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Sample records for amygdala temporal dynamics

  1. Amygdala and fusiform gyrus temporal dynamics: Responses to negative facial expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauch Scott L

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amygdala habituates in response to repeated human facial expressions; however, it is unclear whether this brain region habituates to schematic faces (i.e., simple line drawings or caricatures of faces. Using an fMRI block design, 16 healthy participants passively viewed repeated presentations of schematic and human neutral and negative facial expressions. Percent signal changes within anatomic regions-of-interest (amygdala and fusiform gyrus were calculated to examine the temporal dynamics of neural response and any response differences based on face type. Results The amygdala and fusiform gyrus had a within-run "U" response pattern of activity to facial expression blocks. The initial block within each run elicited the greatest activation (relative to baseline and the final block elicited greater activation than the preceding block. No significant differences between schematic and human faces were detected in the amygdala or fusiform gyrus. Conclusion The "U" pattern of response in the amygdala and fusiform gyrus to facial expressions suggests an initial orienting, habituation, and activation recovery in these regions. Furthermore, this study is the first to directly compare brain responses to schematic and human facial expressions, and the similarity in brain responses suggest that schematic faces may be useful in studying amygdala activation.

  2. Preoperative amygdala fMRI in temporal lobe epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Bonelli, S. B.; Powell, R.; Yogarajah, M; Thompson, P.J.; Symms, M. R.; Koepp, M.J.; Duncan, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Anterior temporal lobe resections (ATLR) benefit 70% of patients with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but may be complicated by emotional disturbances. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the role of the amygdala in processing emotions in TLE and whether this may be a potential preoperative predictive marker for emotional disturbances following surgery. Methods: We studied 54 patients with refractory mesial TLE due to hippocampal sc...

  3. Differential Dynamics of Amino Acid Release in the Amygdala and Olfactory Cortex during Odor Fear Acquisition as Revealed with Simultaneous High Temporal Resolution Microdialysis

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    Hegoburu, Chloe; Sevelinges, Yannick; Thevenet, Marc; Gervais, Remi; Parrot, Sandrine; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Although the amygdala seems to be essential to the formation and storage of fear memories, it might store only some aspects of the aversive event and facilitate the storage of more specific sensory aspects in cortical areas. We addressed the time course of amygdala and cortical activation in the context of odor fear conditioning in rats. Using…

  4. The Role of Amygdala in Emotional and Social Functions: Implications for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Cristinzio Perrin, Chiara; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2007-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is among the most frequent causes of chronic and drug-resistant seizure disorders. It is typically associated with lesions involving critical limbic structures within the anterior medial temporal lobe, such as the amygdala and hippocampus. While the role of the hippocampus and adjacent cortical regions in memory function is now well established, the role of the amygdala and related brain circuits is still poorly known. The amygdala is a complex neural structure implicat...

  5. Contribution of amygdala pathology to comorbid emotional disturbances in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz; O'Loughlin, Elaine; McDermott, Kieran

    2016-06-01

    The amygdala contributes to the generation and propagation of epileptiform activity in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Ictal symptoms such as fear, dreamy states (déjà vu, memory flashbacks, experiential hallucinations), epigastric auras, or sympathetic outflow with cardiovascular changes are often linked to a seizure focus in the amygdala. However, the amygdala may also play a role in comorbid anxiety, depression, and other psychiatric symptoms experienced in the interictal phase, especially in pharmacoresistant TLE. The few studies available on TLE-related alterations in surgical amygdala specimens indicate loss of both excitatory spiny projection neurons as well as interneurons in nuclei with a cortex-like architecture, which may influence mechanisms of feedforward and feedback inhibition. Studies of the human amygdala indicate global alterations in the density of AMPA/kainate, metabotropic glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA ), muscarinic M2 and M3, serotonergic 5-HT1A, and adrenergic α1 receptors. Also, amygdala GABAergic and neuropeptide Y (NPY) systems affected in human TLE are both involved in antiepileptic and anxiolytic effects. Experimental and human positron emission tomography studies indicate changes in amygdala serotonergic, NPY Y1 receptor, neurokinin, and opioid systems in emotional disturbances in TLE. Of particular interest is the reduction in amygdala volume in conjunction with ictal fear, seizure focus in the amygdala, and amygdala and hippocampal sclerosis in TLE patients. In contrast, patients with interictal depression often have an intact or even enlarged amygdala and a negative MRI associated with amygdala hypometabolism, which can be associated with limbic autoimmune encephalitis. These findings suggest a differential role of TLE-related amygdala changes in ictal and interictal emotional disturbances. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26525920

  6. A pavlovian model of the amygdala and its influence within the medial temporal lobe

    OpenAIRE

    Maxime Carrere; Frederic Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience give us a better view of the inner structure of the amygdala, of its relations with other regions in the Medial Temporal Lobe (MTL) and of the prominent role of neuromodulation. They have particularly shed light on two kinds of neurons in the basal nucleus of the amygdala, the so-called fear neurons and extinction neurons. Fear neurons mediate context-dependent fear by receiving contextual information from the hippocampus, whereas extinctio...

  7. A pavlovian model of the amygdala and its influence within the medial temporal lobe

    OpenAIRE

    Carrere, Maxime; Alexandre, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience give us a better view of the inner structure of the amygdala, of its relations with other regions in the Medial Temporal Lobe (MTL) and of the prominent role of neuromodulation. They have particularly shed light on two kinds of neurons in the basal nucleus of the amygdala, the so-called fear neurons and extinction neurons. Fear neurons mediate context-dependent fear by receiving contextual information from the hippocampus, whereas extinction neurons are linked ...

  8. A pavlovian model of the amygdala and its influence within the medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrere, Maxime; Alexandre, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience give us a better view of the inner structure of the amygdala, of its relations with other regions in the Medial Temporal Lobe (MTL) and of the prominent role of neuromodulation. They have particularly shed light on two kinds of neurons in the basal nucleus of the amygdala, the so-called fear neurons and extinction neurons. Fear neurons mediate context-dependent fear by receiving contextual information from the hippocampus, whereas extinction neurons are linked with the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and involved in fear extinction. The computational model of the amygdala that we describe in this paper is primarily a model of pavlovian conditioning, but its architecture also emphasizes the central role of the amygdala in the MTL memory processes through three main information flows. (i) Thalamic and higher order sensory cortical inputs including from the perirhinal cortex are received in the lateral amygdalar nucleus, where CS-US associations can be acquired. (ii) These associations are subsequently modulated, in the basal nucleus of the amygdala, by contextual inputs coming from the hippocampus and the mPFC. Basal fear and extinction neurons indicate the currently valid association to their main targets including in the MTL and the mPFC. (iii) The competition for the choice of the pavlovian response is ultimately performed by projection of these amygdalar neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala where, beyond motor responding, a hormonal response, including cholinergic modulation, is also triggered via the basal forebrain. In turn, acetylcholine modulates activation in the basal nucleus and facilitates learning in the hippocampus. Based on biologically founded arguments, our model replicates a number of biological experiments, proposes some predictions about the role of amygdalar regions and describes pavlovian conditioning as a distributed systemic learning, binding memory processes in the MTL. PMID:25852499

  9. Threat of punishment motivates memory encoding via amygdala, not midbrain, interactions with the medial temporal lobe.

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    Murty, Vishnu P; Labar, Kevin S; Adcock, R Alison

    2012-06-27

    Neural circuits associated with motivated declarative encoding and active threat avoidance have both been described, but the relative contribution of these systems to punishment-motivated encoding remains unknown. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging in humans to examine mechanisms of declarative memory enhancement when subjects were motivated to avoid punishments that were contingent on forgetting. A motivational cue on each trial informed participants whether they would be punished or not for forgetting an upcoming scene image. Items associated with the threat of shock were better recognized 24 h later. Punishment-motivated enhancements in subsequent memory were associated with anticipatory activation of right amygdala and increases in its functional connectivity with parahippocampal and orbitofrontal cortices. On a trial-by-trial basis, right amygdala activation during the motivational cue predicted hippocampal activation during encoding of the subsequent scene; across participants, the strength of this interaction predicted memory advantages due to motivation. Of note, punishment-motivated learning was not associated with activation of dopaminergic midbrain, as would be predicted by valence-independent models of motivation to learn. These data are consistent with the view that motivation by punishment activates the amygdala, which in turn prepares the medial temporal lobe for memory formation. The findings further suggest a brain system for declarative learning motivated by punishment that is distinct from that for learning motivated by reward. PMID:22745496

  10. The epileptic amygdala: Toward the development of a neural prosthesis by temporally coded electrical stimulation.

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    Cota, Vinícius Rosa; Drabowski, Bruna Marcela Bacellar; de Oliveira, Jasiara Carla; Moraes, Márcio Flávio Dutra

    2016-06-01

    Many patients with epilepsy do not obtain proper control of their seizures through conventional treatment. We review aspects of the pathophysiology underlying epileptic phenomena, with a special interest in the role of the amygdala, stressing the importance of hypersynchronism in both ictogenesis and epileptogenesis. We then review experimental studies on electrical stimulation of mesiotemporal epileptogenic areas, the amygdala included, as a means to treat medically refractory epilepsy. Regular high-frequency stimulation (HFS) commonly has anticonvulsant effects and sparse antiepileptogenic properties. On the other hand, HFS is related to acute and long-term increases in excitability related to direct neuronal activation, long-term potentiation, and kindling, raising concerns regarding its safety and jeopardizing in-depth understanding of its mechanisms. In turn, the safer regular low-frequency stimulation (LFS) has a robust antiepileptogenic effect, but its pro- or anticonvulsant effect seems to vary at random among studies. As an alternative, studies by our group on the development and investigation of temporally unstructured electrical stimulation applied to the amygdala have shown that nonperiodic stimulation (NPS), which is a nonstandard form of LFS, is capable of suppressing both acute and chronic spontaneous seizures. We hypothesize two noncompetitive mechanisms for the therapeutic role of amygdala in NPS, 1) a direct desynchronization of epileptic circuitry in the forebrain and brainstem and 2) an indirect desynchronization/inhibition through nucleus accumbens activation. We conclude by reintroducing the idea that hypersynchronism, rather than hyperexcitability, may be the key for epileptic phenomena and epilepsy treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27091311

  11. Early versus late-phase consolidation of opiate reward memories requires distinct molecular and temporal mechanisms in the amygdala-prefrontal cortical pathway.

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    Shervin Gholizadeh

    Full Text Available The consolidation of newly acquired memories involves the temporal transition from a recent, less stable trace to a more permanent consolidated form. Opiates possess potent rewarding effects and produce powerful associative memories. The activation of these memories is associated with opiate abuse relapse phenomena and the persistence of compulsive opiate dependence. However, the neuronal, molecular and temporal mechanisms by which associative opiate reward memories are consolidated are not currently understood. We report that the consolidation of associative opiate reward memories involves a temporal and molecular switch between the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA (early consolidation phase to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC (late consolidation phase. We demonstrate at the molecular, behavioral and neuronal levels that the consolidation of a recently acquired opiate reward memory involves an extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK-dependent phosphorylation process within the BLA. In contrast, later-stage consolidation of a newly acquired memory is dependent upon a calcium-calmodulin-dependent (CaMKII, ERK-independent, mechanism in the mPFC, over a 12 hr temporal gradient. In addition, using in vivo multi-unit neuronal recordings in the mPFC, we report that protein synthesis within the BLA modulates the consolidation of opiate-reward memory in neuronal mPFC sub-populations, via the same temporal dynamic.

  12. Amygdala enlargement in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy without hippocampal sclerosis

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    AnaCarolinaCoan

    2013-10-01

    Discussion: This exploratory study demonstrates the occurrence of AE in 12% of patients with MTLE-NL. This finding supports the hypothesis that there might be a subgroup of patients with MTLE-NL in which the enlarged amygdala could be related to the epileptogenic process. Further studies are necessary but this finding could be of great importance in the understanding of MTLE-NL.

  13. More consistently altered connectivity patterns for cerebellum and medial temporal lobes than for amygdala and striatum in schizophrenia

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    Henning ePeters

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain architecture can be divided into a cortico-thalamic system and modulatory ‘subcortical-cerebellar’ systems containing key structures such as striatum, medial temporal lobes (MTLs, amygdala, and cerebellum. Subcortical-cerebellar systems are known to be altered in schizophrenia. In particular, intrinsic functional brain connectivity (iFC between these systems has been consistently demonstrated in patients. While altered connectivity is known for each subcortical-cerebellar system separately, it is unknown whether subcortical-cerebellar systems’ connectivity patterns with the cortico-thalamic system are comparably altered across systems, i.e., if separate subcortical-cerebellar systems’ connectivity patterns are consistent across patients. Methods: To investigate this question, 18 patients with schizophrenia (3 unmedicated, 15 medicated with atypical antipsychotics and 18 healthy controls were assessed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Independent component analysis of fMRI data revealed cortical intrinsic brain networks (NWs with time courses representing proxies for cortico-thalamic system activity. Subcortical-cerebellar systems’ activity was represented by fMRI-based time courses of selected regions-of-interest (ROIs (i.e., striatum, MTL, amygdala, cerebellum. Correlation analysis among ROI- and NWs-time courses yielded individual connectivity matrices (i.e. connectivity between NW and ROIs (allROIs-NW, separateROI-NW, only NWs (NWs-NWs, and only ROIs (allROIs-allROIs as main outcome measures, which were classified by support-vector-machine-based leave-one-out cross-validation. Differences in classification accuracy were statistically evaluated for consistency across subjects and systems. Results: Correlation matrices based on allROIs-NWs yielded 91% classification accuracy, which was significantly superior to allROIs-allROIs and NWs-NWs (56% and 74%, respectively. Considering separate

  14. Slow wave changes in amygdala to visual, auditory, and social stimuli following lesions of the inferior temporal cortex in squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus).

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    Kling, A S; Lloyd, R L; Perryman, K M

    1987-01-01

    Radiotelemetry of slow wave activity of the amygdala was recorded under a variety of conditions. Power, and the percentage of power in the delta band, increased in response to stimulation. Recordings of monkey vocalizations and slides of ethologically relevant, natural objects produced a greater increase in power than did control stimuli. The responses to auditory stimuli increased when these stimuli were presented in an unrestrained, group setting, yet the responses to the vocalizations remained greater than those following control stimuli. Both the natural auditory and visual stimuli produced a reliable hierarchy with regard to the magnitude of response. Following lesions of inferior temporal cortex, these two hierarchies are disrupted, especially in the auditory domain. Further, these same stimuli, when presented after the lesion, produced a decrease, rather than an increase, in power. Nevertheless, the power recorded from the natural stimuli was still greater than that recorded from control stimuli in that the former produced less of a decrease in power, following the lesion, than did the latter. These data, in conjunction with a parallel report on evoked potentials in the amygdala, before and after cortical lesions, lead us to conclude that sensory information, particularly auditory, available to the amygdala, following the lesion, is substantially the same, and that it is the interpretation of this information, by the amygdala, which is altered by the cortical lesion. PMID:3566692

  15. Temporal dynamics of musical emotions examined through intersubject synchrony of brain activity.

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    Trost, Wiebke; Frühholz, Sascha; Cochrane, Tom; Cojan, Yann; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2015-12-01

    To study emotional reactions to music, it is important to consider the temporal dynamics of both affective responses and underlying brain activity. Here, we investigated emotions induced by music using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a data-driven approach based on intersubject correlations (ISC). This method allowed us to identify moments in the music that produced similar brain activity (i.e. synchrony) among listeners under relatively natural listening conditions. Continuous ratings of subjective pleasantness and arousal elicited by the music were also obtained for the music outside of the scanner. Our results reveal synchronous activations in left amygdala, left insula and right caudate nucleus that were associated with higher arousal, whereas positive valence ratings correlated with decreases in amygdala and caudate activity. Additional analyses showed that synchronous amygdala responses were driven by energy-related features in the music such as root mean square and dissonance, while synchrony in insula was additionally sensitive to acoustic event density. Intersubject synchrony also occurred in the left nucleus accumbens, a region critically implicated in reward processing. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and usefulness of an approach based on ISC to explore the temporal dynamics of music perception and emotion in naturalistic conditions. PMID:25994970

  16. Relationship between remnant hippocampus and amygdala and memory outcomes after stereotactic surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malikova H

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hana Malikova,1,2,* Lenka Kramska,3,* Zdenek Vojtech,4,5 Jan Sroubek,6 Jiri Lukavsky,7 Roman Liscak8 1Department of Radiology, Na Homolce Hospital, 2Institute of Anatomy, Second Medical Faculty, Charles University in Prague, 3Department of Clinical Psychology, Na Homolce Hospital, 4Department of Neurology, Na Homolce Hospital, 5Department of Neurology, 3rd Medical Faculty, Charles University in Prague, 6Department of Neurosurgery, Na Homolce Hospital, 7Institute of Psychology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 8Department of Radiation and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Na Homolce Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and purpose: Mesial temporal structures play an important role in human memory. In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, seizure activity is generated from the same structures. Surgery is the definitive treatment for medically intractable MTLE. In addition to standard temporal lobe microsurgical resection, stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy (SAHE is used as an alternative MTLE treatment. While memory impairments after standard epilepsy surgery are well known, it has been shown that memory decline is not a feature of SAHE. The aim of the present study was to correlate the volume of the remnant hippocampus and amygdala in patients treated by SAHE with changes in memory parameters.Materials and methods: Thirty-seven MTLE patients treated by SAHE (ten right, 27 left were included. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging examinations including hippocampal and amygdalar volumetry and neuropsychological evaluation preoperatively and 1 year after surgery.Results: Using Spearman correlation analyses, larger left-sided hippocampal reductions were associated with lower verbal memory performance (ρ=-0.46; P=0.02. On the contrary, improvement of global memory quotient (MQ was positively correlated with larger right-sided hippocampal reduction (ρ=0.66; P=0

  17. The BOLD signal in the amygdala does not differentiate between dynamic facial expressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gaag, Christiaan; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Keysers, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The amygdala has been considered to be essential for recognizing fear in other people's facial expressions. Recent studies shed doubt on this interpretation. Here we used movies of facial expressions instead of static photographs to investigate the putative fear selectivity of the amygdala using fMR

  18. Dynamic perfusion patterns in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, Patrick; Paesschen, Wim van [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Zaknun, John J. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); University Hospital of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Maes, Alex [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); AZ Groeninge, Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Locharernkul, Chaichon [Chulalongkorn University, Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Bangkok (Thailand); Vasquez, Silvia; Carpintiero, Silvina [Fleni Instituto de Investigaciones Neurologicas, Nuclear Medicine, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bal, C.S. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); Ospedale Maggiore, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    To investigate dynamic ictal perfusion changes during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We investigated 37 patients with TLE by ictal and interictal SPECT. All ictal injections were performed within 60 s of seizure onset. Statistical parametric mapping was used to analyse brain perfusion changes and temporal relationships with injection time and seizure duration as covariates. The analysis revealed significant ictal hyperperfusion in the ipsilateral temporal lobe extending to subcortical regions. Hypoperfusion was observed in large extratemporal areas. There were also significant dynamic changes in several extratemporal regions: ipsilateral orbitofrontal and bilateral superior frontal gyri and the contralateral cerebellum and ipsilateral striatum. The study demonstrated early dynamic perfusion changes in extratemporal regions probably involved in both propagation of epileptic activity and initiation of inhibitory mechanisms. (orig.)

  19. Temporal Fidelity in Dynamic Social Networks

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    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Pentland, Alex 'Sandy'; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    It has recently become possible to record detailed social interactions in large social systems with high resolution. As we study these datasets, human social interactions display patterns that emerge at multiple time scales, from minutes to months. On a fundamental level, an understanding of the network dynamics can be used to inform the process of measuring social networks. The details of measurement are of particular importance when considering dynamic processes where minute-to-minute details are important, because collection of physical proximity interactions with high temporal resolution is difficult and expensive. Here, we consider the dynamic network of proximity-interactions between approximately 500 individuals participating in the Copenhagen Networks Study. We show that in order to accurately model spreading processes on the network, the dynamic processes that occur on the order of minutes are essential and must be included in the analysis.

  20. Temporal fidelity in dynamic social networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Pentland, Alex ‘Sandy’;

    2015-01-01

    of the network dynamics can be used to inform the process of measuring social networks. The details of measurement are of particular importance when considering dynamic processes where minute-to-minute details are important, because collection of physical proximity interactions with high temporal resolution......It has recently become possible to record detailed social interactions in large social systems with high resolution. As we study these datasets, human social interactions display patterns that emerge at multiple time scales, from minutes to months. On a fundamental level, understanding...... is difficult and expensive. Here, we consider the dynamic network of proximity-interactions between approximately 500 individuals participating in the Copenhagen Networks Study. We show that in order to accurately model spreading processes in the network, the dynamic processes that occur on the order...

  1. Temporal fidelity in dynamic social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Pentland, Alex `Sandy'; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-10-01

    It has recently become possible to record detailed social interactions in large social systems with high resolution. As we study these datasets, human social interactions display patterns that emerge at multiple time scales, from minutes to months. On a fundamental level, understanding of the network dynamics can be used to inform the process of measuring social networks. The details of measurement are of particular importance when considering dynamic processes where minute-to-minute details are important, because collection of physical proximity interactions with high temporal resolution is difficult and expensive. Here, we consider the dynamic network of proximity-interactions between approximately 500 individuals participating in the Copenhagen Networks Study. We show that in order to accurately model spreading processes in the network, the dynamic processes that occur on the order of minutes are essential and must be included in the analysis.

  2. Temporal information encoding in dynamic memristive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Wen; Chen, Lin; Du, Chao; Lu, Wei D., E-mail: wluee@eecs.umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    We show temporal and frequency information can be effectively encoded in memristive devices with inherent short-term dynamics. Ag/Ag{sub 2}S/Pd based memristive devices with low programming voltage (∼100 mV) were fabricated and tested. At weak programming conditions, the devices exhibit inherent decay due to spontaneous diffusion of the Ag atoms. When the devices were subjected to pulse train inputs emulating different spiking patterns, the switching probability distribution function diverges from the standard Poisson distribution and evolves according to the input pattern. The experimentally observed switching probability distributions and the associated cumulative probability functions can be well-explained using a model accounting for the short-term decay effects. Such devices offer an intriguing opportunity to directly encode neural signals for neural information storage and analysis.

  3. Temporal dynamics and regulation of lake metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter Anton; Jensen, Kaj Sand

    2007-01-01

    We studied temporal dynamics and regulation of oxygen metabolism in the upper mixed layer of a nutrientrich shallow Danish lake by continuous measurements of oxygen, irradiance, wind, and temperature and frequent measurements of algal chlorophyll, organic pools, and inorganic nutrients. Chlorophyll...... minima from fall to spring after broad-scale changes in irradiance, temperature, mixing depth, and biomass and growth rate of the algal community and concentrations of inorganic nutrients. Lake metabolism was annually balanced (mean GPP :R 1.04 in 2003 and 1.01 in 2004), with net autotrophy occurring......, which integrates growth and loss processes over longer periods. The continuous approach to lake metabolism provides better data and can provide a more accurate picture than averages of a few discrete measurements. Weekly averages reflected the characteristic seasonal peaks and troughs also observed for...

  4. Temporal dynamics of periphyton exposed to tetracycline in stream mesocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant amounts of antibiotics enter the environment via point and non-point sources. We examined the temporal dynamics of tetracycline exposure to stream periphyton and associated organisms across a logarithmically dosed series of experimental mesocosms, designed to mimic na...

  5. Amygdala atrophy affects emotion-related activity in face-responsive regions in frontotemporal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Winter, François-Laurent; Van den Stock, Jan; de Gelder, Beatrice; Peeters, Ronald; Jastorff, Jan; Sunaert, Stefan; Vanduffel, Wim; Vandenberghe, Rik; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    In the healthy brain, modulatory influences from the amygdala commonly explain enhanced activation in face-responsive areas by emotional facial expressions relative to neutral expressions. In the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) facial emotion recognition is impaired and has been associated with atrophy of the amygdala. By combining structural and functional MRI in 19 patients with bvFTD and 20 controls we investigated the neural effects of emotion in face-responsive cortex and its relationship with amygdalar gray matter (GM) volume in neurodegeneration. Voxel-based morphometry revealed decreased GM volume in anterior medio-temporal regions including amygdala in patients compared to controls. During fMRI, we presented dynamic facial expressions (fear and chewing) and their spatiotemporally scrambled versions. We found enhanced activation for fearful compared to neutral faces in ventral temporal cortex and superior temporal sulcus in controls, but not in patients. In the bvFTD group left amygdalar GM volume correlated positively with emotion-related activity in left fusiform face area (FFA). This correlation was amygdala-specific and driven by GM in superficial and basolateral (BLA) subnuclei, consistent with reported amygdalar-cortical networks. The data suggests that anterior medio-temporal atrophy in bvFTD affects emotion processing in distant posterior areas. PMID:27389802

  6. Identify Dynamic Network Modules with Temporal and Spatial Constraints

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    Jin, R; McCallen, S; Liu, C; Almaas, E; Zhou, X J

    2007-09-24

    Despite the rapid accumulation of systems-level biological data, understanding the dynamic nature of cellular activity remains a difficult task. The reason is that most biological data are static, or only correspond to snapshots of cellular activity. In this study, we explicitly attempt to detangle the temporal complexity of biological networks by using compilations of time-series gene expression profiling data.We define a dynamic network module to be a set of proteins satisfying two conditions: (1) they form a connected component in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network; and (2) their expression profiles form certain structures in the temporal domain. We develop the first efficient mining algorithm to discover dynamic modules in a temporal network, as well as frequently occurring dynamic modules across many temporal networks. Using yeast as a model system, we demonstrate that the majority of the identified dynamic modules are functionally homogeneous. Additionally, many of them provide insight into the sequential ordering of molecular events in cellular systems. We further demonstrate that identifying frequent dynamic network modules can significantly increase the signal to noise separation, despite the fact that most dynamic network modules are highly condition-specific. Finally, we note that the applicability of our algorithm is not limited to the study of PPI systems, instead it is generally applicable to the combination of any type of network and time-series data.

  7. The Temporal Dynamics of Visual Processing in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Costa, Silvana; Gonçalves, Oscar F; DeLuca, John; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Chakravarthi, Ramakrishna; Almeida, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Although the integrity of the visual system is often affected in multiple sclerosis (MS), the potential relationship between the temporal dynamics of visual processing and performance on neuropsychological tests assessing processing speed (PS) remains relatively unexplored. Here, we test if a PS deficit is related to abnormalities within the visual system, rather than impaired higher-level cognitive function. Two groups of participants with MS (1 group with PS deficits and another without) and a healthy control group, matched for age and education, were included. To explore the temporal dynamics of visual processing, we used 2 psychophysical paradigms: attention enhancement/prioritization and rapid serial visual presentation. Visual PS deficits were associated with a decreased capability to detect visual stimuli and a higher limitation in visual temporal-processing capacity. These results suggest that a latent sensorial temporal limitation of the visual system is significantly associated to PS deficits in MS. PMID:26508328

  8. Visual Experience Modulates Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Circuit Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lang; Fontanini, Alfredo; Maffei, Arianna

    2011-01-01

    Persistent reduction in sensory drive in early development results in multiple plastic changes of different cortical synapses. How these experience-dependent modifications affect the spatio-temporal dynamics of signal propagation in neocortical circuits is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that brief visual deprivation significantly affects the propagation of electrical signals in the primary visual cortex. The spatio-temporal spread of circuit activation upon direct stimulation of its i...

  9. Visual experience modulates spatio-temporal dynamics of circuit activation

    OpenAIRE

    Arianna Maffei

    2011-01-01

    Persistent reduction in sensory drive in early development results in multiple plastic changes of different cortical synapses. How these experience-dependent modifications affect the spatio-temporal dynamics of signal propagation in neocortical circuits is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that brief visual deprivation significantly affects the propagation of electrical signals in the primary visual cortex. The spatio-temporal spread of circuit activation upon direct stimulation of its i...

  10. Temporal Dynamic Appearance Modeling for Online Multi-Person Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    YANG, MIN; Jia, Yunde

    2015-01-01

    Robust online multi-person tracking requires the correct associations of online detection responses with existing trajectories. We address this problem by developing a novel appearance modeling approach to provide accurate appearance affinities to guide data association. In contrast to most existing algorithms that only consider the spatial structure of human appearances, we exploit the temporal dynamic characteristics within temporal appearance sequences to discriminate different persons. Th...

  11. Temporal nonlinear beam dynamics in infiltrated photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennet, Francis; Rosberg, Christian Romer; Neshev, Dragomir N.;

    -sensing as well as active devices for all-optical switching at low (mW) laser powers. Commercially available PCFs infiltrated with liquids also provide a versatile and compact tool for exploration of the fundamentals of nonlinear beam propagation in periodic photonic structures. To explore the full...... scientific and technological potential of liquid-infiltrated PCFs it is important to understand the temporal dynamics of nonlinear beam propagation in such structures. In this work we consider thermally induced spatial nonlinear effects in infiltrated photonic crystal fibers. We experimentally study the...... temporal dynamics of nonlinear beam reshaping occurring on a short time scale before the establishment of a steady state regime. In experiment, a 532nm laser beam can be injected into a single hole of an infiltrated PCF cladding structure, and the temporal dynamics of the nonlinear response is measured by...

  12. Temporal dynamics of Bose-condensed gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo Martinez, Mauricio

    2014-03-19

    We perform a detailed quantum dynamical study of non-equilibrium trapped, interacting Bose-condensed gases. We investigate Josephson oscillations between interacting Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a finite size double-well trap and the non-trivial time evolution of a coherent state placed at the center of a two dimensional optical lattice. For the Josephson oscillations three time scales appear. We find that Josephson junction can sustain multiple undamped oscillations up to a characteristic time scale τ{sub c} without exciting atoms out of the condensates. Beyond the characteristic time scale τ{sub c} the dynamics of the junction are governed by fast, non-condensed particles assisted Josephson tunnelling as well as the collisions between non-condensed particles. In the non-condensed particles dominated regime we observe strong damping of the oscillations due to inelastic collisions, equilibrating the system leading to an effective loss of details of the initial conditions. In addition, we predict that an initially self-trapped BEC state will be destroyed by these fast dynamics. The time evolution of a coherent state released at the center of a two dimensional optical lattice shows a ballistic expansion with a decreasing expansion velocity for increasing two-body interactions strength and particle number. Additionally, we predict that if the two-body interactions strength exceeds a certain value, a forerunner splits up from the expanding coherent state. We also observe that this system, which is prepared far from equilibrium, can evolve to a quasistationary non-equilibrium state.

  13. Dynamics on networks: competition of temporal and topological correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Artime, Oriol; Miguel, Maxi San

    2016-01-01

    Links in many real-world networks activate and deactivate in correspondence to the sporadic interactions between the elements of the system. The activation patterns may be irregular or bursty and play an important role on the dynamics of processes taking place in the network. Social networks and information or disease spreading processes are paradigmatic examples of this situation. Besides the burstiness, several other correlations may appear in the network dynamics. The activation of links connecting to the same node can be synchronized or the existence of communities in the network may mediate the activation patterns of internal an external links. Here we study the competition of topological and temporal correlations in link activation and how they affect the dynamics of systems running on the network. Interestingly, both types of correlations by separate have opposite effects: one (topological) delays the dynamics of processes on the network, while the other (temporal) accelerates it. When they occur toget...

  14. Symbolic control of attention : Tracking its temporal dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommel, Bernhard; Akyürek, Elkan G.

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments examined the temporal dynamics of the impact of symbols with task-irrelevant spatial meanings on attentional control. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants were color-cued to report the first letter they saw in the left or right of two parallel letter streams. The cue appeared in th

  15. Temporal dynamics of the Venetian blind effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobias, Joshua Jay; Stine, Wm Wren

    2012-05-01

    When square wave gratings are viewed binocularly with lower luminance or contrast in one eye, the individual bars of the grating appear to rotate around a vertical axis (Venetian blind effect). The effect has typically been thought to occur due to retinal disparities that result from irradiation and, therefore, are entirely entoptic. If so, the visual system should process disparities from a luminance or contrast disparity and a geometric disparity at the same rate. Studies of motion-in-depth using geometric disparities have shown that the visual system is unable to process depth cues when those cues are oscillated at frequencies greater than 5 Hz. By changing contrast (experiments one and two) and geometric (experiment three) disparity cues over time, the present study measured the frequency at which both the perception of motion-in-depth and the perception of depth diminish. The perception of motion-in-depth from contrast disparities decreased near 1.1 Hz (experiments one and four) and the perception of depth from contrast disparities decreased near 1.3 Hz (experiments one, two and four); both of which are lower than the frequency where depth from a geometric disparity diminished (near 4.8 Hz in experiment three). The differences between the dynamics of depth from contrast and geometric disparities suggest that the perception arises from separate neural mechanisms. PMID:22406308

  16. Temporal and evolutionary dynamics of two-component signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Michael E; Laub, Michael T

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to numerous environmental signals through two-component signaling pathways. Typically, a given stimulus will activate a sensor histidine kinase to autophosphorylate and then phosphotransfer to a cognate response regulator, which can mount an appropriate response. Although these signaling pathways often appear to be simple switches, they can also orchestrate surprisingly sophisticated and complex responses. These temporal dynamics arise from several key regulatory features, including the bifunctionality of histidine kinases as well as positive and negative feedback loops. Two-component signaling pathways are also dynamic on evolutionary time-scales, expanding dramatically in many species through gene duplication and divergence. Here, we review recent work probing the temporal and evolutionary dynamics of two-component signaling systems. PMID:25589045

  17. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics in Cellular Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu GORAS

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Analog Parallel Architectures like Cellular Neural Networks (CNN’s have been thoroughly studied not only for their potential in high-speed image processing applications but also for their rich and exciting spatio-temporal dynamics. An interesting behavior such architectures can exhibit is spatio-temporal filtering and pattern formation, aspects that will be discussed in this work for a general structure consisting of linear cells locally and homogeneously connected within a specified neighborhood. The results are generalizations of those regarding Turing pattern formation in CNN’s. Using linear cells (or piecewise linear cells working in the central linear part of their characteristic allows the use of the decoupling technique – a powerful technique that gives significant insight into the dynamics of the CNN. The roles of the cell structure as well as that of the connection template are discussed and models for the spatial modes dynamics are made as well.

  18. Nonlinear Spatio-Temporal Dynamics and Chaos in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöll, Eckehard

    2005-08-01

    Nonlinear transport phenomena are an increasingly important aspect of modern semiconductor research. This volume deals with complex nonlinear dynamics, pattern formation, and chaotic behavior in such systems. It bridges the gap between two well-established fields: the theory of dynamic systems and nonlinear charge transport in semiconductors. This unified approach helps reveal important electronic transport instabilities. The initial chapters lay a general framework for the theoretical description of nonlinear self-organized spatio-temporal patterns, such as current filaments, field domains, fronts, and analysis of their stability. Later chapters consider important model systems in detail: impact ionization induced impurity breakdown, Hall instabilities, superlattices, and low-dimensional structures. State-of-the-art results include chaos control, spatio-temporal chaos, multistability, pattern selection, activator-inhibitor kinetics, and global coupling, linking fundamental issues to electronic device applications. This book will be of great value to semiconductor physicists and nonlinear scientists alike.

  19. Temporal Dynamics of Connectivity and Epidemic Properties of Growing Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fotouhi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Traditional mathematical models of epidemic disease had for decades conventionally considered static structure for contacts. Recently, an upsurge of theoretical inquiry has strived towards rendering the models more realistic by incorporating the temporal aspects of networks of contacts, societal and online, that are of interest in the study of epidemics (and other similar diffusion processes). However, temporal dynamics have predominantly focused on link fluctuations and nodal activities, and less attention has been paid to the growth of the underlying network. Many real networks grow: online networks are evidently in constant growth, and societal networks can grow due to migration flux and reproduction. The effect of network growth on the epidemic properties of networks is hitherto unknown---mainly due to the predominant focus of the network growth literature on the so-called steady-state. This paper takes a step towards alleviating this gap. We analytically study the degree dynamics of a given arbitrary net...

  20. Temporal and Evolutionary Dynamics of Two-Component Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Michael E.; Laub, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to numerous environmental signals through two-component signaling pathways. Typically, a given stimulus will activate a sensor histidine kinase to autophosphorylate and then phosphotransfer to a cognate response regulator, which can mount an appropriate response. Although these signaling pathways often appear to be simple switches, they can also orchestrate surprisingly sophisticated and complex responses. These temporal dynamics arise from several key regulatory fe...

  1. The scaling properties of dynamical fluctuations in temporal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chi, Liping

    2015-01-01

    The factorial moments analyses are performed to study the scaling properties of the dynamical fluctuations of contacts and nodes in temporal networks based on empirical data sets. The intermittent behaviors are observed in the fluctuations for all orders of the moments. It indicates that the interaction has self-similarity structure in time interval and the fluctuations are not purely random but dynamical and correlated. The scaling exponents for contacts in Prostitution data and nodes in Conference data are very close to that for 2D Ising model undergoing a second-order phase transition.

  2. Estimating spatio-temporal dynamics of size-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Andersen, Ken Haste; Beyer, Jan E.

    2014-01-01

    simple stock dynamics, to estimate simultaneously how size distributions and spatial distributions develop in time. We demonstrate the method for a cod population sampled by trawl surveys. Particular attention is paid to correlation between size classes within each trawl haul due to clustering of...... individuals with similar size. The model estimates growth, mortality and reproduction, after which any aspect of size-structure, spatio-temporal population dynamics, as well as the sampling process can be probed. This is illustrated by two applications: 1) tracking the spatial movements of a single cohort...

  3. Estimation of dynamic functional connectivity using Multiplication of Temporal Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shine, James M; Koyejo, Oluwasanmi; Bell, Peter T; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Gilat, Moran; Poldrack, Russell A

    2015-11-15

    Functional connectivity provides an informative and powerful framework for exploring brain organization. Despite this, few statistical methods are available for the accurate estimation of dynamic changes in functional network architecture. To date, the majority of existing statistical techniques have assumed that connectivity structure is stationary, which is in direct contrast to emerging data that suggests that the strength of connectivity between regions is variable over time. Therefore, the development of statistical methods that enable exploration of dynamic changes in functional connectivity is currently of great importance to the neuroscience community. In this paper, we introduce the 'Multiplication of Temporal Derivatives' (MTD) and then demonstrate the utility of this metric to: (i) detect dynamic changes in connectivity using data from a novel state-switching simulation; (ii) accurately estimate graph structure in a previously-described 'ground-truth' simulated dataset; and (iii) identify task-driven alterations in functional connectivity. We show that the MTD is more sensitive than existing sliding-window methods in detecting dynamic alterations in connectivity structure across a range of correlation strengths and window lengths in simulated data. In addition to the temporal precision offered by MTD, we demonstrate that the metric is also able to accurately estimate stationary network structure in both simulated and real task-based data, suggesting that the method may be used to identify dynamic changes in network structure as they evolve through time. PMID:26231247

  4. Visual experience modulates spatio-temporal dynamics of circuit activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Maffei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent reduction in sensory drive in early development results in multiple plastic changes of different cortical synapses. How these experience-dependent modifications affect the spatio-temporal dynamics of signal propagation in neocortical circuits is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that brief visual deprivation significantly affects the propagation of electrical signals in the primary visual cortex. The spatio-temporal spread of circuit activation upon direct stimulation of its input layer (Layer 4 is reduced, as is the activation of Layer 2/3 – the main recipient of the output from Layer 4. Our data suggest that the decrease in spatio-temporal activation of L2/3 depends on reduced L4 output, and is not intrinsically generated within L2/3. The data shown here suggest that changes in the synaptic components of the visual cortical circuit result not only in alteration of local integration of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, but also in a significant decrease in overall circuit activation. Furthermore, our data indicate a differential effect of visual deprivation on L4 and L2/3, suggesting that while feedforward activation of L2/3 is reduced, its activation by long range, within layer inputs is unaltered. Thus, brief visual deprivation induces experience-dependent circuit re-organization by modulating not only circuit excitability, but also the spatio-temporal patterns of cortical activation within and between layers.

  5. Perception of temporal asymmetries in dynamic facial expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Reinl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the current study we examined whether timeline-reversals and emotional direction of dynamic facial expressions affect subjective experience of human observers. We recorded natural movies of faces that increased or decreased their expressions of fear, and played them either in the natural frame order or reversed from last to first frame (reversed timeline. This led to four conditions of increasing or decreasing fear, either following the natural or reversed temporal trajectory of facial dynamics. This 2-by-2 factorial design controlled for visual low-level properties, static visual content, and motion energy across the different factors. It allowed us to examine perceptual consequences that would occur if the timeline trajectory of facial muscle movements during the increase of an emotion are not the exact mirror of the timeline during the decrease. It additionally allowed us to study perceptual differences between increasing and decreasing emotional expressions. Perception of these time-dependent asymmetries have not yet been quantified. We found that three emotional measures, emotional intensity, artificialness of facial movement, and convincingness or plausibility of emotion portrayal, were affected by timeline reversals as well as by the emotional direction of the facial expressions. Our results imply that natural dynamic facial expressions contain temporal asymmetries, and show that deviations from the natural timeline lead to a reduction of perceived emotional intensity and convincingness, and to an increase of perceived artificialness of the dynamic facial expression. In addition, they show that decreasing facial expressions are judged as less plausible than increasing facial expressions. Our findings are of relevance for both, behavioural as well as neuroimaging studies, as processing and perception are influenced by temporal asymmetries.

  6. Spatial and temporal dynamics of infected populations: the Mexican epidemic

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Meza, Mario A

    2012-01-01

    Recently the A/H1N1-2009 virus pandemic appeared in Mexico and in other nations. We present a study of this pandemic in the Mexican case using the SIR model to describe epidemics. This model is one of the simplest models but it has been a successful description of some epidemics of closed populations. We consider the data for the Mexican case and use the SIR model to make some predictions. Then, we generalize the SIR model in order to describe the spatial dynamics of the disease. We make a study of the spatial and temporal spread of the infected population with model parameters that are consistent with temporal SIR model parameters obtained by fitting to the Mexican case.

  7. Disturbed temporal dynamics of brain synchronization in vision loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, Michał; Gall, Carolin; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2015-06-01

    Damage along the visual pathway prevents bottom-up visual input from reaching further processing stages and consequently leads to loss of vision. But perception is not a simple bottom-up process - rather it emerges from activity of widespread cortical networks which coordinate visual processing in space and time. Here we set out to study how vision loss affects activity of brain visual networks and how networks' activity is related to perception. Specifically, we focused on studying temporal patterns of brain activity. To this end, resting-state eyes-closed EEG was recorded from partially blind patients suffering from chronic retina and/or optic-nerve damage (n = 19) and healthy controls (n = 13). Amplitude (power) of oscillatory activity and phase locking value (PLV) were used as measures of local and distant synchronization, respectively. Synchronization time series were created for the low- (7-9 Hz) and high-alpha band (11-13 Hz) and analyzed with three measures of temporal patterns: (i) length of synchronized-/desynchronized-periods, (ii) Higuchi Fractal Dimension (HFD), and (iii) Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA). We revealed that patients exhibit less complex, more random and noise-like temporal dynamics of high-alpha band activity. More random temporal patterns were associated with worse performance in static (r = -.54, p = .017) and kinetic perimetry (r = .47, p = .041). We conclude that disturbed temporal patterns of neural synchronization in vision loss patients indicate disrupted communication within brain visual networks caused by prolonged deafferentation. We propose that because the state of brain networks is essential for normal perception, impaired brain synchronization in patients with vision loss might aggravate the functional consequences of reduced visual input. PMID:25956453

  8. Synthesizing Dynamic Programming Algorithms from Linear Temporal Logic Formulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu, Grigore; Havelund, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    The problem of testing a linear temporal logic (LTL) formula on a finite execution trace of events, generated by an executing program, occurs naturally in runtime analysis of software. We present an algorithm which takes an LTL formula and generates an efficient dynamic programming algorithm. The generated algorithm tests whether the LTL formula is satisfied by a finite trace of events given as input. The generated algorithm runs in linear time, its constant depending on the size of the LTL formula. The memory needed is constant, also depending on the size of the formula.

  9. The temporal dynamics of international migration in Europe: Recent trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack DeWaard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Descriptive studies of international migration typically rely on measures of migrant stocks and migration rates to assess migration patterns. In this paper, we propose a third alternative. Using harmonized data on age-specific migration flows from and to countries in the European Union (EU and European Free Trade Association (EFTA from 2002-2007, we estimate the waiting time of international migration, i.e., the total time lived by migrants in receiving countries, on average, given period migration and mortality schedules. The results provide a window into the temporal dynamics of international migration in Europe, which are increasingly relevant given recent expansions of the EU.

  10. Early versus Late-Phase Consolidation of Opiate Reward Memories Requires Distinct Molecular and Temporal Mechanisms in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Cortical Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Shervin Gholizadeh; Ninglei Sun; Xavier De Jaeger; Melanie Bechard; Lique Coolen; Laviolette, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    The consolidation of newly acquired memories involves the temporal transition from a recent, less stable trace to a more permanent consolidated form. Opiates possess potent rewarding effects and produce powerful associative memories. The activation of these memories is associated with opiate abuse relapse phenomena and the persistence of compulsive opiate dependence. However, the neuronal, molecular and temporal mechanisms by which associative opiate reward memories are consolidated are not c...

  11. 4-Hz oscillations synchronize prefrontal-amygdala circuits during fear behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalis, Nikolaos; Dejean, Cyril; Chaudun, Fabrice; Khoder, Suzana; Rozeske, Robert R; Wurtz, Hélène; Bagur, Sophie; Benchenane, Karim; Sirota, Anton; Courtin, Julien; Herry, Cyril

    2016-04-01

    Fear expression relies on the coordinated activity of prefrontal and amygdala circuits, yet the mechanisms allowing long-range network synchronization during fear remain unknown. Using a combination of extracellular recordings, pharmacological and optogenetic manipulations, we found that freezing, a behavioral expression of fear, temporally coincided with the development of sustained, internally generated 4-Hz oscillations in prefrontal-amygdala circuits. 4-Hz oscillations predict freezing onset and offset and synchronize prefrontal-amygdala circuits. Optogenetic induction of prefrontal 4-Hz oscillations coordinates prefrontal-amygdala activity and elicits fear behavior. These results unravel a sustained oscillatory mechanism mediating prefrontal-amygdala coupling during fear behavior. PMID:26878674

  12. Temporal dynamics of biotic and abiotic drivers of litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Shaw, E Ashley; Wall, Diana H; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Climate, litter quality and decomposers drive litter decomposition. However, little is known about whether their relative contribution changes at different decomposition stages. To fill this gap, we evaluated the relative importance of leaf litter polyphenols, decomposer communities and soil moisture for litter C and N loss at different stages throughout the decomposition process. Although both microbial and nematode communities regulated litter C and N loss in the early decomposition stages, soil moisture and legacy effects of initial differences in litter quality played a major role in the late stages of the process. Our results provide strong evidence for substantial shifts in how biotic and abiotic factors control litter C and N dynamics during decomposition. Taking into account such temporal dynamics will increase the predictive power of decomposition models that are currently limited by a single-pool approach applying control variables uniformly to the entire decay process. PMID:26947573

  13. Temporal dynamics of glyoxalase 1 in secondary neuronal injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Pieroh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enhanced glycolysis leads to elevated levels of the toxic metabolite methylglyoxal which contributes to loss of protein-function, metabolic imbalance and cell death. Neurons were shown being highly susceptible to methylglyoxal toxicity. Glyoxalase 1 as an ubiquitous enzyme reflects the main detoxifying enzyme of methylglyoxal and underlies changes during aging and neurodegeneration. However, little is known about dynamics of Glyoxalase 1 following neuronal lesions so far. METHODS: To determine a possible involvement of Glyoxalase 1 in acute brain injury, we analysed the temporal dynamics of Glyoxalase 1 distribution and expression by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot analysis. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures were excitotoxically (N-methyl-D-aspartate, 50 µM for 4 hours lesioned in vitro (5 minutes to 72 hours. Additionally, permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed (75 minutes to 60 days. RESULTS: We found (i a predominant localisation of Glyoxalase 1 in endothelial cells in non-lesioned brains (ii a time-dependent up-regulation and re-distribution of Glyoxalase 1 in neurons and astrocytes and (iii a strong increase in Glyoxalase 1 dimers after neuronal injury (24 hours to 72 hours when compared to monomers of the protein. CONCLUSIONS: The high dynamics of Glyoxalase 1 expression and distribution following neuronal injury may indicate a novel role of Glyoxalase 1.

  14. Neonatal Amygdala or Hippocampus Lesions Influence Responsiveness to Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Toscano, Jessica E.; Bauman, Melissa; Mason, William A.; Amaral, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe brain structures, such as the amygdala, play an important role in the normal perception and generation of emotional behavior. Little research, however, has assessed the role of such structures across the neurodevelopmental trajectory. We assessed emotional behavioral responses of rhesus macaques that received bilateral ibotenic acid lesions of the amygdala or hippocampus at two weeks of age and sham-operated controls. At 9 and 18 months of age, animals interacted with nov...

  15. Noise-induced temporal dynamics in Turing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Schumacher, Linus J.

    2013-04-25

    We examine the ability of intrinsic noise to produce complex temporal dynamics in Turing pattern formation systems, with particular emphasis on the Schnakenberg kinetics. Using power spectral methods, we characterize the behavior of the system using stochastic simulations at a wide range of points in parameter space and compare with analytical approximations. Specifically, we investigate whether polarity switching of stochastic patterns occurs at a defined frequency. We find that it can do so in individual realizations of a stochastic simulation, but that the frequency is not defined consistently across realizations in our samples of parameter space. Further, we examine the effect of noise on deterministically predicted traveling waves and find them increased in amplitude and decreased in speed. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  16. Activity clocks: spreading dynamics on temporal networks of human contact

    CERN Document Server

    Gauvin, Laetitia; Cattuto, Ciro; Barrat, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical processes on time-varying complex networks are key to un- derstanding and modeling a broad variety of processes in socio-technical systems. Here we focus on empirical temporal networks of human proxim- ity and we aim at understanding the factors that, in simulation, shape the arrival time distribution of simple spreading processes. Abandoning the notion of wall-clock time in favour of node-specific clocks based on activ- ity exposes robust statistical patterns in the arrival times across different social contexts. Using randomization strategies and generative models constrained by data, we show that these patterns can be understood in terms of heterogeneous inter-event time distributions coupled with hetero- geneous numbers of events per edge. We also show, both empirically and by using a synthetic dataset, that significant deviations from the above behavior can be caused by the presence of edge classes with strong activity correlations.

  17. Temporal dynamics of connectivity and epidemic properties of growing networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Babak; Shirkoohi, Mehrdad Khani

    2016-01-01

    Traditional mathematical models of epidemic disease had for decades conventionally considered static structure for contacts. Recently, an upsurge of theoretical inquiry has strived towards rendering the models more realistic by incorporating the temporal aspects of networks of contacts, societal and online, that are of interest in the study of epidemics (and other similar diffusion processes). However, temporal dynamics have predominantly focused on link fluctuations and nodal activities, and less attention has been paid to the growth of the underlying network. Many real networks grow: Online networks are evidently in constant growth, and societal networks can grow due to migration flux and reproduction. The effect of network growth on the epidemic properties of networks is hitherto unknown, mainly due to the predominant focus of the network growth literature on the so-called steady state. This paper takes a step towards alleviating this gap. We analytically study the degree dynamics of a given arbitrary network that is subject to growth. We use the theoretical findings to predict the epidemic properties of the network as a function of time. We observe that the introduction of new individuals into the network can enhance or diminish its resilience against endemic outbreaks and investigate how this regime shift depends upon the connectivity of newcomers and on how they establish connections to existing nodes. Throughout, theoretical findings are corroborated with Monte Carlo simulations over synthetic and real networks. The results shed light on the effects of network growth on the future epidemic properties of networks and offers insights for devising a priori immunization strategies. PMID:26871086

  18. Understanding the Spatial Temporal Vegetation Dynamics in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Ndayisaba

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of current vegetation dynamics and an ability to make accurate predictions of ecological changes are essential for minimizing food scarcity in developing countries. Vegetation trends are also closely related to sustainability issues, such as management of conservation areas and wildlife habitats. In this study, AVHRR and MODIS NDVI datasets have been used to assess the spatial temporal dynamics of vegetation greenness in Rwanda under the contrasting trends of precipitation, for the period starting from 1990 to 2014, and for the first growing season (season A. Based on regression analysis and the Hurst exponent index methods, we have investigated the spatial temporal characteristics and the interrelationships between vegetation greenness and precipitation in light of NDVI and gridded meteorological datasets. The findings revealed that the vegetation cover was characterized by an increasing trend of a maximum annual change rate of 0.043. The results also suggest that 81.3% of the country’s vegetation has improved throughout the study period, while 14.1% of the country’s vegetation degraded, from slight (7.5% to substantial (6.6% deterioration. Most pixels with severe degradation were found in Kigali city and the Eastern Province. The analysis of changes per vegetation type highlighted that five types of vegetation are seriously endangered: The “mosaic grassland/forest or shrubland” was severely degraded, followed by “sparse vegetation,” “grassland or woody vegetation regularly flooded on water logged soil,” “artificial surfaces” and “broadleaved forest regularly flooded.” The Hurst exponent results indicated that the vegetation trend was consistent, with a sustainable area percentage of 40.16%, unsustainable area of 1.67% and an unpredictable area of 58.17%. This study will provide government and local authorities with valuable information for improving efficiency in the recently targeted countrywide efforts of

  19. Temporal dynamics of connectivity and epidemic properties of growing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Babak; Shirkoohi, Mehrdad Khani

    2016-01-01

    Traditional mathematical models of epidemic disease had for decades conventionally considered static structure for contacts. Recently, an upsurge of theoretical inquiry has strived towards rendering the models more realistic by incorporating the temporal aspects of networks of contacts, societal and online, that are of interest in the study of epidemics (and other similar diffusion processes). However, temporal dynamics have predominantly focused on link fluctuations and nodal activities, and less attention has been paid to the growth of the underlying network. Many real networks grow: Online networks are evidently in constant growth, and societal networks can grow due to migration flux and reproduction. The effect of network growth on the epidemic properties of networks is hitherto unknown, mainly due to the predominant focus of the network growth literature on the so-called steady state. This paper takes a step towards alleviating this gap. We analytically study the degree dynamics of a given arbitrary network that is subject to growth. We use the theoretical findings to predict the epidemic properties of the network as a function of time. We observe that the introduction of new individuals into the network can enhance or diminish its resilience against endemic outbreaks and investigate how this regime shift depends upon the connectivity of newcomers and on how they establish connections to existing nodes. Throughout, theoretical findings are corroborated with Monte Carlo simulations over synthetic and real networks. The results shed light on the effects of network growth on the future epidemic properties of networks and offers insights for devising a priori immunization strategies.

  20. Plasticity-related genes in brain development and amygdala-dependent learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, D E; Josselyn, S A

    2016-01-01

    Learning about motivationally important stimuli involves plasticity in the amygdala, a temporal lobe structure. Amygdala-dependent learning involves a growing number of plasticity-related signaling pathways also implicated in brain development, suggesting that learning-related signaling in juveniles may simultaneously influence development. Here, we review the pleiotropic functions in nervous system development and amygdala-dependent learning of a signaling pathway that includes brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), extracellular signaling-related kinases (ERKs) and cyclic AMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Using these canonical, plasticity-related genes as an example, we discuss the intersection of learning-related and developmental plasticity in the immature amygdala, when aversive and appetitive learning may influence the developmental trajectory of amygdala function. We propose that learning-dependent activation of BDNF, ERK and CREB signaling in the immature amygdala exaggerates and accelerates neural development, promoting amygdala excitability and environmental sensitivity later in life. PMID:26419764

  1. The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Memory Formation in Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    The central, lateral and basolateral amygdala (BLA) nuclei are essential for the formation of long-term memories including emotional and drug-related memories. Studying cellular and molecular mechanisms of memory in amygdala may lead to better understanding of how memory is formed and of fear and addiction-related disorders. A challenge is to identify molecules activated by learning that subserve cellular changes needed for memory formation and maintenance in amygdala. Recent studies show that activation of synaptic receptors during fear and drug-related learning leads to alteration in actin cytoskeleton dynamics and structure in amygdala. Such changes in actin cytoskeleton in amygdala are essential for fear and drug-related memories formation. Moreover, the actin cytoskeleton subserves, after learning, changes in neuronal morphogenesis and glutamate receptors trafficking in amygdala. These cellular events are involved in fear and drug-related memories formation. Actin polymerization is also needed for the maintenance of drug-associated memories in amygdala. Thus, the actin cytoskeleton is a key mediator between receptor activation during learning and cellular changes subserving long-term memory (LTM) in amygdala. The actin cytoskeleton may serve as a target for pharmacological treatment of fear memory associated with fear and anxiety disorders and drug addiction to prevent the debilitating consequences of these diseases. PMID:27065800

  2. Forecasting temporal dynamics of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Northeast Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Lewnard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is a vector-borne disease of increasing importance in northeastern Brazil. It is known that sandflies, which spread the causative parasites, have weather-dependent population dynamics. Routinely-gathered weather data may be useful for anticipating disease risk and planning interventions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We fit time series models using meteorological covariates to predict CL cases in a rural region of Bahía, Brazil from 1994 to 2004. We used the models to forecast CL cases for the period 2005 to 2008. Models accounting for meteorological predictors reduced mean squared error in one, two, and three month-ahead forecasts by up to 16% relative to forecasts from a null model accounting only for temporal autocorrelation. SIGNIFICANCE: These outcomes suggest CL risk in northeastern Brazil might be partially dependent on weather. Responses to forecasted CL epidemics may include bolstering clinical capacity and disease surveillance in at-risk areas. Ecological mechanisms by which weather influences CL risk merit future research attention as public health intervention targets.

  3. Impaired Bottom-Up Effective Connectivity Between Amygdala and Subgenual Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Unmedicated Adolescents with Major Depression: Results from a Dynamic Causal Modeling Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, Donald R; Eberly, Lynn E; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Basgoze, Zeynep; Thomas, Kathleen M; Mueller, Bryon A; Houri, Alaa; Lim, Kelvin O; Cullen, Kathryn R

    2015-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a significant contributor to lifetime disability and frequently emerges in adolescence, yet little is known about the neural mechanisms of MDD in adolescents. Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) analysis is an innovative tool that can shed light on neural network abnormalities. A DCM analysis was conducted to test several frontolimbic effective connectivity models in 27 adolescents with MDD and 21 healthy adolescents. The best neural model for each person was identified using Bayesian model selection. The findings revealed that the two adolescent groups fit similar optimal neural models. The best across-groups model was then used to infer upon both within-group and between-group tests of intrinsic and modulation parameters of the network connections. First, for model validation, within-group tests revealed robust evidence for bottom-up connectivity, but less evidence for strong top-down connectivity in both groups. Second, we tested for differences between groups on the validated parameters of the best model. This revealed that adolescents with MDD had significantly weaker bottom-up connectivity in one pathway, from amygdala to sgACC (p=0.008), than healthy controls. This study provides the first examination of effective connectivity using DCM within neural circuitry implicated in emotion processing in adolescents with MDD. These findings aid in advancing understanding the neurobiology of early-onset MDD during adolescence and have implications for future research investigating how effective connectivity changes across contexts, with development, over the course of the disease, and after intervention. PMID:26050933

  4. A new perspective on the spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture: temporal dynamics versus time invariant contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mittelbach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture is essential to understand and predict processes in climate science and hydrology. A significant body of literature exists on the characterization of the spatial variability and the ranks stability (also called temporal stability of absolute soil moisture. Yet previous studies were generally based on short-term measurement campaigns and did not distinguish the respective contributions of time varying and time invariant components to these quantities. In this study, we investigate this issue using measurements from 14 grassland sites of the SwissSMEX soil moisture network (spatial extent of approx. 150 × 210 km over the time period May 2010 to July 2011. We thereby decompose the spatial variance of absolute soil moisture over time in contributions from the spatial variance of the mean soil moisture at all sites (which is time invariant, and components that vary over time and are related to soil moisture dynamics. These include the spatial variance of the temporal soil moisture anomalies at all sites and the covariance between the sites' anomalies to the spatial mean at a given time step and those for the temporal mean values. The analysis demonstrates that the time invariant term contributes 50–160% (on average 94% of the spatial soil moisture variance at any point in time, while the covariance term generally contributes negatively to the spatial variance. On the other hand the spatial variance of the temporal anomalies, which is overall most relevant for climate and hydrological applications because it is directly related to soil moisture dynamics, is relatively limited and constitutes at most 2–30% (on average 9% of the total variance. Nonetheless, this term is not negligible compared to the temporal anomalies of the spatial mean. These results suggest that a large fraction of the spatial variability of soil moisture assessed from short-term campaign is time invariant

  5. A new perspective on the spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture: temporal dynamics versus time-invariant contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mittelbach

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture is essential to understand and predict processes in climate science and hydrology. A significant body of literature exists on the characterization of the spatial variability and the rank stability (also called temporal stability of absolute soil moisture. Yet previous studies were generally based on short-term measurement campaigns and did not distinguish the respective contributions of time-varying and time-invariant components to these quantities. In this study, we investigate this issue using measurements from 14 grassland sites of the SwissSMEX soil moisture network (spatial extent of approx. 150 × 210 km over the time period May 2010 to July 2011. We thereby decompose the spatial variance of absolute soil moisture over time in contributions from the spatial variance of the mean soil moisture at all sites (which is time-invariant, and components that vary over time and are related to soil moisture dynamics. These include the spatial variance of the temporal soil moisture anomalies at all sites and the covariance between the site anomalies to the spatial mean at a given time step and those for the temporal mean values. The analysis demonstrates that the time-invariant term contributes 50–160% (on average 94% of the spatial soil moisture variance at any point in time, while the covariance term generally contributes negatively to the spatial variance. On the other hand, the spatial variance of the temporal anomalies, which is overall most relevant for climate and hydrological applications because it is related to soil moisture dynamics, is relatively limited and constitutes at most 2–30% (on average 9% of the total variance. Nonetheless, this term is not negligible compared to the temporal anomalies of the spatial mean. These results suggest that a large fraction of the spatial variability of soil moisture assessed from short-term campaign may be time-invariant if other

  6. Dynamic expression of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein in neurons of the striatum and amygdala of mice, and experimental evidence of their multiple embryonic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bupesh, Munisamy; Vicario, Alba; Abellán, Antonio; Desfilis, Ester; Medina, Loreta

    2014-05-01

    Emotional and motivational dysfunctions observed in Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and drug addiction are associated to an alteration of the mesocortical and mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways, which include axons projecting to the prefrontal cortex, the ventral striatum, and the amygdala. Subpopulations of catecholaminergic neurons have been described in the cortex and striatum of several mammals, but the presence of such cells in the adult amygdala is unclear in murine rodents, and in other rodents appears to show variations depending on the species. Moreover, the embryonic origin of telencephalic tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) cells is unknown, which is essential for trying to understand aspects of their evolution, distribution and function. Herein we investigated the expression of TH mRNA and protein in cells of the striatum and amygdala of developing and adult mice, and analyzed the embryonic origin of such cells using in vitro migration assays. Our results showed the presence of TH mRNA and protein expressing cells in the striatum (including nucleus accumbens), central and medial extended amygdala during development, which are persistent in adulthood although they are less numerous, generally show weak mRNA expression, and some appear to lack the protein. Fate mapping analysis showed that these cells include at least two subpopulations with different embryonic origin in either the commissural preoptic area of the subpallium or the supraopto-paraventricular domain of the alar hypothalamus. These data are important for future studies trying to understand the role of catecholamines in modulation of emotion, motivation, and reward. PMID:23479178

  7. Temporal dynamics of phytoplankton and heterotrophic protists at station ALOHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasulka, Alexis L.; Landry, Michael R.; Taniguchi, Darcy A. A.; Taylor, Andrew G.; Church, Matthew J.

    2013-09-01

    Pico- and nano-sized autotrophic and heterotrophic unicellular eukaryotes (protists) are an important component of open-ocean food webs. To date, however, no direct measurements of cell abundance and biomass of these organisms have been incorporated into our understanding of temporal variability in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). Based primarily on epifluoresence microscopy augmented with flow cytometry, we assessed the abundance and biomass of autotrophs and heterotrophic protists at Station ALOHA between June 2004 and January 2009. Autotrophic eukaryotes (A-EUKS) were more abundant in both the upper euphotic zone and deep chlorophyll maximum layer (DCML) during winter months, driven mostly by small flagellates. A higher ratio of A-EUKS to heterotrophic protists (A:H ratio) and a structural shift in A-EUKS to smaller cells during the winter suggests a seasonal minimum in grazing pressure. Although Prochlococcus spp. comprised between 30% and 50% of autotrophic biomass in both the upper and lower euphotic zone for most of the year, the community structure and seasonality of nano- and micro-phytoplankon differed between the two layers. In the upper layer, Trichodesmium spp. was an important contributor to total biomass (20-50%) in the late summer and early fall. Among A-EUKS, prymnesiophytes and other small flagellates were the dominant contributors to total biomass in both layers regardless of season (10-20% and 13-39%, respectively). Based on our biomass estimates, community composition was less seasonally variable in the DCML relative to the upper euphotic zone. In surface waters, mean estimates of C:Chl a varied with season—highest in the summer and lowest in the winter (means=156±157 and 89±32, respectively); however, there was little seasonal variability of C:Chl a in the DCML (100 m mean=29.9±9.8). Biomass of heterotrophic protists peaked in the summer and generally declined monotonically with depth without a deep maximum. Anomalous patterns

  8. Temporally Dynamic, Spatially Static, Cobble Bedforms In Reversing Subtidal Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkade, Akirat; Carling, Paul; Zong, Quanli; Leyland, Julian; Thompson, Charlie

    2016-04-01

    Cobble bedforms, transverse to the reversing tidal currents, are exposed at extreme low-water Spring tides on an inter-tidal bedrock shelf in the macro-tidal Severn Estuary, UK. Near-bed flow velocities during Spring tides can exceed 1.5m/s, with water depths varying from zero to in excess of 10m. During neap tides the bedforms are not exposed, and sediment is expected to be of limited mobility. When exposed, the bedform geometry tends to be asymmetric; orientated down estuary with the ebb current. During Spring tides, vigorous bedload transport of gravel (including large cobbles) occurs during both flood and ebb over the crests and yet, despite this temporal dynamism, the bedforms remain spatially static over long time periods or show weak down-estuary migration. Stasis implies that the tidal bedload transport vectors are essentially in balance. Near-bed shear stress and bed roughness values vary systematically with the Spring-tide current speeds and the predicted grain-size of the bed load using the Shields criterion is in accord with observed coarser grain-sizes in transport. These hydrodynamic data, delimited by estimates of the threshold of motion, and integrated over either flood or ebb tides are being used to explain the apparent stability of the bedforms. The bulk hydraulic data are supplemented by particle tracer studies and laser-scanning of bed configurations between tides. The high-energy environment results in two forms of armouring. Pronounced steep imbrication of platy-cobbles visible on the exposed up-estuary side of dunes is probably disrupted during flood tides leading to rapid reworking of the toe deposits facing up-estuary. In contrast, some crest and leeside locations have been stable for prolonged periods such that closely-fitted fabrics result; these portions of the bedforms are static and effectively are 'armour-plated'. Ebb-tide deposits of finer, ephemeral sandy-units occur on the down estuary side of the bedforms. Sandy-units (although

  9. Optogenetic dissection of amygdala functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eLalumiere

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies of amygdala functioning have occupied a significant place in the history of understanding how the brain controls behavior and cognition. Early work on the amygdala placed this small structure as a key component in the regulation of emotion and affective behavior. Over time, our understanding of its role in brain processes has expanded, as we have uncovered amygdala influences on memory, reward behavior, and overall functioning in many other brain regions. Studies have indicated that the amygdala has widespread connections with a variety of brain structures, from the prefrontal cortex to regions of the brainstem, that explain its powerful influence on other parts of the brain and behaviors mediated by those regions. Thus, many optogenetic studies have focused on harnessing the powers of this technique to elucidate the functioning of the amygdala in relation to motivation, fear, and memory as well as to determine how the amygdala regulates activity in other structures. For example, studies using optogenetics have examined how specific circuits within amygdala nuclei regulate anxiety. Other work has provided insight into how the basolateral and central amygdala nuclei regulate memory processing underlying aversive learning. Many experiments have taken advantage of optogenetics’ ability to target either genetically distinct subpopulations of neurons or the specific projections from the amygdala to other brain regions. Findings from such studies have provided evidence that particular patterns of activity in basolateral amygdala glutamatergic neurons are related to memory consolidation processes, while other work has indicated the critical nature of amygdala inputs to the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens in regulating behavior dependent on those downstream structures. This review will examine the recent discoveries on amygdala functioning made through experiments using optogenetics, placing these findings in the context of the major

  10. Optogenetic dissection of amygdala functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalumiere, Ryan T

    2014-01-01

    Studies of amygdala functioning have occupied a significant place in the history of understanding how the brain controls behavior and cognition. Early work on the amygdala placed this small structure as a key component in the regulation of emotion and affective behavior. Over time, our understanding of its role in brain processes has expanded, as we have uncovered amygdala influences on memory, reward behavior, and overall functioning in many other brain regions. Studies have indicated that the amygdala has widespread connections with a variety of brain structures, from the prefrontal cortex to regions of the brainstem, that explain its powerful influence on other parts of the brain and behaviors mediated by those regions. Thus, many optogenetic studies have focused on harnessing the powers of this technique to elucidate the functioning of the amygdala in relation to motivation, fear, and memory as well as to determine how the amygdala regulates activity in other structures. For example, studies using optogenetics have examined how specific circuits within amygdala nuclei regulate anxiety. Other work has provided insight into how the basolateral and central amygdala nuclei regulate memory processing underlying aversive learning. Many experiments have taken advantage of optogenetics' ability to target either genetically distinct subpopulations of neurons or the specific projections from the amygdala to other brain regions. Findings from such studies have provided evidence that particular patterns of activity in basolateral amygdala (BLA) glutamatergic neurons are related to memory consolidation processes, while other work has indicated the critical nature of amygdala inputs to the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens (NA) in regulating behavior dependent on those downstream structures. This review will examine the recent discoveries on amygdala functioning made through experiments using optogenetics, placing these findings in the context of the major questions in

  11. Optogenetic dissection of amygdala functioning

    OpenAIRE

    LaLumiere, Ryan T

    2014-01-01

    Studies of amygdala functioning have occupied a significant place in the history of understanding how the brain controls behavior and cognition. Early work on the amygdala placed this small structure as a key component in the regulation of emotion and affective behavior. Over time, our understanding of its role in brain processes has expanded, as we have uncovered amygdala influences on memory, reward behavior, and overall functioning in many other brain regions. Studies have indicated that t...

  12. Spatio-temporal dynamics of kind versus hostile intentions in the human brain: An electrical neuroimaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwen; Huang, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zhen; Cacioppo, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Neuroscience research suggests that inferring neutral intentions of other people recruits a specific brain network within the inferior fronto-parietal action observation network as well as a putative social network including brain areas subserving theory of mind, such as the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), and also the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Recent studies on harmful intentions have refined this network by showing the specific involvement of the ACC, amygdala, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in early stages (within 200 ms) of information processing. However, the functional dynamics for kind intentions within and among these networks remains unclear. To address this question, we measured electrical brain activity from 18 healthy adult participants while they were performing an intention inference task with three different types of intentions: kind, hostile and non-interactive. Electrophysiological results revealed that kind intentions were characterized by significantly larger peak amplitudes of N2 over the frontal sites than those for hostile and non-interactive intentions. On the other hand, there were no significant differences between hostile and non-interactive intentions at N2. The source analysis suggested that the vicinity of the left cingulate gyrus contributed to the N2 effect by subtracting the kindness condition from the non-interactive condition within 250-350 ms. At a later stage (i.e., during the 270-500 ms epoch), the peak amplitude of the P3 over the parietal sites and the right hemisphere was significantly larger for hostile intentions compared to the kind and non-interactive intentions. No significant differences were observed at P3 between kind and non-interactive intentions. The source analysis showed that the vicinity of the left anterior cingulate cortex contributed to the P3 effect by subtracting the hostility condition from the non-interactive condition within 450-550 ms

  13. Spatio-temporal dynamics of bumblebees foraging under predation risk

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Friedrich; Chittka, Lars; Chechkin, Aleksei V; Klages, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    We study bumblebees searching for nectar in a laboratory experiment with and without different types of artificial spiders as predators. We find that the flight velocities obey mixed probability distributions reflecting the access to the food sources while the threat posed by the spiders shows up only in the velocity correlations. This means that the bumblebees adjust their flight patterns spatially to the environment and temporally to the predation risk. Key information on response to environmental changes is thus contained in temporal correlation functions and not in spatial distributions.

  14. Pattern formation in semiconductors: control of spatio-temporal dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoell, E. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    Semiconductors driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium by an applied dc voltage exhibit a variety of spatio-temporal electronic instabilities including complex and chaotic scenarios. We study stabilization of chaotic spatio-temporal patterns in spatially extended semiconductor models by time delayed feedback control. Different control schemes, e.g., a diagonal control matrix, or global control, or combinations of both, are compared. Specifically, we use two models of semiconductor nanostructures which are of particular current interest: (i) superlattice, (ii) double-barrier resonant-tunneling diode. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Alpha Oscillatory Dynamics Index Temporal Expectation Benefits in Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsch, Anna; Henry, Molly J; Herrmann, Björn; Maess, Burkhard; Obleser, Jonas

    2015-07-01

    Enhanced alpha power compared with a baseline can reflect states of increased cognitive load, for example, when listening to speech in noise. Can knowledge about "when" to listen (temporal expectations) potentially counteract cognitive load and concomitantly reduce alpha? The current magnetoencephalography (MEG) experiment induced cognitive load using an auditory delayed-matching-to-sample task with 2 syllables S1 and S2 presented in speech-shaped noise. Temporal expectation about the occurrence of S1 was manipulated in 3 different cue conditions: "Neutral" (uninformative about foreperiod), "early-cued" (short foreperiod), and "late-cued" (long foreperiod). Alpha power throughout the trial was highest when the cue was uninformative about the onset time of S1 (neutral) and lowest for the late-cued condition. This alpha-reducing effect of late compared with neutral cues was most evident during memory retention in noise and originated primarily in the right insula. Moreover, individual alpha effects during retention accounted best for observed individual performance differences between late-cued and neutral conditions, indicating a tradeoff between allocation of neural resources and the benefits drawn from temporal cues. Overall, the results indicate that temporal expectations can facilitate the encoding of speech in noise, and concomitantly reduce neural markers of cognitive load. PMID:24488943

  16. Effects of dynamic-range compression on temporal acuity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, Alan; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Epp, Bastian; Dau, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    with the physical compression of the modulation depth due to the WDRC. Indications of reduced temporal resolution in the HI listeners were observed in the TMTF patterns for the 5 kHz carrier. Significantly higher MDD thresholds were found for the HI group relative to the NH group. No relationship was...

  17. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Cross Polarized Wave Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Daniel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2009-10-01

    We use time-domain Spatially and Spectrally Resolved Interferometry (SSRI) to investigate cross-polarized wave (XPW) generation in barium fluoride. We find that the XPW pulse is √3 smaller than the input in the spatiotemporal domain regardless of the input chirp. Additionally, we calculate a temporally dependent focal length resulting from the nonlinear interaction, and discuss its implications.

  18. Pupil dilation deconvolution reveals the dynamics of attention at high temporal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierda, Stefan M; van Rijn, Hedderik; Taatgen, Niels A; Martens, Sander

    2012-05-29

    The size of the human pupil increases as a function of mental effort. However, this response is slow, and therefore its use is thought to be limited to measurements of slow tasks or tasks in which meaningful events are temporally well separated. Here we show that high-temporal-resolution tracking of attention and cognitive processes can be obtained from the slow pupillary response. Using automated dilation deconvolution, we isolated and tracked the dynamics of attention in a fast-paced temporal attention task, allowing us to uncover the amount of mental activity that is critical for conscious perception of relevant stimuli. We thus found evidence for specific temporal expectancy effects in attention that have eluded detection using neuroimaging methods such as EEG. Combining this approach with other neuroimaging techniques can open many research opportunities to study the temporal dynamics of the mind's inner eye in great detail. PMID:22586101

  19. Dynamic interactions between hydrogeological and exposure parameters in daily dose prediction under uncertainty and temporal variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Dynamic parametric interaction in daily dose prediction under uncertainty. • Importance of temporal dynamics associated with the dose. • Different dose experienced by different population cohorts as a function of time. • Relevance of uncertainty reduction in the input parameters shows temporal dynamism. -- Abstract: We study the time dependent interaction between hydrogeological and exposure parameters in daily dose predictions due to exposure of humans to groundwater contamination. Dose predictions are treated stochastically to account for an incomplete hydrogeological and geochemical field characterization, and an incomplete knowledge of the physiological response. We used a nested Monte Carlo framework to account for uncertainty and variability arising from both hydrogeological and exposure variables. Our interest is in the temporal dynamics of the total dose and their effects on parametric uncertainty reduction. We illustrate the approach to a HCH (lindane) pollution problem at the Ebro River, Spain. The temporal distribution of lindane in the river water can have a strong impact in the evaluation of risk. The total dose displays a non-linear effect on different population cohorts, indicating the need to account for population variability. We then expand the concept of Comparative Information Yield Curves developed earlier (see de Barros et al. [29]) to evaluate parametric uncertainty reduction under temporally variable exposure dose. Results show that the importance of parametric uncertainty reduction varies according to the temporal dynamics of the lindane plume. The approach could be used for any chemical to aid decision makers to better allocate resources towards reducing uncertainty

  20. Spatial and Temporal Infiltration Dynamics During Managed Aquifer Recharge

    OpenAIRE

    Racz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Natural groundwater recharge is inherently difficult to quantify and predict, largely because it comprises a series of processes that are spatially distributed and temporally variable. Infiltration ponds used for managed aquifer recharge (MAR) provide an opportunity to quantify recharge processes across multiple scales under semicontrolled conditions. We instrumented a 3-ha MAR infiltration pond to measure and compare infiltration patterns determined using whole-pond and point-specific method...

  1. Modeling temporal morphological systems via lattice dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Junior; Dougherty, Edward R.; Gubitoso, Marco D.; Hirata, Nina S. T.

    2001-05-01

    This paper introduces the family of Finite Lattice Dynamical Systems (FLDS), that includes, for example, the family of finite chain dynamical systems. It also gives a constructive algebraic representation for these systems, based on classical lattice operator morphological representations, and formalizes the problem of FLDS identification from stochastic initial condition, input and ideal output. Under acceptable practical conditions, the identification problem reduces to a set of problems of lattice operator design from observed input-output data, that has been extensively studied in the context of designing morphological image operators. Finally, an application of this technique for the identification of Boolean Networks (i.e., Boolean lattice dynamical systems) from simulated data is presented and analyzed.

  2. Volumetric associations between uncinate fasciculus, amygdala, and trait anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baur Volker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent investigations of white matter (WM connectivity suggest an important role of the uncinate fasciculus (UF, connecting anterior temporal areas including the amygdala with prefrontal-/orbitofrontal cortices, for anxiety-related processes. Volume of the UF, however, has rarely been investigated, but may be an important measure of structural connectivity underlying limbic neuronal circuits associated with anxiety. Since UF volumetric measures are newly applied measures, it is necessary to cross-validate them using further neural and behavioral indicators of anxiety. Results In a group of 32 subjects not reporting any history of psychiatric disorders, we identified a negative correlation between left UF volume and trait anxiety, a finding that is in line with previous results. On the other hand, volume of the left amygdala, which is strongly connected with the UF, was positively correlated with trait anxiety. In addition, volumes of the left UF and left amygdala were inversely associated. Conclusions The present study emphasizes the role of the left UF as candidate WM fiber bundle associated with anxiety-related processes and suggests that fiber bundle volume is a WM measure of particular interest. Moreover, these results substantiate the structural relatedness of UF and amygdala by a non-invasive imaging method. The UF-amygdala complex may be pivotal for the control of trait anxiety.

  3. Dynamic maps: a visual-analytic methodology for exploring spatio-temporal disease patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chui Kenneth KH

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiologic studies are often confounded by the human and environmental interactions that are complex and dynamic spatio-temporal processes. Hence, it is difficult to discover nuances in the data and generate pertinent hypotheses. Dynamic mapping, a method to simultaneously visualize temporal and spatial information, was introduced to elucidate such complexities. A conceptual framework for dynamic mapping regarding principles and implementation methods was proposed. Methods The spatio-temporal dynamics of Salmonella infections for 2002 in the U.S. elderly were depicted via dynamic mapping. Hospitalization records were obtained from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services. To visualize the spatial relationship, hospitalization rates were computed and superimposed onto maps of environmental exposure factors including livestock densities and ambient temperatures. To visualize the temporal relationship, the resultant maps were composed into a movie. Results The dynamic maps revealed that the Salmonella infections peaked at specific spatio-temporal loci: more clusters were observed in the summer months and higher density of such clusters in the South. The peaks were reached when the average temperatures were greater than 83.4°F (28.6°C. Although the relationship of salmonellosis rates and occurrence of temperature anomalies was non-uniform, a strong synchronization was found between high broiler chicken sales and dense clusters of cases in the summer. Conclusions Dynamic mapping is a practical visual-analytic technique for public health practitioners and has an outstanding potential in providing insights into spatio-temporal processes such as revealing outbreak origins, percolation and travelling waves of the diseases, peak timing of seasonal outbreaks, and persistence of disease clusters.

  4. A Dynamic Approach to Rhythm in Language Toward a Temporal Phonology

    CERN Document Server

    Port, R; Gasser, M; Port, Robert; Cummins, Fred; Gasser, Michael

    1995-01-01

    It is proposed that the theory of dynamical systems offers appropriate tools to model many phonological aspects of both speech production and perception. A dynamic account of speech rhythm is shown to be useful for description of both Japanese mora timing and English timing in a phrase repetition task. This orientation contrasts fundamentally with the more familiar symbolic approach to phonology, in which time is modeled only with sequentially arrayed symbols. It is proposed that an adaptive oscillator offers a useful model for perceptual entrainment (or `locking in') to the temporal patterns of speech production. This helps to explain why speech is often perceived to be more regular than experimental measurements seem to justify. Because dynamic models deal with real time, they also help us understand how languages can differ in their temporal detail---contributing to foreign accents, for example. The fact that languages differ greatly in their temporal detail suggests that these effects are not mere motor u...

  5. Temporal dynamics of high repetition rate pulsed single longitudinal mode dye laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Sridhar; V S Rawar; S Singh; L M Gantayet

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of temporal dynamics of grazing incidence grating (GIG) cavity, single-mode dye laser pumped by high repetition rate copper vapour laser (CVL) are presented. Spectral chirp of the dye laser as they evolve in the cavity due to transient phase dynamics of the amplifier gain medium is studied. Effect of grating efficiency, focal spot size, pump power and other cavity parameters on the temporal behaviour of narrow band dye laser such as build-up time, pulse shape and pulse width is studied using the four level dye laser rate equation and photon evolution equation. These results are compared with experimental observations of GIG single-mode dye laser cavity. The effect of pulse stretching of CVL pump pulse on the temporal dynamics of the dye laser is studied.

  6. The temporal dynamics of emotional acceptance: Experience, expression, and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan-Glauser, Elise S; Gross, James J

    2015-05-01

    Emotional acceptance has begun to attract considerable attention from researchers and clinicians alike. It is not yet clear, however, what effects emotional acceptance has on early emotion response dynamics. To address this question, participants (N = 37) were shown emotional pictures and cued either to simply attend to them, or to accept or suppress their emotional responses. Continuous measures of emotion experience, expressive behavior, and autonomic responses were obtained. Results indicated that, compared to no regulation, acceptance led to more positive emotions, transiently enhanced expressivity, and lowered respiratory rate. Compared to suppression, acceptance led to more positive emotions, stronger expressivity, and smaller changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and pulse amplitude, as well as greater oxygenation. Acceptance and suppression thus have opposite effects on emotional response dynamics. Because acceptance enhances positive emotion experience and expression, this strategy may be particularly useful in facilitating social interactions. PMID:25782407

  7. Dynamic Temporal Relations between Anxious and Depressive Symptoms across Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Quasem, Susanna; Garber, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms of anxiety and depression are prevalent among adolescents and associated with impairment in multiple domains of functioning. Moreover, anxiety and depression frequently co-occur, with estimated comorbidity rates as high as 75%. Whereas previous research has shown that anxiety symptoms predict increased depressive symptoms over time, the relation between depressive symptoms and later anxiety symptoms has been inconsistent. The present study examined dynamic relations between anxiety a...

  8. Dynamic Textures Modelling with Temporal Mixing Coefficients Approximation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havlíček, Michal

    Praha : ČVUT, 2013, s. 41-48. ISBN 978-80-01-05379-9. [Doktorandské dny 2013 FJFI oboru Matematické inženýrství. Praha (CZ), 15.11.2013] Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : dynamic texture * texture synthesis Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://kmwww.fjfi.cvut.cz/ddny/historie/13-sbornik.pdf

  9. Spatio-temporal Dynamics and Mechanisms of Stress Granule Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ohshima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are non-membranous cytoplasmic aggregates of mRNAs and related proteins, assembled in response to environmental stresses such as heat shock, hypoxia, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, chemicals (e.g. arsenite, and viral infections. SGs are hypothesized as a loci of mRNA triage and/or maintenance of proper translation capacity ratio to the pool of mRNAs. In brain ischemia, hippocampal CA3 neurons, which are resilient to ischemia, assemble SGs. In contrast, CA1 neurons, which are vulnerable to ischemia, do not assemble SGs. These results suggest a critical role SG plays in regards to cell fate decisions. Thus SG assembly along with its dynamics should determine the cell fate. However, the process that exactly determines the SG assembly dynamics is largely unknown. In this paper, analyses of experimental data and computer simulations were used to approach this problem. SGs were assembled as a result of applying arsenite to HeLa cells. The number of SGs increased after a short latent period, reached a maximum, then decreased during the application of arsenite. At the same time, the size of SGs grew larger and became localized at the perinuclear region. A minimal mathematical model was constructed, and stochastic simulations were run to test the modeling. Since SGs are discrete entities as there are only several tens of them in a cell, commonly used deterministic simulations could not be employed. The stochastic simulations replicated observed dynamics of SG assembly. In addition, these stochastic simulations predicted a gamma distribution relative to the size of SGs. This same distribution was also found in our experimental data suggesting the existence of multiple fusion steps in the SG assembly. Furthermore, we found that the initial steps in the SG assembly process and microtubules were critical to the dynamics. Thus our experiments and stochastic simulations presented a possible mechanism regulating SG assembly.

  10. Temporal dynamics of a jökulhlaup system

    OpenAIRE

    F. Ng; S. Liu

    2009-01-01

    Recurring jökulhlaups from ice-dammed lakes often form irregular time sequences that are seemingly unpredictable. Using the flood dates of Merzbacher Lake, Kyrgyzstan, as an example, we study these sequences through a model of lake filling and drainage where flood events initiate at a threshold water depth. Even with a constant threshold, model simulation can explain key aspects of the Merzbacher flood sequence. General analysis of model dynamics reveals a pacing mechanism that links one floo...

  11. Annual and diurnal african biomass burning temporal dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Roberts

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Africa is the single largest continental source of biomass burning emissions. Here we conduct the first analysis of one full year of geostationary active fire detections and fire radiative power data recorded over Africa at 15-min temporal interval and a 3 km sub-satellite spatial resolution by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI imaging radiometer onboard the Meteosat-8 satellite. We use these data to provide new insights into the rates and totals of open biomass burning over Africa, particularly into the extremely strong seasonal and diurnal cycles that exist across the continent. We estimate peak daily biomass combustion totals to be 9 and 6 million tonnes of fuel per day in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively, and total fuel consumption between February 2004 and January 2005 is estimated to be at least 855 million tonnes. Analysis is carried out with regard to fire pixel temporal persistence, and we note that the majority of African fires are detected only once in consecutive 15 min imaging slots. An investigation of the variability of the diurnal fire cycle is carried out with respect to 20 different land cover types, and whilst differences are noted between land covers, the fire diurnal cycle characteristics for most land cover type are very similar in both African hemispheres. We compare the Fire Radiative Power (FRP derived biomass combustion estimates to burned-areas, both at the scale of individual fires and over the entire continent at a 1-degree scale. Fuel consumption estimates are found to be less than 2 kg/m2 for all land cover types noted to be subject to significant fire activity, and for savanna grasslands where literature values are commonly reported the FRP-derived median fuel consumption estimate of 300 g/m2 is well within commonly quoted values. Meteosat-derived FRP data of the type presented here is now available freely to interested users continuously and in near

  12. The responsive amygdala: treatment-induced alterations in functional connectivity in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, L E; Pielech, M; Erpelding, N; Linnman, C; Moulton, E; Sava, S; Lebel, A; Serrano, P; Sethna, N; Berde, C; Becerra, L; Borsook, D

    2014-09-01

    The amygdala is a key brain region with efferent and afferent neural connections that involve complex behaviors such as pain, reward, fear, and anxiety. This study evaluated resting state functional connectivity of the amygdala with cortical and subcortical regions in a group of chronic pain patients (pediatric complex regional pain syndrome) with age-sex matched control subjects before and after intensive physical-biobehavioral pain treatment. Our main findings include (1) enhanced functional connectivity from the amygdala to multiple cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions in patients compared with control subjects, with differences predominantly in the left amygdala in the pretreated condition (disease state); (2) dampened hyperconnectivity from the left amygdala to the motor cortex, parietal lobe, and cingulate cortex after intensive pain rehabilitation treatment within patients with nominal differences observed among healthy control subjects from time 1 to time 2 (treatment effects); (3) functional connectivity to several regions key to fear circuitry (prefrontal cortex, bilateral middle temporal lobe, bilateral cingulate, hippocampus) correlated with higher pain-related fear scores; and (4) decreases in pain-related fear associated with decreased connectivity between the amygdala and the motor and somatosensory cortex, cingulate, and frontal areas. Our data suggest that there are rapid changes in amygdala connectivity after an aggressive treatment program in children with chronic pain and intrinsic amygdala functional connectivity activity serving as a potential indicator of treatment response. PMID:24861582

  13. The amygdala and decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Rupa; Koscik, Timothy R.; Bechara, Antoine; Tranel, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Decision-making is a complex process that requires the orchestration of multiple neural systems. For example, decision-making is believed to involve areas of the brain involved in emotion (e.g., amygdala, ventromedial prefrontal cortex) and memory (e.g., hippocampus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). In this article, we will present findings related to the amygdala’s role in decision-making, and differentiate the contributions of the amygdala from those of other structurally and functionally c...

  14. Spatio-Temporal Population Density and Spatial Dynamic Spectrum Allocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A realistic population density distribution scenario in conjunction with the spatial dynamic spectrum allocation (DSA) is taken into account to mitigate the spectrum wastage in terms of extra guard bands. For the insertion of the extra guard bands, an efficient strategy based on self-assessment is applied to each victim cell individually and independently. Consequently, it is no more required to spread the extra guard band over the whole DSA region. Simulation results show an improvement of 3% -4% in percentage of satisfied users for Universal Mobile Telecommunications System ( UMTS ) network and 4% -5% for Digital Video Broadcasting Terrestrial (DVB-T) network.

  15. Dynamic Texture Modelling and Editing Using Temporal Mixing Coefficients Reduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havlíček, Michal

    Praha : FJFI ČVUT, 2014 - (Ambrož, P.; Masáková, Z.), s. 7-16 ISBN 978-80-01-05605-9. [Doktorandské dny 2014. Praha (CZ), 14.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02652S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10911S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : dynamic texture * texture analysis * data compression Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/RO/havlicek-0438021.pdf

  16. Dynamic Textures Modeling Using Temporal Mixing Coefficients Reduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havlíček, Michal; Haindl, Michal; Filip, Jiří

    Los Alamitos, USA: IEEE Computer Society CPS, 2014. ISBN 978-1-4799-7971-4. [International Workshop on Computational Intelligence for Multimedia Understanding 2014 (IWCIM). Paris (FR), 01.11.2014-02.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10911S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02652S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Dynamic texture * texture analysis * texture synthesis * data compression Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/RO/haindl-0439651.pdf

  17. Dynamic temporal relations between anxious and depressive symptoms across adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouros, Chrystyna D; Quasem, Susanna; Garber, Judy

    2013-08-01

    Symptoms of anxiety and depression are prevalent among adolescents and associated with impairment in multiple domains of functioning. Moreover, anxiety and depression frequently co-occur, with estimated comorbidity rates as high as 75%. Whereas previous research has shown that anxiety symptoms predict increased depressive symptoms over time, the relation between depressive symptoms and later anxiety symptoms has been inconsistent. The present study examined dynamic relations between anxiety and depressive symptoms across adolescence and explored whether these longitudinal relations were moderated by maternal history of anxiety, family relationship quality, or children's attributional style. Participants included 240 children (M age = 11.86 years; 53.9% female) and their mothers, who were assessed annually for 6 years. Children reported on their depressive symptoms and mothers reported on their child's anxiety symptoms. Dynamic latent change score models indicated that anxiety symptoms predicted subsequent elevations in depressive symptoms over time. Depressive symptoms predicted subsequent elevations in anxiety symptoms among children who had mothers with a history of anxiety, reported low family relationship quality, or had high levels of negative attributions. Thus, whereas anxiety symptoms were a robust predictor of later depressive symptoms during adolescence, contextual and individual factors may be important to consider when examining relations between depressive symptoms and subsequent change in anxiety symptoms. PMID:23880385

  18. Spatial clustering in the spatio-temporal dynamics of endemic cholera

    OpenAIRE

    Emch Michael; Pascual Mercedes; Ruiz-Moreno Diego; Yunus Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The spatio-temporal patterns of infectious diseases that are environmentally driven reflect the combined effects of transmission dynamics and environmental heterogeneity. They contain important information on different routes of transmission, including the role of environmental reservoirs. Consideration of the spatial component in infectious disease dynamics has led to insights on the propagation of fronts at the level of counties in rabies in the US, and the metapopulatio...

  19. Superior temporal activation in response to dynamic audio-visual emotional cues

    OpenAIRE

    Robins, Diana L.; Hunyadi, Elinora; Schultz, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Perception of emotion is critical for successful social interaction, yet the neural mechanisms underlying the perception of dynamic, audiovisual emotional cues are poorly understood. Evidence from language and sensory paradigms suggests that the superior temporal sulcus and gyrus (STS/STG) play a key role in the integration of auditory and visual cues. Emotion perception research has focused on static facial cues; however, dynamic audiovisual (AV) cues mimic real-world social cues more accura...

  20. Brazilian Amazon Roads and Parks: Temporal & Spatial Deforestation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, A.; Robalino, J.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneous Forest Impacts of Transport Infrastructure: spatial frontier dynamics & impacts of Brazilian Amazon road changes Prior research on road impacts has almost completely ignored heterogeneity of impacts and as a result both empirically understated potential impact and missed policy potential. We note von Thunen's model suggests not only heterogeneity with distance from market but also specifically road impacts rising then falling with distance ('non-monoThunicity') Endogenous development and partial adjustment dynamics support this for the short run. Causal effects result from studying Brazilian Amazon deforestation (1976-87, 2000-04) using matching for short-run responses to lagged new roads changes (1968-75, 1985-00). We show the critical role of prior development, proxied by 1968 and 1985 road distances, for which exact matching addresses development trends and transforms impact estimates. Splitting the sample on this measure finds confirmation of the nonmonotonic predictions: new road impacts are relatively low if a prior road was close, such that prior transport access and endogenous development dynamics compete with the new road for influence, but also if a prior road was far, since first-decade adjustment in pristine areas is limited; yet in between these bounds, investments immediately raise deforestation significantly. This pattern helps to explain lower estimates within research on a single average impact. It suggests potential for REDD if a country chooses to shift its spatial transport networks. Protected Areas & Brazilian Amazon Deforestation: modeling and testing the impacts of varied PA strategies We model and then estimate the impacts of multiple types of protected areas upon 2000 - 2004 deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Our modeling starts with federal versus state objectives and predicts differences in both choice and implementation of each PA strategy that we examine. Our empirical examination brings not only breakdowns sufficient

  1. GABA[subscript A] Receptors Determine the Temporal Dynamics of Memory Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Gavan P.; Augustyn, Katarzyna A.; Richardson, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments studied the role of GABA[subscript A] receptors in the temporal dynamics of memory retention. Memory for an active avoidance response was a nonmonotonic function of the retention interval. When rats were tested shortly (2 min) or some time (24 h) after training, retention was excellent, but when they were tested at intermediate…

  2. An assessment of the temporal dynamics of moral decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Koop

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the domain of moral decision making, models in which emotion and deliberation constitute competing dual-systems have become increasingly popular. Currently, the favored explanation of this interaction is what Evans (2008 termed a ``default-interventionist'' (DI process where moral decisions are the result of a prepotent emotional response, which can be overridden with substantial deliberative effort. Although this ``emotion-then-deliberation'' sequence is often assumed, existing methods have lacked the requisite process resolution to clearly depict the nature of this interaction. The present work utilized continuous mouse tracking, or response dynamics, to develop and test predictions of these DI models of moral decision making. Study 1 utilized previously published moral dilemmas to validate the method for use with such complex stimuli. Although the data replicated typical choice and RT patterns, the process metrics provided by the response trajectories did not demonstrate the online preference reversals predicted by DI models. Study 2 utilized more rigorously constructed stimuli and an alternative presentation format to provide the strongest possible test of DI predictions, but again failed to show the predicted reversals. In summary, neither experiment provided data in accordance with the predictions of popular DI dual-systems models, which suggests that researchers should consider models allowing for concurrent activation of deliberative and emotional systems, or reconceptualize moral decisions within the typical multiattribute decision framework.

  3. Sex differences in the functional connectivity of the amygdalae in association with cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogler, Lydia; Müller, Veronika I; Seidel, Eva-Maria; Boubela, Roland; Kalcher, Klaudius; Moser, Ewald; Habel, Ute; Gur, Ruben C; Eickhoff, Simon B; Derntl, Birgit

    2016-07-01

    Human amygdalae are involved in various behavioral functions such as affective and stress processing. For these behavioral functions, as well as for psychophysiological arousal including cortisol release, sex differences are reported. Here, we assessed cortisol levels and resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of left and right amygdalae in 81 healthy participants (42 women) to investigate potential modulation of amygdala rsFC by sex and cortisol concentration. Our analyses revealed that rsFC of the left amygdala significantly differed between women and men: Women showed stronger rsFC than men between the left amygdala and left middle temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, postcentral gyrus and hippocampus, regions involved in face processing, inner-speech, fear and pain processing. No stronger connections were detected for men and no sex difference emerged for right amygdala rsFC. Also, an interaction of sex and cortisol appeared: In women, cortisol was negatively associated with rsFC of the amygdalae with striatal regions, mid-orbital frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate gyrus, middle and superior frontal gyri, supplementary motor area and the parietal-occipital sulcus. Contrarily in men, positive associations of cortisol with rsFC of the left amygdala and these structures were observed. Functional decoding analyses revealed an association of the amygdalae and these regions with emotion, reward and memory processing, as well as action execution. Our results suggest that functional connectivity of the amygdalae as well as the regulatory effect of cortisol on brain networks differs between women and men. These sex-differences and the mediating and sex-dependent effect of cortisol on brain communication systems should be taken into account in affective and stress-related neuroimaging research. Thus, more studies including both sexes are required. PMID:27039701

  4. Emergence of spatio-temporal dynamics from exact coherent solutions in pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Paul; Mellibovsky, Fernando; Avila, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent-laminar patterns are ubiquitous near transition in wall-bounded shear flows. Despite recent progress in describing their dynamics in analogy to non-equilibrium phase transitions, there is no theory explaining their emergence. Dynamical-system approaches suggest that invariant solutions to the Navier–Stokes equations, such as traveling waves and relative periodic orbits in pipe flow, act as building blocks of the disordered dynamics. While recent studies have shown how transient chaos arises from such solutions, the ensuing dynamics lacks the strong fluctuations in size, shape and speed of the turbulent spots observed in experiments. We here show that chaotic spots with distinct dynamical and kinematic properties merge in phase space and give rise to the enhanced spatio-temporal patterns observed in pipe flow. This paves the way for a dynamical-system foundation to the phenomenology of turbulent-laminar patterns in wall-bounded extended shear flows.

  5. Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of Urban Fire Incidents: a Case Study of Nanjing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, J.; Zhang, X.

    2016-06-01

    Fire and rescue service is one of the fundamental public services provided by government in order to protect people, properties and environment from fires and other disasters, and thus promote a safer living environment. Well understanding spatial-temporal dynamics of fire incidents can offer insights for potential determinants of various fire events and enable better fire risk estimation, assisting future allocation of prevention resources and strategic planning of mitigation programs. Using a 12-year (2002-2013) dataset containing the urban fire events in Nanjing, China, this research explores the spatial-temporal dynamics of urban fire incidents. A range of exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA) approaches and tools, such as spatial kernel density and co-maps, are employed to examine the spatial, temporal and spatial-temporal variations of the fire events. Particular attention has been paid to two types of fire incidents: residential properties and local facilities, due to their relatively higher occurrence frequencies. The results demonstrated that the amount of urban fire has greatly increased in the last decade and spatial-temporal distribution of fire events vary among different incident types, which implies varying impact of potential influencing factors for further investigation.

  6. The basolateral amygdala in reward learning and addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassum, Kate M; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2015-10-01

    Sophisticated behavioral paradigms partnered with the emergence of increasingly selective techniques to target the basolateral amygdala (BLA) have resulted in an enhanced understanding of the role of this nucleus in learning and using reward information. Due to the wide variety of behavioral approaches many questions remain on the circumscribed role of BLA in appetitive behavior. In this review, we integrate conclusions of BLA function in reward-related behavior using traditional interference techniques (lesion, pharmacological inactivation) with those using newer methodological approaches in experimental animals that allow in vivo manipulation of cell type-specific populations and neural recordings. Secondly, from a review of appetitive behavioral tasks in rodents and monkeys and recent computational models of reward procurement, we derive evidence for BLA as a neural integrator of reward value, history, and cost parameters. Taken together, BLA codes specific and temporally dynamic outcome representations in a distributed network to orchestrate adaptive responses. We provide evidence that experiences with opiates and psychostimulants alter these outcome representations in BLA, resulting in long-term modified action. PMID:26341938

  7. The Amygdala, Arousal and Memory: From Lesions to Neuroimaging

    OpenAIRE

    Åhs, Fredrik

    2009-01-01

    Emotional events are better remembered than neutral events. But what are the mechanisms behind this memory enhancing effect? It seems that they depend on the arousal level at the moment we experience the event to be remembered. The first study of the present thesis mapped the brain areas that changed their activity in a highly arousing situation in subjects with snake or spider phobia. Looking at pictures of their feared object engaged the amygdala, situated in the medial temporal lobe. This ...

  8. Modeling Temporal Behavior in Large Networks: A Dynamic Mixed-Membership Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, R; Gallagher, B; Neville, J; Henderson, K

    2011-11-11

    Given a large time-evolving network, how can we model and characterize the temporal behaviors of individual nodes (and network states)? How can we model the behavioral transition patterns of nodes? We propose a temporal behavior model that captures the 'roles' of nodes in the graph and how they evolve over time. The proposed dynamic behavioral mixed-membership model (DBMM) is scalable, fully automatic (no user-defined parameters), non-parametric/data-driven (no specific functional form or parameterization), interpretable (identifies explainable patterns), and flexible (applicable to dynamic and streaming networks). Moreover, the interpretable behavioral roles are generalizable, computationally efficient, and natively supports attributes. We applied our model for (a) identifying patterns and trends of nodes and network states based on the temporal behavior, (b) predicting future structural changes, and (c) detecting unusual temporal behavior transitions. We use eight large real-world datasets from different time-evolving settings (dynamic and streaming). In particular, we model the evolving mixed-memberships and the corresponding behavioral transitions of Twitter, Facebook, IP-Traces, Email (University), Internet AS, Enron, Reality, and IMDB. The experiments demonstrate the scalability, flexibility, and effectiveness of our model for identifying interesting patterns, detecting unusual structural transitions, and predicting the future structural changes of the network and individual nodes.

  9. Temporal Dynamics of the Default Mode Network Characterize Meditation-Induced Alterations in Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Rajanikant; Bharath, Rose D.; Upadhyay, Neeraj; Mangalore, Sandhya; Chennu, Srivas; Rao, Shobini L.

    2016-01-01

    Current research suggests that human consciousness is associated with complex, synchronous interactions between multiple cortical networks. In particular, the default mode network (DMN) of the resting brain is thought to be altered by changes in consciousness, including the meditative state. However, it remains unclear how meditation alters the fast and ever-changing dynamics of brain activity within this network. Here we addressed this question using simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare the spatial extents and temporal dynamics of the DMN during rest and meditation. Using fMRI, we identified key reductions in the posterior cingulate hub of the DMN, along with increases in right frontal and left temporal areas, in experienced meditators during rest and during meditation, in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). We employed the simultaneously recorded EEG data to identify the topographical microstate corresponding to activation of the DMN. Analysis of the temporal dynamics of this microstate revealed that the average duration and frequency of occurrence of DMN microstate was higher in meditators compared to HCs. Both these temporal parameters increased during meditation, reflecting the state effect of meditation. In particular, we found that the alteration in the duration of the DMN microstate when meditators entered the meditative state correlated negatively with their years of meditation experience. This reflected a trait effect of meditation, highlighting its role in producing durable changes in temporal dynamics of the DMN. Taken together, these findings shed new light on short and long-term consequences of meditation practice on this key brain network. PMID:27499738

  10. From circuits to behaviour in the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janak, Patricia H; Tye, Kay M

    2015-01-15

    The amygdala has long been associated with emotion and motivation, playing an essential part in processing both fearful and rewarding environmental stimuli. How can a single structure be crucial for such different functions? With recent technological advances that allow for causal investigations of specific neural circuit elements, we can now begin to map the complex anatomical connections of the amygdala onto behavioural function. Understanding how the amygdala contributes to a wide array of behaviours requires the study of distinct amygdala circuits. PMID:25592533

  11. Beyond the amygdala: Linguistic threat modulates peri-sylvian semantic access cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisholtz, Daniel S; Root, James C; Butler, Tracy; Tüscher, Oliver; Epstein, Jane; Pan, Hong; Protopopescu, Xenia; Goldstein, Martin; Isenberg, Nancy; Brendel, Gary; LeDoux, Joseph; Silbersweig, David A; Stern, Emily

    2015-12-01

    In this study, healthy volunteers were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural systems involved in processing the threatening content conveyed via visually presented "threat words." The neural responses elicited by these words were compared to those elicited by matched neutral control words. The results demonstrate that linguistic threat, when presented in written form, can selectively engage areas of lateral temporal and inferior frontal cortex, distinct from the core language areas implicated in aphasia. Additionally, linguistic threat modulates neural activity in visceral/emotional systems (amygdala, parahippocampal gyrus and periaqueductal gray), and at earlier stages of the visual-linguistic processing stream involved in visual word form representations (ventral occipitotemporal cortex). We propose a model whereby limbic activation modulates activity at multiple nodes along the visual-linguistic-semantic processing stream, including a perisylvian "semantic access network" involved in decoding word meaning, suggesting a dynamic interplay between feedforward and feedback processes. PMID:26575986

  12. Distinctive amygdala subregions involved in emotion-modulated Stroop interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyun Jung; Lee, Kanghee; Kim, Hyun Taek; Kim, Hackjin

    2014-05-01

    Despite the well-known role of the amygdala in mediating emotional interference during tasks requiring cognitive resources, no definite conclusion has yet been reached regarding the differential roles of functionally and anatomically distinctive subcomponents of the amygdala in such processes. In this study, we examined female participants and attempted to separate the neural processes for the detection of emotional information from those for the regulation of cognitive interference from emotional distractors by adding a temporal gap between emotional stimuli and a subsequent cognitive Stroop task. Reaction time data showed a significantly increased Stroop interference effect following emotionally negative stimuli compared with neutral stimuli, and functional magnetic resonance imaging data revealed that the anterior ventral amygdala (avAMYG) showed greater responses to negative stimuli compared with neutral stimuli. In addition, individuals who scored high in neuroticism showed greater posterior dorsal amygdala (pdAMYG) responses to incongruent compared with congruent Stroop trials following negative stimuli, but not following neutral stimuli. Taken together, the findings of this study demonstrated functionally distinctive contributions of the avAMYG and pdAMYG to the emotion-modulated Stroop interference effect and suggested that the avAMYG encodes associative values of emotional stimuli whereas the pdAMYG resolves cognitive interference from emotional distractors. PMID:23543193

  13. Abnormal amygdala connectivity in patients with primary insomnia: Evidence from resting state fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Neurobiological mechanisms underlying insomnia are poorly understood. Previous findings indicated that dysfunction of the emotional circuit might contribute to the neurobiological mechanisms underlying insomnia. The present study will test this hypothesis by examining alterations in functional connectivity of the amygdala in patients with primary insomnia (PI). Methods: Resting-state functional connectivity analysis was used to examine the temporal correlation between the amygdala and whole-brain regions in 10 medication-naive PI patients and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Additionally, the relationship between the abnormal functional connectivity and insomnia severity was investigated. Results: We found decreased functional connectivity mainly between the amygdala and insula, striatum and thalamus, and increased functional connectivity mainly between the amygdala and premotor cortex, sensorimotor cortex in PI patients as compared to healthy controls. The connectivity of the amygdala with the premotor cortex in PI patients showed significant positive correlation with the total score of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Conclusions: The decreased functional connectivity between the amygdala and insula, striatum, and thalamus suggests that dysfunction in the emotional circuit might contribute to the neurobiological mechanisms underlying PI. The increased functional connectivity of the amygdala with the premotor and sensorimotor cortex demonstrates a compensatory mechanism to overcome the negative effects of sleep deficits and maintain the psychomotor performances in PI patients.

  14. Estimating spatio-temporal dynamics of stream total phosphate concentration by soft computing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fi-John; Chen, Pin-An; Chang, Li-Chiu; Tsai, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-08-15

    This study attempts to model the spatio-temporal dynamics of total phosphate (TP) concentrations along a river for effective hydro-environmental management. We propose a systematical modeling scheme (SMS), which is an ingenious modeling process equipped with a dynamic neural network and three refined statistical methods, for reliably predicting the TP concentrations along a river simultaneously. Two different types of artificial neural network (BPNN-static neural network; NARX network-dynamic neural network) are constructed in modeling the dynamic system. The Dahan River in Taiwan is used as a study case, where ten-year seasonal water quality data collected at seven monitoring stations along the river are used for model training and validation. Results demonstrate that the NARX network can suitably capture the important dynamic features and remarkably outperforms the BPNN model, and the SMS can effectively identify key input factors, suitably overcome data scarcity, significantly increase model reliability, satisfactorily estimate site-specific TP concentration at seven monitoring stations simultaneously, and adequately reconstruct seasonal TP data into a monthly scale. The proposed SMS can reliably model the dynamic spatio-temporal water pollution variation in a river system for missing, hazardous or costly data of interest. PMID:27100003

  15. Spatial clustering in the spatio-temporal dynamics of endemic cholera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emch Michael

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spatio-temporal patterns of infectious diseases that are environmentally driven reflect the combined effects of transmission dynamics and environmental heterogeneity. They contain important information on different routes of transmission, including the role of environmental reservoirs. Consideration of the spatial component in infectious disease dynamics has led to insights on the propagation of fronts at the level of counties in rabies in the US, and the metapopulation behavior at the level of cities in childhood diseases such as measles in the UK, both at relatively coarse scales. As epidemiological data on individual infections become available, spatio-temporal patterns can be examined at higher resolutions. Methods The extensive spatio-temporal data set for cholera in Matlab, Bangladesh, maps the individual location of cases from 1983 to 2003. This unique record allows us to examine the spatial structure of cholera outbreaks, to address the role of primary transmission, occurring from an aquatic reservoir to the human host, and that of secondary transmission, involving a feedback between current and past levels of infection. We use Ripley's K and L indices and bootstrapping methods to evaluate the occurrence of spatial clustering in the cases during outbreaks using different temporal windows. The spatial location of cases was also confronted against the spatial location of water sources. Results Spatial clustering of cholera cases was detected at different temporal and spatial scales. Cases relative to water sources also exhibit spatial clustering. Conclusions The clustering of cases supports an important role of secondary transmission in the dynamics of cholera epidemics in Matlab, Bangladesh. The spatial clustering of cases relative to water sources, and its timing, suggests an effective role of water reservoirs during the onset of cholera outbreaks. Once primary transmission has initiated an outbreak, secondary

  16. MR-guided dynamic PET reconstruction with the kernel method and spectral temporal basis functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosad, Philip; Reader, Andrew J

    2016-06-21

    Recent advances in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve markedly improved end-point kinetic parameter maps by incorporating a temporal model of the radiotracer directly into the reconstruction algorithm. In this work we have developed a highly constrained, fully dynamic PET reconstruction algorithm incorporating both spectral analysis temporal basis functions and spatial basis functions derived from the kernel method applied to a co-registered T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) image. The dynamic PET image is modelled as a linear combination of spatial and temporal basis functions, and a maximum likelihood estimate for the coefficients can be found using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Following reconstruction, kinetic fitting using any temporal model of interest can be applied. Based on a BrainWeb T1-weighted MR phantom, we performed a realistic dynamic [(18)F]FDG simulation study with two noise levels, and investigated the quantitative performance of the proposed reconstruction algorithm, comparing it with reconstructions incorporating either spectral analysis temporal basis functions alone or kernel spatial basis functions alone, as well as with conventional frame-independent reconstruction. Compared to the other reconstruction algorithms, the proposed algorithm achieved superior performance, offering a decrease in spatially averaged pixel-level root-mean-square-error on post-reconstruction kinetic parametric maps in the grey/white matter, as well as in the tumours when they were present on the co-registered MR image. When the tumours were not visible in the MR image, reconstruction with the proposed algorithm performed similarly to reconstruction with spectral temporal basis functions and was superior to both conventional frame-independent reconstruction and frame-independent reconstruction with kernel spatial basis functions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a joint spectral

  17. Non-monotonic Temporal-Weighting Indicates a Dynamically Modulated Evidence-Integration Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohar Z Bronfman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Perceptual decisions are thought to be mediated by a mechanism of sequential sampling and integration of noisy evidence whose temporal weighting profile affects the decision quality. To examine temporal weighting, participants were presented with two brightness-fluctuating disks for 1, 2 or 3 seconds and were requested to choose the overall brighter disk at the end of each trial. By employing a signal-perturbation method, which deploys across trials a set of systematically controlled temporal dispersions of the same overall signal, we were able to quantify the participants' temporal weighting profile. Results indicate that, for intervals of 1 or 2 sec, participants exhibit a primacy-bias. However, for longer stimuli (3-sec the temporal weighting profile is non-monotonic, with concurrent primacy and recency, which is inconsistent with the predictions of previously suggested computational models of perceptual decision-making (drift-diffusion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes. We propose a novel, dynamic variant of the leaky-competing accumulator model as a potential account for this finding, and we discuss potential neural mechanisms.

  18. Non-monotonic Temporal-Weighting Indicates a Dynamically Modulated Evidence-Integration Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfman, Zohar Z; Brezis, Noam; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Perceptual decisions are thought to be mediated by a mechanism of sequential sampling and integration of noisy evidence whose temporal weighting profile affects the decision quality. To examine temporal weighting, participants were presented with two brightness-fluctuating disks for 1, 2 or 3 seconds and were requested to choose the overall brighter disk at the end of each trial. By employing a signal-perturbation method, which deploys across trials a set of systematically controlled temporal dispersions of the same overall signal, we were able to quantify the participants' temporal weighting profile. Results indicate that, for intervals of 1 or 2 sec, participants exhibit a primacy-bias. However, for longer stimuli (3-sec) the temporal weighting profile is non-monotonic, with concurrent primacy and recency, which is inconsistent with the predictions of previously suggested computational models of perceptual decision-making (drift-diffusion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes). We propose a novel, dynamic variant of the leaky-competing accumulator model as a potential account for this finding, and we discuss potential neural mechanisms. PMID:26866598

  19. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics in Collective Frog Choruses Examined by Mathematical Modeling and Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Ikkyu; Mizumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takuma; Awano, Hiromitsu; Nagira, Kohei; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports theoretical and experimental studies on spatio-temporal dynamics in the choruses of male Japanese tree frogs. First, we theoretically model their calling times and positions as a system of coupled mobile oscillators. Numerical simulation of the model as well as calculation of the order parameters show that the spatio-temporal dynamics exhibits bistability between two-cluster antisynchronization and wavy antisynchronization, by assuming that the frogs are attracted to the edge of a simple circular breeding site. Second, we change the shape of the breeding site from the circle to rectangles including a straight line, and evaluate the stability of two-cluster and wavy antisynchronization. Numerical simulation shows that two-cluster antisynchronization is more frequently observed than wavy antisynchronization. Finally, we recorded frog choruses at an actual paddy field using our sound-imaging method. Analysis of the video demonstrated a consistent result with the aforementioned simulation: namely, two-cluster antisynchronization was more frequently realized.

  20. Diverse spatio-temporal dynamical patterns of p53 and cell fate decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairambault, Jean; Eliaš, Ján

    2016-06-01

    The protein p53 as a tumour suppressor protein accumulates in cells in response to DNA damage and transactivates a large variety of genes involved in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and numerous other processes. Recent biological observations suggest that specific spatio-temporal dynamical patterns of p53 may be associated with specific cellular response, and thus the spatio-temporal heterogeneity of the p53 dynamics contributes to the overall complexity of p53 signalling. Reaction-diffusion equations taking into account spatial representation of the cell and motion of the species inside the cell can be used to model p53 protein network and could be thus of some help to biologists and pharmacologists in anticancer treatment.

  1. Laminar and Temporal Expression Dynamics of Coding and Noncoding RNAs in the Mouse Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Fertuzinhos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hallmark of the cerebral neocortex is its organization into six layers, each containing a characteristic set of cell types and synaptic connections. The transcriptional events involved in laminar development and function still remain elusive. Here, we employed deep sequencing of mRNA and small RNA species to gain insights into transcriptional differences among layers and their temporal dynamics during postnatal development of the mouse primary somatosensory neocortex. We identify a number of coding and noncoding transcripts with specific spatiotemporal expression and splicing patterns. We also identify signature trajectories and gene coexpression networks associated with distinct biological processes and transcriptional overlap between these processes. Finally, we provide data that allow the study of potential miRNA and mRNA interactions. Overall, this study provides an integrated view of the laminar and temporal expression dynamics of coding and noncoding transcripts in the mouse neocortex and a resource for studies of neurodevelopment and transcriptome.

  2. Spatio-temporal patterns and dynamics of net primary productivity for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring of net primary productivity (NPP) is especially important for the fragile ecosystems in arid and semi-arid regions. Great interest exists in observing large-scale vegetation dynamics and understanding spatial and temporal patterns of NPP in these areas. In this study we present results of NPP obtained with the model BETHY/DLR for Kazakhstan for 2003–2011 and its spatial and temporal dynamics. The spatial distribution of vegetation productivity shows a gradient from North to South and clear differences between individual vegetation classes. The monthly NPP values show the highest productivity in June. Differences between rain-fed and irrigated areas indicate the dependency on water availability. Annual NPP variability was high for agricultural areas, but showed low values for natural vegetation. The analysis of different patterns in vegetation productivity provides valuable information for the identification of regions that are vulnerable to a possible climate change. This information may thus substantially support a sustainable land management

  3. Reduced intrinsic connectivity of amygdala in adults with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RajamannarRamasubbu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Imaging studies of major depressive disorder (MDD have demonstrated enhanced resting-state activity of the amygdala as well as exaggerated reactivity to negative emotional stimuli relative to healthy controls. However, the abnormalities in the intrinsic connectivity of the amygdala in MDD still remain unclear. As the resting-state activity and functional connectivity (RSFC reflect fundamental brain processes, we compared the RSFC of the amygdala between unmedicated MDD patients and healthy controls. Seventy-four subjects, 55 adults meeting the DSM IV criteria for MDD and 19 healthy controls, underwent a resting state 3-T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scan. An amygdala seed-based low frequency RSFC map for the whole brain was generated for each group. Compared with healthy controls, MDD patients showed a wide-spread reduction in the intrinsic connectivity of the amygdala with a variety of brain regions involved in emotional processing and regulation, including the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, insula, caudate, middle and superior temporal regions, occipital cortex, and cerebellum, as well as increased connectivity with the bilateral temporal poles (p< 0.05 corrected. The increase in the intrinsic connectivity of amygdala with the temporal poles was inversely correlated with symptom severity and anxiety scores. Although the directionality of connections between regions cannot be inferred from temporal correlations, the reduced intrinsic connectivity of the amygdala predominantly with regions involved in emotional processing may reflect impaired bottom-up signaling for top-down cortical modulation of limbic regions leading to abnormal affect regulation in MDD.

  4. Energy-Aware Aggregation of Dynamic Temporal Workload in Data Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Haiyang; Li, Fu; Ravindran, Ravishankar; Medhi, Deep

    2013-01-01

    Data center providers seek to minimize their total cost of ownership (TCO), while power consumption has become a social concern. We present formulations to minimize server energy consumption and server cost under three different data center server setups (homogeneous, heterogeneous, and hybrid hetero-homogeneous clusters) with dynamic temporal workload. Our studies show that the homogeneous model significantly differs from the heterogeneous model in computational time (by an order of magnitud...

  5. Spatial and temporal variations of dissolved organic matter dynamics in adisturbed Sphagnum peatland after hydrological restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Le Moing, Franck; Guirimand-Dufour, Audrey; Jozja, Nevila; Défarge, Christian; D'Angelo, Benoît; Binet, Stéphane; Gogo, Sébastien; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    International audience Fluorescence Intensity Spatial and temporal variations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics in a disturbed Sphagnum peatland after hydrological restoration Alberts J.J., Takacs M., 2003. Total luminescence spectra of IHSS standard and reference fulvic acids, humic acids and natural organic matter: comparison of aquatic and terrestrial source terms. Dissolved organic matter fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool to estimate biological activity in a coastal zone sub...

  6. Temporal dynamics of musical emotions examined through intersubject synchrony of brain activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Trost, W.; Frühholz, S.; Cochrane, T.; Cojan, Y.; Vuilleumier, P.

    2015-01-01

    To study emotional reactions to music, it is important to consider the temporal dynamics of both affective responses and underlying brain activity. Here, we investigated emotions induced by music using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a data-driven approach based on intersubject correlations (ISC). This method allowed us to identify moments in the music that produced similar brain activity (i.e. synchrony) among listeners under relatively natural listening conditions. Continu...

  7. Temporal dynamics of Prochlorococcus ecotypes in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans

    OpenAIRE

    Malmstrom, Rex R.; Coe, Allison; Kettler, Gregory Carl; Martiny, Adam C.; Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Zinser, Erik R.; Chisholm, Sallie

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the temporal and spatial dynamics of Prochlorococcus populations, and how these populations co-vary with the physical environment, we followed monthly changes in the abundance of five ecotypes—two high-light adapted and three low-light adapted—over a 5-year period in coordination with the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) and Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) programs. Ecotype abundance displayed weak seasonal fluctuations at HOT and strong seasonal fluctuations at BATS. F...

  8. Spatial and temporal dynamics of the microbial community in the Hanford unconfined aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Kaluzny, Rachael M.; Lauber, C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Knight, Robbie C.; Konopka, Allan

    2012-03-29

    Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes was used to study temporal dynamics of groundwater Bacteria and Archaea over 10 months within 3 well clusters separated by ~30 m and located 250 m from the Columbia River on the Hanford Site, WA. Each cluster contained 3 wells screened at different depths ranging from 10 to 17 m that differed in hydraulic conductivities. Representative samples were selected for analyses of prokaryotic 16S and eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene copy numbers. Temporal changes in community composition occurred in all 9 wells over the 10 month sampling period. However, there were particularly strong effects near the top of the water table when the seasonal rise in the Columbia River caused river water intrusion at the top of the aquifer. The occurrence and disappearance of some microbial assemblages (such as Actinobacteria ACK-M1) were correlated to river water intrusion. This seasonal impact on microbial community structure was greater in the shallow saturated zone than deeper in the aquifer. Spatial and temporal patterns for several 16S rRNA gene operational taxonomic units associated with particular physiological functions (e.g.methane oxidizers and metal reducers) suggests dynamic changes in fluxes of electron donors and acceptors over an annual cycle. In addition, temporal dynamics in eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene copies and the dominance of protozoa in 18S clone libraries suggest that bacterial community dynamics could be affected not only by the physical and chemical environment, but also by top-down biological control.

  9. BOLD Temporal Dynamics of Rat Superior Colliculus and Lateral Geniculate Nucleus following Short Duration Visual Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Condon; Zhou, Iris Y.; Cheung, Matthew M.; Chan, Kevin C.; Wu, Ed X.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The superior colliculus (SC) and lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) are important subcortical structures for vision. Much of our understanding of vision was obtained using invasive and small field of view (FOV) techniques. In this study, we use non-invasive, large FOV blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI to measure the SC and LGN's response temporal dynamics following short duration (1 s) visual stimulation. Methodology/Principal Findings: Experiments are performed at 7 tes...

  10. [AMYGDALA: NEUROANATOMY AND NEUROPHYSIOLOGY OF FEAR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, E A; Krasnoshchekova, E I; Vesselkin, N P; Kharazova, A D

    2015-01-01

    This work describes neuroanatomical and neurophysiological mechanisms of Pavlovian fear conditioning, focusing on contributions of the amygdala, a subcortical nuclear group, to control of conditioned fear responses. The mechanisms of synaptic plasticity at projections to the amygdala and within amygdala were shown to mediate the formation and retention of fear memory. This work reviews current data on anatomical organization of the amygdala, as well as its afferent and efferent projections, in respect to the role of the amygdala in auditory fear conditioning during which acoustic signals serve as the conditioned stimulus. PMID:26983275

  11. Spatio-temporal patterns with hyperchaotic dynamics in diffusively coupled biochemical oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerold Baier

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We present three examples how complex spatio-temporal patterns can be linked to hyperchaotic attractors in dynamical systems consisting of nonlinear biochemical oscillators coupled linearly with diffusion terms. The systems involved are: (a a two-variable oscillator with two consecutive autocatalytic reactions derived from the Lotka–Volterra scheme; (b a minimal two-variable oscillator with one first-order autocatalytic reaction; (c a three-variable oscillator with first-order feedback lacking autocatalysis. The dynamics of a finite number of coupled biochemical oscillators may account for complex patterns in compartmentalized living systems like cells or tissue, and may be tested experimentally in coupled microreactors.

  12. Nonlinear Temporal Dynamics of Strongly Coupled Quantum Dot-Cavity System

    CERN Document Server

    Majumdar, Arka; Bajcsy, Michal; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically analyze and simulate the temporal dynamics of strongly coupled quantum dot-cavity system driven by a resonant laser pulse. We observe the signature of Rabi oscillation in the time resolved response of the system (i.e., in the numerically calculated cavity output), derive simplified linear and non-linear semi-classical models that approximate well the system's behavior in the limits of high and low power drive pulse, and describe the role of quantum coherence in the exact dynamics of the system. Finally, we also present experimental data showing the signature of the Rabi oscillation in time domain.

  13. THE TEMPORAL DYNAMICS OF REGIONAL CITY SIZE DISTRIBUTION: ANDHRA PRADESH (1951-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systems with measurable entities are characterized by certain properties of their size distribution. City Size Distribution (CSD and the underlying city size dynamics have received attention in the urban economic literature in recent years. In this approach we aim at evaluating the temporal dynamics of city size distribution in Andhra Pradesh, an Indian state for the period 1951-2001. The research framework-which is based on a function relating population size to rank-is used to test for the trends of deconcentration cities of population over the study period. The expansion methodology is used to investigate the dynamics of rank size function in temporal dimension. We have studied the threshold size and its influence on temporal trends. The size distribution of cities/towns from one period to another is modeled by way of a Markov Chain. Our findings reveal that all places in the urban system are growing with small towns growing at a faster rate during study period. The largest cities and the smallest towns display higher persistence than the medium sized cities.

  14. A method for investigating the temporal dynamics of local neuroretinal responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigl, Beatrix; Zele, Andrew J

    2008-01-30

    Visual sensitivity improves with prolonged exposure to light. Global neuroretinal responses increase, but little is known about the dynamics of local retinal responses over brief time intervals after changes in light level. This study applies the time-slice multifocal electroretinogram (TS mfERG) paradigm for the measurement of local electrical responses of the human eye over brief time intervals. Sixty-one, localised retinal areas were assessed over 25 degrees of the visual field. Cone-mediated contributions to the time-slice waveform were established. The time-slice mfERG waveforms were similar in shape and timing for pre- and post-photopigment bleach conditions after saturation of rod-mediated responses, suggesting there was no rod-mediated intrusion in the waveform. The temporal dynamics of the mfERG components show that N1P1 amplitudes decrease with each successive time-slice probe, with larger amplitude responses in the central retina compared to nasal and temporal retina. The time-slice mfERG waveform is a technique for assessing the temporal dynamics of cone-generated neural responses over time. The data are interpreted in terms of the vascular supplies and lower-level visual adaptation mechanisms. PMID:17913236

  15. Stress, memory and the amygdala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McEwen, Bruce S.; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2009-01-01

    Emotionally significant experiences tend to be well remembered, and the amygdala has a pivotal role in this process. But the efficient encoding of emotional memories can become maladaptive - severe stress often turns them into a source of chronic anxiety. Here, we review studies that have identified

  16. The temporal derivative of expected utility: a neural mechanism for dynamic decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Hirsch, Joy

    2013-01-15

    Real world tasks involving moving targets, such as driving a vehicle, are performed based on continuous decisions thought to depend upon the temporal derivative of the expected utility (∂V/∂t), where the expected utility (V) is the effective value of a future reward. However, the neural mechanisms that underlie dynamic decision-making are not well understood. This study investigates human neural correlates of both V and ∂V/∂t using fMRI and a novel experimental paradigm based on a pursuit-evasion game optimized to isolate components of dynamic decision processes. Our behavioral data show that players of the pursuit-evasion game adopt an exponential discounting function, supporting the expected utility theory. The continuous functions of V and ∂V/∂t were derived from the behavioral data and applied as regressors in fMRI analysis, enabling temporal resolution that exceeded the sampling rate of image acquisition, hyper-temporal resolution, by taking advantage of numerous trials that provide rich and independent manipulation of those variables. V and ∂V/∂t were each associated with distinct neural activity. Specifically, ∂V/∂t was associated with anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, superior parietal lobule, and ventral pallidum, whereas V was primarily associated with supplementary motor, pre and post central gyri, cerebellum, and thalamus. The association between the ∂V/∂t and brain regions previously related to decision-making is consistent with the primary role of the temporal derivative of expected utility in dynamic decision-making. PMID:22963852

  17. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics and Value of Nature-Based Recreation, Estimated via Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonter, Laura J; Watson, Keri B; Wood, Spencer A; Ricketts, Taylor H

    2016-01-01

    Conserved lands provide multiple ecosystem services, including opportunities for nature-based recreation. Managing this service requires understanding the landscape attributes underpinning its provision, and how changes in land management affect its contribution to human wellbeing over time. However, evidence from both spatially explicit and temporally dynamic analyses is scarce, often due to data limitations. In this study, we investigated nature-based recreation within conserved lands in Vermont, USA. We used geotagged photographs uploaded to the photo-sharing website Flickr to quantify visits by in-state and out-of-state visitors, and we multiplied visits by mean trip expenditures to show that conserved lands contributed US $1.8 billion (US $0.18-20.2 at 95% confidence) to Vermont's tourism industry between 2007 and 2014. We found eight landscape attributes explained the pattern of visits to conserved lands; visits were higher in larger conserved lands, with less forest cover, greater trail density and more opportunities for snow sports. Some of these attributes differed from those found in other locations, but all aligned with our understanding of recreation in Vermont. We also found that using temporally static models to inform conservation decisions may have perverse outcomes for nature-based recreation. For example, static models suggest conserved land with less forest cover receive more visits, but temporally dynamic models suggest clearing forests decreases, rather than increases, visits to these sites. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding both the spatial and temporal dynamics of ecosystem services for conservation decision-making. PMID:27611325

  18. Bursts and heavy tails in temporal and sequential dynamics of foraging decisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanghoon Jung

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental understanding of behavior requires predicting when and what an individual will choose. However, the actual temporal and sequential dynamics of successive choices made among multiple alternatives remain unclear. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that there is a general bursting property in both the timing and sequential patterns of foraging decisions. We conducted a foraging experiment in which rats chose among four different foods over a continuous two-week time period. Regarding when choices were made, we found bursts of rapidly occurring actions, separated by time-varying inactive periods, partially based on a circadian rhythm. Regarding what was chosen, we found sequential dynamics in affective choices characterized by two key features: (a a highly biased choice distribution; and (b preferential attachment, in which the animals were more likely to choose what they had previously chosen. To capture the temporal dynamics, we propose a dual-state model consisting of active and inactive states. We also introduce a satiation-attainment process for bursty activity, and a non-homogeneous Poisson process for longer inactivity between bursts. For the sequential dynamics, we propose a dual-control model consisting of goal-directed and habit systems, based on outcome valuation and choice history, respectively. This study provides insights into how the bursty nature of behavior emerges from the interaction of different underlying systems, leading to heavy tails in the distribution of behavior over time and choices.

  19. Dynamic regulatory on/off minimization for biological systems under internal temporal perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleessen Sabrina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flux balance analysis (FBA together with its extension, dynamic FBA, have proven instrumental for analyzing the robustness and dynamics of metabolic networks by employing only the stoichiometry of the included reactions coupled with adequately chosen objective function. In addition, under the assumption of minimization of metabolic adjustment, dynamic FBA has recently been employed to analyze the transition between metabolic states. Results Here, we propose a suite of novel methods for analyzing the dynamics of (internally perturbed metabolic networks and for quantifying their robustness with limited knowledge of kinetic parameters. Following the biochemically meaningful premise that metabolite concentrations exhibit smooth temporal changes, the proposed methods rely on minimizing the significant fluctuations of metabolic profiles to predict the time-resolved metabolic state, characterized by both fluxes and concentrations. By conducting a comparative analysis with a kinetic model of the Calvin-Benson cycle and a model of plant carbohydrate metabolism, we demonstrate that the principle of regulatory on/off minimization coupled with dynamic FBA can accurately predict the changes in metabolic states. Conclusions Our methods outperform the existing dynamic FBA-based modeling alternatives, and could help in revealing the mechanisms for maintaining robustness of dynamic processes in metabolic networks over time.

  20. The importance of temporal stress variation and dynamic disequilibrium for the initiation of plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenković, V.; Höink, T.; Lenardic, A.

    2016-06-01

    We use 1-D thermal history models and 3-D numerical experiments to study the impact of dynamic thermal disequilibrium and large temporal variations of normal and shear stresses on the initiation of plate tectonics. Previous models that explored plate tectonics initiation from a steady state, single plate mode of convection concluded that normal stresses govern the initiation of plate tectonics, which based on our 1-D model leads to plate yielding being more likely with increasing interior heat and planet mass for a depth-dependent Byerlee yield stress. Using 3-D spherical shell mantle convection models in an episodic regime allows us to explore larger temporal stress variations than can be addressed by considering plate failure from a steady state stagnant lid configuration. The episodic models show that an increase in convective mantle shear stress at the lithospheric base initiates plate failure, which leads with our 1-D model to plate yielding being less likely with increasing interior heat and planet mass. In this out-of-equilibrium and strongly time-dependent stress scenario, the onset of lithospheric overturn events cannot be explained by boundary layer thickening and normal stresses alone. Our results indicate that in order to understand the initiation of plate tectonics, one should consider the temporal variation of stresses and dynamic disequilibrium.

  1. Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions along a Lake Shore: Spatial Patterns and Temporal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, T.; Tecklenburg, C.; Krause, S.; Lewandowski, J.

    2012-12-01

    In this study the spatial and temporal variability of groundwater-surface water interactions along a lake shore is investigated by combining different experimental methods. Study area is Lake Hinnensee, situated in the lake district north of Berlin in Germany. The lake is a seepage lake with no surface inflows or outflows. To investigate the spatial patterns of groundwater surface water interactions as well as their temporal dynamics we applied a number of different techniques: snapshots of spatial patterns were determined by gridded measurements of temperature profiles in the lake sediment as well as with distributed temperature sensing (DTS), using a fiber optic cable placed at the sediment surface. The spatial resolution of measurements adequate for pattern detection was determined by comparing experimental designs at various spatial scales and resolutions. Continuous time series of water levels and temperature time series in piezometer transects at different locations along the lake shore give insight into both spatial variability and temporal dynamics of vertical hydraulic gradients and heat transport. Exfiltration rates of groundwater into the lake were estimated with 3 different approaches. The experimental methodologies were evaluated in a "cost-benefit" analysis, comparing effort with scientific benefit. The results show that groundwater exfiltration into the lake is to some extent variable in time and is highly variable in space: there is a strong gradient perpendicular to the lake shore as well as high heterogeneity along the lake shore.

  2. Temporal genetic analysis of the endangered tidewater goby: extinction-colonization dynamics or drift in isolation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinziger, Andrew P; Hellmair, Michael; McCraney, W Tyler; Jacobs, David K; Goldsmith, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Extinction and colonization dynamics are critical to understanding the evolution and conservation of metapopulations. However, traditional field studies of extinction-colonization are potentially fraught with detection bias and have rarely been validated. Here, we provide a comparison of molecular and field-based approaches for assessment of the extinction-colonization dynamics of tidewater goby (Eucyclogobius newberryi) in northern California. Our analysis of temporal genetic variation across 14 northern California tidewater goby populations failed to recover genetic change expected with extinction-colonization cycles. Similarly, analysis of site occupancy data from field studies (94 sites) indicated that extinction and colonization are very infrequent for our study populations. Comparison of the approaches indicated field data were subject to imperfect detection, and falsely implied extinction-colonization cycles in several instances. For northern California populations of tidewater goby, we interpret the strong genetic differentiation between populations and high degree of within-site temporal stability as consistent with a model of drift in the absence of migration, at least over the past 20-30 years. Our findings show that tidewater goby exhibit different population structures across their geographic range (extinction-colonization dynamics in the south vs. drift in isolation in the north). For northern populations, natural dispersal is too infrequent to be considered a viable approach for recolonizing extirpated populations, suggesting that species recovery will likely depend on artificial translocation in this region. More broadly, this work illustrates that temporal genetic analysis can be used in combination with field data to strengthen inference of extinction-colonization dynamics or as a stand-alone tool when field data are lacking. PMID:26460923

  3. Aging and percolation dynamics in a Non-Poissonian temporal network model

    CERN Document Server

    Moinet, Antoine; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2016-01-01

    We present an exhaustive mathematical analysis of the recently proposed Non-Poissonian Ac- tivity Driven (NoPAD) model [Moinet et al. Phys. Rev. Lett., 114 (2015)], a temporal network model incorporating the empirically observed bursty nature of social interactions. We focus on the aging effects emerging from the Non-Poissonian dynamics of link activation, and on their effects on the topological properties of time-integrated networks, such as the degree distribution. Analytic expressions for the degree distribution of integrated networks as a function of time are derived, ex- ploring both limits of vanishing and strong aging. We also address the percolation process occurring on these temporal networks, by computing the threshold for the emergence of a giant connected component, highlighting the aging dependence. Our analytic predictions are checked by means of extensive numerical simulations of the NoPAD model.

  4. Femtosecond laser microchannels fabrication based on electrons dynamics control using temporally or spatially shaped pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xueliang; Hu, Jie; Li, Xiaowei; Xia, Bo; Liu, Pengjun; Lu, Yongfeng; Jiang, Lan

    2014-11-01

    With ultrashort pulse durations and ultrahigh power densities, femtosecond laser presents unique advantages of high precision and high quality fabrication of microchannels in transparent materials. In our study, by shaping femtosecond laser pulse energy distribution in temporal or spatial domains, localized transient electrons dynamics and the subsequent processes, such as phase changes, can be controlled, leading to the dramatic increases in the capability of femtosecond laser microchannels fabrication. The temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulse trains can significantly enhance the material removal rate in both water-assisted femtosecond laser drilling and femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching. Besides, high-aspect-ratio and small-diameter microchannels are drilled by spatially shaped femtosecond laser pulses.

  5. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy of spins: Magnetization dynamics in thin magnetic films with spatio-temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpene, E., E-mail: ettore.carpene@fisi.polimi.i [CNR-IFN, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, p.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Mancini, E.; Dallera, C. [CNR-IFN, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, p.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Puppin, E. [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, p.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Silvestri, S. [CNR-IFN, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, p.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    Based on the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE), we have developed an experimental set-up that allows us to fully characterize the magnetization dynamics in thin magnetic films by measuring all three real space components of the magnetization vector M. By means of the pump-probe technique it is possible to extract the time dependence of each individual projection with sub-picosecond resolution. This method has been exploited to investigate the temporal evolution of the magnetization (modulus and orientation) induced by an ultrashort laser pulse in thin epitaxial iron films. According to our results, we deduced that the initial, sub-picosecond demagnetization is established at the electronic level through electron-magnon excitations. The subsequent dynamics is characterized by a precessional motion on the 100 ps time scale, around an effective, time-dependent magnetic field. Following the full dynamics of M, the temporal evolution of the magneto-crystalline anisotropy constant can be unambiguously determined, providing the experimental evidence that the precession is triggered by the rapid, optically-induced misalignment between the magnetization vector and the effective magnetic field. These results suggest a possible pathway toward the ultrarapid switching of the magnetization.

  6. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy of spins: Magnetization dynamics in thin magnetic films with spatio-temporal resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE), we have developed an experimental set-up that allows us to fully characterize the magnetization dynamics in thin magnetic films by measuring all three real space components of the magnetization vector M. By means of the pump-probe technique it is possible to extract the time dependence of each individual projection with sub-picosecond resolution. This method has been exploited to investigate the temporal evolution of the magnetization (modulus and orientation) induced by an ultrashort laser pulse in thin epitaxial iron films. According to our results, we deduced that the initial, sub-picosecond demagnetization is established at the electronic level through electron-magnon excitations. The subsequent dynamics is characterized by a precessional motion on the 100 ps time scale, around an effective, time-dependent magnetic field. Following the full dynamics of M, the temporal evolution of the magneto-crystalline anisotropy constant can be unambiguously determined, providing the experimental evidence that the precession is triggered by the rapid, optically-induced misalignment between the magnetization vector and the effective magnetic field. These results suggest a possible pathway toward the ultrarapid switching of the magnetization.

  7. Not FLEXible enough: Exploring the temporal dynamics of attentional reallocations with the multiple object tracking paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerhoff, Hauke S; Papenmeier, Frank; Jahn, Georg; Huff, Markus

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic environment of human observers requires continuous reallocations of visual attention to compensate for location changes of the attended objects. Particularly, situations with reduced spatial distance between targets and other objects in the display are crucial for keeping track of the target objects. In the present experiments, we explored how the temporal dynamics of such moments of reduced spacing affects the reallocation of visual attention. We asked participants to track 4 targets among indistinguishable distractors. Hereby, we manipulated whether target and distractor objects moved at a constant speed or whether their actual speed followed a sine wave profile. The variable speed oscillated around the constant speed thus maintaining average speed as well as traveled distance and average spatial proximity. We observed inferior tracking performance with variable speed profiles relative to constant speed profiles (Experiments 1a and 1b). When we increased the number of pairs of targets and distractors moving with a variable speed profile (Experiment 2), performance declined continuously. Remarkably, tracking performance also declined when only distractors moved at variable speeds, suggesting that the dynamic changes in interobject spacing rather than the variable speed impairs tracking (Experiment 3). In sum, our results provide evidence for a flexible allocation of the attentional resource toward targets suffering spatial interference by demonstrating the temporal constraints of the reallocation process. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26689311

  8. Embodiment of intersubjective time: relational dynamics as attractors in the temporal coordination of interpersonal behaviors and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, Julien; Berardi, Anna Maria; Brangier, Eric

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of "being together," and more specifically the issue of "being together in time." We provide with an integrative framework that is inspired by phenomenology, the enactive approach and dynamical systems theories. To do so, we first define embodiment as a living and lived phenomenon that emerges from agent-world coupling. We then show that embodiment is essentially dynamical and therefore we describe experiential, behavioral and brain dynamics. Both lived temporality and the temporality of the living appear to be complex, multiscale phenomena. Next we discuss embodied dynamics in the context of interpersonal interactions, and briefly review the empirical literature on between-persons temporal coordination. Overall, we propose that being together in time emerges from the relational dynamics of embodied interactions and their flexible co-regulation. PMID:25400598

  9. Temporal Dynamics and Drivers of Ecosystem Metabolism in a Large Subtropical Shallow Lake (Lake Taihu)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenghua Hu; Qitao Xiao; Jinbiao Yang; Wei Xiao; Wei Wang; Shoudong Liu; Xuhui Lee

    2015-01-01

    With continuous measurements of dissolved oxygen, temperature, irradiance, and wind speed, as well as frequent measurements of pH, oxidation-reduction potential, and algal chlorophyll, temporal dynamics and drivers of ecosystem metabolism in a large nutrient-rich shallow lake (Lake Taihu) are tested in this study. The results show that the dissolved oxygen concentrations in the lake fluctuate annually. They increase in autumn and winter with a peak value of 14.19 mg·L−1 in winter, and decreas...

  10. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Pond Use and Recruitment in Florida Gopher Frogs (Rana Capito aesopus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, C.H.

    2000-05-16

    We examined spatio-temporal dynamics of the Florida Gopher frog breeding and juvenile recruitment. Ponds were situated in a hardwood or pine-savanna matrix of upland forest. Movement was monitored from 1994-1999. Adult pond use was low but relatively constant. Juvenile recruitment was higher in the upland savanna matrix. Body size was negatively correlated with the number of juveniles exiting the pond in only one year suggesting intraspecific competition is one of many factors. Most immigration occurred in May through August and was unrelated to rainfall.

  11. A Fisher-gradient complexity in systems with spatio-temporal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbona, A.; Bona, C.; Massó, J.; Miñano, B.; Plastino, A.

    2016-04-01

    We define a benchmark for definitions of complexity in systems with spatio-temporal dynamics and employ it in the study of Collective Motion. We show that LMC's complexity displays interesting properties in such systems, while a statistical complexity model (SCM) based on autocorrelation reasonably meets our perception of complexity. However this SCM is not as general as desirable, as it does not merely depend on the system's Probability Distribution Function. Inspired by the notion of Fisher information, we develop a SCM candidate, which we call the Fisher-gradient complexity, which exhibits nice properties from the viewpoint of our benchmark.

  12. Temporal dynamics of fusion-FEM oscillations: comparison of experiment and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Savilov, A V; Denisov, G G; Bongers, W A; Geer, C A J; Manintveld, P; Verhoeven, A G A; Urbanus, W H

    1999-01-01

    At the first stage of the Fusion-FEM experiment, a high-power electrostatic free-electron laser operating in the mm-wave regime was tested without the energy recovery system. In this situation, a slow temporal drop of the acceleration voltage complicated significantly the dynamics of the FEM operation. In this paper, experimental results are compared to simulations. It is demonstrated that the decrease of the frequency of the output radiation, caused by the voltage drop, has a stepped character; the value of this step is as large as the width of the amplification band.

  13. Amygdala subregions tied to SSRI and placebo response in patients with social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Vanda; Appel, Lieuwe; Åhs, Fredrik; Linnman, Clas; Pissiota, Anna; Frans, Örjan; Bani, Massimo; Bettica, Paolo; Pich, Emilio M; Jacobsson, Eva; Wahlstedt, Kurt; Fredrikson, Mats; Furmark, Tomas

    2012-09-01

    The amygdala is a key structure in the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders, and a putative target for anxiolytic treatments. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and placebo seem to induce anxiolytic effects by attenuating amygdala responsiveness. However, conflicting amygdala findings have also been reported. Moreover, the neural profile of responders and nonresponders is insufficiently characterized and it remains unknown whether SSRIs and placebo engage common or distinct amygdala subregions or different modulatory cortical areas. We examined similarities and differences in the neural response to SSRIs and placebo in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). Positron emission tomography (PET) with oxygen-15-labeled water was used to assess regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 72 patients with SAD during an anxiogenic public speaking task, before and after 6-8 weeks of treatment under double-blind conditions. Response rate was determined by the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale. Conjunction analysis revealed a common rCBF-attenuation from pre- to post-treatment in responders to SSRIs and placebo in the left basomedial/basolateral and right ventrolateral amygdala. This rCBF pattern correlated with behavioral measures of reduced anxiety and differentiated responders from nonresponders. However, nonanxiolytic treatment effects were also observed in the amygdala. All subgroups, including nonresponders, showed deactivation of the left lateral part of the amygdala. No rCBF differences were found between SSRI responders and placebo responders. This study provides new insights into the brain dynamics underlying anxiety relief by demonstrating common amygdala targets for pharmacologically and psychologically induced anxiety reduction, and by showing that the amygdala is functionally heterogeneous in anxiolysis. PMID:22617357

  14. From circuits to behaviour in the amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Janak, Patricia H.; Tye, Kay M

    2015-01-01

    The amygdala has long been associated with emotion and motivation, playing an essential part in processing both fearful and rewarding environmental stimuli. How can a single structure be crucial for such different functions? With recent technological advances that allow for causal investigations of specific neural circuit elements, we can now begin to map the complex anatomical connections of the amygdala onto behavioural function. Understanding how the amygdala contributes to a wide array of...

  15. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wallach

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc. contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner.

  16. Reuse, Temporal Dynamics, Interest Sharing, and Collaboration in Social Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Santos-Neto, Elizeu; Andrade, Nazareno; Iamnitchi, Adriana; Ripeanu, Matei

    2013-01-01

    User-generated content is shaping the dynamics of the World Wide Web. Indeed, an increasingly large number of systems provide mechanisms to support the growing demand for content creation, sharing, and management. Tagging systems are a particular class of these systems where users share and collaboratively annotate content such as photos and URLs. This collaborative behavior and the pool of user-generated metadata create opportunities to improve existing systems and to design new mechanisms. However, to realize this potential, it is necessary to understand the usage characteristics of current systems. This work addresses this issue characterizing three tagging systems (CiteULike, Connotea and del.icio.us) while focusing on three aspects: i) the patterns of information (tags and items) production; ii) the temporal dynamics of users' tag vocabularies; and, iii) the social aspects of tagging systems.

  17. Temporal and Spatial Dynamics of Tree Species Composition in Temperate Mountains of South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boknam; Park, Juhan; Cho, Sungsik; Ryu, Daun; Zaw Wynn, Khine; Park, Minji; Cho, Sunhee; Yoon, Jongguk; Park, Jongyoung; Kim, Hyun Seok

    2015-04-01

    Long term studies on vegetation dynamics are important to identify changes of ecosystem-level responses to climate change. To learn how tree species composition and stand structure change across temperate mountains, the temporal and spatial variations in tree species diversity and structure were investigated using the species composition and DBH size collected over the fourteen-year period across 134 sites in Jiri and Baekoon Mountains, South Korea. The overall temporal changes over fourteen years showed significant increase in stand density, species diversity and evenness according to the indices of Shannon-Weiner diversity, Bray-Curtis dissimilarity, and Pielou's evenness, contributing to the increase of basal area and biomass growth. The change of tree species composition could be categorized into five species communities, representing gradual increase or decrease, establishment, extinction, fluctuation of species population. However, in general, the change in species composition appeared to have consistent and directional patterns of increase in the annual rate of change in the mean species traits including species richness, pole growth rate, adult growth rate, and adult stature with five common dominant species (Quercus mongolica, Quercus variabilis, Quercus serrata, Carpinus laxiflora, and Styrax japonicus). The spatial patterns of species composition appeared to have a higher stand density and species diversity along with the low latitude and high slope ecosystem. The climate change was another main driver to vary the distribution of species abundance. Overall, both temporal and spatial changes of composition in tree species community was clear and further analysis to clarify the reasons for such fast and species-specific changes is underway especially to separate the effect of successional change and climate change. Keywords species composition; climate change; temporal and spatial variation ; forest structure; temperate forest

  18. Charging of a conducting sphere in a weakly ionized collisional plasma: Temporal dynamics and stationary state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the interaction of a isolated conducting sphere with a collisional weakly ionized plasma in an external field. We assume that the plasma consists of two species of ions neglecting of electrons. We take into account charging of the sphere due to sedimentation of plasma ions on it, the field of the sphere charge and the space charge, as well as recombination and molecular diffusion. The nonstationary problem of interaction of the sphere with the surrounding plasma is solved numerically. The temporal dynamics of the sphere charge and plasma perturbations is analyzed, as well as the properties of the stationary state. It is shown that the duration of transient period is determined by the recombination time and by the reverse conductivity of ions. The temporal dynamics of the sphere charge and plasma perturbations is determined by the intensity of recombination processes relative to the influence of the space charge field and diffusion. The stationary absolute value of the sphere charge increases linearly with the external electric field, decreases with the relative intensity of recombination processes and increases in the presence of substantial diffusion. The scales of the perturbed region in the plasma are determined by the radius of the sphere, the external field, the effect of diffusion, and the relative intensity of recombination processes. In the limiting case of the absence of molecular diffusion and a strong external field, the properties of the stationary state coincide with those obtained earlier as a result of approximate solution

  19. Temporal dynamics of linkage disequilibrium in two populations of bighorn sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joshua M; Poissant, Jocelyn; Malenfant, René M; Hogg, John T; Coltman, David W

    2015-01-01

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) is the nonrandom association of alleles at two markers. Patterns of LD have biological implications as well as practical ones when designing association studies or conservation programs aimed at identifying the genetic basis of fitness differences within and among populations. However, the temporal dynamics of LD in wild populations has received little empirical attention. In this study, we examined the overall extent of LD, the effect of sample size on the accuracy and precision of LD estimates, and the temporal dynamics of LD in two populations of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) with different demographic histories. Using over 200 microsatellite loci, we assessed two metrics of multi-allelic LD, D′, and χ′2. We found that both populations exhibited high levels of LD, although the extent was much shorter in a native population than one that was founded via translocation, experienced a prolonged bottleneck post founding, followed by recent admixture. In addition, we observed significant variation in LD in relation to the sample size used, with small sample sizes leading to depressed estimates of the extent of LD but inflated estimates of background levels of LD. In contrast, there was not much variation in LD among yearly cross-sections within either population once sample size was accounted for. Lack of pronounced interannual variability suggests that researchers may not have to worry about interannual variation when estimating LD in a population and can instead focus on obtaining the largest sample size possible. PMID:26380673

  20. Decoding brain cancer dynamics: a quantitative histogram-based approach using temporal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mu; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Russo, Robin; Gillies, Robert J.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2015-03-01

    Brain tumor heterogeneity remains a challenge for probing brain cancer evolutionary dynamics. In light of evolution, it is a priority to inspect the cancer system from a time-domain perspective since it explicitly tracks the dynamics of cancer variations. In this paper, we study the problem of exploring brain tumor heterogeneity from temporal clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Our goal is to discover evidence-based knowledge from such temporal imaging data, where multiple clinical MRI scans from Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients are generated during therapy. In particular, we propose a quantitative histogram-based approach that builds a prediction model to measure the difference in histograms obtained from pre- and post-treatment. The study could significantly assist radiologists by providing a metric to identify distinctive patterns within each tumor, which is crucial for the goal of providing patient-specific treatments. We examine the proposed approach for a practical application - clinical survival group prediction. Experimental results show that our approach achieved 90.91% accuracy.

  1. Temporal dynamics of categorization: Forgetting as the basis of abstraction and generalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haley eVlach

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Historically, models of categorization have focused on how learners track frequencies and co-occurrence information to abstract relevant category features for generalization. The current study takes a different approach by examining how the temporal dynamics of categorization affect abstraction and generalization. In the learning phase of the experiment, all relevant category features were presented an equal number of times across category exemplars. However, the relevant features were presented on one of two learning schedules: massed or interleaved. At a series of immediate and delayed tests, learners were asked to generalize to novel exemplars that contained massed features, interleaved features, or all novel features. The results of this experiment revealed that, at an immediate test, learners more readily generalized based upon features presented on a massed schedule. Conversely, at a delayed test, learners more readily generalized based upon features presented on an interleaved schedule, until information was no longer readily retrievable from memory. These findings suggest that forgetting and retrieval processes engendered by the temporal dynamics of learning are used as a basis of abstraction, implicating forgetting as a central mechanism of generalization.

  2. Spatial and temporal dynamics of the genetic organization of small mammal populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A functional population is a group of organisms and their offspring that contributes to a common gene pool within a certain area and time period. It is also the unit of evolution and should be viewed both in quantitative and qualitative terms. Selection, drift, dispersal, and mutation can alter the composition of populations. Spatial heterogeneity in allele frequencies argues for a conceptual model that has a series of relatively small populations semi-isolated from one another. Because of the relatively high levels of genetic variability characteristic of most mammalian species, significant amounts of gene flow between these spatially subdivided populations must occur when longer time periods are considered. Fluctuations in the genetic structure of populations seem to be important in altering the fitness of the individuals within the populations. The interaction of populations through gene flow is important in changing the levels of intrapopulational genetic variability. Populations can be characterized as existing on a continuum from relatively stable to unstable numbers and by other associated changes in their characteristics. Temporal changes in allele frequency occur in a variety of mammals. Conceptually, a species can be viewed as a series of dynamic populations that vary in numbers and quality in both a spatial and temporal context even over short distances and time periods. Short term changes in the quality of individuals in a population can be important in altering the short term dynamics of a population

  3. Temporal dynamics of distinct CA1 cell populations during unconscious state induced by ketamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Kuang

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a widely used dissociative anesthetic which can induce some psychotic-like symptoms and memory deficits in some patients during the post-operative period. To understand its effects on neural population dynamics in the brain, we employed large-scale in vivo ensemble recording techniques to monitor the activity patterns of simultaneously recorded hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells and various interneurons during several conscious and unconscious states such as awake rest, running, slow wave sleep, and ketamine-induced anesthesia. Our analyses reveal that ketamine induces distinct oscillatory dynamics not only in pyramidal cells but also in at least seven different types of CA1 interneurons including putative basket cells, chandelier cells, bistratified cells, and O-LM cells. These emergent unique oscillatory dynamics may very well reflect the intrinsic temporal relationships within the CA1 circuit. It is conceivable that systematic characterization of network dynamics may eventually lead to better understanding of how ketamine induces unconsciousness and consequently alters the conscious mind.

  4. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Carbonate Chemistry in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, C.; Winn, C. D.; Kahng, S.

    2014-12-01

    The rapid increase in atmospheric and surface ocean CO2 concentrations has the potential to drastically alter the metabolic processes particularly in nearshore ecosystems. However, much of what is known about carbonate chemistry is based on observations and analysis of surface waters of the open ocean where spatial and temporal variability is far less dynamic than in nearshore coral reef ecosystems. Carbon system dynamics data from four consecutive years has been examined in the coastal and nearshore waters of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands. This data has been collected for the purpose of improving our understanding of the carbon system dynamics in this unique and pristine environment. The data collected includes continuous CTD data and discrete bottle samples, as well as continuous underway measurements. In addition to standard hydrographic profile data, water column alkalinity and pH have been measured on discrete water samples, and continuous underway measurements of pCO2 and pH have been obtained. This data is used to investigate the impact of NWHI coral reef ecosystems on the carbon system in and surrounding the archipelago. The data demonstrates that a significant "island mass effect" with respect to the oceanographic carbon system exists around the islands within the archipelago. In addition, spatial and temporal variability of several oceanographic features that exhibit a radial, latitudinal, or longitudinal gradient in the nearshore waters of the NWHI islands, islets, and atolls will be described. Finally, a shallow pH maximum coincident with the shallow oxygen maximum is observed, which suggests an open ocean feature substantially influenced by turbulence surrounding the islands within the monument. The data analysis and coral reef ecosystem monitoring will aid in developing a long-term plan to assist in the sustainability of Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

  5. MRI Amygdala Volume in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitao, Liliana; Sampaio, Adriana; Sampaio, Cassandra; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Fernandez, Montse; Garayzabal, Elena; Shenton, Martha E.; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most intriguing characteristics of Williams Syndrome individuals is their hypersociability. The amygdala has been consistently implicated in the etiology of this social profile, particularly given its role in emotional and social behavior. This study examined amygdala volume and symmetry in WS individuals and in age and sex matched…

  6. Application of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Wu; Wang, Xiaoyi; Xie, Fangfang; Liao, Weihua [Dept. of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital of Central South Univ., Changsha (China)], e-mail: doctoring@sina.com

    2013-02-15

    Background: Accurately locatithe epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is important in clinical practice. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) have been widely used in the lateralization of TLE, but both have limitations. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging can accurately and reliably reflect differences in cerebral blood flow and volume. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in TLE. Material and Methods: Conventional MRI and DSC-MRI scanning was performed in 20 interictal cases of TLE and 20 healthy volunteers. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes of the TLE cases and healthy control groups were calculated. The differences in the perfusion asymmetry indices (AIs), derived from the rCBV and rCBF of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes, were pared between the two groups. Results: In the control group, there were no statistically significant differences between the left and right sides in terms of rCBV (left 1.55 {+-} 0.32, right 1.57 {+-} 0.28) or rCBF (left 99.00 {+-} 24.61, right 100.38 {+-} 23.46) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes. However, in the case group the ipsilateral rCBV and rCBF values (1.75 {+-} 0.64 and 96.35 {+-} 22.63, respectively) were markedly lower than those of the contralateral side (2.01 {+-} 0.79 and 108.56 {+-} 26.92; P < 0.05). Both the AI of the rCBV (AIrCBV; 13.03 {+-} 10.33) and the AI of the rCBF (AIrCBF; 11.24 {+-} 8.70) of the case group were significantly higher than that of the control group (AIrCBV 5.55 {+-} 3.74, AIrCBF 5.12 {+-} 3.48; P < 0.05). The epileptogenic foci of nine patients were correctly lateralized using the 95th percentile of the AIrCBV and AIrCBF of the control group as the normal upper limits. Conclusion: In

  7. A Recurrent Network in the Lateral Amygdala: A Mechanism for Coincidence Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Luke R.; Hou, Mian; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrian; Gribelyuk, Leo M.; Alphs, Hannah H.; Albert, Ladislau; Brown, Bruce L.; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Doyère, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Synaptic changes at sensory inputs to the dorsal nucleus of the lateral amygdala (LAd) play a key role in the acquisition and storage of associative fear memory. However, neither the temporal nor spatial architecture of the LAd network response to sensory signals is understood. We developed a method for the elucidation of network behavior. Using this approach, temporally patterned polysynaptic recurrent network responses were found in LAd (intra-LA), both in vitro and in vivo, in response to ...

  8. Hotspots of Community Change: Temporal Dynamics Are Spatially Variable in Understory Plant Composition of a California Oak Woodland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica N Spotswood

    Full Text Available Community response to external drivers such climate and disturbance can lead to fluctuations in community composition, or to directional change. Temporal dynamics can be influenced by a combination of drivers operating at multiple spatial scales, including external landscape scale drivers, local abiotic conditions, and local species pools. We hypothesized that spatial variation in these factors can create heterogeneity in temporal dynamics within landscapes. We used understory plant species composition from an 11 year dataset from a California oak woodland to compare plots where disturbance was experimentally manipulated with the removal of livestock grazing and a prescribed burn. We quantified three properties of temporal variation: compositional change (reflecting the appearance and disappearance of species, temporal fluctuation, and directional change. Directional change was related most strongly to disturbance type, and was highest at plots where grazing was removed during the study. Temporal fluctuations, compositional change, and directional change were all related to intrinsic abiotic factors, suggesting that some locations are more responsive to external drivers than others. Temporal fluctuations and compositional change were linked to local functional composition, indicating that environmental filters can create subsets of the local species pool that do not respond in the same way to external drivers. Temporal dynamics are often assumed to be relatively static at the landscape scale, provided disturbance and climate are continuous. This study shows that local and landscape scale factors jointly influence temporal dynamics creating hotspots that are particularly responsive to climate and disturbance. Thus, adequate predictions of response to disturbance or to changing climate will only be achieved by considering how factors at multiple spatial scales influence community resilience and recovery.

  9. Culicidae Community Composition and Temporal Dynamics in Guapiaçu Ecological Reserve, Cachoeiras de Macacu, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Alencar, Jeronimo; de Mello, Cecilia Ferreira; Guimarães, Anthony Érico; Hélcio R. Gil-Santana; Silva, Júlia dos Santos; Santos- Mallet, Jacenir R.; Raquel M. Gleiser

    2015-01-01

    A temporal observational study was conducted of the Culicidae fauna in a remnant area of Atlantic Forest within a private reserve (Guapiaçu Ecological Reserve-REGUA) presenting typical vegetation cover of dense rain forest, with some patches recovering a floristic composition similar to that of the original community. Research was carried out to analyze the influence of climatic factors (mean monthly temperature, rainfall, and air relative humidity) on the temporal dynamics of the mosquito co...

  10. Spatially-temporal dynamics of a passively Q-switched Raman-active solid-state oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashnikov, V L; Yumashev, K V

    2009-01-01

    The spatially-temporal model of an all-solid-state passively Q-switched oscillator with an active medium providing the stimulated Raman scattering is presented. The model does not presume a Gaussian shape of the cylindrically symmetric modes at both fundamental and Stokes wavelengths. It is found, that the highly-nontrivial spatially-temporal dynamics can be regularized by the optimal choice of the oscillator parameters, viz. initial transmission of a saturable absorber, curvature of a spherical mirror, and output mirror transmission at the fundamental and Stokes wavelengths. As a result, the pulse can be substantially temporally squeezed and spatially broadened at both fundamental and Stokes wavelengths.

  11. When meaning matters: The temporal dynamics of semantic influences on visual attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Floor; Huettig, Falk; Olivers, Christian N L

    2016-02-01

    An important question is, to what extent is visual attention driven by the semantics of individual objects, rather than by their visual appearance? This study investigates the hypothesis that timing is a crucial factor in the occurrence and strength of semantic influences on visual orienting. To assess the dynamics of such influences, the authors presented the target instruction either before or after visual stimulus onset, while eye movements were continuously recorded throughout the search. The results show a substantial but delayed bias in orienting toward semantically related objects compared with visually related objects when target instruction is presented before visual stimulus onset. However, this delay can be completely undone by presenting the visual information before the target instruction (Experiment 1). Moreover, the absence or presence of visual competition does not change the temporal dynamics of the semantic bias (Experiment 2). Visual orienting is thus driven by priority settings that dynamically shift between visual and semantic representations, with each of these types of bias operating largely independently. The findings bridge the divide between the visual attention and the psycholinguistic literature. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26322686

  12. Population responses to environmental change in a tropical ant: the interaction of spatial and temporal dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Jackson

    Full Text Available Spatial structure can have a profound, but often underappreciated, effect on the temporal dynamics of ecosystems. Here we report on a counterintuitive increase in the population of a tree-nesting ant, Azteca sericeasur, in response to a drastic reduction in the number of potential nesting sites. This surprising result is comprehensible when viewed in the context of the self-organized spatial dynamics of the ants and their effect on the ants' dispersal-limited natural enemies. Approximately 30% of the trees in the study site, a coffee agroecosystem in southern Mexico, were pruned or felled over a two-year period, and yet the abundance of the ant nests more than doubled over the seven-year study. Throughout the transition, the spatial distribution of the ants maintained a power-law distribution - a signal of spatial self organization - but the local clustering of the nests was reduced post-pruning. A cellular automata model incorporating the changed spatial structure of the ants and the resulting partial escape from antagonists reproduced the observed increase in abundance, highlighting how self-organized spatial dynamics can profoundly influence the responses of ecosystems to perturbations.

  13. Optimal temporal convolution smoothing for the perception of the recurrent display of a dynamic image series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The visual perception of temporal changes in a dynamic series of images, e.g. a recurrent movie display of an equilibrium gated angiography, depends strongly on the frequency of the changes in activity of the images. The human eye is three times as sensitive for frequencies at about ten hertz, as for frequencies lower than three hertz. This causes a low sensitivity for the relevant activity changes in the information of the series and a much higher sensitivity for activity changes due to noise. Linear combination of subsequent images allows to filter the frequency content of the series at about ten hertz. This does not affect the information of the series as this contains typically frequencies lower than three hertz (about the third harmonic in a typical angiography). For a filter which creates a new series of images by adding three subsequent images with factors a,b and a respectively, the optimal ratio A=a/b to reduce frequencies at ten hertz depends on the speed of projection of the dynamic series. A projection at 16 images per second leads to A=1.6. The effect of the filter is both objective on the static images (convolution smoothing) and subjective (psychophysical) on the dynamic series. It allows the reduction of the fast disturbing changes in the images due to noise and does not affect the diagnostic information in the images

  14. Spatial, temporal, and environmental dynamics of a multi-species epinephelid spawning aggregation in Pohnpei, Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, K. L.; Nemeth, R. S.; Kadison, E.; Joseph, E.

    2014-09-01

    Long-term and short-term underwater visual censuses using SCUBA, technical Nitrox, and closed circuit rebreathers (CCR) were carried out in Pohnpei, Micronesia, to define spatial and temporal dynamics within a semi-protected multi-species epinephelid (fish) spawning aggregation (FSA) of brown-marbled grouper, Epinephelus fuscoguttatus, camouflage grouper, Epinephelus polyphekadion, and squaretail coralgrouper, Plectropomus areolatus. Results identified species-specific patterns of habitat use, abundance, residency, and dispersal of FSAs. Fish spawning aggregations formed and dispersed monthly within a 21-160-d period after winter solstice within adjacent yet distinct outer reef habitats. The reproductive season coincided with periods of seasonally low sub-surface seawater temperature. Peaks in density varied among species both within the calendar year and relative to the winter solstice. Significant long-term declines in FSA density were observed for all three species, suggesting population-level fishery-induced impacts, similar to those previously reported for E. polyphekadion. Differences in density estimates were also observed between dive gear, with a threefold difference in densities measured by CCR for E. polyphekadion versus SCUBA that suggest a disturbance effect from exhaled SCUBA bubbles for this species. CCR also allowed surveys to be conducted over a larger area in a single dive, thereby improving the potential to gauge actual abundance and density within FSAs. Based on these findings, a combination of long-term and intensive short-term monitoring strategies is recommended to fully characterize trends in seasonal abundance and habitat use for aggregating species at single or multi-species FSA sites. Inherent variations in the timing and distribution of species within FSA make fine-scale temporal management protocols less effective than blanket protective coverage of these species at (e.g., marine protected areas covering FSAs and adjacent migratory

  15. Temporal dynamics of repetition suppression to individual faces presented at a fast periodic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemrodov, Dan; Jacques, Corentin; Rossion, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    Periodic presentation of visual stimuli leads to a robust electrophysiological response on the human scalp exactly at the periodic stimulation frequency, a response defined as a "steady-state visual evoked potential" (SSVEP, Regan, 1966). However, recent studies have shown that SSVEPs over the (right) occipito-temporal cortex are reduced when the same individual face is repeated at periodic rates of 3 to 9 Hz compared to when different faces are presented (Rossion, 2014). Here, we characterized the temporal dynamics of this repetition suppression effect. We presented different face identities at a rate of 5.88 Hz (stimulus onset asynchrony of 170 ms) for 15 s, followed by the repetition of the exact same face at this rate for 35 s. Compared to a stimulation sequence with different faces only, there was a large and specific decrease of the 5.88 Hz response when the same face was repeated at that rate. This effect was observed over the left and right occipito-temporal cortex, but not over medial occipital electrode sites where SSVEPs are typically measured. In the right hemisphere, this decrease occurred abruptly, i.e., within half a second following the introduction of the same-identity stimulation, with no further decrease until the end of the stimulation. These observations indicate that the SSVEP recorded over high-level visual areas to periodic stimulation is not steady but rather adapts immediately and fully following the repetition of the same individual face, supporting a bottom-up, stimulus-driven account of repetition suppression effects. PMID:26113059

  16. Remote sensing and geographic information systems in the spatial temporal dynamics modeling of infectious diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG; Peng

    2006-01-01

    Similar to species immigration or exotic species invasion, infectious disease transmission is strengthened due to the globalization of human activities. Using schistosomiasis as an example, we propose a conceptual model simulating the spatio-temporal dynamics of infectious diseases. We base the model on the knowledge of the interrelationship among the source, media, and the hosts of the disease. With the endemics data of schistosomiasis in Xichang, China, we demonstrate that the conceptual model is feasible; we introduce how remote sensing and geographic information systems techniques can be used in support of spatio-temporal modeling; we compare the different effects caused to the entire population when selecting different groups of people for schistosomiasis control. Our work illustrates the importance of such a modeling tool in supporting spatial decisions. Our modeling method can be directly applied to such infectious diseases as the plague, lyme disease, and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. The application of remote sensing and geographic information systems can shed light on the modeling of other infectious disease and invasive species studies.

  17. Spatio-temporal dynamics induced by competing instabilities in two asymmetrically coupled nonlinear evolution equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schüler, D.; Alonso, S.; Bär, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Torcini, A. [CNR-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi - Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sez. Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    Pattern formation often occurs in spatially extended physical, biological, and chemical systems due to an instability of the homogeneous steady state. The type of the instability usually prescribes the resulting spatio-temporal patterns and their characteristic length scales. However, patterns resulting from the simultaneous occurrence of instabilities cannot be expected to be simple superposition of the patterns associated with the considered instabilities. To address this issue, we design two simple models composed by two asymmetrically coupled equations of non-conserved (Swift-Hohenberg equations) or conserved (Cahn-Hilliard equations) order parameters with different characteristic wave lengths. The patterns arising in these systems range from coexisting static patterns of different wavelengths to traveling waves. A linear stability analysis allows to derive a two parameter phase diagram for the studied models, in particular, revealing for the Swift-Hohenberg equations, a co-dimension two bifurcation point of Turing and wave instability and a region of coexistence of stationary and traveling patterns. The nonlinear dynamics of the coupled evolution equations is investigated by performing accurate numerical simulations. These reveal more complex patterns, ranging from traveling waves with embedded Turing patterns domains to spatio-temporal chaos, and a wide hysteretic region, where waves or Turing patterns coexist. For the coupled Cahn-Hilliard equations the presence of a weak coupling is sufficient to arrest the coarsening process and to lead to the emergence of purely periodic patterns. The final states are characterized by domains with a characteristic length, which diverges logarithmically with the coupling amplitude.

  18. Temporal dynamics influenced by global change: bee community phenology in urban, agricultural, and natural landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Misha; Ponisio, Lauren C; Kremen, Claire; Thorp, Robbin W; Roderick, George K

    2016-03-01

    Urbanization and agricultural intensification of landscapes are important drivers of global change, which in turn have direct impacts on local ecological communities leading to shifts in species distributions and interactions. Here, we illustrate how human-altered landscapes, with novel ornamental and crop plant communities, result not only in changes to local community diversity of floral-dependent species, but also in shifts in seasonal abundance of bee pollinators. Three years of data on the spatio-temporal distributions of 91 bee species show that seasonal patterns of abundance and species richness in human-altered landscapes varied significantly less compared to natural habitats in which floral resources are relatively scarce in the dry summer months. These findings demonstrate that anthropogenic environmental changes in urban and agricultural systems, here mediated through changes in plant resources and water inputs, can alter the temporal dynamics of pollinators that depend on them. Changes in phenology of interactions can be an important, though frequently overlooked, mechanism of global change. PMID:26663622

  19. Fish and phytoplankton exhibit contrasting temporal species abundance patterns in a dynamic north temperate lake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen J A Hansen

    Full Text Available Temporal patterns of species abundance, although less well-studied than spatial patterns, provide valuable insight to the processes governing community assembly. We compared temporal abundance distributions of two communities, phytoplankton and fish, in a north temperate lake. We used both 17 years of observed relative abundance data as well as resampled data from Monte Carlo simulations to account for the possible effects of non-detection of rare species. Similar to what has been found in other communities, phytoplankton and fish species that appeared more frequently were generally more abundant than rare species. However, neither community exhibited two distinct groups of "core" (common occurrence and high abundance and "occasional" (rare occurrence and low abundance species. Both observed and resampled data show that the phytoplankton community was dominated by occasional species appearing in only one year that exhibited large variation in their abundances, while the fish community was dominated by core species occurring in all 17 years at high abundances. We hypothesize that the life-history traits that enable phytoplankton to persist in highly dynamic environments may result in communities dominated by occasional species capable of reaching high abundances when conditions allow. Conversely, longer turnover times and broad environmental tolerances of fish may result in communities dominated by core species structured primarily by competitive interactions.

  20. Temporal variation of trace metal geochemistry in floodplain lake sediment subject to dynamic hydrological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change and land use may significantly influence metal cycling in dynamic river systems. We studied temporal variation of sediment characteristics in a floodplain lake, including concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, acid volatile sulfide and trace metals. The sampling period included a severe winter inundation and a dramatic water level drop during summer. Temporal changes were interpreted using multivariate analysis and chemical equilibrium calculations. Metal concentrations in sediment increased with depth, indicating a gradual improvement of sediment quality. In contrast, dissolved metal concentrations were highest in top layers due to mobilization from oxyhydroxides and precipitation with sulfides in deeper layers. Inundation had a mobilizing effect as it stimulated resuspension and oxygenation of sediment top layers. Water table lowering combined with organic matter decomposition led to immobilization due to sulfide formation. The chemistry of the sediments was consistent with model calculations, especially for macro-elements. The results illustrate the importance of seasonality for metal risk assessment. - There is strong seasonal variation in degree of metal mobilization from lake sediments

  1. Temporal Dynamics of Gully Evolution in a Small, Ephemeral Channel in a Semiarid Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Mary; Nearing, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Incised channels that terminate at a vertical-wall gully heads are common features in semiarid watersheds. The geomorphic evolution of such channels is often dominated by migration of the headwall. The evolution of a headwall in a low order channel on the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southeastern Arizona has been monitored since 2004, and since 2012, time-lapse photography has been employed to observe the temporal dynamics at high resolution. A Canon A1300 off the shelf point and shoot digital camera mounted inside a weatherproof Pelican case has been taking 15 mp photographs since 2012. The camera power supply was modified to run from a 12V car battery that was charged with a 25 Watt solar panel through a solar controller. During the runoff season from July through September, images were collected every 30 seconds and the time step was increase to 30 minutes during winter months. The field of view covers the headcut and the immediate surroundings. Runoff events were distinct flash floods in response to high intensity rain. The temporal sequencing of the dominant processes of erosion including mass wasting, plunge pool erosion, and piping are described. In addition, we present a description of the time-lapse camera system with suggestions for future improvements.

  2. Multimodal emotion perception after anterior temporal lobectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Valérie Milesi; Chiara Cristinzio; Margitta Seeck

    2014-01-01

    In the context of emotion information processing, several studies have demonstrated the involvement of the amygdala in emotion perception, for unimodal and multimodal stimuli. However, it seems that not only the amygdala, but several regions around it, may also play a major role in multimodal emotional integration. In order to investigate the contribution of these regions to multimodal emotion perception, five patients who had undergone unilateral anterior temporal lobe resection were exposed...

  3. The Temporal Dynamics of Spoken Word Recognition in Adverse Listening Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Susanne; Bradlow, Ann R

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the temporal dynamics of spoken word recognition in noise and background speech. In two visual-world experiments, English participants listened to target words while looking at four pictures on the screen: a target (e.g. candle), an onset competitor (e.g. candy), a rhyme competitor (e.g. sandal), and an unrelated distractor (e.g. lemon). Target words were presented in quiet, mixed with broadband noise, or mixed with background speech. Results showed that lexical competition changes throughout the observation window as a function of what is presented in the background. These findings suggest that, rather than being strictly sequential, stream segregation and lexical competition interact during spoken word recognition. PMID:26420754

  4. The role of tropical deforestation in the global carbon cycle: Spatial and temporal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, R. A.; Skole, David; Moore, Berrien; Melillo, Jerry; Steudler, Paul

    1995-01-01

    'The Role of Tropical Deforestation in the Global Carbon cycle: Spatial and Temporal Dynamics', was a joint project involving the University of New Hampshire, the Marine Biological Laboratory, and the Woods Hole Research Center. The contribution of the Woods Hole Research Center consisted of three tasks: (1) assist University of New Hampshire in determining the net flux of carbon between the Brazilian Amazon and the atmosphere by means of a terrestrial carbon model; (2) address the spatial distribution of biomass across the Amazon Basin; and (3) assist NASA Headquarters in development of a science plan for the Terrestrial Ecology component of the NASA-Brazilian field campaign (anticipated for 1997-2001). Progress on these three tasks is briefly described.

  5. Spatio-temporal patterns in ultra-slow domain wall creep dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrero, Ezequiel E; Giamarchi, Thierry; Kolton, Alejandro B; Rosso, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    In presence of impurities, ferromagnetic and ferroelectric domain walls slide only above a finite external field. Close to this depinning threshold, the wall proceeds by large and abrupt jumps, called avalanches, while, at much smaller field, it creeps by thermal activation. In this work we develop a novel numerical technique that captures the ultra-slow creep regime over huge time scales. We point out the existence of activated events that involve collective reorganizations similar to avalanches, but, at variance with them, display correlated spatio-temporal patterns that resemble the complex sequence of aftershocks observed after a large earthquake. Remarkably, we show that events assembly in independent clusters owning the same scale-free statistics as critical depinning avalanches. This correlated dynamics should be experimentally accessible by magneto-optical imaging of ferro- magnetic films.

  6. Formal analysis of temporal dynamics in anxiety states and traits for virtual patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Azizi Ab; Ahmad, Faudziah; Yusof, Nooraini; Ahmad, Farzana Kabir; Yusof, Shahrul Azmi Mohd

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a temporal dynamic model of anxiety states and traits for an individual. Anxiety is a natural part of life, and most of us experience it from time to time. But for some people, anxiety can be extreme. Based on several personal characteristics, traits, and a representation of events (i.e. psychological and physiological stressors), the formal model can represent whether a human that experience certain scenarios will fall into an anxiety states condition. A number of well-known relations between events and the course of anxiety are summarized from the literature and it is shown that the model exhibits those patterns. In addition, the formal model has been mathematically analyzed to find out which stable situations exist. Finally, it is pointed out how this model can be used in therapy, supported by a software agent.

  7. A customized light sheet microscope to measure spatio-temporal protein dynamics in small model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Rieckher

    Full Text Available We describe a customizable and cost-effective light sheet microscopy (LSM platform for rapid three-dimensional imaging of protein dynamics in small model organisms. The system is designed for high acquisition speeds and enables extended time-lapse in vivo experiments when using fluorescently labeled specimens. We demonstrate the capability of the setup to monitor gene expression and protein localization during ageing and upon starvation stress in longitudinal studies in individual or small groups of adult Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. The system is equipped to readily perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, which allows monitoring protein recovery and distribution under low photobleaching conditions. Our imaging platform is designed to easily switch between light sheet microscopy and optical projection tomography (OPT modalities. The setup permits monitoring of spatio-temporal expression and localization of ageing biomarkers of subcellular size and can be conveniently adapted to image a wide range of small model organisms and tissue samples.

  8. Universally Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of Spontaneous Superfluidity Breakdown within Synthetic Gauge Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Shuyuan; Xu, Jun; Lee, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    According to the famous Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM), the universality of spontaneous defect generation in continuous phase transitions (CPTs) can be understood by the critical slowing down. In most CPTs of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), the universality of spontaneous defect generations has been explained by the divergent relaxation time associated with the nontrivial gapless Bogoliubov excitations. However, for atomic BECs in synthetic gauge fields, their spontaneous superfluidity breakdown is resulted from the divergent correlation length associated with the zero Landau critical velocity. Here, by considering an atomic BEC ladder subjected to a synthetic magnetic field, we reveal that the spontaneous superfluidity breakdown obeys the KZM. The Kibble-Zurek scalings are derived from the Landau critical velocity which determines the correlation length. In further, the critical exponents are numerically extracted from the critical spatial-temporal dynamics of the bifurcation delay and the spontaneous...

  9. Environmental Factors Affecting Temporal and Spatial Dynamics of Soil Erosion in Xingguo County, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ku; SHI Xue-Zheng; YU Dong-Sheng; SHI De-Ming; CHEN Jing-Ming; XU Bin-Bin; LIANG Yin; LI De-Cheng

    2005-01-01

    By using soil erosion maps of four different time periods and a digital elevation model (DEM), in combination with the remote sensing and GIS technologies, soil erosion dynamics in Xingguo County of Jiangxi Province in South China were analyzed on both temporal and spatial scales in soils of different parent materials, altitudes and slopes. The results showed that from 1958 to 2000 severe soil erosion was coming under control with a decreasing percentage of the land under severe erosion. It was also found that the soils developed from Quaternary red clay, granite and purple shale were more susceptible to soil erosion and that areas sitting between 200 to 500 m in altitude with a slope less than 3° or between 7° to 20° where human activities were frequent remained to be zones where soil erosion was most likely to occur. These areas deserve special attention in monitoring and controlling.

  10. Spatio-temporal correlations in models of collective motion ruled by different dynamical laws

    CERN Document Server

    Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene; Grigera, Tomas S; Melillo, Stefania; Viale, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Information transfer is an essential factor in determining the robustness of collective behaviour in biological systems with distributed control. The most direct way to study the information transfer mechanisms is to experimentally detect the propagation across the system of a signal triggered by some perturbation. However, for field experiments this method is inefficient, as the possibilities of the observer to perturb the group are limited and empirical observations must rely on rare natural perturbations. An alternative way is to use spatio-temporal correlations to assess the information transfer mechanism directly from the spontaneous fluctuations of the system, without the need to have an actual propagating signal on record. We test the approach on ground truth data provided by numerical simulations in three dimensions of two models of collective behaviour characterized by very different dynamical equations and information transfer mechanisms: the classic Vicsek model, describing an overdamped noninertia...

  11. Thermo-modulational interband susceptibility and ultrafast temporal dynamics in nonlinear gold-based plasmonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Marini, Andrea; Della Valle, Giuseppe; Lee, Ho Wai; Tran, Truong X; Chang, Wonkeun; Schmidt, Markus A; Longhi, Stefano; Russell, Philip St J; Biancalana, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Starting from first principles, we theoretically model the nonlinear temporal dynamics of gold-based plasmonic devices resulting from the heating of their metallic components. At optical frequencies, the gold susceptibility is determined by the interband transitions around the X,L points in the first Brillouin zone and thermo-modulational effects ensue from Fermi smearing of the electronic energy distribution in the conduction band. As a consequence of light-induced heating of the conduction electrons, the optical susceptibility becomes nonlinear. In this paper we describe, for the first time to our knowledge, the effects of the thermo-modulational nonlinearity of gold on the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons guided on gold nanowires. We introduce a novel nonlinear Schroedinger-like equation to describe pulse propagation in such nanowires, and we predict the appearance an intense spectral red-shift caused by the delayed thermal response.

  12. Incremental Temporal Logic Synthesis of Control Policies for Robots Interacting with Dynamic Agents

    CERN Document Server

    Wongpiromsarn, Tichakorn; Belta, Calin; Frazzoli, Emilio; Rus, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    We consider the synthesis of control policies from temporal logic specifications for robots that interact with multiple dynamic environment agents. Each environment agent is modeled by a Markov chain whereas the robot is modeled by a finite transition system (in the deterministic case) or Markov decision process (in the stochastic case). Existing results in probabilistic verification are adapted to solve the synthesis problem. To partially address the state explosion issue, we propose an incremental approach where only a small subset of environment agents is incorporated in the synthesis procedure initially and more agents are successively added until we hit the constraints on computational resources. Our algorithm runs in an anytime fashion where the probability that the robot satisfies its specification increases as the algorithm progresses.

  13. Spatio-temporal dynamics of the white-eye square superlattice pattern in dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lingyan; Dong, Lifang; Feng, Jianyu; Liu, Weibo; Fan, Weili; Pan, Yuyang

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first investigation of the white-eye square superlattice pattern (WESSP) in a dielectric barrier discharge system. The evolution of patterns with increasing voltage is given. A phase diagram of WESSP as functions of gas pressure p and argon concentration φ is presented. The spatio-temporal dynamics of the WESSP is studied by using an intensified charge-coupled device camera and photomultipliers. Results show that the WESSP consists of four different transient sublattices, whose discharge sequence is small spots—spots on the line—halos—central spots in each half voltage cycle. The discharge moment and position of each sublattice are dependent upon the field of the wall charges produced by all sublattices discharged previously.

  14. Temporal dynamics of abundance and composition of nitrogen-fixing communities across agricultural soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele C Pereira E Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the fact that the fixation of nitrogen is one of the most significant nutrient processes in the terrestrial ecosystem, a thorough study of the spatial and temporal patterns in the abundance and distribution of N-fixing communities has been missing so far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to understand the dynamics of diazotrophic communities and their resilience to external changes, we quantified the abundance and characterized the bacterial community structures based on the nifH gene, using real-time PCR, PCR-DGGE and 454-pyrosequencing, across four representative Dutch soils during one growing season. In general, higher nifH gene copy numbers were observed in soils with higher pH than in those with lower pH, but lower numbers were related to increased nitrate and ammonium levels. Results from nifH gene pyrosequencing confirmed the observed PCR-DGGE patterns, which indicated that the N fixers are highly dynamic across time, shifting around 60%. Forward selection on CCA analysis identified N availability as the main driver of these variations, as well as of the evenness of the communities, leading to very unequal communities. Moreover, deep sequencing of the nifH gene revealed that sandy soils (B and D had the lowest percentage of shared OTUs across time, compared with clayey soils (G and K, indicating the presence of a community under constant change. Cosmopolitan nifH species (present throughout the season were affiliated with Bradyrhizobium, Azospirillum and Methylocistis, whereas other species increased their abundances progressively over time, when appropriate conditions were met, as was notably the case for Paenibacilus and Burkholderia. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides the first in-depth pyrosequencing analysis of the N-fixing community at both spatial and temporal scales, providing insights into the cosmopolitan and specific portions of the nitrogen fixing bacterial communities in soil.

  15. Temporal dynamics of arousal and attention in 12-month-old infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, S V; Clackson, K; de Barbaro, K

    2016-07-01

    Research from the animal literature suggests that dynamic, ongoing changes in arousal lead to dynamic changes in an individual's state of anticipatory readiness, influencing how individuals distribute their attention to the environment. However, multiple peripheral indices exist for studying arousal in humans, each showing change on different temporal scales, challenging whether arousal is best characterized as a unitary or a heterogeneous construct. Here, in 53 typical 12-month-olds, we recorded heart rate (HR), head movement patterns, electrodermal activity (EDA), and attention (indexed via look duration) during the presentation of 20 min of mixed animations and TV clips. We also examined triggers for high arousal episodes. Using cross-correlations and auto-correlations, we found that HR and head movement show strong covariance on a sub-minute scale, with changes in head movement consistently preceding changes in HR. EDA showed significant covariance with both, but on much larger time-scales. HR and head movement showed consistent relationships with look duration, but the relationship is temporally specific: relations are observed between head movement, HR and look duration at 30 s time-lag, but not at larger time intervals. No comparable relationships were found for EDA. Changes in head movement and HR occurred before changes in look duration, but not for EDA. Our results suggest that consistent patterns of covariation between heart rate, head movement and EDA can be identified, albeit on different time-scales, and that associations with look duration are present for head movement and heart rate, but not for EDA. Our results suggests that there is a single construct of arousal that can identified across multiple measures, and that phasic changes in arousal precede phasic changes in look duration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 58: 623-639, 2016. PMID:26999073

  16. Temporal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saramäki, Jari

    2013-01-01

    The concept of temporal networks is an extension of complex networks as a modeling framework to include information on when interactions between nodes happen. Many studies of the last decade examine how the static network structure affect dynamic systems on the network. In this traditional approach  the temporal aspects are pre-encoded in the dynamic system model. Temporal-network methods, on the other hand, lift the temporal information from the level of system dynamics to the mathematical representation of the contact network itself. This framework becomes particularly useful for cases where there is a lot of structure and heterogeneity both in the timings of interaction events and the network topology. The advantage compared to common static network approaches is the ability to design more accurate models in order to explain and predict large-scale dynamic phenomena (such as, e.g., epidemic outbreaks and other spreading phenomena). On the other hand, temporal network methods are mathematically and concept...

  17. Real-Time Intensity Domain Characterization of Fibre Lasers Using Spatio-Temporal Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Sugavanam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fibre lasers are light sources that are synonymous with stability. They can give rise to highly coherent continuous-wave radiation, or a stable train of mode locked pulses with well-defined characteristics. However, they can also exhibit an exceedingly diverse range of nonlinear operational regimes spanning a multi-dimensional parameter space. The complex nature of the dynamics poses significant challenges in the theoretical and experimental studies of such systems. Here, we demonstrate how the real-time experimental methodology of spatio-temporal dynamics can be used to unambiguously identify and discern between such highly complex lasing regimes. This two-dimensional representation of laser intensity allows the identification and tracking of individual features embedded in the radiation as they make round-trip circulations inside the cavity. The salient features of this methodology are highlighted by its application to the case of Raman fibre lasers and a partially mode locked ring fibre laser operating in the normal dispersion regime.

  18. Spatio-temporal dynamics of coupled array of Murali-Lakshmanan-Chua circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Muruganandam, P; Lakshmanan, M

    1997-01-01

    The circuit recently proposed by Murali, Lakshmanan and Chua (MLC) is one of the simplest non-autonomous nonlinear electronic circuits which shows a variety of dynamical phenomena including various bifurcations, chaos and so on. In this paper we study the spatio-temporal dynamics in one and two dimensional arrays of coupled MLC circuits both in the absence as well as in the presence of external periodic force. In the absence of any external force, the propagation phenomena of travelling wave front, its failure and Turing instability leading to spontaneous formation of rhombic patterns have been observed from the numerical simulations. Further we investigate the effect of induced defects in the coupling parameter on the Turing patterns. By including tolerance effects in the coupling resistors we show the transition in the Turing patterns from rhombic to hexagonal structure. Also we study the effect of weak coupling and identify the induced failure in the wave front propagation. We also analyse the spatio-tempo...

  19. Spatio-temporal dynamics of sources of hard X-ray pulsations in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, S A; Morgachev, A S; Struminsky, A B

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic analysis of spatio-temporal evolution of sources of hard X-ray (HXR) pulsations in solar flares. We concentrate on disk flares whose impulsive phase are accompanied by a series of more than three peaks (pulsations) of HXR emission detected in the RHESSI 50-100 keV channel with 4-second cadence. 29 such flares observed from February 2002 to June 2015 with time differences between successive peaks of 8-270 s are studied. The main observational result is that sources of HXR pulsations in all flares are not stationary, they demonstrate apparent displacements from pulsation to pulsation. The flares can be subdivided into two groups depending on character of dynamics of HXR sources. The group-1 consists of 16 flares (55%) with systematic dynamics of HXR sources from pulsation to pulsation with respect to a magnetic polarity inversion line (MPIL), which has simple extended trace on the photosphere. The group-2 consists of 13 flares (45%) with more chaotic displacements of HXR sources with respe...

  20. Monitoring Cropland Dynamics of the Yellow River Delta based on Multi-Temporal Landsat Imagery over 1986 to 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Quanlong Feng; Jianhua Gong; Jiantao Liu; Yi Li

    2015-01-01

    Natural deltas can provide human beings with flat and fertile land to be cultivated. It is important to monitor cropland dynamics to provide policy-relevant information for regional sustainable development. This paper utilized Landsat imagery to study the cropland dynamics of the Yellow River Delta during the last three decades. Multi-temporal Landsat data were used to account for the phenological variations of different plants. Several spectral and textural features were adopted to increase ...

  1. Relation between Amygdala Structure and Function in Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmar, Jessica H.; Wang, Fei; Chepenik, Lara G.; Womer, Fay Y.; Jones, Monique M.; Pittman, Brian; Shah, Maulik P.; Martin, Andres; Constable, R. Todd; Blumberg, Hilary P.

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents with bipolar disorder showed decreased amygdala volume and increased amygdala response to emotional faces. Amygdala volume is inversely related to activation during emotional face processing.

  2. What can flux tracking teach us about water age distributions and their temporal dynamics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hrachowitz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The complex interactions of runoff generation processes underlying the hydrological response of streams remain incompletely understood at the catchment scale. Extensive research has demonstrated the utility of tracers for both inferring flow paths distributions and constraining model parameterizations. While useful, the common use of linearity assumptions, i.e. time-invariance and complete mixing, in these studies provides only partial understanding of actual process dynamics. Here we use long term (< 20 yr precipitation, flow and tracer (chloride data of three contrasting upland catchments in the Scottish Highlands to inform integrated conceptual models investigating different mixing assumptions. Using the models as diagnostic tools in a functional comparison, water and tracer fluxes were tracked with the objective of characterizing water age distributions in the three catchments and establishing the wetness-dependent temporal dynamics of these distributions.

    The results highlight the potential importance of partial mixing which is dependent on the hydrological functioning of a catchment. Further, tracking tracer fluxes showed that the various components of a model can be characterized by fundamentally different water age distributions which may be highly sensitive to catchment wetness, available storage, mixing mechanisms, flow path connectivity and the relative importance of the different hydrological processes involved. Flux tracking also revealed that, although negligible for simulating the runoff response, the omission of processes such as interception evaporation can result in considerably biased water age distributions. Finally, the modeling indicated that water age distributions in the three study catchments do have long, power-law tails, which are generated by the interplay of flow path connectivity, the relative importance of different flow paths as well as by the mixing mechanisms involved. In general this study highlights

  3. Temporal dynamics of Prochlorococcus ecotypes in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmstrom, Rex R; Coe, Allison; Kettler, Gregory C; Martiny, Adam C; Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Zinser, Erik R; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2010-10-01

    To better understand the temporal and spatial dynamics of Prochlorococcus populations, and how these populations co-vary with the physical environment, we followed monthly changes in the abundance of five ecotypes-two high-light adapted and three low-light adapted-over a 5-year period in coordination with the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) and Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) programs. Ecotype abundance displayed weak seasonal fluctuations at HOT and strong seasonal fluctuations at BATS. Furthermore, stable 'layered' depth distributions, where different Prochlorococcus ecotypes reached maximum abundance at different depths, were maintained consistently for 5 years at HOT. Layered distributions were also observed at BATS, although winter deep mixing events disrupted these patterns each year and produced large variations in ecotype abundance. Interestingly, the layered ecotype distributions were regularly reestablished each year after deep mixing subsided at BATS. In addition, Prochlorococcus ecotypes each responded differently to the strong seasonal changes in light, temperature and mixing at BATS, resulting in a reproducible annual succession of ecotype blooms. Patterns of ecotype abundance, in combination with physiological assays of cultured isolates, confirmed that the low-light adapted eNATL could be distinguished from other low-light adapted ecotypes based on its ability to withstand temporary exposure to high-intensity light, a characteristic stress of the surface mixed layer. Finally, total Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus dynamics were compared with similar time series data collected a decade earlier at each location. The two data sets were remarkably similar-testimony to the resilience of these complex dynamic systems on decadal time scales. PMID:20463762

  4. Exploring the isotopic niche: isotopic variance, physiological incorporation, and the temporal dynamics of foraging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Douglas Yeakel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumer foraging behaviors are dynamic, changing in response to prey availability, seasonality, competition, and even the consumer's physiological state. The isotopic composition of a consumer is a product of these factors as well as the isotopic `landscape' of its prey, i.e. the isotopic mixing space. Stable isotope mixing models are used to back-calculate the most likely proportional contribution of a set of prey to a consumer's diet based on their respective isotopic distributions, however they are disconnected from ecological process. Here we build a mechanistic framework that links the ecological and physiological processes of an individual consumer to the isotopic distribution that describes its diet, and ultimately to the isotopic composition of its own tissues, defined as its `isotopic niche’. By coupling these processes, we systematically investigate under what conditions the isotopic niche of a consumer changes as a function of both the geometric properties of its mixing space and foraging strategies that may be static or dynamic over time. Results of our derivations reveal general insight into the conditions impacting isotopic niche width as a function of consumer specialization on prey, as well as the consumer's ability to transition between diets over time. We show analytically that moderate specialization on isotopically unique prey can serve to maximize a consumer's isotopic niche width, while temporally dynamic diets will tend to result in peak isotopic variance during dietary transitions. We demonstrate the relevance of our theoretical findings by examining a marine system composed of nine invertebrate species commonly consumed by sea otters. In general, our analytical framework highlights the complex interplay of mixing space geometry and consumer dietary behavior in driving expansion and contraction of the isotopic niche. Because this approach is established on ecological mechanism, it is well-suited for enhancing the

  5. Temporal dynamics of visual attention measured with event-related potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Kashiwase

    Full Text Available How attentional modulation on brain activities determines behavioral performance has been one of the most important issues in cognitive neuroscience. This issue has been addressed by comparing the temporal relationship between attentional modulations on neural activities and behavior. Our previous study measured the time course of attention with amplitude and phase coherence of steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP and found that the modulation latency of phase coherence rather than that of amplitude was consistent with the latency of behavioral performance. In this study, as a complementary report, we compared the time course of visual attention shift measured by event-related potentials (ERPs with that by target detection task. We developed a novel technique to compare ERPs with behavioral results and analyzed the EEG data in our previous study. Two sets of flickering stimulus at different frequencies were presented in the left and right visual hemifields, and a target or distracter pattern was presented randomly at various moments after an attention-cue presentation. The observers were asked to detect targets on the attended stimulus after the cue. We found that two ERP components, P300 and N2pc, were elicited by the target presented at the attended location. Time-course analyses revealed that attentional modulation of the P300 and N2pc amplitudes increased gradually until reaching a maximum and lasted at least 1.5 s after the cue onset, which is similar to the temporal dynamics of behavioral performance. However, attentional modulation of these ERP components started later than that of behavioral performance. Rather, the time course of attentional modulation of behavioral performance was more closely associated with that of the concurrently recorded SSVEPs analyzed. These results suggest that neural activities reflected not by either the P300 or N2pc, but by the SSVEPs, are the source of attentional modulation of behavioral performance.

  6. Detecting Temporal Change in Dynamic Sounds: On the Role of Stimulus Duration, Speed, and Emotion

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    Annett eSchirmer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For dynamic sounds, such as vocal expressions, duration often varies alongside speed. Compared to longer sounds, shorter sounds unfold more quickly. Here, we asked whether listeners implicitly use this confound when representing temporal regularities in their environment. In addition, we explored the role of emotions in this process. Using a mismatch negativity (MMN paradigm, we asked participants to watch a silent movie while passively listening to a stream of task-irrelevant sounds. In Experiment 1, one surprised and one neutral vocalization were compressed and stretched to create stimuli of 378 and 600 ms duration. Stimuli were presented in four blocks, two of which used surprised and two of which used neutral expressions. In one surprised and one neutral block, short and long stimuli served as standards and deviants, respectively. In the other two blocks, the assignment of standards and deviants was reversed. We observed a climbing MMN-like negativity shortly after deviant onset, which suggests that listeners implicitly track sound speed and detect speed changes. Additionally, this MMN-like effect emerged earlier and was larger for long than short deviants, suggesting greater sensitivity to duration increments or slowing down than to decrements or speeding up. Last, deviance detection was facilitated in surprised relative to neutral blocks, indicating that emotion enhances temporal processing. Experiment 2 was comparable to Experiment 1 with the exception that sounds were spectrally rotated to remove vocal emotional content. This abolished the emotional processing benefit, but preserved the other effects. Together, these results provide insights into listener sensitivity to sound speed and raise the possibility that speed biases duration judgments implicitly in a feed-forward manner. Moreover, this bias may be amplified for duration increments relative to decrements and within an emotional relative to a neutral stimulus context.

  7. The Dynamic Hyporheic Zone: Variability of Groundwater-Surface Water Exchange at Multiple Temporal Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binley, A. M.; Dudley-Southern, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The pathways of exchange of surface water and groundwater can have a significant influence on the delivery of nutrient-rich groundwater to streams. Many studies have revealed how the spatial variability of physical properties (sediment permeability, bedform structures, etc.) at the interface of groundwater and surface water can impact on flow pathways and residence times of hyporheic exchange flow. Here we explore the temporal variability of flow pathways at this interface. We focus on observations made on a study reach of the River Leith, UK but also provide evidence of dynamic exchanges at a number of other study sites. Under baseflow conditions, the study reach of the River Leith shows a predominance of upwelling of groundwater to the river, and in some sections of the reach a significant groundwater discharge zone in evident. However, from observations of piezometric heads made over a two year study period, repeated reversal of flow direction was observed during storm events. By deploying novel miniature electrode sensors in the river bed we were able to monitor the migration of surface water during these events. Penetration of river water to depths of 30cm was observed during monitored events, which support the reported reversal of hydraulic gradients. We, therefore, observed event-driven hyporheic exchange flow. The duration and frequency of such events may have significant impact on the biogeochemistry of shallow river bed sediments within this reach. Furthermore, temporal variability of exchange is not limited to such events: changes in regional groundwater flow pathways over longer time scales may have a significant impact on the location of localised upwelling; at much shorter timescales we see evidence of diurnal fluctuations in hydraulic heads due to evapotranspiration processes. We report on similar observations at companion study sites and discuss implications on the management of water quality in these groundwater fed systems.

  8. Temporal Dynamics of Social Exchange and the Development of Solidarity: "Testing the Waters" versus "Taking a Leap of Faith"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Ko; Sheldon, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    In their concerted efforts to unpack the microprocesses that transform repeated exchanges into an exchange relation, exchange theorists have paid little attention to how actors perceive changes and dynamics in exchanges over time. We help fill this gap by studying how temporal patterns of exchange affect the development of cohesion. Some exchange…

  9. Unraveling Kinase Activation Dynamics Using Kinase-Substrate Relationships from Temporal Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanova, Westa; Krycer, James; Chaudhuri, Rima; Yang, Pengyi; Vafaee, Fatemeh; Fazakerley, Daniel; Humphrey, Sean; James, David; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    In response to stimuli, biological processes are tightly controlled by dynamic cellular signaling mechanisms. Reversible protein phosphorylation occurs on rapid time-scales (milliseconds to seconds), making it an ideal carrier of these signals. Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have led to the identification of many tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites, yet for the majority of these the kinase is unknown and the underlying network topology of signaling networks therefore remains obscured. Identifying kinase substrate relationships (KSRs) is therefore an important goal in cell signaling research. Existing consensus sequence motif based prediction algorithms do not consider the biological context of KSRs, and are therefore insensitive to many other mechanisms guiding kinase-substrate recognition in cellular contexts. Here, we use temporal information to identify biologically relevant KSRs from Large-scale In Vivo Experiments (KSR-LIVE) in a data-dependent and automated fashion. First, we used available phosphorylation databases to construct a repository of existing experimentally-predicted KSRs. For each kinase in this database, we used time-resolved phosphoproteomics data to examine how its substrates changed in phosphorylation over time. Although substrates for a particular kinase clustered together, they often exhibited a different temporal pattern to the phosphorylation of the kinase. Therefore, although phosphorylation regulates kinase activity, our findings imply that substrate phosphorylation likely serve as a better proxy for kinase activity than kinase phosphorylation. KSR-LIVE can thereby infer which kinases are regulated within a biological context. Moreover, KSR-LIVE can also be used to automatically generate positive training sets for the subsequent prediction of novel KSRs using machine learning approaches. We demonstrate that this approach can distinguish between Akt and Rps6kb1, two kinases that share the same linear consensus motif

  10. Unraveling Kinase Activation Dynamics Using Kinase-Substrate Relationships from Temporal Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Rima; Yang, Pengyi; Vafaee, Fatemeh; Fazakerley, Daniel; Humphrey, Sean; James, David; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    In response to stimuli, biological processes are tightly controlled by dynamic cellular signaling mechanisms. Reversible protein phosphorylation occurs on rapid time-scales (milliseconds to seconds), making it an ideal carrier of these signals. Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have led to the identification of many tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites, yet for the majority of these the kinase is unknown and the underlying network topology of signaling networks therefore remains obscured. Identifying kinase substrate relationships (KSRs) is therefore an important goal in cell signaling research. Existing consensus sequence motif based prediction algorithms do not consider the biological context of KSRs, and are therefore insensitive to many other mechanisms guiding kinase-substrate recognition in cellular contexts. Here, we use temporal information to identify biologically relevant KSRs from Large-scale In Vivo Experiments (KSR-LIVE) in a data-dependent and automated fashion. First, we used available phosphorylation databases to construct a repository of existing experimentally-predicted KSRs. For each kinase in this database, we used time-resolved phosphoproteomics data to examine how its substrates changed in phosphorylation over time. Although substrates for a particular kinase clustered together, they often exhibited a different temporal pattern to the phosphorylation of the kinase. Therefore, although phosphorylation regulates kinase activity, our findings imply that substrate phosphorylation likely serve as a better proxy for kinase activity than kinase phosphorylation. KSR-LIVE can thereby infer which kinases are regulated within a biological context. Moreover, KSR-LIVE can also be used to automatically generate positive training sets for the subsequent prediction of novel KSRs using machine learning approaches. We demonstrate that this approach can distinguish between Akt and Rps6kb1, two kinases that share the same linear consensus motif

  11. Unraveling Kinase Activation Dynamics Using Kinase-Substrate Relationships from Temporal Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westa Domanova

    Full Text Available In response to stimuli, biological processes are tightly controlled by dynamic cellular signaling mechanisms. Reversible protein phosphorylation occurs on rapid time-scales (milliseconds to seconds, making it an ideal carrier of these signals. Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have led to the identification of many tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites, yet for the majority of these the kinase is unknown and the underlying network topology of signaling networks therefore remains obscured. Identifying kinase substrate relationships (KSRs is therefore an important goal in cell signaling research. Existing consensus sequence motif based prediction algorithms do not consider the biological context of KSRs, and are therefore insensitive to many other mechanisms guiding kinase-substrate recognition in cellular contexts. Here, we use temporal information to identify biologically relevant KSRs from Large-scale In Vivo Experiments (KSR-LIVE in a data-dependent and automated fashion. First, we used available phosphorylation databases to construct a repository of existing experimentally-predicted KSRs. For each kinase in this database, we used time-resolved phosphoproteomics data to examine how its substrates changed in phosphorylation over time. Although substrates for a particular kinase clustered together, they often exhibited a different temporal pattern to the phosphorylation of the kinase. Therefore, although phosphorylation regulates kinase activity, our findings imply that substrate phosphorylation likely serve as a better proxy for kinase activity than kinase phosphorylation. KSR-LIVE can thereby infer which kinases are regulated within a biological context. Moreover, KSR-LIVE can also be used to automatically generate positive training sets for the subsequent prediction of novel KSRs using machine learning approaches. We demonstrate that this approach can distinguish between Akt and Rps6kb1, two kinases that share the same

  12. The effect of STDP temporal kernel structure on the learning dynamics of single excitatory and inhibitory synapses.

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    Yotam Luz

    Full Text Available Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP is characterized by a wide range of temporal kernels. However, much of the theoretical work has focused on a specific kernel - the "temporally asymmetric Hebbian" learning rules. Previous studies linked excitatory STDP to positive feedback that can account for the emergence of response selectivity. Inhibitory plasticity was associated with negative feedback that can balance the excitatory and inhibitory inputs. Here we study the possible computational role of the temporal structure of the STDP. We represent the STDP as a superposition of two processes: potentiation and depression. This allows us to model a wide range of experimentally observed STDP kernels, from Hebbian to anti-Hebbian, by varying a single parameter. We investigate STDP dynamics of a single excitatory or inhibitory synapse in purely feed-forward architecture. We derive a mean-field-Fokker-Planck dynamics for the synaptic weight and analyze the effect of STDP structure on the fixed points of the mean field dynamics. We find a phase transition along the Hebbian to anti-Hebbian parameter from a phase that is characterized by a unimodal distribution of the synaptic weight, in which the STDP dynamics is governed by negative feedback, to a phase with positive feedback characterized by a bimodal distribution. The critical point of this transition depends on general properties of the STDP dynamics and not on the fine details. Namely, the dynamics is affected by the pre-post correlations only via a single number that quantifies its overlap with the STDP kernel. We find that by manipulating the STDP temporal kernel, negative feedback can be induced in excitatory synapses and positive feedback in inhibitory. Moreover, there is an exact symmetry between inhibitory and excitatory plasticity, i.e., for every STDP rule of inhibitory synapse there exists an STDP rule for excitatory synapse, such that their dynamics is identical.

  13. Elaboration of a video processing platform to analyze the temporal dynamics of hydrothermal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, M.; Sarrazin, J.; Sarradin, P.; Mercier, G.

    2010-12-01

    Located on oceanic ridges, hydrothermal ecosystems are characterized by strong physicochemical gradients and the presence of a unique fauna, sustained by microbial chemosynthesis. Several studies have shown that the spatial distribution and composition of vent faunal assemblages were strongly correlated to geological, physical and chemical processes at different spatial and temporal scales, but almost no data are available on the temporal dynamics of these peculiar ecosystems. The objective of our research is to develop a video processing platform to automatically extract the biological, physical and geological data from video imagery in order to study the dynamics of the fauna and its habitat in hydrothermal ecosystems. The video data was acquired from the Tempo-mini module deployed at 100m depth in the Saanich inlet (BC, Canada) and connected to the VENUS cable observatory (http://www.venus.uvic.ca/). This submarine color video-camera acquired four months of video footage, representing 487944 images of typical benthic habitat. A first manual extraction of the data allowed us to identify the key data available on a small subset of the video sequences. The objective of the new processing tool is to automatically extract these key data on the whole dataset, using unsupervized or lightly supervized image processing technique adapted to the specificity of submarines images. Firstly, all the moving objects in the video frames were segmented and labelled, allowing us to use statistical methods to process very large datasets. Secondly, computer vision techniques were used in order to get metric and 3D information from the images. For example, the speed of the moving objects and the image surface area were computed. The method implies the calibration of the camera with a calibration target, i.e. computing the projective geometric properties of the camera and the scene. Lastly, the developed tools will be integrated in a user-friendly processing platform that will be used

  14. Methylphenidate facilitates learning-induced amygdala plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Tye, Kay M.; Tye, Lynne D.; Cone, Jackson J.; Hekkelman, Evelien F; Janak, Patricia H.; Bonci, Antonello

    2010-01-01

    Although methylphenidate (Ritalin) has been used therapeutically for nearly 60 years, the mechanisms by which it acutely modifies behavioral performance are poorly understood. Here we combined intra–lateral amygdala in vivo pharmacology and ex vivo electrophysiology to show that acute administration of methylphenidate, as well as a selective dopamine transporter inhibitor, facilitated learning-induced strengthening of cortico-amygdala synapses through a postsynaptic increase in AMPA receptor–...

  15. MRI amygdala volume in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Capitão, Liliana; Sampaio, Adriana; Sampaio, Cassandra; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Férnandez, Montse; Garayzábal Heinze, Elena; Shenton, Martha E.; Gonçalves, Óscar F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most intriguing characteristics of Williams Syndrome individuals is their hypersociability. The amygdala has been consistently implicated in the etiology of this social profile, particularly given its role in emotional and social behavior. This study examined amygdala volume and symmetry in WS individuals and in age and sex matched controls. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained on a GE 1.5-T magnet with 1.5- mm contiguous slices and were used to measure who...

  16. Structural connectivity of the developing human amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygin, Zeynep M; Osher, David E; Koldewyn, Kami; Martin, Rebecca E; Finn, Amy; Saxe, Rebecca; Gabrieli, John D E; Sheridan, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    A large corpus of research suggests that there are changes in the manner and degree to which the amygdala supports cognitive and emotional function across development. One possible basis for these developmental differences could be the maturation of amygdalar connections with the rest of the brain. Recent functional connectivity studies support this conclusion, but the structural connectivity of the developing amygdala and its different nuclei remains largely unstudied. We examined age related changes in the DWI connectivity fingerprints of the amygdala to the rest of the brain in 166 individuals of ages 5-30. We also developed a model to predict age based on individual-subject amygdala connectivity, and identified the connections that were most predictive of age. Finally, we segmented the amygdala into its four main nucleus groups, and examined the developmental changes in connectivity for each nucleus. We observed that with age, amygdalar connectivity becomes increasingly sparse and localized. Age related changes were largely localized to the subregions of the amygdala that are implicated in social inference and contextual memory (the basal and lateral nuclei). The central nucleus' connectivity also showed differences with age but these differences affected fewer target regions than the basal and lateral nuclei. The medial nucleus did not exhibit any age related changes. These findings demonstrate increasing specificity in the connectivity patterns of amygdalar nuclei across age. PMID:25875758

  17. The amygdala: securing pleasure and avoiding pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anushka B P Fernando

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The amygdala has traditionally been associated with fear, mediating the impact of negative emotions on memory. However, this view does not fully encapsulate the function of the amygdala, nor the impact that processing in this structure has on the motivational limbic corticostriatal circuitry of which it is an important structure. Here we discuss the interactions between different amygdala nuclei with cortical and striatal regions involved in motivation; interconnections and parallel circuitries that have become increasingly understood in recent years. We review the evidence that the amygdala stores memories that allow initially motivationally neutral stimuli to become associated through pavlovian conditioning with motivationally relevant outcomes which, importantly, can be either appetitive (e.g. food or aversive (e.g. electric shock. We also consider how different psychological processes supported by the amygdala such as conditioned reinforcement and punishment, conditioned motivation and suppression, and conditioned approach and avoidance behavior, are not only psychologically but also neurobiologically dissociable, being mediated by distinct yet overlapping neural circuits within the limbic corticostriatal circuitry. Clearly the role of the amygdala goes beyond encoding aversive stimuli to also encode the appetitive, requiring an appreciation of the amygdala’s mediation of both appetitive and fearful behavior through diverse psychological processes.

  18. Embodiment of intersubjective time: relational dynamics as attractors in the temporal coordination of interpersonal behaviors and experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Laroche, Julien; Berardi, Anna Maria; Brangier, Eric

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of “being together,” and more specifically the issue of “being together in time.” We provide with an integrative framework that is inspired by phenomenology, the enactive approach and dynamical systems theories. To do so, we first define embodiment as a living and lived phenomenon that emerges from agent-world coupling. We then show that embodiment is essentially dynamical and therefore we describe experiential, behavioral and brain dynamics. Both lived temporal...

  19. Quantifying Dynamics in Tropical Peat Swamp Forest Biomass with Multi-Temporal LiDAR Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Siegert

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tropical peat swamp forests in Indonesia store huge amounts of carbon and are responsible for enormous carbon emissions every year due to forest degradation and deforestation. These forest areas are in the focus of REDD+ (reducing emissions from deforestation, forest degradation, and the role of conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks projects, which require an accurate monitoring of their carbon stocks or aboveground biomass (AGB. Our study objective was to evaluate multi-temporal LiDAR measurements of a tropical forested peatland area in Central Kalimantan on Borneo. Canopy height and AGB dynamics were quantified with a special focus on unaffected, selective logged and burned forests. More than 11,000 ha were surveyed with airborne LiDAR in 2007 and 2011. In a first step, the comparability of these datasets was examined and canopy height models were created. Novel AGB regression models were developed on the basis of field inventory measurements and LiDAR derived height histograms for 2007 (r2 = 0.77, n = 79 and 2011 (r2 = 0.81, n = 53, taking the different point densities into account. Changes in peat swamp forests were identified by analyzing multispectral imagery. Unaffected forests accumulated on average 20 t/ha AGB with a canopy height increase of 2.3 m over the four year time period. Selective logged forests experienced an average AGB loss of 55 t/ha within 30 m and 42 t/ha within 50 m of detected logging trails, although the mean canopy height increased by 0.5 m and 1.0 m, respectively. Burned forests lost 92% of the initial biomass. These results demonstrate the great potential of repetitive airborne LiDAR surveys to precisely quantify even small scale AGB and canopy height dynamics in remote tropical forests, thereby featuring the needs of REDD+.

  20. Temporal soil organic carbon dynamics following land-use change for lignocellulosic bioenergy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Gary; Rowe, Rebecca; Sohi, Saran; Heal, Kate

    2014-05-01

    As the demand for renewable energy crops increases to assist in reducing anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, the projected future expansion in bioenergy crop production is expected to cause significant land-use change (LUC). It has been reported that lignocellulosic crops such as Miscanthus and willow short rotation coppice (SRC) have the potential to mitigate CO2 emissions through fossil fuel replacement and by soil organic carbon (SOC) accumulation following direct LUC. Many studies have been carried out with the purpose of measuring site-specific changes, however results are often mixed demonstrating both increasing and decreasing carbon (C) stocks over time. Such variation demonstrates the sensitivity of SOC to many factors such as climate, soil texture, previous land-use and initial SOC content. This study examined a chronosequence of ~100 Miscanthus and willow plantations established on arable and grassland across Britain to provide an improved understanding of general effects on temporal SOC dynamics during LUC. Soil was sampled at each site to a depth of 30 cm and SOC stocks assessed over a 14 year time period. For each of the 4 LUCs no significant differences were observed between measured C stocks after 14 years and expected baseline values for land under arable and grassland management. Evidence will be presented that shows in all cases a 0% change lies within the 95% confidence intervals indicating no true average increase or decrease can be reported for the first 14 years of establishment. Therefore we find no evidence to suggest a short term CO2 mitigation effect provided from SOC storage following the establishment of Miscanthus or willow on arable or grassland. However, longer term measurements are required to assess SOC dynamics beyond this initial period.

  1. Spatial and temporal variability in aggregated grain-size distributions, with implications for sediment dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatcroft, Robert A.; Butman, Cheryl Ann

    1997-04-01

    The grain-size distribution of bottom sediments has important implications for diverse aspects of sediment dynamics, including prediction of the critical boundary shear stress and calibration of suspended sediment sensors. Past sampling strategies to obtain estimates of the seabed grain-size distribution typically have not considered spatial and temporal variability, and have been insufficient to resolve potential millimeter-scale vertical variations in grain size. Moreover, laboratory analyses have been predicated on chemically and/or ultrasonically disaggregating the sediments before resolving particle diameter, therefore the more dynamically relevant in situ grain-size spectrum is not measured. To test for such effects, three sites on the northern California continental shelf comprising a cross-shelf transect from a sandy, inner-shelf (60 m) site, to a muddy, mid-shelf (90 m) site and a relict, outer-shelf (130 m) site were studied. Replicate box cores were collected over two winter field seasons, and multiple subcores from each box core were vertically sectioned at 2-mm intervals. Gentle wet sieving techniques were used to determine the mass fraction in the 300,um size classes. In addition, a lesser number of standard disaggregated grain-size analyses were performed using a Coulter Counter. Results from the sandy, inner-shelf site indicate the presence of an ephemeral fine-grained (flow. In addition, there is evidence for a progressive and substantial winnowing of fine-grained sediment from the surface layer over the course of a winter storm season. At the deeper sites, the upper 2 mm of the bed contained 5-20% more material meters) scale spatial variability is modest. In addition, the disaggregated grain-size distribution at the two muddy sites is, in all cases, markedly finer than the in situ grain-size distribution. Therefore, calibrations and predictions based on a knowledge of the size distribution of the primary (i.e. disaggregated) particles could be in

  2. Does carbon availability control temporal dynamics of radial growth in Norway spruce (Picea abies)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas; Swidrak, Irene

    2015-04-01

    Intra-annual dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation of coniferous species exposed to soil dryness revealed early culmination of maximum growth in late spring prior to occurrence of more favourable environmental conditions, i.e., repeated high rainfall events during summer (Oberhuber et al. 2014). Because it is well known that plants can adjust carbon allocation patterns to optimize resource uptake under prevailing environmental constraints, we hypothesize that early decrease in radial stem growth is an adaptation to cope with drought stress, which might require an early switch of carbon allocation to belowground organs. Physical blockage of carbon transport in the phloem through girdling causes accumulation and depletion of carbohydrates above and below the girdle, respectively, making this method quite appropriate to investigate carbon relationships in trees. Hence, in a common garden experiment we will manipulate the carbon status of Norway spruce (Picea abies) saplings by phloem blockage at different phenological stages during the growing season. We will present the methodological approach and first results of the study aiming to test the hypothesis that carbon status of the tree affects temporal dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation in conifers under drought. Acknowledgment The research is funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF): P25643-B16 "Carbon allocation and growth of Scots pine". Reference Oberhuber W, A Gruber, W Kofler, I Swidrak (2014) Radial stem growth in response to microclimate and soil moisture in a drought-prone mixed coniferous forest at an inner Alpine site. Eur J For Res 133:467-479.

  3. Spatial and temporal dynamics of dengue fever in Peru: 1994-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowell, G; Torre, C A; Munayco-Escate, C; Suárez-Ognio, L; López-Cruz, R; Hyman, J M; Castillo-Chavez, C

    2008-12-01

    SUMMARYThe weekly number of dengue cases in Peru, South America, stratified by province for the period 1994-2006 were analysed in conjunction with associated demographic, geographic and climatological data. Estimates of the reproduction number, moderately correlated with population size (Spearman rho=0.28, P=0.03), had a median of 1.76 (IQR 0.83-4.46). The distributions of dengue attack rates and epidemic durations follow power-law (Pareto) distributions (coefficient of determination >85%, P<0.004). Spatial heterogeneity of attack rates was highest in coastal areas followed by mountain and jungle areas. Our findings suggest a hierarchy of transmission events during the large 2000-2001 epidemic from large to small population areas when serotypes DEN-3 and DEN-4 were first identified (Spearman rho=-0.43, P=0.03). The need for spatial and temporal dengue epidemic data with a high degree of resolution not only increases our understanding of the dynamics of dengue but will also generate new hypotheses and provide a platform for testing innovative control policies. PMID:18394264

  4. Temporal dynamics and determinants of whole brain tissue volume changes during recovery from alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazdzinski, Stefan; Durazzo, Timothy C; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2005-06-01

    Brain shrinkage and its partial reversibility with abstinence is a common neuroimaging finding in alcohol dependent individuals. We used an automated three-dimensional whole brain magnetic resonance imaging method (boundary shift integral) in 23 alcohol dependent individuals to measure the temporal dynamics of cerebral tissue and spinal fluid volume changes over a 12-month interval and to examine the major determinants of brain tissue change rates during abstinence and non-abstinence. We found more rapid brain tissue gain during the first month of sobriety than in the following months. The most rapid volume recovery was observed in abstinent individuals with the greatest baseline brain shrinkage and drinking severity. The rapid reversal of brain volume gains in non-abstinent individuals and tissue volume changes are modulated by duration of abstinence and non-abstinence periods, as well as recency of non-abstinence. Age, family history density of alcoholism, relapse severity, and duration or age of onset of heavy drinking were not major determinants of brain shrinkage and brain volume recovery rates. Treatment providers may use this tangible information to reinforce the biomedical benefits of sobriety. Previous quantitative measurements of brain volumes in alcohol dependent individuals performed after several weeks of abstinence likely underestimated the full extent of chronic alcohol-associated brain shrinkage. PMID:15893157

  5. Phylogenetic and temporal dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF01_AE in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jingrong; Xin, Ruolei; Yu, Shuangqing; Bai, Lishi; Wang, Weishi; Wu, Tingchen; Su, Xueli; Lu, Hongyan; Pang, Xinghuo; Yan, Hong; Feng, Xia; He, Xiong; Zeng, Yi

    2013-01-01

    To explore the epidemic history of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in China, 408 fragments of gag gene sequences of CRF01_AE sampled in 2002-2010 were determined from different geographical regions and risk populations in China. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the CRF01_AE sequences can be grouped into four clusters, suggesting that at least four genetically independent CRF01_AE descendants are circulating in China, of which two were closely related to the isolates from Thailand and Vietnam. Cluster 1 has the most extensive distribution in China. In North China, cluster 1 and cluster 4 were mainly transmitted through homosexuality.The real substance of the recent HIV-1 epidemic in men who have sex with men(MSM) of North China is a rapid spread of CRF01_AE, or rather two distinctive natives CRF01_AE.The time of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) of four CRF01_AE clusters ranged from the years 1990.9 to 2003.8 in different regions of China. This is the first phylogenetic and temporal dynamics study of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in China. PMID:23365653

  6. Angular-split/temporal-delay approach to ultrafast protein dynamics at XFELs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong; Yang, Xiaojing

    2016-07-01

    X-ray crystallography promises direct insights into electron-density changes that lead to and arise from structural changes such as electron and proton transfer and the formation, rupture and isomerization of chemical bonds. The ultrashort pulses of hard X-rays produced by free-electron lasers present an exciting opportunity for capturing ultrafast structural events in biological macromolecules within femtoseconds after photoexcitation. However, shot-to-shot fluctuations, which are inherent to the very process of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) that generates the ultrashort X-ray pulses, are a major source of noise that may conceal signals from structural changes. Here, a new approach is proposed to angularly split a single SASE pulse and to produce a temporal delay of picoseconds between the split pulses. These split pulses will allow the probing of two distinct states before and after photoexcitation triggered by a laser pulse between the split X-ray pulses. The split pulses originate from a single SASE pulse and share many common properties; thus, noise arising from shot-to-shot fluctuations is self-canceling. The unambiguous interpretation of ultrafast structural changes would require diffraction data at atomic resolution, as these changes may or may not involve any atomic displacement. This approach, in combination with the strategy of serial crystallography, offers a solution to study ultrafast dynamics of light-initiated biochemical reactions or biological processes at atomic resolution. PMID:27377384

  7. Temporal Dynamics and Drivers of Ecosystem Metabolism in a Large Subtropical Shallow Lake (Lake Taihu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Hu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available With continuous measurements of dissolved oxygen, temperature, irradiance, and wind speed, as well as frequent measurements of pH, oxidation-reduction potential, and algal chlorophyll, temporal dynamics and drivers of ecosystem metabolism in a large nutrient-rich shallow lake (Lake Taihu are tested in this study. The results show that the dissolved oxygen concentrations in the lake fluctuate annually. They increase in autumn and winter with a peak value of 14.19 mg·L−1 in winter, and decrease in spring and summer with a trough value of 6.40 mg·L−1 in summer. Gross primary production (GPP, ecosystem respiration (R, and net ecosystem production (NEP increase in summer, with their peak values in late summer and autumn, and decrease in winter and spring. Mean values of GPP, R and NEP are 1.75 ± 0.06 (Mean ± SE, 1.52 ± 0.05, and 0.23 ± 0.03 g O2 m−3·d−1, respectively. It is also found that water temperature and surface irradiance are the best predictors of GPP and R, while water temperature (wind speed has a significantly positive (negative relationship with NEP. The findings in this study suggest that Lake Taihu is a net autotrophic ecosystem, and water temperature and surface irradiance are the two important drivers of lake metabolism.

  8. Phylogenetic and temporal dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF01_AE in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingrong Ye

    Full Text Available To explore the epidemic history of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in China, 408 fragments of gag gene sequences of CRF01_AE sampled in 2002-2010 were determined from different geographical regions and risk populations in China. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the CRF01_AE sequences can be grouped into four clusters, suggesting that at least four genetically independent CRF01_AE descendants are circulating in China, of which two were closely related to the isolates from Thailand and Vietnam. Cluster 1 has the most extensive distribution in China. In North China, cluster 1 and cluster 4 were mainly transmitted through homosexuality.The real substance of the recent HIV-1 epidemic in men who have sex with men(MSM of North China is a rapid spread of CRF01_AE, or rather two distinctive natives CRF01_AE.The time of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA of four CRF01_AE clusters ranged from the years 1990.9 to 2003.8 in different regions of China. This is the first phylogenetic and temporal dynamics study of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in China.

  9. Spatial Temporal Dynamics and Molecular Evolution of Re-Emerging Rabies Virus in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Cheng Lin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan has been recognized by the World Organization for Animal Health as rabies-free since 1961. Surprisingly, rabies virus (RABV was identified in a dead Formosan ferret badger in July 2013. Later, more infected ferret badgers were reported from different geographic regions of Taiwan. In order to know its evolutionary history and spatial temporal dynamics of this virus, phylogeny was reconstructed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods based on the full-length of glycoprotein (G, matrix protein (M, and nucleoprotein (N genes. The evolutionary rates and phylogeographic were determined using Beast and SPREAD software. Phylogenetic trees showed a monophyletic group containing all of RABV isolates from Taiwan and it further separated into three sub-groups. The estimated nucleotide substitution rates of G, M, and N genes were between 2.49 × 10−4–4.75 × 10−4 substitutions/site/year, and the mean ratio of dN/dS was significantly low. The time of the most recent common ancestor was estimated around 75, 89, and 170 years, respectively. Phylogeographic analysis suggested the origin of the epidemic could be in Eastern Taiwan, then the Formosan ferret badger moved across the Central Range of Taiwan to western regions and separated into two branches. In this study, we illustrated the evolution history and phylogeographic of RABV in Formosan ferret badgers.

  10. Panic Anxiety in Humans with Bilateral Amygdala Lesions: Pharmacological Induction via Cardiorespiratory Interoceptive Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Justin S.; Li, Wei; Feusner, Jamie D.; Adolphs, Ralph; Hurlemann, Rene

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that carbon dioxide inhalation could induce panic anxiety in a group of rare lesion patients with focal bilateral amygdala damage. To further elucidate the amygdala-independent mechanisms leading to aversive emotional experiences, we retested two of these patients (B.G. and A.M.) to examine whether triggering palpitations and dyspnea via stimulation of non-chemosensory interoceptive channels would be sufficient to elicit panic anxiety. Participants rated their affective and sensory experiences following bolus infusions of either isoproterenol, a rapidly acting peripheral β-adrenergic agonist akin to adrenaline, or saline. Infusions were administered during two separate conditions: a panic induction and an assessment of cardiorespiratory interoception. Isoproterenol infusions induced anxiety in both patients, and full-blown panic in one (patient B.G.). Although both patients demonstrated signs of diminished awareness for cardiac sensation, patient A.M., who did not panic, reported a complete lack of awareness for dyspnea, suggestive of impaired respiratory interoception. These findings indicate that the amygdala may play a role in dynamically detecting changes in cardiorespiratory sensation. The induction of panic anxiety provides further evidence that the amygdala is not required for the conscious experience of fear induced via interoceptive sensory channels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We found that monozygotic twins with focal bilateral amygdala lesions report panic anxiety in response to intravenous infusions of isoproterenol, a β-adrenergic agonist similar to adrenaline. Heightened anxiety was evident in both twins, with one twin experiencing a panic attack. The twin who did not panic displayed signs of impaired cardiorespiratory interoception, including a complete absence of dyspnea sensation. These findings highlight that the amygdala is not strictly required for the experience of panic anxiety, and suggest that neural systems beyond

  11. Dynamic characteristics of oxygenation-sensitive MRI signal in different temporal protocols for imaging human brain activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temporal characteristics of cerebral blood oxygenation during human brain activation were monitored with dynamic echo-planar imaging (EPI) using the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI. We investigated oxygenation-sensitive signal changes: 1. during repetitive block stimuli, to determine the latency of the activation-induced signal change in the primary visual cortex; 2. on shortening the rest periods between constant stimulated phases, to investigate the limitations that this latency poses in temporal resolution of the technique; and 3. on sustained steady-state stimulation, to characterise oxygenation changes during prolonged brain activation using different stimuli. Delayed intrinsic haemodynamic response and a finite signal-to-noise ratio limit the temporal resolution achieved with BOLD fMRI. Separate activation periods were resolved when the delay between consecutive stimulations was at least 2 s. In this study oxygenation remained elevated throughout sustained activation, suggesting a constant rate of oxygen consumption by the primary cortical neurones during activation. Characterisation of fMRI signal dynamics in dynamic temporal protocols is significant both in terms of optimising stimulation protocols and the potential to gain insight into the physiological mechanisms underlying neuronal activation which could increase the clinical applicability of the technique. (orig.)

  12. Effects of temporal modelling on the statistical uncertainty of spatiotemporal distributions estimated directly from dynamic SPECT projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artefacts can result when reconstructing a dynamic image sequence from inconsistent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) projection data acquired by a slowly rotating gantry. The artefacts can lead to biases in kinetic parameters estimated from time-activity curves generated by overlaying volumes of interest on the images. Insufficient sampling and truncation of projections by cone-beam collimators can cause additional artefacts. To overcome these sources of bias in conventional image based dynamic data analysis, we have been investigating the estimation of time-activity curves and kinetic model parameters directly from dynamic SPECT projection data by modelling the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiopharmaceutical throughout the projected field of view. In the present work, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to study the effects of the temporal modelling on the statistical variability of the reconstructed spatiotemporal distributions. The simulations utilize fast methods for fully four-dimensional (4D) direct estimation of spatiotemporal distributions and their statistical uncertainties, using a spatial segmentation and temporal B-splines. The simulation results suggest that there is benefit in modelling higher orders of temporal spline continuity. In addition, the accuracy of the time modelling can be increased substantially without unduly increasing the statistical uncertainty, by using relatively fine initial time sampling to capture rapidly changing activity distributions. (author)

  13. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Forest Edge Dynamics in South Western Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, I.; Cochrane, M. A.; Roberts, D. A.; Soares, J. V.

    2008-12-01

    Beyond removing forest, deforestation in the Amazon creates a lot of forest edges. These edges change the microclimate and ecosystem dynamics of the remaining tropical rain forests, contributing directly to forest degradation in the Amazon. Edge-induced changes such as tree mortality and fire vulnerability occur as a function of distance from edges and time since forest fragmentation. New edges are created and older edges are eliminated constantly as deforestation advances. However, Amazon forest edge dynamics over time and space are not well understood. We need to improve our knowledge about forest edge dynamics in order to estimate the actual amount of forest degradation caused by forest fragmentation. In this study, we performed deep spatio-temporal analyses of forest fragmentation for Rondônia, in the southwestern Amazon, using a multitemporal Landsat dataset (1984-2005). Our goals were to: 1) calculate erosion/persistence of forest edges; 2) detect edge age-composition of all forest edges and; 3) estimate total degraded forest area due to forest edge effects. Two counties of different stages of deforestation were selected. Campo Novo de Rondônia (early stage) and Ouro Preto (final stage). Overall, more than 50% of forest edges were eliminated in the first four years, while only 20% of edges survived more than 10 years after edge creation. The composition of edge-ages differs according to the stage of deforestation. Between 2001 and 2005, nearly 60% of forest edges in recently developed Campo Novo de Rondônia were 0-4 years old, with only 20% > 10 years old. Conversely, in the old frontier Ouro Preto region, only 23% of forest edges were 0-4 years old and 50% were > 10 years old. These results suggest that high edge erosion rates in the years following edge creation may cause many edges disappear before they experience the complete process of edge-induced changes such as biomass collapse, potentially reducing the estimated impact of existing forest edges on

  14. Population dynamics of two antilisterial cheese surface consortia revealed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasler Madlen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surface contamination of smear cheese by Listeria spp. is of major concern for the industry. Complex smear ecosystems have been shown to harbor antilisterial potential but the microorganisms and mechanisms involved in the inhibition mostly remain unclear, and are likely related to complex interactions than to production of single antimicrobial compounds. Bacterial biodiversity and population dynamics of complex smear ecosystems exhibiting antilisterial properties in situ were investigated by Temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE, a culture independent technique, for two microbial consortia isolated from commercial Raclette type cheeses inoculated with defined commercial ripening cultures (F or produced with an old-young smearing process (M. Results TTGE revealed nine bacterial species common to both F and M consortia, but consortium F exhibited a higher diversity than consortium M, with thirteen and ten species, respectively. Population dynamics were studied after application of the consortia on fresh-produced Raclette cheeses. TTGE analyses revealed a similar sequential development of the nine species common to both consortia. Beside common cheese surface bacteria (Staphylococcus equorum, Corynebacterium spp., Brevibacterium linens, Microbacterium gubbeenense, Agrococcus casei, the two consortia contained marine lactic acid bacteria (Alkalibacterium kapii, Marinilactibacillus psychrotolerans that developed early in ripening (day 14 to 20, shortly after the growth of staphylococci (day 7. A decrease of Listeria counts was observed on cheese surface inoculated at day 7 with 0.1-1 × 102 CFU cm-2, when cheeses were smeared with consortium F or M. Listeria counts went below the detection limit of the method between day 14 and 28 and no subsequent regrowth was detected over 60 to 80 ripening days. In contrast, Listeria grew to high counts (105 CFU cm-2 on cheeses smeared with a defined surface culture

  15. Assessing the structure and temporal dynamics of seabird communities: the challenge of capturing marine ecosystem complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Rocío; Stowasser, Gabriele; McGill, Rona A R; Bearhop, Stuart; Phillips, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding interspecific interactions, and the influences of anthropogenic disturbance and environmental change on communities, are key challenges in ecology. Despite the pressing need to understand these fundamental drivers of community structure and dynamics, only 17% of ecological studies conducted over the past three decades have been at the community level. Here, we assess the trophic structure of the procellariiform community breeding at South Georgia, to identify the factors that determine foraging niches and possible temporal changes. We collected conventional diet data from 13 sympatric species between 1974 and 2002, and quantified intra- and inter-guild, and annual variation in diet between and within foraging habits. In addition, we tested the reliability of stable isotope analysis (SIA) of seabird feathers collected over a 13-year period, in relation to those of their potential prey, as a tool to assess community structure when diets are diverse and there is high spatial heterogeneity in environmental baselines. Our results using conventional diet data identified a four-guild community structure, distinguishing species that mainly feed on crustaceans; large fish and squid; a mixture of crustaceans, small fish and squid; or carrion. In total, Antarctic krill Euphausia superba represented 32%, and 14 other species a further 46% of the combined diet of all 13 predators, underlining the reliance of this community on relatively few types of prey. Annual variation in trophic segregation depended on relative prey availability; however, our data did not provide evidence of changes in guild structure associated with a suggested decline in Antarctic krill abundance over the past 40 years. Reflecting the differences in δ(15) N of potential prey (crustaceans vs. squid vs. fish and carrion), analysis of δ(15) N in chick feathers identified a three-guild community structure that was constant over a 13-year period, but lacked the trophic cluster representing

  16. Spatial-Temporal dynamics of surface water flooding and consequences for emergency services accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Ian; Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Bosher, Lee; Wilby, Rob; Yang, Lili; Ryley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas are increasingly susceptible to surface water flooding, with more intense precipitation and intensification of land development. Flooding has both direct impacts i.e. locations inundated with water, and indirect impacts i.e. transport networks, utility e.g. electricity/water services etc. The direct areas flooded evolve in space through the event, and are predicted by standard inundation models. However, the wider indirect impacts and the spatial-temporal patterns are less constrained and it is these that are needed to manage the impacts in real-time. This paper focusses on the Category One responders of the Fire and Rescue and Ambulance Services in the City of Leicester, East Midlands, UK. Leicester is ranked 16th out of 4215 settlements at risk of surface water flooding in the UK based upon the population at risk (15,200 people) (DEFRA, 2009). The analysis undertaken involved overlaying the flood extent with the Integrated Transport Network (ITN) data within a GIS framework. Then a simple transport routing algorithm was used to predict the travel time from specific nodes representing ambulance or fire stations to different parts of the city. Flood magnitudes with 1:20, 1:100 and 1:1000 return periods have been investigated. Under a scenario of no flooding, 100% of the city is accessible by the six fire stations in the city. However, in the 1 in 20 year surface water flood event the peak inundation results in 66.5% being accessible in the 10 minute permitted time and 6% is totally inaccessible. This falls to 40% and 13% respectively for the 1 in 100 year event. Maps show the area of the city that are accessible by two or more stations within the permitted response time, which shows these areas are the most resilient to surface water flooding. However, it isn't just the peak water depths at every location which impacts accessibility within the city but the spatial-temporal patterns of the inundation. The areas within the 10 minute response time expand

  17. Sources and temporal dynamics of arsenic in a New Jersey watershed, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Julia L; Bonin, Jennifer L; Deluca, Michael J; Romagna, Terri; Cenno, Kimberly; Alebus, Marzooq; Kratzer, Todd; Hirst, Barbara

    2007-06-15

    We examined potential sources and the temporal dynamics of arsenic (As) in the slightly alkaline waters of the Wallkill River, northwestern New Jersey, where violations of water-quality standards have occurred. The study design included synoptic sampling of stream water and bed sediments in tributaries and the mainstem, hyporheic-zone/ground water on the mainstem, and seasonal and diurnal sampling of water at selected mainstem sites. The river valley is bordered by gneiss and granite highlands and shale lowlands and underlain by glacial deposits over faulted dolomites and the Franklin Marble. Ore bodies in the Marble, which have been mined for rare Zn ore minerals, also contain As minerals. Tributaries, which drain predominantly forested and agricultural land, contributed relatively little As to the river. The highest concentrations of As (up to 34 mug/L) emanated from the outlet of man-made Lake Mohawk at the river's headwaters; these inputs varied substantially with season--high during warm months, low during cold months, apparently because of biological activity in the lake. Dissolved As concentrations were lower (3.3 microg/L) in river water than those in ground water discharging into the riverbed (22 microg/L) near the now-closed Franklin Mine. High total As concentrations (100-190 mg/kg) on the <0.63 microm fraction of bed sediments near the mine apparently result from sorption of the As in the ground-water discharge as well as from the As minerals in the streambed. As concentrations in river water were diluted during high stream flow in fall, winter and spring, and concentrated during low flow in summer. In unfiltered samples from a wetlands site, diurnal cycles in trace-element concentrations occurred; As concentrations appeared to peak during late afternoon as pH increased, but Fe, Mn, and Zn concentrations peaked shortly after midnight. The temporal variability of As and its presence at elevated concentrations in ground water and sediments as well as

  18. Spatial and temporal dynamics of malaria transmission in rural Western Kenya

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    Amek Nyaguara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the relationship between Plasmodium falciparum malaria transmission and health outcomes requires accurate estimates of exposure to infectious mosquitoes. However, measures of exposure such as mosquito density and entomological inoculation rate (EIR are generally aggregated over large areas and time periods, biasing the outcome-exposure relationship. There are few studies examining the extent and drivers of local variation in malaria exposure in endemic areas. Methods We describe the spatio-temporal dynamics of malaria transmission intensity measured by mosquito density and EIR in the KEMRI/CDC health and demographic surveillance system using entomological data collected during 2002–2004. Geostatistical zero inflated binomial and negative binomial models were applied to obtain location specific (house estimates of sporozoite rates and mosquito densities respectively. Model-based predictions were multiplied to estimate the spatial pattern of annual entomological inoculation rate, a measure of the number of infective bites a person receive per unit of time. The models included environmental and climatic predictors extracted from satellite data, harmonic seasonal trends and parameters describing space-time correlation. Results Anopheles gambiae s.l was the main vector species accounting for 86 % (n = 2309 of the total mosquitoes collected with the remainder being Anopheles funestus. Sixty eight percent (757/1110 of the surveyed houses had no mosquitoes. Distance to water bodies, vegetation and day temperature were strongly associated with mosquito density. Overall annual point estimates of EIR were 6.7, 9.3 and 9.6 infectious bites per annum for 2002, 2003 and 2004 respectively. Monthly mosquito density and EIR varied over the study period peaking in May during the wet season each year. The predicted and observed densities of mosquitoes and EIR showed a strong seasonal and spatial pattern over the study area

  19. Role of synaptic dynamics and heterogeneity in neuronal learning of temporal code

    OpenAIRE

    Rotman, Ziv; Klyachko, Vitaly A.

    2013-01-01

    Temporal codes are believed to play important roles in neuronal representation of information. Neuronal ability to classify and learn temporal spiking patterns is thus essential for successful extraction and processing of information. Understanding neuronal learning of temporal code has been complicated, however, by the intrinsic stochasticity of synaptic transmission. Using a computational model of a learning neuron, the tempotron, we studied the effects of synaptic unreliability and short-t...

  20. Awareness of Emotional Stimuli Determines the Behavioral Consequences of Amygdala Activation and Amygdala-Prefrontal Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapate, R. C.; Rokers, B.; Tromp, D. P. M.; Orfali, N. S.; Oler, J. A.; Doran, S. T.; Adluru, N.; Alexander, A. L.; Davidson, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Conscious awareness of negative cues is thought to enhance emotion-regulatory capacity, but the neural mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. Using continuous flash suppression (CFS) in the MRI scanner, we manipulated visual awareness of fearful faces during an affect misattribution paradigm, in which preferences for neutral objects can be biased by the valence of a previously presented stimulus. The amygdala responded to fearful faces independently of awareness. However, when awareness of fearful faces was prevented, individuals with greater amygdala responses displayed a negative bias toward unrelated novel neutral faces. In contrast, during the aware condition, inverse coupling between the amygdala and prefrontal cortex reduced this bias, particularly among individuals with higher structural connectivity in the major white matter pathway connecting the prefrontal cortex and amygdala. Collectively, these results indicate that awareness promotes the function of a critical emotion-regulatory network targeting the amygdala, providing a mechanistic account for the role of awareness in emotion regulation. PMID:27181344

  1. Awareness of Emotional Stimuli Determines the Behavioral Consequences of Amygdala Activation and Amygdala-Prefrontal Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapate, R C; Rokers, B; Tromp, D P M; Orfali, N S; Oler, J A; Doran, S T; Adluru, N; Alexander, A L; Davidson, R J

    2016-01-01

    Conscious awareness of negative cues is thought to enhance emotion-regulatory capacity, but the neural mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. Using continuous flash suppression (CFS) in the MRI scanner, we manipulated visual awareness of fearful faces during an affect misattribution paradigm, in which preferences for neutral objects can be biased by the valence of a previously presented stimulus. The amygdala responded to fearful faces independently of awareness. However, when awareness of fearful faces was prevented, individuals with greater amygdala responses displayed a negative bias toward unrelated novel neutral faces. In contrast, during the aware condition, inverse coupling between the amygdala and prefrontal cortex reduced this bias, particularly among individuals with higher structural connectivity in the major white matter pathway connecting the prefrontal cortex and amygdala. Collectively, these results indicate that awareness promotes the function of a critical emotion-regulatory network targeting the amygdala, providing a mechanistic account for the role of awareness in emotion regulation. PMID:27181344

  2. Dissociable contributions of amygdala and hippocampus to emotion and memory in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Vélez, Edmarie; Warren, David E; Feinstein, Justin S; Bruss, Joel; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The amygdala and the hippocampus are associated with emotional processing and declarative memory, respectively. Studies have shown that patients with bilateral hippocampal damage caused by anoxia/ischemia, and patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), can experience emotions for prolonged periods of time, even when they cannot remember what caused the emotion in the first place (Feinstein et al. (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107:7674-7679; Guzmán-Vélez et al. (2014) Cogn Behav Neurol 27:117-129). This study aimed to investigate, for the first time, the roles of the amygdala and hippocampus in the dissociation between feelings of emotion and declarative memory for emotion-inducing events in patients with AD. Individuals with probable AD (N = 12) and age-matched healthy comparisons participants (HCP; N = 12) completed a high-resolution (0.44 × 0.44 × 0.80 mm) T2-weighted structural MR scan of the medial temporal lobe. Each of these individuals also completed two separate emotion induction procedures (sadness and happiness) using film clips. We collected real-time emotion ratings at baseline and multiple times postinduction, and administered a test of declarative memory shortly after each induction. Consistent with previous research, hippocampal volume was significantly smaller in patients with AD compared with HCP, and was positively correlated with memory for the film clips. Sustained feelings of emotion and amygdala volume did not significantly differ between patients with AD and HCP. Follow-up analyses showed a significant negative correlation between amygdala volume and sustained sadness, and a significant positive correlation between amygdala volume and sustained happiness. Our findings suggest that the amygdala is important for regulating and sustaining an emotion independent of hippocampal function and declarative memory for the emotion-inducing event. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26606553

  3. Anatomic guidelines defined by reformatting images on MRI for volume measurement of amygdala and hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve patients with intractable partial epilepsy underwent MR scans at the Epilepsy Center of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. There were five women and seven men, ranging in age from five to 51 years (mean age: 26 years). Coronal images were obtained using a 3-D SPGR. The coronal images were transferred to an Allegro 5.1 workstation, and reformatted along the cardinal axes (axial and sagittal) in multiple view points. The anterior end of the amygdala was measured at the level just posterior to the disappearance of the temporal stem. The semilunar gyrus of the amygdala was separated from the ambient gyrus by the semianular sulcus that forms the boundary between the amygdala and the entorhinal cortex. The delineation of the hippocampal formation included the subicular complex, hippocampal proper, dentate gyrus, alveus, and fimbria. The uncal cleft separated the uncus above from the parahippocampal gyrus below. The roof of this cleft was formed by the hippocampus and the dentate gyrus, and the floor, by the presubiculum and subiculum. Although using some guidelines, strictly separating the hippocampal head from the posterior part of the amygdala was not feasible as was previously reported, because of the isointensity on MRI between the cortex of the amygdala and the hippocampus. The most posterior portion of the hippocampus was measured at the level of the subsplenial gyri, just below the splenium of the corpus callosum, to measure the hippocampal volume in its near totality. Therefore, it is reliable, and clinically useful, to measure the combined total volume of the amygdala and the hippocampus when comparing results with those of other centers. (S.Y.)

  4. Comparison of deep neural networks to spatio-temporal cortical dynamics of human visual object recognition reveals hierarchical correspondence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichy, Radoslaw Martin; Khosla, Aditya; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Torralba, Antonio; Oliva, Aude

    2016-01-01

    The complex multi-stage architecture of cortical visual pathways provides the neural basis for efficient visual object recognition in humans. However, the stage-wise computations therein remain poorly understood. Here, we compared temporal (magnetoencephalography) and spatial (functional MRI) visual brain representations with representations in an artificial deep neural network (DNN) tuned to the statistics of real-world visual recognition. We showed that the DNN captured the stages of human visual processing in both time and space from early visual areas towards the dorsal and ventral streams. Further investigation of crucial DNN parameters revealed that while model architecture was important, training on real-world categorization was necessary to enforce spatio-temporal hierarchical relationships with the brain. Together our results provide an algorithmically informed view on the spatio-temporal dynamics of visual object recognition in the human visual brain. PMID:27282108

  5. Use of soil moisture dynamics and patterns at different spatio-temporal scales for the investigation of subsurface flow processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Blume

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial patterns as well as temporal dynamics of soil moisture have a major influence on runoff generation. The investigation of these dynamics and patterns can thus yield valuable information on hydrological processes, especially in data scarce or previously ungauged catchments. The combination of spatially scarce but temporally high resolution soil moisture profiles with episodic and thus temporally scarce moisture profiles at additional locations provides information on spatial as well as temporal patterns of soil moisture at the hillslope transect scale. This approach is better suited to difficult terrain (dense forest, steep slopes than geophysical techniques and at the same time less cost-intensive than a high resolution grid of continuously measuring sensors. Rainfall simulation experiments with dye tracers while continuously monitoring soil moisture response allows for visualization of flow processes in the unsaturated zone at these locations. Data was analyzed at different spacio-temporal scales using various graphical methods, such as space-time colour maps (for the event and plot scale and binary indicator maps (for the long-term and hillslope scale. Annual dynamics of soil moisture and decimeter-scale variability were also investigated. The proposed approach proved to be successful in the investigation of flow processes in the unsaturated zone and showed the importance of preferential flow in the Malalcahuello Catchment, a data-scarce catchment in the Andes of Southern Chile. Fast response times of stream flow indicate that preferential flow observed at the plot scale might also be of importance at the hillslope or catchment scale. Flow patterns were highly variable in space but persistent in time. The most likely explanation for preferential flow in this catchment is a combination of hydrophobicity, small scale heterogeneity in rainfall due to redistribution in the canopy and strong gradients in unsaturated conductivities leading to

  6. Temporal Record of Glacial Dynamics in Southern Alaska During the Neogene-A Marine Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, J. M.; Cowan, E.; Finney, B.; Stoner, J.

    2004-05-01

    The Gulf of Alaska (GoA) margin features high mountains next to the ocean trapping abundant precipitation that fuels erosive glacial activity and exceptionally high sediment yields. As climate determines the timing and patterns of precipitation, it controls glacial dynamics, erosion, and sediment/meltwater fluxes to the ocean. Minimal terrestrial sediment storage allows proxy signals of terrestrial climate change such as precipitation, temperature, and glacial mass balance to be rapidly transferred to oceanic sediment records via glaciers and rivers. A reevaluation of DSDP Site 178 stratigraphy coupled with Holocene seismic reflection data and ultra-high resolution sediment cores covering the Little Ice Age reveal that GoA margin strata preserve a strong temporal record of terrestrial paleoclimatic signals on timescales ranging from the seasonal to Quaternary. Over this diverse range of time scales, the nature of sediment input from glaciers to the marine environment follows a cycle of storage and release, with the magnitude of release controlled by climatic forcing. As has been noted for ODP Site 887 in the southern GoA, the extent of sediment delivery to the northern GoA during the Quaternary is forced by the magnitude of glacial advances as reflected in Pacific Ocean benthic del O-18 variations. Over the Holocene, seismic reflection profiles reveal that sediment fluxes appear to have been minimal during the warm early Holocene Hypsithermal Period when glacial coverage is believed to have been minimal. These fluxes likely doubled during the renewal of glacial activity during the late Holocene Neoglacial period. During Little Ice Age glacial advances (~1200-1900 A.D.), sediment release peaked for several decades immediately following terrestrial moraine production and declined by 80-90 percent during the following half century. Likewise, on seasonal time scales, the magnitude of sediment flux from the tidewater Hubbard glacier appears to be positively forced by

  7. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses of substrate-dependent bacterial temporal dynamics in microbial fuel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husen Zhang

    Full Text Available Understanding the microbial community structure and genetic potential of anode biofilms is key to improve extracellular electron transfers in microbial fuel cells. We investigated effect of substrate and temporal dynamics of anodic biofilm communities using phylogenetic and metagenomic approaches in parallel with electrochemical characterizations. The startup non-steady state anodic bacterial structures were compared for a simple substrate, acetate, and for a complex substrate, landfill leachate, using a single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell. Principal coordinate analysis showed that distinct community structures were formed with each substrate type. The bacterial diversity measured as Shannon index decreased with time in acetate cycles, and was restored with the introduction of leachate. The change of diversity was accompanied by an opposite trend in the relative abundance of Geobacter-affiliated phylotypes, which were acclimated to over 40% of total Bacteria at the end of acetate-fed conditions then declined in the leachate cycles. The transition from acetate to leachate caused a decrease in output power density from 243±13 mW/m2 to 140±11 mW/m2, accompanied by a decrease in Coulombic electron recovery from 18±3% to 9±3%. The leachate cycles selected protein-degrading phylotypes within phylum Synergistetes. Metagenomic shotgun sequencing showed that leachate-fed communities had higher cell motility genes including bacterial chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, and increased gene abundance related to metal resistance, antibiotic resistance, and quorum sensing. These differentially represented genes suggested an altered anodic biofilm community in response to additional substrates and stress from the complex landfill leachate.

  8. Switch hands! Mapping temporal dynamics of proactive manual control with anticues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jos J; Jennings, Selas; Bovend'Eerdt, Thamar J H; Hurks, Petra P M; Van Gerven, Pascal W M

    2015-10-01

    This study uses a novel behavioral paradigm-the anticue task-to investigate the temporal dynamics of proactive control aimed at the resolution of response conflict in the manual motor system. The anticue task is a 4-choice reaction time (RT) task, with left and right anticues indicating mirror-symmetrical response hands. In particular, anticues require participants to prepare fingers on the hand opposite to the side of the cue (counter-corresponding mapping), which contrasts with the more standard procues that prompt participants to prepare fingers on the hand spatially in line with the cue (corresponding mapping). In Experiment 1, we examined the effects of anticues and procues as a function of cue-target interval (range: 100-850ms). Results showed that procues produced RT benefits (relative to neutral cues), which increased with longer cue-target intervals. Anticues, however, produced RT costs with short cue-target intervals and RT benefits with longer cue-target intervals. These findings support the view that anticues are mediated by a time-consuming, proactive control process that, using inhibition and activation, redirects the initial but wrong activation of the ipsilateral hand to the correct contralateral hand. In Experiment 2, we used a simple detection response to test, and reject, an alternative (attentional) account of these findings. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed in the context of dual-route models of response selection, the activation-suppression model, and related experimental protocols such as antisaccade, Simon, Stroop, Eriksen flanker, and task switching paradigms. PMID:26386782

  9. Temporal dynamics of amino and fatty acid composition in the razor clam Ensis siliqua (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Lopes, Vanessa M.; Narciso, Luis; Marques, António; Bandarra, Narcisa; Rosa, Rui

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the temporal dynamics of both amino acid (AA) and fatty acid (FA) profiles in marine bivalves. We investigated the seasonal variation of these compounds in the pod razor clam Ensis siliqua in relation to food availability, salinity, water temperature and reproductive cycle. AA content varied between 46.94 and 54.67 % dry weight (DW), and the AAs found in greater quantity were glutamic acid, glycine and aspartic acid. FA content varied between 34.02 and 87.94 mg g-1 DW and the FAs found in greater quantity were 16:0 and 22:6 n-3. Seasonal trends were observed for AAs and FAs. FAs increased with gametogenesis and decreased with spawning while AA content increased throughout spawning. The effect of increasing temperature and high food availability during the spawning season masked the loss of AAs resulting from gamete release. Still, a comparatively greater increase in the contents of glutamic acid and leucine with spawning indicate their possible involvement in a post-spawning gonad recovery mechanism. A post-spawning decrease in 14:0, 16:0, 16:1 n-7, 18:1 n-7 and 18:1 n-9 is indicative of the importance of these FAs in bivalve eggs. An increase in 18:3 n-3, 18:4 n-3, 20:1 n-9 and 20:2 n-6 during gametogenesis suggests their involvement in oocyte maturation. The FA 22:4 n-6, while increasing with spawning, appears to play a role in post-spawning gonad recovery. Salinity did not have an effect on the AA composition. None of the environmental parameters measured had an effect on FA composition.

  10. Spatial and temporal dynamics of hepatitis B virus D genotype in Europe and the Mediterranean Basin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianguglielmo Zehender

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus genotype D can be found in many parts of the world and is the most prevalent strain in south-eastern Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, the Middle East, and the Indian sub-continent. The epidemiological history of the D genotype and its subgenotypes is still obscure because of the scarcity of appropriate studies. We retrieved from public databases a total of 312 gene P sequences of HBV genotype D isolated in various countries throughout the world, and reconstructed the spatio-temporal evolutionary dynamics of the HBV-D epidemic using a bayesian framework.The phylogeographical analysis showed that India had the highest posterior probability of being the location of the tree root, whereas central Asia was the most probable location of the common ancestor of subgenotypes D1-D3. HBV-D5 (identified in native Indian populations diverged from the tree root earlier than D1-D3. The time of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA of the tree root was 128 years ago, which suggests that the common ancestor of the currently circulating subgenotypes existed in the second half of the XIX century. The mean tMRCA of subgenotypes D1-D3 was between the 1940s and the 1950-60s. On the basis of our phylogeographic reconstruction, it seems that HBV-D reached the Mediterranean area in the middle of the XX century by means of at least two routes: the first pathway (mainly due to the spread of subgenotype D1 crossing the Middle East and reaching north Africa and the eastern Mediterranean, and the second pathway (closely associated with D2 that crossed the former Soviet Union and reached eastern Europe and the Mediterranean through Albania. We hypothesise that the main route of dispersion of genotype D was the unsafe use of injections and drug addiction.

  11. Temporal dynamics of cognitive-emotional interplay in moral decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlo, Michela; Lotto, Lorella; Manfrinati, Andrea; Rumiati, Rino; Gallicchio, Germano; Palomba, Daniela

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated the temporal dynamics of emotional and cognitive processing underlying decision-making in moral judgment. Thirty-seven participants were presented with a set of 60 dilemmas varying in whether killing one individual was an intended means to save others (instrumental dilemmas) or a foreseen but unintended consequence (incidental dilemmas). Participants were required to decide between Options A (letting a specific number of people die) and B (killing one person to save a specific number of people). ERPs were recorded to a slide displaying the letters A and B while subjects were deciding between the options, and movement-related potentials were recorded time-locked to the behavioral response, thus allowing the investigation of both stimulus- and response-related processes during decision-making. Ratings of emotional valence and arousal experienced during decision-making were collected after each decision. Compared with incidental dilemmas, instrumental dilemmas prompted a lower number of B choices and significantly more unpleasant decisions. A larger P260 component was found in the frontopolar and frontal areas when subjects were deciding on instrumental than incidental dilemmas, possibly reflecting an immediate affective reaction during the early stage of assessment and formation of preferences between available options. On the other hand, decisions on incidental dilemmas required greater attentional resources during the fairly controlled later processing, as reflected in the larger slow wave amplitudes. In addition, facilitation of action selection and implementation was found for incidental dilemmas during the second stage of decision-making, as supported by the larger amplitudes of both components of the Bereitschaftspotential. PMID:21981668

  12. The Ecuadorian Artisanal Fishery for Large Pelagics: Species Composition and Spatio-Temporal Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Martínez-Ortiz

    Full Text Available The artisanal fisheries of Ecuador operate within one of the most dynamic and productive marine ecosystems of the world. This study investigates the catch composition of the Ecuadorian artisanal fishery for large pelagic fishes, including aspects of its spatio-temporal dynamics. The analyses of this study are based on the most extensive dataset available to date for this fishery: a total of 106,963 trip-landing inspection records collected at its five principal ports during 2008 ‒ 2012. Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries remove a substantial amount of biomass from the upper trophic-level predatory fish community of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. It is estimated that at least 135 thousand metric tons (mt (about 15.5 million fish were landed in the five principal ports during the study period. The great novelty of Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries is the "oceanic-artisanal" fleet component, which consists of mother-ship (nodriza boats with their towed fiber-glass skiffs (fibras operating with pelagic longlines. This fleet has fully expanded into oceanic waters as far offshore as 100°W, west of the Galapagos Archipelago. It is estimated that nodriza operations produce as much as 80% of the total catches of the artisanal fishery. The remainder is produced by independent fibras operating in inshore waters with pelagic longlines and/or surface gillnets. A multivariate regression tree analysis was used to investigate spatio-environmental effects on the nodriza fleet (n = 6,821 trips. The catch species composition of the nodriza fleet is strongly influenced by the northwesterly circulation of the Humboldt Current along the coast of Peru and its associated cold waters masses. The target species and longline gear-type used by nodrizas change seasonally with the incursion of cool waters (< 25°C from the south and offshore. During this season, dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus dominates the catches. However, in warmer waters, the fishery changes to tuna

  13. The Ecuadorian Artisanal Fishery for Large Pelagics: Species Composition and Spatio-Temporal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ortiz, Jimmy; Aires-da-Silva, Alexandre M.; Lennert-Cody, Cleridy E.; Maunder, Mark N.

    2015-01-01

    The artisanal fisheries of Ecuador operate within one of the most dynamic and productive marine ecosystems of the world. This study investigates the catch composition of the Ecuadorian artisanal fishery for large pelagic fishes, including aspects of its spatio-temporal dynamics. The analyses of this study are based on the most extensive dataset available to date for this fishery: a total of 106,963 trip-landing inspection records collected at its five principal ports during 2008 ‒ 2012. Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries remove a substantial amount of biomass from the upper trophic-level predatory fish community of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. It is estimated that at least 135 thousand metric tons (mt) (about 15.5 million fish) were landed in the five principal ports during the study period. The great novelty of Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries is the “oceanic-artisanal” fleet component, which consists of mother-ship (nodriza) boats with their towed fiber-glass skiffs (fibras) operating with pelagic longlines. This fleet has fully expanded into oceanic waters as far offshore as 100°W, west of the Galapagos Archipelago. It is estimated that nodriza operations produce as much as 80% of the total catches of the artisanal fishery. The remainder is produced by independent fibras operating in inshore waters with pelagic longlines and/or surface gillnets. A multivariate regression tree analysis was used to investigate spatio-environmental effects on the nodriza fleet (n = 6,821 trips). The catch species composition of the nodriza fleet is strongly influenced by the northwesterly circulation of the Humboldt Current along the coast of Peru and its associated cold waters masses. The target species and longline gear-type used by nodrizas change seasonally with the incursion of cool waters (< 25°C) from the south and offshore. During this season, dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) dominates the catches. However, in warmer waters, the fishery changes to tuna

  14. Spatial and temporal dynamics of CO2 partial pressure in the Yellow River, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ran

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon transport in river systems is an important component of the global carbon cycle. Most rivers of the world act as atmospheric CO2 sources due to high riverine CO2 partial pressure (pCO2. We investigated the pCO2 dynamics in the Yellow River watershed by using historical water chemistry records (1950s–1984 and recent sampling along the mainstem (2011–2012. Except the headwater region where the pCO2 was lower than the atmospheric equilibrium (i.e., 380 μatm, river waters in the remaining watershed were supersaturated with CO2. The average pCO2 for the watershed was estimated at 2810 ± 1985 μatm, which is 7-fold the atmospheric equilibrium. This indicates a strong CO2 outgassing across the water-air interface. As a result of severe soil erosion and dry climate, waters from the Loess Plateau in the middle reaches had higher pCO2 than that from the upper and lower reaches. From a seasonal perspective, the pCO2 varied from about 200 μatm to >30 000 μatm with higher pCO2 usually occurring in the dry season and low pCO2 in the wet season (at 73% of the sampling sites, suggesting the dilution effect of water. While the pCO2 responded positively to total suspended solids (TSS transport when the TSS was less than 100 kg m−3, it slightly decreased and remained stable when the TSS exceeded 100 kg m−3. This stable pCO2 is largely due to gully erosion that mobilizes subsoils characterized by low organic matter for decomposition. In addition, human activities have changed the pCO2 dynamics. Particularly, flow regulation by dams can diversely affect the temporal changes of pCO2, depending on the physiochemical properties of the regulated waters and adopted operation scheme. Given the high pCO2 in the Yellow River waters, the resultant CO2 outgassing is expected to be substantial and warrants further investigation.

  15. Temporal Changes in Eruption Dynamics at Tungurahua Volcano Deduced from Infrasonic Measurements, June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmigiani, A.; Chojnicki, K. N.; Parcheta, C. E.; Christensen, B.; Marcillo, O. E.; Johnson, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    Tungurahua volcano (1.45S, 78.43W, 5023m), located in the heart of the Andes and within Ecuador's Eastern Cordillera, is the most active populated volcano in the region. Since 1999 Tungurahua has affected the communities on its western flanks with a continuous cycle of Strombolian and Vulcanian activity (VEI 0 and 1) that climaxed on August 16th, 2006 with a VEI 2 event. Continuous tracking of Tungurahua eruptive activity presents a challenge as inclement weather often prevents direct observation of eruptive activity and strong volcanic tremor often masks seismic signals associated with explosive events. Infrasound signals have thus proven invaluable in identifying explosive activity and estimating erupted flux at Tungurahua. During a 10-day-long campaign in June 2009, two temporary arrays (a seismo-acoustic array at 6 km and an acoustic array at 11.5 km) were installed to provide insight into temporal changes in eruption dynamics and near-vent conditions. During the deployment interval, explosive activity was dominated by impulsive infrasonic events. Time-lapse camera footage confirmed Strombolian-style eruptions associated with 77 impulsive events, recorded at an average rate of 8 explosions per day. Columns with variable ash content rose from 2-6 km above the crater rim and incandescent blocks were seen to rise up to 800 meters in altitude during some events. Corresponding infrasonic waveforms had peak pressures as great as 74 Pa at 6 km from the vent and the primary pulses lasted 6-10s. Waveform shapes often displayed high levels of self-similarity in contrast to their seismic counterparts, which persisted up to 40-50s and were emergent and dis-similar. Acoustic array beam-forming and semblance analyses have been employed to decompose the infrasonic wave field, verify volcano acoustic sources, construct a volcano acoustic catalogue, and identify apparent variations in the lateral position of the vent(s). The ratio of elastic energy propagated into the

  16. Microbial Dynamics During a Temporal Sequence of Bioreduction Stimulated by Emulsified Vegetable Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadt, C. W.; Gihring, T. M.; Yang, Z.; Wu, W.; Green, S.; Overholt, W.; Zhang, G.; Brandt, C. C.; Campbell, J. H.; Carroll, S. C.; Criddle, C.; Jardine, P. M.; Lowe, K.; Mehlhorn, T.; Kostka, J. E.; Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Amendments of slow-release substrates (e.g. emulsified vegetable oil; EVO) are potentially pragmatic alternatives to short-lived labile substrates for sustained uranium bioimmobilization within groundwater systems. The spatial and temporal dynamics of geochemical and microbial community changes during EVO amendment are likely to differ significantly from populations stimulated by readily utilizable soluble substrates (e.g. ethanol or acetate). We tracked dynamic changes in geochemistry and microbial communities for 270 days following a one-time EVO injection at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site that resulted in decreased groundwater U concentrations for ~4 months. Pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA) genes from monitoring well samples revealed a rapid decline in bacterial community richness and evenness after EVO injection, concurrent with increased 16S rRNA copy levels, indicating the selection of a narrow group consisting of 10-15 dominant OTUs, rather than a broad community stimulation. By association of the known physiology of close relatives identified in the pyrosequencing analysis, it is possible to infer a hypothesized sequence of microbial functions leading the major changes in electron donors and acceptors in the system. Members of the Firmicutes family Veillonellaceae dominated after injection and most likely catalyzed the initial oil decomposition and utilized the glycerol associated with the oils. Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulforegula, known for LCFA oxidation to acetate, also dominated shortly after EVO amendment and are thought to catalyze this process. Acetate and H2 production during LCFA degradation appeared to stimulate NO3-, Fe(III), U(VI), and SO42- reduction by members of the Comamonadaceae, Geobacteriaceae, and Desulfobacterales. Methanogenic archaea flourished late in the experiment and in some samples constituted over 25 % of the total

  17. Optical system for study of temporal dynamics of a change in the complex degree of polarization in liquor laser images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovitch, D. T.

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a description of the principles defining period of death by polarimetric study temporal dynamics of changes in optical anisotropy of the cerebrospinal fluid of the human body. The optical model of polycrystalline networks of human body liquor is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st-4th order), correlation (correlation area, asymmetry coefficient and autocorrelation function excess) and fractal (dispersion of logarithmic dependencies of power spectra) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of absolute value and phase of complex degree of mutual polarization in the points of laser images of liquor and temporal dynamics of optical anisotropy of human body liquor. The diagnostic criteria of death coming prescription are determined.

  18. Spatial and temporal dynamic of surface water and vegetation dynamic using remotely sensed data in the Murray -Darling Basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulbure, M. G.; Kingsford, R.; Broich, M.

    2012-12-01

    term and across a large space in a drying yet variable climate. Using an internally consistent method, Landsat TM and ETM+ data were used to synoptically map the extent and dynamic of surface water bodies and track the response of vegetation communities to flooding in space and time at selected sites. Per pixel trajectory of surface water and vegetation index time series were used. Results show high interannual variability in number and size of flooded areas and a positive relationship with rainfall. Response of vegetation communities to flooding varied in space and time and with vegetation types and densities. Knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamic of flooding and the response of vegetation communities to flooding is important for management of floodplain wetlands and vegetation communities and for investigating effectiveness of environmental flows and flow regimes in the MDB. The approach presented here can be transferred to other river systems around the world where high demand for water requires informed management decisions.

  19. Mining Temporal Protein Complex Based on the Dynamic PIN Weighted with Connected Affinity and Gene Co-Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xianjun; Yi, Li; Jiang, Xingpeng; He, Tingting; Hu, Xiaohua; Yang, Jincai

    2016-01-01

    The identification of temporal protein complexes would make great contribution to our knowledge of the dynamic organization characteristics in protein interaction networks (PINs). Recent studies have focused on integrating gene expression data into static PIN to construct dynamic PIN which reveals the dynamic evolutionary procedure of protein interactions, but they fail in practice for recognizing the active time points of proteins with low or high expression levels. We construct a Time-Evolving PIN (TEPIN) with a novel method called Deviation Degree, which is designed to identify the active time points of proteins based on the deviation degree of their own expression values. Owing to the differences between protein interactions, moreover, we weight TEPIN with connected affinity and gene co-expression to quantify the degree of these interactions. To validate the efficiencies of our methods, ClusterONE, CAMSE and MCL algorithms are applied on the TEPIN, DPIN (a dynamic PIN constructed with state-of-the-art three-sigma method) and SPIN (the original static PIN) to detect temporal protein complexes. Each algorithm on our TEPIN outperforms that on other networks in terms of match degree, sensitivity, specificity, F-measure and function enrichment etc. In conclusion, our Deviation Degree method successfully eliminates the disadvantages which exist in the previous state-of-the-art dynamic PIN construction methods. Moreover, the biological nature of protein interactions can be well described in our weighted network. Weighted TEPIN is a useful approach for detecting temporal protein complexes and revealing the dynamic protein assembly process for cellular organization. PMID:27100396

  20. fSpatial and temporal dynamics of cellulose degradation and biofilm formation by Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis and Clostridium thermocellum

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhi-Wu; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Elkins, James G; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose degradation is one of the major bottlenecks of a consolidated bioprocess that employs cellulolytic bacterial cells as catalysts to produce biofuels from cellulosic biomass. In this study, we investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of cellulose degradation by Caldicellulosiruptfor obsidiansis, which does not produce cellulosomes, and Clostridium thermocellum, which does produce cellulosomes. Results showed that the degradation of either regenerated or natural cellulose was syn...

  1. Hemispheric differences in amygdala contributions to response monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polli, Frida E.; Wright, Christopher I.; Milad, Mohammed R.; Dickerson, Bradford C.; Vangel, Mark; Barton, Jason J.S.; Rauch, Scott L.; Manoach, Dara S.

    2009-01-01

    The amygdala detects aversive events and coordinates with rostral anterior cingulate cortex to adapt behavior. We assessed error-related activation in these regions and its relation to task performance using functional MRI and a saccadic paradigm. Both amygdalae showed increased activation during error versus correct antisaccade trials that was correlated with error-related activation in the corresponding rostral anterior cingulate cortex. Together, activation in right amygdala and right rostral anterior cingulate cortex predicted greater accuracy. In contrast, left amygdala activation predicted a higher error rate. These findings support a role for amygdala in response monitoring. Consistent with proposed specializations of right and left amygdala in aversive conditioning, we hypothesize that right amygdala-rostral anterior cingulate cortex interactions mediate learning to avoid errors, while left error-related amygdala activation underpins detrimental negative affect. PMID:19218865

  2. Temporal Lobe Anatomy and Psychiatric Symptoms in Velocardiofacial Syndrome (22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kates, Wendy R.; Miller, Adam M.; Abdulsabur, Nuria; Antshel, Kevin M.; Conchelos, Jena; Fremont, Wanda; Roizen, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between mesial temporal lobe morphology, ratios of prefrontal cortex to amygdala and hippocampus volumes, and psychiatric symptomatology in children and adolescents with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). Method: Scores on behavioral rating scales and volumetric measures of the amygdala, hippocampus, and…

  3. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics in the Relationship of Phytoplankton Biomass and Limnological Variables in a Small Artificial Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feipeng; Zhang, Haiping; Zhu, Yiping; Chen, Ling; Zhao, Jianfu

    2010-11-01

    Zhongxin Lake is an artificial freshwater lake located in Qianwei Village of Chongming Island, the third largest island in China. Besides its culture function and aesthetic value, it is also an ideal target, which can be regarded as an enclosed and simplified ecosystem with little external pollution. The objective of the study is to determine the spatial and temporal dynamics in the relationship between phytoplankton and main limnological variables. An intensive observation and monitoring program was performed more than one year at six sampling points along five locally connected watercourses. Nutrient levels and their seasonal variables might be the main factors which control the temporal development of phytoplankton. Chlorophyll-a (chl-a) levels peaked from late August to September and showed a significant positive correlation with water temperature, turbidity, total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and dissolved total phosphorus (DTP). Wind driven flow and geographical features appears to be the limiting factors for the spatial dynamics of phytoplankton. Higher average chl-a levels caused higher turbidity in the south and middle watercourses which are separated by dams and where shallow-circulation flow can be hardly maintained. Low average chl-a levels were recorded in the north watercourse in conditions of lower water levels, direct connection with the east watercourse and west watercourse and higher prevailing wind driven flow. The findings have strongly shown the influence of nutrients and hydro-meteorological variables as important factors of spatial and temporal dynamics of phytoplankton biomass.

  4. Temporal bird community dynamics are strongly affected by landscape fragmentation in a Central American tropical forest region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandón, A.C.; Perelman, S.B.; Ramírez, M.; López, A.; Javier, O.; Robbins, Chandler S.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are considered the main causes of species extinctions, particularly in tropical ecosystems. The objective of this work was to evaluate the temporal dynamics of tropical bird communities in landscapes with different levels of fragmentation in eastern Guatemala. We evaluated five bird community dynamic parameters for forest specialists and generalists: (1) species extinction, (2) species turnover, (3) number of colonizing species, (4) relative species richness, and (5) a homogeneity index. For each of 24 landscapes, community dynamic parameters were estimated from bird point count data, for the 1998–1999 and 2008–2009 periods, accounting for species’ detection probability. Forest specialists had higher extinction rates and a smaller number of colonizing species in landscapes with higher fragmentation, thus having lower species richness in both time periods. Alternatively, forest generalists elicited a completely different pattern, showing a curvilinear association to forest fragmentation for most parameters. Thus, greater community dynamism for forest generalists was shown in landscapes with intermediate levels of fragmentation. Our study supports general theory regarding the expected negative effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on the temporal dynamics of biotic communities, particularly for forest specialists, providing strong evidence from understudied tropical bird communities.

  5. Neonatal Amygdala Lesions Alter Responsiveness to Objects in Juvenile Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Toscano, Jessica E.; Bauman, Melissa; Mason, William A.; Amaral, David G.

    2011-01-01

    The amygdala is widely recognized to play a central role in emotional processing. In nonhuman primates, the amygdala appears to be critical for generating appropriate behavioral responses in emotionally salient contexts. One common finding is that macaque monkeys that receive amygdala lesions as adults are behaviorally uninhibited in the presence of potentially dangerous objects. While control animals avoid these objects, amygdala-lesioned animals readily interact with them. Despite a large l...

  6. Prediction of economic choice by primate amygdala neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Grabenhorst, F.; Hernadi, I.; Schultz, W.

    2012-01-01

    The amygdala is a key structure of the brain’s reward system. Existing theories view its role in decision-making as restricted to an early valuation stage that provides input to decision mechanisms in downstream brain structures. However, the extent to which the amygdala itself codes information about economic choices is unclear. Here, we report that individual neurons in the primate amygdala predict behavioral choices in an economic decision task. We recorded the activity of amygdala neurons...

  7. Amygdala lesions in rhesus macaques decrease attention to threat

    OpenAIRE

    Dal Monte, Olga; Costa, Vincent D; Noble, Pamela L.; Murray, Elisabeth A.; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies has suggested that the amygdala plays a role in detecting threat and in directing attention to the eyes. Nevertheless, there has been no systematic investigation of whether the amygdala specifically facilitates attention to the eyes or whether other features can also drive attention via amygdala processing. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of amygdala lesions in rhesus monkeys on attentional capture by specific facial features, as...

  8. Establishment of post-status epilepticus model of temporal lobe epilepsy induced by electrical stimulation of the amygdala in rats and spontaneous recurrent seizures%大鼠杏仁核电刺激癫痫持续状态模型的建立及其自发性反复癫痫发作的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐兆鹏; 金澎; 刘占涛; 孙鹏; 苏明明

    2011-01-01

    Objective To establish a reliable post-status epilepticus model of temporal lobe epilepsy in rats that mimics human temporal lobe epilepsy, and observe the occurrence of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). Methods Status epilepticus which was monitored for 3 h was induced by a 20-min stimulation of the amygdala ( 100 ms train of 1 ms, 60 Hz bipolar pulses, 400 μA, every 0. 5 s). Stimulated rats ( n =21 ) were monitored with a video recording system for the 3-months follow-up period to record the appearance of SRS. Results SRS (total number 181 ) were detected in 14 of the 21 animals (67%) after a latency period of 8 to 73 days (mean 43 days), including 10 times of stage 3 seizure (5.53%), 77 times of stage 4 seizure (42. 54% ), and 94 times of stage 5 seizure (51.93%). Of all the 14 rats, the seizure number beyond 30 was observed in 3 animals, from 20 to 30 in one animal, from 10 to 20 in 2 animals, between 5 and 10 in 2 animals, and less than 5 in 6 animals. Seventy-three percent of SRS appeared during daytime (07: 00-19: 00) and 74 percent of secondarily generalized seizures occurred during daytime. Conclusion This study has been successfully designed to develop a post-status epilepticus animal model induced by electrical stimulation of the amygdale.%目的 建立癫痫持续状态后颞叶癫痫模型,观察大鼠自发性反复发作(SRS)。方法 持续电刺激大鼠杏仁核20 min(单相方波,强度400μA,波宽1 ms,串长100 ms,串隔0.5s,频率60Hz)引发癫痫持续状态(SE),随后进行3h的SE观察,包括大鼠行为表现和脑电变化。SE状态引出后,进行3个月的视频监测,观察大鼠自发性发作的发作情况并进行分组。结果 经过为期3个月的视频观察,出现SRS14只(67%);未出现者7只(33%)。共记录到3~5级发作181次。其中3级发作10次(5.53%),4级发作77次(42.54%),5级发作94次(51.93%)。发作在30次以上者3只;20 ~ 30次者1只;10 ~20次者2只,5~10次者2只;5

  9. Suspended sediment transport during in-channel gravel mining: spatial and temporal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, Alvaro; Béjar, María; Muñoz, Efrén; Ramos, Ester; Lobera, Gemma; Andrés López-Tarazón, Jose; Gibbins, Chris; Batalla, Ramon J.; Piqué, Gemma; Vericat, Damià

    2015-04-01

    Rivers in natural conditions tend to maintain long-term morphosedimentary equilibrium, however, natural and human induced disturbances (e.g. flooding, damming, gravel mining, etc.) may alter this equilibrium by modifying physical and ecological processes and dynamics. Gravel mining activities cause major changes in the channel mass and energy balances, that in turn affect morphology, bed sedimentology and habitat conditions. In-channel gravel extractions also increase suspended sediment concentrations, locally but with downstream associated effects. The excess of sediments can clog the interstices between substrate clasts, increasing the invertebrate drift, and reducing the available habitat for benthic organisms. The Upper River Cinca (Southern Pyrenees, Iberian Peninsula) has experienced gravel mining activities in the active channel and floodplain since the middle of the last century, although their morpho-sedimentary impacts have never been fully investigated. Nowadays, these practices are still carried out in the upper Cinca, but mainly to prevent damages in infrastructures. One of these extractions has been experimentally monitored in the background of the research project MorphSed (www.morphsed.es). Suspended sediment transport has been monitored before, during and after the gravel extraction in order to assess the spatial and temporal dynamics and their potential impacts in the downstream reaches. Suspended sediment samples were collected manually (Depth integrated sampler DH49) and automatically (ISCO 3700 automatic sampler) at four sampling locations, one just downstream from the mining (M1) and the other two sections (M2, M3) located 100 and 300 m downstream. Additionally, turbidity was continuously registered (every 15 minutes) in the last section (M3). Preliminary results show as during the first field day, when the channel was partially diverted, sediment concentrations increased locally and decreased downstream. Mean suspended sediment concentrations

  10. Spatio-temporal dynamics of surface water quality in a Portuguese peri-urban catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carla; Walsh, Rory; Coelho, Celeste; Ferreira, António

    2016-04-01

    ) attained highest concentrations after the summer. Low discharges led to high pollutant concentrations at baseflow of N-NH4 in ESAC and Porto Bordalo (up to 1.63 mgL‑1 and 1.04 mgL‑1, respectively). The first storm events after the summer led to flushing of accumulated pollutants to produce serious concentrations of N-Nk in Porto Bordalo (2.05 mgL‑1) and Zn at ESAC and Porto Bordalo (up to 0.55 mgL‑1 and 0.59 mgL‑1, respectively), all recorded at peak flows. In wettest periods, greater flow connectivity over the hillslopes led to pollutant concentrations of N-Nk at ESAC, Espírito Santo and Quinta (up to 2.07 mgL‑1, 2.54 mgL‑1 and 2.83 mgL‑1, respectively). Also high levels of Cu and Zn occurred at ESAC (1.74 mgL‑1and 0.77 mgL‑1) during the falling limb. Baseflow chemistry was influenced by bedrock, with highest median concentrations of Ca and Mg, lowest values of Na, and higher pH recorded in limestone (p<0.05). Information about the spatio-temporal dynamics of pollutants, linked to urban patterns and storm drainage system, should help enable urban planners to minimize adverse impacts of urbanization on water quality.

  11. Temporal and spatial dynamics of large lake hypoxia: Integrating statistical and three-dimensional dynamic models to enhance lake management criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocaniov, Serghei A.; Scavia, Donald

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxia or low bottom water dissolved oxygen (DO) is a world-wide problem of management concern requiring an understanding and ability to monitor and predict its spatial and temporal dynamics. However, this is often made difficult in large lakes and coastal oceans because of limited spatial and temporal coverage of field observations. We used a calibrated and validated three-dimensional ecological model of Lake Erie to extend a statistical relationship between hypoxic extent and bottom water DO concentrations to explore implications of the broader temporal and spatial development and dissipation of hypoxia. We provide the first numerical demonstration that hypoxia initiates in the nearshore, not the deep portion of the basin, and that the threshold used to define hypoxia matters in both spatial and temporal dynamics and in its sensitivity to climate. We show that existing monitoring programs likely underestimate both maximum hypoxic extent and the importance of low oxygen in the nearshore, discuss implications for ecosystem and drinking water protection, and recommend how these results could be used to efficiently and economically extend monitoring programs.

  12. Short environmental enrichment in adulthood reverses anxiety and basolateral amygdala hypertrophy induced by maternal separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koe, A S; Ashokan, A; Mitra, R

    2016-01-01

    Maternal separation during early childhood results in greater sensitivity to stressors later in adult life. This is reflected as greater propensity to develop stress-related disorders in humans and animal models, including anxiety and depression. Environmental enrichment (EE) reverses some of the damaging effects of maternal separation in rodent models when provided during peripubescent life, temporally proximal to the separation. It is presently unknown if EE provided outside this critical window can still rescue separation-induced anxiety and neural plasticity. In this report we use a rat model to demonstrate that a single short episode of EE in adulthood reduced anxiety-like behaviour in maternally separated rats. We further show that maternal separation resulted in hypertrophy of dendrites and increase in spine density of basolateral amygdala neurons in adulthood, long after initial stress treatment. This is congruent with prior observations showing centrality of basolateral amygdala hypertrophy in anxiety induced by stress during adulthood. In line with the ability of the adult enrichment to rescue stress-induced anxiety, we show that enrichment renormalized stress-induced structural expansion of the amygdala neurons. These observations argue that behavioural plasticity induced by early adversity can be rescued by environmental interventions much later in life, likely mediated by ameliorating effects of enrichment on basolateral amygdala plasticity. PMID:26836417

  13. Temporal Dynamics and Environmental Controls on Carbon Isotope Discrimination at the Canopy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billmark, K. A.; Griffis, T. J.; Lee, X.; Welp, L. R.; Baker, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Much is currently known about 13C isotopic discrimination by C3 plants at the leaf scale. Multidisciplinary techniques from micrometeorology and the stable isotope community have exploited this knowledge to better understand the dynamic processes and environmental controls on atmosphere/biosphere exchange. Unfortunately, there remains a dearth of measurements relating carbon isotope discrimination at the canopy scale (Δcanopy) with the net carbon ecosystem flux. Our goals here are to evaluate temporal fluctuations in Δcanopy as a result of variable environmental conditions and to critically assess the efficacy of leaf-level assumptions applied at the canopy scale. At the University of Minnesota's Rosemount Research and Outreach Center (RROC), the exchange of 12CO2 and 13CO2 isotopologues are continuously measured using tunable diode laser (TDL) and micrometeorological techniques (eddy covariance-TDL and gradient-TDL methods). We utilize these data in conjunction with eddy flux and ancillary meteorological measurements to estimate Δcanopy, a key parameter for understanding ecosystem carbon source/sink behavior. Traditionally, Δcanopy is estimated using stomatal conductance models and leaf level isotopic discrimination parameters. In this study, we similarly calculated Δcanopy (Big-Leaf approach), where stomatal conductance was obtained through inversion of the Penman-Monteith equation. Additionally, given the high resolution of eddy flux and isoflux measurements at the RROC site, we were able to calculate Δcanopy using an inverse flux approach. For this approach, we partitioned the net ecosystem flux using eddy covariance measurements and a nighttime temperature regression method, and then calculated Δcanopy from the isoflux mass balance. Both calculations of Δcanopy emphasized the diurnal, daily and seasonal variability of this important parameter. In particular, atypically hot weather strongly influenced canopy isotope discrimination. Trends in the two

  14. Air Pollution Dynamics and the Need for Temporally Differentiated Road Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Coria, Jessica; Bonilla, Jorge; Grundström, Maria; Pleijel, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of the temporal variation of pollution dispersion, traffic flows and vehicular emissions on pollution concentration and illustrate the need for temporally differentiated road pricing through an application to the case of the congestion charge in Stockholm, Sweden. By accounting explicitly for the role of pollution dispersion on optimal road pricing, we allow for a more comprehensive view of the economy-ecology interactions at stake, showing that price ...

  15. Fish and Phytoplankton Exhibit Contrasting Temporal Species Abundance Patterns in a Dynamic North Temperate Lake

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Gretchen J. A.; Carey, Cayelan C.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal patterns of species abundance, although less well-studied than spatial patterns, provide valuable insight to the processes governing community assembly. We compared temporal abundance distributions of two communities, phytoplankton and fish, in a north temperate lake. We used both 17 years of observed relative abundance data as well as resampled data from Monte Carlo simulations to account for the possible effects of non-detection of rare species. Similar to what has been found in ot...

  16. Temporal dynamics of attentional selection in adult male carriers of the fragile X premutation allele and adult controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Mei Wong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Carriers of the fragile X premutation allele (fXPCs have an expanded CGG trinucleotide repeat size within the emph{FMR1} gene and are at increased risk of developing Fragile X-associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS. Previous research has shown that male fXPCs with FXTAS exhibit cognitive decline, predominantly in executive functions such as inhibitory control and working memory. Recent evidence suggests fXPCs may also exhibit impairments in processing temporal information. The attentional blink (AB task is often used to examine the dynamics of attentional selection, but disagreements exist as to whether the AB is due to excessive or insufficient attentional control. In this study, we used a variant of the AB task and neuropsychological testing to explore the dynamics of attentional selection, relate AB performance to attentional control, and determine whether fXPCs exhibited temporal and/or attentional control impairments. Participants were adult male fXPCs, aged 18--48 years and asymptomatic for FXTAS (emph{n} = 19 and age-matched male controls (emph{n} = 20. We found that fXPCs did not differ from controls in the AB task, indicating that the temporal dynamics of attentional selection were intact. However, they were impaired in the letter-number sequencing task, a test of attentional control. In the combined fXPC and control group, letter-number sequencing performance correlated positively with AB magnitude. This finding supports models that posit the AB is due to excess attentional control. In our two-pronged analysis approach, we contribute to the theoretical literature in controls by extending the AB literature, and we enhance our understanding of fXPCs by demonstrating that at least some aspects of temporal processing may be spared.

  17. Multi-temporal analysis of aerial images for the investigation of spatial-temporal dynamics of shallow erosion - a case study from the Tyrolean Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, C.; Geitner, C.; Heinrich, K.; Rutzinger, M.

    2012-04-01

    Small and shallow eroded areas characterize the landscape of many pastures and meadows in the Alps. The extent of such erosion phenomena varies between 2 m2 and 200 m2. These patches tend to be only a few decimetres thick, with a maximum depth of 2 m. The processes involved are shallow landslides, superficial erosion by snow and livestock trampling. Key parameters that influence the emergence of shallow erosion are the geological, topographical and climatic circumstances in an area as well as its soils, vegetation and land use. The negative impact of this phenomenon includes not only the loss of soil but also the reduced attractiveness of the landscape, especially in tourist regions. One approach identifying and mapping geomorphological elements is remote sensing. The analysis of aerial images is a suitable method for identifying the multi-temporal dynamics of shallow eroded areas because of the good spatial and temporal resolution. For this purpose, we used a pixel-based approach to detect these areas semi-automatically in an orthophoto. In a first step, each aerial image was classified using dynamic thresholds derived from the histogram of the orthophoto. In a second step, the identified areas of erosion were filtered and visually in-terpreted. Based on this procedure, eroded areas with a minimum size of 5 m2 were detected in a test site located in the Inner Schmirn Valley (Tyrol, Austria). The altitude of the test site ranges between 1,980 m and 2,370 m, with a mean inclination of 36°, facing E to SE. Geologically, the slope is part of the "Hohe Tauern Window", characterized by "Bündner schists" deficient in lime and regolith. Until the 1960s, the slope was used as a hay meadow. Orthophotos from 2000, 2003, 2007 and 2010 were used for this investigation. Older aerial images were not suitable because of their lower resolution and poor ortho-rectification. However, they are useful for relating the results of the ten-year time-span to a larger temporal context

  18. Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of High-Resolution Animal Networks: What Can We Learn from Domestic Animals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Chen

    Full Text Available Animal social network is the key to understand many ecological and epidemiological processes. We used real-time location system (RTLS to accurately track cattle position, analyze their proximity networks, and tested the hypothesis of temporal stationarity and spatial homogeneity in these networks during different daily time periods and in different areas of the pen. The network structure was analyzed using global network characteristics (network density, subgroup clustering (modularity, triadic property (transitivity, and dyadic interactions (correlation coefficient from a quadratic assignment procedure at hourly level. We demonstrated substantial spatial-temporal heterogeneity in these networks and potential link between indirect animal-environment contact and direct animal-animal contact. But such heterogeneity diminished if data were collected at lower spatial (aggregated at entire pen level or temporal (aggregated at daily level resolution. The network structure (described by the characteristics such as density, modularity, transitivity, etc. also changed substantially at different time and locations. There were certain time (feeding and location (hay that the proximity network structures were more consistent based on the dyadic interaction analysis. These results reveal new insights for animal network structure and spatial-temporal dynamics, provide more accurate descriptions of animal social networks, and allow more accurate modeling of multiple (both direct and indirect disease transmission pathways.

  19. Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of High-Resolution Animal Networks: What Can We Learn from Domestic Animals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi; Ilany, Amiyaal; White, Brad J; Sanderson, Michael W; Lanzas, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Animal social network is the key to understand many ecological and epidemiological processes. We used real-time location system (RTLS) to accurately track cattle position, analyze their proximity networks, and tested the hypothesis of temporal stationarity and spatial homogeneity in these networks during different daily time periods and in different areas of the pen. The network structure was analyzed using global network characteristics (network density), subgroup clustering (modularity), triadic property (transitivity), and dyadic interactions (correlation coefficient from a quadratic assignment procedure) at hourly level. We demonstrated substantial spatial-temporal heterogeneity in these networks and potential link between indirect animal-environment contact and direct animal-animal contact. But such heterogeneity diminished if data were collected at lower spatial (aggregated at entire pen level) or temporal (aggregated at daily level) resolution. The network structure (described by the characteristics such as density, modularity, transitivity, etc.) also changed substantially at different time and locations. There were certain time (feeding) and location (hay) that the proximity network structures were more consistent based on the dyadic interaction analysis. These results reveal new insights for animal network structure and spatial-temporal dynamics, provide more accurate descriptions of animal social networks, and allow more accurate modeling of multiple (both direct and indirect) disease transmission pathways. PMID:26107251

  20. A linear discrete dynamic system model for temporal gene interaction and regulatory network influence in response to bioethanol conversion inhibitor HMF for ethanologenic yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    A linear discrete dynamic system model is constructed to represent the temporal interactions among significantly expressed genes in response to bioethanol conversion inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural for ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study identifies the most significant linear...

  1. Spatio-temporal pattern formation, fractals, and chaos in conceptual ecological models as applied to coupled plankton-fish dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current turn-of-the-century period witnesses the intensive use of the bioproducts of the World Ocean while at the same time calling for precautions to preserve its ecological stability. This requires that biophysical processes in aquatic systems be comprehensively explored and new methods for monitoring their dynamics be developed. While aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems have much in common in terms of their mathematical description, there are essential differences between them. For example, the mobility of oceanic plankton is mainly controlled by diffusion processes, whereas terrestrial organisms naturally enough obey totally different laws. This paper is focused on the processes underlying the dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous plankton communities. We demonstrate that conceptual reaction-diffusion mathematical models are an appropriate tool for investigating both complex spatio-temporal plankton dynamics and the fractal properties of planktivorous fish school walks. (reviews of topical problems)

  2. Multimodal emotion perception after anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL)

    OpenAIRE

    Milesi, Valérie; Cekic, Sezen; Péron, Julie; Frühholz, Sascha; Cristinzio, Chiara; Seeck, Margitta; Grandjean, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the context of emotion information processing, several studies have demonstrated the involvement of the amygdala in emotion perception, for unimodal and multimodal stimuli. However, it seems that not only the amygdala, but several regions around it, may also play a major role in multimodal emotional integration. In order to investigate the contribution of these regions to multimodal emotion perception, five patients who had undergone unilateral anterior temporal lobe resection were exposed...

  3. Modeling spatial-temporal dynamics of global wetlands: comprehensive evaluation of a new sub-grid TOPMODEL parameterization and uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Zimmermann, N. E.; Poulter, B.

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of the spatial-temporal dynamics of wetlands are key to understanding the role of wetland biogeochemistry under past and future climate variability. Hydrologic inundation models, such as TOPMODEL, are based on a fundamental parameter known as the compound topographic index (CTI) and provide a computationally cost-efficient approach to simulate wetland dynamics at global scales. However, there remains large discrepancy in the implementations of TOPMODEL in land-surface models (LSMs) and thus their performance against observations. This study describes new improvements to TOPMODEL implementation and estimates of global wetland dynamics using the LPJ-wsl dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM), and quantifies uncertainties by comparing three digital elevation model products (HYDRO1k, GMTED, and HydroSHEDS) at different spatial resolution and accuracy on simulated inundation dynamics. In addition, we found that calibrating TOPMODEL with a benchmark wetland dataset can help to successfully delineate the seasonal and interannual variations of wetlands, as well as improve the spatial distribution of wetlands to be consistent with inventories. The HydroSHEDS DEM, using a river-basin scheme for aggregating the CTI, shows best accuracy for capturing the spatio-temporal dynamics of wetlands among the three DEM products. The estimate of global wetland potential/maximum is ∼ 10.3 Mkm2 (106 km2), with a mean annual maximum of ∼ 5.17 Mkm2 for 1980-2010. This study demonstrates the feasibility to capture spatial heterogeneity of inundation and to estimate seasonal and interannual variations in wetland by coupling a hydrological module in LSMs with appropriate benchmark datasets. It additionally highlights the importance of an adequate investigation of topographic indices for simulating global wetlands and shows the opportunity to converge wetland estimates across LSMs by identifying the uncertainty associated with existing wetland products.

  4. Pain Does Not Follow the Boxcar Model: Temporal Dynamics of the BOLD FMRI Signal during Constant Current Painful Electric Nerve Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ibinson, JW; Vogt, KM

    2013-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal, especially for painful stimulations, is not completely understood. In this study, the BOLD signal response to a long painful electrical stimulation (a continuous painful stimulation of 2 minutes) is directly compared to that of a short painful stimulation (four 30-s periods of painful stimulation interleaved with 30-s rest) in an effort to further probe the relationship between the temporal dynamics of the BOLD signal du...

  5. DYPTOP: a cost-efficient TOPMODEL implementation to simulate sub-grid spatio-temporal dynamics of global wetlands and peatlands

    OpenAIRE

    Stocker, B. D.; Spahni, R.; F. Joos

    2014-01-01

    Simulating the spatio-temporal dynamics of inundation is key to understanding the role of wetlands under past and future climate change. Earlier modelling studies have mostly relied on fixed prescribed peatland maps and inundation time series of limited temporal coverage. Here, we describe and assess the the Dynamical Peatland Model Based on TOPMODEL (DYPTOP), which predicts the extent of inundation based on a computationally efficient TOPMODEL implementation. This...

  6. DYPTOP: a cost-efficient TOPMODEL implementation to simulate sub-grid spatio-temporal dynamics of global wetlands and peatlands

    OpenAIRE

    Stocker, B. D.; Spahni, R.; F. Joos

    2014-01-01

    Simulating the spatio-temporal dynamics of inundation is key to understanding the role of wetlands under past and future climate change. Earlier modelling studies have mostly relied on fixed prescribed peatland maps and inundation time series of limited temporal coverage. Here, we describe and assess the the Dynamical Peatland Model Based on TOPMODEL (DYPTOP), which predicts the extent of inundation based on a computationally efficient TOPMODEL implementation. This approach rests on an empiri...

  7. Temporal dynamics of incoherent waves in noninstantaneous response nonlinear Kerr media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibler, B; Michel, C; Garnier, J; Picozzi, A

    2012-07-01

    We consider the temporal evolution of an incoherent optical wave that propagates in a noninstantaneous response nonlinear medium, such as single mode optical fibers. In contrast with the expected Raman-like spectral redshift due to a delayed nonlinear response, we show that a highly noninstantaneous response leads to a genuine modulational instability of the incoherent optical wave. We derive a Vlasov-like kinetic equation that provides a detailed description of this process of incoherent modulational instability in the temporal domain. PMID:22743425

  8. Nitrate sinks and sources as controls of spatio-temporal water quality dynamics in an agricultural headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Durand, Patrick; Weiler, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Several controls are known to affect water quality of stream networks during flow recession periods, such as solute leaching processes, surface water-groundwater interactions as well as biogeochemical in-stream turnover processes. Throughout the stream network, combinations of specific water and solute export rates and local in-stream conditions overlay the biogeochemical signals from upstream sections. Therefore, upstream sections can be considered functional units which could be distinguished and ordered regarding their relative contribution to nutrient dynamics at the catchment outlet. Based on snapshot sampling of flow and nitrate concentrations along the stream in an agricultural headwater during the summer flow recession period, we determined spatial and temporal patterns of water quality for the whole stream. A data-driven, in-stream-mixing-and-removal model was developed and applied for analysing the spatio-temporal in-stream retention processes and their effect on the spatio-temporal fluxes of nitrate from subcatchments. Thereby, we have been able to distinguish quantitatively between nitrate sinks, sources per stream reaches, and subcatchments, and thus we could disentangle the overlay of nitrate sink and source signals. For nitrate sources, we determined their permanent and temporal impact on stream water quality and for nitrate sinks, we found increasing nitrate removal efficiencies from upstream to downstream. Our results highlight the importance of distinct nitrate source locations within the watershed for in-stream concentrations and in-stream removal processes, respectively. Thus, our findings contribute to the development of a more dynamic perception of water quality in streams and rivers concerning ecological and sustainable water resource management.

  9. Temporal dynamics of spectral bioindicators evidence biological and ecological differences among functional types in a cork oak open woodland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasoli, Sofia; Costa E Silva, Filipe; Silva, João M N

    2016-06-01

    The application of spectral vegetation indices for the purpose of vegetation monitoring and modeling increased largely in recent years. Nonetheless, the interpretation of biophysical properties of vegetation through their spectral signature is still a challenging task. This is particularly true in Mediterranean oak forest characterized by a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. In this study, the temporal dynamics of vegetation indices expected to be related with green biomass and photosynthetic efficiency were compared for the canopy of trees, the herbaceous layer, and two shrub species: cistus (Cistus salviifolius) and ulex (Ulex airensis). coexisting in a cork oak woodland. All indices were calculated from in situ measurements with a FieldSpec3 spectroradiometer (ASD Inc., Boulder, USA). Large differences emerged in the temporal trends and in the correlation between climate and vegetation indices. The relationship between spectral indices and temperature, radiation, and vapor pressure deficit for cork oak was opposite to that observed for the herbaceous layer and cistus. No correlation was observed between rainfall and vegetation indices in cork oak and ulex, but in the herbaceous layer and in the cistus, significant correlations were found. The analysis of spectral vegetation indices with fraction of absorbed PAR (fPAR) and quantum yield of chlorophyll fluorescence (ΔF/Fm') evidenced strongest relationships with the indices Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI)512, respectively. Our results, while confirms the ability of spectral vegetation indices to represent temporal dynamics of biophysical properties of vegetation, evidence the importance to consider ecosystem composition for a correct ecological interpretation of results when the spatial resolution of observations includes different plant functional types. PMID:26449349

  10. Temporal dynamics of spectral bioindicators evidence biological and ecological differences among functional types in a cork oak open woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasoli, Sofia; Costa e Silva, Filipe; Silva, João M. N.

    2016-06-01

    The application of spectral vegetation indices for the purpose of vegetation monitoring and modeling increased largely in recent years. Nonetheless, the interpretation of biophysical properties of vegetation through their spectral signature is still a challenging task. This is particularly true in Mediterranean oak forest characterized by a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. In this study, the temporal dynamics of vegetation indices expected to be related with green biomass and photosynthetic efficiency were compared for the canopy of trees, the herbaceous layer, and two shrub species: cistus ( Cistus salviifolius) and ulex ( Ulex airensis). coexisting in a cork oak woodland. All indices were calculated from in situ measurements with a FieldSpec3 spectroradiometer (ASD Inc., Boulder, USA). Large differences emerged in the temporal trends and in the correlation between climate and vegetation indices. The relationship between spectral indices and temperature, radiation, and vapor pressure deficit for cork oak was opposite to that observed for the herbaceous layer and cistus. No correlation was observed between rainfall and vegetation indices in cork oak and ulex, but in the herbaceous layer and in the cistus, significant correlations were found. The analysis of spectral vegetation indices with fraction of absorbed PAR (fPAR) and quantum yield of chlorophyll fluorescence ( ΔF/ Fm') evidenced strongest relationships with the indices Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI)512, respectively. Our results, while confirms the ability of spectral vegetation indices to represent temporal dynamics of biophysical properties of vegetation, evidence the importance to consider ecosystem composition for a correct ecological interpretation of results when the spatial resolution of observations includes different plant functional types.

  11. Geospatial Narratives and Their Spatio-Temporal Dynamics: Commonsense Reasoning for High-Level Analyses in Geographic Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul Bhatt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The modeling, analysis and visualization of dynamic geospatial phenomenahas been identified as a key developmental challenge for next-generation GeographicInformation Systems (GIS. In this context, the envisaged paradigmatic extensions tocontemporary foundational GIS technology raises fundamental questions concerning theontological, formal representational and (analytical computational methods that wouldunderlie their spatial information theoretic underpinnings. We present the conceptualoverview and architecture for the development of high-level semantic and qualitativeanalytical capabilities for dynamic geospatial domains. Building on formal methods in theareas of commonsense reasoning, qualitative reasoning, spatial and temporal representationand reasoning, reasoning about actions and change and computational models of narrative,we identify concrete theoretical and practical challenges that accrue in the context offormal reasoning about space, events, actions and change. With this as a basis and withinthe backdrop of an illustrated scenario involving the spatio-temporal dynamics of urbannarratives, we address specific problems and solution techniques chiefly involving qualitativeabstraction, data integration and spatial consistency and practical geospatial abduction.

  12. Pulvinar projections to the striatum and amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Day-Brown

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Visually-guided movement is possible in the absence of conscious visual perception, a phenomenon referred to as blindsight. Similarly, fearful images can elicit emotional responses in the absence of their conscious perception. Both capabilities are thought to be mediated by pathways from the retina through the superior colliculus (SC and pulvinar nucleus. To define potential pathways that underlie behavioral responses to unperceived visual stimuli, we examined the projections from the pulvinar nucleus to the striatum and amygdala in the tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri, a species considered to be a protypical primate. The tree shrew brain has a large pulvinar nucleus that contains two SC-recipient subdivisions; the dorsal (Pd and central (Pc pulvinar both receive topographic (specific projections from SC, and Pd receives an additional nontopographic (diffuse projection from SC (Chomsung et al., 2008; JCN 510:24-46. Anterograde and retrograde tract tracing revealed that both Pd and Pc project to the caudate and putamen, and Pd, but not Pc, additionally projects to the lateral amygdala. Using immunocytochemical staining for substance P (SP and parvalbumin (PV to reveal the patch/matrix organization of tree shrew striatum, we found that SP-rich/PV-poor patches interlock with a PV-rich/SP-poor matrix. Confocal microscopy revealed that tracer-labeled pulvinostriatal terminals preferentially innervate the matrix. Electron microscopy revealed that the postsynaptic targets of tracer-labeled pulvino-striatal and pulvino-amygdala terminals are spines, demonstrating that the pulvinar nucleus projects to the spiny output cells of the striatum matrix and the lateral amygdala, potentially relaying: 1 topographic visual information from SC to striatum to aid in guiding precise movements, and 2 nontopographic visual information from SC to the amygdala alerting the animal to potentially dangerous visual images.

  13. Discrete simulations of spatio-temporal dynamics of small water bodies under varied stream flow discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Daya Sagar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatio-temporal patterns of small water bodies (SWBs under the influence of temporally varied stream flow discharge are simulated in discrete space by employing geomorphologically realistic expansion and contraction transformations. Cascades of expansion-contraction are systematically performed by synchronizing them with stream flow discharge simulated via the logistic map. Templates with definite characteristic information are defined from stream flow discharge pattern as the basis to model the spatio-temporal organization of randomly situated surface water bodies of various sizes and shapes. These spatio-temporal patterns under varied parameters (λs controlling stream flow discharge patterns are characterized by estimating their fractal dimensions. At various λs, nonlinear control parameters, we show the union of boundaries of water bodies that traverse the water body and non-water body spaces as geomorphic attractors. The computed fractal dimensions of these attractors are 1.58, 1.53, 1.78, 1.76, 1.84, and 1.90, respectively, at λs of 1, 2, 3, 3.46, 3.57, and 3.99. These values are in line with general visual observations.

  14. Temporal dynamics of abundance and composition of nitrogen-fixing communities across agricultural soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Cassia Pereira e Silva, Michele; Schloter-Hai, Brigitte; Schloter, Michael; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Salles, Joana Falcao

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the fact that the fixation of nitrogen is one of the most significant nutrient processes in the terrestrial ecosystem, a thorough study of the spatial and temporal patterns in the abundance and distribution of N-fixing communities has been missing so far. Methodology/Principal Fi

  15. Hot spot detection and spatio-temporal dynamics of dengue in Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naish, S.; Tong, S.

    2014-11-01

    Dengue has been a major public health concern in Australia since it re-emerged in Queensland in 1992-1993. This study explored spatio-temporal distribution and clustering of locally-acquired dengue cases in Queensland State, Australia and identified target areas for effective interventions. A computerised locally-acquired dengue case dataset was collected from Queensland Health for Queensland from 1993 to 2012. Descriptive spatial and temporal analyses were conducted using geographic information system tools and geostatistical techniques. Dengue hot spots were detected using SatScan method. Descriptive spatial analysis showed that a total of 2,398 locally-acquired dengue cases were recorded in central and northern regions of tropical Queensland. A seasonal pattern was observed with most of the cases occurring in autumn. Spatial and temporal variation of dengue cases was observed in the geographic areas affected by dengue over time. Tropical areas are potential high-risk areas for mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue. This study demonstrated that the locally-acquired dengue cases have exhibited a spatial and temporal variation over the past twenty years in tropical Queensland, Australia. There is a clear evidence for the existence of statistically significant clusters of dengue and these clusters varied over time. These findings enabled us to detect and target dengue clusters suggesting that the use of geospatial information can assist the health authority in planning dengue control activities and it would allow for better design and implementation of dengue management programs.

  16. Dynamical Properties of Transient Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Bacterial Colony of Proteus mirabilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Kurosu, Sayuri; Ikeda, Takemasa; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2002-02-01

    Spatio-temporal patterns emerged inside a colony of bacterial species Proteus mirabilis on the surface of nutrient-rich semisolid agar medium have been investigated. We observed various patterns composed of the following basic types: propagating stripe, propagating stripe with fixed dislocation, expanding and shrinking target, and rotating spiral. The remarkable point is that the pattern changes immediately when we alter the position for observation, but it returns to the original if we restore the observing position within a few minutes. We further investigated mesoscopic and microscopic properties of the spatio-temporal patterns. It turned out that whenever the spatio-temporal patterns are observed in a colony, the areas are composed of two superimposed monolayers of elongated bacterial cells. In each area they are aligned almost parallel with each other like a two-dimensional nematic liquid crystal, and move collectively and independently of another layer. It has been found that the observed spatio-temporal patterns are explained as the moiré effect.

  17. Processes driving temporal dynamics in the nested pattern of waterbird communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián-González, Esther; Botella, Francisco; Paracuellos, Mariano; Sánchez-Zapata, José Antonio

    2010-03-01

    Nestedness is a common pattern of bird communities in habitat patches, and it describes the situation where smaller communities form proper subsets of larger communities. Several studies have examined the processes causing nestedness and the implications for conservation, but few have considered the temporal changes in these processes. We used data from 6 years and two seasons (wintering and breeding) to explore the temporal changes in the causes of the nested pattern of a waterbird community in man-made irrigation ponds. Nestedness was significant in both seasons and in all years, and thus temporally stable. Despite the nestedness of waterbird communities, the proportion of idiosyncratic species (species that do not follow the nested pattern) was higher than in other studies. Furthermore, the idiosyncratic species often had endangered status. Selective colonisation and, mainly, selective extinction were the most important factors producing the nested pattern. In addition, the nested structure of the microhabitats at the ponds also caused the pattern. The causes of the pattern changed temporally even in the absence of big disturbance events. In general, breeding communities were more stable than wintering communities, and the seasonal differences in the causes of the nestedness were larger than the inter-annual differences. Consequently, studies of community nestedness from only one snapshot in time should be considered with caution.

  18. Observation of genuine wave vector (k or β) gap in a dynamic transmission line and temporal photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By definition, a temporal photonic crystal (TPC) has a permittivity ε(t) that varies periodically with time. We prove that, in the long wavelength limit, a TPC is accurately mimicked by a dynamic transmission line (DTL) having a capacitance (inductance) per unit length equal to ε(t) (μ). Employing a DTL in the microwave region, we measured the photonic band structure, which results to display a genuine wave vector (k or β) gap, in very good agreement with our theoretical model and the equivalent TPC

  19. Observation of genuine wave vector (k or β) gap in a dynamic transmission line and temporal photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Ayona, J. R.; Halevi, P., E-mail: halevi@inaoep.mx [Electronics Department, Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840 (Mexico)

    2015-08-17

    By definition, a temporal photonic crystal (TPC) has a permittivity ε(t) that varies periodically with time. We prove that, in the long wavelength limit, a TPC is accurately mimicked by a dynamic transmission line (DTL) having a capacitance (inductance) per unit length equal to ε(t) (μ). Employing a DTL in the microwave region, we measured the photonic band structure, which results to display a genuine wave vector (k or β) gap, in very good agreement with our theoretical model and the equivalent TPC.

  20. Mapping and Characterization of Hydrological Dynamics in a Coastal Marsh Using High Temporal Resolution Sentinel-1A Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Cazals

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In Europe, water levels in wetlands are widely controlled by environmental managers and farmers. However, the influence of these management practices on hydrodynamics and biodiversity remains poorly understood. This study assesses advantages of using radar data from the recently launched Sentinel-1A satellite to monitor hydrological dynamics of the Poitevin marshland in western France. We analyze a time series of 14 radar images acquired in VV and HV polarizations from December 2014 to May 2015 with a 12-day time step. Both polarizations are used with a hysteresis thresholding algorithm which uses both spatial and temporal information to distinguish open water, flooded vegetation and non-flooded grassland. Classification results are compared to in situ piezometric measurements combined with a Digital Terrain Model derived from LiDAR data. Results reveal that open water is successfully detected, whereas flooded grasslands with emergent vegetation and fine-grained patterns are detected with moderate accuracy. Five hydrological regimes are derived from the flood duration and mapped. Analysis of time steps in the time series shows that decreased temporal repetitivity induces significant differences in estimates of flood duration. These results illustrate the great potential to monitor variations in seasonal floods with the high temporal frequency of Sentinel-1A acquisitions.

  1. Single-molecule diffusion and conformational dynamics by spatial integration of temporal fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2014-10-06

    Single-molecule localization and tracking has been used to translate spatiotemporal information of individual molecules to map their diffusion behaviours. However, accurate analysis of diffusion behaviours and including other parameters, such as the conformation and size of molecules, remain as limitations to the method. Here, we report a method that addresses the limitations of existing single-molecular localization methods. The method is based on temporal tracking of the cumulative area occupied by molecules. These temporal fluctuations are tied to molecular size, rates of diffusion and conformational changes. By analysing fluorescent nanospheres and double-stranded DNA molecules of different lengths and topological forms, we demonstrate that our cumulative-area method surpasses the conventional single-molecule localization method in terms of the accuracy of determined diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, the cumulative-area method provides conformational relaxation times of structurally flexible chains along with diffusion coefficients, which together are relevant to work in a wide spectrum of scientific fields.

  2. Spatial and temporal dynamics of Meloidogyne minor on creeping bentgrass in golf greens

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, K.; Horgan, F.G.; Griffin, C.T.

    2013-01-01

    Meloidogyne minor, first reported on potatoes in the Netherlands in 2004, is an emerging nematode pest in Europe. It damages turfgrass, particularly creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) grown on sandy soils such as those of golf greens. However, little is known of the nematode’s life history and pathology. In this study, the spatial and temporal distribution of M. minor on a creeping bentgrass green in Ireland was determined over a 15 month period. Cores were taken on transec...

  3. Temporal dynamics reveal atypical brain response to social exclusion in autism

    OpenAIRE

    McPartland, James C.; Crowley, Michael J.; Perszyk, Danielle R.; Naples, Adam; Mukerji, Cora E.; Wu, Jia; Molfese, Peter; Bolling, Danielle Z.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Mayes, Linda C.

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant social difficulties, children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are vulnerable to the effects of social exclusion. We recorded EEG while children with ASD and typical peers played a computerized game involving peer rejection. Children with ASD reported ostracism-related distress comparable to typically developing children. Event-related potentials (ERPs) indicated a distinct pattern of temporal processing of rejection events in children with ASD. While typically developi...

  4. Time--delay autosynchronization of the spatio-temporal dynamics in resonant tunneling diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Unkelbach, J.; Amann, A; JUST, W.; Schöll, E.

    2003-01-01

    The double barrier resonant tunneling diode exhibits complex spatio-temporal patterns including low-dimensional chaos when operated in an active external circuit. We demonstrate how autosynchronization by time--delayed feedback control can be used to select and stabilize specific current density patterns in a noninvasive way. We compare the efficiency of different control schemes involving feedback in either local spatial or global degrees of freedom. The numerically obtained Floquet exponent...

  5. Temporal, spatial and ecological dynamics of speciation among amphi-Beringian small mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Andrew G.; Takebayashi, Naoki; Galbreath, Kurt E.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Cook, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Quaternary climate cycles played an important role in promoting diversification across the Northern Hemisphere, although details of the mechanisms driving evolutionary change are still poorly resolved. In a comparative phylogeographical framework, we investigate temporal, spatial and ecological components of evolution within a suite of Holarctic small mammals. We test a hypothesis of simultaneous divergence among multiple taxon pairs, investigating time to coalescence and demographic change for each taxon in response to a combination of climate and geography.

  6. Temporal and spatial dynamics of ephemeral macroalgal communities in eelgrass, Zostera marina, beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jonas; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Olesen, Birgit; Nielsen, Søren Laurentius; Pedersen, Troels Møller

    In a field study we investigated the temporal dynamics of drift-algal assemblages on both small (1 m2) and larger (2500 m2) spatial scales in two shallow (1-3 m) and relatively sheltered locations in Aarhus Bay and Isefjorden, Denmark. Drift-algal cover was estimated every second day in 40...... permanent plots (1 m2) randomly positioned in a 2500 m2 study area during three 8-12 days periods of the growth season. Results show that the algal assemblages were highly dynamic on the small spatial scale as cover within individual plots changed regularly between subsequent observations. The change in...... algal cover was inversely correlated with the cover of eelgrass, Zostera marina, suggesting that algae were retained by the eelgrass leaves. At the larger spatial scale algal cover was less variable and significant changes occurred just a few times during the study periods. Variability was caused either...

  7. A temporal ant colony optimization approach to the shortest path problem in dynamic scale-free networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feng; Li, Yanjun; Wu, Tie-Jun

    2010-02-01

    A large number of networks in the real world have a scale-free structure, and the parameters of the networks change stochastically with time. Searching for the shortest paths in a scale-free dynamic and stochastic network is not only necessary for the estimation of the statistical characteristics such as the average shortest path length of the network, but also challenges the traditional concepts related to the “shortest path” of a network and the design of path searching strategies. In this paper, the concept of shortest path is defined on the basis of a scale-free dynamic and stochastic network model, and a temporal ant colony optimization (TACO) algorithm is proposed for searching for the shortest paths in the network. The convergence and the setup for some important parameters of the TACO algorithm are discussed through theoretical analysis and computer simulations, validating the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  8. The effects of spatial and temporal heterogeneity on the population dynamics of four animal species in a Danish landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forchhammer Mads C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation in carrying capacity and population return rates is generally ignored in traditional studies of population dynamics. Variation is hard to study in the field because of difficulties controlling the environment in order to obtain statistical replicates, and because of the scale and expense of experimenting on populations. There may also be ethical issues. To circumvent these problems we used detailed simulations of the simultaneous behaviours of interacting animals in an accurate facsimile of a real Danish landscape. The models incorporate as much as possible of the behaviour and ecology of skylarks Alauda arvensis, voles Microtus agrestis, a ground beetle Bembidion lampros and a linyphiid spider Erigone atra. This allows us to quantify and evaluate the importance of spatial and temporal heterogeneity on the population dynamics of the four species. Results Both spatial and temporal heterogeneity affected the relationship between population growth rate and population density in all four species. Spatial heterogeneity accounted for 23–30% of the variance in population growth rate after accounting for the effects of density, reflecting big differences in local carrying capacity associated with the landscape features important to individual species. Temporal heterogeneity accounted for 3–13% of the variance in vole, skylark and spider, but 43% in beetles. The associated temporal variation in carrying capacity would be problematic in traditional analyses of density dependence. Return rates were less than one in all species and essentially invariant in skylarks, spiders and beetles. Return rates varied over the landscape in voles, being slower where there were larger fluctuations in local population sizes. Conclusion Our analyses estimated the traditional parameters of carrying capacities and return rates, but these are now seen as varying continuously over the landscape depending on habitat quality and the mechanisms

  9. Serotonin, Amygdala and Fear: Assembling the Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, Marco; McHugh, Stephen B.; Bannerman, David M.; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The fear circuitry orchestrates defense mechanisms in response to environmental threats. This circuitry is evolutionarily crucial for survival, but its dysregulation is thought to play a major role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric conditions in humans. The amygdala is a key player in the processing of fear. This brain area is prominently modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). The 5-HT input to the amygdala has drawn particular interest because genetic and pharmacological alterations of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) affect amygdala activation in response to emotional stimuli. Nonetheless, the impact of 5-HT on fear processing remains poorly understood.The aim of this review is to elucidate the physiological role of 5-HT in fear learning via its action on the neuronal circuits of the amygdala. Since 5-HT release increases in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) during both fear memory acquisition and expression, we examine whether and how 5-HT neurons encode aversive stimuli and aversive cues. Next, we describe pharmacological and genetic alterations of 5-HT neurotransmission that, in both rodents and humans, lead to altered fear learning. To explore the mechanisms through which 5-HT could modulate conditioned fear, we focus on the rodent BLA. We propose that a circuit-based approach taking into account the localization of specific 5-HT receptors on neurochemically-defined neurons in the BLA may be essential to decipher the role of 5-HT in emotional behavior. In keeping with a 5-HT control of fear learning, we review electrophysiological data suggesting that 5-HT regulates synaptic plasticity, spike synchrony and theta oscillations in the BLA via actions on different subcellular compartments of principal neurons and distinct GABAergic interneuron populations. Finally, we discuss how recently developed optogenetic tools combined with electrophysiological recordings and behavior could progress the knowledge of the mechanisms underlying 5

  10. Working-Memory Load and Temporal Myopia in Dynamic Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Darrell A.; Otto, A. Ross; Maddox, W. Todd

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of working memory (WM) in dynamic decision making by having participants perform decision-making tasks under single-task or dual-task conditions. In 2 experiments participants performed dynamic decision-making tasks in which they chose 1 of 2 options on each trial. The decreasing option always gave a larger immediate reward…

  11. The Homeobox Genes of Caenorhabditis elegans and Insights into Their Spatio-Temporal Expression Dynamics during Embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Hench

    Full Text Available Homeobox genes play crucial roles for the development of multicellular eukaryotes. We have generated a revised list of all homeobox genes for Caenorhabditis elegans and provide a nomenclature for the previously unnamed ones. We show that, out of 103 homeobox genes, 70 are co-orthologous to human homeobox genes. 14 are highly divergent, lacking an obvious ortholog even in other Caenorhabditis species. One of these homeobox genes encodes 12 homeodomains, while three other highly divergent homeobox genes encode a novel type of double homeodomain, termed HOCHOB. To understand how transcription factors regulate cell fate during development, precise spatio-temporal expression data need to be obtained. Using a new imaging framework that we developed, Endrov, we have generated spatio-temporal expression profiles during embryogenesis of over 60 homeobox genes, as well as a number of other developmental control genes using GFP reporters. We used dynamic feedback during recording to automatically adjust the camera exposure time in order to increase the dynamic range beyond the limitations of the camera. We have applied the new framework to examine homeobox gene expression patterns and provide an analysis of these patterns. The methods we developed to analyze and quantify expression data are not only suitable for C. elegans, but can be applied to other model systems or even to tissue culture systems.

  12. Monitoring Cropland Dynamics of the Yellow River Delta based on Multi-Temporal Landsat Imagery over 1986 to 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanlong Feng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural deltas can provide human beings with flat and fertile land to be cultivated. It is important to monitor cropland dynamics to provide policy-relevant information for regional sustainable development. This paper utilized Landsat imagery to study the cropland dynamics of the Yellow River Delta during the last three decades. Multi-temporal Landsat data were used to account for the phenological variations of different plants. Several spectral and textural features were adopted to increase the between-class separability. The robust random forest classifier was used to generate the land cover maps of the Yellow River Delta for 1986, 1995, 2005 and 2015. Experimental results indicated that the proposed methodology showed good performance with an average classification accuracy of 89.44%. The spatial-temporal analysis indicated that the cropland area increased from 467.6 km2 in 1986 to 718.5 km2 in 2015 with an average growth rate of 8.65 km2/year. The newly created croplands were mainly due to the reclamation of grassland and bare soil while the losses of croplands were due to abandoned cultivation and urban sprawl. The results demonstrate that a sustainable perspective should be adopted by the decision makers in order to simultaneously maintain food security, industrial development and ecosystem safety.

  13. Dynamic PET reconstruction using temporal patch-based low rank penalty for ROI-based brain kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used to measure changes in the bio-distribution of radiopharmaceuticals within particular organs of interest over time. However, to retain sufficient temporal resolution, the number of photon counts in each time frame must be limited. Therefore, conventional reconstruction algorithms such as the ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) produce noisy reconstruction images, thus degrading the quality of the extracted time activity curves (TACs). To address this issue, many advanced reconstruction algorithms have been developed using various spatio-temporal regularizations. In this paper, we extend earlier results and develop a novel temporal regularization, which exploits the self-similarity of patches that are collected in dynamic images. The main contribution of this paper is to demonstrate that the correlation of patches can be exploited using a low-rank constraint that is insensitive to global intensity variations. The resulting optimization framework is, however, non-Lipschitz and non-convex due to the Poisson log-likelihood and low-rank penalty terms. Direct application of the conventional Poisson image deconvolution by an augmented Lagrangian (PIDAL) algorithm is, however, problematic due to its large memory requirements, which prevents its parallelization. Thus, we propose a novel optimization framework using the concave-convex procedure (CCCP) by exploiting the Legendre–Fenchel transform, which is computationally efficient and parallelizable. In computer simulation and a real in vivo experiment using a high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) scanner, we confirm that the proposed algorithm can improve image quality while also extracting more accurate region of interests (ROI) based kinetic parameters. Furthermore, we show that the total reconstruction time for HRRT PET is significantly accelerated using our GPU implementation, which makes the algorithm very practical in clinical environments

  14. Temporal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Petter; Saramäki, Jari

    2012-10-01

    A great variety of systems in nature, society and technology-from the web of sexual contacts to the Internet, from the nervous system to power grids-can be modeled as graphs of vertices coupled by edges. The network structure, describing how the graph is wired, helps us understand, predict and optimize the behavior of dynamical systems. In many cases, however, the edges are not continuously active. As an example, in networks of communication via e-mail, text messages, or phone calls, edges represent sequences of instantaneous or practically instantaneous contacts. In some cases, edges are active for non-negligible periods of time: e.g., the proximity patterns of inpatients at hospitals can be represented by a graph where an edge between two individuals is on throughout the time they are at the same ward. Like network topology, the temporal structure of edge activations can affect dynamics of systems interacting through the network, from disease contagion on the network of patients to information diffusion over an e-mail network. In this review, we present the emergent field of temporal networks, and discuss methods for analyzing topological and temporal structure and models for elucidating their relation to the behavior of dynamical systems. In the light of traditional network theory, one can see this framework as moving the information of when things happen from the dynamical system on the network, to the network itself. Since fundamental properties, such as the transitivity of edges, do not necessarily hold in temporal networks, many of these methods need to be quite different from those for static networks. The study of temporal networks is very interdisciplinary in nature. Reflecting this, even the object of study has many names-temporal graphs, evolving graphs, time-varying graphs, time-aggregated graphs, time-stamped graphs, dynamic networks, dynamic graphs, dynamical graphs, and so on. This review covers different fields where temporal graphs are considered

  15. Interactions between voluntary and involuntary attention modulate the quality and temporal dynamics of visual processing

    OpenAIRE

    Grubb, Michael A.; White, Alex L.; Heeger, David J.; Carrasco, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Successfully navigating a dynamic environment requires the efficient distribution of finite neural resources. Voluntary (endogenous) covert spatial attention selectively allocates those processing resources to goal–relevant locations in the visual scene in the absence of eye movements. However, the allocation of spatial attention is not always voluntary: abrupt onsets in the visual periphery automatically enhance processing of nearby stimuli (exogenous attention). In dynamic environments, exo...

  16. Analysis of Stochastic Radio Channels with Temporal Birth-Death Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Morten Lomholt; Pedersen, Troels; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2014-01-01

    We employ the theory of spatial point processes to revisit and reinterpret a particular class of time-variant stochastic radio channel models. Common for all models in this class is that individual multipath components are emerging and vanishing in a temporal birth-death like manner, with the...... novel assessment of the autocorrelation functions of random processes used in the general channel model description. Under simplifying assumptions the channel transfer function is shown to be wide-sense stationary in both time and frequency (despite the birth-death behavior of the overall channel). The...

  17. The Intrinsic Connectome of the Rat Amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Oliver; Eipert, Peter; Philipp, Konstanze; Kettlitz, Richard; Fuellen, Georg; Wree, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The connectomes of nervous systems or parts there of are becoming important subjects of study as the amount of connectivity data increases. Because most tract-tracing studies are performed on the rat, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of the amygdala connectome of this species resulting in a meta-study. The data were imported into the neuroVIISAS system, where regions of the connectome are organized in a controlled ontology and network analysis can be performed. A weighted digraph represe...

  18. Amygdala lesions in rhesus macaques decrease attention to threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Monte, Olga; Costa, Vincent D; Noble, Pamela L; Murray, Elisabeth A; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies has suggested that the amygdala plays a role in detecting threat and in directing attention to the eyes. Nevertheless, there has been no systematic investigation of whether the amygdala specifically facilitates attention to the eyes or whether other features can also drive attention via amygdala processing. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of amygdala lesions in rhesus monkeys on attentional capture by specific facial features, as well as gaze patterns and changes in pupil dilation during free viewing. Here we show reduced attentional capture by threat stimuli, specifically the mouth, and reduced exploration of the eyes in free viewing in monkeys with amygdala lesions. Our findings support a role for the amygdala in detecting threat signals and in directing attention to the eye region of faces when freely viewing different expressions. PMID:26658670

  19. Amygdala signals subjective appetitiveness and aversiveness of mixed gambles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelskov, Sofie V.; Henningsson, Susanne; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard;

    2015-01-01

    People are more sensitive to losses than to equivalent gains when making financial decisions. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to illuminate how the amygdala contributes to loss aversion. The blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response of the amygdala was mapped while healthy...... and rejected gambles with equal probability. Amygdala activity increased the more the gain-loss ratio deviated from the individual decision boundary showing that the amygdala codes action value. This response pattern was more strongly expressed in loss aversive individuals, linking amygdala activity...... with individual differences in loss aversion. Together, the results show that the amygdala signals subjective appetitiveness or aversiveness of gain-loss ratios at the time of choice. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Segregation of face sensitive areas within the fusiform gyrus using global signal regression? A study on amygdala resting-state functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruschwitz, Johann D; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Veer, Ilya M; Wackerhagen, Carolin; Erk, Susanne; Mohnke, Sebastian; Pöhland, Lydia; Haddad, Leila; Grimm, Oliver; Tost, Heike; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Heinz, Andreas; Walter, Martin; Walter, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The application of global signal regression (GSR) to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data and its usefulness is a widely discussed topic. In this article, we report an observation of segregated distribution of amygdala resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) within the fusiform gyrus (FFG) as an effect of GSR in a multi-center-sample of 276 healthy subjects. Specifically, we observed that amygdala rs-FC was distributed within the FFG as distinct anterior versus posterior clusters delineated by positive versus negative rs-FC polarity when GSR was performed. To characterize this effect in more detail, post hoc analyses revealed the following: first, direct overlays of task-functional magnetic resonance imaging derived face sensitive areas and clusters of positive versus negative amygdala rs-FC showed that the positive amygdala rs-FC cluster corresponded best with the fusiform face area, whereas the occipital face area corresponded to the negative amygdala rs-FC cluster. Second, as expected from a hierarchical face perception model, these amygdala rs-FC defined clusters showed differential rs-FC with other regions of the visual stream. Third, dynamic connectivity analyses revealed that these amygdala rs-FC defined clusters also differed in their rs-FC variance across time to the amygdala. Furthermore, subsample analyses of three independent research sites confirmed reliability of the effect of GSR, as revealed by similar patterns of distinct amygdala rs-FC polarity within the FFG. In this article, we discuss the potential of GSR to segregate face sensitive areas within the FFG and furthermore discuss how our results may relate to the functional organization of the face-perception circuit. PMID:26178527

  1. Human Amygdala Represents the Complete Spectrum of Subjective Valence

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Jingwen; Zelano, Christina; Gottfried, Jay A.; Mohanty, Aprajita

    2015-01-01

    Although the amygdala is a major locus for hedonic processing, how it encodes valence information is poorly understood. Given the hedonic potency of odor stimuli and the amygdala's anatomical proximity to the peripheral olfactory system, we combined high-resolution fMRI with pattern-based multivariate techniques to examine how valence information is encoded in the amygdala. Ten human subjects underwent fMRI scanning while smelling 9 odorants that systematically varied in perceived valence. Re...

  2. The Information Processing Role of the Amygdala in Emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Wataru

    2008-01-01

    This article reviewed research on the amygdala and discussed its role in emotion. Psychological studies have revealed that emotion is a series of information processes that evaluates the adaptive significance of stimuli and generates adaptive responses accordingly. Neuroscientific evidence indicates that in terms of emotion, the amygdala is involved in appraising the significance of stimuli and generating response commands for other regions. Emotion is appraised rapidly in the amygdala throug...

  3. Stress reduction correlates with structural changes in the amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Hölzel, Britta K.; Carmody, James; Evans, Karleyton C.; Hoge, Elizabeth A.; Dusek, Jeffery A; Morgan, Lucas; Pitman, Roger K.; Lazar, Sara W.

    2009-01-01

    Stress has significant adverse effects on health and is a risk factor for many illnesses. Neurobiological studies have implicated the amygdala as a brain structure crucial in stress responses. Whereas hyperactive amygdala function is often observed during stress conditions, cross-sectional reports of differences in gray matter structure have been less consistent. We conducted a longitudinal MRI study to investigate the relationship between changes in perceived stress with changes in amygdala ...

  4. Bidirectional communication between amygdala and fusiform gyrus during facial recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Herrington, John D.; Taylor, James M.; Grupe, Daniel W.; Curby, Kim M.; Schultz, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research have documented the specialization of fusiform gyrus (FG) for facial information processes. Recent theories indicate that FG activity is shaped by input from amygdala, but effective connectivity from amygdala to FG remains undocumented. In this fMRI study, 39 participants completed a face recognition task. 11 participants underwent the same experiment approximately four months later. Robust face-selective activation of FG, amygdala, and lateral occipital cortex were observ...

  5. The Human Amygdala and Pain: Evidence from Neuroimaging

    OpenAIRE

    Simons, Laura; Moulton, Eric A.; Linnman, Clas; Carpino, Elizabeth; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2012-01-01

    The amygdala, a small deep brain structure involved in behavioral processing through interactions with other brain regions, has garnered increased attention in recent years in relation to pain processing. As pain is a multidimensional experience that encompasses physical sensation, affect, and cognition, the amygdala is well suited to play a part in this process. Multiple neuroimaging studies of pain in humans have reported activation in the amygdala. Here we summarize these studies by perfor...

  6. Prefrontal inputs to the amygdala instruct fear extinction memory formation

    OpenAIRE

    Bukalo, Olena; Pinard, Courtney R.; Silverstein, Shana; Brehm, Christina; Hartley, Nolan D.; Whittle, Nigel; Colacicco, Giovanni; Busch, Erica; Patel, Sachin; Singewald, Nicolas; Holmes, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Persistent anxiety after a psychological trauma is a hallmark of many anxiety disorders. However, the neural circuits mediating the extinction of traumatic fear memories remain incompletely understood. We show that selective, in vivo stimulation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC)–amygdala pathway facilitated extinction memory formation, but not retrieval. Conversely, silencing the vmPFC-amygdala pathway impaired extinction formation and reduced extinction-induced amygdala activity....

  7. Specialized Pathways from the Primate Amygdala to Posterior Orbitofrontal Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Timbie, Clare; Barbas, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The primate amygdala sends dense projections to posterior orbitofrontal cortex (pOFC) in pathways that are critical for processing emotional content, but the synaptic mechanisms are not understood. We addressed this issue by investigating pathways in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) from the amygdala to pOFC at the level of the system and synapse. Terminations from the amygdala were denser and larger in pOFC compared with the anterior cingulate cortex, which is also strongly connected with the...

  8. Spatio-temporal dynamics of fructan metabolism in developing barley grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, Manuela; Thiel, Johannes; Peshev, Darin; Weschke, Winfriede; Van den Ende, Wim; Mock, Hans-Peter; Matros, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare) grain development follows a series of defined morphological and physiological stages and depends on the supply of assimilates (mainly sucrose) from the mother plant. Here, spatio-temporal patterns of sugar distributions were investigated by mass spectrometric imaging, targeted metabolite analyses, and transcript profiling of microdissected grain tissues. Distinct spatio-temporal sugar balances were observed, which may relate to differentiation and grain filling processes. Notably, various types of oligofructans showed specific distribution patterns. Levan- and graminan-type oligofructans were synthesized in the cellularized endosperm prior to the commencement of starch biosynthesis, while during the storage phase, inulin-type oligofructans accumulated to a high concentration in and around the nascent endosperm cavity. In the shrunken endosperm mutant seg8, with a decreased sucrose flux toward the endosperm, fructan accumulation was impaired. The tight partitioning of oligofructan biosynthesis hints at distinct functions of the various fructan types in the young endosperm prior to starch accumulation and in the endosperm transfer cells that accomplish the assimilate supply toward the endosperm at the storage phase. PMID:25271242

  9. Temporal dynamics of emergency department and hospital admissions of pediatric asthmatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, Daniel; Levine, Elissa; Timmins, Sidey; Weiss, Sheila R.; Bollinger, Mary E.; Blaisdell, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that can result in exacerbations leading to urgent care in emergency departments (EDs) and hospitals. We examined seasonal and temporal trends in pediatric asthma ED (1997-1999) and hospital (1986-1999) admission data so as to identify periods of increased risk of urgent care by age group, gender, and race. All pediatric ED and hospital admission data for Maryland residents occurring within the state of Maryland were evaluated. Distinct peaks in pediatric ED and hospital asthma admissions occurred each year during the winter-spring and autumn seasons. Although the number and timing of these peaks were consistent across age and racial groups, the magnitude of the peaks differed by age and race. The same number, timing, and relative magnitude of the major peaks in asthma admissions occurred statewide, implying that the variables affecting these seasonal patterns of acute asthma exacerbations occur statewide. Similar gross seasonal trends are observed worldwide. Although several environmental, infectious, and psychosocial factors have been linked with increases in asthma exacerbations among children, thus far they have not explained these seasonal patterns of admissions. The striking temporal patterns of pediatric asthma admissions within Maryland, as described here, provide valuable information in the search for causes.

  10. Temporal dynamics of sediment bacterial communities in monospecific stands of Juncus maritimus and Spartina maritima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, D F R; Polónia, A R M; Sousa, A I; Lillebø, A I; Queiroga, H; Gomes, N C M

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we used 16S rRNA barcoded pyrosequencing to investigate to what extent monospecific stands of different salt marsh plant species (Juncus maritimus and Spartina maritima), sampling site and temporal variation affect sediment bacterial communities. We also used a bioinformatics tool, PICRUSt, to predict metagenome gene functional content. Our results showed that bacterial community composition from monospecific stands of both plant species varied temporally, but both host plant species maintained compositionally distinct communities of bacteria. Juncus sediment was characterised by higher abundances of Alphaproteobacteria, Myxococcales, Rhodospirillales, NB1-j and Ignavibacteriales, while Spartina sediment was characterised by higher abundances of Anaerolineae, Synechococcophycidae, Desulfobacterales, SHA-20 and Rhodobacterales. The differences in composition and higher taxon abundance between the sediment bacterial communities of stands of both plant species may be expected to affect overall metabolic diversity. In line with this expectation, there were also differences in the predicted enrichment of selected metabolic pathways. In particular, bacterial communities of Juncus sediment were predicted to be enriched for pathways related to the degradation of various (xenobiotic) compounds. Bacterial communities of Spartina sediment in turn were predicted to be enriched for pathways related to the biosynthesis of various bioactive compounds. Our study highlights the differences in composition and predicted functions of sediment-associated bacterial communities from two different salt marsh plant species. Loss of salt marsh habitat may thus be expected to both adversely affect microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning and have consequences for environmental processes such as nutrient cycling and pollutant remediation. PMID:27061465

  11. The temporal dynamics of early visual cortex involvement in behavioral priming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianne Jacobs

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS allows for non-invasive interference with ongoing neural processing. Applied in a chronometric design over early visual cortex (EVC, TMS has proved valuable in indicating at which particular time point EVC must remain unperturbed for (conscious vision to be established. In the current study, we set out to examine the effect of EVC TMS across a broad range of time points, both before (pre-stimulus and after (post-stimulus the onset of symbolic visual stimuli. Behavioral priming studies have shown that the behavioral impact of a visual stimulus can be independent from its conscious perception, suggesting two independent neural signatures. To assess whether TMS-induced suppression of visual awareness can be dissociated from behavioral priming in the temporal domain, we thus implemented three different measures of visual processing, namely performance on a standard visual discrimination task, a subjective rating of stimulus visibility, and a visual priming task. To control for non-neural TMS effects, we performed electrooculographical recordings, placebo TMS (sham, and control site TMS (vertex. Our results suggest that, when considering the appropriate control data, the temporal pattern of EVC TMS disruption on visual discrimination, subjective awareness and behavioral priming are not dissociable. Instead, TMS to EVC disrupts visual perception holistically, both when applied before and after the onset of a visual stimulus. The current findings are discussed in light of their implications on models of visual awareness and (subliminal priming.

  12. A Statistical Physics Characterization of the Complex Systems Dynamics: Quantifying Complexity from Spatio-Temporal Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorehdavoudi, Hana; Bogdan, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Biological systems are frequently categorized as complex systems due to their capabilities of generating spatio-temporal structures from apparent random decisions. In spite of research on analyzing biological systems, we lack a quantifiable framework for measuring their complexity. To fill this gap, in this paper, we develop a new paradigm to study a collective group of N agents moving and interacting in a three-dimensional space. Our paradigm helps to identify the spatio-temporal states of the motion of the group and their associated transition probabilities. This framework enables the estimation of the free energy landscape corresponding to the identified states. Based on the energy landscape, we quantify missing information, emergence, self-organization and complexity for a collective motion. We show that the collective motion of the group of agents evolves to reach the most probable state with relatively lowest energy level and lowest missing information compared to other possible states. Our analysis demonstrates that the natural group of animals exhibit a higher degree of emergence, self-organization and complexity over time. Consequently, this algorithm can be integrated into new frameworks to engineer collective motions to achieve certain degrees of emergence, self-organization and complexity.

  13. A Statistical Physics Characterization of the Complex Systems Dynamics: Quantifying Complexity from Spatio-Temporal Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorehdavoudi, Hana; Bogdan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Biological systems are frequently categorized as complex systems due to their capabilities of generating spatio-temporal structures from apparent random decisions. In spite of research on analyzing biological systems, we lack a quantifiable framework for measuring their complexity. To fill this gap, in this paper, we develop a new paradigm to study a collective group of N agents moving and interacting in a three-dimensional space. Our paradigm helps to identify the spatio-temporal states of the motion of the group and their associated transition probabilities. This framework enables the estimation of the free energy landscape corresponding to the identified states. Based on the energy landscape, we quantify missing information, emergence, self-organization and complexity for a collective motion. We show that the collective motion of the group of agents evolves to reach the most probable state with relatively lowest energy level and lowest missing information compared to other possible states. Our analysis demonstrates that the natural group of animals exhibit a higher degree of emergence, self-organization and complexity over time. Consequently, this algorithm can be integrated into new frameworks to engineer collective motions to achieve certain degrees of emergence, self-organization and complexity. PMID:27297496

  14. Quantifying spatial and temporal discharge dynamics of an event in a first order stream, using Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Westhoff

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding spatial distribution of discharge can be important for water quality and quantity modeling. Non-steady flood waves can influence small headwater streams significantly, particularly as a result of short high intensity summer rainstorms. The aim of this paper is to quantify the spatial and temporal dynamics of stream flow in a headwater catchment during a summer rainstorm. These dynamics include gains and losses of stream water, the effect of bypasses that become active and hyporheic exchange fluxes that may vary over time as a function of discharge. We use an advection-dispersion model coupled with an energy balance model to simulate in-stream water temperature, which we confront with high resolution temperature observations obtained with Distributed Temperature Sensing. This model was used as a learning tool to stepwise unravel the complex puzzle of in-stream processes subject to varying discharge. Hypotheses were tested and rejected, which led to more insight in spatial and temporal dynamics in discharge and hyporheic exchange processes. We showed that infiltration losses increase during a rain event, while gains of water remained constant over time. We conclude that, eventually, part of the stream water bypassed the main channel during peak discharge. It also seems that hyporheic exchange varies with varying discharge in the first 250 of the stream; while further downstream it remains constant. Because we relied on solar radiation as the main energy input, we were only able to apply this method during a small event and low flow. However, when additional (artificial energy is available, the presented method is also applicable in larger streams, or during higher flow conditions.

  15. Quantifying spatial and temporal discharge dynamics of an event in a first order stream, using distributed temperature sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Westhoff

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the spatial distribution of discharge can be important for water quality and quantity modeling. Non-steady flood waves can, particularly as a result of short high intensity summer rainstorms, influence small headwater streams significantly. The aim of this paper is to quantify the spatial and temporal dynamics of stream flow in a headwater stream during a summer rainstorm. These dynamics include gains and losses of stream water, the effect of bypasses that become active and hyporheic exchange fluxes that may vary over time as a function of discharge. We use an advection-dispersion model coupled with an energy balance model to simulate in-stream water temperature, which we compare with high resolution temperature observations obtained with Distributed Temperature Sensing. This model was used as a learning tool to stepwise unravel the complex puzzle of in-stream processes subject to varying discharge. Hypotheses were tested and rejected, which led to more insight in the spatial and temporal dynamics in discharge and hyporheic exchange processes. We showed that, for the studied stream infiltration losses increase during a small rain event, while gains of water remained constant over time. We conclude that, eventually, part of the stream water bypassed the main channel during peak discharge. It also seems that hyporheic exchange varies with varying discharge in the first 250 m of the stream; while further downstream it remains constant. Because we relied on solar radiation as the main energy input, we were only able to apply this method during a small summer storm and low flow conditions. However, when additional (artificial energy is available, the presented method is also applicable in larger streams, during higher flow conditions or longer storms.

  16. Dysfunctional amygdala activation and connectivity with the prefrontal cortex in current cocaine users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crunelle, C.L.; Kaag, A.M.; Munkhof, H.E. van den; Reneman, L.; Homberg, J.R.; Sabbe, B.; Brink, W. van den; Wingen, G. van

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Stimulant use is associated with increased anxiety and a single administration of dexamphetamine increases amygdala activation to biologically salient stimuli in healthy individuals. Here, we investigate how current cocaine use affects amygdala activity and amygdala connectivity with the

  17. Modeling and estimating change in temporal networks via a dynamic degree corrected stochastic block model

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, James D; Woodall, William H

    2016-01-01

    In many applications it is of interest to identify anomalous behavior within a dynamic interacting system. Such anomalous interactions are reflected by structural changes in the network representation of the system. We propose and investigate the use of a dynamic version of the degree corrected stochastic block model (DCSBM) as a means to model and monitor dynamic networks that undergo a significant structural change. Our model provides a means to simulate a variety of local and global changes in a time-varying network. Furthermore, one can efficiently detect such changes using the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters that characterize the DCSBM. We assess the utility of the dynamic DCSBM on both simulated and real networks. Using a simple monitoring strategy on the DCSBM, we are able to detect significant changes in the U.S. Senate co-voting network that reflects both times of cohesion and times of polarization among Republican and Democratic members. Our analysis suggests that the dynamic DCSBM pr...

  18. Childhood Cumulative Risk Exposure and Adult Amygdala Volume and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gary W; Swain, James E; King, Anthony P; Wang, Xin; Javanbakht, Arash; Ho, S Shaun; Angstadt, Michael; Phan, K Luan; Xie, Hong; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-06-01

    Considerable work indicates that early cumulative risk exposure is aversive to human development, but very little research has examined the neurological underpinnings of these robust findings. This study investigates amygdala volume and reactivity to facial stimuli among adults (mean 23.7 years of age, n = 54) as a function of cumulative risk exposure during childhood (9 and 13 years of age). In addition, we test to determine whether expected cumulative risk elevations in amygdala volume would mediate functional reactivity of the amygdala during socioemotional processing. Risks included substandard housing quality, noise, crowding, family turmoil, child separation from family, and violence. Total and left hemisphere adult amygdala volumes were positively related to cumulative risk exposure during childhood. The links between childhood cumulative risk exposure and elevated amygdala responses to emotionally neutral facial stimuli in adulthood were mediated by the corresponding amygdala volumes. Cumulative risk exposure in later adolescence (17 years of age), however, was unrelated to subsequent adult amygdala volume or function. Physical and socioemotional risk exposures early in life appear to alter amygdala development, rendering adults more reactive to ambiguous stimuli such as neutral faces. These stress-related differences in childhood amygdala development might contribute to the well-documented psychological distress as a function of early risk exposure. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26469872

  19. Impact of family history and depression on amygdala volume.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saleh, Karim

    2012-07-30

    Family history of depression significantly impacts life-long depression risk. Family history could impact the stress and emotion regulation system that involves the amygdala. This study\\'s purpose was to investigate family history\\'s effect on amygdala volumes, and differences in first degree relatives with and without major depressive disorder (MDD). Participants, aged 18-65, were healthy volunteers (N=52) with (n=26) and without (n=26) first degree family history, and patients with MDD (N=48) with (n=27) and without (n=21)first-degree family history recruited for structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants underwent clinical assessment followed by manual amygdala tracing. Patients with MDD without family history showed significantly larger right amygdala without a family history of MDD. These effects had larger right amygdala than healthy controls without MDD family history. These effects were pronounced in females. Family history and gender impacted amygdala volumes in all participants, providing a rationale for the inconsistent results in MDD amygdala studies. Higher familial risk in depression seems to be associated with smaller amygdala volumes, whereas depression alone is associated with larger amygdala volumes. Ultimately, these findings highlight consideration of family history and gender in research and treatment strategies.

  20. Critical Assessment of Land Use Land Cover Dynamics Using Multi-Temporal Satellite Images

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Surabuddin Mondal; Nayan Sharma; Martin Kappas; Garg, P K

    2015-01-01

    An attempt has been made to assess the dynamics of land use land cover change (LULCC) in the study area. LANDSAT-5 TM, IRS-1C LISS III, IRS-P6 LISS III images of 1987, 1997 and 2007, respectively, were digitally classified for land use land cover (LULC) mapping. The dynamics of LULCC critically analyzed for the two time periods 1987–1997 and 1997–2007. The LULCC analyzed in terms of quantity of change and allocation of change. Relative changes; gross gains, gross losses and persistence; net c...

  1. Modelling above-ground carbon dynamics using multi-temporal airborne lidar: insights from a Mediterranean woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, W.; Ruiz-Benito, P.; Valladares, F.; Coomes, D.

    2016-02-01

    Woodlands represent highly significant carbon sinks globally, though could lose this function under future climatic change. Effective large-scale monitoring of these woodlands has a critical role to play in mitigating for, and adapting to, climate change. Mediterranean woodlands have low carbon densities, but represent important global carbon stocks due to their extensiveness and are particularly vulnerable because the region is predicted to become much hotter and drier over the coming century. Airborne lidar is already recognized as an excellent approach for high-fidelity carbon mapping, but few studies have used multi-temporal lidar surveys to measure carbon fluxes in forests and none have worked with Mediterranean woodlands. We use a multi-temporal (5-year interval) airborne lidar data set for a region of central Spain to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) and carbon dynamics in typical mixed broadleaved and/or coniferous Mediterranean woodlands. Field calibration of the lidar data enabled the generation of grid-based maps of AGB for 2006 and 2011, and the resulting AGB change was estimated. There was a close agreement between the lidar-based AGB growth estimate (1.22 Mg ha-1 yr-1) and those derived from two independent sources: the Spanish National Forest Inventory, and a tree-ring based analysis (1.19 and 1.13 Mg ha-1 yr-1, respectively). We parameterised a simple simulator of forest dynamics using the lidar carbon flux measurements, and used it to explore four scenarios of fire occurrence. Under undisturbed conditions (no fire) an accelerating accumulation of biomass and carbon is evident over the next 100 years with an average carbon sequestration rate of 1.95 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. This rate reduces by almost a third when fire probability is increased to 0.01 (fire return rate of 100 years), as has been predicted under climate change. Our work shows the power of multi-temporal lidar surveying to map woodland carbon fluxes and provide parameters for carbon

  2. Modelling above-ground carbon dynamics using multi-temporal airborne lidar: insights from a Mediterranean woodland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Simonson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Woodlands represent highly significant carbon sinks globally, though could lose this function under future climatic change. Effective large-scale monitoring of these woodlands has a critical role to play in mitigating for, and adapting to, climate change. Mediterranean woodlands have low carbon densities, but represent important global carbon stocks due to their extensiveness and are particularly vulnerable because the region is predicted to become much hotter and drier over the coming century. Airborne lidar is already recognized as an excellent approach for high-fidelity carbon mapping, but few studies have used multi-temporal lidar surveys to measure carbon fluxes in forests and none have worked with Mediterranean woodlands. We use a multi-temporal (five year interval airborne lidar dataset for a region of central Spain to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB and carbon dynamics in typical mixed broadleaved/coniferous Mediterranean woodlands. Field calibration of the lidar data enabled the generation of grid-based maps of AGB for 2006 and 2011, and the resulting AGB change were estimated. There was a close agreement between the lidar-based AGB growth estimate (1.22 Mg ha−1 year−1 and those derived from two independent sources: the Spanish National Forest Inventory, and a~tree-ring based analysis (1.19 and 1.13 Mg ha−1 year−1, respectively. We parameterised a simple simulator of forest dynamics using the lidar carbon flux measurements, and used it to explore four scenarios of fire occurrence. Under undisturbed conditions (no fire occurrence an accelerating accumulation of biomass and carbon is evident over the next 100 years with an average carbon sequestration rate of 1.95 Mg C ha−1 year−1. This rate reduces by almost a third when fire probability is increased to 0.01, as has been predicted under climate change. Our work shows the power of multi-temporal lidar surveying to map woodland carbon fluxes and provide parameters for carbon

  3. Non-linear spatio-temporal filtering of dynamic PET data using a 4-dimensional Gaussian filter and expectation-maximization deconvolution

    OpenAIRE

    Floberg, J M; Holden, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a method for denoising dynamic PET data, spatio-temporal expectation-maximization (STEM) filtering, that combines 4-dimensional Gaussian filtering with EM deconvolution. The initial Gaussian filter suppresses noise at a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies and EM deconvolution quickly restores the frequencies most important to the signal. We aim to demonstrate that STEM filtering can improve variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images without intro...

  4. DYPTOP: a cost-efficient TOPMODEL implementation to simulate sub-grid spatio-temporal dynamics of global wetlands and peatlands

    OpenAIRE

    Stocker, B. D.; Spahni, R.; F. Joos

    2014-01-01

    Simulating the spatio-temporal dynamics of inundation is key to understanding the role of wetlands under past and future climate change. Earlier modelling studies have mostly relied on fixed prescribed peatland maps and inundation time series of limited temporal coverage. Here, we describe and assess the DYPTOP model that predicts the extent of inundation based on a computationally efficient TOPMODEL implementation. This approach rests on an empirical, gridc...

  5. MobilityGraphs: Visual Analysis of Mass Mobility Dynamics via Spatio-Temporal Graphs and Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Landesberger, Tatiana; Brodkorb, Felix; Roskosch, Philipp; Andrienko, Natalia; Andrienko, Gennady; Kerren, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Learning more about people mobility is an important task for official decision makers and urban planners. Mobility data sets characterize the variation of the presence of people in different places over time as well as movements (or flows) of people between the places. The analysis of mobility data is challenging due to the need to analyze and compare spatial situations (i.e., presence and flows of people at certain time moments) and to gain an understanding of the spatio-temporal changes (variations of situations over time). Traditional flow visualizations usually fail due to massive clutter. Modern approaches offer limited support for investigating the complex variation of the movements over longer time periods. PMID:26529684

  6. Temporal dynamics of demersal chondrichthyan species in the central western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Mulas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid expansion of fisheries and globalized trade are emerging as the principal drivers of coastal and ocean threat. Considering the important role of Chondrichthyes as predators at the top of food chain in marine ecosystems, knowledge on their biology remains scarce in the Mediterranean. In this regard, our objective is to give information on their spatial distribution, abundance and population structure. Data were collected for 25 demersal species, including batoid species, sharks and holocephalans from 1994 to 2013 during scientific bottom trawl surveys (MEDITS project carried out around the Sardinian seas. The total frequency of occurrence (f%, the Biomass Index (BI, kg/km2, and the Density Index (DI, N/km2 were estimated for the continental shelf (10-200 m, slope (200-800 m, and overall (10-800 m depth strata. Size trends were also calculated for the most abundant species considering all depth strata. The correlation among MEDITS figures (f%, BI, DI, size structure and years were assessed by species computing the Pearson linear coefficient. From f% and abundance indexes investigation, only the small spotted catshark Scyliorhinus canicula and the thornback ray Raja clavata were ubiquitous in all strata investigated, instead, all the other species showed a preferential distribution for the shelf or the slope. In general, the temporal trends of BI and DI were stable or positive for both macro-strata, except for the longnose spurdog Squalus blainville which seemed to show a statistically significant decreasing trend. All analyzed species displayed temporal stable trends in size structure analysis, apart from Raja brachyura and Dipturus oxyrinchus that showed a statistically significant increase. Despite the time series analysis revealed stable or positive trends, it appears clear the need of urgent management measures to protect the demersal chondrichthyan species extending the monitoring over time and implementing the data collected by

  7. Complex, dynamic combination of physical, chemical and nutritional variables controls spatio-temporal variation of sandy beach community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Ortega Cisneros

    Full Text Available Sandy beach ecological theory states that physical features of the beach control macrobenthic community structure on all but the most dissipative beaches. However, few studies have simultaneously evaluated the relative importance of physical, chemical and biological factors as potential explanatory variables for meso-scale spatio-temporal patterns of intertidal community structure in these systems. Here, we investigate macroinfaunal community structure of a micro-tidal sandy beach that is located on an oligotrophic subtropical coast and is influenced by seasonal estuarine input. We repeatedly sampled biological and environmental variables at a series of beach transects arranged at increasing distances from the estuary mouth. Sampling took place over a period of five months, corresponding with the transition between the dry and wet season. This allowed assessment of biological-physical relationships across chemical and nutritional gradients associated with a range of estuarine inputs. Physical, chemical, and biological response variables, as well as measures of community structure, showed significant spatio-temporal patterns. In general, bivariate relationships between biological and environmental variables were rare and weak. However, multivariate correlation approaches identified a variety of environmental variables (i.e., sampling session, the C∶N ratio of particulate organic matter, dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations, various size fractions of photopigment concentrations, salinity and, to a lesser extent, beach width and sediment kurtosis that either alone or combined provided significant explanatory power for spatio-temporal patterns of macroinfaunal community structure. Overall, these results showed that the macrobenthic community on Mtunzini Beach was not structured primarily by physical factors, but instead by a complex and dynamic blend of nutritional, chemical and physical drivers. This emphasises the need to recognise ocean

  8. High temporal resolution dynamic contrast MRI in a high risk group for placenta accreta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y O; Sohda, S; Shigemitsu, S; Niitsu, M; Itai, Y

    2001-06-01

    Antenatal diagnosis of placenta accreta with MR is not easy even now because T2-weighted images (T2WI) cannot differentiate chorionic villi from decidua basalis. We performed dynamic contrast MRI to study whether trophoblastic villi could be separately demonstrated from the decidua basalis, and whether the contrast resolution between the placenta and myometrium could improve compared to T2WI. Six pregnant women with prior cesarean section were examined at 34-38 gestational weeks. Sagittal T2-weighted images with fast spin echo sequences and dynamic contrast studies with fast field echo sequence every 10-14 s after contrast injection were performed. We analyzed the enhancing pattern of the placenta and compared the contrast between placenta and myometrium. We reviewed medical records to identify complications during the placental delivery and the complications of their newborns. In the early phase after contrast enhancement, multiple foci of the strong lobular enhancement were observed in all cases. Other parts of placenta were slowly but strongly enhanced following them. We speculated that the former corresponded to intervillous space and the latter decidua basalis. The contrast between placenta and myometrium tended to be distinct near the inner cervical os on both T2WI and dynamic contrast study. On the other hand, it was indistinct in the upper part of the uterine body on T2WI despite it was clearly demonstrated on dynamic contrast study. The placentae were delivered without any complication in all cases. Although two neonates showed fetal distress, none of the infant remained any sequelae at the time of the discharge. The other four were well although one of them complicated with meconium staining. As dynamic contrast MRI can differentiate chorionic villi and decidua basalis, and can provide excellent contrast between placenta and myometrium at anywhere within the uterus, it may be a promising technique for antepartum diagnosis of the placenta accreta. PMID

  9. Temporal condensation and dynamic λ-transition within the complex network: an application to real-life market evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiliński, Mateusz; Szewczak, Bartłomiej; Gubiec, Tomasz; Kutner, Ryszard; Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2015-02-01

    We fill a void in merging empirical and phenomenological characterisation of the dynamical phase transitions in complex networks by identifying and thoroughly characterising a triple sequence of such transitions on a real-life financial market. We extract and interpret the empirical, numerical, and analytical evidences for the existence of these dynamical phase transitions, by considering the medium size Frankfurt stock exchange (FSE), as a typical example of a financial market. By using the canonical object for the graph theory, i.e. the minimal spanning tree (MST) network, we observe: (i) the (initial) dynamical phase transition from equilibrium to non-equilibrium nucleation phase of the MST network, occurring at some critical time. Coalescence of edges on the FSE's transient leader (defined by its largest degree) is observed within the nucleation phase; (ii) subsequent acceleration of the process of nucleation and the emergence of the condensation phase (the second dynamical phase transition), forming a logarithmically diverging temporal λ-peak of the leader's degree at the second critical time; (iii) the third dynamical fragmentation phase transition (after passing the second critical time), where the λ-peak logarithmically relaxes over three quarters of the year, resulting in a few loosely connected sub-graphs. This λ-peak (comparable to that of the specific heat vs. temperature forming during the equilibrium continuous phase transition from the normal fluid I 4He to the superfluid II 4He) is considered as a prominent result of a non-equilibrium superstar-like superhub or a dragon-king's abrupt evolution over about two and a half year of market evolution. We capture and meticulously characterise a remarkable phenomenon in which a peripheral company becomes progressively promoted to become the dragon-king strongly dominating the complex network over an exceptionally long period of time containing the crash. Detailed analysis of the complete trio of the

  10. Culicidae community composition and temporal dynamics in Guapiaçu Ecological Reserve, Cachoeiras de Macacu, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Jeronimo; de Mello, Cecilia Ferreira; Guimarães, Anthony Érico; Gil-Santana, Hélcio R; Silva, Júlia Dos Santos; Santos-Mallet, Jacenir R; Gleiser, Raquel M

    2015-01-01

    A temporal observational study was conducted of the Culicidae fauna in a remnant area of Atlantic Forest within a private reserve (Guapiaçu Ecological Reserve-REGUA) presenting typical vegetation cover of dense rain forest, with some patches recovering a floristic composition similar to that of the original community. Research was carried out to analyze the influence of climatic factors (mean monthly temperature, rainfall, and air relative humidity) on the temporal dynamics of the mosquito communities that occur in the reserve. The completeness of the mosquito inventory was assessed with individual-based rarefaction-extrapolation curves. Differences in species composition between sites and months were tested with PERMANOVA. True diversities of orders 0, 1, and 2 (effective numbers) were estimated and compared between sites, months, and years. Multiple stepwise regressions were used to assess relationships between climatic variables, measures of diversity, and abundances of the most common species. There were significant interactive effects between year and site on measures of diversity. However, diversity estimates showed little variation among months, and these were weakly correlated with climatic variables. Abundances of the most common species were significantly related to temperature or relative humidity, but not rainfall. The presence of mosquito species known to be vectors of human diseases combined with an intermittent flow of visitors to the study area suggests there is a risk of disease transmission that warrants further monitoring. PMID:25815724

  11. Culicidae community composition and temporal dynamics in Guapiacu Ecological Reserve, Cachoeiras de Macacu, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeronimo Alencar

    Full Text Available A temporal observational study was conducted of the Culicidae fauna in a remnant area of Atlantic Forest within a private reserve (Guapiaçu Ecological Reserve-REGUA presenting typical vegetation cover of dense rain forest, with some patches recovering a floristic composition similar to that of the original community. Research was carried out to analyze the influence of climatic factors (mean monthly temperature, rainfall, and air relative humidity on the temporal dynamics of the mosquito communities that occur in the reserve. The completeness of the mosquito inventory was assessed with individual-based rarefaction-extrapolation curves. Differences in species composition between sites and months were tested with PERMANOVA. True diversities of orders 0, 1, and 2 (effective numbers were estimated and compared between sites, months, and years. Multiple stepwise regressions were used to assess relationships between climatic variables, measures of diversity, and abundances of the most common species. There were significant interactive effects between year and site on measures of diversity. However, diversity estimates showed little variation among months, and these were weakly correlated with climatic variables. Abundances of the most common species were significantly related to temperature or relative humidity, but not rainfall. The presence of mosquito species known to be vectors of human diseases combined with an intermittent flow of visitors to the study area suggests there is a risk of disease transmission that warrants further monitoring.

  12. Complex dynamics and spatio-temporal patterns in a network of three distributed chemical reactors with periodical feed switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the dynamics of a periodically forced network of three catalytic reactors is studied. The reactors are modeled as distributed parameter systems with a Z3xS1 spatio-temporal symmetry. The symmetry property is induced by periodical forcing, and it forces the Poincare map to be the third iterate of another non-stroboscopic map. This property is used to compute the bifurcation diagram of the periodic and multiperiodic regimes of the reactor network through the continuation of the corresponding fixed points of the non-stroboscopic map. Moreover, this property is used to determine the symmetry and multiplicity of the regimes by comparing the invariant sets of the Poincare map with those of the non-stroboscopic map. As demonstrated in this paper, this is possible even for quasi-periodic and chaotic regime. For symmetry and spatially distributed nature of the system, several complex symmetric and asymmetric spatio-temporal patterns corresponding to multiperiodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic regimes are found in a wide range of the bifurcation parameter. Symmetry breaking bifurcations, catastrophic transitions from periodic to quasi-periodic regimes, and different routes to chaotic regimes (Curry-Yorke, type I and III intermittencies and torus doubling cascade) are found and discussed

  13. Varying the resolution of the Rouse model on temporal and spatial scales: application to multiscale modelling of DNA dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rolls, Edward; Erban, Radek

    2016-01-01

    A multi-resolution bead-spring model for polymer dynamics is developed as a generalization of the Rouse model. A polymer chain is described using beads of variable sizes connected by springs with variable spring constants. A numerical scheme which can use different timesteps to advance the positions of different beads is presented and analyzed. The position of a particular bead is only updated at integer multiples of the timesteps associated with its connecting springs. This approach extends the Rouse model to a multiscale model on both spatial and temporal scales, allowing simulations of localized regions of a polymer chain with high spatial and temporal resolution, while using a coarser modelling approach to describe the rest of the polymer chain. A method for changing the model resolution on-the-fly is developed using the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. It is shown that this approach maintains key statistics of the end-to-end distance and diffusion of the polymer filament and makes computational savings whe...

  14. The relationship between employees' perceptions of human resource systems and organizational performance: examining mediating mechanisms and temporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piening, Erk P; Baluch, Alina M; Salge, Torsten Oliver

    2013-11-01

    Given the limited understanding of temporal issues in extant theorizing about the link between human resource management (HRM) and performance, in this study we aim to shed light on how, when, and why HR interventions affect organizational performance. On the basis of longitudinal, multi-informant and multisource data from public hospital services in England, we provide new insights into the complex interplay between employees' perceptions of HR systems, job satisfaction, and performance outcomes over time. The dynamic panel data analyses provide support for changes in employees' experience of an HR system being related to subsequent changes in customer satisfaction, as mediated by changes in job satisfaction, albeit these effects decrease over time. Moreover, our longitudinal analyses highlight the importance of feedback effects in the HRM-performance chain, which otherwise appears to evolve in a cyclical manner. PMID:23915431

  15. Temporal interferences driven by a single-cycle terahertz pulse in the photodetachment dynamics of negative ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B. C.; Robicheaux, F.

    2015-12-01

    We present theory and calculations of a real-time-domain interferometry for the photodetachment dynamics of negative ions in the presence of a single-cycle terahertz pulse. The photoelectron can follow two or more classical trajectories to arrive at a detector simultaneously allowing the electron waves to interfere quantum mechanically. Both the in-phase and antiphase oscillations can be observed in the photoelectron interferences from negative hydrogen and fluorine ions depending on the pulse strength and the observing angle. Especially, a temporal-caustic bifurcation is observed when the detection angle is not in line with the pulse polarization direction. Similar interferences and bifurcations are also expected in the angle-resolved energy spectrum, as a result of its approximate equivalence with the time-dependent electron flux at large distances.

  16. Resonant control of stochastic spatio-temporal dynamics in a tunnel diode by multiple time delayed feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Majer, Niels

    2008-01-01

    We study the control of noise-induced spatio-temporal current density patterns in a semiconductor nanostructure (double barrier resonant tunnelling diode) by multiple time-delayed feedback. We find much more pronounced resonant features of noise-induced oscillations compared to single time feedback, rendering the system more sensitive to variations in the delay time $\\tau$. The coherence of noise-induced oscillations measured by the correlation time exhibits sharp resonances as a function of $\\tau$, and can be strongly increased by optimal choices of $\\tau$. Similarly, the peaks in the power spectral density are sharpened. We provide analytical insight into the control mechanism by relating the correlation times and mean frequencies of noise-induced breathing oscillations to the stability properties of the deterministic stationary current density filaments under the influence of the control loop. Moreover, we demonstrate that the use of multiple time delays enlarges the regime in which the deterministic dynam...

  17. Amygdala habituation: a reliable fMRI phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plichta, Michael M; Grimm, Oliver; Morgen, Katrin; Mier, Daniela; Sauer, Carina; Haddad, Leila; Tost, Heike; Esslinger, Christine; Kirsch, Peter; Schwarz, Adam J; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Amygdala function is of high interest for cognitive, social and psychiatric neuroscience, emphasizing the need for reliable assessments in humans. Previous work has indicated unsatisfactorily low within-subject reliability of amygdala activation fMRI measures. Based on basic science evidence for strong habituation of amygdala response to repeated stimuli, we investigated whether a quantification of habituation provides additional information beyond the usual estimate of the overall mean activity. We assessed the within-subject reliability of amygdala habituation measures during a facial emotion matching paradigm in 25 healthy subjects. We extracted the amygdala signal decrement across the course of the fMRI run for the two test-retest measurement sessions and compared reliability estimates with previous findings based on mean response amplitude. Retest-reliability of the session-wise amygdala habituation was significantly higher than the evoked amygdala mean amplitude (intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC)=0.53 vs. 0.16). To test the task-specificity of this finding, we compared the retest-reliability of amygdala habituation across two different tasks. Significant amygdala response decrement was also seen in a cognitive task (n-back working memory) that did not per se activate the amygdala, but was totally unreliable in that context (ICC~0.0), arguing for task-specificity. Together the results show that emotion-dependent amygdala habituation is a robust and considerably more reliable index than the mean amplitude, and provides a robust potential endpoint for within-subject designs including pharmaco-fMRI studies. PMID:25284303

  18. Temporal dynamics of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the Salt Lake Valley urban ecosystem of northern Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, S. E.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.

    2013-12-01

    Urban ecosystems are a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions. Existing data obtained from surface based measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) are largely limited to static monitoring stations and show a high degree of temporal and spatial variability both within and across urban areas. Finer scale spatial resolution data of surface measurements were collected to obtain a more comprehensive view of trace gas dynamics at the whole-ecosystem scale, to integrate across space among existing stationary measurement locations, and to provide data for the development and validation of modeled emissions estimates. We utilized a mobile laboratory to obtain high precision measurements of CO2 and CO in the highly urbanized and urbanizing areas across the Salt Lake Valley of northern Utah, USA. Continuous measurements of CO2, CO, and geospatial position data were obtained at a 5-second frequency along a transect route representative of major urban land use types. Data collection across the transect route was repeated thrice daily (morning, afternoon and evening) through all seasons of the year. Preliminary results show significant spatial structure in CO2, CO, and the ratio of CO to CO2 across both diurnal and seasonal time scales. In general, we found higher concentrations of both trace gases as well as the ratio of CO to CO2 in the morning and evening periods compared to the afternoon time periods. In addition, we found higher concentrations of both trace gases and the ratio of CO to CO2 in winter than summer time periods. Our results provide a foundation for the information needed to improve our understanding of whole-ecosystem scale temporal dynamics of CO2 and CO in urban regions.

  19. Automated on-line liquid-liquid extraction system for temporal mass spectrometric analysis of dynamic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Kai-Ta; Liu, Pei-Han; Urban, Pawel L

    2015-09-24

    Most real samples cannot directly be infused to mass spectrometers because they could contaminate delicate parts of ion source and guides, or cause ion suppression. Conventional sample preparation procedures limit temporal resolution of analysis. We have developed an automated liquid-liquid extraction system that enables unsupervised repetitive treatment of dynamic samples and instantaneous analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). It incorporates inexpensive open-source microcontroller boards (Arduino and Netduino) to guide the extraction and analysis process. Duration of every extraction cycle is 17 min. The system enables monitoring of dynamic processes over many hours. The extracts are automatically transferred to the ion source incorporating a Venturi pump. Operation of the device has been characterized (repeatability, RSD = 15%, n = 20; concentration range for ibuprofen, 0.053-2.000 mM; LOD for ibuprofen, ∼0.005 mM; including extraction and detection). To exemplify its usefulness in real-world applications, we implemented this device in chemical profiling of pharmaceutical formulation dissolution process. Temporal dissolution profiles of commercial ibuprofen and acetaminophen tablets were recorded during 10 h. The extraction-MS datasets were fitted with exponential functions to characterize the rates of release of the main and auxiliary ingredients (e.g. ibuprofen, k = 0.43 ± 0.01 h(-1)). The electronic control unit of this system interacts with the operator via touch screen, internet, voice, and short text messages sent to the mobile phone, which is helpful when launching long-term (e.g. overnight) measurements. Due to these interactive features, the platform brings the concept of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) to the chemistry laboratory environment. PMID:26423626

  20. The spatio-temporal dynamics of a post-vaccination resurgence of rabies in foxes and emergency vaccination planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulke, H H; Tischendorf, L; Staubach, C; Selhorst, T; Jeltsch, F; Müller, T; Schlüter, H; Wissel, C

    1999-10-19

    We used a simulation model to study the spatio-temporal dynamics of a potential rabies outbreak in an immunized fox population after the termination of a long-term, large-scale vaccination program with two campaigns per year one in spring and one in autumn. The 'worst-case' scenario of rabies resurgence occurs if rabies has persisted at a low prevalence despite control and has remained undetected by a customary surveillance program or if infected individuals invade to the control area. Even if the termination of a vaccination program entails such a risk of a subsequent new outbreak, prolonged vaccination of a wild host population is expensive and the declining cost-benefit ratio over time eventually makes it uneconomic. Based on the knowledge of the spatio-temporal dynamics of a potential new outbreak gained from our modelling study, we suggest "terminating but observing" to be an appropriate strategy. Simulating the decline of population immunity without revaccination, we found that a new outbreak of rabies should be detected by customary surveillance programs within two years after the termination of the control. The time until detection does not depend on whether vaccination was terminated within the fourth, fifth or sixth years of repeated biannual campaigns. But it is faster if the program was completed with an autumn campaign (because next-year dispersal then occurs after a noticeable decrease in population immunity). Finally, if a rabid fox is detected after terminating vaccination, we determine a rule for defining a circular hazard area based on the simulated spatial spread of rabies. The radius of this area should be increased with the time since the last vaccination campaign. The trade-off between the number of foxes potentially missed by the emergency treatment and the cost for the emergency measures in an enlarged hazard area was found. PMID:11018731

  1. Periodic temporal oscillations in biocrust-vegetation dynamics on sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhaq, Hezi; Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2016-03-01

    We show that the system of biocrust and vegetation on sand dunes modeled by two coupled ordinary nonlinear differential equations exhibits self-sustained oscillations. Such oscillations can occur on vegetated linear dunes that are mostly covered by biocrust. The vegetation-biocrust interaction underlies these oscillations and these do not occur if only vegetation dynamics is considered. The oscillations are "relaxation oscillations" which are characterized by two alternating attraction processes to equilibrium states with high low vegetation covers. The complex dynamics of the biocrust-vegetation model leads to unexpected scenarios, such as vegetation rehabilitation induced by drought or by grazing during which the system shifts to one of the bistable state dominated by a higher vegetation cover, or rehabilitation of vegetation that is induced by decrease in precipitation. The oscillation periods range from decades to millennia and they can interact and be affected by the climate system variability.

  2. Weak temporal signals can synchronize and accelerate the transition dynamics of biopolymers under tension

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Won Kyu; Sung, Wokyung

    2012-01-01

    In addition to thermal noise, which is essential to promote conformational transitions in biopolymers, cellular environment is replete with a spectrum of athermal fluctuations that are produced from a plethora of active processes. To understand the effect of athermal noise on biological processes, we studied how a small oscillatory force affects the thermally induced folding and unfolding transition of an RNA hairpin, whose response to constant tension had been investigated extensively in both theory and experiments. Strikingly, our molecular simulations performed under overdamped condition show that even at a high (low) tension that renders the hairpin (un)folding improbable, a weak external oscillatory force at a certain frequency can synchronously enhance the transition dynamics of RNA hairpin and increase the mean transition rate. Furthermore, the RNA dynamics can still discriminate a signal with resonance frequency even when the signal is mixed among other signals with nonresonant frequencies. In fact, o...

  3. Reuse, temporal dynamics, interest sharing, and collaboration in social tagging systems

    OpenAIRE

    Santos-Neto, Elizeu; Condon, David (Northwestern University); Revelle, William (Northwestern University); Andrade, Nazareno; Iamnitchi, Adriana; Ripeanu, Matei

    2014-01-01

    User–generated content shapes the dynamics of the World Wide Web. In particular, collaborative tagging represents a simple, yet powerful, feature that enables users to share and collaboratively annotate content such as photos and URLs. This collaborative behavior and the pool of user–generated metadata create opportunities to improve existing systems and to design new mechanisms. However, to realize this potential, it is necessary to first understand the usage characteristics of current syste...

  4. Assessing the structure and temporal dynamics of seabird communities: the challenge of capturing marine ecosystem complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Rocio; Stowasser, Gabriele; McGill, Rona A.R.; Bearhop, Stuart; Phillips, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary 1.Understanding interspecific interactions, and the influences of anthropogenic disturbance and environmental change on communities, are key challenges in ecology. Despite the pressing need to understand these fundamental drivers of community structure and dynamics, only 17% of ecological studies conducted over the past three decades have been at the community level. 2.Here, we assess the trophic structure of the procellariiform community breeding at South Georgia, to identify ...

  5. Spatio-Temporal Dynamic of Tuber magnatum Mycelium in Natural Truffle Grounds

    OpenAIRE

    Iotti, Mirco; Leonardi, Marco; Lancellotti, Enrico; Salerni, Elena; Oddis, Marilena; Leonardi, Pamela; Perini, Claudia; PACIONI, GIOVANNI; Zambonelli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Tuber magnatum produces the world's most expensive truffle. This fungus produces very rare ectomycorrhizas which are difficult or even impossible to detect in the field. A “real-time” PCR assay was recently developed to quantify and to track T. magnatum mycelium in soil. Here, this technique was used to investigate the spatial distribution of T. magnatum extra-radical mycelium in soil productive patches and its dynamic across seasons. This study was carried out in four different natural T. ma...

  6. Exploring the spatial and temporal dynamics of land use - with special reference to China

    OpenAIRE

    P. Verburg

    2000-01-01

    Land-use and land-cover change have large impacts on our natural environment. Changes in our natural environment directly influence our living conditions through the possibilities that we have to obtain a safe food in a healthy environment, but also in aesthetic ways through our perception of landscapes and diversity. To avoid unfavorable consequences of land-use changes, systematic approaches for land-use intervention are developed for policy makers. Systematic intervention in the dynamics o...

  7. Temporal dynamics of motivation-cognitive control interactions revealed by high-resolution pupillometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly Sarah Chiew; Braver, Todd S.

    2013-01-01

    Motivational manipulations, such as the presence of performance-contingent reward incentives, can have substantial influences on cognitive control. Previous evidence suggests that reward incentives may enhance cognitive performance specifically through increased preparatory, or proactive, control processes. The present study examined reward influences on cognitive control dynamics in the AX-Continuous Performance Task (AX-CPT), using high-resolution pupillometry. In the AX-CPT, contextual cue...

  8. Dynamics of imports of sheep meat in Brazil: analysis of temporal components

    OpenAIRE

    João Garibaldi Almeida Viana; Mariana Regina Espalter de Moraes; Josiane Pedroso Dorneles

    2015-01-01

    The sheep production is an important livestock activity in Brazil. Its production stretches away into the country, a source of income and livelihood. On the demand side, there is an increase in domestic consumption, driven by the increased purchasing power of the population. To meet the growing demand, Brazil access international markets through of sheep meat imports. In this context, the work aims to analyze the dynamics of sheep meat imports in Brazil from 2000 to 2012, giving particular at...

  9. Temporal Granger causality and the dynamics examination on the tourism-growth nexus in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Chor Foon

    2011-01-01

    This study applied the cointegration, error-correction modelling and persistence profile to analyse the dynamic relationship between real tourism receipts, real income and real exchange rate in Malaysia. This study covers the annual sample period from 1974 to 2009. This study finds that the variables are cointegrated. In the short run, this study finds that neutrality causality between real tourism receipts and real income, while they are bi-directional Granger causality in the long run. Neve...

  10. The biological traits of the large red scorpionfish, Scorpaena scrofa: Temporal and ontogenetic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matić-Skoko, Sanja; Stagličić, Nika; Kraljević, Miro; Pallaoro, Armin; Dulčić, Jakov

    2015-01-01

    Large red scorpionfish, Scorpaena scrofa, is a prevalent, important and highly valued commercial species throughout the rocky coastal areas of the Mediterranean Sea. Despite this, there is a surprising scarcity of biological and ecological information for this species. As artisanal fisheries have a very long tradition in the whole Mediterranean, a considerable impact of continuous fishing pressure is expected on this valuable rockfish. To elucidate some biological parameters that indicate the status of S. scrofa in the Adriatic Sea and to show which consequences high fishery effort may have on its age, growth and reproduction, sampling was carried out in the middle Adriatic using trammel nets. Temporal trends in body size/weight of S. scrofa were also assessed using long-term data including specimens caught from 1960 to 2010. Temporal trends of S. scrofa in the middle Adriatic indicated significant decreases of 19% in length and 43% in total weight over time. In contrast, official landings for the last five years showed an increase of 13%. However, this increasing trend most likely reflects the continuous change in national policies for reporting the catches. Both catch data and landings statistics showed peak in catch per unit effort during summer which coincides with spawning period of S. scrofa. Length at first sexual maturity was observed at 29.0 cm for females and 24.9 cm for males. All specimens larger than 32 cm were mature. Age analysis revealed 15 age classes with a 25 year old female as the oldest specimen. However, age classes 3+ and 4+ were predominant in the total catch. The growth rate is relatively high during the first four years of life and afterwards it considerably slows down, with females growing at slightly slower rate and attaining slightly larger sizes than males. Given the identified biological implications that confirm our assumptions of inherent vulnerabilities and negative effects arising from continued artisanal fisheries practice

  11. Dynamic analysis of temporal moisture profiles in heatset printing studied with near-infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic analysis of the water transfer onto coated paper, and its permeation and absorption into the porous structure were studied online in a full-scale heatset web offset printing environment. The moisture content of the paper was investigated at five different positions during the printing process. Changes in the moisture content of the paper were studied as a function of the web temperature, printing speed and silicone application in the folding unit positioned after the hot air drying oven. Additionally, the influence of fountain solution composition on the pick-up by the paper was investigated. The water content of the fountain solution transferred to the paper from the printing units was observed as changes in near-infrared absorbance. A calibration data set enabled the subsequent quantification of the dynamic moisture content of the paper at the studied locations. An increase in the printing speed reduced the water transfer to the paper and an increase in web temperature resulted in a reduction in the moisture content. An increase in the dosage level of the water–silicone mixture was observed as a re-moistening effect of the paper. Differences in the drying strategy resulted in different moisture profiles depending on the type of fountain solution used. As a conclusion, the near-infrared signal provides an effective way to characterize the moisture dynamics online at different press units

  12. Fire in Fennoscandia: A palaeo-perspective of spatial and temporal variability in fire frequency and vegetation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clear, Jennifer; Bradshaw, Richard; Seppä, Heikki

    2014-05-01

    Active fire suppression in Fennoscandia has created a boreal forest ecosystem that is almost free of fire. Absence of fire is thought to have contributed to the widespread dominance of Picea abies (Norway spruce), though the character and structure of spruce forests operates as a positive feedback retarding fire frequency. This lack of fire and dominance by Picea abies may have assisted declines in deciduous tree species, with a concomitant loss of floristic diversity. Forest fires are driven by a complex interplay between natural (climate, vegetation and topography) and anthropogenic disturbance and through palaeoecology we are able to explore spatio-temporal variability in the drivers of fire, changing fire dynamics and the subsequent consequences for forest succession, development and floristic diversity over long timescales. High resolution analysis of palaeoenvironmental proxies (pollen and macroscopic charcoal) allows Holocene vegetation and fire dynamics to be reconstructed at the local forest-stand scale. Comparisons of fire histories with pollen-derived quantitative reconstruction of vegetation at local- and regional-scales identify large-scale ecosystem responses and local-scale disturbance. Spatio-temporal heterogeneity and variability in biomass burning is explored to identify the drivers of fire and palaeovegetation reconstructions are compared to process-based, climate-driven dynamic vegetation model output to test the significance of fire frequency as a driver of vegetation composition and dynamics. Fire was not always so infrequent in the northern European forest with early-Holocene fire regimes driven by natural climate variations and fuel availability. The establishment and spread of Picea abies was probably driven by an increase in continentality of climate, but local natural and anthropogenic ecosystem disturbance may have aided this spread. Picea expansion led to a step-wise reduction in regional biomass burning and here we show the now

  13. A recurrent network in the lateral amygdala: a mechanism for coincidence detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic changes at sensory inputs to the dorsal nucleus of the lateral amygdala (LAd play a key role in the acquisition and storage of associative fear memory. However, neither the temporal nor spatial architecture of the LAd network response to sensory signals is understood. We developed a method for the elucidation of network behavior. Using this approach, temporally patterned polysynaptic recurrent network responses were found in LAd (intra-LA, both in vitro and in vivo, in response to activation of thalamic sensory afferents. Potentiation of thalamic afferents resulted in a depression of intra-LA synaptic activity, indicating a homeostatic response to changes in synaptic strength within the LAd network. Additionally; the latencies of thalamic afferent triggered recurrent network activity within the LAd overlap with known later occurring cortical afferent latencies. Thus, this recurrent network may facilitate temporal coincidence of sensory afferents within LAd during associative learning.

  14. Task-Related Dynamic Division of Labor Between Anterior Temporal and Lateral Occipital Cortices in Representing Object Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    top-down” cognitive state of an observer changes the dynamic interaction between different subregions of the ventral temporal cortex. Using inhibitory neurostimulation combined with a novel paradigm, we demonstrate a flexible division of labor in the neurocognitive architecture that underpins size knowledge: the lateral occipital cortex codes perceptually based aspects (statistical visual configuration of small/large objects), whereas the anterior temporal lobe represents semantically based aspects (object identity), with their involvement interactively weighted by task demand. The interactive nature of the ventral temporal cortex highlights how top-down modulation constrains and shapes neural representations in the visual system. PMID:27122025

  15. Temporal Dynamics of Task Switching and Abstract-Concept Learning in Pigeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Alexander Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined whether pigeons could learn to use abstract concepts as the basis for conditionally switching behavior as a function of time. Using a mid-session reversal task, experienced pigeons were trained to switch from matching-to-sample (MTS to non-matching-to-sample (NMTS conditional discriminations within a session. One group had prior training with MTS, while the other had prior training with NMTS. Over training, stimulus set size was progressively doubled from 3 to 6 to 12 stimuli to promote abstract concept development. Prior experience had an effect on the initial learning at each of the set sizes but by the end of training there were no group differences, as both groups showed similar within-session linear matching functions. After acquiring the 12-item set, abstract-concept learning was tested by placing novel stimuli at the beginning and end of a test session. Prior matching and non-matching experience affected transfer behavior. The matching experienced group transferred to novel stimuli in both the matching and non-matching portion of the sessions using a matching rule. The non-matching experienced group transferred to novel stimuli in both portions of the session using a non-matching rule. The representations used as the basis for mid-session reversal of the conditional discrimination behaviors and subsequent transfer behavior appears to have different temporal sources. The implications for the flexibility and organization of complex behaviors are considered.

  16. Analysis of temporal dynamics in imagery during acute limb ischemia and reperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, John M.; Regan, John; Spain, Tammy A.; Caruso, Joseph D.; Rodriquez, Maricela; Luthra, Rajiv; Forsberg, Jonathon; Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion injuries present major challenges for both military and civilian medicine. Improved methods for assessing the effects and predicting outcome could guide treatment decisions. Specific issues related to ischemia and reperfusion injury can include complications arising from tourniquet use, such as microvascular leakage in the limb, loss of muscle strength and systemic failures leading to hypotension and cardiac failure. Better methods for assessing the viability of limbs/tissues during ischemia and reducing complications arising from reperfusion are critical to improving clinical outcomes for at-risk patients. The purpose of this research is to develop and assess possible prediction models of outcome for acute limb ischemia using a pre-clinical model. Our model relies only on non-invasive imaging data acquired from an animal study. Outcome is measured by pathology and functional scores. We explore color, texture, and temporal features derived from both color and thermal motion imagery acquired during ischemia and reperfusion. The imagery features form the explanatory variables in a model for predicting outcome. Comparing model performance to outcome prediction based on direct observation of blood chemistry, blood gas, urinalysis, and physiological measurements provides a reference standard. Initial results show excellent performance for the imagery-base model, compared to predictions based direct measurements. This paper will present the models and supporting analysis, followed by recommendations for future investigations.

  17. Measurement of DNA Translocation Dynamics in a Solid-State Nanopore at 100 ns Temporal Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekar, Siddharth; Niedzwiecki, David J; Chien, Chen-Chi; Ong, Peijie; Fleischer, Daniel A; Lin, Jianxun; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Drndić, Marija; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2016-07-13

    Despite the potential for nanopores to be a platform for high-bandwidth study of single-molecule systems, ionic current measurements through nanopores have been limited in their temporal resolution by noise arising from poorly optimized measurement electronics and large parasitic capacitances in the nanopore membranes. Here, we present a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) nanopore (CNP) amplifier capable of low noise recordings at an unprecedented 10 MHz bandwidth. When integrated with state-of-the-art solid-state nanopores in silicon nitride membranes, we achieve an SNR of greater than 10 for ssDNA translocations at a measurement bandwidth of 5 MHz, which represents the fastest ion current recordings through nanopores reported to date. We observe transient features in ssDNA translocation events that are as short as 200 ns, which are hidden even at bandwidths as high as 1 MHz. These features offer further insights into the translocation kinetics of molecules entering and exiting the pore. This platform highlights the advantages of high-bandwidth translocation measurements made possible by integrating nanopores and custom-designed electronics. PMID:27332998

  18. Temporal dynamics between cattle in-stream presence and suspended solids in a headwater catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Julie A; McW H Benskin, Clare; Eastoe, Emma F; Haygarth, Philip M

    2014-07-01

    Cattle in-stream activity is potentially an important contributor to water pollution from agriculture. Here we present research on the physical movements of cattle within a stream on suspended solid concentrations (SSC). This study used camera surveillance to monitor the in-stream activity of dairy cattle in an unfenced reach over a four-month period. Results were compared against high-resolution SSC data. Over the days that cattle grazed the field, 57.9% of the instances when SSC crossed the 25 mg l(-1) Freshwater Fish Directive guideline threshold can be attributed to cattle presence in the stream. Flow was the main driver of total sediments transported over the study period, and no relationship was found between SSC and the absolute number of cattle feet in the water. Hysteresis analysis indicated a 'first-flush' of local sediments rapidly mobilised during the non-cattle related SSC events, a result of cattle proximity to channel margins. Results demonstrate a temporal lag between cattle in-stream presence and a critical amount of their contribution to sediment load, and that monitoring only instantaneously with cattle activity may lead to underestimation of their pollution impact. PMID:24522791

  19. A spatio-temporal analysis of landscape dynamics under changing environmental regimes in southern African savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Erin L.

    The United Nations and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) deem many regions of southern Africa as vulnerable landscapes due to changing climatic regimes, ecological condition, and low adaptive capacity. The savanna ecosystems of southern Africa are of great ecological importance due to the high biodiversity they sustain, their high level of productivity, and the great role they play in the global carbon cycle. Given the dependence of humans on the lands it is essential to explore landscape level trends in patterns and processes in an effort to inform management practices. Even if climate change mitigation strategies were put in place, this is still a region heavily dependent on rain-fed agriculture and tourism of the biological diverse lands. Therefore analysis of climate variability, both interannual and intra-annual, and the changing role it plays on the landscape is critical. This body of research analyzes the role of climate variability and climate on environmental condition and socio-economic development via research on (1) spatial and temporal vegetation patterns, (2) the underlying processes that influence savanna ecosystem resilience, (3) local perception of risk to livelihood development, and (4) potential consequences of climate change on vegetation patterns. As a whole this demonstrates the key role that climate plays on savanna landscapes, which would be highly beneficial when developing conservation or mitigation strategies. Increased climate variability is occurring, but what is still open to debate is the resilience of savanna landscape and vulnerability of socio-economic development.

  20. Temporal Evolution of Coronagraphic Dynamic Range, and Constraints on Companions to Vega

    CERN Document Server

    Hinkley, S; Soummer, R; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Roberts, L C; Kühn, J; Makidon, R B; Perrin, M D; Lloyd, J P; Kratter, K M; Brenner, D; Hinkley, Sasha; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Soummer, Remi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Jr., Lewis C. Roberts; Kuhn, Jeffrey; Makidon, Russell B.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Lloyd, James P.; Kratter, Kaitlin; Brenner, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    The major obstacle to the direct detection of companions to nearby stars is the overwhelming brightness of the host star. Current instruments employing the combination of adaptive optics (AO) and coronagraphy can typically detect objects within 2'' of the star that are 10^{4-5} times fainter. Correlated speckle noise is one of the biggest obstacles limiting such high-contrast imaging. We have obtained a series of 284 8 s, AO-corrected, coronagraphically occulted H-band images of the star Vega at the 3.63 m AEOS telescope located on Haleakala, Hawaii. This dataset is unique for studying the temporal behavior of speckle noise, and represents the first time such a study on highly corrected _coronagraphic_ AO images has been carried out in a quantitative way. We find the speckle pattern to be highly stable in both position and time in our data. This is due to the fact that the AO system corrects disturbances to the stellar wave front at the level where the instrumental wave front errors dominate. Because of this,...

  1. Temporal Dynamics of Corn Flea Beetle Populations Infested with Pantoea stewartii, Causal Agent of Stewart's Disease of Corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esker, P D; Nutter, F W

    2003-02-01

    ABSTRACT In order to better understand the epidemiology of the Stewart's disease of corn pathosystem, quantitative information concerning the temporal dynamics of the amount of pathogen inoculum present in the form of Pantoea stewartii-infested corn flea beetles (Chaetocnema pulicaria) is needed. Temporal changes in the proportion of P. stewartii-infested corn flea beetle populations were monitored by testing individual corn flea beetles for the presence of P. stewartii using a peroxidase-labeled, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Approximately 90 corn flea beetles were collected each week from seven locations in Iowa from September 1998 through October 2000 using sweep nets. The proportion of P. stewartii-infested beetles at the end of the 1998 growing season ranged from 0.04 to 0.19. In spring 1999, the proportion of overwintering adult corn flea beetles infested with P. stewartii ranged from 0.10 to 0.11 and did not differ significantly from the previous fall based on chi(2). During the 1999 corn-growing season, the proportion of infested corn flea beetles ranged from 0.04 to 0.86, with the highest proportions occurring in August. In fall 1999, the proportion of beetles infested with P. stewartii ranged from 0.20 to 0.77. In spring 2000, the proportion of overwintering adult corn flea beetles infested with P. stewartii ranged from 0.08 to 0.30; these proportions were significantly lower than the proportions observed in fall 1999 at Ames, Chariton, and Nashua. During the 2000 corn-growing season, the proportion of P. stewartii-infested corn flea beetles ranged from 0.08 to 0.53, and the highest observed proportions again occurred in August. Corn flea beetle populations sampled in late fall 2000 had proportions of infested beetles ranging from 0.08 to 0.20. This is the first study to quantify the temporal population dynamics of P. stewartii-infested C. pulicaria populations in hybrid corn and provides new quantitative information that should be useful in

  2. Connections of the corticomedial amygdala in the golden hamster. II. Efferents of the ''olfactory amygdala''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anterior cortical (C1) and posterolateral cortical (C2) nuclei of the amygdala are designated the ''olfactory amygdala'' because they each receive direct projections from the main olfactory bulb. The efferents of these nuclei were traced after stereotaxic placement of 1-5 muCi tritiated proline in the corticomedial amygdala of the male golden hamsters. Following survival times of 12, 24, or 48 hours, 20 micron frozen sections of the brains were processed for light microscopic autoradiography. Efferents from C2 terminate in layers II and III of the olfactory tubercle and in layer Ib of pars ventralis and pars medialis of the anterior olfactory nucleus. Fibers from this nucleus also project to layers I and II of the infralimbic cortex and to the molecular layer of the agranular insular cortex. More posteriorly, fibers from C2 terminate in layer I of the dorsolateral entorhinal cortex, and in the endopiriform nucleus. From C1, efferent fibers travel in the stria terminalis and terminate in the precommissural bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and in the mediobasal hypothalamus. Efferents from C1 also innervate the molecular layer of C2, the amygdalo-hippocampal area, and the adjacent piriform cortex. Neurons in both C1 and C2 project to the molecular layer of the medial amygdaloid nucleus and the posteromedial cortical nucleus of the amygdala, the plexiform layer of the ventral subiculum, and the molecular layer of the lateral entorhinal cortex

  3. Spatio-temporal dynamics behind the shock front from compacted metal nanopowders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leela, Ch; Venkateshwarlu, P; Singh, Raja V; Verma, Pankaj; Kiran, P Prem

    2014-03-10

    Laser ablated shock waves from compacted metal nanoenergetic powders of Aluminum (Al), Nickel coated Aluminum (Ni-Al) was characterized using shadowgraphy technique and compared with that from Boron Potassium Nitrate (BKN), Ammonium Perchlorate (AP) and Potassium Bromide (KBr) powders. Ablation is created by focused second harmonic (532 nm, 7 ns) of Nd:YAG laser. Time resolved shadowgraphs of propagating shock front and contact front revealed dynamics and the precise time of energy release of materials under extreme ablative pressures. Among the different compacted materials studied, Al nanopowders have maximum shock velocity and pressure behind the shock front compared to others. PMID:24922235

  4. Optimized Temporal Window for Detection and Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinomas with Dynamic CT Scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhong Wang; Peijun Wang; Xiaohu Zhao; Xinqin Mao; Xiaolong Gao; Jun Liu

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the optimized time period for detection and characterization of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) when the specific CT features appear during spiral dynamic CT scanning, and to optimize an effective scanning protocol of spiral CT for evaluating RCC.METHODS Twenty-four patients with RCC verified by pathology had undergone a dynamic CT (D-CT) scan. A plain scan was employed to select the target slice. Single-level dynamic scanning started at 14-17 s after the intravenous contrast media had been administered, with a scan interval of 4.9 s acquiring a total number of 17~24 frames. A regular CT scan of the whole kidney followed by a delayed single slice acquisition through the target slice in the excretory phase was performed. Images were assessed in two ways: (1) A group of experienced radiologists reviewed the CT images to find when the specific signs appeared and when the CT features of RCC were optimally displayed; (2) Data measurement of the time-density curves (T-DC) of RCC. The exact time was obtained when the densities of the tumor, renal parenchyma, medulla and aorta reached their peak enhancement, thus also the time when the density difference between tumor and parenchyma was at maximum (Max T-M). Based on the slope of the contrast media uptake curve, T-DC types were ranked from the smallest to the biggest of slope as type A, B and C.RESULTS 1. The review of the CT images by the radiologists showed that the CT features of RCC were optimally demonstrated at 70.2 s. The earliest time at which RCC CT features were examined was at 23.9 s. 2. Image data analysis: the time that the density (or CT value) of the tumor mass reached peak enhancement was at 54 s and peak value was at 80.4 Hu for RCC. The time of the maximal difference of densities between tumor and renal parenchyma was at 102 s.CONCLUSION The following proposal is the scanning protocol for detecting RCC recommended by our research: After a plain scan to determine the target level, a

  5. Disorganized attachment in infancy predicts greater amygdala volume in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons-Ruth, K; Pechtel, P; Yoon, S A; Anderson, C M; Teicher, M H

    2016-07-15

    Early life stress in rodents is associated with increased amygdala volume in adulthood. In humans, the amygdala develops rapidly during the first two years of life. Thus, disturbed care during this period may be particularly important to amygdala development. In the context of a 30-year longitudinal study of impoverished, highly stressed families, we assessed whether disorganization of the attachment relationship in infancy was related to amygdala volume in adulthood. Amygdala volumes were assessed among 18 low-income young adults (8M/10F, 29.33±0.49years) first observed in infancy (8.5±5.6months) and followed longitudinally to age 29. In infancy (18.58±1.02mos), both disorganized infant attachment behavior and disrupted maternal communication were assessed in the standard Strange Situation Procedure (SSP). Increased left amygdala volume in adulthood was associated with both maternal and infant components of disorganized attachment interactions at 18 months of age (overall r=0.679, pimportance of quality of early care for amygdala development in human children as well as in rodents. The long-term prediction found here suggests that the first two years of life may be an early sensitive period for amygdala development during which clinical intervention could have particularly important consequences for later child outcomes. PMID:27060720

  6. Amygdala and Hippocampus Enlargement during Adolescence in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Wouter; Teluij, Michelle; Buitelaar, Jan; Tendolkar, Indira

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The amygdala and hippocampus are key components of the neural system mediating emotion perception and regulation and are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of autism. Although some studies in children with autism suggest that there is an enlargement of amygdala and hippocampal volume, findings in adolescence are sparse.…

  7. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in agroforestry systems. Temporal patterns of some important soil processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyberg, Gert [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    2001-07-01

    The ameliorative effects of different tree species on soils in some agroforestry systems were studied. The temporal pattern of nutrient release from tree organic material is important to achieve synchrony with crop uptake. When, as in many tropical agroforestry systems, trees (C{sub 3}-plants) are planted on C{sub 4}-carbon dominated soils, the difference of around 12-16 per mille in natural abundance of {sup 13}C between C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} plants makes the natural abundance of {sup 13}C a particularly sensitive indicator of the influence of trees on the soil. An increase of 3-5% of the percentage C was proven to derive from trees by this method, only five years after planting. By using the difference of around 10 per mille in natural abundance of {sup 13}C between the endogenous soil C (mainly C{sub 4}) and the applied C (C{sub 3}) in green manure experiments, the contributions of the two C sources to soil respiration can be calculated. The microbial response to the additions of leaves was an immediate increase in respiration. This non-destructive method allows repeated measurements of the actual rate of C mineralisation and facilitates decomposition studies with high temporal resolution in the field. The mineralisation of N was also very rapid and the concentration of NH{sub 4}{sup +} in the soil correlated well with respiration of added C. In our studies, 3-4% of the added C was respired daily, for the first 10 days after addition of Sesbania sesban leaves. Although respiration rates decline with time, we estimated 70-90% to be respired in as short time as 40 days. Weight losses of around 80% after 52 days, from high quality residues in litter bags, also indicate substantial C losses. Measurable build-up of soil organic matter is, hence, unlikely. For immediate soil fertility, addition of high quality green manure may, however, be a viable management option. To achieve synchrony with crop demand, caution is needed in management as large amounts of N are

  8. Swim-training changes the spatio-temporal dynamics of skeletogenesis in zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansa W Fiaz

    Full Text Available Fish larvae experience many environmental challenges during development such as variation in water velocity, food availability and predation. The rapid development of structures involved in feeding, respiration and swimming increases the chance of survival. It has been hypothesized that mechanical loading induced by muscle forces plays a role in prioritizing the development of these structures. Mechanical loading by muscle forces has been shown to affect larval and embryonic bone development in vertebrates, but these investigations were limited to the appendicular skeleton. To explore the role of mechanical load during chondrogenesis and osteogenesis of the cranial, axial and appendicular skeleton, we subjected zebrafish larvae to swim-training, which increases physical exercise levels and presumably also mechanical loads, from 5 until 14 days post fertilization. Here we show that an increased swimming activity accelerated growth, chondrogenesis and osteogenesis during larval development in zebrafish. Interestingly, swim-training accelerated both perichondral and intramembranous ossification. Furthermore, swim-training prioritized the formation of cartilage and bone structures in the head and tail region as well as the formation of elements in the anal and dorsal fins. This suggests that an increased swimming activity prioritized the development of structures which play an important role in swimming and thereby increasing the chance of survival in an environment where water velocity increases. Our study is the first to show that already during early zebrafish larval development, skeletal tissue in the cranial, axial and appendicular skeleton is competent to respond to swim-training due to increased water velocities. It demonstrates that changes in water flow conditions can result into significant spatio-temporal changes in skeletogenesis.

  9. Spatio-temporal dynamics of global H5N1 outbreaks match bird migration patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Si

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The global spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 in poultry, wild birds and humans, poses a significant pandemic threat and a serious public health risk. An efficient surveillance and disease control system relies on the understanding of the dispersion patterns and spreading mechanisms of the virus. A space-time cluster analysis of H5N1 outbreaks was used to identify spatio-temporal patterns at a global scale and over an extended period of time. Potential mechanisms explaining the spread of the H5N1 virus, and the role of wild birds, were analyzed. Between December 2003 and December 2006, three global epidemic phases of H5N1 influenza were identified. These H5N1 outbreaks showed a clear seasonal pattern, with a high density of outbreaks in winter and early spring (i.e., October to March. In phase I and II only the East Asia Australian flyway was affected. During phase III, the H5N1 viruses started to appear in four other flyways: the Central Asian flyway, the Black Sea Mediterranean flyway, the East Atlantic flyway and the East Africa West Asian flyway. Six disease cluster patterns along these flyways were found to be associated with the seasonal migration of wild birds. The spread of the H5N1 virus, as demonstrated by the space-time clusters, was associated with the patterns of migration of wild birds. Wild birds may therefore play an important role in the spread of H5N1 over long distances. Disease clusters were also detected at sites where wild birds are known to overwinter and at times when migratory birds were present. This leads to the suggestion that wild birds may also be involved in spreading the H5N1 virus over short distances.

  10. Interactions between voluntary and involuntary attention modulate the quality and temporal dynamics of visual processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Michael A; White, Alex L; Heeger, David J; Carrasco, Marisa

    2015-04-01

    Successfully navigating a dynamic environment requires the efficient distribution of finite neural resources. Voluntary (endogenous) covert spatial attention selectively allocates those processing resources to goal-relevant locations in the visual scene in the absence of eye movements. However, the allocation of spatial attention is not always voluntary; abrupt onsets in the visual periphery automatically enhance processing of nearby stimuli (exogenous attention). In dynamic environments, exogenous events and internal goals likely compete to determine the distribution of attention, but how such competition is resolved is not well understood. To investigate how exogenous events interact with the concurrent allocation of voluntary attention, we used a speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT) procedure. SAT conjointly measures the rate of information accrual and asymptotic discriminability, allowing us to measure how attentional interactions unfold over time during stimulus processing. We found that both types of attention sped information accrual and improved discriminability. However, focusing endogenous attention at the target location reduced the effects of exogenous cues on the rate of information accrual and rendered negligible their effects on asymptotic discriminability. We verified the robustness of these findings in four additional experiments that targeted specific, critical response delays. In conclusion, the speed and quality of visual processing depend conjointly on internally and externally driven attentional states, but it is possible to voluntarily diminish distraction by irrelevant events in the periphery. PMID:25117089

  11. Spatial and temporal dynamics of drosophilid larval assemblages associated to fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Alves da Mata

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of organisms and their resources is critical to further understanding population dynamics in space and time. Although drosophilids have been widely used as biological models, their relationship with breeding and feeding sites has received little attention. Here, we investigate drosophilids breeding in fruits in the Brazilian Savanna, in two contrasting vegetation types, throughout 16 months. Specifically, larval assemblages were compared between savannas and forests, as well as between rainy and dry seasons. The relationships between resource availability and drosophilid abundance and richness were also tested. The community (4,022 drosophilids of 23 species and 2,496 fruits of 57 plant taxa varied widely in space and time. Drosophilid assemblages experienced a strong bottleneck during the dry season, decreasing to only 0.5% of the abundance of the rainy season. Additionally, savannas displayed lower richness and higher abundance than the forests, and were dominated by exotic species. Both differences in larval assemblages throughout the year and between savannas and gallery forests are consistent with those previously seen in adults. Although the causes of this dynamic are clearly multifactorial, resource availability (richness and abundance of rotten fruits was a good predictor of the fly assemblage structure.

  12. Temporal dynamics of Puumala hantavirus infection in cyclic populations of bank voles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, Liina; Kallio, Eva R; Niemimaa, Jukka; Vapalahti, Olli; Henttonen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of zoonotic pathogens in their reservoir host populations is a prerequisite for predicting and preventing human disease epidemics. The human infection risk of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) is highest in northern Europe, where populations of the rodent host (bank vole, Myodes glareolus) undergo cyclic fluctuations. We conducted a 7-year capture-mark-recapture study to monitor seasonal and multiannual patterns of the PUUV infection rate in bank vole populations exhibiting a 3-year density cycle. Infected bank voles were most abundant in mid-winter months during years of increasing or peak host density. Prevalence of PUUV infection in bank voles exhibited a regular, seasonal pattern reflecting the annual population turnover and accumulation of infections within each year cohort. In autumn, the PUUV transmission rate tracked increasing host abundance, suggesting a density-dependent transmission. However, prevalence of PUUV infection was similar during the increase and peak years of the density cycle despite a twofold difference in host density. This may result from the high proportion of individuals carrying maternal antibodies constraining transmission during the cycle peak years. Our exceptionally intensive and long-term dataset provides a solid basis on which to develop models to predict the dynamic public health threat posed by PUUV in northern Europe. PMID:26887639

  13. Temporal functional analysis of dynamic scintigraphy by application of the Karhunen-Loeve transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four main themes are dealt with in four different chapters. The first describes the scintigraphic data acquisition system: gamma camera and computer, as well as the various types of examination performed. Chapter two develops the subject of image processing techniques, especially as applied to kidney and heart scintigraphs which cover all problems encountered by doctors in the interpretation of a dynamic scintigraph. Chapter three is devoted to the formalism of Karhunen-Loeve transformation, the method best suited for data sorting because alone able to achieve a compression of this data in the sense of the mean quadratic error. The method is applied in chapter four to obtain functional heart and kidney images. The demarcation of the outlines of organs is often imprecise and two neighbouring zones developing at different rates have been differentiated by application of the Fukunaga-Koontz transformation which uses the properties of the Kahrunen-Loeve transformation in the case of heart scintigraphy where ventricles and auricles are superimposed. The aim of this work is to find out whether the compression of data for the Kahrunen-Loeve transformation provides any objective elements in the interpretation of dynamic scintigraphs

  14. The association between perceived social support and amygdala structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Kubota, Yasutaka; Uono, Shota; Sawada, Reiko; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2016-05-01

    The subjective perception of social support plays a crucial role in human well-being. However, its structural neural substrates remain unknown. We hypothesized that the amygdala, specifically its laterobasal and superficial subregions, which have been suggested to serve social functions, could be associated with the level of perceived social support. To test this hypothesis, we assessed perceived social support using the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. In addition, we measured the volume and shape of the amygdala using structural magnetic resonance imaging in 49 healthy participants. Global amygdala volume in the left hemisphere was positively associated with the perceived social support score after adjusting for total cerebral volume, sex, age, intelligence, and five-factor personality domains. The local shape of the laterobasal and superficial subregions of the left amygdala showed the same association with perceived social support. These data suggest that the social subregions of the left amygdala are associated with the implementation of perceived social support. PMID:27039164

  15. Post-translational Control of the Temporal Dynamics of Transcription Factor Activity Regulates Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiao-Jiang; Yuan, Liqun; Tiberi, Luca; Claeys, Annelies; De Geest, Natalie; Yan, Jiekun; van der Kant, Rob; Xie, Wei R; Klisch, Tiemo J; Shymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Bollen, Mathieu; Beullens, Monique; Zoghbi, Huda Y; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; Hassan, Bassem A

    2016-01-28

    Neurogenesis is initiated by the transient expression of the highly conserved proneural proteins, bHLH transcriptional regulators. Here, we discover a conserved post-translational switch governing the duration of proneural protein activity that is required for proper neuronal development. Phosphorylation of a single Serine at the same position in Scute and Atonal proneural proteins governs the transition from active to inactive forms by regulating DNA binding. The equivalent Neurogenin2 Threonine also regulates DNA binding and proneural activity in the developing mammalian neocortex. Using genome editing in Drosophila, we show that Atonal outlives its mRNA but is inactivated by phosphorylation. Inhibiting the phosphorylation of the conserved proneural Serine causes quantitative changes in expression dynamics and target gene expression resulting in neuronal number and fate defects. Strikingly, even a subtle change from Serine to Threonine appears to shift the duration of Atonal activity in vivo, resulting in neuronal fate defects. PMID:26824657

  16. The Temporal Dynamics of Regularity Extraction in Non-Human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minier, Laure; Fagot, Joël; Rey, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    Extracting the regularities of our environment is one of our core cognitive abilities. To study the fine-grained dynamics of the extraction of embedded regularities, a method combining the advantages of the artificial language paradigm (Saffran, Aslin, & Newport, ) and the serial response time task (Nissen & Bullemer, ) was used with a group of Guinea baboons (Papio papio) in a new automatic experimental device (Fagot & Bonté, ). After a series of random trials, monkeys were exposed to language-like patterns. We found that the extraction of embedded patterns positioned at the end of larger patterns was faster than the extraction of initial embedded patterns. This result suggests that there is a learning advantage for the final element of a sequence that benefits from the contextual information provided by previous elements. PMID:26303229

  17. Direct observation of spatio-temporal dynamics of short electron bunches in storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Evain, C; Parquier, M Le; Szwaj, C; Tordeux, M -A; Manceron, L; Brubach, J -B; Roy, P; Bielawski, S

    2016-01-01

    In recent synchrotron radiation facilities, the use of short (picosecond) electron bunches is a powerful method for producing giant pulses of Terahertz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (THz CSR). Here we report on the first direct observation of these pulse shapes with a few picoseconds resolution, and of their dynamics over a long time. We thus confirm in a very direct way the theories predicting an interplay between two physical processes. Below a critical bunch charge, we observe a train of identical THz pulses (a broadband Terahertz comb) stemming from the shortness of the electron bunches. Above this threshold, a large part of the emission is dominated by drifting structures, which appear through spontaneous self-organization. These challenging single-shot THz recordings are made possible by using a recently developed photonic time stretch detector with a high sensitivity. The experiment has been realized at the SOLEIL storage ring.

  18. Temporal and spatial dynamics of ephemeral drift-algae in eelgrass, Zostera marina, beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jonas; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Olesen, Birgit;

    2013-01-01

    ) suggesting that variability in algal cover may go by undetected in monthly assessments. The changes in cover were caused either by algal growth or by physical forces moving large aggregations of algae into or out of the study area. Within plots (1 m2) variability was even higher and algal cover changed...... regularly between observations (days). Hence, the algae were continuously rearranged within the eelgrass beds; also during periods with no change in average algal cover. The variability in cover of individual plots was negatively correlated to eelgrass cover, suggesting that algae were retained by the...... eelgrass leaves. This highly dynamic nature of filamentous macroalgal aggregations in eelgrass beds should be considered when evaluating implications of macroalgal blooms for seagrass growth and survival. A frequent relocation of drift-algae at small spatial scale may moderate the formation of poor oxygen...

  19. Dynamical Analysis of Blocking Events: Spatial and Temporal Fluctuations of Covariant Lyapunov Vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schubert, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    One of the most relevant weather regimes in the mid latitudes atmosphere is the persistent deviation from the approximately zonally symmetric jet stream to the emergence of so-called blocking patterns. Such configurations are usually connected to exceptional local stability properties of the flow which come along with an improved local forecast skills during the phenomenon. It is instead extremely hard to predict onset and decay of blockings. Covariant Lyapunov Vectors (CLVs) offer a suitable characterization of the linear stability of a chaotic flow, since they represent the full tangent linear dynamics by a covariant basis which explores linear perturbations at all time scales. Therefore, we will test whether CLVs feature a signature of the blockings. We examine the CLVs for a quasi-geostrophic beta-plane two-layer model in a periodic channel baroclinically driven by a meridional temperature gradient $\\Delta T$. An orographic forcing enhances the emergence of localized blocked regimes. We detect the blockin...

  20. Spatio-temporal dynamics of word selection in speech production: Insights from electrocorticography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie K Ries

    2015-04-01

    Our results suggest that the posterior inferior LTC is involved in word selection as semantic concepts become available. Posterior medial and left PFC regions may be involved in trial-by-trial top-down control over LTC to help overcome interference caused by semantically-related alternatives in word selection. The single-case result supports this hypothesis and suggests that the posterior medial PFC plays a causal role in resolving this interference in word selection. Lastly, the sensitivity to semantic interference of the post-vocal onset posterior LTC activity suggests the semantic interference effect does not only reflect word selection difficulty but is also present at post-selection stages such as verbal response monitoring. In sum, this study reveals a dynamic network of interacting brain regions that support word selection in language production.

  1. Geographic and temporal dynamics of a global radiation and diversification in the killer whale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Phillip A; Parsons, Kim M; Archer, Frederick I; Ávila-Arcos, María C; Barrett-Lennard, Lance G; Dalla Rosa, Luciano; Duchêne, Sebastián; Durban, John W; Ellis, Graeme M; Ferguson, Steven H; Ford, John K; Ford, Michael J; Garilao, Cristina; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Kaschner, Kristin; Matkin, Craig O; Petersen, Stephen D; Robertson, Kelly M; Visser, Ingrid N; Wade, Paul R; Ho, Simon Y W; Foote, Andrew D

    2015-08-01

    Global climate change during the Late Pleistocene periodically encroached and then released habitat during the glacial cycles, causing range expansions and contractions in some species. These dynamics have played a major role in geographic radiations, diversification and speciation. We investigate these dynamics in the most widely distributed of marine mammals, the killer whale (Orcinus orca), using a global data set of over 450 samples. This marine top predator inhabits coastal and pelagic ecosystems ranging from the ice edge to the tropics, often exhibiting ecological, behavioural and morphological variation suggestive of local adaptation accompanied by reproductive isolation. Results suggest a rapid global radiation occurred over the last 350 000 years. Based on habitat models, we estimated there was only a 15% global contraction of core suitable habitat during the last glacial maximum, and the resources appeared to sustain a constant global effective female population size throughout the Late Pleistocene. Reconstruction of the ancestral phylogeography highlighted the high mobility of this species, identifying 22 strongly supported long-range dispersal events including interoceanic and interhemispheric movement. Despite this propensity for geographic dispersal, the increased sampling of this study uncovered very few potential examples of ancestral dispersal among ecotypes. Concordance of nuclear and mitochondrial data further confirms genetic cohesiveness, with little or no current gene flow among sympatric ecotypes. Taken as a whole, our data suggest that the glacial cycles influenced local populations in different ways, with no clear global pattern, but with secondary contact among lineages following long-range dispersal as a potential mechanism driving ecological diversification. PMID:26087773

  2. Processes driving short-term temporal dynamics of small mammal distribution in human-disturbed environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, Julie; Pothier, David; Fortin, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    As the impact of anthropogenic activities intensifies worldwide, an increasing proportion of landscape is converted to early successional stages every year. To understand and anticipate the global effects of the human footprint on wildlife, assessing short-term changes in animal populations in response to disturbance events is becoming increasingly important. We used isodar habitat selection theory to reveal the consequences of timber harvesting on the ecological processes that control the distribution dynamics of a small mammal, the red-backed vole (Myodes gapperi). The abundance of voles was estimated in pairs of cut and uncut forest stands, prior to logging and up to 2 years afterwards. A week after logging, voles did not display any preference between cut and uncut stands, and a non-significant isodar indicated that their distribution was not driven by density-dependent habitat selection. One month after harvesting, however, juvenile abundance increased in cut stands, whereas the highest proportions of reproductive females were observed in uncut stands. This distribution pattern appears to result from interference competition, with juveniles moving into cuts where there was weaker competition with adults. In fact, the emergence of source-sink dynamics between uncut and cut stands, driven by interference competition, could explain why the abundance of red-backed voles became lower in cut (the sink) than uncut (the source) stands 1-2 years after logging. Our study demonstrates that the influences of density-dependent habitat selection and interference competition in shaping animal distribution can vary frequently, and for several months, following anthropogenic disturbance. PMID:27003700

  3. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of a Mortality Event among Central African Great Apes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kenneth N.; Reed, Patricia; Morgan, David B.; Ondzié, Alain I.; Sanz, Crickette M.; Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Olson, Sarah H.; Leroy, Eric; Karesh, William B.; Mundry, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In 2006–2007 we observed an unusual mortality event among apes in northern Republic of Congo that, although not diagnostically confirmed, we believe to have been a disease outbreak. In 2007–2011 we conducted ape nest surveys in the region, recording 11,835 G. g. gorilla nests (2,262 groups) and 5,548 P. t. troglodytes nests (2,139 groups). We developed a statistical model to determine likely points of origin of the outbreak to help identify variables associated with disease emergence and spread. We modeled disease spread across the study area, using suitable habitat conditions for apes as proxy for local ape densities. Infectious status outputs from that spread model were then used alongside vegetation, temperature, precipitation and human impact factors as explanatory variables in a Generalized Linear Model framework to explain observed 2007–2011 ape nest trends in the region. The best models predicted emergence in the western region of Odzala-Kokoua National Park and north of the last confirmed Ebola virus disease epizootics. Roads were consistently associated with attenuation of modeled virus spread. As disease is amongst the leading threats to great apes, gaining a better understanding of disease transmission dynamics in these species is imperative. Identifying ecological drivers underpinning a disease emergence event and transmission dynamics in apes is critical to creating better predictive models to guide wildlife management, develop potential protective measures for wildlife and to reduce potential zoonotic transmission to humans. The results of our model represent an important step in understanding variables related to great ape disease ecology in Central Africa. PMID:27192424

  4. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Coastal Bluff Erosion near Barrow Alaska over the Past Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, K. B.; Lopez, A. F.; Aguirre, A.; Aiken, Q.; Cody, R. P.; Gaylord, A. G.; Manley, W. F.; Green, E.; Nelson, L.; Lougheed, V.; Velasco, A. A.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic coastal systems are recognized as being one of the most climate change - vulnerable ecosystems on Earth and represent a complex nexus for examining change at the interface between marine, terrestrial, atmospheric, cryospheric and social systems. Although coastal erosion has received increased attention in the Arctic, few studies have examined the fine scale spatiotemporal dynamics and variability in erosion rates relative to the range of factors that act concomitantly to control erosion (e.g. duration of ice free seas, bathymetry, wave action, sea and air temperature, landscape morphology). This study reports on the spatiotemporal dynamics of annual DGPS surveys of eroding coastal bluffs in northern Alaska near the city of Barrow. Surveys along ca. 11km of the Elson Lagoon coast have been conducted since 2002 and additional surveys along ca. 120km of Elson Lagoon and Chuckhi Sea coast have been conducted since 2013. There has been strong inter-annual spatiotemporal variability in erosion rates with no indication of a long term change in erosion rates over time. Factors controlling wave intensity (e.g. wind run, off shore bathymetry, aspect of the coast relative to prevailing winds) explain most variability in erosion rates over time but during relatively calm periods, landscape history and morphology become more important. These findings highlight the extreme fine scale spatiotemporal heterogeneity in erosion rates along the Arctic Coast, and the importance of incorporating both storm-related climatic events and landscape characteristics when forecasting future environmental states in Arctic coastal landscapes. Case studies outlining new remote sensing technologies and future directions of study will also be outlined including terrestrial and airborne LiDAR, and Kite, UAV, and satellite imagery that is being used to derive and monitor topographic and hydrological change near eroding coastal bluffs; a wireless sensor network of micrometeorological and optical

  5. Temporal Dynamics of Antioxidant Defence System in Relation to Polyamine Catabolism in Rice under Direct-Seeded and Transplanted Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manisha KUMARI; Bavita ASTHIR; Navtej Singh BAINS

    2014-01-01

    Six rice cultivars viz. PR120, PR116, Feng Ai Zan, PR115, PAU201 and Punjab Mehak 1 under the direct-seeded and transplanted conditions were used to investigate the involvement of antioxidative defence system in relation to polyamine catabolism in temporal regulation of developing grains. Activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APx), guaiacol peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), polyamine oxidases (PAO) and contents of ascorbate,α-tocopherol, proline and polyamines increased gradually until mid-milky stage and then declined towards maturity stage under both planting conditions. The transplanted condition led to higher activities of antioxidative enzymes (APx, GPx and CAT) and contents of ascorbate,α-tocopherol and proline whereas the direct-seeded condition had elevated levels of PAO and SOD activities and contents of polyamines, lipid peroxide and hydrogen peroxide. Cultivars Feng Ai Zan and PR120 exhibited superior tolerance over other cultivars by accumulating higher contents of ascorbate,α-tocopherol and proline with increasing level of PAO and SOD activities under the direct-seeded condition. However, under the transplanted condition PR116 and PAU201 showed higher activities of antioxidative enzymes with decreasing content of lipid peroxide. Therefore, we concluded that under the direct-seeded condition, enhancements of polyamines content and PAO activity enabled rice cultivars more tolerant to oxidative stress, while under the transplanted condition, antioxidative defence with decreasing of lipid peroxide content was closely associated with the protection of grains by maintaining membrane integrity during rice grain filling. The results indicated that temporal dynamics of H2O2 metabolic machinery was strongly up-regulated especially at the mid-milky stage.

  6. Spatial and temporal dynamics of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) health indicators: linking individual-based indicators to a management-relevant endpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tyler; Jones, Michael L.; Ebener, Mark P.; Arts, Michael T.; Brenden, Travis O.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Wright, Gregory M.; Faisal, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    We examined the spatial and temporal dynamics of health indicators in four lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) stocks located in northern lakes Michigan and Huron from 2003 to 2006. The specific objectives were to (1) quantify spatial and temporal variability in health indicators; (2) examine relationships among nutritional indicators and stock-specific spatial and temporal dynamics of pathogen prevalence and intensity of infection; and (3) examine relationships between indicators measured on individual fish and stock-specific estimates of natural mortality. The percent of the total variation attributed to spatial and temporal sources varied greatly depending on the health indicator examined. The most notable pattern was a downward trend in the concentration of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs), observed in all stocks, in the polar lipid fraction of lake whitefish dorsal muscle tissue over the three study years. Variation among stocks and years for some indicators were correlated with the prevalence and intensity of the swimbladder nematode Cystidicola farionis, suggesting that our measures of fish health were related, at some level, with disease dynamics. We did not find relationships between spatial patterns in fish health indicators and estimates of natural mortality rates for the stocks. Our research highlights the complexity of the interactions between fish nutritional status, disease dynamics, and natural mortality in wild fish populations. Additional research that identifies thresholds of health indicators, below (or above) which survival may be reduced, will greatly help in understanding the relationship between indicators measured on individual fish and potential population-level effects.

  7. DISCOVERY 2010: Spatial and temporal variability in a dynamic polar ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarling, G. A.; Ward, P.; Atkinson, A.; Collins, M. A.; Murphy, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    DIC deficits, the South Georgia bloom was found to contain the strongest seasonal carbon uptake in the ice-free zone of the Southern Ocean. The surveys also encountered low-production, iron-limited regions, a situation more typical of the wider Southern Ocean. The response of primary and secondary consumers to spatial and temporal heterogeneity in production was complex. Many of the life-cycles of small pelagic organisms showed a close coupling to the seasonal cycle of food availability. For instance, Antarctic krill showed a dependence on early, non-ice-associated blooms to facilitate early reproduction. Strategies to buffer against environmental variability were also examined, such as the prevalence of multiyear life-cycles and variability in energy storage levels. Such traits were seen to influence the way in which Scotia Sea communities were structured, with biomass levels in the larger size classes being higher than in other ocean regions. Seasonal development also altered trophic function, with the trophic level of higher predators increasing through the course of the year as additional predator-prey interactions emerged in the lower trophic levels. Finally, our studies re-emphasised the role that the simple phytoplankton-krill-higher predator food chain plays in this Southern Ocean region, particularly south of the SACCF. To the north, alternative food chains, such as those involving copepods, macrozooplankton and mesopelagic fish, were increasingly important. Continued ocean warming in this region is likely to increase the prevalence of such alternative such food chains with Antarctic krill predicted to move southwards.

  8. Dynamics of imports of sheep meat in Brazil: analysis of temporal components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Garibaldi Almeida Viana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The sheep production is an important livestock activity in Brazil. Its production stretches away into the country, a source of income and livelihood. On the demand side, there is an increase in domestic consumption, driven by the increased purchasing power of the population. To meet the growing demand, Brazil access international markets through of sheep meat imports. In this context, the work aims to analyze the dynamics of sheep meat imports in Brazil from 2000 to 2012, giving particular attention to the tendency and seasonality of the quantity imported. The data of volume and value of imports were collected from the system AliceWeb. Statistical analysis followed the multiplicative time series model. Identified an upward tendency of sheep meat import, with annual growth of 5.09% in the period. Still, the total quantity commercialized, there is the purchase of sheep bone cuts. There was the seasonal behavior in the import of sheep meat, focusing primarily in the months of the end of the year, with import volumes 68% higher than the average of the total amount. The main trading partner of Brazil is the Uruguay, market responsible for at least 80% of the annual volume of import.

  9. Spatio-temporal dynamic of Tuber magnatum mycelium in natural truffle grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iotti, Mirco; Leonardi, Marco; Lancellotti, Enrico; Salerni, Elena; Oddis, Marilena; Leonardi, Pamela; Perini, Claudia; Pacioni, Giovanni; Zambonelli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Tuber magnatum produces the world's most expensive truffle. This fungus produces very rare ectomycorrhizas which are difficult or even impossible to detect in the field. A "real-time" PCR assay was recently developed to quantify and to track T. magnatum mycelium in soil. Here, this technique was used to investigate the spatial distribution of T. magnatum extra-radical mycelium in soil productive patches and its dynamic across seasons. This study was carried out in four different natural T. magnatum truffle grounds located in different Italian regions. During the fruiting seasons, the amount of T. magnatum mycelium was significantly higher around the fruiting points and decreased going farther away from them. Moreover, T. magnatum mycelium inside the productive patches underwent seasonal fluctuations. In early spring, the amount of T. magnatum mycelium was significantly higher than in summer. In summer, probably due to the hot and dry season, T. magnatum mycelium significantly decreased, whereas in autumn it increased again and was concentrated at the putative fruiting points. These results give new insights on T. magnatum ecology and are useful to plan the most appropriate sampling strategy for evaluating the management of a truffle ground. PMID:25535741

  10. Genetic diversity and temporal dynamics of phytoplankton viruses in East Lake, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Niang; Wang; Xing-Yi; Ge; Yong-Quan; Wu; Xing-Lou; Yang; Bing; Tan; Yu-Ji; Zhang; Zheng-Li; Shi

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton viruses are important components of aquatic ecosystems. However, their prevalence and genetic diversity in marine and freshwater systems are largely under estimated owing to the immense size of water bodies and limitations in virus discovery techniques. In this study, we conducted a 1-year survey of phytoplankton virus communities by collecting surface water monthly from an inland lake(East Lake) in China between May 2012 and April 2013. We examined four phytoplankton viruses, i.e., myoviruses, podoviruses, siphoviruses, and phycodnaviruses, and seven sets of primers were used to target conserved genes within these four species. In this year-long investigation, a total of 358 different virus-related sequences from four virus families were obtained. All virus families were detected in all months, except for cyanopodoviruses, which were only identified during eight of the 12 months surveyed. Moreover, virus abundance and diversity changed dynamically over time. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the majority of viral sequences from East Lake, China displayed distinct clustering patterns compared with published sequences. These results supported the existence of a highly diverse and unique phytoplankton virus community in East Lake, China.

  11. Temporal Dynamics of Active Prokaryotic Nitrifiers and Archaeal Communities from River to Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugoni, Mylène; Agogué, Hélène; Taib, Najwa; Domaizon, Isabelle; Moné, Anne; Galand, Pierre E; Bronner, Gisèle; Debroas, Didier; Mary, Isabelle

    2015-08-01

    To test if different niches for potential nitrifiers exist in estuarine systems, we assessed by pyrosequencing the diversity of archaeal gene transcript markers for taxonomy (16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)) during an entire year along a salinity gradient in surface waters of the Charente estuary (Atlantic coast, France). We further investigated the potential for estuarine prokaryotes to oxidize ammonia and hydrolyze urea by quantifying thaumarchaeal amoA and ureC and bacterial amoA transcripts. Our results showed a succession of different nitrifiers from river to sea with bacterial amoA transcripts dominating in the freshwater station while archaeal transcripts were predominant in the marine station. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed that Thaumarchaeota marine group I (MGI) were the most abundant overall but other archaeal groups like Methanosaeta were also potentially active in winter (December-March) and Euryarchaeota marine group II (MGII) were dominant in seawater in summer (April-August). Each station also contained different Thaumarchaeota MGI phylogenetic clusters, and the clusters' microdiversity was associated to specific environmental conditions suggesting the presence of ecotypes adapted to distinct ecological niches. The amoA and ureC transcript dynamics further indicated that some of the Thaumarchaeota MGI subclusters were involved in ammonia oxidation through the hydrolysis of urea. Our findings show that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria were adapted to contrasted conditions and that the Thaumarchaeota MGI diversity probably corresponds to distinct metabolisms or life strategies. PMID:25851445

  12. Spatio-temporal dynamic of Tuber magnatum mycelium in natural truffle grounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Iotti

    Full Text Available Tuber magnatum produces the world's most expensive truffle. This fungus produces very rare ectomycorrhizas which are difficult or even impossible to detect in the field. A "real-time" PCR assay was recently developed to quantify and to track T. magnatum mycelium in soil. Here, this technique was used to investigate the spatial distribution of T. magnatum extra-radical mycelium in soil productive patches and its dynamic across seasons. This study was carried out in four different natural T. magnatum truffle grounds located in different Italian regions. During the fruiting seasons, the amount of T. magnatum mycelium was significantly higher around the fruiting points and decreased going farther away from them. Moreover, T. magnatum mycelium inside the productive patches underwent seasonal fluctuations. In early spring, the amount of T. magnatum mycelium was significantly higher than in summer. In summer, probably due to the hot and dry season, T. magnatum mycelium significantly decreased, whereas in autumn it increased again and was concentrated at the putative fruiting points. These results give new insights on T. magnatum ecology and are useful to plan the most appropriate sampling strategy for evaluating the management of a truffle ground.

  13. The temporal dynamics of reversal learning: P3 amplitude predicts valence-specific behavioral adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Kayla R; Ait Oumeziane, Belel; Hélie, Sebastien; Foti, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Adapting behavior to dynamic stimulus-reward contingences is a core feature of reversal learning and a capacity thought to be critical to socio-emotional behavior. Impairment in reversal learning has been linked to multiple psychiatric outcomes, including depression, Parkinson's disorder, and substance abuse. A recent influential study introduced an innovative laboratory reversal-learning paradigm capable of disentangling the roles of feedback valence and expectancy. Here, we sought to use this paradigm in order to examine the time-course of reward and punishment learning using event-related potentials among a large, representative sample (N=101). Three distinct phases of processing were examined: initial feedback evaluation (reward positivity, or RewP), allocation of attention (P3), and sustained processing (late positive potential, or LPP). Results indicate a differential pattern of valence and expectancy across these processing stages: the RewP was uniquely related to valence (i.e., positive vs. negative feedback), the P3 was uniquely associated with expectancy (i.e., unexpected vs. expected feedback), and the LPP was sensitive to both valence and expectancy (i.e., main effects of each, but no interaction). The link between ERP amplitudes and behavioral performance was strongest for the P3, and this association was valence-specific. Overall, these findings highlight the potential utility of the P3 as a neural marker for feedback processing in reversal-based learning and establish a foundation for future research in clinical populations. PMID:27059320

  14. Temporal and steric analysis of ionic permeation and binding in SERCA via molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, J E; Kaya, S; Rakowski, R F

    2007-10-24

    The availability of the crystal structure of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) has allowed atomic-level molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of this membrane transport protein to be done. The biomedical and nanotechnological implications of this work are discussed as well as the methods of performing the simulations and analysis. We have performed nanosecond timescale simulations of SERCA for several of its known conformations in a lipid/water environment. One simulation contained Ca(2+) ions, while others without ions were analyzed by techniques such as steric pathway determination. We discuss details of the resulting putative cytoplasmic and lumenal pathways, along with experimental evidence from the literature to support our conclusions. Finally, we give a brief overview of future research directions, as they pertain to MD simulations and their analysis. The methodology used in this work shows that significant insight into the structure-function relationship of ion-motive transmembrane pumps can be derived by a combination of simulation tools and analysis techniques including MD trajectories, steric analysis and electrostatic potentials. PMID:21730455

  15. Assessment of temporal dynamics of evaporation in the Itumbiara reservoir, GO, using remote sensing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Antônio Lorenzzetti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this work was to study the dynamics of evaporation in the Itumbiara reservoir, located in Central Brazil, using MODIS-derived water surface temperature (product MOD11A1 and meteorological data acquired over the water surface. The evaporation rates were derived from latent heat flux, estimated through a mass transfer model. The estimates were carried out for the period between 1/1/2010 and 31/12/2010. The results showed that evaporation rate tends to increase from January to September and then decrease from September to December. The evaporation rate reached values near 20 mm day-1 in Itumbiara reservoir during the dry season in 2010. The mean evaporation rate for the wet season was 3.66 mm day-1 and 8.25 mm day-1 for the dry season. The total water volume evaporated from Itumbiara reservoir during 2010 was estimated at about 1.7 billion m³ (2,300 mm which represents 10% of total reservoir volume. The results suggest that advection is the main transport mechanism which drives the evaporation in Itumbiara. The convective processes contribute secondarily to evaporation in Itumbiara reservoir.

  16. Dynamical Analysis of Blocking Events: Spatial and Temporal Fluctuations of Covariant Lyapunov Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Sebastian; Lucarini, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    One of the most relevant weather regimes in the mid latitudes atmosphere is the persistent deviation from the approximately zonally symmetric jet stream to the emergence of so-called blocking patterns. Such configurations are usually connected to exceptional local stability properties of the flow which come along with an improved local forecast skills during the phenomenon. It is instead extremely hard to predict onset and decay of blockings. Covariant Lyapunov Vectors (CLVs) offer a suitable characterization of the linear stability of a chaotic flow, since they represent the full tangent linear dynamics by a covariant basis which explores linear perturbations at all time scales. Therefore, we will test whether CLVs feature a signature of the blockings. We examine the CLVs for a quasi-geostrophic beta-plane two-layer model in a periodic channel baroclinically driven by a meridional temperature gradient ΔT. An orographic forcing enhances the emergence of localized blocked regimes. We detect the blocking events of the channel flow with a Tibaldi-Molteni scheme adapted to the periodic channel. When blocking occurs, the global growth rates of the fastest growing CLVs are significantly higher. Hence against intuition, globally the circulation is more unstable in blocked phases. Such an increase in the finite time Lyapunov exponents with respect to the long term average is attributed to stronger barotropic and baroclinic conversion in the case of high temperature gradients, while for low values of ΔT, the effect is only due to stronger barotropic instability. For the localization of the CLVs, we compare the meridionally averaged variance of the CLVs during blocked and unblocked phases. We find that on average the variance of the CLVs is clustered around the center of blocking. These results show that the blocked flow affects all time scales and processes described by the CLVs.

  17. Spatial and temporal dynamics of phytoplankton and bacterioplankton biomass in Sanya Bay, northern South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weihua; Li, Tao; Cai, Chuanghua; Huang, Liangmin; Wang, Hankui; Xu, Jirong; Dong, Junde; Zhang, Si

    2009-01-01

    The composition of phytoplankton and the dynamics of phytoplankton and bacterioplankton biomass (PB and BB, respectively) of Sanya Bay, South China Sea, were determined. A total of 168 species (67 genera) phytoplankton were identified, including Bacillariophyta (diatom, 128 species), Pyrrophyta (35 species), Cyanophyta (3 species), and Chrysophyta (2 species). Annual average abundance of phytoplankton was 1.2 x 10(7) cells/m3, with the highest abundance in autumn, and the lowest in summer. Annual average diversity index (H') and evenness (J) values were 3.96 and 0.70, respectively. Average chlorophyll-a was 2.5 mg/m3, and the average PB was 124 mg C/m3, with the highest value in autumn. Surface PB was higher than the bottom, except for summer. Annual mean bacterioplankton abundance and BB were 6.9 x 10(11) cells/m3 and 13.8 mg C/m3, respectively. The highest BB was found in summer, followed by winter, spring, and autumn. Surface BB was higher than bottom all year round. The spatial distribution patterns of PB and BB were very similar with the highest biomass in the estuary, and decreased seaward, primarily due to the terrestrial input from the Sanya River and influx of oceanic water. The main factor influencing PB and BB was dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). Other factors such as temperature, which is above 22 degrees C throughout the year, had a negligible impact. The correlation between BB and PB was significant (P bacterioplankton. PMID:20108660

  18. Temporal dynamics in an immunological synapse: Role of thermal fluctuations in signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Daniel R.; Chattopadhyay, Amit K.

    2015-07-01

    The article analyzes the contribution of stochastic thermal fluctuations in the attachment times of the immature T-cell receptor TCR: peptide-major-histocompatibility-complex pMHC immunological synapse bond. The key question addressed here is the following: how does a synapse bond remain stabilized in the presence of high-frequency thermal noise that potentially equates to a strong detaching force? Focusing on the average time persistence of an immature synapse, we show that the high-frequency nodes accompanying large fluctuations are counterbalanced by low-frequency nodes that evolve over longer time periods, eventually leading to signaling of the immunological synapse bond primarily decided by nodes of the latter type. Our analysis shows that such a counterintuitive behavior could be easily explained from the fact that the survival probability distribution is governed by two distinct phases, corresponding to two separate time exponents, for the two different time regimes. The relatively shorter timescales correspond to the cohesion:adhesion induced immature bond formation whereas the larger time reciprocates the association:dissociation regime leading to TCR:pMHC signaling. From an estimate of the bond survival probability, we show that, at shorter timescales, this probability PΔ(τ ) scales with time τ as a universal function of a rescaled noise amplitude D/Δ2, such that PΔ(τ ) ˜τ-(Δ/√{D }+1/2 ) ,Δ being the distance from the mean intermembrane (T cell:Antigen Presenting Cell) separation distance. The crossover from this shorter to a longer time regime leads to a universality in the dynamics, at which point the survival probability shows a different power-law scaling compared to the one at shorter timescales. In biological terms, such a crossover indicates that the TCR:pMHC bond has a survival probability with a slower decay rate than the longer LFA-1:ICAM-1 bond justifying its stability.

  19. The Role of the Subgenual Anterior Cingulate Cortex and Amygdala in Environmental Sensitivity to Infant Crying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutschler, Isabella; Ball, Tonio; Kirmse, Ursula; Wieckhorst, Birgit; Pluess, Michael; Klarhöfer, Markus; Meyer, Andrea H; Wilhelm, Frank H; Seifritz, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Newborns and infants communicate their needs and physiological states through crying and emotional facial expressions. Little is known about individual differences in responding to infant crying. Several theories suggest that people vary in their environmental sensitivity with some responding generally more and some generally less to environmental stimuli. Such differences in environmental sensitivity have been associated with personality traits, including neuroticism. This study investigated whether neuroticism impacts neuronal, physiological, and emotional responses to infant crying by investigating blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) responses using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a large sample of healthy women (N = 102) with simultaneous skin conductance recordings. Participants were repeatedly exposed to a video clip that showed crying infants and emotional responses (valence, arousal, and irritation) were assessed after every video clip presentation. Increased BOLD signal during the perception of crying infants was found in brain regions that are associated with emotional responding, the amygdala and anterior insula. Significant BOLD signal decrements (i.e., habituation) were found in the fusiform gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, Broca's homologue on the right hemisphere, (laterobasal) amygdala, and hippocampus. Individuals with high neuroticism showed stronger activation in the amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) when exposed to infant crying compared to individuals with low neuroticism. In contrast to our prediction we found no evidence that neuroticism impacts fMRI-based measures of habituation. Individuals with high neuroticism showed elevated skin conductance responses, experienced more irritation, and perceived infant crying as more unpleasant. The results support the hypothesis that individuals high in neuroticism are more emotionally responsive, experience more negative emotions, and may

  20. Alexithymic features and automatic amygdala reactivity to facial emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugel, Harald; Eichmann, Mischa; Dannlowski, Udo; Ohrmann, Patricia; Bauer, Jochen; Arolt, Volker; Heindel, Walter; Suslow, Thomas

    2008-04-11

    Alexithymic individuals have difficulties in identifying and verbalizing their emotions. The amygdala is known to play a central role in processing emotion stimuli and in generating emotional experience. In the present study automatic amygdala reactivity to facial emotion was investigated as a function of alexithymia (as assessed by the 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale). The Beck-Depression Inventory (BDI) and the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were administered to measure participants' depressivity and trait anxiety. During 3T fMRI scanning, pictures of faces bearing sad, happy, and neutral expressions masked by neutral faces were presented to 21 healthy volunteers. The amygdala was selected as the region of interest (ROI) and voxel values of the ROI were extracted, summarized by mean and tested among the different conditions. A detection task was applied to assess participants' awareness of the masked emotional faces shown in the fMRI experiment. Masked sad and happy facial emotions led to greater right amygdala activation than masked neutral faces. The alexithymia feature difficulties identifying feelings was negatively correlated with the neural response of the right amygdala to masked sad faces, even when controlling for depressivity and anxiety. Reduced automatic amygdala responsivity may contribute to problems in identifying one's emotions in everyday life. Low spontaneous reactivity of the amygdala to sad faces could implicate less engagement in the encoding of negative emotional stimuli. PMID:18314269

  1. Altered amygdala-prefrontal connectivity during emotion perception in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkquist, Olivia A; Olsen, Emily K; Nelson, Brady D; Herbener, Ellen S

    2016-08-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia evidence impaired emotional functioning. Abnormal amygdala activity has been identified as an etiological factor underlying affective impairment in this population, but the exact nature remains unclear. The current study utilized psychophysiological interaction analyses to examine functional connectivity between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during an emotion perception task. Participants with schizophrenia (SZ) and healthy controls (HC) viewed and rated positive, negative, and neutral images while undergoing functional neuroimaging. Results revealed a significant group difference in right amygdala-mPFC connectivity during perception of negative versus neutral images. Specifically, HC participants demonstrated positive functional coupling between the amygdala and mPFC, consistent with co-active processing of salient information. In contrast, SZ participants evidenced negative functional coupling, consistent with top-down inhibition of the amygdala by the mPFC. A significant positive correlation between connectivity strength during negative image perception and clinician-rated social functioning was also observed in SZ participants, such that weaker right amygdala-mPFC coupling during negative compared to neutral image perception was associated with poorer social functioning. Overall, results suggest that emotional dysfunction and associated deficits in functional outcome in schizophrenia may relate to abnormal interactions between the amygdala and mPFC during perception of emotional stimuli. This study adds to the growing literature on abnormal functional connections in schizophrenia and supports the functional disconnection hypothesis of schizophrenia. PMID:27083779

  2. The human amygdala and pain: evidence from neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Laura E; Moulton, Eric A; Linnman, Clas; Carpino, Elizabeth; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2014-02-01

    The amygdala, a small deep brain structure involved in behavioral processing through interactions with other brain regions, has garnered increased attention in recent years in relation to pain processing. As pain is a multidimensional experience that encompasses physical sensation, affect, and cognition, the amygdala is well suited to play a part in this process. Multiple neuroimaging studies of pain in humans have reported activation in the amygdala. Here, we summarize these studies by performing a coordinate-based meta-analysis within experimentally induced and clinical pain studies using an activation likelihood estimate analysis. The results are presented in relation to locations of peak activation within and outside of amygdala subregions. The majority of studies identified coordinates consistent with human amygdala cytoarchitecture indicating reproducibility in neuroanatomical labeling across labs, analysis methods, and imaging modalities. Differences were noted between healthy and clinical pain studies: in clinical pain studies, peak activation was located in the laterobasal region, suggestive of the cognitive-affective overlay present among individuals suffering from chronic pain; while the less understood superficial region of the amygdala was prominent among experimental pain studies. Taken together, these findings suggest several important directions for further research exploring the amygdala's role in pain processing. PMID:23097300

  3. Does bilateral damage to the human amygdala produce autistic symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Lynn K; Corsello, Christina; Tranel, Daniel; Adolphs, Ralph

    2010-09-01

    A leading neurological hypothesis for autism postulates amygdala dysfunction. This hypothesis has considerable support from anatomical and neuroimaging studies. Individuals with bilateral amygdala lesions show impairments in some aspects of social cognition. These impairments bear intriguing similarity to those reported in people with autism, such as impaired recognition of emotion in faces, impaired theory of mind abilities, failure to fixate eyes in faces, and difficulties in regulating personal space distance to others. Yet such neurological cases have never before been assessed directly to see if they meet criteria for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Here we undertook such an investigation in two rare participants with developmental-onset bilateral amygdala lesions. We administered a comprehensive clinical examination, as well as the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), together with several other standardized questionnaires. Results from the two individuals with amygdala lesions were compared with published norms from both healthy populations as well as from people with ASD. Neither participant with amygdala lesions showed any evidence of autism across the array of different measures. The findings demonstrate that amygdala lesions in isolation are not sufficient for producing autistic symptoms. We suggest instead that it may be abnormal connectivity between the amygdala and other structures that contributes to autistic symptoms at a network level. PMID:20700516

  4. Temporary amygdala inhibition reduces stress effects in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalooei, Jila Rezaeian; Sahraei, Hedayat; Meftahi, Gholam Hossein; Khosravi, Maryam; Bahari, Zahra; Hatef, Boshra; Mohammadi, Alireza; Nicaeili, Fateme; Eftekhari, Fateme; Ghamari, Fateme; Hadipour, Mohamadmehdi; Kaka, Gholamreza

    2016-09-01

    The current study investigated the effect of temporary inhibition of amygdala in response to metabolic changes caused by stress in female mice. Unilateral and bilateral amygdala cannulation was carried out, and after a week of recovery, 2% lidocaine hydrochloride was injected into the mice amygdalae five minutes before the induction of stress. A communication box was employed to induce stress for four consecutive days and plasma corticosterone, food and water intake, weight changes, and anorexia were measured as stress-induced metabolic changes. Results demonstrated that stress, increases stress, increased plasma corticosterone concentrations, weight, food, and water intake. Temporary inhibition of the amygdala slightly decreased plasma corticosterone concentrations, but did not fully reduce the effect of stress. The bilateral injection of lidocaine hydrochloride to the amygdala reduced the effect of stress and reduced water intake and weight. Unilateral injection of lidocaine hydrochloride into the left and right amygdala reduced food intake. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the left side and right side of amygdala nuclei play a different role in metabolic responses in stress. PMID:27489731

  5. Similarity-Based Fusion of MEG and fMRI Reveals Spatio-Temporal Dynamics in Human Cortex During Visual Object Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichy, Radoslaw Martin; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Oliva, Aude

    2016-08-01

    Every human cognitive function, such as visual object recognition, is realized in a complex spatio-temporal activity pattern in the brain. Current brain imaging techniques in isolation cannot resolve the brain's spatio-temporal dynamics, because they provide either high spatial or temporal resolution but not both. To overcome this limitation, we developed an integration approach that uses representational similarities to combine measurements of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to yield a spatially and temporally integrated characterization of neuronal activation. Applying this approach to 2 independent MEG-fMRI data sets, we observed that neural activity first emerged in the occipital pole at 50-80 ms, before spreading rapidly and progressively in the anterior direction along the ventral and dorsal visual streams. Further region-of-interest analyses established that dorsal and ventral regions showed MEG-fMRI correspondence in representations later than early visual cortex. Together, these results provide a novel and comprehensive, spatio-temporally resolved view of the rapid neural dynamics during the first few hundred milliseconds of object vision. They further demonstrate the feasibility of spatially unbiased representational similarity-based fusion of MEG and fMRI, promising new insights into how the brain computes complex cognitive functions. PMID:27235099

  6. High-resolution functional MRI of the human amygdala at 7 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sladky, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.sladky@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Baldinger, Pia; Kranz, Georg S. [Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Tröstl, Jasmin [MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Höflich, Anna; Lanzenberger, Rupert [Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Moser, Ewald [MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Windischberger, Christian, E-mail: christian.windischberger@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-05-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the primary non-invasive method for investigating the human brain function. With an increasing number of ultra-high field MR systems worldwide possibilities of higher spatial and temporal resolution in combination with increased sensitivity and specificity are expected to advance detailed imaging of distinct cortical brain areas and subcortical structures. One target region of particular importance to applications in psychiatry and psychology is the amygdala. However, ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of these ventral brain regions is a challenging endeavor that requires particular methodological considerations. Ventral brain areas are particularly prone to signal losses arising from strong magnetic field inhomogeneities along susceptibility borders. In addition, physiological artifacts from respiration and cardiac action cause considerable fluctuations in the MR signal. Here we show that, despite these challenges, fMRI data from the amygdala may be obtained with high temporal and spatial resolution combined with increased signal-to-noise ratio. Maps of neural activation during a facial emotion discrimination paradigm at 7 T are presented and clearly show the gain in percental signal change compared to 3 T results, demonstrating the potential benefits of ultra-high field functional MR imaging also in ventral brain areas.

  7. High-resolution functional MRI of the human amygdala at 7 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the primary non-invasive method for investigating the human brain function. With an increasing number of ultra-high field MR systems worldwide possibilities of higher spatial and temporal resolution in combination with increased sensitivity and specificity are expected to advance detailed imaging of distinct cortical brain areas and subcortical structures. One target region of particular importance to applications in psychiatry and psychology is the amygdala. However, ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of these ventral brain regions is a challenging endeavor that requires particular methodological considerations. Ventral brain areas are particularly prone to signal losses arising from strong magnetic field inhomogeneities along susceptibility borders. In addition, physiological artifacts from respiration and cardiac action cause considerable fluctuations in the MR signal. Here we show that, despite these challenges, fMRI data from the amygdala may be obtained with high temporal and spatial resolution combined with increased signal-to-noise ratio. Maps of neural activation during a facial emotion discrimination paradigm at 7 T are presented and clearly show the gain in percental signal change compared to 3 T results, demonstrating the potential benefits of ultra-high field functional MR imaging also in ventral brain areas

  8. Altered Resting State Brain Dynamics in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Can Be Observed in Spectral Power, Functional Connectivity and Graph Theory Metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Quraan, Maher A; McCormick, Cornelia; Cohn, Melanie; Valiante, Taufik A.; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2013-01-01

    Despite a wealth of EEG epilepsy data that accumulated for over half a century, our ability to understand brain dynamics associated with epilepsy remains limited. Using EEG data from 15 controls and 9 left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE) patients, in this study we characterize how the dynamics of the healthy brain differ from the “dynamically balanced” state of the brain of epilepsy patients treated with anti-epileptic drugs in the context of resting state. We show that such differences can be ...

  9. The dual role of lakes as buffers and amplifiers of dissolved organic matter temporal dynamics: Buffering transport and amplifying transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejarque, Elisabet; Schelker, Jakob; Khan, Samiullah; Hollaus, Lisa-Maria; Steniczka, Gertraud; Kainz, Martin; Battin, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Lakes that disrupt the flow of water and its constituents within the fluvial continuum can modify the downstream dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Potential causes of this change may include the hydrological buffering capacity of lakes relative to streams and rivers and the amplification of biotic processes. To test this hypothesis, we measured DOM quantity and quality at the inflow and outflow of sub-alpine Lake Lunz (Lower Austria) during one year. DOM quality was characterised using optical metrics indicative of the humic-like composition (fluorescence peak C), humification (HIX), and aromaticity (SUVA) degree, predominance of autochthonous components (BIX), and average molecular weight (E2:E3). Total annual variability was found to be lower in the outflow compared with the inflow (SDout:SDin 1). This was due to the large seasonal variability in the outflow, which contrasted with a reduced temporal dynamics in the inflow. Combined, this created a shift from similar inflow-outflow DOM characteristics during winter, to uncoupled DOM characteristics during summer. This uncoupling consisted in a higher signal of the autotrophic origin of DOM, a lower average molecular weight, as well as a lower aromatic and humic-like content in the outflow. Overall, these results highlight the role of the Lake Lunz as a DOC source and as a buffer of hydrological pulses of DOC export. Moreover, results emphasise the capacity of the lake to amplify the seasonal variability of DOM quality, creating a maximum uncoupling between the inflow and the outflow during the months of increased biotic processing in the lake.

  10. Temporal dynamics in a shallow coastal benthic food web: Insights from fatty acid biomarkers and their stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeckman, Ulrike; Provoost, Pieter; Sabbe, Koen; Soetaert, Karline; Middelburg, Jack J; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the temporal variation of pelagic and benthic food sources in the diet of benthic taxa at a depositional site in the Southern Bight of the North Sea by means of fatty acid (FA) biomarkers and compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA). The taxa were the non-selective deposit feeding nematodes (Sabatieria spp. and 'other nematodes'), and three dominant macrobenthic species: two true suspension-deposit feeders (the bivalve Abra alba and the tube dwelling polychaete Owenia fusiformis) and the suspected predatory mud-dwelling anemone Sagartia sp. These species make up on average 16% (Abra alba), 17% (Sagartia sp.) and 20% (Owenia fusiformis) of the biomass in the Abra alba-Kurtiella bidentata community in this area. Phytoplankton dynamics in the suspended particulate matter of the water column as inferred from cell counts, chlorophyll-a and organic carbon content were clearly visible in sediment and animal FA abundance as well, whereas phytodetritus dynamics in the sediment FA composition were less clear, probably due to patchy distribution or stripping of FA by macrofauna. Nematodes appeared to assimilate mainly Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs) from their sedimentary environment and were further non-selectively accumulating more (Sabatieria spp.) or less ('other nematodes') FA from the deposited phytodetritus. In contrast, Abra alba FA composition was consistent with a diatom-dominated diet and consumption of Phaeocystis was observed in Owenia fusiformis, whereas Sagartia sp. showed evidence of a predatory behaviour. While the total FA content in Owenia fusiformis remained constant throughout the year, Sagartia sp. doubled and Abra alba increased its FA level more than 10-fold in response to the organic matter deposition from the phytoplankton bloom. This leads to the conclusion that there is no resource partitioning between non-selective deposit feeding nematodes and the suspension-deposit feeding macrobenthic organisms, suggesting they

  11. Connections of the corticomedial amygdala in the golden hamster. I. Efferents of the ''vomeronasal amygdala''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medial (M) an posteromedial cortical (C3) amygdaloid nuclei and the nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (NAOT) are designated the ''vomeronasal amygdala'' because they are the only components of the amygdala to receive a direct projection from the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). The efferents of M and C3 were traced after injections of 3H-proline into the amygdala in male golden hamsters. Frozen sections of the brains were processed for autoradiography. The efferents of the ''vomeronasal amygdala'' are largely to areas which are primary and secondary terminal areas along the vomeronasal pathway, although the efferents from C3 and M terminate in different layers in these areas than do the projections from the vomeronasal nerve or the AOB. Specifically, C3 projects ipsilaterally to the internal granule cell layer of the AOB, the cellular layer of NAOT, and layer Ib of M. Additional fibers from C3 terminate in a retrocommissural component of the bed nucleus of the strain terminalis (BNST) bilaterally, and in the cellular layers of the contralateral C3. The medial nucleus projects to the cellular layer of the ipsilateral NAOT, layer Ib of C3, and bilaterally to the medial component of BNST. Projections from M to non-vomeronasal areas terminate in the medial preoptic area-anterior hypothalamic junction, ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, ventral premammillary nucleus and possibly in the ventral subiculum. These results demonstrate reciprocal connections between primary and secondary vomeronasal areas between the secondary areas themselves. They suggest that M, but not C3, projects to areas outside this vomeronasal network. The medial amygdaloid nucleus is therefore an important link between the vomeronasal organ and areas of the brain not receiving direct vomeronasal input

  12. Neural evidence for moral intuition and the temporal dynamics of interactions between emotional processes and moral cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Dan-Yang; Gan, Tian; Liu, Chao

    2016-08-01

    Behavioral and neurological studies have revealed that emotions influence moral cognition. Although moral stimuli are emotionally charged, the time course of interactions between emotions and moral judgments remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the temporal dynamics of the interaction between emotional processes and moral cognition. The results revealed that when making moral judgments, the time course of the event-related potential (ERP) waveform was significantly different between high emotional arousal and low emotional arousal contexts. Different stages of processing were distinguished, showing distinctive interactions between emotional processes and moral reasoning. The precise time course of moral intuition and moral reasoning sheds new light on theoretical models of moral psychology. Specifically, the N1 component (interpreted as representing moral intuition) did not appear to be influenced by emotional arousal. However, the N2 component and late positive potential were strongly affected by emotional arousal; the slow wave was influenced by both emotional arousal and morality, suggesting distinct moral processing at different emotional arousal levels. PMID:26286634

  13. Spatial and temporal dynamics of ammonia oxidizers in the sediments of the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetterli, Adrien; Hietanen, Susanna; Leskinen, Elina

    2016-02-01

    The diversity and dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) nitrifying communities in the sediments of the eutrophic Gulf of Finland (GoF) were investigated. Using clone libraries of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene fragments and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), we found a low richness of both AOB and AOA. The AOB amoA phylogeny matched that of AOB 16S ribosomal genes from the same samples. AOA communities were characterized by strong spatial variation while AOB communities showed notable temporal patterns. At open sea sites, where transient anoxic conditions prevail, richness of both AOA and AOB was lowest and communities were dominated by organisms with gene signatures unique to the GoF. Given the importance of nitrification as a link between the fixation of nitrogen and its removal from aquatic environments, the low diversity of ammonia-oxidizing microbes across the GoF could be of relevance for ecosystem resilience in the face of rapid global environmental changes. PMID:26722795

  14. Dynamics of viral abundance and diversity in a Sphagnum-dominated peatland: temporal fluctuations prevail over habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flore Charlotte Ballaud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses impact microbial activity and carbon cycling in various environments, but their diversity and ecological importance in Sphagnum-peatlands are unknown. Abundances of viral particles and prokaryotes were monitored bi-monthly at a fen and a bog at two different depths. Viral particle abundance ranged from 1.7x106 to 5.6x108 particles mL-1, and did not differ between fen and bog but showed seasonal fluctuations. These fluctuations were positively correlated with prokaryote abundance and dissolved organic carbon, and negatively correlated with water-table height and dissolved oxygen. Using shotgun metagenomics we observed a shift in viral diversity between winter/spring and summer/autumn, indicating a seasonal succession of viral communities, mainly driven by weather-related environmental changes. Based on the seasonal asynchrony between viral and microbial diversity, we hypothesize a seasonal shift in the active microbial communities associated with a shift from lysogenic to lytic lifestyles. Our results suggest that temporal variations of environmental conditions rather than current habitat differences control the dynamics of virus-host interactions in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands.

  15. Dynamics of Viral Abundance and Diversity in a Sphagnum-Dominated Peatland: Temporal Fluctuations Prevail Over Habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballaud, Flore; Dufresne, Alexis; Francez, André-Jean; Colombet, Jonathan; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Quaiser, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Viruses impact microbial activity and carbon cycling in various environments, but their diversity and ecological importance in Sphagnum-peatlands are unknown. Abundances of viral particles and prokaryotes were monitored bi-monthly at a fen and a bog at two different layers of the peat surface. Viral particle abundance ranged from 1.7 x 10(6) to 5.6 x 10(8) particles mL(-1), and did not differ between fen and bog but showed seasonal fluctuations. These fluctuations were positively correlated with prokaryote abundance and dissolved organic carbon, and negatively correlated with water-table height and dissolved oxygen. Using shotgun metagenomics we observed a shift in viral diversity between winter/spring and summer/autumn, indicating a seasonal succession of viral communities, mainly driven by weather-related environmental changes. Based on the seasonal asynchrony between viral and microbial diversity, we hypothesize a seasonal shift in the active microbial communities associated with a shift from lysogenic to lytic lifestyles. Our results suggest that temporal variations of environmental conditions rather than current habitat differences control the dynamics of virus-host interactions in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands. PMID:26779149

  16. Relationships between M. enterolobii and F. solani: spatial and temporal dynamics in the occurrence of guava decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Martins Gomes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Guava decline, caused by the interaction between the phytonematode Meloidogyne enterolobii and the fungus Fusarium solani, has caused direct and indirect losses to the whole productive chain of guava. Aiming to understand the interaction mechanisms between M. enterolobii and F. solani, this study carried out a bioassay on guava plants with roots in two different treatments: inoculated separatelyor together with the fungus and/or nematode. The nematode parasitism not triggered an systemic effect on the plant become susceptible to root rot caused by the fungus.Therefore, it was concluded that there was a local effect of parasitism by M. enterolobii on the pathogenicity of F. solani in guava roots, making it necessary for the two pathogens to occupy the same space at the same time for occurrence of guava decline. Keywords: complex disease, Fusarium solani, guava root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne enterolobii, Psidium guajava. Cite as Gomes VM, Souza RM, Almeida AM, Dolinski C. Relationships between M. enterolobii and F. solani: spatial and temporal dynamics in the occurrence of guava decline.

  17. Eyes wide shut: amygdala mediates eyes-closed effect on emotional experience with music.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Lerner

    Full Text Available The perceived emotional value of stimuli and, as a consequence the subjective emotional experience with them, can be affected by context-dependent styles of processing. Therefore, the investigation of the neural correlates of emotional experience requires accounting for such a variable, a matter of an experimental challenge. Closing the eyes affects the style of attending to auditory stimuli by modifying the perceptual relationship with the environment without changing the stimulus itself. In the current study, we used fMRI to characterize the neural mediators of such modification on the experience of emotionality in music. We assumed that closed eyes position will reveal interplay between different levels of neural processing of emotions. More specifically, we focused on the amygdala as a central node of the limbic system and on its co-activation with the Locus Ceruleus (LC and Ventral Prefrontal Cortex (VPFC; regions involved in processing of, respectively, 'low', visceral-, and 'high', cognitive-related, values of emotional stimuli. Fifteen healthy subjects listened to negative and neutral music excerpts with eyes closed or open. As expected, behavioral results showed that closing the eyes while listening to emotional music resulted in enhanced rating of emotionality, specifically of negative music. In correspondence, fMRI results showed greater activation in the amygdala when subjects listened to the emotional music with eyes closed relative to eyes open. More so, by using voxel-based correlation and a dynamic causal model analyses we demonstrated that increased amygdala activation to negative music with eyes closed led to increased activations in the LC and VPFC. This finding supports a system-based model of perceived emotionality in which the amygdala has a central role in mediating the effect of context-based processing style by recruiting neural operations involved in both visceral (i.e. 'low' and cognitive (i.e. 'high' related processes

  18. Arousal Enhanced Memory Retention Is Eliminated Following Temporal Lobe Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahs, Fredrik; Kumlien, Eva; Fredrikson, Mats

    2010-01-01

    The amygdala, situated in the anterior medial temporal lobe (MTL), is involved in the emotional enhancement of memory. The present study evaluated whether anterior MTL-resections attenuated arousal induced memory enhancement for pictures. Also, the effect of MTL-resections on response latencies at retrieval was assessed. Thirty-one patients with…

  19. Monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of annual floods in the Niger Inner Delta using MODIS satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, A.; Belaud, G.; Delenne, C.; Bader, J.-C.; Oleksiak, A.; Bailly, J.-S.

    2012-04-01

    The Niger Inner Delta is a vast three million hectare wetland in Mali, whose annual flood supports the livelihoods of over one million herders, fishermen and farmers. Large projects on the Niger River upstream may however alter the extent and dynamics of the flood in the future. Due to the scale (about 50 000 km2) and the very flat topography of this hydrological system, there is very scarce ground data to characterise the flood and its spatial and temporal dynamics remain poorly understood. Since the flood is mainly caused by precipitation in the upper catchment, the flood peak in the delta occurs a few weeks after the rainy season, when cloud cover does not limit the use of optical remote sensing data. An original automated method was developed to study the progress of the flooding using normalised band ratio indices on 8-day MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) 500m-satellite images. The Modified Normalised Difference Water Index (MNDWI) was shown to be the most suitable for detecting flooded areas out of six commonly used band ratio indices. Its combination with the Normalised Difference Moisture Index (NDMI) aids the distinction between flooded and humid vegetation, especially in the drier months when the flood recedes. Three 30m Landsat images covering different phases of the flood, on which K-means clustering and analysis of spectral profiles enabled the identification of flooded pixels, were used to calibrate the threshold values of both indices. A programme using a specific composite MNDWI-NDMI index, with constant thresholds and a topographically relevant grid of the river and its floodplain was developed in ENVI IDL© to automatically provide the percentage of flooded pixels per grid cell for each image. The method was validated by computing correlations between water depth measurements from gauging stations in the delta and the flooded surface area for the corresponding grid cell calculated from the MODIS images. Estimates of the total

  20. Temporal resilience and dynamics of anaerobic methane-oxidizing microbial communities to short-term changes in methane partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasek, S.; Tiantian, Y.; Torres, M. E.; Colwell, F. S.; Wang, F.; Liang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Marine sediments produce tens to hundreds of teragrams of methane annually, which is released from the seabed at thousands of cold seeps distributed globally along continental margins. Around 80-90% of this methane is consumed in shallower sediment layers before reaching the hydrosphere, in a microbially-mediated process known as anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) However, cold seeps appear to exhibit temporal variation in gas flux intensity, and AOM filter efficiency at cold seeps generally decreases with fluid flow rate. To our knowledge, the degree to which temporal heterogeneity in subsurface methane flux stimulates AOM community growth and adaptation to increased methane concentrations has not been investigated. Static high-pressure bioreactors were used to incubate sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) and methanogenic zone sediments underlying a Mediterranean mud volcano gas flare under in situ temperature and pressure at 8 MPa methane. Sulfide production rates of 0.4 μmol/cm3/day in both sediment regimes after 4 months of incubation suggested the resilience of the marine subsurface methane filter may extend well below the SMTZ (40 cm). Similar incubations of SMTZ samples from below a gas flare off Svalbard at saturating (3.8 MPa) and 0.2 MPa methane are being sampled after 1 week, 4 weeks, and 4 months; sulfide production rates of 8-18 nmol/cm3/day were first observed after 4 weeks of incubation. Sediment samples at all specified time points for both sets of incubations were collected for nucleic acid extraction and cell fixation. Anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are expected dominant taxa in enriched and non-enriched communities. 16S rDNA community analysis is expected to reveal additional microbial players involved in the short-term adaptation to higher methane partial pressures in the marine subsurface. Increased AOM community activity (RNA/DNA ratio) and copy numbers of methane cycling transcripts (mcr

  1. The influence of vegetation covers on soil moisture dynamics at high temporal resolution in scattered tree woodlands of Mediterranean climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Parra, Javier; Schnabel, Susanne; Ceballos-Barbancho, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Soil water is a key factor that controls the organization and functioning of dryland ecosystems. However, in spite of its great importance in ecohydrological processes, most of the studies focus on daily or longer timescales, while its dynamics at shorter timescales are very little known. The main objective of this work was to determine the role of vegetation covers (grassland and tree canopy) in the soil hydrological response using measurements with high temporal resolution in evergreen oak woodland with Mediterranean climate. For this, soil water content was monitored continuously with a temporal resolution of 30 minutes and by means of capacitance sensors, mainly for the hydrological years 2010-2011 and 2011-2012. They were installed at 5, 10 and 15 cm, and 5 cm above the bedrock and depending on soil profile. This distribution along the soil profile is justified because soils are generally very shallow and most of the roots are concentrated in the upper layer. The sensors were gathered in 8 soil moisture stations in two contrasting situations characterized by different vegetation covers: under tree canopy and in open spaces or grasslands. Soil moisture variations were calculated at rainfall event scale at top soil layer and deepest depth by the difference between the final and initial soil moisture registered by a sensor at the finish and the beginning of the rainfall event, respectively. Besides, as soil moisture changes are strongly influenced by antecedent conditions, different antecedent soil moisture conditions or states, from driest to wettest, were also defined. The works were carried out in 3 experimental farms of the Spanish region of Extremadura. Results obtained revealed that rainwater amount bypassing vegetation covers and reaching the soil may temporarily be modified by covers according to precipitation properties and antecedent environmental conditions (from dry to wet) before the rain episode. Rainfall amounts triggering a positive soil

  2. The COMT Val158Met Polymorphism and Temporal Lobe Morphometry in Healthy Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Warren D.; Züchner, Stephan; Payne, Martha E.; Messer, Denise F.; Doty, Tracy J.; MacFall, James R.; BEYER, JOHN L.; Krishnan, K. Ranga R.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relationship between COMT Val158Met genotype and temporal lobe volumes, including the caudate as a control region. 31 healthy subjects completed 1.5T brain MRI and genotyping. After controlling for demographics, Val158 allele homozygotes exhibited significantly smaller temporal lobe and hippocampal volumes, with a trend for smaller amygdala volumes.

  3. Stress leads to contrasting effects on the levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus and amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harini Lakshminarasimhan

    Full Text Available Recent findings on stress induced structural plasticity in rodents have identified important differences between the hippocampus and amygdala. The same chronic immobilization stress (CIS, 2 h/day causes growth of dendrites and spines in the basolateral amygdala (BLA, but dendritic atrophy in hippocampal area CA3. CIS induced morphological changes also differ in their temporal longevity--BLA hypertrophy, unlike CA3 atrophy, persists even after 21 days of stress-free recovery. Furthermore, a single session of acute immobilization stress (AIS, 2 h leads to a significant increase in spine density 10 days, but not 1 day, later in the BLA. However, little is known about the molecular correlates of the differential effects of chronic and acute stress. Because BDNF is known to be a key regulator of dendritic architecture and spines, we investigated if the levels of BDNF expression reflect the divergent effects of stress on the hippocampus and amygdala. CIS reduces BDNF in area CA3, while it increases it in the BLA of male Wistar rats. CIS-induced increase in BDNF expression lasts for at least 21 days after the end of CIS in the BLA. But CIS-induced decrease in area CA3 BDNF levels, reverses to normal levels within the same period. Finally, BDNF is up regulated in the BLA 1 day after AIS and this increase persists even 10 days later. In contrast, AIS fails to elicit any significant change in area CA3 at either time points. Together, these findings demonstrate that both acute and chronic stress trigger opposite effects on BDNF levels in the BLA versus area CA3, and these divergent changes also follow distinct temporal profiles. These results point to a role for BDNF in stress-induced structural plasticity across both hippocampus and amygdala, two brain areas that have also been implicated in the cognitive and affective symptoms of stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  4. Distinctive amygdala subregions involved in emotion-modulated Stroop interference

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Hyun Jung; Lee, Kanghee; Kim, Hyun Taek; Kim, Hackjin

    2013-01-01

    Despite the well-known role of the amygdala in mediating emotional interference during tasks requiring cognitive resources, no definite conclusion has yet been reached regarding the differential roles of functionally and anatomically distinctive subcomponents of the amygdala in such processes. In this study, we examined female participants and attempted to separate the neural processes for the detection of emotional information from those for the regulation of cognitive interference from emot...

  5. Fear and panic in humans with bilateral amygdala damage

    OpenAIRE

    Feinstein, Justin S.; Buzza, Colin; Hurlemann, Rene; Follmer, Robin L.; Dahdaleh, Nader S.; Coryell, William H.; Welsh, Michael J.; Tranel, Daniel; Wemmie, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Decades of research have highlighted the amygdala’s influential role in fear. Surprisingly, we found that inhalation of 35% CO2 evoked not only fear, but also panic attacks, in three rare patients with bilateral amygdala damage. These results indicate that the amygdala is not required for fear and panic, and make an important distinction between fear triggered by external threats from the environment versus fear triggered internally by CO2.

  6. Association between amygdala reactivity and a dopamine transporter gene polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, O.; Åhs, F; Furmark, T; Appel, L; Linnman, C; Faria, V; Bani, M; Pich, E M; Bettica, P; Henningsson, S; Manuck, S B; Ferrell, R E; Nikolova, Y S; Hariri, A R; Fredrikson, M.

    2014-01-01

    Essential for detection of relevant external stimuli and for fear processing, the amygdala is under modulatory influence of dopamine (DA). The DA transporter (DAT) is of fundamental importance for the regulation of DA transmission by mediating reuptake inactivation of extracellular DA. This study examined if a common functional variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in the 3′ untranslated region of the DAT gene (SLC6A3) influences amygdala function during the processing of aversive emotio...

  7. The Effect of Threat on Novelty Evoked Amygdala Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Balderston, Nicholas L.; Schultz, Doug H.; Helmstetter, Fred J.

    2013-01-01

    A number of recent papers have suggested that the amygdala plays a role in the brain’s novelty detection circuit. In a recent study, we showed that this role may be specific to certain classes of biologically-relevant stimuli, such as human faces. The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether other biologically-relevant stimuli also evoke novelty specific amygdala responses. To test this idea, we presented novel and repeated images of snakes and flowers while measuring BOLD. ...

  8. Does bilateral damage to the human amygdala produce autistic symptoms?

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Lynn K.; Corsello, Christina; Tranel, Daniel; Adolphs, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    A leading neurological hypothesis for autism postulates amygdala dysfunction. This hypothesis has considerable support from anatomical and neuroimaging studies. Individuals with bilateral amygdala lesions show impairments in some aspects of social cognition. These impairments bear intriguing similarity to those reported in people with autism, such as impaired recognition of emotion in faces, impaired theory of mind abilities, failure to fixate eyes in faces, and difficulties in regulating per...

  9. What does the amygdala contribute to social cognition?

    OpenAIRE

    Adolphs, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The amygdala has received intense recent attention from neuroscientists investigating its function at the molecular, cellular, systems, cognitive, and clinical level. It clearly contributes to processing emotionally and socially relevant information, yet a unifying description and computational account have been lacking. The difficulty of tying together the various studies stems in part from the sheer diversity of approaches and species studied, in part from the amygdala's inherent heterogene...

  10. Performance on Indirect Measures of Race Evaluation Predicts Amygdala Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Phelps, Elizabeth A.; O'Connor, Kevin J.; Cunningham, William A.; Funayama, E. Sumie; Gatenby, J. Christopher; Gore, John C.; Banaji, Mahzarin R.

    2000-01-01

    We used fMRI to explore the neural substrates involved in the unconscious evaluation of Black and White social groups. Specifically, we focused on the amygdala, a subcortical structure known to play a role in emotional learning and evaluation. In Experiment 1, White American subjects observed faces of unfamiliar Black and White males. The strength of amygdala activation to Black-versus-White faces was correlated with two indirect (unconscious) measures of race evaluation (Implicit Association...

  11. Juvenile obesity enhances emotional memory and amygdala plasticity through glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitard, Chloé; Maroun, Mouna; Tantot, Frédéric; Cavaroc, Amandine; Sauvant, Julie; Marchand, Alain; Layé, Sophie; Capuron, Lucile; Darnaudery, Muriel; Castanon, Nathalie; Coutureau, Etienne; Vouimba, Rose-Marie; Ferreira, Guillaume

    2015-03-01

    In addition to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, obesity is associated with adverse cognitive and emotional outcomes. Its growing prevalence during adolescence is particularly alarming since recent evidence indicates that obesity can affect hippocampal function during this developmental period. Adolescence is a decisive period for maturation of the amygdala and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis, both required for lifelong cognitive and emotional processing. However, little data are available on the impact of obesity during adolescence on amygdala function. Herein, we therefore evaluate in rats whether juvenile high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity alters amygdala-dependent emotional memory and whether it depends on HPA axis deregulation. Exposure to HFD from weaning to adulthood, i.e., covering adolescence, enhances long-term emotional memories as assessed by odor-malaise and tone-shock associations. Juvenile HFD also enhances emotion-induced neuronal activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), which correlates with protracted plasma corticosterone release. HFD exposure restricted to adulthood does not modify all these parameters, indicating adolescence is a vulnerable period to the effects of HFD-induced obesity. Finally, exaggerated emotional memory and BLA synaptic plasticity after juvenile HFD are alleviated by a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. Altogether, our results demonstrate that juvenile HFD alters HPA axis reactivity leading to an enhancement of amygdala-dependent synaptic and memory processes. Adolescence represents a period of increased susceptibility to the effects of diet-induced obesity on amygdala function. PMID:25740536

  12. Association between amygdala reactivity and a dopamine transporter gene polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, O; Åhs, F; Furmark, T; Appel, L; Linnman, C; Faria, V; Bani, M; Pich, E M; Bettica, P; Henningsson, S; Manuck, S B; Ferrell, R E; Nikolova, Y S; Hariri, A R; Fredrikson, M; Westberg, L; Eriksson, E

    2014-01-01

    Essential for detection of relevant external stimuli and for fear processing, the amygdala is under modulatory influence of dopamine (DA). The DA transporter (DAT) is of fundamental importance for the regulation of DA transmission by mediating reuptake inactivation of extracellular DA. This study examined if a common functional variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in the 3' untranslated region of the DAT gene (SLC6A3) influences amygdala function during the processing of aversive emotional stimuli. Amygdala reactivity was examined by comparing regional cerebral blood flow, measured with positron emission tomography and [(15)O]water, during exposure to angry and neutral faces, respectively, in a Swedish sample comprising 32 patients with social anxiety disorder and 17 healthy volunteers. In a separate US sample, comprising 85 healthy volunteers studied with blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, amygdala reactivity was assessed by comparing the activity during exposure to threatening faces and neutral geometric shapes, respectively. In both the Swedish and the US sample, 9-repeat carriers displayed higher amygdala reactivity than 10-repeat homozygotes. The results suggest that this polymorphism contributes to individual variability in amygdala reactivity. PMID:25093598

  13. Differential serotonergic innervation of the amygdala in bonobos and chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Cheryl D; Barger, Nicole; Taglialatela, Jared P; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Hof, Patrick R; Hopkins, William D; Sherwood, Chet C

    2016-03-01

    Humans' closest living relatives are bonobos (Pan paniscus) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), yet these great ape species differ considerably from each other in terms of social behavior. Bonobos are more tolerant of conspecifics in competitive contexts and often use sexual behavior to mediate social interactions. Chimpanzees more frequently employ aggression during conflicts and actively patrol territories between communities. Regulation of emotional responses is facilitated by the amygdala, which also modulates social decision-making, memory and attention. Amygdala responsiveness is further regulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin. We hypothesized that the amygdala of bonobos and chimpanzees would differ in its neuroanatomical organization and serotonergic innervation. We measured volumes of regions and the length density of serotonin transporter-containing axons in the whole amygdala and its lateral, basal, accessory basal and central nuclei. Results showed that accessory basal nucleus volume was larger in chimpanzees than in bonobos. Of particular note, the amygdala of bonobos had more than twice the density of serotonergic axons than chimpanzees, with the most pronounced differences in the basal and central nuclei. These findings suggest that variation in serotonergic innervation of the amygdala may contribute to mediating the remarkable differences in social behavior exhibited by bonobos and chimpanzees. PMID:26475872

  14. Oxytocin Modulates Amygdala Reactivity to Masked Fearful Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanat, Manuela; Heinrichs, Markus; Mader, Irina; van Elst, Ludger Tebartz; Domes, Gregor

    2015-10-01

    The amygdala reveals enhanced reactivity to fearful eye whites, even when they are backwardly masked by a neutral face and therefore processed with limited visual awareness. In our fMRI study, we investigated whether this effect is indeed associated with fear detection within the eyes of the neutral face mask, or more generally, with reactivity to any salient increase in eye white area. In addition, we examined whether a single dose of intranasal oxytocin would modulate amygdala responses to masked fearful eye whites via a double-blind, placebo-controlled pharmacological protocol. We found that increased amygdala responses to salient changes within a face's eye region occurred specifically for masked fearful eyes but not for similar increases in white area as induced by nonsocial control stimuli. Administration of oxytocin attenuated amygdala responses to masked fearful eye whites. Our results suggest that the amygdala is particularly tuned to potential threat signals from the eye region. The dampening effects of oxytocin on early amygdala reactivity may reflect reduced vigilance for facial threat cues at a preconscious level. Future studies may investigate whether this early modulation accounts for the beneficial effects of oxytocin on social cognition in anxiety-related disorders, as suggested by previous studies. PMID:25881796

  15. Temporal Glare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritschel, Tobias; Ihrke, Matthias; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall;

    2009-01-01

    Glare is a consequence of light scattered within the human eye when looking at bright light sources. This effect can be exploited for tone mapping since adding glare to the depiction of high-dynamic range (HDR) imagery on a low-dynamic range (LDR) medium can dramatically increase perceived contra...... to initially static HDR images. By conducting psychophysical studies, we validate that our method improves perceived brightness and that dynamic glare-renderings are often perceived as more attractive depending on the chosen scene.......Glare is a consequence of light scattered within the human eye when looking at bright light sources. This effect can be exploited for tone mapping since adding glare to the depiction of high-dynamic range (HDR) imagery on a low-dynamic range (LDR) medium can dramatically increase perceived contrast....... Even though most, if not all, subjects report perceiving glare as a bright pattern that fluctuates in time, up to now it has only been modeled as a static phenomenon. We argue that the temporal properties of glare are a strong means to increase perceived brightness and to produce realistic and...

  16. Temporal dynamics of action perception: differences on ERP evoked by object-related and non-object-related actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamain, Yannick; Pluciennicka, Ewa; Kalénine, Solène

    2014-10-01

    While neuropsychological dissociations suggest that distinct processes are involved in execution or perception of transitive (object-related) and intransitive (non-object-related) actions, the few neuroimaging studies that directly contrasted the brain activations underlying transitive and intransitive gesture perception failed to find substantial differences between the two action types. However, the distinction could be visible on brain activity timing within the fronto-parietal network. In this study, we used Event-Related Potential (ERP) method to assess the temporal dynamics of object-related and non-object-related action processing. Although both meaningful, only object-related actions involve object motor features. Accordingly, perception of the two action types would show distinct neural correlates. Participants were presented with four movie types (ORA, Object-Related Action, NORA: Non-Object-Related Action and 2 control movies) and were instructed to perform tasks that required explicit or implicit action recognition (specific action recognition or color change detection). Movies were presented as Point-Light Display (PLD) and thus provided only information about gesture kinematics regardless of action type. ERP were computed during movie visual perception and analyzed as a function of movie type and task. The main result revealed a difference between ORA and NORA on the amplitude of the P3a component in the fronto-parietal region. The difference observed around 250 ms after movie onset do not likely origin from variation in low-level visual features or attention resource allocation. Instead, we suggest that it reflects incidental recruitment of object attributes during object-related action perception. The exact nature of these attributes is discussed. PMID:25204513

  17. Temporal biomass dynamics of an Arctic plankton bloom in response to increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Schulz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification and carbonation, driven by anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, have been shown to affect a variety of marine organisms and are likely to change ecosystem functioning. High latitudes, especially the Arctic, will be the first to encounter profound changes in carbonate chemistry speciation at a large scale, namely the under-saturation of surface waters with respect to aragonite, a calcium carbonate polymorph produced by several organisms in this region. During a CO2 perturbation study in Kongsfjorden on the west coast of Spitsbergen (Norway, in the framework of the EU-funded project EPOCA, the temporal dynamics of a plankton bloom was followed in nine mesocosms, manipulated for CO2 levels ranging initially from about 185 to 1420 μatm. Dissolved inorganic nutrients were added halfway through the experiment. Autotrophic biomass, as identified by chlorophyll a standing stocks (Chl a, peaked three times in all mesocosms. However, while absolute Chl a concentrations were similar in all mesocosms during the first phase of the experiment, higher autotrophic biomass was measured as high in comparison to low CO2 during the second phase, right after dissolved inorganic nutrient addition. This trend then reversed in the third phase. There were several statistically significant CO2 effects on a variety of parameters measured in certain phases, such as nutrient utilization, standing stocks of particulate organic matter, and phytoplankton species composition. Interestingly, CO2 effects developed slowly but steadily, becoming more and more statistically significant with time. The observed CO2-related shifts in nutrient flow into different phytoplankton groups (mainly dinoflagellates, prasinophytes and haptophytes could have consequences for future organic matter flow to higher trophic levels and export production, with consequences

  18. Evaluating spatial-temporal dynamics of net primary productivity of different forest types in northeastern China based on improved FORCCHN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junfang; Yan, Xiaodong; Guo, Jianping; Jia, Gensuo

    2012-01-01

    An improved individual-based forest ecosystem carbon budget model for China (FORCCHN) was applied to investigate the spatial-temporal dynamics of net primary productivity of different forest types in northeastern China. In this study, the forests of northeastern China were categorized into four ecological types according to their habitats and generic characteristics (evergreen broadleaf forest, deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest and deciduous needleleaf forest). The results showed that distribution and change of forest NPP in northeastern China were related to the different forest types. From 1981 to 2002, among the forest types in northeastern China, per unit area NPP and total NPP of deciduous broadleaf forest were the highest, with the values of 729.4 gC/(m(2)•yr) and 106.0 TgC/yr, respectively, followed by mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest, deciduous needleleaf forest and evergreen needleleaf forest. From 1981 to 2002, per unit area NPP and total NPP of different forest types in northeastern China exhibited significant trends of interannual increase, and rapid increase was found between the 1980s and 1990s. The contribution of the different forest type's NPP to total NPP in northeastern China was clearly different. The greatest was deciduous broadleaf forest, followed by mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest and deciduous needleleaf forest. The smallest was evergreen needleleaf forest. Spatial difference in NPP between different forest types was remarkable. High NPP values of deciduous needleleaf forest, mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest and deciduous broadleaf forest were found in the Daxing'anling region, the southeastern of Xiaoxing'anling and Jilin province, and the Changbai Mountain, respectively. However, no regional differences were found for evergreen needleleaf NPP. This study provided not only an estimation NPP of different forest types in northeastern China but also a useful methodology for estimating forest carbon storage at

  19. Temporal biomass dynamics of an Arctic plankton bloom in response to increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Schulz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification and carbonation, driven by anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, have been shown to affect a variety of marine organisms and are likely to change ecosystem functioning. High latitudes, especially the Arctic, will be the first to encounter profound changes in carbonate chemistry speciation at a large scale, namely the under-saturation of surface waters with respect to aragonite, a calcium carbonate polymorph produced by several organisms in this region. During a CO2 perturbation study in 2010, in the framework of the EU-funded project EPOCA, the temporal dynamics of a plankton bloom was followed in nine mesocosms, manipulated for CO2 levels ranging initially from about 185 to 1420 μatm. Dissolved inorganic nutrients were added halfway through the experiment. Autotrophic biomass, as identified by chlorophyll a standing stocks (Chl a, peaked three times in all mesocosms. However, while absolute Chl a concentrations were similar in all mesocosms during the first phase of the experiment, higher autotrophic biomass was measured at high in comparison to low CO2 during the second phase, right after dissolved inorganic nutrient addition. This trend then reversed in the third phase. There were several statistically significant CO2 effects on a variety of parameters measured in certain phases, such as nutrient utilization, standing stocks of particulate organic matter, and phytoplankton species composition. Interestingly, CO2 effects developed slowly but steadily, becoming more and more statistically significant with time. The observed CO2 related shifts in nutrient flow into different phytoplankton groups (mainly diatoms, dinoflagellates, prasinophytes and haptophytes could have consequences for future organic matter flow to higher trophic levels and export production, with consequences for ecosystem productivity and atmospheric

  20. Long-term temporal and spatial dynamics of food availability for endangered mountain gorillas in Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueter, Cyril C; Ndamiyabo, Ferdinand; Plumptre, Andrew J; Abavandimwe, Didier; Mundry, Roger; Fawcett, Katie A; Robbins, Martha M

    2013-03-01

    Monitoring temporal and spatial changes in the resource availability of endangered species contributes to their conservation. The number of critically endangered mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) in the Virunga Volcano population has doubled over the past three decades, but no studies have examined how food availability has changed during that period. First, we assessed if the plant species consumed by the gorillas have changed in abundance and distribution during the past two decades. In 2009-2010, we replicated a study conducted in 1988-1989 by measuring the frequency, density, and biomass of plant species consumed by the gorillas in 496 plots (ca. 6 km(2)) in the Karisoke study area in Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. We expected to observe a decreased presence of major gorilla food plants as a likely result of density-dependent overharvesting by gorillas. Among the five most frequently consumed species (composing approximately 70% of the gorilla's diet, excluding bamboo), two have decreased in availability and abundance, while three have increased. Some species have undergone shifts in their altitudinal distribution, possibly due to regional climatic changes. Second, we made baseline measurements of food availability in a larger area currently utilized by the gorillas. In the extended sampling (n = 473 plots) area (ca. 25 km(2) ), of the five most frequently consumed species, two were not significantly different in frequency from the re-sampled area, while two occurred significantly less frequently, and one occurred significantly more frequently. We discuss the potential impact of gorilla-induced herbivory on changes of vegetation abundance. The changes in the species most commonly consumed by the gorillas could affect their nutrient intake and stresses the importance of monitoring the interrelation among plant population dynamics, species density, and resource use. PMID:23208819

  1. Spatio-Temporal Assessment and Mapping of the Landuse Landcover Dynamics in The Central Forest Belt of Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.O. Oyinloye

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the Landuse and Landcover (LULC dynamics of the central cocoa cultivation area of southwestern Nigeria between 1972 and 2002 using remotely sensed multi-temporal datasets. The datasets are Landsat 1972, 1986, 1991 and 2002 imageries. The datasets were each subjected to supervised classification techniques employing the maximum likelihood classifier using ILWIS software. This implies that field observation for identification and completion of ambiguous features and other details supported by GPS locations was carried out. Seven dominant classes of feature: agro-forest/light forest, built-up area, exposed rock surfaces/bare land, forest reserve, shrub and arable land, ridge forest and water body were identified. A time series analysis of the LULC changes was carried out to provide the necessary understanding of the changes required for policy formulation and decision-making with respect to cocoa production, forest reserve management and landuse planning, control, coordination and budgeting while being mindful of environmental conservation. This indispensable geo-information is yet lacking in the cocoa growing belt of southwestern Nigeria. ArcView software was used to prepare the corresponding time series LULC maps of the study area. The study showed that the forest reserves within the study area reduced at an average rate of 2.78% per year while agro-forest/light forest reduced to 46.39% (i.e., at an average rate of 1.55% per year and, shrub and arable land increased by 323.06% (i.e., at an average rate of 10.77% per year for food production farming to feed the rapidly increasing population between 1972 and 2002.

  2. TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL DYNAMICS OF DIFFERENT PARTICLE SIZE OF SUSPENDED SEDIMENT IN THE LIU RIVER CATCHMENTS,CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haoming FAN; Qiangguo CAI; Chengjiu GUO; Tieliang WANG

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents information on the particle size characteristics of suspended sediment transported by the Liu River, which has the most serious erosion and sedimentation problems in the northeast of China. The median (d50) particle size for the individual stations on the Liu River ranged from 0.0343 to 0.0588 mm. Particles <0.01 mm ranged from 15.4 to 33.3% and >0.05 mm of ranged from 24.3 to 53.7%. Spatial and temporal variations were noticeable in the particle size composition of suspended sediment within the study basins. At different locations the sediment particles size varies as a result of differences in catchment characteristics. The preferential deposition of the coarser size fractions has resulted in downstream fining of the suspended sediment load. In the flood season the suspended sediment particle size was finer than that in low flow season. The relations among water discharge, suspended sediment concentration, and sediment particle size are complicated. At small water discharge or suspended sediment concentration, with the increase of water discharge or sediment concentration the particle size of suspended sediment decreases to a minimum. However, when the water discharge or sediment concentration exceed certain threshold values (turning points) the particle size increases or remains constant with the increase of water discharge or sediment concentration. The tuning points are different in different rivers. Thus, their relations are double-valued. The negative relation between suspended sediment particle size and flow discharge reflects the importance of supply conditions and the positive relation reflects that the flow and hydraulics take a greater role in sediment transportation. On the whole, variation of the sediment particle size is subject to many factors such as the hydraulic conditions, the type and extent of erosion, human activities, vegetation coverage, hydraulic projects, and sediment supply. The findings reported in this paper

  3. Temporal dynamics of a commensal network of cavity-nesting vertebrates: increased diversity during an insect outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockle, Kristina L; Martin, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    Network analysis offers insight into the structure and function of ecological communities, but little is known about how empirical networks change over time during perturbations. "Nest webs" are commensal networks that link secondary cavity-nesting vertebrates (e.g., bluebirds, ducks, and squirrels, which depend on tree cavities for nesting) with the excavators (e.g., woodpeckers) that produce cavities. In central British Columbia, Canada, Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) is considered a keystone excavator, providing most cavities for secondary cavity-nesters. However, roles of species in the network, and overall network architecture, are expected to vary with population fluctuations. Many excavator species increased in abundance in association with a pulse of food (adult and larval beetles) during an outbreak of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), which peaked in 2003-2004. We studied nest-web dynamics from 1998 to 2011 to determine how network architecture changed during this resource pulse. Cavity availability increased at the onset of the beetle outbreak and peaked in 2005. During and after the outbreak, secondary cavity-nesters increased their use of cavities made by five species of beetle-eating excavators, and decreased their use of flicker cavities. We found low link turnover, with 74% of links conserved from year to year. Nevertheless, the network increased in evenness and diversity of interactions, and declined slightly in nestedness and niche overlap. These patterns remained evident seven years after the beetle outbreak, suggesting a legacy effect. In contrast to previous snapshot studies of nest webs, our dynamic approach reveals how the role of each cavity producer, and thus quantitative network architecture, can vary over time. The increase in interaction diversity with the beetle outbreak adds to growing evidence that insect outbreaks can increase components of biodiversity in forest ecosystems at various temporal scales. The observed

  4. The study of temporal dynamics of a change in the degree of polarizing laser radiation scattered by liquor layers for determining the prescription of death coming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachunskyi, V. T.; Pavlukovych, O. V.; Hadniuk, S. V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper was provide a description of the principles defining prescription death by polarimetric study the temporal dynamics of changes in optical anisotropy of the cerebrospinal fluid of the human body. The optical model of polycrystalline networks of human body liquor is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st-4th order), correlation (correlation area, asymmetry coefficient and autocorrelation function excess) and fractal (dispersion of logarithmic dependencies of power spectra) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of absolute value and phase of complex degree of mutual polarization in the points of laser images of liquor and temporal dynamics of optical anisotropy of human body liquor. The diagnostic criteria of death coming prescription are determined.

  5. Temporal dynamics of soil organic carbon after land-use change in the temperate zone – carbon response functions as a model approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poeplau, Christopher; Don, Axel; Vesterdal, Lars; Leifeld, Jens; van Wesemaels, Bas; Schumacher, Jens; Gensior, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Land-use change (LUC) is a major driving factor for the balance of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and the global carbon cycle. The temporal dynamic of SOC after LUC is especially important in temperate systems with a long reaction time. On the basis of 95 compiled studies covering 322 sites in...... the temperate zone, carbon response functions (CRFs) were derived to model the temporal dynamic of SOC after five different LUC types (mean soil depth of 30±6 cm). Grassland establishment caused a long lasting carbon sink with a relative stock change of 128±23% and afforestation on former cropland a...... sink of 116±54%, 100 years after LUC (mean±95% confidence interval). No new equilibrium was reached within 120 years. In contrast, there was no SOC sink following afforestation of grasslands and 75% of all observations showed SOC losses, even after 100 years. Only in the forest floor, there was carbon...

  6. Temporal population dynamics of dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum in a semi-enclosed mariculture pond and its relationship to environmental factors and protozoan grazers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许恒龙; MIN; Gi-Sik; CHOI; Joong-Ki; 朱明壮; 姜勇; AL-RASHEID; Khaled; A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The ecological processes and interrelationships between protists,either autotrophic or heterotrophic,and environmental factors in mariculture ponds are largely unknown.This study investigated the temporal dynamics of potentially harmful dinoflagellate,Prorocentrum minimum (Pavillard) Schiller,and its relationship to physico-chemical factors and protozoan grazers over a complete cycle in a semi-enclosed shrimp-farming pond near Qingdao,Northern China.P.minimum occurred frequently in low numbers from June to ...

  7. Developing Baltic cod recruitment models I : Resolving spatial and temporal dynamics of spawning stock and recruitment for cod, herring, and sprat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köster, Fritz; Möllmann, C.; Neuenfeldt, Stefan;

    2001-01-01

    The Baltic Sea comprises a heterogeneous oceanographic environment influencing the spatial and temporal potential for reproductive success of cod (Gadus morhua) and sprat (Sprattus sprattus) in the different spawning basins. Hence, to quantify stock and recruitment dynamics, it is necessary to......-disaggregated multispecies virtual population analyses (MSVPA) were performed for interacting species cod, herring (Clupea harengus), and sprat in the different subdivisions of the Central Baltic. The MSVPA runs revealed distinct spatial trends in population abundance, spawning biomass, recruitment, and predation...

  8. Dynamics in mangroves assessed by high-resolution and multi-temporal satellite data: a case study in Zhanjiang Mangrove National Nature Reserve (ZMNNR), P. R. China

    OpenAIRE

    K. Leempoel; B. Satyaranayana; Bourgeois, C.; J. Zhang; Chen, M.; Wang, J.; Bogaert, J.; Dahdouh-Guebas, F.

    2013-01-01

    Mangrove forests are declining across the globe, mainly because of human intervention, and therefore require an evaluation of their past and present status (e.g. areal extent, species-level distribution, etc.) to implement better conservation and management strategies. In this paper, mangrove cover dynamics at Gaoqiao (P. R. China) were assessed through time using 1967, 2000 and 2009 satellite imagery (sensors Corona KH-4B, Landsat ETM+, GeoEye-1 respectively). Firstly, multi-temporal analysi...

  9. Ensemble coding of context-dependent fear memory in the amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin A Orsini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available After fear conditioning, presenting the conditioned stimulus (CS alone yields a context-specific extinction memory; fear is suppressed in the extinction context, but renews in any other context. The context-dependence of extinction is mediated by a brain circuit consisting of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala. In the present work, we sought to determine at what level of this circuit context-dependent representations of the CS emerge. To explore this question, we used cellular compartment analysis of temporal activity by fluorescent in situ hybridization (catFISH. This method exploits the intracellular expression profile of the immediate early gene, Arc, to visualize neuronal activation patterns to two different behavioral experiences. Rats were fear conditioned in one context and extinguished in another; twenty-four hours later, they were sequentially exposed to the CS in the extinction context and another context. Control rats were also tested in each context, but were never extinguished. We assessed Arc mRNA expression within the basal amygdala (BA, lateral amygdala (LA, ventral hippocampus (VH, prelimbic cortex (PL and infralimbic cortex (IL. We observed that the sequential retention tests induced context-dependent patterns of Arc expression in the BA, LA, and IL of extinguished rats; this was not observed in non-extinguished controls. In general, non-extinguished animals had proportionately greater numbers of non-selective (double-labeled neurons than extinguished animals. Collectively, these findings suggest that extinction learning results in pattern separation, particularly within the BA, in which unique neuronal ensembles represent fear memories after extinction.

  10. Subgenual Cingulate-Amygdala Functional Disconnection and Vulnerability to Melancholic Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Clifford I; Lythe, Karen E; McKie, Shane; Moll, Jorge; Gethin, Jennifer A; Deakin, John Fw; Elliott, Rebecca; Zahn, Roland

    2016-07-01

    The syndromic heterogeneity of major depressive disorder (MDD) hinders understanding of the etiology of predisposing vulnerability traits and underscores the importance of identifying neurobiologically valid phenotypes. Distinctive fMRI biomarkers of vulnerability to MDD subtypes are currently lacking. This study investigated whether remitted melancholic MDD patients, who are at an elevated lifetime risk for depressive episodes, demonstrate distinctive patterns of resting-state connectivity with the subgenual cingulate cortex (SCC), known to be of core pathophysiological importance for severe and familial forms of MDD. We hypothesized that patterns of disrupted SCC connectivity would be a distinguishing feature of melancholia. A total of 63 medication-free remitted MDD (rMDD) patients (33 melancholic and 30 nonmelancholic) and 39 never-depressed healthy controls (HC) underwent resting-state fMRI scanning. SCC connectivity was investigated with closely connected bilateral a priori regions of interest (ROIs) relevant to MDD (anterior temporal, ventromedial prefrontal, dorsomedial prefrontal cortices, amygdala, hippocampus, septal region, and hypothalamus). Decreased (less positive) SCC connectivity with the right parahippocampal gyrus and left amygdala distinguished melancholic rMDD patients from the nonmelancholic rMDD and HC groups (cluster-based familywise error-corrected p⩽0.007 over individual a priori ROIs corresponding to approximate Bonferroni-corrected p⩽0.05 across all seven a priori ROIs). No areas demonstrating increased (more positive) connectivity were observed. Abnormally decreased connectivity of the SCC with the amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus distinguished melancholic from nonmelancholic rMDD. These results provide the first resting-state neural signature distinctive of melancholic rMDD and may reflect a subtype-specific primary vulnerability factor given a lack of association with the number of previous episodes. PMID:26781519

  11. Temporal dynamics of and effects of an ice storm on litter production in an evergreen broad-leaved forest in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Zhang; Xiaohe Wang; Xiangcheng Mi; Jianhua Chen; Mingjian Yu

    2011-01-01

    To study litter production, composition, temporal dynamics, and the effects of an ice storm on litter production in a 24-ha evergreen broad-leaved forest dynamic plot in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve, Zhejiang, we set up 169 seed traps, and collected litterfall weekly from October 2006 to December 2009. Total annual litter production in 2007 and 2009 was 532.05 g/m2 and 375.17 g/m2, respectively. We attribute the remarkable drop in production due to an ice storm in February 2008. Leaves,...

  12. Temporal Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Petter

    2011-01-01

    A great variety of systems in nature, society and technology can be modeled as graphs of vertices coupled by edges. The network structure, describing how the graph is wired, helps us understand, predict and optimize the behavior of dynamic systems. In many cases, however, the edges are not continuously active. As an example, in networks of communication via email, text messages, or phone calls, edges represent sequences of instantaneous or practically instantaneous contacts. In some cases, edges are active for non-negligible periods of time: e.g., the proximity patterns of inpatients at hospitals can be represented by a graph where an edge between two individuals is on throughout the time they are at the same ward. Like network topology, the temporal structure of edge activations can affect dynamics of systems interacting through the network, from disease contagion on the network of patients to information diffusion over an e-mail network. In this review, we present the emergent field of temporal networks, an...

  13. The intercalated cells of the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhouse, O E

    1986-05-01

    The intercalated cell groups, or massa intercalata, of the amygdala have been studied in rodent brains with Golgi methods. They also have been examined in gallocyanin-chromalum-, AChE-, and Timm-stained rat brains. The Golgi data indicate that the intercalated cells are not confined to a series of isolated cell clumps but form a neuronal net that covers the rostral half of the lateral-basolateral nuclear complex, stretches across a major portion of rostral amygdala, and continues rostrally beneath the anterior commissure. There are two general types of intercalated neuron--medium and large neurons. The medium intercalated neurons are more common. They have round to elongate somata, 9-18 microns in diameter, and round to bipolar dendritic trees, depending on their location. Most of the dendrites are spine-bearing, as are 20% of the somata. Their axons often have locally ramifying collaterals. The parent axons apparently terminate in either the lateral-basolateral or central nuclei and some of them appear to enter the external capsule. There is a unique medium intercalated neuron that has nearly spine-free, varicose dendrites and an axon that is typical of short axon (Golgi II) cells. There are two varieties of large intercalated neuron-spiny and aspiny. Most of them are aspiny, although they usually have a few spines scattered along their dendrites. Both varieties have elongate, sometimes round, somata that can be as much as 60 microns long. Their dendrites are long, thick, and have few branch points. Only the initial part of the large aspiny cell axon has been impregnated. The large spiny cell axons have several local collaterals; the destination of the parent axons is unknown. The intercalated cells occur along fiber bundles, which are probably afferent to them. The axons that travel among the intercalated cells give off short collaterals and boutons en passant. The sources of these fibers are not known. From the published experimental data, it is likely that they

  14. Estudo da dinâmica espaço-temporal do bioma Pantanal por meio de imagens MODIS Spatial-temporal analysis of MODIS image applied to dynamic of Pantanal biome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Adami

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar dados multitemporais, obtidos pelo sensor "moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer" (MODIS, para o estudo da dinâmica espaço-temporal de duas sub-regiões do bioma Pantanal. Foram utilizadas 139 imagens "enhanced vegetation index" (EVI, do produto MOD13 "vegetation index", dados de altimetria oriundos do "shuttle radar topography mission" (SRTM e dados de precipitação do "tropical rainfall measuring mission" (TRMM. Para a redução da dimensionalidade dos dados, as imagens MODIS-EVI foram amostradas com base nas curvas de nível espaçadas em 10 m. Foram aplicadas as técnicas de análise de autocorrelação e análise de agrupamentos aos dados das amostras, e a análise de componentes principais na área total da imagem. Houve dependência tanto temporal quanto espacial da resposta espectral com a precipitação. A análise de agrupamentos apontou a presença de dois grupos, o que indicou a necessidade da análise completa da área. A análise de componentes principais permitiu diferenciar quatro comportamentos distintos: as áreas permanentemente alagadas; as áreas não inundáveis, compostas por vegetação; as áreas inundáveis com maior resposta de vegetação; e áreas com vegetação ripária.The objective of this work was to evaluate multitemporal data, obtained by moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS sensor, for the study of spatial-temporal dynamics in two subregions of the Pantanal biome. One hundred and thirty nine enhanced vegetation index (EVI images, from MOD13 vegetation index product, altimetry data from shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM and tropical rainfall measuring mission (TRMM precipitation data were used. In order to reduce data dimensionality, MODIS EVI images were sampled based on contour lines spacing of 10 m. The autocorrelation and cluster analysis were used for spatial and temporal evaluation of the samples; and the principal components analysis

  15. Spatial and temporal variations of dissolved organic matter dynamics in a disturbed Sphagnum peatland after hydrological restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moing, Franck; Guirimand-Dufour, Audrey; Jozja, Nevila; Defarge, Christian; D'Angelo, Benoît; Binet, Stéphane; Gogo, Sébastien; Laggoun, Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands contain a third of the world soil C in spite of their relatively low global area (3% of land area). They can become sources of C because of human disturbances such as drainage. The aim of this work is to assess the effect of an hydrological restoration on a disturbed Sphagnum peatland. It concerns spatial and temporal variations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics. The investigated site was La Guette peatland (France, N 47°19'44', E 2°17'04', alt. 154m), whose hydrological conditions are influenced by a road passing through its former area. The road drain accelerates drying mechanisms, favouring thus vascular plants settlement to the detriment of specific flora of peatlands (i.e. Sphagnum). Hydrological restoration was undertaken in February 2014. It consisted in building thresholds to slow down drain runoff and to promote the soil rewetting. Two transects of piezometers were settled in independent two hydrological sub-systems: Trans-up and Trans-down. Trans-down is supposed to be influenced by the hydrological restoration, while Trans-up is not. These transects cross the peatland and follow water flow direction until the outlet. Six sampling campaigns were performed before, during and after the vegetation period. Water conductivity and pH were measured on site. Water samples were collected in the piezometers. Samples were filtered in the field at 0.45 μm. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+) and anions (Cl-, SO42-, PO43-, NO2-, NO3-) were measured. Absorbance was measured by UV-VIS spectrophotometer to assess SUVA254 and aromaticity of DOM. Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrices (EEM) were undertaken to characterise fluorescent DOM (FDOM). Humification (HIX) and biological (BIX) fluorescence indices were calculated. PARAFAC algorithm was used to treat EEMs. Precipitations and water levels were measured automatically by a weather station and automatic probes, respectively. Rain water was

  16. Selective involvement of the amygdala in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart J Emmer

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies specifically affect the amygdala in a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. The aim of our study was to investigate whether there is also specific involvement of the amygdala in human SLE. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We analyzed a group of 37 patients with neuropsychiatric SLE (NP-SLE, 21 patients with SLE, and a group of 12 healthy control participants with diffusion weighted imaging (DWI. In addition, in a subset of eight patients, plasma was available to determine their anti-NMDAR antibody status. From the structural magnetic resonance imaging data, the amygdala and the hippocampus were segmented, as well as the white and gray matter, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC was retrieved. ADC values between controls, patients with SLE, and patients with NP-SLE were tested using analysis of variance with post-hoc Bonferroni correction. No differences were found in the gray or white matter segments. The average ADC in the amygdala of patients with NP-SLE and SLE (940 x 10(-6 mm2/s; p = 0.006 and 949 x 10(-6 mm2/s; p = 0.019, respectively was lower than in healthy control participants (1152 x 10(-6 mm2/s. Mann-Whitney analysis revealed that the average ADC in the amygdala of patients with anti-NMDAR antibodies (n = 4; 802 x 10(-6 mm2/s was lower (p = 0.029 than the average ADC of patients without anti-NMDAR antibodies (n = 4; 979 x 10(-6 mm2/s and also lower (p = 0.001 than in healthy control participants. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to our knowledge to observe damage in the amygdala in patients with SLE. Patients with SLE with anti-NMDAR antibodies had more severe damage in the amygdala compared to SLE patients without anti-NMDAR antibodies.

  17. Paradoxical facilitation of working memory after basolateral amygdala damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barak Morgan

    Full Text Available Working memory is a vital cognitive capacity without which meaningful thinking and logical reasoning would be impossible. Working memory is integrally dependent upon prefrontal cortex and it has been suggested that voluntary control of working memory, enabling sustained emotion inhibition, was the crucial step in the evolution of modern humans. Consistent with this, recent fMRI studies suggest that working memory performance depends upon the capacity of prefrontal cortex to suppress bottom-up amygdala signals during emotional arousal. However fMRI is not well-suited to definitively resolve questions of causality. Moreover, the amygdala is neither structurally or functionally homogenous and fMRI studies do not resolve which amygdala sub-regions interfere with working memory. Lesion studies on the other hand can contribute unique causal evidence on aspects of brain-behaviour phenomena fMRI cannot "see". To address these questions we investigated working memory performance in three adult female subjects with bilateral basolateral amygdala calcification consequent to Urbach-Wiethe Disease and ten healthy controls. Amygdala lesion extent and functionality was determined by structural and functional MRI methods. Working memory performance was assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III digit span forward task. State and trait anxiety measures to control for possible emotional differences between patient and control groups were administered. Structural MRI showed bilateral selective basolateral amygdala damage in the three Urbach-Wiethe Disease subjects and fMRI confirmed intact functionality in the remaining amygdala sub-regions. The three Urbach-Wiethe Disease subjects showed significant working memory facilitation relative to controls. Control measures showed no group anxiety differences. Results are provisionally interpreted in terms of a 'cooperation through competition' networks model that may account for the observed paradoxical

  18. Fluoxetine Facilitates Fear Extinction Through Amygdala Endocannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Flynn, Shaun; Brockway, Emma; Kaugars, Katherine; Baldi, Rita; Ramikie, Teniel S; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; Patel, Sachin; Holmes, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacologically elevating brain endocannabinoids (eCBs) share anxiolytic and fear extinction-facilitating properties with classical therapeutics, including the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. There are also known functional interactions between the eCB and serotonin systems and preliminary evidence that antidepressants cause alterations in brain eCBs. However, the potential role of eCBs in mediating the facilitatory effects of fluoxetine on fear extinction has not been established. Here, to test for a possible mechanistic contribution of eCBs to fluoxetine's proextinction effects, we integrated biochemical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral techniques, using the extinction-impaired 129S1/Sv1mJ mouse strain. Chronic fluoxetine treatment produced a significant and selective increase in levels of anandamide in the BLA, and an associated decrease in activity of the anandamide-catabolizing enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase. Slice electrophysiological recordings showed that fluoxetine-induced increases in anandamide were associated with the amplification of eCB-mediated tonic constraint of inhibitory, but not excitatory, transmission in the BLA. Behaviorally, chronic fluoxetine facilitated extinction retrieval in a manner that was prevented by systemic or BLA-specific blockade of CB1 receptors. In contrast to fluoxetine, citalopram treatment did not increase BLA eCBs or facilitate extinction. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel, obligatory role for amygdala eCBs in the proextinction effects of a major pharmacotherapy for trauma- and stressor-related disorders and anxiety disorders. PMID:26514583

  19. Fluoxetine Facilitates Fear Extinction Through Amygdala Endocannabinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Flynn, Shaun; Brockway, Emma; Kaugars, Katherine; Baldi, Rita; Ramikie, Teniel S; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; Patel, Sachin; Holmes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacologically elevating brain endocannabinoids (eCBs) share anxiolytic and fear extinction-facilitating properties with classical therapeutics, including the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. There are also known functional interactions between the eCB and serotonin systems and preliminary evidence that antidepressants cause alterations in brain eCBs. However, the potential role of eCBs in mediating the facilitatory effects of fluoxetine on fear extinction has not been established. Here, to test for a possible mechanistic contribution of eCBs to fluoxetine's proextinction effects, we integrated biochemical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral techniques, using the extinction-impaired 129S1/Sv1mJ mouse strain. Chronic fluoxetine treatment produced a significant and selective increase in levels of anandamide in the BLA, and an associated decrease in activity of the anandamide-catabolizing enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase. Slice electrophysiological recordings showed that fluoxetine-induced increases in anandamide were associated with the amplification of eCB-mediated tonic constraint of inhibitory, but not excitatory, transmission in the BLA. Behaviorally, chronic fluoxetine facilitated extinction retrieval in a manner that was prevented by systemic or BLA-specific blockade of CB1 receptors. In contrast to fluoxetine, citalopram treatment did not increase BLA eCBs or facilitate extinction. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel, obligatory role for amygdala eCBs in the proextinction effects of a major pharmacotherapy for trauma- and stressor-related disorders and anxiety disorders. PMID:26514583

  20. Depression/anxiety disorder and amygdala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described and discussed are neuro-imaging studies on the amygdala (Am) concerning its volume, neuro-active drug effect on it and its response to repulsive and attractive stress-evoked character/temperament tests in patients mainly with major depression (MD) and anxiety disorder (AD), by functional MRI (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). A recent trend of volumetry of Am is the voxel-based morphometry by MRI, of which results are still controversial in MD. In contrast, many studies by PET and fMRI using neuro-active drugs have revealed that Am activity in MD is stimulated, and this hyperactivity can be improved by anti-depressive drugs. In addition, difference of activities is suggested in Am left and right hemispheres. The hyperactivity in Am has been reported also in AD and phobic disorders, of which symptoms are conceivably expressed by the sensitivity changes in the cerebral limbic system involving Am. The author considers the central region responsible for the depressive mood is present around cortex of anteroinferior genu of corpus callosum where neuro-network with Am is dense. (R.T.)

  1. Investigating the relationship between subjective drug craving and temporal dynamics of the default mode network, executive control network, and salience network in methamphetamine dependents using rsfMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanian-Zadeh, Somayyeh; Hossein-Zadeh, Gholam-Ali; Shahbabaie, Alireza; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2016-03-01

    Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) studies using fMRI provides a great deal of knowledge on the spatiotemporal organization of the brain. The relationships between and within a number of resting state functional networks, namely the default mode network (DMN), salience network (SN) and executive control network (ECN) have been intensely studied in basic and clinical cognitive neuroscience [1]. However, the presumption of spatial and temporal stationarity has mostly restricted the assessment of rsFC [1]. In this study, sliding window correlation analysis and k-means clustering were exploited to examine the temporal dynamics of rsFC of these three networks in 24 abstinent methamphetamine dependents. Afterwards, using canonical correlation analysis (CCA) the possible relationship between the level of self-reported craving and the temporal dynamics was examined. Results indicate that the rsFC transits between 6 discrete "FC states" in the meth dependents. CCA results show that higher levels of craving are associated with higher probability of transiting from state 4 to 6 (positive FC of DMN-ECN getting weak and negative FC of DMN-SN appearing) and staying in state 4 (positive FC of DMN-ECN), lower probability of staying in state 2 (negative FC of DMN-ECN), transiting from state 4 to 2 (change of positive FC of DMN-ECN to negative FC), and transiting from state 3 to 5 (appearance of negative FC of DMN-SN and positive FC of DMN-ECN with the presence of negative FC of SN-ECN). Quantitative measures of temporal dynamics in large-scale brain networks could bring new added values to increase potentials for applications of rsfMRI in addiction medicine.

  2. Cannabis use in early adolescence: Evidence of amygdala hypersensitivity to signals of threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Spechler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis use in adolescence may be characterized by differences in the neural basis of affective processing. In this study, we used an fMRI affective face processing task to compare a large group (n = 70 of 14-year olds with a history of cannabis use to a group (n = 70 of never-using controls matched on numerous characteristics including IQ, SES, alcohol and cigarette use. The task contained short movies displaying angry and neutral faces. Results indicated that cannabis users had greater reactivity in the bilateral amygdalae to angry faces than neutral faces, an effect that was not observed in their abstinent peers. In contrast, activity levels in the cannabis users in cortical areas including the right temporal-parietal junction and bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex did not discriminate between the two face conditions, but did differ in controls. Results did not change after excluding subjects with any psychiatric symptomology. Given the high density of cannabinoid receptors in the amygdala, our findings suggest cannabis use in early adolescence is associated with hypersensitivity to signals of threat. Hypersensitivity to negative affect in adolescence may place the subject at-risk for mood disorders in adulthood.

  3. Cannabis use in early adolescence: Evidence of amygdala hypersensitivity to signals of threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spechler, Philip A; Orr, Catherine A; Chaarani, Bader; Kan, Kees-Jan; Mackey, Scott; Morton, Aaron; Snowe, Mitchell P; Hudson, Kelsey E; Althoff, Robert R; Higgins, Stephen T; Cattrell, Anna; Flor, Herta; Nees, Frauke; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W; Whelan, Robert; Büchel, Christian; Bromberg, Uli; Conrod, Patricia; Frouin, Vincent; Papadopoulos, Dimitri; Gallinat, Jurgen; Heinz, Andreas; Walter, Henrik; Ittermann, Bernd; Gowland, Penny; Paus, Tomáš; Poustka, Luise; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Artiges, Eric; Smolka, Michael N; Schumann, Gunter; Garavan, Hugh

    2015-12-01

    Cannabis use in adolescence may be characterized by differences in the neural basis of affective processing. In this study, we used an fMRI affective face processing task to compare a large group (n=70) of 14-year olds with a history of cannabis use to a group (n=70) of never-using controls matched on numerous characteristics including IQ, SES, alcohol and cigarette use. The task contained short movies displaying angry and neutral faces. Results indicated that cannabis users had greater reactivity in the bilateral amygdalae to angry faces than neutral faces, an effect that was not observed in their abstinent peers. In contrast, activity levels in the cannabis users in cortical areas including the right temporal-parietal junction and bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex did not discriminate between the two face conditions, but did differ in controls. Results did not change after excluding subjects with any psychiatric symptomology. Given the high density of cannabinoid receptors in the amygdala, our findings suggest cannabis use in early adolescence is associated with hypersensitivity to signals of threat. Hypersensitivity to negative affect in adolescence may place the subject at-risk for mood disorders in adulthood. PMID:26347227

  4. Nonlinear spatio-temporal filtering of dynamic PET data using a four-dimensional Gaussian filter and expectation-maximization deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a method for denoising dynamic PET data, spatio-temporal expectation-maximization (STEM) filtering, that combines four-dimensional Gaussian filtering with EM deconvolution. The initial Gaussian filter suppresses noise at a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies and EM deconvolution quickly restores the frequencies most important to the signal. We aim to demonstrate that STEM filtering can improve variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images without introducing significant bias. We evaluate STEM filtering with a dynamic phantom study, and with simulated and human dynamic PET studies of a tracer with reversible binding behaviour, [C-11]raclopride, and a tracer with irreversible binding behaviour, [F-18]FDOPA. STEM filtering is compared to a number of established three and four-dimensional denoising methods. STEM filtering provides substantial improvements in variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images generated with a number of kinetic analysis techniques while introducing little bias. STEM filtering does bias early frames, but this does not affect quantitative parameter estimates. STEM filtering is shown to be superior to the other simple denoising methods studied. STEM filtering is a simple and effective denoising method that could be valuable for a wide range of dynamic PET applications. (paper)

  5. Spatial and temporal dynamics of visual search tasks distinguish subtypes of unilateral spatial neglect: Comparison of two cases with viewer-centered and stimulus-centered neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Katsuhiro; Kato, Kenji; Tsuji, Tetsuya; Shindo, Keiichiro; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Liu, Meigen

    2016-08-01

    We developed a computerised test to evaluate unilateral spatial neglect (USN) using a touchscreen display, and estimated the spatial and temporal patterns of visual search in USN patients. The results between a viewer-centered USN patient and a stimulus-centered USN patient were compared. Two right-brain-damaged patients with USN, a patient without USN, and 16 healthy subjects performed a simple cancellation test, the circle test, a visuomotor search test, and a visual search test. According to the results of the circle test, one USN patient had stimulus-centered neglect and a one had viewer-centered neglect. The spatial and temporal patterns of these two USN patients were compared. The spatial and temporal patterns of cancellation were different in the stimulus-centered USN patient and the viewer-centered USN patient. The viewer-centered USN patient completed the simple cancellation task, but paused when transferring from the right side to the left side of the display. Unexpectedly, this patient did not exhibit rightward attention bias on the visuomotor and visual search tests, but the stimulus-centered USN patient did. The computer-based assessment system provided information on the dynamic visual search strategy of patients with USN. The spatial and temporal pattern of cancellation and visual search were different across the two patients with different subtypes of neglect. PMID:26059555

  6. DYPTOP: a cost-efficient TOPMODEL implementation to simulate sub-grid spatio-temporal dynamics of global wetlands and peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, B. D.; Spahni, R.; Joos, F.

    2014-12-01

    Simulating the spatio-temporal dynamics of inundation is key to understanding the role of wetlands under past and future climate change. Earlier modelling studies have mostly relied on fixed prescribed peatland maps and inundation time series of limited temporal coverage. Here, we describe and assess the the Dynamical Peatland Model Based on TOPMODEL (DYPTOP), which predicts the extent of inundation based on a computationally efficient TOPMODEL implementation. This approach rests on an empirical, grid-cell-specific relationship between the mean soil water balance and the flooded area. DYPTOP combines the simulated inundation extent and its temporal persistency with criteria for the ecosystem water balance and the modelled peatland-specific soil carbon balance to predict the global distribution of peatlands. We apply DYPTOP in combination with the LPX-Bern DGVM and benchmark the global-scale distribution, extent, and seasonality of inundation against satellite data. DYPTOP successfully predicts the spatial distribution and extent of wetlands and major boreal and tropical peatland complexes and reveals the governing limitations to peatland occurrence across the globe. Peatlands covering large boreal lowlands are reproduced only when accounting for a positive feedback induced by the enhanced mean soil water holding capacity in peatland-dominated regions. DYPTOP is designed to minimize input data requirements, optimizes computational efficiency and allows for a modular adoption in Earth system models.

  7. Diverting attention suppresses human amygdala responses to faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eMorawetz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies disagree as to whether the processing of emotion-laden visual stimuli is dependent upon the availability of attentional resources or entirely capacity-free. Two main factors have been proposed to be responsible for the discrepancies: the differences in the perceptual attentional demands of the tasks used to divert attentional resources from emotional stimuli and the spatial location of the affective stimuli in the visual field. To date, no neuroimaging report addressed these two issues in the same set of subjects. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate the effects of high and low attentional load as well as different stimulus locations on face processing in the amygdala using fMRI to provide further evidence for one of the two opposing theories. We were able for the first time to directly test the interaction of attentional load and spatial location. The results revealed a strong attenuation of amygdala activity when the attentional load was high. The eccentricity of the emotional stimuli did not affect responses in the amygdala and no interaction effect between attentional load and spatial location was found. We conclude that the processing of emotional stimuli in the amygdala is strongly dependent on the availability of attentional resources without a preferred processing of stimuli presented in the periphery and provide firm evidence for the concept of the attentional load theory of emotional processing in the amygdala.

  8. Amygdala volume is reduced in early course schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Alyson M; Cho, Youngsun T; Tang, Yanqing; Savic, Aleksandar; Krystal, John H; Wang, Fei; Xu, Ke; Anticevic, Alan

    2016-04-30

    Subcortical structural alterations have been implicated in the neuropathology of schizophrenia. Yet, the extent of anatomical alterations for subcortical structures across illness phases remains unknown. To assess this, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to examine volume differences of major subcortical structures: thalamus, nucleus accumbens, caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, amygdala and hippocampus. These differences were examined across four groups: (i) healthy comparison subjects (HCS, n=96); (ii) individuals at high risk (HR, n=21) for schizophrenia; (iii) early-course schizophrenia patients (EC-SCZ, n=28); and (iv) chronic schizophrenia patients (C-SCZ, n=20). Raw gray matter volumes and volumetric ratios (volume of specific structure/total gray matter volume) were extracted using automated segmentation tools. EC-SCZ group exhibited smaller bilateral amygdala volumetric ratios, compared to HCS and HR subjects. Findings did not change when corrected for age, level of education and medication use. Amygdala raw volumes did not differ among groups once adjusted for multiple comparisons, but the smaller amygdala volumetric ratio in EC-SCZ survived Bonferroni correction. Other structures were not different across the groups following Bonferroni correction. Smaller amygdala volumes during early illness course may reflect pathophysiologic changes specific to illness development, including disrupted salience processing and acute stress responses. PMID:27035063

  9. Evidence for smaller right amygdala volumes in posttraumatic stress disorder following childhood trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M. Veer; N.Y.L. Oei; M.A. van Buchem; Ph. Spinhoven; B.M. Elzinga; S.A.R.B. Rombouts

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampus and amygdala volumes in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to childhood trauma are relatively understudied, albeit the potential importance to the disorder. Whereas some studies reported smaller hippocampal volumes, little evidence was found for abnormal amygdala volumes. Here

  10. Temporal population dynamics of dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum in a semi-enclosed mariculture pond and its relationship to environmental factors and protozoan grazers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Henglong; Min, Gi-Sik; Choi, Joong-Ki; Zhu, Mingzhuang; Jiang, Yong; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.

    2010-01-01

    The ecological processes and interrelationships between protists, either autotrophic or heterotrophic, and environmental factors in mariculture ponds are largely unknown. This study investigated the temporal dynamics of potentially harmful dinoflagellate, Prorocentrum minimum (Pavillard) Schiller, and its relationship to physico-chemical factors and protozoan grazers over a complete cycle in a semi-enclosed shrimp-farming pond near Qingdao, Northern China. P. minimum occurred frequently in low numbers from June to August, followed by a sharp increase from the middle of August, reaching a single maximum peak value of 2.2×105 cells L-1 in October. Temporal variation in abundance was positively correlated with dissolved nitrogen, but showed a significant inverse relationship to abundance of the dominant ciliates, Tintinnopsis lohmanni and Askenasia stellaris. The results provide statistical evidence that the number of P. minimum increased with increasing nitrogen, and the suppression or shortening of algal bloom may be associated with protozoan grazers, such as Tintinnopsis lohmanni, in mariculture ponds.

  11. Temporal mapping of CEBPA and CEBPB binding during liver regeneration reveals dynamic occupancy and specific regulatory codes for homeostatic and cell cycle gene batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Schou; Waage, Johannes; Rapin, Nicolas;

    2013-01-01

    homeostatic gene expression prior to S-phase entry. By analyzing the three classes of CEBP bound regions, we uncovered mutually exclusive sets of sequence motifs, suggesting temporal codes of CEBP recruitment by differential cobinding with other factors. These findings were validated by sequential Ch......IP experiments involving a panel of central transcription factors and/or by comparison to external ChIP-seq data. Our quantitative investigation not only provides in vivo evidence for the involvement of many new factors in liver regeneration but also points to similarities in the circuitries regulating self......-renewal of differentiated cells. Taken together, our work emphasizes the power of global temporal analyses of transcription factor occupancy to elucidate mechanisms regulating dynamic biological processes in complex higher organisms....

  12. Effects of Repeated Stress on Excitatory Drive of Basal Amygdala Neurons In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Padival, Mallika; Quinette, Danielle; Rosenkranz, J. Amiel

    2013-01-01

    Chronic stress leads to heightened affective behaviors, and can precipitate the emergence of depression and anxiety. These disorders are associated with increased amygdala activity. In animal models, chronic stress leads to increased amygdala-dependent behaviors, as well as hyperactivity of amygdala neurons. However, it is not known whether increased excitatory synaptic drive after chronic stress contributes to hyperactivity of basolateral amygdala (BLA; comprised of basal, lateral, and acces...

  13. Sex differences in the correlation of emotional control and amygdala volumes in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Blanton, Rebecca E.; CHAPLIN, TARA M.; Sinha, Rajita

    2010-01-01

    We examined male and female adolescents (8–18 years of age) that were scanned with structural brain MRI and looked for a correlation between volume of the right or the left amygdala and parent-reported ability of emotional control. A sex difference was found in the correlation between emotional control and the corrected volume of the left amygdala (that is the amygdala volume adjusted for total cranial volume). In girls, smaller left amygdala volumes were associated with better emotional cont...

  14. Performance on indirect measures of race evaluation predicts amygdala activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, E A; O'Connor, K J; Cunningham, W A; Funayama, E S; Gatenby, J C; Gore, J C; Banaji, M R

    2000-09-01

    We used fMRI to explore the neural substrates involved in the unconscious evaluation of Black and White social groups. Specifically, we focused on the amygdala, a subcortical structure known to play a role in emotional learning and evaluation. In Experiment 1, White American subjects observed faces of unfamiliar Black and White males. The strength of amygdala activation to Black-versus-White faces was correlated with two indirect (unconscious) measures of race evaluation (Implicit Association Test [IAT] and potentiated startle), but not with the direct (conscious) expression of race attitudes. In Experiment 2, these patterns were not obtained when the stimulus faces belonged to familiar and positively regarded Black and White individuals. Together, these results suggest that amygdala and behavioral responses to Black-versus-White faces in White subjects reflect cultural evaluations of social groups modified by individual experience. PMID:11054916

  15. Hippocampus and amygdala morphology in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Bansal, Ravi; Zhu, Hongtu;

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: Limbic structures are implicated in the genesis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) by the presence of mood and cognitive disturbances in affected individuals and by elevated rates of mood disorders in family members of probands with ADHD. OBJECTIVE: To study the morphology...... of the hippocampus and amygdala in children with ADHD. DESIGN: A cross-sectional case-control study of the hippocampus and amygdala using anatomical magnetic resonance imaging. SETTINGS: University research institute. PATIENTS: One hundred fourteen individuals aged 6 to 18 years, 51 with combined......-type ADHD and 63 healthy controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Volumes and measures of surface morphology for the hippocampus and amygdala. RESULTS: The hippocampus was larger bilaterally in the ADHD group than in the control group (t = 3.35; P <.002). Detailed surface analyses of the hippocampus further...

  16. Intact rapid detection of fearful faces in the absence of the amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuchiya, Naotsugu; Moradi, Farshad; Felsen, Csilla; Yamazaki, Madoka; Adolphs, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    The amygdala is thought to process fear-related stimuli rapidly and nonconsciously. We found that an individual with complete bilateral amygdala lesions, who cannot recognize fear from faces, nonetheless showed normal rapid detection and nonconscious processing of those same fearful faces. We conclude that the amygdala is not essential for early stages of fear processing but, instead, modulates recognition and social judgment.

  17. Meta-Analysis of Amygdala Volumes in Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Jonathan C.; Welge, Jeffrey; Strakowski. Stephen M.; Adler, Caleb M.; Delbello, Melissa P.

    2008-01-01

    The size of amygdala of bipolar youths and adults is investigated using neuroimaging studies. Findings showed that smaller volumes of amygdala were observed in youths with bipolar youths compared with children and adolescents without bipolar disorder. The structural amygdala abnormalities in bipolar youths are examined further.

  18. The intercalated nuclear complex of the primate amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikopoulos, Basilis; John, Yohan J; García-Cabezas, Miguel Ángel; Bunce, Jamie G; Barbas, Helen

    2016-08-25

    The organization of the inhibitory intercalated cell masses (IM) of the primate amygdala is largely unknown despite their key role in emotional processes. We studied the structural, topographic, neurochemical and intrinsic connectional features of IM neurons in the rhesus monkey brain. We found that the intercalated neurons are not confined to discrete cell clusters, but form a neuronal net that is interposed between the basal nuclei and extends to the dorsally located anterior, central, and medial nuclei of the amygdala. Unlike the IM in rodents, which are prominent in the anterior half of the amygdala, the primate inhibitory net stretched throughout the antero-posterior axis of the amygdala, and was most prominent in the central and posterior extent of the amygdala. There were two morphologic types of intercalated neurons: spiny and aspiny. Spiny neurons were the most abundant; their somata were small or medium size, round or elongated, and their dendritic trees were round or bipolar, depending on location. The aspiny neurons were on average slightly larger and had varicose dendrites with no spines. There were three non-overlapping neurochemical populations of IM neurons, in descending order of abundance: (1) Spiny neurons that were positive for the striatal associated dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP-32+); (2) Aspiny neurons that expressed the calcium-binding protein calbindin (CB+); and (3) Aspiny neurons that expressed nitric oxide synthase (NOS+). The unique combinations of structural and neurochemical features of the three classes of IM neurons suggest different physiological properties and function. The three types of IM neurons were intermingled and likely interconnected in distinct ways, and were innervated by intrinsic neurons within the amygdala, or by external sources, in pathways that underlie fear conditioning and anxiety. PMID:27256508

  19. Specialized pathways from the primate amygdala to posterior orbitofrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbie, Clare; Barbas, Helen

    2014-06-11

    The primate amygdala sends dense projections to posterior orbitofrontal cortex (pOFC) in pathways that are critical for processing emotional content, but the synaptic mechanisms are not understood. We addressed this issue by investigating pathways in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) from the amygdala to pOFC at the level of the system and synapse. Terminations from the amygdala were denser and larger in pOFC compared with the anterior cingulate cortex, which is also strongly connected with the amygdala. Axons from the amygdala terminated most densely in the upper layers of pOFC through large terminals. Most of these terminals innervated spines of presumed excitatory neurons and many were frequently multisynaptic and perforated, suggesting high synaptic efficacy. These amygdalar synapses in pOFC exceeded in size and specialization even thalamocortical terminals from the prefrontal-related thalamic mediodorsal nucleus to the middle cortical layers, which are thought to be highly efficient drivers of cortical neurons. Pathway terminals in the upper layers impinge on the apical dendrites of neurons in other layers, suggesting that the robust amygdalar projections may also activate neurons in layer 5 that project back to the amygdala and beyond to autonomic structures. Among inhibitory neurons, the amygdalar pathway innervated preferentially the neurochemical classes of calbindin and calretinin neurons in the upper layers of pOFC, which are synaptically suited to suppress noise and enhance signals. These features provide a circuit mechanism for flexibly shifting focus and adjusting emotional drive in processes disrupted in psychiatric disorders, such as phobias and obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:24920616

  20. Dual-color dynamic tracking of GM-CSF receptors/JAK2 kinases signaling activation using temporal focusing multiphoton fluorescence excitation and astigmatic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Fan-Ching; Lien, Chi-Hsiang; Dai, Yang-Hong

    2015-11-30

    The dual-color dynamic particle tracking approach that uses temporal focusing multiphoton fluorescence excitation and two-channel astigmatic imaging is utilized to track molecular trajectories in three dimensions to explore molecular interactions. Images of two fluorophores were obtained to extract their positions by optical sectioning excitation using a fast temporal focusing multiphoton excitation microscope (TFMPEM) and by the simultaneous collection of data in two channels. The presented pair of cylindrical lenses, which was used to adjust the astigmatism effect with the minimum shifting of the imaging plane, was more feasible and flexible than single cylindrical lens for aligning two separate detection channels in astigmatic imaging. The lateral and axial positioning resolutions were observed to be approximately 9-13 nm and 23-30 nm respectively, for the two fluorescence channels. The dynamic movement and binding behavior of clusters of GM-CSF receptors and JAK2 kinases in HeLa cells in the presence of GM-CSF ligands were observed. Therefore, the proposed dual-color tracking strategy is useful for the dynamic study of molecular interactions in living specimens with a fast frame rate, less photobleaching, better penetration depth, and minimum optical trapping force. PMID:26698726