to overproduction or insufficient clearance and defects in the proteolytic degradation of Aβ peptides. Hence, Aβ peptide degradation could be a promising therapeutic approach in AD treatment. Recent experimental report suggests that aminopeptidase from Streptomyces griseus KK565 (SGAK) can degrade Aβ peptides but the interactive residues are yet to be known in detail at the atomic level. Hence, we developed the three-dimensional model of aminopeptidase (SGAK) using SWISS-MODEL, Geno3D and MODELLER. Model built by MODELLER was used for further studies. Molecular docking was performed between aminopeptidase (SGAK) with wild-type and mutated Aβ peptides. The docked complex of aminopeptidase (SGAK) and wild-type Aβ peptide (1IYT.pdb) shows more stability than the other complexes. Molecular docking and MD simulation results revealed that the residues His93, Asp105, Glu139, Glu140, Asp168 and His255 are involved in the hydrogen bonding with Aβ peptide and zinc ions. The interactions between carboxyl oxygen atoms of Glu139 of aminopeptidase (SGAK) with water molecule suggest that the Glu139 may be involved in the nucleophilic attack on Ala2-Glu3 peptide bond of Aβ peptide. Hence, amino acid Glu139 of aminopeptidase (SGAK) might play an important role to degrade Aβ peptides, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Gene expression profile of amyloid beta protein-injected mouse model for Alzheimer disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-na KONG; Ping-ping ZUO; Liang MU; Yan-yong LIU; Nan YANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the gene expression profile changes in the cerebral cortex of mice injected icv with amyloid beta-protein (Aβ) fragment 25-35 using cDNA microarray. Methods: Balb/c mice were randomly divided into a control group and Aβ-treated group. The Morris water maze test was performed to detect the effect of Aβ-injection on the learning and memory of mice. Atlas Mouse 1.2 Expression Arrays containing 1176 genes were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of each group. Results: The gene expression profiles showed that 19 genes including TBX1, NF-κB, AP-1/c-Jun, cadherin, integrin, erb-B2, and FGFR1 were up-regulated after 2 weeks oficv administration of Aβ; while 12 genes were downregulated, including NGF, glucose phosphate isomerase 1, AT motif binding factor 1, Na+/K+-ATPase, and Akt. Conclusions: The results provide important leads for pursuing a more complete understanding of the molecular events of Aβ-injection into mice with Alzheimer disease.

  10. Multifunctional cholinesterase and amyloid Beta fibrillization modulators. Synthesis and biological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butini, Stefania; Brindisi, Margherita; Brogi, Simone; Maramai, Samuele; Guarino, Egeria; Panico, Alessandro; Saxena, Ashima; Chauhan, Ved; Colombo, Raffaella; Verga, Laura; De Lorenzi, Ersilia; Bartolini, Manuela; Andrisano, Vincenza; Novellino, Ettore; Campiani, Giuseppe; Gemma, Sandra

    2013-12-12

    In order to identify novel Alzheimer's modifying pharmacological tools, we developed bis-tacrines bearing a peptide moiety for specific interference with surface sites of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) binding amyloid-beta (Aβ). Accordingly, compounds 2a-c proved to be inhibitors of hAChE catalytic and noncatalytic functions, binding the catalytic and peripheral sites, interfering with Aβ aggregation and with the Aβ self-oligomerization process (2a). Compounds 2a-c in complex with TcAChE span the gorge with the bis-tacrine system, and the peptide moieties bulge outside the gorge in proximity of the peripheral site. These moieties are likely responsible for the observed reduction of hAChE-induced Aβ aggregation since they physically hamper Aβ binding to the enzyme surface. Moreover, 2a was able to significantly interfere with Aβ self-oligomerization, while 2b,c showed improved inhibition of hAChE-induced Aβ aggregation. PMID:24900626

  11. The Alzheimer's disease-associated amyloid beta-protein is an antimicrobial peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Soscia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta is believed to be the key mediator of Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Abeta is most often characterized as an incidental catabolic byproduct that lacks a normal physiological role. However, Abeta has been shown to be a specific ligand for a number of different receptors and other molecules, transported by complex trafficking pathways, modulated in response to a variety of environmental stressors, and able to induce pro-inflammatory activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we provide data supporting an in vivo function for Abeta as an antimicrobial peptide (AMP. Experiments used established in vitro assays to compare antimicrobial activities of Abeta and LL-37, an archetypical human AMP. Findings reveal that Abeta exerts antimicrobial activity against eight common and clinically relevant microorganisms with a potency equivalent to, and in some cases greater than, LL-37. Furthermore, we show that AD whole brain homogenates have significantly higher antimicrobial activity than aged matched non-AD samples and that AMP action correlates with tissue Abeta levels. Consistent with Abeta-mediated activity, the increased antimicrobial action was ablated by immunodepletion of AD brain homogenates with anti-Abeta antibodies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest Abeta is a hitherto unrecognized AMP that may normally function in the innate immune system. This finding stands in stark contrast to current models of Abeta-mediated pathology and has important implications for ongoing and future AD treatment strategies.

  12. A mathematical model of the kinetics of beta-amyloid fibril growth from the denatured state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallitto, M M; Murphy, R M

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous conversion of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) from soluble monomer to insoluble fibril may underlie the neurodegeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease. A complete description of Abeta self-association kinetics requires identification of the oligomeric species present and the pathway of association, as well as quantitation of rate constants and reaction order. Abeta was rendered monomeric and denatured by dissolution in 8 M urea, pH 10. "Refolding" and fibrillization were initiated by rapid dilution into phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4. The kinetics of growth were followed at three different concentrations, using size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and static light scattering. A multi-step pathway for fibril formation and growth was postulated. This pathway included 1) rapid commitment to either stable monomer/dimer or unstable intermediate, 2) cooperative association of intermediate into a multimeric "nucleus," 3) elongation of the "nucleus" into filaments via addition of intermediate, 4) lateral aggregation of filaments into fibrils, and 5) fibril elongation via end-to-end association. Differential and algebraic equations describing this kinetic pathway were derived, and model parameters were determined by fitting the data. The utility of the model for identifying toxic Abeta oligomeric specie(s) is demonstrated. The model should prove useful for designing compounds that inhibit Abeta aggregation and/or toxicity. PMID:11509390

  13. Amyloid-Beta Induced Changes in Vesicular Transport of BDNF in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Seifert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is an important growth factor in the CNS. Deficits in transport of this secretory protein could underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of disease-related changes in BDNF transport might provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying, for example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To analyze the role of BDNF transport in AD, live cell imaging of fluorescently labeled BDNF was performed in hippocampal neurons of different AD model systems. BDNF and APP colocalized with low incidence in vesicular structures. Anterograde as well as retrograde transport of BDNF vesicles was reduced and these effects were mediated by factors released from hippocampal neurons into the extracellular medium. Transport of BDNF was altered at a very early time point after onset of human APP expression or after acute amyloid-beta(1-42 treatment, while the activity-dependent release of BDNF remained unaffected. Taken together, extracellular cleavage products of APP induced rapid changes in anterograde and retrograde transport of BDNF-containing vesicles while release of BDNF was unaffected by transgenic expression of mutated APP. These early transport deficits might lead to permanently impaired brain functions in the adult brain.

  14. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Neuroprotective Compounds from Uncaria rhynchophylla against Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Fang Xian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla is a component herb of many Chinese herbal formulae for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Previous study in our laboratory has demonstrated that an ethanol extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla ameliorated cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease induced by D-galactose. However, the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla responsible for the anti-Alzheimer’s disease activity have not been identified. This study aims to identify the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla by a bioassay-guided fractionation approach and explore the acting mechanism of these active ingredients by using a well-established cellular model of Alzheimer’s disease, beta-amyloid- (Aβ- induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. The results showed that six alkaloids, namely, corynoxine, corynoxine B, corynoxeine, isorhynchophylline, isocorynoxeine, and rhynchophylline were isolated from the extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla. Among them, rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline significantly decreased Aβ-induced cell death, intracellular calcium overloading, and tau protein hyperphosphorylation in PC12 cells. These results suggest that rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline are the major active ingredients responsible for the protective action of Uncaria rhynchophylla against Aβ-induced neuronal toxicity, and their neuroprotective effect may be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting intracellular calcium overloading and tau protein hyperphosphorylation.

  15. Low Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-Beta Concentration Is Associated with Poorer Delayed Memory Recall in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanni Haapalinna

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data on the association of memory performance with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD are inconsistent. The Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease neuropsychological battery (CERAD-NB is a commonly used validated cognitive tool; however, only few studies have examined its relationship with CSF biomarkers for AD. We studied the correlation of pathological changes in CSF biomarkers with various CERAD-NB subtests and total scores. Methods: Out of 79 subjects (36 men, mean age 70.5 years, 63 had undergone an assessment of cognitive status with CERAD-NB and a CSF biomarker analysis due to a suspected memory disorder, and 16 were controls with no memory complaint.Results: In women we found a significant correlation between CSF amyloid-beta (Aβ1-42 and several subtests measuring delayed recall. Word List Recall correlated with all markers: Aβ1-42 (r = 0.323, p = 0.035, tau (r = -0.304, p = 0.050 and hyperphosphorylated tau (r = -0.331, p = 0.046. No such correlations were found in men. Conclusions: CSF biomarkers correlate with delayed memory scores in CERAD-NB in women, and women may have more actual AD pathology at the time of the investigations than men.

  16. Nanoscale-alumina induces oxidative stress and accelerates amyloid beta (Aβ) production in ICR female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shahid Ali; Yoon, Gwang Ho; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ullah, Faheem; Ul Amin, Faiz; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-10-01

    The adverse effects of nanoscale-alumina (Al2O3-NPs) have been previously demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies, whereas little is known about their mechanism of neurotoxicity. It is the goal of this research to determine the toxic effects of nano-alumina on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and mouse hippocampal HT22 cells in vitro and on ICR female mice in vivo. Nano-alumina displayed toxic effects on SH-SY5Y cell lines in three different concentrations also increased aluminium abundance and induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells. Nano-alumina peripherally administered to ICR female mice for three weeks increased brain aluminium and ROS production, disturbing brain energy homeostasis, and led to the impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory. Most importantly, these nano-particles induced Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology by enhancing the amyloidogenic pathway of Amyloid Beta (Aβ) production, aggregation and implied the progression of neurodegeneration in the cortex and hippocampus of these mice. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that nano-alumina is toxic to both cells and female mice and that prolonged exposure may heighten the chances of developing a neurodegenerative disease, such as AD.

  17. The Structure of the Amyloid-[beta] Peptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Titmuss, Stephen J.; Epa, V. Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J.; Masters, Colin L.; Varghese, Joseph N. (CSIRO/MHT)

    2008-11-03

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of A{beta}-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in A{beta} may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of A{beta} peptides complexed with Cu{sup 2+} in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu{sup 2+} binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to A{beta} can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  18. Neurotrophic and Neurotoxic Effects of Amyloid |beta Protein: Reversal by Tachykinin Neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankner, Bruce A.; Duffy, Lawrence K.; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    1990-10-01

    The amyloid β protein is deposited in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease but its pathogenic role is unknown. In culture, the amyloid β protein was neurotrophic to undifferentiated hippocampal neurons at low concentrations and neurotoxic to mature neurons at higher concentrations. In differentiated neurons, amyloid β protein caused dendritic and axonal retraction followed by neuronal death. A portion of the amyloid β protein (amino acids 25 to 35) mediated both the trophic and toxic effects and was homologous to the tachykinin neuropeptide family. The effects of the amyloid β protein were mimicked by tachykinin antagonists and completely reversed by specific tachykinin agonists. Thus, the amyloid β protein could function as a neurotrophic factor for differentiating neurons, but at high concentrations in mature neurons, as in Alzheimer's disease, could cause neuronal degeneration.

  19. alpha-Synuclein enhances secretion and toxicity of amyloid beta peptides in PC12 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazmierczak, Anna; Strosznajder, Joanna B.; Adamczyk, Agata

    2008-01-01

    alpha-Synuclein is the fundamental component of Lewy bodies which occur in the brain of 60% of sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease patients. Moreover, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-synuclein, the so-called non-amyloid component of Alzheimer's disease amyloid, was found to be an integral part

  20. Intravenous immunglobulin binds beta amyloid and modifies its aggregation, neurotoxicity and microglial phagocytosis in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Cattepoel

    Full Text Available Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG has been proposed as a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease (AD and its efficacy is currently being tested in mild-to-moderate AD. Earlier studies reported the presence of anti-amyloid beta (Aβ antibodies in IVIG. These observations led to clinical studies investigating the potential role of IVIG as a therapeutic agent in AD. Also, IVIG is known to mediate beneficial effects in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions by interfering with various pathological processes. Therefore, we investigated the effects of IVIG and purified polyclonal Aβ-specific antibodies (pAbs-Aβ on aggregation, toxicity and phagocytosis of Aβ in vitro, thus elucidating some of the potential mechanisms of action of IVIG in AD patients. We report that both IVIG and pAbs-Aβ specifically bound to Aβ and inhibited its aggregation in a dose-dependent manner as measured by Thioflavin T assay. Additionally, IVIG and the purified pAbs-Aβ inhibited Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line and prevented Aβ binding to rat primary cortical neurons. Interestingly, IVIG and pAbs-Aβ also increased the number of phagocytosing cells as well as the amount of phagocytosed fibrillar Aβ by BV-2 microglia. Phagocytosis of Aβ depended on receptor-mediated endocytosis and was accompanied by upregulation of CD11b expression. Importantly, we could also show that Privigen dose-dependently reversed Aβ-mediated LTP inhibition in mouse hippocampal slices. Therefore, our in vitro results suggest that IVIG may have an impact on different processes involved in AD pathogenesis, thereby promoting further understanding of the effects of IVIG observed in clinical studies.

  1. Glial expression of the {beta}-Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) in global ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banati, R.B.; Gehrmann, J.; Kreutzberg, G.W. [Max Planck Institute of Psychiarty, Martinsried (Germany)]|[Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research, Koeln (Germany)]|[Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1995-07-01

    The {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) bears characteristics of an acute-phase protein and therefore is likely to be involved in the glial response to brain injury. In the brain, APP is rapidly synthesized by activated glial cells in response to comparatively mild neuronal lesions, e.g., a remote peripheral nerve injury. Perfusion deficits in the brain result largely in neuronal necrosis and are a common condition in elderly patients. This neuronal necrosis is accompanied by a pronounced reaction of astrocytes and microglia, which can also be observed in animal models. We have therefore studied in the rat, immunocytochemically, the induction of APP after 30 min of global ischemia caused by four-vessel occlusion. The postischemic brain injuries were examined at survival times from 12 h to 7 days. From day 3 onward, APP immunoreactivity was strongly induced in the CA{sub 1} and CA{sub 4} regions of the rat dorsal hippocampus as well as in the dorsolateral striatum. In these areas, the majority of APP-immunoreactive cells were reactive glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes, as shown by double-immunofluorescence labeling for GFAP and APP. Additionally, small ramified cells, most likely activated microglia, expressed APP immunoreactivity. In contrast, in the parietal cortex, APP immunoreactivity occurred focally in clusters of activated microglia rather than in astrocytes, as demonstrated by double-immunofluorescence labeling for APP and the microglia-binding lectin Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B{sub 4}. In conclusion, following global ischemia, APP is induced in reactive glial cells with spatial differences in the distribution pattern of APP induction in actrocytes and microglia. 51 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Soluble Beta-Amyloid Precursor Protein Is Related to Disease Progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacker, Petra; Fang, Lubin; Kuhle, Jens; Petzold, Axel; Tumani, Hayrettin; Ludolph, Albert C.; Otto, Markus; Brettschneider, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Background Biomarkers of disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) could support the identification of beneficial drugs in clinical trials. We aimed to test whether soluble fragments of beta-amyloid precursor protein (sAPPα and sAPPß) correlated with clinical subtypes of ALS and were of prognostic value. Methodology/Principal Findings In a cross-sectional study including patients with ALS (N = 68) with clinical follow-up data over 6 months, Parkinson's disease (PD, N = 20), and age-matched controls (N = 40), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of sAPPα a, sAPPß and neurofilaments (NfHSMI35) were measured by multiplex assay, Progranulin by ELISA. CSF sAPPα and sAPPß levels were lower in ALS with a rapidly-progressive disease course (p = 0.03, and p = 0.02) and with longer disease duration (p = 0.01 and p = 0.01, respectively). CSF NfHSMI35 was elevated in ALS compared to PD and controls, with highest concentrations found in patients with rapid disease progression (p<0.01). High CSF NfHSMI3 was linked to low CSF sAPPα and sAPPß (p = 0.001, and p = 0.007, respectively). The ratios CSF NfHSMI35/CSF sAPPα,-ß were elevated in patients with fast progression of disease (p = 0.002 each). CSF Progranulin decreased with ongoing disease (p = 0.04). Conclusions This study provides new CSF candidate markers associated with progression of disease in ALS. The data suggest that a deficiency of cellular neuroprotective mechanisms (decrease of sAPP) is linked to progressive neuro-axonal damage (increase of NfHSMI35) and to progression of disease. PMID:21858182

  3. Soluble beta-amyloid precursor protein is related to disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Steinacker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biomarkers of disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS could support the identification of beneficial drugs in clinical trials. We aimed to test whether soluble fragments of beta-amyloid precursor protein (sAPPα and sAPPß correlated with clinical subtypes of ALS and were of prognostic value. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a cross-sectional study including patients with ALS (N = 68 with clinical follow-up data over 6 months, Parkinson's disease (PD, N = 20, and age-matched controls (N = 40, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of sAPPα a, sAPPß and neurofilaments (NfH(SMI35 were measured by multiplex assay, Progranulin by ELISA. CSF sAPPα and sAPPß levels were lower in ALS with a rapidly-progressive disease course (p = 0.03, and p = 0.02 and with longer disease duration (p = 0.01 and p = 0.01, respectively. CSF NfH(SMI35 was elevated in ALS compared to PD and controls, with highest concentrations found in patients with rapid disease progression (p<0.01. High CSF NfH(SMI3 was linked to low CSF sAPPα and sAPPß (p = 0.001, and p = 0.007, respectively. The ratios CSF NfH(SMI35/CSF sAPPα,-ß were elevated in patients with fast progression of disease (p = 0.002 each. CSF Progranulin decreased with ongoing disease (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new CSF candidate markers associated with progression of disease in ALS. The data suggest that a deficiency of cellular neuroprotective mechanisms (decrease of sAPP is linked to progressive neuro-axonal damage (increase of NfH(SMI35 and to progression of disease.

  4. Novel roles of amyloid-beta precursor protein metabolites in fragile X syndrome and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmark, C J; Sokol, D K; Maloney, B; Lahiri, D K

    2016-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and is associated with up to 5% of autism cases. Several promising drugs are in preclinical testing for FXS; however, bench-to-bedside plans for the clinic are severely limited due to lack of validated biomarkers and outcome measures. Published work from our laboratories has demonstrated altered levels of amyloid-beta (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) and its metabolites in FXS and idiopathic autism. Westmark and colleagues have focused on β-secretase (amyloidogenic) processing and the accumulation of Aβ peptides in adult FXS models, whereas Lahiri and Sokol have studied α-secretase (non-amyloidogenic or anabolic) processing and altered levels of sAPPα and Aβ in pediatric autism and FXS. Thus, our groups have hypothesized a pivotal role for these Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related proteins in the neurodevelopmental disorders of FXS and autism. In this review, we discuss the contribution of APP metabolites to FXS and autism pathogenesis as well as the potential use of these metabolites as blood-based biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Our future focus is to identify key underlying mechanisms through which APP metabolites contribute to FXS and autism condition-to-disease pathology. Positive outcomes will support utilizing APP metabolites as blood-based biomarkers in clinical trials as well as testing drugs that modulate APP processing as potential disease therapeutics. Our studies to understand the role of APP metabolites in developmental conditions such as FXS and autism are a quantum leap for the neuroscience field, which has traditionally restricted any role of APP to AD and aging. PMID:27573877

  5. CCR5 deficiency accelerates lipopolysaccharide-induced astrogliosis, amyloid-beta deposit and impaired memory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chul Ju; Park, Mi Hee; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Yun, Na Young; Oh, Sang Yeon; Song, Ju Kyung; Seo, Hyun Ok; Kim, Yun-Bae; Hwang, Dae Yeon; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-03-15

    Chemokine receptors are implicated in inflammation and immune responses. Neuro-inflammation is associated with activation of astrocyte and amyloid-beta (Aβ) generations that lead to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Previous our study showed that deficiency of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) results in activation of astrocytes and Aβ deposit, and thus memory dysfunction through increase of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. CCR5 knockout mice were used as an animal model with memory dysfunction. For the purpose LPS was injected i.p. daily (0.25 mg/kg/day). The memory dysfunctions were much higher in LPS-injected CCR5 knockout mice compared to CCR5 wild type mice as well as non-injected CCR5 knockout mice. Associated with severe memory dysfuction in LPS injected CCR5 knockout mice, LPS injection significant increase expression of inflammatory proteins, astrocyte activation, expressions of β-secretase as well as Aβ deposition in the brain of CCR5 knockout mice as compared with that of CCR5 wild type mice. In CCR5 knockout mice, CCR2 expressions were high and co-localized with GFAP which was significantly elevated by LPS. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) which ligands of CCR2 also increased by LPS injection, and increment of MCP-1 expression is much higher in CCR5 knockout mice. BV-2 cells treated with CCR5 antagonist, D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA) and cultured astrocytes isolated from CCR5 knockout mice treated with LPS (1 μg/ml) and CCR2 antagonist, decreased the NF-ĸB activation and Aβ level. These findings suggest that the deficiency of CCR5 enhances response of LPS, which accelerates to neuro-inflammation and memory impairment.

  6. Mechanism of neuronal versus endothelial cell uptake of Alzheimer's disease amyloid beta protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunya K Kandimalla

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by significant neurodegeneration in the cortex and hippocampus; intraneuronal tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau protein; and accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta proteins 40 and 42 in the brain parenchyma as well as in the cerebral vasculature. The current understanding that AD is initiated by the neuronal accumulation of Abeta proteins due to their inefficient clearance at the blood-brain-barrier (BBB, places the neurovascular unit at the epicenter of AD pathophysiology. The objective of this study is to investigate cellular mechanisms mediating the internalization of Abeta proteins in the principle constituents of the neurovascular unit, neurons and BBB endothelial cells. Laser confocal micrographs of wild type (WT mouse brain slices treated with fluorescein labeled Abeta40 (F-Abeta40 demonstrated selective accumulation of the protein in a subpopulation of cortical and hippocampal neurons via nonsaturable, energy independent, and nonendocytotic pathways. This groundbreaking finding, which challenges the conventional belief that Abeta proteins are internalized by neurons via receptor mediated endocytosis, was verified in differentiated PC12 cells and rat primary hippocampal (RPH neurons through laser confocal microscopy and flow cytometry studies. Microscopy studies have demonstrated that a significant proportion of F-Abeta40 or F-Abeta42 internalized by differentiated PC12 cells or RPH neurons is located outside of the endosomal or lysosomal compartments, which may accumulate without degradation. In contrast, BBME cells exhibit energy dependent uptake of F-Abeta40, and accumulate the protein in acidic cell organelle, indicative of endocytotic uptake. Such a phenomenal difference in the internalization of Abeta40 between neurons and BBB endothelial cells may provide essential clues to understanding how various cells can differentially regulate Abeta proteins and help explain the vulnerability of cortical

  7. Organotypic vibrosections from whole brain adult Alzheimer mice (overexpressing amyloid-precursor-protein with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations as a model to study clearance of beta-amyloid plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eHumpel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer´s disease is a severe neurodegenerative disorder of the brain, pathologically characterized by extracellular beta-amyloid plaques, intraneuronal Tau inclusions, inflammation, reactive glial cells, vascular pathology and neuronal cell death. The degradation and clearance of beta-amyloid plaques is an interesting therapeutic approach, and the proteases neprilysin (NEP, insulysin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP are of particular interest. The aim of this project was to establish and characterize a simple in vitro model to study the degrading effects of these proteases. Organoytpic brain vibrosections (120 µm thick were sectioned from adult (9 month old wildtype and transgenic mice (expressing amyloid precursor protein (APP harboring the Swedish K670N/M671L, Dutch E693Q, and Iowa D694N mutations; APP_SDI and cultured for 2 weeks. Plaques were stained by immunohistochemistry for beta-amyloid and Thioflavin S. Our data show that plaques were evident in 2 week old cultures from 9 month old transgenic mice. These plaques were surrounded by reactive GFAP+ astroglia and Iba1+ microglia. Incubation of fresh slices for 2 weeks with 1-0.1-0.01 µg/ml of NEP, insulysin, MMP-2 or MMP-9 showed that NEP, insulysin and MMP-9 markedly degradeded beta-amyloid plaques but only at the highest concentration. Our data provide for the first time a potent and powerful living brain vibrosection model containing a high number of plaques, which allows to rapidly and simply study the degradation and clearance of beta-amyloid plaques in vitro.

  8. Amyloid beta-peptide worsens cognitive impairment following cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury*****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Song; Qiang Ao; Ying Niu; Qin Shen; Huancong Zuo; Xiufang Zhang; Yandao Gong

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β-peptide, a major component of senile plaques in Alzheimer’s disease, has been impli-cated in neuronal cel death and cognitive impairment. Recently, studies have shown that the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia is closely linked with Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a rat model of global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was established via occlusion of four arteries;meanwhile, fibril ar amyloid β-peptide was injected into the rat lateral ventricle. The Morris water maze test and histological staining revealed that administration of amyloid β-peptide could further aggravate impairments to learning and memory and neuronal cel death in the hippocampus of rats subjected to cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Western blot showed that phosphorylation of tau protein and the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3β were significantly stronger in cerebral is-chemia-reperfusion injury rats subjected to amyloidβ-peptide administration than those undergoing cerebral ischemia-reperfusion or amyloidβ-peptide administration alone. Conversely, the activity of protein phosphatase 2A was remarkably reduced in rats with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury fol owing amyloidβ-peptide administration. These findings suggest that amyloidβ-peptide can po-tentiate tau phosphorylation induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion and thereby aggravate cog-nitive impairment.

  9. Cholesterol enhances amyloid {beta} deposition in mouse retina by modulating the activities of A{beta}-regulating enzymes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko, E-mail: k.ohno.oph@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Section of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-treated RPE produces more A{beta} than non-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neprilysin expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Secretase expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-enriched diet induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} were present in cholesterol-enriched-diet-induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. -- Abstract: Subretinally-deposited amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) is a main contributor of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanism causing A{beta} deposition in AMD eyes is unknown. Hypercholesterolemia is a significant risk for developing AMD. Thus, we investigated the effects of cholesterol on A{beta} production in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and in the mouse retina in vivo. RPE cells isolated from senescent (12-month-old) C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 {mu}g/ml cholesterol for 48 h. A{beta} amounts in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Activity and expression of enzymes and proteins that regulate A{beta} production were examined by activity assay and real time PCR. The retina of mice fed cholesterol-enriched diet was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol significantly increased A{beta} production in cultured RPE cells. Activities of A{beta} degradation enzyme; neprilysin (NEP) and anti-amyloidogenic secretase; {alpha}-secretase were significantly decreased in cell lysates of cholesterol-treated RPE cells compared to non-treated cells, but there was no change in the activities of {beta}- or {gamma}-secretase. mRNA levels of NEP and {alpha}-secretase (ADAM10 and ADAM17) were significantly lower in cholesterol-treated RPE cells than non-treated cells. Senescent (12-month-old) mice fed cholesterol-enriched chow developed subRPE deposits containing A{beta}, whereas

  10. Protective effects of berberine against amyloid beta-induced toxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Yanjun Zhang; Shuai Du; Mixia Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Berberine, a major constituent of Coptidis rhizoma, exhibits neural protective effects. The present study analyzed the potential protective effect of berberine against amyloid G-induced cytotoxicity in rat cerebral cortical neurons. Alzheimer's disease cell models were treated with 0.5 and 2 μmol/Lberberine for 36 hours to inhibit amyloid G-induced toxicity. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling staining results showed that berberine significantly increased cell viability and reduced cell apoptosis in primary cultured rat cortical neurons. In addition, western blot analysis revealed a protective effect of berberine against amyloid β-induced toxicity in cultured cortical neurons, which coincided with significantly decreased abnormal up-regulation of activated caspase-3. These results showed that berberine exhibited a protective effect against amyloid 13-induced cytotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons.

  11. Spatial patterns of brain amyloid-beta burden and atrophy rate associations in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Duygu; Schuff, Norbert; Mathis, Chester A; Jagust, William; Weiner, Michael W

    2011-04-01

    Amyloid-β accumulation in the brain is thought to be one of the earliest events in Alzheimer's disease, possibly leading to synaptic dysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive/functional decline. The earliest detectable changes seen with neuroimaging appear to be amyloid-β accumulation detected by (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography imaging. However, some individuals tolerate high brain amyloid-β loads without developing symptoms, while others progressively decline, suggesting that events in the brain downstream from amyloid-β deposition, such as regional brain atrophy rates, play an important role. The main purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between the regional distributions of increased amyloid-β and the regional distribution of increased brain atrophy rates in patients with mild cognitive impairment. To simultaneously capture the spatial distributions of amyloid-β and brain atrophy rates, we employed the statistical concept of parallel independent component analysis, an effective method for joint analysis of multimodal imaging data. Parallel independent component analysis identified significant relationships between two patterns of amyloid-β deposition and atrophy rates: (i) increased amyloid-β burden in the left precuneus/cuneus and medial-temporal regions was associated with increased brain atrophy rates in the left medial-temporal and parietal regions; and (ii) in contrast, increased amyloid-β burden in bilateral precuneus/cuneus and parietal regions was associated with increased brain atrophy rates in the right medial temporal regions. The spatial distribution of increased amyloid-β and the associated spatial distribution of increased brain atrophy rates embrace a characteristic pattern of brain structures known for a high vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease pathology, encouraging for the use of (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography measures as early indicators of

  12. Minocycline alleviates beta-amyloid protein and tau pathology via restraining neuroinflammation induced by diabetic metabolic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhiyou; Yan, Yong; Wang, Yonglong

    2013-01-01

    Background Compelling evidence has shown that diabetic metabolic disorder plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, including increased expression of β-amyloid protein (Aβ) and tau protein. Evidence has supported that minocycline, a tetracycline derivative, protects against neuroinflammation induced by neurodegenerative disorders or cerebral ischemia. This study has evaluated minocycline influence on expression of Aβ protein, tau phosphorylation, and inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α) in the brain of diabetic rats to clarify neuroprotection by minocycline under diabetic metabolic disorder. Method An animal model of diabetes was established by high fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin. In this study, we investigated the effect of minocycline on expression of Aβ protein, tau phosphorylation, and inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α) in the hippocampus of diabetic rats via immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results These results showed that minocycline decreased expression of Aβ protein and lowered the phosphorylation of tau protein, and retarded the proinflammatory cytokines, but not amyloid precursor protein. Conclusion On the basis of the finding that minocycline had no influence on amyloid precursor protein and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 which determines the speed of Aβ generation, the decreases in Aβ production and tau hyperphosphorylation by minocycline are through inhibiting neuroinflammation, which contributes to Aβ production and tau hyperphosphorylation. Minocycline may also lower the self-perpetuating cycle between neuroinflammation and the pathogenesis of tau and Aβ to act as a neuroprotector. Therefore, the ability of minocycline to modulate inflammatory reactions may be of great importance in the selection of neuroprotective agents, especially in chronic conditions

  13. Low levels of amyloid-beta and its transporters in neonatal rats with and without hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverberg Gerald D

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies in aging animals have shown that amyloid-beta protein (Aβ accumulates and its transporters, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE are impaired during hydrocephalus. Furthermore, correlations between astrocytes and Aβ have been found in human cases of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH and Alzheimer's disease (AD. Because hydrocephalus occurs frequently in children, we evaluated the expression of Aβ and its transporters and reactive astrocytosis in animals with neonatal hydrocephalus. Methods Hydrocephalus was induced in neonatal rats by intracisternal kaolin injections on post-natal day one, and severe ventriculomegaly developed over a three week period. MRI was performed on post-kaolin days 10 and 21 to document ventriculomegaly. Animals were sacrificed on post-kaolin day 21. For an age-related comparison, tissue was used from previous studies when hydrocephalus was induced in a group of adult animals at either 6 months or 12 months of age. Tissue was processed for immunohistochemistry to visualize LRP-1, RAGE, Aβ, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and with quantitative real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR to quantify expression of LRP-1, RAGE, and GFAP. Results When 21-day post-kaolin neonatal hydrocephalic animals were compared to adult (6–12 month old hydrocephalic animals, immunohistochemistry demonstrated levels of Aβ, RAGE, and LRP-1 that were substantially lower in the younger animals; in contrast, GFAP levels were elevated in both young and old hydrocephalic animals. When the neonatal hydrocephalic animals were compared to age-matched controls, qRT-PCR demonstrated no significant changes in Aβ, LRP-1 and RAGE. However, immunohistochemistry showed very small increases or decreases in individual proteins. Furthermore, qRT-PCR indicated statistically significant increases in GFAP

  14. Differential modulation of Alzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide accumulation by diverse classes of metal ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caragounis, Aphrodite; Du, Tai; Filiz, Gulay; Laughton, Katrina M; Volitakis, Irene; Sharples, Robyn A; Cherny, Robert A; Masters, Colin L; Drew, Simon C; Hill, Andrew F; Li, Qiao-Xin; Crouch, Peter J; Barnham, Kevin J; White, Anthony R

    2007-11-01

    Biometals have an important role in AD (Alzheimer's disease) and metal ligands have been investigated as potential therapeutic agents for treatment of AD. In recent studies the 8HQ (8-hydroxyquinoline) derivative CQ (clioquinol) has shown promising results in animal models and small clinical trials; however, the actual mode of action in vivo is still being investigated. We previously reported that CQ-metal complexes up-regulated MMP (matrix metalloprotease) activity in vitro by activating PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) and JNK (c-jun N-terminal kinase), and that the increased MMP activity resulted in enhanced degradation of secreted Abeta (amyloid beta) peptide. In the present study, we have further investigated the biochemical mechanisms by which metal ligands affect Abeta metabolism. To achieve this, we measured the effects of diverse metal ligands on cellular metal uptake and secreted Abeta levels in cell culture. We report that different classes of metal ligands including 8HQ and phenanthroline derivatives and the sulfur compound PDTC (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate) elevated cellular metal levels (copper and zinc), and resulted in substantial loss of secreted Abeta. Generally, the ability to inhibit Abeta levels correlated with a higher lipid solubility of the ligands and their capacity to increase metal uptake. However, we also identified several ligands that potently inhibited Abeta levels while only inducing minimal change to cellular metal levels. Metal ligands that inhibited Abeta levels [e.g. CQ, 8HQ, NC (neocuproine), 1,10-phenanthroline and PDTC] induced metal-dependent activation of PI3K and JNK, resulting in JNK-mediated up-regulation of metalloprotease activity and subsequent loss of secreted Abeta. The findings in the present study show that diverse metal ligands with high lipid solubility can elevate cellular metal levels resulting in metalloprotease-dependent inhibition of Abeta. Given that a structurally diverse array of ligands was assessed, the

  15. The conformations of the amyloid-beta (21-30) fragment can be described by three families in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2006-08-28

    Alzheimer's disease has been linked to the self-assembly of the amyloid-beta protein of 40 and 42 residues. Although monomers are in equilibrium with higher-order species ranging from dimers to heptamers, structural knowledge of the monomeric amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides is an important issue. Recent experimental data have shown that the fragment (21-30) is protease-resistant within full-length Abeta peptides and displays two structural families in solution. Because the details of the Abeta(21-30) structures found using distinct force fields and protocols differ at various degrees from those of the NMR structures, we revisit the conformational space of this peptide using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau) coupled with a coarse-grained force field (OPEP v.3.0). We find that although Abeta(21-30) does not have a secondary structure, it dominantly populates three structural families, with a loop spanning residues Val24-Lys28. The first two families, which differ in the nature of the electrostatic interactions, satisfy the five interproton rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) distances and superpose well onto the NMR structures. The third family, which cannot be seen by ROESY NMR experiments, displays a more open structure. This numeric study complements the experimental results by providing a much more detailed description of the dominant structures. Moreover, it provides further evidence of the capability of ART OPEP in providing a reliable conformational picture of peptides in solution.

  16. Atomistic MD simulations reveal the protective role of cholesterol in dimeric beta-amyloid induced disruptions in neuronal membrane mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Cheng, Sara; Chou, George; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, K.

    2011-10-01

    Interactions of oligomeric beta-amyloid peptides with neuronal membranes have been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The molecular details of the interactions of different lipid components, particularly cholesterol (CHOL), of the membranes with the peptides are not clear. Using an atomistic MD simulations approach, the water permeability barrier, structural geometry and order parameters of binary phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/CHOL lipid bilayers were examined from various 200 ns-simulation replicates. Our results suggest that the longer length dimer (2 x 42 residues) perturbs the membrane more than the shorter one (2 x 40 residues). In addition, we discovered a significant protective role of cholesterol in protein-induced disruptions of the membranes. The use of a new Monte-Carlo method in characterizing the structures of the conformal annular lipids in close proximity with the proteins will be introduced. We propose that the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid peptide may be associated with the nanodomain or raft-like structures of the neuronal membranes in-vivo in the development of AD.

  17. Dynamic changes of beta-amyloid protein deposition in hippocampus of female ovariectomized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqing Xie; Jianda Zhou; Shaodan Sun; Xuhong Li; Liming Deng; Fengmei Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate and summarize the effects of cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve on the treatment of SICAS. Recently, research on β-amyloid protein has focused on the regulatory effects of es-trogen or phytoestrogen on its deposition. However, there have been only a few reports on dynamic changes of β-amyloid protein deposition in hippocampus of ovariectomized rats.OBJECTIVE: To measureβ-amyloid protein deposition in the hippocampal formation of ovariectomized rats by using immunohistochemistry; to observe time-dependent dynamic changes. DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal study.SETTING: Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University.MATERIALS: The experiment was carried out in the Central Laboratory of the Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University from November 2005 to December 2006. Fifty healthy female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, weighing (293 ± 10) g, were provided by the Animal Laboratory of Xiangya Medical College, Central South University. All rats had neither a childbearing history nor hepatic or renal disease, or skeletal deformity. Β-amyloid protein immunohistochemical kit was provided by Wuhan Boster Company. The ex-periment was in accordance with animal ethics standards.METHODS: All rats were randomly divided into five groups, including normal control group (n = 10), sham operation group (n = 10), and ovariectomized group (n = 30). After anesthesia in the ovariectomized group, the bilateral ovaries were separated and resected. The same volume of fat was resected in the sham operation group. Rats from the normal control group, however, did not receive any surgical treatments. Rats in the normal control group and sham operation group were sacrificed by anesthesia 7 weeks after surgery. Every ten rats from the ovariectomized group was respectively sacrificed at 7, 15, and 30 weeks after surgery. Immunohistochemistry was used to detectβ-amyloid protein deposition in hippocampal sections. Cell counting and gray value

  18. Insulin Promotes Survival of Amyloid-Beta Oligomers Neuroblastoma Damaged Cells via Caspase 9 Inhibition and Hsp70 Upregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD and type 2 diabetes are connected in a way that is still not completely understood, but insulin resistance has been implicated as a risk factor for developing AD. Here we show an evidence that insulin is capable of reducing cytotoxicity induced by Amyloid-beta peptides (A-beta in its oligomeric form in a dose-dependent manner. By TUNEL and biochemical assays we demonstrate that the recovery of the cell viability is obtained by inhibition of intrinsic apoptotic program, triggered by A-beta and involving caspase 9 and 3 activation. A protective role of insulin on mitochondrial damage is also shown by using Mito-red vital dye. Furthermore, A-beta activates the stress inducible Hsp70 protein in LAN5 cells and an overexpression is detectable after the addition of insulin, suggesting that this major induction is the necessary condition to activate a cell survival program. Together, these results may provide opportunities for the design of preventive and therapeutic strategies against AD.

  19. Inhibition of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme and beta-amyloid precursor protein genes in SK-N-SH cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suqin Gao; Lin Sun; Enji Han; Hongshun Qi; Jinbo Feng; Shunliang Xu; Wen Xia

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Previous studies have demonstrated that Piper futokadsura stem selectively inhibits expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the mRNA level.In addition,the piperlonguminine (A) and dihydropiperlonguminine (B) components (1:0.8),which can be separated from Futokadsura stem,selectively inhibit expression of the APP at mRNA and protein levels.OBJECTIVE:Based on previous findings,the present study investigated the effects of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE1) and APP genes on the production of β-amyloid peptide 42 (Aβ42) in human neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH cells) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and A/B components separated from Futokadsura stem,respectively.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A gene interference-based randomized,controlled,in vitro experiment was performed at the Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research,Ministries of Education and Public Health,and Institute of Pharmacologic Research,School of Pharmaceutical Science & Department of Biochemistry,School of Medicine,Shandong University between July 2006 and December 2007.MATERIALS:SK-N-SH cells were provided by Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Shanghai,China;mouse anti-human BACE1 monoclonal antibody was purchased from R&D Systems,USA;mouse anti-human APP monoclonal antibody was purchased from Cell Signaling Technology,USA;and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG was provided by Sigma,USA.METHODS:The human BACE1 cDNA sequence was obtained from NCBI website (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez).Three pairs of siRNAs,specific to human BACE1 gene,were synthesized through the use of Silencer? pre-designed siRNA specification,and were transfected into SK-N-SH cells with siPORT NeoFX transfection agent to compare the effects of different concentrations of siRNAs (10-50 nmol/L) on SK-N-SH cells.Futokadsura stem was separated and purified with chemical methods,and the crystal was composed of

  20. Minocycline alleviates beta-amyloid protein and tau pathology via restraining neuroinflammation induced by diabetic metabolic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Z

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Zhiyou Cai,1 Yong Yan,2 Yonglong Wang2 1Department of Neurology, the Lu’an Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Lu’an People’s Hospital, Lu’an, Anhui Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurology, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Background: Compelling evidence has shown that diabetic metabolic disorder plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, including increased expression of β-amyloid protein (Aβ and tau protein. Evidence has supported that minocycline, a tetracycline derivative, protects against neuroinflammation induced by neurodegenerative disorders or cerebral ischemia. This study has evaluated minocycline influence on expression of Aβ protein, tau phosphorylation, and inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α in the brain of diabetic rats to clarify neuroprotection by minocycline under diabetic metabolic disorder. Method: An animal model of diabetes was established by high fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin. In this study, we investigated the effect of minocycline on expression of Aβ protein, tau phosphorylation, and inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus of diabetic rats via immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: These results showed that minocycline decreased expression of Aβ protein and lowered the phosphorylation of tau protein, and retarded the proinflammatory cytokines, but not amyloid precursor protein. Conclusion: On the basis of the finding that minocycline had no influence on amyloid precursor protein and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 which determines the speed of Aβ generation, the decreases in Aβ production and tau hyperphosphorylation by minocycline are through inhibiting

  1. Aging and amyloid beta-induced oxidative DNA damage and mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease: implications for early intervention and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Peizhong; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2011-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting thousands of people in the world and effective treatment is still not available. Over two decades of intense research using AD postmortem brains, transgenic mouse and cell models of amyloid precursor protein and tau revealed that amyloid beta (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau are synergistically involved in triggering disease progression. Accumulating evidence also revealed that aging and amyloid beta-induced oxidative DNA damage and mitochondrial dysfunction initiate and contributes to the development and progression of the disease. The purpose of this article is to summarize the latest progress in aging and AD, with a special emphasis on the mitochondria, oxidative DNA damage including methods of its measurement. It also discusses the therapeutic approaches against oxidative DNA damage and treatment strategies in AD.

  2. Direct interaction of beta-amyloid with Na,K-ATPase as a putative regulator of the enzyme function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu.; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Anashkina, Anastasia A.; Adzhubei, Alexei A.; Burnysheva, Ksenia M.; Lakunina, Valentina A.; Kamanina, Yulia V.; Dergousova, Elena A.; Lopina, Olga D.; Ogunshola, Omolara O.; Bogdanova, Anna Yu.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    By maintaining the Na+ and K+ transmembrane gradient mammalian Na,K-ATPase acts as a key regulator of neuronal electrotonic properties. Na,K-ATPase has an important role in synaptic transmission and memory formation. Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) at the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease is accompanied by reduction of Na,K-ATPase functional activity. The molecular mechanism behind this phenomenon is not known. Here we show that the monomeric Aβ(1-42) forms a tight (Kd of 3 μM), enthalpy-driven equimolar complex with α1β1 Na,K-ATPase. The complex formation results in dose-dependent inhibition of the enzyme hydrolytic activity. The binding site of Aβ(1-42) is localized in the “gap” between the alpha- and beta-subunits of Na,K-ATPase, disrupting the enzyme functionality by preventing the subunits from shifting towards each other. Interaction of Na,K-ATPase with exogenous Aβ(1-42) leads to a pronounced decrease of the enzyme transport and hydrolytic activity and Src-kinase activation in neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y. This interaction allows regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity by short-term increase of the Aβ(1-42) level. However prolonged increase of Aβ(1-42) level under pathological conditions could lead to chronical inhibition of Na,K-ATPase and disruption of neuronal function. Taken together, our data suggest the role of beta-amyloid as a novel physiological regulator of Na,K-ATPase. PMID:27296892

  3. Screening for a human single chain Fv antibody against epitope on amyloid-beta 1-40 from a human phage display library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhen-fu; GAO Guo-quan; LIU Shu; ZOU Jun-tao; XIE Yao; YUAN Qun-fang; WANG Hua-qiao; YAO Zhi-bin

    2007-01-01

    @@ Amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ) are believed to be responsible for the mental decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In 1999, Schenk et al1 reported that immunization with Aβ attenuated AD-like pathology in the PDAPP mouse, and developed a new vaccination approach to AD.

  4. Effect of 1 night of total sleep deprivation on cerebrospinal fluid beta-amyloid 42 in healthy middle-aged men: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, S.; Overeem, S.; Besse, K.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Verbeek, M.M.; Claassen, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Increasing evidence suggests a relationship between poor sleep and the risk of developing Alzheimer disease. A previous study found an effect of sleep on beta-amyloid (Abeta), which is a key protein in Alzheimer disease pathology. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of 1 night of total sl

  5. The soluble transcobalamin receptor (sCD320) is present in cerebrospinal fluid and correlates to dementia-related biomarkers tau proteins and amyloid-beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuyaman, Omar; Nexo, Ebba

    2015-01-01

    in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and show its correlations to dementia-related biomarkers tau proteins and amyloid-beta. METHODS: We collected 223 cerebrospinal fluid samples and corresponding plasma samples (n = 46). We measured CSF and plasma sCD320, holoTC and total TC employing in-house ELISA methods and CSF...

  6. Regional Hippocampal Atrophy and Higher Levels of Plasma Amyloid-Beta Are Associated With Subjective Memory Complaints in Nondemented Elderly Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantero, Jose L; Iglesias, Juan E.; Van Leemput, Koen;

    2016-01-01

    is regionally specific and whether SMC are also paralleled by changes in peripheral levels of amyloid-beta (Aβ). Methods: The volume of hippocampal subregions and plasma Aβ levels were cross-sectionally compared between elderly individuals with (SMC(+); N = 47) and without SMC (SMC(-); N = 48). Significant...

  7. The nicotinic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor agonist ssr180711 is unable to activate limbic neurons in mice overexpressing human amyloid-beta1-42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soderman, A.; Spang-Thomsen, Mogens; Hansen, H.;

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that amyloid-beta1-42 (Abeta1-42) binds to the nicotinergic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor (alpha7 nAChR) and that the application of Abeta1-42 to cells inhibits the function of the alpha7 nAChR. The in vivo consequences of the pharmacological activation of the alpha...

  8. Correlations between serum levels of beta amyloid, cerebrospinal levels of tau and phospho tau, and delayed response tasks in young and aged cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, Huda Shalahudin; Sajuthi, D; Kalliokoski, O;

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to explore cynomolgus monkeys as an animal model for Alzheimer's disease, the present study focused on the Alzheimer's biomarkers beta amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42 ) in serum, and total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels in cerebrospinal fluid....

  9. Radioiodinated benzimidazole derivatives as single photon emission computed tomography probes for imaging of {beta}-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Mengchao [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Ono, Masahiro, E-mail: ono@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Hidekazu [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Liu Boli [Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Saji, Hideo, E-mail: hsaji@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Five iodinated 2-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as potential probes for {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques. One of the compounds, 4-(6-iodo-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylaniline (12), showed excellent affinity for A{beta}{sub 1-42} aggregates (K{sub i}=9.8 nM). Autoradiography with sections of postmortem Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain revealed that a radioiodinated probe [{sup 125}I]12, labeled A{beta} plaques selectively with low nonspecific binding. Biodistribution experiments with normal mice injected intravenously with [{sup 125}I]12 showed high uptake [4.14 percent injected dose per gram (% ID/g) at 2 min] into and rapid clearance (0.15% ID/g at 60 min) from the brain, which may bring about a good signal-to-noise ratio and therefore achieve highly sensitive detection of A{beta} plaques. In addition, [{sup 125}I]12 labeled amyloid plaques in vivo in an AD transgenic model. The preliminary results strongly suggest that [{sup 125}I]12 bears characteristics suitable for detecting amyloid plaques in vivo. When labeled with {sup 123}I, it may be a useful SPECT imaging agent for A{beta} plaques in the brain of living AD patients.

  10. Amyloid Beta Aggregation in the Presence of Temperature-Sensitive Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Funtan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of amyloid fibrils is considered to be one of the main causes for many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s or Huntington’s disease. Current knowledge suggests that amyloid-aggregation represents a nucleation-dependent aggregation process in vitro, where a sigmoidal growth phase follows an induction period. Here, we studied the fibrillation of amyloid β 1-40 (Aβ40 in the presence of thermoresponsive polymers, expected to alter the Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics due to their lower critical solution behavior. To probe the influence of molecular weight and the end groups of the polymer on its lower critical solution temperature (LCST, also considering its concentration dependence in the presence of buffer-salts needed for the aggregation studies of the amyloids, poly(oxazolines (POx with LCSTs ranging from 14.2–49.8 °C and poly(methoxy di(ethylene glycolacrylates with LCSTs ranging from 34.4–52.7 °C were synthesized. The two different polymers allowed the comparison of the influence of different molecular structures onto the fibrillation process. Mixtures of Aβ40 with these polymers in varying concentrations were studied via time-dependent measurements of the thioflavin T (ThT fluorescence. The studies revealed that amyloid fibrillation was accelerated in, accompanied by an extension of the lag phase of Aβ40 fibrillation from 18.3 h in the absence to 19.3 h in the presence of the poly(methoxy di(ethylene glycolacrylate (3600 g/mol.

  11. Chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha}, suppress amyloid {beta}-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Milatovic, Snjezana-Zaja [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Milatovic, Dejan [Department of Pediatrics/Pediatric Toxicology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Splittgerber, Ryan [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Fan, Guo-Huang [Department of Neurobiology and Neurotoxicology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN 37221 (United States); Richmond, Ann, E-mail: ann.richmond@vanderbilt.edu [VA Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and accumulation of neurotoxic oligomeric peptides amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}). Although the molecular events are not entirely known, it has become evident that inflammation, environmental and other risk factors may play a causal, disruptive and/or protective role in the development of AD. The present study investigated the ability of the chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}), the respective ligands for chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, to suppress A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} significantly protected neurons from A{beta}-induced dendritic regression and apoptosis in vitro through activation of Akt, ERK1/2 and maintenance of metalloproteinase ADAM17 especially with SDF-1{alpha}. Intra-cerebroventricular (ICV) injection of A{beta} led to reduction in dendritic length and spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and increased oxidative damage 24 h following the exposure. The A{beta}-induced morphometric changes of neurons and increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with the chemokines MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha}. Additionally, MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} was able to suppress the aberrant mislocalization of p21-activated kinase (PAK), one of the proteins involved in the maintenance of dendritic spines. Furthermore, MIP-2 also protected neurons against A{beta} neurotoxicity in CXCR2-/- mice, potentially through observed up regulation of CXCR1 mRNA. Understanding the neuroprotective potential of chemokines is crucial in defining the role for their employment during the early stages of neurodegeneration. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuroprotective ability of the chemokines MIP2 and CXCL12 against A{beta} toxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MIP

  12. Osthole decreases beta amyloid levels through up-regulation of miR-107 in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yanan; Kong, Liang; Yao, Yingjia; Li, Shaoheng; Tao, Zhenyu; Yan, Yuhui; Yang, Jingxian

    2016-09-01

    Accumulation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in the brain plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although osthole has been shown to neuroprotective activity in AD, the exact molecular mechanism of its neuroprotective effects has not yet been fully elucidated. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to regulate multiple aspects of AD development and progression, indicating that targeting miRNAs could be a novel strategy to treat AD. In the current study, we investigated whether a natural coumarin derivative osthole could up-regulate miR-107, resulting in facilitating the cells survival, reducing LDH leakage, inhibiting apoptosis and reducing beta amyloid (Aβ) production in AD. We found that osthole treatment significantly up-regulate miR-107 expression and inhibited BACE1, one of the targets of miR-107. Administration of osthole to APP/PS1 transgenic mice resulted in a significant improvement in learning and memory function, which was associated with a significant a decrease in Aβ in the hippocampal and cortex region of the brain. Our findings demonstrated that osthole plays a neuroprotective activity role in part through up-regulate miR-107 in AD. PMID:27143098

  13. Amyloid beta oligomers induce neuronal elasticity changes in age-dependent manner: a force spectroscopy study on living hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungureanu, Andreea-Alexandra; Benilova, Iryna; Krylychkina, Olga; Braeken, Dries; De Strooper, Bart; Van Haesendonck, Chris; Dotti, Carlos G; Bartic, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Small soluble species of amyloid-beta (Aβ) formed during early peptide aggregation stages are responsible for several neurotoxic mechanisms relevant to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), although their interaction with the neuronal membrane is not completely understood. This study quantifies the changes in the neuronal membrane elasticity induced by treatment with the two most common Aβ isoforms found in AD brains: Aβ40 and Aβ42. Using quantitative atomic force microscopy (AFM), we measured for the first time the static elastic modulus of living primary hippocampal neurons treated with pre-aggregated Aβ40 and Aβ42 soluble species. Our AFM results demonstrate changes in the elasticity of young, mature and aged neurons treated for a short time with the two Aβ species pre-aggregated for 2 hours. Neurons aging under stress conditions, showing aging hallmarks, are the most susceptible to amyloid binding and show the largest decrease in membrane stiffness upon Aβ treatment. Membrane stiffness defines the way in which cells respond to mechanical forces in their environment and has been shown to be important for processes such as gene expression, ion-channel gating and neurotransmitter vesicle transport. Thus, one can expect that changes in neuronal membrane elasticity might directly induce functional changes related to neurodegeneration.

  14. Rimmed vacuoles with beta-amyloid and ubiquitinated filamentous deposits in the muscles of patients with long-standing denervation (postpoliomyelitis muscular atrophy): similarities with inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semino-Mora, C; Dalakas, M C

    1998-10-01

    In the chronically denervated muscles of patients with prior paralytic poliomyelitis, there are secondary myopathic features, including endomysial inflammation and rare vacuolated fibers. To assess the frequency and characteristics of the vacuoles and their similarities with those seen in inclusion body myositis (IBM), we examined 58 muscle biopsy specimens from patients with prior paralytic poliomyelitis for (1) the presence of rimmed vacuoles; (2) acid-phosphatase reactivity; (3) Congo-red-positive amyloid deposits; (4) electron microscopy, searching for tubulofilaments; and (5) immunoelectron microscopy, using antibodies against beta-amyloid and ubiquitin. We found vacuolated muscle fibers in 18 of 58 (31%) biopsies, with a mean frequency of 2.06 +/- 0.42 fibers per specimen. The vacuoles contained acid phosphatase-positive material in 6 of the 18 (33.30%) specimens and stained positive for Congo red in five (27.80%). By immunoelectron microscopy, the vacuoles contained 5.17 +/- 0.13 nm fibrils and 14.9 +/- 0.31 nm filaments that immunoreacted with antibodies to beta-amyloid and ubiquitin in a pattern identical to the one seen in IBM. We conclude that vacuolated muscle fibers containing filamentous inclusions positive for amyloid and ubiquitin are not unique to IBM and the other vacuolar myopathies but can also occur in a chronic neurogenic condition, such as postpoliomyelitis. The chronicity of the underlying disease, rather than the cause, may lead to vacuolar formation, amyloid deposition, and accumulation of ubiquitinated filaments.

  15. ETAS, an enzyme-treated asparagus extract, attenuates amyloid beta-induced cellular disorder in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Junetsu; Ito, Tomohiro; Wakame, Koji; Kitadate, Kentaro; Sakurai, Takuya; Sato, Shogo; Ishibashi, Yoshinaga; Izawa, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Kazuto; Ishida, Hitoshi; Takabatake, Ichiro; Kizaki, Takako; Ohno, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    One of the pathological characterizations of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) in cerebral cortical cells. The deposition of Abeta in neuronal cells leads to an increase in the production of free radicals that are typified by reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby inducing cell death. A growing body of evidence now suggests that several plant-derived food ingredients are capable of scavenging ROS in mammalian cells. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS), which is rich in antioxidants, is one of these ingredients. The pre-incubation of differentiated PC 12 cells with ETAS significantly recovered Abeta-induced reduction of cell viability, which was accompanied by reduced levels of ROS. These results suggest that ETAS may be one of the functional food ingredients with anti-oxidative capacity to help prevent AD.

  16. MMPBSA decomposition of the binding energy throughout a molecular dynamics simulation of amyloid-beta (Abeta(10-35)) aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanera, Josep M; Pouplana, Ramon

    2010-04-15

    Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides indicate that the formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The toxicity of Abeta oligomers depend on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. However, a detailed knowledge of the structure of at the atomic level has not been achieved yet due to limitations of current experimental techniques. In this study, replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify the expected diversity of dimer conformations of Abeta(10-35) monomers. The most representative dimer conformation has been used to track the dimer formation process between both monomers. The process has been characterized by means of the evolution of the decomposition of the binding free energy, which provides an energetic profile of the interaction. Dimers undergo a process of reorganization driven basically by inter-chain hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions and also solvation/desolvation processes.

  17. MMPBSA Decomposition of the Binding Energy throughout a Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Amyloid-Beta (Aß10−35 Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Campanera

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Aβ peptides indicate that the formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. The toxicity of Aβ oligomers depend on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. However, a detailed knowledge of the structure of at the atomic level has not been achieved yet due to limitations of current experimental techniques. In this study, replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify the expected diversity of dimer conformations of Aβ10−35 monomers. The most representative dimer conformation has been used to track the dimer formation process between both monomers. The process has been characterized by means of the evolution of the decomposition of the binding free energy, which provides an energetic profile of the interaction. Dimers undergo a process of reorganization driven basically by inter-chain hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions and also solvation/desolvation processes.

  18. Amyloid Beta and Tau Proteins as Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment: Rethinking the Current Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Mondragón-Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is defined by the concurrence of accumulation of abnormal aggregates composed of two proteins: Amyloid beta (Aβ and tau, and of cellular changes including neurite degeneration and loss of neurons and cognitive functions. Based on their strong association with disease, genetically and pathologically, it is not surprising that there has been a focus towards developing therapies against the aggregated structures. Unfortunately, current therapies have but mild benefit. With this in mind we will focus on the relationship of synaptic plasticity with Aβ and tau protein and their role as potential targets for the development of therapeutic drugs. Finally, we will provide perspectives in developing a multifactorial strategy for AD treatment.

  19. NMDA-receptor activation but not ion flux is required for amyloid-beta induced synaptic depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tamburri

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease is characterized by a gradual decrease of synaptic function and, ultimately, by neuronal loss. There is considerable evidence supporting the involvement of oligomeric amyloid-beta (Aβ in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. Historically, AD research has mainly focused on the long-term changes caused by Aβ rather than analyzing its immediate effects. Here we show that acute perfusion of hippocampal slice cultures with oligomeric Aβ depresses synaptic transmission within 20 minutes. This depression is dependent on synaptic stimulation and the activation of NMDA-receptors, but not on NMDA-receptor mediated ion flux. It, therefore, appears that Aβ dependent synaptic depression is mediated through a use-dependent metabotropic-like mechanism of the NMDA-receptor, but does not involve NMDA-receptor mediated synaptic transmission, i.e. it is independent of calcium flux through the NMDA-receptor.

  20. The tissue plasminogen activator-plasminogen proteolytic cascade accelerates amyloid-beta (Abeta) degradation and inhibits Abeta-induced neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchor, Jerry P; Pawlak, Robert; Strickland, Sidney

    2003-10-01

    Accumulation of the amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide depends on both its generation and clearance. To better define clearance pathways, we have evaluated the role of the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-plasmin system in Abeta degradation in vivo. In two different mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, chronically elevated Abeta peptide in the brain correlates with the upregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and inhibition of the tPA-plasmin system. In addition, Abeta injected into the hippocampus of mice lacking either tPA or plasminogen persists, inducing PAI-1 expression and causing activation of microglial cells and neuronal damage. Conversely, Abeta injected into wild-type mice is rapidly cleared and does not cause neuronal degeneration. Thus, the tPA-plasmin proteolytic cascade aids in the clearance of Abeta, and reduced activity of this system may contribute to the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Intracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta - a predictor for synaptic dysfunction and neuron loss in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Bayer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite of long-standing evidence that beta-amyloid (Aβ peptides have detrimental effects on synaptic function, the relationship between Aβ, synaptic and neuron loss is largely unclear. During the last years there is growing evidence that early intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ peptides is one of the key events leading to synaptic and neuronal dysfunction. Many studies have been carried out using transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD which have been proven to be valuable model system in modern AD research. The present review discusses the impact of intraneuronal Aβ accumulation on synaptic impairment and neuron loss and provides an overview of currently available AD mouse models showing these pathological alterations.

  2. Amyloid beta-protein and lipid rafts: focused on biogenesis and catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Wataru; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is thought to play a key role in the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three secretases (β-, γ-, and α-secretase) are proteases that control the production of Aβ from amyloid precursor protein. Increasing evidence suggests that cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains termed 'lipid rafts' are involved in the biogenesis and accumulation of Aβ as well as Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity. γ-Secretase is enriched in lipid rafts, which are considered an important site for Aβ generation. Additionally, Aβ-degrading peptidases located in lipid rafts, such as neprilysin, appear to play a role in Aβ catabolism. This mini-review focuses on the roles of lipid rafts in the biogenesis and catabolism of Aβ, covering recent research on the relationship between lipid rafts and the three secretases or Aβ-degrading peptidases. Furthermore, the significance of lipid rafts in Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity is briefly summarized.

  3. Insight into the stability of cross-beta amyloid fibril from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; He, Yong-Jie; Wu, Maoying; Yan, Guanwen; Li, Yixue; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2010-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are considered to play causal roles in the pathogenesis of amyloid-related degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes mellitus, the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and prion disease. The mechanism of fibril formation is still hotly debated and remains an important open question. In this study, we utilized molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to analyze the stability of hexamer for eight class peptides. The MD results suggest that VEALYL and MVGGVV-1 are the most stable ones, then SNQNNY, followed by LYQLEN, MVGGVV-2, VQIVYK, SSTSAA, and GGVVIA. The statistics result indicates that hydrophobic residues play a key role in stabilizing the zipper interface. Single point and two linkage mutants of MVGGVV-1 confirmed that both Met1 and Val2 are key hydrophobic residues. This is consistent with the statistics analysis. The stability results of oligomer for MVGGVV-1 suggest that the intermediate state should be trimer (3-0) and tetramer (2-2). These methods can be used in stabilization study of other amyloid fibril.

  4. Alterations in amyloid beta-protein and apolipoprotein E in cerebrospinal fluid after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinzhong Wen; Yonghong Zhang; Leiming Huo

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The findings about the alterations in cerebrospinal fluid beta-amyloid protein (Aβ) and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) after subarachnoid hemorrhage indicate that they have significant correlation with prognosis of patients.OBJECTIVE: To observe the alterations in cerebrospinal fluid Aβ and ApoE after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).DESIGN: Contrast observation.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, the First Hospital of Lanzhou University.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 25 SAH patients including 16 males and 9 females aged from 13 to 72 years were selected form Department of Neurosurgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Lanzhou University from October 2003 to February 2004. The Hunt-Hess grade ranged from Ⅰ to Ⅳ, and patients admitted hospital in 24 hours after invasion, affirmed by the brain CT scan and lumbar vertebra puncture, no other severe complications and important organs' functional defect and severe infection, no hematological system disease.METHODS: All admitted patients were collected CSF by lumbar vertebra puncture in 24 hours. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of control group came from the admitted 15 patients of our hospital that have no nervous system disease. Aβ content was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the kit was provided by the Central Laboratory of the First Hospital of Lanzhou University; ApoE concentration was detected by monoclone enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the kit was provided by the Immunotechnique Research Institute of the Fourth Military Medical University. S100B concentration was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay double antibody sandwich method, the kit was provided by the Physiological Research Room of the Fourth Military Medical University. The data were indicated on Mean±SD and were analyzed by SPSS 10.0 statistical package. All data were handled through test of significance variance analysis, and groups were compared through independent sampler t test. The concentration was

  5. Effects of age and beta-amyloid on cognitive changes in normal elderly people

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Hwamee; Madison, Cindee,; Haight, Thaddeus J.; Markley, Candace; Jagust, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related decline is common in multiple cognitive domains. β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, is also associated with cognitive changes in many older people. In this study, we examined a wide range of cognitive function in order to differentiate the effect of age and Aβ on cognition during aging. Using PET imaging with the radiotracer Pittsburgh compound B (PIB), we classified normal older subjects as High PIB-Old and Low PIB-Old and applied sequentia...

  6. Ab initio molecular simulations on specific interactions between amyloid beta and monosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuya; Okamoto, Akisumi; Yano, Atsushi; Higai, Shin'ichi; Kondo, Takashi; Kamba, Seiji; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2012-09-01

    Aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which is a key pathogenetic event in Alzheimer's disease, can be caused by cell-surface saccharides. We here investigated stable structures of the solvated complexes of Aβ with some types of monosaccharides using molecular simulations based on protein-ligand docking and classical molecular mechanics methods. Moreover, the specific interactions between Aβ and the monosaccharides were elucidated at an electronic level by ab initio fragment molecular orbital calculations. Based on the results, we proposed which type of monosaccharide prefers to have large binding affinity to Aβ and inhibit the Aβ aggregation.

  7. Protective spin-labeled fluorenes maintain amyloid beta peptide in small oligomers and limit transitions in secondary structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Robin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Ly, Sonny [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Physical and Life Science Directorate; Hilt, Silvia [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Petrlova, Jitka [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Maezawa, Izumi [Univ. of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States). MIND Inst. and Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Kálai, Tamás [Univ. of Pecs (Hungary). Inst. of Organic and Medicinal Chemistry; Hideg, Kálmán [Univ. of Pecs (Hungary). Inst. of Organic and Medicinal Chemistry; Jin, Lee-Way [Univ. of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States). MIND Inst. and Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Laurence, Ted A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Voss, John C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques comprised of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides. Soluble oligomers of the Aβ peptide underlie a cascade of neuronal loss and dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease. Single particle analyses of Aβ oligomers in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) were used to provide real-time descriptions of how spin-labeled fluorenes (SLFs; bi-functional small molecules that block the toxicity of Aβ) prevent and disrupt oligomeric assemblies of Aβ in solution. The FCS results, combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy, demonstrate SLFs can inhibit the growth of Aβ oligomers and disrupt existing oligomers while retaining Aβ in a largely disordered state. Furthermore, while the ability of SLF to block Aβ toxicity correlates with a reduction in oligomer size, our results suggest the conformation of Aβ within the oligomer determines the toxicity of the species. Attenuation of Aβ toxicity, which has been associated primarily with the soluble oligomeric form, can be achieved through redistribution of the peptides into smaller oligomers and arrest of the fractional increase in beta secondary structure.

  8. Protective Effects of Some Medicinal Plants from Lamiaceae Family Against Beta-Amyloid Induced Toxicity in PC12 Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Saeidnia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive accumulation of beta-amyliod peptide (Aβ, the major component of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD, causes neuronal cell death through induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, antioxidants may be of use in the treatment of AD. The medicinal plants from the Lamiaceae family have been widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. These plants contain compounds with antioxidant activity and some species in this family have been reported to have neuroprotective properties. In the present study, methanolic extract of seven plants from salvia and satureja species were evaluated for their protective effects against beta-amyloid induced neurotoxicity.Methods: Aerial parts of the plants were extracted with ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively, by percolation at room temperature and subsequently, methanolic extracts of the plants were prepared. PC12 cells were incubated with different concentrations of the extracts in culture medium 1h prior to incubation with Aβ. Cell toxicity was assessed 24h after addition of Aβ by MTT assay.Results: Satureja bachtiarica, Salvia officinalis and Salvia macrosiphon methanolic extracts exhibited high protective effects against Aβ induced toxicity (P<0.001. Protective effects of Satureja bachtiarica and Salvia officinalis were dose-dependent.Conclusion: The main constituents of these extracts are polyphenolic and flavonoid compounds such as rosmarinic acid, naringenin, apigenin and luteolin which have antioxidant properties and may have a role in neuroprotection. Based on neuroprotective effect of these plants against Aβ induced toxicity, we recommend greater attention to their use in the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  9. Amyloid-beta peptide degradation in cell cultures by mycoplasma contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Peter

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell cultures have become an indispensable tool in Alzheimer's disease research for studying amyloid-β (Aβ metabolism. It is estimated that up to 35% of cell cultures in current use are infected with various mycoplasma species. In contrast with common bacterial and fungal infections, contaminations of cell cultures with mycoplasmas represent a challenging issue in terms of detectability and prevention. Mycoplasmas are the smallest and simplest self-replicating bacteria and the consequences of an infection for the host cells are variable, ranging from no apparent effect to induction of apoptosis. Findings Here we present evidence that mycoplasmas from a cell culture contamination are able to efficiently and rapidly degrade extracellular Aβ. As a result, we observed no accumulation of Aβ in the conditioned medium of mycoplasma-positive cells stably transfected with the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP. Importantly, eradication of the mycoplasma contaminant – identified as M. hyorhinis – by treatments with a quinolone-based antibiotic, restored extracellular Aβ accumulation in the APP-transfected cells. Conclusion These data show that mycoplasmas degrade Aβ and thus may represent a significant source of variability when comparing extracellular Aβ levels in different cell lines. On the basis of these results, we recommend assessment of mycoplasma contaminations prior to extracellular Aβ level measurements in cultured cells.

  10. Amyloid beta-peptide(25-35) changes [Ca2+] in hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Beatty, D M; Morris, S J;

    1998-01-01

    of A beta(25-35) on [Ca2+]i and intracellular H+ concentration ([H+]i) in single hippocampal neurons by real time fluorescence imaging using the Ca(2+)- and H(+)-specific ratio dyes, indo-1 and SNARF-1. Incubation of these cultures with A beta(25-35) for 3-12 days in vitro increased [Ca2+]i and [H......+]i in large, NMDA-responsive neurons....

  11. Familial Danish dementia: a novel form of cerebral amyloidosis associated with deposition of both amyloid-Dan and amyloid-beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holton, J.L; Lashley, T.; Ghiso, J.;

    2002-01-01

    response using conventional techniques, immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy. We showed that ADan is widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS) in the leptomeninges, blood vessels, and parenchyma. A predominance of parenchymal pre-amyloid (non...

  12. Choroid plexus dysfunction impairs beta-amyloid clearance in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim eGonzález Marrero

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Compromised secretory function of choroid plexus (CP and defective cerebrospinal fluid (CSF production, along with accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ peptides at the blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB, likely contribute to complications of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The AD triple transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD at 16 month-old mimics several critical hallmarks of the human disease. In brain, the 3xTg-AD progressively develops β-amyloid (Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles with a temporal- and regional- specific profile resembling their development in human AD. Currently, little is known about transport and metabolic responses by CP to the disrupted homeostasis of CNS Aβ in AD. This study analyzed the effects of highly-expressed AD-linked human transgenes (APP, PS1 and tau on lateral ventricle CP function. Confocal imaging and immunohistochemistry revealed an increase in Aβ42 (but not Aβ40 in epithelial cytosol and in stroma surrounding choroidal capillaries; the buildup in insoluble Aβ42 may reflect insufficient clearance transport from CSF to blood. Still, there was increased expression, presumably compensatory, of the choroidal Aβ transporters: the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE. A thickening of the epithelial basal membrane and greater collagen IV deposition occurred around capillaries in CP of 3xTg-AD mice, probably curtailing solute exchanges. Moreover, there was attenuated expression of epithelial aquaporin-1 and transthyretin protein compared to non-Tg controls. Collectively these findings indicate CP dysfunction (hypothetically linked to increasing Aβ burden resulting in less efficient ion transport, concurrently with reduced production of cerebrospinal fluid (less sink action on brain Aβ and diminished secretion of transthyretin (less neuroprotection against cortical Aβ toxicity. The putative effects of a disabled CP-CSF system on CNS f

  13. Initial stages of beta-amyloid Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 oligomerization observed using fluorescence decay and molecular dynamics analyses of tyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Mariana; Kubiak-Ossowska, Karina; Birch, David J. S.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2013-03-01

    The development of Alzheimer’s disease is associated with the aggregation of the beta-amyloid peptides Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42. It is believed that the small oligomers formed during the early stages of the aggregation are neurotoxic and involved in the process of neurodegeneration. In this paper we use fluorescence decay measurements of beta-amyloid intrinsic fluorophore tyrosine (Tyr) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the early stages of oligomer formation for the Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 peptides in vitro. We demonstrate that the lifetime distributions of the amyloid fluorescence decay efficiently describe changes in the complex Tyr photophysics during the peptide aggregation and highlight the differences in aggregation performance of the two amyloids. Tyr fluorescence decay is found to be a more sensitive sensor of Aβ1-40 aggregation than Aβ1-42 aggregation. The MD simulation of the peptide aggregation is compared with the experimental data and supports a four-rotamer model of Tyr.

  14. Presence of non-fibrillar amyloid beta protein in skin biopsies of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Down's syndrome and non-AD normal persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, G Y; Wisniewski, H M; Blondal, H;

    1994-01-01

    -24 of synthetic amyloid beta protein (A beta), and 4G8-Fab (the antigen-binding fragment of 4G8 IgG, reactive only to amyloid plaque) was observed in the epidermis-dermis junction or the basement membrane of the epidermis and in some blood vessels of the biopsy skins of 13/18 (72%) AD, 9/10 (90%) DS, and 14....../38 (37%) non-AD control cases. The Fisher exact probability test revealed a significant difference (P = 0.0415 one-tailed) in immunoreactivity between AD and age-matched controls. There was also a significant difference (P = 0.0152 one-tailed; P = 0.0200 two-tailed) between DS and age-matched control...

  15. CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the gamma-secretase complex inAlzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2005-04-06

    {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex that cleaves the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) within the transmembrane region, following prior processing by {beta}-secretase, producing amyloid {beta}-peptides (A{beta}{sub 40} and A{beta}{sub 42}). Errant production of A{beta}-peptides that substantially increases A{beta}{sub 42} production has been associated with the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Biophysical and genetic studies indicate that presenilin-1 (Psn-1), which contains the proteolytic active site, and three other membrane proteins, nicastrin (Nct), APH-1, and PEN-2 are required to form the core of the active {gamma}-secretase complex. Here, we report the purification of the native {gamma}-secretase complexes from HeLa cell membranes and the identification of an additional {gamma}-secretase complex subunit, CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein with two immunoglobulin-like domains. The presence of this subunit as an integral part of the complex itself was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation studies of the purified protein from HeLa cells and solubilized complexes from other cell lines such as neural cell HCN-1A and HEK293. Depletion of CD147 by RNA interference was found to increase the production of A{beta} peptides without changing the expression level of the other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates while CD147 overexpression had no statistically significant effect on amyloid {beta}-peptide production, other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates, indicating that the presence of the CD147 subunit within the {gamma}-secretase complex directly down-modulates the production of A{beta}-peptides. {gamma}-secretase was first recognized through its role in the production of the A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (1). {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex with unusual aspartyl protease activity that cleaves a variety of type I membrane proteins

  16. Cholinergic Neurons - Keeping Check on Amyloid beta in the Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saak V. Ovsepian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiological relevance of the uptake of ligands with no apparent trophic functions via the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR remains unclear. Herein, we propose a homeostatic role for this in clearance of amyloid β (Aβ in the brain. We hypothesize that uptake of Aβ in conjunction with p75NTR followed by its degradation in lysosomes endows cholinergic basalo-cortical projections enriched in this receptor a facility for maintaining physiological levels of Aβ in target areas. Thus, in addition to the diffuse modulator influence and channeling of extra-thalamic signals, cholinergic innervations could supply the cerebral cortex with an elaborate system for Aβ drainage. Interpreting the emerging relationship of new molecular data with established role of cholinergic modulator system in regulating cortical network dynamics should provide new insights into the brain physiology and mechanisms of neuro-degenerative diseases.

  17. Protective effect of Wnt-5a against amyloid beta-induced memory impairment in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guili Zhang; Lu Lu; Yaping Ge; Fang Deng; Ying Zhang; Jiachun Feng

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway improves memory function in rats. This study investigated the effects of Wnt-5a on amyloid β (Aβ)-induced cognitive impairment. Aβ25-35 was injected into the rat right lateral ventricle to induce Alzheimer's disease-associated pathology, and Wnt-5a was injected as a potential therapeutic treatment. Immunofluorescence staining showed that compared with normal rats, Aβ25-35 significantly decreased postsynaptic density-95 protein expression in the rat hippocampal CA1 region, but Wnt-5a pretreatment blocked this decrease. This study shows that Wnt-5a can reduce Aβ-induced cognitive impairment, and that it has the potential to be a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Synergistic effects of high fat feeding and apolipoprotein E deletion on enterocytic amyloid-beta abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaliwal Satvinder S

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid-β (Aβ, a key protein found in amyloid plaques of subjects with Alzheimer's disease is expressed in the absorptive epithelial cells of the small intestine. Ingestion of saturated fat significantly enhances enterocytic Aβ abundance whereas fasting abolishes expression. Apolipoprotein (apo E has been shown to directly modulate Aβ biogenesis in liver and neuronal cells but it's effect in enterocytes is not known. In addition, apo E modulates villi length, which may indirectly modulate Aβ as a consequence of differences in lipid absorption. This study compared Aβ abundance and villi length in wild-type (WT and apo E knockout (KO mice maintained on either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Wild-type C57BL/6J and apo E KO mice were randomised for six-months to a diet containing either 4% (w/w unsaturated fats, or chow comprising 16% saturated fats and 1% cholesterol. Quantitative immunohistochemistry was used to assess Aβ abundance in small intestinal enterocytes. Apo E KO mice given the low-fat diet had similar enterocytic Aβ abundance compared to WT controls. Results The saturated fat diet substantially increased enterocytic Aβ in WT and in apo E KO mice, however the effect was greater in the latter. Villi height was significantly greater in apo E KO mice than for WT controls when given the low-fat diet. However, WT mice had comparable villi length to apo E KO when fed the saturated fat and cholesterol enriched diet. There was no effect of the high-fat diet on villi length in apo E KO mice. Conclusion The findings of this study are consistent with the notion that lipid substrate availability modulates enterocytic Aβ. Apo E may influence enterocytic lipid availability by modulating absorptive capacity.

  19. Inhibition of tau hyperphosphorylation and beta amyloid production in rat brain by oral administration of atorvastatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fen; LI Xu; SUO Ai-qin; ZHANG Jie-wen

    2010-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. The two hallmark lesions in AD brain are deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs).Hypercholesteremia is one of the risk factors of AD. But its role in the pathogenesis of AD is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hypercholesteremia and tau phosphorylation or β-amyloid (Aβ),and evaluate the effect of atorvastatin on the level of tau phosphorylation and Aβ in the brains of rats fed with high cholesterol diet.Methods Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into normal diet control group, high cholesterol diet group,and high cholesterol diet plus atorvastatin (Lipitor, 15 mg·kg-1·d-1) treated group. Blood from caudal vein was collected to measure total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) at the end of the 3th and the 6th months by an enzymatic method. The animals were sacrificed 6 months later and brains were removed. All left brain hemispheres were fixed for immunohistochemistry. Hippocampus and cerebral cortex were separated from right hemispheres and homogenized separately. Tau phosphorylation and Aβ in the brain tissue were determined by Western blotting (using antibodies PHF-1 and Tau-1) and anti-Aβ40/anti-Aβ42, respectively.Results We found that high cholesterol diet led to hypercholesteremia of rats as well as hyperphosphorylation of tau and increased Aβ level in the brains. Treatment of the high cholesterol diet fed rats with atorvastatin prevented the changes of both tau phosphorylation and Aβ level induced by high cholesterol diet.Conclusions Hypercholesteremia could induce tau hyperphosphorylation and Aβ production in rat brain. Atorvastatin could inhibit tau hyperphosphorylation and decrease Aβ generation. It may play a protective role in the patho-process of hypercholesteremia

  20. Sphingolipid metabolism correlates with cerebrospinal fluid Beta amyloid levels in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred N Fonteh

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer's disease (AD is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but

  1. Poor Memory Performance in Aged Cynomolgus Monkeys with Hippocampal Atrophy, Depletion of Amyloid Beta 1-42 and Accumulation of Tau Proteins in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, Huda S; Pandelaki, Jacub; Mulyadi, Rahmad;

    2014-01-01

    , aged cynomolgus monkeys were divided into two groups to compare high-performing (n=6) and low-performing (n=6) subjects. Both groups were tested for biomarkers related to Alzheimer's disease and their brains were scanned using structural magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: The subjects with poor DRT...... performance had evidence of atrophy in the hippocampus and cortical areas, significantly lower cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid beta amino acid 1-42 (ptau levels (p

  2. In silico analysis of the apolipoprotein E and the amyloid beta peptide interaction: misfolding induced by frustration of the salt bridge network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghui Luo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between Apolipoprotein E (ApoE and the aggregation processes of the amyloid beta (A beta peptide has been shown to be crucial for Alzheimer's disease (AD. The presence of the ApoE4 isoform is considered to be a contributing risk factor for AD. However, the detailed molecular properties of ApoE4 interacting with the A beta peptide are unknown, although various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the physiological and pathological role of this relationship. Here, computer simulations have been used to investigate the process of A beta interaction with the N-terminal domain of the human ApoE isoforms (ApoE2, ApoE3 and ApoE4. Molecular docking combined with molecular dynamics simulations have been undertaken to determine the A beta peptide binding sites and the relative stability of binding to each of the ApoE isoforms. Our results show that from the several ApoE isoforms investigated, only ApoE4 presents a misfolded intermediate when bound to A beta. Moreover, the initial alpha-helix used as the A beta peptide model structure also becomes unstructured due to the interaction with ApoE4. These structural changes appear to be related to a rearrangement of the salt bridge network in ApoE4, for which we propose a model. It seems plausible that ApoE4 in its partially unfolded state is incapable of performing the clearance of A beta, thereby promoting amyloid forming processes. Hence, the proposed model can be used to identify potential drug binding sites in the ApoE4-A beta complex, where the interaction between the two molecules can be inhibited.

  3. Anti-acetylcholinesterase and Antioxidant Activities of Inhaled Juniper Oil on Amyloid Beta (1-42)-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica; Mihasan, Marius; Hritcu, Lucian

    2015-05-01

    Juniper volatile oil is extracted from Juniperus communis L., of the Cupressaceae family, also known as common juniper. Also, in aromatherapy the juniper volatile oil is used against anxiety, nervous tension and stress-related conditions. In the present study, we identified the effects of the juniper volatile oil on amyloid beta (1-42)-induced oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus. Rats received a single intracerebroventricular injection of amyloid beta (1-42) (400 pmol/rat) and then were exposed to juniper volatile oil (200 μl, either 1 or 3 %) for controlled 60 min period, daily, for 21 continuous days. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase specific activities, the total content of the reduced glutathione, protein carbonyl and malondialdehyde levels. Additionally, the acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus was assessed. The amyloid beta (1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: increase of the acetylcholinesterase, superoxide dismutase and catalase specific activities, decrease of glutathione peroxidase specific activity and the total content of the reduced glutathione along with an elevation of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels. Inhalation of the juniper volatile oil significantly decreases the acetylcholinesterase activity and exhibited antioxidant potential. These findings suggest that the juniper volatile oil may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic agents to manage oxidative stress associated with Alzheimer's disease through decreasing the activity of acetylcholinesterase and anti-oxidative mechanism. PMID:25743585

  4. Computational Studies of Beta Amyloid (Aβ42 with p75NTR Receptor: A Novel Therapeutic Target in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shine Devarajan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of beta amyloid plaques (Aβ which can induce neurite degeneration and progressive dementia. It has been identified that neuronal apoptosis is induced by binding of Aβ42 to pan neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR and gave the possibility that beta amyloid oligomer is a ligand for p75NTR. However, the atomic contact point responsible for molecular interactions and conformational changes of the protein upon binding was not studied in detail. In view of this, we conducted a molecular docking and simulation study to investigate the binding behaviour of Aβ42 monomer with p75NTR ectodomain. Furthermore, we proposed a p75NTR-ectodomain-Aβ42 complex model. Our data revealed that, Aβ42 specifically recognizes CRD1 and CRD2 domains of the receptor and formed a “cap” like structure at the N-terminal of receptor which is stabilized by a network of hydrogen bonds. These findings are supported by molecular dynamics simulation that Aβ42 showed distinct structural alterations at N- and C-terminal regions due to the influence of the receptor binding site. Overall, the present study gives more structural insight on the molecular interactions of beta amyloid protein involved in the activation of p75NTR receptor.

  5. Origin of life. Primordial genetics: Information transfer in a pre-RNA world based on self-replicating beta-sheet amyloid conformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Carl Peter J

    2015-10-01

    The question of the origin of life on Earth can largely be reduced to the question of what was the first molecular replicator system that was able to replicate and evolve under the presumably very harsh conditions on the early Earth. It is unlikely that a functional RNA could have existed under such conditions and it is generally assumed that some other kind of information system preceded the RNA world. Here, I present an informational molecular system that is stable, self-replicative, environmentally responsive, and evolvable under conditions characterized by high temperatures, ultraviolet and cosmic radiation. This postulated pregenetic system is based on the amyloid fold, a functionally unique polypeptide fold characterized by a cross beta-sheet structure in which the beta strands are arranged perpendicular to the fiber axis. Beside an extraordinary structural robustness, the amyloid fold possesses a unique ability to transmit information by a three-dimensional templating mechanism. In amyloidogenesis short peptide monomers are added one by one to the growing end of the fiber. From the same monomeric subunits several structural variants of amyloid may be formed. Then, in a self-replicative mode, a specific amyloid conformer can act as a template and confer its spatially encoded information to daughter molecular entities in a repetitive way. In this process, the specific conformational information, the spatially changed organization, is transmitted; the coding element is the steric zipper structure, and recognition occurs by amino acid side chain complementarity. The amyloid information system fulfills several basic requirements of a primordial evolvable replicator system: (i) it is stable under the presumed primitive Earth conditions, (ii) the monomeric building blocks of the informational polymer can be formed from available prebiotic compounds, (iii) the system is self-assembling and self-replicative and (iv) it is adaptive to changes in the environment and

  6. Stoichiometric inhibition of amyloid beta-protein aggregation with peptides containing alternating alpha,alpha-disubstituted amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Marcus A; Aucoin, Jed P; Fu, Yanwen; McCarley, Robin L; Hammer, Robert P

    2006-03-22

    We have prepared two peptides based on the hydrophobic core (Lys-Leu-Val-Phe-Phe) of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) that contain alpha,alpha-disubstituted amino acids at alternating positions, but differ in the positioning of the oligolysine chain (AMY-1, C-terminus; AMY-2, N-terminus). We have studied the effects of AMY-1 and AMY-2 on the aggregation of Abeta and find that, at stoichiometric concentrations, both peptides completely stop Abeta fibril growth. Equimolar mixtures of AMY-1 and Abeta form only globular aggregates as imaged by scanning force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These samples show no signs of protofibrillar or fibrillar material even after prolonged periods of time (4.5 months). Also, 10 mol % of AMY-1 prevents Abeta self-assembly for long periods of time; aged samples (4.5 months) show only a few protofibrillar or fibrillar aggregates. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of equimolar mixtures of AMY-1 and Abeta show that the secondary structure of the mixture changes over time and progresses to a predominantly beta-sheet structure, which is consistent with the design of these inhibitors preferring a sheet-like conformation. Changing the position of the charged tail on the peptide, AMY-2 interacts with Abeta differently in that equimolar mixtures form large ( approximately 1 mum) globular aggregates which do not progress to fibrils, but precipitate out of solution. The differences in the aggregation mediated by the two peptides is discussed in terms of a model where the inhibitors act as cosurfactants that interfere with the native ability of Abeta to self-assemble by disrupting hydrophobic interactions either at the C-terminus or N-terminus of Abeta. PMID:16536517

  7. Comparison of the amyloid pore forming properties of rat and human Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide 1-42: Calcium imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    The data here consists of calcium imaging of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the calcium-sensitive dye Fluo-4AM and then incubated with nanomolar concentrations of either human or rat Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide Aβ1-42. These data are both of a qualitative (fluorescence micrographs) and semi-quantitative nature (estimation of intracellular calcium concentrations of cells probed by Aβ1-42 peptides vs. control untreated cells). Since rat Aβ1-42 differs from its human counterpart at only three amino acid positions, this comparative study is a good assessment of the specificity of the amyloid pore forming assay. The interpretation of this dataset is presented in the accompanying study "Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides" [1]. PMID:26909380

  8. Morphology and structural dynamics of amyloid beta 42 assembly in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Jinsheng He; Shuhan Guo; Jingdong Song; Jianguo Gu; Tao Hong

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid β42 (Aβ42) aggregation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.However, the morphology and structural dynamics in different stages of Aβ42 assembly are not well known.To investigate the dynamic properties of morphological and structural changes in the aggregation process of A(3 in vitro, transmission electron microscopy, western blot analysis and circular dichroism were used to observe the changes in morphology, immunoreactivity and secondary structure during Ap aggregation, respectively.Results demonstrated that at 24 hours following Ap42 aggregation in vitro, the structures of spherical granules from 5 to 10 nm and coils from 20 to 30 nm were visualized by transmission electron microscopy.Different immunoreactivities of the oligomers and fibers were detected by western blot analysis.The dynamic changes of the a-helix to β-sheet were confirmed by circular dichroism spectra.The dynamic properties of the morphological and structural changes in the aggregation process of Aβ42 in vitro were analyzed,which contributed to the identification of stable conditions of Aβ42 oligomer formation.

  9. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. Aβ precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1–3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some Aβ fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with Aβ peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloid-β peptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals

  10. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Ion, Laura [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Murariu, Manuela; Habasescu, Laura [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, Iasi 700487 (Romania)

    2014-10-06

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. Aβ precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1–3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some Aβ fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with Aβ peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloid-β peptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals.

  11. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitotempo protects mitochondrial function against amyloid beta toxicity in primary cultured mouse neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongtao; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial defects including excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and compromised ATP generation are featured pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated mitochondrial ROS overproduction disrupts intra-neuronal Redox balance, in turn exacerbating mitochondrial dysfunction leading to neuronal injury. Previous studies have found the beneficial effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal injury in AD animal and cell models, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS scavengers hold promise for the treatment of this neurological disorder. In this study, we have determined that mitotempo, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant protects mitochondrial function from the toxicity of Aβ in primary cultured neurons. Our results showed that Aβ-promoted mitochondrial superoxide production and neuronal lipid oxidation were significantly suppressed by the application of mitotempo. Moreover, mitotempo also demonstrated protective effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics evidenced by preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c oxidase activity as well as ATP production. In addition, the Aβ-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and decreased expression levels of mtDNA replication-related DNA polymerase gamma (DNA pol γ) and Twinkle were substantially mitigated by mitotempo. Therefore, our study suggests that elimination of excess mitochondrial ROS rescues mitochondrial function in Aβ-insulted neruons; and mitotempo has the potential to be a promising therapeutic agent to protect mitochondrial and neuronal function in AD. PMID:27444386

  12. Accumulation of Exogenous Amyloid-Beta Peptide in Hippocampal Mitochondria Causes Their Dysfunction: A Protective Role for Melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Acuna-Castroviejo, Dario; Tan, Dun Xian; López-Armas, Gabriela; Cruz-Ramos, José; Munoz, Rubén; Melnikov, Valery G.; Manchester, Lucien C.; Reiter, Russel J.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) pathology is related to mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied by energy reduction and an elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Monomers and oligomers of Aβ have been found inside mitochondria where they accumulate in a time-dependent manner as demonstrated in transgenic mice and in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. We hypothesize that the internalization of extracellular Aβ aggregates is the major cause of mitochondrial damage and here we report that following the injection of fibrillar Aβ into the hippocampus, there is severe axonal damage which is accompanied by the entrance of Aβ into the cell. Thereafter, Aβ appears in mitochondria where it is linked to alterations in the ionic gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. This effect is accompanied by disruption of subcellular structure, oxidative stress, and a significant reduction in both the respiratory control ratio and in the hydrolytic activity of ATPase. Orally administrated melatonin reduced oxidative stress, improved the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio, and ameliorated the energy imbalance. PMID:22666521

  13. [Compensatory mechanisms to heal neuroplasticity impairment under Alzheiemer's disease neurodegeneration. I: The role of amyloid beta and its' precursor protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudinov, A R; Kudinova, N V; Kezlia, E V; Kozyrev, K M; Medvedev, A E; Berezov, T T

    2012-01-01

    In-depth scholar literature analysis of Alzheimer's disease neurodegenerative features of amyloid beta protein neurochemistry modification and excessive phosphorylation of tau protein (and associated neuronal cytoskeleton rearrangements) are secondary phenomena. At early disease stage these neurobiochemical mechanisms are reversible and serve to heal an impairment of biophysical properties of neuronal membranes, neurotransmission, basic neuronal function and neuroplasticity, while preserving anatomical and functional brain fields. Abeta and tau could well serve to biochemically restore physico-chemical properties of neual membranes due to a role these proteins play in lipid metabolism. Under such scenario therapeutic block of aggregation and plaque formation of Abeta and inhibition of tau phosphorylation, as well as pharmaceutical modification of other secondary neurodegenerative features (such as a cascade of oxidative stress reactions) are unable to provide an effective cure of Alzheimer's disease and related pathologies of the Central and peripheral nervous systems, because they are not arraying primary pathagenetic cause. We review the role of Abeta in compensatory mechanisms of neuroplasticity restoration under normal physiological condition and Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Icariin Prevents Amyloid Beta-Induced Apoptosis via the PI3K/Akt Pathway in PC-12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Icariin is a prenylated flavonol glycoside derived from the Chinese herb Epimedium sagittatum that exerts a variety of pharmacological activities and shows promise in the treatment and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of icariin against amyloid beta protein fragment 25–35 (Aβ25–35 induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and explored potential underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that icariin dose-dependently increased cell viability and decreased Aβ25–35-induced apoptosis, as assessed by MTT assay and Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, respectively. Results of western blot analysis revealed that the selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor LY294002 suppressed icariin-induced Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that the protective effects of icariin are associated with activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. LY294002 also blocked the icariin-induced downregulation of proapoptotic factors Bax and caspase-3 and upregulation of antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2 in Aβ25–35-treated PC12 cells. These findings provide further evidence for the clinical efficacy of icariin in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation and molecular docking studies of Angiotensin converting enzyme with inhibitor lisinopril and amyloid Beta Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalkute, Chidambar Balbhim; Barage, Sagar Hindurao; Dhanavade, Maruti Jayram; Sonawane, Kailas Dasharath

    2013-06-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) cleaves amyloid beta peptide. So far this cleavage mechanism has not been studied in detail at atomic level. Keeping this view in mind, we performed molecular dynamics simulation of crystal structure complex of testis truncated version of ACE (tACE) and its inhibitor lisinopril along with Zn(2+) to understand the dynamic behavior of active site residues of tACE. Root mean square deviation results revealed the stability of tACE throughout simulation. The residues Ala 354, Glu 376, Asp 377, Glu 384, His 513, Tyr 520 and Tyr 523 of tACE stabilized lisinopril by hydrogen bonding interactions. Using this information in subsequent part of study, molecular docking of tACE crystal structure with Aβ-peptide has been made to investigate the interactions of Aβ-peptide with enzyme tACE. The residues Asp 7 and Ser 8 of Aβ-peptide were found in close contact with Glu 384 of tACE along with Zn(2+). This study has demonstrated that the residue Glu 384 of tACE might play key role in the degradation of Aβ-peptide by cleaving peptide bond between Asp 7 and Ser 8 residues. Molecular basis generated by this attempt could provide valuable information towards designing of new therapies to control Aβ concentration in Alzheimer's patient.

  16. Accumulation of Exogenous Amyloid-Beta Peptide in Hippocampal Mitochondria Causes Their Dysfunction: A Protective Role for Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rosales-Corral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-beta (Aβ pathology is related to mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied by energy reduction and an elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Monomers and oligomers of Aβ have been found inside mitochondria where they accumulate in a time-dependent manner as demonstrated in transgenic mice and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD brain. We hypothesize that the internalization of extracellular Aβ aggregates is the major cause of mitochondrial damage and here we report that following the injection of fibrillar Aβ into the hippocampus, there is severe axonal damage which is accompanied by the entrance of Aβ into the cell. Thereafter, Aβ appears in mitochondria where it is linked to alterations in the ionic gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. This effect is accompanied by disruption of subcellular structure, oxidative stress, and a significant reduction in both the respiratory control ratio and in the hydrolytic activity of ATPase. Orally administrated melatonin reduced oxidative stress, improved the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio, and ameliorated the energy imbalance.

  17. Two different immunostaining patterns of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) may distinguish traumatic from nontraumatic axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2015-09-01

    Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) is recognized as an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, but it also detects axonal injury due to ischemic or other metabolic causes. Previously, we reported two different patterns of APP staining: labeled axons oriented along with white matter bundles (pattern 1) and labeled axons scattered irregularly (pattern 2) (Hayashi et al. (Leg Med (Tokyo) 11:S171-173, 2009). In this study, we investigated whether these two patterns are consistent with patterns of trauma and hypoxic brain damage, respectively. Sections of the corpus callosum from 44 cases of blunt head injury and equivalent control tissue were immunostained for APP. APP was detected in injured axons such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons in 24 of the 44 cases of head injuries that also survived for three or more hours after injury. In 21 of the 24 APP-positive cases, pattern 1 alone was observed in 14 cases, pattern 2 alone was not observed in any cases, and both patterns 1 and 2 were detected in 7 cases. APP-labeled injured axons were detected in 3 of the 44 control cases, all of which were pattern 2. These results suggest that pattern 1 indicates traumatic axonal injury, while pattern 2 results from hypoxic insult. These patterns may be useful to differentiate between traumatic and nontraumatic axonal injuries.

  18. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitotempo protects mitochondrial function against amyloid beta toxicity in primary cultured mouse neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongtao; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial defects including excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and compromised ATP generation are featured pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated mitochondrial ROS overproduction disrupts intra-neuronal Redox balance, in turn exacerbating mitochondrial dysfunction leading to neuronal injury. Previous studies have found the beneficial effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal injury in AD animal and cell models, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS scavengers hold promise for the treatment of this neurological disorder. In this study, we have determined that mitotempo, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant protects mitochondrial function from the toxicity of Aβ in primary cultured neurons. Our results showed that Aβ-promoted mitochondrial superoxide production and neuronal lipid oxidation were significantly suppressed by the application of mitotempo. Moreover, mitotempo also demonstrated protective effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics evidenced by preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c oxidase activity as well as ATP production. In addition, the Aβ-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and decreased expression levels of mtDNA replication-related DNA polymerase gamma (DNA pol γ) and Twinkle were substantially mitigated by mitotempo. Therefore, our study suggests that elimination of excess mitochondrial ROS rescues mitochondrial function in Aβ-insulted neruons; and mitotempo has the potential to be a promising therapeutic agent to protect mitochondrial and neuronal function in AD.

  19. IMPY, a potential {beta}-amyloid imaging probe for detection of prion deposits in scrapie-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, P.-J. [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Bernard, Serge [IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France)], E-mail: bernard@tours.inra.fr; Sarradin, Pierre [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Vergote, Jackie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Barc, Celine [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Chalon, Sylvie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Kung, M.-P.; Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guilloteau, Denis [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction: A potential single-photon emission computed tomography imaging agent for labeling of A{beta} plaques of Alzheimer's disease, IMPY (2-(4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-6-iodo-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine), would be effective in detection of prion amyloid deposits in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Methods: In vitro autoradiographic studies were carried out with [{sup 125}I]IMPY on brain sections from scrapie-infected mice and age-matched controls. Competition study was performed to evaluate the prion deposit binding specificity with nonradioactive IMPY. Results: Binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was observed in infected brain sections, while on age-matched control brain sections, there was no or very low labeling. Prion deposit binding was confirmed by histoblots with prion protein-specific monoclonal antibody 2D6. In the presence of nonradioactive IMPY, the binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was significantly inhibited in all regions studied. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IMPY can detect the prion deposits in vitro in scrapie-infected mice. Labeled with {sup 123}I, this ligand may be useful to quantitate prion deposit burdens in TSEs by in vivo imaging.

  20. Role of Notch-1 signaling pathway in PC12 cell apoptosis induced by amyloid beta-peptide (25-35)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huimin Liang; Yaozhou Zhang; Xiaoyan Shi; Tianxiang Wei; Jiyu Lou

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that Notch-1 expression is increased in the hippocampus of Alzheimer’s disease patients. We speculate that Notch-1 signaling may be involved in PC12 cell apoptosis induced by amyloid beta-peptide (25-35) (Aβ25-35). In the present study, PC12 cells were cultured with different doses (0, 0.1, 1.0, 10 and 100 nmol/L) of N-[N-(3,5-Dilfuorophen-acetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester, a Notch-1 signaling pathway inhibitor, for 30 minutes. Then cultured cells were induced with Aβ25-35 for 48 hours. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with high doses of N-[N-(3,5-Dilfuorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (> 10 nmol/L) prolonged the survival of PC12 cells after Aβ25-35 induction, decreased the expression of apoptosis-related proteins caspase-3, -8, -9, increased the activity of oxidative stress-related su-peroxide dismutase and catalase, inhibited the production of active oxygen, and reduced nuclear factor kappa B expression. This study indicates that the Notch-1 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in Aβ25-35-induced PC12 apoptosis.

  1. The Aqueous Extract of Rhizome of Gastrodia elata Protected Drosophila and PC12 Cells against Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Fai Ng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the neuroprotective effect of the rhizome of Gastrodia elata (GE aqueous extract on beta-amyloid(Aβ-induced toxicity in vivo and in vitro. Transgenic Drosophila mutants with Aβ-induced neurodegeneration in pan-neuron and ommatidia were used to determine the efficacy of GE. The antiapoptotic and antioxidative mechanisms of GE were also studied in Aβ-treated pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells. In vivo studies demonstrated that GE (5 mg/g Drosophila media-treated Drosophila possessed a longer lifespan, better locomotor function, and less-degenerated ommatidia when compared with the Aβ-expressing control (all P<0.05. In vitro studies illustrated that GE increased the cell viability of Aβ-treated PC12 cells in dose-dependent manner, probably through attenuation of Aβ-induced oxidative and apoptotic stress. GE also significantly upregulated the enzymatic activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, leading to the decrease of reactive oxidation species production and apoptotic marker caspase-3 activity. In conclusion, our current data presented the first evidence that the aqueous extract of GE was capable of reducing the Aβ-induced neurodegeneration in Drosophila, possibly through inhibition of apoptosis and reduction of oxidative stress. GE aqueous extract could be developed as a promising herbal agent for neuroprotection and novel adjuvant therapies for Alzheimer’s disease.

  2. Metabolic changes may precede proteostatic dysfunction in a Drosophila model of amyloid beta peptide toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Stanislav; Vishnivetskaya, Anastasia; Malmendal, Anders; Crowther, Damian C

    2016-05-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation is linked to the initiation of Alzheimer's disease; accordingly, aggregation-prone isoforms of Aβ, expressed in the brain, shorten the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. However, the lethal effects of Aβ are not apparent until after day 15. We used shibire(TS) flies that exhibit a temperature-sensitive paralysis phenotype as a reporter of proteostatic robustness. In this model, we found that increasing age but not Aβ expression lowered the flies' permissive temperature, suggesting that Aβ did not exert its lethal effects by proteostatic disruption. Instead, we observed that chemical challenges, in particular oxidative stressors, discriminated clearly between young (robust) and old (sensitive) flies. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis, we compared water-soluble metabolite profiles at various ages in flies expressing Aβ in their brains. We observed 2 genotype-linked metabolomic signals, the first reported the presence of any Aβ isoform and the second the effects of the lethal Arctic Aβ. Lethality was specifically associated with signs of oxidative respiration dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:27103517

  3. 1,8-cineole (eucalyptol) mitigates inflammation in amyloid Beta toxicated PC12 cells: relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Andleeb; Vaibhav, Kumar; Javed, Hayate; Tabassum, Rizwana; Ahmed, Md Ejaz; Khan, Mohd Moshahid; Khan, M Badruzzaman; Shrivastava, Pallavi; Islam, Farah; Siddiqui, M Saeed; Safhi, M M; Islam, Fakhrul

    2014-02-01

    Inflammatory process has a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and insoluble amyloid beta deposits and neurofibrillary tangles provide the obvious stimuli for inflammation. The present study demonstrate the effect of pretreatment of 1,8-cineole (Cin) on inflammation induced by Aβ(25-35) in differentiated PC12 cells. The cells were treated with Cin at different doses for 24 h and then replaced by media containing Aβ(25-35) for another 24 h. The cell viability was decreased in Aβ(25-35) treated cells which was significantly restored by Cin pretreatment. Cin successfully reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS and NO levels in Aβ(25-35) treated cells. Cin also lowered the levels of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in Aβ(25-35) treated cells. Moreover, Cin also succeeded in lowering the expression of NOS-2, COX-2 and NF-κB. This study suggests the protective effects of Cin on inflammation and provides additional evidence for its potential beneficial use in therapy as an anti-inflammatory agent in neurodegenerative disease.

  4. beta-Amyloid precursor protein isoforms show correlations with neurones but not with glia of demented subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, A W; Francis, P T; Holmes, C; Webster, M T; Qume, M; Stratmann, G C; Doshi, R; Mann, D M; Harrison, P J; Pearson, R C

    1994-01-01

    Post-mortem cerebral cortex from 15 demented patients was specially collected to minimise autolysis and two membrane fractions and one soluble fraction were quantitatively examined for the major species of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) of high apparent molecular mass (> or = 80 kDa) together with the major mRNA species encoding APP isoforms. The number of pyramidal neurones and astrocytes, putative biochemical indices of interneurones and pyramidal neurones, and choline acetyl transferase activity were also determined. Multiple regression analysis has been used to investigate intercorrelations of APP species with biochemical and morphometric measures, free of any effects of confounding demographic variables. Subjects with Alzheimer's disease showed a loss of cholinergic activity and D-aspartate uptake compared with patients with other causes of dementia. The major finding of the study is that measures of neurones rather than astrocytes most closely correlate with the concentration of APP. Pyramidal cell numbers were positively correlated with mRNA for APP695. APP in the soluble fraction showed a negative correlation with pyramidal cell numbers and cholinergic activity. These results indicate that neurones within the cerebral cortex are the major source of APP, and that secretion of APP is dependent upon cortical pyramidal neuronal activity and cholinergic activity. PMID:7879601

  5. PB1-F2 influenza A virus protein adopts a beta-sheet conformation and forms amyloid fibers in membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Christophe; Al Bazzal, Ali; Vidic, Jasmina; Février, Vincent; Bourdieu, Christiane; Bouguyon, Edwige; Le Goffic, Ronan; Vautherot, Jean-François; Bernard, Julie; Moudjou, Mohammed; Noinville, Sylvie; Chich, Jean-François; Da Costa, Bruno; Rezaei, Human; Delmas, Bernard

    2010-04-23

    The influenza A virus PB1-F2 protein, encoded by an alternative reading frame in the PB1 polymerase gene, displays a high sequence polymorphism and is reported to contribute to viral pathogenesis in a sequence-specific manner. To gain insights into the functions of PB1-F2, the molecular structure of several PB1-F2 variants produced in Escherichia coli was investigated in different environments. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that all variants have a random coil secondary structure in aqueous solution. When incubated in trifluoroethanol polar solvent, all PB1-F2 variants adopt an alpha-helix-rich structure, whereas incubated in acetonitrile, a solvent of medium polarity mimicking the membrane environment, they display beta-sheet secondary structures. Incubated with asolectin liposomes and SDS micelles, PB1-F2 variants also acquire a beta-sheet structure. Dynamic light scattering revealed that the presence of beta-sheets is correlated with an oligomerization/aggregation of PB1-F2. Electron microscopy showed that PB1-F2 forms amorphous aggregates in acetonitrile. In contrast, at low concentrations of SDS, PB1-F2 variants exhibited various abilities to form fibers that were evidenced as amyloid fibers in a thioflavin T assay. Using a recombinant virus and its PB1-F2 knock-out mutant, we show that PB1-F2 also forms amyloid structures in infected cells. Functional membrane permeabilization assays revealed that the PB1-F2 variants can perforate membranes at nanomolar concentrations but with activities found to be sequence-dependent and not obviously correlated with their differential ability to form amyloid fibers. All of these observations suggest that PB1-F2 could be involved in physiological processes through different pathways, permeabilization of cellular membranes, and amyloid fiber formation.

  6. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    Full Text Available Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text] oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1 elongation of short protofilaments; (2 breakage of large protofilaments; (3 formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4 elongation of protofilament pairs.

  7. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Anna; Sticht, Heinrich; Horn, Anselm H C

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text]) oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1) elongation of short protofilaments; (2) breakage of large protofilaments; (3) formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4) elongation of protofilament pairs.

  8. A ketogenic diet reduces amyloid beta 40 and 42 in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

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    Van Leuven Fred

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that primarily strikes the elderly. Studies in both humans and animal models have linked the consumption of cholesterol and saturated fats with amyloid-β (Aβ deposition and development of AD. Yet, these studies did not examine high fat diets in combination with reduced carbohydrate intake. Here we tested the effect of a high saturated fat/low carbohydrate diet on a transgenic mouse model of AD. Results Starting at three months of age, two groups of female transgenic mice carrying the "London" APP mutation (APP/V717I were fed either, a standard diet (SD composed of high carbohydrate/low fat chow, or a ketogenic diet (KD composed of very low carbohydrate/high saturated fat chow for 43 days. Animals fed the KD exhibited greatly elevated serum ketone body levels, as measured by β-hydroxybutyrate (3.85 ± 2.6 mM, compared to SD fed animals (0.29 ± 0.06 mM. In addition, animals fed the KD lost body weight (SD 22.2 ± 0.6 g vs. KD 17.5 ± 1.4 g, p = 0.0067. In contrast to earlier studies, the brief KD feeding regime significantly reduced total brain Aβ levels by approximately 25%. Despite changes in ketone levels, body weight, and Aβ levels, the KD diet did not alter behavioral measures. Conclusion Previous studies have suggested that diets rich in cholesterol and saturated fats increased the deposition of Aβ and the risk of developing AD. Here we demonstrate that a diet rich in saturated fats and low in carbohydrates can actually reduce levels of Aβ. Therefore, dietary strategies aimed at reducing Aβ levels should take into account interactions of dietary components and the metabolic outcomes, in particular, levels of carbohydrates, total calories, and presence of ketone bodies should be considered.

  9. Low background and high contrast PET imaging of amyloid-{beta} with [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in Alzheimer's disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Anton; Andersson, Jan; Varnaes, Katarina; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Jureus, Anders; Swahn, Britt-Marie; Sandell, Johan; Julin, Per; Svensson, Samuel [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Cselenyi, Zsolt; Schou, Magnus; Johnstroem, Peter; Farde, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Hospital, AstraZeneca Translational Sciences Centre, PET CoE, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksdotter, Maria; Freund-Levi, Yvonne [Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jeppsson, Fredrik [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate AZD2995 side by side with AZD2184 as novel PET radioligands for imaging of amyloid-{beta} in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vitro binding of tritium-labelled AZD2995 and AZD2184 was studied and compared with that of the established amyloid-{beta} PET radioligand PIB. Subsequently, a first-in-human in vivo PET study was performed using [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in three healthy control subjects and seven AD patients. AZD2995, AZD2184 and PIB were found to share the same binding site to amyloid-{beta}. [{sup 3}H]AZD2995 had the highest signal-to-background ratio in brain tissue from patients with AD as well as in transgenic mice. However, [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 had superior imaging properties in PET, as shown by larger effect sizes comparing binding potential values in cortical regions of AD patients and healthy controls. Nevertheless, probably due to a lower amount of nonspecific binding, the group separation of the distribution volume ratio values of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 was greater in areas with lower amyloid-{beta} load, e.g. the hippocampus. Both AZD2995 and AZD2184 detect amyloid-{beta} with high affinity and specificity and also display a lower degree of nonspecific binding than that reported for PIB. Overall [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 seems to be an amyloid-{beta} radioligand with higher uptake and better group separation when compared to [{sup 11}C]AZD2995. However, the very low nonspecific binding of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 makes this radioligand potentially interesting as a tool to study minute levels of amyloid-{beta}. This sensitivity may be important in investigating, for example, early prodromal stages of AD or in the longitudinal study of a disease modifying therapy. (orig.)

  10. Hubungan Konsumsi Antioksidan dari Makanan dengan Beta-Amyloid Plasma sebagai Penanda Gangguan Fungsi Kognitif pada Lanjut Usia

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    Ratna D Siregar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui hubungan antara konsumsi vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, zink dan selenium dari makanan dengan fungsi kognitif pada lanjut usia. Metoda penelitian adalah cross sectional study terhadap 145 lansia umur ≥ 60 tahun, pada dua kecamatan di Kabupaten Lima Puluh Kota Sumatra Barat. Wawancara konsumsi antioksidan menggunakan Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQ, fungsi kognitif diperiksa dengan Montreal Cognitive Assesment versi Indonesia (MoCA-Ina, Aβ40 dan Aβ42 plasma diperiksa dengan metode ELISA. Data dianalisis menggunakan uji Mann-Whitney dan Chi-square. Pada hasil penelitian ditemukan 83 orang (57,2% lansia yang mengalami gangguan fungsi kognitif. Terdapat hubungan yang signifikan antara konsumsi vitamin C (p<0,049 dan vitamin E (p<0,037 tetapi tidak terdapat hubungan signifikan antara vitamin A, zink dan selenium dengan fungsi kognitif. Tidak terdapat hubungan yang signifikan antara konsumsi antioksidan dengan tingkat Aβ40 dan Aβ42 serta antara tingkat Aβ40 dan Aβ42 dengan fungsi kognitif masing-masing (p<0,058 dan p<0,350. Kesimpulan hasil penelitian ini didapatkan hubungan antara konsumsi vitamin C dan vitamin E dari makanan dengan fungsi kognitif. Tetapi tidak terdapat hubungan antara konsumsi antioksidan dengan Aβ40 dan Aβ42 plasma dan Aβ40 dan Aβ42 dengan fungsi kognitif.Kata kunci: antioksidan, beta-amyloid, fungsi kognitif, lanjut usiaAbstractThe objective of this study was to determine the relationship between consumption of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc and selenium from foods with cognitive function in elderly. This was a cross-sectional study that was conducted to 145 elderly with age ≥ 60 years, in two districts in West Sumatra, in Lima Puluh Kota city. Interview antioxidant intake using a Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQ, cognitive function was checked by Montreal Cognitive Assessment Indonesian version (MoCA-Ina, plasma Aβ40 dan Aβ42 were examined by ELISA

  11. Substitution of isoleucine-31 by helical-breaking proline abolishes oxidative stress and neurotoxic properties of Alzheimer's amyloid beta-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, Jaroslaw; Aksenova, Marina; Schöneich, Christian; Butterfield, D Allan

    2002-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain is characterized by excess deposition of the 42-amino acid amyloid beta-peptide [A(beta)(1-42)]. AD brain is under intense oxidative stress, and we have previously suggested that A(beta)(1-42) was associated with this increased oxidative stress. In addition, we previously demonstrated that the single methionine residue of A(beta)(1-42), residue 35, was critical for the oxidative stress and neurotoxic properties of this peptide. Others have shown that the C-terminal region of A(beta)(1-42) is helical in aqueous micellar solutions, including that part of the protein containing Met35. Importantly, Cu(II)-binding induces alpha-helicity in A(beta) in aqueous solution. Invoking the i + 4 rule of helices, we hypothesized that the carbonyl oxygen of Ile31 would interact with the S atom of Met35 to change the electronic environment of the sulfur such that molecular oxygen could lead to the production of a sulfuramyl free radical on Met35. If this hypothesis is correct, a prediction would be that breaking the helical interaction of Ile31 and Met35 would abrogate the oxidative stress and neurotoxic properties of A(beta)(1-42). Accordingly, we investigated A(beta)(1-42) in which the Ile31 residue was replaced with the helix-breaking amino acid, proline. The alpha-helical environment around Met35 was completely abolished as indicated by circular dichroism (CD)-spectroscopy. As a consequence, the aggregation, oxidative stress, Cu(II) reduction, and neurotoxic properties of A(beta)(1-42)I31P were completely altered compared to native A(beta)(1-42). The results presented here are consistent with the notion that interaction of Ile31 with Met35 may play an important role in the oxidative processes of Met35 contributing to the toxicity of the peptide.

  12. Reduced amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid beta-protein precursor by the small-molecule Differentiation Inducing Factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; Washicosky, Kevin; Moir, Robert D; Tesco, Giuseppina; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Wasco, Wilma

    2009-04-01

    The detection of cell cycle proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains may represent an early event leading to neurodegeneration. To identify cell cycle modifiers with anti-Abeta properties, we assessed the effect of Differentiation-Inducing Factor-1 (DIF-1), a unique, small-molecule from Dictyostelium discoideum, on the proteolysis of the amyloid beta-protein precursor (APP) in a variety of different cell types. We show that DIF-1 slows cell cycle progression through G0/G1 that correlates with a reduction in cyclin D1 protein levels. Western blot analysis of DIF-treated cells and conditioned medium revealed decreases in the levels of secreted APP, mature APP, and C-terminal fragments. Assessment of conditioned media by sandwich ELISA showed reduced levels of Abeta40 and Abeta42, also demonstrating that treatment with DIF-1 effectively decreases the ratio of Abeta42 to Abeta40. In addition, DIF-1 significantly diminished APP phosphorylation at residue T668. Interestingly, site-directed mutagenesis of APP residue Thr668 to alanine or glutamic acid abolished the effect of DIF-1 on APP proteolysis and restored secreted levels of Abeta. Finally, DIF-1 prevented the accumulation of APP C-terminal fragments induced by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin, and calpain inhibitor N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN). Our findings suggest that DIF-1 affects G0/G1-associated amyloidogenic processing of APP by a gamma-secretase-, proteasome- and calpain-insensitive pathway, and that this effect requires the presence of residue Thr668. PMID:19154786

  13. Cortical Amyloid beta in cognitively normal elderly adults is associated with decreased network efficiency within the cerebro-cerebellar system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eSteininger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of cortical amyloid beta (Aβ is a correlate of aging and a risk factor for Alzheimer Disease (AD. While several higher order cognitive processes involve functional interactions between cortex and cerebellum, this study aims to investigate effects of cortical Aβ deposition on coupling within the cerebro-cerebellar system. We included 15 healthy elderly subjects with normal cognitive performance as assessed by neuropsychological testing. Cortical Aβ was quantified using Pittsburgh Compound-B positron-emission-tomography (PiB-PET late frame signals. Volumes of brain structures were assessed by applying an automated parcellation algorithm to three dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo T1-weighted images. Basal functional network activity within the cerebro-cerebellar system was assessed using blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI at the high field strength of 7 Tesla for measuring coupling between cerebellar seeds and cerebral gray matter. A bivariate regression approach was applied for identification of brain regions with significant effects of individual cortical Aβ load on coupling.Consistent with earlier reports, a significant degree of positive and negative coupling could be observed between cerebellar seeds and cerebral voxels. Significant positive effects of cortical Aβ load on cerebro-cerebellar coupling resulted for cerebral brain regions located in inferior temporal lobe, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and thalamus. Our findings indicate that brain amyloidosis in cognitively normal elderly subjects is associated with decreased network efficiency within the cerebro-cerebellar system. While the identified cerebral regions are consistent with established patterns of increased sensitivity for Aβ associated neurodegeneration, additional studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between dysfunction of the cerebro

  14. The effect of resveratrol on beta amyloid-induced memory impairment involves inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 related signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Ling; Pan, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jiechun; Wang, Liqun; Wang, Weijie; Cheng, Ruochuan; Wu, Fan; Feng, Xiaoqing; Yu, Yingcong; Zhang, Han-Ting; O'Donnell, James M; Xu, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol found in red wine, has wide spectrum of pharmacological properties including antioxidative and antiaging activities. Beta amyloid peptides (Aβ) are known to involve cognitive impairment, neuroinflammatory and apoptotic processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Activation of cAMP and/or cGMP activities can improve memory performance and decrease the neuroinflammation and apoptosis. However, it remains unknown whether the memory enhancing effect of resveratrol on AD associated cognitive disorders is related to the inhibition of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) subtypes and subsequent increases in intracellular cAMP and/or cGMP activities. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol on Aβ1-42-induced cognitive impairment and the participation of PDE4 subtypes related cAMP or cGMP signaling. Mice microinfused with Aβ1-42 into bilateral CA1 subregions displayed learning and memory impairment, as evidenced by reduced memory acquisition and retrieval in the water maze and retention in the passive avoidance tasks; it was also significant that neuroinflammatory and pro-apoptotic factors were increased in Aβ1-42-treated mice. Aβ1-42-treated mice also increased in PDE4A, 4B and 4D expression, and decreased in PKA level. However, PKA inhibitor H89, but not PKG inhibitor KT5823, prevented resveratrol's effects on these parameters. Resveratrol also reversed Aβ1-42-induced decreases in phosphorylated cAMP response-element binding protein (pCREB), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and anti-apoptotic factor BCl-2 expression, which were reversed by H89. These findings suggest that resveratrol reversing Aβ-induced learning and memory disorder may involve the regulation of neuronal inflammation and apoptosis via PDE4 subtypes related cAMP-CREB-BDNF signaling. PMID:26980711

  15. Satureja bachtiarica ameliorate beta-amyloid induced memory impairment, oxidative stress and cholinergic deficit in animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soodi, Maliheh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Dashti, Abolfazl; Sepand, Mohammad Reza; Moradi, Shahla

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular deposition of Beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is the main finding in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which damages cholinergic neurons through oxidative stress and reduces the cholinergic neurotransmission. Satureja bachtiarica is a medicinal plant from the Lamiaceae family which was widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible protective effects of S. bachtiarica methanolic extract on Aβ induced spatial memory impairment in Morris Water Maze (MWM), oxidative stress and cholinergic neuron degeneration. Pre- aggregated Aβ was injected into the hippocampus of each rat bilaterally (10 μg/rat) and MWM task was performed 14 days later to evaluate learning and memory function. Methanolic extract of S.bachtiarica (10, 50 and 100 mg/Kg) was injected intraperitoneally for 19 consecutive days, after Aβ injection. After the probe test the brain tissue were collected and lipid peroxidation, Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and Cholin Acetyl Transferees (ChAT) immunorectivity were measured in the hippocampus. Intrahipocampal injection of Aβ impaired learning and memory in MWM in training days and probe trail. Methanolic extract of S. bachtiarica (50 and 100 mg/Kg) could attenuate Aβ-induced memory deficit. ChAT immunostaining revealed that cholinergic neurons were loss in Aβ- injected group and S. bachtiarica (100 mg/Kg) could ameliorate Aβ- induced ChAT reduction in the hippocampus. Also S. bachtiarica could ameliorate Aβ-induced lipid peroxidation and AChE activity increase in the hippocampus. In conclusion our study represent that S.bachtiarica methanolic extract can improve Aβ-induced memory impairment and cholinergic loss then we recommended this extract as a candidate for further investigation in treatment of AD. PMID:26638718

  16. Development of a high-sensitivity immunoassay for amyloid-beta 1-42 using a silicon microarray platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagni, Paola; Sola, Laura; Cretich, Marina; Chiari, Marcella

    2013-09-15

    In this work, we present a highly sensitive immunoassay for the detection of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarker amyloid-beta 1-42 (Aβ42) based on a label/label-free microarray platform that utilises silicon/silicon oxide (Si/SiO2) substrates. Due to constructive interference, Si/SiO2 layered slides allow enhancement of the fluorescence intensity on the surface with significant improvements in sensitivity of detection. The same substrate allows the label-free multiplexed detection of targets using the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS), a platform amenable to high-throughput detection of mass changes on microarray substrates. Silicon chips are coated with copoly(DMA-NAS-MAPS), a ter-copolymer made from dimethylacrylamide (DMA), 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MAPS) and N-Acryloyloxy succinimide (NAS). Aβ42 aggregation was studied by circular dichroism (CD), and an optimal antibody pair was selected based on specificity of recognition, binding yield and spot morphology of the capture antibody on the coated silicon surface as analysed by IRIS. Finally, incubation conditions were optimised, and an unprecedented Aβ42 detection sensitivity of 73pg/mL was achieved using an artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample. Because of their multiplexing capability, low volume sample consumption and efficient sample-to-result time for population-wide screening, microarrays are ideal tools for the identification of individuals with preclinical AD who are still cognitively healthy. The high sensitivity of this assay format, potentially coupled to a pre-concentration step or signal-enhancing modifications, could lead to a non-invasive, inexpensive diagnostic tool for population-wide screening of AD biomarkers in biological fluids other than CSF, such as serum or plasma. PMID:23624018

  17. Gengnianchun recipe inhibits apoptosis of pheochromocytoma cells from beta-amyloid 25-35 insult, better than monotherapies and their compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Li; Wenjun Wang; Dajin Li; Wenjiang Zhou

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to determine and compare the protective effects of Gengnianchun recipe drug serum and compounds of its representative drug monotherapies against sympathetic nerve pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 cells damaged by beta-amyloid 25-35 at the cellular apoptosis and related signal pathway levels. PC12 cells cultured with medicated rat serum showed enhanced cell viability and reduced cellular apoptosis rates compared with those of monotherapies and their compounds. Furthermore, Gengnianchun recipe up-regulated expressions of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, estrogen receptor-beta and phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2; and down-regulated expressions of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase-3. Gengnianchun recipe was superior to representative drug monotherapies, such as paeoniflorin, berberine, timosaponin A-III, icariine and their compounds in protecting PC12 cells. Mitogen-activated protein kinase blocker and estrogen receptor antagonist were found to reverse the above effects of Gengnianchun recipe. The experimental findings indicate that, Gengnianchun recipe protects PC12 cells from beta-amyloid 25-35 insult; its inhibitory effect on apoptosis may be achieved through the mitogen-activated protein kinase and estrogen receptor pathways.

  18. Dissecting the structural determinants for the difference in mechanical stability of silk and amyloid beta-sheet stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; Xiao, Shijun; Gräter, Frauke

    2013-06-14

    Stacking of β-sheets results in a protein super secondary structure with remarkable mechanical properties. β-Stacks are the determinants of a silk fiber's resilience and are also the building blocks of amyloid fibrils. While both silk and amyloid-type crystals are known to feature a high resistance against rupture, their structural and mechanical similarities and particularities are yet to be fully understood. Here, we systematically compare the rupture force and stiffness of amyloid and spider silk poly-alanine β-stacks of comparable sizes using Molecular Dynamics simulations. We identify the direction of force application as the primary determinant of the rupture strength; β-sheets in silk are orientated along the fiber axis, i.e. the pulling direction, and consequently require high forces in the several nanoNewton range for shearing β-strands apart, while β-sheets in amyloid are oriented vertically to the fiber, allowing a zipper-like rupture at sub-nanoNewton forces. A secondary factor rendering amyloid β-stacks softer and weaker than their spider silk counterparts is the sub-optimal side-chain packing between β-sheets due to the sequence variations of amyloid-forming proteins as opposed to the perfectly packed poly-alanine β-sheets of silk. Taken together, amyloid fibers can reach the stiffness of silk fibers in spite of their softer and weaker β-sheet arrangement as they are missing a softening amorphous matrix.

  19. Amyloid-beta induced CA1 pyramidal cell loss in young adult rats is alleviated by systemic treatment with FGL, a neural cell adhesion molecule-derived mimetic peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J Corbett

    Full Text Available Increased levels of neurotoxic amyloid-beta in the brain are a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease. FG-Loop (FGL, a neural cell adhesion molecule-derived peptide that corresponds to its second fibronectin type III module, has been shown to provide neuroprotection against a range of cellular insults. In the present study impairments in social recognition memory were seen 24 days after a 5 mg/15 µl amyloid-beta(25-35 injection into the right lateral ventricle of the young adult rat brain. This impairment was prevented if the animal was given a systemic treatment of FGL. Unbiased stereology was used to investigate the ability of FGL to alleviate the deleterious effects on CA1 pyramidal cells of the amyloid-beta(25-35 injection. NeuN, a neuronal marker (for nuclear staining was used to identify pyramidal cells, and immunocytochemistry was also used to identify inactive glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3β and to determine the effects of amyloid-beta(25-35 and FGL on the activation state of GSK3β, since active GSK3β has been shown to cause a range of AD pathologies. The cognitive deficits were not due to hippocampal atrophy as volume estimations of the entire hippocampus and its regions showed no significant loss, but amyloid-beta caused a 40% loss of pyramidal cells in the dorsal CA1 which was alleviated partially by FGL. However, FGL treatment without amyloid-beta was also found to cause a 40% decrease in CA1 pyramidal cells. The action of FGL may be due to inactivation of GSK3β, as an increased proportion of CA1 pyramidal neurons contained inactive GSK3β after FGL treatment. These data suggest that FGL, although potentially disruptive in non-pathological conditions, can be neuroprotective in disease-like conditions.

  20. First selective dual inhibitors of tau phosphorylation and Beta-amyloid aggregation, two major pathogenic mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Marica; Schmitt, Christian; Miralinaghi, Parisa; Catto, Marco; Hartmann, Rolf W; Carotti, Angelo; Engel, Matthias

    2014-12-17

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple factors account for the accumulation of neurocellular changes, which may begin several years before symptoms appear. The most important pathogenic brain changes that are contributing to the development of AD are the formation of the cytotoxic β-amyloid aggregates and of the neurofibrillary tangles, which originate from amyloid-β peptides and hyperphosphorylated tau protein, respectively. New therapeutic agents that target both major pathogenic mechanisms may be particularly efficient. In this study, we introduce bis(hydroxyphenyl)-substituted thiophenes as a novel class of selective, dual inhibitors of the tau kinase Dyrk1A and of the amyloid-β aggregation. PMID:25247807

  1. Cryogenic solid state NMR studies of fibrils of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid-{beta} peptide: perspectives for DNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez del Amo, Juan-Miguel [CIC Energigune (Spain); Schneider, Dennis [Bruker BioSpin (Germany); Loquet, Antoine; Lange, Adam [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biophysikalische Chemie (Germany); Reif, Bernd, E-mail: reif@tum.de [Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt, Helmholtz-Zentrum Muenchen (HMGU) (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization solid-state NMR holds the potential to enable a dramatic increase in sensitivity by exploiting the large magnetic moment of the electron. However, applications to biological solids are hampered in uniformly isotopically enriched biomacromolecules due to line broadening which yields a limited spectral resolution at cryogenic temperatures. We show here that high magnetic fields allow to overcome the broadening of resonance lines often experienced at liquid nitrogen temperatures. For a fibril sample of the Alzheimer's disease {beta}-amyloid peptide, we find similar line widths at low temperature and at room temperature. The presented results open new perspectives for structural investigations in the solid-state.

  2. Data supporting beta-amyloid dimer structural transitions and protein–lipid interactions on asymmetric lipid bilayer surfaces using MD simulations on experimentally derived NMR protein structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Y. Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This data article supports the research article entitled “Maximally Asymmetric Transbilayer Distribution of Anionic Lipids Alters the Structure and interaction with Lipids of an Amyloidogenic Protein Dimer Bound to the Membrane Surface” [1]. We describe supporting data on the binding kinetics, time evolution of secondary structure, and residue-contact maps of a surface-absorbed beta-amyloid dimer protein on different membrane surfaces. We further demonstrate the sorting of annular and non-annular regions of the protein/lipid bilayer simulation systems, and the correlation of lipid-number mismatch and surface area per lipid mismatch of asymmetric lipid membranes.

  3. Data supporting beta-amyloid dimer structural transitions and protein–lipid interactions on asymmetric lipid bilayer surfaces using MD simulations on experimentally derived NMR protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sara Y.; Chou, George; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark W.; Compton, Campbell; Cheng, Kwan H.

    2016-01-01

    This data article supports the research article entitled “Maximally Asymmetric Transbilayer Distribution of Anionic Lipids Alters the Structure and interaction with Lipids of an Amyloidogenic Protein Dimer Bound to the Membrane Surface” [1]. We describe supporting data on the binding kinetics, time evolution of secondary structure, and residue-contact maps of a surface-absorbed beta-amyloid dimer protein on different membrane surfaces. We further demonstrate the sorting of annular and non-annular regions of the protein/lipid bilayer simulation systems, and the correlation of lipid-number mismatch and surface area per lipid mismatch of asymmetric lipid membranes. PMID:27054174

  4. Effects of long-term estrogen replacement therapy on beta-amyloid precursor protein and mRNA expression in ovariectomized rat hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Jiang; Eryuan Liao; Liming Tan; Ruchun Dai; Zhijie Xiao

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vitro cultures of neural stem cells have shown that estrogen can regulate beta-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) metabolism and reduce amyloid-beta production.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of long-term oral administration of compound nylestriol or low-dose 17beta-estradiol on β-APP and mRNA expression in the hippocampus of ovariectomized (OVX) rats. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This randomized and controlled experiment was performed at the Animal Laboratory and Laboratory of Endocrine and Metabolic Disease, Xiangya Second Hospital of Central South University between April 2003 and May 2004.MATERIALS: According to body mass, 50 six-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 10 per group): normal control, sham operation, OVX model, 17beta-estradiol (Sigma, USA), and compound nylestriol tablet (Laboratory of Endocrine and Metabolic Disease, Xiangya Second Hospital of Central South University) groups.METHODS: Rats in OVX plus 17beta-estradiol and OVX plus compound nylestriol tablet groups underwent ovariectomy. On the second day after surgery, rats were intragastrically given 17beta-estradiol (100 μg/kg), once per day or compound nylestriol tablet (0.5 mg/kg) and levonorgestrel (0.15 mg/kg) every 2 days.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: β-APP expression in the hippocampus of OVX rats was determined using immunohistochemistry (SABC method) and β-APP mRNA expression was analyzed by in situ hybridization. The results were quantitatively analyzed using cell counting and average optical density. RESULTS: The number and optical density of β-APP-positive neurons in every subregion of the hippocampus of OVX rats was dramatically increased compared with normal and sham operation groups following 35 weeks of administration (P < 0.05). Levels of β-APP were decreased following oral administration of compound nylestriol or 17beta-estradiol. In situ hybridization showed that long-term estrogen deficiency and oral administration

  5. Local atomic structure and oxidation processes of Cu(I) binding site in amyloid beta peptide: XAS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremennaya, M. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Stretsov, V. A.; Soldatov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    There are two different motifs of X-ray absorption spectra for Cu(I) K-edge in amyloid-β peptide which could be due to two different configurations of local Cu(I) environment. Two or three histidine ligands can coordinate copper ion in varying conformations. On the other hand, oxidation of amyloid-β peptide could play an additional role in local copper environment. In order to explore the peculiarities of local atomic and electronic structure of Cu(I) binding sites in amyloid-β peptide the x-ray absorption spectra were simulated for various Cu(I) environments including oxidized amyloid-β and compared with experimental data.

  6. GMP-compliant automated synthesis of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 (Florbetapir F 18) for imaging {beta}-amyloid plaques in human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, C.-H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Weng, C.-C. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, I.-T. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ting, Y.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Jan, T.-R. [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Wey, S.-P., E-mail: spwey@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-12-15

    We report herein the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant automated synthesis of {sup 18}F-labeled styrylpyridine, AV-45 (Florbetapir), a novel tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. [{sup 18}F]AV-45 was prepared in 105 min using a tosylate precursor with Sumitomo modules for radiosynthesis under GMP-compliant conditions. The overall yield was 25.4{+-}7.7% with a final radiochemical purity of 95.3{+-}2.2% (n=19). The specific activity of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 reached as high as 470{+-}135 TBq/mmol (n=19). The present studies show that [{sup 18}F]AV-45 can be manufactured under GMP-compliant conditions and could be widely available for routine clinical use.

  7. Fetzima (levomilnacipran), a drug for major depressive disorder as a dual inhibitor for human serotonin transporters and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Syed Mohd Danish; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Khan, Mahiuddin; Biswas, Deboshree; Hameed, Nida; Shakil, Shazi

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological management of Major Depressive Disorder includes the use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors which targets serotonin transporters (SERT) to increase the synaptic concentrations of serotonin. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE-1) is responsible for amyloid β plaque formation. Hence it is an interesting target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy. This study describes molecular interactions of a new Food and Drug Administration approved antidepressant drug named 'Fetzima' with BACE-1 and SERT. Fetzima is chemically known as levomilnacipran. The study has explored a possible link between the treatment of Depression and AD. 'Autodock 4.2' was used for docking study. The free energy of binding (ΔG) values for 'levomilnacipran-SERT' interaction and 'levomilnacipran-BACE1' interaction were found to be -7.47 and -8.25 kcal/mol, respectively. Levomilnacipran was found to interact with S438, known to be the most important amino acid residue of serotonin binding site of SERT during 'levomilnacipran-SERT' interaction. In the case of 'levomilnacipran-BACE1' interaction, levomilnacipran interacted with two very crucial aspartic acid residues of BACE-1, namely, D32 and D228. These residues are accountable for the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein and the subsequent formation of amyloid β plaques in AD brain. Hence, Fetzima (levomilnacipran) might act as a potent dual inhibitor of SERT and BACE-1 and expected to form the basis of a future dual therapy against depression and AD. It is an established fact that development of AD is associated with Major Depressive Disorder. Therefore, the design of new BACE-1 inhibitors based on antidepressant drug scaffolds would be particularly beneficial. PMID:25345508

  8. Cytokine-producing microglia have an altered beta-amyloid load in aged APP/PS1 Tg mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Ilkjær, Laura; Clausen, Bettina H; Villadsen, Birgitte; Dissing-Olesen, Lasse; Bendixen, Anita T M; Lyck, Lise; Lambertsen, Kate L; Finsen, Bente

    2015-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and chronic neuroinflammation are significant neuropathological features of Alzheimer's disease. Microglial cells in aged brains have potential to produce cytokines such as TNF and IL-1 family members (IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-1Ra) and to phagocytose Aβ in Alzheimer's disease, however the inter-relationship between these processes is poorly understood. Here we show that % Aβ plaque load followed a sigmoidal trajectory with age in the neocortex of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 Tg mice, and correlated positively with soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42. Aβ measures were moderately correlated with mRNA levels of CD11b, TNF, and IL-1Ra. Cytokine production and Aβ load were assessed in neocortical CD11b(+)(CD45(+)) microglia by flow cytometry. Whereas most microglia in aged mice produced IL-1Ra, relatively low proportions of microglia produced TNF, IL-1α, and IL-1β. However, microglial production of these latter cytokines was generally increased in APP/PS1 Tg mice. Microglia that phagocytosed endogenously-produced Aβ were only observed in APP/PS1 Tg mice. Differences in phagocytic index and total Aβ load were observed in microglia with specific cytokine profiles. Both phagocytic index and total Aβ load were higher in IL-1α(+) and IL-1Ra(+) microglia, than microglia that did not produce these cytokines. In contrast, total Aβ load was lower in IL-1β(+) and TNF(+) microglia, compared to IL-1β(-) and TNF(-) microglia, and TNF(+) microglia also had a lower phagocytic index. Using GFP bone marrow chimeric mice, we confirmed that the majority of neocortical CD11b(+)(CD45(+)) microglia were resident cells (GFP(-)) in APP/PS1 Tg mice, even after selectively analysing CD11b(+)CD45(high) cells, which are typically considered to be infiltrating cells. Together, our data demonstrate that cytokine expression is selectively correlated with age and Aβ pathology, and is associated with an altered Aβ load in phagocytic microglia from APP/PS1 Tg mice. These findings have

  9. Aggregation, impaired degradation and immunization targeting of amyloid-beta dimers in Alzheimer’s disease: a stochastic modelling approach

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    Proctor Carole J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most frequently diagnosed neurodegenerative disorder affecting humans, with advanced age being the most prominent risk factor for developing AD. Despite intense research efforts aimed at elucidating the precise molecular underpinnings of AD, a definitive answer is still lacking. In recent years, consensus has grown that dimerisation of the polypeptide amyloid-beta (Aß, particularly Aß42, plays a crucial role in the neuropathology that characterise AD-affected post-mortem brains, including the large-scale accumulation of fibrils, also referred to as senile plaques. This has led to the realistic hope that targeting Aß42 immunotherapeutically could drastically reduce plaque burden in the ageing brain, thus delaying AD onset or symptom progression. Stochastic modelling is a useful tool for increasing understanding of the processes underlying complex systems-affecting disorders such as AD, providing a rapid and inexpensive strategy for testing putative new therapies. In light of the tool’s utility, we developed computer simulation models to examine Aß42 turnover and its aggregation in detail and to test the effect of immunization against Aß dimers. Results Our model demonstrates for the first time that even a slight decrease in the clearance rate of Aß42 monomers is sufficient to increase the chance of dimers forming, which could act as instigators of protofibril and fibril formation, resulting in increased plaque levels. As the process is slow and levels of Aβ are normally low, stochastic effects are important. Our model predicts that reducing the rate of dimerisation leads to a significant reduction in plaque levels and delays onset of plaque formation. The model was used to test the effect of an antibody mediated immunological response. Our results showed that plaque levels were reduced compared to conditions where antibodies are not present. Conclusion Our model supports the current

  10. Phosphorylated tau/amyloid beta 1-42 ratio in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid reflects outcome in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Sunil

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH is a potentially reversible cause of dementia and gait disturbance that is typically treated by operative placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The outcome from shunting is variable, and some evidence suggests that the presence of comorbid Alzheimer's disease (AD may impact shunt outcome. Evidence also suggests that AD biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF may predict the presence of AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the phosphorylated tau/amyloid beta 1-42 (ptau/Aβ1-42 ratio in ventricular CSF and shunt outcome in patients with iNPH. Methods We conducted a prospective trial with a cohort of 39 patients with suspected iNPH. Patients were clinically and psychometrically assessed prior to and approximately 4 months after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Lumbar and ventricular CSF obtained intraoperatively, and tissue from intraoperative cortical biopsies were analyzed for AD biomarkers. Outcome measures included performance on clinical symptom scales, supplementary gait measures, and standard psychometric tests. We investigated relationships between the ptau/Aβ1-42 ratio in ventricular CSF and cortical AD pathology, initial clinical features, shunt outcome, and lumbar CSF ptau/Aβ1-42 ratios in the patients in our cohort. Results We found that high ptau/Aβ1-42 ratios in ventricular CSF correlated with the presence of cortical AD pathology. At baseline, iNPH patients with ratio values most suggestive of AD presented with better gait performance but poorer cognitive performance. Patients with high ptau/Aβ1-42 ratios also showed a less robust response to shunting on both gait and cognitive measures. Finally, in a subset of 18 patients who also underwent lumbar puncture, ventricular CSF ratios were significantly correlated with lumbar CSF ratios. Conclusions Levels of AD biomarkers in CSF correlate with the presence of cortical AD pathology

  11. Protective Effect of Ecdysterone on PC12 Cells Cytotoxicity Induced by Beta-amyloid25-35

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Su-fen; WU Zhong-jun; YANG Zheng-qin; WU Qin; GONG Qi-hai; ZHOU Qi-xin; SHI Jing-shan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the protective effect of ecdysterone (ECR) against beta-amyloid peptide fragment25-35 (Aβ25-35)-induced PC12 cells cytotoxicity, and to further explore its mechanism. Methods:Experimental PC12 cells were divided into the Aβ group (treated by Aβ25-35 100 μmol/L), the blank group (untreated), the positive control group (treated by Vit E 100 μmol/L after induction) and the ECR treated groups (treated by ECR with different concentrations of 1, 50 and 100 μmol/L). The damaged and survival condition of PC12 cells in various groups was monitored by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and MTT assay. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured by fluorometric assay to indicate the lipid peroxidation. And the antioxidant enzymes activities in PC12 cells, including superoxide dismutases(SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase(GSH-Px), were detected respectively. Results: After PC12 cells were treated with Aβ25-35 ( 100 μmol/L) for 24 hrs, they revealed a great decrease in MTT absorbance and activity of antioxidant enzymes, including SOD, CAT and GSH-Px as well as a significant increase of LDH activity and MDA content in PC12 cells (P<0.01). When the cells was pretreated with 1-100 μmol/L ECR for 24 hrs before Aβ25-35 treatment, the above-mentioned cytotoxic effect of Aβ25-35 could be significantly attenuated dose-dependently, for ECR 50 μmol/L, P<0.05 and for ECR 100 μmol/L, P<0.01. Moreover, ECR also showed significant inhibition on the Aβ25-35 induced decrease of SOD and GSH-Px activity, but not on that of CAT. Conclusion: ECR could protect PC12 cells from cytotoxicity of Aβ25-35, and the protective mechanism might be related to the increase of SOD and GSH-Px activities and the decrease of MDA resulting from the ECR-pretreatment.

  12. Amyloid beta dimers/trimers potently induce cofilin-actin rods that are inhibited by maintaining cofilin-phosphorylation

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    Podlisny Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we reported 1 μM synthetic human amyloid beta1-42 oligomers induced cofilin dephosphorylation (activation and formation of cofilin-actin rods within rat hippocampal neurons primarily localized to the dentate gyrus. Results Here we demonstrate that a gel filtration fraction of 7PA2 cell-secreted SDS-stable human Aβ dimers and trimers (Aβd/t induces maximal neuronal rod response at ~250 pM. This is 4,000-fold more active than traditionally prepared human Aβ oligomers, which contain SDS-stable trimers and tetramers, but are devoid of dimers. When incubated under tyrosine oxidizing conditions, synthetic human but not rodent Aβ1-42, the latter lacking tyrosine, acquires a marked increase (620 fold for EC50 in rod-inducing activity. Gel filtration of this preparation yielded two fractions containing SDS-stable dimers, trimers and tetramers. One, eluting at a similar volume to 7PA2 Aβd/t, had maximum activity at ~5 nM, whereas the other, eluting at the void volume (high-n state, lacked rod inducing activity at the same concentration. Fractions from 7PA2 medium containing Aβ monomers are not active, suggesting oxidized SDS-stable Aβ1-42 dimers in a low-n state are the most active rod-inducing species. Aβd/t-induced rods are predominantly localized to the dentate gyrus and mossy fiber tract, reach significance over controls within 2 h of treatment, and are reversible, disappearing by 24 h after Aβd/t washout. Overexpression of cofilin phosphatases increase rod formation when expressed alone and exacerbate rod formation when coupled with Aβd/t, whereas overexpression of a cofilin kinase inhibits Aβd/t-induced rod formation. Conclusions Together these data support a mechanism by which Aβd/t alters the actin cytoskeleton via effects on cofilin in neurons critical to learning and memory.

  13. Protective effects of testosterone on cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease model rats induced by oligomeric beta amyloid peptide 1-42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Dong-Sheng; Sun, Jian-Fang; Zhang, Baifeng; Yan, Xu-Sheng; Wang, He; Jia, Jian-Xin; Yang, Zhan-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is known to be influenced by circulating sex steroidal hormones. The aim of this study was to examine the protective effect and possible protective mechanism of testosterone (T) on cognitive performance in male rats induced by intrahippocampal injections of beta amyloid 1-42 oligomers (Aβ1-42). Treatment with T as evidenced by the Morris water maze (MWM) test significantly shortened escape latency and reduced path length to reach the platform compared to the control (C). During probe trials, the T group displayed a significantly greater percent of time in the target quadrant and improved the number of platform crossings compared with C, flutamide (F), an antiandrogen, and a combined F and T group. Flutamide markedly inhibited the influence of T on cognitive performance. Following Nissl staining, the number of intact pyramidal cells was significantly elevated in the T group, and the effect of T was blocked by F. Immunohistochemisty and Western blot analysis showed that the protein expression level of Aβ 1-42 was markedly decreased and expression levels of synaptophysin (SYN) significantly increased with T, while F inhibited all T-mediated effects. Our data suggest that the influence of T on cognitive performance was mediated via androgen receptors (AR) to remove beta amyloid, which leads to enhanced synaptic plasticity. PMID:27599231

  14. Noopept efficiency in experimental Alzheimer disease (cognitive deficiency caused by beta-amyloid25-35 injection into Meynert basal nuclei of rats).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskaya, R U; Belnik, A P; Storozheva, Z I

    2008-07-01

    Experiments on adult Wistar rats showed that injection of beta-amyloid25-35 (2 microg) into Meynert basal nuclei caused long-term memory deficiency which was detected 24 days after this injection by the memory trace retrieval in conditioned passive avoidance reflex (CPAR). The effects of noopept, an original nootropic and neuroprotective dipeptide, on the severity of this cognitive deficiency were studied. Preventive (for 7 days before the injury) intraperitoneal injections of noopept in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg completely prevented mnestic disorders under conditions of this model. Noopept exhibited a significant normalizing effect, if the treatment was started 15 days after the injury, when neurodegenerative changes in the basal nuclei, cortex, and hippocampus were still acutely pronounced. The mechanisms of this effect of the drug are studied, including, in addition to the choline-positive effect, its multicomponent neuroprotective effect and stimulation of production of antibodies to beta-amyloid25-35. Noopept efficiency in many models of Alzheimer disease, its high bioavailability and low toxicity suggest this dipeptide for further studies as a potential agent for the treatment of this condition (initial and moderate phases). PMID:19145356

  15. Regulation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels suppresses the toxic effects of amyloid-beta peptide (25-35)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Kong; Maowen Ba; Hui Liang; Peng Shao; Tianxia Yu; Ying Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we treated PC12 cells with 0-20 μM amyloid-β peptide (25-35) for 24 hours to induce cytotoxicity, and found that 5-20 μM amyloid-β peptide (25-35) decreased PC12 cell viability, but adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel activator diazoxide suppressed the decrease reactive oxygen species levels. These protective effects were reversed by the selective mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate. An inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine, also protected PC12 cells from intracellular reactive oxygen species levels. However, the H2O2-degrading enzyme catalase could that the increases in both mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species levels adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels and nitric oxide. Regulation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels suppresses PC12 cell cytotoxicity induced by amyloid

  16. Expression of secreted human single-chain fragment variable antibody against human amyloid beta peptide in Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiong Cai; Fang Li; Shizhen Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that monoclonal or polyclonal antibody injections ofamyloid β peptide arc effective in removing amyloid β peptide overload in the brain.OBJECTIVE: Based on successful screening of a human single-chain fragment variable antibody specific to amyloid β peptide, this paper aimed to express recombinant human single-chain variable antibody against amyloid β peptide.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A single sample experiment was performed at the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Hospital (Beijing, China) from January to July 2006.MATERIALS: Human single-chain fragment variable antibody gene against amyloid β peptide was screened from a human phage-display antibody library.METHODS: Human single-chain fragment variable antibody gene was mutated to eliminate a BamHI restriction site and cloned into a Teasy plasmid for pT-seFvAβ construction, which was identified by PCR amplification and endonuclease digestion. Plasmid pT-scFvA β was cut by EcoRl and Notl endonucleases, and the antibody gene was cloned into pPIC9K plasmid to construct pPIC9K-scFvA β expression vector, which was confirmed by gene sequencing. Linearized pPICgK-scFvA β was used to transform a Pichia pastoris GS115 cell line, and the recombinant was induced by 0.5 % methanol to express human single-chain fragment variable antibody specific to amyloid β peptide.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Protein electrophoresis was used to identify PCR products, gene sequencing was uscd to verify the pPIC9K-scFvA sequence, and SDS-PAGE was used to detect recombinant expression of human single-chain fragment variable antibody specific to amyloid β peptide in Pichia pastoris.RESULTS: Gene sequencing confirmed pPICgK-scFvA β orientation. Rccomhinants were obtained by lineadzed pPIC9K-scFvA β transformation. After induction with 0.5% methanol, the recombinant yeast cells secreted proteins of 33-ku size

  17. Neuroprotective effects of human telomerase reverse transcriptase on beta-amyloid fragment 25-35-treated human embryonic cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingping Kong; Lingzhi Wu; Jie Zhang; Yaping Liao; Huaqiao Wang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Numerous current studies have suggested that human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene has neuroprotective effects and can inhibit apoptosis induced by various cytotoxic stresses;however,the mechanism of action remains unknown.OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the neuroprotective effects and possible mechanism of action of hTERT gene transfection in human embryonic cortical neurons treated with beta-amyloid fragment 25-35 (Aβ25-35).DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:The randomized,controlled and molecular biological studies were performed at the Department of Anatomy and Brain Research,Zhongshan School of Medicine,Sun Yat-sen University,China,from September 2005 to June 2008.MATERIALS:AdEasy-1 Expression System was gifted by Professor Guoquan Gao from Sun Yat-Sen University,China.Human cortical neurons were derived from 12-20 week old aborted fetuses,obtained from the Guangzhou Maternal and Child Health Hospital,China.Mouse anti-Cdk5 and mouse anti-p16 monoclonal antibodies (Lab Vision,USA),and mouse anti-hTERT monoclonal antibody (Epitomics,USA),were used in this study.METHODS:(1) Recombinant adenovirus vectors,encoding hTERT (Ad-hTERT) and green fluorescent protein (Ad-GFP),were constructed using the AdEasy-1 Expression System.Human embryonic cortical neurons in the Ad-hTERT group were transfected with Ad-hTERT for 1-21 days.Likewise,human embryonic cortical neurons in the Ad-GFP group were transfected with Ad-GFP for 1-21 days.Human embryonic cortical neurons in the control group were cultured as normal.(2) Human embryonic cortical neurons in the Ad-hTERT group were treated with 10 μmol/L Aβ25-35 for 24 hours.Normal human embryonic cortical neurons treated with 10 μmol/L Aβ25-35 for 24 hours served as a model group.Human embryonic cortical neurons in the Ad-GFP and control groups were not treated with Aβ25-35.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Expression of hTERT in human embryonic cortical neurons was evaluated by immunocytochemical staining and Western blot assay

  18. Individualized quantification of brain {beta}-amyloid burden: results of a proof of mechanism phase 0 florbetaben PET trial in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, Henryk; Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg; Patt, Marianne; Sattler, Bernhard; Schildan, Andreas; Hesse, Swen; Meyer, Philipp M.; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Hammerstein, Eva; Hartwig, Kristin; Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Eggers, Birk [Arzneimittelforschung Leipzig GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); University of Zurich, Department of Psychiatry, Zurich (Switzerland); Zimmermann, Torsten; Reischl, Joachim; Rohde, Beate; Reininger, Cornelia [Bayer Healthcare, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Complementing clinical findings with those generated by biomarkers - such as {beta}-amyloid-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging - has been proposed as a means of increasing overall accuracy in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Florbetaben ([{sup 18}F]BAY 94-9172) is a novel {beta}-amyloid PET tracer currently in global clinical development. We present the results of a proof of mechanism study in which the diagnostic efficacy, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of florbetaben were assessed. The value of various quantitative parameters derived from the PET scans as potential surrogate markers of cognitive decline was also investigated. Ten patients with mild-moderate probable AD (DSM-IV and NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) and ten age-matched ({>=} 55 years) healthy controls (HCs) were administered a single dose of 300 MBq florbetaben, which contained a tracer mass dose of < 5 {mu}g. The 70-90 min post-injection brain PET data were visually analysed by three blinded experts. Quantitative assessment was also performed via MRI-based, anatomical sampling of predefined volumes of interest (VOI) and subsequent calculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios (SUVRs, cerebellar cortex as reference region). Furthermore, single-case, voxelwise analysis was used to calculate individual ''whole brain {beta}-amyloid load''. Visual analysis of the PET data revealed nine of the ten AD, but only one of the ten HC brains to be {beta}-amyloid positive (p = 0.001), with high inter-reader agreement (weighted kappa {>=} 0.88). When compared to HCs, the neocortical SUVRs were significantly higher in the ADs (with descending order of effect size) in frontal cortex, lateral temporal cortex, occipital cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, and parietal cortex (p = 0.003-0.010). Voxel-based group comparison confirmed these differences. Amongst the PET-derived parameters, the Statistical Parametric Mapping-based whole brain

  19. Influence of scan duration on the accuracy of {beta}-amyloid PET with florbetaben in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiepolt, Solveig; Barthel, Henryk; Butzke, Daniel; Hesse, Swen; Patt, Marianne; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Reininger, Cornelia [Bayer Pharma AG, Global Clinical Development, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Florbetaben is a {beta}-amyloid-targeted PET tracer with significant potential for augmenting the toolbox in the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In dementia imaging, shortening of scan duration may simplify future clinical use. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the effect of scan duration on diagnostic accuracy. PET scans obtained from 25 AD patients and 25 healthy volunteers (HVs) were analysed. In each subject, scans of three different durations (5, 10 and 20 min; all starting 90 min after injection) were obtained, randomized, and visually assessed by three experts blinded to the subject's identity and group affiliation. Presence/absence of {beta}-amyloid and diagnostic confidence (0-100 %) were scored, and 10 % of the scans were re-read. Further, randomly selected datasets of ten AD patients and ten HVs were quantified using an established VOI-based approach and using a voxel-based approach. The sensitivity and specificity of the blinded read were 80 % and 96 %, respectively, for all scan durations. Diagnostic confidence was high (97 {+-} 6 %, 97 {+-} 6 % and 95 {+-} 8 % for the 20-min, 10-min and 5-min scans, respectively; n.s.), as was interreader agreement (kappa{sub 20} {sub min} = 0.94, kappa{sub 10} {sub min} = 0.94, kappa{sub 5} {sub min} = 0.89; n.s.). Intrareader agreement was highest for the 20-min scan (kappa = 1.00) and lower for the 10-min scan (kappa = 0.71) and 5-min scan (kappa = 0.80; p = 0.002 and 0.003 vs. the 20-min scan). For all scan durations, composite SUVRs (Cohen's d effect size 4.5, 3.9 and 4.8 for the 5-min, 10-min and 20-min scans; p < 0.0001 each) and individual brain volumes affected by {beta}-amyloid (Cohen's d effect size 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 for the 5-min, 10-min and 20-min scans; p < 0.005 each) were significantly higher in AD patients than in HVs. Reduction in scan duration did not relevantly affect the accuracy of florbetaben PET scans in discriminating between AD patients

  20. Characterization of the beta amyloid precursor protein-like gene in the central nervous system of the crab Chasmagnathus. Expression during memory consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fustiñana Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human β-amyloid, the main component in the neuritic plaques found in patients with Alzheimer's disease, is generated by cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein. Beyond the role in pathology, members of this protein family are synaptic proteins and have been associated with synaptogenesis, neuronal plasticity and memory, both in vertebrates and in invertebrates. Consolidation is necessary to convert a short-term labile memory to a long-term and stable form. During consolidation, gene expression and de novo protein synthesis are regulated in order to produce key proteins for the maintenance of plastic changes produced during the acquisition of new information. Results Here we partially cloned and sequenced the beta-amyloid precursor protein like gene homologue in the crab Chasmagnathus (cappl, showing a 37% of identity with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster homologue and 23% with Homo sapiens but with much higher degree of sequence similarity in certain regions. We observed a wide distribution of cappl mRNA in the nervous system as well as in muscle and gills. The protein localized in all tissues analyzed with the exception of muscle. Immunofluorescence revealed localization of cAPPL in associative and sensory brain areas. We studied gene and protein expression during long-term memory consolidation using a well characterized memory model: the context-signal associative memory in this crab species. mRNA levels varied at different time points during long-term memory consolidation and correlated with cAPPL protein levels Conclusions cAPPL mRNA and protein is widely distributed in the central nervous system of the crab and the time course of expression suggests a role of cAPPL during long-term memory formation.

  1. Selenomethionine reduces the deposition of beta-amyloid plaques by modulating β-secretase and enhancing selenoenzymatic activity in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-Hao; Chen, Chen; Wu, Qiu-Yan; Zheng, Rui; Liu, Qiong; Ni, Jia-Zuan; Hoffmann, Peter R; Song, Guo-Li

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the production of large amounts of beta-amyloid (Aβ) and the accumulation of extracellular senile plaques, which have been considered to be potential targets in the treatment of AD. Selenium (Se) is a nutritionally essential trace element with known antioxidant potential and Se status has been shown to decrease with age and has a close relationship with cognitive competence in AD. Selenomethionine (Se-Met), a major reserve form of Se in organisms, has been shown in our previous study to ameliorate the decline in cognitive function, increase oxidation resistance, and reduce tau hyperphosphorylation in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD. However, it has not been reported whether Se-Met has any effects on Aβ pathology in AD mice. To study the effect of Se-Met on Aβ pathology and the function of selenoproteins/selenoenzymes in 3× Tg-AD mice, 3× Tg-AD mice at 8 months of age were treated with Se-Met for 3 months. Se-Met led to significantly reduced production and deposition of Aβ, down-regulation of β-secretase levels and enhanced activity of selenoenzymes as well as increased levels of Se in the hippocampus and cortex. Se-Met reduces amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein while modulating β-secretase and selenoenzymatic activity in AD mice. These results indicate that Se-Met might exert its therapeutic effect through multiple pathways in AD. PMID:27465436

  2. Green-fluorescent protein+ Astrocytes Attach to beta-Amyloid Plaques in an Alzheimer Mouse Model and GFPare Sensitive for Clasmatodendrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eHumpel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is pathologically characterized by beta-amyloid (Aβ plaques and Tau pathology. It is well-established that Aβ plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes, highly expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. In order to study the cellular interaction of reactive astrocytes with Aβ plaques, we crossbred mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations (APP-SweDI with mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the GFAP-promotor. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy revealed a tight association and intense sprouting of astrocytic fine branched processes towards Aβ plaques in 12 month old mice. In order to study phagocytosis, 110 µm thick brain slices from 12 month old crossbred mice were cultured overnight, however, we found that the GFP fluorescence faded away, distal processes degenerated and a complete loss of astrocytic morphology was seen (clasmatodendrosis. In summary, our data show that GFP+ reactive astrocytes make intense contact with Aβ plaques but these cells are highly vulnerable for degeneration.

  3. Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis by detecting exogenous fluorescent signal of ligand bound to beta amyloid in the lens of human eye: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eKerbage

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We report results of a clinical exploratory human trial involving 10 participants using a combination of a fluorescent ligand and a laser scanning device, SAPPHIRE System, as an aid in the diagnosis of Probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such a technique has been used in vivo of a human lens. The primary goal of the clinical trial, in addition to safety assessment, was to evaluate efficacy of the system. By detecting specific fluorescent signature of ligand bound beta amyloid in the supranucleus region of the human lens, a two-fold differentiation factor between AD patients and Control groups is achieved. Data from our studies indicates that deeper regions of the supranucleus provide the highest measures of ligand bound fluorescence signal from both controls and AD patients. Further studies are underway involving a larger population for statistical evaluation of the method.

  4. The Effect of Beta-Amyloid on Neurons and the Influence of Glucocorticoid and Age on Such Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈红辉; 孙圣刚; 梅元武; 刘昌勤; 刘安求; 童萼塘

    2002-01-01

    Summary: To explore the relationship between β-amyloid (Aβ) and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), after injection of β-amyloid into the rat brain, the apoptosis of nerve cells and acetylcholine (Ach) content in rat hippocampus were examined by employing TUNEL technique and base hydroxylamine colorimetry respectively. The influence of age and glucocorticoid on the neurotoxic effect of Aβ was also analyzed. Aβ peptide could strongly induce the apoptosis of neurons in hippocampus, cortex and striate body (P<0. 05 or P<0. 01). In addition, the senility and glucocorticoid pre-treatment could enhance the toxic effect of Aβ(P<0. 05 or P<0. 01). It is concluded that Aβ may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease via its induction of apoptosis of neurons and by decreasing the content of the Ach.

  5. Amyloid-Beta Peptide, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Alzheimer's Disease: Potential Neuroprotective Effects of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    S. C. Dyall

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in the elderly and is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterised by a decline in cognitive function and also profound alterations in mood and behaviour. The pathology of the disease is characterised by the presence of extracellular amyloid peptide deposits and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Although many hypotheses have been put forward for the aetiology of the disease, increased inflammation and oxidativ...

  6. Cratoxylum formosum Extract Protects against Amyloid-Beta Toxicity in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keowkase, Roongpetch; Weerapreeyakul, Natthida

    2016-04-01

    Amyloid-β, one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, is toxic to neurons and causes cell death in the brain. Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in Alzheimer's disease, and there is strong evidence linking oxidative stress to amyloid-β. The herbal plant "Tiew kon" (Cratoxylum formosum ssp. pruniflorum) is an indigenous vegetable that is grown in Southeast Asia. Many reports suggested that the twig extract from C. formosum possesses an antioxidant property. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of the twig extract from C. formosum against amyloid-β toxicity using the transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model. This study demonstrated that the extract significantly delayed amyloid-β-induced paralysis in the C. elegans model of Alzheimer's disease. Using a genetic approach, we found that DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor, heat shock factor 1, and SKN-1 (Nrf2 in mammals) were required for the extract-mediated delayed paralysis. The extract ameliorated oxidative stress by reducing the level of H2O2, which appeared to account for the protective action of the extract. The extract possesses antioxidant activity against juglone-induced oxidative stress as it was shown to increase survival of the stressed worms. In addition, C. formosum decreased the expression of the heat shock protein-16.2 gene which was induced by thermal stress, indicating its ability to reduce cellular stress. The results from this study support the C. elegans model in the search for disease-modifying agents to treat Alzheimer's disease and indicate the potential of the extract from C. formosum ssp. pruniflorum as a source for the development of anti-Alzheimer's drugs. PMID:26845710

  7. Chronic pre-treatment with memantine prevents amyloid-beta protein-mediated long-term potentiation disruption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fushun Li; Xiaowei Chen; Feiming Wang; Shujun Xu; Lan Chang; Roger Anwyl; Qinwen Wang

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that memantine, a low-affinity N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, exerted acute protective effects against amyloid-β protein-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, the chronic effects and mechanisms of memantine were investigated further using electrophysiological methods. The results showed that 7-day intraperitoneal application of memantine, at doses of 5 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg, did not alter hippocampal long-term potentiation induction in rats, while 40 mg/kg memantine presented potent long-term potentiation inhibition. Then further in vitro studys were carried out in 5 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg memantine treated rats. We found that 20 mg/kg memantine attenuated the potent long-term potentiation inhibition caused by exposure to amyloid-β protein in the dentate gyrus in vitro. These findings are the first to demonstrate the antagonizing effect of long-term systematic treatment of memantine against amyloid-β protein triggered long-term potentiation inhibition to improve synaptic plasticity.

  8. Improving cognitive impairment by Tongxinluo via inhibiting expression of beta-secretase 1/beta-amyloid peptide in experimental vascular dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Jia; Wenbin Zhu; Lihui Wang; Yun Xu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tongxinluo has been clinically proven to be effective in improving memory and cognitive function in patients with post-stroke vascular dementia. Is the mechanism related to the deposition of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in hippocampus? OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of Tongxinluo on cognitive impairment in a mouse model with vascular dementia and the changes of Aβ deposition andβ-secretase 1 (BACE1) expression.DESIGN: Randomized controlled study.SETTING: State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology of Nanjing University and Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School.MATERIALS: The experiment was carried out in the State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology of Nanjing University and Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School from March 2006 to January 2007. A total of 36 healthy Kunming mice, 18 of each gender, were chosen. The study was conducted in accordance with the National Regulations of Experimental Animal Administration, and all animal experiments were approved by the Committee of Experimental Animal Administration of Nanjing University. Tongxinluo was provided by Shijiazhuang Yiling Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.METHODS: All mice were randomly divided into 6 groups, including naive control (n=6), sham-operated control (n=6) and experimental groups treated with different doses of Tongxinluo (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 g/kg/d; n=6 for each group) or vehicle (n=6). Five groups were subjected to bilateral common carotid arteries (2-VO) occlusion to produce a vascular dementia model(noocclusion was performed in sham-operated group). The mice in the Tongxinluo treatment groups were intragastricly administered daily with a Tongxinluo suspension (40 g/L in distilled water) at doses of 0.2, 0.4 or 0.6 g/kg/d from day 1 to day 30 post-surgery. The animals in vehicle, sham-operated and naive groups were administered an equal volume of distilled water. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ①Escape latency time

  9. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by sodium ferulate in protecting neurons from beta-amyloid induced damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyan Yao; Deyu Zheng; Zhuo Liu; Ying Jin

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sodium ferulate (SF) has an effect of anti-inflammation; however, whether it can inhibit beta-amyloid (Aβ) induced damage or not should be further studied.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of SF on neurotoxicity mediated by Aβ-induced macrophage activation via inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in vitro.DESTGN: A contrast experiment based on cells.SETTrNG: Departments of Pathophysiology, Pharmacology and Anatomy, Liaoning Medical College.MATERTALS: A total of 36 Kunming mice aged 8-10 weeks and some SD rats aged 2-3 days of both genders were selected in this study. Main reagents were detailed as follows: Aβ peptide (Sigma Company); SF (purity >99%, Suzhou Changtong Chemical Co., Ltd.); lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay kit (Bangding Biological Engineering Co., Beijing, China); microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) monoclonal antibodies and TNF-αmonoclonal antibodies (Boster Biological Engineering Co., Wuhan, China).METHODS: The experiment was carried out in Laboratories of Pharmacology and Anatomy, Liaoning Medical College from May to December 2004. Cerebellum was obtained from rats under sterile condition to culture neurons and macrophages taken from mice abdominal cavity. Later, two parallel experiments were performed as follows: ① Macrophages culture groups: In normal control group, macrophages were cultured in DMEM after being seeded. In Aβ group, neurotoxic form of Aβ was added into DMEM media with final concentration of 10 μmol/L after macrophages were seeded for 24 hours. In Aβ+SF group, ten minutes after Aβ treatment, for 10, 100, 500 μmol/L and 1 mmol/L of SF were added to the media of the macrophages culture. ②Macrophages-neurons co-cultured groups: Control macrophages-neurons were co-cultured. Aβ group:Neurotoxic form of Aβ was added into the media with concentration of 10 iμmol/L after macrophages were seeded in the neurons cultured wells for 24 hours. Aβ±SF group: Ten minutes after Aβ treatment, 10

  10. 99mTc-MAMA-chrysamine G, a probe for beta-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrysamine G (CG), an analogue of Congo red, is known to bind in vitro to the β-amyloid protein (Aβ 10-43) and to homogenates of several regions of the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We synthesised a conjugate of 2-(acetamido)-CG with a bis-S-trityl protected monoamide-monoaminedithiol (MAMA-Tr2) tetraligand, which was efficiently deprotected and labelled with a 75% yield with technetium-99m, to obtain 99mTc-MAMA-CG. In mice, 99mTc-MAMA-CG was cleared mainly by the hepatobiliary system, resulting in a fast blood clearance. Brain uptake of 99mTc-MAMA-CG was low. Co-injection with the blood pool tracer iodine-125 human serum albumin (125I-HSA) demonstrated a brain/blood activity ratio for 99mTc-MAMA-CG that was significantly higher than that for 125I-HSA (t test for dependent samples, P99mTc-MAMA-CG to cross the blood-brain barrier. In vitro autoradiography demonstrated pronounced binding of 99mTc-MAMA-CG to β-amyloid deposits in autopsy sections of the parietal and occipital cortex of an AD patient as compared with controls. Adding 10 μM Congo red during incubation displaced the binding of 99mTc-MAMA-CG. Congo red staining and autoradiography identified the same lesions. 99mTc-MAMA-CG seems to bind selectively to β-amyloid deposition in human brain parenchyma and blood vessels in vitro and thus might be a lead compound for further development of a useful tracer agent for the in vivo diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.)

  11. Amyloid Aggregation and Membrane Disruption by Amyloid Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-03-01

    Amyloidogenesis has been the focus of intense basic and clinical research, as an increasing number of amyloidogenic proteins have been linked to common and incurable degenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, type II diabetes, and Parkinson's. Recent studies suggest that the cell toxicity is mainly due to intermediates generated during the assembly process of amyloid fibers, which have been proposed to attack cells in a variety of ways. Disruption of cell membranes is believed to be one of the key components of amyloid toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Our research in this area is focused on the investigation of the early events in the aggregation and membrane disruption of amyloid proteins, Islet amyloid polypeptide protein (IAPP, also known as amylin) and amyloid-beta peptide, on the molecular level. Structural insights into the mechanisms of membrane disruption by these amyloid proteins and the role of membrane components on the membrane disruption will be presented.

  12. Beta-Amyloid Downregulates MDR1-P-Glycoprotein (Abcb1 Expression at the Blood-Brain Barrier in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Brenn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurovascular dysfunction is an important component of Alzheimer's disease, leading to reduced clearance across the blood-brain barrier and accumulation of neurotoxic β-amyloid (Aβ peptides in the brain. It has been shown that the ABC transport protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1 is involved in the export of Aβ from the brain into the blood. To determine whether Aβ influences the expression of key Aβ transporters, we studied the effects of 1-day subcutaneous Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 administration via Alzet mini-osmotic pumps on P-gp, BCRP, LRP1, and RAGE expression in the brain of 90-day-old male FVB mice. Our results demonstrate significantly reduced P-gp, LRP1, and RAGE mRNA expression in mice treated with Aβ1-42 compared to controls, while BCRP expression was not affected. The expression of the four proteins was unchanged in mice treated with Aβ1-40 or reverse-sequence peptides. These findings indicate that, in addition to the age-related decrease of P-gp expression, Aβ1-42 itself downregulates the expression of P-gp and other Aβ-transporters, which could exacerbate the intracerebral accumulation of Aβ and thereby accelerate neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease and cerebral β-amyloid angiopathy.

  13. A new DNA vaccine fused with the C3d-p28 induces a Th2 immune response against amyloid-beta*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanshu Guo; Sha Sha; Tongzi Jiang; Xiaona Xing; Yunpeng Cao

    2013-01-01

    To enhance anti-amyloid-beta (Aβ) antibody generation and induce a Th2 immune response, we constructed a new DNA vaccine p(Aβ3-10 )10-C3d-p28.3 encoding ten repeats of Aβ3-10 and three copies of C3d-p28 as a molecular adjuvant. In this study, we administered this adjuvant intramus-cularly to female C57BL/6J mice at 8-10 weeks of age. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the titer of serum anti-Aβ antibody, isotypes, and cytokines in splenic T cel s. A 3-(4,5-cimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was used to detect the prolifera-tion rate of splenic T cel s. Brain sections from a 12-month-old APP/PS1 transgenic mouse were used for detecting the binding capacities of anti-Aβ antibodies to Aβ plaques. The p(Aβ3-10)10-C3d-p28.3 vaccine induced high titers of anti-amyloid-βantibodies, which bound to Aβplaques in APP/PS1 transgenic mouse brain tissue, demonstrating that the vaccine is effective against plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, the vaccine elicited a pre-dominantly IgG1 humoral response and low levels of interferon-γ in ex vivo cultured splenocytes, indicating that the vaccine could shift the cel ular immune response towards a Th2 phenotype. This indicated that the vaccine did not elicit a detrimental immune response and had a favorable safety profile. Our results indicate that the p(Aβ3-10)10-C3d-p28.3 vaccine is a promising immunothera-peutic option for Aβvaccination in Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. Influence of the solvent on the self-assembly of a modified amyloid beta peptide fragment. II. NMR and computer simulation investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamley, I W; Nutt, D R; Brown, G D; Miravet, J F; Escuder, B; Rodríguez-Llansola, F

    2010-01-21

    The conformation of a model peptide AAKLVFF based on a fragment of the amyloid beta peptide Abeta16-20, KLVFF, is investigated in methanol and water via solution NMR experiments and molecular dynamics computer simulations. In previous work, we have shown that AAKLVFF forms peptide nanotubes in methanol and twisted fibrils in water. Chemical shift measurements were used to investigate the solubility of the peptide as a function of concentration in methanol and water. This enabled the determination of critical aggregation concentrations. The solubility was lower in water. In dilute solution, diffusion coefficients revealed the presence of intermediate aggregates in concentrated solution, coexisting with NMR-silent larger aggregates, presumed to be beta-sheets. In water, diffusion coefficients did not change appreciably with concentration, indicating the presence mainly of monomers, coexisting with larger aggregates in more concentrated solution. Concentration-dependent chemical shift measurements indicated a folded conformation for the monomers/intermediate aggregates in dilute methanol, with unfolding at higher concentration. In water, an antiparallel arrangement of strands was indicated by certain ROESY peak correlations. The temperature-dependent solubility of AAKLVFF in methanol was well described by a van't Hoff analysis, providing a solubilization enthalpy and entropy. This pointed to the importance of solvophobic interactions in the self-assembly process. Molecular dynamics simulations constrained by NOE values from NMR suggested disordered reverse turn structures for the monomer, with an antiparallel twisted conformation for dimers. To model the beta-sheet structures formed at higher concentration, possible model arrangements of strands into beta-sheets with parallel and antiparallel configurations and different stacking sequences were used as the basis for MD simulations; two particular arrangements of antiparallel beta-sheets were found to be stable, one

  15. Exploring the contribution of estrogen to amyloid-beta regulation:a novel multifactorial computational modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Anastasio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the amyloid hypothesis, Alzheimer Disease results from the accumulation beyond normative levels of the peptide amyloid-β (Aβ. Perhaps because of its pathological potential, Aβ and the enzymes that produce it are heavily regulated by the molecular interactions occurring within cells, including neurons. This regulation involves a highly complex system of intertwined normative and pathological processes, and the sex hormone estrogen contributes to it by influencing the Aβ-regulation system at many different points. Owing to its high complexity, Aβ regulation and the contribution of estrogen are very difficult to reason about. This report describes a computational model of the contribution of estrogen to Aβ regulation that provides new insights and generates experimentally testable and therapeutically relevant predictions. The computational model is written in the declarative programming language known as Maude, which allows not only simulation but also analysis of the system using temporal logic. The model illustrates how the various effects of estrogen could work together to reduce Aβ levels, or prevent them from rising, in the presence of pathological triggers. The model predicts that estrogen itself should be more effective in reducing Aβ than agonists of estrogen receptor α (ERα, and that agonists of ERβ should be ineffective. The model shows how estrogen itself could dramatically reduce Aβ, and predicts that NSAIDs should provide a small additional benefit. It also predicts that certain compounds, but not others, could augment the reduction in Aβ due to estrogen. The model is intended as a starting point for a computational/experimental interaction in which model predictions are tested experimentally, the results are used to confirm, correct, and expand the model, new predictions are generated, and the process continues, producing a model of ever increasing explanatory power and predictive value.

  16. Extraskeletal problems and amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drüeke, T B

    1999-12-01

    The major clinical manifestations of dialysis-associated A beta 2M amyloidosis are chronic arthralgias, destructive arthropathy and the carpal tunnel syndrome. For dialysis patients who have been maintained on renal replacement therapy for more than 10-15 years, this complication may become a major physical handicap. It may even be life-threatening in some instances due to cervical cord compression. Amyloid deposits in joint areas precede clinical symptoms and signs by several years. Systemic deposits may also occur but their clinical manifestations are infrequent. The diagnosis of dialysis arthropathy associated with beta 2-microglobulin-associated (A beta 2M) amyloidosis mostly relies on indirect clinical and radiological evidence. Histologic proof is rarely obtained in vivo. The pathogenesis of the disease is complex. It includes reduced elimination of beta 2M and potentially also as impaired degradation of A beta 2M as well as enhanced production of A beta 2M amyloid fibrils. Non enzymatic modifications of beta 2M probably play a role, including beta 2M protein modification with advanced glycation end-products (AGE) and advanced oxidation protein products. Modified beta 2M, collagen and proteoglycans appear actively involved in the induction of a local inflammatory response and beta 2M amyloid formation. There is also evidence in favor of treatment-related factors such as the type of hemodialysis membrane and the purity of dialysis water. Hopefully, the translation of our improving knowledge of all the factors involved will lead to a better treatment and eventually to the prevention of this dramatic complication of dialysis.

  17. Yizhijiannao Granule and a combination of its effective monomers, icariin and Panax notoginseng saponins, inhibit early PC12 cell apoptosis induced by beta-amyloid (25–35)☆

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Zhanwei; Dong, Keli; Li, Guangcheng; Zhu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    One of our previous studies showed that Yizhijiannao Granule, a compound Chinese medicine, effectively improved the clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, we established a model of Alzheimer's disease using beta-amyloid (25–35) in PC12 cells, and treated the cells with Yizhijiannao Granule and its four monomers, i.e., icariin, catechin, Panax notoginseng saponins, and eleutheroside E. Flow cytometry showed that Yizhijiannao Granule-containing serum, icariin, Panax not...

  18. CD45RB is a novel molecular therapeutic target to inhibit Abeta peptide-induced microglial MAPK activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyan Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microglial activation, characterized by p38 MAPK or p44/42 MAPK pathway signal transduction, occurs in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Our previous studies demonstrated CD45, a membrane-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP, opposed beta-amyloid (Abeta peptide-induced microglial activation via inhibition of p44/42 MAPK. Additionally we have shown agonism of the RB isoform of CD45 (CD45RB abrogates lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced microglial activation. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: In this study, CD45RB modulation of Abeta peptide or LPS-activated primary cultured microglial cells was further investigated. Microglial cells were co-treated with "aged" FITC-Abeta(1-42 and multiple CD45 isoform agonist antibodies. Data revealed cross-linking of CD45, particularly the CD45RB isoform, enhances microglial phagocytosis of Abeta(1-42 peptide and inhibits LPS-induced activation of p44/42 and p38 pathways. Co-treatment of microglial cells with agonist CD45 antibodies results in significant inhibition of LPS-induced microglial TNF-alpha and IL-6 release through p44/42 and/or p38 pathways. Moreover, inhibition of either of these pathways augmented CD45RB cross-linking induced microglial phagocytosis of Abeta(1-42 peptide. To investigate the mechanism(s involved, microglial cells were co-treated with a PTP inhibitor (potassium bisperoxo [1,10-phenanthroline oxovanadate; Phen] and Abeta(1-42 peptides. Data showed synergistic induction of microglial activation as evidenced by TNF-alpha and IL-6 release; both of which are demonstrated to be dependent on increased p44/42 and/or p38 activation. Finally, it was observed that cross-linking of CD45RB in the presence of Abeta(1-42 peptide, inhibits co-localization of microglial MHC class II and Abeta peptide; suggesting CD45 activation inhibits the antigen presenting phenotype of microglial cells. CONCLUSION: In summary, p38 MAPK is another novel signaling pathway, besides p44/42, in which CD45RB cross

  19. Imaging characteristic of dual-phase {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET for the concomitant detection of perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Kun-Ju; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences and Healthy Aging Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Hsu, Jung-Lung [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Section of Dementia and Cognitive Impairment, Department of Neurology, Taoyuan (China); Taipei Medical University, Graduate Institute of Humanities in Medicine, Taipei (China); Huang, Chin-Chang; Huang, Kuo-Lun [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and University, Department of Neurology, Taoyuan (China)

    2016-07-15

    We investigated dual-phase {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET imaging for the concomitant detection of brain perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and in cognitively healthy controls (HCs). A total of 82 subjects (24 AD patients, 44 MCI patients and 14 HCs) underwent both dual-phase {sup 18}F-AV-45 PET and MRI imaging. Dual-phase dynamic PET imaging consisted of (1) five 1-min scans obtained 1 - 6 min after tracer injection (perfusion {sup 18}F-AV-45 imaging, pAV-45), and (2) ten 1-min scans obtained 50 - 60 min after tracer injection (amyloid {sup 18}F-AV-45 imaging). Amyloid-negative MCI/AD patients were excluded. Volume of interest analysis and statistical parametric mapping of pAV-45 and {sup 18}F-AV-45 images were performed to investigate the perfusion deficits and the beta-amyloid burden in the three study groups. The associations between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and global perfusion deficits and amyloid deposition were investigated with linear and segmental linear correlation analyses. HCs generally had normal pAV-45 findings, whereas perfusion deficits were evident in the hippocampus, and temporal, parietal and middle frontal cortices in both MCI and AD patients. The motor-sensory cortex was relatively preserved. MMSE scores in the entire study cohort were significantly associated with the degree of perfusion impairment as assessed by pAV-45 imaging (r = 0.5156, P < 0.0001). {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake was significantly higher in AD patients than in the two other study groups. However, the correlation between MMSE scores and {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake in MCI patients was more of a binary phenomenon and began in MCI patients with MMSE score 23.14 when {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake was higher and MMSE score lower than in patients with early MCI. Amyloid deposition started in the precuneus and the frontal and temporal regions in early MCI, ultimately

  20. Telencephalin protects PAJU cells from amyloid beta protein-induced apoptosis by activating the ezrin/radixin/moesin protein family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heping Yang; Dapeng Wu; Xiaojie Zhang; Xiang Wang; Yi Peng; Zhiping Hu

    2012-01-01

    Telencephalin is a neural glycoprotein that reduces apoptosis induced by amyloid beta protein in the human neural tumor cell line PAJU.In this study,we examined the role of the ezrin/radixin/moesin protein family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway in this process.Western blot analysis demonstrated that telencephalin,phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B were not expressed in PAJU cells transfected with empty plasmid,while they were expressed in PAJU cells transfected with a telencephalin expression plasmid.After treatment with 1.0 nM amyloid beta protein 42,expression of telencephalin and phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B in the transfected cells gradually diminished,while levels of phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin increased.In addition,the high levels of telencephalin,phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B expression in PAJU cells transfected with a telencephalin expression plasmid could be suppressed by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor LY294002.These findings indicate that telencephalin activates the ezrin/radixin/moesin family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway and protects PAJU cells from amyloid beta protein-induced apoptosis.

  1. In vivo labelling of hippocampal beta-amyloid in triple-transgenic mice with a fluorescent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor released from nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtig, Wolfgang; Kacza, Johannes; Paulke, Bernd-Reiner; Grosche, Jens; Bauer, Ute; Hoffmann, Anke; Elsinghorst, Paul W; Gütschow, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The drastic loss of cholinergic projection neurons in the basal forebrain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and drugs most frequently applied for the treatment of dementia include inhibitors of the acetylcholine-degrading enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). This protein is known to act as a ligand of beta-amyloid (Abeta) in senile plaques, a further neuropathological sign of AD. Recently, we have shown that the fluorescent, heterodimeric AChE inhibitor PE154 allows for the histochemical staining of cortical Abeta plaques in triple-transgenic (TTG) mice with age-dependent beta-amyloidosis and tau hyperphosphorylation, an established animal model for aspects of AD. In the present study, we have primarily demonstrated the targeting of Abeta-immunopositive plaques with PE154 in vivo for 4 h up to 1 week after injection into the hippocampi of 13-20-month-old TTG mice. Numerous plaques, double-stained for PE154 and Abeta-immunoreactivity, were revealed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Additionally, PE154 targeted hippocampal Abeta deposits in aged TTG mice after injection of carboxylated polyglycidylmethacrylate nanoparticles delivering the fluorescent marker in vivo. Furthermore, biodegradable core-shell polystyrene/polybutylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles were found to be suitable, alternative vehicles for PE154 as a useful in vivo label of Abeta. Moreover, we were able to demonstrate that PE154 targeted Abeta, but neither phospho-tau nor reactive astrocytes surrounding the plaques. In conclusion, nanoparticles appear as versatile carriers of AChE inhibitors and other promising drugs for the treatment of AD.

  2. High-frequency magnetic stimulation attenuates beta-amyloid protein 1-42 neurotoxicity in organotypic hippocampal slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Don-Kyu Kim; Young Chul Yoon; Soo Ahn Chae; Kyung Mook Seo; Tai Ryoon Han; Si-Hyun Kang

    2010-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation(rTMS)has been utilized as a therapeutic tool for neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease.However,the precise mechanisms of its clinical effects remain unknown.β-amyloid(Aβ)exhibits direct neurotoxic effects and is closely related to neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease.Therefore,it has been hypothesized that the neuroprotective effects of rTMS are related to the mechanisms of protection against Aβneurotoxicity.Organotypic hippocampal slices were prepared from 8-day old,Sprague Dawley rats.The tissue slices were exposed to 100 μmol/L Aβ1-42 since day 12 in vitro with and without high-frequency(20 Hz)magnetic stimulation.Magnetic stimulation efficacy was evaluated by measuring neuronal nuclei(NeuN)protein expression and by observing cultures following propidium iodide fluorescence staining and bromodeoxyuridine(BrdU)immunohistochemistry.Lactate dehydrogenase activity was detected in the culture media to evaluate hippocampal neuronal damage.Our results demonstrated that high-frequency magnetic stimulation significantly reversed the reduction of NeuN protein expression because of Aβ1-42 exposure(P < 0.05)and significantly reduced the number of damaged cells in the hippocampal slices(P < 0.05).However,lactate dehydrogenase levels and anti-BrdU staining results did not reveal any statistical differences.These findings indicate that high-frequency magnetic stimulation might have protective effect on hippocampal neurons from Aβ1-42 neurotoxicity.

  3. The effects of Betula platyphylla bark on amyloid beta-induced learning and memory impairment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Namki; Lee, Hee Kyoung; Jeon, Byung Ju; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Young Choong; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is closely associated with amyloid β (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity and oxidative stress in the brain. Betula platyphylla, which has been used to treat various oxidative-stressed related diseases, has recently received attention for its preventive activity on age-related neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we attempted to investigate the effects of B. platyphylla bark (BPB-316) on Aβ(1-42)-induced neurotoxicity and memory impairment. Oral treatment using BPB-316 significantly attenuated Aβ-induced memory impairment which was evaluated by behavioral tests including the passive avoidance, Y-maze and Morris water maze test. BPB-316 also inhibited the elevation of β-secretase activity accompanying the reduced Aβ(1-42) levels in the hippocampus of the brain. Furthermore, BPB-316 significantly decreased the acetylcholinesterase activity and increased the glutathione content in the hippocampus. In addition, we confirmed that the expression of both cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of Aβ(1-42)-injected mice were markedly upregulated by the treatment of BPB-316. Our data suggest that the extracts of B. platyphylla bark might be a potential therapeutic agent against AD.

  4. The Relationship between Different Assays for Detection and Quantification of Amyloid Beta 42 in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid

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    Teresa A. Ellis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, which is characterized by a degeneration of neurons and their synapses, is one of the most common forms of dementia. CSF levels of amyloid 42 (A42 have been recognized as a strong candidate to serve as an AD biomarker. There are a number of commercial assays that are routinely employed for measuring A42; however, these assays give diverse ranges for the absolute levels of CSF A42. In order to employ CSF A42 as a biomarker across multiple laboratories, studies need to be performed to understand the relationship between the different platforms. We have analyzed CSF samples from both diseased and nondiseased subjects with two different widely used assay platforms. The results showed that different values for the levels of CSF A42 were reported, depending on the assay used. Nonetheless, both assays clearly demonstrated statistically significant differences in the levels of A42 in CSF from AD relative to age-matched controls (AMC. This paper provides essential data for establishing the relationship between these assays and provides an important step towards the validation of A42 as a biomarker for AD.

  5. Control of Alzheimer's amyloid beta toxicity by the high molecular weight immunophilin FKBP52 and copper homeostasis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Sanokawa-Akakura

    Full Text Available FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs, also called immunophilins, are prolyl-isomerases (PPIases that participate in a wide variety of cellular functions including hormone signaling and protein folding. Recent studies indicate that proteins that contain PPIase activity can also alter the processing of Alzheimer's Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP. Originally identified in hematopoietic cells, FKBP52 is much more abundantly expressed in neurons, including the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and basal ganglia. Given the fact that the high molecular weight immunophilin FKBP52 is highly expressed in CNS regions susceptible to Alzheimer's, we investigated its role in Abeta toxicity. Towards this goal, we generated Abeta transgenic Drosophila that harbor gain of function or loss of function mutations of FKBP52. FKBP52 overexpression reduced the toxicity of Abeta and increased lifespan in Abeta flies, whereas loss of function of FKBP52 exacerbated these Abeta phenotypes. Interestingly, the Abeta pathology was enhanced by mutations in the copper transporters Atox1, which interacts with FKBP52, and Ctr1A and was suppressed in FKBP52 mutant flies raised on a copper chelator diet. Using mammalian cultures, we show that FKBP52 (-/- cells have increased intracellular copper and higher levels of Abeta. This effect is reversed by reconstitution of FKBP52. Finally, we also found that FKBP52 formed stable complexes with APP through its FK506 interacting domain. Taken together, these studies identify a novel role for FKBP52 in modulating toxicity of Abeta peptides.

  6. Glutamine acts as a neuroprotectant against DNA damage, beta-amyloid and H2O2-induced stress.

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    Jianmin Chen

    Full Text Available Glutamine is the most abundant free amino acid in the human blood stream and is 'conditionally essential' to cells. Its intracellular levels are regulated both by the uptake of extracellular glutamine via specific transport systems and by its intracellular synthesis by glutamine synthetase (GS. Adding to the regulatory complexity, when extracellular glutamine is reduced GS protein levels rise. Unfortunately, this excess GS can be maladaptive. GS overexpression is neurotoxic especially if the cells are in a low-glutamine medium. Similarly, in low glutamine, the levels of multiple stress response proteins are reduced rendering cells hypersensitive to H(2O(2, zinc salts and DNA damage. These altered responses may have particular relevance to neurodegenerative diseases of aging. GS activity and glutamine levels are lower in the Alzheimer's disease (AD brain, and a fraction of AD hippocampal neurons have dramatically increased GS levels compared with control subjects. We validated the importance of these observations by showing that raising glutamine levels in the medium protects cultured neuronal cells against the amyloid peptide, Aβ. Further, a 10-day course of dietary glutamine supplementation reduced inflammation-induced neuronal cell cycle activation, tau phosphorylation and ATM-activation in two different mouse models of familial AD while raising the levels of two synaptic proteins, VAMP2 and synaptophysin. Together, our observations suggest that healthy neuronal cells require both intracellular and extracellular glutamine, and that the neuroprotective effects of glutamine supplementation may prove beneficial in the treatment of AD.

  7. Pelargonidin Improves Passive Avoidance Task Performance in a Rat Amyloid Beta25-35 Model of Alzheimer's Disease Via Estrogen Receptor Independent Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohanaki, Hamid; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Nikbakht, Farnaz; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2016-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a disorder with multiple pathophysiological causes, destructive outcomes, and no available definitive cure. Pelargonidin (Pel), an anthocyanin derivative, is an estrogen receptor agonist with little estrogen side effects. This study was designed to assess Pel memory enhancing effects on the a rat Amyloid Beta25-35 (Aβ) intrahippocampal microinjections model of AD in the passive avoidance task performance paradigm and further evaluate the potential estrogen receptor role on the memory-evoking compound. Equally divided rats were assigned to 5 groups of sham, Aβ intrahippocampal microinjected, Pel pretreated (10 mg/kg; P.O), α estrogen antagonist intra-cerebrovascular (i.c.v.) microinjected, and β estrogen antagonist (i.c.v) microinjected animals. Intrahippocampal microinjections of Aβ were adopted to provoke AD model. Passive avoidance task test was also used to assess memory performance. Pel pretreatment prior to Aβ microinjections significantly improved step-through latency (Pavoidance test. In α and β estrogen, antagonists received animals, passive avoidance task performance was not statistically changed (P=0.11 & P=0.41 respectively) compared to Pel pretreated and sham animals. Our results depicted that Pel improves Aβ induced memory dysfunction in passive avoidance test performance through estrogen receptor independently related pathways.

  8. Methionine residue 35 is critical for the oxidative stress and neurotoxic properties of Alzheimer's amyloid beta-peptide 1-42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D Allan; Kanski, Jaroslaw

    2002-07-01

    Amyloid beta-peptide 1-42 [Abeta(1-42)] is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the AD brain is under intense oxidative stress. Our laboratory combined these two aspects of AD into the Abeta-associated free radical oxidative stress model for neurodegeneration in AD brain. Abeta(1-42) caused protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species formation, and cell death in neuronal and synaptosomal systems, all of which could be inhibited by free radical antioxidants. Recent studies have been directed at discerning molecular mechanisms by which Abeta(1-42)-associated free radical oxidative stress and neurotoxicity arise. The single methionine located in residue 35 of Abeta(1-42) is critical for these properties. This review presents the evidence supporting the role of methionine in Abeta(1-42)-associated free radical oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. This work is of obvious relevance to AD and provides a coupling between the centrality of Abeta(1-42) in the pathogenesis of AD and the oxidative stress under which the AD brain exists.

  9. Protective effects of components of the Chinese herb grassleaf sweetlfag rhizome on PC12 cells incubated with amyloid-beta42

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-hao Liang; Xiao-hui Cheng; Zhi-gang Ruan; Han Wang; Shan-shan Li; Jing Liu; Guo-ying Li; Su-min Tian

    2015-01-01

    The major ingredients of grassleaf sweetlfag rhizome areβ-asarone and eugenol, which can cross the blood-brain barrier and protect neurons. This study aimed to observe the neuroprotective effects and mechanisms ofβ-asarone and eugenol, components of the Chinese herb grassleaf sweetlfag rhizome, on PC12 cells. First, PC12 cells were cultured with different concentrations (between 1 × 10–10 M and 1 × 10–5 M) ofβ-asarone and eugenol. Survival rates of PC12 cells were not significantly affected. Second, PC12 cells incubated with amyloid-beta42, which reduced cell survival, were cultured under the same conditions (1 × 10–6 Mβ-asarone and eugenol). The survival rates of PC12 cells significantly increased, while expression levels of the mRNAs for the pro-apoptotic protein Bax decreased, and those for the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl mRNA increased. In addition, the combination ofβ-asarone with eugenol achieved better results than either component alone. Our experimental ifndings indicate that bothβ-asarone and eugenol protect PC12 cells through inhibiting apoptosis, and that the combination of the two is better than either alone.

  10. Sodium Hydrosulfide Attenuates Beta-Amyloid-Induced Cognitive Deficits and Neuroinflammation via Modulation of MAPK/NF-κB Pathway in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiyu; Deng, Yuanyuan; Gao, Jianmei; Liu, Yuangui; Li, Wenxian; Shi, Jingshan; Gong, Qihai

    2015-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ), a neurotoxic peptide, accumulates in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects to initiate neuroinflammation eventually leading to memory impairment. Here, we demonstrated that Aβ-injected rats exhibited cognitive impairment and neuroinflammation with a remarkable reduction of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels in the hippocampus compared with that in shamoperated rats. Interestingly, the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and 3- mercaptopyruvate-sulfurtransferase (3MST), the major enzymes responsible for endogenous H2S generation, were also significantly decreased. However, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, a H2S donor) dramatically attenuated cognitive impairment and neuroinflammation induced by hippocampal injection of 10 μg of Aβ1-42 in rats. Subsequently, NaHS significantly suppressed the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in rat hippocampus following Aβ administration. Furthermore, NaHS exerted a beneficial effect on inhibition of IκB-α degradation and subsequent activation of transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), as well as inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) activity and p38 MAPK activity but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity induced by Aβ. These results demonstrate that NaHS might be a potential agent for treatment of neuroinflammation-related AD.

  11. Carnosic Acid Prevents Beta-Amyloid-Induced Injury in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells via the Induction of Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Su, Hua; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-09-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ), the hallmark protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD), induces neurotoxicity that involves oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to cell death. Carnosic acid (CA), a polyphenolic diterpene isolated from the herb rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis), was investigated in our study to assess its neuroprotective effect and underlying mechanism against Aβ-induced injury in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. We found that CA pretreatment alleviated the Aβ25-35-induced loss of cell viability, inhibited both Aβ1-42 accumulation and tau hyperphosphorylation, reduced reactive oxygen species generation, and maintained the mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, CA increased the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II/I ratio and decreased SQSTM1(p62), indicating that CA could induce autophagy. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) attenuated the neuroprotective effect of CA, suggesting that autophagy was involved in the neuroprotection of CA. It was also observed that CA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Furthermore, blocking AMPK with si-AMPKα successfully inhibited the upregulation of LC3-II/I, prevented the downregulation of phosphorylation of mTOR and SQSTM1(p62), indicating that CA induced autophagy in SH-SY5Y cells via the activation of AMPK. These results suggested that CA might be a potential agent for preventing AD. PMID:27168327

  12. 7.0T nuclear magnetic resonance evaluation of the amyloid beta (1-40) animal model of Alzheimer’s disease:comparison of cytology veriifcation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhang; Shuai Dong; Guixiang Zhao; Yu Ma

    2014-01-01

    3.0T magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging is a commonly used method in the research of brain function in Alzheimer’s disease. However, the role of 7.0T high-ifeld magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in brain function of Alzheimer’s disease remains unclear. In this study, 7.0T magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that in the hippocampus of Alzheimer’s disease rats, the N-acetylaspartate wave crest was reduced, and the creatine and choline wave crest was elevated. This ifnding was further supported by hematoxylin-eosin staining, which showed a loss of hippocampal neurons and more glial cells. Moreover, electron microscopy showed neuronal shrinkage and mitochondrial rupture, and scanning electron microscopy revealed small size hippocampal synaptic vesicles, incomplete synaptic structure, and reduced number. Overall, the results revealed that 7.0T high-ifeld nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy detected the lesions and functional changes in hippocampal neurons of Alzheimer’s disease rats in vivo, allowing the possibility for assessing the success rate and grading of the amyloid beta (1-40) animal model of Alzheimer’s disease.

  13. Effects of Low-Dose Pioglitazone on Serum Levels of Adiponectin, Dehydroepiandrosterone, Amyloid Beta Peptide, and Lipid Profile in Elderly Japanese People with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Aoki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to see how pioglitazone at low doses could affect blood biomarkers related to atherosclerosis and aging. The effects of an add-on treatment with pioglitazone (15 mg for males and 7.5 mg for females for 6 months were assessed in 24 outpatients (12 males, 12 females with type 2 diabetes aged ≥ 70 years. As doses of sulfonylurea were reduced in 10 patients, no significant differences in HbA1c and glucose levels were seen. After the treatment, serum levels of HDL cholesterol, arachidonic acid (predominant in males, and high-molecular-weight adiponectin significantly increased. The level of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate significantly decreased. No significant changes were seen in those of small dense LDL cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and amyloid beta peptides 1–40 and 1–42. There was a slight but significant increase in body weight, but apparent adverse effects were not observed. In conclusion, pioglitazone at low doses increased serum adiponectin, HDL cholesterol, and arachidonic acid levels but decreased serum dehydroepiandrosterone level, not associated with glycemia, in elderly Japanese people with type 2 diabetes. An optimal dose of pioglitazone should be sought for to minimize its adverse effects and to fully exert its pleiotropic effects such as antiatherosclerotic and antiaging effects.

  14. Exploring Beta-Amyloid Protein Transmembrane Insertion Behavior and Residue-Specific Lipid Interactions in Lipid Bilayers Using Multiscale MD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2013-03-01

    Beta-amyloid (Abeta) interactions with neurons are linked to Alzheimer's. Using a multiscale MD simulation strategy that combines the high efficiency of phase space sampling of coarse-grained MD (CGD) and the high spatial resolution of Atomistic MD (AMD) simulations, we studied the Abeta insertion dynamics in cholesterol-enriched and -depleted lipid bilayers that mimic the neuronal membranes domains. Forward (AMD-CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) mappings were used. At the atomistic level, cholesterol promoted insertion of Abeta with high (folded) or low (unfolded) helical contents of the lipid insertion domain (Lys28-Ala42), and the insertions were stabilized by the Lys28 snorkeling and Ala42-anchoring to the polar lipid groups of the bilayer up to 200ns. After the forward mapping, the folded inserted state switched to a new extended inserted state with the Lys28 descended to the middle of the bilayer while the unfolded inserted state migrated to the membrane surface up to 4000ns. The two new states remained stable for 200ns at the atomistic scale after the reverse mapping. Our results suggested that different Abeta membrane-orientation states separated by free energy barriers can be explored by the multiscale MD more effectively than by Atomistic MD simulations alone. NIH RC1-GM090897-02

  15. Treatment of beta amyloid 1–42 (Aβ1–42)-induced basal forebrain cholinergic damage by a non-classical estrogen signaling activator in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakowsky, Andrea; Potapov, Kyoko; Kim, SooHyun; Peppercorn, Katie; Tate, Warren P.; Ábrahám, István M.

    2016-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is a loss in cholinergic innervation targets of basal forebrain which has been implicated in substantial cognitive decline. Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ1–42) accumulates in AD that is highly toxic for basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurons. Although the gonadal steroid estradiol is neuroprotective, the administration is associated with risk of off-target effects. Previous findings suggested that non-classical estradiol action on intracellular signaling pathways has ameliorative potential without estrogenic side effects. After Aβ1–42 injection into mouse basal forebrain, a single dose of 4-estren-3α, 17β-diol (estren), the non-classical estradiol pathway activator, restored loss of cholinergic cortical projections and also attenuated the Aβ1–42-induced learning deficits. Estren rapidly and directly phosphorylates c-AMP-response–element-binding-protein and extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase-1/2 in BFC neurons and restores the cholinergic fibers via estrogen receptor-α. These findings indicated that selective activation of non-classical intracellular estrogen signaling has a potential to treat the damage of cholinergic neurons in AD. PMID:26879842

  16. Antibodies targeted to the brain with image-guided focused ultrasound reduces amyloid-beta plaque load in the TgCRND8 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica F Jordão

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD relies on antibodies directed against toxic amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta, which circulate in the bloodstream and remove Abeta from the brain. In mouse models of AD, the administration of anti-Abeta antibodies directly into the brain, in comparison to the bloodstream, was shown to be more efficient at reducing Abeta plaque pathology. Therefore, delivering anti-Abeta antibodies to the brain of AD patients may also improve treatment efficiency. Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS is known to transiently-enhance the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, allowing intravenously administered therapeutics to enter the brain. Our goal was to establish that anti-Abeta antibodies delivered to the brain using magnetic resonance imaging-guided FUS (MRIgFUS can reduce plaque pathology. To test this, TgCRND8 mice received intravenous injections of MRI and FUS contrast agents, as well as anti-Abeta antibody, BAM-10. MRIgFUS was then applied transcranially. Within minutes, the MRI contrast agent entered the brain, and BAM-10 was later found bound to Abeta plaques in targeted cortical areas. Four days post-treatment, Abeta pathology was significantly reduced in TgCRND8 mice. In conclusion, this is the first report to demonstrate that MRIgFUS delivery of anti-Abeta antibodies provides the combined advantages of using a low dose of antibody and rapidly reducing plaque pathology.

  17. Protective effects of components of the Chinese herb grassleaf sweetflag rhizome on PC12 cells incubated with amyloid-beta42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-hao Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The major ingredients of grassleaf sweetflag rhizome are β-asarone and eugenol, which can cross the blood-brain barrier and protect neurons. This study aimed to observe the neuroprotective effects and mechanisms of β-asarone and eugenol, components of the Chinese herb grassleaf sweetflag rhizome, on PC12 cells. First, PC12 cells were cultured with different concentrations (between 1 × 10 -10 M and 1 × 10 -5 M of β-asarone and eugenol. Survival rates of PC12 cells were not significantly affected. Second, PC12 cells incubated with amyloid-beta42, which reduced cell survival, were cultured under the same conditions (1 × 10 -6 M β-asarone and eugenol. The survival rates of PC12 cells significantly increased, while expression levels of the mRNAs for the pro-apoptotic protein Bax decreased, and those for the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl mRNA increased. In addition, the combination of β-asarone with eugenol achieved better results than either component alone. Our experimental findings indicate that both β-asarone and eugenol protect PC12 cells through inhibiting apoptosis, and that the combination of the two is better than either alone.

  18. Cyanidin suppresses amyloid beta-induced neurotoxicity by inhibiting reactive oxygen species-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis in PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Wang; Nam Chun Cho; Xiao-ting Fu; Da-wei Li; Kun Wang; Xin-zhi Wang; Yuan Li; Bao-liang Sun; Xiao-yi Yang; Zun-cheng Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ)-induced oxidative stress is a major pathologic hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Cyan-idin, a natural lfavonoid compound, is neuroprotective against oxidative damage-mediated degeneration. However, its molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of cyanidin pretreat-ment against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells, and explored the underlying mechanisms. Cyanidin pretreatment signiifcantly attenuated Aβ-induced cell mortality and morphological changes in PC12 cells. Mechanistically, cyanidin effectively blocked apoptosis induced by Aβ, by restoring the mitochondrial mem-brane potentialvia upregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression. Moreover, cyanidin markedly protected PC12 cells from Aβ-induced DNA damage by blocking reactive oxide species and superoxide accumulation. These results provide evidence that cyanidin suppresses Aβ-induced cytotoxicity, by preventing oxidative damage mediated by reactive oxide species, which in turn inhibits mitochondrial apoptosis. Our study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of cyanidin in the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated Aβ neurotoxicity.

  19. Curcumin inhibits beta-amyloid protein 40/42 expression in the brain in a concentration-and time-dependent manner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Zhang; Lu Si; Xiaodong Shi; Wenke Yin; Yu Li

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the amount of beta-amyloid(Aβ)protein in the brain can be lowered by down-regulating Aβ production,promoting Aβ degradation,reducing Aβ oligomerization or deposition,thereby alleviating symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.Curcumin has been known to be a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma(PPARy)agonist and can obviously inhibit Aβ production and oligomerization.This study investigated the effects of curcumin on the β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1(BACE1)activity and PPARy expression in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells,and validated the inhibitory effects of curcumin on Aβ40/42 expression in the brain.Results revealed that PPARy mRNA and protein expression in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells significantly increased with increasing curcumin concentration and time course(P < 0.05);BACE1 mRNA and protein expression and Aβ40/42 production significantly decreased with increasing curcumin concentration and time course(P < 0.05).The changes in PPARY and BACE1expression during Aβ production could be reversed by the PPARy antagonist GW9662.These findings indicate that curcumin reduced Aβ production by activating PPARy expression and inhibiting BACE1 expression in a concentration-and time-dependent manner.

  20. Curcumin Attenuates Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neuroinflammation via Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-Gamma Function in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zun-Jing; Li, Zhong-Hao; Liu, Lei; Tang, Wen-Xiong; Wang, Yu; Dong, Ming-Rui; Xiao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is known to have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and curcumin has been reported to have therapeutical effects on AD because of its anti-inflammatory effects. Curcumin is not only a potent PPARγ agonist, but also has neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemic injury. However, whether PPARγ activated by curcumin is responsible for the anti-neuroinflammation and neuroprotection on AD remains unclear, and needs to be further investigated. Here, using both APP/PS1 transgenic mice and beta-amyloid-induced neuroinflammation in mixed neuronal/glial cultures, we showed that curcumin significantly alleviated spatial memory deficits in APP/PS1 mice and promoted cholinergic neuronal function in vivo and in vitro. Curcumin also reduced the activation of microglia and astrocytes, as well as cytokine production and inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway, suggesting the beneficial effects of curcumin on AD are attributable to the suppression of neuroinflammation. Attenuation of these beneficial effects occurred when co-administrated with PPARγ antagonist GW9662 or silence of PPARγ gene expression, indicating that PPARγ might be involved in anti-inflammatory effects. Circular dichroism and co-immunoprecipitation analysis showed that curcumin directly bound to PPARγ and increased the transcriptional activity and protein levels of PPARγ. Taking together, these data suggested that PPARγ might be a potential target of curcumin, acting to alleviate neuroinflammation and improve neuronal function in AD. PMID:27594837

  1. A semi-automated motion-tracking analysis of locomotion speed in the C. elegans transgenics overexpressing beta-amyloid in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eMachino

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Worm Tracker (MWT is a real-time computer vision system that can simultaneously quantify motional patterns of multiple worms. MWT provides several behavioral parameters, including analysis of accurate real-time locomotion speed in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we determined locomotion speed of the Alzheimer’s disease (AD transgenic strain that over-expresses human beta-amyloid1-42 (Aβ in the neurons. The MWT analysis showed that the AD strain logged a slower average speed than the wild type worms. The results may be consistent with the observation that the AD patients with dementia tend to show deficits in physical activities, including frequent falls. The AD strain showed reduced ability of the eggs to hatch and slowed hatching of the eggs. Thus, over-expression of Aβ in neurons causes negative effects on locomotion and hatchability. This study sheds light on new examples of detrimental effects that Aβ deposits can exhibit using C. elegans as a model system. The information gathered from this study indicates that the motion tracking analysis is a cost-effective, efficient way to assess the deficits of Aβ over-expression in the C. elegans system.

  2. Protective Effects of Some Medicinal Plants from Lamiaceae Family Against Beta-Amyloid Induced Toxicity in PC12 Cell

    OpenAIRE

    S. Saeidnia; M Soodi; P Balali

    2012-01-01

    Background: Excessive accumulation of beta-amyliod peptide (Aβ), the major component of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD), causes neuronal cell death through induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, antioxidants may be of use in the treatment of AD. The medicinal plants from the Lamiaceae family have been widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. These plants contain compounds with antioxidant activity and some species in this family have been reported to have neuroprotective pro...

  3. Progressive effect of beta amyloid peptides accumulation on CA1 pyramidal neurons: a model study suggesting possible treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana eCulmone

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Several independent studies show that accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ peptides , one of the characteristic hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, can affect normal neuronal activity in different ways. However, in spite of intense experimental work to explain the possible underlying mechanisms of action, a comprehensive and congruent understanding is still lacking. Part of the problem might be the opposite ways in which Aβ have been experimentally found to affect the normal activity of a neuron; for example, making a neuron more excitable (by reducing the A- or DR-type K+ currents or less excitable (by reducing synaptic transmission and Na+ current. The overall picture is therefore confusing, since the interplay of many mechanisms makes it difficult to link individual experimental findings with the more general problem of understanding the progression of the disease. This is an important issue, especially for the development of new drugs trying to ameliorate the effects of the disease. We addressed these paradoxes through computational models. We first modeled the different stages of AD by progressively modifying the intrinsic membrane and synaptic properties of a realistic model neuron, while accounting for multiple and different experimental findings and by evaluating the contribution of each mechanism to the overall modulation of the cell’s excitability. We then tested a number of manipulations of channel and synaptic activation properties that could compensate for the effects of Aβ. The model predicts possible therapeutic treatments in terms of pharmacological manipulations of channels’ kinetic and activation properties. The results also suggest how and which mechanisms can be targeted by a drug to restore the original firing conditions.

  4. Isorhynchophylline Protects PC12 Cells Against Beta-Amyloid-Induced Apoptosis via PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Fang Xian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotoxicity of amyloid-β (Aβ has been implicated as a critical cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Isorhynchophylline (IRN, an oxindole alkaloid isolated from Uncaria rhynchophylla, exerts neuroprotective effect against Aβ25–35-induced neurotoxicity in vitro. However, the exact mechanism for its neuroprotective effect is not well understood. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective action of IRN against Aβ25–35-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells. Pretreatment with IRN significantly increased the cell viability, inhibited the release of lactate dehydrogenase and the extent of DNA fragmentation in Aβ25–35-treated cells. IRN treatment was able to enhance the protein levels of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (p-GSK-3β. Lithium chloride blocked Aβ25–35-induced cellular apoptosis in a similar manner as IRN, suggesting that GSK-3β inhibition was involved in neuroprotective action of IRN. Pretreatment with LY294002 completely abolished the protective effects of IRN. Furthermore, IRN reversed Aβ25–35-induced attenuation in the level of phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein (p-CREB and the effect of IRN could be blocked by the PI3K inhibitor. These experimental findings unambiguously suggested that the protective effect of IRN against Aβ25–35-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells was associated with the enhancement of p-CREB expression via PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway.

  5. Differential mode of interaction of ThioflavinT with native β structural motif in human α 1-acid glycoprotein and cross beta sheet of its amyloid: Biophysical and molecular docking approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Nusrat, Saima; Alam, Parvez; Zaidi, Nida; Badr, Gamal; Mahmoud, Mohamed H.; Rajpoot, Ravi Kant; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-08-01

    The present study details the interaction mechanism of Thioflavin T (ThT) to Human α1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) applying various spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant in the order of 104 M-1 and the standard Gibbs free energy change value, ΔG = -6.78 kcal mol-1 for the interaction between ThT and AAG indicating process is spontaneous. There is increase in absorbance of AAG upon the interaction of ThT that may be due to ground state complex formation between ThT and AAG. ThT impelled rise in β-sheet structure in AAG as observed from far-UV CD spectra while there are minimal changes in tertiary structure of the protein. DLS results suggested the reduction in AAG molecular size, ligand entry into the central binding pocket of AAG may have persuaded the molecular compaction in AAG. Isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) results showed the interaction process to be endothermic with the values of standard enthalpy change ΔH0 = 4.11 kcal mol-1 and entropy change TΔS0 = 10.82 kcal.mol- 1. Moreover, docking results suggested hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding played the important role in the binding process of ThT with F1S and A forms of AAG. ThT fluorescence emission at 485 nm was measured for properly folded native form and for thermally induced amyloid state of AAG. ThT fluorescence with native AAG was very low, while on the other hand with amyloid induced state of the protein AAG showed a positive emission peak at 485 nm upon the excitation at 440 nm, although it binds to native state as well. These results confirmed that ThT binding alone is not responsible for enhancement of ThT fluorescence but it also required beta stacked sheet structure found in protein amyloid to give proper signature signal for amyloid. This study gives the mechanistic insight into the differential interaction of ThT with beta structures found in native state of the proteins and amyloid forms, this study reinforce

  6. Diet rich in date palm fruits improves memory, learning and reduces beta amyloid in transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer′s disease

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    Selvaraju Subash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: At present, the treatment options available to delay the onset or slow down the progression of Alzheimer′s disease (AD are not effective. Recent studies have suggested that diet and lifestyle factors may represent protective strategies to minimize the risk of developing AD. Date palm fruits are a good source of dietary fiber and are rich in total phenolics and natural antioxidants, such as anthocyanins, ferulic acid, protocatechuic acid and caffeic acid. These polyphenolic compounds have been shown to be neuroprotective in different model systems. Objective: We investigated whether dietary supplementation with 2% and 4% date palm fruits (grown in Oman could reduce cognitive and behavioral deficits in a transgenic mouse model for AD (amyloid precursor protein [APPsw]/Tg2576. Materials and Methods: The experimental groups of APP-transgenic mice from the age of 4 months were fed custom-mix diets (pellets containing 2% and 4% date fruits. We assessed spatial memory and learning ability, psychomotor coordination, and anxiety-related behavior in all the animals at the age of 4 months and after 14 months of treatment using the Morris water maze test, rota-rod test, elevated plus maze test, and open-field test. We have also analyzed the levels of amyloid beta (Aβ protein (1-40 and 1-42 in plasma of control and experimental animals. Results: Standard diet-fed Tg mice showed significant memory deficits, increased anxiety-related behavior, and severe impairment in spatial learning ability, position discrimination learning ability and motor coordination when compared to wild-type on the same diet and Tg mice fed 2% and 4% date supplementation at the age of 18 months. The levels of both Aβ proteins were significantly lowered in date fruits supplemented groups than the Tg mice without the diet supplement. The neuroprotective effect offered by 4% date fruits diet to AD mice is higher than 2% date fruits diet. Conclusions: Our results suggest

  7. 人参皂苷Rg1经线粒体通路抗Aβ25-35致原代大鼠皮层神经元凋亡%Ginsenoside Rg1 antagonizes β-amyloid peptide-induced apoptosis in primarily cultured rat neurons via mitochondrial pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴佳莹; 沈圆圆; 朱闻杰; 程梅园; 王志强; 刘琰; 朱丹雁; 楼宜嘉

    2012-01-01

    Objective; To assess the neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rgl against p-amyloid peptide ( Aβ25-35) -induced apoptosis in primarily cultured rat cortical neurons. Methods; Primarily cultured cortical neurons were obtained from embryonic (E18d) rat fetus and maintained in neurobasal medium for 7d. Primary neurons pretreated with 1 (μmol/L, 10 μmol/L or 20 μmol/L Rg1 for 24 h were challenged with 10 μmol/L Aβ25-35 for 72 h. Morphological changes of neurons were evaluated; mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was measured; with JC-1 staining and the expression of neural apoptosis-related proteins was detected by Western blot analysis. Results; Exposure to Aβ25-35 for 72 h caused serious neural cell insults. A pretreatment with Rgl significantly reduced Aβ25-35-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal effect ( -90% ) obtained at 20 |xmol/L. The JC-1 staining results demonstrated the loss of ΔΨm after Aβ25-35 treatment, while Rgl maintained the normal level of ΔΨm. A series of mitochondrion-mediated apoptotic events happened after Aβ25-35 treatment, such as decrease of Bcl-2/Bax, release of cytoehrome C and activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3, which were all blocked by Rgl pretreatment. Both estrogen receptor ( ER) antagonist IC1182, 780 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU486 blocked the antiapoptotic effects of Rgl. Conclusions; Ginsenoside Rgl protects primary cultured rat cortical neurons from Aβ25-35-induced injury, which may be associated with mitochondrion-mediated antiapoptosis pathway.%目的:通过人参皂苷Rg1与原代培养大鼠皮层神经元预培养,评价抗β淀粉样肽(β-amy1oid peptide,Aβ)所致神经元损伤,并探讨Rg1的神经保护作用及相关分子机制.方法:原代神经元培养7d成熟后,分别以1、10、20 μmol/L Rg1处理24 h,加入Aβ毒性片段Aβ25.35 10 μmoL/L模拟阿尔茨海默病( Alzheimer's Disease,AD)脑组织局部微环境.孵育72 h后,光镜观察

  8. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates spatial memory impairment and hippocampal neuroinflammation in beta-amyloid rat model of Alzheimer’s disease

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    Xuan Aiguo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endogenously produced hydrogen sulfide (H2S may have multiple functions in brain. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated its anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, a H2S donor on cognitive impairment and neuroinflammatory changes induced by injections of Amyloid-β1-40 (Aβ1-40, and explored possible mechanisms of action. Methods We injected Aβ1-40 into the hippocampus of rats to mimic rat model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Morris water maze was used to detect the cognitive function. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay was performed to detect neuronal apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry analyzed the response of glia. The expression of interleukin (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. The expression of Aβ1-40, phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, phospho-p65 Nuclear factor (NF-κB, and phospho-c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK was analyzed by western blot. Results We demonstrated that pretreatment with NaHS ameliorated learning and memory deficits in an Aβ1-40 rat model of AD. NaHS treatment suppressed Aβ1-40-induced apoptosis in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus. Moreover, the over-expression in IL-1β and TNF-α as well as the extensive astrogliosis and microgliosis in the hippocampus induced by Aβ1-40 were significantly reduced following administration of NaHS. Concomitantly, treatment with NaHS alleviated the levels of p38 MAPK and p65 NF-κB phosphorylation but not JNK phosphorylation that occurred in the Aβ1-40-injected hippocampus. Conclusions These results indicate that NaHS could significantly ameliorate Aβ1-40-induced spatial learning and memory impairment, apoptosis, and neuroinflammation at least in part via the inhibition of p38 MAPK and p65 NF

  9. Lipoprotein-based nanoparticles rescue the memory loss of mice with Alzheimer's disease by accelerating the clearance of amyloid-beta.

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    Song, Qingxiang; Huang, Meng; Yao, Lei; Wang, Xiaolin; Gu, Xiao; Chen, Juan; Chen, Jun; Huang, Jialin; Hu, Quanyin; Kang, Ting; Rong, Zhengxing; Qi, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Chen, Hongzhuan; Gao, Xiaoling

    2014-03-25

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation in the brain is believed to play a central role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, and the common late-onset form of AD is characterized by an overall impairment in Aβ clearance. Therefore, development of nanomedicine that can facilitate Aβ clearance represents a promising strategy for AD intervention. However, previous work of this kind was concentrated at the molecular level, and the disease-modifying effectiveness of such nanomedicine has not been investigated in clinically relevant biological systems. Here, we hypothesized that a biologically inspired nanostructure, apolipoprotein E3-reconstituted high density lipoprotein (ApoE3-rHDL), which presents high binding affinity to Aβ, might serve as a novel nanomedicine for disease modification in AD by accelerating Aβ clearance. Surface plasmon resonance, transmission electron microscopy, and co-immunoprecipitation analysis showed that ApoE3-rHDL demonstrated high binding affinity to both Aβ monomer and oligomer. It also accelerated the microglial, astroglial, and liver cell degradation of Aβ by facilitating the lysosomal transport. One hour after intravenous administration, about 0.4% ID/g of ApoE3-rHDL gained access to the brain. Four-week daily treatment with ApoE3-rHDL decreased Aβ deposition, attenuated microgliosis, ameliorated neurologic changes, and rescued memory deficits in an AD animal model. The findings here provided the direct evidence of a biomimetic nanostructure crossing the blood-brain barrier, capturing Aβ and facilitating its degradation by glial cells, indicating that ApoE3-rHDL might serve as a novel nanomedicine for disease modification in AD by accelerating Aβ clearance, which also justified the concept that nanostructures with Aβ-binding affinity might provide a novel nanoplatform for AD therapy. PMID:24527692

  10. Droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay using microchannel-connected multiwell plates (μCHAMPs) for the detection of amyloid beta oligomers.

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    Park, Min Cheol; Kim, Moojong; Lim, Gun Taek; Kang, Sung Min; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Tae Song; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2016-06-21

    Multiwell plates are regularly used in analytical research and clinical diagnosis but often require laborious washing steps and large sample or reagent volumes (typically, 100 μL per well). To overcome such drawbacks in the conventional multiwell plate, we present a novel microchannel-connected multiwell plate (μCHAMP) that can be used for automated disease biomarker detection in a small sample volume by performing droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay inside the plate. In this μCHAMP-based immunoassay platform, small volumes (30-50 μL) of aqueous-phase working droplets are stably confined within each well by the simple microchannel structure (200-300 μm in height and 0.5-1 mm in width), and magnetic beads are exclusively transported into an adjacent droplet through the oil-filled microchannels assisted by a magnet array aligned beneath and controlled by a XY-motorized stage. Using this μCHAMP-based platform, we were able to perform parallel detection of synthetic amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers as a model analyte for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This platform easily simplified the laborious and consumptive immunoassay procedure by achieving automated parallel immunoassay (32 assays per operation in 3-well connected 96-well plate) within 1 hour and at low sample consumption (less than 10 μL per assay) with no cumbersome manual washing step. Moreover, it could detect synthetic Aβ oligomers even below 10 pg mL(-1) concentration with a calculated detection limit of ∼3 pg mL(-1). Therefore, the μCHAMP and droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay, with the combination of XY-motorized magnet array, would be a useful platform in the diagnosis of human disease, including AD, which requires low consumption of the patient's body fluid sample and automation of the entire immunoassay procedure for high processing capacity. PMID:27185215

  11. Neurodegeneration in an Animal Model of Chronic Amyloid-beta Oligomer Infusion Is Counteracted by Antibody Treatment Infused with Osmotic Pumps.

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    Sajadi, Ahmadali; Provost, Chloé; Pham, Brendon; Brouillette, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Decline in hippocampal-dependent explicit memory (memory for facts and events) is one of the earliest clinical symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is well established that synapse loss and ensuing neurodegeneration are the best predictors for memory impairments in AD. Latest studies have emphasized the neurotoxic role of soluble amyloid-beta oligomers (Aβo) that begin to accumulate in the human brain approximately 10 to 15 yr before the clinical symptoms become apparent. Many reports indicate that soluble Aβo correlate with memory deficits in AD models and humans. The Aβo-induced neurodegeneration observed in neuronal and brain slice cultures has been more challenging to reproduce in many animal models. The model of repeated Aβo infusions shown here overcome this issue and allow addressing two key domains for developing new disease modifying therapies: identify biological markers to diagnose early AD, and determine the molecular mechanisms underpinning Aβo-induced memory deficits at the onset of AD. Since soluble Aβo aggregate relatively fast into insoluble Aβ fibrils that correlate poorly with the clinical state of patients, soluble Aβo are prepared freshly and injected once per day during six days to produce marked cell death in the hippocampus. We used cannula specially design for simultaneous infusions of Aβo and continuous infusion of Aβo antibody (6E10) in the hippocampus using osmotic pumps. This innovative in vivo method can now be used in preclinical studies to validate the efficiency of new AD therapies that might prevent the deposition and neurotoxicity of Aβo in pre-dementia patients. PMID:27585306

  12. Metformin activation of AMPK-dependent pathways is neuroprotective in human neural stem cells against Amyloid-beta-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

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    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Cheng, Yi-Chuan; Chen, Shiang-Jiuun; Yen, Chia-Hui; Huang, Rong-Nan

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the general consequence of dementia and is diagnostic neuropathology by the cumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein aggregates, which are thought to promote mitochondrial dysfunction processes leading to neurodegeneration. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a critical regulator of energy homeostasis and a major player in lipid and glucose metabolism, is potentially implied in the mitochondrial deficiency of AD. Metformin, one of the widespread used anti- metabolic disease drugs, use its actions in part by stimulation of AMPK. While the mechanisms of AD are well established, the neuronal roles for AMPK in AD are still not well understood. In the present study, human neural stem cells (hNSCs) exposed to Aβ had significantly reduced cell viability, which correlated with decreased AMPK, neuroprotective genes (Bcl-2 and CREB) and mitochondria associated genes (PGC1α, NRF-1 and Tfam) expressions, as well as increased activation of caspase 3/9 activity and cytosolic cytochrome c. Co-treatment with metformin distinct abolished the Aβ-caused actions in hNSCs. Metformin also significantly rescued hNSCs from Aβ-mediated mitochondrial deficiency (lower D-loop level, mitochondrial mass, maximal respiratory function, COX activity, and mitochondrial membrane potential). Importantly, co-treatment with metformin significantly restored fragmented mitochondria to almost normal morphology in the hNSCs with Aβ. These findings extend our understanding of the central role of AMPK in Aβ-related neuronal impairment. Thus, a better understanding of AMPK might assist in both the recognition of its critical effects and the implementation of new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of AD. PMID:27554603

  13. Regional Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR at 7 Tesla correlates with Amyloid beta in Hippocampus and Brainstem of cognitively normal elderly subjects.

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    Simon J Schreiner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ may occur during healthy aging and is a risk factor for Alzheimer Disease (AD. While individual Aβ-accumulation can be measured non-invasively using Pittsburgh compound-B positron-emission-tomography (PiB-PET, Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR is a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI sequence, capable of indicating heterogeneous age-related brain pathologies associated with tissue-edema. In the current study cognitively normal elderly subjects were investigated for regional correlation of PiB- and FLAIR- intensity. Methods: 14 healthy elderly subjects without known history of cognitive impairment received 11C-PiB-PET for estimation of regional Aβ-load. In addition, whole brain T1-MPRAGE and FLAIR-MRI sequences were acquired at high field strength of 7 Tesla (7T. Volume-normalized intensities of brain regions were assessed by applying an automated subcortical segmentation algorithm for spatial definition of brain structures. Statistical dependence between FLAIR- and PiB-PET intensities was tested using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rho, followed by Holm-Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Results: Neuropsychological testing revealed normal cognitive performance levels in all participants. Mean regional PiB-PET and FLAIR intensities were normally distributed and independent. Significant correlation between volume-normalized PiB-PET signals and FLAIR intensities resulted for Hippocampus (right:rho=0.86; left:rho=0.84, Brainstem (rho=0.85 and left Basal Ganglia vessel region (rho=0.82. Conclusions: Our finding of a significant relationship between PiB- and FLAIR-intensity mainly observable in the Hippocampus and Brainstem, indicates regional Aβ associated tissue-edema in cognitively normal elderly subjects. Further studies including clinical populations are necessary to clarify the relevance of our findings for estimating individual risk for age-related neurodegenerative

  14. Effect of oxidative stress on DNA damage and beta-amyloid precursor proteins in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a Nigerian population.

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    Lahiri, D K; Xu, Y; Klaunig, J; Baiyewu, O; Ogunniyi, A; Hall, K; Hendrie, H; Sahota, A

    1999-01-01

    The epsilon 4 allele of apolipoprotein E (APOE) is strongly associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Caucasian populations, but our studies suggest that APOE epsilon 4 is not a risk factor for AD in Nigerian blacks and is a weak risk factor in African-Americans. The prevalence of AD is lower in Nigerians than in African-Americans. Increased oxidative damage to macromolecules in brain tissue by reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been reported in AD. Here we examined the effects of endogenous and induced oxidative stress on total (nuclear and mitochondrial) DNA damage in lymphoblastoid cell lines (5 probable AD and 3 controls) from Ibadan, Nigeria. Cells were exposed to 200 microM t-butyl peroxide (a generator of ROS) for 4 hours. Total DNA was isolated and digested with nuclease P1 and alkaline phosphatase. DNA fragments were separated by HPLC and the levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (OH8dG, an indicator of DNA damage) and deoxyguanosine (dG) determined. We did not detect a significant difference in the OH8dG/dG ratio in untreated or treated cell lines in the two groups, and this was independent of APOE genotype. We also examined, by Western blotting, the level of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) which is involved in AD. The level of the heat shock protein (HSP-70) was examined as a control. There was a slight decrease in levels of APP and HSP-70 following treatment. Studies in cell lines from Caucasian subjects have shown an increase in mitochondrial DNA damage following oxidative challenge. Our preliminary results suggest that African populations are less vulnerable to chemical-induced oxidative DNA damage. PMID:10672260

  15. Blood amyloid beta levels in healthy, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease individuals: replication of diastolic blood pressure correlations and analysis of critical covariates.

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    Agustín Ruiz

    Full Text Available Plasma amyloid beta (Aβ levels are being investigated as potential biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. In AB128 cross-sectional study, a number of medical relevant correlates of blood Aβ40 or Aβ42 were analyzed in 140 subjects (51 Alzheimer's disease patients, 53 healthy controls and 36 individuals diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment. We determined the association between multiple variables with Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels measured in three different blood compartments called i Aβ directly accessible (DA in the plasma, ii Aβ recovered from the plasma matrix (RP after diluting the plasma sample in a formulated buffer, and iii associated with the remaining cellular pellet (CP. We confirmed that diastolic blood pressure (DBP is consistently correlated with blood DA Aβ40 levels (r=-0.19, P=0.032. These results were consistent in the three phenotypic groups studied. Importantly, the observation resisted covariation with age, gender or creatinine levels. Observed effect size and direction of Aβ40 levels/DBP correlation are in accordance with previous reports. Of note, DA Aβ40 and the RP Aβ40 were also strongly associated with creatinine levels (r=0.599, P<<0.001 and to a lesser extent to urea, age, hematocrit, uric acid and homocysteine (p<0.001. DBP and the rest of statistical significant correlates identified should be considered as potential confounder factors in studies investigating blood Aβ levels as potential AD biomarker. Remarkably, the factors affecting Aβ levels in plasma (DA, RP and blood cell compartments (CP seem completely different.

  16. Benefit of 13-desmethyl spirolide C treatment in triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease: beta-amyloid and neuronal markers improvement.

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    Alonso, Eva; Otero, Paz; Vale, Carmen; Alfonso, Amparo; Antelo, Alvaro; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Chabaud, Laurent; Guillou, Catherine; Botana, Luis M

    2013-03-01

    Spirolides are marine toxins that are not currently in the routine monitoring assays. Nicotinic receptors seem to be the target of these compounds making them a promising pharmacological tool for related diseases as dementias as previously shown in vitro. In the present work, the bioavailability of 13-desMethyl spirolide C (13-desMeC) in the brain and in vivo effects were tested. Bioavailability was studied by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and its effect over Alzheimer hallmarks was studied by Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) and western blot. Only 2 minutes after its intraperitoneal injection it is found in brain and remains detectable even 24 hours post administration. Based on previous works that showed beneficial effects in an in vitro model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we studied the effect in the same mice, 3xTg-AD, in vivo. We found that 13-desMeC (11.9 ug/kg, i.p.) induced positive effects on AD markers with an increase in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) levels. These results were supported by an increase in synaptophysin levels and also a decrease in the intracellular amyloid beta levels in the hippocampus of treated 3xTg- AD versus non treated mice remarking the positive effects of this molecule in a well known model of AD. These data indicate for the first time that 13-desMeC cross the blood brain barrier and shows in vivo beneficial effects against AD after administration of low intraperitoneal doses of this marine toxin. This toxin may inspire a novel medical treatment of age-related diseases.

  17. The anti-tumor histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA and the natural flavonoid curcumin exhibit synergistic neuroprotection against amyloid-beta toxicity.

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    Jia Meng

    Full Text Available With the trend of an increasing aged population worldwide, Alzheimer's disease (AD, an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, as one of the major causes of dementia in elderly people is of growing concern. Despite the many hard efforts attempted during the past several decades in trying to elucidate the pathological mechanisms underlying AD and putting forward potential therapeutic strategies, there is still a lack of effective treatments for AD. The efficacy of many potential therapeutic drugs for AD is of main concern in clinical practice. For example, large bodies of evidence show that the anti-tumor histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilidehydroxamic acid (SAHA, may be of benefit for the treatment of AD; however, its extensive inhibition of HDACs makes it a poor therapeutic. Moreover, the natural flavonoid, curcumin, may also have a potential therapeutic benefit against AD; however, it is plagued by low bioavailability. Therefore, the integrative effects of SAHA and curcumin were investigated as a protection against amyloid-beta neurotoxicity in vitro. We hypothesized that at low doses their synergistic effect would improve therapeutic selectivity, based on experiments that showed that at low concentrations SAHA and curcumin could provide comprehensive protection against Aβ25-35-induced neuronal damage in PC12 cells, strongly implying potent synergism. Furthermore, network analysis suggested that the possible mechanism underlying their synergistic action might be derived from restoration of the damaged functional link between Akt and the CBP/p300 pathway, which plays a crucial role in the pathological development of AD. Thus, our findings provided a feasible avenue for the application of a synergistic drug combination, SAHA and curcumin, in the treatment of AD.

  18. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Xu, Jinbin; Zeng, Chenbo; Kirk, Molly J; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Cruchaga, Carlos; Goate, Alison; Cahill, Michael A; Arancio, Ottavio; Mach, Robert H; Craven, Rolf; Head, Elizabeth; LeVine, Harry; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1) protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological effects of

  19. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

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    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Abeta 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1 protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological

  20. Ethnic comparison of pharmacokinetics of {sup 18}F-florbetaben, a PET tracer for beta-amyloid imaging, in healthy Caucasian and Japanese subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senda, Michio; Sasaki, Masahiro; Yamane, Tomohiko; Shimizu, Keiji [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Division of Molecular Imaging, 2-2 Minatojima-Minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe (Japan); Patt, Marianne; Barthel, Henryk; Sattler, Bernhard; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Nagasawa, Toshiki; Aitoku, Yasuko [Bayer Yakuhin Ltd, Osaka (Japan); Schultze-Mosgau, Marcus [Bayer HealthCare AG, Berlin (Germany); Dinkelborg, Ludger [Piramal Imaging GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    {sup 18}F-Florbetaben is a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer indicated for imaging cerebral beta-amyloid deposition in adult patients with cognitive impairment who are being evaluated for Alzheimer's disease and other causes of cognitive decline. The present study examined ethnic comparability of the plasma pharmacokinetics, which is the input to the brain, between Caucasian and Japanese subjects. Two identical phase I trials were performed in 18 German and 18 Japanese healthy volunteers to evaluate the plasma pharmacokinetics of a single dose of 300 MBq {sup 18}F-florbetaben, either of low (≤5 μg, LD) or high (50-55 μg, HD) mass dose. Pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated based on the total {sup 18}F radioactivity measurements in plasma followed by metabolite analysis using radio-HPLC. The pharmacokinetics of {sup 18}F-florbetaben was characterized by a rapid elimination from plasma. The dose-normalized areas under the curve of {sup 18}F-florbetaben in plasma as an indicator of the input to the brain were comparable between Germans (LD: 0.38 min/l, HD: 0.55 min/l) and Japanese (LD: 0.35 min/l, HD: 0.45 min/l) suggesting ethnic similarity, and the mass dose effect was minimal. A polar metabolite fraction was the main radiolabelled degradation product in plasma and was also similar between the doses and the ethnic groups. Absence of a difference in the pharmacokinetics of {sup 18}F-florbetaben in Germans and Japanese has warranted further global development of the PET imaging agent. (orig.)

  1. The ability of apolipoprotein E fragments to promote intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid beta peptide 42 is both isoform and size-specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafnis, Ioannis; Argyri, Letta; Sagnou, Marina; Tzinia, Athina; Tsilibary, Effie C.; Stratikos, Efstratios; Chroni, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The apolipoprotein (apo) E4 isoform is the strongest risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). ApoE4 is more susceptible to proteolysis than apoE2 and apoE3 isoforms and carboxyl-terminal truncated apoE4 forms have been found in AD patients’ brain. We have previously shown that a specific apoE4 fragment, apoE4-165, promotes amyloid-peptide beta 42 (Aβ42) accumulation in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species formation, two events considered to occur early in AD pathogenesis. Here, we show that these effects are allele-dependent and absolutely require the apoE4 background. Furthermore, the exact length of the fragment is critical since longer or shorter length carboxyl-terminal truncated apoE4 forms do not elicit the same effects. Structural and thermodynamic analyses showed that apoE4-165 has a compact structure, in contrast to other carboxyl-terminal truncated apoE4 forms that are instead destabilized. Compared however to other allelic backgrounds, apoE4-165 is structurally distinct and less thermodynamically stable suggesting that the combination of a well-folded structure with structural plasticity is a unique characteristic of this fragment. Overall, our findings suggest that the ability of apoE fragments to promote Aβ42 intraneuronal accumulation is specific for both the apoE4 isoform and the particular structural and thermodynamic properties of the fragment. PMID:27476701

  2. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in

  3. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  4. Viewing ageing eyes: diverse sites of amyloid Beta accumulation in the ageing mouse retina and the up-regulation of macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie Hoh Kam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyloid beta (Aβ accumulates in the ageing central nervous system and is associated with a number of age-related diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD in the eye. AMD is characterised by accumulation of extracellular deposits called drusen in which Aβ is a key constituent. Aβ activates the complement cascade and its deposition is associated with activated macrophages. So far, little is known about the quantitative measurements of Aβ accumulation and definitions of its relative sites of ocular deposition in the normal ageing mouse. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have traced Aβ accumulation quantitatively in the ageing mouse retina using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. We reveal that it is not only deposited at Bruch's membrane and along blood vessels, but unexpectedly, it also coats photoreceptor outer segments. While Aβ is present at all sites of deposition from 3 months of age, it increases markedly from 6 months onward. Progressive accumulation of deposits on outer segments was confirmed with scanning electron microscopy, revealing age-related changes in their morphology. Such progress of accumulation of Aβ on photoreceptor outer segments with age was also confirmed in human retinae using immunohistochemistry. We also chart the macrophage response to increases in Aβ showing up-regulation in their numbers using both confocal laser imaging of the eye in vivo followed by in vitro immunostaining. With age macrophages become bloated with cellular debris including Aβ, however, their increasing numbers fail to stop Aβ accumulation. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing Aβ deposition in blood vessels and Bruch's membrane will impact upon retinal perfusion and clearance of cellular waste products from the outer retina, a region of very high metabolic activity. This accumulation of Aβ may contribute to the 30% reduction of photoreceptors found throughout life and the shortening of those that remain. The

  5. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  6. Inhibition of beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity by pinocembrin through Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yumin; Miao, Yingchun; Mir, Aamina Zia; Cheng, Long; Wang, Lina; Zhao, Linan; Cui, Qifu; Zhao, Weili; Wang, Hongquan

    2016-09-15

    Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) can cause neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It evokes a cascade of oxidative damage to neurons. Pinocembrin (PCB), the most abundant flavonoid in propolis, has been proven to have neuroprotective effects in vivo and in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of PCB on Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to 25μM Aβ25-35 for 24h caused viability loss, apoptotic increase and reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase, pre-treatment with PCB for 4h significantly reduced the viability loss, apoptotic rate and attenuated Aβ-mediated ROS production. PCB strikingly inhibited Aβ25-35-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions, including lowered membrane potential, decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio. In addition, PCB suppressed the release of cytochrome c and the cleavage of caspase-3. PCB treatment also resulted in an increase in Nrf2 protein levels and subsequent induction of heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) expression in SH-SY5Y cells. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Nrf2 expression suppressed the PCB-induced HO-1 expression. Notably, we found that the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) markedly diminished the neuroprotective effect of PCB against Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity. Taken together, these results indicated that PCB protects SH-SY5Y cells from Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity through activation of Nrf2/HO-1 pathways. Thus, activation of Nrf2/HO-1 pathways and inhibition of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis together may protect cells from Aβ25-35-induceded neurotoxicity. PMID:27538638

  7. Lipoprotein-based nanoparticles rescue the memory loss of mice with Alzheimer's disease by accelerating the clearance of amyloid-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qingxiang; Huang, Meng; Yao, Lei; Wang, Xiaolin; Gu, Xiao; Chen, Juan; Chen, Jun; Huang, Jialin; Hu, Quanyin; Kang, Ting; Rong, Zhengxing; Qi, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Chen, Hongzhuan; Gao, Xiaoling

    2014-03-25

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation in the brain is believed to play a central role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, and the common late-onset form of AD is characterized by an overall impairment in Aβ clearance. Therefore, development of nanomedicine that can facilitate Aβ clearance represents a promising strategy for AD intervention. However, previous work of this kind was concentrated at the molecular level, and the disease-modifying effectiveness of such nanomedicine has not been investigated in clinically relevant biological systems. Here, we hypothesized that a biologically inspired nanostructure, apolipoprotein E3-reconstituted high density lipoprotein (ApoE3-rHDL), which presents high binding affinity to Aβ, might serve as a novel nanomedicine for disease modification in AD by accelerating Aβ clearance. Surface plasmon resonance, transmission electron microscopy, and co-immunoprecipitation analysis showed that ApoE3-rHDL demonstrated high binding affinity to both Aβ monomer and oligomer. It also accelerated the microglial, astroglial, and liver cell degradation of Aβ by facilitating the lysosomal transport. One hour after intravenous administration, about 0.4% ID/g of ApoE3-rHDL gained access to the brain. Four-week daily treatment with ApoE3-rHDL decreased Aβ deposition, attenuated microgliosis, ameliorated neurologic changes, and rescued memory deficits in an AD animal model. The findings here provided the direct evidence of a biomimetic nanostructure crossing the blood-brain barrier, capturing Aβ and facilitating its degradation by glial cells, indicating that ApoE3-rHDL might serve as a novel nanomedicine for disease modification in AD by accelerating Aβ clearance, which also justified the concept that nanostructures with Aβ-binding affinity might provide a novel nanoplatform for AD therapy.

  8. Increase of beta-amyloid and C-reactive protein in liver transplant recipients with postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Li; Da-Xiang Wen; Yan-Hong Zhao

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative  cognitive  dysfunction  (POCD) is  an  adverse  condition  characterized  by  declined  cognitive functions following surgeries and anesthesia. POCD has been associated  with  increased  hospital  stay  and  mortality.  There are histological similarities to Alzheimer's disease. Most early studies  were  conducted  in  patients  receiving  cardiac  surgery. Since there is no information about POCD in liver transplant recipients, we measured the incidence of POCD in patients after liver  transplantation  and  examined  the  correlation  between neurological  dysfunction  and  biological  markers  of  dementia-based diseases. METHODS: We studied 25 patients who had a liver transplan-tation between July 2008 and February 2009. Patients with prior encephalopathy or risk factors associated with the development of  POCD  were  excluded  from  the  study.  Five  validated neuropsychiatric  tests  were  used  for  diagnosis.  The  diagnosis was based on one standard deviation decline in two of the five neuropsychiatric tests. The correlation between patient variables and the development of POCD was examined. Serum levels of beta-amyloid and C-reactive protein were measured by standard ELISA and compared between patients with and without POCD. RESULTS: POCD  was  present  in  11  (44%)  of  the  25  patients. Patients  with  POCD  had  significantly  higher  MELD  scores, were more often Child-Pugh class C and received more blood transfusion  during  surgery.  The  serum  beta-amyloid  protein and  C-reactive  protein  concentrations

  9. Transmissible amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjernberg, L O; Rising, A; Johansson, J; Jaudzems, K; Westermark, P

    2016-08-01

    There are around 30 human diseases associated with protein misfolding and amyloid formation, each one caused by a certain protein or peptide. Many of these diseases are lethal and together they pose an enormous burden to society. The prion protein has attracted particular interest as being shown to be the pathogenic agent in transmissible diseases such as kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Whether similar transmission could occur also in other amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and serum amyloid A amyloidosis is a matter of intense research and debate. Furthermore, it has been suggested that novel biomaterials such as artificial spider silk are potentially amyloidogenic. Here, we provide a brief introduction to amyloid, prions and other proteins involved in amyloid disease and review recent evidence for their potential transmission. We discuss the similarities and differences between amyloid and silk, as well as the potential hazards associated with protein-based biomaterials. PMID:27002185

  10. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  11. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  12. Adaptor protein sorting nexin 17 regulates amyloid precursor protein trafficking and processing in the early endosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Jiyeon; Retamal, Claudio; Cuitino, Loreto; Caruano-Yzermans, Amy; Shin, Jung-Eun; van Kerkhof, Peter; Marzolo, Maria-Paz; Bu, Guojun

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of extracellular amyloid beta peptide (A beta), generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing by beta- and gamma-secretases, is toxic to neurons and is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Production of A beta from APP is greatly affected by the subcellular loca

  13. Role of glycine-33 and methionine-35 in Alzheimer's amyloid beta-peptide 1-42-associated oxidative stress and neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, Jaroslaw; Varadarajan, Sridhar; Aksenova, Marina; Butterfield, D Allan

    2002-03-16

    Recent theoretical calculations predicted that Gly33 of one molecule of amyloid beta-peptide (1-42) (Abeta(1-42)) is attacked by a putative sulfur-based free radical of methionine residue 35 of an adjacent peptide. This would lead to a carbon-centered free radical on Gly33 that would immediately bind oxygen to form a peroxyl free radical. Such peroxyl free radicals could contribute to the reported Abeta(1-42)-induced lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and neurotoxicity, all of which are prevented by the chain-breaking antioxidant vitamin E. In the theoretical calculations, it was shown that no other amino acid, only Gly, could undergo such a reaction. To test this prediction we studied the effects of substitution of Gly33 of Abeta(1-42) on protein oxidation and neurotoxicity of hippocampal neurons and free radical formation in synaptosomes and in solution. Gly33 of Abeta(1-42) was substituted by Val (Abeta(1-42G33V)). The substituted peptide showed almost no neuronal toxicity compared to the native Abeta(1-42) as well as significantly lowered levels of oxidized proteins. In addition, synaptosomes subjected to Abeta(1-42G33V) showed considerably lower dichlorofluorescein-dependent fluorescence - a measure of reactive oxygen species (ROS) - in comparison to native Abeta(1-42) treatment. The ability of the peptides to generate ROS was also evaluated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping methods using the ultrapure spin trap N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN). While Abeta(1-42) gave a strong mixture of four- and six-line PBN-derived spectra, the intensity of the EPR signal generated by Abeta(1-42G33V) was far less. Finally, the ability of the peptides to form fibrils was evaluated by electron microscopy. Abeta(1-42G33V) does not form fibrils nearly as well as Abeta(1-42) after 48 h of incubation. The results suggest that Gly33 may be a possible site of free radical propagation processes that are initiated on Met35 of Abeta(1-42) and that

  14. [{sup 18}F]Flutemetamol amyloid-beta PET imaging compared with [{sup 11}C]PIB across the spectrum of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatashita, Shizuo; Yamasaki, Hidetomo [Shonan-Atsugi Hospital, Neurology, PET Center, Atsugi (Japan); Suzuki, Yutaka; Wakebe, Daichi; Hayakawa, Hideki [Shonan-Atsugi Hospital, Radiology, PET Center, Atsugi (Japan); Tanaka, Kumiko [Shonan-Atsugi Hospital, Pharmacology, PET Center, Atsugi (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The aim was to identify the amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with the {sup 18}F-labeled Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) derivative [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol (FMM) across a spectrum of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to compare Aβ deposition between [{sup 18}F]FMM and [{sup 11}C]PIB PET imaging. The study included 36 patients with AD, 68 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 41 older healthy controls (HC) (aged ≥56), 11 young HC (aged ≤45), and 10 transitional HC (aged 46-55). All 166 subjects underwent 30-min static [{sup 18}F]FMM PET 85 min after injection, 60-min dynamic [{sup 11}C]PIB PET, and cognitive testing. [{sup 18}F]FMM scans were assessed visually, and standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) were defined quantitatively in regions of interest identified on coregistered MRI (cerebellar cortex as a reference region). The PIB distribution volume ratios (DVR) were determined in the same regions. Of 36 AD patients, 35 had positive scans, while 36 of 41 older HC subjects had negative scans. [{sup 18}F]FMM scans had a sensitivity of 97.2 % and specificity of 85.3 % in distinguishing AD patients from older HC subjects, and a specificity of 100 % for young and transitional HC subjects. The [{sup 11}C]PIB scan had the same results. Interreader agreement was excellent (kappa score = 0.81). The cortical FMM SUVR in AD patients was significantly greater than in older HC subjects (1.76 ± 0.23 vs 1.30 ± 0.26, p < 0.01). Of the MCI patients, 68 had a bimodal distribution of SUVR, and 29 of them (42.6 %) had positive scans. Cortical FMM SUVR values were strongly correlated with PIB DVR (r = 0.94, n = 145, p < 0.001). [{sup 18}F]FMM PET imaging detects Aβ deposition in patients along the continuum from normal cognitive status to dementia of AD and discriminates AD patients from HC subjects, similar to [{sup 11}C]PIB PET. (orig.)

  15. Involvement of insulin-degrading enzyme in the clearance of beta-amyloid at the blood-CSF barrier: Consequences of lead exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yanshu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by the deposition of beta-amyloid (Aβ peptides in the brain extracellular matrix, resulting in pathological changes and neurobehavioral deficits. Previous work from this laboratory demonstrated that the choroid plexus (CP possesses the capacity to remove Aβ from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, and exposure to lead (Pb compromises this function. Since metalloendopeptidase insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE, has been implicated in the metabolism of Aβ, we sought to investigate whether accumulation of Aβ following Pb exposure was due to the effect of Pb on IDE. Methods Rats were injected with a single dose of Pb acetate or an equivalent concentration of Na-acetate; CP tissues were processed to detect the location of IDE by immunohistochemistry. For in vitro studies, choroidal epithelial Z310 cells were treated with Pb for 24 h in the presence or absence of a known IDE inhibitor, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM to assess IDE enzymatic activity and subsequent metabolic clearance of Aβ. Additionally, the expression of IDE mRNA and protein were determined using real time PCR and western blots respectively. Results Immunohistochemistry and confocal imaging revealed the presence of IDE towards the apical surface of the CP tissue with no visible alteration in either its intensity or location following Pb exposure. There was no significant difference in the expressions of either IDE mRNA or protein following Pb exposure compared to controls either in CP tissues or in Z310 cells. However, our findings revealed a significant decrease in the IDE activity following Pb exposure; this inhibition was similar to that seen in the cells treated with NEM alone. Interestingly, treatment with Pb or NEM alone significantly increased the levels of intracellular Aβ, and a greater accumulation of Aβ was seen when the cells were exposed to a combination of both. Conclusion These data suggest that Pb exposure inhibits IDE

  16. Dual effect of beta-amyloid on α7 and α4β2 nicotinic receptors controlling the release of glutamate, aspartate and GABA in rat hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Mura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously showed that beta-amyloid (Aβ, a peptide considered as relevant to Alzheimer's Disease, is able to act as a neuromodulator affecting neurotransmitter release in absence of evident sign of neurotoxicity in two different rat brain areas. In this paper we focused on the hippocampus, a brain area which is sensitive to Alzheimer's Disease pathology, evaluating the effect of Aβ (at different concentrations on the neurotransmitter release stimulated by the activation of pre-synaptic cholinergic nicotinic receptors (nAChRs, α4β2 and α7 subtypes. Particularly, we focused on some neurotransmitters that are usually involved in learning and memory: glutamate, aspartate and GABA. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: WE USED A DUAL APPROACH: in vivo experiments (microdialysis technique on freely moving rats in parallel to in vitro experiments (isolated nerve endings derived from rat hippocampus. Both in vivo and in vitro the administration of nicotine stimulated an overflow of aspartate, glutamate and GABA. This effect was greatly inhibited by the highest concentrations of Aβ considered (10 µM in vivo and 100 nM in vitro. In vivo administration of 100 nM Aβ (the lowest concentration considered potentiated the GABA overflow evoked by nicotine. All these effects were specific for Aβ and for nicotinic secretory stimuli. The in vitro administration of either choline or 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (α7 and α4β2 nAChRs selective agonists, respectively elicited the hippocampal release of aspartate, glutamate, and GABA. High Aβ concentrations (100 nM inhibited the overflow of all three neurotransmitters evoked by both choline and 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride. On the contrary, low Aβ concentrations (1 nM and 100 pM selectively acted on α7 subtypes potentiating the choline-induced release of both aspartate and glutamate, but not the one of GABA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results reinforce the concept that Aβ has relevant

  17. Lipopolysaccharide impairs amyloid beta efflux from brain: altered vascular sequestration, cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption, peripheral clearance and transporter function at the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson Michelle A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defects in the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1 and p-glycoprotein (Pgp clearance of amyloid beta (Aβ from brain are thought to contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. We have recently shown that induction of systemic inflammation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS results in impaired efflux of Aβ from the brain. The same treatment also impairs Pgp function. Here, our aim is to determine which physiological routes of Aβ clearance are affected following systemic inflammation, including those relying on LRP-1 and Pgp function at the blood–brain barrier. Methods CD-1 mice aged between 6 and 8 weeks were treated with 3 intraperitoneal injections of 3 mg/kg LPS at 0, 6, and 24 hours and studied at 28 hours. 125I-Aβ1-42 or 125I-alpha-2-macroglobulin injected into the lateral ventricle of the brain (intracerebroventricular (ICV or into the jugular vein (intravenous (IV was used to quantify LRP-1-dependent partitioning between the brain vasculature and parenchyma and peripheral clearance, respectively. Disappearance of ICV-injected 14 C-inulin from brain was measured to quantify bulk flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Brain microvascular protein expression of LRP-1 and Pgp was measured by immunoblotting. Endothelial cell localization of LRP-1 was measured by immunofluorescence microscopy. Oxidative modifications to LRP-1 at the brain microvasculature were measured by immunoprecipitation of LRP-1 followed by immunoblotting for 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-nitrotyrosine. Results We found that LPS: caused an LRP-1-dependent redistribution of ICV-injected Aβ from brain parenchyma to brain vasculature and decreased entry into blood; impaired peripheral clearance of IV-injected Aβ; inhibited reabsorption of CSF; did not significantly alter brain microvascular protein levels of LRP-1 or Pgp, or oxidative modifications to LRP-1; and downregulated LRP-1 protein levels and caused LRP-1 mislocalization in cultured brain

  18. In silico and in vitro studies to elucidate the role of Cu2+ and galanthamine as the limiting step in the amyloid beta (1-42) fibrillation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Maricarmen; Correa-Basurto, José; Benitez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Rosales-Hernández, Martha C

    2013-10-01

    The formation of fibrils and oligomers of amyloid beta (Aβ) with 42 amino acid residues (Aβ 1-42 ) is the most important pathophysiological event associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The formation of Aβ fibrils and oligomers requires a conformational change from an α-helix to a β-sheet conformation, which is encouraged by the formation of a salt bridge between Asp 23 or Glu 22 and Lys 28. Recently, Cu(2+) and various drugs used for AD treatment, such as galanthamine (Reminyl(®) ), have been reported to inhibit the formation of Aβ fibrils. However, the mechanism of this inhibition remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this work was to explore how Cu(2+) and galanthamine prevent the formation of Aβ1-42 fibrils using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (20 ns) and in vitro studies using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. The MD simulations revealed that Aβ1-42 acquires a characteristic U-shape before the α-helix to β-sheet conformational change. The formation of a salt bridge between Asp 23 and Lys 28 was also observed beginning at 5 ns. However, the MD simulations of Aβ 1-42 in the presence of Cu(2+) or galanthamine demonstrated that both ligands prevent the formation of the salt bridge by either binding to Glu 22 and Asp 23 (Cu(2+) ) or to Lys 28 (galanthamine), which prevents Aβ 1-42 from adopting the U-characteristic conformation that allows the amino acids to transition to a β-sheet conformation. The docking results revealed that the conformation obtained by the MD simulation of a monomer from the 1Z0Q structure can form similar interactions to those obtained from the 2BGE structure in the oligomers. The in vitro studies demonstrated that Aβ remains in an unfolded conformation when Cu(2+) and galanthamine are used. Then, ligands that bind Asp 23 or Glu 22 and Lys 28 could therefore be used to prevent β turn formation and, consequently, the formation of Aβ fibrils.

  19. Cyclophilin A affects Bcl-2 and Bax expression following beta-amyloid fragment 25-35-induced injury to PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Cheng; Chaodong Zhang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cyclophilin A can protect neurons against oxidative stress.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of cyclophilin A on Bcl-2 and Bax protein expression in pheochromocytoma (PCI2) cells treated with beta-amyloid fragment 25-35 (A β25-35), and to verify the protection pathway ofcyclophilin A.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The initial experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Department of Neurology, First Clinical College, China Medical University from November 2006 to July 2007.MATERIALS: PCI2 cells were cultured at the Cell Center of Peking Union Medical College. A β25-35 (Sigma, USA), antibodies of Bcl-2 and Bax (Wuhan Boster, China), and recombinant human cyclophilin A (Biomol, USA) were used in this study.METHODS: PC12 cells were divided into three groups. Cells in the control group were incubated in culture medium. Cells in the Aβ25-35 injury group were incubated in medium containing a final concentration of 10 μ mol/L of Aβ25-35. Cells in the cyclophilin A group were incubated in medium containing a final concentration of 10 nmol/L of cyclophilin A for 30 minutes, and then treated with 10 μmol/L Aβ25-35. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: After 24 hours of culture, immunohistochemistry was used to detect Bcl-2 and Bax expression in PC12 cells. Annexin-V flow cytometry was employed to measure the apoptosis rate of PC12 cells. The MTT method was applied to examine the survival rate of PC12 cells.RESULTS: Bcl-2 expression decreased, whereas Bax expression increased in PCI2 cells treated with Aβ25-35 (t = 2.277, 5.957, P<0.05). However, in PC12 cells treated with Aβ25-35 and cyclophilin A, Bcl-2 expression increased and Bax expression decreased (t = 4.497, 2.531, P < 0.05). The survival rate of PC12 cells significantly decreased and the apoptosis rate increased (t=8.509, 22.886, P < 0.05) following Aβ25-35 treatment. Cyclophilin A enhanced the survival rate of PC12 cells to Aβ25-35-induced apoptosis (t = 4.895, 10.042, P< 0.05).CONCLUSION: Cyclophilin A can

  20. Effect of combination of extracts of ginseng and ginkgo biloba on acetylcholine in amyloid beta-protein-treated rats determined by an improved HPLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-xun LIU; Wei-hong CONG; Li XU; Jian-nong WANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the concentration of acetylcholine (ACh) in amyloid beta-protein (Aβ) treated rats and offer a method determining ACh as well. METHODS: A 1-month combination of extrats of ginseng and ginkgo biloba(Naoweikang) ig administration to rats was performed daily after bilateral injection of Aβ1-40 (4 g/L, 1 μL for each side) into hippocampus. After decollation, homogenizing, and centrifuging and extracting, a high pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method using electrochemical detection (ECD) combined with two immobilized enzyme reactors was used to determine ACh in rat whole brain. RESULTS: With a mobile phase consisting of disodium hydrogen orthophosphate, tetramethylammonium chloride (TMAC1), octanesulfonic acid sodium salt (OSA) and"Reagent MB" at a final pH of 8.0, ACh was determined while removing the interfering choline in less than 10 min at a flow rate of 0.35 mL/min on a platinum (Pt) working electrode at a potential of +300 mV vs a solid-state palladium (Pd) reference electrode. Linear regression analysis of peak area vs concentration demonstrated linearity in the 28.01 to 1400.06 μg/L injection range. The r-value was 0.9978. The limit of detection (LOD) is 0.28 ng on column. ACh in whole brain decreased by 20.34 % (from 162.1±32.7 to 134.7±14.0 μg/L, P<0.05) after bilateral injection of Aβ into rat hippocampus. After Naoweikang administration (31 and 15.5 mg/kg, respectively), ACh increased by 19.97 % (from 134.7+14.0 to 161.6+26.2 μg/L, P<0.05) and 18.56 % (from 134.7+14.0 to 159.7+22.9 μg/L, P<0.05), respectively. CONCLUSION: Naoweikang significantly increased the level of ACh in whole brain of Aβ treated rats. And a sensitive, selective and reliable method for routinely determining ACh in rat whole brain was established in this study.

  1. Calcium binding to beta-2-microglobulin at physiological pH drives the occurrence of conformational changes which cause the protein to precipitate into amorphous forms that subsequently transform into amyloid aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhdeep Kumar

    Full Text Available Using spectroscopic, calorimetric and microscopic methods, we demonstrate that calcium binds to beta-2-microglobulin (β2m under physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength, in biological buffers, causing a conformational change associated with the binding of up to four calcium atoms per β2m molecule, with a marked transformation of some random coil structure into beta sheet structure, and culminating in the aggregation of the protein at physiological (serum concentrations of calcium and β2m. We draw attention to the fact that the sequence of β2m contains several potential calcium-binding motifs of the DXD and DXDXD (or DXEXD varieties. We establish (a that the microscopic aggregation seen at physiological concentrations of β2m and calcium turns into actual turbidity and visible precipitation at higher concentrations of protein and β2m, (b that this initial aggregation/precipitation leads to the formation of amorphous aggregates, (c that the formation of the amorphous aggregates can be partially reversed through the addition of the divalent ion chelating agent, EDTA, and (d that upon incubation for a few weeks, the amorphous aggregates appear to support the formation of amyloid aggregates that bind to the dye, thioflavin T (ThT, resulting in increase in the dye's fluorescence. We speculate that β2m exists in the form of microscopic aggregates in vivo and that these don't progress to form larger amyloid aggregates because protein concentrations remain low under normal conditions of kidney function and β2m degradation. However, when kidney function is compromised and especially when dialysis is performed, β2m concentrations probably transiently rise to yield large aggregates that deposit in bone joints and transform into amyloids during dialysis related amyloidosis.

  2. Against Research Progress of Beta Amyloid Protein in the Role of Alzheimer Disease and Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapy by Multiple Targets%β-淀粉样蛋白在阿尔茨海默病中的作用及中药多靶点对抗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡海燕

    2012-01-01

    阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer's disease,AD)是以认知功能障碍和记忆损害为主要临床特征的神经退行性疾病,其病理变化之一是患者脑内的神经炎性斑(老年斑),主要成分为细胞外β-淀粉样蛋白(amyloid protein β,Aβ)的沉积,而Aβ又由淀粉样前体蛋白(amyloid precursor protein,APP)经序列水解而来.研究表明,Aβ可能是各种原因诱发AD的共同通路,是AD形成和发展的关键因素,因此本文以Aβ为靶标,对其产生、神经毒性及中药多靶点抗AD作用的研究进展进行综述.%AlzheimerS disease ( Alzheimer's disease, AD) is cognitive impairment and memory impairment as the main clinical features of neurodegenerative diseases. One of pathological changes was the brain in patients with neuritic plaques (senile plaques). The main component was extracellular amyloid beta protein (amyloid protein A beta,Ap) dep-osition, while the amyloid precursor protein (amyloid precursor protein, APP) is hydrolyzed to the A beta by sequence. Research shows that A beta may be various reasons induced AD common pathway and the key to AD formation and development, therefore, this paper, based on A beta as a target reviewed its generation, neurotoxicity and multiple targets of anti AD effects by traditional Chinese medicine therapy.

  3. Beta-amyloid deposition and cognitive function in patients with major depressive disorder with different subtypes of mild cognitive impairment: {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kuan-Yi; Liu, Chia-Yih; Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Lee, Chin-Pang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Psychiatry, Tao-Yuan (China); Chen, Cheng-Sheng [Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital and College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung (China); Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Lin, Kun-Ju [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Kuei Shan Hsiang, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences and Healthy Aging Research Center, Tao-Yuan (China)

    2016-06-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the amyloid burden, as assessed by {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) positron emission tomography PET, in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) with different subtypes of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and the relationship between amyloid burden and cognition in MDD patients. The study included 55 MDD patients without dementia and 21 healthy control subjects (HCs) who were assessed using a comprehensive cognitive test battery and {sup 18}F-florbetapir PET imaging. The standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) in eight cortical regions using the whole cerebellum as reference region were determined and voxel-wise comparisons between the HC and MDD groups were performed. Vascular risk factors, serum homocysteine level and the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype were also determined. Among the 55 MDD patients, 22 (40.0 %) had MCI, 12 (21.8 %) non-amnestic MCI (naMCI) and 10 (18.2 %) amnestic MCI (aMCI). The MDD patients with aMCI had the highest relative {sup 18}F-florbetapir uptake in all cortical regions, and a significant difference in relative {sup 18}F-florbetapir uptake was found in the parietal region as compared with that in naMCI subjects (P < 0.05) and HCs (P < 0.01). Voxel-wise analyses revealed significantly increased relative {sup 18}F-florbetapir uptake in the MDD patients with aMCI and naMCI in the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital areas (P < 0.005). The global cortical SUVR was significantly negatively correlated with MMSE score (r = -0.342, P = 0.010) and memory function (r = -0.328, P = 0.015). The negative correlation between the global SUVR and memory in the MDD patients remained significant in multiple regression analyses that included age, educational level, ApoE genotype, and depression severity (β = -3.607, t = -2.874, P = 0.006). We found preliminary evidence of brain beta-amyloid deposition in MDD patients with different subtypes of MCI. Our findings in MDD patients support the

  4. Atomic View of a Toxic Amyloid Small Oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Park, Jiyong; Zhao, Minglei; Pensalfini, Anna; Soriaga, Angela B.; Landau, Meytal; Teng, Poh K.; Cascio, Duilio; Glabe, Charles; Eisenberg, David (UCI); (UCLA)

    2012-04-30

    Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and the prion conditions, are each associated with a particular protein in fibrillar form. These amyloid fibrils were long suspected to be the disease agents, but evidence suggests that smaller, often transient and polymorphic oligomers are the toxic entities. Here, we identify a segment of the amyloid-forming protein {alpha}{beta} crystallin, which forms an oligomeric complex exhibiting properties of other amyloid oligomers: {beta}-sheet-rich structure, cytotoxicity, and recognition by an oligomer-specific antibody. The x-ray-derived atomic structure of the oligomer reveals a cylindrical barrel, formed from six antiparallel protein strands, that we term a cylindrin. The cylindrin structure is compatible with a sequence segment from the {beta}-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease. Cylindrins offer models for the hitherto elusive structures of amyloid oligomers.

  5. Looking for a generic inhibitor of amyloid-like fibril formation among flavone derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Šneideris, Tomas; Baranauskienė, Lina; Jonathan G Cannon; Rutkienė, Rasa; Meškys, Rolandas; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    A range of diseases is associated with amyloid fibril formation. Despite different proteins being responsible for each disease, all of them share similar features including beta-sheet-rich secondary structure and fibril-like protein aggregates. A number of proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, resembling structural features of disease-related amyloids. Given these generic structural properties of amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils, generic inhibitors of fibril formation would be of i...

  6. Effects of natural-cerebrolysin-containing serum on neurotoxicity and synaptogenesis in amyloid-beta 1-40-induced Alzheimer's disease in vitro models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinghong Li; Zhengzhi Wu; Andrew C. J. HuangO; Ming Li; XiaoLi Zhang; Jiguo Wang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuronal loss, synapse mutilation, and increasing malnourished axons are pathologically related to Alzheimer's disease. Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) is of importance for neuronal, axonal, and dendritic generation, extension, and stabilization, as well as for the regulation of synaptic plasticity.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the antagonistic effects of natural-cerebrolysin-containing serum on beta amyloid protein 1-40 (Aβ1-40)-induced neurotoxicity from the standpoints of cell proliferation, synaptogenesis, and cytoskeleton formation (MAP2 expression).DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A paralleled, controlled, neural cell, and molecular biology experiment was performed at the Institute of Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine, Shenzhen Hospital, Southern Medical University between February 2006 and April 2008.MATERIALS: PC12 cells, derived from the rat central nervous system, were purchased from Shanghai Institute of Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China. A β1-40 was provided by Sigma, USA. Natural-cerebrolysin was provided by Shenzhen Institute of Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine, China. The natural-cerebrolysin was predominantly composed of Renshen (Radix Ginseng), Tianma (Rhizoma Gastrodiae), and Yixingye (Ginkgo Leaf) in a proportion of 1:2:2. Following conventional water extraction technology, an extract (1:20) was prepared. Each gram of extract equaled 20 grams of crude drug. In a total of 12 adult male New Zealand rabbits, six underwent intragastric administration of natural-cerebrolysin extract for 1 month to prepare administration of physiological saline to prepare normal blank serum.METHODS: An Alzheimer's disease in vitro model was induced in PC12 cells using Aβ1-40. The cells were incubated with varying doses of natural-cerebrolysin-containing serum (2.5%, 5%, and 10%). Normal blank serum-treated PC12 cells served as a blank control group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Through the use of inverted phase contrast microscope, cell

  7. PET imaging of brain with the {beta}-amyloid probe, [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1, in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Hiroshi [Fujita Health University, Department of Radiology, Aichi (Japan); National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ye, Daniel; Cohen, Robert M. [National Institutes of Health, Geriatric Psychiatry Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Cai, Lisheng; Musachio, John L.; Hong, Jinsoo; Crescenzo, Mathew; Tipre, Dnyanesh; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Zoghbi, Sami; Vines, Douglass C.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B. [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Jacobowitz, David [USUHS, Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V. [National Institutes of Health, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Katada, Kazuhiro [Fujita Health University, Department of Radiology, Aichi (Japan)

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacity of [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1 and positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). PET imaging was performed with the NIH ATLAS small animal scanner in six elderly transgenic mice (Tg2576; age 22.0{+-}1.8 months; 23.6{+-}2.6 g) overexpressing a mutated form of human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) known to result in the production of A{beta} plaques, and in six elderly wild-type litter mates (age 21.8{+-}1.6 months; 29.5{+-}4.7 g). Dynamic PET scans were performed for 30 min in each mouse under 1% isoflurane inhalation anesthesia after a bolus injection of 13-46 MBq of [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1. PET data were reconstructed with 3D OSEM. On the coronal PET image, irregular regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on frontal cortex (FR), parietal cortex (PA), striatum (ST), thalamus (TH), pons (PO), and cerebellum (CE), guided by a mouse stereotaxic atlas. Time-activity curves (TACs) (expressed as percent injected dose per gram normalized to body weight: % ID-kg/g) were obtained for FR, PA, ST, TH, PO, and CE. ROI-to-CE radioactivity ratios were also calculated. Following PET scans, sections of mouse brain prepared from anesthetized and fixative-perfused mice were stained with thioflavin-S. TACs for [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1 in all ROIs peaked early (at 30-55 s), with radioactivity washing out quickly thereafter in both transgenic and wild-type mice. Peak uptake in all regions was significantly lower in transgenic mice than in wild-type mice. During the later part of the washout phase (12-30 min), the mean FR/CE and PA/CE ratios were higher in transgenic than in wild-type mice (1.06{+-}0.04 vs 0.98{+-}0.07, p=0.04; 1.06{+-}0.09 vs 0.93{+-}0.08 p=0.02) while ST/CE, TH/CE, and PO/CE ratios were not. Ex vivo staining revealed widespread A{beta} plaques in cortex, but not in cerebellum of transgenic mice or in any brain regions of wild

  8. Obesity in Aging Exacerbates Blood–Brain Barrier Disruption, Neuroinflammation, and Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Hippocampus: Effects on Expression of Genes Involved in Beta-Amyloid Generation and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Mitschelen, Matthew; Koller, Akos; Szalai, Gabor; Sonntag, William E.; Csiszar, Anna

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity has deleterious effects on the brain and cognitive function in the elderly population. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging and obesity interact to promote cognitive decline remain unclear. To test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates obesity-induced cerebromicrovascular damage and neuroinflammation, we compared young (7 months) and aged (24 months) high fat diet–fed obese C57BL/6 mice. Aging exacerbated obesity-induced systemic inflammation and blood–brain barrier disruption, as indicated by the increased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased presence of extravasated immunoglobulin G in the hippocampus, respectively. Obesity-induced blood–brain barrier damage was associated with microglia activation, upregulation of activating Fc-gamma receptors and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased oxidative stress. Treatment of cultured primary microglia with sera derived from aged obese mice resulted in significantly more pronounced microglia activation and oxidative stress, as compared with treatment with young sera. Serum-induced activation and oxidative stress were also exacerbated in primary microglia derived from aged animals. Hippocampal expression of genes involved in regulation of the cellular amyloid precursor protein–dependent signaling pathways, beta-amyloid generation, and the pathogenesis of tauopathy were largely unaffected by obesity in aged mice. Collectively, obesity in aging is associated with a heightened state of systemic inflammation, which exacerbates blood–brain barrier disruption. The resulting neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus likely contribute to the significant cognitive decline observed in aged obese animals. PMID:24269929

  9. Obesity in aging exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption, neuroinflammation, and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus: effects on expression of genes involved in beta-amyloid generation and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Mitschelen, Matthew; Koller, Akos; Szalai, Gabor; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2014-10-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity has deleterious effects on the brain and cognitive function in the elderly population. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging and obesity interact to promote cognitive decline remain unclear. To test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates obesity-induced cerebromicrovascular damage and neuroinflammation, we compared young (7 months) and aged (24 months) high fat diet-fed obese C57BL/6 mice. Aging exacerbated obesity-induced systemic inflammation and blood-brain barrier disruption, as indicated by the increased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased presence of extravasated immunoglobulin G in the hippocampus, respectively. Obesity-induced blood-brain barrier damage was associated with microglia activation, upregulation of activating Fc-gamma receptors and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased oxidative stress. Treatment of cultured primary microglia with sera derived from aged obese mice resulted in significantly more pronounced microglia activation and oxidative stress, as compared with treatment with young sera. Serum-induced activation and oxidative stress were also exacerbated in primary microglia derived from aged animals. Hippocampal expression of genes involved in regulation of the cellular amyloid precursor protein-dependent signaling pathways, beta-amyloid generation, and the pathogenesis of tauopathy were largely unaffected by obesity in aged mice. Collectively, obesity in aging is associated with a heightened state of systemic inflammation, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption. The resulting neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus likely contribute to the significant cognitive decline observed in aged obese animals.

  10. Fibrillar beta-amyloid peptide Aβ1–40 activates microglial proliferation via stimulating TNF-α release and H2O2 derived from NADPH oxidase: a cell culture study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpe Martyn

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the accumulation of neuritic plaques, containing activated microglia and β-amyloid peptides (Aβ. Fibrillar Aβ can activate microglia, resulting in production of toxic and inflammatory mediators like hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide, and cytokines. We have recently found that microglial proliferation is regulated by hydrogen peroxide derived from NADPH oxidase. Thus, in this study, we investigated whether Aβ can stimulate microglial proliferation and cytokine production via activation of NADPH oxidase to produce hydrogen peroxide. Methods Primary mixed glial cultures were prepared from the cerebral cortices of 7-day-old Wistar rats. At confluency, microglial cells were isolated by tapping, replated, and treated either with or without Aβ. Hydrogen peroxide production by cells was measured with Amplex Red and peroxidase. Microglial proliferation was assessed under a microscope 0, 24 and 48 hours after plating. TNF-α and IL-1β levels in the culture medium were assessed by ELISA. Results We found that 1 μM fibrillar (but not soluble Aβ1–40 peptide induced microglial proliferation and caused release of hydrogen peroxide, TNF-α and IL-1β from microglial cells. Proliferation was prevented by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 μM, by the hydrogen peroxide-degrading enzyme catalase (60 U/ml, and by its mimetics EUK-8 and EUK-134 (20 μM; as well as by an antibody against TNF-α and by a soluble TNF receptor inhibitor. Production of TNF-α and IL-1β, measured after 24 hours of Aβ treatment, was also prevented by apocynin, catalase and EUKs, but the early release (measured after 1 hour of Aβ treatment of TNF-α was insensitive to apocynin or catalase. Conclusion These results indicate that Aβ1–40-induced microglial proliferation is mediated both by microglial release of TNF-α and production of hydrogen peroxide from NADPH oxidase. This suggests that TNF-α and NADPH

  11. Successful adjuvant-free vaccination of BALB/c mice with mutated amyloid β peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahi Monika M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent human clinical trial of an Alzheimer's disease (AD vaccine using amyloid beta (Aβ 1–42 plus QS-21 adjuvant produced some positive results, but was halted due to meningoencephalitis in some participants. The development of a vaccine with mutant Aβ peptides that avoids the use of an adjuvant may result in an effective and safer human vaccine. Results All peptides tested showed high antibody responses, were long-lasting, and demonstrated good memory response. Epitope mapping indicated that peptide mutation did not lead to epitope switching. Mutant peptides induced different inflammation responses as evidenced by cytokine profiles. Ig isotyping indicated that adjuvant-free vaccination with peptides drove an adequate Th2 response. All anti-sera from vaccinated mice cross-reacted with human Aβ in APP/PS1 transgenic mouse brain tissue. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that an adjuvant-free vaccine with different Aβ peptides can be an effective and safe vaccination approach against AD. This study represents the first report of adjuvant-free vaccines utilizing Aβ peptides carrying diverse mutations in the T-cell epitope. These largely positive results provide encouragement for the future of the development of human vaccinations for AD.

  12. Brain beta-amyloid measures and magnetic resonance imaging atrophy both predict time-to-progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Clifford R; Wiste, Heather J; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Weigand, Stephen D; Senjem, Matthew L; Zeng, Guang; Bernstein, Matt A; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Pankratz, Vernon S; Aisen, Paul S; Weiner, Michael W; Petersen, Ronald C; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Knopman, David S

    2010-11-01

    Biomarkers of brain Aβ amyloid deposition can be measured either by cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 or Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography imaging. Our objective was to evaluate the ability of Aβ load and neurodegenerative atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging to predict shorter time-to-progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's dementia and to characterize the effect of these biomarkers on the risk of progression as they become increasingly abnormal. A total of 218 subjects with mild cognitive impairment were identified from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. The primary outcome was time-to-progression to Alzheimer's dementia. Hippocampal volumes were measured and adjusted for intracranial volume. We used a new method of pooling cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 and Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography measures to produce equivalent measures of brain Aβ load from either source and analysed the results using multiple imputation methods. We performed our analyses in two phases. First, we grouped our subjects into those who were 'amyloid positive' (n = 165, with the assumption that Alzheimer's pathology is dominant in this group) and those who were 'amyloid negative' (n = 53). In the second phase, we included all 218 subjects with mild cognitive impairment to evaluate the biomarkers in a sample that we assumed to contain a full spectrum of expected pathologies. In a Kaplan-Meier analysis, amyloid positive subjects with mild cognitive impairment were much more likely to progress to dementia within 2 years than amyloid negative subjects with mild cognitive impairment (50 versus 19%). Among amyloid positive subjects with mild cognitive impairment only, hippocampal atrophy predicted shorter time-to-progression (P mild cognitive impairment were combined (amyloid positive and negative), hippocampal atrophy and Aβ load predicted shorter time-to-progression with comparable power (hazard ratio for an inter

  13. Pharmacokinetics of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol in wild-type rodents and its binding to beta amyloid deposits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snellman, Anniina; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R.; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja [University of Turku, MediCity/PET Preclinical Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Rokka, Johanna; Eskola, Olli [University of Turku, Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Wilson, Ian; Farrar, Gill [GE Healthcare Medical Diagnostics, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire (United Kingdom); Scheinin, Mika [University of Turku, Department of Pharmacology, Drug Development and Therapeutics, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, Turku (Finland); Solin, Olof [University of Turku, Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Aabo Akademi University, Accelerator Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Rinne, Juha O. [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland)

    2012-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol as a preclinical PET tracer for imaging {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) deposition by comparing its pharmacokinetics to those of [{sup 11}C]Pittsburgh compound B ([{sup 11}C]PIB) in wild-type Sprague Dawley rats and C57Bl/6N mice. In addition, binding of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol to A{beta} deposits was studied in the Tg2576 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. [{sup 18}F]Flutemetamol biodistribution was evaluated using ex vivo PET methods and in vivo PET imaging in wild-type rats and mice. Metabolism and binding of [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol to plasma proteins were analysed using thin-layer chromatography and ultrafiltration methods, respectively. Radiation dose estimates were calculated from rat ex vivo biodistribution data. The binding of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol to A{beta} deposits was also studied using ex vivo and in vitro autoradiography. The location of A{beta} deposits in the brain was determined with thioflavine S staining and immunohistochemistry. The pharmacokinetics of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol resembled that of [{sup 11}C]PIB in rats and mice. In vivo studies showed that both tracers readily entered the brain, and were excreted via the hepatobiliary pathway in both rats and mice. The metabolism of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol into radioactive metabolites was faster than that of [{sup 11}C]PIB. [{sup 18}F]Flutemetamol cleared more slowly from the brain than [{sup 11}C]PIB, particularly from white matter, in line with its higher lipophilicity. Effective dose estimates for [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol were 2.28 and 6.65 {mu}Sv/MBq, respectively. Autoradiographs showed [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol binding to fibrillar A{beta} deposits in the brain of Tg2576 mice. Based on its pharmacokinetic profile, [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol showed potential as a PET tracer for preclinical imaging. It showed good brain uptake and was bound to A{beta} deposits in the

  14. Beta-amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme-1 expression in adult rat retinal neurons in the early period after lead exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jufang Huang; Kai Huang; Lei Shang; Hui Wang; Xiaoxin Yan; Kun Xiong

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that non-human primates and rodents exposed to lead during brain development may become dependent on the deposition of pre-determined β-amyloid protein (Aβ), and exhibit upregulation of β-site amyloid precursor protein expression in old age. However, further evidence is required to elucidate the precise relationship and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of early lead exposure on excessive Aβ production in adult mammals. The present study investigated the effects of lead exposure on expression of β-amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme-1 (BACE-1) in the rat retina and the production of Aβ in early development, using the retina as a window for studying Alzheimer's disease. Adult rats were intraocularly injected with different doses of lead acetate (10 μmol/L, 100 μmol/L, 1 mmol/L, 10 mmol/L and 100 mmol/L). The results revealed that retinal lead concentration, BACE-1 and its cleavage products β-C-terminal fragment and retina Aβ1-40 were all significantly increased in almost all of the lead exposure groups 48 hours later in a dose-dependent manner. The only exception was the 10 μmol/L group. The distribution of BACE-1 in the retina did not exhibit obvious changes, and no distinctive increase in the activation of retinal microglia was apparent. Similarly, retinal synaptophysin expression did not exhibit any clear changes. These data suggest that lead exposure can result in the upregulation of retinal neuron BACE-1 expression in the early period of development and further increase the overproduction of Aβ1-40 in the retina. Our results provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying environmentally-induced Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Increased expression of ApoE and protection from amyloid-beta toxicity in transmitochondrial cybrids with haplogroup K mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaker, Kunal; Chwa, Marilyn; Atilano, Shari R; Coskun, Pinar; Cáceres-Del-Carpio, Javier; Udar, Nitin; Boyer, David S; Jazwinski, S Michal; Miceli, Michael V; Nesburn, Anthony B; Kuppermann, Baruch D; Kenney, M Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA haplogroups, defined by specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns, represent populations of diverse geographic origins and have been associated with increased risk or protection of many diseases. The H haplogroup is the most common European haplogroup while the K haplogroup is highly associated with the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Transmitochondrial cybrids (cell lines with identical nuclei, but mtDNA from either H (n=8) or K (n=8) subjects) were analyzed by the Seahorse flux analyzer, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Cybrids were treated with amyloid-β peptides and cell viabilities were measured. Other cybrids were demethylated with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and expression levels for APOE and NFkB2 were measured. Results show K cybrids have (a) significantly lower mtDNA copy numbers, (b) higher expression levels for MT-DNA encoded genes critical for oxidative phosphorylation, (c) lower Spare Respiratory Capacity, (d) increased expression of inhibitors of the complement pathway and important inflammasome-related genes; and (e) significantly higher levels of APOE transcription that were independent of methylation status. After exposure to amyloid-β1-42 peptides (active form), H haplogroup cybrids demonstrated decreased cell viability compared to those treated with amyloid-β42-1 (inactive form) (p<0.0001), while this was not observed in the K cybrids (p=0.2). K cybrids had significantly higher total global methylation levels and differences in expression levels for two acetylation genes and four methylation genes. Demethylation with 5-aza-dC altered expression levels for NFkB2, while APOE transcription patterns were unchanged. Our findings support the hypothesis that mtDNA-nuclear retrograde signaling may mediate expression levels of APOE, a key factor in many age-related diseases. Future studies will focus on identification of the mitochondrial-nuclear retrograde signaling

  16. FLZ alleviates the memory deficits in transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease via decreasing beta-amyloid production and tau hyperphosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Qi Bao

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia worldwide and mainly characterized by the aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau. FLZ is a novel synthetic derivative of natural squamosamide and has been proved to improve memory deficits in dementia animal models. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms of FLZ's neuroprotective effect in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice and SH-SY5Y (APPwt/swe cells. The results showed that treatment with FLZ significantly improved the memory deficits of APP/PS1 transgenic mice and decreased apoptosis of SH-SY5Y (APPwt/swe cells. FLZ markedly attenuated Aβ accumulation and tau phosphorylation both in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistic study showed that FLZ interfered APP processing, i.e., FLZ decreased β-amyloid precursor protein (APP phosphorylation, APP-carboxy-terminal fragment (APP-CTF production and β-amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 expression. These results indicated that FLZ reduced Aβ production through inhibiting amyloidogenic pathway. The mechanistic study about FLZ's inhibitory effect on tau phosphorylation revealed t the involvement of Akt/glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β pathway. FLZ treatment increased Akt activity and inhibited GSK3β activity both in vivo and in vitro. The inhibitory effect of FLZ on GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation was suppressed by inhibiting Akt activity, indicating that Akt/GSK3β pathway might be the possible mechanism involved in the inhibitory effect of FLZ on tau hyperphosphorylation. These results suggested FLZ might be a potential anti-AD drug as it not only reduced Aβ production via inhibition amyloidogenic APP processing pathway, but also attenuated tau hyperphosphoylation mediated by Akt/GSK3β.

  17. Mutation-based structural modification and dynamics study of amyloid beta peptide (1–42: An in-silico-based analysis to cognize the mechanism of aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritam Kumar Panda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is the prevalent cause of premature senility, a progressive mental disorder due to degeneration in brain and deposition of amyloid β peptide (1–42, a misfolded protein in the form of aggregation that prevails for a prolonged time and obstructs every aspect of life. One of the primary hallmarks of the neuropathological disease is the accretion of amyloid β peptide in the brain that leads to Alzheimer's disease, but the mechanism is still a mystery. Several investigations have shown that mutations at specific positions have a significant impact in stability of the peptide as predicted from aggregation profiles. Here in our study, we have analyzed the mutations by substituting residues at position A22G, E22G, E22K, E22Q, D23N, L34V and molecular dynamics have been performed to check the deviation in stability and conformation of the peptide. The results validated that the mutations at specific positions lead to instability and the proline substitution at E22P and L34P stalled the aggregation of the peptide.

  18. Synthesis of fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents for amyloid-beta fibrils detection and removal by a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaat, Hadas; Margel, Shlomo

    2009-09-01

    Early diagnosis in Alzheimer's disease (AD), before the onset of marked clinical symptoms, is critical in preventing the irreversible neuronal damage that eventually leads to dementia and ultimately death. Therefore, there is an urgent need for in vivo imaging agents, which are valuable as specific biomarkers to demonstrate the location and density of amyloid plaques in the living human brain. The present manuscript describes a novel method for selective marking of Abeta(40) fibrils by non-fluorescent gamma-Fe(2)O(3) and fluorescent-magnetic gamma-Fe(2)O(3)-rhodamine or gamma-Fe(2)O(3)-Congo red nanoparticles, and the complete removal of the magnetized fibrils from the aqueous continuous phase by a magnetic field. These fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents have a great advantage due to the combination of the magnetic and fluorescence imaging into one nanostructured system. This hybrid system, which selectively marks Abeta(40) fibrils, might enable the early detection of plaques using both MRI and fluorescence microscopy, and therefore may be applied in in vivo AD diagnosis studies. These fluorescent-magnetic nanoparticles may also be useful as selective biomarkers to detect the location and the removal of other amyloid plaques derived from different amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow, and prion diseases. PMID:19559008

  19. Amyloid Imaging in Aging and Dementia: Testing the Amyloid Hypothesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rabinovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging represents a major advance in neuroscience, enabling the detection and quantification of pathologic protein aggregations in the brain. In this review we survey current amyloid imaging techniques, focusing on positron emission tomography (PET with ^{11}carbon-labelled Pittsburgh Compound-B (11C-PIB, the most extensively studied and best validated tracer. PIB binds specifically to fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ deposits, and is a sensitive marker for Aβ pathology in cognitively normal older individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. PIB-PET provides us with a powerful tool to examine in vivo the relationship between amyloid deposition, clinical symptoms, and structural and functional brain changes in the continuum between normal aging and AD. Amyloid imaging studies support a model in which amyloid deposition is an early event on the path to dementia, beginning insidiously in cognitively normal individuals, and accompanied by subtle cognitive decline and functional and structural brain changes suggestive of incipient AD. As patients progress to dementia, clinical decline and neurodegeneration accelerate and proceed independently of amyloid accumulation. In the future, amyloid imaging is likely to supplement clinical evaluation in selecting patients for anti-amyloid therapies, while MRI and FDG-PET may be more appropriate markers of clinical progression.

  20. Curcumin protects against intracellular amyloid toxicity in rat primary neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Jelina; Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether curcumin is protective against intracellular amyloid beta (A beta) toxicity, different concentrations of curcumin were applied to with intracellular A beta in rat primary hippocampal neurons in culture. We find that at low dosages, curcumin effectively inhibits intracellular A

  1. Messenger RNA-based therapeutics for brain diseases: An animal study for augmenting clearance of beta-amyloid by intracerebral administration of neprilysin mRNA loaded in polyplex nanomicelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Yu; Perche, Federico; Ikegami, Masaru; Uchida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji

    2016-08-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis is considered to be the metabolic imbalance between anabolism and clearance of amyloid-beta (Aβ), and the strategy of breaking the equilibrium between soluble and insoluble forms of Aβ is likely to help prevent the progression of AD. Neprilysin (NEP) plays a major role in the clearance of Aβ in the brain, and its supplementation using viral vectors has shown to decrease Aβ deposition and prevent pathogenic changes in the brain. In this study, we developed a new therapeutic strategy by mRNA-based gene introduction. mRNA has the advantages of negligible risk of random integration into genome and not needing to be transcribed precludes the need for nuclear entry. This allows efficient protein expression in slowly-dividing or non-dividing cells, such as neural cells. We constructed mRNA encoding the mouse NEP protein and evaluated its ability degrade Aβ. In vitro transfection of NEP mRNA to primary neurons exhibited Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) degradation activity superior to that of NEP encoding plasmid DNA. We then evaluated the in vivo activity of NEP mRNA by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion using a cationic polymer-based PEGylated nanocarrier to form polyplex nanomicelles, which have been shown to have a high potential to deliver mRNA to various target tissues and organs. Nanomicelles carrying a GFP-NEP fusion mRNA produced efficient protein expression in a diffuse manner surrounding the ventricular space. An ELISA evaluation revealed that the mRNA infusion significantly augmented NEP level and effectively reduced the concentration of Aβ that had been supplemented in the mouse brain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the therapeutic potential of introducing exogenous mRNA for the treatment of brain diseases, opening the new era of mRNA-based therapeutics. PMID:27282413

  2. Islet amyloid polypeptide-induced membrane leakage involves uptake of lipids by forming amyloid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparr, Emma; Engel, Maarten F M; Sakharov, Dmitri V; Sprong, Mariette; Jacobs, Jet; de Kruijff, Ben; Höppener, Jo W M; Killian, J Antoinette

    2004-11-01

    Fibril formation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is associated with cell death of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. A likely cause for the cytotoxicity of human IAPP is that it destroys the barrier properties of the cell membrane. Here, we show by fluorescence confocal microscopy on lipid vesicles that the process of hIAPP amyloid formation is accompanied by a loss of barrier function, whereby lipids are extracted from the membrane and taken up in the forming amyloid deposits. No membrane interaction was observed when preformed fibrils were used. It is proposed that lipid uptake from the cell membrane is responsible for amyloid-induced membrane damage and that this represents a general mechanism underlying the cytotoxicity of amyloid forming proteins. PMID:15527771

  3. Protective effects of baicalin on amyloid beta 25-35- induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Geng; Hongyan Chen; Jianhua Wang; Yazhuo Hu; Jianwei Liu; Jing Liu; Jingkun Pan; Yuhong Gao

    2010-01-01

    Baicalin, a type of flavanoid, effectively prevents cellular apoptosis induced by various factors. However, little evidence is available regarding its role on amyloid β (Aβ) -induced neuronal apoptosis. The present study investigated the protective mechanisms of baicalin on Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis. Flow cytometry and cation dye 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethyl- benzimidazoly lcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) were employed to measure mitochondrial membrane potential, and nitric oxide secretion and apoptotic-related factors, such as caspase-3, were comprehensively analyzed. Results demonstrated a protective effect of baicalin on Aβ-treated SH-SY5Y cell viability; the rate of apoptosis decreased, nitric oxide generation and expression of caspase-3 were effectively inhibited, and mitochondrial membrane potential was effectively protected. Baicalin inhibited Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis via multiple targets and multiple pathways, such as the inhibition of free radical damage, reduction of caspase-3 expression, and protection of normal mitochondrial functions.

  4. Rescue of amyloid-Beta-induced inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by a peptide homologous to the nicotine binding domain of the alpha 7 subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur A Nery

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by brain accumulation of the neurotoxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ and by loss of cholinergic neurons and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. Recent evidence indicates that memory loss and cognitive decline in AD correlate better with the amount of soluble Aβ than with the extent of amyloid plaque deposits in affected brains. Inhibition of nAChRs by soluble Aβ40 is suggested to contribute to early cholinergic dysfunction in AD. Using phage display screening, we have previously identified a heptapeptide, termed IQ, homologous to most nAChR subtypes, binding with nanomolar affinity to soluble Aβ40 and blocking Aβ-induced inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced currents in PC12 cells expressing α7 nAChRs. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis and whole-cell current recording, we have now defined the amino acids in IQ essential for reversal of Aβ40 inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced responses in PC12 cells, mediated by α7 subtypes and other endogenously expressed nAChRs. We further investigated the effects of soluble Aβ, IQ and analogues of IQ on α3β4 nAChRs recombinantly expressed in HEK293 cells. Results show that nanomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ40 potently inhibit the function of α3β4 nAChRs, and that subsequent addition of IQ or its analogues does not reverse this effect. However, co-application of IQ makes the inhibition of α3β4 nAChRs by Aβ40 reversible. These findings indicate that Aβ40 inhibits different subtypes of nAChRs by interacting with specific receptor domains homologous to the IQ peptide, suggesting that IQ may be a lead for novel drugs to block the inhibition of cholinergic function in AD.

  5. Quantification of molecular interactions between ApoE, amyloid-beta (Aβ) and laminin: Relevance to accumulation of Aβ in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekonyte, Jurgita; Sakai, Kenji; Nicoll, James A R; Weller, Roy O; Carare, Roxana O

    2016-05-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in plaques in the brain and in artery walls as cerebral amyloid angiopathy indicates a failure of elimination of Aβ from the brain with age and Alzheimer's disease. A major pathway for elimination of Aβ and other soluble metabolites from the brain is along basement membranes within the walls of cerebral arteries that represent the lymphatic drainage pathways for the brain. The motive force for the elimination of Aβ along this perivascular pathway appears to be the contrary (reflection) wave that follows the arterial pulse wave. Following injection into brain parenchyma, Aβ rapidly drains out of the brain along basement membranes in the walls of cerebral arteries; such drainage is impaired in apolipoprotein E ε4 (ApoE4) mice. For drainage of Aβ to occur in a direction contrary to the pulse wave, some form of attachment to basement membrane would be required to prevent reflux of Aβ back into the brain during the passage of the subsequent pulse wave. In this study, we show first that apolipoprotein E co-localizes with Aβ in basement membrane drainage pathways in the walls of arteries. Secondly, we show by Atomic Force Microscopy that attachment of ApoE4/Aβ complexes to basement membrane laminin is significantly weaker than ApoE3/Aβ complexes. These results suggest that perivascular elimination of ApoE4/Aβ complexes would be less efficient than with other isoforms of apolipoprotein E, thus endowing a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease. Therapeutic correction for ApoE4/Aβ/laminin interactions may increase the efficiency of elimination of Aβ in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26327683

  6. Effects of beta-amyloid protein on M1 and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band complex of the rat: relationship with cholinergic, GABAergic, and calcium-binding protein perikarya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Iván; Arévalo-Serrano, Juan; Sanz-Anquela, José Miguel; Gonzalo-Ruiz, Alicia

    2007-06-01

    Cortical cholinergic dysfunction has been correlated with the expression and processing of beta-amyloid precursor protein. However, it remains unclear as to how cholinergic dysfunction and beta-amyloid (Abeta) formation and deposition might be related to one another. Since the M1- and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are considered key molecules that transduce the cholinergic message, the purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of the injected Abeta peptide on the number of M1mAchR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum-diagonal band (MS-nDBB) complex of the rat. Injections of Abeta protein into the retrosplenial cortex resulted in a decrease in M1mAChR and M2mAChR immunoreactivity in the MS-nDBB complex. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant reduction in the number of M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum nucleus (MS) and in the horizontal nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) as compared to the corresponding hemisphere in control animals and with that seen in the contralateral hemisphere, which corresponds to the PBS-injected side. Co-localization studies showed that the M1mAChR protein is localized in GABA-immunoreactive cells of the MS-nDBB complex, in particular those of the MS nucleus, while M2mAChR protein is localized in both the cholinergic and GABAergic cells. Moreover, GABAergic cells containing M2mAChR are mainly localized in the MS nucleus, while cholinergic cells containing M2mAChR are localized in the MS and the HDB nuclei. Our findings suggest that Abeta induces a reduction in M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-containing cells, which may contribute to impairments of cholinergic and GABAergic transmission in the MS-nDBB complex.

  7. Alzheimer's Disease Brain-Derived Amyloid-{beta}-Mediated Inhibition of LTP In Vivo Is Prevented by Immunotargeting Cellular Prion Protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Andrew E

    2011-05-18

    Synthetic amyloid-β protein (Aβ) oligomers bind with high affinity to cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), but the role of this interaction in mediating the disruption of synaptic plasticity by such soluble Aβ in vitro is controversial. Here we report that intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ-containing aqueous extracts of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) brain robustly inhibits long-term potentiation (LTP) without significantly affecting baseline excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus in vivo. Moreover, the disruption of LTP was abrogated by immunodepletion of Aβ. Importantly, intracerebroventricular administration of antigen-binding antibody fragment D13, directed to a putative Aβ-binding site on PrP(C), prevented the inhibition of LTP by AD brain-derived Aβ. In contrast, R1, a Fab directed to the C terminus of PrP(C), a region not implicated in binding of Aβ, did not significantly affect the Aβ-mediated inhibition of LTP. These data support the pathophysiological significance of SDS-stable Aβ dimer and the role of PrP(C) in mediating synaptic plasticity disruption by soluble Aβ.

  8. Some commonly used brominated flame retardants cause Ca2+-ATPase inhibition, beta-amyloid peptide release and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawaz Al-Mousa

    Full Text Available Brominated flame retardants (BFRs are chemicals commonly used to reduce the flammability of consumer products and are considered pollutants since they have become widely dispersed throughout the environment and have also been shown to bio-accumulate within animals and man. This study investigated the cytotoxicity of some of the most commonly used groups of BFRs on SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The results showed that of the BFRs tested, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD, tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA and decabromodiphenyl ether (DBPE, all are cytotoxic at low micromolar concentrations (LC(50 being 2.7 ± 0.7 µM, 15 ± 4 µM and 28 ± 7 µM, respectively. They induced cell death, at least in part, by apoptosis through activation of caspases. They also increased intracellular [Ca(2+] levels and reactive-oxygen-species within these neuronal cells. Furthermore, these BFRs also caused rapid depolarization of the mitochondria and cytochrome c release in these neuronal cells. Elevated intracellular [Ca(2+] levels appear to occur through a mechanism involving microsomal Ca(2+-ATPase inhibition and this maybe responsible for Ca(2+-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, µM levels of these BFRs caused β-amyloid peptide (Aβ-42 processing and release from these cells with a few hours of exposure. These results therefore shows that these pollutants are both neurotoxic and amyloidogenic in-vitro.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and TrkB expression in the "oldest-old," the 90+ Study: correlation with cognitive status and levels of soluble amyloid-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Bernadeta; Corrada, Maria M; Kawas, Claudia H; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    Factors associated with maintaining good cognition into old age are unclear. Decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) contributes to memory loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and soluble assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau contribute to neurodegeneration. However, it is unknown whether AD-type neuropathology, soluble Aβ and tau, or levels of BDNF and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) correlate with dementia in the oldest-old. We examined these targets in postmortem Brodmann's areas 7 and 9 (BA7 and BA9) in 4 groups of subjects >90 years old: (1) no dementia/no AD pathology, (2) no dementia/AD pathology, (3) dementia/no AD pathology, (4) dementia/AD pathology. In BA7, BDNF messenger RNA correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination scores and was decreased in demented versus nondemented subjects, regardless of pathology. Soluble Aβ42 was increased in both groups with AD pathology, demented or not, compared to no dementia/no AD pathology subjects. Groups did not differ in TrkB isoform levels or in levels of total soluble tau, individual tau isoforms, threonine-181 tau phosphorylation, or ratio of phosphorylated 3R-4R isoforms. In BA9, soluble Aβ42 correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination scores and with BDNF messenger RNA expression. Thus, soluble Aβ42 and BDNF, but not TrkB or soluble tau, correlate with dementia in the oldest-old.

  10. Induced Th2 dominant immune response in APPswe, PSEN1dE9 transgenic mice after nasal immunization with an adenoviral vector encoding 10 tandem repeats of beta-amyloid 3-10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Guo; Kui Huang; Tongzi Jiang; Jian Li; Yu Li; Xiaona Xing; Yunpeng Cao

    2011-01-01

    Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is effective in improving cognitive function in transgenic mouse models of AD. Because the AN1792 [beta-amyloid (Aβ) 1-42] vaccine was halted because of T cell mediated meningoencephalitis, many scientists are searching for a novel vaccine to avoid the T cell mediated immune response caused by the Aβ1-42. Importantly, the time when the immunization is begun can influence the immune effect. In this study, an adenovirus vaccine was constructed containing 10 × Aβ3-10 repeats and gene adjuvant CpG DNA. Transgenic AD mice were immunized intranasally for 3 months. After 10 × Aβ3-10 vaccine immunization, high titers of anti-Aβ42 IgG1 predominant antibodies were induced. In spatial learning ability and probe tests, the 10 × Aβ3-10 immunized mice showed significantly improved memories compared to control mice. The 10 × Aβ3-10 vaccine resulted in a robust Th2 dominant humoral immune response and reduced learning deficits in AD mice. In addition, the 10 × Aβ3-10 vaccine might be more efficient if administered before Aβ aggregation at an early stage in the AD mouse brain. Thus, the adenovirus vector encoding 10 × Aβ3-10 is a promising vaccine for AD.

  11. Method for measurement of the blood-brain barrier permeability in the perfused mouse brain: application to amyloid-beta peptide in wild type and Alzheimer's Tg2576 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRue, Barbra; Hogg, Elizabeth; Sagare, Abhay; Jovanovic, Suzana; Maness, Lawrence; Maurer, Calvin; Deane, Rashid; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2004-09-30

    The role of transport exchanges of neuroactive solutes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is increasingly recognized. To take full advantage of genetically altered mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders for BBB transport studies, we adapted a brain perfusion technique to the mouse. During a carotid brain perfusion with a medium containing sheep red blood cells and mock plasma, the physiological parameters in the arterial inflow, regional cerebral blood flow (14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography), ultrastructural integrity of the tissue, barrier to lanthanum, brain water content, energy metabolites and lactate levels remain unchanged. Amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta) were iodinated by lactoperoxidase method. Non-oxidized mono-iodinated Abeta monomers were separated by HPLC (as confirmed by MALDI-TOF spectrometry) and used in transport measurements. Transport of intact 125I-Abeta40 across the BBB was time- and concentration-dependent in contrast to negligible 14C-inulin uptake. In 5-6 months old Alzheimer's Tg2576 mice, Abeta40 BBB transport was increased by >eight-fold compared to age-matched littermate controls, and was mediated via the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts. We conclude the present arterial brain perfusion method provides strictly controlled environment in cerebral microcirculation suitable for examining transport of rapidly and slowly penetrating molecules across the BBB in normal and transgenic mice.

  12. Proteomic study of amyloid beta (25-35) peptide exposure to neuronal cells: Impact on APE1/Ref-1's protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantha, Anil K; Dhiman, Monisha; Taglialatela, Giulio; Perez-Polo, Regino J; Mitra, Sankar

    2012-06-01

    The genotoxic, extracellular accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) protein and subsequent neuronal cell death are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). APE1/Ref-1, the predominant apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease and essential in eukaryotic cells, plays a central role in the base excision repair (BER) pathway for repairing oxidized and alkylated bases and single-strand breaks (SSBs) in DNA. APE1/Ref-1 is also involved in the redox activation of several trans-acting factors (TFs) in various cell types, but little is known about its role in neuronal functions. There is emerging evidence for APE1/Ref-1's role in neuronal cells vulnerable in AD and other neurodegenerative disorders, as reflected in its nuclear accumulation in AD brains. An increase in APE1/Ref-1 has been shown to enhance neuronal survival after oxidative stress. To address whether APE1/Ref-1 level or its association with other proteins is responsible for this protective effect, we used 2-D proteomic analyses and identified cytoskeleton elements (i.e., tropomodulin 3, tropomyosin alpha-3 chain), enzymes involved in energy metabolism (i.e., pyruvate kinase M2, N-acetyl transferase, sulfotransferase 1c), proteins involved in stress response (i.e., leucine-rich and death domain, anti-NGF30), and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotien-H (hnRNP-H) as being associated with APE1/Ref-1 in Aβ(25-35)-treated rat pheochromocytoma PC12 and human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell lines, two common neuronal precursor lines used in Aβ neurotoxicity studies. Because the levels of some of these proteins are affected in the brains of AD patients, our study suggests a neuroprotective role for APE1/Ref-1 via its association with those proteins and modulating their cellular functions during Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity.

  13. Gene expression profiling in the stress control brain region hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus reveals a novel gene network including Amyloid beta Precursor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deussing Jan M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pivotal role of stress in the precipitation of psychiatric diseases such as depression is generally accepted. This study aims at the identification of genes that are directly or indirectly responding to stress. Inbred mouse strains that had been evidenced to differ in their stress response as well as in their response to antidepressant treatment were chosen for RNA profiling after stress exposure. Gene expression and regulation was determined by microarray analyses and further evaluated by bioinformatics tools including pathway and cluster analyses. Results Forced swimming as acute stressor was applied to C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice and resulted in sets of regulated genes in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN, 4 h or 8 h after stress. Although the expression changes between the mouse strains were quite different, they unfolded in phases over time in both strains. Our search for connections between the regulated genes resulted in potential novel signalling pathways in stress. In particular, Guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha inhibiting 2 (GNAi2 and Amyloid β (A4 precursor protein (APP were detected as stress-regulated genes, and together with other genes, seem to be integrated into stress-responsive pathways and gene networks in the PVN. Conclusions This search for stress-regulated genes in the PVN revealed its impact on interesting genes (GNAi2 and APP and a novel gene network. In particular the expression of APP in the PVN that is governing stress hormone balance, is of great interest. The reported neuroprotective role of this molecule in the CNS supports the idea that a short acute stress can elicit positive adaptational effects in the brain.

  14. Atorvastatin prevents age-related and amyloid-beta-induced microglial activation by blocking interferon-gamma release from natural killer cells in the brain

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, Anthony

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Microglial function is modulated by several factors reflecting the numerous receptors expressed on the cell surface, however endogenous factors which contribute to the age-related increase in microglial activation remain largely unknown. One possible factor which may contribute is interferon-γ (IFNγ). IFNγ has been shown to increase in the aged brain and potently activates microglia, although its endogenous cell source in the brain remains unidentified. Methods Male Wistar rats were used to assess the effect of age and amyloid-β (Aβ) on NK cell infiltration into the brain. The effect of the anti-inflammatory compound, atorvastatin was also assessed under these conditions. We measured cytokine and chemokine (IFNγ, IL-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IFNγ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10)), expression in the brain by appropriate methods. We also looked at NK cell markers, CD161, NKp30 and NKp46 using flow cytometry and western blot. Results Natural killer (NK) cells are a major source of IFNγ in the periphery and here we report the presence of CD161+ NKp30+ cells and expression of CD161 and NKp46 in the brain of aged and Aβ-treated rats. Furthermore, we demonstrate that isolated CD161+ cells respond to interleukin-2 (IL-2) by releasing IFNγ. Atorvastatin, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, attenuates the increase in CD161 and NKp46 observed in hippocampus of aged and Aβ-treated rats. This was paralleled by a decrease in IFNγ, markers of microglial activation and the chemokines, MCP-1 and IP-10 which are chemotactic for NK cells. Conclusions We propose that NK cells contribute to the age-related and Aβ-induced neuroinflammatory changes and demonstrate that these changes can be modulated by atorvastatin treatment.

  15. Protective effect of cyclophilin A against Alzheimer's amyloid beta-peptide (25-35)-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Yu-song; TENG Wei-yu; ZHANG Chao-dong

    2009-01-01

    Background β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is considered responsible for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Possible mechanisms underlying Aβ-induced neuronal cytotoxicity include excessive production of reactive oxidative species (ROS) and apoptosis. Cyclophilin A (CypA), exhibits antioxidant properties and protects neurons against oxidative stress induced injury. This study was conducted to demonstrate whether CyPA added to cultured PC12 cells could alleviate Aβ-induced oxidative stress and protect them from apoptosis.Methods PC12 cells were pre-incubated for 30 minutes with recombinant human cyclophilin A (rhCyPA) in 0.1 nmol/L, 1.0 nmol/L, 10 nmol/L and 100 nmol/L and then incubated with 10 umol/L Aβ25-35. In every group, cell viability, apoptotic morphology, apoptotic rate, intracellular ROS accumulation, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) of PC12 cells and mitochondrial transmembrane potential were detected. Subsequently, the expression of the active form of caspase-3 was determined by Western blotting.Results It was shown that cultures treated with 1.0 nmol/L, 10 nmol/L or 100 nmol/L rhCyPA + Aβ25-35 had significantly higher cell viability and a lower rate of apoptosis compared with the cultures exposed only to Aβ25-35. In addition, rhCyPA attenuated Aβ25-35-induced overproduction of intracellular ROS and Aβ25-35-induced a decrease in activity of the key antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px. Furthermore, rhCyPA also attenuated Aβ25-35-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and the activation of caspase-3.Conclusion CyPA may act as an ROS scavenger, and prevent Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity through attenuating oxidative stress induced by Aβ25-35.

  16. Oligomeric amyloid-{beta} inhibits the proteolytic conversion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), AMPA receptor trafficking, and classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaoqing; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Keifer, Joyce

    2010-11-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is thought to have a significant role in the progressive memory loss observed in patients with Alzheimer disease and inhibits synaptic plasticity in animal models of learning. We previously demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical for synaptic AMPA receptor delivery in an in vitro model of eyeblink classical conditioning. Here, we report that acquisition of conditioned responses was significantly attenuated by bath application of oligomeric (200 nm), but not fibrillar, Aβ peptide. Western blotting revealed that BDNF protein expression during conditioning is significantly reduced by treatment with oligomeric Aβ, as were phosphorylation levels of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), and ERK. However, levels of PKA and PKCζ/λ were unaffected, as was PDK-1. Protein localization studies using confocal imaging indicate that oligomeric Aβ, but not fibrillar or scrambled forms, suppresses colocalization of GluR1 and GluR4 AMPA receptor subunits with synaptophysin, indicating that trafficking of these subunits to synapses during the conditioning procedure is blocked. In contrast, coapplication of BDNF with oligomeric Aβ significantly reversed these findings. Interestingly, a tolloid-like metalloproteinase in turtle, tTLLs (turtle tolloid-like protein), which normally processes the precursor proBDNF into mature BDNF, was found to degrade oligomeric Aβ into small fragments. These data suggest that an Aβ-induced reduction in BDNF, perhaps due to interference in the proteolytic conversion of proBDNF to BDNF, results in inhibition of synaptic AMPA receptor delivery and suppression of the acquisition of conditioning.

  17. Antiaggregation Potential of Padina gymnospora against the Toxic Alzheimer's Beta-Amyloid Peptide 25-35 and Cholinesterase Inhibitory Property of Its Bioactive Compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan Shanmuganathan

    Full Text Available Inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ aggregation in the cerebral cortex of the brain is a promising therapeutic and defensive strategy in identification of disease modifying agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD. Since natural products are considered as the current alternative trend for the discovery of AD drugs, the present study aims at the evaluation of anti-amyloidogenic potential of the marine seaweed Padina gymnospora. Prevention of aggregation and disaggregation of the mature fibril formation of Aβ 25-35 by acetone extracts of P. gymnospora (ACTPG was evaluated in two phases by Thioflavin T assay. The results were further confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analysis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic analysis. The results of antiaggregation and disaggregation assay showed that the increase in fluorescence intensity of aggregated Aβ and the co-treatment of ACTPG (250 μg/ml with Aβ 25-35, an extensive decrease in the fluorescence intensity was observed in both phases, which suggests that ACTPG prevents the oligomers formation and disaggregation of mature fibrils. In addition, ACTPG was subjected to column chromatography and the bioactivity was screened based on the cholinesterase inhibitory activity. Finally, the active fraction was subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis for the identification of bioactive compounds. Overall, the results suggest that the bioactive compound alpha bisabolol present in the alga might be responsible for the observed cholinesterase inhibition with the IC50 value < 10 μg/ml for both AChE and BuChE when compared to standard drug donepezil (IC50 value < 6 μg/ml and support its use for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  18. Divalent cation tolerance protein binds to β-secretase and inhibits the processing of amyloid precursor protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Runzhong Liu; Haibo Hou; Xuelian Yi; Shanwen Wu; Huan Zeng

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid-beta is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-beta is derived from amyloid precursor protein through sequential proteolytic cleavages by β-secretase (beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1) and γ-secretase. To further elucidate the roles of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 in the development of Alzheimer's disease, a yeast two-hybrid system was used to screen a human embryonic brain cDNA library for proteins directly interacting with the intracellular domain of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1. A potential beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1- interacting protein identified from the positive clones was divalent cation tolerance protein. Immunoprecipitation studies in the neuroblastoma cell line N2a showed that exogenous divalent cation tolerance protein interacts with endogenous beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1. The overexpression of divalent cation tolerance protein did not affect beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 protein levels, but led to increased amyloid precursor protein levels in N2a/APP695 cells, with a concomitant reduction in the processing product amyloid precursor protein C-terminal fragment, indicating that divalent cation tolerance protein inhibits the processing of amyloid precursor protein. Our experimental findings suggest that divalent cation tolerance protein negatively regulates the function of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1. Thus, divalent cation tolerance protein could play a protective role in Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Involvement of formyl peptide receptors in receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE - and amyloid beta 1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slowik Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggest that the chemotactic G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor-like-1 (FPRL1 and the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE play an important role in the inflammatory response involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Therefore, the expression and co-localisation of mouse formyl peptide receptor (mFPR 1 and 2 as well as RAGE in an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model using immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR were analysed. The involvement of rat or human FPR1/FPRL1 (corresponds to mFPR1/2 and RAGE in amyloid-β 1–42 (Aβ1-42-induced signalling were investigated by extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the cAMP level in primary rat glial cells (microglia and astrocytes and transfected HEK 293 cells was measured. Formyl peptide receptors and RAGE were inhibited by a small synthetic antagonist WRW4 and an inactive receptor variant delta-RAGE, lacking the intracytoplasmatic domains. Results We demonstrated a strong increase of mFPR1/2 and RAGE expression in the cortex and hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice co-localised to the glial cells. In addition, the Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction is dependant on FPRL1, but also on FPR1. For the first time, we have shown a functional interaction between FPRL1/FPR1 and RAGE in RAGE ligands S100B- or AGE-mediated signalling by ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement. In addition a possible physical interaction between FPRL1 as well as FPR1 and RAGE was shown with co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The results suggest that both formyl peptide receptors play an essential role in Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells. The interaction with RAGE could explain the broad ligand spectrum of formyl peptide receptors and their important role for inflammation and the host defence against infections.

  20. Beta amyloid differently modulate nicotinic and muscarinic receptor subtypes which regulate in vitro and in vivo the release of glycine in the rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania eZappettini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Using both in vitro (hippocampal synaptosomes in superfusion and in vivo (microdialysis approaches we investigated whether and to what extent β amyloid peptide 1-40 (Aβ 1-40 interferes with the cholinergic modulation of the release of glycine (GLY in the rat hippocampus. The nicotine-evoked overflow of endogenous GLY in hippocampal synaptosomes in superfusion was significantly inhibited by Aβ 1-40 (10 nM while increasing the concentration to 100 nM the inhibitory effect did not further increase. Both the Choline (Ch (α7 agonist; 1 mM and the 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (5IA85380, α4β2 agonist; 10 nM-evoked GLY overflow were inhibited by Aβ1-40 at 100 nM but not at 10nM concentrations. The KCl evoked [3H]GLY and [3H]Acetylcholine (ACh overflow were strongly inhibited in presence of oxotremorine; however this inhibitory muscarinic effect was not affected by Aβ1-40. The effects of Aβ1-40 on the administration of nicotine, veratridine, 5IA85380 and PHA 543613 hydrochloride (PHA543613 (a selective agonist of α7 subtypes on hippocampal endogenous GLY release in vivo were also studied. Aβ 1-40 significantly reduced (at 10 μM but not at 1 μM the nicotine evoked in vivo release of GLY. Aβ 1-40 (at 10 μM but not at 1 μM significantly inhibited the PHA543613 (1 mM-elicited GLY overflow while was ineffective on the GLY overflow evoked by 5IA85380 (1 mM. Aβ 40-1 (10 μM did not produce any inhibitory effect on nicotine evoked GLY overflow both in the in vitro and in vivo experiments. Our results indicate that a the cholinergic modulation of the release of GLY occurs by the activation of both α7 and α4β2 nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs as well as by the activation of inhibitory muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs and b Aβ 1-40 can modulate cholinergic evoked GLY release exclusively through the interaction with α7 and the α4β2 nAChR nicotinic receptors but not through mAChR subtypes.

  1. Single-vesicle detection and analysis of peptide-induced membrane permeabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ehrlich, Nicky; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager;

    2015-01-01

    The capability of membrane-active peptides to disrupt phospholipid membranes is often studied by investigating peptide-induced leakage of quenched fluorescent molecules from large unilamellar lipid vesicles. In this article, we explore two fluorescence microscopy-based single-vesicle detection...

  2. Visual and fluorescent assays for selective detection of beta-amyloid oligomers based on the inner filter effect of gold nanoparticles on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ning; Zhou, Binbin; Huang, Nanbing; Jiang, Mengsha; Zhang, Jiebing; Liu, Lin

    2016-11-15

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are the major constituents of senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Aβ monomers (AβMs) can coalesce to form small, soluble oligomers (AβOs), followed by reorganization and assembly into long, thread-like fibrils (AβFs). Recently, soluble AβOs have been regarded as reliable molecular biomarkers for the diagnosis of AD because of their high toxicity for neuronal synapse and high concentration levels in the brains of AD patients. In this work, we reported a label-free, sensitive and selective method for visual and fluorescent detection of AβOs based on the inner filter effect (IFE) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots (QDs). Specifically, the fluorescence of CdTe QDs was quenched significantly by AuNPs through the IFE. PrP(95-110), an AβOs-specific binding peptide from cellular prion protein, triggered the aggregation and color change of AuNPs suspension; thus, the IFE of AuNPs on the fluorescence of CdTe QDs was weakened and the fluorescence intensity was recovered. However, in the presence of AβOs, the specific interaction of AβOs and PrP(95-110) prevented the absorption of PrP(95-110) onto the surface of AuNPs. As a result, the aggregation of AuNPs was inhibited and the fluorescence intensity of CdTe QDs was quenched again. This label-free method is specific for detection of AβOs but not for AβMs and AβFs. The detection limits were found to be 0.5nM for the visual assay and 0.2nM for the fluorescent detection. We believe that this work would be valuable for many investigations related to AD diagnosis and drug discovery. PMID:27240009

  3. Effects of L-3-n-butylphthalide on caspase-3 and nuclear factor kappa-B expression in primary basal forebrain and hippocampal cultures after beta-amyloid peptide 1-42 treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixia Wang; Yong Zhang; Liangliang Jiang; Guozhao Ma; Qingxi Fu; Jialong Li; Peng Yan; Lunqian Shen; Yabo Feng; Chunxia Li; Zaiying Pang; Yuanxiao Cui; Chunfu Chen; Yifeng Du; Zhaokong Liu

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: L-3-n-butylphthalide (L-NBP) can inhibit phosphorylation of tau protein and reduce the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid peptide 1-42 (Aβ1-42).OBJECTIVE: To observe the neuroprotective effects of L-NBP on caspase-3 and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-кB) expression in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A cell experiment was performed at the Central Laboratory of Provincial Hospital affiliated to Shandong University between January 2008 and August 2008.MATERIALS: L-NBP (purity>98%) was provided by Shijiazhuang Pharma Group NBP Pharmaceutical Company Limited. Aβ1-42, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazolo-2]-2,5 iphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and rabbit anti-Caspase-3 polyclonal antibody were provided by Cell Signaling, METHODS: Primary cultures were generated from rat basal forebrain and hippocampal neurons at 17 or 19 days of gestation. The cells were assigned into five groups: the control group, the Aβ1-42 group (2μmol/L), the Aβ1-42+0.1μmol/L L-NBP group, the Aβ1-42+1 μmol/L L-NBP group, and the Aβ1-42 + 10μmol/L L-NBP group. The neurons were treated with Aβ1-42 (2 μmol/L) alone or in combination with L-NBP (0.1, 1, 10μmol/L) for 48 hours. Cells in the control group were incubated in PBS.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Morphologic changes were evaluated using inverted microscopy, Western blot.RESULTS: Induction with Aβ1-42 for 48 hours caused cell death and soma atrophy, and increased the high dose (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Aβ1-42 is toxic to basal forebrain and hippocampal primary neurons; L-NBP protects against this toxicity and inhibits the induction of caspase-3 and NF-κB expression.

  4. Neuropsychological Effects of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Matthew; Kirshner, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a condition of the cerebral arterioles and to a lesser extent capillaries and veins, wherein beta-amyloid is deposited. In arterioles, this preferentially targets vascular smooth muscle cells and in the later stages undermines the stability of the vessel. This condition is frequently comorbid with Alzheimer's disease and its role in cognitive impairment and dementia is a topic of considerable recent research. This article reviews recent literature which confirms that CAA independently contributes to cognitive impairment by potentiating the neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease, by predisposing to microhemorrhagic and microischemic injury to the brain parenchyma, and by interfering with the autoregulation of CNS blood flow. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, with a focus on the neuropsychological manifestations of this vasculopathy. PMID:27357378

  5. Exons 16 and 17 of the amyloid precursor protein gene in familial inclusion body myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, K; Cervenáková, L; Dalakas, M C; Leon-Monzon, M; Isaacson, S H; Nagle, J W; Vasconcelos, O; Goldfarb, L G

    1995-08-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (A beta) occurs in some muscle fibers of patients with inclusion body myopathy and resembles the type of amyloid deposits seen in the affected tissues of patients with Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular amyloidosis. Because mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta APP) gene on chromosome 21 have been identified in patients with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease and Dutch-type cerebrovascular amyloidosis, we searched for mutations of the same region in patients with familial inclusion body myopathy. Sequencing of both alleles in 8 patients from four unrelated families did not reveal any mutations in these exons. The amyloid deposition in familial forms of inclusion body myopathy may be either due to errors in other gene loci, or it is secondary reflecting altered beta APP metabolism or myocyte degeneration and cell membrane degradation.

  6. Appropriate Use Criteria for Amyloid PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith A.; Minoshima, Satoshi; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Donohoe, Kevin J.; Foster, Norman L.; Herscovitch, Peter; Karlawish, Jason H.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Hartley, Dean M.; Hedrick, Saima; Mitchell, Kristi; Pappas, Virginia; Thies, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of brain amyloid-beta is a technology that is becoming more available, but its clinical utility in medical practice requires careful definition. In order to provide guidance to dementia care practitioners, patients and caregivers, the Alzheimer Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging convened the Amyloid Imaging Taskforce (AIT). The AIT considered a broad range of specific clinical scenarios in which amyloid PET could potentially be appropriately used. Peer-reviewed, published literature was searched to ascertain available evidence relevant to these scenarios, and the AIT developed a consensus of expert opinion. While empirical evidence of impact on clinical outcomes is not yet available, a set of specific Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) were agreed upon that define the types of patients and clinical circumstances in which amyloid PET could be used. Both appropriate and inappropriate uses were considered and formulated, and are reported and discussed here. Because both dementia care and amyloid PET technology are in active development, these AUC will require periodic reassessment. Future research directions are also outlined, including diagnostic utility and patient-centered outcomes. PMID:23360977

  7. Inhibition of amyloid fibril formation of human amylin by N-alkylated amino acid and alpha-hydroxy acid residue containing peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkers, DTS; Hoppener, JWM; Posthuma, G; Lips, CJM; Liskamp, RMJ

    2002-01-01

    Amyloid deposits are formed as a result of uncontrolled aggregation of (poly)peptides or proteins. Today several diseases are known, for example Alzheimer's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, mad cow disease, in which amyloid formation is involved. Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of beta-pleat

  8. AMYLOID-β PEPTIDE BINDS TO MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1B (MAP1B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18079022

  9. Compressive deformation of ultralong amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-12-01

    Involved in various neurodegenerative diseases, amyloid fibrils and plaques feature a hierarchical structure, ranging from the atomistic to the micrometer scale. At the atomistic level, a dense and organized hydrogen bond network is resembled in a beta-sheet rich secondary structure, which drives a remarkable stiffness in the range of 10-20GPa, larger than many other biological nanofibrils, a result confirmed by both experiment and theory. However, the understanding of how these exceptional mechanical properties transfer from the atomistic to the nanoscale remains unknown. Here we report a multiscale analysis that, from the atomistic-level structure of a single fibril, extends to the mesoscale level, reaching size scales of hundreds of nanometers. We use parameters directly derived from full atomistic simulations of A β (1-40) amyloid fibrils to parameterize a mesoscopic coarse-grained model, which is used to reproduce the elastic properties of amyloid fibrils. We then apply our mesoscopic model in an analysis of the buckling behavior of amyloid fibrils with different lengths and report a comparison with predictions from continuum beam theory. An important implication of our results is a severe reduction of the effective modulus due to buckling, an effect that could be important to interpret experimental results of ultra-long amyloid fibrils. Our model represents a powerful tool to mechanically characterize molecular structures on the order of hundreds of nanometers to micrometers on the basis of the underlying atomistic behavior. The work provides insight into structural and mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils and may enable further analysis of larger-scale assemblies such as amyloidogenic bundles or plaques as found in disease states.

  10. In vivo amyloid aggregation kinetics tracked by time-lapse confocal microscopy in real-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Piqué, Anna; Espargaró, Alba; Ventura, Salvador; Sabate, Raimon

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid polymerization underlies an increasing number of human diseases. Despite this process having been studied extensively in vitro, aggregation is a difficult process to track in vivo due to methodological limitations and the slow kinetics of aggregation reactions in cells and tissues. Herein we exploit the amyloid properties of the inclusions bodies (IBs) formed by amyloidogenic proteins in bacteria to address the kinetics of in vivo amyloid aggregation. To this aim we used time-lapse confocal microscopy and a fusion of the amyloid-beta peptide (A β42) with a fluorescent reporter. This strategy allowed us to follow the intracellular kinetics of amyloid-like aggregation in real-time and to discriminate between variants exhibiting different in vivo aggregation propensity. Overall, the approach opens the possibility to assess the impact of point mutations as well as potential anti-aggregation drugs in the process of amyloid formation in living cells.

  11. β-淀粉样蛋白25-35致伤对PC12神经元突触相关蛋白表达的影响%Effects of amyloid-beta 25-35 on expression of synapse-associated proteins in PC12 neurons Effects of amyloid-beta 25-35 on expression of synapse-associated proteins in PC12 neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张爽; 黄昕艳; 刘爽; 李艳君; 赵锦程

    2016-01-01

    背景:脑内β-淀粉样蛋白的聚集可诱导神经细胞凋亡,大量神经元及突触的缺失和功能的损害尚无有效的干预手段,提高突触可塑性为治疗早期阿尔茨海默病提供重要方向。目的:筛选最佳的阿尔茨海默病模型,检测β-淀粉样蛋白25-35致伤PC12神经元的突触相关蛋白表达。方法:采用50μg/L神经生长因子诱导PC12细胞分化为神经元样细胞,以不同浓度β-淀粉样蛋白25-35致伤PC12神经元样细胞。应用CCK8法检测细胞生存率。神经颗粒素、神经调节素免疫荧光染色观察模型细胞的形态学变化,Western blot法检测神经颗粒素、CAMKⅡ、PSD-95蛋白表达水平。结果与结论:随着β-淀粉样蛋白25-35浓度增高和作用时间的延长,PC12神经元生存率呈剂量依赖性降低;可见突触长度变短、神经元萎缩、神经元彼此连接疏松;神经颗粒素、CAMK Ⅱ、PSD-95蛋白表达均下调。结果提示,10μmol/Lβ-淀粉样蛋白25-35、48 h是筛选早期PC12神经元阿尔茨海默病细胞模型的最佳干预浓度和时间。%BACKGROUND:An amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregation in the brain can induce nerve cel apoptosis, loss of synapses and functional damage. However, there is stil no effective intervention. Improving the synaptic plasticity provides an important direction for the treatment of early Alzheimer’s disease. OBJECTIVE: To screen the best model of Alzheimer’s disease and to explore the expression of synapse-associated proteins in Aβ25-35-injured PC12 neurons. METHODS:PC12 cels were induced by 50 μg/L nerve growth factor to differentiate into neuronal-like cels. Then, these cels were treated with Aβ25-35 at different concentrations. Consequently, cel survival rate was detected using cel counting kit-8; neurogranin and neuregulin immunofluorescence stainings were used to observe morphological changes of model cels; western blot used to detect the expression level of

  12. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... al. Course of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation. Neurology. 2007;68:1411-1416. PMID: 17452586 www.ncbi. ...

  13. The role of mutated amyloid beta 1-42 stimulating dendritic cells in a PDAPP transgenic mouse%突变型Aβ1~42致敏树突状细胞疫苗治疗阿尔茨海默病转基因鼠作用机制探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家林; 罗仲秋; 徐新女; 曹传海; 王金环

    2012-01-01

    研究背景β-淀粉样蛋白在脑组织中沉积是阿尔茨海默病的典型病理特征之一,免疫疗法虽可有效清除β-淀粉样蛋白,但在治疗的同时也伴随出现一些不良反应.为了避免疫苗治疗过程中产生的严重不良反应如脑膜脑炎等.尝试采用突变型β-淀粉样蛋白(Aβ1~42)致敏树突状细胞制备阿尔茨海默病疫苗.并在充分评价其安伞性和有效性的基础上,进一步探讨其治疗阿尔茨海默病转基因鼠的作用机制.方法 提取C57/B6小鼠胫骨和股骨树突状细胞,分别以突变型Aβ1~42致敏树突状细胞(实验组)和经弗氏佐剂免疫的野生型Aβ1~42 多肽(佐剂阳性对照组)制备疫苗,然后接种于阿尔茨海默病转基因鼠.免疫组织化学染色观察小鼠脑组织中核激素肝x受体(LXR)、三磷酸腺苷结合盒转运子1(ABCA1)、CD45、晚期糖基化终产物受体(RAGE)和β-分泌酶(BACE)表达水平,体视学法半定量检测海马区cAl、CA2、CA3、DG、Rad和皮质区阳性神经元.结果 与阴性对照组相比.实验组和佐剂阳性对照组转基因鼠脑组织β-淀粉样蛋白表达水平显著降低(P=0.000),阴性对照组治疗前后无变化;经突变型Aβ1~42致敏的树突状细胞疫莆治疗后,转基因鼠脑组织中的LXR、ABCA1、CD45和BACE表达水平升高(P=0.000),RAGE表达水平降低(P=0.000).结论 经突变型Aβ1~42致敏树突状细胞制备的疫苗可通过多种因索的相互作用使阿尔茨海默病转基因鼠大脑β-淀粉样蛋白代谢达到新的免疫半衡,从而减少其在脑组织中的沉积.且无脑膜脑炎等严重不良反应,此与LXR/ABCA1通道作用有关.树突状细胞自身也在清除β-淀粉样蛋白的过程中扮演着预防小良反应发生的重要角色.%Background Amyloid plaque is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Anti-beta-amyloid (Aβ) immunotherapy is effective in removing brain Aβ, but has shown to be

  14. Impact of amyloid imaging on drug development in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, Chester A. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)], E-mail: mathisca@upmc.edu; Lopresti, Brian J. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Klunk, William E. [Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Imaging agents capable of assessing amyloid-beta (A{beta}) content in vivo in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects likely will be important as diagnostic agents to detect A{beta} plaques in the brain as well as to help test the amyloid cascade hypothesis of AD and as an aid to assess the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutics currently under development and in clinical trials. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies of amyloid deposition in human subjects with several A{beta} imaging agents are currently underway. We reported the first PET studies of the carbon 11-labeled thioflavin-T derivative Pittsburgh Compound B in 2004, and this work has subsequently been extended to include a variety of subject groups, including AD patients, mild cognitive impairment patients and healthy controls. The ability to quantify regional A{beta} plaque load in the brains of living human subjects has provided a means to begin to apply this technology as a diagnostic agent to detect regional concentrations of A{beta} plaques and as a surrogate marker of therapeutic efficacy in anti-amyloid drug trials.

  15. Glycemia and Levels of Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid and Tau in Patients Attending a Memory Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exalto, Lieza G.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Scheltens, Phillip; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between markers of glycemia and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid beta 1-42 (A beta 42) and tau levels in patients attending a memory clinic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Memory clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred forty-five consecutive patients atte

  16. Amyloid Fibril Solubility

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, L G

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  17. Tensile deformation and failure of amyloid and amyloid-like protein fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-03-01

    Here we report a series of full atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of six amyloid or amyloid-like protein fibrils in order to systematically understand the effect of different secondary structure motifs on the mechanical tensile and failure response of cross-\\beta protein fibrils. We find a similar failure behavior across the six structures; an initial failure event occurs at small strains involving cooperative rupture of a group of hydrogen bonds, followed by a slow one-by-one hydrogen bond rupture process as the remaining \\beta -sheets peel off with very low applied stress. We also find that the ultimate tensile strength of the protein fibrils investigated scales directly with the number of hydrogen bonds per unit area which break in the initial rupture event. Our results provide insights into structure-property relationships in protein fibrils important for disease and engineering applications and lay the groundwork for the development of materials selection criteria for the design of de novo amyloid-based functional biomaterials.

  18. Astrocytic expression of the Alzheimer's disease beta-secretase (BACE1) is stimulus-dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartlage-Rübsamen, Maike; Zeitschel, Ulrike; Apelt, Jenny;

    2003-01-01

    The beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is a prerequisite for the generation of beta-amyloid peptides, which give rise to cerebrovascular and parenchymal beta-amyloid deposits in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. BACE1 is neuronally expressed in the brains of humans and experimental...... paradigms studied. In contrast, BACE1 expression by reactive astrocytes was evident in chronic but not in acute models of gliosis. Additionally, we observed BACE1-immunoreactive astrocytes in proximity to beta-amyloid plaques in the brains of aged Tg2576 mice and Alzheimer's disease patients....

  19. Quantification of cleaved beta2-microglobulin in serum from patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corlin, Dorthe B; Sen, Jette W; Ladefoged, Søren;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients on chronic hemodialysis are prone to develop amyloid deposits of misfolded beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)M) in osteoarticular tissues. beta(2)M with various deletions/truncations and chemical modifications has been found together with structurally intact beta(2)M in extracts...

  20. Advances in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease: a re-evaluation of amyloid cascade hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Suzhen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized clinically by progressive deterioration of memory, and pathologically by histopathological changes including extracellular deposits of amyloid-beta (A-beta peptides forming senile plaques (SP and the intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFT of hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. This review focused on the new developments of amyloid cascade hypothesis with details on the production, metabolism and clearance of A-beta, and the key roles of some important A-beta-related genes in the pathological processes of AD. The most recent research advances in genetics, neuropathology and pathogenesis of the disease were also discussed.

  1. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosicka, Iga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II is a metabolic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The disease is associated with occurence of insoluble, fibrillar, protein aggregates in islets of Langerhans in the pancreas - islet amyloid. The main constituent of these protein fibers is the human islet...

  2. Functional Hydrogel Materials Inspired by Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joel

    2012-02-01

    Protein assembly resulting in the formation of amyloid fibrils, assemblies rich in cross beta-sheet structure, is normally thought of as a deleterious event associated with disease. However, amyloid formation is also involved in a diverse array of normal biological functions such as cell adhesion, melanin synthesis, insect defense mechanism and modulation of water surface tension by fungi and bacteria. These findings indicate that Nature has evolved to take advantage of large, proteinaceous fibrillar assemblies to elicit function. We are designing functional materials, namely hydrogels, from peptides that self-assembled into fibrillar networks, rich in cross beta-sheet structure. These gels can be used for the direct encapsulation and delivery of small molecule-, protein- and cell-based therapeutics. Loaded gels exhibit shear-thinning/self-healing mechanical properties enabling their delivery via syringe. In addition to their use for delivery, we have found that some of these gels display antibacterial activity. Although cytocompatible towards mammalian cells, the hydrogels can kill a broad spectrum of bacteria on contact.

  3. The effects of beta-amyloid protein and presenilin on potassium channel%淀粉样蛋白及早老素对钾通道的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟晓永; 王晓良

    2001-01-01

    Alzheimer病目前是痴呆的最常见原因,病理学特征是:神经纤维缠结,神经斑块,神经元丢失,淀粉样血管改变。临床上最显著的特点是学习记忆障碍。钾通道在学习记忆中起着重要作用。Alzheimer病人成纤维细胞以及嗅成纤维细胞113pS四已胺敏感的钾通道缺失。记忆相关蛋白Cp20以及与Alzheimer病遗传密切相关的淀粉样蛋白前体蛋白及早老素均能调节钾通道活性。Alzheimer病时钾通道亚型的改变尚需进一步的理论研究。钾通道在Alzhe imer病治疗方面有可能成为重要靶点。%Alzheimer disease(AD) is the most common cau se of dementia today. Th e characteristic histopathologic changes include neurofibrillary tangles, neurit ic plaques, neuronal loss, and amyloid angiopathy. The noted Alzheimer symptom is the dysfunction of learning a nd memory. Potassium channels play a key role in it. A 113-pS tetraethylammoniu m-sensitive potassium channel was consistently absent from AD fibroblasts and o lfactory neuroblasts. Cp20, a memory-associated protein, amyloid precuror prote in and presenilin which are all tightly associated with genetic Alzheimer diseas e can regulate the activities of potassium channels. The changes of potassium ch annels subtype need further study. Potassium channels are maybe the important dr ug targets in the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  4. Amyloids here, amyloids there…What’s wrong with them?

    OpenAIRE

    Gharibyan, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid formation is inherent property of proteins which under certain circumstances can become a pathologic feature of a group of diseases called amyloidosis. There are about 30 known human amyloidosis and more than 27 identified proteins involved in these pathologies.  Besides these proteins, there are a growing number of proteins non-related to diseases shown to form amyloid-like structures in vitro, which make them excellent tools for studying amyloid formation mechanisms, physicochemical...

  5. Antigen-oriented T cell migration contributes to myelin peptide induced-EAE and immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peiguo; Fu, Hanxiao; Wei, Gaohui; Wei, Zhongwei; Zhang, Junhua; Ma, Xuehan; Rui, Dong; Meng, Xianchun; Ming, Liang

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with soluble myelin peptide can efficiently and specifically induce tolerance to demyelination autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, however the mechanism underlying this therapeutic effect remains to be elucidated. In actively induced mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) we analyzed T cell and innate immune cell responses in the central nervous system (CNS) and spleen after intraperitoneal (i.p.) infusion of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). We found that i.p. MOG infusion blocked effector T cell recruitment to the CNS and protected mice from EAE and lymphoid organ atrophy. Innate immune CD11b(+) cells preferentially recruited MOG-specific effector T cells, particularly when activated to become competent antigen presenting cells (APCs). During EAE development, mature APCs were enriched in the CNS rather than in the spleen, attracting effector T cells to the CNS. Increased myelin antigen exposure induced CNS-APC maturation, recruiting additional effector T cells to the CNS, causing symptoms of disease. MOG triggered functional maturation of splenic APCs. MOG presenting APCs interacted with MOG-specific T cells in the spleen, aggregating to cluster around CD11b(+) cells, and were trapped in the periphery. This process was MHC II dependent as an MHC II directed antibody blocked CD4(+) T cell cluster formation. These findings highlight the role of myelin peptide-loaded APCs in myelin peptide-induced EAE and immune tolerance. PMID:27327113

  6. Amyloid PET in European and North American cohorts; and exploring age as a limit to clinical use of amyloid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several radiotracers that bind to fibrillar amyloid-beta in the brain have been developed and used in various patient cohorts. This study aimed to investigate the comparability of two amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as well as examine how age affects the discriminative properties of amyloid PET imaging. Fifty-one healthy controls (HCs), 72 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 90 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a European cohort were scanned with [11C]Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) and compared with an age-, sex- and disease severity-matched population of 51 HC, 72 MCI and 84 AD patients from a North American cohort who were scanned with [18F]Florbetapir. An additional North American population of 246 HC, 342 MCI and 138 AD patients with a Florbetapir scan was split by age (55-75 vs 76-93 y) into groups matched for gender and disease severity. PET template-based analyses were used to quantify regional tracer uptake. The mean regional uptake patterns were similar and strong correlations were found between the two tracers across the regions of interest in HC (ρ = 0.671, p = 0.02), amyloid-positive MCI (ρ = 0.902, p < 0.001) and AD patients (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001). The application of the Florbetapir cut-off point resulted in a higher proportion of amyloid-positive HC and a lower proportion of amyloid-positive AD patients in the older group (28 and 30 %, respectively) than in the younger group (19 and 20 %, respectively). These results illustrate the comparability of Florbetapir and PIB in unrelated but matched patient populations. The role of amyloid PET imaging becomes increasingly important with increasing age in the diagnostic assessment of clinically impaired patients. (orig.)

  7. Amyloid PET in European and North American cohorts; and exploring age as a limit to clinical use of amyloid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiotis, Konstantinos [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Carter, Stephen F. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Farid, Karim [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); APHP, Hotel-Dieu Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Savitcheva, Irina [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Collaboration: for the Diagnostic Molecular Imaging (DiMI) network and the Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2015-09-15

    Several radiotracers that bind to fibrillar amyloid-beta in the brain have been developed and used in various patient cohorts. This study aimed to investigate the comparability of two amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as well as examine how age affects the discriminative properties of amyloid PET imaging. Fifty-one healthy controls (HCs), 72 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 90 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a European cohort were scanned with [11C]Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) and compared with an age-, sex- and disease severity-matched population of 51 HC, 72 MCI and 84 AD patients from a North American cohort who were scanned with [18F]Florbetapir. An additional North American population of 246 HC, 342 MCI and 138 AD patients with a Florbetapir scan was split by age (55-75 vs 76-93 y) into groups matched for gender and disease severity. PET template-based analyses were used to quantify regional tracer uptake. The mean regional uptake patterns were similar and strong correlations were found between the two tracers across the regions of interest in HC (ρ = 0.671, p = 0.02), amyloid-positive MCI (ρ = 0.902, p < 0.001) and AD patients (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001). The application of the Florbetapir cut-off point resulted in a higher proportion of amyloid-positive HC and a lower proportion of amyloid-positive AD patients in the older group (28 and 30 %, respectively) than in the younger group (19 and 20 %, respectively). These results illustrate the comparability of Florbetapir and PIB in unrelated but matched patient populations. The role of amyloid PET imaging becomes increasingly important with increasing age in the diagnostic assessment of clinically impaired patients. (orig.)

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid A beta(1-40) Improves Differential Dementia Diagnosis in Patients with Intermediate P-tau(181P) Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaets, Sylvie; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed that the concentration of amyloid-beta(1-40) (A beta(1-40)) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflects the total amount of A beta protein in the brain and thus allows a better interpretation of inter-individual differences in A beta quantity than the A beta(1-42) concentration. In this stud

  9. Aβ对小胶质细胞中IL-1β及iNOS mRNA水平的影响%The changes of IL-1β and iNOS mRNA in cultured hippocampal microglia of rats exposed to amyloid beta-protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾丽艳; 拓西平; 朱嘉琦; 周俊

    2005-01-01

    目的观察β-淀粉样蛋白(amyloid beta-protein, Aβ)对原代培养的大鼠海马小胶质细胞中白细胞介素-1β(interleukin-1 beta ,IL-1β)及诱导型一氧化氮合酶(inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS)mRNA 水平的影响,探讨Aβ诱导的氧化应激和炎症反应在阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer's disease, AD)发病机制中的作用. 方法采用Aβ25-35孵育原代培养的新生大鼠海马小胶质细胞的方法建立Aβ诱导损伤的神经细胞模型,用半定量逆转录-聚合酶链反应(reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, RT-PCR)方法观察体外条件下Aβ25-35对小胶质细胞中IL-1β及iNOS mRNA 水平的影响. 结果 1 μmol/L Aβ25-35作用于原代培养的新生大鼠海马小胶质细胞 48 h后,IL-1β及iNOS mRNA 水平较空白对照组显著升高(P<0.01). 结论 Aβ25-35诱导的氧化应激和炎症反应在AD的发病机制中具有重要作用.

  10. A is for Amylin and Amyloid in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden MR

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid deposits within the islet of the pancreas have been known for a century. In 1987, the islet amyloid precursor polypeptide (IAPP amylin (a 37 amino acid was discovered. Recently there has been an explosion of amylin's importance in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. This review is intended to share what is understood about amylin derived amyloid and the role it plays in T2DM. Whether islet amyloid is an epiphenomenona, a tombstone, or a trigger it leaves an indelible footprint in greater that 70% of the patients with T2DM. There is current data supporting the damaging role of intermediate sized toxic amyloid particles to the beta cell resulting in a beta cell defect which contributes to a relative deficiency or loss of insulin secretion. Within the islet there is an intense redox stress which may be associated with the unfolding of amylin's native secondary structure compounding its amyloidogenic properties. In addition to the beta cell defect there may be an absorptive defect as a result of amyloid deposition in the basement membranes which form an envelope around the inta-islet capillary endothelium. We have an opportunity to change our current treatment modalities with newer medications and we should attempt to diagnose T2DM earlier and use these newer treatment strategies in combination to decrease glucotoxicity without elevating endogenous insulin and amylin. In the 21st century our goal should be to prevent remodeling, save the pancreatic islet, conquer islet amyloid, and amyloid diabetes.

  11. Targeting amyloid-degrading enzymes as therapeutic strategies in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anthony J; Fisk, Lilia; Nalivaeva, Natalia N

    2004-12-01

    The levels of amyloid beta-peptides (Abeta) in the brain represent a dynamic equilibrium state as a result of their biosynthesis from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretases, their degradation by a team of amyloid-degrading enzymes, their subsequent oligomerization, and deposition into senile plaques. While most therapeutic attention has focused on developing inhibitors of secretases to prevent Abeta formation, enhancing the rate of Abeta degradation represents an alternative and viable strategy. Current evidence both in vivo and in vitro suggests that there are three major players in amyloid turnover: neprilysin, endothelin converting enzyme(s), and insulin-degrading enzyme, all of which are zinc metallopeptidases. Other proteases have also been implicated in amyloid metabolism, including angiotensin-converting enzyme, and plasmin but for these the evidence is less compelling. Neprilysin and endothelin converting enzyme(s) are homologous membrane proteins of the M13 peptidase family, which normally play roles in the biosynthesis and/or metabolism of regulatory peptides. Insulin-degrading enzyme is structurally and mechanistically distinct. The regional, cellular, and subcellular localizations of these enzymes differ, providing an efficient and diverse mechanism for protecting the brain against the normal accumulation of toxic Abeta peptides. Reduction in expression levels of some of these proteases following insults (e.g., hypoxia and ischemia) or aging might predispose to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Conversely, enhancement of their levels by gene delivery or pharmacological means could be neuroprotective. Even a relatively small enhancement of Abeta metabolism could slow the inexorable progression of the disease. The relative merits of targeting these enzymes for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease will be reviewed and possible side-effects of enhancing their activity evaluated.

  12. Effect of Panax notoginseng saponins on the expression of beta-amyloid protein in the cortex of the parietal lobe and hippocampus, and spatial learning and memory in a mouse model of senile dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenguo Zhong; Dengpan Wu; Liang Lü; Jinsheng Wang; Wenyan Zhang; Zeqiang Qu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pharmacological actions of Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) lie in removing free radicals, anti-inflammation and anti-oxygenation. It can also improve memory and behavior in rat models of Alzheimer's disease.OBJECTIVE: Using the Morris water maze, immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and RT-PCR, this study aimed to measure improvement in spatial learning, memory, expression of amyloid precursor protein (App) and β -amyloid (A β ), to investigate the mechanism of action of PNS in the treatment of AD in the senescence accelerated mouse-prone 8 (SAMP8) and compare the effects with huperzine A.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A completely randomized grouping design, controlled animal experiment was performed in the Center for Research & Development of New Drugs, Guangxi Traditional Chinese Medical University from July 2005 to April 2007.MATERIALS: Sixty male SAMP8 mice, aged 3 months, purchased from Tianjin Chinese Traditional Medical University of China, were divided into four groups: PNS high-dosage group, PNS low-dosage group,huperzine A group and control group. PNS was provided by Weihe Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. (batch No.:Z53021485, Yuxi, Yunan Province, China). Huperzine A was provided by Zhenyuan Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.(batch No.: 20040801, Zhejiang. China).METHODS: The high-dosage group and low-dosage group were treated with 93.50 and 23.38 mg/kg PNS respectively per day and the huperzine A group was treated with 0.038 6 mg/kg huperzine A per day, all by intragastric administration, for 8 consecutive weeks. The same volume of double distilled water was given to the control group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: After drug administration, learning and memory abilities were assessed by place navigation and spatial probe tests. The recording indices consisted of escape latency (time-to-platform), and the percentage of swimming time spent in each quadrant. The number of A β1-40,A β1-42 and App immunopositive neurons in the brains of SAMP8 mice was analyzed by

  13. Hacking the code of amyloid formation: the amyloid stretch hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Serrano, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems.

  14. Serum amyloid P component scintigraphy in familial amyloid polyneuropathy: regression of visceral amyloid following liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) associated with transthyretin (TTR) mutations is the commonest type of hereditary amyloidosis. Plasma TTR is produced almost exclusively in the liver and orthotopic liver transplantation is the only available treatment, although the clinical outcome varies. Serum amyloid P component (SAP) scintigraphy is a method for identifying and quantitatively monitoring amyloid deposits in vivo, but it has not previously been used to study the outcome of visceral amyloid deposits in FAP following liver transplantation. Whole body scintigraphy following injection of iodine-123 labelled SAP was performed in 17 patients with FAP associated with TTR Met30 and in five asymptomatic gene carriers. Follow-up studies were performed in ten patients, eight of whom had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation 1-5 years beforehand. There was abnormal uptake of 123I-SAP in all FAP patients, including the kidneys in each case, the spleen in five cases and the adrenal glands in three cases. Renal amyloid deposits were also present in three of the asymptomatic carriers. Follow-up studies 1-5 years after liver transplantation showed that there had been substantial regression of the visceral amyloid deposits in two patients and modest improvement in three cases. The amyloid deposits were unchanged in two patients. In conclusion, 123I-SAP scintigraphy identified unsuspected visceral amyloid in each patient with FAP due to TTR Met30. The universal presence of renal amyloid probably underlies the high frequency of renal failure that occurs in FAP following liver transplantation. The variable capacity of patients to mobilise amyloid deposits following liver transplantation may contribute to their long-term clinical outcome. (orig.)

  15. Serum amyloid P component scintigraphy in familial amyloid polyneuropathy: regression of visceral amyloid following liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydh, A.; Hietala, S.O.; Aahlstroem, K.R. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Suhr, O. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Pepys, M.B.; Hawkins, P.N. [Immunological Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) associated with transthyretin (TTR) mutations is the commonest type of hereditary amyloidosis. Plasma TTR is produced almost exclusively in the liver and orthotopic liver transplantation is the only available treatment, although the clinical outcome varies. Serum amyloid P component (SAP) scintigraphy is a method for identifying and quantitatively monitoring amyloid deposits in vivo, but it has not previously been used to study the outcome of visceral amyloid deposits in FAP following liver transplantation. Whole body scintigraphy following injection of iodine-123 labelled SAP was performed in 17 patients with FAP associated with TTR Met30 and in five asymptomatic gene carriers. Follow-up studies were performed in ten patients, eight of whom had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation 1-5 years beforehand. There was abnormal uptake of {sup 123}I-SAP in all FAP patients, including the kidneys in each case, the spleen in five cases and the adrenal glands in three cases. Renal amyloid deposits were also present in three of the asymptomatic carriers. Follow-up studies 1-5 years after liver transplantation showed that there had been substantial regression of the visceral amyloid deposits in two patients and modest improvement in three cases. The amyloid deposits were unchanged in two patients. In conclusion, {sup 123}I-SAP scintigraphy identified unsuspected visceral amyloid in each patient with FAP due to TTR Met30. The universal presence of renal amyloid probably underlies the high frequency of renal failure that occurs in FAP following liver transplantation. The variable capacity of patients to mobilise amyloid deposits following liver transplantation may contribute to their long-term clinical outcome. (orig.) With 2 figs., 2 tabs., 22 refs.

  16. Structure-based design of non-natural amino-acid inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Karanicolas, John; Chang, Howard W.; Zhao, Anni; Jiang, Lin; Zirafi, Onofrio; Stevens, Jason T.; Münch, Jan; Baker, David; Eisenberg, David (UCLA); (UWASH); (UL); (Kansas); (Ulm)

    2011-09-20

    Many globular and natively disordered proteins can convert into amyloid fibrils. These fibrils are associated with numerous pathologies as well as with normal cellular functions, and frequently form during protein denaturation. Inhibitors of pathological amyloid fibril formation could be useful in the development of therapeutics, provided that the inhibitors were specific enough to avoid interfering with normal processes. Here we show that computer-aided, structure-based design can yield highly specific peptide inhibitors of amyloid formation. Using known atomic structures of segments of amyloid fibrils as templates, we have designed and characterized an all-D-amino-acid inhibitor of the fibril formation of the tau protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, and a non-natural L-amino-acid inhibitor of an amyloid fibril that enhances sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Our results indicate that peptides from structure-based designs can disrupt the fibril formation of full-length proteins, including those, such as tau protein, that lack fully ordered native structures. Because the inhibiting peptides have been designed on structures of dual-{beta}-sheet 'steric zippers', the successful inhibition of amyloid fibril formation strengthens the hypothesis that amyloid spines contain steric zippers.

  17. Anti-amyloid Aggregation Activity of Natural Compounds: Implications for Alzheimer's Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xian-Le; Rao, Praveen P N; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Several plant-derived natural compounds are known to exhibit anti-amyloid aggregation activity which makes them attractive as potential therapies to treat Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms of their anti-amyloid activity are not well known. In this regard, many natural compounds are known to exhibit direct binding to various amyloid species including oligomers and fibrils, which in turn can lead to conformational change in the beta-sheet assembly to form nontoxic aggregates. This review discusses the mechanism of anti-amyloid activity of 16 natural compounds and gives structural details on their direct binding interactions with amyloid aggregates. Our computational investigations show that the physicochemical properties of natural products do fit Lipinski's criteria and that catechol and catechol-type moieties present in natural compounds act as lysine site-specific inhibitors of amyloid aggregation. Based on these observations, we propose a structural template to design novel small molecules containing site-specific ring scaffolds, planar aromatic and nonaromatic linkers with suitably substituted hydrogen bond acceptors and donors. These studies will have significant implications in the design and development of novel amyloid aggregation inhibitors with superior metabolic stability and blood-brain barrier penetration as potential agents to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Small-animal PET imaging of amyloid-beta plaques with [11C]PiB and its multi-modal validation in an APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Manook

    Full Text Available In vivo imaging and quantification of amyloid-β plaque (Aβ burden in small-animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD is a valuable tool for translational research such as developing specific imaging markers and monitoring new therapy approaches. Methodological constraints such as image resolution of positron emission tomography (PET and lack of suitable AD models have limited the feasibility of PET in mice. In this study, we evaluated a feasible protocol for PET imaging of Aβ in mouse brain with [(11C]PiB and specific activities commonly used in human studies. In vivo mouse brain MRI for anatomical reference was acquired with a clinical 1.5 T system. A recently characterized APP/PS1 mouse was employed to measure Aβ at different disease stages in homozygous and hemizygous animals. We performed multi-modal cross-validations for the PET results with ex vivo and in vitro methodologies, including regional brain biodistribution, multi-label digital autoradiography, protein quantification with ELISA, fluorescence microscopy, semi-automated histological quantification and radioligand binding assays. Specific [(11C]PiB uptake in individual brain regions with Aβ deposition was demonstrated and validated in all animals of the study cohort including homozygous AD animals as young as nine months. Corresponding to the extent of Aβ pathology, old homozygous AD animals (21 months showed the highest uptake followed by old hemizygous (23 months and young homozygous mice (9 months. In all AD age groups the cerebellum was shown to be suitable as an intracerebral reference region. PET results were cross-validated and consistent with all applied ex vivo and in vitro methodologies. The results confirm that the experimental setup for non-invasive [(11C]PiB imaging of Aβ in the APP/PS1 mice provides a feasible, reproducible and robust protocol for small-animal Aβ imaging. It allows longitudinal imaging studies with follow-up periods of approximately one and a

  19. Sodium ferulate prevents amyloid-beta-induced neurotoxicity through suppression of p38 MAPK and upregulation of ERK-1/2 and Akt/protein kinase B in rat hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying JIN; En-zhi YAN; Ying FAN; Zhi-hong ZONG; Zhi-min QI; Zhi LI

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To observe whether an amyloid β (Aβ)-induced increase in interleukin (IL)1 β was accompanied by an increase in the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and a decrease in the cell survival pathway, and whether sodium ferulate (SF) treatment was effective in preventing these Aβ-induced changes.Methods: Rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with Aβ25-35. Seven days after injection, immunohistochemical techniques for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were used to determine the astrocyte infiltration and activation in hippocampal CA1 areas. The expression of IL-1 β, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 MAPK, Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), Fas ligand and caspase-3 were determined by Western blotting. The caspase-3 activity was measured by cleavage of the caspase-3 substrate (Ac-DEVD-pNA). Reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the changes in IL- 1 βmRNA levels.Results:Intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ25-35 elicited astrocyte activation and infiltration and caused a strong inflammatory reaction characterized by increased IL-1 β production and elevated levels of IL-1 β mRNA. Increased IL-1 β synthesis was accompanied by increased activation of p38 MAPK and downregulation of phospho-ERK and phospho-Akt/PKB in hippocampal CA regions prepared from Aβ-treated rats, leading to cell death as assessed by activation of caspase-3. SF significantly prevented Aβ-induced increases in IL-1 β and p38 MAPK activation and also Aβ-induced changes in phospho-ERK and phospho-Akt/PKB expression levels. Conclusion: SF prevents Aβ-induced neurotoxicity through suppression of p38 MAPK activation and upregulation of phospho-ERK and phospho-Akt/PKB expression.survival signals ERK and Akt/PKB may contribute to the demise of the cells. These are significantly abrogated by SF treatment, which also attenuates Aβ-induced increase in caspase-3 activity and FasL expression.

  20. Immunotherapy against amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Daniela; Ghezzi, Laura; Scarpini, Elio

    2013-10-15

    The first drugs developed for Alzheimer's disease (AD), anticholinesterase inhibitors (AchEI), increase acetylcholine levels, previously demonstrated to be reduced in AD. To date, four AchEI are approved for the treatment of mild to moderate AD. A further therapeutic option available for moderate to severe AD is memantine. These treatments are symptomatic, whereas drugs under development are supposed to modify pathological steps leading to AD, thus acting on the evolution of the disease. For this reason they are currently termed "disease modifying" drugs. To block the progression of the disease, they have to interfere with pathogenic steps at the basis of clinical symptoms, including the deposition of extracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques and of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. The most innovative approach is represented by the vaccination and passive immunization against Aβ peptide. In this article, current knowledge about concluded and ongoing clinical trials with both vaccination with different antigens and passive immunization will be reviewed and discussed.

  1. AFM-based force spectroscopy measurements of mature amyloid fibrils of the peptide glucagon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Mingdong; Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Mamdouh, Wael; Xu Sailong; Otzen, Daniel Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)], E-mail: dao@inano.dk, E-mail: fbe@inano.dk

    2008-09-24

    We report on the mechanical characterization of individual mature amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). These self-assembling materials, formed from the 29-residue amphiphatic peptide hormone glucagon, were found to display a reversible elastic behaviour. Based on AFM morphology and SMFS studies, we suggest that the observed elasticity is due to a force-induced conformational transition which is reversible due to the {beta}-helical conformation of protofibrils, allowing a high degree of extension. The elastic properties of such mature fibrils contribute to their high stability, suggesting that the internal hydrophobic interactions of amyloid fibrils are likely to be of fundamental importance in the assembly of amyloid fibrils and therefore for the understanding of the progression of their associated pathogenic disorders. In addition, such biological amyloid fibril structures with highly stable mechanical properties can potentially be used to produce nanofibres (nanowires) that may be suitable for nanotechnological applications.

  2. Engineering Metal Ion Coordination to Regulate Amyloid Fibril Assembly And Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.; Canfield, J.M.; Mehta, A.K.; Shokes, J.E.; Tian, B.; Childers, W.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Mao, Z.; Scott, R.A.; Warncke, K.; Lynn, D.G.

    2009-06-02

    Protein and peptide assembly into amyloid has been implicated in functions that range from beneficial epigenetic controls to pathological etiologies. However, the exact structures of the assemblies that regulate biological activity remain poorly defined. We have previously used Zn{sup 2+} to modulate the assembly kinetics and morphology of congeners of the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) associated with Alzheimer's disease. We now reveal a correlation among A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} coordination, peptide self-assembly, and neuronal viability. By using the central segment of A{beta}, HHQKLVFFA or A{beta}(13-21), which contains residues H13 and H14 implicated in A{beta}-metal ion binding, we show that Cu{sup 2+} forms complexes with A{beta}(13-21) and its K16A mutant and that the complexes, which do not self-assemble into fibrils, have structures similar to those found for the human prion protein, PrP. N-terminal acetylation and H14A substitution, Ac-A{beta}(13-21)H14A, alters metal coordination, allowing Cu{sup 2+} to accelerate assembly into neurotoxic fibrils. These results establish that the N-terminal region of A{beta} can access different metal-ion-coordination environments and that different complexes can lead to profound changes in A{beta} self-assembly kinetics, morphology, and toxicity. Related metal-ion coordination may be critical to the etiology of other neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. High-affinity Anticalins with aggregation-blocking activity directed against the Alzheimer β-amyloid peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Rauth, Sabine; Hinz, Dominik; Börger, Michael; Uhrig, Markus; Mayhaus, Manuel; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Skerra, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, in particular Aβ42 and Aβ40, exert neurotoxic effects and their overproduction leads to amyloid deposits in the brain, thus constituting an important biomolecular target for treatments of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We describe the engineering of cognate Anticalins as a novel type of neutralizing protein reagent based on the human lipocalin scaffold. Phage display selection from a genetic random library comprising variants of the human lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) with mutatio...

  4. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  5. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Hernandez-Zimbron

    Full Text Available Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  6. β-淀粉样蛋白对小胶质细胞合成一氧化氮的影响%Effect of amyloid beta-peptide on activated microglial cell excreting nitric oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩笑峰; 吕丽; 葛汝丽; 唐荣华

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨β-淀粉样蛋白(arnyloid beta-peptide,AB)诱导小胶质细胞活化后K轻链核因子(nuclear factor-kappa B,NF-kB)的表达及一氧化氮(NO)水平的变化.方法 Ap干预纯化培养的小胶质细胞,观察其形态学变化,采用镉还原法测定NO水平,免疫细胞化学方法研究NF-KB的表达.结果 500 nmol/L及1000 mnol/L AB干预组细胞形态呈"阿米巴样",细胞核内NF-kB的表达增加(P<0.05),培养基中NO浓度升高(P<0.05).结论 AB激活小胶质细胞NF-kB途径大量合成NO,可能参与阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer's disease,AD)的致病过程.

  7. Thermodynamics of amyloid formation and the role of intersheet interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Irbäck, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of proteins into $\\beta$-sheet-rich amyloid fibrils has been observed to occur with sigmoidal kinetics, indicating that the system initially is trapped in a metastable state. Here, we use a minimal lattice-based model to explore the thermodynamic forces driving amyloid formation in a finite canonical ($NVT$) system. By means of generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo techniques and a semi-analytical method, the thermodynamic properties of this model are investigated for different sets of intersheet interaction parameters. When the interactions support lateral growth into multi-layered fibrillar structures, an evaporation/condensation transition is observed, between a supersaturated solution state and a thermodynamically distinct state where small and large fibril-like species exist in equilibrium. Intermediate-size aggregates are statistically suppressed. These properties do not hold if aggregate growth is one-dimensional.

  8. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  9. Protein-induced Photophysical Changes to the Amyloid Indicator Dye Thioflavin T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Wolfe; M Calabrese; A Nath; D Blaho; A Miranker; Y Xiong

    2011-12-31

    The small molecule thioflavin T (ThT) is a defining probe for the identification and mechanistic study of amyloid fiber formation. As such, ThT is fundamental to investigations of serious diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, and type II diabetes. For each disease, a different protein undergoes conformational conversion to a {beta}-sheet rich fiber. The fluorescence of ThT exhibits an increase in quantum yield upon binding these fibers. Despite its widespread use, the structural basis for binding specificity and for the changes to the photophysical properties of ThT remain poorly understood. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of ThT with two alternative states of {beta}-2 microglobulin ({beta}2m); one monomeric, the other an amyloid-like oligomer. In the latter, the dye intercalates between {beta}-sheets orthogonal to the {beta}-strands. Importantly, the fluorophore is bound in such a manner that a photophysically relevant torsion is limited to a range of angles generally associated with low, not high, quantum yield. Quantum mechanical assessment of the fluorophore shows the electronic distribution to be strongly stabilized by aromatic interactions with the protein. Monomeric {beta}2m gives little increase in ThT fluorescence despite showing three fluorophores, at two binding sites, in configurations generally associated with high quantum yield. Our efforts fundamentally extend existing understanding about the origins of amyloid-induced photophysical changes. Specifically, the {beta}-sheet interface that characterizes amyloid acts both sterically and electronically to stabilize the fluorophore's ground state electronic distribution. By preventing the fluorophore from adopting its preferred excited state configuration, nonradiative relaxation pathways are minimized and quantum yield is increased.

  10. Interactions driving the collapse of islet amyloid polypeptide: Implications for amyloid aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Stephanie M.

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), also known as amylin, is a 37-residue intrinsically disordered hormone involved in glucose regulation and gastric emptying. The aggregation of hIAPP into amyloid fibrils is believed to play a causal role in type 2 diabetes. To date, not much is known about the monomeric state of hIAPP or how it undergoes an irreversible transformation from disordered peptide to insoluble aggregate. IAPP contains a highly conserved disulfide bond that restricts hIAPP(1-8) into a short ring-like structure: N_loop. Removal or chemical reduction of N_loop not only prevents cell response upon binding to the CGRP receptor, but also alters the mass per length distribution of hIAPP fibers and the kinetics of fibril formation. The mechanism by which N_loop affects hIAPP aggregation is not yet understood, but is important for rationalizing kinetics and developing potential inhibitors. By measuring end-to-end contact formation rates, Vaiana et al. showed that N_loop induces collapsed states in IAPP monomers, implying attractive interactions between N_loop and other regions of the disordered polypeptide chain . We show that in addition to being involved in intra-protein interactions, the N_loop is involved in inter-protein interactions, which lead to the formation of extremely long and stable beta-turn fibers. These non-amyloid fibers are present in the 10 muM concentration range, under the same solution conditions in which hIAPP forms amyloid fibers. We discuss the effect of peptide cyclization on both intra- and inter-protein interactions, and its possible implications for aggregation. Our findings indicate a potential role of N_loop-N_loop interactions in hIAPP aggregation, which has not previously been explored. Though our findings suggest that N_loop plays an important role in the pathway of amyloid formation, other naturally occurring IAPP variants that contain this structural feature are incapable of forming amyloids. For example, hIAPP readily

  11. Failure of Alzheimer's Aβ(1-40) amyloid nanofibrils under compressive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-04-01

    Amyloids are associated with severe degenerative diseases and show exceptional mechanical properties, in particular great stiffhess. Amyloid fibrils, forming protein nanotube structures, are elongated fibers with a diameter of ≈8 nm with a characteristic dense hydrogen-bond (H-bond)patterning in the form of beta-sheets (β-sheets). Here we report a series of molecular dynamics simulations to study mechanical failure properties of a twofold symmetric Aβ(l-40) amyloid fibril, a pathogen associated with Alzheimer’s disease. We carry out computational experiments to study the response of the amyloid fibril to compressive loading. Our investigations reveal atomistic details of the failure process, and confirm that the breakdown of H-bonds plays a critical role during the failure process of amyloid fibrils. We obtain a Young’s modulus of ≈12.43 GPa, in dose agreement with earlier experimental results. Our simulations show that failure by buck-ling and subsequent shearing in one of the layers initiates at ≈1% compressive strain, suggesting that amyloid fibrils can be rather brittle mechanical elements.

  12. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  13. Rescue of Early bace-1 and Global DNA Demethylation by S-Adenosylmethionine Reduces Amyloid Pathology and Improves Cognition in an Alzheimer’s Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Carmo, Sonia; Hanzel, Cecilia E.; Jacobs, Marie L.; Machnes, Ziv; Iulita, M. Florencia; Yang, Jingyun; Yu, Lei; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Danik, Marc; Breuillaud, Lionel S.; Bennett, David A.; Szyf, Moshe; Cuello, A. Claudio

    2016-01-01

    General DNA hypomethylation is associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but it is unclear when DNA hypomethylation starts or plays a role in AD pathology or whether DNA re-methylation would rescue early amyloid-related cognitive impairments. In an APP transgenic mouse model of AD-like amyloid pathology we found that early intraneuronal amyloid beta build-up is sufficient to unleash a global and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (bace-1) DNA demethylation in AD-vulnerable brain regions. S-adenosylmethionine administration at these early stages abolished this hypomethylation, diminished the amyloid pathology and restored cognitive capabilities. To assess a possible human significance of findings, we examined the methylation at 12 CpGs sites in the bace-1 promoter, using genome-wide DNA methylation data from 740 postmortem human brains. Thus, we found significant associations of bace-1 promoter methylation with β-amyloid load among persons with AD dementia, and PHFtau tangle density. Our results support a plausible causal role for the earliest amyloid beta accumulation to provoke DNA hypomethylation, influencing AD pathological outcomes. PMID:27681803

  14. Physiopathological modulators of amyloid aggregation and novel pharmacological approaches in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEFELICE FERNANDA G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological mechanisms underlying the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD are complex, as several factors likely contribute to the development of the disease. Therefore, it is not surprising that a number of different possible therapeutic approaches addressing distinct aspects of this disease are currently being investigated. Among these are ways to prevent amyloid aggregation and/or deposition, to prevent neuronal degeneration, and to increase brain neurotransmitter levels. Here, we discuss possible roles of endogenous modulators of Abeta aggregation in the physiopathology of AD and some of the strategies currently under consideration to interfere with brain levels of beta-amyloid, its aggregation and neurotoxicity.

  15. High plasma levels of islet amyloid polypeptide in young with new-onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan F Paulsson

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP is a beta cell hormone secreted together with insulin upon glucose stimulation. IAPP participates in normal glucose regulation, but IAPP is also known for its ability to misfold and form islet amyloid. Amyloid fibrils form through smaller cell toxic intermediates and deposited amyloid disrupts normal islet architecture. Even though IAPP and amyloid formation are much discussed in type 2 diabetes, our aim was to study the significance of IAPP in type 1 diabetes. RESULTS: Plasma IAPP levels in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes (n = 224 were analysed and concentrations exceeding 100 pmol/L (127.2-888.7 pmol/L were found in 11% (25/224. The IAPP increase did not correlate with C-peptide levels. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Plasma levels of IAPP and insulin deviate in a subpopulation of young with newly-diagnosed type 1 diabetes. The determined elevated levels of IAPP might increase the risk for IAPP misfolding and formation of cell toxic amyloid in beta cells. This finding add IAPP-aggregation to the list over putative pathological factors causing type 1 diabetes.

  16. Calcium signaling and amyloid toxicity in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Stutzmann, Grace E

    2010-04-23

    Intracellular Ca(2+) signaling is fundamental to neuronal physiology and viability. Because of its ubiquitous roles, disruptions in Ca(2+) homeostasis are implicated in diverse disease processes and have become a major focus of study in multifactorial neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). A hallmark of AD is the excessive production of beta-amyloid (Abeta) and its massive accumulation in amyloid plaques. In this minireview, we highlight the pathogenic interactions between altered cellular Ca(2+) signaling and Abeta in its different aggregation states and how these elements coalesce to alter the course of the neurodegenerative disease. Ca(2+) and Abeta intersect at several functional levels and temporal stages of AD, thereby altering neurotransmitter receptor properties, disrupting membrane integrity, and initiating apoptotic signaling cascades. Notably, there are reciprocal interactions between Ca(2+) pathways and amyloid pathology; altered Ca(2+) signaling accelerates Abeta formation, whereas Abeta peptides, particularly in soluble oligomeric forms, induce Ca(2+) disruptions. A degenerative feed-forward cycle of toxic Abeta generation and Ca(2+) perturbations results, which in turn can spin off to accelerate more global neuropathological cascades, ultimately leading to synaptic breakdown, cell death, and devastating memory loss. Although no cause or cure is currently known, targeting Ca(2+) dyshomeostasis as an underlying and integral component of AD pathology may result in novel and effective treatments for AD.

  17. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweers, K. K. M.; Bennink, M. L.; Subramaniam, V.

    2012-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils.

  18. Oligomerization and toxicity of A{beta} fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, Joanne M., E-mail: Jo.Caine@csiro.au [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Bharadwaj, Prashant R. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Centre for Excellence for Alzheimer' s Disease Research and Care, School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia (Australia); Sankovich, Sonia E. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D. [The Department of Pathology and Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Streltsov, Victor A.; Varghese, Jose [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} We expressed amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide as a soluble maltose binding protein fusion (MBP-A{beta}42 and MBP-A{beta}16). {yields} The full length A{beta} peptide fusion, MBP-A{beta}42, forms oligomeric species as determined by SDS-PAGE gels, gel filtration and DLS. {yields} The MBP-A{beta}42, but not MBP-A{beta}16 or MBP alone, is toxic to both yeast and mammalian cells as determined by toxicity assays. -- Abstract: This study has found that the Maltose binding protein A{beta}42 fusion protein (MBP-A{beta}42) forms soluble oligomers while the shorter MBP-A{beta}16 fusion and control MBP did not. MBP-A{beta}42, but neither MBP-A{beta}16 nor control MBP, was toxic in a dose-dependent manner in both yeast and primary cortical neuronal cells. This study demonstrates the potential utility of MBP-A{beta}42 as a reagent for drug screening assays in yeast and neuronal cell cultures and as a candidate for further A{beta}42 characterization.

  19. Heterologous amyloid seeding: revisiting the role of acetylcholinesterase in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Létitia Jean

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases associated with abnormal protein folding and ordered aggregation require an initial trigger which may be infectious, inherited, post-inflammatory or idiopathic. Proteolytic cleavage to generate vulnerable precursors, such as amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta production via beta and gamma secretases in Alzheimer's Disease (AD, is one such trigger, but the proteolytic removal of these fragments is also aetiologically important. The levels of Abeta in the central nervous system are regulated by several catabolic proteases, including insulysin (IDE and neprilysin (NEP. The known association of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE with pathological aggregates in AD together with its ability to increase Abeta fibrilization prompted us to search for proteolytic triggers that could enhance this process. The hAChE C-terminal domain (T40, AChE(575-614 is an exposed amphiphilic alpha-helix involved in enzyme oligomerisation, but it also contains a conformational switch region (CSR with high propensity for conversion to non-native (hidden beta-strand, a property associated with amyloidogenicity. A synthetic peptide (AChE(586-599 encompassing the CSR region shares homology with Abeta and forms beta-sheet amyloid fibrils. We investigated the influence of IDE and NEP proteolysis on the formation and degradation of relevant hAChE beta-sheet species. By combining reverse-phase HPLC and mass spectrometry, we established that the enzyme digestion profiles on T40 versus AChE(586-599, or versus Abeta, differed. Moreover, IDE digestion of T40 triggered the conformational switch from alpha- to beta-structures, resulting in surfactant CSR species that self-assembled into amyloid fibril precursors (oligomers. Crucially, these CSR species significantly increased Abeta fibril formation both by seeding the energetically unfavorable formation of amyloid nuclei and by enhancing the rate of amyloid elongation. Hence, these results may offer an explanation

  20. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy presenting as a posterior leukoencephalopathy: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maramattom Boby Varkey

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is well known to present with lobar intracerebral hemorrhage, dementia or transient neurological events. White matter changes with CAA have only been recently described and can be seen with either sporadic or familial CAA. We present a 50-year-old man with rapidly progressive dementia in whom MRI brain showed symmetrical white matter changes in the parieto-occipital regions. Brain biopsy revealed changes of CAA along with features of Alzheimer′s disease. Immunohistochemistry revealed amyloid beta protein. The subcortical lesions were thought to occur from hypoperfusion of the distal white matter. The role of amyloid in the pathogenesis of CAA and the mechanism of leukoencephalopathy are discussed.

  1. Modeling Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology in Amyloid-β Metabolism using Neural-Crest-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Cheung

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is growing recognition of cerebrovascular contributions to neurodegenerative diseases. In the walls of cerebral arteries, amyloid-beta (Aβ accumulation is evident in a majority of aged people and patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Here, we leverage human pluripotent stem cells to generate vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs from neural crest progenitors, recapitulating brain-vasculature-specific attributes of Aβ metabolism. We confirm that the lipoprotein receptor, LRP1, functions in our neural-crest-derived SMCs to mediate Aβ uptake and intracellular lysosomal degradation. Hypoxia significantly compromises the contribution of SMCs to Aβ clearance by suppressing LRP1 expression. This enabled us to develop an assay of Aβ uptake by using the neural crest-derived SMCs with hypoxia as a stress paradigm. We then tested several vascular protective compounds in a high-throughput format, demonstrating the value of stem-cell-based phenotypic screening for novel therapeutics and drug repurposing, aimed at alleviating amyloid burden.

  2. Islet amyloid polypeptide inserts into phospholipid monolayers as monomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maarten F M; Yigittop, HaciAli; Elgersma, Ronald C; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J; de Kruijff, Ben; Höppener, Jo W M; Antoinette Killian, J

    2006-02-24

    Amyloid deposits in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are thought to be a main factor responsible for death of the insulin-producing islet beta-cells in type 2 diabetes. It is hypothesized that beta-cell death is related to interaction of the 37 amino acid residue human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), the major constituent of islet amyloid, with cellular membranes. However, the mechanism of hIAPP-membrane interactions is largely unknown. Here, we study the nature and the molecular details of the initial step of hIAPP-membrane interactions by using the monolayer technique. It is shown that both freshly dissolved hIAPP and the non-amyloidogenic mouse IAPP (mIAPP) have a pronounced ability to insert into phospholipid monolayers, even at lipid packing conditions that exceed the conditions that occur in biological membranes. In contrast, the fibrillar form of hIAPP has lost the ability to insert. These results, combined with the observations that both the insertion kinetics and the dependence of insertion on the initial surface pressure are similar for freshly dissolved hIAPP and mIAPP, indicate that hIAPP inserts into phospholipid monolayers most likely as a monomer. In addition, our results suggest that the N-terminal part of hIAPP, which is nearly identical with that of mIAPP, is largely responsible for insertion. This is supported by experiments with hIAPP fragments, which show that a peptide consisting of the 19 N-terminal residues of hIAPP efficiently inserts into phospholipid monolayers, whereas an amyloidogenic decapeptide, consisting of residues 20-29 of hIAPP, inserts much less efficiently. The results obtained here suggest that hIAPP monomers might insert with high efficiency in biological membranes in vivo. This process could play an important role as a first step in hIAPP-induced membrane damage in type 2 diabetes. PMID:16403520

  3. Amyloid formation: functional friend or fearful foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, P; Roan, N R; Römling, U; Bevins, C L; Münch, J

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid formation has been most studied in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, as well as in amyloidosis. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that amyloid is also present in the healthy setting; for example nontoxic amyloid formation is important for melanin synthesis and in innate immunity. Furthermore, bacteria have mechanisms to produce functional amyloid structures with important roles in bacterial physiology and interaction with host cells. Here, we will discuss some novel aspects of fibril-forming proteins in humans and bacteria. First, the amyloid-forming properties of the antimicrobial peptide human defensin 6 (HD6) will be considered. Intriguingly, unlike other antimicrobial peptides, HD6 does not kill bacteria. However, recent data show that HD6 can form amyloid structures at the gut mucosa with strong affinity for bacterial surfaces. These so-called nanonets block bacterial invasion by entangling the bacteria in net-like structures. Next, the role of functional amyloid fibrils in human semen will be discussed. These fibrils were discovered through their property to enhance HIV infection but they may also have other yet unknown functions. Finally, the role of amyloid formation in bacteria will be reviewed. The recent finding that bacteria can make amyloid in a controlled fashion without toxic effects is of particular interest and may have implications for human disease. The role of amyloid in health and disease is beginning to be unravelled, and here, we will review some of the most recent findings in this exciting area. PMID:27151743

  4. Aggregation prone amyloid-β⋅CuII Species formed on the millisecond timescale at mildly acidic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jeppe Trudslev; Borg, Christian Bernsen; Michaels, Thomas C. T.;

    2015-01-01

    Metal ions and their interaction with the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide might be key elements in the development of Alzheimer's disease. In this work the effect of CuII on the aggregation of Aβ is explored on a timescale from milliseconds to days, both at physiological pH and under mildly acidic...

  5. 18F-flutemetamol amyloid imaging in Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment: a phase 2 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, Rik; Van Laere, Koen; Ivanoiu, Adrian;

    2010-01-01

    The most widely studied positron emission tomography ligand for in vivo beta-amyloid imaging is (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PIB). Its availability, however, is limited by the need for an on-site cyclotron. Validation of the (18)F-labeled PIB derivative (18)F-flutemetamol could significantl...

  6. JNK/p38 MAPK involves in ginsenoside Rb1 attenuating beta-amyloid peptide (25-35)-induced tau protein hyperphosphorylation in embryo rat cortical neurons%人参皂苷Rb1通过JNK/p38 MAPK途径减轻Aβ25-35诱导的胎鼠皮层神经元tau蛋白过度磷酸化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋锦秋; 陈晓春; 张静; 黄天文; 曾育琦; 沈杰; 陈丽敏

    2008-01-01

    探讨在Aβ25-35(beta-amyloid peptide (25-35),Aβ25-35)诱导的拟阿尔茨海默病样胎鼠皮层神经元tau蛋白过度磷酸化中,人参皂苷Rb1对tau蛋白磷酸化及JNK/p38 MAPK的可能作用.应用蛋白免疫印迹和免疫细胞化学染色的方法,观察tau蛋白磷酸化和JNK(c-jun N-terminal kinase)/p38 MAPK的表达情况.凝聚态Aβ25-35(20 μmol·L-1)作用于皮层神经元12 h,tau蛋白的磷酸化水平明显增高,同时JNK/p38 MAPK的总量及其活性形式--磷酸化JNK/p38 MAPK的蛋白表达水平也增加,人参皂苷Rb1可以减轻tau蛋白的磷酸化水平及JNK/p38 MAPK的蛋白水平.人参皂苷Rb1可通过JNK/p38 MAPK途径减轻Aβ25-35诱导的tau蛋白过度磷酸化.

  7. Canadian Consensus Guidelines on Use of Amyloid Imaging in Canada: Update and Future Directions from the Specialized Task Force on Amyloid imaging in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforce, Robert; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Rabinovici, Gil D; Dubois, Bruno; Gauthier, S

    2016-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of brain amyloid beta is now clinically available in several countries including the United States and the United Kingdom, but not Canada. It has become an established technique in the field of neuroimaging of aging and dementia, with data incorporated in the new consensus guidelines for the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and predementia Alzheimer's disease-related conditions. At this point, there are three US Food and Drug Administration- and European Union-approved tracers. Guided by appropriate use criteria developed in 2013 by the Alzheimer's Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, the utility of amyloid imaging in medical practice is now supported by a growing body of research. In this paper, we aimed to provide an update on the 2012 Canadian consensus guidelines to dementia care practitioners on proper use of amyloid imaging. We also wished to generate momentum for the industry to submit a new drug proposal to Health Canada. A group of local, national, and international dementia experts and imaging specialists met to discuss scenarios in which amyloid PET could be used appropriately. Peer-reviewed and published literature between January 2004 and May 2015 was searched. Technical and regulatory considerations pertaining to Canada were considered. The results of a survey of current practices in Canadian dementia centers were considered. A set of specific clinical and research guidelines was agreed on that defines the types of patients and clinical circumstances in which amyloid PET could be used in Canada. Future research directions were also outlined, notably the importance of studies that would assess the pharmaco-economics of amyloid imaging. PMID:26916179

  8. Ellagic acid promotes A{beta}42 fibrillization and inhibits A{beta}42-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ying [Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Yang, Shi-gao; Du, Xue-ting; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Xiao-xia; Zhao, Min [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Sun, Gui-yuan, E-mail: sungy2004@sohu.com [Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Rui-tian, E-mail: rtliu@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-12-25

    Smaller, soluble oligomers of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Selective inhibition of A{beta} oligomer formation provides an optimum target for AD therapy. Some polyphenols have potent anti-amyloidogenic activities and protect against A{beta} neurotoxicity. Here, we tested the effects of ellagic acid (EA), a polyphenolic compound, on A{beta}42 aggregation and neurotoxicity in vitro. EA promoted A{beta} fibril formation and significant oligomer loss, contrary to previous results that polyphenols inhibited A{beta} aggregation. The results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Western blot displayed more fibrils in A{beta}42 samples co-incubated with EA in earlier phases of aggregation. Consistent with the hypothesis that plaque formation may represent a protective mechanism in which the body sequesters toxic A{beta} aggregates to render them harmless, our MTT results showed that EA could significantly reduce A{beta}42-induced neurotoxicity toward SH-SY5Y cells. Taken together, our results suggest that EA, an active ingredient in many fruits and nuts, may have therapeutic potential in AD.

  9. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  10. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Bunyamin; Koca, Yavuz Savas; Koca, Tugba; Yildiz, Ihsan; Gerek Celikden, Sevda; Ciris, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG) is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn's disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis. PMID:27051538

  11. DNA aptamers detecting generic amyloid epitopes

    OpenAIRE

    Mitkevich, Olga V.; Kochneva-Pervukhova, Natalia V; Surina, Elizaveta R.; Benevolensky, Sergei V.; Kushnirov, Vitaly V.; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloids are fibrillar protein aggregates resulting from non-covalent autocatalytic polymerization of various structurally and functionally unrelated proteins. Previously we have selected DNA aptamers, which bind specifically to the in vitro assembled amyloid fibrils of the yeast prionogenic protein Sup35. Here we show that such DNA aptamers can be used to detect SDS-insoluble amyloid aggregates of the Sup35 protein, and of some other amyloidogenic proteins, including mouse PrP, formed in yea...

  12. A beta2-microglobulin cleavage variant fibrillates at near-physiological pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corlin, Dorthe B; Johnsen, Christina K; Nissen, Mogens H;

    2009-01-01

    several days. Here, we show that amyloid fibrils are generated in less than an hour when a cleavage variant of beta2m--found in the circulation of many dialysis patients--is exposed to pH levels (pH 6.6) occurring in joints during inflammation. Aggregation and fibrillation, including seeding effects......Beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) deposits as amyloid in dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), predominantly in joints. The molecular mechanisms underlying the amyloidogenicity of beta2m are still largely unknown. In vitro, acidic conditions, pH ... with intact, native beta2m were studied by Thioflavin T fluorescence spectroscopy, turbidimetry, capillary electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. We conclude that a biologically relevant variant of beta2m is amyloidogenic at slightly acidic pH. Also, only a very small amount of preformed fibrils...

  13. Amyloid myopathy: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Tuomaala

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid myopathy (AM is a rare manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis (AL. Like inflammatory myopathies, it presents with proximal muscle weakness and an increased creatine kinase level. We describe a case of AL with severe, rapidly progressive myopathy as the initial symptom. The clinical manifestation and muscle biopsy were suggestive of inclusion body myositis. AM was not suspected until amyloidosis was seen in the gastric mucosal biopsy. The muscle biopsy was then re-examined more specifically, and Congo red staining eventually showed vascular and interstitial amyloid accumulation, which led to a diagnosis of AM. The present case illustrates the fact that the clinical picture of AM can mimic that of inclusion body myositis.

  14. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of β-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. PMID:21695112

  15. Reversal effects of crocin on amyloid β-induced memory deficit: Modification of autophagy or apoptosis markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Farideh; Jamshidi, Amir Hossein; Khodagholi, Fariba; Yans, Asal; Azimi, Leila; Faizi, Mehrdad; Vali, Leila; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Crocin, as a carotenoid, is one of the main and active constituents of saffron stigmas (Crocus sativus L.) that is widely used in folk medicine. Several studies have pointed out the potent antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of crocin which may have therapeutic values for management of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia among the elderly and is characterized by massive neuronal loss and progressive cognitive impairment. Beta amyloid hypothesis is the main theoretical research framework for Alzheimer's disease which states that extracellular aggregation of beta amyloid results in synaptic loss and eventually cell apoptosis. Recent findings suggest that autophagy and apoptosis are extensively involved in Alzheimer's disease. In order to investigate therapeutic values of crocin, we examined the effect of crocin on memory, cell apoptosis, and autophagy using in vivo models of Alzhei