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Sample records for amyl nitrite

  1. 21 CFR 250.100 - Amyl nitrite inhalant as a prescription drug for human use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amyl nitrite inhalant as a prescription drug for... Prescription Status of Specific Drugs § 250.100 Amyl nitrite inhalant as a prescription drug for human use. (a) Amyl nitrite inhalant has been available over-the-counter for emergency use by the patient in...

  2. Differentiation between organic stenosis and functional dyskinesia of the sphincter of Oddi with amyl nitrite-augmented quantitative hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amyl nitrite-augmented quantitative hepatobiliary scintigraphy (QHBS) was performed on nine asymptomatic volunteers and 22 patients with SOD of biliary types I and II. Normal QHBS parameters were established in the asymptomatic volunteers. QHBS revealed a partial obstructive pattern in nine patients in whom SO stenosis was suspected and in 13 patients in whom SO dyskinesia was suspected. This obstructive pattern remained unchanged in the former group, but was completely relieved in the latter group of patients on amyl nitrite administration. In conclusion, amyl nitrite-augmented QHBS proved to be a useful non-invasive method in the diagnosis of SOD of biliary types I and II and permitted differentiation between organic stenosis and functional motor abnormalities of the SO. (orig./MG)

  3. Amyl: A Misunderstood Word

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjonaas, Richard A.

    1996-12-01

    There is much confusion associated with the word amyl. For example, many textbooks draw a structural formula of n-pentyl acetate rather than isopentyl acetate when referring to the chief component of banana oil (amyl acetate). When younger chemists are taught to use the words propyl, butyl, and pentyl in place of n-propyl, n-butyl, and n-pentyl, they then incorrectly assume that this practice also applies to the word amyl. As is the case with banana oil, if the word amyl is going to be used to refer to just one of the isomeric pentyl groups, it should rightfully be isopentyl. The reason for this dates back to an abundant and important article of commerce called amylic alcohol (also called potato oil) which consisted chiefly of isopentyl alcohol. In fact, one can look in various chemical catalogs and handbooks of today and see such names as amyl benzoate and amyl nitrite used in place of isopentyl benzoate and isopentyl nitrite. Adding to all the confusion is the common practice of using the word amyl along with the singular form of another word when referring to an isomeric mixture; i.e. using amyl acetate rather than amyl acetates when referring to a mixture of pentyl acetates.

  4. Nitrates and Nitrites in the Treatment of Ischemic Cardiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nossaman, Vaughn E.; Nossaman, Bobby D.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    The organic nitrite, amyl of nitrite, was initially used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of angina pectoris in 1867, but was replaced over a decade later by the organic nitrate, nitroglycerin (NTG), due to the ease of administration and longer duration of action. The administration of organic nitrate esters, such as NTG, continues to be used in the treatment of angina pectoris and heart failure during the birth of modern pharmacology. The clinical effectiveness is due to vasodilator a...

  5. MetAmyl: a METa-predictor for AMYLoid proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Emily

    Full Text Available The aggregation of proteins or peptides in amyloid fibrils is associated with a number of clinical disorders, including Alzheimer's, Huntington's and prion diseases, medullary thyroid cancer, renal and cardiac amyloidosis. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of fibril formation remain largely unknown. Several lines of evidence revealed that short amino-acid segments (hot spots, located in amyloid precursor proteins act as seeds for fibril elongation. Therefore, hot spots are potential targets for diagnostic/therapeutic applications, and a current challenge in bioinformatics is the development of methods to accurately predict hot spots from protein sequences. In this paper, we combined existing methods into a meta-predictor for hot spots prediction, called MetAmyl for METapredictor for AMYLoid proteins. MetAmyl is based on a logistic regression model that aims at weighting predictions from a set of popular algorithms, statistically selected as being the most informative and complementary predictors. We evaluated the performances of MetAmyl through a large scale comparative study based on three independent datasets and thus demonstrated its ability to differentiate between amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic polypeptides. Compared to 9 other methods, MetAmyl provides significant improvement in prediction on studied datasets. We further show that MetAmyl is efficient to highlight the effect of point mutations involved in human amyloidosis, so we suggest this program should be a useful complementary tool for the diagnosis of these diseases.

  6. Mutagenicity of some alkyl nitrites used as recreational drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkel, V.C.; Cameron, T.P. (National Institute of Health, Bethesda (USA)); Rogers-Back, A.M.; Lawlor, T.E.; Harbell, J.W. (Microbiological Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    When the AIDS epidemic was in its earliest stages, and prior to identification of HIV as the etiological factor, the use of volatile nitrites by the male homosexual community to enhance sexual activities appeared to have a significant role in this disease. Preliminary observations indicated that that portion of the male homosexual community which developed Kaposi's sarcoma were also heavy nitrite users. These nitrites had been demonstrated to be mutagenic in bacteria and thus it was postulated that they could be responsible for the appearance of the sarcoma. To evaluate further the genotoxic activity of these chemicals, six nitrites, including those most commonly used by homosexuals for sexual gratification, were selected for testing in the mouse lymphoma TK {plus minus} and Salmonell typhimurium mutagenicity assays. One chemical, n-amyl nitrite, was negative in the mouse lymphoma assay, while the other five chemicals, n-butyl, isobutyl, iso-amyl, sec-butyl, and n-propyl nitrite, were positive. All six compounds were positive in the Salmonella assay. The mutagenic and known toxic effects of these chemicals remain a concern because a large population of teenagers and young adults continue to abuse these substances.

  7. The sensitizing potential of primary amyl acetate in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, B; Tyler, T R; Auletta, C S

    1986-06-01

    Primary amyl acetate is a liquid mixture of the isomeric forms of pentyl acetate, which is used as a volatile organic solvent. Because of the possibility for skin contact, primary amyl acetate was investigated for its potential to cause allergic contact dermatitis. Using a guinea pig maximization procedure, primary amyl acetate was found to be a possible marginal skin sensitizer. PMID:3727350

  8. Study on Extraction Performance of Tri-iso-amyl Phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The distribution performance of HNO3, Pu(Ⅲ ), Pu(Ⅳ) and Np(Ⅳ) in the two phase system of Tri-iso-Amyl Phosphate(TiAP) and aqueous, the influence of the concentration of extractant, nitric acid and Al(NO3)3 on the distribution ratio of Pu(Ⅲ ),

  9. Diisopropylammonium nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chun Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecular salt, C6H16N+·NO2−, the cation forms two N—H...O hydrogen bonds to nearby nitrite anions which link the ionic units into chains propagating along the b-axis direction.

  10. Nitrite-Mediated Antagonism of Cyanide Inhibition of Cytochrome c Oxidase in Dopamine Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Leavesley, Heather B.; Li, Li; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Borowitz, Joseph L.; Isom, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Cyanide inhibits aerobic metabolism by binding to the binuclear heme center of cytochrome c oxidase (CcOX). Amyl nitrite and sodium nitrite (NaNO2) antagonize cyanide toxicity in part by oxidizing hemoglobin to methemoglobin (mHb), which then scavenges cyanide. mHb generation is thought to be a primary mechanism by which the NO2− ion antagonizes cyanide. On the other hand, NO2− can undergo biotransformation to generate nitric oxide (NO), which may then directly antagonize cyanide inhibition o...

  11. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  12. Kinetics Studies on Esterification Reaction of Acetic acid with Iso-amyl Alcohol over Ion Exchange Resin as Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar D. Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The low molecular weight organic esters have pleasing smell and are found in applications in the food industry for synthetic essence and perfume. Esterification reactions are ubiquitous reactions especially in pharmaceutical, perfumery and polymer industries, wherein; both heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts have been extensively used. Iso-amyl acetate (or Iso-pentyl acetate is often called as banana oil, since it has the recognizable odor of this fruit. Iso-amyl acetate is synthesized by esterification of acetic acid with iso-amyl alcohol. (Eq.1. Since the equilibrium does not help the formation of the ester, it must be shifted to the right, in favor of the product, by using a surplus of one of the starting materials. Iso-amyl acetate is a kind of flavor reagent with fruit taste. The use of H2SO4 often originates the problems such as corrosion for equipments and pollution for environment.

  13. Thermal decomposition studies on tri-iso-amyl phosphate in n-dodecane-nitric acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-iso-amyl Phosphate (TiAP) is a promising alternative solvent to TBP, with near similar extraction behaviour and physical properties but lower aqueous phase solubility and does not form third phase during the extraction of Pu(IV). In addition to the solubilised extractant, inadvertent entrainment of the extractant into the aqueous stream is a concern during the evaporation operation as the extractant comes into contact with higher nitric acid concentrations and metal nitrates. Hence the thermal decomposition behaviour of TiAP-HNO3 systems has been studied using an adiabatic calorimeter in closed air ambience, under heat-wait-search mode (H-W-S)

  14. Oxygen Regulates Tissue Nitrite Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Erin; Hsu, Lewis L.; Noguchi, Audrey C.; Geary, Lisa; Shiva, Sruti

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Once dismissed as an inert byproduct of nitric oxide (NO) auto-oxidation, nitrite (NO2-) is now accepted as an endocrine reservoir of NO that elicits biological responses in major organs. While it is known that tissue nitrite is derived from NO oxidation and the diet, little is known about how nitrite is metabolized by tissue, particularly at intermediate oxygen tensions. We investigated the rates and mechanisms of tissue nitrite metabolism over a range of oxygen concentrations. Results...

  15. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric studies on tri-iso-amyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) has wide applications in various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle as an extractant. 30% TBP in n-dodecane is currently used as the solvent in Plutonium URanium EXtraction (PUREX) process for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. However, third phase formation is a major limitation of TBP and therefore there is need for identification of alternate extractants, which however, should retain the advantages of TBP, particularly for fast reactor fuel reprocessing. Tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP) is reported to be a potential extractant and is being extensively evaluated as an alternate extractant to TBP for the fast reactor fuel reprocessing. Hence, it is important to study the degradation products that are expected to be formed with TiAP under radiolytic conditions, as such degradation products are expected to affect the extraction process. Preliminary results on radiolytic degradation of TiAP are presented in this paper

  16. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrogen dioxide, nitrite and nitrate with neutral red

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayathri, N.; Balasubramanian, N. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Bombay (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1999-03-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is the most hazardous pollutant among the oxides of nitrogen and plays an important role in the formation of acid rain, photochemical smog and in generation of many secondary pollutants. In this work, a simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of nitrogen dioxide in air and nitrite in water, soil, some analytical grade chemicals and tooth paste has been developed. Nitrogen dioxide in air is fixed as nitrite ion in alkaline sodium arsenite or tri-ethanolamine absorber solution.. The method is based on the reaction of nitrite in aqueous medium with known excess of Neutral Red (C.I. 50040), an azine dye having a primary amino group with absorption maxima at 530 nm. In acid medium, it medium, it showed a decrease in colour intensity due to diazotization, followed by deamination. Addition of bromide ion enhances the rate of diazotization, and the reaction goes to completion almost instantaneously. Beer`s law is obeyed over the range 0 - 20 {mu}g nitrite and the molar absorptivity is 2. x 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1} cm{sup -1}. The colour system is stable for 2 days. The dye can be extracted under alkaline condition in iso-amyl alcohol and the addition of methanolic sulphuric acid restores the dye colour. It showed molar absorptivity of 4.3 x 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1} cm{sup -1}. Beer`s law is obeyed over the range 0 - 1.6 {mu}g of nitrite, having a detection limit of 0.15 {mu}g. (authors) 18 refs.

  17. Kinetics Studies on Esterification Reaction of Acetic acid with Iso-amyl Alcohol over Ion Exchange Resin as Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2014-01-01

    The low molecular weight organic esters have pleasing smell and are found in applications in the food industry for synthetic essence and perfume. Esterification reactions are ubiquitous reactions especially in pharmaceutical, perfumery and polymer industries, wherein; both heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts have been extensively used. Iso-amyl acetate (or Iso-pentyl acetate) is often called as banana oil, since it has the recognizable odor of this fruit. I...

  18. Allylic Nitro Compounds as Nitrite Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrapani, Harinath; Gorczynski, Michael J.; King, S Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Allylic nitro compounds were synthesized and evaluated as organic sources of nitrite and nitric oxide. Unactivated allylic nitro compounds do not spontaneously release nitrite and nucleophile promoted nitrite release is slow. However, 2-(nitromethyl)-cyclohex-1-ene-3-one spontaneously dissociates in buffer (pH = 7.4) to release nitrite with a kobs = 1.6 × 10−5 s−1. In the presence of L-cysteine, this compound rapidly yields nitrite and reacts with hemoglobin similarly to sodium nitrite. Struc...

  19. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY WASTEWATER TREATMENT OF NITRITE IONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Morozov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The main reason for high concentration of nitrite ions in water is the existence of sources of industrial and agricultural pollution. Contamination of drinking water, juices, wine and other liquids of nitrite ions as a result of improper use of nitrogen fertilizers has an adverse effect on living organism, because under the influence of enzymes nitrite ions in living organisms form high carcinogenic nitrosamines, and the interaction of nitrite ions from blood hemoglobin causes such toxicity that leads to disease cyanosis [1]. Therefore removal of nitrite ions from water has received increased attention. The paper discusses an innovative wastewater treatment technology from the nitrite ion with hypochlorite produced during electrolysis.

  20. Boletus edulis Nitrite Reductase Reduces Nitrite Content of Pickles and Mitigates Intoxication in Nitrite-intoxicated Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Weiwei Zhang; Guoting Tian; Shanshan Feng; Jack Ho Wong; Yongchang Zhao; Xiao Chen; Hexiang Wang; Tzi Bun Ng

    2015-01-01

    Pickles are popular in China and exhibits health-promoting effects. However, nitrite produced during fermentation adversely affects health due to formation of methemoglobin and conversion to carcinogenic nitrosamine. Fruiting bodies of the mushroom Boletus edulis were capable of inhibiting nitrite production during pickle fermentation. A 90-kDa nitrite reductase (NiR), demonstrating peptide sequence homology to fungal nitrite reductase, was isolated from B. edulis fruiting bodies. The optimum...

  1. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Preservatives § 172.175 Sodium nitrite. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in or on specified... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite. 172.175 Section 172.175 Food and... preservative and color fixative, with sodium nitrate, in meat-curing preparations for the home curing of...

  2. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and... Listing § 573.700 Sodium nitrite. Sodium nitrite may be safely used in canned pet food containing meat and... as a preservative and color fixative in canned pet food containing fish, meat, and fish and...

  3. Nitric oxide formation from nitrite in zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is a potential nitric oxide (NO) donor and may have important biological functions at low concentrations. The present study tests the hypothesis that nitrite accumulation across the gills in fish will cause a massive NO production from nitrite. Zebrafish were exposed to three different...

  4. Nitrates and nitrites intoxications’ management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Trif

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The study pointed out the major sources for clinical and subclinical intoxications with nitrates/nitrites (drinking water and nitrates containing fertilizers, circumstances that determine fertilizers to became sources of intoxication (excessive fertilization/consecutive high level of nitrates in fodders, free access of animals to the fertilizers, administration into the diet instead of natrium chloride, factors that determine high nitrates accumulation in fodders despite optimal fertilization (factors related to the plants, soil, clime, harvest methods, storage, agrotechnical measures, nitrates/nitrites toxicity (over 45 ppm nitrates in drinking water, over 0.5 g nitrate/100 g D.M fodder/diet, the factors that influence nitrates/nitrites toxicity ( species, age, rate of feeding, diet balance especially energetically, pathological effects and symptoms (irritation and congestions on digestive tract, resulting diarrhoea, transformation of hemoglobin into methemoglobin determining severe respiratory insufficiency, vascular collapse, low blood pressure inthe acute nitrates intoxication; hypotiroidism, hypovitaminosis A, reproductive disturbances(abortion, low rate of fertility, dead born offspring, diarrhoea and/or respiratory insufficiency in new born e.g. calves, immunosuppression, decrease of milk production in chronic intoxication. There were presented some suggestions concerning management practices to limit nitrate intoxication (analyze of nitrates/nitrites in water and fodders, good management of the situation of risk ,e .g. dilution of the diet with low nitrate content fodders, feeding with balanced diet in energy, protein, minerals and vitamins, accommodation to high nitrate level diet, avoid grazing one week after a frost period, avoid feeding chop green fodders stored a couple of days, monitoring of health status of animals fed with fodders containing nitrates at risk level, a.o..

  5. Nitrates and nitrites intoxications’ management

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Trif

    2007-01-01

    The study pointed out the major sources for clinical and subclinical intoxications with nitrates/nitrites (drinking water and nitrates containing fertilizers), circumstances that determine fertilizers to became sources of intoxication (excessive fertilization/consecutive high level of nitrates in fodders, free access of animals to the fertilizers, administration into the diet instead of natrium chloride), factors that determine high nitrates accumulation in fodders despite optimal fertilizati...

  6. Screening for occupational vitiligo in workers exposed to hydroquinone monomethyl ether and to paratertiary-amyl-phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, J.J.; Stevenson, C.J.

    1981-11-01

    Two men reported previously with vitiligo after occupational exposure to hydroquinone monomethyl ether (HMME) have been reviewed after eight years. Repigmentation of significant degree was found in one man and of limited degree in the other. One hundred and sixty-nine men in the same works have been screened with Wood's light for evidence of vitiligo. No cases were found in the 148 men exposed to HMME (colleagues who screened 100 men exposed to HMME in two other factories also found no case) or in the 129 who had been exposed to paratertiary-amyl-phenol. Loss of light reflection on Wood's light examination was observed in 13 men due to scars or to other skin disorders.

  7. Isolation and Identification of Nitrite- oxidizing Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulong; CHEN; Wenyong; TAN; Da; YANG

    2015-01-01

    In order to select the strain that can degrade nitrite,we use the screening plate with nitrite as the sole nitrogen source to select the strain with ability to degrade nitrite,and get a strain with nitrite degrading capacity from the silt of shrimp farming pond in Hepu City,Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. By identifying the strain from colony morphology,physiological and biochemical characteristics and 16 S r RNA sequence,we finally get a bacteria strain that can degrade nitrite,and this strain can grow well on the culture medium with nitrite concentration of 2 g / L. Based on morphology,nitrogen source requirements and evolutionary tree analysis of the above 16 S r RNA sequence,it is found that this strain belongs to Pannonibacter phragmitetus. According to the screening location,it is named HPPP007 strain.

  8. 21 CFR 862.1510 - Nitrite (nonquantitative) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrite (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1510... Systems § 862.1510 Nitrite (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrite (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to identify nitrite in urine. Nitrite identification is used in...

  9. Nitrite, a Hidden Foe in Foods:Evaluation of Nitrite in Toxicological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Erkekoğlu, Pınar; Baydar, Terken

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACTNitrites and nitrates possess a unique position in human toxicology. They are both ubiquitous in the environment and can be formed from nitrogenous compounds. Water, vegetables and meat are important sources of nitrite exposure. Nitrites have several detrimental effects on health. The primary health concern regarding nitrate and nitrite exposure is the formation of methemoglobinemia. Baby food and infant formulas can be important sources of nitrite and infants younger than six months ...

  10. Nitrates, Nitrites, and Health. Bulletin 750.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Barbara S.; Sloan, Kenneth W.

    This review is intended to assess available literature in order to define the range of nitrate/nitrite effects on animals. Though the literature deals primarily with livestock and experimental animals, much of the contemporary research is concerned with human nitrite intoxication. Thus, the effects on man are discussed where appropriate. Some of…

  11. A comparison of the degradation behavior of tri-iso-amyl phosphate and tri-n-butyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-iso-amyl Phosphate (TiAP) has been identified as a promising alternative to TBP for fast reactor fuel reprocessing. It has excellent extraction characteristics, higher capacity to load Pu(IV) without third phase formation, lower aqueous solubility etc. Radiolytic stability of a solvent is an important parameter for which the solvent needs to be qualified for the reprocessing of the spent fuels. To examine the feasibility of using TiAP for fast reactor fuel reprocessing, it is necessary to investigate the radiolytic stability of TiAP. The present work deals with the measurement of physiochemical properties, distribution and metal retention studies with uranium and plutonium for radiolytically degraded solvents. The samples were irradiated in a 60Co gamma chamber with a dose rate of 5 kGy/hr. Density and viscosity of 100% and 1.1M solutions of TiAP and TBP in n-dodecane (degraded and undegraded solvents) were measured. Results indicate that the densities and viscosities are higher for degraded solvents compared to that of pristine (undegraded) solvents. The densities of 1.1 M solutions of TiAP and TBP in n-dodecane do not change significantly, whereas their viscosities increase as a function of absorbed dose

  12. Oxygen isotopes in nitrite: Analysis, calibration, and equilibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, K.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; McIlvin, M.R.; Mroczkowski, S.J.; Hannon, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the nitrogen cycle and can persist in significant concentrations in ocean waters, sediment pore waters, and terrestrial groundwaters. To fully interpret the effect of microbial processes on nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and nitrous oxide (N2O) cycling in these systems, the nitrite pool must be accessible to isotopic analysis. Furthermore, because nitrite interferes with most methods of nitrate isotopic analysis, accurate isotopic analysis of nitrite is essential for correct measurement of nitrate isotopes in a sample that contains nitrite. In this study, nitrite salts with varying oxygen isotopic compositions were prepared and calibrated and then used to test the denitrifier method for nitrite oxygen isotopic analysis. The oxygen isotopic fractionation during nitrite reduction to N2O by Pseudomonas aureofaciens was lower than for nitrate conversion to N2O, while oxygen isotopic exchange between nitrite and water during the reaction was similar. These results enable the extension of the denitrifier method to oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite (in the absence of nitrate) and correction of nitrate isotopes for the presence of nitrite in "mixed" samples. We tested storage conditions for seawater and freshwater samples that contain nitrite and provide recommendations for accurate oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite by any method. Finally, we report preliminary results on the equilibrium isotope effect between nitrite and water, which can play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic value of nitrite where equilibration with water is significant. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  13. Nitrite disrupts multiple physiological functions in aquatic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2003-01-01

    Nitrite is a potential problem in aquatic environments. Freshwater fish actively take up nitrite across the gills, leading to high internal concentrations. Seawater fish are less susceptible but do take up nitrite across intestine and gills. Nitrite has multiple physiological effects. Its uptake ...

  14. Nitrite complexes of uranium and thorium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulong, Florian; Pouessel, Jacky; Thuéry, Pierre; Berthet, Jean-Claude; Ephritikhine, Michel; Cantat, Thibault

    2013-03-25

    The first examples of inorganic nitrite complexes of the natural actinides are described, including the structures of the homoleptic thorium(IV) [PPh(4)](2)[Th(NO(2))(6)] and the uranyl(VI) [PPh(4)](2)[UO(2)(NO(2))(4)] complexes; the nitrite ligand can adopt two different coordination modes in the coordination sphere of the uranyl ion and is unstable towards reduction.

  15. Demonstration of feasibility of using tri-iso-amyl phosphate as an alternate extractant in fast reactor fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earlier studies carried out in the laboratory have shown that Tri-iso-amyl Phosphate (TiAP) is a potential extractant for fast reactor fuel reprocessing. Feasibility of using TiAP as an alternate extractant reactor fuel reprocessing has been demonstrated using a system comprising of an ejector mixer-settler unit and metering pumps housed in a double-module glove box with several safety features. The details of the mixer-settler used for the present study are described elsewhere. Prior to the active runs, the performance of the equipment was tested by carrying out extraction and strip runs with 1.1M TiAP and nitric acid solutions. Overall performance of the system during the inactive runs was found to be satisfactory with good mass balance and based on these runs the facility was dedicated for active runs. The basic flow sheet for the extraction and stripping of U(VI) and Pu(IV) comprises of three runs. The stage profile data for the extraction run indicate that only 3-4 stages are required for the extraction of U(VI) and Pu(IV) without any loss of heavy metals into the raffinate stream. The data generated from strip run I indicate that more than 99.99% of Pu(IV) along with a fraction of U(VI) was stripped from the loaded organic by using 4M and 0.01M HNO3 solutions. The remaining fraction of U(VI) was stripped during strip run II with a small loss of U(VI) in the lean organic stream (∼ 0.16 mg U/mL) using 0.067M HNO3 as strippant. Data reveal that the recovery of uranium is around 99.8%

  16. Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

    2012-09-25

    This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

  17. Sensing nitrite through a pseudoazurin-nitrite reductase electron transfer relay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astier, Y; Canters, GW; Davis, JJ; Hill, HAO; Verbeet, MP; Wijma, HJ

    2005-01-01

    Nitrite is converted to nitric oxide by haem or copper-containing enzymes in denitrifying bacteria during the process of denitrification. In designing an efficient biosensor, this enzymic turnover must be quantitatively assessed. The enzyme nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis contains a redo

  18. pH dependence of copper geometry, reduction potential, and nitrite affinity in nitrite reductase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobson, F.; Pistorius, A.M.A.; Farkas, D.; Grip, W.J. de; Hansson, O.; Sjolin, L.; Neutze, R.

    2007-01-01

    Many properties of copper-containing nitrite reductase are pH-dependent, such as gene expression, enzyme activity, and substrate affinity. Here we use x-ray diffraction to investigate the structural basis for the pH dependence of activity and nitrite affinity by examining the type 2 copper site and

  19. Nitrite controls the release of nitric oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd1 nitrite reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrite reductase (cd1NIR) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which catalyses the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), contains a c-heme as the electron acceptor and a d1-heme where catalysis occurs. Reduction involves binding of nitrite to the reduced d1-heme, followed by dehydration to yield NO; release of NO and re-reduction of the enzyme close the cycle. Since NO is a powerful inhibitor of ferrous hemeproteins, enzymatic turnover demands the release of NO. We recently discovered that NO dissociation from the ferrous d1-heme is fast, showing that cd1NIR behaves differently from other hemeproteins. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the physiological substrate nitrite displaces NO from the ferrous enzyme, which enters a new catalytic cycle; this reaction depends on the conserved His369 whose role in substrate stabilization is crucial for catalysis. Thus we suggest that also in vivo the activity of cd1NIR is controlled by nitrite

  20. 微波辐射催化合成乙酸异戊酯%Catalytic synthesis of iso-amyl acetate under microwave irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯金松

    2013-01-01

    以乙酸与异戊醇为原料,对甲苯磺酸为催化剂,微波辐射催化合成了乙酸异戊酯,优化了合成条件.结果表明,n(异戊醇)∶n(冰醋酸)=1∶1.45,催化剂用量2.10g,反应温度100℃,反应时间5 min,微波功率440W,此时产品收率达78.3%.%Iso-amyl acetate were synthesized with acetic acid and iso-pentyl alcohol as raw material and p-toluenesulfonic acid as catalyst under microwave irradiation. The yield of ester is 78. 3% under optimal reaction conditions which the mole ratio of iso-amyl alcohol to acetic acid is 1:1. 45, P-toluenesulfonic acid is 2. 10 g, irradiation temperature is 100 ℃ , irradiation time is 5 min, irradiation power is 440 W.

  1. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia ...... of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals....... survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  2. Platelet inhibition by nitrite is dependent on erythrocytes and deoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirada Srihirun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrite is a nitric oxide (NO metabolite in tissues and blood, which can be converted to NO under hypoxia to facilitate tissue perfusion. Although nitrite is known to cause vasodilation following its reduction to NO, the effect of nitrite on platelet activity remains unclear. In this study, the effect of nitrite and nitrite+erythrocytes, with and without deoxygenation, on platelet activity was investigated. METHODOLOGY/FINDING: Platelet aggregation was studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP and PRP+erythrocytes by turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry, respectively. In PRP, DEANONOate inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP while nitrite had no effect on platelets. In PRP+erythrocytes, the inhibitory effect of DEANONOate on platelets decreased whereas nitrite at physiologic concentration (0.1 µM inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release. The effect of nitrite+erythrocytes on platelets was abrogated by C-PTIO (a membrane-impermeable NO scavenger, suggesting an NO-mediated action. Furthermore, deoxygenation enhanced the effect of nitrite as observed from a decrease of P-selectin expression and increase of the cGMP levels in platelets. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood showed inverse correlations with the nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes. CONCLUSION: Nitrite alone at physiological levels has no effect on platelets in plasma. Nitrite in the presence of erythrocytes inhibits platelets through its reduction to NO, which is promoted by deoxygenation. Nitrite may have role in modulating platelet activity in the circulation, especially during hypoxia.

  3. Carbon-Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    During nitrification, nitrite is produced as an intermediate when ammonia is oxidized to nitrate. It is well established that nitrifying biofilm are involved in nitrification episodes in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems with nitrite accumulation occurring during ...

  4. In Vitro Killing of Mycobacterium ulcerans by Acidified Nitrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R.; Kuijper, S.; Benjamin, N.; Wansbrough-Jones, M.; Wilks, M.; Kolk, A. H. J.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, which causes Buruli ulcer, was exposed to acidified nitrite or to acid alone for 10 or 20 min. Killing was rapid, and viable counts were reduced below detectable limits within 10 min of exposure to 40 mM acidified nitrite. M. ulcerans is highly susceptible to acidified nitrite in vitro. PMID:15273132

  5. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank B;

    2009-01-01

    bicarbonate and nitrite, we hypothesized that CA uses nitrite as a substrate to produce the potent vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) to increase local blood flow to metabolically active tissues. Here we show that CA readily reacts with nitrite to generate NO, particularly at low pH, and that the NO produced...

  6. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank Bo;

    2009-01-01

    bicarbonate and nitrite, we hypothesized that CA uses nitrite as a substrate to produce the potent vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) to increase local blood flow to metabolically active tissues. Here we show that CA readily reacts with nitrite to generate NO, particularly at low pH, and that the NO produced...

  7. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be prepared without nitrate or nitrite and labeled with such standard name when immediately preceded with the term... to such product as commonly prepared with nitrate and nitrite: And provided further, That...

  8. Determination of Nitric Oxide-Derived Nitrite and Nitrate in Biological Samples by HPLC Coupled to Nitrite Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Anguo; Duan, Tingting; Tang, Dan; Xu, Youhua; Feng, Liang; Zheng, Zhaoguang; Zhu, Jiaxiao; Wang, Rushang; Zhu, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Nitrite and nitrate are main stable products of nitric oxide, a pivotal cellular signaling molecule, in biological fluids. Therefore, accurate measurement of the two ions is profoundly important. Nitrite is difficult to be determined for a larger number of interferences and unstable in the presence of oxygen. In this paper, a simple, cost-effective and accurate HPLC method for the determination of nitrite and nitrate was developed. On the basis of the reaction that nitrite is oxidized rapidly...

  9. Studies on extraction behavior of U(VI) and Th(IV) from nitric acid medium using tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP)/ n-dodecane as extractant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-iso-amyl phosphate is a higher homologue of TBP, retaining many advantages of TBP while eliminating or mitigating its disadvantages. Its longer, branched alkyl chain, resists third phase formation during overloading of actinides. The TiAP is being considered as an alternative of TBP for the reprocessing of Fast Breeder Reactor fuels due to its various advantages over TBP

  10. Macro level extraction of U(VI) and Pu(IV) by tri-iso-amyl phosphate and tri-n-butyl phosphate from nitric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch extraction of Pu(IV) by 1.1 M Tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP) in n-dodecane (DD) from plutonium nitrate solutions in nitric acid media has been investigated as a function of metal loading and equilibrium aqueous phase acidity at 303 K under high solvent loading conditions. Co-extraction behavior of U(VI) and Pu(IV) with 1.1 M solutions of trialkyl phosphates (TBP and TiAP) in n-DD from nitric acid media has also been compared by carrying out the extraction from a U-Pu feed solution (21% Pu to mimic PFBR MOX fuel composition) at 303 K. (author)

  11. Equilibrium and kinetics of co-extraction of U(VI) and HNO3 using tri-n-butyl phosphate and tri-iso-amyl phosphate in paraffin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) is versatile solvent for recovery of actinides as it is cheaper and the extracted actinides can be stripped from the loaded organic phase using plain water. However there are inherent problems associated TBP such as i) formation of the third phase ii) high solubility in aqueous phase iii) radiolytic hydrolysis at high radiation environment and iv) high propensity for extraction of mineral acids. The last mentioned property makes it less suitable for liquid emulsion membrane (LEM) extraction where acid transport to the strip phase drastically reduces extraction efficiency. Therefore there is need to replace TBP with an extractant which has lesser propensity for acid extraction. Many researcher reported Tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP) as an alternative extractant which can sustain high radiation environment without chemical/radiative degradation. However there are no studies available on co-extraction of U(VI) and mineral acids by TiAP. In this research paper equilibrium and kinetics of co-extraction of U(VI) and HNO3 from nitric acid medium into a hydrocarbon phase (paraffin) using Tri n- butyl phosphate (TBP), Tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP) has been studied. Relative rates of extraction of uranium(VI) and HNO3 by TiAP and TBP were measured simultaneously using bulk-liquid membrane (BLM) system. Study reveals although TiAP is less efficient in extracting U(IV), than TBP, it transfers lesser quantity of nitric acid to organic phase. Hence TiAP is more suitable as a carrier for LEM extraction than TBP

  12. Severe Methemoglobinemia due to Sodium Nitrite Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katabami, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Mineji; Gando, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Case. We report a case of severe methemoglobinemia due to sodium nitrite poisoning. A 28-year-old man was brought to our emergency department because of transient loss of consciousness and cyanosis. He was immediately intubated and ventilated with 100% oxygen. A blood test revealed a methemoglobin level of 92.5%. Outcome. We treated the patient with gastric lavage, activated charcoal, and methylene blue (2 mg/kg) administered intravenously. Soon after receiving methylene blue, his cyanosis resolved and the methemoglobin level began to decrease. After relocation to the intensive care unit, his consciousness improved and he could recall ingesting approximately 15 g sodium nitrite about 1 hour before he was brought to our hospital. The patient was discharged on day 7 without neurologic impairment. Conclusion. Severe methemoglobinemia may be fatal. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of methemoglobinemia is very important so that treatment can be started as soon as possible. PMID:27563472

  13. Nitrite in feed: From Animal health to human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockburn, Andrew [Institute for Research on Environment and Sustainability, Devonshire Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE17RU (United Kingdom); Brambilla, Gianfranco [Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Toxicological chemistry unit, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Fernández, Maria-Luisa [Departamento de Medio Ambiente, Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Carretera de la Coruña, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Arcella, Davide [Unit on Data Collection and Exposure, European Food Safety Authority, Largo N. Palli 5/A43100 Parma (Italy); Bordajandi, Luisa R. [Unit on Contaminants in the Food chain, European Food Safety Authority, Largo N. Palli 5/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Cottrill, Bruce [Policy Delivery Group, Animal Health and Welfare, ADAS, Wolverhampton (United Kingdom); Peteghem, Carlos van [University of Gent, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Dorne, Jean-Lou, E-mail: jean-lou.dorne@efsa.europa.eu [Unit on Contaminants in the Food chain, European Food Safety Authority, Largo N. Palli 5/A, 43100 Parma (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  14. Nitrite in feed: From Animal health to human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  15. Biomass Industrial Effluent Effect on Carbohydrates, Aminoacids, Nitrite and Nitrite Enzyme Activities of Arachis hypogaea L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PC Nagajyoti; N Dinakarc; S Suresh; Y Udaykiran; C Suresh; T N V K V Prasad; T Damodharam

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the present investigations are to see the effects of biomass power plant effluent on the carbohydrates, aminoacids, nitrite and nitrite enzyme activitiesand proline of Arachis hypogaea L. vat TCGS 320 under controlled pot culture methods. Plants were cultivated with 25, 50, 75 and 100% of the effluent and a control without the effluent. The treatment of the crop with 25% of the effluent has shown stimulatory effect on all the biochemical parameters studied. Carbohydrates, starch, aminoacids, protein, nitrate and nitrite reductase enzymatic activities have increased in 10, 15, 20 DAS (days after sowing). In 25 and 30 DAS all biochemical parameters have decreased, due to environmental factors (rainfall, temperature, humidity, etc.). The present investigation clearly indicated that the biomass power plant effluent has stimulatory effect on all the biochemical contents at lower concentration, and at higher concentration they have deleterious effects.

  16. Determination of Nitrite in Meat Products using a Metalloporphyrin Based Nitrite-Selective Membrane Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana VLASCICI

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The potentiometric response characteristics of a nitrite-selective electrode based on Co (III tetraphenylporphyrins (TPP in o-nitrophenyloctylether plasticized polyvinyl chloride membranes are compared. To establish the optimum composition of the membrane, different molar percents of cationic derivative (0-100 mol% relative to ionophore were used. The influence of different plasticizers: o-nitrophenyloctylether, dioctylphtalate and tricresilphosphate on potentiometric answer were studied. Electrodes formulated with membranes containing 1 wt% ClCoTPP, 66 wt% o-NPOE, 33 wt% PVC (plasticizer:PVC = 2:1 and the lipophilic cationic derivative (10 mol% are shown to exhibit high selectivity for nitrite over many anions, except the lipophilic anions perchlorate and thiocyanate. The electrodes based on Co (III porphyrins were used for the potentiometric determination of nitrites in meat products. The results were compared with a colorimetric method used as the reference method. There was a good agreement between the potentiometric and colorimetric procedures.

  17. NITRATE AND NITRITE CONCENTRATION IN VEGETABLES GRAWING AROUND ISFAHAN CITY

    OpenAIRE

    R.A JAFARI; A AZIZ ZADEH; A FARZAN

    2001-01-01

    Introduction: The improper and excess use of chemical fertilizers by the farmers special in "urea" form may cause the commulation of nitrates and nitrites in vegetables and fruits. This investigation has been done to determine the concentration of nitrates and nitrites in some vegetables growing around Isfahan. Methods: One hundred and thirteen random samples from 15 different kinds of green lest tuber vegetables were measured by Cadmium Column Procedure for nitrates and nitrites. R...

  18. The role of nitrite in nitric oxide homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2009-01-01

    Nitrite is endogenously produced as an oxidative metabolite of nitric oxide, but it also functions as a NO donor that can be activated by a number of cellular proteins under hypoxic conditions. This article discusses the physiological role of nitrite and nitrite-derived NO in blood flow regulation...... mechanisms. Nitrite reduction to NO provides cytoprotection in tissues during ischemia-reperfusion events by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration and limiting reactive oxygen species. It is argued that the study of hypoxia-tolerant lower vertebrates and diving mammals may help evaluate mechanisms and a full...

  19. Nitrite-dependent vasodilation is facilitated by hypoxia and is independent of known NO-generating nitrite reductase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Thomas; Fago, Angela

    2007-01-01

    The reduction of circulating nitrite to nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as an important physiological reaction aimed to increase vasodilation during tissue hypoxia. Although hemoglobin, xanthine oxidase, endothelial NO synthase, and the bc1 complex of the mitochondria are known to reduce nitrite...... effect of nitrite during hypoxia was abolished on inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase and was unaffected by removal of the endothelium or by inhibition of xanthine oxidase and of the mitochondrial bc1 complex. In the presence of hemoglobin and inositol hexaphosphate (which increases the fraction...... is largely intrinsic to the vessel and that under hypoxia physiological nitrite concentrations are sufficient to induce NO-mediated vasodilation independently of the nitrite reductase activities investigated here. Possible reaction mechanisms for nitrite vasoactivity, including formation of S...

  20. 用于生产TAEE的反应精馏和全蒸发的混合过程%Hybrid Process of Reactive Distillation and Pervaporation for the Production of Tert-amyl Ethyl Ether

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amornchai Arpornwichanop; Ukrit Sahapatsombud; Yaneeporn Patcharavorachot; Suttichai Assabumrungrat

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a reactive distillation column in which chemical reaction and separation occur simultane-ously is applied for the synthesis of tert-amyl ethyl ether (TAEE) from ethanol (EtOH) and tert-amyl alcohol (TAA).Pervaporation, an efficient membrane separation technique, is integrated with the reactive distillation for enhancing the efficiency of TAEE production. A user-defined Fortran subroutine of a pervaporation unit is developed, allowing the design and simulation of the hybrid process of reactive distillation and pervaporation in Aspen Plus simulator.The performance of such a hybrid process is analyzed and the results indicate that the integration of the reactive distillation with the pervaporation increases the conversion of TAA and the purity of TAEE product, compared with the conventional reactive distiUation.

  1. Differences in nitrite-oxidizing communities and kinetics in a brackish environment after enrichment at low and high nitrite concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangkitjawisut, Wipasanee; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Pornkulwat, Preeyaporn; Suwannasilp, Benjaporn Boonchayaanant

    2016-04-01

    Nitrite accumulation in shrimp ponds can pose serious adverse effects to shrimp production and the environment. This study aims to develop an effective process for the enrichment of ready-to-use nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) inocula that would be appropriate for nitrite removal in brackish shrimp ponds. To achieve this objective, the effects of nitrite concentrations on NOB communities and nitrite oxidation kinetics in a brackish environment were investigated. Moving-bed biofilm sequencing batch reactors and continuous moving-bed biofilm reactors were used for the enrichment of NOB at various nitrite concentrations, using sediment from brackish shrimp ponds as seed inoculum. The results from NOB population analysis with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) show that only Nitrospira were detected in the sediment from the shrimp ponds. After the enrichment, both Nitrospira and Nitrobacter coexisted in the reactors controlling effluent nitrite at 0.1 and 0.5 mg-NO2(-)-N/L. On the other hand, in the reactors controlling effluent nitrite at 3, 20, and 100 mg-NO2(-)-N/L, Nitrobacter outcompeted Nitrospira in many orders of magnitude. The half saturation coefficients (Ks) for nitrite oxidation of the enrichments at low nitrite concentrations (0.1 and 0.5 mg-NO2(-)-N/L) were in the range of 0.71-0.98 mg-NO2(-)-N/L. In contrast, the K(s) values of NOB enriched at high nitrite concentrations (3, 20, and 100 mg-NO2(-)-N/L) were much higher (8.36-12.20 mg-NO2(-)-N/L). The results suggest that the selection of nitrite concentrations for the enrichment of NOB inocula can significantly influence NOB populations and kinetics, which could affect the effectiveness of their applications in brackish shrimp ponds. PMID:27090693

  2. Origin, causes and effects of increased nitrite concentrations in aquatic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philips, S.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Verstraete, W.

    2002-01-01

    Literature frequently mentions increased nitrite concentrations along with its inhibitory effect towards bacteria and aquatic life. Nitrite accumulation has been studied for decades, and although numerous causal factors have already been commented on in literature, the mechanism of nitrite accumulat

  3. Nitrite as a stimulus for ammonia-starved Nitrosomonas europaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laanbroek, H.J.; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.; Hoogveld, H.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia-starved cells of Nitrosomonas europaea are able to preserve a high level of ammonia-oxidizing activity in the absence of ammonium. However, when the nitrite-oxidizing cells that form part of the natural nitrifying community do not keep pace with the ammonia-oxidizing cells, nitrite accumulat

  4. Bidirectional catalysis by copper-containing nitrite reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijma, HJ; Canters, GW; de Vries, S; Verbeet, MP

    2004-01-01

    The copper-containing nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 was found to catalyze the oxidation of nitric oxide to nitrite, the reverse of its physiological reaction. Thermodynamic and kinetic constants with the physiological electron donor pseudoazurin were determined for both directions

  5. Amperometric Carbon Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    A highly selective needle type solid state amperometric nitrite microsensor based on direct nitrite oxidation on carbon fiber was developed using a simplified fabrication method. The microsensor’s tip diameter was approximately 7 µm, providing a high spatial resolution of at lea...

  6. NITRITE AND NITRATE DETERMINATIONS IN PLASMA - A CRITICAL-EVALUATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOSHAGE, H; KOK, B; HUIZENGA, [No Value; JANSEN, PLM

    1995-01-01

    Plasma nitrite and nitrate determinations are increasingly being used in clinical chemistry as markers for the activity of nitric oxide synthase and the production of nitric oxide radicals. However, a systematic evaluation of the determination of nitrite and nitrate in plasma has not been performed.

  7. Unraveling the origin of the nitrite-mediated hypoxic vasodilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Dalsgaard, T.; Simonsen, U.

    2007-01-01

    Circulating nitrite has recently emerged as an important physiological metabolite that contributes to increase vasodilation during tissue hypoxia. Using a wire myograph, we have investigated how the nitrite-dependent vasodilation in rat aortic rings is controlled by oxygen tension, norepinephrine...

  8. The Impact of Nitrite on Aerobic Growth of Paracoccus denitrificans PD1222

    OpenAIRE

    Hartop, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The effect of nitrite stress induced in Paracoccus denitrificans PD1222 was examined using additions of sodium nitrite to an aerobic bacterial culture. Nitrite generates a strong stress response in P. denitrificans, causing growth inhibition. This is dependent on both the concentration of nitrite present and the pH. The pH dependent effect of nitrite growth inhibition is likely a result of nitrite and free nitrous acid (FNA; pKa = 3.16) and subsequent reactive nitrogen oxides, ...

  9. Equilibrium surface tension and the interaction energy of DMSO with tert-butyl alcohol or iso-amyl alcohol at various temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Surface tension of non-ideal binary systems of alcohol/DMSO determined. • The surface tension data of binary mixtures were correlated with five equations. • The interaction energy values were calculated by using LWW model. • The U12 value shows different behavior for two systems with increasing temperature. - Abstract: Surface tension of binary mixtures of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) and iso-amyl alcohol (IAA) with DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) were measured over the entire concentration range at pressure of 82.5 kPa at temperatures between (298.15 and 328.15) K. Correlating the surface tension and surface tension deviation of the above mentioned binary systems was performed with empirical and thermodynamic based models. The average relative error obtained from the comparison of experimental and calculated surface tension values for the two binary systems with five models at various temperatures is less than 2%. The effect of temperature on the interaction energy values in binary mixtures has been used to obtain information about solute structural effects on DMSO. Also, the experimental data were used to evaluate the nature and type of intermolecular interactions in binary mixtures

  10. Solvent extraction studies with some fission product elements from nitric acid media employing tri-iso-amyl phosphate and tri-n-butyl phosphate as extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP) has been identified as an alternate extractant to tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) for the reprocessing of fast reactor fuels. In the present work, extraction behaviour of some fission product elements such as Zr(IV), RuNO(III), TcO-4, La(III), Ce(III) and Nd(III) along with Am(III) has been investigated with 1.1 M solutions of TiAP and TBP in n-alkane diluents from nitric acid medium. The extraction of Zr(IV) has been evaluated with unirradiated and gamma irradiated solvents as a function of organic phase uranium(VI) loading. The influence of degradation products of TiAP and TBP on the extraction behaviour of fission products has also been examined. The effect of diluent degradation products and effect of alkali wash on the extraction of Zr(IV) is discussed. The formation of interfacial deposits during the washing of gamma irradiated solvents with alkali solution is also discussed. (author)

  11. Extraction and stripping behaviour of tri-iso-amyl phosphate and tri-n-butyl phosphate in n-dodecane with U(VI) in nitric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch extraction of U(VI) by 1.1 M solution of tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP) in n-dodecane (n-DD) from uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid media has been investigated as a function of metal loading and equilibrium aqueous phase acidity at 303 K. A method adopted for free acidity determination by using a mixture of potassium oxalate and sodium fluoride for complexing U(VI) has been validated by comparing the data generated in the present study with literature data available for tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) under identical conditions. Extraction and stripping behaviour of 1.1 M TiAP/n-DD-U(VI)/HNO3 and 1.1 M TBP/n-DD-U(VI)/HNO3 systems have been compared by carrying out extraction, scrubbing and a series of stripping in cross-current mode. Stripping behaviour of both the solvents loaded with U(VI) and HNO3 has also been investigated as a function of time to understand the effects of nitric acid induced degradation on stripping.

  12. Study on the effect of gamma radiolysis on the chromatographic composition profile of tri-isoAmyl-phosphate-n-dodecane-nitric acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-Iso-Amyl phosphate (TiAP), a higher homologue of tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) is the solvent proposed for the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel of Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) origin. TiAP-n-dodecane has extraction behavior comparable to that of TBP-n-dodecane system, without third phase formation and an aqueous solubility ∼ 19mg/L, that is far too less in case as compared to that with TBP(∼400gm/L). We have initiated our study to examine the radiolytic degradation behavior of TiAP-n-dodecane in comparison to that of TBP and explore its full potential for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. A 30% mixture of TiAP with n-dodecane equilibrated with nitric acid of concentrations 2M has been subjected to steady state gamma radiolysis using 60Co source. The samples were irradiated for increasing absorbed dose of 6,12 and 18M rad. Each of these samples were subjected to gas chromatographic analysis under optimised condition using thermal conductivity detector. Separately, these samples were also methylated using diazomethane for the determination of acidic phosphate species as their volatile methyl ester

  13. Extraction kinetics of Uranium(VI) and Thorium(IV) with Tri-iso-amyl phosphate from nitric acid using a Lewis Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction kinetics of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) with Tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP) from nitric acid medium has been investigated using a Lewis Cell. Especially, dependences of the extraction rate on stirring speed, temperature, interfacial area were firstly measured to elucidate the extraction kinetics regimes. The experimental results demonstrated that extraction kinetic of U(VI) is governed by chemical reactions at interface with an activation energy, Ea, of 43.41 kJ/mol, while the rate of Th(IV) extraction is proved to be intermediate controlled, of which the Ea is 23.20 kJ/mol. Reaction orders with respect to the influencing parameters of the extraction rate are determined, and the rate equations of U(VI) and Th(IV) at 293 K have been proposed as r = -dcUO2(NO3)2/dt = 1.80×10-3[UO2(NO3)2]1.01 [TiAP]0.55, r = -dcTh (NO3)4/dt = 1.88×10-3[Th (NO3)4]1.04 [TiAP]1.77[HNO3]0.38, respectively. (author)

  14. Determination of NO chemical affinities of benzyl nitrite in acetonitrile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin LI; Xiaoqing ZHU; Jinpei CHENG

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the study of NO chemical affinities of organic nitrites, for the bio-logical and physiological effects of organic nitrites seem to be due to their ability to release NO. In this paper, NO chemical affinities of ten substituted benzyl nitrites were determined by titration calorimetry combined with a ther-modynamic cycle in acetonitrile solution. The results show that ΔHhet(O-NO)s of benzyl nitrites are substan-tially larger than the corresponding ΔHhomo(O-NO)s, suggesting that these O-nitroso compounds much more easily release NO radicals by the O-NO bond homolytic cleavage. It is believed that the structural and energetic information disclosed in this work should be useful in understanding chemical and biological functions of organic nitrites.

  15. Electrolytic denitrification of alkaline nitrate and nitrite solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) will produce a low-level alkaline salt solution, containing approximately 17% sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. This solution will be incorporated into a cement wasteform, saltstone, and placed in an engineered landfill. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated the technical feasibility of electrochemically reducing the nitrate and nitrite in a synthetic, nonradioactive salt solution similar in composition to that expected to be produced at SRP. Greater than ninety-five percent of the sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite can be reduced electrolytically, producing ammonia, nitrogen, oxygen, and sodium hydroxide. Reduction of the nitrate and nitrite will reduce the leaching of nitrate and nitrite from the saltstone monolith. In addition, significant reductions in the volume of saltstone may be realized if the sodium hydroxide produced by electrolysis can be recycled

  16. Electrochemical processing of alkaline nitrate and nitrite solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) will produce, as a by product, a low- level, alkaline salt solution containing approximately 17% sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. This solution will be incorporated into a cement formulation, saltstone, and placed in an engineered landfill. Electrochemical methods have been investigated to decrease the nitrate and nitrite in this solution in order to lower the leaching of nitrate and nitrite from saltstone and to reduce the volume of saltstone. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated the technical feasibility of electrolytically reducing the nitrate and nitrite in a synthetic salt solution similar in composition to that expected to be produced at SRP. Greater than 99% of the sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite can be reduced, producing ammonia, nitrogen, oxygen, and sodium hydroxide. In addition, significant reductions in the volume of saltstone may be realized if the sodium hydroxide produced by electrolysis can be recycled

  17. Dietary nitrate and nitrite: Benefits, risks, and evolving perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedale, Wendy; Sindelar, Jeffrey J; Milkowski, Andrew L

    2016-10-01

    Consumers have an illogical relationship with nitrite (and its precursor, nitrate) in food. Despite a long history of use, nitrite was nearly banned from use in foods in the 1970s due to health concerns related to the potential for carcinogenic nitrosamine formation. Changes in meat processing methods reduced those potential risks, and nitrite continued to be used in foods. Since then, two opposing movements continue to shape how consumers view dietary nitrate and nitrite. The discovery of the profound physiological importance of nitric oxide led to the realization that dietary nitrate contributes significantly to the nitrogen reservoir for nitric oxide formation. Numerous clinical studies have also demonstrated beneficial effects from dietary nitrate consumption, especially in vascular and metabolic health. However, the latest wave of consumer sentiment against food additives, the clean-label movement, has renewed consumer fear and avoidance of preservatives, including nitrite. Education is necessary but may not be sufficient to resolve this disconnect in consumer perception. PMID:26994928

  18. Investigating the inhibiting effect of sodium nitrite on equipment corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium nitrite as a corrosion inhibitor is widely used for protecting equipment components made of carbon steel. It is well known that nitrite addition at several grams per liter level can efficiently reduce carbon steel corrosion even in sea water. However, nitrites are very hazardous for environment and concentrated inhibitor solutions are hard to dispose of. Therefore, it is important to experimentally determine the minimum nitrite concentrations capable of protecting structural materials from corrosion. There is also concern about highly probable releases of significant chloride amounts into the coolant water as a result of accidental heat transfer equipment failures. In light of this problem, the following research tasks have been set: determine the lower limit for nitrite concentration which can inhibit corrosion of steels with different surfaces conditions; measure the rate of a decrease in the nitrite concentration due to inhibition process with formation of γ-Fe2O3 and ammonia, and nitrite oxidation to nitrate by reaction with dissolved oxygen; assess the influence of chloride and nitrate concentration on the inhibition efficiency. The present paper describes results of corrosion tests on specimens of Russian grade CT3 and CT20 steels with different surface conditions in demineralized water with chloride impurities. Sodium nitrite concentrations for steel specimens with both polished surface and surface with corrosion pits were specified. The minimum sufficient concentration of the inhibitor to protect the heat transfer equipment against corrosion was determined. The experiments have measured the limiting concentrations of nitrate and chloride ions for sodium nitrite as an active inhibitor of corrosion. Based on the results obtained, new algorithms for calculation of optimum nitrite dosage have been developed. (author)

  19. A random-sequential mechanism for nitrite binding and active site reduction in copper-containing nitrite reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijma, HJ; Jeuken, LJC; Verbeet, MP; Armstrong, FA; Canters, GW

    2006-01-01

    The homotrimeric copper-containing nitrite reductase ( NiR) contains one type-1 and one type-2 copper center per monomer. Electrons enter through the type-1 site and are shuttled to the type-2 site where nitrite is reduced to nitric oxide. To investigate the catalytic mechanism of NiR the effects of

  20. Comparative analysis of nitrite uptake and hemoglobin-nitrite reactions in erythrocytes: sorting out uptake mechanisms and oxygenation dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Rohde, Sabina

    2010-01-01

    diffusion and AE1-mediated facilitated NO2- diffusion. Participation of HNO2 diffusion was emphasized by rapid transmembrane nitrite equilibration also in the natural AE1 knockouts. Following the equilibration, nitrite was consumed by reacting with Hb, which created a continued inward diffusion controlled...

  1. Determination of Nitrite in Meat Products using a Metalloporphyrin Based Nitrite-Selective Membrane Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Vlascici, Dana; Pica, Elena Maria; Eugenia Fagadar COSMA; Bizerea, Otilia; Cosma, Viorica

    2006-01-01

    The potentiometric response characteristics of a nitrite-selective electrode based on Co (III) tetraphenylporphyrins (TPP) in o-nitrophenyloctylether plasticized polyvinyl chloride membranes are compared. To establish the optimum composition of the membrane, different molar percents of cationic derivative (0-100 mol% relative to ionophore) were used. The influence of different plasticizers: o-nitrophenyloctylether, dioctylphtalate and tricresilphosphate on potentiometric answer were studied. ...

  2. NITRATE AND NITRITE CONCENTRATION IN VEGETABLES GRAWING AROUND ISFAHAN CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A JAFARI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The improper and excess use of chemical fertilizers by the farmers special in "urea" form may cause the commulation of nitrates and nitrites in vegetables and fruits. This investigation has been done to determine the concentration of nitrates and nitrites in some vegetables growing around Isfahan. Methods: One hundred and thirteen random samples from 15 different kinds of green lest tuber vegetables were measured by Cadmium Column Procedure for nitrates and nitrites. Results: The mean of the nitrates level in green leaf and tuber-vegetables was 287.9 and 76.3 mg/kg, respectively. These amounts were more higher than standard value (67 mg/kg in the basis of wet material, significantly. The mean of the nitrite level in green leaf and tuber vegetables were 1.7 and 1 mg/kg, repectively, which were more higher than standard value (zero mg/kg in the basis of wet matrial. The most high concentration of nitrites and nitrates was seen in commondill and leek, repectively. Discussion: Amounts of nitrites and nitrates in our analysed samples exceeded the perimissible limits. The comulation of nitrates in some of the vegetables depend on the application of chemical fertilizers, temprature and wether, but the nitrites in vegetables is unusual in normal condition and the unsuitable storage of them causes it"s expansion.

  3. Nitrite removal from marine aquaculture wastewater using electrochemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hazardous and toxic nature of some of the constituent such as nitrite in the aquaculture wastewater is of major concern. Present study focuses the removal of nitrite from the aquaculture wastewater prior to disposal. Effect of certain operational parameters such as electrode material, current density, initial pH, and electrode spacing on nitrite removal from aquaculture wastewater was elucidated. Better nitrite removal efficiency achieved when nickel used as compared to stainless steel, graphite and aluminum electrodes. Nitrite removal is positively related to the current density however, increase is up to 31.4% when current density increased from 2.5 to 9.3 mA/cm/sup 2/. Further increase in current density does not improve the process efficiency. Removal efficiency of electrochemical process decreased with the increase in initial pH of test solution. However, with the passage of time this difference is diminishing. This may be attributed to the presence of higher amount of hypochloric acid which does not dissociate at lower pH values. Subsequently faster oxidation of nitrite achieved during first few minutes of test runs. Amount of available hypochloric acid reduced at high pH values and oxidation of nitrite reduced subsequently. Rate of nitrite removal found to be increased as the inter-electrode spacing decreased up to an optimal spacing of 3 cm which showed highest nitrite removal. Further reduction in spacing does not augment the removal efficiency probably due to the formation of scale on cathode surface and passivation of electrode which suppressed further oxidation process. (author)

  4. Control factors of partial nitritation for landfill leachate treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Zhu; LIU Jun-xin

    2007-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) technology has potential technical superiority and economical efficiency for the nitrogen removal from landfill leachate, which contains high-strength ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) and refractory organics. To complete the ANAMMOX process, a preceding partial nitritation step to produce the appropriate ratio of nitrite/ammonium is a key stage. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal conditions to acquire constant partial nitritation for landfill leachate treatment, and a bench scale fixed bed bio-film reactor was used in this study to investigate the effects of the running factors on the partial nitritation. The results showed that both the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and the ammonium volumetric loading rate (Nv) had effects on the partial nitritation. In the controlling conditions with a temperature of 30±1℃, Nv of 0.2-1.0 kg NH4+-N/(m3·d), and DO concentration of 0.8-2.3 mg/L, the steady partial nitritation was achieved as follows: more than 94% partial nitritation efficiency (nitrite as the main product), 60%-74% NH4+-N removal efficiency, and NO2--N/NH4+-N ratio (concentration ratio) of 1.0-1.4 in the effluent.The impact of temperature was related to Nv at certain DO concentration, and the temperature range of 25-30℃ was suitable for treating high strength ammonium leachate. Ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) could be acclimated to higher FA (free ammonium) in the range of 122-224 mg/L. According to the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis result of the bio-film in the reactor, there were 25 kinds of 16S rRNA gene fragments, which indicated that abundant microbial communities existed in the bio-film, although high concentrations of ammonium and FA may inhibit the growth of the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and other microorganisms in the reactor.

  5. Impact of mitochondria on nitrite metabolism in HL-1 cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eDungel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Apart from ATP synthesis mitochondria have many other functions, one being nitrite reductase activity. NO released from nitrite has been shown to protect the heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury in a cGMP-dependent manner. However, the exact impact of mitochondria on the release of NO from nitrite in cardiomyocytes is not completely understood. Besides mitochondria, a number of non-mitochondrial metalloproteins have been suggested to facilitate this process. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of mitochondria on the bioactivation of nitrite in HL-1 cardiomyocytes.The levels of nitrosyl complexes of hemoglobin (NO-Hb and cGMP levels were measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy and enzyme immunoassay. In addition the formation of free NO was determined by confocal microscopy as well as intracellular nitrite and S-nitrosothiols by chemoluminescence analysis. NO was released from nitrite in cell culture in an oxygen dependent manner. Application of specific inhibitors of the respiratory chain, p450, NO synthases and xanthine oxidoreductase showed that all four enzymatic systems are involved in the release of NO, but more than 50% of NO is released via the mitochondrial pathway. Only NO released by mitochondria activated cGMP synthesis. Cardiomyocytes co-cultured with red blood cells (RBC competed with RBC for nitrite, but free NO was detected only in HL-1 cells suggesting that RBC are not a source of NO in this model. Apart from activation of cGMP synthesis, NO formed in HL-1 cells diffused out of the cells and formed NO-Hb complexes. In addition nitrite was converted by HL-1 cells to S-nitrosyl complexes. In HL-1 cardiomyocytes, several enzymatic systems are involved in nitrite reduction to NO but only the mitochondrial pathway of NO release activates cGMP synthesis. Our data suggest that this pathway may be a key regulator of myocardial contractility especially under hypoxic conditions.

  6. Modeling the Impact of Ingoing Sodium Nitrite, Sodium Ascorbate, and Residual Nitrite Concentrations on Growth Parameters of Listeria monocytogenes in Cooked, Cured Pork Sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Seman, Dennis L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-01

    Sodium nitrite has been identified as a key antimicrobial ingredient to control pathogens in ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and poultry products, including Listeria monocytogenes. This study was designed to more clearly elucidate the relationship between chemical factors (ingoing nitrite, ascorbate, and residual nitrite) and L. monocytogenes growth in RTE meats. Treatments of cooked, cured pork sausage (65% moisture, 1.8% salt, pH 6.6, and water activity 0.98) were based on response surface methodology with ingoing nitrite and ascorbate concentrations as the two main factors. Concentrations of nitrite and ascorbate, including star points, ranged from 0 to 352 and 0 to 643 ppm, respectively. At one of two time points after manufacturing (days 0 and 28), half of each treatment was surface inoculated to target 3 log CFU/g of a five-strain L. monocytogenes cocktail, vacuum packaged, and stored at 7°C for up to 4 weeks. Growth of L. monocytogenes was measured twice per week, and enumerations were used to estimate lag time and growth rates for each treatment. Residual nitrite concentrations were measured on days 0, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28, and nitrite depletion rate was estimated by using first-order kinetics. The response surface methodology was used to model L. monocytogenes lag time and growth rate based on ingoing nitrite, ascorbate, and the residual nitrite remaining at the point of inoculation. Modeling results showed that lag time was impacted by residual nitrite concentration remaining at inoculation, as well as the squared term of ingoing nitrite, whereas growth rate was affected by ingoing nitrite concentration but not by the remaining residual nitrite at the point of inoculation. Residual nitrite depletion rate was dependent upon ingoing nitrite concentration and was only slightly affected by ascorbate concentration. This study confirmed that ingoing nitrite concentration influences L. monocytogenes growth in RTE products, yet residual nitrite concentration contributes

  7. Modeling the Impact of Ingoing Sodium Nitrite, Sodium Ascorbate, and Residual Nitrite Concentrations on Growth Parameters of Listeria monocytogenes in Cooked, Cured Pork Sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Seman, Dennis L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-01

    Sodium nitrite has been identified as a key antimicrobial ingredient to control pathogens in ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and poultry products, including Listeria monocytogenes. This study was designed to more clearly elucidate the relationship between chemical factors (ingoing nitrite, ascorbate, and residual nitrite) and L. monocytogenes growth in RTE meats. Treatments of cooked, cured pork sausage (65% moisture, 1.8% salt, pH 6.6, and water activity 0.98) were based on response surface methodology with ingoing nitrite and ascorbate concentrations as the two main factors. Concentrations of nitrite and ascorbate, including star points, ranged from 0 to 352 and 0 to 643 ppm, respectively. At one of two time points after manufacturing (days 0 and 28), half of each treatment was surface inoculated to target 3 log CFU/g of a five-strain L. monocytogenes cocktail, vacuum packaged, and stored at 7°C for up to 4 weeks. Growth of L. monocytogenes was measured twice per week, and enumerations were used to estimate lag time and growth rates for each treatment. Residual nitrite concentrations were measured on days 0, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28, and nitrite depletion rate was estimated by using first-order kinetics. The response surface methodology was used to model L. monocytogenes lag time and growth rate based on ingoing nitrite, ascorbate, and the residual nitrite remaining at the point of inoculation. Modeling results showed that lag time was impacted by residual nitrite concentration remaining at inoculation, as well as the squared term of ingoing nitrite, whereas growth rate was affected by ingoing nitrite concentration but not by the remaining residual nitrite at the point of inoculation. Residual nitrite depletion rate was dependent upon ingoing nitrite concentration and was only slightly affected by ascorbate concentration. This study confirmed that ingoing nitrite concentration influences L. monocytogenes growth in RTE products, yet residual nitrite concentration contributes

  8. Analisis Kadar Nitrit Pada Daging Sosis dengan Metode Spektrofotometri

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, Noerdiansyah

    2014-01-01

    Nitrit is an additive that is used as preservative according to the provision’s of national Standart Indonesia (SNI-01-3820-195) use of nitrit in meat has a maximum dosed of 125 mg/kg .purpose of this study was to determine the supermarket are from the Medan city. Sample that in the analysis are the three sausage products with different brands of supermarket location in the Medan city . Nitrit essay performed visible spectrofotometri using a color reagent N-( 1-napthyl)ethylene diamine dihydr...

  9. Estimated Dietary Intake of Nitrite and Nitrate in Swedish Children

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Kristin Anna; Darnerud, Per Ola; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar; Merino, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This study examined the intake of nitrate and nitrite in Swedish children. Daily intake estimates were based on a nationwide food consumption survey (4-day food diary) and nitrite/nitrate content in vegetables, fruit, cured meat and water. The mean intake of nitrite from cured meat among 2259 children studied was 0.013, 0.010 and 0.007 mg kg-1 body weight day-1 in age groups 4, 8-9 and 11-12, respectively. Among these age groups, three individuals (0.1% of the studied chil...

  10. Effects of Ammonium and Nitrite on Growth and Competitive Fitness of Cultivated Methanotrophic Bacteria▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nyerges, Györgyi; Han, Suk-Kyun; Stein, Lisa Y.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of nitrite and ammonium on cultivated methanotrophic bacteria were investigated. Methylomicrobium album ATCC 33003 outcompeted Methylocystis sp. strain ATCC 49242 in cultures with high nitrite levels, whereas cultures with high ammonium levels allowed Methylocystis sp. to compete more easily. M. album pure cultures and cocultures consumed nitrite and produced nitrous oxide, suggesting a connection between denitrification and nitrite tolerance.

  11. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca;

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity...... is controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...

  12. Mitochondria recycle nitrite back to the bioregulator nitric monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitric monoxide (NO) exerts a great variety of physiological functions. L-Arginine supplies amino groups which are transformed to NO in various NO-synthase-active isoenzyme complexes. NO-synthesis is stimulated under various conditions increasing the tissue of stable NO-metabolites. The major oxidation product found is nitrite. Elevated nitrite levels were reported to exist in a variety of diseases including HIV, reperfusion injury and hypovolemic shock. Denitrifying bacteria such as Paracoccus denitrificans have a membrane bound set of cytochromes (cyt cd1, cyt bc) which were shown to be involved in nitrite reduction activities. Mammalian mitochondria have similar cytochromes which form part of the respiratory chain. Like in bacteria quinols are used as reductants of these types of cytochromes. The observation of one-e- divergence from this redox-couple to external dioxygen made us to study whether this site of the respiratory chain may also recycle nitrite back to its bioactive form NO. Thus, the aim of the present study was therefore to confirm the existence of a reductive pathway which reestablishes the existence of the bioregulator NO from its main metabolite NO2-. Our results show that respiring mitochondria readily reduce added nitrite to NO which was made visible by nitrosylation of deoxyhemoglobin. The adduct gives characteristic triplet-ESR-signals. Using inhibitors of the respiratory chain for chemical sequestration of respiratory segments we were able to identify the site where nitrite is reduced. The results confirm the ubiquinone/cyt bc1 couple as the reductant site where nitrite is recycled. The high affinity of NO to the heme-iron of cytochrome oxidase will result in an impairment of mitochondrial energy-production. ''Nitrite tolerance'' of angina pectoris patients using NO-donors may be explained in that way. (author)

  13. Low serum total nitrite and nitrate levels in severe leptospirosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kalugalage, Thilini; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Vithanage, Thamal; Somaratne, Pranitha; de Silva, H. Janaka; Handunnetti, Shiroma; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2013-01-01

    Background The relationship between inducible nitric oxide synthatase activity and disease severity in leptospirosis is unclear. Nitric oxide is converted to nitrites and nitrates, thus nitrite and nitrate levels (NOx) in serum are considered surrogate markers for nitric oxide. NOx are excreted through the kidneys, and elimination is diminished in renal impairment. We assessed the correlation of NOx with disease severity in patients with leptospirosis, compared with healthy controls and non-l...

  14. Time-dependent depletion of nitrite in pork/beef and chicken meat products and its effect on nitrite intake estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Leonardo; Darnerud, Per Ola; Toldrá, Fidel; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    The food additive nitrite (E249, E250) is commonly used in meat curing as a food preservation method. Because of potential negative health effects of nitrite, its use is strictly regulated. In an earlier study we have shown that the calculated intake of nitrite in children can exceed the acceptable daily intake (ADI) when conversion from dietary nitrate to nitrite is included. This study examined time-dependent changes in nitrite levels in four Swedish meat products frequently eaten by children: pork/beef sausage, liver paté and two types of chicken sausage, and how the production process, storage and also boiling (e.g., simmering in salted water) and frying affect the initial added nitrite level. The results showed a steep decrease in nitrite level between the point of addition to the product and the first sampling of the product 24 h later. After this time, residual nitrite levels continued to decrease, but much more slowly, until the recommended use-by date. Interestingly, this continuing decrease in nitrite was much smaller in the chicken products than in the pork/beef products. In a pilot study on pork/beef sausage, we found no effects of boiling on residual nitrite levels, but frying decreased nitrite levels by 50%. In scenarios of time-dependent depletion of nitrite using the data obtained for sausages to represent all cured meat products and including conversion from dietary nitrate, calculated nitrite intake in 4-year-old children generally exceeded the ADI. Moreover, the actual intake of nitrite from cured meat is dependent on the type of meat source, with a higher residual nitrite levels in chicken products compared with pork/beef products. This may result in increased nitrite exposure among consumers shifting their consumption pattern of processed meats from red to white meat products. PMID:26743589

  15. Time-dependent depletion of nitrite in pork/beef and chicken meat products and its effect on nitrite intake estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Leonardo; Darnerud, Per Ola; Toldrá, Fidel; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The food additive nitrite (E249, E250) is commonly used in meat curing as a food preservation method. Because of potential negative health effects of nitrite, its use is strictly regulated. In an earlier study we have shown that the calculated intake of nitrite in children can exceed the acceptable daily intake (ADI) when conversion from dietary nitrate to nitrite is included. This study examined time-dependent changes in nitrite levels in four Swedish meat products frequently eaten by children: pork/beef sausage, liver paté and two types of chicken sausage, and how the production process, storage and also boiling (e.g., simmering in salted water) and frying affect the initial added nitrite level. The results showed a steep decrease in nitrite level between the point of addition to the product and the first sampling of the product 24 h later. After this time, residual nitrite levels continued to decrease, but much more slowly, until the recommended use-by date. Interestingly, this continuing decrease in nitrite was much smaller in the chicken products than in the pork/beef products. In a pilot study on pork/beef sausage, we found no effects of boiling on residual nitrite levels, but frying decreased nitrite levels by 50%. In scenarios of time-dependent depletion of nitrite using the data obtained for sausages to represent all cured meat products and including conversion from dietary nitrate, calculated nitrite intake in 4-year-old children generally exceeded the ADI. Moreover, the actual intake of nitrite from cured meat is dependent on the type of meat source, with a higher residual nitrite levels in chicken products compared with pork/beef products. This may result in increased nitrite exposure among consumers shifting their consumption pattern of processed meats from red to white meat products. PMID:26743589

  16. Studies on the extraction behaviour of some fission product elements employing tri-iso-amyl phosphate and tri-n-butyl phosphate as extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our recent studies, Tri-iso-amyl Phosphate (TiAP) was found to be a potential extractant for fast reactor fuel reprocessing. Mixer-Settler runs with TiAP showed excellent extraction and stripping behavior of uranium and plutonium. Prior to the deployment of TiAP in a reprocessing plant, it is important to understand the extraction behavior of troublesome fission product elements like Zr, Ru, etc as well as lanthanides. In the present work, the extraction behaviour of Zr(IV), RuNO(III), Ce(III) and Nd(III) with 1.1M TiAP and 1.1M TBP in n-dodecane from nitric acid media were carried out at 303 K. The effect of uranium loading in the organic phase on the extraction of Zr(IV) by the above solvents (irradiated to 10 MRad as well as unirradiated) was also investigated. The metal ions were analyzed by suitable analytical methods. The D values for the extraction of Zr(IV) and RuNO(III) as a function of equilibrium aqueous phase nitric acid concentration (0.5-6M) are presented. Results clearly indicated similar extraction behaviour for TBP and TiAP i.e. the D values for Zr(IV) increase with nitric acid concentration, whereas for RuNO(III) the D values first increase upto 1.5M HNO3 and then decrease. The data indicates that the D values for the extraction of Zr (IV) and RuNO(III) by TiAP are marginally lower compared to that of TBP. The D values for Nd(III) and Ce(III) as a function of equilibrium aqueous phase nitric acid concentration (0.5-6M) are presented. The D values show marginal increase from 0.5-3M HNO3 and thereafter decrease gradually. The distribution data clearly show that the extraction of these elements by TiAP is comparable with that of TBP, throughout the acidity range. Investigation on the effect of uranium loading in the organic phase on the extraction of Zr(IV) from 4M HNO3 by TiAP and TBP indicates that the D values for the extraction of Zr(IV) decrease steadily with uranium loading in the organic phase for both degraded and undegraded solvents and

  17. Magnetic resonance study of the transmembrane nitrite diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samouilov, A; Woldman, Ya Yu; Zweier, J L; Khramtsov, V V

    2007-05-01

    Nitrite (NO(2)-), being a product of metabolism of both nitric oxide (NO(*)) and nitrate (NO(3)-), can accumulate in tissues and regenerate NO() by several mechanisms. The effect of NO(2)- on ischemia/reperfusion injury was also reported. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of intracellular NO(2)- accumulation are poorly understood. We suggested significant role of nitrite penetration through biological membranes in the form of undissociated nitrous acid (HNO(2)). This hypothesis has been tested using large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine liposomes and several spectroscopic techniques. HNO(2) transport across the phospholipid bilayer of liposomes facilitates proton transfer resulting in intraliposomal acidification, which was measured using pH-sensitive probes. NO(2)(-)-mediated intraliposomal acidification was confirmed by EPR spectroscopy using membrane-impermeable pH-sensitive nitroxide, AMC (2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-yloxy-2,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-3-ium-4-yl)-aminomethanesulfonic acid (pK 5.25), and by (31)P NMR spectroscopy using inorganic phosphate (pK 6.9). Nitrite accumulates inside liposomes in concentration exceeding its concentration in the bulk solution, when initial transmembrane pH gradient (alkaline inside) is applied. Intraliposomal accumulation of NO(2)- was observed by direct measurement using chemiluminescence technique. Perfusion of isolated rat hearts with buffer containing 4 microM NO(2)- was performed. The nitrite concentrations in the effluent and in the tissue, measured after 1 min perfusion, were close, supporting fast penetration of the nitrite through the tissue. Measurements of the nitrite/nitrate showed that total concentration of NO(x) in myocardium increased from initial 7.8 to 24.7 microM after nitrite perfusion. Physiological significance of passive transmembrane transport of NO(2)- and its coupling with intraliposomal acidification are discussed.

  18. Synthesis and intracrystalline oxidation of nitrite-intercalated layered double hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrite-intercalated LDHs could be prepared by a two-stage process that involves coprecipitation in the presence of nitrite ions followed by stirring the product with excess of nitrite ions. The nitrite ion lies flat in these LDHs with its c2-axis lying approximately perpendicular to the crystallographic c-axis. The interlayer nitrite ions in these LDHs could be quantitatively oxidized to nitrate ions using H2O2 solution. In the LDHs thus obtained the nitrate ion lies flat with its c3-axis parallel to the crystallographic c-axis (D3h symmetry) in the interlayer region resulting in lower basal spacing. - Graphical abstract: Nitrite-intercalated LDHs could be prepared by a two-stage process that involves coprecipitation in the presence of nitrite ions followed by stirring the product with excess of nitrite ions. The interlayer nitrite ions in these LDHs could be quantitatively oxidized to nitrate ions

  19. Nitrogen cycling in the secondary nitrite maximum of the eastern tropical North Pacific off Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Carolyn; Santoro, Alyson E.; Stanley, Rachel H. R.; Casciotti, Karen L.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the marine nitrogen cycle and represents a critical juncture where nitrogen can be reduced to the less bioavailable N2 gas or oxidized to nitrate and retained in a more bioavailable form. We present an analysis of rates of microbial nitrogen transformations in the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ) within the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP). We determined rates using a novel one-dimensional model using the distribution of nitrite and nitrate concentrations, along with their natural abundance nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope profiles. We predict rate profiles for nitrate reduction, nitrite reduction, and nitrite oxidation throughout the ODZ, as well as the contributions of anammox to nitrite reduction and nitrite oxidation. Nitrate reduction occurs at a maximum rate of 25 nM d-1 at the top of the ODZ, at the same depth as the maximum rate of nitrite reduction, 15 nM d-1. Nitrite oxidation occurs at maximum rates of 10 nM d-1 above the secondary nitrite maximum, but also in the secondary nitrite maximum, within the ODZ. Anammox contributes to nitrite oxidation within the ODZ but cannot account for all of it. Nitrite oxidation within the ODZ that is not through anammox is also supported by microbial gene abundance profiles. Our results suggest the presence of nitrite oxidation within the ETNP ODZ, with implications for the distribution and physiology of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and for total nitrogen loss in the largest marine ODZ.

  20. Immobilization of nitrite oxidizing bacteria using biopolymeric chitosan media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pranee Lertsutthiwong; Duangcheewan Boonpuak; Wiboonluk Pungrasmi; Sorawit Powtongsook

    2013-01-01

    The effects of chitosan characteristics including the degree of deacetylation,molecular weight,particle size,pH pretreatment and immobilization time on the immobilization of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) on biopolymeric chitosan were investigated.Nitrite removal efficiency of immobilized NOB depended on the degree of deacetylation,particle size,pH pretreatment on the surface of chitosan and immobilization time.Scanning electron microscope characterization illustrated that the number of NOB cells attached to the surface of chitosan increased with an increment of immobilization time.The optimal condition for NOB immobilization on chitosan was achieved during a 24-hr immobilization period using chitosan with the degree of deacetylation larger than 80% and various particle size ranges between 1-5 mm at pH 6.5.In general,the NOB immobilized on chitosan flakes has a high potential to remove excess nitrite from wastewater and aquaculture systems.

  1. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite in simulated Purex Process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectrophotometric method for nitrite determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is presented, utilizing the Griess reagent for the formation of the coloured azocompound with an absorption maximum at 525 nm. Molar absortivity was 36,262 and the sensitivity of the method 10-6M for nitrite. The calibration curve is linear in the range of 2 to 30μg NO-2/25 ml in cells of 1 cm optical path. The method can be used in the presence of uranium up to limits of an U/NO-2 ratio of 150. Test solutions were prepared to simulate composition and concentrations as obtained by irradiating standard fuel with a neutro flux of 3.2 x 1013 n.s-1.cm-2, with a burn-up value of 33,000 Mwd/T and cooling time of two years. Nitrite determinations in these solutions were accurate within limits of 5%. (Author)

  2. Nebulization of the acidified sodium nitrite formulation attenuates acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surber Mark W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Generalized hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV occurring during exposure to hypoxia is a detrimental process resulting in an increase in lung vascular resistance. Nebulization of sodium nitrite has been shown to inhibit HPV. The aim of this project was to investigate and compare the effects of nebulization of nitrite and different formulations of acidified sodium nitrite on acute HPV. Methods Ex vivo isolated rabbit lungs perfused with erythrocytes in Krebs-Henseleit buffer (adjusted to 10% hematocrit and in vivo anesthetized catheterized rabbits were challenged with periods of hypoxic ventilation alternating with periods of normoxic ventilation. After baseline hypoxic challenges, vehicle, sodium nitrite or acidified sodium nitrite was delivered via nebulization. In the ex vivo model, pulmonary arterial pressure and nitric oxide concentrations in exhaled gas were monitored. Nitrite and nitrite/nitrate were measured in samples of perfusion buffer. Pulmonary arterial pressure, systemic arterial pressure, cardiac output and blood gases were monitored in the in vivo model. Results In the ex vivo model, nitrite nebulization attenuated HPV and increased nitric oxide concentrations in exhaled gas and nitrite concentrations in the perfusate. The acidified forms of sodium nitrite induced higher levels of nitric oxide in exhaled gas and had longer vasodilating effects compared to nitrite alone. All nitrite formulations increased concentrations of circulating nitrite to the same degree. In the in vivo model, inhaled nitrite inhibited HPV, while pulmonary arterial pressure, cardiac output and blood gases were not affected. All nitrite formulations had similar potency to inhibit HPV. The tested concentration of appeared tolerable. Conclusion Nitrite alone and in acidified forms effectively and similarly attenuates HPV. However, acidified nitrite formulations induce a more pronounced increase in nitric oxide exhalation.

  3. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H;

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process is......(I) and the trinuclear copper centre in ascorbate oxidase, and the characteristics of the internal ET processes of these enzymes are compared. The data are consistent with the faster ET observed in nitrite reductase arising from a more advantageous entropy of activation when compared with ascorbate...

  4. Nitrite-induced enhancement of toxicity of phenanthrene in fish and its implications for coastal waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shailaja, M.S.; Rodrigues, A.

    higher when exposed simultaneously to nitrite. Contact with nitrite and phenanthrene together also led to severe hepatic damage with possible cell death as inferred from the large enhancement in sorbitol dehydrogenase activity in the serum and reduced...

  5. Effect of the kinetics of ammonium and nitrite oxidation on nitritation success or failure for different biofilm reactor geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lackner, Susanne; Smets, Barth F.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of biokinetics on nitritation was investigated in two biofilm geometries, the Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) and a conventional biofilm system. A 1D biofilm model was used and evaluated by global sensitivity analysis using the variance based Sobol method. The main focus...... strongly depends on the chosen kinetic parameters of AOB and NOB. The maximum specific growth rates (μmax,AOB and μmax,NOB) had the strongest impact on nitritation efficiency (NE). In comparison, the counter-diffusion geometry yielded more parameter combinations (27.5%) that resulted in high NE than the co...

  6. Nanoliposomal Growth Hormone and Sodium Nitrite Release from Silicone Fibers Reduces Thrombus Formation Under Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi-Nik, Nasim; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Banikarimi, Seyedeh Parnian; Pouran, Behdad; Malaie-Balasi, Zahra; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2016-08-01

    Biocompatibility of artificial lungs can be improved by endothelialization of hollow fibers. Bioavailability of growth-inducing and anti-thrombotic agents on the hollow fiber-blood interface inhibits thrombosis. We investigated if nanoliposomal growth-inducing growth hormone (nGH) and anti-thrombotic sodium nitrite (nNitrite) incorporation into collagen-coating on silicone hollow fibers improves blood biocompatibility by increasing endothelial cell growth and nitrite bioavailability under flow. Nitrite production rate was assessed under varying flow conditions. Finite element (FE) modeling was used to simulate nitrite transport within the parallel-plate flow chamber, and nitrite bioavailability on the fiber-blood interface at 1-30 dyn/cm(2) shear stress. Endothelial cell number on fibers coated with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate was 1.5-fold higher than on collagen-coated fibers. For collagen-coated fibers, nitrite production reached a maximum at 18 dyn/cm(2) shear stress. When fibers were coated with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate, nitrite production increased continuously by increasing shear stress. FE modeling revealed that nitrite concentrations at the fiber-blood interface were affected by shear stress-induced nitrite production, and diffusion/convection-induced nitrite removal. Highest nitrite concentrations and lowest thrombus deposition were observed on fibers coated with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate exposed to 6-12 dyn/cm(2) shear stress. In conclusion, our results suggest that nNitrite-nGH-Col conjugate coatings promote endothelialization of silicone hollow fibers in biohybrid artificial lungs. PMID:26762283

  7. Physiology and interaction of nitrate and nitrite reduction in Staphylococcus carnosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Neubauer, H.; Götz, F

    1996-01-01

    Staphylococcus carnosus reduces nitrate to ammonia in two steps. (i) Nitrate was taken up and reduced to nitrite, and nitrite was subsequently excreted. (ii) After depletion of nitrate, the accumulated nitrite was imported and reduced to ammonia, which again accumulated in the medium. The localization, energy gain, and induction of the nitrate and nitrite reductases in S. carnosus were characterized. Nitrate reductase seems to be a membrane-bound enzyme involved in respiratory energy conserva...

  8. Measurement of Nitrite in Blood Samples Using the Ferricyanide-Based Hemoglobin Oxidation Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Piknova, Barbora; Schechter, Alan N.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrite is currently recognized as a biomarker of the state of nitric oxide metabolism. Therefore, assessing nitrite levels in various organs and compartments is an important issue. As nitrite levels in most organs and tissues are low (in high nanomolar or low micromolar range) several new sensitive methods for quantifying nitrite in various biological samples have been developed. Chemiluminescence, combined with tri-iodide reducing solution, is currently considered the most sensitive method,...

  9. Regulation of nitrite transport in red blood cells by hemoglobin oxygen fractional saturation

    OpenAIRE

    Vitturi, Dario A; Teng, Xinjun; Toledo, José C.; Matalon, Sadis; Lancaster, Jack R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2009-01-01

    Allosteric regulation of nitrite reduction by deoxyhemoglobin has been proposed to mediate nitric oxide (NO) formation during hypoxia. Nitrite is predominantly an anion at physiological pH, raising questions about the mechanism by which it enters the red blood cell (RBC) and whether this is regulated and coupled to deoxyhemoglobin-mediated reduction. We tested the hypothesis that nitrite transport by RBCs is regulated by fractional saturation. Using human RBCs, nitrite consumption was faster ...

  10. Artificial electron donors for nitrate and nitrite reductases usable as mediators in amperometric biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strehlitz, B. (Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany)); Gruendig, B. (Institut fuer Chemo- und Biosensorik, Muenster-Roxel (Germany)); Vorlop, K.D. (Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Technologie); Bartholmes, P. (Witten-Herdecke Univ., Witten (Germany). Inst. fuer Biochemie); Kotte, H. (Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany)); Stottmeister, U. (Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany))

    1994-07-01

    Various nitrate and nitrite reductases are capable of accepting electrons from artificial donors. Combining these redox active donors with an amperometric redox electrode which is covered with an immobilized layer of such a nitrate or nitrite reductase, new enzyme sensors can be created for the detection of nitrate or nitrite, respectively. A range of suitable electron donors for nitrate reductases and nitrite reductase from different sources have been selected and characterized by electrochemical methods. (orig.)

  11. Study on the nitrite and nitrate levels changes by drying and frying processing in vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi, E; K Sharafi; A Almasi; M Dayhim; E Azizi; M Ghayebzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives: Nitrate and nitrite threaten the human health. According to recent research works, one of the great sources of exposure to nitrate and nitrite in human diet is vegetables. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of drying and frying processes on nitrate and nitrite levels in abundant vegetables. Materials and methods: In this descriptive – analytical study, 180 vegetable samples were taken randomly from Kermanshah markets. Nitrite and nitrate concentrati...

  12. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.177 Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in combination with salt (NaCl) to aid in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub....

  13. 75 FR 29534 - Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... AGENCY Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft... draft ecological risk assessment for the registration review of inorganic nitrates - nitrites, carbon... occur for all inorganic nitrates- nitrites, carbon and carbon dioxide uses, as well as gas...

  14. 77 FR 71006 - Sodium Nitrite Injection and Sodium Thiosulfate Injection Drug Products Labeled for the Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-1134 Sodium Nitrite Injection and... products containing sodium nitrite labeled for the treatment of cyanide poisoning and unapproved injectable... products containing sodium nitrite or sodium thiosulfate that are labeled for the treatment of...

  15. Practical Use of Nitrite and Basis for Dosage in the Manufacture of Meat Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Jens; Ekgreen, Maria Helbo; Risum, Jørgen

    -treated, but not sterilised meat products, the EU limit of 50 mg/kg on residual nitrite in the British speciality, jellied veal and brisket, is roughly comparable with a range of Danish products, where Danish legislation specifies from 60 to 150 mg/kg added nitrite. Denmark has specifically exempted the addition of nitrite...

  16. Neurotoxicity induced by alkyl nitrites: Impairment in learning/memory and motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hye Jin; Kim, Yun Ji; Jeon, Seo Young; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2016-04-21

    Although alkyl nitrites are used as recreational drugs, there is only little research data regarding their effects on the central nervous system including their neurotoxicity. This study investigated the neurotoxicity of three representative alkyl nitrites (isobutyl nitrite, isoamyl nitrite, and butyl nitrite), and whether it affected learning/memory function and motor coordination in rodents. Morris water maze test was performed in mice after administrating the mice with varying doses of the substances in two different injection schedules of memory acquisition and memory retention. A rota-rod test was then performed in rats. All tested alkyl nitrites lowered the rodents' capacity for learning and memory, as assessed by both the acquisition and retention tests. The results of the rota-rod test showed that isobutyl nitrite in particular impaired motor coordination in chronically treated rats. The mice chronically injected with isoamyl nitrite also showed impaired function, while butyl nitrite had no significant effect. The results of the water maze test suggest that alkyl nitrites may impair learning and memory. Additionally, isoamyl nitrite affected the rodents' motor coordination ability. Collectively, our findings suggest that alkyl nitrites may induce neurotoxicity, especially on the aspect of learning and memory function.

  17. Serum nitrite levels in Sri Lankan patients with leptospirosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rohini I Gunaratna; Shiroma M Handunnetti; MRC Bulathsinghalage; Pranitha Somaratne; Ananda Jayanaga; HJ de Silva; Senaka Rajapakse

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To determine whether blood nitrite levels are elevated in patients with leptospirosis. Methods: Male patients fulfilling clinical and epidemiological criteria for a diagnosis of leptospirosis were recruited. Those with MAT titre of≥400 together with those seroconverting to a titer of≥200 were included in the analysis. Serum nitrite levels were measured in these patients and age, sex matched healthy controls. Results:Patients from 3 hospitals (n=75) were screened during a 3 month period from 28th June to 3rd September 2009, of whom 20 were eligible for the study. Serum nitrite levels were found to be significantly higher in patients with acute leptospirosis [n=20, (0.359±0.229)μM] compared to controls [(n=13,(0.216±0.051)μM] (P=0.014). A significant correlation was also observed between the MAT titre and the day of illness (r = 0.547; P<0.0001). Conclusions: Serum nitrite levels are higher in patients with acute leptospirosis compared to age and sex matched controls. No correlation could be assessed with severity of illness, as sample size was inadequate to determine this.

  18. Evaluation of nitrate and nitrite destruction/separation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1997-08-29

    This report describes and evaluates four types of nitrate and nitrite destruction and separation technologies that could be used to treat the aqueous, alkaline, nitrate-bearing mixed waste that is generated by the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The technologies considered in this report include thermal, hydrothermal, chemical, and electrochemical technologies.

  19. Ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Jayakumar, Amal; Oleynik, Sergey; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Devol, Allan H.; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrification plays a key role in the marine nitrogen (N) cycle, including in oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are hot spots for denitrification and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Recent evidence suggests that nitrification links the source (remineralized organic matter) and sink (denitrification and anammox) of fixed N directly in the steep oxycline in the OMZs. We performed shipboard incubations with 15N tracers to characterize the depth distribution of nitrification in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP). Additional experiments were conducted to investigate photoinhibition. Allylthiourea (ATU) was used to distinguish the contribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation. The abundance of archaeal and β-proteobacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene subunit A (amoA) was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The rates of ammonia and nitrite oxidation showed distinct subsurface maxima, with the latter slightly deeper than the former. The ammonia oxidation maximum coincided with the primary nitrite concentration maximum, archaeal amoA gene maximum, and the subsurface nitrous oxide maximum. Negligible rates of ammonia oxidation were found at anoxic depths, where high rates of nitrite oxidation were measured. Archaeal amoA gene abundance was generally 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than bacterial amoA gene abundance, and inhibition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with 10 μM ATU did not affect ammonia oxidation rates, indicating the dominance of archaea in ammonia oxidation. These results depict highly dynamic activities of ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the oxycline of the ETNP OMZ.

  20. Nitrate metabolism in tobacco leaves overexpressing Arabidopsis nitrite reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Susie; Le Lay, Pascaline; Sanchez-Tamburrrino, Juan Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Primary nitrogen assimilation in plants includes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium in the chloroplasts by the enzyme nitrite reductase (NiR EC:1.7.7.1) or in the plastids of non-photosynthetic organs. Here we report on a study overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana NiR (AtNiR) gene in tobacco plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CERV - Carnation Etched Ring Virus). The aim was to overexpress AtNiR in an attempt to alter the level of residual nitrite in the leaf which can act as precursor to the formation of nitrosamines. The impact of increasing the activity of AtNiR produced an increase in leaf protein and a stay-green phenotype in the primary transformed AtNiR population. Investigation of the T1 homozygous population demonstrated elevated nitrate reductase (NR) activity, reductions in leaf nitrite and nitrate and the amino acids proline, glutamine and glutamate. Chlorophyl content of the transgenic lines was increased, as evidenced by the stay-green phenotype. This reveals the importance of NiR in primary nitrogen assimilation and how modification of this key enzyme affects both the nitrogen and carbon metabolism of tobacco plants. PMID:26447683

  1. One-stage partial nitritation and anammox in membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaowu; Sun, Kaihang; Wei, Qiaoyan; Urata, Kohei; Yamashita, Yuki; Hong, Nian; Hama, Takehide; Kawagoshi, Yasunori

    2016-06-01

    Partial nitritation and anammox (PN/A) was applied in a lab-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) to investigate its technical feasibility for treating ammonium-rich wastewater with low C/N ratio. The bacterial community was analyzed by molecular cloning and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Partial nitritation (PN) was first realized in MBR by seeding aerobic activated sludge. With dissolved oxygen control, a steady effluent mixture with NO2 (-)-N/NH4 (+)-N ratio of 1.13 ± 0.08 was generated from the PN process. Subsequently, the MBR was seeded with anammox biomass on day 59. After running 300 days, the one-stage PN/A achieved a maximum nitrogen removal rate of 1.45 kg N/m(3)/day at the nitrogen removal efficiency of 89.5 %. Microbial community analysis revealed that Nitrosomonas sp. HKU and Nitrosospira sp. YKU corresponded to nitritation; meanwhile, Candidatus Brocadia TKU sp. accounted for nitrogen removal of the PN/A system. Specifically, Nitrosomonas sp. were enriched in the reactor at the PN/A phase and then conquered Nitrosospira sp. to be the predominant ammonia oxidizers. Nitrite oxidizers and denitrifiers were detected in symbiosis with aforementioned microbes. Denitrification promised potential plus nitrogen depletion. The present one-stage PN/A process allows a significant decrease in operational costs compared with classical nitrification/denitrification. PMID:26916267

  2. Nitrogen removal via nitrite from municipal landfill leachate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Lina; PENG Chengyao; ZHANG Shujun; PENG Yongzhen

    2009-01-01

    A system consisting of a two-stage up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB),an anoxic/aerobic (A/O) reactor and a sequencing batch reactor (SBR),was used to treat landfill leachate.During operation,denitrification and methanogenesis took place simultaneously in the first stage UASB (UASB1),and the effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD) was further removed in the second stage UASB (UASB2).Then the denitrification of nitrite and nitrate in the returned sludge by using the residual COD was accomplished in the A/O reactor,and ammonia was removed via nitrite in it.Last but not least,the residual ammonia was removed in SBR as well as nitrite and nitrate which were produced by nitrification.A system consisting of a two-stage UASB and an A/O reactor was used to achieve the stable short-cut nitrification in the first stage (60 d).The effluent of stage one was treated by SBR in the second stage (60 d).The results over 120 d were as follows: when the total nitrogen (TN) concentration of influent leachate was about 2500 mg/L and the ammonia nitrogen concentration was about 2000 mg/L,the short-cut nitrification with 85%-90% nitrite accumulation was achieved stably in the A/O reactor.The TN and ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies of the system were 98% and 97%,respectively.The residual ammonia,nitrite and nitrate which were produced by nitrification in the A/O reactor could be washed out almost completely in SBR.The TN and ammonia nitrogen concentrations of final effluent were about 39 mg/L and 12 mg/L,respectively.

  3. Effects of seawater salinity on nitrite accumulation in short-range nitrification to nitrite as end product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU De-shuang; PENG Yong-zhen; ZHANG Kui

    2004-01-01

    The effect of seawater salinity on nitrite accumulation in short-range nitrification to nitrite as the end productwas studied by using a SBR. Experimental results indicated that the growth of nitrobacteria was inhibited and veryhigh levels of nitrite accumulation at different salinities were achieved under the conditions of 25-28 ℃, pH 7.5-8.0, and the influent ammonia nitrogen of 40-70 mg/L when seawater flow used to flush toilet was less than 35%(salinity 12393 mg/L, Cl- 6778 mg/L) of total domestic wastewater flow, which is mainly ascribed to much highchlorine concentration of seawater. Results showed that high seawater salinity is available for short-range nitrificationto nitrite as the end product. When the seawater flow used to flush toilet accounting for above 70% of the totaldomestic wastewater flow, the removal efficiency of ammonia was still above 80% despite the removal of organicsdeclined obviously(less than 60% ). It was found that the effect of seawater salinity on the removal of organics wasnegative rather than positive one as shown for ammonia removal.

  4. Model-based evaluation on the conversion ratio of ammonium to nitrite in a nitritation process for ammonium-rich wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-ming; YANG Qi; ZENG Guang-ming; A. Cornelius; K. H. Rosenwinkel; S. Kunst; D. Weichgrebe

    2004-01-01

    Modeling for nitritation process was discussed and analyzed quantlitatively for the factors that influence nitrite accumulation. The results indicated that pH, inorganic carbon source and Hydraulic Retention Time(HRT) as well as biomass concentration are the main factors that influenced the conversion ratio of ammonium to nitrite. A constant high pH can lead to a high nitritation rate and results in high conversion ratio on condition that free ammonia inhibition do not happen. In a CSTR system, without pH control, this conversion ratio can be monitored by pH variation in the reactor. The pH goes down far from the inlet level means a strongly nitrite accumulation. High concentration of alkalinity can promoted the conversion ratio by means of accelerating the nitritation rate through providing sufficient inorganic carbon source(carbon dioxide). When inorganic carbon source was depleted, the nitritation process stopped. HRT adjustment could be an efficient way to make the nitritation system run more flexible, which to some extent can meet the requirements of the fluctuant of inlet parameters such as ammonium concentration, pH, and temperature and so on. Biomass concentration is the key point, especially for a CSTR system in steady state, which was normally circumscribed by the characteristics of bacteria and may also affected by aeration mode and can be increased by prolonging the HRT on the condition of no nitrate accumulation when no recirculation available. The higher the biomass concentration is, the better the nitrite accumulation can be obtained.

  5. Experimental study of nitrite accumulation in predenitrification biological nitrogen removal process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on nitrite accumulation was investigated in a pilot-scale pre-denitrification process at room temperature for 100 days.In the first 10 days,due to the instability of the system,the DO concentration fluctuated between 1.0 and 2.0 mg/L.In the next 14 days,the DO concentration was kept at 0.5 mg/L and nitrite accumulation occurred,with the average nitrite accumulation rate at 91%.From the 25th day,the DO concentration was increased to 2.0 mg/L to destroy the nitrite accumulation,but nitrite accumulation rate was still as high as 90%.From the 38th day the nitrite accumulation rate decreased to 15%-30% linearly.From the 50th day,DO concentration was decreased to 0.5 mg/L to resume nitrite accumulation.Until the 83rd day the nitrite accumulation rate began to increase to 80%.Dissolved oxygen was the main cause of nitrite accumulation,taking into account other factors such as pH,free ammonia concentration,temperature,and sludge retention time.Because of the different affinity for oxygen between nitrite oxidizing bacteria and ammonia oxidizing bacteria when DO concentration was kept at 0.5 rag/L,nitrite accumulation occurred.

  6. The effect of environmental hypercapnia and size on nitrite toxicity in the striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Malthe; Damsgaard, Christian; Gam, Le Thi Hong;

    2016-01-01

    Striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) are farmed intensively at high stocking densities in Vietnam where they are likely to encounter environmental hypercapnia as well as occasional high levels of aquatic nitrite. Nitrite competes with Cl- for uptake at the branchial HCO3-/Cl- exchanger...... to a reduced nitrite uptake. To assess the effect of hypercapnia on nitrite uptake, fish were cannulated in the dorsal aorta, allowing repeated blood sampling for measurements of haemoglobin derivatives, plasma ions and acid-base status during exposure to 0.9 mM nitrite alone and in combination with...... acute and 48 h acclimated hypercapnia over a period of 72 h. Nitrite uptake was initially reduced during the hypercapnia-induced acidosis, but after pH recovery the situation was reversed, resulting in higher plasma nitrite concentrations and lower functional haemoglobin levels that eventually caused...

  7. Role of nitrate and nitrite in the induction of nitrite reductase in leaves of barley seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, M.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The role of NO3- and NO2- in the induction of nitrite reductase (NiR) activity in detached leaves of 8-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was investigated. Barley leaves contained 6 to 8 micromoles NO2-/gram fresh weight x hour of endogenous NiR activity when grown in N-free solutions. Supply of both NO2- and NO3- induced the enzyme activity above the endogenous levels (5 and 10 times, respectively at 10 millimolar NO2- and NO3- over a 24 hour period). In NO3(-)-supplied leaves, NiR induction occurred at an ambient NO3- concentration of as low as 0.05 millimolar; however, no NiR induction was found in leaves supplied with NO2- until the ambient NO2- concentration was 0.5 millimolar. Nitrate accumulated in NO2(-)-fed leaves. The amount of NO3- accumulating in NO2(-)-fed leaves induced similar levels of NiR as did equivalent amounts of NO3- accumulating in NO3(-)-fed leaves. Induction of NiR in NO2(-)-fed leaves was not seen until NO3- was detectable (30 nanomoles/gram fresh weight) in the leaves. The internal concentrations of NO3-, irrespective of N source, were highly correlated with the levels of NiR induced. When the reduction of NO3- to NO2- was inhibited by WO4(2-), the induction of NiR was inhibited only partially. The results indicate that in barley leaves in NiR is induced by NO3- directly, i.e. without being reduced to NO2-, and that absorbed NO2- induces the enzyme activity indirectly after being oxidized to NO3- within the leaf.

  8. Environental assessment of methane oxidizers nitrite driven bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    VAELLO LÓPEZ, MARIA TERESA

    2013-01-01

    The nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO) bacteria has been discovered in the last decade and there is little known about its environmental distribution and contribution to the oxidation of methane (CH4). Because CH4 is of environmental concern due to its contribution to global warming, it has become very important to look for ways to reduce it. The purpose of this thesis is the acquisition of established molecular tools and their application in microbial ecology investiga...

  9. Measurement and Correlation of Solubilityof Ethyl Nitrite in Mixed Solvent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was used to measure the solubility of ethylnitrite in mixedsolvents under the lower pressure and higher temperature. The solubilitiesof ethyl nitrite inmixed solvents of ethanol-water at 15° C---40° C and ethanol-diethyloxalate at 20° C---40° C weredetermined. A Henry constant model has been improved, and the interaction parameters havebeen fitted from experimental data. The calculation results have been compared withexperimental data; the results obtained are satisfactory.

  10. Nitrite and Nitrate Removal Efficiencies of Soil Aquifer Treatment Columns

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNGÖR, Kerem; ÜNLÜ, Kahraman

    2005-01-01

    Bench-scale soil column experiments were performed to examine the effects of soil type and infiltration conditions on the removal efficiencies of wastewater nitrites and nitrates during the biological ripening phase of soil aquifer treatment (SAT) columns. SAT was simulated in three 1-m-high soil columns packed with 3 different natural agricultural soils having sandy clay loam (SCL), loamy sand (LS) and sandy loam (SL) textures. All columns were equipped with tensiometers and soil-wa...

  11. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2015-03-02

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  12. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils. PMID:25784903

  13. Intragastric nitrites, nitrosamines, and bacterial overgrowth during cimetidine treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Stockbrugger, R W; Cotton, P B; Eugenides, N; Bartholomew, B. A.; Hill, M.J.; Walters, C L

    1982-01-01

    A six week course of cimetidine (1 g/day) healed peptic ulcers in 20 of 23 patients (14 with duodenal ulcer, nine with gastric ulcer). Reduction of basal acid output by 73% and peak acid output by 36% led to a rise in concentrations of intragastric aerobic bacteria and nitrate-reducing bacteria. While the mean intragastric concentration of nitrate was unchanged by treatment, there were statistically significant rises in nitrite and N-nitrosamine concentrations. The conversion from nitrates to...

  14. Simple methods to decrease sodium and nitrite contents in hams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talia Franco-Avila

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ham is a product highly consumed by society; however it contains some elements that make it a non-recommended food. Thus, it has been attempted to eliminate or reduce those components.Material and Methods: Content of sodium, nitrites, peroxides and total coliforms were compared after processes of Washing (W and Simple Cooking (SC in turkey and pork ham in a cross-sectional analytical experimental study. Furthermore, sensory acceptance of thesamples through an acceptance test of five points was evaluated. One-way ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni were used to assess the mean difference between groups. The value of p≤0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Both processes reduced the amount of sodium in both types of ham in statistically significant way (p≤0.001. The major percentage of reduction was presented with SC: 73.4% for turkey ham and 63.5% for pork ham. Likewise, the higher percentage of nitrite reduction was 50.6% in pork ham with SC technique (p≤0.05. Peroxide index decreased with both techniques in both hams without statistical significance. Total coliforms count was kept constant in all samples. Higher sensory acceptance of W concerning SC in all sensory characteristics was observed.Conclusions: W and SC techniques reduce sodium, nitrite and peroxide index without affecting the sanitation of hams. Furthermore, W is accepted in all sensory categories. We recommend using W technique before consumption of the product.

  15. Modelling nitrite dynamics and associated feedback processes in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashifane, T. B.; Vichi, M.; Waldron, H. N.; Machu, E.; Garçonc, V.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding nitrite dynamics in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) is a challenge as it represents an intermediary nitrogen species with a short turnover time. Nitrite is also reduced to nitrogen in OMZs, preventing its accumulation. This creates difficulties in detecting nitrite with colorimetric methods as concentrations may occur below detection limits in some regions. Nitrite concentrations are key to understanding intermediate nitrogen processes and their implication for nitrogen loss in OMZs. A coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied in the Benguela OMZ to study nitrite dynamics and its associated feedback processes. Simulated results show occurrence of primary and secondary nitrite maxima in the Benguela shelf waters. The primary nitrite maxima in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification and nitrate assimilation as they occur in association with the nitracline. Secondary nitrite maxima accumulate in the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF) OMZ and are attributed to denitrification. The secondary nitrite maxima are consumed by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) off Walvis Bay. Nitrite maxima are restricted to the shelf off Walvis Bay and advected offshore in the ABF region. Interchanges between the poleward South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the equatorward, well-aerated Eastern South Atlantic Central Water (ESACW) drive the seasonality of nitrogen processes in the Benguela. Subsequent nitrite reduction in the Benguela OMZ leads to nitrous oxide production, with high concentrations occurring in the ABF region as a result of nitrification and denitrification. Off Walvis Bay, nitrous oxide production is low since nitrite is consumed by anammox. Nitrous oxide production occurs in thermocline, intermediate and deeper water masses in the ABF region. High N fluxes in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification as compared to anammox and denitrification. Results from this study demonstrate the role of intermediate nitrogen species in nitrogen feedback

  16. Role of the denitrifying Haloarchaea in the treatment of nitrite-brines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nájera-Fernández, Cindy; Zafrilla, Basilio; Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2012-09-01

    Haloferax mediterranei is a denitrifying halophilic archaeon able to reduce nitrate and nitrite under oxic and anoxic conditions. In the presence of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite are used as nitrogen sources for growth. Under oxygen scarcity, this haloarchaeon uses both ions as electron acceptors via a denitrification pathway. In the present work, the maximal nitrite concentration tolerated by this organism was determined by studying the growth of H. mediterranei in minimal medium containing 30, 40 and 50 mM nitrite as sole nitrogen source and under initial oxic conditions at 42 degrees C. The results showed the ability of H. mediterranei to withstand nitrite concentrations up to 50 mM. At the beginning of the incubation, nitrate was detected in the medium, probably due to the spontaneous oxidation of nitrite under the initial oxic conditions. The complete removal of nitrite and nitrate was accomplished in most of the tested conditions, except in culture medium containing 50 mM nitrite, suggesting that this concentration compromised the denitrification capacity of the cells. Nitrite and nitrate reductases activities were analyzed at different growth stages of H. mediterranei. In all cases, the activities of the respiratory enzymes were higher than their assimilative counterparts; this was especially the case for NirK. The denitrifying and possibly detoxifying role of this enzyme might explain the high nitrite tolerance of H. mediterranei. This archaeon was also able to remove 60% of the nitrate and 75% of the nitrite initially present in brine samples collected from a wastewater treatment facility. These results suggest that H. mediterranei, and probably other halophilic denitrifying Archaea, are suitable candidates for the bioremediation of brines with high nitrite and nitrate concentrations. PMID:23847815

  17. Measurement of nitrite reductase in leaf tissue of Vigna mungo : A new method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R C; Bose, B; Mukerji, D; Mathur, S N; Srivastava, H S

    1979-12-01

    The enzyme nitrite reductase (EC 1.6.6.4) is generally assayed in terms of disappearance of nitrite from the assay medium. We describe a technique which allowed estimation of the enzyme level in leaf tissues of Vigna mungo (L). Hepper in terms of the release of the product (NH3) of the enzyme reaction. The technique is offered as an alternative, possibly more convenient method for assay of nitrite reductase in plant tissue in vivo.

  18. Regulation by Light of Chemotaxis to Nitrite during the Sexual Life Cycle in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Ermilova; Zhanneta Zalutskaya

    2014-01-01

    Nitrite plays an important role in the nitrogen metabolism of most cells, including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We have shown that vegetative cells of C. reinhardtii are attracted by nitrite. The Nia1nit2 mutant with defects in genes encoding the nitrate reductase and regulatory protein NIT2 respectively was found to exhibit normal chemotaxis to nitrite. The data suggest that chemotaxis events appear to be specific and independent of those involved in nitrate assimilation. Unlike vegetative ce...

  19. Modelling the fate of nitrite in an urbanized river using experimentally obtained nitrifier growth parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Vilmin, Lauriane; Flipo, Nicolas; Rocher, Vincent; Laverman, Anniet M

    2015-01-01

    International audience Maintaining low nitrite concentrations in aquatic systems is a major issue for stakeholders due to nitrite's high toxicity for living species. This study reports on a cost-effective and realistic approach to study nitrite dynamics and improve its modelling in human-impacted river systems. The implementation of different nitrifying biomasses to model riverine communities and waste water treatment plant (WWTP)-related communities enabled us to assess the impact of a ma...

  20. Average daily nitrate and nitrite intake in the Belgian population older than 15 years

    OpenAIRE

    Temme, Liesbeth; Vandevijvere, Stefanie Marie; Vinkx, Christine; Huybrechts, Inge; Goeyens, Leo; Van Oyen, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the dietary intake of nitrate and nitrite in Belgium. The nitrate content of processed vegetables, cheeses and meat products was analyzed. These data were completed by data from non-targeted official control and from literature. In addition, the nitrite content of meat products was measured. Concentration data for nitrate and nitrite were linked to food consumption data of the Belgian Food Consumption Survey. This study included 3245 res...

  1. Sources of reducing equivalents for nitrite reductase in Pisum arvense roots

    OpenAIRE

    Grażyna Kłobus

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate and NADP+ as well as malic acid and NADP+ present in the incubation mixture enhanced nitrite reductase (EC 1.6.6.4) activity in Pisum arvense roots. This was manifested by a depression of the nitrite level in the tissues and an increased reduction of nitrites by plastids isolated from P. arvense roots. A marked stimulation of plastid malate dehydrogenase was also observed under the influence of nitrates present in the medium. These results suggest that pyridin nucleotides ...

  2. Nitrate reduction to nitrite, nitric oxide and ammonia by gut bacteria under physiological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Tiso

    Full Text Available The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in

  3. Evaluation of the Intake of Nitrate, Nitrite, Nitrosodiethylamine and Nitrosodimethylamine by Food Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Liliana Avasilcai; Marieta Nichifor; Geanina Bireescu; Rodica Cuciureanu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the evaluation of nitrate, nitrite, nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) and nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) intake by food consumption. We determined concentrations of nitrates, nitrites in 102 food samples (40 meat products, 15 fermented cheese, 25 vegetables, 22 fruits) and the concentration NDEA, NDMA in 40 meat products. Nitrates and nitrites were determined using Peter-Griess method; nitrosamines were quantified by HPLC with UV detection.  We designed vegetalian, vege...

  4. Portable integrated micro-fluidic platform for the monitoring and detection of nitrite

    OpenAIRE

    Czugala, Monika; Fay, Cormac; O'Connor, Noel E.; Corcoran, Brian; Benito-Lopez, Fernando; Diamond, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    A wireless, portable integrated micro-fluidic platform is proposed and applied for the determination of nitrite anions in water. The colourimetric analysis of nitrite is based on the Griess reagent, and the colour intensity of nitrite Griess reagent complex is detected using a low cost Paired Emitter Detector Diode technique. The micro-fluidic device employed a photoswitchable micro-valve, controlled by white light and generated using a light emitting diode. This low-cost and low-power detect...

  5. Effect of Nitrite Inhibitor on the Macrocell Corrosion Behavior of Reinforcing Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonglu Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of nitrite ions on the macrocell corrosion behavior of reinforcing steel embedded in cement mortar was investigated by comparing and analyzing the macrocell corrosion current, macrocell polarization ratios, and slopes of anodic and cathodic steels. Based on the experimental results, the relationship between macrocell potential difference and macrocell current density was analyzed, and the mechanism of macrocell corrosion affected by nitrite ions was proposed. The results indicated that nitrite ions had significant impact on the macrocell polarization ratios of cathode and anode. The presence of nitrite could reduce the macrocell current by decreasing the macrocell potential difference and increasing the macrocell polarization resistance of the anode.

  6. Role of Nitrite in Processed Meat Products and its Degradation during their Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILIRJANA BOCI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the analytical data of nitrite level obtained from the experimental work done on meat processed samples taken from a meat processing plant in Tirana. There has been a long debate and health concern about the nitrite content in meat products. Nitrite is added to e.g. sausages, and hams and other meat products to preserve these products and keep them free from dangerous bacteria. Among the aims are preventing botulism, a dangerous food poison. But also it’s important to use the smallest possible amount of nitrite as a preservative because nitrite in meat can also form nitrosamines, which can damage the health. That’s why the role of nitrite in processed meat and its recommended level conform to new EC Regulations are given in the introduction part of this paper. It is important that the nitrite level be monitored during all the processing steps up to the end consumers. This makes the objective of this paper. It gives the analytical data on nitrite level on meat processed samples taken and tested during their storage and ripening period of time. Different kinds of meat products are taken and tested to evaluate the influence of various parameters (storage time, time until to the end consumers, various kinds of packing in the degradation rate of ingoing nitrite.

  7. Radiation preservation with reduced nitrites of bacon and other cured meats - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main problem caused by nitrite as a preservative is the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines in bacon and other cured meats. This has led to a search for alternatives to the use of nitrite. Irradiation with reduced level of nitrite is a promising alternative to the use of current levels of nitrite. Radurization (radiation pasteurization) of bacon containing 20 to to 40 mg/kg of nitrite in evacuated packages, irradiated and stored at 4 degrees C, gives a product with good organoleptic qualities and extended shelf life of > 80 days vs. < days 30 days for the conventionally treated bacon. Radappertization (radiation sterilization) of bacon containing 20 mg/kg of nitrite at a dose of about 30 kGy, irradiated at -20 degrees or lower in evacuated packages, results in a product that is shelf stable for months to years at room temperature (∼ 25 degrees C). It has organoleptic properties comparable to commercial bacon in terms of color, flavor, odor and texture. Irradiation also reduces the nitrite and preformed nitrosamines present in bacon. Lower levels of nitrosamines are formed on cooking irradiated bacon containing presently used commercial levels of nitrite (120-150 mg/kg) and the levels of nitrosamines become negligible with 20 mg/kg of nitrite. Various aspects of preservation of bacon and other cured meats are reviewed in this report with emphasis on radiation processing. 357 refs

  8. Nitrite toxicity of Litopenaeus vannamei in water containing low concentrations of sea salt or mixed salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, A.; Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.; Browdy, C.L.; Tomasso, J.R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake, depuration and toxicity of environmental nitrite was characterized in Litopenaeus vannamei exposed in water containing low concentrations of artificial sea salt or mixed salts. In 2 g/L artificial sea salts, nitrite was concentrated in the hemolymph in a dose-dependent and rapid manner (steady-state in about 2 d). When exposed to nitrite in 2 g/L artificial sea salts for 4 d and then moved to a similar environment without added nitrite, complete depuration occurred within a day. Increasing salinity up to 10 g/L decreased uptake of environmental nitrite. Nitrite uptake in environments containing 2 g/L mixed salts (combination of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium chlorides) was similar to or lower than rates in 2 g/L artificial sea salt. Toxicity was inversely related to total dissolved salt and chloride concentrations and was highest in 2 g/L artificial sea salt (96-h medial lethal concentration = 8.4 mg/L nitrite-N). Animals that molted during the experiments did not appear to be more susceptible to nitrite than animals that did not molt. The shallow slope of the curve describing the relationship between toxicity and salinity suggests that management of nitrite toxicity in low-salinity shrimp ponds by addition of more salts may not be practical. ?? Copyright by the World Aquaculture Society 2004.

  9. METHOD FOR NITRATE DETERMINATION IN WATER IN THE PRESENCE OF NITRITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sandu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study relates to determination of nitrate in presence of nitrite in water and can be used in the quality monitoring of natural water (surface and groundwater, drinking water, water from fish farms and public aquaria where autonomous filters is used. The nature and quantity of reagents used have insignificant impact on natural waters and sewages. According to the investigation, the method includes the removal of nitrite from the solution/water with sulfaminic acid, the nitrate ion reduction to nitrite using a reducing mixture that contains Na2SO4 and zinc dust in ratio of 100:5 and determining the nitrite with the Griess reagent.

  10. Model-based evaluation on the conversion ratio of ammonium to nitrite in a nitritation process for ammonium-rich wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Cornelius, A; Rosenwinkel, K H; Kunst, S; Weichgrebe, D

    2004-01-01

    Modeling for nitritation process was discussed and analyzed quantitatively for the factors that influence nitrite accumulation. The results indicated that pH, inorganic carbon source and Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) as well as biomass concentration are the main factors that influenced the conversion ratio of ammonium to nitrite. A constant high pH can lead to a high nitritation rate and results in high conversion ratio on condition that free ammonia inhibition do not happen. In a CSTR system, without pH control, this conversion ratio can be monitored by pH variation in the reactor. The pH goes down far from the inlet level means a strongly nitrite accumulation. High concentration of alkalinity can promoted the conversion ratio by means of accelerating the nitritation rate through providing sufficient inorganic carbon source(carbon dioxide). When inorganic carbon source was depleted, the nitritation process stopped. HRT adjustment could be an efficient way to make the nitritation system run more flexible, which to some extent can meet the requirements of the fluctuant of inlet parameters such as ammonium concentration, pH, and temperature and so on. Biomass concentration is the key point, especially for a CSTR system in steady state, which was normally circumscribed by the characteristics of bacteria and may also affected by aeration mode and can be increased by prolonging the HRT on the condition of no nitrate accumulation when no recirculation available. The higher the biomass concentration is, the better the nitrite accumulation can be obtained. PMID:15900739

  11. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike eBalk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests.The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  12. ADSORPTION OF NITRITE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING SAWDUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Nuran ACAR

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of nitrites ions onto sawdust materials have been studied using a batch system. In this study, using adsorbents are beech, pine, poplar and walnut sawdust materials. The maximum adsorption percentage was occured by beech sawdust. In the studies, the effects of adsorbents and the solution of initial pH for beech sawdust were analysed using the first order reversible reaction kinetic model. For the different experimental conditions, the reaction rate constants and equilibrium constant have been determined with this kinetic model.

  13. Co-extraction and co-stripping of U(VI) and Pu(IV) using tri-iso-amyl phosphate and tri-n-butyl phosphate in n-dodecane from nitric acid media under high loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreenivasulu, Balija; Suresh, Ammath; Sivaraman, Nagarajan; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Chemistry Group

    2016-08-01

    The extraction of Pu(IV) using 1.1 M solution of tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP)/n-dodecane (DD) from plutonium nitrate solutions in nitric acid media was examined as a function of equilibrium aqueous phase metal ion concentration and equilibrium aqueous phase acidity at 303 K. The nitric acid concentration in the organic phase was measured as a function of equilibrium organic phase plutonium concentration. The co-extraction of U(VI) and Pu(IV) was studied using 1.1 M TiAP/DD system as a function of their equilibrium aqueous phase metal ion concentration and compared with 1.1 M tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/n-DD system under identical conditions. Co-extraction and co-stripping of U(VI) and Pu(IV) were studied using 1.1 M TiAP/DD and 1.1 M TBP/DD systems in cross current mode to evaluate the number of stages required for the extraction and stripping of heavy metal ions (uranium and plutonium). The extraction and stripping efficiencies were calculated for both the systems. The saturation limit of the organic phase was also established in these studies.

  14. The effect of environmental hypercapnia and size on nitrite toxicity in the striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvas, Malthe; Damsgaard, Christian; Gam, Le Thi Hong; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Jensen, Frank B; Bayley, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) are farmed intensively at high stocking densities in Vietnam where they are likely to encounter environmental hypercapnia as well as occasional high levels of aquatic nitrite. Nitrite competes with Cl(-) for uptake at the branchial HCO3(-)/Cl(-) exchanger, causing a drastic reduction in the blood oxygen carrying capacity through the formation of methaemoglobin and nitrosylhaemoglobin. Environmental hypercapnia induces a respiratory acidosis where the branchial HCO3(-)/Cl(-) exchange activity is reduced in order to retain HCO3(-) for pH recovery, which should lead to a reduced nitrite uptake. To assess the effect of hypercapnia on nitrite uptake, fish were cannulated in the dorsal aorta, allowing repeated blood sampling for measurements of haemoglobin derivatives, plasma ions and acid-base status during exposure to 0.9mM nitrite alone and in combination with acute and 48h acclimated hypercapnia over a period of 72h. Nitrite uptake was initially reduced during the hypercapnia-induced acidosis, but after pH recovery the situation was reversed, resulting in higher plasma nitrite concentrations and lower functional haemoglobin levels that eventually caused mortality. This suggests that branchial HCO3(-)/Cl(-) exchange activity is reduced only during the initial acid-base compensation, but subsequently increases with the greater availability of internal HCO3(-) counter-ions as pH is compensated. The data further suggest that branchial Na(+)/H(+) exchange plays a significant role in the initial phase of acid-base compensation. Overall, longer term environmental hypercapnia does not protect against nitrite uptake in P. hypophthalmus, but instead enhances it. In addition, we observed a significant size effect in nitrite accumulation, where large fish attained plasma [nitrite] above the ambient concentration, while small fish did not. Small P. hypophthalmus instead had significantly higher plasma [nitrate], and haemoglobin

  15. Acrylic microspheres-based optosensor for visual detection of nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Nur Syarmim Mohamed; Tan, Ling Ling; Heng, Lee Yook; Chong, Kwok Feng; Tajuddin, Saiful Nizam

    2016-09-15

    A new optosensor for visual quantitation of nitrite (NO2(-)) ion has been fabricated by physically immobilizing Safranine O (SO) reagent onto a self-adhesive poly(n-butyl acrylate) [poly(nBA)] microspheres matrix, which was synthesized via facile microemulsion UV lithography technique. Evaluation and optimization of the optical NO2(-) ion sensor was performed with a fiber optic reflectance spectrophotometer. Scanning electron micrograph showed well-shaped and smooth spherical morphology of the poly(nBA) microspheres with a narrow particles size distribution from 0.6 μm up to 1.8 μm. The uniform size distribution of the acrylic microspheres promoted homogeneity of the immobilized SO reagent molecules on the microspheres' surfaces, thereby enhanced the sensing response reproducibility (<5% RSD) with a linear range obtained from 10 to 100 ppm NO2(-) ion. The micro-sized acrylic immobilization matrix demonstrated no significant barrier for diffusion of reactant and product, and served as a good solid state ion transport medium for reflectometric nitrite determination in food samples. PMID:27080889

  16. Raman scattering in sodium nitrite crystals near the phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Pyatyshev, A. Yu.; Krylov, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Raman spectra of a ferroelectric sodium nitrite crystal have been detected in a wide spectrum range at various temperatures, including the region of the ferroelectric phase transition. A manifestation of a transverse soft polar mode of the A 1( z) type responsible for the ferroelectric phase transition has been discovered in the spectrum at room temperature. This mode has been found to become overdamped even far from the ferroelectric phase transition temperature. This mode also appears as a central peak under heating. It has been found that the pseudoscalar mode of the A 2 type has the highest intensity in the Raman spectrum of sodium nitrite. The frequency corresponding to the maximum intensity of this mode in the Raman spectrum varies from 130 cm-1 at 123 K to 106 cm-1 at T = 513 K. A fair agreement of the experimental data for the A 1( z) mode with the Lyddane-Sachs-Teller relation has been established. The polariton curves for the A 1( z) polar mode and the dispersion curves for axinons has been plotted.

  17. Addition of nitrite enhances the electrochemical defluorination of 2-fluoroaniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huajun; Liang, Yuxiang; Guo, Kun; Long, Yuyang; Cong, Yanqing; Shen, Dongsheng

    2015-12-30

    This study introduces a novel approach that uses the interaction of pollutants with added nitrite to produce diazonium salts, which cause in situ self-assembly of the pollutants on carbon electrodes, to improve their 2-fluoroaniline (2-FA) defluorination and removal performance. The 2-FA degradation performance, electrode properties, electrochemical properties and degradation pathway were investigated. The reactor containing NO2(-) achieved a 2-FA removal efficiency of 90.1% and a defluorination efficiency of 38% within 48 h, 1.4 and 2.3 times higher than the corresponding results achieved without NO2(-), respectively. The residual NO2(-) was less than 0.5mg/L in the reactor containing added NO2(-), which would not cause serious secondary pollution. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results proved that the carbon anode surface was successfully modified with benzene polymer, and electrochemical tests confirmed that the electrochemical activity of the modified anode was enhanced significantly. The C-F bond was weakened by the effect of the positive charge of the benzenediazonium groups, and the high electrochemical activity of the carbon anode enhanced the electrochemical performance of the system to accelerate defluorination. Thus, the present electrical method involving nitrite nitrogen is very promising for the treatment of wastewater containing fluoroaniline compounds.

  18. STRESS INDUCED NITROGEN DIFFUSION IN NITRITED CoCr ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKVILĖ PETRAITIENĖ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the nitrogen transport mechanism in plasma nitrited CoCr alloy at moderate temperature ( 400ºC is explained by non-Fickian diffusion model. This mechanism is considered by stress induced diffusion model. The model involves diffusion of nitrogen induced by internal stresses created during nitriding process. The model considers the diffusion of nitrogen in the presence of  internal stresses gradient induced by penetrating nitrogen as the next driving force of diffusion after concentration gradient. This model is commonly used for analysis of stainless steel nitriding, however, in this work it is shown that the same nitrogen penetration mechanism takes place in CoCr alloy. For mathematical description of stress induced diffusion process the equation of baro-diffusion is used which involves concentration dependant baro-diffusion concentration. For calculation of stress gradient it is assumed that stress depth profile linearly relates with nitrogen concentration depth profile. The fitting is done using experimental curves of nitrogen depth profiles for medical grade CoCr alloy (ISO 5831-12 nitrited at 400 ºC temperature. The experimental curves are taken from literature. The nitriding duration was 2h, 6h, 20h. Calculated nitrogen depth profiles in CoCr alloy are in good agreement with experimental nitrogen depth profiles.  The diffusion coefficient D is found from fitting of experimental data.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5711

  19. Source and sink of nitrite in heavily populated European River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimonet, M.; Viollier, E.; Culoma, L.; Laverman, A.

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence of nitrite (NO2-) accumulation is a major environmental issue, as NO2- is highly toxic to living organisms, even at low concentrations. Even if NO2- is generally quickly oxidized in the environment, NO2- accumulation has been reported in various terrestrial and aquatic environments. The Seine River - that receive water effluents from one of the most heavily populated system in Europe - is characterized by NO2- accumulation downstream of Paris city. The main hypotheses to explain the persistence of NO2- are high NO2- concentrations in outlets of the biggest European waste water treatment plant and the low growth rate of nitrifying bacteria - and especially, nitrite oxidizing bacteria - compared to river water residence time. However, the role of benthic processes and sediment resuspension on NO2- dynamics has not been investigated in the river, where fluvial transport generates episodic and frequent resuspension. In this study, we quantified reaction rates of processes involving NO2- production and/or consumption in surface water and sediments, as well as benthic exchanges at the sediment-water interface, under oxic and anoxic conditions. This work allowed estimating the contribution of the Seine River to NO2- dynamics and the response of riverine bacteria to high NO2- loads.

  20. Method 353.4 Determination of Nitrate and Nitrite in Estuarine and Coastal Waters by Gas Segmented Continuous Flow Colorimetric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This method provides a procedure for determining nitrate and nitrite concentrations in estuarine and coastal waters. Nitrate is reduced to nitrite by cadmium,1-3 and the resulting nitrite determined by formation of an azo dye.4-6

  1. Biological nitrogen removal in one step by nitritation and anaerobic oxidation of ammonia in biofilms; Einstufige biologische Stickstoffelimination durch Nitritation und anaerobe Ammonium-Oxidation im Biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmer, C.; Tromm, C.; Hippen, A.; Rosenwinkel, K.H.; Seyfried, C.F.; Kunst, S. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft und Abfalltechnik

    1999-07-01

    For biological treatment of high nitrogenous wastewaters with low C/N ratio autotrophic microorganisms which are able to convert ammonium directly into nitrogen gas are especially interesting. It is exceptionally difficult to verify their presence and importance in mixed populations of full scale wastewater treatment plants. So it could not be clarified finally up to now which basic microbial reactions lead to single stage complete nitrogen removal, here called deammonification, in the nitrification step (biological contactor) of the leachate treatment plant in Mechernich. It succeeded meanwhile to establish the process of deammonification in a continuous flow moving-bed pilot plant. In batch experiments which biomass-covered carriers nitrogen conversions could become investigated at the intact biofilm for the first time. Two autotrophic nitrogen conversion reactions could be proved in the biofilm depending on dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration: A nitritation under aerobic conditions and an anaerobic ammonium oxidation. For the anaerobic ammonium oxidation nitrite was used as electron acceptor with ammonium as electron donor. N{sub 2} was the end product of the reaction. The ratio of ammonium conversion to nitrite conversion was 1:1,37, which was described in the same range for the ANAMMOX-process (1:1,31{+-}0,06). Nitrate could not be used as electron acceptor. Nitrite had to be added to the experiment to obtain oxygen independent oxidation of ammonium. The parts of nitritation and anaerobic ammonium conversion in nitrogen conversion could be controlled by the DO concentration. At a DO concentration of 0.7 mg/l both processes were balanced, so that a direct almost complete elimination of ammonium was possible without any dosage of nitrite. The added ammonium was partially oxidised to nitrite and partially oxidised anaerobically. The aerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrite in the outer oxygen supplied biofilm layers produced the reactant for the anaerobic ammonium

  2. Formation of new bioactive organic nitrites and their identification with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography coupled to nitrite reduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Kristofer F.; Lundgren, Michael; Agvald, Per; Adding, L. Christofer; Linnarsson, Dag; Lars E Gustafsson

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nitric oxide (NO) donors, notably organic nitrates and nitrites are used therapeutically but tolerance develops rapidly, making the use of e.g. nitroglycerin difficult. NO donation in the pulmonary vascular bed might be useful in critically ill patients. Organic nitrites are not associated with tachyphylaxis but may induce methaemoglobinemia and systemic hypotension which might hamper their use. We hypothesised that new lung-selective NO donors can be identified by utilizi...

  3. Haematological and ion regulatory effects of nitrite in the air-breathing snakehead fish Channa striata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Jensen, Frank Bo; Huong, Do T.T.;

    2012-01-01

    The tolerance and effects of nitrite on ion balance and haematology were investigated in the striped snakehead, Channa striata Bloch 1793, which is an air-breathing fish with reduced gills of importance for aquaculture in South East Asia. C. striata was nitrite tolerant with a 96 h LC50 of 4.7 m...

  4. Bioavailability of sodium nitrite from an aqueous solution in healthy adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunault, C.C.; van Velzen, A.G.; Sips, A.J.; Schothorst, R.C.; Meulenbelt, J.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrate intake in humans is high through intake of vegetables such as beets, lettuce, and spinach. Nitrate itself is a compound of low toxicity but its metabolite, nitrite, formed by bacteria in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, has been suspected of potential carcinogenic effects. Nitrite

  5. Susceptibility of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fed dietary sodium chloride to nitrite toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were fed diets supplemented with 0 or 6% NaCl for 10 weeks. Tilapia were exposed to approximately 21 mg/l nitrite-N after five and ten weeks of feeding to determine the effect of dietary NaCl supplementation on resistance to nitrite toxicity. Fish were...

  6. Nitrite and Nitrate Content in Meat Products and Estimated Intake in Denmark From 1998 to 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Torben; Fagt, Sisse; Nielsen, S.;

    2008-01-01

    The content of nitrite and nitrate in cured meat products has been monitored in Denmark seven times between 1995 and 2006. The maximum permitted added amounts of sodium nitrite in Denmark (60 mg kg(-1) for most products up to 150 mg kg(-1) for special products) have not been exceeded, except for ...

  7. Metabolic fates and effects of nitrite in brown trout under normoxic and hypoxic conditions: blood and tissue nitrite metabolism and interactions with branchial NOS, Na+/K+-ATPase and hsp70 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Frank B; Gerber, Lucie; Hansen, Marie N; Madsen, Steffen S

    2015-07-01

    Nitrite secures essential nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in hypoxia at low endogenous concentrations, whereas it becomes toxic at high concentrations. We exposed brown trout to normoxic and hypoxic water in the absence and presence of added ambient nitrite to decipher the cellular metabolism and effects of nitrite at basal and elevated concentrations under different oxygen regimes. We also tested hypotheses concerning the influence of nitrite on branchial nitric oxide synthase (NOS), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (nka) and heat shock protein (hsp70) mRNA expression. Basal plasma and erythrocyte nitrite levels were higher in hypoxia than normoxia, suggesting increased NOS activity. Nitrite exposure strongly elevated nitrite concentrations in plasma, erythrocytes, heart tissue and white muscle, which was associated with an extensive metabolism of nitrite to nitrate and to iron-nitrosylated and S-nitrosated compounds. Nitrite uptake was slightly higher in hypoxia than normoxia, and high internal nitrite levels extensively converted blood hemoglobin to methemoglobin and nitrosylhemoglobin. Hypoxia increased inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA levels in the gills, which was overruled by a strong inhibition of iNOS expression by nitrite in both normoxia and hypoxia, suggesting negative-feedback regulation of iNOS gene expression by nitrite. A similar inhibition was absent for neuronal NOS. Branchial NKA activity stayed unchanged, but mRNA levels of the nkaα1a subunit increased with hypoxia and nitrite, which may have countered an initial NKA inhibition. Nitrite also increased hsp70 gene expression, probably contributing to the cytoprotective effects of nitrite at low concentrations. Nitrite displays a concentration-dependent switch between positive and negative effects similar to other signaling molecules. PMID:25908056

  8. Measurements of nitrite production and nitrite-producing organisms in and around the primary nitrite maximum in the central California Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Santoro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite (NO2– is a substrate for both oxidative and reductive microbial metabolism. NO2– accumulates at the base of the euphotic zone in oxygenated, stratified open ocean water columns, forming a feature known as the primary nitrite maximum (PNM. Potential pathways of NO2– production include the oxidation of ammonia (NH3 by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria or archaea and assimilatory nitrate (NO3– reduction by phytoplankton or heterotrophic bacteria. Measurements of NH3 oxidation and NO3– reduction to NO2– were conducted at two stations in the central California Current in the eastern North Pacific to determine the relative contributions of these processes to NO2– production in the PNM. Sensitive (−1, high-resolution measurements of [NH4+] and [NO2–] indicated a persistent NH4+ maximum overlying the PNM at every station, with concentrations as high as 1.5 μmol L−1. Within and just below the PNM, NH3 oxidation was the dominant NO2– producing process with rates of NH3 oxidation of up to 50 nmol L−1 d−1, coinciding with high abundances of ammonia-oxidizing archaea. Though little NO2– production from NO3– was detected, potentially nitrate-reducing phytoplankton (photosynthetic picoeukaryotes, Synechococcus, and Prochlorococcus were present at the depth of the PNM. Rates of NO2– production from NO3– were highest within the upper mixed layer (4.6 nmol L−1 d−1 but were either below detection limits or 10 times lower than NH3 oxidation rates around the PNM. One-dimensional modeling of water column NO2– profiles supported direct rate measurements of a net biological sink for NO2– just below the PNM. Residence time estimates of NO2– within the PNM were similar at the mesotrophic and oligotrophic stations and ranged from 150–205 d. Our results suggest the PNM is a dynamic, rather than relict, feature with a source term dominated by ammonia oxidation.

  9. The use of atmospheric pressure plasma-treated water as a source of nitrite for emulsion-type sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; In Yong, Hae; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the possible use of atmospheric pressure plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source in curing process. Emulsion-type sausages were manufactured with PTW, celery powder containing nitrite, and synthetic sodium nitrite at a concentration of nitrite ion 70mgkg(-1). In terms of sausage quality, there were no noticeable effects of PTW on the total aerobic bacterial counts, color, and peroxide values of sausages compared with those of celery powder and sodium nitrite throughout 28days of storage at 4°C. Sausage with added PTW had lower concentrations of residual nitrite compared to those of added celery powder and sodium nitrite during the storage period (Psausages were not different, whereas the sausage with added celery powder received the lowest scores in taste and acceptability. From the results, it is concluded that PTW can be used as a nitrite source equivalent to a natural curing agent.

  10. Aggregate Size and Architecture Determine Microbial Activity Balance for One-Stage Partial Nitritation and Anammox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaeminck, S.E.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.;

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB) and anoxic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) cooperate in partial nitritation/anammox systems to remove ammonium from wastewater. In this process, large granular microbial aggregates enhance the performance, but little is known about granulation so far......AOB abundance and the activity balance for the different aggregate sizes and (ii) to relate aggregate morphology, size distribution, and architecture putatively to the inoculation and operation of the three reactors. A nitrite accumulation rate ratio (NARR) was defined as the net aerobic nitrite production rate...... divided by the anoxic nitrite consumption rate. The smallest reactor A, B, and C aggregates were nitrite sources (NARR, > 1.7). Large reactor A and C aggregates were granules capable of autonomous nitrogen removal (NARR, 0.6 to 1.1) with internal AnAOB zones surrounded by an AerAOB rim. Around 50% of the...

  11. Effect of anaerobic digestion on the high rate of nitritation, treating piggery wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiyeol Im; Kyungik Gil

    2011-01-01

    The amount of piggery wastewater as domestic livestock is increasing.The volume of piggery wastewater produced is less than the volume of other wastewaters,but piggery wastewater has a heavy impact on wastewater streams due to an extremely high concentration of nitrogen and COD.In this study,laboratory reactors were operated using piggery wastewater and the effluent of anaerobic digester from piggery wastewater plants.The purpose of this study was to induce the nitritation process,which is an economically advantageous nitrogen removal method that converts ammonium nitrogen into nitrite.The results showed that the effluent of anaerobic digester from piggery wastewater was more efficient than raw piggery wastewater in terms of inducing nitritation.It can be deduced that nitritation is largely affected by an organic fraction of piggery wastewater.It can also be concluded that a small amount of biodegradable organic matter in piggery wastewater is efficient in inducing nitritation.

  12. Achieving and maintaining biological nitrogen removal via nitrite under normal conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI You-wei; PENG Yong-zhen; GAN Xiang-qing; YE Liu; WANG Ya-yi

    2005-01-01

    The principal aim of this paper is to develop an approach to realize stable biological nitrogen removal via nitrite under normal conditions. Validation of the new method was established on laboratory-scale experiments applying the sequencing batch reactor(SBR)activated sludge process to domestic wastewater with low C/N ratio. The addition of sodium chloride(NaCl) to influent was established to achieve nitrite build-up. The high nitrite accumulation, depending on the salinity in influent and the application duration of salt, was obtained in SBRs treating saline wastewater. The maintenance results indicated that the real-time SBRs can maintain stable nitrite accumulation, but conversion from shorter nitrification-denitrification to full nitrification-denitrification was observed after some operation cycles in the other SBR with fixed-time control. The presented method is valuable to offer a solution to realize and to maintain nitrogen removal via nitrite under normal conditions.

  13. Conjugated linoleic acid and nitrite attenuate mitochondrial dysfunction during myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoose, Patrick M; Kelm, Natia Qipshidze; Piell, Kellianne M; Cole, Marsha P

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular health is influenced by dietary composition and the western diet is composed of varying types/amounts of fat. Conjugated linoleic acid (cLA) is an abundant dietary unsaturated fatty acid associated with health benefits but its biological signaling is not well understood. Nitrite is enriched in vegetables within the diet and can impact signaling of unsaturated fatty acids; however, its role on cLA signaling is not well understood. Elucidating how nitrite may impact the biological signaling of cLA is important due to the dietary consumption of both cLA and nitrite in the western diet. Since co-administration of cLA and nitrite results in cardioprotection during myocardial infarction (MI), it was hypothesized that cLA and nitrite may affect cardiac mitochondrial respiratory function and complex activity in MI. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cLA and nitrite for either 10 or 13days, where MI was induced on day 3. Following treatment, respiration and complex activity were measured. Among the major findings of this study, cLA treatment (10days) decreases state 3 respiration in vivo. Following MI, nitrite alone and in combination with cLA attenuates increased state 3 respiration and decreases hydrogen peroxide levels. Further, nitrite and cLA co-treatment attenuates increased complex III activity after MI. These results suggest that cLA, nitrite and the combination significantly alter cardiac mitochondrial respiratory and electron transport chain activity in vivo and following MI. Overall, the daily consumption of cLA and nitrite in the diet can have diverse cardiovascular implications, some of which occur at the mitochondrial level. PMID:27156147

  14. Antimicrobial effect of acidified nitrate and nitrite on six common oral pathogens in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Deng-sheng; LIU Yin; ZHANG Chun-mei; YANG Sheng-hui; WANG Song-lin

    2006-01-01

    Background Salivary nitrate is positively correlated with plasma nitrate and its level is 9 times the plasma level after nitrate loading. Nitrate in saliva is known to be reduced to nitrite by oral bacteria. Nitrate and nitrite levels in saliva are 3-5 times those in serum in physiological conditions respectively in our previous study. The biological functions of high salivary nitrate and nitrite are still not well understood. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of nitrate and nitrite on main oral pathogens under acidic conditions.Methods Six common oral pathogens including Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4646, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277, Capnocytophaga gingivalis ATCC 33624, Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953, and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were cultured in liquid medium. Sodium nitrate or sodium nitrite was added to the medium to final concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 10 mmol/L. All of the microorganisms were incubated for 24 to 48 hours. The optical densities (OD) of cell suspensions were determined and the cultures were transferred to solid nutrient broth medium to observe the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration for the six tested pathogens.Results Nitrite at concentrations of 0.5 to 10 mmol/L had an inhibitory effect on all tested organisms at low pH values. The antimicrobial effect of nitrite increased with the acidity of the medium. Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449 was highly sensitive to nitrite at low pH values. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4646 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were relatively resistant to acidified nitrite. Nitrate at the given concentrations and under acidic conditions had no inhibitory effect on the growth of any of the tested pathogens.Conclusion Nitrite, at a concentration equal to that in human saliva, is both cytocidal and cytostatic to six principal oral pathogens in vitro, whereas nitrate at a similar

  15. Effects of pulse duration and post-exposure period on the nitrite toxicity to a freshwater amphipod

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, A.; Camargo, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    This research assesses the effects of nitrite pulses and post-exposure periods after nitrite exposures on the survival of the freshwater amphipod Eulimnogammarus toletanus. A toxicity bioassay was performed using three different nitrite concentrations (0.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/L NO2-N), four pulse expos

  16. Inhibition of hypochlorous acid-induced cellular toxicity by nitrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Matthew; Hooper, D. Craig; Scott, Gwen S.; Koprowski, Hilary; Halliwell, Barry

    2002-09-01

    Chronic inflammation results in increased nitrogen monoxide (NO) formation and the accumulation of nitrite (NO). Neutrophils stimulated by various inflammatory mediators release myeloperoxidase to produce the cytotoxic agent hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Exposure of chondrocytic SW1353 cells to HOCl resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent loss in viability, ATP, and glutathione levels. Treatment of cells with NO but not nitrate (NO) substantially decreased HOCl-dependent cellular toxicity even when NO was added at low (μM) concentrations. In contrast, NO alone (even at 1 mM concentrations) did not affect cell viability or ATP and glutathione levels. These data suggest that NO accumulation at chronic inflammatory sites, where both HOCl and NO are overproduced, may be cytoprotective against damage caused by HOCl. We propose that this is because HOCl is removed by reacting with NO to give nitryl chloride (NO2Cl), which is less damaging in our cell system. inflammation | cell toxicity | nitryl chloride | nitric oxide | arthritis

  17. Blood indexes of nitrite toxicosis in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stefanon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate (NO_ 3 and nitrite (NO_ 2 can be ingested with water and feeds and NO_ 2 can be produced from NO_ 3 by rumen and intestinal microbes. Moreover,NO_ 3 and NO_ 2 are endogenously produced by cells of various tissues from nitric oxide (NO and arginine (Passi, 2000. Toxicity of NO_ 3 is casued by the reduction to NO_ 2 in the rumen environment. This ion competes with superoxide for hemoglobin (Doyle et al., 1982, producing methemoglobin (MtHb, which does not carry oxygen. The reaction is reversible, but the transient hypoxia can be exacerbated if the amount of ingested nitrates is high, causing fall of blood pressure and increase of heart rate........

  18. Strategies of Nitrosomonas europaea 19718 to counter low dissolved oxygen and high nitrite concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandran Kartik

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitrosomonas europaea is a widely studied chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizing bacterium. While significant work exists on the ammonia oxidation pathway of N. europaea, its responses to factors such as dissolved oxygen limitation or sufficiency or exposure to high nitrite concentrations, particularly at the functional gene transcription level are relatively sparse. The principal goal of this study was to investigate responses at the whole-cell activity and gene transcript levels in N. europaea 19718 batch cultures, which were cultivated at different dissolved oxygen and nitrite concentrations. Transcription of genes coding for principal metabolic pathways including ammonia oxidation (amoA, hydroxylamine oxidation (hao, nitrite reduction (nirK and nitric oxide reduction (norB were quantitatively measured during batch growth, at a range of DO concentrations (0.5, 1.5 and 3.0 mg O2/L. Measurements were also conducted during growth at 1.5 mg O2/L in the presence of 280 mg-N/L of externally added nitrite. Results Several wide ranging responses to DO limitation and nitrite toxicity were observed in N. europaea batch cultures. In contrast to our initial hypothesis, exponential phase mRNA concentrations of both amoA and hao increased with decreasing DO concentrations, suggesting a mechanism to metabolize ammonia and hydroxylamine more effectively under DO limitation. Batch growth in the presence of 280 mg nitrite-N/L resulted in elevated exponential phase nirK and norB mRNA concentrations, potentially to promote utilization of nitrite as an electron acceptor and to detoxify nitrite. This response was in keeping with our initial hypothesis and congruent with similar responses in heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria. Stationary phase responses were distinct from exponential phase responses in most cases, suggesting a strong impact of ammonia availability and metabolism on responses to DO limitation and nitrite toxicity. In general

  19. Study of Enzymatic Synthesis of L-ascorbyl Fatty Acid Esters in Tert-amyl Alcohol%叔戊醇体系中酶法合成L-抗坏血酸脂肪酸酯的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洪勇; 钱俊青

    2011-01-01

    研究以棕榈油为酰基供体和L-抗坏血酸在有机相中利用脂肪酶催化酯交换反应合成L-抗坏血酸脂肪酸酯.对催化合成L-抗坏血酸脂肪酸酯的反应介质进行了比较,系统考察了底物浓度、溶剂用量、底物摩尔比、温度、水活度、分子筛加入时间和加入量对酶催化反应的影响,确定了最适反应条件:在20 mL用分子筛充分除水的叔戊醇中,0.352g·L-1抗坏血酸和4.535 g棕榈油(L-抗坏血酸和脂肪酸的底物摩尔比为1∶8)在14.2%(w/w,酶/L-抗坏血酸)的脂肪酶Novo435催化作用下,反应初始加入50 g·L-1的分子筛,温度55℃,摇床转速200 r ·min-1,反应24 h后底物转化率可达65%,产物浓度可达22 g·L-1.%The synthesis of L-ascorbyl fatty acid esters through transesterification of ascorbic acid and palm oil in tert-amy\\ alcohol catalyzed by immobilized lipase was studied. A series of solvents used for the reaction were investigated, among them the tert-amyl alcohol was found to be the most suitable reaction media for the enzymatic synthesis of L-ascorbyl fatty acid esters. The addition of the molecular sieves was found to be helpful for reaction system to keep the water activity and to make the equilibrium go to the product. The factors affecting catalytic leaction, such as the substrate concentration, amount of solvent, substrate molar ratio, temperature, water activity and the addition of molecular sieve, were investigated. The results show that, when 0.352 g ascorbic acid and 4.535 g palm oil (the molar ratio of ascorbic acid to fatty acid is 1:8) are catalyzed by 14.2% Novo435 (weight % of ascorbic acid) in 20 mL terf-amyl alcohol with 50 g·L-1 molecular sieve added and rotation speed of 200 r·min-1, the conversion of ascorbic acid can reach 65% and the concentration of L-ascorbyl fatty acid esters is 22 g·L-1 after 24 h reaction at 55℃.

  20. Thymoquinone ameliorates testicular tissue inflammation induced by chronic administration of oral sodium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyoussef, A; Al-Gayyar, M M H

    2016-06-01

    Although sodium nitrite has been widely used as food preservative, building bases of scientific evidence about nitrite continues to oppose the general safety in human health. Moreover, thymoquinone (TQ) has therapeutic potential as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anticancer. Therefore, we investigated the effects of both sodium nitrite and TQ on testicular tissues of rats. Forty adult male Sprague Dawley rats were used. They received either 80 mg kg(-1) sodium nitrite or 50 mg kg(-1) TQ daily for twelve weeks. Serum testosterone was measured. Testis were weighed and the testicular tissue homogenates were used for measurements of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL10, caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9. Sodium nitrite resulted in significant reduction in serum testosterone concentration and elevation in testis weight and Gonado-Somatic Index. We found significant reduction in testicular tissues levels of IL-4 and IL-10 associated with elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9. In conclusion, chronic oral sodium nitrite induced changes in the weight of rat testis accompanied by elevation in the testicular tissue level of oxidative stress markers and inflammatory cytokines. TQ attenuated sodium nitrite-induced testicular tissue damage through blocking oxidative stress, restoration of normal inflammatory cytokines balance and blocking of apoptosis.

  1. Inhibition of nitrite-induced toxicity in channel catfish by calcium chloride and sodium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasso J.R., Wright; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    Environmental chloride has been shown to inhibit methemoglobin formation in fish, thereby offering a protective effect against nitrite toxicity. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were simultaneously exposed to various environmental nitrite and chloride levels (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) in dechlorinated tap water (40 mg/L total hardness, 47 mg/L alkalinity, 4 mg/L chloride, pH = 6.9-7.1, and temperature 21-24°C). Methemoglobin levels in fish simultaneously exposed to 2.5 mg/L nitrite and up to 30 mg/L chloride as either CaCl2 or NaCl were similar but significantly lower than in unprotected fish. Exposure to 10 mg/L nitrite and 60 mg/L chloride resulted in methemoglobin levels similar to those of the controls; most unprotected fish died. Fish exposed to 10 mg/L nitrite had significantly lower methemoglobin levels when protected with 15.0 mg/L chloride as CaCl2 than with NaCl. Fish exposed to nitrite in the presence of 60 mg/L chloride (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) had similar 24-h LC50 values that were significantly elevated above those obtained in the absence of chloride. Calcium had little effect on tolerance to nitrite toxicity in channel catfish in contrast to its large effect reported in steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri).

  2. Coastal water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation are decoupled in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Elise M.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2016-09-01

    Water column nitrification is a key process in the nitrogen cycle as it links reduced and oxidized forms of nitrogen and also provides the substrate (nitrate) needed for reactive nitrogen removal by denitrification. We measured potential water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates at four sites along an estuary to continental shelf gradient over two summers. In most cases, nitrite oxidation rates outpaced ammonium oxidation rates. Overall, ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were higher outside of the estuary, and this trend was primarily driven by higher oxidation rates in deeper waters. Additionally, both ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were impacted by different in situ variables. Ammonium oxidation rates throughout the water column as a whole were most positively correlated to depth and salinity and negatively correlated to dissolved oxygen and light. In contrast, nitrite oxidation rates throughout the water column were negatively correlated with light and pH. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that while both surface (20 m) ammonium oxidation rates were most strongly predicted by depth and light, surface rates were also regulated by salinity and deep rates by temperature. Surface (20 m) nitrite oxidation rates. These results support the growing body of evidence that ammonium oxidation and nitrite oxidation are not always coupled, should be measured separately, and are influenced by different environmental conditions.

  3. Seasonal Cycle Analysis of the Nitrate Nitrogen and Nitrite Nitrogen in the Bohai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Qiang; Chen Jianglin; Li Chongde

    2002-01-01

    During 1985~1987, the concentration of nitrate nitrogen was higher in the Laizhou Bay and the Bohai Bay while that of nitrite nitrogen was higher in the Liaodong Bay and the Bohai Bay. The concentration of nitrate nitrogen was highest in winter and lowest in summer while that of nitrite nitrogen was highest in autumn and lowest in spring. The seasonal variation of the concentration of nitrate nitrogen was maximum in the Laizhou Bay and the Bohai Bay while that of the concentration of nitrite nitrogen was maximum in the Liaodong Bay. There was a great difference in the concentration of nitrate nitrogen between the surface and the bottom in autumn and in the concentration of nitrite nitrogen between the surface and the bottom in summer. The main reason for the seasonal variations of the concentration of nitrate nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen was the marine biochemical process. The nitrate nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen in the Bohai Sea basically maintained a quasi-equilibrium state seasonal cycle. The quasi-equilibrium state seasonal cycle of nitrate nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen at the bottom was stable while that at the surface was liable to variations caused by other factors.

  4. Preliminary nitrite, nitrate and colour analysis of Malaysian edible bird’s nest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meei Chien Quek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The high nitrite content in edible bird’s nests is a major concern to the local swiftlet industry. It lowers the price of the edible bird’s nests and it brings severe health hazards to consumers and farmers. This research investigated the nitrite and nitrate contents of eight types of local edible bird’s nests by using ion chromatography system and evaluating its colour using the CIE system in L∗a∗b∗ parameters. The nitrite content obtained ranged from 5.7 μg/g for the house nests to 843.8 μg/g for the cave nests. The nitrate content for the house and cave nests was 98.2 μg/g and 36,999.4 μg/g, respectively. The cave nests with darker and redder colour had higher nitrite and nitrate contents than the brighter and more yellow house nests. This likely suggests that the nitrite and nitrate contents have correlations with edible bird’s nests colour. Correlations studies suggested that the nitrite content had high correlations with colour parameters, L∗a∗b∗ of edible bird’s nests at significant level of P < 0.10. These findings suggest that edible bird’s nests’ colour may be a useful indicator for measuring nitrite and nitrate contaminations.

  5. The nitritation performance of biofilm reactor for treating domestic wastewater under high dissolved oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaoming; Li, Zebing; Ma, Jing; Du, Jia; Chen, Guanghui; Bian, Wei; Li, Jun; Zhao, Baihang

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the nitritation performance in a biofilm reactor for treating domestic wastewater. The reactor was operated in continuous feed mode from phases 1 to 3. The dissolved oxygen (DO) was controlled at 3.5-7 mg/L throughout the experiment. The biofilm reactor showed excellent nitritation performance after the inoculation of nitrifying sludge, with the hydraulic retention time being reduced from 24 to 7 hr. Above 90% nitrite accumulation ratio (NAR) was maintained in phase 1. Afterwards, nitratation occurred with the low NH4(+)-N concentration in the reactor. The improvement of NH4(+)-N concentration to 20-35 mg/L had a limited effect on the recovery of nitritation. However, nitritation recovered rapidly when sequencing batch feed mode was adopted in phase 4, with the effluent NH4(+)-N concentration above 7 mg/L. The improvement of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) activity and the combined inhibition effect of free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) on the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were two key factors for the rapid recovery of nitritation. Sludge activity was obtained in batch tests. The results of batch tests had a good relationship with the long term operation performance of the biofilm reactor. PMID:27090719

  6. Nitrous oxide formation during nitritation and nitrification of high-strength wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Yvonne; Beier, Maike; Rosenwinkel, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the formation of nitrous oxide (N2O) in nitritation and nitrification under stable, comparable and not limiting conditions typical for treatment of high-strength wastewater. A laboratory-scale aerated chemostat was operated with reject water at different sludge retention times, achieving suppression of nitrate formation by wash-out of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria for nitritation. The N2O formation factor during stable nitritation was higher (2.90% N2O-N /NH4(-)-Nox) than during nitrification (0.74%). The positive correlation of N2O formation rates and ammonium oxidation rates was linear and thus did not contribute to changes of the N2O formation factor. The dominant factor for N2O formation during stable operation was high nitrite concentration, which was positively correlated with N2O formation rates. The highest formation factors were observed during a transition phase from nitrification to nitritation with unstable process conditions (4.81%) and during a short-term experiment with increased pH of 7 (10.28%). The results indicate that even with operational conditions that are regarded favourable for the process of nitritation N2O formation can be limited but not avoided. PMID:23752381

  7. Transpulmonary plasma ET-1 and nitrite differences in high altitude pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Marc M; Dehnert, Christoph; Bailey, Damian M; Luks, Andrew M; Menold, Elmar; Castell, Christian; Schendler, Guido; Faoro, Vitalie; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Bärtsch, Peter; Swenson, Erik R

    2009-01-01

    Berger, Marc M., Christoph Dehnert, Damian M. Bailey, Andrew M. Luks, Elmar Menold, Christian Castell, Guido Schendler, Vitalie Faoro, Heimo Mairbäurl, Peter Bärtsch, and Eric R. Swenson. Transpulmonary plasma ET-1 and nitrite differences in high altitude pulmonary hypertension. High Alt. Med. Biol. 10:17-24, 2009.- Thirty-four mountaineers were studied at low (110 m) and high altitude (4559 m) to evaluate if increased pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) at high altitude is associated with increased pulmonary endothelin-1 (ET-1) availability and alterations in nitrite metabolism across the lung. Blood samples were obtained using central venous and radial artery catheters for plasma ET-1 and nitrite. Pulmonary blood flow was measured by inert gas rebreathing to calculate transpulmonary exchange of plasma ET-1 and nitrite, and PASP was assessed by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. After ascent to high altitude, PASP increased from 23 +/- 4 to 39 +/- 10 mmHg. Arterial and central venous plasma ET-1 increased, while plasma nitrite did not change significantly. At low altitude there was a transpulmonary loss of plasma ET-1, but a transpulmonary gain at high altitude. In contrast was a transpulmonary gain of plasma nitrite at low altitude and a transpulmonary loss at high altitude. PASP positively correlated with a transpulmonary gain of plasma ET-1 and negatively correlated with a transpulmonary loss of plasma nitrite. These results suggest that a transpulmonary gain of plasma ET- 1 is associated with higher PASP at high altitude. Transpulmonary loss of plasma nitrite indicates either less pulmonary nitric oxide (NO) production, which contributes to higher PASP, or increased NO bioavailability arising from nitrite reduction, which may oppose ET-1-mediated vasoconstriction.

  8. Haematological and ion regulatory effects of nitrite in the air-breathing snakehead fish Channa striata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Jensen, Frank B; Huong, Do T T; Wang, Tobias; Phuong, Nguyen T; Bayley, Mark

    2012-08-15

    The tolerance and effects of nitrite on ion balance and haematology were investigated in the striped snakehead, Channa striata Bloch 1793, which is an air-breathing fish with reduced gills of importance for aquaculture in South East Asia. C. striata was nitrite tolerant with a 96 h LC50 of 4.7 mM. Effects of sub-lethal exposures to nitrite (0mM, 1.4mM, and 3.0mM) were determined during a 7-day exposure period. Plasma nitrite increased, but the internal concentration remained well below ambient levels. Extracellular nitrate rose by several mM, indicating that a large proportion of the nitrite taken up was converted to nitrate. Nitrite reacted with erythrocyte haemoglobin (Hb) causing methaemoglobin (metHb) to increase to 30% and nitrosylhaemoglobin (HbNO) to increase to 10% of total Hb. Both metHb and HbNO stabilised after 4 days, and functional Hb levels accordingly never fell below 60% of total Hb. Haematocrit and total Hb were unaffected by nitrite. Although the effects of nitrite exposure seemed minor in terms of plasma nitrite and metHb increases, ion balance was strongly affected. In the high exposure group, total osmolality decreased from 320 mOsm to 260 mOsm, and plasma sodium from 150 mM to 120 mM, while plasma chloride fell from 105 mM to 60mM and plasma bicarbonate rose from 12 mM in controls to 20mM in exposed fish. The extreme changes in ion balance in C. striata are different from the response reported in other fish, and further studies are needed to investigate the mechanism behind the observed changes in regulation.

  9. Nitrite dynamics and associated feedback processes in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashifane, Thulwaneng; Waldron, Howard; Vichi, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Understanding nitrite dynamics in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is a challenge as it represents an intermediary nitrogen species with a short turnover time. Nitrite is also reduced to nitrogen in some OMZs, preventing its accumulation. This creates difficulties in detecting nitrite with colorimetric methods as concentrations occur below the detection limit in some regions. Nitrite concentrations are key to understanding dominant nitrogen loss mechanisms through modeling studies in the Benguela OMZ. The coupled physical-biogeochemical model for eastern boundary upwelling systems (BioEBUS) using the Southern Africa experiment (SAfE) nested configuration is applied in the Benguela to study nitrite dynamics. Model results show nitrite maxima associated with the Angola-Benguela front region. The maxima are linked to poleward nutrient rich, oxygen-depleted south Atlantic central water (SACW) from the Angola gyre which favour denitrification on the shelf during summer to autumn. Ventilation of the shelf during winter to spring by the equatorward well-aerated eastern south Atlantic central water (ESACW) results in depleted nitrite concentrations. In addition to local circulation, Hovmuller analyses suggest that both primary and secondary nitrite maxima are driven by shelf biogeochemical processes and offshore advection. Vertical depth profiles show nitrite maxima at 17°S and depletion at 23°S attributed to denitrification and anammox, respectively. Model results suggest nitrogen in the Benguela OMZ is lost to anammox, denitrification and offshore advection, with denitrification as the dominant loss mechanism rather than anammox as previously documented. These results are key to understanding feedback processes from nitrogen loss in the Benguela OMZ and its impact on related biogeochemical cycles.

  10. Haematological and ion regulatory effects of nitrite in the air-breathing snakehead fish Channa striata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Jensen, Frank B; Huong, Do T T; Wang, Tobias; Phuong, Nguyen T; Bayley, Mark

    2012-08-15

    The tolerance and effects of nitrite on ion balance and haematology were investigated in the striped snakehead, Channa striata Bloch 1793, which is an air-breathing fish with reduced gills of importance for aquaculture in South East Asia. C. striata was nitrite tolerant with a 96 h LC50 of 4.7 mM. Effects of sub-lethal exposures to nitrite (0mM, 1.4mM, and 3.0mM) were determined during a 7-day exposure period. Plasma nitrite increased, but the internal concentration remained well below ambient levels. Extracellular nitrate rose by several mM, indicating that a large proportion of the nitrite taken up was converted to nitrate. Nitrite reacted with erythrocyte haemoglobin (Hb) causing methaemoglobin (metHb) to increase to 30% and nitrosylhaemoglobin (HbNO) to increase to 10% of total Hb. Both metHb and HbNO stabilised after 4 days, and functional Hb levels accordingly never fell below 60% of total Hb. Haematocrit and total Hb were unaffected by nitrite. Although the effects of nitrite exposure seemed minor in terms of plasma nitrite and metHb increases, ion balance was strongly affected. In the high exposure group, total osmolality decreased from 320 mOsm to 260 mOsm, and plasma sodium from 150 mM to 120 mM, while plasma chloride fell from 105 mM to 60mM and plasma bicarbonate rose from 12 mM in controls to 20mM in exposed fish. The extreme changes in ion balance in C. striata are different from the response reported in other fish, and further studies are needed to investigate the mechanism behind the observed changes in regulation. PMID:22516674

  11. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Singh Raman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT in 30 wt. % MgCl2 solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  12. Intramolecular electron transfer in cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri; kinetics and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G;

    2002-01-01

    Cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri catalyzes the one electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. It is a homodimer, each monomer containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1), the former being the electron uptake site while the latter is the nitrite reduction site. Hence...... diffusion controlled process. Following this initial step, the reduction equivalent is equilibrating between the c and d(1) heme sites in a unimolecular process (k=23 s(-1), 298 K, pH 7.0) and an equilibrium constant of 1.0. The temperature dependence of this internal electron transfer process has been...

  13. Solubilities of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in simulated nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Herting, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    Solubilities were determined for sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in synthetic nuclear waste liquor. Solubilities were determined as a function of temperature and solution composition (concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate). Temperature had the greatest effect on the solubilities of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite and a somewhat lesser effect on sodium aluminate solubility. Hydroxide had a great effect on the solubilities of all three salts. Other solution components had minor effects. 2 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  14. Preliminary nitrite, nitrate and colour analysis of Malaysian edible bird’s nest

    OpenAIRE

    Meei Chien Quek; Nyuk Ling Chin; Yus Aniza Yusof; Sheau Wei Tan; Chung Lim Law

    2015-01-01

    The high nitrite content in edible bird’s nests is a major concern to the local swiftlet industry. It lowers the price of the edible bird’s nests and it brings severe health hazards to consumers and farmers. This research investigated the nitrite and nitrate contents of eight types of local edible bird’s nests by using ion chromatography system and evaluating its colour using the CIE system in L∗a∗b∗ parameters. The nitrite content obtained ranged from 5.7 μg/g for the house nests to 843.8 μg...

  15. Solubilities of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in simulated nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solubilities were determined for sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in synthetic nuclear waste liquor. Solubilities were determined as a function of temperature and solution composition (concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate). Temperature had the greatest effect on the solubilities of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite and a somewhat lesser effect on sodium aluminate solubility. Hydroxide had a great effect on the solubilities of all three salts. Other solution components had minor effects. 2 references, 8 figures, 11 tables

  16. A carbon nanotube/polyvanillin composite film as an electrocatalyst for the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite and its application as a nitrite sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a simple method for the stable dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in water by vanillin and controllable surface addition onto carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFE) via electropolymerization. We have characterized these polyvanillin-carbon nanotube (PVN-MWNT) composite films with techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and voltammetry. These investigations showed that the films have a uniform porous nanostructure with a large surface area. This PVN-MWNT composite-modified CFE (PVN-MWNT/CFE) exhibited a sensitive response to the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimal working conditions, the oxidation peak current of nitrite linearly increased with its concentration in the range of 0.2 μM-3.1 mM, with the system exhibiting a lower detection limit of 50 nM (S/N = 3). We successfully applied the PVN-MWNT/CFE system to the determination of nitrite from lake water. The efficient recovery of nitrite indicated that this electrode was able to detect nitrite in real samples.

  17. A carbon nanotube/polyvanillin composite film as an electrocatalyst for the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite and its application as a nitrite sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Dongyun [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hu Chengguo [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)], E-mail: cghu@whu.edu.cn; Peng Yanfen [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hu Shengshui [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)], E-mail: sshu@whu.edu.cn

    2009-08-30

    We report a simple method for the stable dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in water by vanillin and controllable surface addition onto carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFE) via electropolymerization. We have characterized these polyvanillin-carbon nanotube (PVN-MWNT) composite films with techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and voltammetry. These investigations showed that the films have a uniform porous nanostructure with a large surface area. This PVN-MWNT composite-modified CFE (PVN-MWNT/CFE) exhibited a sensitive response to the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimal working conditions, the oxidation peak current of nitrite linearly increased with its concentration in the range of 0.2 {mu}M-3.1 mM, with the system exhibiting a lower detection limit of 50 nM (S/N = 3). We successfully applied the PVN-MWNT/CFE system to the determination of nitrite from lake water. The efficient recovery of nitrite indicated that this electrode was able to detect nitrite in real samples.

  18. The Effect of Influent Characteristics and Operational Conditions over the Performance and Microbial Community Structure of Partial Nitritation Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Rodriguez-Sanchez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is a main contaminant of wastewater worldwide. Novel processes for nitrogen removal have been developed over the last several decades. One of these is the partial nitritation process. This process includes the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite without the generation of nitrate. The partial nitritation process has several advantages over traditional nitrification-denitrification processes for nitrogen removal from wastewaters. In addition, partial nitritation is required for anammox elimination of nitrogen from wastewater. Partial nitritation is affected by operational conditions and substances present in the influent, such as quinolone antibiotics. In this review, the impact that several operational conditions, such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, hydraulic retention time and solids retention time, have over the partial nitritation process is covered. The effect of quinolone antibiotics and other emerging contaminants are discussed. Finally, future perspectives for the partial nitritation process are commented upon.

  19. Increased formation of carcinogenic PAH metabolites in fish promoted by nitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shailaja, M.S.; Rajamanickam, R.; Wahidullah, S.

    the impact of nitrite (NO2−) on the metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fish. In a laboratory experiment, exposure of euryhaline fish, Oreochromis mossambicus to industrial effluents containing PAHs in the presence of NO2− enhanced...

  20. Nitrite Biosensing via Selective Enzymes—A Long but Promising Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gabriela Almeida

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The last decades have witnessed a steady increase of the social and political awareness for the need of monitoring and controlling environmental and industrial processes. In the case of nitrite ion, due to its potential toxicity for human health, the European Union has recently implemented a number of rules to restrict its level in drinking waters and food products. Although several analytical protocols have been proposed for nitrite quantification, none of them enable a reliable and quick analysis of complex samples. An alternative approach relies on the construction of biosensing devices using stable enzymes, with both high activity and specificity for nitrite. In this paper we review the current state-of-the-art in the field of electrochemical and optical biosensors using nitrite reducing enzymes as biorecognition elements and discuss the opportunities and challenges in this emerging market.

  1. Bioelectrode-based approach for enhancing nitrate and nitrite removal and electricity generation from eutrophic lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    Nitrate and nitrite contamination of surface waters (e.g. lakes) has become a severe environmental and health problem, especially in developing countries. The recent demonstration of nitrate reduction at the cathode of microbial fuel cell (MFC) provides an opportunity to develop a new technology...... respectively from nitrate- and nitrite-rich synthetic lake waters at initial concentration of 10 mg-N/L. Along with the electricity production a total nitrogen removal of 62% and 77% was accomplished, for nitrate and nitrite, respectively. The nitrogen removal was almost 4 times higher under close......-circuit condition with biocathode, compared to either the open-circuit operation or with abiotic cathode. The mass balance on nitrogen indicates that most of the removed nitrate and nitrite (84.7±0.1% and 81.8±0.1%, respectively) was reduced to nitrogen gas. The nitrogen removal and power generation was limited by...

  2. Nitrate and nitrite levels of potable water supply in Warri, Nigeria: a public health concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduka, John Kanayochukwu; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere; Ezenweke, Linus Obi

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the nitrate and nitrite in different water sources (surface water, shallow well water, and borehole water) in the market and industrialized areas of Warri in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria. The authors' goal was to find the comparative levels of nitrates and nitrites from these two parts of the community. They selected five sampling sites from industrialized areas and another five from market areas. Nitrate and nitrites were determined using a DR/4000 UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The appreciable quantities of nitrates and nitrites found in these investigations have some public health implications. This study suggests that indiscriminate disposal of waste and poor sanitation may be additional contributing factors in the nitrate pollution of the water supply in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria. PMID:20104831

  3. Harvesting biohydrogen from cellobiose from sulfide or nitrite-containing wastewaters using Clostridium sp. R1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kuo-Ling; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2011-09-01

    Harvesting biohydrogen from inhibiting wastewaters is of practical interest since the toxicity of compounds in a wastewater stream commonly prevents the bioenergy content being recovered. The isolated Clostridium sp. R1 is utilized to degrade cellobiose in sulfide or nitrite-containing medium for biohydrogen production. The strain can effectively degrade cellobiose free of severe inhibitory effects at up to 200 mgl(-1) sulfide or to 5 mgl(-1) nitrite, yielding hydrogen at >2.0 mol H2 mol(-1) cellobiose. Principal metabolites of cellobiose fermentation are acetate and butyrate, with the concentration of the former increases with increasing sulfide and nitrite concentrations. The isolated strain can yield hydrogen from cellobiose in sulfide-laden wastewaters. However, the present of nitrite significantly limit the efficiency of the biohydrogen harvesting process.

  4. The kinetics for ammonium and nitrite oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinyu; Xiao, Pengying; Zhang, Daijun; Lu, Peili; Yao, Zongbao; He, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics for ammonium (NH4(+)) oxidation and nitrite (NO2(-)) oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) were studied by respirometry using the nitrifying sludge from a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor. Modified models were used to estimate kinetics parameters of ammonia and nitrite oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine. An inhibition effect of hydroxylamine on the ammonia oxidation was observed under different hydroxylamine concentration levels. The self-inhibition coefficient of hydroxylamine oxidation and noncompetitive inhibition coefficient of hydroxylamine for nitrite oxidation was estimated by simulating exogenous oxygen-uptake rate profiles, respectively. The inhibitive effect of NH2OH on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria was stronger than on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. This work could provide fundamental data for the kinetic investigation of the nitrification process. PMID:26942528

  5. Sources of reducing equivalents for nitrite reductase in Pisum arvense roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Kłobus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate and NADP+ as well as malic acid and NADP+ present in the incubation mixture enhanced nitrite reductase (EC 1.6.6.4 activity in Pisum arvense roots. This was manifested by a depression of the nitrite level in the tissues and an increased reduction of nitrites by plastids isolated from P. arvense roots. A marked stimulation of plastid malate dehydrogenase was also observed under the influence of nitrates present in the medium. These results suggest that pyridin nucleotides utilised by NiR during nitrite reduction may be formed not only in processes of glucose-6-phosphate oxidation in the pentosephosphate cycle, but also of malic acid by NADP+-dependent malate dehydrogenase.

  6. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrogen dioxide in air and nitrite in water and soil samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandurangappa, M.; Balasubramanian, N. [Indian Institute of Technology, Madras (India)

    1995-02-01

    A sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of nitrogen dioxide in air and nitrite in water and soil samples is described. Nitrogen dioxide in air is fixed as nitrite ion in alkaline sodium arsenite or in triethanolamine absorber solutions. The method is based on the diazo coupling reaction between p-nitro aniline and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid. The azo dye formed under aqueous condition has an absorption maximum at 585nm and obeys Beer`s law over the range 0-25{mu}g of nitrite. The colour system is stable for 72h. The relative standard deviation is 2.7% for ten determinations at 15{mu}g of nitrite. The dye is extracted with 1:1 isoamyl alcohol-IBMK mixture and stabilisation with methanolic potassium hydroxide showed {lambda}{sub max} at 610nm. It obeys Beer`s law over the range 0-4{mu}g of nitrite. The colour system is stable for 40h in organic phase and the relative standard deviation is 2.5% for ten determinations at 3{mu}g of nitrite. The molar absorptivity of the colour system is 3.68 x 10{sup 4} Lmol{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}. The effect of interfering gases and other ions on the determination of nitrite is described. The developed method has been applied for the determination of residual nitrogen dioxide gas present in the laboratory fume cupboard and automobile exhaust gases. In addition, the method has been applied for the determination of nitrite and nitrate in samples like water, soil and radiator coolants.

  7. Conversion of nitrite to nitric oxide at zinc via S-nitrosothiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Allan Jay P; Abelman, Rebecca; Warren, Timothy H

    2014-01-01

    Nitrite is an important reservoir of nitric oxide activity in the plasma and cells. Using a biomimetic model, we demonstrate the conversion of zinc-bound nitrite in the tris(pyrazolyl)borate complex (iPr2)TpZn(NO2) to the corresponding S-nitrosothiol RSNO and zinc thiolate (iPr2)TpZn-SR via reaction with thiols H-SR. Decomposition of the S-nitrosothiol formed releases nitric oxide gas. PMID:24217415

  8. Diversity and enrichment of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing bacteria from wastewater sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Luesken, Francisca A.; van Alen, Theo A.; van der Biezen, Erwin; Frijters, Carla; Toonen, Ger; Kampman, Christel; Hendrickx, Tim L. G.; Zeeman, Grietje; Temmink, Hardy; Strous, Marc; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Recently discovered microorganisms affiliated to the bacterial phylum NC10, named “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera”, perform nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation. These microorganisms could be important players in a novel way of anaerobic wastewater treatment where ammonium and residual dissolved methane might be removed at the expense of nitrate or nitrite. To find suitable inocula for reactor startup, ten selected wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in The Netherlands w...

  9. Linkage Isomerization in Heme–NOx Compounds: Understanding NO, Nitrite, and Hyponitrite Interactions with Iron Porphyrins

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Nan; Yi, Jun; George B. Richter-Addo

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives such as nitrite and hyponitrite are biologically important species of relevance to human health. Much of their physiological relevance stems from their interactions with the iron centers in heme proteins. The chemical reactivities displayed by the heme-NOx species (NOx = NO, nitrite, hyponitrite) are a function of the binding modes of the NOx ligands. Hence, an understanding of the types of binding modes extant in heme-NOx compounds is important if we are...

  10. PRELIMINARY STUDY ON GROUNDWATER POLLUTION WITH NITRITES AND NITRATES IN GĂTAIA (TIMIŞ COUNTY)

    OpenAIRE

    Rodica TÖRÖK-OANCE; Daniela TULHINĂ; Mihaela LAZĂR

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate pollution of water is a widespread issue. This study analyses the pollution with nitrites and nitrates in wells from Gătaia. We collected water samples from 17 wells. The nitrites and nitrates content was determined by the photometric method, using the Spectroquant NOVA60 photometer. We analysed following factors impacting pollution: manure deposits, latrines, livestock farms, slope and depth of the groundwater level in wells. The distances between wells and the analysed pollution sou...

  11. Analysis of responses to glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the intact chest rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossaman, Bobby D; Pankey, Edward A; Badejo, Adeleke R; Casey, David B; Uppu, Satvika; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2012-05-15

    Responses to glyceryl trinitrate/nitroglycerin (GTN), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), and sodium nitrite were compared in the intact chest rat. The iv injections of GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO produced dose-dependent decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. In as much as cardiac output was not reduced, the decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures indicate that GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO have significant vasodilator activity in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds in the rat. Responses to GTN were attenuated by cyanamide, but not allopurinol, whereas responses to nitrite formed by the metabolism of GTN were attenuated by allopurinol and cyanamide. The results with allopurinol and cyanamide suggest that only mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase is involved in the bioactivation of GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO, whereas both pathways are involved in the bioactivation of nitrite anion in the intact rat. The comparison of vasodilator activity indicates that GSNO and GTN are more than 1000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in the rat. Following administration of 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadizaolo[4,3-]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), responses to GTN were significantly attenuated, indicating that responses are mediated by the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. These data suggest that the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide formed from the metabolism of GTN, cannot account for the vasodilator activity of GTN in the intact rat and that another mechanism; perhaps the formation of an S-NO, may mediate the vasodilator response to GTN in this species.

  12. Performance and control of biofilm systems with partial nitritation and Anammox for supernatant treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Szatkowska, Beata

    2007-01-01

    Separate treatment of supernatant with dewatering of digested sludge with application of partial nitritation/Anammox process is assessed to be a cost-effective way to remove about 10-15% of influent nitrogen and, thereby, facilitate possibilities to reach required effluent requirements from the plant. The combined partial nitritation/Anammox process can be performed in two separate reactors or in one-stage. Both process options have been investigated in technical- and laboratory-scale pilot p...

  13. Nitrogen polishing in a fully anoxic anammox MBBR treating mainstream nitritation-denitritation effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Pusker; Holgate, Becky; Miller, Mark W; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B

    2016-03-01

    As nitrogen discharge limits are becoming more stringent, short-cut nitrogen systems and tertiary nitrogen polishing steps are gaining popularity. For partial nitritation or nitritation-denitritation systems, anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) polishing may be feasible to remove residual ammonia and nitrite from the effluent. Nitrogen polishing of mainstream nitritation-denitritation system effluent via anammox was studied at 25°C in a fully anoxic moving bed bioreactor (MBBR) (V = 0.45 m(3) ) over 385 days. Unlike other anammox based processes, a very fast startup of anammox MBBR was demonstrated, despite nitrite limited feeding conditions (influent nitrite = 0.7 ± 0.59 mgN/L, ammonia = 6.13 ± 2.86 mgN/L, nitrate = 3.41 ± 1.92 mgN/L). The nitrogen removal performance was very stable within a wide range of nitrogen inputs. Anammox bacteria (AMX) activity up to 1 gN/m(2) /d was observed which is comparable to other biofilm-based systems. It is generally believed that nitrate production limits nitrogen removal through AMX metabolism. However, in this study, anammox MBBR demonstrated ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate removal at limited chemical oxygen demand (COD) availability. AMX and heterotrophs contributed to 0.68 ± 0.17 and 0.32 ± 0.17 of TIN removal, respectively. It was speculated that nitrogen removal might be aided by denitratation which could be due to heterotrophs or the recently discovered ability for AMX to use short-chain fatty acids to reduce nitrate to nitrite. This study demonstrates the feasibility of anammox nitrogen polishing in an MBBR is possible for nitritation-denitration systems. PMID:26333200

  14. Measurement and Correlation of Solubility of Ethyl Nitrite in Mixed Solvent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞建媛; 刘国维; 马沛生; 方越

    2000-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was used to measure the solubility of ethyl nitrite in mixed solvents under the lower pressure and higher temperature. The solubilities of ethyl nitrite in mixed solvents of ethanol-water at 15℃-40℃ and ethanol-diethyl oxalate at 20℃--40℃ were determined. A Henry constant model has been improved, and the interaction parameters have been fitted from experimental data. The calculation results have been compared with experimental data; the results obtained are satisfactory.

  15. Levels of nitrates and nitrites in chili pepper and ventricina salami

    OpenAIRE

    Giampaolo Colavita; Michele Piccirilli; Luigi Iafigliola; Carmela Amadoro

    2014-01-01

    Ventricina is a traditional sausage made from pork meat produced in the Abruzzi and Molise regions. The aim of this study was to detect the content of nitrates and nitrites in local cultivars of chilli pepper, and their concentration in ventricina samples spiced with the same chilli pepper. Furthermore, it was examined whether, in the samples of ventricina with nitrate addition, the spicing with chilli pepper could exceed the maximum added dose. The concentration of nitrates and nitrites in t...

  16. Effects of agriculture production systems on nitrate and nitrite accumulation on baby-leaf salads

    OpenAIRE

    Aires, Alfredo; Carvalho, Rosa; Eduardo A.S. Rosa; Saavedra, Maria J.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are widespread contaminants of vegetables, fruits, and waters. The levels of these compounds are increased as a result of using organic wastes from chemical industries, domestic wastes, effluents, nitrogenous fertilizers, and herbicides in agriculture. Therefore, determining the nitrate and nitrite levels in biological, food, and environmental samples is important to protect human health and the environment. In this context, we set this study, in which we report the effect...

  17. Researches concerning nitrates and nitrites accumulation in carrots, along of the vegetation stages

    OpenAIRE

    Monica NEGREA; Aurel LAZUREANU; Alexa ERSILIA; Alina BULMAGA

    2008-01-01

    The presented paper deals with the determination of nitrates and nitrites content in carrots, in different vegetation stages of the carrot culture. High nitrates and nitrites concentration in vegetables is mainly due to excessive nitrogen content in the soil system, thus deteriorating the nutritional and hygienic values of products and complicating the processing and storage. The determination was tested on carrot samples assayed from an experimental field set up near Timisoara. In experiment...

  18. METHOD FOR NITRATE DETERMINATION IN WATER IN THE PRESENCE OF NITRITE

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Sandu; Tudor Lupascu; Anatol Tarita; Tatiana Goreacioc; Sergiu Turcan; Elena Mosanu

    2014-01-01

    The study relates to determination of nitrate in presence of nitrite in water and can be used in the quality monitoring of natural water (surface and groundwater), drinking water, water from fish farms and public aquaria where autonomous filters is used. The nature and quantity of reagents used have insignificant impact on natural waters and sewages. According to the investigation, the method includes the removal of nitrite from the solution/water with sulfaminic acid, the nitrate ion reducti...

  19. Nitrite attenuated peroxynitrite and hypochlorite generation in activated neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Ding, Yun; Lu, Naihao

    2016-03-15

    Oxidative stress is usually considered as an important factor to the pathogenesis of various diseases. Peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and hypochlorite (OCl(-)) are formed in immune cells as a part of the innate host defense system, but excessive reactive oxygen species generation can cause progressive inflammation and tissue damage. It has been proven that through mediating nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis, inorganic nitrite (NO2(-)) shows organ-protective effects on oxidative stress and inflammation. However, the effects of NO2(-) on the function of immune cells were still not clear. The potential role of NO2(-) in modulating ONOO(-) and OCl(-) generation in neutrophil cells was investigated in this study. As an immune cell activator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased both ONOO(-) and OCl(-) production in neutrophils, which was significantly attenuated by NO2(-). NO2(-) reduced superoxide (O2(·-)) generation via a NO-dependent mechanism and increased NO formation in activated neutrophils, suggesting a crucial role of O2(·-) in NO2(-)-mediated reduction of ONOO(-). Moreover, the reduced effect of NO2(-) on OCl(-) production was attributed to that NO2(-) reduced H2O2 production in activated neutrophils without influencing the release of myeloperoxidase (MPO), thus limiting OCl(-) production by MPO/H2O2 system. Therefore, NO2(-) attenuates ONOO(-) and OCl(-) formation in activated neutrophils, opening a new direction to modulate the inflammatory response. PMID:26854590

  20. Nitrite is produced by elicited but not by circulating neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Stewart

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of nitrite (NO2− was used as an index of the production of nitric oxide by human and rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN and rat peritoneal macrophages. Human peripheral blood PMN did not produce significant levels of NO2−. Attempts to induce NO2− generation in human PMN by incubation with GM–CSF (1 nM, TNFα (0.3 nM, endotoxin (1 μg/ml or formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (100 nM for up to 16 h were not successful. Addition of human PMN primed by GM–CSF (1 nM to rabbit aortic ring preparations precontracted with phenylephrine had no effect on tone. In contrast to these observations, PMN, isolated from the peritoneum of oyster glycogen treated rats, generated NO2− via a pathway sensitive to inhibition by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-monomethyl L-arginine. However, peripheral blood rat PMN obtained from the same animals did not produce NO2−, even during prolonged incubation for periods of up to 16 h. It is suggested that detectable NO production by PMN requires NO synthase activity to be induced either by the process of PMN migration or by exposure to certain cytokines produced locally at the site of inflammation.

  1. Removal of nitrite impurity from nitrate labeled with nitrogen-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potassium nitrate labeled with 15N is often used as a tracer in studies of N dynamics in soil and water systems. Typically, 0.8% NO2- impurity has been found in the batches of K15NO3 enriched to 99 atom % excess 15N that were purchased by our laboratory. Nitrite is an intermediate in several N cycling processes so its addition when adding NO3- could produce misleading results. We have developed a safe, simple, and inexpensive method to remove NO2- impurity from any NO3- solution in a water matrix. The principle is the oxidation of NO2- to NO3- by UV light in the presence of a heterogenous TiO2 catalyst. A NO2- concentration of 0.2 mM in 100 mL of 0.2 M NO3- solution could be oxidized in 12 min using 0.5 g L-1 TiO2 in a specially constructed photoreactor with a 75-W UV facial tanning lamp. For the routine removal of NO2-, use of the same TiO2 concentration in a standard beaker worked equally well when the irradiation time was extended to 2.5 h. After irradiation, the TiO2 is easily and totally removed from the solution by membrane filtration. (author)

  2. A family cluster of nitrite poisoning, Suzhou City, Jiangsu Province, China, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiping Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In April 2013, a hospital in Suzhou City notified authorities of a patient with nitrite poisoning with two other family members who had similar toxic symptoms five days prior. We investigated the event to identify the cause, source and possible route of contamination. Methods: A case was defined as any person living in the Yang Shan Hua Yuan community who had been diagnosed with cyanoderma and food poisoning symptoms from 15 to 25 April 2013. Active case finding was conducted by interviewing community residents and reviewing medical records from local clinics; information was then retrospectively collected on the patient’s food history, cooking procedures and food sources. Results: We identified three nitrite poisoning cases, one male and two females, from the same family. The time between dinner and onset of illness was less than an a hour. A retrospective survey showed that a substance presumed to be sugar mixed with asparagus on 17 April and with stir-fried asparagus on 21 April wasthe suspected contaminant. The presumed sugar came from a clean-up of a neighbouring rental house. Nitrite was detected in a vomitus sample, the sugar substance and two leftover food samples. Conclusion: This family cluster of nitrite poisoning resulted from the mistaken use of nitrite as sugar to cook dishes. We recommend that sodium nitrite be dyed a bright colour to prevent such a mistake and that health departments strengthen food hygiene education to alert people about the danger of eating unidentified food from an unknown source.

  3. A Family Clustered Nitrite Intoxication Investigation in Gaoxin District, Suzhou, China, 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiping Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In April, 2013, a Suzhou Hospital reported a nitrite intoxication patient in coma as well as 2 family members with the similar symptom 5 days ahead. We investigated the event to identify the cause, source and possible pollution ways of the contamination.We defined case as any person living in YSHY community who has cyanosis and with at least one of the following symptoms: dizziness, headache, fatigue, tachycardia, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain or diar-rhea during April 15 to April 25, 2013. We searched for case by interviewing community residents and reviewing clinics' medical records; information was then retrospectively collected on the patient's food history, cooking procedures and food sources.We identified 3 nitrite intoxication cases, 1 male and 2 female from a family. The interval time between dinner and onset was < 1 hour. Retrospective survey showed 'sugar stir and mix asparagus' on April 17 and 'scrambled asparagus' on April 21 were suspected foods. Both suspected dishes had 'sugar' added, sourced from a clean-up of a neighboring rental house. Nitrite was detected in a vomitus sample, the 'sugar' and two leftover food samples.This family clustered nitrite intoxication was induced by using unidentified nitrite as sugar to cook dishes. We recommend sodium nitrite should be dyed with bright colors to avoid mistaking it for plain salt or sugar, health departments strengthen food hygiene propaganda to improve people's recognition of food safety, and to alert them the dangerous of eating unidentified or unknown source food.

  4. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite in soil and water using cefixime and central composite design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati-Rad, Masoud; Irandoust, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Shabnam

    2015-10-01

    The present paper seeks to develop a simple method for the spectrophotometric determination of nitrite in soil and water samples and also measure optimum reaction conditions along with other analytical parameters. The method is based on the diazotization-coupling reaction of nitrite with cefixime and 1-naphthylamine in an acidic solution (Griess reaction). The final product that is an azo dye has an orange color with maximum absorption at 360 nm which Beer's Law is obeyed over the concentration range 0.02-15.00 mg L-1 of nitrite. Optimal conditions of the variables affecting the reaction were obtained by central composite design (CCD). A detection limit of 4.3 × 10-3 mg L-1 was obtained for determination of nitrite by the proposed method. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine nitrite in soil and water samples. The molar absorptivity of the product of the reaction and RSD in determination of nitrite in real samples are 4.1 × 103 (L mol-1 cm-1) and lower than 10%, respectively.

  5. Enhanced Activity and Selectivity of Carbon Nanofiber Supported Pd Catalysts for Nitrite Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2012-03-06

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Corrosion risk associated with microbial souring control using nitrate or nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Casey; Nemati, Mehdi; Jenneman, Gary; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2005-08-01

    Souring, the production of hydrogen sulfide by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in oil reservoirs, can be controlled through nitrate or nitrite addition. To assess the effects of this containment approach on corrosion, metal coupons were installed in up-flow packed-bed bioreactors fed with medium containing 8 mM sulfate and 25 mM lactate. Following inoculation with produced water to establish biogenic H(2)S production, some bioreactors were treated with 17.5 mM nitrate or up to 20 mM nitrite, eliminating souring. Corrosion rates were highest near the outlet of untreated bioreactors (up to 0.4 mm year(-1)). Nitrate (17.5 mM) eliminated sulfide but gave pitting corrosion near the inlet of the bioreactor, whereas a high nitrite dose (20 mM) completely eliminated microbial activity and associated corrosion. More gradual, step-wise addition of nitrite up to 20 mM resulted in the retention of microbial activity and localized pitting corrosion, especially near the bioreactor inlet. We conclude that: (1) SRB control by nitrate or nitrite reduction shifts the corrosion risk from the bioreactor outlet to the inlet (i.e. from production to injection wells) and (2) souring treatment by continuous addition of a high inhibitory nitrite dose is preferable from a corrosion-prevention point of view. PMID:15711941

  7. Numerical modeling of nitrogen removal processes in biofilters with simultaneous nitritation and anammox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shun; Tao, Wendong

    2013-01-01

    This study developed a simple numerical model for nitrogen removal in biofilters, which was designed to enhance simultaneous nitritation and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). It is the first attempt to simulate anammox together with two-step nitrification in natural treatment systems, which may have different kinetic parameters and temperature effects from conventional bioreactors. Prediction accuracy was improved by adjusting kinetic coefficients over the startup period of the biofilters. The maximum rates of nitritation and nitrite oxidation increased linearly over time during the startup period. Simulations confirmed successful enhancement of simultaneous nitritation and anammox (SNA) in the biofilters, with anammox contributing 35% of ammonium removal. Effluent ammonium concentration was affected by influent ammonium concentration and the maximum nitritation rate, and was insensitive to the maximum nitrite oxidation rate and anammox substrate factor. Ammonium removal via SNA was likely limited by biomass of aerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria in the biofilters. The developed model is a promising tool for studying the dynamics of nitrogen removal processes including SNA in natural treatment systems.

  8. Effect of nitrite on the formation of halonitromethanes during chlorination of organic matter from different origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huachang; Qian, Lingya; Xiao, Zhuoqun; Zhang, Jianqing; Chen, Jianrong; Lin, Hongjun; Yu, Haiying; Shen, Liguo; Liang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Occurrence of halonitromethanes (HNMs) in drinking water has been a public concern due to the potential risks to human health. Though quite a lot of work has been carried out to understand the formation of HNMs, the relationship between HNMs formation and the nitrite remains unclear. In this study, the effects of nitrite on the formation of HNMs during chlorination of organic matter from different origin were assessed. Organic matter (OM) derived from phoenix tree (fallen leaves: FLOM; green leaves: GLOM) and Microcystis aeruginosa (intracellular organic matter: IOM) were used to mimic the allochthonous and autochthonous organic matter in surface water, respectively. Results showed that HNMs yields were significantly enhanced with the addition of nitrite, and the highest enhancement was observed for FLOM, successively followed by GLOM and IOM, suggesting that the contribution of nitrite to HNMs formation was positively related with SUVA (an indicator for aromaticity) of OM. Therefore, the nitrite contamination should be strictly controlled for the source water dominated by allochthonous OM, which may significantly reduce the formation of HNMs during chlorination. Moreover, given a certain nitrite level, the higher pH resulted in higher stimulation of HNM formation, yet the chlorine dose (always added in excess resulting in residual reactive chlorine), reaction time and temperature did not show obvious influence.

  9. Optimization of fermentation media for nitrite oxidizing bacteria using sequential statistical design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jie; Lin, Wei-Tie; Shen, Yan-Jing; Wang, Ju-Fang; Luo, Xiao-Chun; Xie, Ming-Quan

    2008-11-01

    The sequential statistical experimental design (Plackett-Burman, factorial, response surface and steepest ascent experiment) was applied to optimize the culture medium of nitrite oxidizing bacteria for improving the nitrite oxidizing rate. Estimated optimum medium composition of the nitrite oxidizing rate was as follows: NaHCO3, 1.86gl(-1); NaNO2, 2.04gl(-1); Na2CO3, 0.2gl(-1); NaCl, 0.2gl(-1); KH2PO4, 0.1gl(-1); MgSO4 x7H2O, 0.1gl(-1); and FeSO4 x 7H2O, 0.01gl(-1). The nitrite oxidizing rate was increased by 48.0% and reached a maximum at 859.5+/-8.4mgNO2-N/gMLSS.d as compared to 580.7+/-25.8mgNO2-N/gMLSS x d. In the field trial, 50L of nitrite oxidizing bacteria concentrate (1.99gVSS/L) with 850mgNO2-N/gMLSS x d were added to 0.6ha of the aquaculture water. Nitrite level in all treated ponds remained very low compared to the steady increase observed in all of the control ponds during 7 days.

  10. Consistent antioxidant and antihypertensive effects of oral sodium nitrite in DOCA-salt hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson H. Amaral

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common disease that includes oxidative stress as a major feature, and oxidative stress impairs physiological nitric oxide (NO activity promoting cardiovascular pathophysiological mechanisms. While inorganic nitrite and nitrate are now recognized as relevant sources of NO after their bioactivation by enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways, thus lowering blood pressure, mounting evidence suggests that sodium nitrite also exerts antioxidant effects. Here we show for the first time that sodium nitrite exerts consistent systemic and vascular antioxidant and antihypertensive effects in the deoxycorticosterone-salt (DOCA-salt hypertension model. This is particularly important because increased oxidative stress plays a major role in the DOCA-salt hypertension model, which is less dependent on activation of the renin-angiotensin system than other hypertension models. Indeed, antihypertensive effects of oral nitrite were associated with increased plasma nitrite and nitrate concentrations, and completely blunted hypertension-induced increases in plasma 8-isoprostane and lipid peroxide levels, in vascular reactive oxygen species, in vascular NADPH oxidase activity, and in vascular xanthine oxidoreductase activity. Together, these findings provide evidence that the oral administration of sodium nitrite consistently decreases the blood pressure in association with major antioxidant effects in experimental hypertension.

  11. Use of gamma radiation on control of Clostridium botulinum in mortadella formulated with different nitrite levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Monalisa Pereira; Aleixo, Glécia de Cássia; Ramos, Alcinéia de Lemos Souza; Silva, Maurício Henriques Louzada; Pereira, Marcio Tadeu; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of applying different doses of gamma radiation (0, 10 and 20 kGy) on Clostridium botulinum spores (107 spores/g) inoculated into mortadellas with different nitrite contents (0, 150 and 300 ppm). We also evaluated the order of application of heat (cooking) and irradiation processing. The products were evaluated for survival of C. botulinum, pH, water activity (Aw), redox potential (Eh) and residual nitrite content. In the non-irradiated raw batters, almost all spores could be recovered when no nitrite was added and only half was recovered with the addition of 150 ppm of nitrite. The use of 150 ppm of nitrite was able to inhibit the germination or growth of C. botulinum in non-irradiated cooked mortadellas after 48 h of processing. However, after 30 days of chilling storage (4 °C), it was possible to recover 105 UFC/g of this microorganism. The gamma irradiation (>10 kGy) had a positive effect on the inactivation of C. botulinum in mortadellas, independent of the sodium nitrite level used and the cooking/irradiation processing order.

  12. Quantitative risk assessment on the dietary exposure of Finnish children and adults to nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suomi, Johanna; Ranta, Jukka; Tuominen, Pirkko; Putkonen, Tiina; Bäckman, Christina; Ovaskainen, Marja-Leena; Virtanen, Suvi M; Savela, Kirsti

    2016-01-01

    Nitrite intake from the consumption of cured meat and tap water was estimated for Finnish children of 1, 3 and 6 years as well as Finnish adults of 25-74 years. Nitrite content in the foods was measured by capillary electrophoresis, and was then used together with individual food consumption data from the FINDIET 2007 and DIPP studies in a stochastic exposure assessment by a Monte Carlo Risk Assessment (MCRA) program. Nitrite intake from additive sources and tap water was assessed, and more than every 10th child between the ages 3 and 6 years was estimated to have a nitrite intake exceeding the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of nitrite. The high exposure levels were caused by frequent consumption of large portions of sausages, up to 350 g day(-1) or 750 g in 3 days, among the children. Median nitrite intake from cured meat was 0.016, 0.040, 0.033 and 0.005 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for children of 1, 3 and 6 years and adults, respectively. Bayesian estimation was employed to determine safe consumption levels of sausages and cold cuts for children, and these results gave rise to new national food consumption advice. PMID:26609554

  13. Production of cured meat color in nitrite-free Harbin red sausage by Lactobacillus fermentum fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Kong, Baohua; Xiong, Youling L

    2007-12-01

    Lactobacillus fermentum was substituted for nitrite to produce cured pink color in a Chinese-style sausage. Treatments included inoculations (10(4), 10(6), and 10(8)CFU/g meat) followed by fermentation at 30°C for 8h and then at 4°C for 16h. Control sausage (with sodium nitrite, 60mg/kg meat) was cured at 4°C for 24h without L. fermentum. The UV-Vis spectra of pigment extract from L. fermentum-treated sausage were identical to that of nitrosylmyoglobin (NO-Mb) formed in nitrite-treated control. The NO-Mb concentration and the colorimetric a(∗) value of sausage treated with 10(8)CFU/g meat of L. fermentum essentially replicated those in nitrite-cured meat. Free amino acid content in sausage treated with L. fermentum was greater and the pH slightly lower compared with the nitrite-cured control sample. This study showed that L. fermentum has the potential to substitute for nitrite in the sausage production.

  14. Electrocatalytic reduction of nitrite using ferricyanide; Application for its simple and selective determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrocatalytic reduction of nitrite has been studied by ferricyanide at the surface of carbon paste electrode. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques were used to investigate the suitability of ferricyanide as a mediator for the electrocatalytic nitrite reduction in aqueous solution with various pH. Results showed that pH 0.00 is the most suitable for this purpose. In the optimum pH, the electrocatalytic ability about 700 mV can be seen and the homogeneous second-order rate constant (k s) for nitrite coupled catalytically to ferricyanide was calculated 2.75 x 103 M-1 s-1 by Nicholson-Shain method. Also, electron transfer coefficients (α) for ferricyanide was determined by using various electrochemical approaches such as Tafel plot in the absence and presence of nitrite 0.556 and 0.760, respectively. The catalytic reduction peak current was linearly dependent on the nitrite concentration and the linearity range obtained was 5.00 x 10-5 to 1.00 x 10-3 M. Detection limit has been found to be 2.63 x 10-5 M (2σ). This method has been applied as a selective, simple and precise method for determination of nitrite in real sample

  15. Energetic Consequences of nitrite stress in Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough, inferred from global transcriptional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qiang; Huang, Katherine H.; He, Zhili; Alm, Eric J.; Fields,Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2005-11-03

    Many of the proteins that are candidates for bioenergetic pathways involved with sulfate respiration in Desulfovibrio spp. have been studied, but complete pathways and overall cell physiology remain to be resolved for many environmentally relevant conditions. In order to understand the metabolism of these microorganisms under adverse environmental conditions for improved bioremediation efforts, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was used as a model organism to study stress response to nitrite, an important intermediate in the nitrogen cycle. Previous physiological studies demonstrated that growth was inhibited by nitrite and that nitrite reduction was observed to be the primary mechanism of detoxification. Global transcriptional profiling with whole-genome microarrays revealed coordinated cascades of responses to nitrite in pathways of energy metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, oxidative stress response, and iron homeostasis. In agreement with previous observations, nitrite-stressed cells showed a decrease in the expression of genes encoding sulfate reduction functions in addition to respiratory oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthase activity. Consequently, the stressed cells had decreased expression of the genes encoding ATP-dependent amino acid transporters and proteins involved in translation. Other genes up-regulated in response to nitrite include the genes in the Fur regulon, which is suggested to be involved in iron homeostasis, and genes in the Per regulon, which is predicted to be responsible for oxidative stress response.

  16. Effect of lycopene on serum nitrite-nitrate levels in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim Ç Yegin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of lycopene on serum nitrate-nitrite levels was investigated in diabetic rats. In this investigation, 28 Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups, each of seven rats. These groups were control group, diabetes group, diabetes-lycopene group and lycopene group. The concentration of nitrite and nitrate was detected at high levels in diabetes group, diabetes-lycopene group and lycopene group as compared with the control group (P<0.05. Especially, the increase in the levels of nitrate in diabetes group and lycopene group was statistically significant when compared with diabetes-lycopene group and control group (P<0.05. In addition, we also determined the proportion of nitrite/nitrate for nitric oxide radical formation. Therefore, it is important to investigate the recovery and stability of nitrite and nitrate in samples. As a result of this study, it was observed that the amounts of nitrate and nitrite increased due to oxidative stress in diabetes and also application of antioxidant lycopene caused an increase in the amounts of nitrate and nitrite levels.

  17. Performance and microbial ecology of a nitritation sequencing batch reactor treating high-strength ammonia wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenjing; Dai, Xiaohu; Cao, Dawen; Wang, Sha; Hu, Xiaona; Liu, Wenru; Yang, Dianhai

    2016-01-01

    The partial nitrification (PN) performance and the microbial community variations were evaluated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for 172 days, with the stepwise elevation of ammonium concentration. Free ammonia (FA) and low dissolved oxygen inhibition of nitrite-oxidized bacteria (NOB) were used to achieve nitritation in the SBR. During the 172 days operation, the nitrogen loading rate of the SBR was finally raised to 3.6 kg N/m3/d corresponding the influent ammonium of 1500 mg/L, with the ammonium removal efficiency and nitrite accumulation rate were 94.12% and 83.54%, respectively, indicating that the syntrophic inhibition of FA and low dissolved oxygen contributed substantially to the stable nitrite accumulation. The results of the 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing revealed that Nitrospira, the only nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the system, were successively inhibited and eliminated, and the SBR reactor was dominated finally by Nitrosomonas, the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, which had a relative abundance of 83%, indicating that the Nitrosomonas played the primary roles on the establishment and maintaining of nitritation. Followed by Nitrosomonas, Anaerolineae (7.02%) and Saprospira (1.86%) were the other mainly genera in the biomass. PMID:27762325

  18. Interference of Nitrite with Pyrite under Acidic Conditions: Implications for Studies of Chemolithotrophic Denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ruiwen; Kappler, Andreas; Peiffer, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Chemolithotrophic denitrification coupled to pyrite oxidation is regarded a key process in the removal of nitrate in aquifers. A common product is nitrite, which is a strong oxidant under acidic conditions. Nitrite may thus interfere with Fe(II) during acidic extraction, a procedure typically used to quantify microbial pyrite oxidation, in overestimating Fe(III) production. We studied the reaction between pyrite (5-125 mM) and nitrite (40-2000 μM) at pH 0, 5.5, and 6.8 in the absence and presence of oxygen. Significant oxidation of pyrite was measured at pH 0 with a yield of 100 μM Fe(III) after 5 mM pyrite was incubated with 2000 μM nitrite for 24 h. Dissolved oxygen increased the rate at pH 0. No oxidation of pyrite was observed at pH 5.5 and 6.8. Our data imply a cyclic model for pyrite oxidation by Fe(III) on the basis of the oxidation of residual Fe(II) by NO and NO2. Interference by nitrite could be avoided if nitrite was removed from the pyrite suspensions through a washing procedure prior to acidic extraction. We conclude that such interferences should be considered in studies on microbially mediated pyrite oxidation with nitrate. PMID:26335043

  19. Inorganic nitrite and nitrate: evidence to support consideration as dietary nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Nathan S; Ivy, John L

    2015-08-01

    There are now indisputable health benefits of nitrite and nitrate derived from food sources or when administered in a clinical setting for specific diseases. Most of the published reports identify the production of nitric oxide (NO) as the mechanism of action for nitrite and nitrate. Basic science as well as clinical studies demonstrates that nitrite and/or nitrate can restore NO homeostasis as an endothelium-independent source of NO that may be a redundant system for endogenous NO production. Nitrate must first be reduced to nitrite by oral commensal bacteria and then nitrite must be further reduced to NO along the physiological oxygen gradient. The purpose of this review is to define their role as indispensable nutrients needed for maintaining NO homeostasis and describe the daily intake required to achieve a threshold of activation as well as define the upper tolerable limits based on published literature in PubMed databases. Optimal ranges of intake will be discussed to maximize the benefits while mitigating any potential risks of overexposure to these naturally occurring anions. This information will allow for future research using safe and effective doses of nitrite and nitrate in long-term clinical trials to effectively test their roles in disease prevention or treatment. PMID:26189149

  20. Expanded metabolic versatility of ubiquitous nitrite-oxidizing bacteria from the genus Nitrospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Albertsen, Mads; Kitzinger, Katharina; Herbold, Craig; Spieck, Eva; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2015-09-01

    Nitrospira are a diverse group of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria and among the environmentally most widespread nitrifiers. However, they remain scarcely studied and mostly uncultured. Based on genomic and experimental data from Nitrospira moscoviensis representing the ubiquitous Nitrospira lineage II, we identified ecophysiological traits that contribute to the ecological success of Nitrospira. Unexpectedly, N. moscoviensis possesses genes coding for a urease and cleaves urea to ammonia and CO2. Ureolysis was not observed yet in nitrite oxidizers and enables N. moscoviensis to supply ammonia oxidizers lacking urease with ammonia from urea, which is fully nitrified by this consortium through reciprocal feeding. The presence of highly similar urease genes in Nitrospira lenta from activated sludge, in metagenomes from soils and freshwater habitats, and of other ureases in marine nitrite oxidizers, suggests a wide distribution of this extended interaction between ammonia and nitrite oxidizers, which enables nitrite-oxidizing bacteria to indirectly use urea as a source of energy. A soluble formate dehydrogenase lends additional ecophysiological flexibility and allows N. moscoviensis to use formate, with or without concomitant nitrite oxidation, using oxygen, nitrate, or both compounds as terminal electron acceptors. Compared with Nitrospira defluvii from lineage I, N. moscoviensis shares the Nitrospira core metabolism but shows substantial genomic dissimilarity including genes for adaptations to elevated oxygen concentrations. Reciprocal feeding and metabolic versatility, including the participation in different nitrogen cycling processes, likely are key factors for the niche partitioning, the ubiquity, and the high diversity of Nitrospira in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:26305944

  1. The Effects of Physicochemical Factors and Cell Density on Nitrite Transformation in a Lipid-Rich Chlorella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fang; Du, Kui; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2015-12-28

    To understand the effects of physicochemical factors on nitrite transformation by microalgae, a lipid-rich Chlorella with high nitrite tolerance was cultured with 8 mmol/l sodium nitrite as sole nitrogen source under different conditions. The results showed that nitrite transformation was mainly dependent on the metabolic activities of algal cells rather than oxidation of nitrite by dissolved oxygen. Light intensity, temperature, pH, NaHCO3 concentrations, and initial cell densities had significant effects on the rate of nitrite transformation. Single-factor experiments revealed that the optimum conditions for nitrite transformation were light intensity: 300 μmol/m(2); temperature: 30°C; pH: 7-8; NaHCO3 concentration: 2.0 g/l; and initial cell density: 0.15 g/l; and the highest nitrite transformation rate of 1.36 mmol/l/d was achieved. There was a positive correlation between nitrite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella. The relationship between nitrite transformation rate (mg/l/d) and biomass productivity (g/l/d) could be described by the regression equation y = 61.3x (R(2) = 0.9665), meaning that 61.3 mg N element was assimilated by 1.0 g dry biomass on average, which indicated that the nitrite transformation is a process of consuming nitrite as nitrogen source by Chlorella. The results demonstrated that the Chlorella suspension was able to assimilate nitrite efficiently, which implied the feasibility of using flue gas for mass production of Chlorella without preliminary removal of NOX.

  2. Effects of nitrite exposure on haematological parameters, oxidative stress and apoptosis in juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Rui; Han, Cen; Lei, Ji-Lin; Liu, Bao-Liang; Huang, Bin; Huo, Huan-Huan; Yin, Shu-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Nitrite (NO2(-)) is commonly present as contaminant in aquatic environment and toxic to aquatic organisms. In the present study, we investigated the effects of nitrite exposure on haematological parameters, oxidative stress and apoptosis in juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus). Fish were exposed to various concentrations of nitrite (0, 0.02, 0.08, 0.4 and 0.8mM) for 96 h. Fish blood and gills were collected to assay haematological parameters, oxidative stress and expression of genes after 0, 24, 48 and 96 h of exposure. In blood, the data showed that the levels of methemoglobin (MetHb), triglyceride (TG), potassium (K(+)), cortisol, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and glucose significantly increased in treatments with higher concentrations of nitrite (0.4 and/or 0.8mM) after 48 and 96 h, while the levels of haemoglobin (Hb) and sodium (Na(+)) significantly decreased in these treatments. In gills, nitrite (0.4 and/or 0.8mM) apparently reduced the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH), increased the formation of malondialdehyde (MDA), up-regulated the mRNA levels of c-jun amino-terminal kinase (JUK1), p53, caspase-3, caspase-7 and caspase-9 after 48 and 96 h of exposure. The results suggested caspase-dependent and JUK signaling pathways played important roles in nitrite-induced apoptosis in fish. Further, this study provides new insights into how nitrite affects the physiological responses and apoptosis in a marine fish. PMID:26476021

  3. Quantitative analysis of nitrate and nitrite contents in vegetables commonly consumed in Delta State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyesom, I; Okoh, P N

    2006-11-01

    Plasma thiocyanate has been reported to be high among cassava-eating populations such as that in Nigeria because of the cyanide content of cassava. Thiocyanate, which is secreted into the stomach contents of animals, has been demonstrated to catalyse the formation of nitrosamines (potent carcinogens) in the stomach from secondary amines and nitrite. The main source of the nitrite precursor in this environment is vegetables, primarily eaten as the chief supplier of proteins. The present study attempts to analyse the levels of nitrate and nitrite in vegetables commonly grown and consumed in Delta State, Nigeria. The nitrate and nitrite contents in green vegetable (Amaranthus spp.), bitter leaf (Vernonia amygdalina), pumpkin (Telfaria occidentalis) and water leaf (Talinum triangulare) grown in different localities of the state were determined by standard analytical procedures. The results show that those vegetables grown in the industrialised urban centres of the state had higher nitrate (223 (SD 71) mg/kg dry weight; P0.05) levels when compared with the same species (188 (SD 77) mg nitrate/kg dry weight and 10.9 (SD 1.1) mg nitrite/kg dry weight) cultivated in less industrialised suburbs. We conclude that frequent consumption of such vegetables whose nitrate and nitrite contents are high by cassava-eating individuals might put them at risk of developing stomach cancer and other possible results of nitrate and/or nitrite toxicity. In order to avoid an outbreak in our communities, appropriate agencies should monitor and regulate the release of chemicals into the environment. In the meantime, the cultivation and consumption of vegetables grown in industrialised areas of the state should be discouraged. PMID:17092380

  4. Crystal Structures of the Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Complexes of Horse Heart Myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland,D.; Soares, A.; West, A.; Richter-Addo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrite is an important species in the global nitrogen cycle, and the nitrite reductase enzymes convert nitrite to nitric oxide (NO). Recently, it has been shown that hemoglobin and myoglobin catalyze the reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions. We have determined the 1.20 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of the nitrite adduct of ferric horse heart myoglobin (hh Mb). The ligand is bound to iron in the nitrito form, and the complex is formulated as Mb{sup III}(ONO{sup -}). The Fe-ONO bond length is 1.94 Angstroms, and the O-N-O angle is 113 degrees. In addition, the nitrite ligand is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with the distal His64 residue. We have also determined the 1.30 Angstroms resolution crystal structures of hh Mb{sup II}NO. When hh Mb{sup II}NO is prepared from the reaction of metMb{sup III} with nitrite/dithionite, the FeNO angle is 144 degrees with a Fe-NO bond length of 1.87 Angstroms. However, when prepared from the reaction of NO with reduced Mb{sup II}, the FeNO angle is 120 degrees with a Fe-NO bond length of 2.13 Angstroms. This difference in FeNO conformations as a function of preparative method is reproducible, and suggests a role of the distal pocket in hh Mb{sup II}NO in stabilizing local FeNO conformational minima.

  5. Safety and feasibility of long-term intravenous sodium nitrite infusion in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard M Pluta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infusion of sodium nitrite could provide sustained therapeutic concentrations of nitric oxide (NO for the treatment of a variety of vascular disorders. The study was developed to determine the safety and feasibility of prolonged sodium nitrite infusion. METHODOLOGY: Healthy volunteers, aged 21 to 60 years old, were candidates for the study performed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH; protocol 05-N-0075 between July 2007 and August 2008. All subjects provided written consent to participate. Twelve subjects (5 males, 7 females; mean age, 38.8±9.2 years (range, 21-56 years were intravenously infused with increasing doses of sodium nitrite for 48 hours (starting dose at 4.2 µg/kg/hr; maximal dose of 533.8 µg/kg/hr. Clinical, physiologic and laboratory data before, during and after infusion were analyzed. FINDINGS: The maximal tolerated dose for intravenous infusion of sodium nitrite was 267 µg/kg/hr. Dose limiting toxicity occurred at 446 µg/kg/hr. Toxicity included a transient asymptomatic decrease of mean arterial blood pressure (more than 15 mmHg and/or an asymptomatic increase of methemoglobin level above 5%. Nitrite, nitrate, S-nitrosothiols concentrations in plasma and whole blood increased in all subjects and returned to preinfusion baseline values within 12 hours after cessation of the infusion. The mean half-life of nitrite estimated at maximal tolerated dose was 45.3 minutes for plasma and 51.4 minutes for whole blood. CONCLUSION: Sodium nitrite can be safely infused intravenously at defined concentrations for prolonged intervals. These results should be valuable for developing studies to investigate new NO treatment paradigms for a variety of clinical disorders, including cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage, and ischemia of the heart, liver, kidney and brain, as well as organ transplants, blood-brain barrier modulation and pulmonary hypertension. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION INFORMATION: http

  6. Single stage biological nitrogen removal by nitritation and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in biofilm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, C; Tromm, C; Hippen, A; Rosenwinkel, K H; Seyfried, C F; Kunst, S

    2001-01-01

    In full scale wastewater treatment plants with at times considerable deficits in the nitrogen balances, it could hitherto not be sufficiently explained which reactions are the cause of the nitrogen losses and which micro-organisms participate in the process. The single stage conversion of ammonium into gaseous end-products--which is henceforth referred to as deammonification--occurs particularly frequently in biofilm systems. In the meantime, one has succeeded to establish the deammonification processes in a continuous flow moving-bed pilot plant. In batch tests with the biofilm covered carriers, it was possible for the first time to examine the nitrogen conversion at the intact biofilm. Depending on the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, two autotrophic nitrogen converting reactions in the biofilm could be proven: one nitritation process under aerobic conditions and one anaerobic ammonium oxidation. With the anaerobic ammonium oxidation, ammonium as electron donor was converted with nitrite as electron acceptor. The end-product of this reaction was N2. Ammonium and nitrite did react in a stoichiometrical ratio of 1:1.37, a ratio which has in the very same dimension been described for the ANAMMOX-process (1:1.31 +/- 0.06). Via the oxygen concentration in the surrounding medium, it was possible to control the ratio of nitritation and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the nitrogen conversion of the biofilm. Both processes were evenly balanced at a DO concentration of 0.7 mg/l, so that it was possible to achieve a direct, almost complete elimination of ammonium without addition of nitrite. One part of the provided ammonium did participate in the nitritation, the other in the anaerobic ammonium oxidation. Through the aerobic ammonium oxidation into nitrite within the outer oxygen supplied layers of the biofilm, the reaction partner was produced for the anaerobic ammonium oxidation within the inner layers of the biofilm. PMID:11379106

  7. The role of red blood cell S-nitrosation in nitrite bioactivation and its modulation by leucine and glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem Wajih; Xiaohua Liu; Pragna Shetty; Swati Basu; Hanzhi Wu; Neil Hogg; Patel, Rakesh P.; Furdui, Cristina M.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has shown that red blood cells (RBCs) reduce nitrite to NO under conditions of low oxygen. Strong support for the ability of red blood cells to promote nitrite bioactivation comes from using platelet activation as a NO-sensitive process. Whereas addition of nitrite to platelet rich plasma in the absence of RBCs has no effect on inhibition of platelet activation, when RBCs are present platelet activation is inhibited by an NO-dependent mechanism that is potentiated under hypoxia....

  8. Ameliorating Effect of Chloride on Nitrite Toxicity to Freshwater Invertebrates with Different Physiology: a Comparative Study Between Amphipods and Planarians

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, A.; Camargo, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    High nitrite concentrations in freshwater ecosystems may cause toxicity to aquatic animals. These living organisms can take nitrite up from water through their chloride cells, subsequently suffering oxidation of their respiratory pigments (hemoglobin, hemocyanin). Because NO2¿ and Cl¿ ions compete for the same active transport site, elevated chloride concentrations in the aquatic environment have the potential of reducing nitrite toxicity. Although this ameliorating effect is well documented ...

  9. Reducing the amount of nitrites in the production of pasteurized organic meat : summary of the project and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Stegeman, D.; Verkleij, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    In the production of organic meat products like cold meats, nitrites and nitrates are used for several reasons: for the antimicrobial and anti-oxidative properties, forming and stabilizing the red, cured meat colour, and for forming a cured flavour. From literature, it is concluded that it is not possible to substitute nitrite in the production of organic cooked cured meat products with a single additive or combination of additives without changing the quality of the meat products. Nitrite is...

  10. Influence of nitrite accumulation on "Candidatus Accumulibacter" population structure and enhanced biological phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Li, Boxiao; Wang, Xiangdong; Bai, Xinlong; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-02-01

    A modified University of Cape Town (MUCT) process was used to treat real municipal wastewater with low carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N). To our knowledge, this is the first study where the influence of nitrite accumulation on "Candidatus Accumulibacter" clade-level population structure was investigated during nitritation establishment and destruction. Real time quantitative PCR assays were conducted using the polyphosphate kinase 1 gene (ppk1) as a genetic marker. Abundances of total "Candidatus Accumulibacter", the relative distributions and population structure of the five "Candidatus Accumulibacter" clades were characterized. Under complete nitrification, clade I using nitrate as electron acceptor was below 5% of total "Candidatus Accumulibacter". When the reactor was transformed into nitritation, clade I gradually disappeared. Clade IID using nitrite as electron acceptor for denitrifying phosphorus (P) removal was always the dominant "Candidatus Accumulibacter" throughout the operational period. This clade was above 90% on average in total "Candidatus Accumulibacter", even up to nearly 100%, which was associated with good performance of denitrifying P removal via nitrite pathway. The nitrite concentrations affected the abundance of clade IID. The P removal was mainly completed by anoxic P uptake of about 88%. The P removal efficiency clearly had a positive correlation with the nitrite accumulation ratio. Under nitritation, the P removal efficiency was 30% higher than that under complete nitrification, suggesting that nitrite was appropriate as electron acceptor for denitrifying P removal when treating carbon-limited wastewater. PMID:26439519

  11. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase mediates vasodilator responses of glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the pulmonary vascular bed of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badejo, Adeleke M; Hodnette, Chris; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S; Casey, David B; Pankey, Edward; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-09-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) catalyzes the formation of glyceryl dinitrate and inorganic nitrite from glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), leading to an increase in cGMP and vasodilation in the coronary and systemic vascular beds. However, the role of nitric oxide (NO) formed from nitrite in mediating the response to GTN in the pulmonary vascular bed is uncertain. The purpose of the present study was to determine if nitrite plays a role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN. In this study, intravenous injections of GTN and sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure under baseline and elevated tone conditions and decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and sodium nitrite were attenuated by cyanamide, an ALDH2 inhibitor, whereas responses to the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were not altered. The decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and SNP were not altered by allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase, whereas responses to sodium nitrite were attenuated. GTN was approximately 1,000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. These results suggest that ALDH2 plays an important role in the bioactivation of GTN and nitrite in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds and that the reduction of nitrite to vasoactive NO does not play an important role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN in the intact chest rat.

  12. Study of Cobalt(III) Corrole as the Neutral Ionophore for Nitrite and Nitrate Detection via Polymeric Membrane Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Si; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Cobalt(III) 5, 10, 15-tris(4-tert-butylphenyl) corrole was synthesized and incorporated into plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membranes and studied as a neutral carrier ionophore via potentiometry. This cobalt(III) complex has binding affinity to nitrite, and the resulting membrane electrode yields reversible and Nernstian response toward nitrite. Enhanced nitrite selectivity is observed over other anions, including lipophilic anions such as thiocyanate and perchlorate when an appropriate amount of lipophilic cationic sites are added to the membrane phase. Detection limit to nitrite is ca. 5 µM. Using tributylphosphate as the plasticizer with the cobalt(III) corrole species yields electrodes with enhanced nitrate selectivity.

  13. Suspected nitrite poisoning in pigs caused by Capsella bursa-pastoris (L. Medik. ('herderstassie', shepherd's purse : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.J. Wiese

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite poisoning in pigs was suspected when 4 of 18 pigs died in a piggery near Ellisras in the Northern Province. The pigs showed typical brownish discolouration of the blood at autopsy. It was established that they ingested vegetable tops and weeds from the adjacent garden as part of their daily ration. Of the available plants, only Capsella bursa-pastoris contained nitrites. The drinking water and some of the other plants tested positive for nitrates but not for nitrites. This is the first report of suspected nitrite poisoning in pigs caused by Capsella bursa-pastoris.

  14. Effects of low concentrations of bisulfite--sulfite and nitrite on microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodzinski, R.S.; Labeda, D.P.; Alexander, M.

    1978-04-01

    A wide range of microorganisms was tested to determine their sensitivity to low concentrations of bisulfite-sulfite and nitrite, solubility products of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/, respectively. Photosynthesis by blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) was more strongly inhibited by 0.1 mM bisulfite-sulfite and 1 mM nitrite at pH 6.0 than photosynthesis by eucaryotic algae and respiration of bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. At pH 7.7, blud-green algae were still more sensitive to busulfite-sulfite and nitrite than eurcaryotic algae, but the toxicity of bisulfite-sulfite and nitrite decreased as the pH increased. Photosynthesis by Anabaena flos-aquae at pH 6.0 was inhibited 25% by a bisulfite-sulfite concentration of 10 ..mu..M and 15% by a nitrite concentration of 50 ..mu..M. Photosynthesis by the blud-green alga, Lyngbya sp., was not exceptionally sensitive to chlorate and thiosulfate. Acetylene-reducing activity of Beijerinckia indica was completely inhibited by 0.1 mM bisulfite-sulfite at pH 4.0, the suppression being decreased with increasing pH.

  15. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO3− and NO2−. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing

  16. Effect of sodium ascorbate and sodium nitrite on protein and lipid oxidation in dry fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardo, A; De Maere, H; Stavropoulou, D A; Rysman, T; Leroy, F; De Smet, S

    2016-11-01

    The effects of sodium nitrite and ascorbate on lipid and protein oxidation were studied during the ripening process of dry fermented sausages. Samples were taken at day 0, 2, 8, 14, 21 and 28 of ripening to assess lipid (malondialdehyde) and protein (carbonyls and sulfhydryl groups) oxidation. Sodium ascorbate and nitrite were separately able to reduce the formation of malondialdehyde. Their combined addition resulted in higher amounts of carbonyl compounds compared to their separate addition or the treatment without any of both compounds. Moreover, sodium nitrite limited the formation of γ-glutamic semialdehyde whereas sodium ascorbate showed a pro-oxidant effect. A loss of thiol groups was observed during ripening, which was not affected by the use of sodium ascorbate nor sodium nitrite. In conclusion, sodium nitrite and ascorbate affected protein and lipid oxidation in different manners. The possible pro-oxidant effect of their combined addition on carbonyl formation might influence the technological and sensory properties of these products. PMID:27424306

  17. DFT Study on Enzyme Turnover Including Proton and Electron Transfers of Copper-Containing Nitrite Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintuluoto, Masami; Lintuluoto, Juha M

    2016-08-23

    The reaction mechanism of copper-containing nitrite reductase (CuNiR) has been proposed to include two important events, an intramolecular electron transfer and a proton transfer. The two events have been suggested to be coupled, but the order of these events is currently under debate. We investigated the entire enzyme reaction mechanism of nitrite reduction at the T2 Cu site in thermophilic Geobacillus CuNiR from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2 (GtNiR) using density functional theory calculations. We found significant conformational changes of His ligands coordinated to the T2 Cu site upon nitrite binding during the catalytic reaction. The reduction potentials and pKa values calculated for the relevant protonation and reduction states show two possible routes, A and B. Reduction of the T2 Cu site in the resting state is followed by endothermic nitrite binding in route A, while exothermic nitrite binding occurs prior to reduction of the T2 Cu site in route B. We concluded that our results support the random-sequential mechanism rather than the ordered mechanism. PMID:27455866

  18. Antagonism of Acute Sulfide Poisoning in Mice by Nitrite Anion without Methemoglobinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronican, Andrea A; Frawley, Kristin L; Ahmed, Humza; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2015-07-20

    There are currently no FDA-approved antidotes for H2S/sulfide intoxication. Sodium nitrite, if given prophylactically to Swiss Webster mice, was shown to be highly protective against the acute toxic effects of sodium hydrosulfide (∼LD40 dose) with both agents administered by intraperitoneal injections. However, sodium nitrite administered after the toxicant dose did not detectably ameliorate sulfide toxicity in this fast-delivery, single-shot experimental paradigm. Nitrite anion was shown to rapidly produce NO in the bloodstream, as judged by the appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin, together amounting to less than 5% of the total hemoglobin present. Sulfide-intoxicated mice were neither helped by the supplemental administration of 100% oxygen nor were there any detrimental effects. Compared to cyanide-intoxicated mice, animals surviving sulfide intoxication exhibited very short knockdown times (if any) and full recovery was extremely fast (∼15 min) irrespective of whether sodium nitrite was administered. Behavioral experiments testing the ability of mice to maintain balance on a rotating cylinder showed no motor impairment up to 24 h post sulfide exposure. It is argued that antagonism of sulfide inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO is the crucial antidotal activity of nitrite rather than formation of methemoglobin.

  19. Nitrite accumulation during denitrification depends on the carbon quality and quantity in wastewater treatment with biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocher, Vincent; Laverman, Anniet M; Gasperi, Johnny; Azimi, Sam; Guérin, Sabrina; Mottelet, Stéphane; Villières, Thierry; Pauss, André

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to understand the mechanisms of nitrite appearance during wastewater denitrification by biofilters, focusing on the role of the carbon source. Experiments were carried out at lab-scale (batch tests) and full-scale plant (Parisian plant, capacities of 240,000 m(3) day(-1)). Results showed that the nature of the carbon source affects nitrite accumulation rates. This accumulation is low, 0.05 to 0.10 g N-NO2(-) per g N-NO3(-) eliminated, for alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, or glycerol. The utilization of glycerol leads to fungal development causing clogging of the biofilters. This fungal growth and consequent clogging exclude this carbon source, with little nitrite accumulation, as carbon source for denitrification. Whatever the carbon source, the C/N ratio in the biofilter plays a major role in the appearance of residual nitrite; an optimal C/N ratio from 3.0 to 3.2 allows a complete denitrification without any nitrite accumulation.

  20. Laboratory study on factors influencing nitrogen removal in marble chip biofilters incorporating nitritation and anammox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wendong; Wen, Jianfeng; Norton, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    It remains challenging to integrate nitritation and anammox in ecologically engineered treatment systems such as passive biofilters that are packed with natural materials and have low energy inputs. This study explored the factors influencing nitritation-anammox through parallel operation of two laboratory-scale biofilters packed with large and small marble chips respectively. Clean marble chips (mainly CaCO3) had an alkalinity dissolution rate of 130 mg CaCO3/kg marble d when water pH approached 6.5. Marble chips effectively increased water pH and provided sufficient alkalinity to support nitritation-anammox in the biofilters. Ammonium and total nitrogen removal decreased by 47 and 26%, respectively, when nutrients were not amended to influent. An influent nitrite concentration above 8.9 mg N/L could inhibit anammox in thin biofilms of biofilters. Nitritation-anammox was enhanced with a hydraulic retention time of 2 d relative to 7 d, likely due to enhanced air entrainment. Size of marble chips rarely made a significant difference in nitrogen removal, possibly due to sufficient surface area available for bacterial attachment and alkalinity dissolution.

  1. Nitrate as a source of nitrite and nitric oxide during exercise hyperemia in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piknova, Barbora; Park, Ji Won; Kwan Jeff Lam, Kai; Schechter, Alan N

    2016-05-01

    The presence of nitric oxide (NO) synthase enzymes, mainly the NOS1 isoform, in skeletal muscle had been well established; however in the last decade it has been realized that NO may also be produced by reduction of nitrate and tissue nitrite. We have recently shown that rodent skeletal muscle contains unusually high concentrations of nitrate, compared to blood and other tissues, likely produced by oxidation of NOS1-produced NO. In the present study we measured nitrate and nitrite levels in Wistar rat leg tissue before and after acute and chronic exercise of the animals on a treadmill. We found a very large decrease of muscle nitrate levels immediately after exercise accompanied by a transient increase of nitrite levels. A significant decrease in blood nitrate levels accompanied the changes in muscle levels. Using skeletal muscle tissue homogenates we established that xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is at least partially responsible for the generation of nitrite and/or NO from nitrate and that this effect is increased by slight lowering of pH and by other processes related to the exercise itself. We hypothesize that the skeletal muscle nitrate reservoir contributes significantly to the generation of nitrite and then, probably via formation of NO, exercise-induced functional hyperemia. A model for these metabolic interconversions in mammals is presented. These reactions could explain the muscle-generated vasodilator causing increased blood flow, with induced contraction, exercise, or hypoxia, postulated more than 100 years ago. PMID:27000467

  2. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Saykally, Richard J., E-mail: saykally@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Shih, Orion [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Rizzuto, Anthony M. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Prendergast, David [The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO{sub 3}{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −}. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing.

  3. A sensitive fluorimetric method for determination of trace amounts of nitrite based on luminescence energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient luminescence energy transfer (LET) system based on terbium(III)-sodium hexametaphosphate (Tb/SHMP) chelates as donor and 4-((4-(2-aminoethylamino)naphthalen-1-yl)diazenyl)benzenesulfonic acid dihydrochloride (ANDBS) as acceptor was developed for sensitive determination of trace nitrite. Stable and strong fluorescence Tb/SHMP chelates were prepared in aqueous solution. Based on Griess Reaction, ANDBS was generated by the quantitative reaction of nitrite, sulfanilamide and N-(1-naphtyl)-ethylenediamine dihydrochloride (N1NED). The degree of the overlap was effective for LET between the emission spectrum of Tb/SHMP chelates and the absorption spectrum of ANDBS. Based on the luminescence intensity quenching of Tb/SHMP chelates in proportion to the trace amounts of nitrite, a new assay for the selective and sensitive determination of nitrite was developed. Under the optimum conditions, the linear calibration graph was obtained with a linear range of 0.00040-0.20 μg mL-1 (R=0.99657). The detection limit of NO2- was 0.00010 μg mL-1 (R=0.99657). The method was applied successfully to the determination of nitrite for synthetic samples.

  4. Effects of nitrite on phosphate uptake in anaerobic-oxic process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jie; XIONG Biyong; ZHANG Shude; YANG Hong; ZHANG Jie

    2007-01-01

    An anaerobic-oxic(A/O)biological phosphorus removal reactor was operated to study the effect of nitrite on phosphate uptake.The phosphorus uptake profile was determined under different operating conditions.The results indicated that in addition to oxygen and nitrate(DPBNa,nitrate denitrifying phosphorus removal),to some extent,nitrite could also serve as an electron acceptor to achieve nitrite denitrifying phosphorus removal(DPBNi).The quantity and rate of phosphorus uptake of DPBNi,however,were evidently lower than that of DPBNa.The experiment results revealed that nitrite would bring toxic action to phosphate accumulating organisms(PAOs)when NO2- -N≥93]7 mg/L.The nitrite existing in the anoxic reactor made no difference to the quantity and rate of denitrifying phosphorus removal,but it could reduce the consumption of nitrate.Moreover,the data showed that the aerobic phosphate uptake of DPBNi was lower than that of anaerobic phosphorus-released sludge in a traditional A/O process.However,there was not much difference between these two kinds of sludge in terms of the total phosphorus uptake quantity and the effluent quality.

  5. Long-term nitritation performance of ammonium-rich landfill leachate☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei Sun; Xintao L; Yongzhen Peng; Shuying Wang; Juan Ma

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a biological system combined upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) with sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to treat ammonium-rich landfill leachate. The start-up and operation of the nitritation at low temperatures were investigated. The synergetic interaction of free ammonia (FA) inhibition on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and process control was used to achieve nitritation in the SBR. It is demonstrated that nitritation was successful y started up in the SBR at low temperatures (14.0 °C–18.2 °C) by using FA inhibition coupled with process control, and then was maintained for 482 days at normal/low temperature. Although ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and NOB co-existed within bacterial clusters in the SBR sludge, AOB were confirmed to be dominant nitrifying population species by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. This confirmation not only emphasized that cultivating the appropriate bacteria is essential for achieving stable nitritation performance, but it also revealed that NOB activity was strongly inhibited by FA rather than being eliminated altogether from the system.

  6. Biochemical Studies On The Effect Of Sodium Nitrite And/Or Glutathione Treatment On Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Helal; *Zahkok, S; **Ghada Z A Soliman; * Al-Kassas, M;

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Using food preservatives as sodium nitrite are increased in industrial food productions. Teratogenic, mutagenic and carcinogenic effects have been related to using of some food preservatives. Purpose: To study the effect of sodium nitrite (food additives and treated with glutathione (nature antitoxic on rats. Material And Methods: Certain parameters were measured as percentage of body weight change, body temperature, heart rates, Red & white blood cells count (RBCs & WBCs, hemoglobin (Hb level, hematocrite (Hct value, serum total lipids, serum cholesterol, serum total protein, serum albumin, serum glucose, serum alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase (ALT & AST activity and serum total cholinesterase. The organs, body weight were detected. Organs were prepared for biochemical analysis. Results: Body weight, respiration rate, hepatosomatic index, RBCs & WBCs count, Hb, Hct, serum total lipids, protein, albumin, A/G ratio, liver and muscle total lipids and cholesterol were significantly reduced while serum cholesterol, kidney total lipids and cholesterol, serum ALT & AST was significantly increased. Supplementation of sodium nitrite to rats had no effect on serum glucose level or cholinesterase activity Conclusion: Due to the hazardous effect of food additives as sodium nitrite, it is recommended that the use of sodium nitrite as food additives must be limited and gluathione has the ability to prevent its toxic effect

  7. [Effect of HCO3- on Nitrogen Removal Efficiency in Partial Nitritation-ANAMMOX Process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Cheng, Zong-heng; Huang, Yong; Yuan, Yi; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Da-lin

    2015-11-01

    The effect of HCO3- on nitrogen removal efficiency in partial nitritation-ANAMMOX process was studied by using the combined process of partial nitritation and ANAMMOX has been started and achieved the stable operation of nitrogen removal. The results showed that, when the ratio of C/N decreased from 2 to 0.17 in influent, the nitrogen removal rate decreased from 1.3 kg- ( M3 x d)(-1) to 0.40 kg x (M3 x d)(-1), the decrease range arrived at 69.3%. The nitrogen conversion efficiency was limited, because of the added amount of HCO3- was decreased, which leading to the pH value declined sharply in nitritation and ANAMMOX zone. In the partial nitritation-ANAMMOX process, the effect of HCO3- limitation on activity of ammonium oxidizing bacteria, ANAMMOX bacteria and nitrifying bacteria was decreased in turn. When the C/N ratio increased to 1, the nitrogen removal rate of combined process was quickly restored to 1 kg x (m3 x d)(-1). It indicated that short HCO3- limitation on nitrogen conversion efficiency of the combined process can be fast recovery. The resulted also showed that the relationship between influent C/N ratio and nitrogen removal efficiency has obvious relativity in partial nitritation-ANAMMOX process. PMID:26911008

  8. Influence of operating conditions on nitrous oxide formation during nitritation and nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Y; Beier, M; Rosenwinkel, K-H

    2014-10-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), a strong greenhouse gas, can be produced by ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) as a by-product of ammonium oxidation and can potentially be formed in all types of nitrification processes. However, partial nitritation has been reported to cause significantly higher N2O emissions than complete nitrification. In the study presented here, the mechanisms and factors that drive N2O formation by AOB were investigated with respect to different operational strategies to achieve nitrite accumulation base on combined evaluation of oxygen uptake rate (OUR) and N2O formation rate. On the one hand, N2O formation during partial nitritation and nitrification in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with continuous aerobic conditions was observed. On the other hand, the effect of intermittent aeration on N2O formation during nitrification was investigated. The presence of nitrite, the extend of sludge-specific ammonium loading, low oxygen concentration, and transition from aerobic to anoxic conditions significantly increased N2O formation in this reactor independently from each other, indicating that different formation pathways, supposedly via nitrite or hydroxylamine, were active. PMID:24928380

  9. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Shih, Orion; Rizzuto, Anthony M.; Prendergast, David; Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO3- and NO2-. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing.

  10. A sensitive fluorimetric method for determination of trace amounts of nitrite based on luminescence energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Lun, E-mail: wanglun@mail.ahnu.edu.c [Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo-Biosensing, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Chen Jingguo; Chen Hongqi; Zhou Cailing; Ling Bo; Fu Jie [Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo-Biosensing, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)

    2011-01-15

    An efficient luminescence energy transfer (LET) system based on terbium(III)-sodium hexametaphosphate (Tb/SHMP) chelates as donor and 4-((4-(2-aminoethylamino)naphthalen-1-yl)diazenyl)benzenesulfonic acid dihydrochloride (ANDBS) as acceptor was developed for sensitive determination of trace nitrite. Stable and strong fluorescence Tb/SHMP chelates were prepared in aqueous solution. Based on Griess Reaction, ANDBS was generated by the quantitative reaction of nitrite, sulfanilamide and N-(1-naphtyl)-ethylenediamine dihydrochloride (N1NED). The degree of the overlap was effective for LET between the emission spectrum of Tb/SHMP chelates and the absorption spectrum of ANDBS. Based on the luminescence intensity quenching of Tb/SHMP chelates in proportion to the trace amounts of nitrite, a new assay for the selective and sensitive determination of nitrite was developed. Under the optimum conditions, the linear calibration graph was obtained with a linear range of 0.00040-0.20 {mu}g mL{sup -1} (R=0.99657). The detection limit of NO{sub 2}{sup -} was 0.00010 {mu}g mL{sup -1} (R=0.99657). The method was applied successfully to the determination of nitrite for synthetic samples.

  11. INCREASED CONCENTRATION OF NITRITE IN SYNOVIAL FLUID AND SERUM SAMPLES IN STEROID INDUCED FEMORAL HEAD NECROSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in steroid-induced femoral head necrosis, NO production was measured indirectly as nitrite in serum and synovial fluid samples from patients with steroid-induced femoral head necrosis together with serum samples from healthy volunteers matched for age and sex. The results showed that:① serum nitrite concentration in patients with femoral head necrosis were significantly lower than that in controls (P<0.001); ② nitrite level of synovial fluid was markedly higher than that of serum. In addition, there was a positive correlation between them (r=0.378,P<0.05). We reach the conclusion:① NO is synthesized by synovium and chondrocytes; ② the decreased NO concentration in serum suggests a protective role in steroid-induced femoral head necrosis.

  12. Directed Molecular Evolution of Nitrite Oxido-reductase by DNA-shuffling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUN-WEN LI; JIN-LAI ZHENG; XIN-WEI WANG; MIN JIN; FU-HUAN CHAO

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develtop directly molecular evolution of nitrite oxido-reductase using DNA-shuffling technique because nitrobacteria grow extremely slow and are unable to nitrify effectively inorganic nitrogen in wastewater treatment. Methods The norB gene coding the nitrite oxido-reductase in nitrobacteria was cloned and sequenced. Then, directed molecular evolution of nitrite oxido-reductase was developed by DNA-shuffling of 15 norB genes from different nitrobacteria. Results After DNA-shuffling with sexual PCR and staggered extension process PCR, the sequence was different from its parental DNA fragments and the homology ranged from 98% to 99%. The maximum nitrification rate of the modified bacterium of X16 by modified bacterium had the same characteristics of its parental bacteria of E. coli and could grow rapidly in normal cultures.Conclusion DNA-shuffling was successfully used to engineer E. coli, which had norB gene and could degrade inorganic nitrogen effectively.

  13. Evaluation of leukocyte esterase and nitrite strip tests to detect spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of leukocyte esterase and nitrite reagent strips for bedside diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP).METHODS: A total of 63 consecutive patients with cirrhotic ascites (38 male, 25 female) tested between April 2005 and July 2006 were included in the study. Bedside reagent strip testing was performed on ascitic fluid and the results compared to manual cell counting and ascitic fluid culture. SBP was defined as having a olymorphonuclear ascites count of ≥ 250/mm3.RESULTS: Fifteen samples showed SBP. The sensitivity,specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the leukocyte esterase reagent strips were; 93%, 100%, 100%, and 98%, respectively. The sensitivity,specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the nitrite reagent strips were 13%, 93%, 40%, and 77%, respectively. The combination of leukocyte esterase and nitrite reagents strips did not yield statistically significant effects on diagnostic accuracy. CONCLUSION: Leukocyte esterase reagent strips may provide a rapid, bedside diagnostic test for SBP.

  14. Effect of wall growth on the kinetic modeling of nitrite oxidation in a CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokianakis, Spiros N; Kornaros, Michael; Lyberatos, Gerasimos

    2006-03-01

    A simple kinetic model was developed for describing nitrite oxidation by autotrophic aerobic nitrifiers in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), in which mixed (suspended and attached) growth conditions prevail. The CSTR system was operated under conditions of constant nitrite feed concentration and varying volumetric flow rates. Experimental data from steady-state conditions in the CSTR system and from batch experiments were used for the determination of the model's kinetic parameters. Model predictions were verified against experimental data obtained under transient operating conditions, when volumetric flow rate and nitrite feed concentration disturbances were imposed on the CSTR. The presented kinetic modeling procedure is quite simple and general and therefore can also be applied to other mixed growth biological systems.

  15. Bioelectrode-based approach for enhancing nitrate and nitrite removal and electricity generation from eutrophic lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite contamination of surface waters (e.g. lakes) has become a severe environmental and health problem, especially in developing countries. The recent demonstration of nitrate reduction at the cathode of microbial fuel cell (MFC) provides an opportunity to develop a new technology...... for nitrogen removal from surface waters. In this study, a sediment-type MFC based on two pieces of bioelectrodes was employed as a novel in situ applicable approach for nitrogen removal, as well as electricity production from eutrophic lakes. Maximum power density of 42 and 36 mW/m2 were produced respectively...... from nitrate- and nitrite-rich synthetic lake waters at initial concentration of 10 mg-N/L. Along with the electricity production a total nitrogen removal of 62% and 77% was accomplished, for nitrate and nitrite, respectively. The nitrogen removal was almost 4 times higher under close-circuit condition...

  16. Partial replacement of nitrite by annatto as a colour additive in sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarringhalami, S; Sahari, M A; Hamidi-Esfehani, Z

    2009-01-01

    For decreasing the use of nitrite in sausage in industrial conditions, annatto (Bixa orellana L.) powder (1% norbixin) was used in two different formulations of sausage (with 55% and 70% of meat) as a replacement for 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% nitrite. Then the qualitative characteristics of the samples such as colour (L(∗), a(∗) and b(∗)), microbial contamination and sensory tests (flavour and odour) were compared with the control (without annatto and with 100% nitrite) after 2, 10, 20 and 30 days from production and under the refrigerated condition. The Statistical comparison showed that in both formulations of sausage, the sample containing 60% annatto was the best sample for its colour (for higher a(∗) and lower b(∗)); yet, this sample also did not show any significant differences from the control for microbial contamination and sensory properties. PMID:22063996

  17. Reaction mixtures formed by nitrite and selected sulfa-drugs showed mutagenicity in acidic medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trossero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite, which is present in preserved meat and can be produced in the oral cavity by reduction of nitrate taken from vegetables, could react in stomach with nitrosatable drugs, giving genotoxic-carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds (NOC. The mutagenicity of reaction mixtures formed by sodium nitrite and selected sulfa-drugs (sulfathiazole, HST; phtalylsulfathiazole, PhST; complex Co(II-sulfathiazole, Co(II-ST in acidic medium was evaluated using the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test, with TA98 and TA 100 strains. The reactions were carried out at room temperature, with a mole ratio [nitrite]/[sulfa-drug] > 1. The three reaction mixtures showed mutagenic effects in the considered range.

  18. Study on the Corrosion Inhibition Characteristics of Carbon Steel by Sodium Phosphate and Sodium Nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium nitrite is widely used as one of the popular corrosion inhibitors for the protection of ferrous metal in closed cooling water system, such as a diesel engine and a chiller. The optimum treatment conditions are studied through laboratory tests using linear polarization resistance (LPR) technique. Corrosion rate of the carbon steel electrode could be maintained less than 2.5x10-3 mmpy in the test condition of 500 ppm as NO2-, 200 ppm as CT, 70 .deg. C and pH 6.8. The pH control is confirmed not to be an important factor in the protection of carbon steel by sodium nitrite inhibitor. The addition of tolyltriazole was needed for the protection of the copper alloy in the sodium nitrite treatment system

  19. Effect of temperature and type of packages on nitrates and nitrites content in lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Bąkowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lettuce wrapped in unperforated PE film, perforated PE film, stretch film and without wrapping was stored at 1, 6, 20 and 28°C. Freshly harvested lettuce and after one day of storage, independently on storage conditions, did not contains nitrites„ During storage of lettuce at 1°C only one time small quantities of nitrites (4.3 mg NO2/kg fresh matter were found - after twelve days storage in perforated PE film. Storage of lettuce longer than 7 days at 6°C caused formation of nitrites. Lettuce stored at 20 and 28°C in unperforated PE film contained nitrites already after 2 or 3 days of storage. Decline of nitrates during storage of lettuce was independent from film used to wrapping.

  20. The physiological performance and immune response of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) to nitrite exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Rui; Liu, Bao-Liang; Han, Cen; Huang, Bin; Lei, Ji-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Nitrite (NO(2-)) is the most common toxic nitrogenous compound in aquatic environment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of nitrite physiological performance and immune response of turbot. Fish were exposed to 0, 0.02, 0.08, 0.4 and 0.8 mM nitrite for 96 h. After 0, 24, 48 and 96 h of exposure, blood were collected to measure the levels of glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), glutamate oxalate transaminase (GOT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total protein (TP), albumin (Alb), complement C3 (C3), complement C4 (C4), immunoglobulin M (IgM) and lysozyme (LYS); gill samples were taken to analyze mRNA levels of LYS, heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70), heat shock protein 90 (HSP 90), metallothionein (MT), toll-like receptor 3 (TLR-3), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). The results showed that nitrite (0.4 and/or 0.8mM) significantly increased the levels of GPT, GOT, ALP, C3 and C4, reduced the levels of IgM and LYS, up-regulated the gene expressions of HSP 70, HSP 90, MT, TLR-3, TNF-α and IL-1β, and down-regulated the gene expressions of LYS and IGF-1 after 48 and 96 h of exposure. Based on the results, it can be concluded that high level nitrite exposure results in dysfunction of the blood physiology and immunity in turbot. Further, this study will be helpful to understand the mechanism of aquatic toxicology induced by nitrite in marine fish. PMID:26802553

  1. Electrochemical Determination of Food Preservative Nitrite with Gold Nanoparticles/p-Aminothiophenol-Modified Gold Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşem Üzer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the negative impact of nitrate and nitrite on human health, their presence exceeding acceptable levels is not desired in foodstuffs. Thus, nitrite determination at low concentrations is a major challenge in electroanalytical chemistry, which can be achieved by fast, cheap, and safe electrochemical sensors. In this work, the working electrode (Au was functionalized with p-aminothiophenol (p-ATP and modified with gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs to manufacture the final (Au/p-ATP-Aunano electrode in a two-step procedure. In the first step, p-ATP was electropolymerized on the electrode surface to obtain a polyaminothiophenol (PATP coating. In the second step, Au/p-ATP-Aunano working electrode was prepared by coating the surface with the use of HAuCl4 solution and cyclic voltammetry. Determination of aqueous nitrite samples was performed with the proposed electrode (Au/p-ATP-Aunano using square wave voltammetry (SWV in pH 4 buffer medium. Characteristic peak potential of nitrite samples was 0.76 V, and linear calibration curves of current intensity versus concentration was linear in the range of 0.5–50 mg·L−1 nitrite with a limit of detection (LOD of 0.12 mg·L−1. Alternatively, nitrite in sausage samples could be colorimetrically determined with high sensitivity by means of p-ATP‒modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and naphthylethylene diamine as coupling agents for azo-dye formation due to enhanced charge-transfer interactions with the AuNPs surface. The slopes of the calibration lines in pure NO2− solution and in sausage sample solution, to which different concentrations of NO2− standards were added, were not significantly different from each other, confirming the robustness and interference tolerance of the method. The proposed voltammetric sensing method was validated against the colorimetric nanosensing method in sausage samples.

  2. Electrochemical Determination of Food Preservative Nitrite with Gold Nanoparticles/p-Aminothiophenol-Modified Gold Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üzer, Ayşem; Sağlam, Şener; Can, Ziya; Erçağ, Erol; Apak, Reşat

    2016-08-02

    Due to the negative impact of nitrate and nitrite on human health, their presence exceeding acceptable levels is not desired in foodstuffs. Thus, nitrite determination at low concentrations is a major challenge in electroanalytical chemistry, which can be achieved by fast, cheap, and safe electrochemical sensors. In this work, the working electrode (Au) was functionalized with p-aminothiophenol (p-ATP) and modified with gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) to manufacture the final (Au/p-ATP-Aunano) electrode in a two-step procedure. In the first step, p-ATP was electropolymerized on the electrode surface to obtain a polyaminothiophenol (PATP) coating. In the second step, Au/p-ATP-Aunano working electrode was prepared by coating the surface with the use of HAuCl₄ solution and cyclic voltammetry. Determination of aqueous nitrite samples was performed with the proposed electrode (Au/p-ATP-Aunano) using square wave voltammetry (SWV) in pH 4 buffer medium. Characteristic peak potential of nitrite samples was 0.76 V, and linear calibration curves of current intensity versus concentration was linear in the range of 0.5-50 mg·L(-1) nitrite with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.12 mg·L(-1). Alternatively, nitrite in sausage samples could be colorimetrically determined with high sensitivity by means of p-ATP‒modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and naphthylethylene diamine as coupling agents for azo-dye formation due to enhanced charge-transfer interactions with the AuNPs surface. The slopes of the calibration lines in pure NO₂(-) solution and in sausage sample solution, to which different concentrations of NO₂(-) standards were added, were not significantly different from each other, confirming the robustness and interference tolerance of the method. The proposed voltammetric sensing method was validated against the colorimetric nanosensing method in sausage samples.

  3. PRELIMINARY STUDY ON GROUNDWATER POLLUTION WITH NITRITES AND NITRATES IN GĂTAIA (TIMIŞ COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica TÖRÖK-OANCE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate pollution of water is a widespread issue. This study analyses the pollution with nitrites and nitrates in wells from Gătaia. We collected water samples from 17 wells. The nitrites and nitrates content was determined by the photometric method, using the Spectroquant NOVA60 photometer. We analysed following factors impacting pollution: manure deposits, latrines, livestock farms, slope and depth of the groundwater level in wells. The distances between wells and the analysed pollution sources as well as the slope were determined in ArcGIS 9.3. Software. The statistical analysis has been performed in Excel and GraphPad InStat. The maximum admissible concentration of nitrates has been exceeded in 41.17% of the water samples, and the maximum admissible concentration of nitrites in 11.76% of the water samples. Both simple and multiple regressions (with 2 to 5 independent variables have been performed in order to analyse the relationship between nitrites concentration, respectively nitrates concentration in water and the factors impacting pollution. The simple linear regression could explain to a very small extent this relationship but it was explained to a greater extent by multiple regression. As more factors impacting pollution have been taken into consideration as independent variables, the correlation coefficient between the nitrites content, respectively nitrates, in water and these factors increased. The greatest correlation coefficient (0.6079 with p significant (0.0419 was obtained in case of multiple regression with all 5 independent variables, the dependent variable being the nitrite concentration.

  4. Role of nitrite, urate and pepsin in the gastroprotective effects of saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Bárbara S; Lundberg, Jon O; Radi, Rafael; Laranjinha, João

    2016-08-01

    Dietary nitrate is now recognized as an alternative substrate for nitric oxide (•NO) production in the gut. This novel pathway implies the sequential reduction of nitrate to nitrite, •NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides but the physiological relevance of these oxidants has remained elusive. We have previously shown that dietary nitrite fuels an hitherto unrecognized nitrating pathway at acidic gastric pH, through which pepsinogen is nitrated in the gastric mucosa, yielding a less active form of pepsin in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that pepsin is nitrated in vivo and explore the functional impact of protein nitration by means of peptic ulcer development. Upon administration of pentagastrin and human nitrite-rich saliva or sodium nitrite to rats, nitrated pepsin was detected in the animal's stomach by immunoprecipitation. •NO was measured in the gastric headspace before and after nitrite instillation by chemiluminescence. At the end of each procedure, the stomach's lesions, ranging from gastric erosions to haemorrhagic ulcers, were scored. Nitrite increased gastric •NO by 200-fold (p<0.05) and nitrated pepsin was detected both in the gastric juice and the mucosa (p<0.05). Exogenous urate, a scavenger of nitrogen dioxide radical, blunted •NO detection and inhibited pepsin nitration, suggesting an underlining free radical-dependent mechanism for nitration. Functionally, pepsin nitration prevented the development of gastric ulcers, as the lesions were only apparent when pepsin nitration was inhibited by urate. In sum, this work unravels a novel dietary-dependent nitrating pathway in which pepsin is nitrated and inactivated in the stomach, preventing the progression of gastric ulcers. PMID:27156250

  5. Electrochemical Determination of Food Preservative Nitrite with Gold Nanoparticles/p-Aminothiophenol-Modified Gold Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üzer, Ayşem; Sağlam, Şener; Can, Ziya; Erçağ, Erol; Apak, Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Due to the negative impact of nitrate and nitrite on human health, their presence exceeding acceptable levels is not desired in foodstuffs. Thus, nitrite determination at low concentrations is a major challenge in electroanalytical chemistry, which can be achieved by fast, cheap, and safe electrochemical sensors. In this work, the working electrode (Au) was functionalized with p-aminothiophenol (p-ATP) and modified with gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) to manufacture the final (Au/p-ATP-Aunano) electrode in a two-step procedure. In the first step, p-ATP was electropolymerized on the electrode surface to obtain a polyaminothiophenol (PATP) coating. In the second step, Au/p-ATP-Aunano working electrode was prepared by coating the surface with the use of HAuCl4 solution and cyclic voltammetry. Determination of aqueous nitrite samples was performed with the proposed electrode (Au/p-ATP-Aunano) using square wave voltammetry (SWV) in pH 4 buffer medium. Characteristic peak potential of nitrite samples was 0.76 V, and linear calibration curves of current intensity versus concentration was linear in the range of 0.5–50 mg·L−1 nitrite with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.12 mg·L−1. Alternatively, nitrite in sausage samples could be colorimetrically determined with high sensitivity by means of p-ATP‒modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and naphthylethylene diamine as coupling agents for azo-dye formation due to enhanced charge-transfer interactions with the AuNPs surface. The slopes of the calibration lines in pure NO2− solution and in sausage sample solution, to which different concentrations of NO2− standards were added, were not significantly different from each other, confirming the robustness and interference tolerance of the method. The proposed voltammetric sensing method was validated against the colorimetric nanosensing method in sausage samples. PMID:27490543

  6. Investigation of the photocatalytic effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles in the presence of nitrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Min; Abbood, Hayder A. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Hubei key Laboratory of Bioinorganic Chemistry and Medicine, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhu, Zhening [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, No.11 ZhongGuanCun BeiYiTiao Road, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Hailing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Hubei key Laboratory of Bioinorganic Chemistry and Medicine, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gao, Zhonghong, E-mail: zhgao144@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Hubei key Laboratory of Bioinorganic Chemistry and Medicine, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Nitrite enhanced the photo-damage by ZnO nanoparticles to BSA and HaCaT cells. ► Protein nitration was induced by nitrite in photo-damaged BSA and HaCaT cells. ► The effects of photo-damage on BSA were affected by various factors. ► 50-nm ZnO induced more apoptosis than 90-nm ZnO in HaCaT cells. -- Abstract: Zinc oxide nanoparticles are widely used in sunscreen products because of their chemical stability and capability of blocking harmful ultraviolet rays. However, zinc oxide nanoparticles can also generate reactive species under ultraviolet irradiation. Because nitrite can form reactive nitrogen species under oxidative stress and because it exists in perspiration and cosmetics, we studied the effects of nitrites on the photocatalytic damage of zinc oxide nanoparticles (50 nm and 90 nm) to bovine serum albumin and human keratinocyte cells under ultraviolet irradiation (365 nm and 254 nm). The results indicate that nitrite plays an enhancing role in photocatalytic damage by breaking amino acid residues and promoting protein oxidation and nitration. The concentrations of zinc oxide and nitrite, the irradiation light and duration, and the pH of the medium are important factors influencing this photocatalytic damage. Size effects of ZnO nanoparticles on bovine serum albumin and keratinocyte cells are different. It is speculated that the extent of photo-damage is partially dependent on the aggregation of zinc oxide. These findings may be valuable for understanding potential risks of applying zinc oxide nanoparticle-containing sunscreens to human skin under sunlight exposure.

  7. Researches concerning nitrates and nitrites accumulation in carrots, along of the vegetation stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica NEGREA

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with the determination of nitrates and nitrites content in carrots, in different vegetation stages of the carrot culture. High nitrates and nitrites concentration in vegetables is mainly due to excessive nitrogen content in the soil system, thus deteriorating the nutritional and hygienic values of products and complicating the processing and storage. The determination was tested on carrot samples assayed from an experimental field set up near Timisoara. In experimental field, to the carrot culture was administrated different doses of fertilizers (NPK and the samples for analysis were assayed in different phases of vegetation. The obtained results indicated that the highest level of nitrate in carrots was found to the variant b3 (N150P90K90 in experimental field, who was above maximum limit allowed (LMA. Maximum limit allowed for nitrates in carrots, in accordance with ORDER No. 293/640/2001-1/2002 regarding security and quality conditions for vegetables and fresh fruits for human consumption is 400 ppm. For all other samples of carrots the nitrates level was below of LMA. The nitrite content grows in case of fertilizer administration during the whole vegetation stages of the plant. In variant N150P90K90 the nitrite content was above (LMA in carrot samples in all stages of vegetation. The nitrite content in carrots should not exceed 1-2 ppm. Nitrate and nitrite content in carrots was done with the help of High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC in the Laboratory for the Measurement of Residues of the Department of Agro-techniques of the U.S.A-V.M.B in Timisoara.

  8. Investigation of the photocatalytic effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles in the presence of nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Nitrite enhanced the photo-damage by ZnO nanoparticles to BSA and HaCaT cells. ► Protein nitration was induced by nitrite in photo-damaged BSA and HaCaT cells. ► The effects of photo-damage on BSA were affected by various factors. ► 50-nm ZnO induced more apoptosis than 90-nm ZnO in HaCaT cells. -- Abstract: Zinc oxide nanoparticles are widely used in sunscreen products because of their chemical stability and capability of blocking harmful ultraviolet rays. However, zinc oxide nanoparticles can also generate reactive species under ultraviolet irradiation. Because nitrite can form reactive nitrogen species under oxidative stress and because it exists in perspiration and cosmetics, we studied the effects of nitrites on the photocatalytic damage of zinc oxide nanoparticles (50 nm and 90 nm) to bovine serum albumin and human keratinocyte cells under ultraviolet irradiation (365 nm and 254 nm). The results indicate that nitrite plays an enhancing role in photocatalytic damage by breaking amino acid residues and promoting protein oxidation and nitration. The concentrations of zinc oxide and nitrite, the irradiation light and duration, and the pH of the medium are important factors influencing this photocatalytic damage. Size effects of ZnO nanoparticles on bovine serum albumin and keratinocyte cells are different. It is speculated that the extent of photo-damage is partially dependent on the aggregation of zinc oxide. These findings may be valuable for understanding potential risks of applying zinc oxide nanoparticle-containing sunscreens to human skin under sunlight exposure

  9. On the optimum conditions for the reduction of nitrate to nitrite by cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydahl, F

    1976-05-01

    The variables of direct importance in the reduction of nitrate to nitrite by a metallic reductant such as cadmium used in a reductor column are discussed with special reference to the determination of nitrate as nitrite in very dilute solutions, e.g., natural waters. As a result of these considerations the effect of flow-rate (expressed as bed-volumes min ), pH, temperature, chloride concentration and various types of reductor cadmium on the yield of nitrite is investigated. The effect of dissolved oxygen in the sample solution on pH and cadmium concentration in the reduced solution is demonstrated. At constant pH a maximum yield of nitrite is obtained at a certain flow-rate, which is explained as the result of a rapid formation and simultaneously proceeding slow reduction of nitrite. With increasing pH this maximum is shifted to lower flow-rates, and grows broader whilst the yield at maximum approaches 100%; at pH 9.5 a yield of 99.9 +/- 0.1% is obtained. The temperature has little effect on the reduction rate in the interval 20-30 degrees but at 10 degrees the reduction is noticeably slower. Chloride ions have a strongly retarding effect on the reduction rate but the yield at maximum is not affected. Electrolytically precipitated cadmium, filings of pure cadmium or amalgamated pure cadmium all give practically the same yield at maximum though some differences in reduction rate are observed. Impure cadmium or copper-cadmium and silver-cadmium, owing to the formation of galvanic cells with higher reducing power, give a high reduction rate, which also applies to nitrite, causing a poorer yield at maximum. The practical consequences of the results are thoroughly discussed.

  10. [Presence of nitrates and nitrites in baker's products and in certain other flour products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabrzyski, M; Gajewska, R; Ganowiak, Z

    1990-01-01

    The results of the study demonstrated that the content of nitrates and nitrites in various baker's products varied from 0.96 (in wheat rolls and baguettes) to 44.07 mg KO3/kg in pumpernickel bread. In wholemeal bread, village bread, tourist bread, rye brown bread and Graham bread the content of these compounds was from 1.46 to 27.10 mg KNO3/kg. The mean content of nitrites in these bread sorts was 1.76 mg NaNo2/kg, range 0.10-4.40 mg NaNo2/kg. In white wheat flours (Wrocław flour, cake flour and Poznań flour) the content of nitrates ranged from 1.10 to 19.08 mg KNO3/kg, and in the dishes produced from them in household was from 0.50 to 16.33 mg KNO3/kg. The content of nitrites in these flours was in the range from 0.00 to 4.16 mg NaNo2/kg, and in the products prepared from them it was from 0.00 to 1.60 mg NaNO2/kg. Eleven types were tested also of popular biscuits, wafers, gingerbread and hard cakes in which the content of nitrates was from 3.66 to 17.72 mg/kg, and that of nitrites was from 0.00 to 8.80 mg NaNo2/kg. Considering the average consumption of these products per one person in the seashore region and the mean values of nitrates and nitrites it was calculated that they provided daily about 3.9 mg KNO3 and 0.4 NaNo2, that is about 1.8% of nitrates and 7.7% of nitrites consumed by adults in daily food ration.

  11. Allosteric control of internal electron transfer in cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G;

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase is a bifunctional multiheme enzyme catalyzing the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide and the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the internal electron transfer process in the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme have...... been studied and found to be dominated by pronounced interactions between the c and the d1 hemes. The interactions are expressed both in dramatic changes in the internal electron-transfer rates between these sites and in marked cooperativity in their electron affinity. The results constitute a prime...... example of intraprotein control of the electron-transfer rates by allosteric interactions....

  12. Co-treatment with conjugated linoleic acid and nitrite protects against myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natia Qipshidze-Kelm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the CDC, the most common type of heart disease is coronary artery disease, which commonly leads to myocardial infarction (MI. Therapeutic approaches to lessen the resulting cardiovascular injury associated with MI are limited. Recently, MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to act as negative regulators of gene expression by inhibiting mRNA translation and/or stimulating mRNA degradation. A single miRNA can modulate physiological or disease phenotypes by regulating whole functional systems. Importantly, miRNAs can regulate cardiac function, thereby modulating heart muscle contraction, heart growth and morphogenesis. MicroRNA-499 (miRNA-499 is a cardiac-specific miRNA that when elevated causes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, in turn preventing cardiac dysfunction during MI. Previous studies revealed that combination treatment with conjugated linoleic acid (cLA and nitrite preserved cardiovascular function in mice. Therefore, it was hypothesized that cLA and nitrite may regulate miRNA-499, thus providing cardiac protection during MI. To test this hypothesis, 12-week old mice were treated with cLA (10 mg/kg/d-via osmotic mini-pump or cLA and nitrite (50 ppm-drinking water 3 days prior to MI (ligation of the left anterior descending artery. Echocardiography and pressure–volume (PV-loop analysis revealed that cLA and nitrite-treated MI mice had improved heart function (10 days following MI compared to untreated MI mice. Treatment with cLA and nitrite significantly induced levels of miRNA-499 compared to untreated MI mice. In addition, treatment with cLA and nitrite abolished MI-induced protein expression of p53 and dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP-1. Moreover, the antioxidant enzyme expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 was elevated in MI mice treated with cLA and nitrite compared to untreated MI mice. Confocal imaging on heart tissue confirmed expression the levels of HO-1 and p53. Taken together, these results suggest that therapeutic

  13. Ultra-trace analysis of nitrite in food samples by flow injection with spectrophotometric detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensafi, A.A.; Bagherian Dehaghei, G. [College of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    A flow injection system with spectrophotometric detection is proposed for the determination of low levels of nitrite based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of gallocyanine by bromate in acidic media. Various analytical parameters such as acidity, reagent concentration, flow rate, sample size, time, temperature, and interfering species were studied. The calibration graph was linear for 0.020-0.500 {mu}g/mL of nitrite. The method is successfully applied to food samples. Up to 30 {+-} 5 samples can be analyzed per hour. (orig.) With 3 figs., 3 tabs., 17 refs.

  14. Modeling pitting corrosion of iron exposed to alkaline solutions containing nitrate and nitrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lifeng

    2001-07-01

    Pitting corrosion could be extremely serious for dilute high-level radioactive waste stored or processed in carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Site. In these solutions, nitrate is an aggressive ion with respect to pitting of carbon steel while nitrite can be used as an inhibitor. Excessive additions of nitrite increase the risk of generating unstable nitrogen compounds during waste processing, and insufficient additions of nitrite could increase the risk of corrosion-induced failure. Thus there are strong incentives to obtain a fundamental understanding of the role of nitrite in pitting corrosion prevention with these solution chemistries. In this dissertation, both a 1-D and a 2-D model are used to study the pitting mechanism as a function of nitrite/nitrate ratios. The 1-D model used BAND(J) to test a reaction mechanism for the passivation behavior by comparing the predicted Open Circuit Potential (OCP) with OCP data from experiments at different NO2-/NO3- ratio. The model predictions are compared with Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) experiments. A 2-D model was developed for the propagation of a pit in iron by writing subroutines for finite element software of GAMBIT and FIDAP. Geometrically distributed anodic and cathodic reactions are assumed. The results show three partial explanations describing the inhibition influence of nitrite to iron corrosion: the competing reduction reaction of nitrate to nitrite, the formation of Fe(OH)+, and the function of the porous film. The current distributions and the effect of porosity of the film on pH are also explained. The calculation results also show that rate of pit growth decreases as the pit diameter increases until it reaches a constant value. The profile of the local current density on the pit wall is parabolic for small pits and it changes to a linear distribution for large pits. The model predicts that addition of nitrite will decrease the production of ferrous ions and those can prevent iron from

  15. Enhancement of Nitrite Reduction Kinetics on Electrospun Pd-Carbon Nanomaterial Catalysts for Water Purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tao; Durkin, David P; Hu, Maocong; Wang, Xianqin; Banek, Nathan A; Wagner, Michael J; Shuai, Danmeng

    2016-07-20

    We report a facile synthesis method for carbon nanofiber (CNF) supported Pd catalysts via one-pot electrospinning and their application for nitrite hydrogenation. A mixture of Pd acetylacetonate (Pd(acac)2), polyacrylonitrile (PAN), and nonfunctionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was electrospun and thermally treated to produce Pd/CNF-MWCNT catalysts. The addition of MWCNTs with a mass loading of 1.0-2.5 wt % (to PAN) significantly improved nitrite reduction activity compared to the catalyst without MWCNT addition. The results of CO chemisorption confirmed that the addition of MWCNTs increased Pd exposure on CNFs and hence improved catalytic activity.

  16. Enhancement of Nitrite Reduction Kinetics on Electrospun Pd-Carbon Nanomaterial Catalysts for Water Purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tao; Durkin, David P; Hu, Maocong; Wang, Xianqin; Banek, Nathan A; Wagner, Michael J; Shuai, Danmeng

    2016-07-20

    We report a facile synthesis method for carbon nanofiber (CNF) supported Pd catalysts via one-pot electrospinning and their application for nitrite hydrogenation. A mixture of Pd acetylacetonate (Pd(acac)2), polyacrylonitrile (PAN), and nonfunctionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was electrospun and thermally treated to produce Pd/CNF-MWCNT catalysts. The addition of MWCNTs with a mass loading of 1.0-2.5 wt % (to PAN) significantly improved nitrite reduction activity compared to the catalyst without MWCNT addition. The results of CO chemisorption confirmed that the addition of MWCNTs increased Pd exposure on CNFs and hence improved catalytic activity. PMID:27387354

  17. Determination of nitrite ion and sulfanilic and orthanilic acids by differential pulse polarography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulaiman, S.T.

    1984-11-01

    The nitrite ion can be determined with a high degree of accuracy and sensitivity by differential pulse polarography utilizing the rapid and quantitative reaction between the nitrite ion and sulfanilic acid or orthanilic acid at pH 1.5. The experimental detection limit is shown to be 8.6 X 10/sup -8/ M (as NO/sub 2//sup -/) in simple aqueous solution. The method is further used to determine concentrations of sulfanilic acid down to 4 X 10/sup -7/ M and orthanilic acid down to 1.6 X 10/sup -6/ M under optimum conditions.

  18. The nasFEDCBA operon for nitrate and nitrite assimilation in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, J. T.; Goldman, B. S.; Stewart, V

    1994-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilation pathway. We previously identified structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases, nasA and nasB, respectively. We report here our further identification of four genes, nasFEDC, upstream of the nasBA genes. The nasFEDCBA genes probably form an operon. Mutational and complementation analyses indicated that both the nasC and nasA genes are required for nitrate assimilatio...

  19. Iron-Doped Titania Nanoparticles for the Photocatalytic Oxidative Degradation of Nitrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Iron-doped titania nanoparticles exhibit a higher photocatalytic activity than pure TiO2 for the degradation of nitrite. The optimum Fe-doped content in terms of activity is approximately 0. 5 %. The increase in photoactivity is probably due to the higher adsorption and the inhibition of electron-hole recombination. The photocatalytic oxidation reaction of nitrite over the Fe-doped TiO2 catalyst follows zero-order kinetics, which is different from that over pure TiO2. The reaction rate decreases linearly with the increase of the pH of the solution.

  20. Controls of nitrite oxidation in ammonia-removing biological air filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler, Susanne; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Nielsen, Lars Peter;

    2008-01-01

    analysis. Furthermore, the effect of varying air load and water exchange was investigated. Absence of NOB in many filters was explained by the inhibitory effect of Free Ammonia (FA). When first established, NOB induced a self-perpetuating effect through oxidation of nitrite which allowed increased AOB...... activity resulting in a lowered pH and thus a decreased FA concentration, promoting further growth of NOB. Yet, in some cases a situation with a nitrate-to-nitrite ratio of 1 and moderate pH remained stable even under varying air load and water supply, suggesting that additional mechanisms were involved...

  1. Effect of temperature and type of packages on nitrates and nitrites content in lettuce

    OpenAIRE

    Józef Bąkowski; Helena Michalik; Marcin Horbowicz

    2013-01-01

    Lettuce wrapped in unperforated PE film, perforated PE film, stretch film and without wrapping was stored at 1, 6, 20 and 28°C. Freshly harvested lettuce and after one day of storage, independently on storage conditions, did not contains nitrites„ During storage of lettuce at 1°C only one time small quantities of nitrites (4.3 mg NO2/kg fresh matter) were found - after twelve days storage in perforated PE film. Storage of lettuce longer than 7 days at 6°C caused formation of nitrites. Lettuc...

  2. Chemical perspectives on alkali and earth alkaline nitrate and nitrite salts for concentrated solar power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordaro, Joseph G. [Sandia National Labsoratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Molten salts have been widely considered as the leading candidate heat transfer fluids (HTF) used in high temperature, concentrated solar power plants. Specifically, nitrate and nitrite based salts have been investigated as a HTF and even deployed in pilot plants generating up to 19.9 MW of electricity at operating temperatures above 500 C. New plant designs requiring higher operating temperatures for better efficiencies are pushing the stability limit of HTF. This paper presents an overview of the thermophysical properties of nitrate and nitrite salts and discusses thermodynamic and kinetic stability limitations as they relate to concentrated solar power generation. (orig.)

  3. Impact of nitrite on aerobic phosphorus uptake by poly-phosphate accumulating organisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Li, Boxiao; Yang, Yingying; Wang, Xiangdong; Li, Lei; Peng, Yongzhen

    2014-02-01

    Impact of nitrite on aerobic phosphorus (P) uptake of poly-phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) in three different enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems was investigated, i.e., the enriched PAOs culture fed with synthetic wastewater, the two lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) treating domestic wastewater for nutrient removal through nitrite-pathway nitritation and nitrate-pathway nitrification, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization results showed that PAOs in the three sludges accounted for 72, 7.6 and 6.5% of bacteria, respectively. In the enriched PAOs culture, at free nitrous acid (FNA) concentration of 0.47 × 10(-3) mg HNO₂-N/L, aerobic P-uptake and oxidation of intercellular poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates were both inhibited. Denitrifying phosphorus removal under the aerobic conditions was observed, indicating the existence of PAOs using nitrite as electron acceptor in this culture. When the FNA concentration reached 2.25 × 10(-3) mg HNO2-N/L, denitrifying phosphorus removal was also inhibited. And the inhibition ceased once nitrite was exhausted. Corresponding to both SBRs treating domestic wastewater with nitritation and nitrification pathway, nitrite inhibition on aerobic P-uptake by PAOs did not occur even though FNA concentration reached 3 × 10(-3) and 2.13 × 10(-3) mg HNO₂-N/L, respectively. Therefore, PAOs taken from different EBPR activated sludges had different tolerance to nitrite. PMID:23771179

  4. Aldehyde-Selective Wacker-Type Oxidation of Unbiased Alkenes Enabled by a Nitrite Co-Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Wickens, Zachary K.

    2013-09-13

    Breaking the rules: Reversal of the high Markovnikov selectivity of Wacker-type oxidations was accomplished using a nitrite co-catalyst. Unbiased aliphatic alkenes can be oxidized with high yield and aldehyde selectivity, and several functional groups are tolerated. 18O-labeling experiments indicate that the aldehydic O atom is derived from the nitrite salt.

  5. Evaluation of the nitrite and leukocyte esterase activity tests for the diagnosis of acute symptomatic urinary tract infection in men.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeijers, J.J.; Kessels, A.G.H.; Nys, S.; Bartelds, A.; Donker, G.; Stobberingh, E.; Verbon, A.

    2007-01-01

    For 422 male patients with symptoms indicative of a urinary tract infection, nitrite and leukocyte esterase activity dipstick test results were compared with results of culture of urine samples. The positive predictive value of a positive nitrite test result was 96%. Addition of results of the leuko

  6. NarK is a nitrite-extrusion system involved in anaerobic nitrate respiration by Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowe, John J.; Ubbink-Kok, Trees; Molenaar, Douwe; Konings, Wilhelmus; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli can use nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration. A polytopic membrane protein, termed NarK, has been implicated in nitrate uptake and nitrite excretion and is thought to function as a nitrate/nitrite antiporter. The longest-lived radioactive isotope of nitr

  7. 78 FR 69646 - Sodium Nitrite From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited First Sunset...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ...-Year (``Sunset'') Reviews, 78 FR 39256 (July 1, 2013); see also Sodium Nitrite from the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Order, 73 FR 50595 (August 27, 2008) (``CVD Order''). As explained... International Trade Administration Sodium Nitrite From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

  8. The acclimation of Chlorella to high-level nitrite for potential application in biological NOx removal from industrial flue gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianpei; Xu, Gang; Rong, Junfeng; Chen, Hui; He, Chenliu; Giordano, Mario; Wang, Qiang

    2016-05-20

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are the components of fossil flue gas that give rise to the greatest environmental concerns. This study evaluated the ability of the green algae Chlorella to acclimate to high level of NOx and the potential utilization of Chlorella strains in biological NOx removal (DeNOx) from industrial flue gases. Fifteen Chlorella strains were subject to high-level of nitrite (HN, 176.5 mmolL(-1) nitrite) to simulate exposure to high NOx. These strains were subsequently divided into four groups with respect to their ability to tolerate nitrite (excellent, good, fair, and poor). One strain from each group was selected to evaluate their photosynthetic response to HN condition, and the nitrite adaptability of the four Chlorella strains were further identified by using chlorophyll fluorescence. The outcome of our experiments shows that, although high concentrations of nitrite overall negatively affect growth and photosynthesis of Chlorella strains, the degree of nitrite tolerance is a strain-specific feature. Some Chlorella strains have an appreciably higher ability to acclimate to high-level of nitrite. Acclimation is achieved through a three-step process of restrict, acclimate, and thriving. Notably, Chlorella sp. C2 was found to have a high tolerance and to rapidly acclimate to high concentrations of nitrite; it is therefore a promising candidate for microalgae-based biological NOx removal. PMID:27010349

  9. Electro-oxidation nitrite based on copper calcined layered double hydroxide and gold nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Lin; Meng Xiaomeng; Xu Minrong; Shang Kun [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); Ai Shiyun, E-mail: ashy@sdau.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); Liu Yinping [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > A nitrite sensor fabricated based on copper calcined layered double hydroxides and gold nanoparticles modified electrode. > This sensor exhibited excellent electrocatalytic oxidation to nitrite. > This nitrite sensor exhibited very good analytical performance with low cost, convenient preparation and rapid detection. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel nitrite sensor was constructed based on electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a copper calcined layered double hydroxide (Cu-CLDH) modified glassy carbon electrode. Electrochemical experiments showed that AuNPs/CLDH composite film exhibited excellent electrocatalytic oxidation activity with nitrite due to the synergistic effect of the Cu-CLDH with AuNPs. The fabricated sensor exhibited excellent performance for nitrite detection within a wide concentration interval of 1-191 {mu}M and with a detection limit of 0.5 {mu}M. The superior electrocatalytic response to nitrite was mainly attributed to the large surface area, minimized diffusion resistance, and enhanced electron transfer of the Cu-CLDH and AuNPs composition film. This platform offers a novel route for nitrite sensing with wide analytical applications and will supply the practical applications for a variety of simple, robust, and easy-to-manufacture analytical approaches in the future.

  10. Investigating quality attributes and consumer acceptance of uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added commercial hams, bacons, and frankfurters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, J J; Cordray, J C; Olson, D G; Sebranek, J G; Love, J A

    2007-10-01

    Increasing demands for natural, organic, and/or preservative-free foods have resulted in the consumer availability of uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added processed meat and poultry products. A comprehensive understanding about the quality and sensory attributes of commercially available uncured products is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine if quality and sensory differences exist between uncured and cured meat products. Five different commercial brands (Brands A to E; 4 uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added, and 1 nitrite-added) of 3 product types (hams, frankfurters, and bacons) were obtained from retail supermarkets. The samples were evaluated for color, pigment content, pH, lipid oxidation, residual nitrate and nitrite content, and consumer acceptance. All brands from all product types evaluated, except for 1 bacon (Brand B), had cured color, aroma, and flavor attributes similar to the nitrite-added control (Brand E). All product types and brands contained residual nitrate and residual nitrite except for Brands B and D bacons (brands within each product type were similar to the control. Consumer sensory ratings for surface/lean color, aroma, flavor, texture, and overall acceptance determined that variation existed. Brand E (nitrite-added control) and 1 uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added brand for each product type were not different (P > 0.05) for overall acceptance and received higher scores (P brands within each product type. PMID:17995620

  11. Photolysis of n-butyl nitrite and isoamyl nitrite at 355 nm: A time-resolved Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy and ab initio study

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Min; Zhang, Qun; Chen, Yang

    2009-01-01

    We report on the photodissociation dynamics study of n-butyl nitrite (n-C_4H_9ONO) and isoamyl nitrite ((CH_3)_2C_3H_5ONO) by means of time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (TR-FTIR) emission spectroscopy. The obtained TR-FTIR emission spectra of the nascent NO fragments produced in the 355-nm laser photolysis of the two alkyl nitrite species showed an almost identical rotational temperature and vibrational distributions of NO. In addition, a close resemblance between the two species was also found in the measured temporal profiles of the IR emission of NO and the recorded UV absorption spectra. The experimental results are consistent with our ab initio calculations using the time-dependent density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which indicate that the substitution of one of the two {gamma}-H atoms in n-C_4H_9ONO with a methyl group to form (CH_3)_2C_3H_5ONO has only a minor effect on the photodissociation dynamics of the two molecules.

  12. Achieving the nitrite pathway using FA inhibition and process control in UASB-SBR system removing nitrogen from landfill leachate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An up-flow sludge blanket(UASB) and sequencing batch reactor(SBR) system was introduced to remove organics and nitrogen from landfill leachate.The synergetic effect of free ammonia(FA) inhibition and process control was used to achieve the nitrite pathway in the SBR.In previous research,inhibition of FA on nitrite oxidizing bacteria(NOB) activity has been revealed and the process control parameters(DO,ORP and pH) exactly indicate the end-point of nitritation.The method was implemented in the SBR achieving stable nitrogen removal via the nitrite pathway from landfill leachate.The degree of nitrite accumulation during the nitritation was monitored along with the simultaneous and advanced removal of organics and nitrogen in the UASB-SBR system.The nitrifying bacteria community was quantitatively analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH) techniques.Batch tests were carried out to investigate the denitritation kinetics of microbial bacteria in the SBR.Experimental results showed that the nitrite pathway could be repeatedly and reliably achieved by synergetic effect of FA inhibition and process control.FISH analysis showed the dominant nitrifying bacteria were ammonia-oxidizing β-Proteobacteria. Relationship between nitrite concentration and nitrite reduction rate followed the Monod-type equation.The maximum specific nitrite utilization rate(k) and half-velocity constant(Ks) were calculated as 0.44 gN gVSS-1d-1and 15.8 mg L-1,respectively.

  13. FIA-Spectrophotometric Method for Determination of Nitrite in Meat Products: An Experiment Exploring Color Reduction of an Azo-Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, Jose C.; Angnes, Lucio; Masini, Jorge C.; Oliveira, Paulo C. C.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the reaction between nitrite and safranine O. This sensitive reaction is based on the disappearance of color of the reddish-orange azo dye, allowing the determination of nitrite at the mg mL-1 level. A factorial optimization of parameters was carried out and the method was applied for the quantification of nitrite in…

  14. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane Coupled to Nitrite Reduction by Halophilic Marine NC10 Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chaoyang; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Yan; Pan, Yawei; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua; Hu, Baolan

    2015-08-15

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to nitrite reduction is a novel AOM process that is mediated by denitrifying methanotrophs. To date, enrichments of these denitrifying methanotrophs have been confined to freshwater systems; however, the recent findings of 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences in marine sediments suggest a possible occurrence of AOM coupled to nitrite reduction in marine systems. In this research, a marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was obtained after 20 months of enrichment. Activity testing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis were then conducted and showed that the methane oxidation activity and the number of NC10 bacteria increased correlatively during the enrichment period. 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that only bacteria in group A of the NC10 phylum were enriched and responsible for the resulting methane oxidation activity, although a diverse community of NC10 bacteria was harbored in the inoculum. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that NC10 bacteria were dominant in the enrichment culture after 20 months. The effect of salinity on the marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was investigated, and the apparent optimal salinity was 20.5‰, which suggested that halophilic bacterial AOM coupled to nitrite reduction was obtained. Moreover, the apparent substrate affinity coefficients of the halophilic denitrifying methanotrophs were determined to be 9.8 ± 2.2 μM for methane and 8.7 ± 1.5 μM for nitrite. PMID:26048927

  15. Interdependence of two NarK domains in a fused nitrate/nitrite transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Alan D; Moir, James W B; Richardson, David J; Ferguson, Stuart J

    2008-11-01

    Nitrate uptake is essential for various bacterial processes and combines with nitrite export to form the usual initial steps of denitrification, a process that reduces nitrate to dinitrogen gas. Although many bacterial species contain NarK-like transporters that are proposed to function as either nitrate/proton symporters or nitrate/nitrite antiporters based on sequence homology, these transporters remain, in general, poorly characterized. Several bacteria appear to contain a transporter that is a fusion of two NarK-like proteins, although the significance of this arrangement remains elusive. We demonstrate that NarK from Paracoccus denitrificans is expressed as a fusion of two NarK-like transporters. NarK1 and NarK2 are separately capable of supporting anaerobic denitrifying growth but with growth defects that are partially mitigated by coexpression of the two domains. NarK1 appears to be a nitrate/proton symporter with high affinity for nitrate and NarK2 a nitrate/nitrite antiporter with lower affinity for nitrate. Each transporter requires two conserved arginine residues for activity. A transporter consisting of inactivated NarK1 fused to active NarK2 has a dramatically increased affinity for nitrate compared with NarK2 alone, implying a functional interaction between the two domains. A potential model for nitrate and nitrite transport in P. denitrificans is proposed. PMID:18823285

  16. Nitrite promotes protein carbonylation and Strecker aldehyde formation in experimental fermented sausages: are both events connected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, A; Ventanas, J; Estévez, M

    2014-12-01

    The role played by curing agents (nitrite, ascorbate) on protein oxidation and Strecker aldehyde formation is studied. To fulfill this objective, increasing concentrations of nitrite (0, 75 and 150ppm) and ascorbate (0, 250 and 500ppm) were added to sausages subjected to a 54day drying process. The concurrence of intense proteolysis, protein carbonylation and formation of Strecker aldehydes during processing of sausages suggests that α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AAS) and γ-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) may be implicated in the formation of Strecker aldehydes. The fact that nitrite (150ppm, ingoing amount) significantly promoted the formation of protein carbonyls at early stages of processing and the subsequent formation of Strecker aldehydes provides strength to this hypothesis. Ascorbate (125 and 250ppm) controlled the overall extent of protein carbonylation in sausages without declining the formation of Strecker aldehydes. These results may contribute to understanding the chemistry fundamentals of the positive influence of nitrite on the flavor and overall acceptability of cured muscle foods.

  17. Tetrazine-based chemistry for nitrite determination in a paper microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gomez, Inmaculada; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Álvarez-Bermejo, José Antonio; Ariza-Avidad, Maria; de Orbe-Payá, Ignacio; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Capitan-Vallvey, Luis Fermin

    2016-11-01

    We present a new chemistry to determine nitrites implemented in a microfluidic paper-based analytical device (µPAD). The device is fabricated in cellulose paper with a sample reception area and three replicate detection areas with recognition chemistry immobilized by adsorption. The method involves the use of nitrite in an acid medium reaction to generate nitrous acid, which produces the oxidation of s-dihydrotetrazine: 1,2-dihydro-3,6-bis(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DHBPTz), which change the detection zone from colorless to pink. We used a digital camera and smartphone for the quantitative analysis of nitrite with the color coordinate S of the HSV color space as the analytical parameter. Parameters such as concentration and volume of s-dihydrotetrazine, pH, sample volume and reaction time were studied. The detection limit for this method is 1.30µM nitrite. To estimate the selectivity of the method an interference study of common ions in water samples was performed. The procedure was applied to natural water and compared with reference procedures. PMID:27591668

  18. [Research on Cultivation and Stability of Nitritation Granular Sludge in Integrated ABR-CSTR Reactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kai-cheng; Wu, Peng; Shen, Yao-liang; Li, Yue-han; Wang, Han-fang; Xu, Yue-zhong

    2015-11-01

    Abstract: The last two compartments of the Anaerobic Baffled Readtor ( ABR) were altered into aeration tank and sedimentation tank respectively to get an integrated anaerobic-aerobic reactor, using anaerobic granular sludge in anaerobic zone and aerobic granular sludge in aerobic zone as seed sludge. The research explored the condition to cultivate nitritation granular sludge, under the condition of continuous flow. The C/N rate was decreased from 1 to 0.4 and the ammonia nitrogen volumetric loading rate was increased from 0.89 kg x ( m3 x d)(-1) to 2.23 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) while the setting time of 1 h was controlled in the aerobic zone. After the system was operated for 45 days, the mature nitritation granular sludge in aerobic zone showed a compact structure and yellow color while the nitrite accumulation rate was about 80% in the effluent. The associated inhibition of free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) dominated the nitritation. Part of granules lost stability during the initial period of operation and flocs appeared in the aerobic zone. However, the flocs were transformed into newly generated small particles in the following reactor operation, demonstrating that organic carbon was benefit to granulation and the enrichment of slow-growing nitrifying played an important role in the stability of granules.

  19. Colorimetric determination of nitrate plus nitrite in water by enzymatic reduction, automated discrete analyzer methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Charles J.; Kryskalla, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents work at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to validate enzymatic reduction, colorimetric determinative methods for nitrate + nitrite in filtered water by automated discrete analysis. In these standard- and low-level methods (USGS I-2547-11 and I-2548-11), nitrate is reduced to nitrite with nontoxic, soluble nitrate reductase rather than toxic, granular, copperized cadmium used in the longstanding USGS automated continuous-flow analyzer methods I-2545-90 (NWQL laboratory code 1975) and I-2546-91 (NWQL laboratory code 1979). Colorimetric reagents used to determine resulting nitrite in aforementioned enzymatic- and cadmium-reduction methods are identical. The enzyme used in these discrete analyzer methods, designated AtNaR2 by its manufacturer, is produced by recombinant expression of the nitrate reductase gene from wall cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unlike other commercially available nitrate reductases we evaluated, AtNaR2 maintains high activity at 37°C and is not inhibited by high-phenolic-content humic acids at reaction temperatures in the range of 20°C to 37°C. These previously unrecognized AtNaR2 characteristics are essential for successful performance of discrete analyzer nitrate + nitrite assays (henceforth, DA-AtNaR2) described here.

  20. Tetrazine-based chemistry for nitrite determination in a paper microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gomez, Inmaculada; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Álvarez-Bermejo, José Antonio; Ariza-Avidad, Maria; de Orbe-Payá, Ignacio; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Capitan-Vallvey, Luis Fermin

    2016-11-01

    We present a new chemistry to determine nitrites implemented in a microfluidic paper-based analytical device (µPAD). The device is fabricated in cellulose paper with a sample reception area and three replicate detection areas with recognition chemistry immobilized by adsorption. The method involves the use of nitrite in an acid medium reaction to generate nitrous acid, which produces the oxidation of s-dihydrotetrazine: 1,2-dihydro-3,6-bis(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DHBPTz), which change the detection zone from colorless to pink. We used a digital camera and smartphone for the quantitative analysis of nitrite with the color coordinate S of the HSV color space as the analytical parameter. Parameters such as concentration and volume of s-dihydrotetrazine, pH, sample volume and reaction time were studied. The detection limit for this method is 1.30µM nitrite. To estimate the selectivity of the method an interference study of common ions in water samples was performed. The procedure was applied to natural water and compared with reference procedures.

  1. The acid-catalyzed interaction of melanin with nitrite ions. An EPR investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Matuszak Zenon; Chignell Collin F.; Reszka Krzysztof J.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of synthetic dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) melanin (DM) with nitrite ions, NO2−, in the pH 3.6–7.0 range, has been investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). We found that especially at pH

  2. Nitrite intensity explains N management effects on N2O emissions in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is typically assumed that the dependence of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions on soil nitrogen (N) availability is best quantified in terms of ammonium (NH4+) and/or nitrate (NO3-) concentrations. In contrast, nitrite (NO2-) is seldom measured separately from NO3- despite its role as a central substr...

  3. Nitrite-Driven Nitrous Oxide Production Under Aerobic Soil Conditions: Kinetics and Biochemical Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  4. Positive role of nitrite as electron acceptor on anoxic denitrifying phosphorus removal process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG RongXin; LI Dong; LI XiangKun; BAO LinLin; JIANG AnXi; ZHANG Jie

    2007-01-01

    Literatures revealed that the electron acceptor-nitrite could be inhibitory or toxic in the denitrifying phosphorus removal process.Batch test experiments were used to investigate the inhibitory effect during the anoxic condition.The inoculated activated sludge was taken from a continuous double- sludge denitrifying phosphorus and nitrogen removal system.Nitrite was added at the anoxic stage.One time injection and sequencing batch injection were carried on in the denitrifying dephosphorus procedure.The results indicated that the nitrite concentration higher than 30 mg/L would inhibit the anoxic phosphate uptake severely, and the threshold inhibitory concentration was dependent on the characteristics of the activated sludge and the operating conditions; instead, lower than the inhibitory concentration would not be detrimental to anoxic phosphorus uptake, and it could act as good electron acceptor for the anoxic phosphate accumulated.Positive effects performed during the denitrifying biological dephosphorus all the time.The utility of nitrite as good electron acceptor would provide a new feasible way in the denitrifying phosphorus process.

  5. Nonthermal effect of microwave irradiation on nitrite uptake in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When cells of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were subjected to microwave irradiation at 2.45 GHz, nitrite uptake kinetics still obeyed the Michaelis-Menten equation, the Km of the process remaining constant, whereas V max increased, which indicates an enhanced nonthermal permeability in irradiated cells. (author)

  6. Intake of nitrate and nitrite and the risk of gastric cancer: A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, A.J.M. van; Botterweck, A.A.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brants, H.A.M.; Klaveren, J.D. van; Brandt, P.A. van den

    1998-01-01

    The association between the intake of nitrate or nitrite and gastric cancer risk was investigated in a prospective cohort study started in 1986 in the Netherlands, of 120,852 men and women aged 55-69 years. At baseline, data on dietary intake, smoking habits and other covariates were collected by me

  7. Photolysis of Nitrate and Nitrite in Artificial Snow and Artificial Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, W.; Green, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    It is well known that nitrate and nitrite undergo photolysis in aqueous solution. Recent studies show that these reactions are likely to occur in natural snow as well. Therefore it is of interest to measure rates of photolysis of nitrate and nitrite in snow and ice. In this study artificial snow was made by spraying a solution onto the wall of a reservoir containing liquid nitrogen. Artificial snow and ice were irradiated in a sealed quartz tube with a UV lamp and production of hydroxyl radicals was quantified. Hydroxyl radicals produced in these processes react with dimethyl sulfoxide to release methyl radicals, which were trapped by 3-amino-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxy free radical (3AP). The 3AP-CH3 compound was later derivatized to produce a highly fluorescent adduct, which was measured by HPLC. Snow produced the highest yield of hydroxyl radicals and ice the lowest. Nitrite had higher yield than nitrate. The calculation of photolysis rates for nitrate and nitrite in snow and ice is discussed.

  8. Formation and mitigation of N-nitrosamines in nitrite preserved cooked sausages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Susan Strange; Granby, Kit; Duedahl-Olesen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    -nitrosohydroxyproline (NHPRO), N-nitrosoproline (NPRO), N-nitrosothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NTCA) and N-nitroso-2-methyl-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NMTCA) and the amount of nitrite added to cooked pork sausages. The levels studied were 0, 60, 100, 150, 250 and 350 mg kg-1. The levels of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA...

  9. Electrochemical Single‐Molecule AFM of the Redox Metalloenzyme Copper Nitrite Reductase in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Xian; Zhang, Jingdong; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager;

    2012-01-01

    We studied the electrochemical behavior of the redox metalloenzyme copper nitrite reductase (CNiR, Achromobacter xylosoxidans) immobilized on a Au(111)‐electrode surface modified by a self‐assembled cysteamine molecular monolayer (SAM) using a combination of cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical...

  10. Simultaneous Voltammetric/Amperometric Determination of Sulfide and Nitrite in Water at BDD Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamaria Baciu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work reported new voltammetric/amperometric-based protocols using a commercial boron-doped diamond (BDD electrode for simple and fast simultaneous detection of sulfide and nitrite from water. Square-wave voltammetry operated under the optimized working conditions of 0.01 V step potential, 0.5 V modulation amplitude and 10 Hz frequency allowed achieving the best electroanalytical parameters for the simultaneous detection of nitrite and sulfide. For practical in-field detection applications, the multiple-pulsed amperometry technique was operated under optimized conditions, i.e., −0.5 V/SCE for a duration of 0.3 s as conditioning step, +0.85 V/SCE for a duration of 3 s that assure the sulfide oxidation and +1.25 V/SCE for a duration of 0.3 s, where the nitrite oxidation occurred, which allowed the simultaneously detection of sulfide and nitrite without interference between them. Good accuracy was found for this protocol in comparison with standardized methods for each anion. Also, no interference effect was found for the cation and anion species, which are common in the water matrix.

  11. Simultaneous Voltammetric/Amperometric Determination of Sulfide and Nitrite in Water at BDD Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baciu, Anamaria; Ardelean, Magdalena; Pop, Aniela; Pode, Rodica; Manea, Florica

    2015-01-01

    This work reported new voltammetric/amperometric-based protocols using a commercial boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode for simple and fast simultaneous detection of sulfide and nitrite from water. Square-wave voltammetry operated under the optimized working conditions of 0.01 V step potential, 0.5 V modulation amplitude and 10 Hz frequency allowed achieving the best electroanalytical parameters for the simultaneous detection of nitrite and sulfide. For practical in-field detection applications, the multiple-pulsed amperometry technique was operated under optimized conditions, i.e., −0.5 V/SCE for a duration of 0.3 s as conditioning step, +0.85 V/SCE for a duration of 3 s that assure the sulfide oxidation and +1.25 V/SCE for a duration of 0.3 s, where the nitrite oxidation occurred, which allowed the simultaneously detection of sulfide and nitrite without interference between them. Good accuracy was found for this protocol in comparison with standardized methods for each anion. Also, no interference effect was found for the cation and anion species, which are common in the water matrix. PMID:26102487

  12. Partial nitritation ANAMMOX in submerged attached growth bioreactors with smart aeration at 20 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, James M; Hauser, Lee W; Liu, Xikun; Parkin, Gene F; Mattes, Timothy E; Just, Craig L

    2015-01-01

    Submerged attached growth bioreactors (SAGBs) were operated at 20 °C for 30 weeks in smart-aerated, partial nitritation ANAMMOX mode and in a timer-controlled, cyclic aeration mode. The smart-aerated SAGBs removed 48-53% of total nitrogen (TN) compared to 45% for SAGBs with timed aeration. Low dissolved oxygen concentrations and cyclic pH patterns in the smart-aerated SAGBs suggested conditions favorable to partial nitritation ANAMMOX and stoichiometrically-derived and numerically modeled estimations attributed 63-68% and 14-44% of TN removal to partial nitritation ANAMMOX in these bioreactors, respectively. Ammonia removals of 36-67% in the smart-aerated SAGBs, with measured oxygen and organic carbon limitations, further suggest partial nitritation ANAMMOX. The smart-aerated SAGBs required substantially less aeration to achieve TN removals similar to SAGBs with timer-controlled aeration. Genomic DNA testing confirmed that the dominant ANAMMOX seed bacteria, received from a treatment plant utilizing the DEMON® sidestream deammonification process, was a Candidatus Brocadia sp. (of the Planctomycetales order). The DNA from these bacteria was also present in the SAGBs at the conclusion of the study providing evidence for attached growth and limited biomass washout.

  13. Reduced iron associated with secondary nitrite maxima in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Moffetta, J.W.; Goepferta, T.J.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    Dissolved iron and Fe(II) were measured in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea in September 2004. The OMZ is a well-demarcated feature characterized by high rates of denitrification, and a deep nitrite maximum coinciding with oxygen...

  14. Molecular Underpinnings of Nitrite Effect on CymA-Dependent Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Miao; Fu, Huihui; Yin, Jianhua; Yuan, Jie; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella exhibit a remarkable versatility of respiration, with a diverse array of electron acceptors (EAs). In environments where these bacteria thrive, multiple EAs are usually present. However, we know little about strategies by which these EAs and their interaction affect ecophysiology of Shewanella. In this study, we demonstrate in the model strain, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, that nitrite, not through nitric oxide to which it may convert, inhibits respiration of fumarate, and probably many other EAs whose reduction depends on quinol dehydrogenase CymA. This is achieved via the repression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production, a second messenger required for activation of cAMP-receptor protein (Crp) which plays a primary role in regulation of respiration. If nitrite is not promptly removed, intracellular cAMP levels drop, and this impairs Crp activity. As a result, the production of nitrite reductase NrfA, CymA, and fumarate reductase FccA is substantially reduced. In contrast, nitrite can be simultaneously respired with trimethylamine N-oxide, resulting in enhanced biomass. PMID:27493647

  15. Aggregate size and architecture determine biomass activity for one-stage partial nitritation and anammox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaeminck, S.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.;

    2010-01-01

    In partial nitritation/anammox systems, aerobic and anoxic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB and AnAOB) remove ammonium from wastewater. In this process, large granular microbial aggregates enhance the performance, but little is known about this type of granulation so far. In this study, aggreg...

  16. CONCENTRATION OF NITRATE AND NITRITE IN SOME SELECTED CEREALS SOURCED WITHIN KADUNA STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. ABDULRAZAK

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of nitrate and nitrite ions were assessed in maize, millet, guinea corn and wheat obtained in Kaduna State, Nigeria. The results showed that nitrate ion concentration for white maize, red maize, agric millet, normal millet, white guinea corn, red guinea corn, and wheat were 4.5 mg/g, 4.2 mg/g, 15.5 mg/g, 21.3 mg/g, 6.3 mg/g, 4.0 mg/g, and 3.0 mg/g respectively. While the nitrite ion concentration for white maize, red maize, agric millet, normal millet, white guinea corn, red guinea corn, and wheat were 0.035mg/g, 0.030mg/g, 0.074 mg/g, 0.087 mg/g, 0.050 mg/g, 0.050 mg/g and 0.0154 mg/g respectively. The results obtained fall below the WHO’s Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI which is 40-100 mg/g for nitrates, and fall within range for nitrites which is 0.03 to 2.6 mg/g. This means that the nitrate and nitrite contents of maize, guinea corn, millet and wheat grown in Kaduna State may not presently pose a health hazard in the human population.

  17. Determination of Nitrite and Nitrate in Natural Waters Using Flow Injection with Spectrophotometric Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and sensitive flow injection spectrophotometric method is reported for the room temperature determination of nitrite and nitrate based on the Griess reaction and a copperised cadmium column for reduction of nitrate. Calibration graphs were linear over the range 2 - 1000 micro g N L /sup -1/ (R2 = 0.9997 and 0.9999, n = 9) with a limit of detection (3 s.d.) of 1.0 micro g N L and relative standard deviations (n = 10) of 0.9 and 1.2% for 50 micro g N L nitrite and nitrate respectively. The sample throughput was 50 h. The effect of reagent concentrations, physical parameters (flow rate, sample volume, reaction coil and copperised cadmium column length) and the potential interferences are reported. The effect of salinity on the blank and on the determination of nitrite and nitrate are also presented. The method was applied to natural waters (rainwater, freshwater and estuarine water) and the results for nitrite + nitrate (140 - 7310 micro g N L/sup -1/) were not significantly different (95% confidence interval) from results obtained using a segmented flow analyser reference method with spectrophotometric detection. (author)

  18. Calorimetric and spectroscopic investigations of the thermal denaturation of wild type nitrite reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stirpe, A; Guzzi, R; Wijma, H; Verbeet, MP; Canters, GW; Sportelli, L

    2005-01-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) is a multicopper protein, with a trimeric structure containing two types of copper site: type I is present in each subunit whereas type 2 is localized at the subunits interface. The paper reports on the thermal behaviour of wild type NiR from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6. The tem

  19. Tolerance of ciliated protozoan Paramecium bursaria (Protozoa,Ciliophora) to ammonia and nitrites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The tolerance to ammonia and nitrites in freshwater ciliate Paramecium bursaria was measured in a conventional open system. The ciliate was exposed to different concentrations of ammonia and nitrites for 2h and 12h in order to determine the lethal concentrations. Linear regression analysis revealed that the 2h-LC50 value for ammonia was 95.94 mg/L and for nitrite 27.35 mg/L using probit scale method (with 95% confidence intervals). There was a linear correlation between the mortality probit scale and logarithmic concentration of ammonia which fit by a regression equation y=7.32x-9.51 (R2=0.98; y, mortality probit scale; x, logarithmic concentration of ammonia), by which 2 h-LC50 value for ammonia was fotnd to be 95.50 mg/L. A linear correlation between mortality probit scales and logarithmic concentration of nitrite is also followed the regression equation y=2.86x+0.89 (R2=0.95; y, mortality probit scale; x, logarithmic concentration of nitrite). The regression analysis of toxicity curves showed that the linear correlation between exposed time of ammonia-N LC50 value and ammonia-N LC50 value followed the regression equation y=2862.85e-0.0ax (R2=0.95; y, duration of exposure to LC50 value; x, LC50 value), and that between exposed time of nitrite-N LC50 value and nitrite-N LC50 value followed the regression equation y = 127.15e-0.13x (R2=0.91; y, exposed time of LC50 value; x, LC50 value). The results demonstrate that the tolerance to ammonia in P. bursaria is considerably higher than that of the larvae or juveniles of some metozoa, e.g. cultured prawns and oysters. In addition, ciliates, as bacterial predators, are likely to play a positive role in maintaining and improving water quality in aquatic environments with high-level ammonium, such as sewage treatment systems.

  20. Tolerance of ciliated protozoan Paramecium bursaria (Protozoa, Ciliophora) to ammonia and nitrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Henglong; Song, Weibo; Lu, Lu; Alan, Warren

    2005-09-01

    The tolerance to ammonia and nitrites in freshwater ciliate Paramecium bursaria was measured in a conventional open system. The ciliate was exposed to different concentrations of ammonia and nitrites for 2h and 12h in order to determine the lethal concentrations. Linear regression analysis revealed that the 2h-LC50 value for ammonia was 95.94 mg/L and for nitrite 27.35 mg/L using probit scale method (with 95% confidence intervals). There was a linear correlation between the mortality probit scale and logarithmic concentration of ammonia which fit by a regression equation y=7.32 x 9.51 ( R 2=0.98; y, mortality probit scale; x, logarithmic concentration of ammonia), by which 2 h-LC50 value for ammonia was found to be 95.50 mg/L. A linear correlation between mortality probit scales and logarithmic concentration of nitrite is also followed the regression equation y=2.86 x+0.89 ( R 2=0.95; y, mortality probit scale; x, logarithmic concentration of nitrite). The regression analysis of toxicity curves showed that the linear correlation between exposed time of ammonia-N LC50 value and ammonia-N LC50 value followed the regression equation y=2 862.85 e -0.08 x ( R 2=0.95; y, duration of exposure to LC50 value; x, LC50 value), and that between exposed time of nitrite-N LC50 value and nitrite-N LC50 value followed the regression equation y=127.15 e -0.13 x ( R 2=0.91; y, exposed time of LC50 value; x, LC50 value). The results demonstrate that the tolerance to ammonia in P. bursaria is considerably higher than that of the larvae or juveniles of some metozoa, e.g. cultured prawns and oysters. In addition, ciliates, as bacterial predators, are likely to play a positive role in maintaining and improving water quality in aquatic environments with high-level ammonium, such as sewage treatment systems.

  1. Control of sulfide and methane production in anaerobic sewer systems by means of Downstream Nitrite Dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguet, Olga; Pijuan, Maite; Borrego, Carles M; Gutierrez, Oriol

    2016-04-15

    Bioproduction of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and methane (CH4) under anaerobic conditions in sewer pipes causes detrimental effects on both sewer facilities and surrounding environment. Among the strategies used to mitigate the production of both compounds, the addition of nitrite (NO2(-)) has shown a greater long-term inhibitory effect compared with other oxidants such as nitrate or oxygen. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a new method, the Downstream Nitrite Dosage strategy (DNO2D), to control H2S and CH4 emissions in sewers. Treatment effectiveness was assessed on H2S and CH4 abatement on the effluent of a laboratory sewer pilot plant that mimics a full-scale anaerobic rising sewer. The experiment was divided in three different periods: system setup (period 1), nitrite addition (period 2) and system recovery (period 3). Different process and molecular methods were combined to investigate the impact of NO2(-) addition on H2S and CH4 production. Results showed that H2S load was reduced completely during nitrite addition when compared to period 1 due to H2S oxidation but increased immediately after nitrite addition stopped. The H2S overproduction during recovery period was associated with the bacterial reduction of different sulfur species (elemental sulfur/thiosulfate/sulfite) accumulated within the sewer biofilm matrix. Oxidation of CH4 was also detected during period 2 but, contrary to sulfide production, re-establishment of methanogenesis was not immediate after stopping nitrite dosing. The analysis of bulk and active microbial communities along experimental treatment showed compositional changes that agreed with the observed dynamics of chemical processes. Results of this study show that DNO2D strategy could significantly reduce H2S and CH4 emissions from sewers during the addition period but also suggest that microbial agents involved in such processes show a high resilience towards chemical stressors, thus favoring the re

  2. Using saliva nitrite and nitrate levels as a biomarker for drug induced gingival overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan eSukuroglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Drug-induced gingival overgrowth has a multifactorial nature and the pathogenesis is still uncertain. It has been suggested that Nitric Oxide (NO might play a role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival overgrowth due to the contribution of NO to immune response and matrix degradation. NO levels in biological fluids have been used as a diagnostic biomarker in many diseases. The aim of this study is to determine whether NO levels in plasma, saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF can serve as a potential biomarker for the evaluation of drug-induced gingival overgrowth risk. Material and Methods: A total of 104 patients, receiving cyclosporine A (n=35, phenytoin (n=25, nifedipine (n=26 or diltiazem (n=18 participated in the study. The amount of gingival overgrowth was evaluated with two indices and was given as percentage. Periodontal clinical parameters including plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, gingival bleeding time index (GBTI and probing depth (PD were also assessed. Saliva, GCF and plasma samples were obtained from each participants. Nitrite and nitrate levels in saliva, GCF and plasma were analyzed by Griess reagent. Results: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels in responders were significantly higher than those in non-responders in only phenytoin group (p˂0.05. Nitrite and nitrate levels of gingival crevicular fluid and plasma did not significantly differ between responders and non-responders in all study groups (p˃0.05. Salivary nitrite levels exhibited a significant correlation with PD, GBTI, severity of gingival overgrowth (%GO and GCF volume (p˂0.05. Additionally, a strong positive correlation was detected between saliva and plasma nitrate levels (p˂0.005. However, both nitrite and nitrate levels in GCF and plasma demonstrated no significant correlation with clinical parameters, GO severity and GCF volume (p˃0.05.Conclusion: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels could be used as periodontal disease biomarkers in

  3. Using Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Levels as a Biomarker for Drug-Induced Gingival Overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukuroglu, Erkan; Güncü, Güliz N.; Kilinc, Kamer; Caglayan, Feriha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Drug-induced gingival overgrowth has a multifactorial nature and the pathogenesis is still uncertain. It has been suggested that Nitric Oxide (NO) might play a role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival overgrowth due to the contribution of NO to immune response and matrix degradation. NO levels in biological fluids have been used as a diagnostic biomarker in many diseases. The aim of this study is to determine whether NO levels in plasma, saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) can serve as a potential biomarker for the evaluation of drug-induced gingival overgrowth risk. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 patients, receiving cyclosporine A (n = 35), phenytoin (n = 25), nifedipine (n = 26), or diltiazem (n = 18) participated in the study. The amount of gingival overgrowth was evaluated with two indices and was given as percentage. Periodontal clinical parameters including plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding time index (GBTI), and probing depth (PD) were also assessed. Saliva, GCF, and plasma samples were obtained from each participants. Nitrite and nitrate levels in saliva, GCF, and plasma were analyzed by Griess reagent. Results: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels in responders were significantly higher than those in non-responders in only phenytoin group (p Nitrite and nitrate levels of gingival crevicular fluid and plasma did not significantly differ between responders and non-responders in all study groups (p > 0.05). Salivary nitrite levels exhibited a significant correlation with PD, GBTI, severity of gingival overgrowth (%GO), and GCF volume (p nitrate levels (p nitrite and nitrate levels in GCF and plasma demonstrated no significant correlation with clinical parameters, GO severity, and GCF volume (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels could be used as periodontal disease biomarkers in phenytoin induced gingival overgrowth, and that saliva seems to have a better diagnostic potential than GCF

  4. Binding of nitrite and its reductive activation to nitric oxide at biomimetic copper centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzani, E; Anthony, G J; Koolhaas, A; Spandre, A; Leggieri, E; Casella, L; Gullotti, M; Nardin, G; Randaccio, L; Fontani, M; Zanello, P; Reedijk, J

    2000-04-01

    The reactivity of nitrite towards the copper(II) and copper(I) centers of a series of complexes with tridentate nitrogen donor ligands has been investigated. The ligands are bis[(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)methyl]amine (1-bb), bis[2-(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl]amine (2-bb), and bis[2-(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)ethyl]amine (ddah) and carry two terminal benzimidazole (1-bb, 2-bb) or pyrazole (ddah) rings and a central amine donor residue. While 2-bb and ddah form two adjacent six-membered chelate rings on metal coordination, 1-bb forms two smaller rings of five members. The binding affinity of nitrite and azide to the Cu(II) complexes (ClO4- as counterion) has been determined in solution. The association constants for the two ligands are similar, but nitrite is a slightly stronger ligand than azide when it binds as a bidentate donor. The X-ray crystal structure of the nitrite complex [Cu(ddah)(NO2)]ClO4 (final R=0.056) has been determined: triclinic P1space group, a=8.200(2) A, b=9.582(3) A, c=15.541(4) A. It may be described as a perchlorate salt of a "supramolecular" species resulting from the assembly of two complex cations and one sodium perchlorate unit. The copper stereochemistry in the complex is intermediate between SPY and TBP, and nitrite binds to Cu(II) asymmetrically, with Cu-O distances of 2.037(2) and 2.390(3) A and a nearly planar CuO2N cycle. On standing, solutions of [Cu(ddah)(NO2)]ClO4 in methanol produce the dinuclear complex [Cu(ddah)(OMe)]2(ClO4)2, containing dibridging methoxy groups. In fact the crystal structure analysis (final R=0.083) showed that the crystals are built up by dinuclear cations, arranged on a crystallographic symmetry center, and perchlorate anions. Electrochemical analysis shows that binding of nitrite to the Cu(II) complexes of 2-bb and ddah shifts the reduction potential of the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple towards negative values by about 0.3 V. The thermodynamic parameters of the Cu(II)/Cu(I) electron transfer have also been

  5. A novel marine nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira species from Dutch coastal North Sea water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Caroline Marianne Haaijer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine microorganisms are important for the global nitrogen cycle, but marine nitrifiers, especially aerobic nitrite-oxidizers, remain largely unexplored. To increase the number of cultured representatives of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB, a bioreactor cultivation approach was adopted to first enrich nitrifiers and ultimately nitrite oxidizers from Dutch coastal North Sea water. With solely ammonia as the substrate an active nitrifiying community consisting of novel marine Nitrosomonas aerobic ammonia oxidizers (AOB and Nitrospina and Nitrospira NOB was obtained which converted a maximum of 2 mmoles of ammonia per liter per day. Switching the feed of the culture to nitrite as a sole substrate resulted in a Nitrospira NOB dominated community (approximately 80% of the total microbial community based on FISH and metagenomic data converting a maximum of 3 mmoles of nitrite per liter per day. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the Nitrospira enriched from the North Sea is a novel Nitrospira species with Nitrospira marina as the next taxonomically described relative (94% 16S rRNA sequence identity. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a cell plan typical for Nitrospira species. The cytoplasm contained electron light particles that might represent glycogen storage. A large periplasmic space was present which was filled with electron dense particles. Nitrospira-targeted PCR analyses demonstrated the presence of the enriched Nitrospira species in a time series of North Sea genomic DNA samples. The availability of this new Nitrospira species enrichment culture facilitates further in-depth studies such as determination of physiological constraints, and comparison to other NOB species.

  6. Survery of nitrate and nitrite content in distributed red meat in Mazandaran (2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Karimzadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available , , , , , 1 2 3 (Received 28 September, 2009 ; Accepted 28 December, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Chemical fertilizers which contain nitrite and nitrate ions contaminate water, soil and plants. The livestock are exposed to the ions through grazing in these areas. This study was designed to evaluate the levels of ions in raw sheep and cows meat in Mazandaran and also, to estimate the dietary intake of the ions from fresh meat consumed in a regular diet.Materials and methods: A total of 36 samples of beef and 36 samples of mutton meat were collected from different cities of Mazandaran province (Sari, Babol and Qaemshahr and their nitrite and nitrate contents were measured by colorimetric Griess Ilosvay method. Data were statistically analyzed by using Mann Whitney.Results: The mean of nitrate and nitrite in mutton was 4/9 and 0/36 and beef was 6/3 and 0/38 mg/kg. Nitrite and nitrate content in beef and mutton had no significant difference.Conclusion: Considering the recommended consumption of meat groups and their substitutes in the food pyramid, which is 6.5 ounce/daily for those who use 2,500 Kcal/day, it is estimated that the amount of nitrate and nitrite consumed by an adult in all meat groups from red meat, the nitrate intake is higher than in some countries such as the UK, although lower than CONTAM Panel is recommended. J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(72: 35-41 (Persian.

  7. Impact of hemoglobin nitrite to nitric oxide reductase on blood transfusion for resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Brouse

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transfusion of blood remains the gold standard for fluid resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. Hemoglobin (Hb within the red blood cell transports oxygen and modulates nitric oxide (NO through NO scavenging and nitrite reductase. Aims: This study was designed to examine the effects of incorporating a novel NO modulator, RRx-001, on systemic and microvascular hemodynamic response after blood transfusion for resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock in a hamster window chamber model. In addition, to RRx-001 the role of low dose of nitrite (1 × 10−9 moles per animal supplementation after resuscitation was studied. Materials and Methods: Severe hemorrhage was induced by arterial controlled bleeding of 50% of the blood volume (BV and the hypovolemic state was maintained for 1 h. The animals received volume resuscitation by an infusion of 25% of BV using fresh blood alone or with added nitrite, or fresh blood treated with RRx-001 (140 mg/kg or RRx-001 (140 mg/kg with added nitrite. Systemic and microvascular hemodynamics were followed at baseline and at different time points during the entire study. Tissue apoptosis and necrosis were measured 8 h after resuscitation to correlate hemodynamic changes with tissue viability. Results: Compared to resuscitation with blood alone, blood treated with RRx-001 decreased vascular resistance, increased blood flow and functional capillary density immediately after resuscitation and preserved tissue viability. Furthermore, in RRx-001 treated animals, both mean arterial pressure (MAP and met Hb were maintained within normal levels after resuscitation (MAP >90 mmHg and metHb <2%. The addition of nitrite to RRx-001 did not significantly improve the effects of RRx-001, as it increased methemoglobinemia and lower MAP. Conclusion: RRx-001 alone enhanced perfusion and reduced tissue damage as compared to blood; it may serve as an adjunct therapy to the current gold standard treatment for resuscitation from

  8. Combined exposure to ambient UVB radiation and nitrite negatively affects survival of amphibian early life stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias, Guadalupe [Donana Biological Station, CSIC, Spanish Council for Scientific Research. P.O. Box 1056, Sevilla 41013 (Spain); Marco, Adolfo [Donana Biological Station, CSIC, Spanish Council for Scientific Research. P.O. Box 1056, Sevilla 41013 (Spain)], E-mail: amarco@ebd.csic.es; Blaustein, Andrew R. [Department of Zoology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, 97331 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Many aquatic species are sensitive to ambient levels of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVB) and chemical fertilizers. However, recent studies indicate that the interaction among multiple stressors acting simultaneously could be contributing to the population declines of some animal species. Therefore, we tested the potential synergistic effects between ambient levels of UVB and a contaminant, sodium nitrite in the larvae of two amphibian species, the common European toad Bufo bufo and the Iberian green frog Rana perezi. We studied R. perezi from both mountain and coastal populations to examine if populations of the same species varied in their response to stressors in different habitats. Both species were sensitive to the two stressors acting alone, but the interaction between the two stressors caused a multiplicative impact on tadpole survival. For B. bufo, the combination of UVB and nitrite was up to seven times more lethal than mortality for each stressor alone. In a coastal wetland, the combination of UVB and nitrite was four times more toxic for R. perezi than the sum of the effect on mortality for each stressor alone. One mg/L of nitrite killed half the population of R. perezi at Gredos Mountains at day 10 in the absence of UVB. In the presence of UVB, 50% of the tadpoles from the same experiment died at day 7. Similar toxic response were found for R. perezi in two highly contrasted environments suggesting this synergistic interaction can be a widespread phenomenon. The interaction of excess chemical fertilizers and manure with ambient UVB radiation could be contributing to the global decline of some amphibian species. We suggest that potential exposure to UVB radiation be accounted for when assessing water quality criteria regarding nitrite pollution.

  9. PENURUNAN KADAR AMONIA, NITRIT, DAN NITRAT LIMBAH CAIR INDUSTRI TAHU MENGGUNAKAN ARANG AKTIF DARI AMPAS KOPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmanto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The tofu industry is one of food industry which the product of organic waste to environment pollution. One of alternative methode which used to overcome tofu industrial waste water pollution is adsorption methode using activated carbon from coffee waste. The aim of this researched is to know about the activated carbon from coffee waste quality which observe of rendemen, water content, ash content, and iodium adsorption, to know optimum contact of time and pH of coffee waste to decrease ammonia, nitrite and nitrate contents in tofu industry waste water and to know decrease percentage of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate contents in tofu industrial waste water using activated carbon from coffee waste. The activated carbon made by soaking of coffee waste in HCl 0.1 M solution for 2 days. The activated carbon coaled in muffle furnace at temperature 350°C. The activated carbon analyzed consist of rendemen, water content, ash content, and iodium adsorption. Optimum contact of time and pH of coffee waste determined in order to get optimum adsorption ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in tofu industrial waste water. Contact time variation are 1, 10, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120 minutes and pH variation are 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. The result showed that the activated carbon from coffee waste fulfill the criteria SNI number 06-3730-1995. The activated carbon from coffee waste could be used to decrease the ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate contents in tofu industrial waste water at the optimum contact of time of 30 minutes and pH 7. Decreasing percentage of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate contents in tofu industrial waste water are 64,69% , 52,35% and 86,40% respectively.

  10. Levels of nitrates and nitrites in chili pepper and ventricina salami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Colavita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ventricina is a traditional sausage made from pork meat produced in the Abruzzi and Molise regions. The aim of this study was to detect the content of nitrates and nitrites in local cultivars of chilli pepper, and their concentration in ventricina samples spiced with the same chilli pepper. Furthermore, it was examined whether, in the samples of ventricina with nitrate addition, the spicing with chilli pepper could exceed the maximum added dose. The concentration of nitrates and nitrites in the organic chilli pepper was 531.0±94.6 mg/kg and less than 5.0 mg, respectively, in the traditional chilli pepper it was 394.0±39.6 and less than 5.0 mg, while in the commercial it was 325.0±115.0 and less than 5.0 mg. The determination of nitrites and nitrates was carried out by high performance ion chromatography. In ventricina samples produced without added sodium nitrate, nitrates and nitrites were below 5.0 mg/kg at the case-filling time (t0 and after 50 days of aging (t50. In the samples of ventricina with added sodium nitrate, nitrate concentration values were 134.0±20.9 mg/kg at t0 and 129.0±15.4 mg/kg at t50, while the nitrites were below 5.0 mg/kg at t0 and 28.8±15.8 mg/kg at t50. Although in ventricina the amount of chilli pepper is quite relevant, it did not lead to a detectable concentration of nitrates. The maximum allowed amount was never exceeded.

  11. Electrocatalytic reduction of nitrite on tetraruthenated metalloporphyrins/Nafion glassy carbon modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calfuman, Karla [Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Casilla 653, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile); Aguirre, Maria Jesus [Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Departamento de Quimica de los Materiales, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Canete-Rosales, Paulina; Bollo, Soledad [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas y Farmaceuticas, Departamento de Quimica Farmacologica y Toxicologica, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Llusar, Rosa [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Jaume I, Castellon (Spain); Isaacs, Mauricio, E-mail: misaacs@uchile.cl [Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Casilla 653, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > Preparation and characterization of modified electrodes with M(II) Tetraruthenated porphyrins onto a Nafion film. > The electrodes were characterized by SEM, TEM, AFM and SECM techniques. > The modified electrodes are active in the electrochemical reduction of nitrite at -660 mV vs Ag/AgCl. > GC/Nf/CoTRP modified electrode is more electrochemically active than their Ni and Zn analogues. - Abstract: This paper describes the electrochemical reduction of nitrite ion in neutral aqueous solution mediated by tetraruthenated metalloporphyrins (Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II)) electrostatically assembled onto a Nafion film previously adsorbed on glassy carbon or ITO electrodes. Scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results have shown that on ITO electrodes the macrocycles forms multiple layers with a disordered stacking orientation over the Nafion film occupying hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites in the polyelectrolyte. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results demonstrated that the Nafion film is 35 nm thick and tetraruthenated metalloporphyrins layers 190 nm thick presenting a thin but compacted morphology. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) images shows that the Co(II) tetraruthenated porphyrins/Nf/GC modified electrode is more electrochemically active than their Ni and Zn analogues. These modified electrodes are able to reduce nitrite at -660 mV showing enhanced reduction current and a decrease in the required overpotential compared to bare glassy carbon electrode. Controlled potential electrolysis experiments verify the production of ammonia, hydrazine and hydroxylamine at potentials where reduction of solvent is plausible demonstrating some selectivity toward the nitrite ion. Rotating disc electrode voltammetry shows that the factor that governs the kinetics of nitrite reduction is the charge propagation in the film.

  12. Oxidative stress and nitrite dynamics under maximal load in elite athletes: relation to sport type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubrilo, Dejan; Djordjevic, Dusica; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Djuric, Dragan; Blagojevic, Dusko; Spasic, Mihajlo; Jakovljevic, Vladimir

    2011-09-01

    Maximal workload in elite athletes induces increased generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS) and oxidative stress, but the dynamics of RONS production are not fully explored. The aim of our study was to examine the effects of long-term engagement in sports with different energy requirements (aerobic, anaerobic, and aerobic/anaerobic) on oxidative stress parameters during progressive exercise test. Concentrations of lactates, nitric oxide (NO) measured through stabile end product-nitrites (NO(2) (-)), superoxide anion radical (O(2) (•-)), and thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) as index of lipid peroxidation were determined in rest, after maximal workload, and at 4 and 10th min of recovery in blood plasma of top level competitors in rowing, cycling, and taekwondo. Results showed that sportmen had similar concentrations of lactates and O(2) (•-) in rest. Nitrite concentrations in rest were the lowest in taekwondo fighters, while rowers had the highest levels among examined groups. The order of magnitude for TBARS level in the rest was bicycling > taekwondo > rowing. During exercise at maximal intensity, the concentration of lactate significantly elevated to similar levels in all tested sportsmen and they were persistently elevated during recovery period of 4 and 10 min. There were no significant changes in O(2) (•-), nitrite, and TBARS levels neither at the maximum intensity of exercise nor during the recovery period comparing to the rest period in examined individuals. Our results showed that long term different training strategies establish different basal nitrites and lipid peroxidation levels in sportmen. However, progressive exercise does not influence basal nitrite and oxidative stress parameters level neither at maximal load nor during the first 10 min of recovery in sportmen studied.

  13. Levels of Nitrates and Nitrites in Chili Pepper and Ventricina Salami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirilli, Michele; Iafigliola, Luigi; Amadoro, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Ventricina is a traditional sausage made from pork meat produced in the Abruzzi and Molise regions. The aim of this study was to detect the content of nitrates and nitrites in local cultivars of chilli pepper, and their concentration in ventricina samples spiced with the same chilli pepper. Furthermore, it was examined whether, in the samples of ventricina with nitrate addition, the spicing with chilli pepper could exceed the maximum added dose. The concentration of nitrates and nitrites in the organic chilli pepper was 531.0±94.6 mg/kg and less than 5.0 mg, respectively, in the traditional chilli pepper it was 394.0±39.6 and less than 5.0 mg, while in the commercial it was 325.0±115.0 and less than 5.0 mg. The determination of nitrites and nitrates was carried out by high performance ion chromatography. In ventricina samples produced without added sodium nitrate, nitrates and nitrites were below 5.0 mg/kg at the case-filling time (t0) and after 50 days of aging (t50). In the samples of ventricina with added sodium nitrate, nitrate concentration values were 134.0±20.9 mg/kg at t0 and 129.0±15.4 mg/kg at t50, while the nitrites were below 5.0 mg/kg at t0 and 28.8±15.8 mg/kg at t50. Although in ventricina the amount of chilli pepper is quite relevant, it did not lead to a detectable concentration of nitrates. The maximum allowed amount was never exceeded.

  14. Dietary Nitrates, Nitrites, and Nitrosamines Intake and the Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peng; Wu, Lei; Guan, Wenxian

    2015-12-01

    The potential associations between dietary consumption of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines and gastric cancer risk have been investigated by several studies, but yielded inconclusive results. We conducted a meta-analysis to provide a quantitative assessment of their relationships. Relevant articles were identified by a systematic literature searching of PubMed and Embase databases prior to August 2015. Random-effects models were employed to pool the relative risks. A total of 22 articles consisting of 49 studies-19 studies for nitrates, 19 studies for nitrites, and 11 studies for N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)-were included. The summary relative risk of stomach cancer for the highest categories, compared with the lowest, was 0.80 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.69-0.93) for dietary nitrates intake, 1.31 (95% CI, 1.13-1.52) for nitrites, and 1.34 (95% CI, 1.02-1.76) for NDMA (p for heterogeneity was 0.015, 0.013 and nitrates and nitrites. The heterogeneity for NDMA could not be eliminated completely through stratified analysis. Although significant associations were all observed in case-control studies, the cohort studies still showed a slight trend. The dose-response analysis indicated similar results as well. High nitrates intake was associated with a weak but statistically significant reduced risk of gastric cancer. Whereas increased consumption of nitrites and NDMA seemed to be risk factors for cancer. Due to the lack of uniformity for exposure assessment across studies, further prospective researches are warranted to verify these findings. PMID:26633477

  15. Dietary Nitrates, Nitrites, and Nitrosamines Intake and the Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Song

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential associations between dietary consumption of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines and gastric cancer risk have been investigated by several studies, but yielded inconclusive results. We conducted a meta-analysis to provide a quantitative assessment of their relationships. Relevant articles were identified by a systematic literature searching of PubMed and Embase databases prior to August 2015. Random-effects models were employed to pool the relative risks. A total of 22 articles consisting of 49 studies—19 studies for nitrates, 19 studies for nitrites, and 11 studies for N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA—were included. The summary relative risk of stomach cancer for the highest categories, compared with the lowest, was 0.80 (95% confidence interval (CI, 0.69–0.93 for dietary nitrates intake, 1.31 (95% CI, 1.13–1.52 for nitrites, and 1.34 (95% CI, 1.02–1.76 for NDMA (p for heterogeneity was 0.015, 0.013 and <0.001, respectively. The study type was found as the main source of heterogeneity for nitrates and nitrites. The heterogeneity for NDMA could not be eliminated completely through stratified analysis. Although significant associations were all observed in case-control studies, the cohort studies still showed a slight trend. The dose-response analysis indicated similar results as well. High nitrates intake was associated with a weak but statistically significant reduced risk of gastric cancer. Whereas increased consumption of nitrites and NDMA seemed to be risk factors for cancer. Due to the lack of uniformity for exposure assessment across studies, further prospective researches are warranted to verify these findings.

  16. Gastric S-nitrosothiol formation drives the antihypertensive effects of oral sodium nitrite and nitrate in a rat model of renovascular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Lucas C; Amaral, Jefferson H; Ferreira, Graziele C; Portella, Rafael L; Ceron, Carla S; Montenegro, Marcelo F; Toledo, Jose Carlos; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2015-10-01

    Many effects of nitrite and nitrate are attributed to increased circulating concentrations of nitrite, ultimately converted into nitric oxide (NO(•)) in the circulation or in tissues by mechanisms associated with nitrite reductase activity. However, nitrite generates NO(•) , nitrous anhydride, and other nitrosating species at low pH, and these reactions promote S-nitrosothiol formation when nitrites are in the stomach. We hypothesized that the antihypertensive effects of orally administered nitrite or nitrate involve the formation of S-nitrosothiols, and that those effects depend on gastric pH. The chronic effects of oral nitrite or nitrate were studied in two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) hypertensive rats treated with omeprazole (or vehicle). Oral nitrite lowered blood pressure and increased plasma S-nitrosothiol concentrations independently of circulating nitrite levels. Increasing gastric pH with omeprazole did not affect the increases in plasma nitrite and nitrate levels found after treatment with nitrite. However, treatment with omeprazole severely attenuated the increases in plasma S-nitrosothiol concentrations and completely blunted the antihypertensive effects of nitrite. Confirming these findings, very similar results were found with oral nitrate. To further confirm the role of gastric S-nitrosothiol formation, we studied the effects of oral nitrite in hypertensive rats treated with the glutathione synthase inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to induce partial thiol depletion. BSO treatment attenuated the increases in S-nitrosothiol concentrations and antihypertensive effects of oral nitrite. These data show that gastric S-nitrosothiol formation drives the antihypertensive effects of oral nitrite or nitrate and has major implications, particularly to patients taking proton pump inhibitors. PMID:26159506

  17. Nitrate reductase and nitrite as additional components of defense system in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) against Helicoverpa armigera herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rimaljeet; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Taggar, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Amylase inhibitors serve as attractive candidates of defense mechanisms against insect attack. Therefore, the impediment of Helicoverpa armigera digestion can be the effective way of controlling this pest population. Nitrite was found to be a potent mixed non-competitive competitive inhibitor of partially purified α-amylase of H. armigera gut. This observation impelled us to determine the response of nitrite and nitrate reductase (NR) towards H. armigera infestation in nine pigeonpea genotypes (four moderately resistant, three intermediate and two moderately susceptible). The significant upregulation of NR in moderately resistant genotypes after pod borer infestation suggested NR as one of the factors that determine their resistance status against insect attack. The pod borer attack caused greater reduction of nitrate and significant accumulation of nitrite in moderately resistant genotypes. The activity of nitrite reductase (NiR) was also enhanced more in moderately resistant genotypes than moderately susceptible genotypes on account of H. armigera herbivory. Expression of resistance to H. armigera was further revealed when significant negative association between NR, NiR, nitrite and percent pod damage was observed. This is the first report that suggests nitrite to be a potent inhibitor of H. armigera α-amylase and also the involvement of nitrite and NR in providing resistance against H. armigera herbivory. PMID:25307464

  18. Effect of alkalinity on nitrite accumulation in treatment of coal chemical industry wastewater using moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Baolin; Han, Hongjun; Jia, Shengyong; Zhuang, Haifeng; Zhao, Qian; Xu, Peng

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen removal via nitrite (the nitrite pathway) is more suitable for carbon-limited industrial wastewater. Partial nitrification to nitrite is the primary step to achieve nitrogen removal via nitrite. The effect of alkalinity on nitrite accumulation in a continuous process was investigated by progressively increasing the alkalinity dosage ratio (amount of alkalinity to ammonia ratio, mol/mol). There is a close relationship among alkalinity, pH and the state of matter present in aqueous solution. When alkalinity was insufficient (compared to the theoretical alkalinity amount), ammonia removal efficiency increased first and then decreased at each alkalinity dosage ratio, with an abrupt removal efficiency peak. Generally, ammonia removal efficiency rose with increasing alkalinity dosage ratio. Ammonia removal efficiency reached to 88% from 23% when alkalinity addition was sufficient. Nitrite accumulation could be achieved by inhibiting nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) by free ammonia (FA) in the early period and free nitrous acid in the later period of nitrification when alkalinity was not adequate. Only FA worked to inhibit the activity of NOB when alkalinity addition was sufficient.

  19. Nutritional epidemiology in the context of nitric oxide biology: a risk-benefit evaluation for dietary nitrite and nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkowski, Andrew; Garg, Harsha K; Coughlin, James R; Bryan, Nathan S

    2010-02-15

    The discovery of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in the 1980s represented a critical advance in understanding cardiovascular disease, and today a number of human diseases are characterized by NO insufficiency. In the interim, recent biomedical research has demonstrated that NO can be modulated by the diet independent of its enzymatic synthesis from l-arginine, e.g., the consumption of nitrite- and nitrate-rich foods such as fruits, leafy vegetables, and cured meats along with antioxidants. Regular intake of nitrate-containing food such as green leafy vegetables may ensure that blood and tissue levels of nitrite and NO pools are maintained at a level sufficient to compensate for any disturbances in endogenous NO synthesis. However, some in the public perceive that dietary sources of nitrite and nitrate are harmful, and some epidemiological studies reveal a weak association between foods that contain nitrite and nitrate, namely cured and processed meats, and cancer. This paradigm needs revisiting in the face of undisputed health benefits of nitrite- and nitrate-enriched diets. This review will address and interpret the epidemiological data and discuss the risk-benefit evaluation of dietary nitrite and nitrate in the context of nitric oxide biology. The weak and inconclusive data on the cancer risk of nitrite, nitrate and processed meats are far outweighed by the health benefits of restoring NO homeostasis via dietary nitrite and nitrate. This risk/benefit balance should be a strong consideration before there are any suggestions for new regulatory or public health guidelines for dietary nitrite and nitrate exposures.

  20. A new, fast and sensitive method for the determination of trace amounts of nitrite using differential pulse polarography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somer, Güler; Kalaycı, Şükrü; Almas, Ziya

    2016-07-01

    Nitrite salts of sodium or potassium are being used for the protection of meat products. They provide color and taste of meat and they protect against clostridia. On the other hand, nitrite ions can interact with amines to form nitrosamines which are known as carcinogenic substances. They may also react with hemoglobin and reduce its oxygen carrying capacity. Thus, its concentration in food-stuff has to be controlled carefully by highly sensitive methods. A new DP polarographic method is established for the determination of nitrite. Nitrite cannot be determined directly with any analytical methods. Long and tedious procedures are necessary for many of them. In this polarographic method arsenite, As(III), ion is used for the reduction of nitrite. The nitrite is determined from the As(III) quantity left over after the reaction with nitrite. The peak of arsenite has been used since it is sharp and responds well for the standard addition of arsenite. The optimum conditions for the quantitative reaction between nitrite and arsenite have been studied. It was found that the pH for the reaction medium has to be 5-7, since nitrite is decomposed at lower pH values. The reaction medium has to be stirred for about 5 min with nitrogen gas in order to expel the NO gas formed and thus to shift the equilibrium to products side. The limit of detection, LOD, was found to be as 2 × 10(-7) M. No interference was observed from most common ions. PMID:27153987

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation of the inhibition of the phosphoroclastic system of Clostridium sporogenes by nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, M J; Woods, L F; Gibbs, P; Cammack, R

    1990-10-01

    The proposal that nitrite exerts its inhibitory effect on anaerobic bacteria by direct interaction with the iron-sulphur proteins of the phosphoroclastic system was investigated. The effects of nitrate, nitrite with or without ascorbate, and nitric oxide on the growth of Clostridium sporogenes in liquid cultures at pH 7.4, on the rates of hydrogen production, and on the activities of the enzymes pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and hydrogenase, and of ferredoxin were investigated. In agreement with previous studies, nitrate was the least effective inhibitor of cell growth, and nitric oxide the most effective. Nitrite reductase activity was very low in C. sporogenes, indicating that the presence of external reducing agents would be necessary for the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. Inhibition by nitrite was enhanced by ascorbate; 0.5 mM-nitrite with 10 mM-ascorbate stopped growth completely. In partially-purified preparations 4.1 mM-NaNO2 and equimolar ascorbate caused complete inactivation of hydrogenase activity but only partial (up to 78%) inactivation of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase. This agreed with the loss of hydrogen production observed with nitrite in vivo. Inhibition occurred within 5 min, and was irreversible in each case. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy showed that paramagnetic [Fe(NO)2(SR)2] species were formed during growth in the presence of nitrite, and were associated with cells. However, the intensity of these EPR signals did not correlate with the inhibition of cell growth. The [4Fe-4S] clusters in ferredoxin were shown by EPR spectroscopy to be resistant to treatment with 3.6 mM-NaNO2 and 3.6 mM-ascorbate. It is concluded that the effects of nitrite on pre-formed iron-sulphur proteins are not convincing as a basis for the lethal effects on bacterial cells.

  2. Cooperative use of cytochrome cd{sub 1} nitrite reductase and its redox partner cytochrome c{sub 552} to improve the selectivity of nitrite biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, A.S.; Jorge, S.R.; Silveira, C.M.; Moura, J.J.G. [REQUIMTE - Dept. de Quimica, CQFB, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Jubete, E.; Ochoteco, E.; Cabanero, G.; Grande, H. [CIDETEC - Centro de Tecnologias Electroquimicas, Parque Tecnologico de San Sebastian, Po Miramon, 196, 20009 Donostia - San Sebastian (Spain); Almeida, M.G., E-mail: mga@dq.fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE - Dept. de Quimica, CQFB, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Escola Superior de Saude Egas Moniz, Monte de Caparica, 2829-511 Caparica (Portugal)

    2011-05-05

    In this work, a novel enzymatic biosensor for determination of nitrites constructed on an electrochemical transducing platform is proposed. The sensor is based on cytochrome-cd{sub 1} (cyt-cd{sub 1}) nitrite reductase from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus strain 617 as biological recognition element, and its putative physiological redox partner cytochrome-c{sub 552} (cyt-c{sub 552}), as electron mediator. The proteins were co-immobilized using a photopolymerizable polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) derivative, onto carbon paste screen printed electrodes (CPSPEs); the optimal modification conditions were 100 {mu}M cyt-cd{sub 1}/100 {mu}M cyt-c{sub 552} and 50% PVA, after a 48 h polymerization time. Electrochemical characterization of the mediator was carried out by cyclic voltammetry. The one-electron exchange between cyt-c{sub 552} and the working electrode is a quasi-reversible process, without mass transport limitations. The formal potential of the mediator is 254 {+-} 2 mV vs NHE and the intermolecular electron transfer rate constant between cytochromes c{sub 552} and cd{sub 1} is 9.9 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The analytical parameters of the biosensor response to nitrite as assessed by amperometric measurements were: linear range from 10 to 200 {mu}M; detection and quantification limits of 7 and 24 {mu}M, respectively; sensitivity of 2.49 {+-} 0.08 A mol{sup -1} cm{sup 2} {mu}M{sup -1}. Catalytic profiles in the presence of possible interfering species were also investigated. The interference from competitive enzymatic reduction of dissolved oxygen could be overcome by tuning the cyclic voltammograms for faster sweep rates.

  3. Dramatic increase of nitrite levels in hearts of anoxia-exposed crucian carp supporting a role in cardioprotection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Guro K.; Nilsson, Göran E.; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2012-01-01

    anoxia-tolerance of this fish by measuring NO metabolites in normoxic, anoxic and reoxygenated crucian carp. We also cloned and sequenced crucian carp NO synthase variants and quantified their mRNA levels in several tissues in normoxia and anoxia. Despite falling levels of blood plasma nitrite, the....... We conclude that nitrite is shifted into the tissues where it acts as NO donor during anoxia, inducing cytoprotection under anoxia/reoxygenation. This can be especially important in the crucian carp heart, which maintains output in anoxia. Nitrite is currently tested as a therapeutic drug against...

  4. The Research Status of Nitrite Safety%亚硝酸盐安全性研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚骏; 陈闯; 佟永薇

    2015-01-01

    This paper focused on the safety of nitrite. The research status of nitrite alternatives and the inhibition of N-nitrosamine were reviewed, which would provide a reference of the nitrite safer using in cured meat.%从亚硝酸盐的安全性入手,对亚硝酸盐替代物研究现状和抑制N-亚硝胺生成研究现状进行综述,为亚硝酸盐在腌肉制品领域更安全使用提供参考。

  5. Suspected nitrite poisoning in pigs caused by Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik. ('herderstassie', shepherd's purse) : case report

    OpenAIRE

    W.J. Wiese; J.P.J. Joubert

    2001-01-01

    Nitrite poisoning in pigs was suspected when 4 of 18 pigs died in a piggery near Ellisras in the Northern Province. The pigs showed typical brownish discolouration of the blood at autopsy. It was established that they ingested vegetable tops and weeds from the adjacent garden as part of their daily ration. Of the available plants, only Capsella bursa-pastoris contained nitrites. The drinking water and some of the other plants tested positive for nitrates but not for nitrites. This is the firs...

  6. Penetapan Kadar Nitrit Dan Nitrat Di Dalam Sosis Yang Beredar Di Kota Medan Secara Spektrofotometri Sinar Tampak

    OpenAIRE

    Lusiana, Rosalinda

    2016-01-01

    Nitrites and nitrates are foot additives that can be used as a preservative. According to the requirement of the Minister of Health of Indonesia RI number 722/MENKES/IX/1988, level allowed for nitrites in processed meat is 125 μg/g, wheres for nitrates is 500 μg/g. The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of nitrites and nitrates found in sausages marketed the supermarket in Medan. The samples analyzed were five sausages products are branded and unbranded two sausages products...

  7. Effect of betaine supplementation on plasma nitrate/nitrite in exercise-trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy Cameron G

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Betaine, beetroot juice, and supplemental nitrate have recently been reported to improve certain aspects of exercise performance, which may be mechanistically linked to increased nitric oxide. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of betaine supplementation on plasma nitrate/nitrite, a surrogate marker or nitric oxide, in exercise-trained men. Methods We used three different study designs (acute intake of betaine at 1.25 and 5.00 grams, chronic intake of betaine at 2.5 grams per day for 14 days, and chronic [6 grams of betaine per day for 7 days] followed by acute intake [6 grams], all involving exercise-trained men, to investigate the effects of orally ingested betaine on plasma nitrate/nitrite. Blood samples were collected before and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after ingestion of 1.25 and 5.00 grams of betaine (Study 1; before and after 14 days of betaine supplementation at a dosage of 2.5 grams (Study 2; and before and after 7 days of betaine supplementation at a dosage of 6 grams, followed by acute ingestion of 6 grams and blood measures at 30 and 60 min post ingestion (Study 3. Results In Study 1, nitrate/nitrite was relatively unaffected and no statistically significant interaction (p = 0.99, dosage (p = 0.69, or time (p = 0.91 effects were noted. Similar findings were noted in Study 2, with no statistically significant interaction (p = 0.57, condition (p = 0.98, or pre/post intervention (p = 0.17 effects noted for nitrate/nitrite. In Study 3, no statistically significant changes were noted in nitrate/nitrite between collection times (p = 0.97. Conclusion Our data indicate that acute or chronic ingestion of betaine by healthy, exercise-trained men does not impact plasma nitrate/nitrite. These findings suggest that other mechanisms aside from increasing circulating nitric oxide are likely responsible for any performance enhancing effect of betaine supplementation.

  8. Nitric oxide formation from the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit hemoglobin at intermediate oxygen saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2008-01-01

    The nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin has received much recent interest because the nitric oxide produced in this reaction may participate in blood flow regulation during hypoxia. The present study used spectral deconvolution to characterize the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit...... and its autocatalysis are inhibited by nitrosylhemoglobin from the deoxyhemoglobin reaction. The production of NO and nitrosylhemoglobin is faster and higher in carp hemoglobin with high O2 affinity than in rabbit hemoglobin with lower O2 affinity, and it correlates inversely with oxygen saturation...... NO generation from nitrite. The reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin leads to a 1 : 1 formation of nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin in both species. At intermediate oxygen saturations, the reaction with deoxyhemoglobin is clearly favored over that with oxyhemoglobin, and the oxyhemoglobin reaction...

  9. A nanomaterial composed of cobalt nanoparticles, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) and graphene with high electrocatalytic activity for nitrite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the oxidative electrochemistry of nitrite on glassy carbon electrodes modified with cobalt nanoparticles, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), and graphene. The modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results suggest that this new type of electrode combines the advantages of PEDOT-graphene films and cobalt nanoparticles and exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of nitrite. There is a linear relationship between the peak current and the nitrite concentration in the range from 0.5 μM to 240 μM, and the detection limit is 0.15 μM. The modified electrodes also enable the determination of nitrite at low potentials where the noise level and interferences by other electro-oxidizable compounds are weak. (author)

  10. Nitric oxide availability in deeply hypoxic crucian carp: acute and chronic changes and utilization of ambient nitrite reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Marie N; Gerber, Lucie; Jensen, Frank B

    2016-03-15

    Recent research suggest that anoxia-tolerant fish transfer extracellular nitrite into the tissues, where it is used for nitric oxide (NO) generation, iron-nitrosylation, and S-nitrosation of proteins, as part of the cytoprotective response toward prolonged hypoxia and subsequent reoxygenation. We hypothesized that crucian carp take up ambient nitrite and use it as a source of cellular NO availability during hypoxia. Fish were exposed for 1 day to normoxia (Po2 > 140 mmHg) and deep hypoxia (1 nitric oxide synthase-2 gene variant. The data support that ambient nitrite is taken up across the gills to be distributed via the blood to the tissues, particularly the heart, where it assists in cytoprotection and other functions. Cardiac nitrite was not elevated in acutely exposed fish, revealing that the response requires time. NO metabolite levels were higher during acute than chronic exposures, possibly caused by increased swimming activity and stress in acutely exposed fish.

  11. Utilization of urea, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate by crop plants in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Rains, D. W.; Qualset, C. O.

    1982-01-01

    The utilization of nitrogen compounds by crop plants is studied. The selection of crop varieties for efficient production using urea, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate, and the assimilation of mixed nitrogen sources by cereal leaves and roots are discussed.

  12. Optical nitrite sensor based on chemical modification of a polymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, A.; Daghighi, S.

    2005-06-01

    A new, low-cost nitrite sensor was developed by immobilizing a direct indicator dye in an optical sensing film for food and environmental monitoring. This sensor was fabricated by binding gallocyanine to a cellulose acetate film that had previously been subjected to an exhaustive base hydrolysis. The membrane has good durability (>6 months) and a short response time (<7 s). Nitrite can be determined for the range 0.008-1.50 μg/ml with 3 δ detection limits of 1 ng/ml. The method is easy to perform and uses acetylcellulose as a carrier. The reagents used for activating the cellulose support are inexpensive, non-toxic and widely available.

  13. Oxidation phenomena and color properties of grape pomace on nitrite-reduced meat emulsion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazi, Fatemeh; Zeynali, Fariba; Hoseini, Ebrahim; Behmadi, Homa; Savadkoohi, Sobhan

    2016-11-01

    The present study focuses on the effect of different levels of red grape pomace (1 and 2%, w/w) on the color changes, lipid oxidation (TBARS), antioxidant activity, microbial counts, total phenol content and sensory attributes of the sausages formulated with various levels of sodium nitrite (30, 60 and 120mg/kg). It was found that the addition of grape pomace (1%, w/w) in combination of reduced nitrite levels to the beef sausage samples reduced TBARS content and the degree of lipid oxidation. Antioxidant activity and total phenol contents were further evaluated based on DPPH scavenging activity method. A significant reduction in lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) of systems containing grape pomace was observed, following by an increase in the oxidative stability and the radical scavenging activity. Acceptability of beef sausages was not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the addition of grape pomace and had relatively greater scores from a sensory point of view. PMID:27424305

  14. A New Perspective on Microbes Formerly Known as Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daims, Holger; Lücker, Sebastian; Wagner, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) catalyze the second step of nitrification, nitrite oxidation to nitrate, which is an important process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. NOB were traditionally perceived as physiologically restricted organisms and were less intensively studied than other nitrogen-cycling microorganisms. This picture is in contrast to new discoveries of an unexpected high diversity of mostly uncultured NOB and a great physiological versatility, which includes complex microbe-microbe interactions and lifestyles outside the nitrogen cycle. Most surprisingly, close relatives to NOB perform complete nitrification (ammonia oxidation to nitrate) and this finding will have far-reaching implications for nitrification research. We review recent work that has changed our perspective on NOB and provides a new basis for future studies on these enigmatic organisms. PMID:27283264

  15. Preparing electrochemical active hierarchically porous carbons for detecting nitrite in drinkable water

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Baojun

    2016-01-13

    A class of hierarchically porous carbons were prepared by a facile dual-templating approach. The obtained samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Brunaner-Emmett-Teller measurement and electrochemical work station, respectively. The porous carbons could possess large specific surface area, interconnected pore structures, high conductivity and graphitizing degree. The resulting materials were used to prepare integrated modified electrodes. Based on the experimental results, the as-prepared hierarchically porous graphite (HPG) modified electrode showed the best electroactive performances toward the detection of nitrite with a detection limit of 8.1 × 10-3 mM. This HPG electrode was also repeatable and stable for 6 weeks. Moreover, this electrode was used for the determination of nitrite in drinkable water, and had acceptable recoveries. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2016.

  16. Control of hydrogen sulfide production in oil fields by managing microbial communities through nitrate or nitrite addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Casey R. J.

    Nitrate or nitrite injection into oil reservoirs during water flooding has the potential to control biological souring, the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Souring control is essential because sulfide is toxic, sulfide precipitates can plug reservoir formations, souring lowers crude oil value, and SRB induce corrosion. Nitrate and nitrite can stimulate heterotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (hNRB) and nitrate- or nitrite-reducing, sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NRSOB). Nitrite also inhibits SRB activity by blocking the sulfate reduction pathway. Continuous up-flow packed-bed bioreactors were inoculated with produced water from the Coleville oil field to establish sulfide-producing biofilms similar to those found in sour reservoirs. Nitrate or nitrite addition to bioreactors indicated that the dose required for hNRB or NR-SOB to control souring depended on the concentration of oil organics. Either mechanism mediates the net removal of oil organics (lactate) with nitrate or nitrite, with lower doses of nitrate required due to its greater oxidative power. Microbial community analysis by reverse sample genome probing (RSGP) revealed that NR-SOB mediated sulfide removal at low nitrate or nitrite concentrations when lactate was still available to SRB and the redox potential was low. At high nitrate doses hNRB oxidized lactate directly, produced nitrite and maintained a high redox potential, thus excluding SRB activity. Facultatively chemolithotrophic Campylobacter sp. strains were isolated from the bioreactors and incorporated into RSGP analyses, revealing their dominance in both NR-SOB- and hNRB-containing communities. The metabolic flexibility of these strains may confer a competitive advantage over obligate chemolithotrophs like Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO or hNRB that do not have NR-SOB activity like newly isolated Thauera sp. and Rhodobacter sp. strains. A single high dose of nitrite resulted in immediate

  17. Formation and mitigation of N-nitrosamines in nitrite preserved cooked sausages

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Susan Strange; Granby, Kit; Duedahl-Olesen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Literature on formation and mitigation of N-nitrosamine (NA) and especially non-volatile NA (NVNA) in meat products is scarce and the present study is therefore a relevant contribution to the field. We found positive correlation between the levels of N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP), N-nitrosohydroxyproline (NHPRO), N-nitrosoproline (NPRO), N-nitrosothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NTCA) and N-nitroso-2-methyl-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NMTCA) and the amount of nitrite added to cooked pork saus...

  18. Plasma Levels of Nitrite and Nitrate in Early and Recent Classes of Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Donna A.; Flood, Mary H; Lewis, Debra A; Virginia M Miller; Krause, William J

    2008-01-01

    The stable metabolite of nitric oxide in plasma is NOx, the sum of nitrite plus nitrate. Measures of plasma NOx may provide information about the nitric oxide tonus of the entire endothelium including capillary microvessels. Although data are available for mammalian species, plasma NOx measurements in early vertebrate species are scarce. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that plasma NOx would be similar to the NOx in the water environment for fish in early classes (Agnatha ...

  19. Expanded metabolic versatility of ubiquitous nitrite-oxidizing bacteria from the genus Nitrospira

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Albertsen, Mads;

    2015-01-01

    , we identified ecophysiological traits that contribute to the ecological success of Nitrospira. Unexpectedly, N. moscoviensis possesses genes coding for a urease and cleaves urea to ammonia and CO2. Ureolysis was not observed yet in nitrite oxidizers and enables N. moscoviensis to supply ammonia...... oxygen concentrations. Reciprocal feeding and metabolic versatility, including the participation in different nitrogen cycling processes, likely are key factors for the niche partitioning, the ubiquity, and the high diversity of Nitrospira in natural and engineered ecosystems....

  20. Ammonium removal from municipal wastewater with application of ion exchange and partial nitritation/Anammox process

    OpenAIRE

    Malovanyy, Andriy

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen removal from municipal wastewater with application of Anammox process offers cost reduction, especially if it is combined with maximal use of organic content of wastewater for biogas production. In this study a new technology is proposed, which is based on ammonium concentration from municipal wastewater by ion exchange followed by biological removal of ammonium from the concentrated stream by partial nitritation/Anammox process. In experiments on ammonium concentration four the most...

  1. Electroencephalographic Response to Sodium Nitrite May Predict Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Matthew J.; Ezra, Martyn; Herigstad, Mari; Hayen, Anja; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Westbrook, Jon; Warnaby, Catherine E.; Pattinson, Kyle T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage often leads to death and poor clinical outcome. Injury occurring during the first 72 hours is termed “early brain injury,” with disruption of the nitric oxide pathway playing an important pathophysiologic role in its development. Quantitative electroencephalographic variables, such as α/δ frequency ratio, are surrogate markers of cerebral ischemia. This study assessed the quantitative electroencephalographic response to a cerebral nitric oxide donor (intravenous sodium nitrite) to explore whether this correlates with the eventual development of delayed cerebral ischemia. Design: Unblinded pilot study testing response to drug intervention. Setting: Neuroscience ICU, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom. Patients: Fourteen World Federation of Neurosurgeons grades 3, 4, and 5 patients (mean age, 52.8 yr [range, 41–69 yr]; 11 women). Interventions: IV sodium nitrite (10 μg/kg/min) for 1 hour. Measurements and Main Results: Continuous electroencephalographic recording for 2 hours. The alpha/delta frequency ratio was measured before and during IV sodium nitrite infusion. Seven of 14 patients developed delayed cerebral ischemia. There was a +30% to +118% (range) increase in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in patients who did not develop delayed cerebral ischemia (p < 0.0001) but an overall decrease in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in those patients who did develop delayed cerebral ischemia (range, +11% to –31%) (p = 0.006, multivariate analysis accounting for major confounds). Conclusions: Administration of sodium nitrite after severe subarachnoid hemorrhage differentially influences quantitative electroencephalographic variables depending on the patient’s susceptibility to development of delayed cerebral ischemia. With further validation in a larger sample size, this response may be developed as a tool for risk stratification after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27441898

  2. Mechanism of Pitting Corrosion Prevention by Nitrite in Carbon Steel Exposed to Dilute Salt Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip E. Zapp; John W. Van Zee

    2002-02-01

    The research has developed a broad fundamental understanding of the inhibition action of nitrite ions in preventing nitrate pitting corrosion of carbon steel tanks containing high-level radioactive waste. This fundamental understanding can be applied to specific situations during waste removal for permanent disposition and waste tank closure to ensure that the tanks are maintained safely. The results of the research provide the insight necessary to develop solutions that prevent further degradation.

  3. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile to the food preservatives sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Su-Chen; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important enteric pathogen of humans and food animals. Recently it has been isolated from retail foods with prevalences up to 42%, prompting concern that contaminated foods may be one of the reasons for increased community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI). A number of studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in raw meats and fresh vegetables; however, fewer studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in ready-to-eat meat. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibility of 11 C. difficile isolates of food animal and retail food origins to food preservatives commonly used in ready-to-eat meats. The broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite against C. difficile. Checkerboard assays were used to investigate the combined effect of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate, commonly used in combination in meats. Modal MIC values for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite were 250 μg/ml, >4000 μg/ml and 1000 μg/ml, respectively. No bactericidal activity was observed for all three food preservatives. The checkerboard assays showed indifferent interaction between sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. This study demonstrated that C. difficile can survive in the presence of food preservatives at concentrations higher than the current maximum permitted levels allowed in ready-to-eat meats. The possibility of retail ready-to-eat meats contaminated with C. difficile acting as a source of CDI needs to be investigated. PMID:26700884

  4. Diversity, abundance and expression of nitrite reductase (nirK)-like genes in marine thaumarchaea

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Marie B; Smith, Jason M.; Francis, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are widespread and abundant in aquatic and terrestrial habitats and appear to have a significant impact on the global nitrogen cycle. Like the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, AOA encode a gene homologous to copper-containing nitrite reductases (nirK), which has been studied very little to date. In this study, the diversity, abundance and expression of thaumarchaeal nirK genes from coastal and marine environments were investigated using two mutually excluding primer...

  5. Ultraviolet irradiation effects incorporation of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen into aquatic natural organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    One of the concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of ultraviolet radiation for treatment of drinking water and wastewater is the fate of nitrate, particularly its photolysis to nitrite. In this study, 15N NMR was used to establish for the first time that UV irradiation effects the incorporation of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen into aquatic natural organic matter (NOM). Irradiation of 15N-labeled nitrate in aqueous solution with an unfiltered medium pressure mercury lamp resulted in the incorporation of nitrogen into Suwannee River NOM (SRNOM) via nitrosation and other reactions over a range of pH from approximately 3.2 to 8.0, both in the presence and absence of bicarbonate, confirming photonitrosation of the NOM. The major forms of the incorporated label include nitrosophenol, oxime/nitro, pyridine, nitrile, and amide nitrogens. Natural organic matter also catalyzed the reduction of nitrate to ammonia on irradiation. The nitrosophenol and oxime/nitro nitrogens were found to be susceptible to photodegradation on further irradiation when nitrate was removed from the system. At pH 7.5, unfiltered irradiation resulted in the incorporation of 15N-labeled nitrite into SRNOM in the form of amide, nitrile, and pyridine nitrogen. In the presence of bicarbonate at pH 7.4, Pyrex filtered (cutoff below 290–300 nm) irradiation also effected incorporation of nitrite into SRNOM as amide nitrogen. We speculate that nitrosation of NOM from the UV irradiation of nitrate also leads to production of nitrogen gas and nitrous oxide, a process that may be termed photo-chemodenitrification. Irradiation of SRNOM alone resulted in transformation or loss of naturally abundant heterocyclic nitrogens.

  6. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile to the food preservatives sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Su-Chen; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important enteric pathogen of humans and food animals. Recently it has been isolated from retail foods with prevalences up to 42%, prompting concern that contaminated foods may be one of the reasons for increased community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI). A number of studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in raw meats and fresh vegetables; however, fewer studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in ready-to-eat meat. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibility of 11 C. difficile isolates of food animal and retail food origins to food preservatives commonly used in ready-to-eat meats. The broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite against C. difficile. Checkerboard assays were used to investigate the combined effect of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate, commonly used in combination in meats. Modal MIC values for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite were 250 μg/ml, >4000 μg/ml and 1000 μg/ml, respectively. No bactericidal activity was observed for all three food preservatives. The checkerboard assays showed indifferent interaction between sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. This study demonstrated that C. difficile can survive in the presence of food preservatives at concentrations higher than the current maximum permitted levels allowed in ready-to-eat meats. The possibility of retail ready-to-eat meats contaminated with C. difficile acting as a source of CDI needs to be investigated.

  7. Effect of omeprazole on intragastric bacterial counts, nitrates, nitrites, and N-nitroso compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Verdu, E; Viani, F.; Armstrong, D; Fraser, R; Siegrist, H. H.; Pignatelli, B.; Idström, J P; Cederberg, C; Blum, A L; Fried, M

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that profound inhibition of gastric acid secretion may increase exposure to potentially carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds. The aim of this study was to find out if the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole (20 mg daily) is associated with increased concentrations of potentially carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds in gastric juice. The volume of gastric contents, number of bacteria, and concentrations of nitrates, nitrites, and N-nitroso compounds was determined in gastr...

  8. Dietary Nitrates, Nitrites, and Nitrosamines Intake and the Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Song; Lei Wu; Wenxian Guan

    2015-01-01

    The potential associations between dietary consumption of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines and gastric cancer risk have been investigated by several studies, but yielded inconclusive results. We conducted a meta-analysis to provide a quantitative assessment of their relationships. Relevant articles were identified by a systematic literature searching of PubMed and Embase databases prior to August 2015. Random-effects models were employed to pool the relative risks. A total of 22 articles ...

  9. Serum nitrate and nitrite levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ersoy, Y.; Ozerol, E; Baysal, O; Temel, I; MacWalter, R; Meral, U; Altay, Z

    2002-01-01

    Methods: Thirty five patients with RA, 32 patients with AS, and 36 patients with OA were entered into this study. In addition, 30 healthy volunteers acted as a control group. Concentrations of nitrate and nitrite in serum were determined by direct and indirect Griess reactions. C reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate levels were determined as markers of systemic activity of disease (SAD) in RA and AS groups.

  10. Relationship between Nitrite Reduction and Active Phosphate Uptake in the Phosphate-Accumulating Denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. Strain JR 12

    OpenAIRE

    Barak, Yoram; van Rijn, Jaap

    2000-01-01

    Phosphate uptake by the phosphate-accumulating denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. JR12 was examined with different combinations of electron and carbon donors and electron acceptors. Phosphate uptake in acetate-supplemented cells took place with either oxygen or nitrate but did not take place when nitrite served as the final electron acceptor. Furthermore, nitrite reduction rates by this denitrifier were shown to be significantly reduced in the presence of phosphate. Phosphate uptake assays in the pr...

  11. Implications of Decreased Nitrite Concentrations on Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Ready-to-Eat Meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Megan I; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S; Shaw, Angela M; Tarté, Rodrigo; Adams, Kristin R; Neibuhr, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Increased popularity of natural and organic processed meats can be attributed to the growing consumer demand for preservative-free foods, including processed meats. To meet this consumer demand, meat processors have begun using celery juice concentrate in place of sodium nitrite to create products labeled as no-nitrate or no-nitrite-added meat products while maintaining the characteristics unique to conventionally cured processed meats. Because of flavor limitations, natural cures with celery concentrate typically provide lower ingoing nitrite concentrations for ready-to-eat processed meats than do conventional cures, which could allow for increased growth of pathogens, such as Clostridium perfringens, during cooked product cooling such as that required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the implications associated with reduced nitrite concentrations for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth during a typical cooling cycle used for cooked products. Nitrite treatments of 0, 50, and 100 ppm were tested in a broth system inoculated with a three-strain C. perfringens cocktail and heated with a simulated product thermal process followed by a typical cooling-stabilization process. The nitrite concentration of 50 ppm was more effective for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth than was 0 ppm but was not as effective as 100 ppm. The interaction between nitrite and temperature significantly affected (P 0.05) on spore outgrowth. Results indicate that decreased nitrite concentrations (50 ppm) have increased potential for total C. perfringens population outgrowth during cooling and may require additional protective measures, such as faster chilling rates.

  12. Nitrate-nitrite-nitrosamines exposure and the risk of type 1 diabetes: A review of current data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadoran, Zahra; Ghasemi, Asghar; Mirmiran, Parvin; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    The potential toxic effects of nitrate-nitrite-nitrosamine on pancreatic β cell have remained a controversial issue over the past two decades. In this study, we reviewed epidemiological studies investigated the associations between nitrate-nitrite-nitrosamines exposure, from both diet and drinking water to ascertain whether these compounds may contribute to development of type 1 diabetes. To identify relevant studies, a systematic search strategy of PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct was conducted using queries including the key words “nitrate”, “nitrite”, “nitrosamine” with “type 1 diabetes” or “insulin dependent diabetes mellitus”. All searches were limited to studies published in English. Ecologic surveys, case-control and cohort studies have indicated conflicting results in relation to nitrate-nitrite exposure from drinking water and the risk of type 1 diabetes. A null, sometimes even negative association has been mainly reported in regions with a mean nitrate levels 40-80 mg/L. Limited data are available regarding the potential diabetogenic effect of nitrite from drinking water, although there is evidence indicating dietary nitrite could be a risk factor for development of type 1 diabetes, an effect however that seems to be significant in a higher range of acceptable limit for nitrate/nitrite. Current data regarding dietary exposure of nitrosamine and development of type 1 diabetes is also inconsistent. Considering to an increasing trend of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) along with an elevated nitrate-nitrite exposure, additional research is critical to clarify potential harmful effects of nitrate-nitrite-nitrosamine exposure on β-cell autoimmunity and the risk of T1DM. PMID:27795817

  13. Elucidating the Roles of Conserved Active Site Amino Acids in the Escherichia coli Cytochrome c Nitrite Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The periplasmic cytochrome c nitrite reductase NrfA is a homodimeric protein containing ten c-type cytochromes. NrfA catalyses the six electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia which in turn facilitates anaerobic respiration. NrfA also reduces nitric oxide and hydroxylamine to ammonium. The reduction of substrate is carried out at the distal position of a lysine ligated heme and in an active site cavity dominated by a conserved catalytic triad of histidine, tyrosine and arginine...

  14. Determination of nitrate and nitrite in dairy samples by sequential injection using an in-line cadmium-reducing column

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, M.J. Reis; Fernandes, Sílvia M.V.; Rangel, António O.S.S.

    2006-01-01

    A sequential injection analysis (SIA) system for the spectrophotometric determination of nitrate in dairy samples was developed. A test portion was aspirated into a carrier solution containing ethylendiaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) and ammonium buffer, which flowed into a copperized cadmium reduction column installed in-line for the determination of the nitrate plus nitrite contents of samples. For the nitrite determination, another test portion of sample was aspirated and directly sen...

  15. NasFED Proteins Mediate Assimilatory Nitrate and Nitrite Transport in Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae) M5al

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Qitu; Stewart, Valley

    1998-01-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources. The enzymes required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. We report here the complete nasFED sequence. Sequence comparisons indicate that the nasFED genes encode components of a conventional periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein (NasF), a homodimeric intrinsic membrane protein (NasE), and a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (...

  16. Implications of Decreased Nitrite Concentrations on Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Ready-to-Eat Meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Megan I; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S; Shaw, Angela M; Tarté, Rodrigo; Adams, Kristin R; Neibuhr, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Increased popularity of natural and organic processed meats can be attributed to the growing consumer demand for preservative-free foods, including processed meats. To meet this consumer demand, meat processors have begun using celery juice concentrate in place of sodium nitrite to create products labeled as no-nitrate or no-nitrite-added meat products while maintaining the characteristics unique to conventionally cured processed meats. Because of flavor limitations, natural cures with celery concentrate typically provide lower ingoing nitrite concentrations for ready-to-eat processed meats than do conventional cures, which could allow for increased growth of pathogens, such as Clostridium perfringens, during cooked product cooling such as that required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the implications associated with reduced nitrite concentrations for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth during a typical cooling cycle used for cooked products. Nitrite treatments of 0, 50, and 100 ppm were tested in a broth system inoculated with a three-strain C. perfringens cocktail and heated with a simulated product thermal process followed by a typical cooling-stabilization process. The nitrite concentration of 50 ppm was more effective for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth than was 0 ppm but was not as effective as 100 ppm. The interaction between nitrite and temperature significantly affected (P 0.05) on spore outgrowth. Results indicate that decreased nitrite concentrations (50 ppm) have increased potential for total C. perfringens population outgrowth during cooling and may require additional protective measures, such as faster chilling rates. PMID:26735043

  17. Fine structure characterization of zero-valent iron nanoparticles for decontamination of nitrites and nitrates in wastewater and groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-Song Lin et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of the present study were to investigate the chemical reduction of nitrate or nitrite species by zero-valent iron nanoparticle (ZVIN in aqueous solution and related reaction kinetics or mechanisms using fine structure characterization. This work also exemplifies the utilization of field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE–SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and x-ray diffraction (XRD to reveal the speciation and possible reaction pathway in a very complex adsorption and redox reaction process. Experimentally, ZVIN of this study was prepared by sodium borohydride reduction method at room temperature and ambient pressure. The morphology of as-synthesized ZVIN shows that the nearly ball and ultrafine particles ranged of 20–50 nm were observed with FE–SEM or TEM analysis. The kinetic model of nitrites or nitrates reductive reaction by ZVIN is proposed as a pseudo first-order kinetic equation. The nitrite and nitrate removal efficiencies using ZVIN were found 65–83% and 51–68%, respectively, based on three different initial concentrations. Based on the XRD pattern analyses, it is found that the quantitative relationship between nitrite and Fe(III or Fe(II is similar to the one between nitrate and Fe(III in the ZVIN study. The possible reason is due to the faster nitrite reduction by ZVIN. In fact, the occurrence of the relative faster nitrite reductive reaction suggested that the passivation of the ZVIN have a significant contribution to iron corrosion. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS or x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES spectra show that the nitrites or nitrates reduce to N2 or NH3 while oxidizing the ZVIN to Fe2O3 or Fe3O4 electrochemically. It is also very clear that decontamination of nitrate or nitrite species in groundwater via the in-situ remediation with a ZVIN permeable reactive barrier would be environmentally attractive.

  18. Maternal dietary intake of nitrates, nitrites and nitrosamines and selected birth defects in offspring: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, John C.; Brender, Jean D; Zheng, Qi; Sharkey, Joseph R; Vuong, Ann M; Shinde, Mayura U; Griesenbeck, John S; Suarez, Lucina; Langlois, Peter H.; Canfield, Mark A.; Romitti, Paul A.; Weyer, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary intake of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines can increase the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds in the stomach. Results from animal studies suggest that these compounds might be teratogenic. We examined the relationship between maternal dietary intake of nitrates, nitrites (including plant and animal sources as separate groups), and nitrosamines and several types of birth defects in offspring. Methods For this population-based case–control study, data from a 58-...

  19. Development of estimates of dietary nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines for use with the short willet food frequency questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Rene Antonio A; Sharkey Joseph R; Huber John C; Steck Michelle D; Griesenbeck John S; Brender Jean D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies have suggested that nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines have an etiologic role in adverse pregnancy outcomes and chronic diseases such as cancer. Although an extensive body of literature exists on estimates of these compounds in foods, the extant data varies in quality, quantified estimates, and relevance. Methods We developed estimates of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines for food items listed in the Short Willet Food Frequency Questionnaire (WFFQ) as adapted ...

  20. Redox-coupled proton transfer mechanism in nitrite reductase revealed by femtosecond crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Yohta; Tse, Ka Man; Nakane, Takanori; Nakatsu, Toru; Suzuki, Mamoru; Sugahara, Michihiro; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nureki, Osamu; Murphy, Michael E P; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-03-15

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, plays an essential role in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), the key metalloenzyme in microbial denitrification of the global nitrogen cycle. Analyses of the nitrite reduction mechanism in CuNiR with conventional synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX) have been faced with difficulties, because X-ray photoreduction changes the native structures of metal centers and the enzyme-substrate complex. Using serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), we determined the intact structures of CuNiR in the resting state and the nitrite complex (NC) state at 2.03- and 1.60-Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the SRX NC structure representing a transient state in the catalytic cycle was determined at 1.30-Å resolution. Comparison between SRX and SFX structures revealed that photoreduction changes the coordination manner of the substrate and that catalytically important His255 can switch hydrogen bond partners between the backbone carbonyl oxygen of nearby Glu279 and the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr280. These findings, which SRX has failed to uncover, propose a redox-coupled proton switch for PCET. This concept can explain how proton transfer to the substrate is involved in intramolecular electron transfer and why substrate binding accelerates PCET. Our study demonstrates the potential of SFX as a powerful tool to study redox processes in metalloenzymes.

  1. Structure of octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens in a complex with phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens (TvNiR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia. The structures of the free enzyme and of the enzyme in complexes with the substrate (nitrite ion) and the inhibitor (azide ion) have been solved previously. In this study we report the structures of the oxidized complex of TvNiR with phosphate and of this complex reduced by europium(II) chloride (1.8- and 2.0-A resolution, the R factors are 15.9 and 16.7%, respectively) and the structure of the enzyme in the complex with cyanide (1.76-A resolution, the R factor is 16.5%), which was prepared by soaking a crystal of the oxidized phosphate complex of TvNiR. In the active site of the enzyme, the phosphate ion binds to the iron ion of the catalytic heme and to the side chains of the catalytic residues Arg131, Tyr303, and His361. The cyanide ion is coordinated to the heme-iron ion and is hydrogen bonded to the residue His361. In the structure of reduced TvNiR, the phosphate ion is bound in the same manner as in the structure of oxidized TvNiR, and the ninecoordinated europium ion is located on the surface of one of the crystallographically independent monomers of the enzyme.

  2. Structural basis for dynamic mechanism of nitrate/nitrite antiport by NarK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Takeda, Hironori; Kato, Hideaki E.; Doki, Shintaro; Ito, Koichi; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    NarK belongs to the nitrate/nitrite porter (NNP) family in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and plays a central role in nitrate uptake across the membrane in diverse organisms, including archaea, bacteria, fungi and plants. Although previous studies provided insight into the overall structure and the substrate recognition of NarK, its molecular mechanism, including the driving force for nitrate transport, remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that NarK is a nitrate/nitrite antiporter, using an in vitro reconstituted system. Furthermore, we present the high-resolution crystal structures of NarK from Escherichia coli in the nitrate-bound occluded, nitrate-bound inward-open and apo inward-open states. The integrated structural, functional and computational analyses reveal the nitrate/nitrite antiport mechanism of NarK, in which substrate recognition is coupled to the transport cycle by the concomitant movement of the transmembrane helices and the key tyrosine and arginine residues in the substrate-binding site.

  3. Redox-coupled proton transfer mechanism in nitrite reductase revealed by femtosecond crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Yohta; Tse, Ka Man; Nakane, Takanori; Nakatsu, Toru; Suzuki, Mamoru; Sugahara, Michihiro; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Nureki, Osamu; Murphy, Michael E. P.; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, plays an essential role in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), the key metalloenzyme in microbial denitrification of the global nitrogen cycle. Analyses of the nitrite reduction mechanism in CuNiR with conventional synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX) have been faced with difficulties, because X-ray photoreduction changes the native structures of metal centers and the enzyme–substrate complex. Using serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), we determined the intact structures of CuNiR in the resting state and the nitrite complex (NC) state at 2.03- and 1.60-Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the SRX NC structure representing a transient state in the catalytic cycle was determined at 1.30-Å resolution. Comparison between SRX and SFX structures revealed that photoreduction changes the coordination manner of the substrate and that catalytically important His255 can switch hydrogen bond partners between the backbone carbonyl oxygen of nearby Glu279 and the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr280. These findings, which SRX has failed to uncover, propose a redox-coupled proton switch for PCET. This concept can explain how proton transfer to the substrate is involved in intramolecular electron transfer and why substrate binding accelerates PCET. Our study demonstrates the potential of SFX as a powerful tool to study redox processes in metalloenzymes. PMID:26929369

  4. Achieving nitritation and anammox enrichment in a single moving-bed biofilm reactor treating reject water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekker, I; Rikmann, E; Tenno, T; Saluste, A; Tomingas, M; Menert, A; Loorits, L; Lemmiksoo, Vallo; Tenno, T

    2012-01-01

    A biofilm with high nitrifying efficiency was converted into a nitritating and thereafter a nitritating-anammox biofilm in a moving-bed biofilm reactor at 26.5 (+/- 0.5) degrees C by means of a combination of intermittent aeration, low dissolved oxygen concentration, low hydraulic retention time, free ammonia and furthermore, also by elevated HCO3- concentration. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were more effectively suppressed by an enhanced HCO3- concentration range of 1200-2350 mg/L as opposed to free-ammonia-based process control where NOBs recovered from inhibition; the respective total-nitrogen removal rates were 0.3 kg N/(m3 x d) and 0.2 kg N/(m3 x d). The biofilm modification strategies resulted in a shift in bacterial community as the NOB Nitrobacter spp. were replaced with NOB belonging to the genus Nitrospira spp. and were closely related to Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii. A community of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms -uncultured Planctomycetales bacterium clone P4 (closely related to Candidatus Brocadia fulgida)--was developed.

  5. Partial substitution of nitrite by chitosan and the effect on the quality properties of pork sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario García

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of partial nitrite replacement by chitosan on the quality of Ham Visking (a type of pork sausages. Five Ham Visking formulations were elaborated modifying the sodium nitrite (0.011; 0.016 or 0.0212% and chitosan concentrations (0.25 or 0.5% in the products. Sausages were stored at 4 ºC and physicochemical, microbiological, and sensorial evaluations were performed in order to estimate their shelf life. Chitosan can be used in pork sausages without affecting ensory attributes such as color although the panelists detected textural differences among the samples with chitosan, which suggests that there is some influence of deacetylation degree of chitosan on the textural behavior of sausages which still needed to be explained for a successful application of chitosan in meat products. The reduction of residual sodium nitrite did not affect the color and flavor of such products, but the use of chitosan increasedsignificantly the shelf life of sausages.

  6. Yield of Ozone, Nitrite Nitrogen and Hydrogen Peroxide Versus Discharge Parameter Using APPJ Under Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingyan; Zhu, Changping; Fei, Juntao; He, Xiang; Yin, Cheng; Wang, Yuan; Gao, Ying; Jiang, Yongfeng; Wen, Wen; Chen, Longwei

    2016-03-01

    Discharge plasma in and in contact with water can be accompanied with ultraviolet radiation and electron impact, thus can generate hydroxyl radicals, ozone, nitrite nitrogen and hydrogen peroxide. In this paper, a non-equilibrium plasma processing system was established by means of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet immersed in water. The hydroxyl intensities and discharge energy waveforms were tested. The results show that the positive and negative discharge energy peaks were asymmetric, where the positive discharge energy peak was greater than the negative one. Meanwhile, the yield of ozone and nitrite nitrogen was enhanced with the increase of both the treatment time and the discharge energy. Moreover, the pH value of treated water was reduced rapidly and maintained at a lower level. The residual concentration of hydrogen peroxide in APPJ treated water was kept at a low level. Additionally, both the efficiency energy ratio of the yield of ozone and nitrite nitrogen and that of the removal of p-nitrophenol increased as a function of discharge energy and discharge voltage. The experimental results were fully analyzed and the chemical reaction equations and the physical processes of discharges in water were given. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11274092, 11404092, 61401146), the Nantong Science and Technology Project, Nantong, China (No. BK2014024), the Open Project of Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Engineering, Nanjing, China (No. KF2014001), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 2014B11414)

  7. Bare and boron-doped cubic silicon carbide nanowires for electrochemical detection of nitrite sensitively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Liqin; Hou, Xinmei; Chen, Junhong; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Fabrication of eletrochemical sensors based on wide bandgap compound semiconductors has attracted increasing interest in recent years. Here we report for the first time electrochemical nitrite sensors based on cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires (NWs) with smooth surface and boron-doped cubic SiC NWs with fin-like structure. Multiple techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to characterize SiC and boron-doped SiC NWs. As for the electrochemical behavior of both SiC NWs electrode, the cyclic voltammetric results show that both SiC electrodes exhibit wide potential window and excellent electrocatalytic activity toward nitrite oxidation. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) determination reveals that there exists a good linear relationship between the oxidation peak current and the concentration in the range of 50–15000 μmoL L‑1 (cubic SiC NWs) and 5–8000 μmoL L‑1 (B-doped cubic SiC NWs) with the detection limitation of 5 and 0.5 μmoL L‑1 respectively. Compared with previously reported results, both as-prepared nitrite sensors exhibit wider linear response range with comparable high sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility.

  8. Catalysis of nitrite generation from nitroglycerin by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Amedea B; Ouellet, Marc; Antonic, Marija; Chrétien, Michelle N; English, Ann M

    2013-11-30

    Vascular relaxation to nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate; GTN) requires its bioactivation by mechanisms that remain controversial. We report here that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the release of nitrite from GTN. In assays containing dithiothreitol (DTT) and NAD(+), the GTN reductase activity of purified GAPDH produces nitrite and 1,2-GDN as the major products. A vmax of 2.6nmolmin(-)(1)mg(-)(1) was measured for nitrite production by GAPDH from rabbit muscle and a GTN KM of 1.2mM. Reductive denitration of GTN in the absence of DTT results in dose- and time-dependent inhibition of GAPDH dehydrogenase activity. Disulfiram, a thiol-modifying drug, inhibits both the dehydrogenase and GTN reductase activity of GAPDH, while DTT or tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine reverse the GTN-induced inhibition. Incubation of intact human erythrocytes or hemolysates with 2mM GTN for 60min results in 50% inhibition of GAPDH's dehydrogenase activity, indicating that GTN is taken up by these cells and that the dehydrogenase is a target of GTN. Thus, erythrocyte GAPDH may contribute to GTN bioactivation.

  9. Modeling of Nitrous Oxide Production from Nitritation Reactors Treating Real Anaerobic Digestion Liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qilin; Ni, Bing-Jie; Lemaire, Romain; Hao, Xiaodi; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a mathematical model including both ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and heterotrophic bacteria (HB) is constructed to predict N2O production from the nitritation systems receiving the real anaerobic digestion liquor. This is for the first time that N2O production from such systems was modeled considering both AOB and HB. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from both lab- and pilot-scale nitritation reactors. The model predictions matched the dynamic N2O, ammonium, nitrite and chemical oxygen demand data well, supporting the capability of the model. Modeling results indicated that HB are the dominant contributor to N2O production in the above systems with the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of 0.5-1.0 mg O2/L, accounting for approximately 75% of N2O production. The modeling results also suggested that the contribution of HB to N2O production decreased with the increasing DO concentrations, from 75% at DO = 0.5 mg O2/L to 25% at DO = 7.0 mg O2/L, with a corresponding increase of the AOB contribution (from 25% to 75%). Similar to HB, the total N2O production rate also decreased dramatically from 0.65 to 0.25 mg N/L/h when DO concentration increased from 0.5 to 7.0 mg O2/L. PMID:27125491

  10. The nasFEDCBA operon for nitrate and nitrite assimilation in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J T; Goldman, B S; Stewart, V

    1994-05-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilation pathway. We previously identified structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases, nasA and nasB, respectively. We report here our further identification of four genes, nasFEDC, upstream of the nasBA genes. The nasFEDCBA genes probably form an operon. Mutational and complementation analyses indicated that both the nasC and nasA genes are required for nitrate assimilation. The predicted NASC protein is homologous to a variety of NADH-dependent oxidoreductases. Thus, the NASC protein probably mediates electron transfer from NADH to the NASA protein, which contains the active site for nitrate reduction. The deduced NASF, NASE, and NASD proteins are homologous to the NRTA, NRTB, and NRTD proteins, respectively, that are involved in nitrate uptake in Synechococcus sp. (T. Omata, X. Andriesse, and A. Hirano, Mol. Gen. Genet. 236:193-202, 1993). Mutational and complementation studies indicated that the nasD gene is required for nitrate but not nitrite assimilation. By analogy with the Synechococcus nrt genes, we propose that the nasFED genes are involved in nitrate transport in K. pneumoniae. PMID:8169203

  11. Salivary surrogates of plasma nitrite and catecholamines during a 21-week training season in swimmers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Mauricio Díaz Gómez

    Full Text Available The collection of samples of saliva is noninvasive and straightforward, which turns saliva into an ideal fluid for monitoring the adaptive response to training. Here, we investigated the response of the salivary proteins alpha-amylase (sAA, chromogranin A (sCgA, and the concentration of total protein (sTP as well as salivary nitrite (sNO2 in relation to plasma catecholamines and plasma nitrite (pNO2, respectively. The variation in these markers was compared to the intensity and load of training during a 21-week training season in 12 elite swimmers. Overall, the salivary proteins tracked the concentration of plasma adrenaline and were inversely correlated with the training outcomes. No correlations were observed between sNO2 and pNO2. However, sNO2 correlated positively with the intensity and load of training. We argue that the decrease in sympathetic activity is responsible for the decrease in the concentration of proteins throughout the training season. Furthermore, the increase in nitrite is likely to reflect changes in hemodynamics and regulation of vascular tone. The association of the salivary markers with the training outcomes underlines their potential as noninvasive markers of training status in professional athletes.

  12. Modeling of Nitrous Oxide Production from Nitritation Reactors Treating Real Anaerobic Digestion Liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qilin; Ni, Bing-Jie; Lemaire, Romain; Hao, Xiaodi; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a mathematical model including both ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and heterotrophic bacteria (HB) is constructed to predict N2O production from the nitritation systems receiving the real anaerobic digestion liquor. This is for the first time that N2O production from such systems was modeled considering both AOB and HB. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from both lab- and pilot-scale nitritation reactors. The model predictions matched the dynamic N2O, ammonium, nitrite and chemical oxygen demand data well, supporting the capability of the model. Modeling results indicated that HB are the dominant contributor to N2O production in the above systems with the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of 0.5–1.0 mg O2/L, accounting for approximately 75% of N2O production. The modeling results also suggested that the contribution of HB to N2O production decreased with the increasing DO concentrations, from 75% at DO = 0.5 mg O2/L to 25% at DO = 7.0 mg O2/L, with a corresponding increase of the AOB contribution (from 25% to 75%). Similar to HB, the total N2O production rate also decreased dramatically from 0.65 to 0.25 mg N/L/h when DO concentration increased from 0.5 to 7.0 mg O2/L. PMID:27125491

  13. Integrating landfill bioreactors, partial nitritation and anammox process for methane recovery and nitrogen removal from leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Faqian; Su, Xiaomei; Kang, Tingting; Wu, Songwei; Yuan, Mengdong; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Xiayun; Xu, Fang; Wu, Weixiang

    2016-01-01

    A new process consisting of a landfill bioreactor, partial-nitritation (PN) and the anammox process has been developed for landfill leachate treatment. In this study, the landfill bioreactor exhibited excellent performance in methane-rich biogas recovery, with a specific biogas yield of 0.47 L gas g(-1) COD and methane percentages of 53-76%. PN was achieved in the aerobic reactor by high free ammonia (101 ± 83 mg NH3 L(-1)) inhibition for nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and the desired PN effluent composition (effluent nitrite: ammonium ratio of 1.1 ± 0.3) was controlled by adjusting the alkalinity concentration per unit of ammonium oxidized to approximately 14.3 mg CaCO3 mg(-1) N in the influent. The startup of anammox process was successfully achieved with a membrane bioreactor in 160 d, and a maximum nitrogen removal rate of 216 mg N L(-1) d(-1) was attained for real landfill leachate treatment. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction results confirmed that the cell-specific anammox activity was approximately 68-95 fmol N cell(-1) d(-1), which finally led to the stable operation of the system. PMID:27279481

  14. Bare and boron-doped cubic silicon carbide nanowires for electrochemical detection of nitrite sensitively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Liqin; Hou, Xinmei; Chen, Junhong; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-04-25

    Fabrication of eletrochemical sensors based on wide bandgap compound semiconductors has attracted increasing interest in recent years. Here we report for the first time electrochemical nitrite sensors based on cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires (NWs) with smooth surface and boron-doped cubic SiC NWs with fin-like structure. Multiple techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to characterize SiC and boron-doped SiC NWs. As for the electrochemical behavior of both SiC NWs electrode, the cyclic voltammetric results show that both SiC electrodes exhibit wide potential window and excellent electrocatalytic activity toward nitrite oxidation. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) determination reveals that there exists a good linear relationship between the oxidation peak current and the concentration in the range of 50-15000 μmoL L(-1) (cubic SiC NWs) and 5-8000 μmoL L(-1) (B-doped cubic SiC NWs) with the detection limitation of 5 and 0.5 μmoL L(-1) respectively. Compared with previously reported results, both as-prepared nitrite sensors exhibit wider linear response range with comparable high sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility.

  15. Antitumor effect of synergistic contribution of nitrite and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma activated medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Mizuno, Masaaki; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas (NEAPP) have been attracted attention in the noble application of cancer therapy. Although good effects of the Plasma-Activated-Medium (PAM) such as the selective antitumor effect and killing effect for the anticancer agent resistant cells were reported, a mechanism of this effect has not been still clarified yet. In this study, we have investigated a contribution of the reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS) generated in PAM such as hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. Those species generated in the PAM quantitatively measured by light absorbance of commercial regent. Moreover, viable cell count after cell culture with those RNOS intentionally added medium or PAM were also measured by MTS assay. Our NEAPP source generated hydrogen peroxide and nitrite with the generation ratio of 0.35 μM/s and 9.8 μM/s. In those RNOS, hydrogen peroxide has respective antitumor effect. On the other hands, nitrite has no antitumor effect singly. But, synergistically enhance the antitumor effect of hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, this effect of those RNOS also contribute for the selectively cancer killing effect of PAM.

  16. Integrating landfill bioreactors, partial nitritation and anammox process for methane recovery and nitrogen removal from leachate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Faqian; Su, Xiaomei; Kang, Tingting; Wu, Songwei; Yuan, Mengdong; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Xiayun; Xu, Fang; Wu, Weixiang

    2016-06-01

    A new process consisting of a landfill bioreactor, partial-nitritation (PN) and the anammox process has been developed for landfill leachate treatment. In this study, the landfill bioreactor exhibited excellent performance in methane-rich biogas recovery, with a specific biogas yield of 0.47 L gas g‑1 COD and methane percentages of 53–76%. PN was achieved in the aerobic reactor by high free ammonia (101 ± 83 mg NH3 L‑1) inhibition for nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and the desired PN effluent composition (effluent nitrite: ammonium ratio of 1.1 ± 0.3) was controlled by adjusting the alkalinity concentration per unit of ammonium oxidized to approximately 14.3 mg CaCO3 mg‑1 N in the influent. The startup of anammox process was successfully achieved with a membrane bioreactor in 160 d, and a maximum nitrogen removal rate of 216 mg N L‑1 d‑1 was attained for real landfill leachate treatment. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction results confirmed that the cell-specific anammox activity was approximately 68–95 fmol N cell‑1 d‑1, which finally led to the stable operation of the system.

  17. Evaluation of Nitrate and Nitrite Reduction Kinetics Related to Liquid-Air-Interface Corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid-air interface (LAI) corrosion has been a concern for causing leaks in the carbon steel tanks used for holding high-level radioactive liquid waste. To assist in understanding the mechanism of LAI corrosion, the kinetics of nitrate and nitrite reduction reactions were investigated electrochemically. Cyclic voltammetry and cathodic polarization measurements indicated that the nitrite reduction reaction exhibited faster kinetics than the nitrate reduction reaction at higher cathodic overpotential. However, the primary reduction reaction at the open circuit potential under aerated conditions was the oxygen reduction reaction. The reduction of residual oxygen was also the dominant cathodic reaction at open circuit potential in deaerated conditions. Moreover, the kinetics of oxygen reduction on steel electrodes were significantly influenced by the sample immersion conditions (partial vs. full) for aerated liquid nuclear waste simulants, but not for deaerated conditions. Lastly, the gaseous products formed during LAI corrosion were analyzed using the gas detector tube method and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and found to contain NH3, NO2 and NO. However, the results suggested that these products were caused by the local acidification generated by the hydrolysis of cations after LAI corrosion underwent extensive propagation, instead of being directly reduced in alkaline conditions. Thus, the results in this work showed that the kinetics of nitrate and nitrite reduction could not generate a salt concentration cell in the meniscus region to cause LAI corrosion

  18. Researches concerning nitrates and nitrites accumulation in kohlrabi in the west side of Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica NEGREA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we followed the monitoring of nitrate and nitrite content in kohlrabi after the administration of organic and mineral fertilizers in different doses. Kohlrabi samples (GIGANT hybride for the analysis have been taken from an experimental field established in Mosnita, near Timisoara. In the experimental field to kohlrabi have been administrated three doses of synthetic fertilisers NPK N0P0K0 N30P30K30, (200 kg/ha NPK N60P60K60 (400 kg/ha NPK and N120P60K60 (400 kg/ha NPK + 180 kg/ha ammonium nitrogen and one dose of organic fertilisers (organic compost - 30 t/ha.The nitrate and nitrite content in kohlrabi was done from aqueous solution after spectrophotometric detection using the rapid tests AQUA MERCK and the Spectrophotometer SQ 118 at a wavelength of 515 and 525 nm for nitrate and nitrites. The experimental results show that the nitrate content, in samples taken from the Timis County we registered values above maximum limit allowed for kohlrabi. The highest nitrate content (2180 ppm was registered to variant V4 where the used mineral fertiliser dose was N120P60K60. This excessive accumulation appears because of the high nitrogen content N120 applied to this variant.

  19. Stable partial nitritation for low-strength wastewater at low temperature in an aerobic granular reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isanta, Eduardo; Reino, Clara; Carrera, Julián; Pérez, Julio

    2015-09-01

    Partial nitritation for a low-strength wastewater at low temperature was stably achieved in an aerobic granular reactor. A bench-scale granular sludge bioreactor was operated in continuous mode treating an influent of 70 mg N-NH4(+) L(-1) to mimic pretreated municipal nitrogenous wastewater and the temperature was progressively decreased from 30 to 12.5 °C. A suitable effluent nitrite to ammonium concentrations ratio to a subsequent anammox reactor was maintained stable during 300 days at 12.5 °C. The average applied nitrogen loading rate at 12.5 °C was 0.7 ± 0.3 g N L(-1) d(-1), with an effluent nitrate concentration of only 2.5 ± 0.7 mg N-NO3(-) L(-1). The biomass fraction of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in the granular sludge decreased from 19% to only 1% in 6 months of reactor operation at 12.5 °C. Nitrobacter spp. where found as the dominant NOB population, whereas Nitrospira spp. were not detected. Simulations indicated that: (i) NOB would only be effectively repressed when their oxygen half-saturation coefficient was higher than that of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria; and (ii) a lower specific growth rate of NOB was maintained at any point in the biofilm (even at 12.5 °C) due to the bulk ammonium concentration imposed through the control strategy. PMID:26001281

  20. A miniaturized fiber-optic colorimetric sensor for nitrite determination by coupling with a microfluidic capillary waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan; Wang, Cheng-Jie; Tao, Tao; Duan, Ming; Fang, Shen-Wen; Zheng, Min

    2016-05-01

    A microfluidic-capillary-waveguide-coupled fiber-optic sensor was developed for colorimetric determination of hazardous nitrite based on the Griess-Ilosvay reaction. The sensor was modularly designed by use of a light-emitting diode as the light source, silica fiber as the light transmission element, and a capillary waveguide tube as the light reaction flow cell. With the light interacting with the azo dye generated by the Griess-Ilosvay reaction between nitrite and Griess reagents, nitrite could be determined by a colorimetric method according to Beer's law. By use of the inexpensive and micro-sized elements mentioned above, the sensor provided a new low-cost and portable method for in situ and online measurement of nitrite. The sensor had a wide linear range for nitrite from 0.02 to 1.8 mg L(-1) and a low detection limit of 7 μg L(-1) (3σ), with a relative standard deviation of 0.37% (n = 10). With a low reagent demand of 200 μL, a short response time of 6.24 s, and excellent selectivity, the sensor is environmentally friendly and has been applied to nitrite determination in different water samples. The results were compared with those obtained by conventional spectrophotometry and ion chromatography, indicating the sensor's potential for practical applications. PMID:26939671

  1. Nitrites, nitrates and N-nitrosoamines in Estonian cured meat products: intake by Estonian children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinik, M; Tamme, T; Roasto, M; Juhkam, K; Jurtsenko, S; Tenńo, T; Kiis, A

    2005-11-01

    The contents of nitrate, nitrite and N-nitrosoamines in commercial cured meat products on the Estonian market were determined for 2000-01 and 2003-04 as part of the Estonian food safety monitoring programme and the Estonian Science Foundation grant research activities. The maximum permitted levels of residual nitrites and nitrates were not exceeded in the samples analysed. However, a great variation in the content of nitrate, nitrite and N-nitrosoamines was found for all the products. The concentrations of these compounds in domestic cured meat products showed a decrease from year to year. The mean intake of nitrate, nitrite and N-nitrosoamines by Estonian children (n=346) from cured meat products was calculated on the basis of individual intake data. The mean daily intake of nitrates was 1.7 mg, that of nitrites was 0.83 mg and that of N-nitrosoamines was 0.073 microg. In the 2000-01 study, the calculated nitrite intake exceeded the acceptable daily intake by up to 140% for 1-6-year-old children and up to 105% in 2003-04.

  2. The impact of nitrite and antioxidants on ultraviolet-A-induced cell death of human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opländer, Christian; Cortese, Miriam M; Korth, Hans-Gert; Kirsch, Michael; Mahotka, Csaba; Wetzel, Wiebke; Pallua, Norbert; Suschek, Christoph V

    2007-09-01

    Nitrite (NO(2)(-)) occurs ubiquitously in biological fluids such as blood and sweat. Ultraviolet A-induced nitric oxide formation via decomposition of cutaneous nitrite, accompanied by the production of reactive oxygen (ROS) or nitrogen species (RNS), represents an important source for NO in human skin physiology. Examining the impact of nitrite and the antioxidants glutathione (GSH), Trolox (TRL), and ascorbic acid (ASC) on UVA-induced toxicity of human skin fibroblasts (FB) we found that NO(2)(-) concentration-dependently enhances the susceptibility of FB to the toxic effects of UVA by a mechanism comprising enhanced induction of lipid peroxidation. While ASC completely protects FB cultures from UVA/NO(2)(-)-induced cell damage, GSH or TRL excessively enhances UVA/NO(2)(-)-induced cell death by a mechanism comprising nitrite concentration-dependent TRL radical formation or GSH-derived oxidative stress. Simultaneously, in the presence of GSH or TRL the mode of UVA/NO(2)(-)-induced cell death changes from apoptosis to necrosis. In summary, during photodecomposition of nitrite, ROS or RNS formation may act as strong toxic insults. Although inhibition of oxidative stress by NO and other antioxidants represents a successful strategy for protection from UVA/NO(2)(-)-induced injuries, GSH and TRL may nitrite-dependently aggravate the injurious impact by TRL or GSH radical formation, respectively.

  3. An observational prospective study of topical acidified nitrite for killing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in contaminated wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson Gail P

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endogenous nitric oxide (NO kills bacteria and other organisms as part of the innate immune response. When nitrite is exposed to low pH, NO is generated and has been used as an NO delivery system to treat skin infections. We demonstrated eradication of MRSA carriage from wounds using a topical formulation of citric acid (4.5% and sodium nitrite (3% creams co-applied for 5 days to 15 wounds in an observational prospective pilot study of 8 patients. Findings Following treatment with topical citric acid and sodium nitrite, 9 of 15 wounds (60% and 3 of 8 patients (37% were cleared of infection. MRSA isolates from these patients were all sensitive to acidified nitrite in vitro compared to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus and a reference strain of MRSA. Conclusions Nitric oxide and acidified nitrite offer a novel therapy for control of MRSA in wounds. Wounds that were not cleared of infection may have been re-contaminated or the bioavailability of acidified nitrite impaired by local factors in the tissue.

  4. HONO and its potential source particulate nitrite at an urban site in North China during the cold season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwei; Wen, Liang; Xu, Caihong; Chen, Jianmin; Wang, Xinfeng; Yang, Lingxiao; Wang, Wenxing; Yang, Xue; Sui, Xiao; Yao, Lan; Zhang, Qingzhu

    2015-12-15

    Characteristics and transformation of nitrous acid (HONO) and particulate nitrite were investigated with high time-resolution field measurements at an urban site in Ji'nan, China from Nov. 2013 to Jan. 2014. During the sampling period, averages of 0.35ppbv HONO and 2.08μgm(-3) fine particulate nitrite were observed. HONO and particulate nitrite exhibited similar diurnal variation patterns but differed in the time at which concentration peaks and valleys occurred. Elevated nocturnal HONO concentration peaks were mainly associated with primary emissions from vehicle exhaust and secondary formation via heterogeneous reactions of NO2. In fresh air masses dominated by vehicle emissions, the average HONO/NOx ratio was 0.58%. The nocturnal heterogeneous reactions of NO2 contributed to about half of the elevated HONO concentration peaks, with the conversion rates in the range of 0.05% to 0.96%h(-1). Meanwhile, a large amount of particulate nitrite, which greatly exceeded the concentration of the gas-phase HONO, was also produced through the heterogeneous reactions of NO2. The large yields of particulate nitrite were facilitated by abundant ammonia and particulate cations in urban Ji'nan. Notably, in the daytime, particulate nitrite acted as a potential source of HONO, especially in conditions of low humidity and acidic aerosols, which possibly has subsequent effects on photochemistry in the boundary layer. PMID:26298252

  5. Gibberellic acid nitrite stimulates germination of two species of light-requiring seeds via the nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Vladan; Giba, Zlatko; Djoković, Dejan; Milosavljević, Slobodan; Grubisić, Dragoljub; Konjević, Radomir

    2005-06-01

    We used two species of light-requiring seeds, Paulownia tomentosa, which have absolute light requirement (no germination in darkness), and Stellaria media seeds, which germinate in darkness to a certain extent because of presence of preformed active phytochrome, to obtain results strongly suggesting that gibberellic acid nitrite stimulates seed germination via its capability as a functional NO donor. Exogenous application of gibberellic acid nitrite stimulates gibberellin-insensitive Stellaria media seed germination in darkness as do a wide variety of NO donors. Pure gibberellic acid could replace the light requirement of P. tomentosa seeds, thus enabling them to germinate in darkness. Gibberellic acid nitrite did not have this effect. A stimulative effect from gibberellic acid nitrite could be detected only after exposure of these seeds to short, 10 min, pulse of red light. Taken together, these results suggest that gibberellic activity of gibberellic acid nitrite is lost after nitrosation but, regarding to the presence of -O-NO moiety in the molecule, gibberellic acid nitrite shares stimulative properties in seed germination with other compounds with NO-releasing properties. PMID:16154981

  6. Mechanism of pitting corrosion prevention by nitrite in carbon steel exposed to dilute salt solutions. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The overall goal of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the role of nitrite in preventing the breakdown of protective oxide(s) on carbon steel and the onset of pitting. Pitting corrosion of carbon steel exposed to dilute alkaline salt solutions can be induced by nitrate, sulfate, and chloride ions and is prevented by sufficient concentration of nitrite. A significant example of this material/electrolyte system is the storage and processing of DOE''s high-level radioactive liquid waste in carbon steel tanks. Added nitrite in the waste has a considerable downstream impact on the immobilization of the waste in a stable glass form. Waste tank integrity and glass production efficiency may benefit from the fundamental understanding of nitrite''s role in preventing pitting. This report summarizes progress after approximately six months of effort in this three-year EMSP project. Initial experimental and theoretical work has focused on the electrochemical behavior of carbon steel in simplified non-radioactive solutions that simulate complex dilute radioactive waste solutions. These solutions contain corrosion-inducing species such as nitrate and chloride and the corrosion-inhibiting nitrite at moderately alkaline pHs. The electrochemical behavior of interest here is that of the open-circuit potential of the steel specimen at equilibrium in the experimental electrolyte and the measures of the steel''s passivity and passivity breakdown.'

  7. Hemi-ordered nanoporous carbon electrode material for highly selective determination of nitrite in physiological and environmental systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemi-ordered nanoporous carbon (HONC) was obtained from a mesoporous silica template through a nano-replication method using furfuryl alcohol as the carbon source. The structure and morphology of HONC were characterized and analyzed in detail by X-ray diffraction, N2-sorption, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. HONC was then demonstrated as active electrode material for selective determination of nitrite in either physiological or environmental system. Well separated oxidation peaks of ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid and nitrite were observed in physiological system, and simultaneous discrimination of catechol, hydroquinone, resorcinol and nitrite in environmental system was also accomplished. Distinctly improved performances for selective determination of nitrite (such as significantly fast and sensitive current response with especially high selectivity) coexisted with ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid in the physiological system, as well as with catechol, hydroquinone and resorcinol in the environmental system were achieved at HONC electrode material. The excellent discriminating ability and high selectivity for NO2− determination were ascribed to the good electronic conductivity, unique hemi-ordered porous structure, large surface area and large number of edge plane defect sites contained on the surface of nanopore walls of HONC. Results in this work demonstrated that HONC is one of the promising catalytic electrode materials for nitrite sensor fabrication. - Highlights: • Hemi-ordered nanoporous carbon as an active electrode material • Good discriminating ability towards NO2− from physiological or environmental system • Highly selective determination of nitrite with fast and sensitive current response

  8. Effects of nitrite exposure on functional haemoglobin levels, bimodal respiration, and swimming performance in the facultative air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, Sjannie, E-mail: sjannie.lefevre@biology.au.dk [Zoophysiology, Department of Biological Sciences, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Jensen, Frank B. [Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Huong, Do.T.T. [College of Aquaculture and Fisheries, Can Tho University, Can Tho City (Viet Nam); Wang, Tobias [Zoophysiology, Department of Biological Sciences, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Phuong, Nguyen T. [College of Aquaculture and Fisheries, Can Tho University, Can Tho City (Viet Nam); Bayley, Mark [Zoophysiology, Department of Biological Sciences, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2011-07-15

    In this study we investigated nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) effects in striped catfish, a facultative air-breather. Fish were exposed to 0, 0.4, and 0.9 mM nitrite for 0, 1, 2, 4, and 7 days, and levels of functional haemoglobin, methaemoglobin (metHb) and nitrosyl haemoglobin (HbNO) were assessed using spectral deconvolution. Plasma concentrations of nitrite, nitrate, chloride, potassium, and sodium were also measured. Partitioning of oxygen consumption was determined to reveal whether elevated metHb (causing functional hypoxia) induced air-breathing. The effects of nitrite on maximum oxygen uptake (MO{sub 2max}) and critical swimming speed (U{sub crit}) were also assessed. Striped catfish was highly tolerant to nitrite exposure, as reflected by a 96 h LC{sub 50} of 1.65 mM and a moderate nitrite uptake into the blood. Plasma levels of nitrite reached a maximum after 1 day of exposure, and then decreased, never exceeding ambient levels. MetHb, HbNO and nitrate (a nitrite detoxification product) also peaked after 1 day and then decreased. Only high levels of nitrite and metHb caused reductions in MO{sub 2max} and U{sub crit}. The response of striped catfish contrasts with that seen in most other fish species and discloses efficient mechanisms of combating nitrite threats. Furthermore, even though striped catfish is an efficient air-breather, this species has the ability to sustain aerobic scope and swimming performance without air-breathing, even when faced with nitrite-induced reductions in blood oxygen carrying capacity. Our study is the first to confirm that high levels of nitrite and metHb reduce MO{sub 2max} and thereby aerobic scope, while more moderate elevations fail to do so. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the low nitrite accumulation in striped catfish.

  9. Effects of nitrite exposure on functional haemoglobin levels, bimodal respiration, and swimming performance in the facultative air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we investigated nitrite (NO2-) effects in striped catfish, a facultative air-breather. Fish were exposed to 0, 0.4, and 0.9 mM nitrite for 0, 1, 2, 4, and 7 days, and levels of functional haemoglobin, methaemoglobin (metHb) and nitrosyl haemoglobin (HbNO) were assessed using spectral deconvolution. Plasma concentrations of nitrite, nitrate, chloride, potassium, and sodium were also measured. Partitioning of oxygen consumption was determined to reveal whether elevated metHb (causing functional hypoxia) induced air-breathing. The effects of nitrite on maximum oxygen uptake (MO2max) and critical swimming speed (Ucrit) were also assessed. Striped catfish was highly tolerant to nitrite exposure, as reflected by a 96 h LC50 of 1.65 mM and a moderate nitrite uptake into the blood. Plasma levels of nitrite reached a maximum after 1 day of exposure, and then decreased, never exceeding ambient levels. MetHb, HbNO and nitrate (a nitrite detoxification product) also peaked after 1 day and then decreased. Only high levels of nitrite and metHb caused reductions in MO2max and Ucrit. The response of striped catfish contrasts with that seen in most other fish species and discloses efficient mechanisms of combating nitrite threats. Furthermore, even though striped catfish is an efficient air-breather, this species has the ability to sustain aerobic scope and swimming performance without air-breathing, even when faced with nitrite-induced reductions in blood oxygen carrying capacity. Our study is the first to confirm that high levels of nitrite and metHb reduce MO2max and thereby aerobic scope, while more moderate elevations fail to do so. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the low nitrite accumulation in striped catfish.

  10. Relevance of nitrate and nitrite in dry-cured ham and their effects on aroma development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores, Mónica

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Potassium and sodium salts of nitrite (E 249 and E 250 and nitrate (E 251 and E 252 are authorised for use under certain levels in several foodstuffs such as non-heat-treated, cured and dried meat products, other cured meat products, canned meat products and bacon. The key point in the use of nitrate and nitrite as preservatives is to find a balance between ensuring the microbiological safety of the ham and keeping as low as possible the level of nitrosamines in the final product. Nitrites and nitrates are authorised as additives for dry-cured ham in the Directive 2006/52/EC of 5 July 2006 that modifies previous Council Directive 95/2/EC on food additives other than colours and sweeteners. The effect of nitrate and its reduction to nitrite in controlling the lipid oxidation process during the ham ripening is very important for the development of the characteristic cured flavour. The main benefits and drawbacks of the use of nitrites and nitrates in dry-cured ham and how these levels may affect its flavour are discussed in this manuscript.Las sales sódica y potásica del nitrito (E249 y E250 y del nitrato (E251 y E252 están autorizados para su uso en los productos cárnicos, secos, curados y no tratados por el calor, otros productos cárnicos curados, productos cárnicos enlatados y bacon. El punto esencial en el uso de nitrato y nitrito como conservantes consiste en encontrar un balance entre el aseguramiento de la seguridad microbiológica del jamón y mantener el nivel de nitrosaminas tan bajo como sea posible. Los nitratos y nitritos están autorizados como aditivos en el jamón curado según la Directiva Europea 2006/52/EC de 5 de Julio de 2006 que modificaba la previa Directiva Europea 95/2/EC de aditivos alimentarios distintos a los colorantes y edulcorantes. El efecto del nitrato y su reducción a nitrito para controlar la oxidación de los lípidos durante la maduración del jamón es muy importante para el desarrollo del caracter

  11. Metabolic fates and effects of nitrite in brown trout under normoxic and hypoxic conditions: blood and tissue nitrite metabolism and interactions with branchial NOS, Na+/K+-ATPase and hsp70 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Gerber, Lucie; Hansen, Marie Niemann;

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite secures essential nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in hypoxia at low endogenous concentrations, whereas it becomes toxic at high concentrations. We exposed brown trout to normoxic and hypoxic water in the absence and presence of added ambient nitrite to decipher the cellular metabolism and...... were higher in hypoxia than normoxia, suggesting increased NOS activity. Nitrite exposure strongly elevated nitrite concentrations in plasma, erythrocytes, heart tissue and white muscle, which was associated with an extensive metabolism of nitrite to nitrate and to iron-nitrosylated and S...

  12. Effect of sodium nitrite on ischaemia and reperfusion-induced arrhythmias in anaesthetized dogs: is protein S-nitrosylation involved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Kovács

    Full Text Available To provide evidence for the protective role of inorganic nitrite against acute ischaemia and reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias in a large animal model.Dogs, anaesthetized with chloralose and urethane, were administered intravenously with sodium nitrite (0.2 µmol kg(-1 min(-1 in two protocols. In protocol 1 nitrite was infused 10 min prior to and during a 25 min occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD coronary artery (NaNO2-PO; n = 14, whereas in protocol 2 the infusion was started 10 min prior to reperfusion of the occluded vessel (NaNO2-PR; n = 12. Control dogs (n = 15 were infused with saline and subjected to the same period of ischaemia and reperfusion. Severities of ischaemia and ventricular arrhythmias, as well as changes in plasma nitrate/nitrite (NOx levels in the coronary sinus blood, were assessed throughout the experiment. Myocardial superoxide and nitrotyrosine (NT levels were determined during reperfusion. Changes in protein S-nitrosylation (SNO and S-glutathionylation were also examined.Compared with controls, sodium nitrite administered either pre-occlusion or pre-reperfusion markedly suppressed the number and severity of ventricular arrhythmias during occlusion and increased survival (0% vs. 50 and 92% upon reperfusion. There were also significant decreases in superoxide and NT levels in the nitrite treated dogs. Compared with controls, increased SNO was found only in NaNO2-PR dogs, whereas S-glutathionylation occurred primarily in NaNO2-PO dogs.Intravenous infusion of nitrite profoundly reduced the severity of ventricular arrhythmias resulting from acute ischaemia and reperfusion in anaesthetized dogs. This effect, among several others, may result from an NO-mediated reduction in oxidative stress, perhaps through protein SNO and/or S-glutathionylation.

  13. Nitrite and Nitrate Levels of Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Saliva in Subjects with Gingivitis and Chronic Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Orkun Topcu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Nitrosative stress plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. The aim of this study is to analyze the gingival crevicular fluid and saliva nitrite and nitrate levels in periodontally healthy and diseased sites. Material and Methods: A total of 60 individuals including, 20 chronic periodontitis and 20 gingivitis patients and 20 periodontally healthy controls participated in the present study. Probing depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, gingival index and plaque index were assessed, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF and saliva samples were obtained from the subjects, including 480 GCF samples and 60 unstimulated whole saliva samples. Nitrite and nitrate were analyzed by Griess reagent. Results: Total GCF nitrite levels were higher in gingivitis and periodontitis groups (1.07 [SD 0.62] nmol and 1.08 [SD 0.59] nmol than the control group (0.83 [SD 0.31] nmol (P 0.05. The difference in GCF nitrate level was not significant among the control, gingivitis and periodontitis groups (7.7 [SD 2.71] nmol, 7.51 [SD 4.16] nmol and 7.38 [SD 1.91] nmol. Saliva nitrite and nitrate levels did not differ significantly among three study groups. Saliva nitrate/nitrite ratios were higher in periodontitis and gingivitis groups than the control group. A gradual decrease in nitrate/nitrite ratio in GCF was detected with the presence of inflammation. Conclusions: It may be suggested that nitrite in gingival crevicular fluid is a better periodontal disease marker than nitrate and may be used as an early detection marker of periodontal inflammation, and that local nitrosative stress markers don’t show significant difference between the initial and advanced stages of periodontal disease.

  14. Nitrogen and Oxygen Regulation of Bacillus subtilis nasDEF Encoding NADH-Dependent Nitrite Reductase by TnrA and ResDE

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Michiko M.; Hoffmann, Tamara; Zhu, Yi; Jahn, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    The nitrate and nitrite reductases of Bacillus subtilis have two different physiological functions. Under conditions of nitrogen limitation, these enzymes catalyze the reduction of nitrate via nitrite to ammonia for the anabolic incorporation of nitrogen into biomolecules. They also function catabolically in anaerobic respiration, which involves the use of nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors. Two distinct nitrate reductases, encoded by narGHI and nasBC, function in anabolic and...

  15. Penetapan Kadar Nitrit dan Nitrat dalam Kornet Daging Sapi dan Daging Sapi Burger pada Beberapa Supermarket di Kota Medan Secara Spektrofotometri Sinar Tampak

    OpenAIRE

    Harefa, Erlinawatisari

    2016-01-01

    Nitrite and nitrate in the permitted number, added in meat processing to inhibit growth of the bacteria Clostridium botulinum, maintain the red color of meat to appear attractive, as well as forming taste. But nitrite and nitrate can undergo changes during processing and storage, and can react with alkyl amines to form nitrosamines which are karsiogenik.Limit used of nitrite 125mg/kg (meat manufactured and meat preserving have maximum limit 500mg/kg. the purpose of this rese...

  16. Structures of genes nasA and nasB, encoding assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, J. T.; Goldman, B. S.; Stewart, V

    1993-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources during aerobic growth. Assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases convert nitrate through nitrite to ammonium. We report here the molecular cloning of the nasA and nasB genes, which encode assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductase, respectively. These genes are tightly linked and probably form a nasBA operon. In vivo protein expression and DNA sequence analysis revealed that the nasA and nasB genes encode 92- and 104...

  17. Effect of sodium lactate /sodium diacetate in combination with sodium nitrite on physiochemical, microbial properties and sensory evaluation of cow sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Sedghi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sodium nitrite has been always considered as one of the common additives due to its antibacterial effects on Clostridium botulinum and meat products' color, however it produces cancer creating nitrosamine. Recently, organic acids and their salts such as lactates have been employed as antimicrobial compounds. Lactates also improve organileptic properties including color, texture and taste and antioxidant properties. Sodium lactate causes to more reduction of anaerobic spore former bacteria than nitrite, inhibits botulin produced by Clostridium botulinum. Sodium lactate produces a permanent reddish pink color through reduction of deoxymygloboline and producing deoxymyoglobuline. In this study, the decrease of sodium nitrite amount from 120ppm to 15ppm by adding sodium lactate / sodium diacetate led to achieve an acceptable product. The best results revealed through adding 3.0625% of sodium lactate / sodium diacetate in combination with 30ppm sodium nitrite. Results also exhibited more reduction of pathogens' growth than nitrite, enhanced flavor slightly, but unable to produce reddish pink color as produced by nitrite. Results also exhibited that sodium lactate / diacetate cause to retard in microbial growth, reducing chemical change, enhance sensory properties, partially improvement in taste and texture. Although inappropriate color demonstrated sodium lactate / diacetate's inability in red pink color production in 4th sample (contains 15 ppm nitrite, its synergy effect in combination with sodium nitrite on nitroso myoglobuline production has been proven, led to sodium nitrite reduction in sausages.

  18. Serial crystallography captures enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase at atomic resolution from one crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrell, Sam; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Eady, Robert R; Hasnain, S Samar; Hough, Michael A; Strange, Richard W

    2016-07-01

    Relating individual protein crystal structures to an enzyme mechanism remains a major and challenging goal for structural biology. Serial crystallography using multiple crystals has recently been reported in both synchrotron-radiation and X-ray free-electron laser experiments. In this work, serial crystallography was used to obtain multiple structures serially from one crystal (MSOX) to study in crystallo enzyme catalysis. Rapid, shutterless X-ray detector technology on a synchrotron MX beamline was exploited to perform low-dose serial crystallography on a single copper nitrite reductase crystal, which survived long enough for 45 consecutive 100 K X-ray structures to be collected at 1.07-1.62 Å resolution, all sampled from the same crystal volume. This serial crystallography approach revealed the gradual conversion of the substrate bound at the catalytic type 2 Cu centre from nitrite to nitric oxide, following reduction of the type 1 Cu electron-transfer centre by X-ray-generated solvated electrons. Significant, well defined structural rearrangements in the active site are evident in the series as the enzyme moves through its catalytic cycle, namely nitrite reduction, which is a vital step in the global denitrification process. It is proposed that such a serial crystallography approach is widely applicable for studying any redox or electron-driven enzyme reactions from a single protein crystal. It can provide a 'catalytic reaction movie' highlighting the structural changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. The anticipated developments in the automation of data analysis and modelling are likely to allow seamless and near-real-time analysis of such data on-site at some of the powerful synchrotron crystallographic beamlines.

  19. Serial crystallography captures enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase at atomic resolution from one crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Horrell

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Relating individual protein crystal structures to an enzyme mechanism remains a major and challenging goal for structural biology. Serial crystallography using multiple crystals has recently been reported in both synchrotron-radiation and X-ray free-electron laser experiments. In this work, serial crystallography was used to obtain multiple structures serially from one crystal (MSOX to study in crystallo enzyme catalysis. Rapid, shutterless X-ray detector technology on a synchrotron MX beamline was exploited to perform low-dose serial crystallography on a single copper nitrite reductase crystal, which survived long enough for 45 consecutive 100 K X-ray structures to be collected at 1.07–1.62 Å resolution, all sampled from the same crystal volume. This serial crystallography approach revealed the gradual conversion of the substrate bound at the catalytic type 2 Cu centre from nitrite to nitric oxide, following reduction of the type 1 Cu electron-transfer centre by X-ray-generated solvated electrons. Significant, well defined structural rearrangements in the active site are evident in the series as the enzyme moves through its catalytic cycle, namely nitrite reduction, which is a vital step in the global denitrification process. It is proposed that such a serial crystallography approach is widely applicable for studying any redox or electron-driven enzyme reactions from a single protein crystal. It can provide a `catalytic reaction movie' highlighting the structural changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. The anticipated developments in the automation of data analysis and modelling are likely to allow seamless and near-real-time analysis of such data on-site at some of the powerful synchrotron crystallographic beamlines.

  20. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation from formic acid in nitrite-containing simulated nuclear waste media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed by the U.S. Department of Energy to immobilize high-level nuclear waste. Simulants for the HWVP feed containing the major nonradioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO32-, NO3- and NO2- were used as media to evaluate the stability of formic acid towards hydrogen evolution by the reaction HCO2H→H2+/CO2 catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Small-scale experiments using 40-50 mL of feed simulant in closed glass reactors (250-550 mL total volume) at 80-100 degree C were used to study the effect of nitrite and nitrate ion on the catalytic activities of the noble metals for formic acid decomposition. Reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO2, H2, NO, and N2O in the gas phase as a function of time. Rhodium, which was introduced as soluble RhCl3.3H2O, was found to be the most active catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid above nearly 80 degree C in the presence of nitrite ion in accord with earlier observations. The apparent homogeneous nature of the nitrite-promoted Rh-catalyzed formic acid decomposition is consistent with the approximate pseudo-first-order dependence of the hydrogen production rate on Rh concentration. 24 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Serial crystallography captures enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase at atomic resolution from one crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrell, Sam; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Eady, Robert R; Hasnain, S Samar; Hough, Michael A; Strange, Richard W

    2016-07-01

    Relating individual protein crystal structures to an enzyme mechanism remains a major and challenging goal for structural biology. Serial crystallography using multiple crystals has recently been reported in both synchrotron-radiation and X-ray free-electron laser experiments. In this work, serial crystallography was used to obtain multiple structures serially from one crystal (MSOX) to study in crystallo enzyme catalysis. Rapid, shutterless X-ray detector technology on a synchrotron MX beamline was exploited to perform low-dose serial crystallography on a single copper nitrite reductase crystal, which survived long enough for 45 consecutive 100 K X-ray structures to be collected at 1.07-1.62 Å resolution, all sampled from the same crystal volume. This serial crystallography approach revealed the gradual conversion of the substrate bound at the catalytic type 2 Cu centre from nitrite to nitric oxide, following reduction of the type 1 Cu electron-transfer centre by X-ray-generated solvated electrons. Significant, well defined structural rearrangements in the active site are evident in the series as the enzyme moves through its catalytic cycle, namely nitrite reduction, which is a vital step in the global denitrification process. It is proposed that such a serial crystallography approach is widely applicable for studying any redox or electron-driven enzyme reactions from a single protein crystal. It can provide a 'catalytic reaction movie' highlighting the structural changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. The anticipated developments in the automation of data analysis and modelling are likely to allow seamless and near-real-time analysis of such data on-site at some of the powerful synchrotron crystallographic beamlines. PMID:27437114

  2. Simultaneous electricity generation and pollutant removal in microbial fuel cell with denitrifying biocathode over nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An MFC was successfully started up using nitrite as cathodic electron acceptor. • The optimal HRT was deemed to be 8 h in this study. • The suitable temperature for power generation was found to be 20 °C. • The suitable temperature for pollutant removal was found to be 25 °C. • Free buffer led to 50% decrease of TN removal rate and power generation. - Abstract: The influences of hydraulic retention time, temperature and free buffer on the performance of short-cut denitrifying microbial fuel cell were investigated after it was successfully started up using nitrite as the cathodic electron acceptor. The results revealed that a power density of 8.3 ± 0.5 W m−3 NC was obtained after 15 days operation. The desirable hydraulic retention time was found in this study to be 8 h, with a COD removal rate of 2.117 ± 0.006 kg m−3 NC d−1 and a total nitrogen removal rate of 0.041 ± 0.002 kg m−3 NC d−1, respectively. It demonstrated that temperature had different effects on the electricity generation and pollutant removal performance of microbial fuel cell. The suitable temperature for power generation and pollutant removal was found to be 20 °C and 25 °C, respectively. Free buffer led to 50% decrease of both total nitrogen removal rate and power density of microbial fuel cell compared to that with phosphate buffer solution addition. The optimal total nitrogen removal rate obtained in the case with sodium azide addition (0.075 ± 0.008 kg m−3 NC d−1) increased by 50% as compared to that without sodium azide addition. It suggested that abolishing oxygen or inhibiting nitrite oxidizing bacteria would favor nitrogen removal

  3. Electrocatalytic Activity of Carbonized Nanostructured Polyanilines for Oxidation Reactions: Sensing of Nitrite Ions and Ascorbic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbonized PANIs prepared from various nanostructured PANI precursors • Electroanalytical performances of carbonized PANIs evaluated using voltammetry • Study of carbonized PANIs physico-chemical properties related to electroactivity • The lowest over-potential for NO2− oxidation at c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE) • The lowest over-potential for ascorbic acid oxidation at both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA - Abstract: A comparative study of the electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-containing carbon nanomaterials, prepared by the carbonization of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) salts, for the electrooxidation reactions is presented. Nanostructured PANI salts were synthesized by the oxidative polymerization of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate in an aqueous solution in the presence of 5-sulfosalicylic acid (PANI-SSA), 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (PANI-DNSA) as well as without added acid (PANI), and subsequently carbonized to c-PANI-SSA, c-PANI-DNSA and c-PANI, respectively. Glassy carbon tip was modified with nanostructured c-PANIs and used for the investigation of sensing of nitrite and ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions as model analytes by linear sweep voltammetry. All three types of the investigated c-PANIs gave excellent response to the nitrite ions and ascorbic acid electrooxidation. The lowest peak potential for nitrite ion oxidation exhibited c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE), and for ascorbic acid oxidation both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA (ca. + 0.13 V vs. SCE). Electrochemical data were correlated with structural and textural data obtained by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental and nitrogen sorption analysis

  4. Denitrification of high concentrations of nitrites and nitrates in synthetic medium with different sources of organic carbon. III. Methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyk, M; Gałka, E; Sakowicz, E; Mycielski, R

    1985-01-01

    The denitrification of nitrites and nitrates (1000 mg N/l) in medium containing methanol as a source of organic carbon was studied. Continuous cultures of mixed population of autochtonic microflora from bottom sludge of nitrogenous wastewater reservoir were set up in a chemostat-type column and packed bed reactor. The efficiency of denitrification of nitrates in packed bed reactor was 506.7 mg N/l/h whereas denitrification of nitrites was from 8.7 to 16.0 mg N/l/h depending on the granulation of the filing material. In the latter case 83% nitrogen was removed from the medium. One of the factors causing low efficiency of denitrification of nitrites is excessive alkalization of the medium in the bed. The use of a three-step bed with adjusted pH resulted in complete denitrification of nitrites with efficiency 60 mg N/l/h. The bacteria inside the bed were dominated by Paracoccus denitrificans and by Pseudomonas aeruginosa when nitrates were present. The sensitivity of P. denitrificans to high concentrations of nitrites seems to be the second factor contributing to low efficiency of denitrification with methanol as organic substrate. PMID:2412408

  5. Globin X is a six-coordinate globin that reduces nitrite to nitric oxide in fish red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Paola; Xue, Jianmin; Tejero, Jesús; Wajih, Nadeem; Sun, Ming; Stolz, Donna B; Tsang, Michael; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Gladwin, Mark T

    2016-07-26

    The discovery of novel globins in diverse organisms has stimulated intense interest in their evolved function, beyond oxygen binding. Globin X (GbX) is a protein found in fish, amphibians, and reptiles that diverged from a common ancestor of mammalian hemoglobins and myoglobins. Like mammalian neuroglobin, GbX was first designated as a neuronal globin in fish and exhibits six-coordinate heme geometry, suggesting a role in intracellular electron transfer reactions rather than oxygen binding. Here, we report that GbX to our knowledge is the first six-coordinate globin and the first globin protein apart from hemoglobin, found in vertebrate RBCs. GbX is present in fish erythrocytes and exhibits a nitrite reduction rate up to 200-fold faster than human hemoglobin and up to 50-fold higher than neuroglobin or cytoglobin. Deoxygenated GbX reduces nitrite to form nitric oxide (NO) and potently inhibits platelet activation in vitro, to a greater extent than hemoglobin. Fish RBCs also reduce nitrite to NO and inhibit platelet activation to a greater extent than human RBCs, whereas GbX knockdown inhibits this nitrite-dependent NO signaling. The description of a novel, six-coordinate globin in RBCs with dominant electron transfer and nitrite reduction functionality provides new insights into the evolved signaling properties of ancestral heme-globins. PMID:27407144

  6. The impact of influent total ammonium nitrogen concentration on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria inhibition in moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, Vojtech; Catrysse, Michael; Stryjova, Hana; Jonatova, Ivana; Volcke, Eveline I P; Svehla, Pavel; Bartacek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The application of nitrification-denitrification over nitrite (nitritation-denitritation) with municipal (i.e. diluted and cold (or low-temperature)) wastewater can substantially improve the energy balance of municipal wastewater treatment plants. For the accumulation of nitrite, it is crucial to inhibit nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) with simultaneous proliferation of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The present study describes the effect of the influent total ammonium nitrogen (TAN) concentration on AOB and NOB activity in two moving bed biofilm reactors operated as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) at 15 °C (SBR I) and 21 °C (SBR II). The reactors were fed with diluted reject water containing 600, 300, 150 and 75 mg TAN L(-1). The only factor limiting NOB activity in these reactors was the high concentrations of free ammonia and/or free nitrous acid (FNA) during the SBR cycles. Nitrite accumulation was observed with influents containing 600, 300 and 150 mg TAN L(-1) in SBR I and 600 and 300 in SBR II. Once nitrate production established in the reactors, the increase of influent TAN concentration up to the original 600 mg TAN L(-1) did not limit NOB activity. This was due to the massive development of NOB clusters throughout the biofilm that were able to cope with faster formation of FNA. The results of the fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis preliminarily showed the stratification of bacteria in the biofilm.

  7. Nucleotide/Tb³⁺ coordination polymer nanoparticles as luminescent sensor and scavenger for nitrite ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zewan; You, Qi; Chen, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Newly emerged metal organic coordination polymers have aroused the great interest in designing tailored functional materials. In this study, multiple functional components, luminescent Tb(3+) ion, nucleobase and antenna molecule, were integrated in a single material and prepared into a responsive nanoparticle for nitrite. The terbium coordination polymer nanoparticles made of this kind of material have the dual functions of recognition and transduction and obey a preset sensing mechanism without a post-functionalization of common materials. As the result of the tailored, the terbium coordination polymer nanoparticles are highly sensitive and selective to nitrite by means of Dexter energy transfer between Tb(3+) ion and nitrite, and can be used for the scavenger for nitrite in aqueous solution. The detection limit, dynamic range and removal capacity of U-Tb-OBBA CPNPs for nitrite are 0.3 µM, 0.3-470 µM and 4.44 mg per gram of particles, respectively. Metal organic coordination polymers show an attractive potential in constructing smart sensing materials.

  8. Electrocatalytic oxidation of nitrite using metal-free nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide nanosheets for sensitive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Jiang, Jingjing; Du, Xuezhong

    2016-08-01

    Nitrite can become poisonous to animals and human beings as it can lead to generation of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines. Metal-free nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (NrGO) exhibited a good electrocatalytic activity toward oxidation of nitrite with the relatively low oxidation potential of 0.68V (v.s. saturated calomel electrode), thus, a facile electrochemical sensor based on metal-free NrGO was fabricated for sensitive detection of nitrite for the first time. The novel sensor showed a wide linear concentration range from 0.5 to 5000μM and a low detection limit of 0.2μM at the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 with good selectivity, stability, and reproducibility. This fabricated sensor was used for the determination of nitrite in pickled garlic and river water. These results demonstrate that the facile metal-free NrGO-modified electrochemical sensor has promising applications for the determination of nitrite in food and environment. PMID:27216690

  9. Alternating nitrification-denitrification via nitrite for nitrogen removal from soybean wastewater by SBR with real-time control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-ying; GAO Da-wen; PENG Yong-zhen; WANG Peng; YANG Qing

    2004-01-01

    Anew treating technology for complete nitrogen removal from soybean wastewater with high nitrogen concentrations was studied. Nitrification-denitrification via nitrite was performed in three kinds of operation condition, i.e. nitrification-denitrification via nitrite under traditional SBR process, nitrification- denitrification via nitrite by alternating oxic/anoxic under fixed-time control and nitrification- denitrification via nitrite by alternating oxic/anoxic under on-line fuzzy control. As a result, nitrification-denitrification via nitrite by alternating oxic/anoxic under on-line fuzzy control was the best. It not only improve both nitrification and denitrification rates and decrease total reaction time, but also, save the amount of adding carbon source and alkalinity. Also real-time fuzzy control aeration and mixing time could shorten reaction time and save operation cost. So this method enhanced the efficiency and the stability of nitrogen removal together with, and made operation costs and construction invest to be reduced in the process of wastewater .

  10. Behavior of Staphylococcus aureus and autochthone microbiota in fresh sausages added of sodium nitrite and stored under refrigeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucyanne Maria Moraes Correia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Fresh sausages are cured meat products that may be contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus during the manufacturing procedure, which is frequently related with inadequate handling practices. The use of nitrite in meat products has proven efficacy against Clostridium botulinum, and studies indicate that bactericidal action against S. aureus depends on factors that are intrinsic and extrinsic to the product. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of nitrite concentration, and pH on S. aureus and psychrotrophic autochthone microbiota in fresh sausages stored at different times and temperatures. Fresh sausage were produced at nitrite concentrations 50, 150 and 200ppm and contaminated with S. aureus. The sausages were storage at refrigeration (7 and 12°C and the quantification of S. aureus and psychrotrophic microorganisms was carried out on days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 10. Results showed that nitrite concentrations and the temperatures used had minimal effect on the multiplication of S. aureus and psychrotrophic autochthone microbiota. Final counts depended only on the length of storage: at the end of 10 days, counts were statistically similar in the different groups, showing that temperature and nitrite concentrations used did not control microbial growth effectively. It is suggested that the product should be stored below 7°C or at freezing temperatures for greater microbiological stability

  11. NasFED proteins mediate assimilatory nitrate and nitrite transport in Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae) M5al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q; Stewart, V

    1998-03-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources. The enzymes required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. We report here the complete nasFED sequence. Sequence comparisons indicate that the nasFED genes encode components of a conventional periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein (NasF), a homodimeric intrinsic membrane protein (NasE), and a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein (NasD). The NasF protein and the related NrtA and CmpA proteins of cyanobacteria contain leader (signal) sequences with the double-arginine motif that is hypothesized to direct prefolded proteins to an alternate protein export pathway. The NasE protein and the related NrtB and CmpB proteins of cyanobacteria contain unusual variants of the EAA loop sequence that defines membrane-intrinsic proteins of ABC transporters. To characterize nitrate and nitrite transport, we constructed in-frame nonpolar deletions of the chromosomal nasFED genes. Growth tests coupled with nitrate and nitrite uptake assays revealed that the nasFED genes are essential for nitrate transport and participate in nitrite transport as well. Interestingly, the delta nasF strain exhibited leaky phenotypes, particularly at elevated nitrate concentrations, suggesting that the NasED proteins are not fully dependent on the NasF protein. PMID:9495773

  12. Z-Selective Ruthenium Metathesis Catalysts: Comparison of Nitrate and Nitrite X-type Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribisko, Melanie A.; Ahmed, Tonia S.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Two new Ru-based metathesis catalysts, 3 and 4, have been synthesized for the purpose of comparing their catalytic properties to those of their cis-selective nitrate analogues, 1 and 2. Although catalysts 3 and 4 exhibited slower initiation rates than 1 and 2, they maintained high cis-selectivity in homodimerization and ring-opening metathesis polymerization reactions. Furthermore, the nitrite catalysts displayed higher cis-selectivity than 2 for ring-opening metathesis polymerizations, and 4 delivered higher yields of polymer. PMID:25484484

  13. Using the Griess colorimetric nitrite assay for measuring aliphatic β-nitroalcohols

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Quan; Paik, David C

    2012-01-01

    Our recent studies suggest that aliphatic β-nitroalcohols (BNAs) may represent a useful class of compounds for topical therapeutic corneoscleral cross-linking agents. Thus, this study was undertaken in order to standardize a simple method for nitroalcohol quantitation based on a denitration step followed by colorimetric Griess nitrite assay. Conditions necessary for denitration included a pH of 7-9 and heating for 1 hour at 100°C. Standard curves for two mono-nitroalcohols (2-nitroethanol and...

  14. Imaging NO elimination in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of nitroalkanes and alkyl nitrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Ravin; Ariyasingha, Nuwandi M.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2016-02-01

    We present a DC slice imaging study of the decomposition of C2, C3 and C4 nitroalkanes and alkyl nitrites, focusing on the NO elimination channel, possibly a minor pathway. Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) is used to induce dissociation on the ground electronic state under collisionless conditions. The channels that produced NO as a product were studied and compared among the target molecules to gain a better understanding of the isomerization of the nitroalkanes prior to dissociation. Trends in the total translational energy and NO rotational temperatures obtained from the images are discussed.

  15. Effect of gamma radiation on residual nitrate and nitrite in some meat and chicken products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to establish the residual nitrate and nitrite and concentrations of six heavy metals in meat products samples that purchased from retail outlets in Sharkia governorate, Egypt. The possibility of using gamma irradiation at doses of 3, 5 and 7 KGy for reducing residual nitrate and nitrite was studied. The results showed that most of samples under investigation above the maximum permissible limit of nitrate in Egypt. Gamma irradiation at doses of 3, 5 and 7 KGy reduced the levels of nitrate and nitrite proportionally to applied doses. The irradiation dose of 7 KGy was more effective for reducing the level of residual nitrate and nitrite. Heavy metals concentrations were determined using the inductively coupled plasma spectrometry (ICPS) in non-irradiated samples. The results showed that the concentration of Pb in meat products was ranged between 0.643-0.828, 0.548, 0.598-0.844, 0.574-0.877, 0.324-0.568 and 0.156-0.432 mg/kg (wet weight basis) in pastirma, chicken luncheon, fresh sausages, burger, minced chicken and minced beef meat, respectively, but the values of Hg ranged between 0.0965-0.839, 0.121, 0.147-0.218, 0.114-0.258, 0.087-0.143 and 0.057-0.124 mg/kg in pastirma, chicken luncheon, fresh sausages, burger, minced chicken and beef meat, respectively. The content of iron ranged between 0.336, 0.362-4.284, 0.364-0.611, 0.264-0.336 and 0.276-0.314 mg/kg in chicken luncheon, fresh sausages, burger, minced chicken and beef meat, respectively. However, the results indicated that, the most of meat products under investigation had high concentrations from toxic metals of Pb and Hg than the permissible limits that recommended by FAO/WHO of person daily. Therefore, the consumption of high amount of these commodities dose not pose a health risk for the consumer

  16. Inter- and intra-specific variation on sensitivity of larval amphibians to nitrite

    OpenAIRE

    Shinn, C.; Marco, Adolfo; Serrano, L

    2008-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that nitrogen-based fertilizers may be contributing to the global amphibian decline. We have studied the impact of sodium nitrite on early aquatic stages of Epidalea calamita, Pelophylax perezi and Hyla meridionalis larvae from Doñana National Park (coastal wetland) and P. perezi from Gredos Mountain (high mountain ponds), exposed during 10 to 16 days. After 8 days of exposure all P. perezi larvae from Doñana presented 100% mortality at 5 mg l−1View the Math...

  17. Nitrite Treatment Rescues Cardiac Dysfunction in Aged Mice Treated with Conjugated Linoleic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Piell, Kellianne M.; Kelm, Natia Qipshidze; Caroway, Megan P.; Aman, Masarath; Cole, Marsha P.

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (cLA) is a commercially available weight loss supplement that is not currently regulated by the FDA. Numerous studies suggest that cLA mediates protection in diseases including cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis, immune function, and obesity. Based upon these reports, it was hypothesized that supplementation of cLA would improve heart function in aged wild-type (WT) mice. At 10 months of age, mice were treated with cLA, nitrite, or the combination of the two. Echocardi...

  18. Investigation of interaction between molybdenum and salicylic acid and resorcinol in the presence of sodium nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of spectrophotometry and ESR spectroscopy were used to investigate complexing in the molybdenum (5.6)-phenol (salicylic acid and resorcinol)-sodium nitrites ternary system. It is shown that Mo(6) only forms unstable complexes of the MoO2L(H2O)2+ composition with nitrosation products of calicylic acid and resorcinol (2-nitrosophenol and 2.4 dinitrosoresorcinol, L) and Mo(5) in the reaction process oxidizes to Mo(6). A limiting stage of Mo(6) complexing with resorcinol in the presence of NaNO2 is the formation of Mo(6) complex with 2.4- dnitrosoresorcinol as an intermediate product

  19. Nitrite reduction by a pyridinediimine complex with a proton-responsive secondary coordination sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yubin M; Delgado, Mayra; Zakharov, Lev N; Seda, Takele; Gilbertson, John D

    2016-09-21

    The proton-responsive pyridinediimine ligand, (DEA)PDI (where (DEA)PDI = [(2,6-(i)PrC6H3)(N[double bond, length as m-dash]CMe)(N(Et)2C2H4)(N[double bond, length as m-dash]CMe)C5H3N]) was utilized for the reduction of NO2(-) to NO. Nitrite reduction is facilitated by the protonated secondary coordination sphere coupled with the ligand-based redox-active sites of [Fe(H(DEA)PDI)(CO)2](+) and results in the formation of the {Fe(NO)2}(9) DNIC, [Fe((DEA)PDI)(NO)2](+).

  20. Nitrite- and Nitrate-Dependent Methanotrophs - Environmental Detection and Relevance in Freshwater Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettwig, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Humans continue to have an enormous impact on global C and N cycles. While a clear stimulation of methane emissions through human activities is evident, the role of also increasingly released nitrogenous compounds as electron acceptors for microbial methane oxidation is not well constrained. We have developed diverse methods for environmental detection of nitrate(NO3-)- and - predominantly - nitrite(NO2-)-dependent methanotrophs, which have been applied to several freshwater environments. In contrast to most metabolically flexible heterotrophic denitrifiers, the microorganisms responsible for methane-dependent nitrate/nitrite reduction seem to be specialized to use methane only, grow slowly and employ pathways different from each other and from model organisms, which necessitate new approaches for the assessment of their environmental relevance. Nitrite-dependent methane oxidation is carried out by bacteria of the NC10 phylum, whereas nitrate-dependent methane oxidizers are close relatives of methanogenic archaea and sulfate-dependent anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME-2). Laboratory enrichment cultures of the nitrite-reducing methanotroph Methylomirabilis oxyfera (NC10 phylum) have formed the basis for its genetic and physiological characterization and the development of several independent methods for its sensitive detection. M. oxyfera differs from all known microorganisms by encoding an incomplete denitrification pathway, in which the last 2 steps, the reduction of NO via N2O to N2, apparently is replaced by the dismutation of NO to N2 and O2. The intracellularly produced O2 is used for methane oxidation via a methane monooxygenase, analogously to the phylogenetically unrelated proteobacterial methanotrophs. But unlike in proteobacteria, C is not assimilated from methane, but rather CO2, with important consequences for the interpretation of environmental isotope labelling studies. In addition, M. oxyfera is characterized by a distinct PLFA profile, including

  1. Metal-mediated Multiporphyrin Arrays at Interfaces:Preparation, Electrochemistry, Catalytic Oxidation of Nitrite and NO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Manganese porphyrins have attracted growing interest because of their unique physical and chemical properties,such as mimicking the role of Mn complex in photosystem Ⅱ and acting as electrocatalysts towards the oxidation of nitric oxide and nitrite.As one of the bottom-up techniques,we are currently investigating the design,preparation and opto-electrochemical properties of metal-mediated multiporphyrin arrays on the solid surfaces.Because the porphyrins are connected by metal ions via coordin...

  2. Intake of nitrate and nitrite and the risk of gastric cancer: a prospective cohort study.

    OpenAIRE

    Loon, A.J.M. van; Botterweck, A.A.M.; Goldbohm, R. A.; Brants, H.A.M.; van Klaveren, J.D.; van den Brandt, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    The association between the intake of nitrate or nitrite and gastric cancer risk was investigated in a prospective cohort study started in 1986 in the Netherlands, of 120,852 men and women aged 55-69 years. At baseline, data on dietary intake, smoking habits and other covariates were collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire. For data analysis, a case-cohort approach was used, in which the person-years at risk were estimated from a randomly selected subcohort (1688 men and 1812 ...

  3. A simple low cost double beam spectrophotometer for colorimetric detection of nitrite in seawater

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Weidong; Mowlem, Matt; Kraft, Michael; Morgan, Hywel

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the optical detection system of a prototype nitrite sensor for seawater analysis. The sensor uses a colorimetric Griess reaction that produces an Azo dye with an absorption peak at 540 nm. A simple low-cost double beam spectrophotometer using a green light emitting diode (LED) light source, two integrated photo detectors and lock-in detection is described. A log-ratio amplifier is used to produce an output proportional to absorbance. The optical devices were mounted in a...

  4. Different responses to nitrate and nitrite by the model organism Escherichia coli and the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, R N; Cole, J A

    2006-02-01

    The ability of Escherichia coli to use both nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic growth is mediated by the dual-acting two-component regulatory systems NarX-NarL and NarQ-NarP. In contrast, Neisseria gonorrhoeae responds only to nitrite: it expresses only NarQ-NarP. We have shown that although N. gonorrhoeae NarQ can phosphorylate E. coli NarL and NarP, the N. gonorrhoeae NarP is unable to regulate gene expression in E. coli. Mutagenesis experiments have revealed residues in E. coli NarQ that are essential for nitrate and nitrite sensing. Chimaeric proteins revealed domains of NarQ that are important for ligand sensing.

  5. Nitrite residue and malonaldehyde reduction in dendeng--Indonesian dried meat--influenced by spices, curing methods and precooking preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryati, T; Astawan, M; Lioe, H N; Wresdiyati, T; Usmiati, S

    2014-03-01

    This research was conducted to reduce nitrite residue and malonaldehyde (MDA) content of dendeng through modifying the formulation of spices, curing technique and precooking preparation. The result showed that spiced fried dendeng was likely to contain high total phenolics and antioxidant activity. Wet cured dendeng combined with spices containing 2.0% coriander and 10.0% garlic and preparation by soaking before frying was effective to produce dendeng that had no detected nitrite residue and low MDA. In conclusion, the spice formulas used in this study could reduce nitrite residue and MDA level of dendeng, and the treatment prior to frying, by soaking the dendeng briefly in water, lowered MDA of non-spiced dendeng, but no effect of soaking was observed in spiced samples due to the very low MDA found in the samples.

  6. Biogenic amine formation and nitrite reactions in meat batter as affected by high-pressure processing and chilled storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Capillas, C; Aller-Guiote, P; Carballo, J; Colmenero, F Jiménez

    2006-12-27

    Changes in biogenic amine formation and nitrite depletion in meat batters as affected by pressure-temperature combinations (300 MPa/30 min/7, 20, and 40 degrees C), cooking process (70 degrees C/30 min), and storage (54 days/2 degrees C) were studied. Changes in residual nitrite concentration in raw meat batters were conditioned by the temperature and not by the pressure applied. Cooking process decreased (P batters. High-pressure processing conditions had no effect on the rate of residual nitrite loss throughout the storage. The application of high pressure decreased (P < 0.05) the concentration of some biogenic amines (tyramine, agmatine, and spermine). Irrespective of the high processing conditions, generally, throughout storage biogenic amine levels did not change or increased, although quantitatively this effect was not very important.

  7. New Mechanism on Synergistic Effect of Nitrite and Triethanolamine Addition on the Corrosion of Ductile Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, we compared the different inhibition mechanisms of organic inhibitor with that of anodic inhibitor. When triethanolamine or nitrite was added separately to tap water for inhibiting the corrosion of ductile cast iron, large amounts of inhibitor were needed. This is because the corrosion inhibitors had to overcome the galvanic corrosion that occurs between graphite and matrix. In this work, we investigated the corrosion of ductile cast iron in tap water with/without inhibitors. The corrosion rate was measured using chemical immersion test and electrochemical methods, including anodic polarization test. The inhibited surface was analyzed using EPMA and XPS. Test solutions were analyzed by performing FT-IR measurement. When triethanolamine and nitrite coexisted in tap water, synergistic effect built up, and the inhibition effect was ca. 30 times more effective than witnessed with single addition. This work focused on the synergistic effect brought about by nitrite and triethanolamine and its novel mechanism was also proposed.

  8. Hydrotris(triazolyl)borate complexes as functional models for Cu nitrite reductase: the electronic influence of distal nitrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Dixon, Natalie A; Merkle, Anna C; Zeller, Matthias; Lehnert, Nicolai; Papish, Elizabeth T

    2012-07-01

    Hydrotris(triazolyl)borate (Ttz) ligands form CuNO(x) (x = 2, 3) complexes for structural and functional models of copper nitrite reductase. These complexes have distinct properties relative to complexes of hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate (Tp) and neutral tridentate N-donor ligands. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of five-coordinate copper complexes show rare nitrogen superhyperfine couplings with the Ttz ligand, indicating strong σ donation. The copper(I) nitrite complex [PPN](+)[(Ttz(tBu,Me))Cu(I)NO(2)](-) has been synthesized and characterized and allows for the stoichiometric reduction of NO(2)(-) to NO with H(+) addition. Anionic Cu(I) nitrite complexes are unusual and are stabilized here for the first time because Ttz is a good π acceptor. PMID:22671968

  9. Kinetics of Nitrite Reduction and Peroxynitrite Formation by Ferrous Heme in Human Cystathionine β-Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballal, Sebastián; Cuevasanta, Ernesto; Yadav, Pramod K; Gherasim, Carmen; Ballou, David P; Alvarez, Beatriz; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-04-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine with serine or with cysteine to form cystathionine and either water or hydrogen sulfide, respectively. Human CBS possesses a noncatalytic heme cofactor with cysteine and histidine as ligands, which in its oxidized state is relatively unreactive. Ferric CBS (Fe(III)-CBS) can be reduced by strong chemical and biochemical reductants to Fe(II)-CBS, which can bind carbon monoxide (CO) or nitric oxide (NO(•)), leading to inactive enzyme. Alternatively, Fe(II)-CBS can be reoxidized by O2to Fe(III)-CBS, forming superoxide radical anion (O2 (̇̄)). In this study, we describe the kinetics of nitrite (NO2 (-)) reduction by Fe(II)-CBS to form Fe(II)NO(•)-CBS. The second order rate constant for the reaction of Fe(II)-CBS with nitrite was obtained at low dithionite concentrations. Reoxidation of Fe(II)NO(•)-CBS by O2showed complex kinetic behavior and led to peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formation, which was detected using the fluorescent probe, coumarin boronic acid. Thus, in addition to being a potential source of superoxide radical, CBS constitutes a previously unrecognized source of NO(•)and peroxynitrite. PMID:26867575

  10. Hemorheological changes and hematometric erythrocyte characteristics in rats after sodium nitrite intoxication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ivan; Gluhcheva, Yordanka; Petrova, Emilia; Antonova, Nadia

    2014-05-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) is a precursor to a variety of organic compounds (pharmaceuticals, dyes and pesticides), but it is best known as a food additive. The aim of the study is to investigate the influence of acute (i.p.) treatment of Wistar rats with NaNO2 (at the dose of 50 mg/kg b.w.) on the blood rheological properties and erythrocyte hematometric indices (Hb, HCT, RBC, MCV, RDW, MCH, MCHC). The significant differences were not found in the whole blood viscosity (WBV) values of the control and NaNO2-treated groups. The changes in the erythrocyte hematometric indices were statistically significant for RDW, MCHC and MCH at the 1st hour, five- and ten days after NaNO2 administration. Interestingly, at the day 5th of the NaNO2 treatment we obtained statistically significant lower values for the RBC count, Hb, HCT, RDW, as well as elevated indices MCV (no statistically significant), MCH, MCHC. The results obtained indicate that hemorheological and hematometric parameters examined should be monitored in cases of acute exposure to nitrites — for the purposes of clinical toxicology. The quantitative values of hematometric indices reported in our experimental model could be suitable for predicting NaNO2 intoxication and methemoglobinemia in animals and humans.

  11. Cultivation of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria: impact of reactor configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Baolan; He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chen; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua

    2014-09-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is mediated by bacteria that anaerobically oxidize methane coupled with nitrite reduction and is a potential bioprocess for wastewater treatment. In this work, the effect of reactor configuration on n-damo bacterial cultivation was investigated. A magnetically stirred gas lift reactor (MSGLR), a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), and a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were selected to cultivate the bacteria. Microbial community was monitored by using quantitative PCR, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pmoA gene sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The effects of substrate inhibition, methane mass transfer, and biomass washout in the three reactors were focused on. The results indicated that the MSGLR had the best performance among the three reactor systems, with the highest total and specific n-damo activities. Its maximum volumetric nitrogen removal rate was up to 76.9 mg N L(-1) day(-1), which was higher than previously reported values (5.1-37.8 mg N L(-1) d(-1)).

  12. Irradiation conditions for induction of nitrite reducing activity of horse heart cytochrome c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suruga, Kohei; Ogawa, Masahiro; Nishio, Toshiyuki; Oku, Tadatake [Nihon Univ., Fujisawa, Kanagawa (Japan); Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-09-01

    Denatured horse heart cytochrome (Cyt) c by gamma-irradiation showed high reducing activity of nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) to ammonia (NH{sub 4}{sup +}), in the presence of sodium dithionite and methylviologen. Effect of O{sub 2} on irradiation of the Cyt c and the detailed irradiation conditions for nitrite reducing activity of 0.03 mM Cyt c have been investigated. The Cyt c in an aqueous solution (0.03 mM) was treated by Co-60 gamma-irradiation at doses of 0.25-5.0 kGy, dose rates of 0.15-5.0 kGy/h under N{sub 2} or O{sub 2} atmosphere. The Cyt c babbled with O{sub 2} during irradiation showed much higher activity than that with N{sub 2}. The excellent irradiation conditions for increasing the activity of 0.03 mM Cyt c were total dose of 1.0 kGy under O{sub 2} atmosphere. The activity of irradiated Cyt c by these conditions was increased approximately 5 times of unirradiated one. (author)

  13. Activation of accumulated nitrite reduction by immobilized Pseudomonas stutzeri T13 during aerobic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fang; Sun, Yilu; Li, Ang; Zhang, Xuening; Yang, Jixian

    2015-01-01

    The excellent removal efficiency of nitrate by the aerobic denitrifier, Pseudomonas stutzeri T13, was achieved in free cells system. However, poor nitrite reduction prevents efficient aerobic denitrification because of the nitrite accumulation. This problem could be conquered by immobilizing the cells on supports. In this study, strain T13 was immobilized by mycelial pellets (MPs), polyurethane foam cubes (PFCs) and sodium alginate beads (SABs). Higher removal percentages of TN in MP (43.78%), PFC (42.31%) and SAB (57.25%) systems were achieved compared with the free cell system (29.7%). Furthermore, the optimal condition for immobilized cell systems was as follows: 30°C, 100rpm shaking speed and pH 7. The shock-resistance of SAB system was relatively poor, which could collapse under either alkaline (pH=9) or high rotating (200rpm) conditions. The recycling experiments demonstrated that the high steady TN removal rate could be maintained for seven cycles in both MP and PFC systems. PMID:25827250

  14. Antioxidant and Nitrite-Scavenging Capacities of Phenolic Compounds from Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. Tops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Sun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane tops were extracted with 50% ethanol and fractionated by petroleum ether, ethyl acetate (EtOAc, and n-butyl alcohol successively. Eight phenolic compounds in EtOAc extracts were purified through silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatographies, and then identified by nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization mass spectra. The results showed that eight phenolic compounds from EtOAc extracts were identified as caffeic acid, cis-p-hydroxycinnamic acid, quercetin, apigenin, albanin A, australone A, moracin M, and 5'-geranyl-5,7,2',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone. The antioxidant and nitrite-scavenging capacities of different solvent extracts correlated positively with their total phenolic (TP contents. Amongst various extracts, EtOAc extracts possessed the highest TP content and presented the strongest oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC, 1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical-scavenging capacity, 2,2'-azobis-3-ethylbenthiaazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS radical-scavenging capacity, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and nitrite-scavenging capacity. Thus, sugarcane tops could be promoted as a source of natural antioxidant.

  15. Electrochemical detection of nitrite on poly(pyronin Y)/graphene nanocomposites modified ITO substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şinoforoğlu, Mehmet; Dağcı, Kader; Alanyalıoğlu, Murat; Meral, Kadem

    2016-06-01

    The present study reports on an easy preparation of poly(pyronin Y)/graphene (poly(PyY)/graphene) nanocomposites thin films on indium tin oxide coated glass substrates (ITO). The thin films of poly(PyY)/graphene nanocomposites are prepared by a novel method consisting of three steps; (i) preparation of graphene oxide (GO) thin films on ITO by spin-coating method, (ii) self-assembly of PyY molecules from aqueous solution onto the GO thin film, (iii) surface-confined electropolymerization (SCEP) of the adsorbed PyY molecules on the GO thin film. The as-prepared poly(PyY)/graphene nanocomposites thin films are characterized by using electroanalytical and spectroscopic techniques. Afterwards, the graphene-based polymeric dye thin film on ITO is used as an electrode in an electrochemical cell. Its performance is tested for electrochemical detection of nitrite. Under optimized conditions, the electrocatalytical effect of the nanocomposites thin film through electrochemical oxidation of nitrite is better than that of GO coated ITO.

  16. Effect of nitrite concentration on pit depth in carbon steel exposed to simulated radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of pits in carbon steel exposed to dilute (0.055 M nitrate-bearing) alkaline salt solutions that simulate radioactive waste was investigated in coupon immersion tests. Most coupons were tested in the as-received condition, with the remainder having been heat treated to produce an oxide film. Nitrite, which is an established pitting inhibitor in these solutions, was present in concentrations from 0 to 0.031 M to 0.16 M; the last concentration is known to prevent pitting initiation in the test solution at the 50 degrees C test temperature. The depths of the deepest pits on coupons of particular exposure conditions were measure microscopically and were analyzed as simple, type 1 extreme value statistical distributions, to predict the deepest expected pit in a radioactive waste tank subject to the test conditions. While the growth rate of pits could not be established from these tests, the absolute value of the deepest pits predicted is of the order of 100 mils after 448 days of exposure. The data indicate that even nitrite concentrations insufficient to prevent pitting have a beneficial effect on limiting the growth of deepest pits

  17. Electrocatalytic determination of nitrite based on straw cellulose/molybdenum sulfide nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honggui; Wen, Fangfang; Chen, Yajie; Sun, Ting; Meng, Yao; Zhang, Ya

    2016-11-15

    Cellulose is the most abundant, renewable, biodegradable natural polymer resource on earth, which can be a good substrate for catalysis. In this work, straw cellulose has been oxidized through 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, and then a TEMPO oxidized straw cellulose/molybdenum sulfide (TOSC-MoS2) composite has been synthesized via a hydrothermal method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirm that TOSC and MoS2 have successfully composited. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show the TOSC as a carbon nanotube-like structure and edged MoS2 grows on the TOSC substrate. The TOSC-MoS2 modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is used as a simple and non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor. Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) result shows TOSC-MoS2 has excellent electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of nitrite. The amperometric response result indicates the TOSC-MoS2 modified GCE can be used to determine nitrite concentration in wide linear ranges of 6.0-3140 and 3140-4200µM with a detection limit of 2.0µM. The proposed sensor has good anti-interference property. Real sample analysis and the electrocatalytic mechanism have also been presented. PMID:27258173

  18. Continuous-flow combined process of nitritation and ANAMMOX for treatment of landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong; Peng, Yongzhen; Miao, Lei; Cao, Tianhao; Zhang, Fangzhai; Wang, Shuying; Han, Jinhao

    2016-08-01

    Due to the difficulty in removing nitrogen from landfill leachate, a combined continuous-flow process of nitritation and anammox was applied to process mature leachate. The transformation rate of ammonia and nitrite accumulation ratio in A/O reactor were kept above 95% and 92% respectively through associated inhibition of free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) to NOB. The total nitrogen volumetric load of anammox in an UASB reactor was brought up from 0.5kg/(m(3)·d) to 1.2kg/(m(3)·d) by gradually increasing influent substrate concentration and reducing hydraulic retention time (HRT). The results show that COD from mature leachate did not bring obvious inhibition effects to anammox. Under concentrations of influent ammonia and COD which were respectively 1330mg/L and 2250mg/L, the removal efficiencies of TN and COD reached 94% and 62% respectively. In the quantitative PCR reactions, the proportions occupied by AOB, NOB and anammox in A/O were 11.39%, 1.76% and 0.05% respectively; and proportions of those in UASB were 0.35%, 4.01% and 7.78% respectively. PMID:27176671

  19. Nitrosylation of c heme in cd(1)-nitrite reductase is enhanced during catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2014-08-29

    The reduction of nitrite into nitric oxide (NO) in denitrifying bacteria is catalyzed by nitrite reductase. In several species, this enzyme is a heme-containing protein with one c heme and one d1 heme per monomer (cd1NiR), encoded by the nirS gene. For many years, the evidence of a link between NO and this hemeprotein represented a paradox, given that NO was known to tightly bind and, possibly, inhibit hemeproteins, including cd1NiRs. It is now established that, during catalysis, cd1NiRs diverge from "canonical" hemeproteins, since the product NO rapidly dissociates from the ferrous d1 heme, which, in turn, displays a peculiar "low" affinity for NO (KD=0.11 μM at pH 7.0). It has been also previously shown that the c heme reacts with NO at acidic pH but c heme nitrosylation was not extensively investigated, given that in cd1NiR it was considered a side reaction, rather than a genuine process controlling catalysis. The spectroscopic study of the reaction of cd1NiR and its semi-apo derivative (containing the sole c heme) with NO reported here shows that c heme nitrosylation is enhanced during catalysis; this evidence has been discussed in order to assess the potential of c heme nitrosylation as a regulatory process, as observed for cytochrome c nitrosylation in mammalian mitochondria.

  20. Prebiotic Nitrogen Fixation by FeS Reduction of Nitrite Under Acidic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, David P.; Mead, Susan C. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Theories for the origin of life require the availability of reduced nitrogen for the formation of such species as amino acid and nucleic acids. In a strongly reducing atmosphere, compounds essential to the chemical evolution of life, such as amino acids, can form by reactions between HCN, NH3, and carbonyl compounds produced in spark discharges. However, under non-reducing atmospheres, electric discharges produced NO rather than HCN or NH3. This raises the questions of; how ammonia can be formed under a neutral atmosphere, and what conditions are needed such formation to occur? On possibility is the conversion of NO into nitric and nitrous acids (through HNO) and rained into the oceans. The reduction of nitrite by aqueous Fe(II) (6 Fe(+2) + 7 H(+) + NO2(-) yields 6 Fe(III) + 2 H2O + NH3) such as was present on the early Earth could then have produced ammonia. However, this reaction does not proceed at pHs less than 7.3. An alternative is reduction by other forms of Fe(II), such as FeS. We will present results that show that FeS can reduce nitrite to ammonia at pHs as low as pH 5 under a variety of conditions.

  1. Regulating the nitrite reductase activity of myoglobin by redesigning the heme active center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei-Bin; Yuan, Hong; Gao, Shu-Qin; You, Yong; Nie, Chang-Ming; Wen, Ge-Bo; Lin, Ying-Wu; Tan, Xiangshi

    2016-07-01

    Heme proteins perform diverse functions in living systems, of which nitrite reductase (NIR) activity receives much attention recently. In this study, to better understand the structural elements responsible for the NIR activity, we used myoglobin (Mb) as a model heme protein and redesigned the heme active center, by introducing one or two distal histidines, and by creating a channel to the heme center with removal of the native distal His64 gate (His to Ala mutation). UV-Vis kinetic studies, combined with EPR studies, showed that a single distal histidine with a suitable position to the heme iron, i.e., His43, is crucial for nitrite (NO2(-)) to nitric oxide (NO) reduction. Moreover, creation of a water channel to the heme center significantly enhanced the NIR activity compared to the corresponding mutant without the channel. In addition, X-ray crystallographic studies of F43H/H64A Mb and its complexes with NO2(-) or NO revealed a unique hydrogen-bonding network in the heme active center, as well as unique substrate and product binding models, providing valuable structural information for the enhanced NIR activity. These findings enriched our understanding of the structure and NIR activity relationship of heme proteins. The approach of creating a channel in this study is also useful for rational design of other functional heme proteins. PMID:27108710

  2. A study on the toxigenesis by Clostridium botulinum in nitrate and nitrite-reduced dry fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospital, Xavier F; Hierro, Eva; Stringer, Sandra; Fernández, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    Nitrite has been traditionally used to control Clostridium botulinum in cured meat products. However, in the case of dry fermented sausages, environmental factors such as pH, aw and the competitive microbiota may exert a more relevant role than nitrite in the inhibition of the growth and toxin production by C. botulinum. In this challenge test study, two varieties of Mediterranean dry sausages (salchichón and fuet) were inoculated with spores of C. botulinum Group I (proteolytic) and C. botulinum Group II (nonproteolytic). Sausages were prepared with 150 mg/kg of NaNO3 and 150 mg/kg of NaNO2 (maximum ingoing amounts allowed by the European Union regulation), with a 25% and 50% reduction, and without nitrate/nitrite. The initial pH in both products was 5.6, and decreased to values below 5.0 in salchichón and to 5.2 in fuet. Lactic acid bacteria counts reached 8-9 log cfu/g after fermentation. The aw decreased from initial values of 0.96 to about 0.88-0.90 at the end of ripening. Botulinum neurotoxin was not detected in any of the sausages, including those manufactured without nitrate and nitrite. Despite the environmental conditions were within the range for germination and growth of C. botulinum Group I during the first 8 days of the ripening process in fuet and 10-12 days in salchichón, acidity, aw and incubation temperature combined to inhibit the production of toxin, independently of the concentration of curing agents. Although decreasing or even removing nitrate/nitrite from the formula did not compromise safety regarding C. botulinum in the conditions tested in this study, their antimicrobial role should not be underestimated in the case that other hurdles could fail or other ripening conditions were used, and also considering the effect of nitrite on other pathogens. PMID:26619314

  3. Correlation of plasma nitrite/nitrate levels and inducible nitric oxide gene expression among women with cervical abnormalities and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowjanya, A Pavani; Rao, Meera; Vedantham, Haripriya; Kalpana, Basany; Poli, Usha Rani; Marks, Morgan A; Sujatha, M

    2016-01-30

    Cervical cancer is caused by infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a soluble factor involved in chronic inflammation, may modulate cervical cancer risk among HPV infected women. The aim of the study was to measure and correlate plasma nitrite/nitrate levels with tissue specific expression of iNOS mRNA among women with different grades of cervical lesions and cervical cancer. Tissue biopsy and plasma specimens were collected from 120 women with cervical neoplasia or cancer (ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL and invasive cancer) and 35 women without cervical abnormalities. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA from biopsy and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels of the same study subjects were measured. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed on the promoter region and Ser608Leu (rs2297518) in exon 16 of the iNOS gene. Differences in iNOS gene expression and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels were compared across disease stage using linear and logistic regression analysis. Compared to normal controls, women diagnosed with HSIL or invasive cancer had a significantly higher concentration of plasma nitrite/nitrate and a higher median fold-change in iNOS mRNA gene expression. Genotyping of the promoter region showed three different variations: A pentanucleotide repeat (CCTTT) n, -1026T > G (rs2779249) and a novel variant -1153T > A. These variants were associated with increased levels of plasma nitrite/nitrate across all disease stages. The higher expression of iNOS mRNA and plasma nitrite/nitrate among women with pre-cancerous lesions suggests a role for nitric oxide in the natural history of cervical cancer. PMID:26435258

  4. The levels of nitrite and nitrate, proline and protein profiles in tomato plants infected with pseudomonas syringae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the contents of nitrite-nitrate and free L-proline, and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins in tomato plants following inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain were examined. The results of the nitrite and nitrate indicated that there was a reduction in the levels of nitrate in the infected tomato plants through 1-8 study days, compared with the healthy plants. On the other hands, when the nitrite amounts increased in the first and second days, the nitrite concentrations reduced in infected plants at subsequent time periods, compared with uninfected plants. The accumulation of free proline increased in the infected plants, according to control plants. The whole-cell protein profiles displayed that the levels of the protein bands of molecular masses 204.6 kDa and 69.9 kDa significantly increased in infected and uninfected plants during 2-10 study days. In additionally, in the quantities of the protein bands of molecular weights 90.3 and 79.4 kDa were observed an increase in the infected and healthy plants after the fourth day. However, the protein band of molecular weight 54.3 kDa was visible only in uninfected plants for the fourth and eighth days. Finally, the study suggest that there were the sophisticate relationships among the proline accumulation, the conversion of nitrate to nitrite and the induction of PR protein genes in the regulation of defense mechanisms toward microbial invaders. Our results also indicated that the increases in nitrite and proline contents might be useful indicator for the response toward pathogen attacks. (author)

  5. Hemi-ordered nanoporous carbon electrode material for highly selective determination of nitrite in physiological and environmental systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shenghai; Wu, Hongmin; Wu, Ying; Shi, Hongyan; Feng, Xun; Jiang, Shang; Chen, Jian; Song, Wenbo, E-mail: wbsong@jlu.edu.cn

    2014-08-01

    Hemi-ordered nanoporous carbon (HONC) was obtained from a mesoporous silica template through a nano-replication method using furfuryl alcohol as the carbon source. The structure and morphology of HONC were characterized and analyzed in detail by X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2}-sorption, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. HONC was then demonstrated as active electrode material for selective determination of nitrite in either physiological or environmental system. Well separated oxidation peaks of ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid and nitrite were observed in physiological system, and simultaneous discrimination of catechol, hydroquinone, resorcinol and nitrite in environmental system was also accomplished. Distinctly improved performances for selective determination of nitrite (such as significantly fast and sensitive current response with especially high selectivity) coexisted with ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid in the physiological system, as well as with catechol, hydroquinone and resorcinol in the environmental system were achieved at HONC electrode material. The excellent discriminating ability and high selectivity for NO{sub 2}{sup −} determination were ascribed to the good electronic conductivity, unique hemi-ordered porous structure, large surface area and large number of edge plane defect sites contained on the surface of nanopore walls of HONC. Results in this work demonstrated that HONC is one of the promising catalytic electrode materials for nitrite sensor fabrication. - Highlights: • Hemi-ordered nanoporous carbon as an active electrode material • Good discriminating ability towards NO{sub 2}{sup −} from physiological or environmental system • Highly selective determination of nitrite with fast and sensitive current response.

  6. Residues in the Distal Heme Pocket of Arabidopsis Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins: Implication for Nitrite Reductase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well-established that plant hemoglobins (Hbs are involved in nitric oxide (NO metabolism via NO dioxygenase and/or nitrite reductase activity. The ferrous-deoxy Arabidopsis Hb1 and Hb2 (AHb1 and AHb2 have been shown to reduce nitrite to NO under hypoxia. Here, to test the hypothesis that a six- to five-coordinate heme iron transition might mediate the control of the nitrite reduction rate, we examined distal pocket mutants of AHb1 and AHb2 for nitrite reductase activity, NO production and spectroscopic features. Absorption spectra of AHbs distal histidine mutants showed that AHb1 mutant (H69L is a stable pentacoordinate high-spin species in both ferrous and ferric states, whereas heme iron in AHb2 mutant (H66L is hexacoordinated low-spin with Lys69 as the sixth ligand. The bimolecular rate constants for nitrite reduction to NO were 13.3 ± 0.40, 7.3 ± 0.5, 10.6 ± 0.8 and 171.90 ± 9.00 M−1·s−1 for AHb1, AHb2, AHb1 H69L and AHb2 H66L, respectively, at pH 7.4 and 25 °C. Consistent with the reductase activity, the amount of NO detected by chemiluminescence was significantly higher in the AHb2 H66L mutant. Our data indicate that nitrite reductase activity is determined not only by heme coordination, but also by a unique distal heme pocket in each AHb.

  7. Residues in the Distal Heme Pocket of Arabidopsis Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins: Implication for Nitrite Reductase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitin; Astegno, Alessandra; Chen, Jian; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Dominici, Paola

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that plant hemoglobins (Hbs) are involved in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism via NO dioxygenase and/or nitrite reductase activity. The ferrous-deoxy Arabidopsis Hb1 and Hb2 (AHb1 and AHb2) have been shown to reduce nitrite to NO under hypoxia. Here, to test the hypothesis that a six- to five-coordinate heme iron transition might mediate the control of the nitrite reduction rate, we examined distal pocket mutants of AHb1 and AHb2 for nitrite reductase activity, NO production and spectroscopic features. Absorption spectra of AHbs distal histidine mutants showed that AHb1 mutant (H69L) is a stable pentacoordinate high-spin species in both ferrous and ferric states, whereas heme iron in AHb2 mutant (H66L) is hexacoordinated low-spin with Lys69 as the sixth ligand. The bimolecular rate constants for nitrite reduction to NO were 13.3 ± 0.40, 7.3 ± 0.5, 10.6 ± 0.8 and 171.90 ± 9.00 M(-1)·s(-1) for AHb1, AHb2, AHb1 H69L and AHb2 H66L, respectively, at pH 7.4 and 25 °C. Consistent with the reductase activity, the amount of NO detected by chemiluminescence was significantly higher in the AHb2 H66L mutant. Our data indicate that nitrite reductase activity is determined not only by heme coordination, but also by a unique distal heme pocket in each AHb. PMID:27136534

  8. Effect of Nitrite and Nitrate Concentrations on the Performance of AFB-MFC Enriched with High-Strength Synthetic Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-sheng Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effect of nitrite and nitrate on the performance of microbial fuel cell, a system combining an anaerobic fluidized bed (AFB and a microbial fuel cell (MFC was employed for high-strength nitrogen-containing synthetic wastewater treatment. Before this study, the AFB-MFC had been used to treat high-strength organic wastewater for about one year in a continuous flow mode. The results showed that when the concentrations of nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen were increased from 1700 mg/L to 4045 mg/L and 545 mg/L to 1427 mg/L, respectively, the nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen removal efficiencies were both above 99%; the COD removal efficiency went up from 60.00% to 88.95%; the voltage was about 375 ± 15 mV while the power density was at 70 ± 5 mW/m2. However, when the concentrations of nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen were above 4045 mg/L and 1427 mg/L, respectively, the removal of nitrite nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, COD, voltage, and power density were decreased to be 86%, 88%, 77%, 180 mV, and 17 mW/m2 when nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen were increased to 4265 mg/L and 1661 mg/L. In addition, the composition of biogas generated in the anode chamber was analyzed by a gas chromatograph. Nitrogen gas, methane, and carbon dioxide were obtained. The results indicated that denitrification happened in anode chamber.

  9. The Kinetic Aspects of the Interaction of Nitrite Ions with Sulfanilic Acid and 1-Naphthylamine in Aqueous and Micellar Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneeva, O. I.; Chernova, R. K.; Doronin, S. Yu.

    2008-04-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of nitrite ions with sulfanilic acid and 1-naphthylamine in aqueous and micellar (sodium dodecyl sulfate) media was studied step-by-step. The diazotization of sulfanilic acid with the nitrite ion was found to occur virtually instantaneously. Anionic surfactant micelles did not influence the rate of this reaction. The calculated effective rate constants and activation energies of the azo coupling reaction between synthesized sulfophenyldiazonium and 1-naphthylamine showed that the passage from water into the micellar medium decelerated the reaction. It was found that sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles played the role of a reagent separator.

  10. Integrating nitric oxide, nitrite and hydrogen sulfide signaling in the physiological adaptations to hypoxia: A comparative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo; Tota, Bruno;

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrite (NO2-) are formed in vivo and are of crucial importance in the tissue response to hypoxia, particularly in the cardiovascular system, where these signaling molecules are involved in a multitude of processes including the regulation of vascular...... of the Society for Experimental Biology in 2011 in Glasgow. It also highlights the need and potential for a comparative approach of study and collaborative effort to identify potential link(s) between the signaling pathways involving NO, nitrite and H2S in the whole-body responses to hypoxia....

  11. [Spatial Variation of Ammonia-N, Nitrate-N and Nitrite-N in Groundwater of Dongshan Island].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiu, Hai-yan; Fu, Shi-feng; Cai, Xiao-qiong; Tang, Kun-xian; Cao, Chao; Chen, Qing-hui; Liang, Xiu-yu

    2015-09-01

    In Dongshan Island, groundwater is the main resource of the local residents' drinking water, domestic water, agriculture irrigation and freshwater aquaculture. This study aimed to investigate the spatial distribution characteristic and its variation pattern of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater, as well as its pollution source and influence factors. It is very important to understand the pollution level of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater of Dongshan Island, the control and prevention of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N pollution, which is of great significance to the residents' health. In this study, the spatial variability characteristics of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N concentration in groundwater of Dongshan Island was analysed by geo- statistic method, the values of the non-observation points were determined by Kriging method, and the pollution characteristics of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater of Dongshan Island was also analyzed. Our results showed that the ammonia-N and nitrite-N concentration in groundwater of Dongshan Island were at low levels, but their spatial variability were high, and their autocorrelation were poor; however, the nitrate-N concentration was general high, its spatial variability was moderate, and the autocorrelation was much good. The distribution characteristics of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater of Dongshan Island were similar that the high concentration areas were all located in the coastal land. The domestic pollutants and human and animal wastes from towns and villages were the main sources of nitrogen pollution, which would be the first step to control the nitrogen pollution of Dongshan Island. Land use pattern, soil type, groundwater depth, pH, dissolved oxygen, season, and the existence of Fe2+, were the impact factors that influence the distribution and transformation of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater, which could be the considerable

  12. The effect of G1c6P uptake and its subsequent oxidation within pea root plastids on nitrite reduction and glutamate synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowsher, Caroline G.; Lacey, Anne E.; Hanke, Guy T.; Clarkson, David T.; Saker, Les R.; Stulen, Ineke; Emes, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In roots, nitrate assimilation is dependent upon a supply of reductant that is initially generated by oxidative metabolism including the pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP). The uptake of nitrite into the plastids and its subsequent reduction by nitrite reductase (NiR) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) ar

  13. Improved selectivity for partial oxidation of methane to methanol in the presence of nitrite ions and BiVO4 photocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcia-López, S; Villa, K; Andreu, T; Morante, J R

    2015-04-28

    Nitrite ions are shown to have significant influence on the selectivity of the photocatalytic oxidation of methane to methanol. An almost complete inhibition of undesired CO2 has been achieved with BiVO4 in the presence of a low concentration of nitrite, which might act both as a UV filter and as a hydroxyl radical scavenger. PMID:25815428

  14. Use of polyurethane foam and 3-hydroxy-7,8-benzo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline for determination of nitrite by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apyari, V V; Dmitrienko, S G; Ostrovskaya, V M; Anaev, E K; Zolotov, Y A

    2008-07-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) has been suggested as a solid polymeric reagent for determination of nitrite. The determination is based on the diazotization of end toluidine groups of PUF with nitrite in acidic medium followed by coupling of polymeric diazonium cation with 3-hydroxy-7,8-benzo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline. The intensely colored polymeric azodye formed in this reaction can be used as a convenient analytic form for the determination of nitrite by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (c (min) = 0.7 ng mL(-1)). The possibility of using a desktop scanner, digital camera, and computer data processing for the numerical evaluation of the color intensity of the polymeric azodye has been investigated. A scanner and digital camera can be used for determination of nitrite with the same sensitivity and reproducibility as with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The approach developed was applied for determination of nitrite in river water and human exhaled breath condensate. PMID:18431561

  15. Identification and structure of the nasR gene encoding a nitrate- and nitrite-responsive positive regulator of nasFEDCBA (nitrate assimilation) operon expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, B. S.; Lin, J. T.; Stewart, V

    1994-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilatory pathway. The structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases together with genes necessary for nitrate transport form an operon, nasFEDCBA. Expression of the nasF operon is regulated both by general nitrogen control and also by nitrate or nitrite induction. We have identified a gene, nasR, that is necessary for nitrate and nitrite induction. The nasR gene, located immed...

  16. Nitrate and nitrite-mediated transcription antitermination control of nasF (nitrate assimilation) operon expression in Klebsiella pheumoniae M5al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J T; Stewart, V

    1996-03-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources during aerobic growth. Nitrate is converted through nitrite to ammonium by assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductase, respectively. Enzymes required for nitrate assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon of K. pneumoniae; nasF operon expression is subject to both general nitrogen control and pathway-specific nitrate/nitrite induction, mediated by the NtrC and NasR proteins, respectively. Sequence inspection revealed a presumptive sigmaN (sigma54)-dependent promoter as well as two presumptive upstream NtrC protein binding sites. Site-specific mutational and primer extension analyses confirmed the identity of the sigmaN-dependent promoter. Deletions removing the apparent NtrC protein binding sites greatly reduced NtrC-dependent regulation, indicating that these sites are involved in general nitrogen control. However, deletions removing most of the sequence upstream of the promoter had little effect on nitrate/nitrite regulation, suggesting that the nasF leader region is involved in nitrate/nitrite regulation. The 119 nucleotide long transcribed leader region contains an apparent factor-independent transcription terminator. Promoter replacement experiments demonstrated that the leader region is involved in nitrate/nitrite regulation of nasF operon expression. Deletions removing the transcription terminator structure resulted in a nitrate-blind constitutive phenotype, indicating that the transcription terminator structure serves a negative function. Other deletions, removing proximal portions of the leader region, resulted in an uninducible phenotype, indicating that this region serves a positive function. These results indicate that nitrate/nitrite regulation of nasF operon expression is determined by a transcription attenuation mechanism. We hypothesize that in the absence of nitrate or nitrite, the terminator structure abrogates transcription readthrough into the nasF operon. In the

  17. Antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of condiments paste used as nitrite replacer in chicken mince

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Goswami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of 4% Ginger + 4% Garlic + Turmeric 1000ppm (GGT, nitrite 200ppm (N and the control (C on minced chicken stored at 4±10C. Materials and Methods: Physico-chemical properties (pH, Thio Barbituric acid value (TBA, Peroxide value (PV and Free Fatty acid (FFA were evaluated on 0, 3, 6 and 9th day of the storage. The antimicrobial studies viz. Total viable count (TVC, Escherichia coli count, Clostridium sporogenes count and Clostridium perfringens count were carried out on 1, 4, 7 and 10th day of storage. Results: Highly significant difference (P<0.01 was noticed between the treatments and between the storage periods in pH (5.951±0.02-GGT as compared to C-5.898±0.05and N-5.899±0.02, TBA(0.566±0.09-GGT as compared to C-1.569±0.04m and N-0.614±0.11, PV(1.679±0.18-GGT as compared to C-2.595±0.41and N-2.03±0.21, FFA(1.199±0.21-GGT as compared to C-2.284±0.40 and N-1.446±0.24 and N-7.194±0.68, TVC (log CFU/g (7.528±0.70-GGT as compared to C-8.583±0.49 and N-6.446±0.53, Escherichia coli (log CFU/g (6.476±0.54-GGT as compared to C-7.658±0.71 and N-6.609±0.61, Clostridium sporogenes count (log CFU/g (7.746±0.69-GGT as compared to C-8.681±0.74 and N- and Clostridium perfringens count (log CFU/g (6.864±0.76-GGT as compared to C-8.790±0.53 and N-6.864±0.58. Conclusion: The Ginger garlic turmeric paste has an excellent potential to replace the nitrite as a natural antioxidant with other advantages. It is highly effective against Escherichia coli. It is also significantly effective against Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium sporogenes and TVC as compared to C but lesser than N. We recommend further research by replacing the nitrite with various combinations of the spices and the condiments.

  18. Nitric oxide, nitrite, and Fnr regulation of hmp (flavohemoglobin) gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, R K; Anjum, M F; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Kim, S O; Hughes, M N; Stewart, V

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli possesses a soluble flavohemoglobin, with an unknown function, encoded by the hmp gene. A monolysogen containing an hmp-lacZ operon fusion was constructed to determine how the hmp promoter is regulated in response to heme ligands (O2, NO) or the presence of anaerobically utilized electron acceptors (nitrate, nitrite). Expression of the phi (hmp-lacZ)1 fusion was similar during aerobic growth in minimal medium containing glucose, glycerol, maltose, or sorbitol as a carbon source. Mutations in cya (encoding adenylate cyclase) or changes in medium pH between 5 and 9 were without effect on aerobic expression. Levels of aerobic and anaerobic expression in glucose-containing minimal media were similar; both were unaffected by an arcA mutation. Anaerobic, but not aerobic, expression of phi (hmp-lacZ)1 was stimulated three- to four-fold by an fnr mutation; an apparent Fnr-binding site is present in the hmp promoter. Iron depletion of rich broth medium by the chelator 2'2'-dipyridyl (0.1 mM) enhanced hmp expression 40-fold under anaerobic conditions, tentatively attributed to effects on Fnr. At a higher chelator concentration (0.4 mM), hmp expression was also stimulated aerobically. Anaerobic expression was stimulated 6-fold by the presence of nitrate and 25-fold by the presence of nitrite. Induction by nitrate or nitrite was unaffected by narL and/or narP mutations, demonstrating regulation of hmp by these ions via mechanisms alternative to those implicated in the regulation of other respiratory genes. Nitric oxide (10 to 20 microM) stimulated aerobic phi (hmp-lacZ)1 activity by up to 19-fold; soxS and soxR mutations only slightly reduced the NO effect. We conclude that hmp expression is negatively regulated by Fnr under anaerobic conditions and that additional regulatory mechanisms are involved in the responses to oxygen, nitrogen compounds, and iron availability. Hmp is implicated in reactions with small nitrogen compounds. PMID:8808940

  19. The study of abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite in Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Belgium, Boom Clay is studied as a reference host rock for the geological disposal of high-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Compatibility studies at the SCK.CEN aim at investigating a perturbation of the capacity of Boom Clay to retard the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere, after disposal of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste in the clay (Valcke et al., 2009; Aertsens et al., 2009; Bleyen et al., 2010).One of the geo-chemical perturbations is the possible oxidation of Boom Clay by the large amounts of nitrate that will be released by Eurobitum. A more oxidised Boom Clay could have a lower reducing capacity towards redox sensitive radionuclides, possibly enhancing their migration. As the conditions in the Boom Clay formation around a disposal gallery for Eurobitum are far from optimal for the growth of prokaryotes (limited space in the far-field, high pH in the near-field, gamma radiation by the waste during the first ∼300 years (effect limited to the primary and secondary waste package)), the impact of microbially mediated reduction of nitrate and nitrite is unclear. Therefore, batch tests are performed at the SCK.CEN to study whether nitrate and nitrite can directly oxidise the main redoxactive components of Boom Clay (dissolved organic matter, kerogen, pyrite) without the mediation of prokaryotes. In a first series of batch tests, which are reported in this paper, the activity of denitrifying and nitrate reducing prokaryotes was inhibited by the addition of NaN3. NaN3 revealed to be an efficient inhibitor for these prokaryotes without affecting considerably the geochemistry of Boom Clay and/or Boom Clay pore water. Neither in batch tests with the Boom Clay slurries (with NaNO3 (0.1 and 1 M) or NaNO2 (0.1 M)) and with Boom Clay water (with 0.05 and 0.2 M NaNO3) a pure chemical nitrate or nitrite reduction was observed after respectively 3, 7 and 17 weeks and 1 year (Boom Clay slurries) and about 2 years (Boom Clay water

  20. The study of abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite in Boom Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariën, A.; Bleyen, N.; Aerts, S.; Valcke, E.

    In Belgium, Boom Clay is studied as a reference host rock for the geological disposal of high-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Compatibility studies at the SCK•CEN aim at investigating a perturbation of the capacity of Boom Clay to retard the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere, after disposal of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste in the clay ( Valcke et al., 2009; Aertsens et al., 2009; Bleyen et al., 2010). One of the geo-chemical perturbations is the possible oxidation of Boom Clay by the large amounts of nitrate that will be released by Eurobitum. A more oxidised Boom Clay could have a lower reducing capacity towards redox sensitive radionuclides, possibly enhancing their migration. As the conditions in the Boom Clay formation around a disposal gallery for Eurobitum are far from optimal for the growth of prokaryotes (limited space in the far-field, high pH in the near-field, gamma radiation by the waste during the first ∼300 years (effect limited to the primary and secondary waste package)), the impact of microbially mediated reduction of nitrate and nitrite is unclear. Therefore, batch tests are performed at the SCK•CEN to study whether nitrate and nitrite can directly oxidise the main redoxactive components of Boom Clay (dissolved organic matter, kerogen, pyrite) without the mediation of prokaryotes. In a first series of batch tests, which are reported in this paper, the activity of denitrifying and nitrate reducing prokaryotes was inhibited by the addition of NaN 3. NaN 3 revealed to be an efficient inhibitor for these prokaryotes without affecting considerably the geochemistry of Boom Clay and/or Boom Clay pore water. Neither in batch tests with the Boom Clay slurries (with NaNO 3 (0.1 and 1 M) or NaNO 2 (0.1 M)) and with Boom Clay water (with 0.05 and 0.2 M NaNO 3) a pure chemical nitrate or nitrite reduction was observed after respectively 3, 7 and 17 weeks and 1 year (Boom Clay slurries) and about 2 years (Boom Clay