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Sample records for amygdala temporal dynamics

  1. Amygdala temporal dynamics: temperamental differences in the timing of amygdala response to familiar and novel faces

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    Shelton Richard C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibited temperament - the predisposition to respond to new people, places or things with wariness or avoidance behaviors - is associated with increased risk for social anxiety disorder and major depression. Although the magnitude of the amygdala's response to novelty has been identified as a neural substrate of inhibited temperament, there may also be differences in temporal dynamics (latency, duration, and peak. We hypothesized that persons with inhibited temperament would have faster responses to novel relative to familiar neutral faces compared to persons with uninhibited temperament. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure the temporal dynamics of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD response to both novel and familiar neutral faces in participants with inhibited or uninhibited temperament. Results Inhibited participants had faster amygdala responses to novel compared with familiar faces, and both longer and greater amygdala response to all faces. There were no differences in peak response. Conclusion Faster amygdala response to novelty may reflect a computational bias that leads to greater neophobic responses and represents a mechanism for the development of social anxiety.

  2. Differential Dynamics of Amino Acid Release in the Amygdala and Olfactory Cortex during Odor Fear Acquisition as Revealed with Simultaneous High Temporal Resolution Microdialysis

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    Hegoburu, Chloe; Sevelinges, Yannick; Thevenet, Marc; Gervais, Remi; Parrot, Sandrine; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Although the amygdala seems to be essential to the formation and storage of fear memories, it might store only some aspects of the aversive event and facilitate the storage of more specific sensory aspects in cortical areas. We addressed the time course of amygdala and cortical activation in the context of odor fear conditioning in rats. Using…

  3. Absence of gender effect on amygdala volume in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Silva, Ivaldo; Lin, Katia; Jackowski, Andrea P; Centeno, Ricardo da Silva; Pinto, Magali L; Carrete, Henrique; Yacubian, Elza M; Amado, Débora

    2010-11-01

    Sexual dimorphism has already been described in temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS). This study evaluated the effect of gender on amygdala volume in patients with TLE-MTS. One hundred twenty-four patients with refractory unilateral or bilateral TLE-MTS who were being considered for epilepsy surgery underwent a comprehensive presurgical evaluation and MRI. Amygdalas of 67 women (27 with right; 32 with left, and 8 with bilateral TLE) and 57 men (22 with right, 30 with left, and 5 with bilateral TLE) were manually segmented. Significant ipsilateral amygdala volume reduction was observed for patients with right and left TLE. No gender effect on amygdala volume was observed. Contralateral amygdalar asymmetry was observed for patients with right and left TLE. Although no gender effect was observed on amygdala volume, ipsilateral amygdala volume reductions in patients with TLE might be related to differential rates of cerebral maturation between hemispheres.

  4. Dynamic modulation of amygdala-hippocampal connectivity by emotional arousal.

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    Fastenrath, Matthias; Coynel, David; Spalek, Klara; Milnik, Annette; Gschwind, Leo; Roozendaal, Benno; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J F

    2014-10-15

    Positive and negative emotional events are better remembered than neutral events. Studies in animals suggest that this phenomenon depends on the influence of the amygdala upon the hippocampus. In humans, however, it is largely unknown how these two brain structures functionally interact and whether these interactions are similar between positive and negative information. Using dynamic causal modeling of fMRI data in 586 healthy subjects, we show that the strength of the connection from the amygdala to the hippocampus was rapidly and robustly increased during the encoding of both positive and negative pictures in relation to neutral pictures. We also observed an increase in connection strength from the hippocampus to the amygdala, albeit at a smaller scale. These findings indicate that, during encoding, emotionally arousing information leads to a robust increase in effective connectivity from the amygdala to the hippocampus, regardless of its valence.

  5. Updating temporal expectancy of an aversive event engages striatal plasticity under amygdala control

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    Dallérac, Glenn; Graupner, Michael; Knippenberg, Jeroen; Martinez, Raquel Chacon Ruiz; Tavares, Tatiane Ferreira; Tallot, Lucille; El Massioui, Nicole; Verschueren, Anna; Höhn, Sophie; Bertolus, Julie Boulanger; Reyes, Alex; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Schafe, Glenn E.; Diaz-Mataix, Lorenzo; Doyère, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Pavlovian aversive conditioning requires learning of the association between a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an unconditioned, aversive stimulus (US) but also involves encoding the time interval between the two stimuli. The neurobiological bases of this time interval learning are unknown. Here, we show that in rats, the dorsal striatum and basal amygdala belong to a common functional network underlying temporal expectancy and learning of a CS–US interval. Importantly, changes in coherence between striatum and amygdala local field potentials (LFPs) were found to couple these structures during interval estimation within the lower range of the theta rhythm (3–6 Hz). Strikingly, we also show that a change to the CS–US time interval results in long-term changes in cortico-striatal synaptic efficacy under the control of the amygdala. Collectively, this study reveals physiological correlates of plasticity mechanisms of interval timing that take place in the striatum and are regulated by the amygdala. PMID:28067224

  6. Amygdala enlargement in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy without hippocampal sclerosis

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    Ana Carolina Coan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE without MRI abnormalities (MTLE-NL represent a challenge for definition of underlying pathology and for presurgical evaluation. In a recent study we observed significant amygdala enlargement in 14% of MTLE patients with MRI signs of HS. Areas of gray matter volume (GMV increase could represent structural abnormalities related to the epileptogenic zone or part of a developmental abnormality. Our objective was to look for undetected areas of increased GMV in MTLE-NL using post processing MRI techniques to better understand the pathophysiology of this condition.Methods: We evaluated 66 patients with MTLE-NL on visual analysis and 82 controls. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM group analysis was performed with VBM8/SPM8 looking for areas of increased GMV. We then performed automatic amygdala volumetry using Freesurfer software and T2 relaxometry to confirm VBM findings.Results: VBM group-analysis demonstrated increased amygdala volume in the MTLE-NL group compared to controls. Individual volumetric analysis confirmed amygdala enlargement (AE in eight (12% patients. Overall, from all patients with AE and defined epileptic focus, four (57% had the predominant increased volume ipsilateral to the epileptic focus. These results were cross-validated by a secondary VBM analysis including subgroups of patients according to the volumetric data. T2 relaxometry demonstrated no amygdala hyperintense signal in any individual with significant amygdala enlargement. There were no clinical differences between patients with and without AE.Discussion: This exploratory study demonstrates the occurrence of AE in 12% of patients with MTLE-NL. This finding supports the hypothesis that there might be a subgroup of patients with MTLE-NL in which the enlarged amygdala could be related to the epileptogenic process. Further studies are necessary but this finding could be of great importance in the understanding of MTLE-NL.

  7. Threat of punishment motivates memory encoding via amygdala, not midbrain, interactions with the medial temporal lobe.

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    Murty, Vishnu P; Labar, Kevin S; Adcock, R Alison

    2012-06-27

    Neural circuits associated with motivated declarative encoding and active threat avoidance have both been described, but the relative contribution of these systems to punishment-motivated encoding remains unknown. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging in humans to examine mechanisms of declarative memory enhancement when subjects were motivated to avoid punishments that were contingent on forgetting. A motivational cue on each trial informed participants whether they would be punished or not for forgetting an upcoming scene image. Items associated with the threat of shock were better recognized 24 h later. Punishment-motivated enhancements in subsequent memory were associated with anticipatory activation of right amygdala and increases in its functional connectivity with parahippocampal and orbitofrontal cortices. On a trial-by-trial basis, right amygdala activation during the motivational cue predicted hippocampal activation during encoding of the subsequent scene; across participants, the strength of this interaction predicted memory advantages due to motivation. Of note, punishment-motivated learning was not associated with activation of dopaminergic midbrain, as would be predicted by valence-independent models of motivation to learn. These data are consistent with the view that motivation by punishment activates the amygdala, which in turn prepares the medial temporal lobe for memory formation. The findings further suggest a brain system for declarative learning motivated by punishment that is distinct from that for learning motivated by reward.

  8. Temporal and spacial changes of highly polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule immunoreactivity in amygdala kindling development.

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    Sato, K; Iwai, M; Nagano, I; Shoji, M; Abe, K

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the migration of neural stem cells as well as neural plastic changes in epileptic brain, spaciotemporal expression of immunoreactive highly polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) was examined in amygdala kindling development of rat. The neural migration and synaptic remodeling detected with PSA-NCAM staining occurred in dentate gyrus of hippocampus, subventricular zone and pyriform cortex with amygdaloid kindling in generalized seizure but not in partial seizure. Although PSA-NCAM positive dendrite in dentate gyrus was minimally found in the control brain, it extended slightly in animals with partial seizure, and greatly toward the molecular layer with generalized seizure. Thus, the migration of neural stem cells as well as neural plastic changes were specially and temporally different between brain regions depending on different kindling stages. These changes may mainly contribute to the reorganization of neural network in epileptic brain.

  9. Aberrant functional connectivity between the amygdala and the temporal pole in drug-free generalized anxiety disorder

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    Wei Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The amygdala and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC play important roles in emotion dysregulation, which has a profound impact on etiologic research of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD. The present study analyzed both eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI of 43 subjects (21 GAD patients with medicine free and 22 matched healthy controls. The amygdala and the DLPFC were defined as regions of interest (ROI to analyze functional connectivity (FC in GAD patients compared with healthy controls. The main findings revealed GAD patients had increased FC between the amygdala and the temporal pole compared to healthy controls, which was found in both eyes-open and eyes-closed rs-fMRI. And altered FC between the ROIs and brain regions that mainly belonged to the default mode network (DMN were found. These findings suggest that the abnormal FC between the amygdala and the temporal pole may contribute to the pathophysiology of GAD, and provide insights into the current understanding of the emotion dysregulation of anxiety disorders.

  10. Aberrant Functional Connectivity between the Amygdala and the Temporal Pole in Drug-Free Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

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    Li, Wei; Cui, Huiru; Zhu, Zhipei; Kong, Li; Guo, Qian; Zhu, Yikang; Hu, Qiang; Zhang, Lanlan; Li, Hui; Li, Qingwei; Jiang, Jiangling; Meyers, Jordan; Li, Jianqi; Wang, Jijun; Yang, Zhi; Li, Chunbo

    2016-01-01

    The amygdala and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) play important roles in "emotion dysregulation," which has a profound impact on etiologic research of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The present study analyzed both eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) of 43 subjects (21 GAD patients with medicine free and 22 matched healthy controls). The amygdala and the DLPFC were defined as regions of interest (ROI) to analyze functional connectivity (FC) in GAD patients compared with healthy controls. The main findings revealed GAD patients had increased FC between the amygdala and the temporal pole compared to healthy controls, which was found in both eyes-open and eyes-closed rs-fMRI. And altered FC between the ROIs and brain regions that mainly belonged to the default mode network (DMN) were found. These findings suggest that the abnormal FC between the amygdala and the temporal pole may contribute to the pathophysiology of GAD, and provide insights into the current understanding of the emotion dysregulation of anxiety disorders.

  11. Dynamic modulation of amygdala-hippocampal connectivity by emotional arousal

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    Fastenrath, M.; Coynel, D.; Spalek, K.; Milnik, A.; Gschwind, L.; Roozendaal, B.; Papassotiropoulos, A.; Quervain, D.J. de

    2014-01-01

    Positive and negative emotional events are better remembered than neutral events. Studies in animals suggest that this phenomenon depends on the influence of the amygdala upon the hippocampus. In humans, however, it is largely unknown how these two brain structures functionally interact and whether

  12. Dynamic Changes in Amygdala Psychophysiological Connectivity Reveal Distinct Neural Networks for Facial Expressions of Basic Emotions

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    Diano, Matteo; Tamietto, Marco; Celeghin, Alessia; Weiskrantz, Lawrence; Tatu, Mona-Karina; Bagnis, Arianna; Duca, Sergio; Geminiani, Giuliano; Cauda, Franco; Costa, Tommaso

    2017-01-01

    The quest to characterize the neural signature distinctive of different basic emotions has recently come under renewed scrutiny. Here we investigated whether facial expressions of different basic emotions modulate the functional connectivity of the amygdala with the rest of the brain. To this end, we presented seventeen healthy participants (8 females) with facial expressions of anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness and emotional neutrality and analyzed amygdala’s psychophysiological interaction (PPI). In fact, PPI can reveal how inter-regional amygdala communications change dynamically depending on perception of various emotional expressions to recruit different brain networks, compared to the functional interactions it entertains during perception of neutral expressions. We found that for each emotion the amygdala recruited a distinctive and spatially distributed set of structures to interact with. These changes in amygdala connectional patters characterize the dynamic signature prototypical of individual emotion processing, and seemingly represent a neural mechanism that serves to implement the distinctive influence that each emotion exerts on perceptual, cognitive, and motor responses. Besides these differences, all emotions enhanced amygdala functional integration with premotor cortices compared to neutral faces. The present findings thus concur to reconceptualise the structure-function relation between brain-emotion from the traditional one-to-one mapping toward a network-based and dynamic perspective. PMID:28345642

  13. Targeting the endocannabinoid system in the amygdala kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy in mice.

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    Wendt, Hannes; Soerensen, Jonna; Wotjak, Carsten T; Potschka, Heidrun

    2011-07-01

    The endocannabinoid system can be considered as a putative target to affect ictogenesis as well as the generation of a hyperexcitable epileptic network. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of a CB1 receptor agonist (WIN55.212-2) and of an inhibitor of the enzymatic degradation of the endocannabinoid anandamide (fatty acid hydrolase inhibitor URB597) in the amygdala kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Only minor effects on seizure thresholds and seizure parameters without a clear dose-dependency were observed in fully kindled mice. When evaluating the impact on kindling acquisition, WIN55.212-2 significantly delayed the progression of seizure severity. In contrast, URB597 did not affect the development of seizures in the kindling paradigm. Analysis of cell proliferation and neurogenesis during the kindling process revealed that URB597 significantly reduced the number of newborn neurons. These data give first evidence that CB1-receptor activation might render a disease-modifying approach. Future studies are necessary that further analyze the role of CB1 receptors and to confirm the efficacy of CB1-receptor agonists in other models of chronic epilepsy.

  14. Early versus late-phase consolidation of opiate reward memories requires distinct molecular and temporal mechanisms in the amygdala-prefrontal cortical pathway.

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    Shervin Gholizadeh

    Full Text Available The consolidation of newly acquired memories involves the temporal transition from a recent, less stable trace to a more permanent consolidated form. Opiates possess potent rewarding effects and produce powerful associative memories. The activation of these memories is associated with opiate abuse relapse phenomena and the persistence of compulsive opiate dependence. However, the neuronal, molecular and temporal mechanisms by which associative opiate reward memories are consolidated are not currently understood. We report that the consolidation of associative opiate reward memories involves a temporal and molecular switch between the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA (early consolidation phase to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC (late consolidation phase. We demonstrate at the molecular, behavioral and neuronal levels that the consolidation of a recently acquired opiate reward memory involves an extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK-dependent phosphorylation process within the BLA. In contrast, later-stage consolidation of a newly acquired memory is dependent upon a calcium-calmodulin-dependent (CaMKII, ERK-independent, mechanism in the mPFC, over a 12 hr temporal gradient. In addition, using in vivo multi-unit neuronal recordings in the mPFC, we report that protein synthesis within the BLA modulates the consolidation of opiate-reward memory in neuronal mPFC sub-populations, via the same temporal dynamic.

  15. Early versus late-phase consolidation of opiate reward memories requires distinct molecular and temporal mechanisms in the amygdala-prefrontal cortical pathway.

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    Gholizadeh, Shervin; Sun, Ninglei; De Jaeger, Xavier; Bechard, Melanie; Coolen, Lique; Laviolette, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    The consolidation of newly acquired memories involves the temporal transition from a recent, less stable trace to a more permanent consolidated form. Opiates possess potent rewarding effects and produce powerful associative memories. The activation of these memories is associated with opiate abuse relapse phenomena and the persistence of compulsive opiate dependence. However, the neuronal, molecular and temporal mechanisms by which associative opiate reward memories are consolidated are not currently understood. We report that the consolidation of associative opiate reward memories involves a temporal and molecular switch between the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) (early consolidation phase) to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) (late consolidation phase). We demonstrate at the molecular, behavioral and neuronal levels that the consolidation of a recently acquired opiate reward memory involves an extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)-dependent phosphorylation process within the BLA. In contrast, later-stage consolidation of a newly acquired memory is dependent upon a calcium-calmodulin-dependent (CaMKII), ERK-independent, mechanism in the mPFC, over a 12 hr temporal gradient. In addition, using in vivo multi-unit neuronal recordings in the mPFC, we report that protein synthesis within the BLA modulates the consolidation of opiate-reward memory in neuronal mPFC sub-populations, via the same temporal dynamic.

  16. Amygdala regulates risk of predation in rats foraging in a dynamic fear environment.

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    Choi, June-Seek; Kim, Jeansok J

    2010-12-14

    In a natural environment, foragers constantly face the risk of encountering predators. Fear is a defensive mechanism evolved to protect animals from danger by balancing the animals' needs for primary resources with the risk of predation, and the amygdala is implicated in mediating fear responses. However, the functions of fear and amygdala in foraging behavior are not well characterized because of the technical difficulty in quantifying prey-predator interaction with real (unpredictable) predators. Thus, the present study investigated the rat's foraging behavior in a seminaturalistic environment when confronted with a predator-like robot programmed to surge toward the animal seeking food. Rats initially fled into the nest and froze (demonstrating fear) and then cautiously approached and seized the food as a function of decreasing nest-food and increasing food-robot distances. The likelihood of procuring food increased and decreased via lesioning/inactivating and disinhibiting the amygdala, respectively. These results indicate that the amygdala bidirectionally regulates risk behavior in rats foraging in a dynamic fear environment.

  17. Neuroimaging the temporal dynamics of human avoidance to sustained threat.

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    Schlund, Michael W; Hudgins, Caleb D; Magee, Sandy; Dymond, Simon

    2013-11-15

    Many forms of human psychopathology are characterized by sustained negative emotional responses to threat and chronic behavioral avoidance, implicating avoidance as a potential transdiagnostic factor. Evidence from both nonhuman neurophysiological and human neuroimaging studies suggests a distributed frontal-limbic-striatal brain network supports avoidance. However, our understanding of the temporal dynamics of the network to sustained threat that prompts sustained avoidance is limited. To address this issue, 17 adults were given extensive training on a modified free-operant avoidance task in which button pressing avoided money loss during a sustained threat period. Subsequently, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing the avoidance task. In our regions of interest, we observed phasic, rather than sustained, activation during sustained threat in dorsolateral and inferior frontal regions, anterior and dorsal cingulate, ventral striatum and regions associated with emotion, including the amygdala, insula, substantia nigra and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis complex. Moreover, trait levels of experiential avoidance were negatively correlated with insula, hippocampal and amygdala activation. These findings suggest knowledge that one can consistently avoid aversive outcomes is not associated with decreased threat-related responses and that individuals with greater experiential avoidance exhibit reduced reactivity to initial threat. Implications for understanding brain mechanisms supporting human avoidance and psychological theories of avoidance are discussed.

  18. The Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Phase Synchronization during Epileptogenesis in Amygdala-Kindling Mice

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    Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji; Zhang, Pu-Ming; Lu, Qin-Chi

    2016-01-01

    The synchronization among the activities of neural populations in functional regions is one of the most important electrophysiological phenomena in epileptic brains. The spatiotemporal dynamics of phase synchronization was investigated to reveal the reciprocal interaction between different functional regions during epileptogenesis. Local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded simultaneously from the basolateral amygdala (BLA), the cornu ammonis 1 of hippocampus (CA1) and the mediodorsal nucleus of thalamus (MDT) in the mouse amygdala-kindling models during the development of epileptic seizures. The synchronization of LFPs was quantified between BLA, CA1 and MDT using phase-locking value (PLV). During amygdala kindling, behavioral changes (from stage 0 to stage 5) of mice were accompanied by after-discharges (ADs) of similar waveforms appearing almost simultaneously in CA1, MDT, as well as BLA. AD durations were positively related to the intensity of seizures. During seizures at stages 1~2, PLVs remained relatively low and increased dramatically shortly after the termination of the seizures; by contrast, for stages 3~5, PLVs remained a relatively low level during the initial period but increased dramatically before the seizure termination. And in the theta band, the degree of PLV enhancement was positively associated with seizure intensity. The results suggested that during epileptogenesis, the functional regions were kept desynchronized rather than hyper-synchronized during either the initial or the entire period of the seizures; so different dynamic patterns of phase synchronization may be involved in different periods of the epileptogenesis, and this might also reflect that during seizures at different stages, the mechanisms underlying the dynamics of phase synchronization were different. PMID:27100891

  19. The Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Phase Synchronization during Epileptogenesis in Amygdala-Kindling Mice.

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    Li, Jia-Jia; Li, Yong-Hua; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji; Zhang, Pu-Ming; Lu, Qin-Chi

    2016-01-01

    The synchronization among the activities of neural populations in functional regions is one of the most important electrophysiological phenomena in epileptic brains. The spatiotemporal dynamics of phase synchronization was investigated to reveal the reciprocal interaction between different functional regions during epileptogenesis. Local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded simultaneously from the basolateral amygdala (BLA), the cornu ammonis 1 of hippocampus (CA1) and the mediodorsal nucleus of thalamus (MDT) in the mouse amygdala-kindling models during the development of epileptic seizures. The synchronization of LFPs was quantified between BLA, CA1 and MDT using phase-locking value (PLV). During amygdala kindling, behavioral changes (from stage 0 to stage 5) of mice were accompanied by after-discharges (ADs) of similar waveforms appearing almost simultaneously in CA1, MDT, as well as BLA. AD durations were positively related to the intensity of seizures. During seizures at stages 1~2, PLVs remained relatively low and increased dramatically shortly after the termination of the seizures; by contrast, for stages 3~5, PLVs remained a relatively low level during the initial period but increased dramatically before the seizure termination. And in the theta band, the degree of PLV enhancement was positively associated with seizure intensity. The results suggested that during epileptogenesis, the functional regions were kept desynchronized rather than hyper-synchronized during either the initial or the entire period of the seizures; so different dynamic patterns of phase synchronization may be involved in different periods of the epileptogenesis, and this might also reflect that during seizures at different stages, the mechanisms underlying the dynamics of phase synchronization were different.

  20. More consistently altered connectivity patterns for cerebellum and medial temporal lobes than for amygdala and striatum in schizophrenia

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    Henning ePeters

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain architecture can be divided into a cortico-thalamic system and modulatory ‘subcortical-cerebellar’ systems containing key structures such as striatum, medial temporal lobes (MTLs, amygdala, and cerebellum. Subcortical-cerebellar systems are known to be altered in schizophrenia. In particular, intrinsic functional brain connectivity (iFC between these systems has been consistently demonstrated in patients. While altered connectivity is known for each subcortical-cerebellar system separately, it is unknown whether subcortical-cerebellar systems’ connectivity patterns with the cortico-thalamic system are comparably altered across systems, i.e., if separate subcortical-cerebellar systems’ connectivity patterns are consistent across patients. Methods: To investigate this question, 18 patients with schizophrenia (3 unmedicated, 15 medicated with atypical antipsychotics and 18 healthy controls were assessed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Independent component analysis of fMRI data revealed cortical intrinsic brain networks (NWs with time courses representing proxies for cortico-thalamic system activity. Subcortical-cerebellar systems’ activity was represented by fMRI-based time courses of selected regions-of-interest (ROIs (i.e., striatum, MTL, amygdala, cerebellum. Correlation analysis among ROI- and NWs-time courses yielded individual connectivity matrices (i.e. connectivity between NW and ROIs (allROIs-NW, separateROI-NW, only NWs (NWs-NWs, and only ROIs (allROIs-allROIs as main outcome measures, which were classified by support-vector-machine-based leave-one-out cross-validation. Differences in classification accuracy were statistically evaluated for consistency across subjects and systems. Results: Correlation matrices based on allROIs-NWs yielded 91% classification accuracy, which was significantly superior to allROIs-allROIs and NWs-NWs (56% and 74%, respectively. Considering separate

  1. Temporal dynamics of musical emotions examined through intersubject synchrony of brain activity.

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    Trost, Wiebke; Frühholz, Sascha; Cochrane, Tom; Cojan, Yann; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2015-12-01

    To study emotional reactions to music, it is important to consider the temporal dynamics of both affective responses and underlying brain activity. Here, we investigated emotions induced by music using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a data-driven approach based on intersubject correlations (ISC). This method allowed us to identify moments in the music that produced similar brain activity (i.e. synchrony) among listeners under relatively natural listening conditions. Continuous ratings of subjective pleasantness and arousal elicited by the music were also obtained for the music outside of the scanner. Our results reveal synchronous activations in left amygdala, left insula and right caudate nucleus that were associated with higher arousal, whereas positive valence ratings correlated with decreases in amygdala and caudate activity. Additional analyses showed that synchronous amygdala responses were driven by energy-related features in the music such as root mean square and dissonance, while synchrony in insula was additionally sensitive to acoustic event density. Intersubject synchrony also occurred in the left nucleus accumbens, a region critically implicated in reward processing. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and usefulness of an approach based on ISC to explore the temporal dynamics of music perception and emotion in naturalistic conditions.

  2. Dynamic modulation of inflammatory pain-related affective and sensory symptoms by optical control of amygdala metabotropic glutamate receptor 4.

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    Zussy, C; Gómez-Santacana, X; Rovira, X; De Bundel, D; Ferrazzo, S; Bosch, D; Asede, D; Malhaire, F; Acher, F; Giraldo, J; Valjent, E; Ehrlich, I; Ferraguti, F; Pin, J-P; Llebaria, A; Goudet, C

    2016-12-20

    Contrary to acute pain, chronic pain does not serve as a warning signal and must be considered as a disease per se. This pathology presents a sensory and psychological dimension at the origin of affective and cognitive disorders. Being largely refractory to current pharmacotherapies, identification of endogenous systems involved in persistent and chronic pain is crucial. The amygdala is a key brain region linking pain sensation with negative emotions. Here, we show that activation of a specific intrinsic neuromodulatory system within the amygdala associated with type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu4) abolishes sensory and affective symptoms of persistent pain such as hypersensitivity to pain, anxiety- and depression-related behaviors, and fear extinction impairment. Interestingly, neuroanatomical and synaptic analysis of the amygdala circuitry suggests that the effects of mGlu4 activation occur outside the central nucleus via modulation of multisensory thalamic inputs to lateral amygdala principal neurons and dorso-medial intercalated cells. Furthermore, we developed optogluram, a small diffusible photoswitchable positive allosteric modulator of mGlu4. This ligand allows the control of endogenous mGlu4 activity with light. Using this photopharmacological approach, we rapidly and reversibly inhibited behavioral symptoms associated with persistent pain through optical control of optogluram in the amygdala of freely behaving animals. Altogether, our data identify amygdala mGlu4 signaling as a mechanism that bypasses central sensitization processes to dynamically modulate persistent pain symptoms. Our findings help to define novel and more precise therapeutic interventions for chronic pain, and exemplify the potential of optopharmacology to study the dynamic activity of endogenous neuromodulatory mechanisms in vivo.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 20 December 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.223.

  3. Relationship between remnant hippocampus and amygdala and memory outcomes after stereotactic surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Malikova H

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hana Malikova,1,2,* Lenka Kramska,3,* Zdenek Vojtech,4,5 Jan Sroubek,6 Jiri Lukavsky,7 Roman Liscak8 1Department of Radiology, Na Homolce Hospital, 2Institute of Anatomy, Second Medical Faculty, Charles University in Prague, 3Department of Clinical Psychology, Na Homolce Hospital, 4Department of Neurology, Na Homolce Hospital, 5Department of Neurology, 3rd Medical Faculty, Charles University in Prague, 6Department of Neurosurgery, Na Homolce Hospital, 7Institute of Psychology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 8Department of Radiation and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Na Homolce Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and purpose: Mesial temporal structures play an important role in human memory. In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, seizure activity is generated from the same structures. Surgery is the definitive treatment for medically intractable MTLE. In addition to standard temporal lobe microsurgical resection, stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy (SAHE is used as an alternative MTLE treatment. While memory impairments after standard epilepsy surgery are well known, it has been shown that memory decline is not a feature of SAHE. The aim of the present study was to correlate the volume of the remnant hippocampus and amygdala in patients treated by SAHE with changes in memory parameters.Materials and methods: Thirty-seven MTLE patients treated by SAHE (ten right, 27 left were included. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging examinations including hippocampal and amygdalar volumetry and neuropsychological evaluation preoperatively and 1 year after surgery.Results: Using Spearman correlation analyses, larger left-sided hippocampal reductions were associated with lower verbal memory performance (ρ=-0.46; P=0.02. On the contrary, improvement of global memory quotient (MQ was positively correlated with larger right-sided hippocampal reduction (ρ=0.66; P=0

  4. Temporal and spacial changes of BrdU immunoreactivity in amygdala kindling development.

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    Sato, K; Iwai, M; Nagano, I; Shoji, M; Abe, K

    2002-09-01

    To investigate the proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC) in epileptic brain, spaciotemporal expression of immunoreactive bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was examined in kindling development of rat. Amygdaloid kindling in partial seizure (PS) was effective in proliferation of NSC detected with BrdU-labeling in subventricular zone (SVZ), but not in dentate gyrus (DG). In SVZ, however, the BrdU-labeling cells decreased at stage generalized seizure (GS). These facts indicate that proliferation of NSC increased with PS and decreased with more severe seizures of GS in SVZ, that such a proliferation did not occur in DG with PS or GS. Thus, the proliferation of NSC was spacially and temporally different between brain regions depending on different kindling stages.

  5. Dexamethasone Treatment Leads to Enhanced Fear Extinction and Dynamic Fkbp5 Regulation in Amygdala.

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    Sawamura, Takehito; Klengel, Torsten; Armario, Antonio; Jovanovic, Tanja; Norrholm, Seth D; Ressler, Kerry J; Andero, Raül

    2016-02-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is both a prevalent and debilitating trauma-related disorder associated with dysregulated fear learning at the core of many of its signs and symptoms. Improvements in the currently available psychological and pharmacological treatments are needed in order to improve PTSD treatment outcomes and to prevent symptom relapse. In the present study, we used a putative animal model of PTSD that included presentation of immobilization stress (IMO) followed by fear conditioning (FC) a week later. We then investigated the acute effects of GR receptor activation on the extinction (EXT) of conditioned freezing, using dexamethasone administered systemically which is known to result in suppression of the HPA axis. In our previous work, IMO followed by tone-shock-mediated FC was associated with impaired fear EXT. In this study, we administered dexamethasone 4 h before EXT training and then examined EXT retention (RET) 24 h later to determine whether dexamethasone suppression rescued EXT deficits. Dexamethasone treatment produced dose-dependent enhancement of both EXT and RET. Dexamethasone was also associated with reduced amygdala Fkbp5 mRNA expression following EXT and after RET. Moreover, DNA methylation of the Fkbp5 gene occurred in a dose-dependent and time course-dependent manner within the amygdala. Additionally, we found dynamic changes in epigenetic regulation, including Dnmt and Tet gene pathways, as a function of both fear EXT and dexamethasone suppression of the HPA axis. Together, these data suggest that dexamethasone may serve to enhance EXT by altering Fkbp5-mediated glucocorticoid sensitivity via epigenetic regulation of Fkbp5 expression.

  6. Attention and awareness influence amygdala activity for dynamic bodily expressions - A short review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice eDe Gelder

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The amygdala (AMG has long been viewed as the gateway to sensory processing of emotions and is also known to play an importanta role at the interface between cognition and emotion. However, the debate continues on whether AMG activation is independent of attentional demands. Recently, researchers started exploring AMG functions using dynamic stimuli rather than the traditional pictures of facial expressions. Our present goal is to review some recent studies using dynamic stimuli to investigate AMG activation and discuss the impact of different viewing conditions, including oddball detection, explicit or implicit recognition, variable cognitive task load, and non-conscious perception. In the second part we relate these different effects to a dynamic dual route model of affective processing and discuss its implications for AMG activity. We sketch a dynamic dual route perspective of affective perception and we argue that this allows for multiple AMG involvement in separate networks and at different times in the processing streams. Attention has a different impact on these separate but interacting networks. Route I is engaged in early emotion processing, is partly supported by AMG activity and is possibly independent of attention, whereas activity in the later emotion processing is influenced by attention. Route II is a cortical-based network that underlies body recognition and action representation. The end result of route I and II is reflexive and voluntary behavior respectively. We conclude that using dynamic emotion stimuli and a dynamic dual route model of affective perception can provide new insights into the varieties of AMG activation.

  7. Dynamic perfusion patterns in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, Patrick; Paesschen, Wim van [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Zaknun, John J. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); University Hospital of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Maes, Alex [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); AZ Groeninge, Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Locharernkul, Chaichon [Chulalongkorn University, Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Bangkok (Thailand); Vasquez, Silvia; Carpintiero, Silvina [Fleni Instituto de Investigaciones Neurologicas, Nuclear Medicine, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bal, C.S. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); Ospedale Maggiore, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    To investigate dynamic ictal perfusion changes during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We investigated 37 patients with TLE by ictal and interictal SPECT. All ictal injections were performed within 60 s of seizure onset. Statistical parametric mapping was used to analyse brain perfusion changes and temporal relationships with injection time and seizure duration as covariates. The analysis revealed significant ictal hyperperfusion in the ipsilateral temporal lobe extending to subcortical regions. Hypoperfusion was observed in large extratemporal areas. There were also significant dynamic changes in several extratemporal regions: ipsilateral orbitofrontal and bilateral superior frontal gyri and the contralateral cerebellum and ipsilateral striatum. The study demonstrated early dynamic perfusion changes in extratemporal regions probably involved in both propagation of epileptic activity and initiation of inhibitory mechanisms. (orig.)

  8. Optimal temporal patterns for dynamical cellular signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2016-11-01

    Cells use temporal dynamical patterns to transmit information via signaling pathways. As optimality with respect to the environment plays a fundamental role in biological systems, organisms have evolved optimal ways to transmit information. Here, we use optimal control theory to obtain the dynamical signal patterns for the optimal transmission of information, in terms of efficiency (low energy) and reliability (low uncertainty). Adopting an activation-deactivation decoding network, we reproduce several dynamical patterns found in actual signals, such as steep, gradual, and overshooting dynamics. Notably, when minimizing the energy of the input signal, the optimal signals exhibit overshooting, which is a biphasic pattern with transient and steady phases; this pattern is prevalent in actual dynamical patterns. We also identify conditions in which these three patterns (steep, gradual, and overshooting) confer advantages. Our study shows that cellular signal transduction is governed by the principle of minimizing free energy dissipation and uncertainty; these constraints serve as selective pressures when designing dynamical signaling patterns.

  9. Temporal fidelity in dynamic social networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Pentland, Alex ‘Sandy’

    2015-01-01

    of the network dynamics can be used to inform the process of measuring social networks. The details of measurement are of particular importance when considering dynamic processes where minute-to-minute details are important, because collection of physical proximity interactions with high temporal resolution......It has recently become possible to record detailed social interactions in large social systems with high resolution. As we study these datasets, human social interactions display patterns that emerge at multiple time scales, from minutes to months. On a fundamental level, understanding...... is difficult and expensive. Here, we consider the dynamic network of proximity-interactions between approximately 500 individuals participating in the Copenhagen Networks Study. We show that in order to accurately model spreading processes in the network, the dynamic processes that occur on the order...

  10. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala induces anhedonic behavior and recurrent seizures in a rat model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Wang, Helen; Zaveri, Hitten P; Tang, Amber B; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Eid, Tore; Dhaher, Roni

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of depression and suicide is increased in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE); however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Anhedonia, a core symptom of depression that is predictive of suicide, is common in patients with MTLE. Glutamine synthetase, an astrocytic enzyme that metabolizes glutamate and ammonia to glutamine, is reduced in the amygdala in patients with epilepsy and depression and in suicide victims. Here, we sought to develop a novel model of anhedonia in MTLE by testing the hypothesis that deficiency in glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) leads to epilepsy and comorbid anhedonia. Nineteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with an osmotic pump infusing either the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine [MSO (n=12)] or phosphate buffered saline [PBS (n=7)] into the right CeA. Seizure activity was monitored by video-intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings for 21days after the onset of MSO infusion. Sucrose preference, a measure of anhedonia, was assessed after 21days. Methionine sulfoximine-infused rats exhibited recurrent seizures during the monitoring period and showed decreased sucrose preference over days when compared with PBS-infused rats (pglutamine synthetase activity in the CeA is a possible common cause of anhedonia and seizures in TLE. We propose that the MSO CeA model can be used for mechanistic studies that will lead to the development and testing of novel drugs to prevent seizures, depression, and suicide in patients with TLE.

  11. Temporal dynamics of hydrological threshold events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. McGrath

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The episodic nature of hydrological flows such as surface runoff and preferential flow is a result of the nonlinearity of their triggering and the intermittency of rainfall. In this paper we examine the temporal dynamics of threshold processes that are triggered by either an infiltration excess (IE mechanism when rainfall intensity exceeds a specified threshold value, or a saturation excess (SE mechanism governed by a storage threshold. We use existing and newly derived analytical results to describe probabilistic measures of the time between successive events in each case, and in the case of the SE triggering, we relate the statistics of the time between events (the inter-event time, denoted IET to the statistics of storage and the underlying water balance. In the case of the IE mechanism, the temporal dynamics of flow events is found to be simply scaled statistics of rainfall timing. In the case of the SE mechanism the time between events becomes structured. With increasing climate aridity the mean and the variance of the time between SE events increases but temporal clustering, as measured by the coefficient of variation (CV of the IET, reaches a maximum in deep stores when the climatic aridity index equals 1. In very humid and also very arid climates, the temporal clustering disappears, and the pattern of triggering is similar to that seen for the IE mechanism. In addition we show that the mean and variance of the magnitude of SE events decreases but the CV increases with increasing aridity. The CV of IETs is found to be approximately equal to the CV of the magnitude of SE events per storm only in very humid climates with the CV of event magnitude tending to be much larger than the CV of IETs in arid climates. In comparison to storage the maximum temporal clustering was found to be associated with a maximum in the variance of soil moisture. The CV of the time till the first saturation excess event was found to be greatest when the initial

  12. Temporal dynamics of hydrological threshold events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. McGrath

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The episodic nature of hydrological flows such as surface runoff and preferential flow is a result of the nonlinearity of their triggering and the intermittency of rainfall. In this paper we examine the temporal dynamics of threshold processes that are triggered by either an infiltration excess (IE mechanism when rainfall intensity exceeds a specified threshold value, or a saturation excess (SE mechanism governed by a storage threshold. We analytically derive probabilistic measures of the time between successive events in each case, and in the case of the SE triggering, we relate the statistics of the time between events to the statistics of storage and the underlying water balance. In the case of the IE mechanism, the temporal dynamics of flow events is shown to be simply scaled statistics of rainfall timing. In the case of the SE mechanism the time between events becomes structured. With increasing climate aridity the mean and the variance of the time between SE events increases but temporal clustering, as measured by the coefficient of variation (CV of the inter-event time, reaches a maximum in deep stores when the climatic aridity index equals 1. In very humid and also very arid climates, the temporal clustering disappears, and the pattern of triggering is similar to that seen for the IE mechanism. In addition we show that the mean and variance of the magnitude of SE events decreases but the CV increases with increasing aridity. The CV of inter-event times is found to be approximately equal to the CV of the magnitude of SE events per storm only in very humid climates with the CV of event magnitude tending to be much larger than the CV of inter-event times in arid climates. In comparison to storage the maximum temporal clustering was found to be associated with a maximum in the variance of soil moisture. The CV of the time till the first saturation excess event was found to be greatest when the initial storage was at the threshold.

  13. Temporal dynamics and regulation of lake metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter Anton; Jensen, Kaj Sand

    2007-01-01

    We studied temporal dynamics and regulation of oxygen metabolism in the upper mixed layer of a nutrientrich shallow Danish lake by continuous measurements of oxygen, irradiance, wind, and temperature and frequent measurements of algal chlorophyll, organic pools, and inorganic nutrients. Chlorophyll...... and minima from fall to spring after broad-scale changes in irradiance, temperature, mixing depth, and biomass and growth rate of the algal community and concentrations of inorganic nutrients. Lake metabolism was annually balanced (mean GPP :R 1.04 in 2003 and 1.01 in 2004), with net autotrophy occurring...... significantly reduced GPP. Normalizing GPP to chlorophyll provided an index of algal growth potential (GPPB), which followed a hyperbolic relationship to Emean, and both parameters were related to blooms and collapses of algal biomass. Metabolic rates were much more variable from day to day than algal biomass...

  14. Impaired prefrontal-amygdala effective connectivity is responsible for the dysfunction of emotion process in major depressive disorder: a dynamic causal modeling study on MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Li, Haoran; Luo, Guoping; Wang, Yi; Tang, Hao; Han, Li; Yao, Zhijian

    2012-08-15

    Depression is proved to be associated with the dysfunction of prefrontal-limbic neural circuit, especially during emotion processing procedure. Related explorations have been undertaken from the aspects of abnormal activation and functional connectivity. However, the mechanism of the dysfunction of coordinated interactions remains unknown and is still a matter of debate. The present study gave direct evidence of this issue from the aspect of effective connectivity via dynamic causal modeling (DCM). 20 major depressive disorder (MDD) patients and 20 healthy controls were recruited to attend facial emotional stimulus during MEG recording. Bayesian model selection (BMS) was applied to choose the best model. Results under the optimal model showed that top-down endogenous effective connectivity from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to the amygdala was greatly impaired in patients relative to health controls; while bottom-up endogenous effective connectivity from the amygdala to the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) as well as modulatory effective connectivity from ACC to DLPFC was significantly increased. We inferred the incapable DLPFC failed to exert influence on amygdala, and finally lead to enhanced amygdala-ACC and ACC-DLPFC bottom-up effects. Such impaired prefrontal-amygdala connectivity was supposed to be responsible for the dysfunction in MDD when dealing with emotional stimuli.

  15. Disrupted effective connectivity between the amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex in social anxiety disorder during emotion discrimination revealed by dynamic causal modeling for FMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladky, Ronald; Höflich, Anna; Küblböck, Martin; Kraus, Christoph; Baldinger, Pia; Moser, Ewald; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Windischberger, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by over-reactivity of fear-related circuits in social or performance situations and associated with marked social impairment. We used dynamic causal modeling (DCM), a method to evaluate effective connectivity, to test our hypothesis that SAD patients would exhibit dysfunctions in the amygdala-prefrontal emotion regulation network. Thirteen unmedicated SAD patients and 13 matched healthy controls performed a series of facial emotion and object discrimination tasks while undergoing fMRI. The emotion-processing network was identified by a task-related contrast and motivated the selection of the right amygdala, OFC, and DLPFC for DCM analysis. Bayesian model averaging for DCM revealed abnormal connectivity between the OFC and the amygdala in SAD patients. In healthy controls, this network represents a negative feedback loop. In patients, however, positive connectivity from OFC to amygdala was observed, indicating an excitatory connection. As we did not observe a group difference of the modulatory influence of the FACE condition on the OFC to amygdala connection, we assume a context-independent reduction of prefrontal control over amygdalar activation in SAD patients. Using DCM, it was possible to highlight not only the neuronal dysfunction of isolated brain regions, but also the dysbalance of a distributed functional network.

  16. Bridges between Dynamic Doxastic and Doxastic Temporal Logics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Benthem, Johan; Dégremont, Cédric

    This paper builds bridges between the two main families of modal logics of belief change, both based on plausibility pre-orders: dynamic doxastic logics computing stepwise updates, and temporal doxastic logics describing global system evolutions. Following earlier results linking dynamic-epistemic and epistemic-temporal logics, we prove representation theorems showing under which conditions a doxastic temporal model can be represented as the stepwise evolution of a doxastic model under successive 'priority updates'. This allows for merges, where, in particular, the notion of a 'temporal protocol' defining a global information process (for instance of communication or learning) can be introduced into the more local dynamic perspective.

  17. Divisible quantum dynamics satisfies temporal Tsirelson’s bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thao; Pollock, Felix A.; Paterek, Tomasz; Paternostro, Mauro; Modi, Kavan

    2017-02-01

    We give strong evidence that divisibility of qubit quantum processes implies temporal Tsirelson’s bound. We also give strong evidence that the classical bound of the temporal Bell’s inequality holds for dynamics that can be described by entanglement-breaking channels—a more general class of dynamics than that allowed by classical physics.

  18. [Emotion, amygdala, and autonomic nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    Emotion refers to the dynamic changes of feeling accompanied by the alteration of physical and visceral activities. Autonomic nervous system (sympathetic and parasympathetic) regulates the visceral activities. Therefore, monitoring and analyzing autonomic nervous activity help understand the emotional changes. To this end, the survey of the expression of immediate early genes (IEGs), such as c-Fos in the brain and target organs, and the viral transneuronal labeling method using the pseudorabies virus (PRV) have enabled the visualization of the neurocircuitry of emotion. By comparing c-Fos expression and data from PRV or other neuroanatomical labeling techniques, the central sites that regulate emotional stress-induced autonomic activation can be deduced. Such regions have been identified in the limbic system (e. g., the extended amygdaloid complex; lateral septum; and infralimbic, insular, and ventromedial temporal cortical regions), as well as in several hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei. The amygdala is structurally diverse and comprises several subnuclei, which play a role in emotional process via projections from the cortex and a variety of subcortical structures. All amygdaloid subnuclei receive psychological information from other limbic systems, while the lateral and central subnuclei receive peripheral and sensory information. Output to the hypothalamus and peripheral sympathetic system mainly originates from the medial amygdala. As estrogen receptor α, estrogen receptor β, and androgen receptor are expressed in the medial amygdala, sex steroids may modulate the autonomic nervous activities.

  19. A dynamic appearance descriptor approach to facial actions temporal modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bihan; Valstar, Michel; Martinez, Brais; Pantic, Maja

    2014-02-01

    Both the configuration and the dynamics of facial expressions are crucial for the interpretation of human facial behavior. Yet to date, the vast majority of reported efforts in the field either do not take the dynamics of facial expressions into account, or focus only on prototypic facial expressions of six basic emotions. Facial dynamics can be explicitly analyzed by detecting the constituent temporal segments in Facial Action Coding System (FACS) Action Units (AUs)-onset, apex, and offset. In this paper, we present a novel approach to explicit analysis of temporal dynamics of facial actions using the dynamic appearance descriptor Local Phase Quantization from Three Orthogonal Planes (LPQ-TOP). Temporal segments are detected by combining a discriminative classifier for detecting the temporal segments on a frame-by-frame basis with Markov Models that enforce temporal consistency over the whole episode. The system is evaluated in detail over the MMI facial expression database, the UNBC-McMaster pain database, the SAL database, the GEMEP-FERA dataset in database-dependent experiments, in cross-database experiments using the Cohn-Kanade, and the SEMAINE databases. The comparison with other state-of-the-art methods shows that the proposed LPQ-TOP method outperforms the other approaches for the problem of AU temporal segment detection, and that overall AU activation detection benefits from dynamic appearance information.

  20. SPECIAL DYNAMIC BEHAVIORS OF A TEMPORAL CHAOTIC SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxuan Zhang; Jinjiang Yu; Wangqiang Han

    2008-01-01

    When dynamic behaviors of temporal chaotic system are analyzed,we find that a temporal chaotic system has not only genetic dynamic behaviors of chaotic reflection,but also has phenomena influencing two chaotic attractors by original values.Along with the system parameters changing to certain value,the system will appear a break in chaotic region,and jump to another orbit of attractors.When it is opposite that the system parameters change direction,the temporal chaotic system appears complicated chaotic behaviors.

  1. Identify Dynamic Network Modules with Temporal and Spatial Constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, R; McCallen, S; Liu, C; Almaas, E; Zhou, X J

    2007-09-24

    Despite the rapid accumulation of systems-level biological data, understanding the dynamic nature of cellular activity remains a difficult task. The reason is that most biological data are static, or only correspond to snapshots of cellular activity. In this study, we explicitly attempt to detangle the temporal complexity of biological networks by using compilations of time-series gene expression profiling data.We define a dynamic network module to be a set of proteins satisfying two conditions: (1) they form a connected component in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network; and (2) their expression profiles form certain structures in the temporal domain. We develop the first efficient mining algorithm to discover dynamic modules in a temporal network, as well as frequently occurring dynamic modules across many temporal networks. Using yeast as a model system, we demonstrate that the majority of the identified dynamic modules are functionally homogeneous. Additionally, many of them provide insight into the sequential ordering of molecular events in cellular systems. We further demonstrate that identifying frequent dynamic network modules can significantly increase the signal to noise separation, despite the fact that most dynamic network modules are highly condition-specific. Finally, we note that the applicability of our algorithm is not limited to the study of PPI systems, instead it is generally applicable to the combination of any type of network and time-series data.

  2. How memory generates heterogeneous dynamics in temporal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Vestergaard, Christian L; Barrat, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Empirical temporal networks display strong heterogeneities in their dynamics, which profoundly affect processes taking place on these networks, such as rumor and epidemic spreading. Despite the recent wealth of data on temporal networks, little work has been devoted to the understanding of how such heterogeneities can emerge from microscopic mechanisms at the level of nodes and links. Here we show that long-term memory effects are present in the creation and disappearance of links in empirical networks. We thus consider a simple generative modeling framework for temporal networks able to incorporate these memory mechanisms. This allows us to study separately the role of each of these mechanisms in the emergence of heterogeneous network dynamics. In particular, we show analytically and numerically how heterogeneous distributions of contact durations, of inter-contact durations and of numbers of contacts per link emerge. We also study the individual effect of heterogeneities on dynamical processes, such as the ...

  3. Dynamic CRM occupancy reflects a temporal map of developmental progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyński, Bartek; Furlong, Eileen E M

    2010-06-22

    Development is driven by tightly coordinated spatio-temporal patterns of gene expression, which are initiated through the action of transcription factors (TFs) binding to cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). Although many studies have investigated how spatial patterns arise, precise temporal control of gene expression is less well understood. Here, we show that dynamic changes in the timing of CRM occupancy is a prevalent feature common to all TFs examined in a developmental ChIP time course to date. CRMs exhibit complex binding patterns that cannot be explained by the sequence motifs or expression of the TFs themselves. The temporal changes in TF binding are highly correlated with dynamic patterns of target gene expression, which in turn reflect transitions in cellular function during different stages of development. Thus, it is not only the timing of a TF's expression, but also its temporal occupancy in refined time windows, which determines temporal gene expression. Systematic measurement of dynamic CRM occupancy may therefore serve as a powerful method to decode dynamic changes in gene expression driving developmental progression.

  4. Temporal dynamics of Bose-condensed gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo Martinez, Mauricio

    2014-03-19

    We perform a detailed quantum dynamical study of non-equilibrium trapped, interacting Bose-condensed gases. We investigate Josephson oscillations between interacting Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a finite size double-well trap and the non-trivial time evolution of a coherent state placed at the center of a two dimensional optical lattice. For the Josephson oscillations three time scales appear. We find that Josephson junction can sustain multiple undamped oscillations up to a characteristic time scale τ{sub c} without exciting atoms out of the condensates. Beyond the characteristic time scale τ{sub c} the dynamics of the junction are governed by fast, non-condensed particles assisted Josephson tunnelling as well as the collisions between non-condensed particles. In the non-condensed particles dominated regime we observe strong damping of the oscillations due to inelastic collisions, equilibrating the system leading to an effective loss of details of the initial conditions. In addition, we predict that an initially self-trapped BEC state will be destroyed by these fast dynamics. The time evolution of a coherent state released at the center of a two dimensional optical lattice shows a ballistic expansion with a decreasing expansion velocity for increasing two-body interactions strength and particle number. Additionally, we predict that if the two-body interactions strength exceeds a certain value, a forerunner splits up from the expanding coherent state. We also observe that this system, which is prepared far from equilibrium, can evolve to a quasistationary non-equilibrium state.

  5. The temporal dynamics of visual object priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Philip C; Duda, Bryant; Hussey, Erin P; Mason, Emily J; Ally, Brandon A

    2014-11-01

    Priming reflects an important means of learning that is mediated by implicit memory. Importantly, priming occurs for previously viewed objects (item-specific priming) and their category relatives (category-wide priming). Two distinct neural mechanisms are known to mediate priming, including the sharpening of a neural object representation and the retrieval of stimulus-response mappings. Here, we investigated whether the relationship between these neural mechanisms could help explain why item-specific priming generates faster responses than category-wide priming. Participants studied pictures of everyday objects, and then performed a difficult picture identification task while we recorded event-related potentials (ERP). The identification task gradually revealed random line segments of previously viewed items (Studied), category exemplars of previously viewed items (Exemplar), and items that were not previously viewed (Unstudied). Studied items were identified sooner than Unstudied items, showing evidence of item-specific priming, and importantly Exemplar items were also identified sooner than Unstudied items, showing evidence of category-wide priming. Early activity showed sustained neural suppression of parietal activity for both types of priming. However, these neural suppression effects may have stemmed from distinct processes because while category-wide neural suppression was correlated with priming behavior, item-specific neural suppression was not. Late activity, examined with response-locked ERPs, showed additional processes related to item-specific priming including neural suppression in occipital areas and parietal activity that was correlated with behavior. Together, we conclude that item-specific and category-wide priming are mediated by separate, parallel neural mechanisms in the context of the current paradigm. Temporal differences in behavior are determined by the timecourses of these distinct processes.

  6. Dynamics on networks: competition of temporal and topological correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Artime, Oriol; Miguel, Maxi San

    2016-01-01

    Links in many real-world networks activate and deactivate in correspondence to the sporadic interactions between the elements of the system. The activation patterns may be irregular or bursty and play an important role on the dynamics of processes taking place in the network. Social networks and information or disease spreading processes are paradigmatic examples of this situation. Besides the burstiness, several other correlations may appear in the network dynamics. The activation of links connecting to the same node can be synchronized or the existence of communities in the network may mediate the activation patterns of internal an external links. Here we study the competition of topological and temporal correlations in link activation and how they affect the dynamics of systems running on the network. Interestingly, both types of correlations by separate have opposite effects: one (topological) delays the dynamics of processes on the network, while the other (temporal) accelerates it. When they occur toget...

  7. Effects of dynamic-range compression on temporal acuity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, Alan; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Epp, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    processing, temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) and “supra-threshold” modulation-depth discrimination (MDD) thresholds were obtained in normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with and without wide-dynamic range compression (WDRC). The TMTFs were obtained using tonal carriers of 1...

  8. Analysing the temporal dynamics of model performance for hydrological models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reusser, D.E.; Blume, T.; Schaefli, B.; Zehe, E.

    2009-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of hydrological model performance gives insights into errors that cannot be obtained from global performance measures assigning a single number to the fit of a simulated time series to an observed reference series. These errors can include errors in data, model parameters, or m

  9. A temporal interpolation approach for dynamic reconstruction in perfusion CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Pau; Lauritsch, Günter

    2007-07-01

    This article presents a dynamic CT reconstruction algorithm for objects with time dependent attenuation coefficient. Projection data acquired over several rotations are interpreted as samples of a continuous signal. Based on this idea, a temporal interpolation approach is proposed which provides the maximum temporal resolution for a given rotational speed of the CT scanner. Interpolation is performed using polynomial splines. The algorithm can be adapted to slow signals, reducing the amount of data acquired and the computational cost. A theoretical analysis of the approximations made by the algorithm is provided. In simulation studies, the temporal interpolation approach is compared with three other dynamic reconstruction algorithms based on linear regression, linear interpolation, and generalized Parker weighting. The presented algorithm exhibits the highest temporal resolution for a given sampling interval. Hence, our approach needs less input data to achieve a certain quality in the reconstruction than the other algorithms discussed or, equivalently, less x-ray exposure and computational complexity. The proposed algorithm additionally allows the possibility of using slow rotating scanners for perfusion imaging purposes.

  10. Temporal Dynamics of Connectivity and Epidemic Properties of Growing Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fotouhi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Traditional mathematical models of epidemic disease had for decades conventionally considered static structure for contacts. Recently, an upsurge of theoretical inquiry has strived towards rendering the models more realistic by incorporating the temporal aspects of networks of contacts, societal and online, that are of interest in the study of epidemics (and other similar diffusion processes). However, temporal dynamics have predominantly focused on link fluctuations and nodal activities, and less attention has been paid to the growth of the underlying network. Many real networks grow: online networks are evidently in constant growth, and societal networks can grow due to migration flux and reproduction. The effect of network growth on the epidemic properties of networks is hitherto unknown---mainly due to the predominant focus of the network growth literature on the so-called steady-state. This paper takes a step towards alleviating this gap. We analytically study the degree dynamics of a given arbitrary net...

  11. Estimating spatio-temporal dynamics of size-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2014-01-01

    Spatial distributions of structured populations are usually estimated by fitting abundance surfaces for each stage and at each point of time separately, ignoring correlations that emerge from growth of individuals. Here, we present a statistical model that combines spatio-temporal correlations...... with simple stock dynamics, to estimate simultaneously how size distributions and spatial distributions develop in time. We demonstrate the method for a cod population sampled by trawl surveys. Particular attention is paid to correlation between size classes within each trawl haul due to clustering...... of individuals with similar size. The model estimates growth, mortality and reproduction, after which any aspect of size-structure, spatio-temporal population dynamics, as well as the sampling process can be probed. This is illustrated by two applications: 1) tracking the spatial movements of a single cohort...

  12. Temporal dynamics of ikaite in experimental sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, Søren; Wang, F.; Galley, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    -covered seas. Little is known, however, of the spatial and temporal dynamics of ikaite in sea ice. Here we present evidence for highly dynamic ikaite precipitation and dissolution in sea ice grown at an outdoor pool of the Sea-ice Environmental Research Facility (SERF) in Manitoba, Canada. During...... with ikaite concentrations of 200–400 μmol kg−1, and (3) a bottom layer with ikaite concentrations of Manual removal of the snow cover allowed the sea ice to cool and brine salinities to increase, resulting in rapid...

  13. The scaling properties of dynamical fluctuations in temporal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chi, Liping

    2015-01-01

    The factorial moments analyses are performed to study the scaling properties of the dynamical fluctuations of contacts and nodes in temporal networks based on empirical data sets. The intermittent behaviors are observed in the fluctuations for all orders of the moments. It indicates that the interaction has self-similarity structure in time interval and the fluctuations are not purely random but dynamical and correlated. The scaling exponents for contacts in Prostitution data and nodes in Conference data are very close to that for 2D Ising model undergoing a second-order phase transition.

  14. Dynamics on networks: competition of temporal and topological correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artime, Oriol; Ramasco, José J.; San Miguel, Maxi

    2017-02-01

    Links in many real-world networks activate and deactivate in correspondence to the sporadic interactions between the elements of the system. The activation patterns may be irregular or bursty and play an important role on the dynamics of processes taking place in the network. Information or disease spreading in networks are paradigmatic examples of this situation. Besides burstiness, several correlations may appear in the process of link activation: memory effects imply temporal correlations, but also the existence of communities in the network may mediate the activation patterns of internal an external links. Here we study the competition of topological and temporal correlations in link activation and how they affect the dynamics of systems running on the network. Interestingly, both types of correlations by separate have opposite effects: one (topological) delays the dynamics of processes on the network, while the other (temporal) accelerates it. When they occur together, our results show that the direction and intensity of the final outcome depends on the competition in a non trivial way.

  15. Visual experience modulates spatio-temporal dynamics of circuit activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang eWang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent reduction in sensory drive in early development results in multiple plastic changes of different cortical synapses. How these experience-dependent modifications affect the spatio-temporal dynamics of signal propagation in neocortical circuits is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that brief visual deprivation significantly affects the propagation of electrical signals in the primary visual cortex. The spatio-temporal spread of circuit activation upon direct stimulation of its input layer (Layer 4 is reduced, as is the activation of Layer 2/3 – the main recipient of the output from Layer 4. Our data suggest that the decrease in spatio-temporal activation of L2/3 depends on reduced L4 output, and is not intrinsically generated within L2/3. The data shown here suggest that changes in the synaptic components of the visual cortical circuit result not only in alteration of local integration of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, but also in a significant decrease in overall circuit activation. Furthermore, our data indicate a differential effect of visual deprivation on L4 and L2/3, suggesting that while feedforward activation of L2/3 is reduced, its activation by long range, within layer inputs is unaltered. Thus, brief visual deprivation induces experience-dependent circuit re-organization by modulating not only circuit excitability, but also the spatio-temporal patterns of cortical activation within and between layers.

  16. Spatial and temporal dynamics of infected populations: the Mexican epidemic

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Meza, Mario A

    2012-01-01

    Recently the A/H1N1-2009 virus pandemic appeared in Mexico and in other nations. We present a study of this pandemic in the Mexican case using the SIR model to describe epidemics. This model is one of the simplest models but it has been a successful description of some epidemics of closed populations. We consider the data for the Mexican case and use the SIR model to make some predictions. Then, we generalize the SIR model in order to describe the spatial dynamics of the disease. We make a study of the spatial and temporal spread of the infected population with model parameters that are consistent with temporal SIR model parameters obtained by fitting to the Mexican case.

  17. Spatio-temporal diffusion of dynamic PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauber, C; Chalon, S; Guilloteau, D [Inserm U930, CNRS ERL3106, Universite Francois Rabelais, Tours (France); Stute, S; Buvat, I [IMNC, IN2P3, UMR 8165 CNRS-Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, Orsay (France); Chau, M [ASA-Advanced Solutions Accelerator, Montpellier (France); Spiteri, P, E-mail: clovis.tauber@univ-tours.fr [IRIT-ENSEEIHT, UMR CNRS 5505, Toulouse (France)

    2011-10-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images are corrupted by noise. This is especially true in dynamic PET imaging where short frames are required to capture the peak of activity concentration after the radiotracer injection. High noise results in a possible bias in quantification, as the compartmental models used to estimate the kinetic parameters are sensitive to noise. This paper describes a new post-reconstruction filter to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging. It consists in a spatio-temporal robust diffusion of the 4D image based on the time activity curve (TAC) in each voxel. It reduces the noise in homogeneous areas while preserving the distinct kinetics in regions of interest corresponding to different underlying physiological processes. Neither anatomical priors nor the kinetic model are required. We propose an automatic selection of the scale parameter involved in the diffusion process based on a robust statistical analysis of the distances between TACs. The method is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations of brain activity distributions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method and its superior performance over two other post-reconstruction spatial and temporal filters. Our simulations suggest that the proposed method can be used to significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging.

  18. Temporal dynamics of biotic and abiotic drivers of litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Shaw, E Ashley; Wall, Diana H; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Climate, litter quality and decomposers drive litter decomposition. However, little is known about whether their relative contribution changes at different decomposition stages. To fill this gap, we evaluated the relative importance of leaf litter polyphenols, decomposer communities and soil moisture for litter C and N loss at different stages throughout the decomposition process. Although both microbial and nematode communities regulated litter C and N loss in the early decomposition stages, soil moisture and legacy effects of initial differences in litter quality played a major role in the late stages of the process. Our results provide strong evidence for substantial shifts in how biotic and abiotic factors control litter C and N dynamics during decomposition. Taking into account such temporal dynamics will increase the predictive power of decomposition models that are currently limited by a single-pool approach applying control variables uniformly to the entire decay process.

  19. Analysing the temporal dynamics of model performance for hydrological models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Reusser

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The temporal dynamics of hydrological model performance gives insights into errors that cannot be obtained from global performance measures assigning a single number to the fit of a simulated time series to an observed reference series. These errors can include errors in data, model parameters, or model structure. Dealing with a set of performance measures evaluated at a high temporal resolution implies analyzing and interpreting a high dimensional data set. This paper presents a method for such a hydrological model performance assessment with a high temporal resolution and illustrates its application for two very different rainfall-runoff modeling case studies. The first is the Wilde Weisseritz case study, a headwater catchment in the eastern Ore Mountains, simulated with the conceptual model WaSiM-ETH. The second is the Malalcahuello case study, a headwater catchment in the Chilean Andes, simulated with the physics-based model Catflow. The proposed time-resolved performance assessment starts with the computation of a large set of classically used performance measures for a moving window. The key of the developed approach is a data-reduction method based on self-organizing maps (SOMs and cluster analysis to classify the high-dimensional performance matrix. Synthetic peak errors are used to interpret the resulting error classes. The final outcome of the proposed method is a time series of the occurrence of dominant error types. For the two case studies analyzed here, 6 such error types have been identified. They show clear temporal patterns which can lead to the identification of model structural errors.

  20. Analysing the temporal dynamics of model performance for hydrological models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zehe

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The temporal dynamics of hydrological model performance gives insights into errors that cannot be obtained from global performance measures assigning a single number to the fit of a simulated time series to an observed reference series. These errors can include errors in data, model parameters, or model structure. Dealing with a set of performance measures evaluated at a high temporal resolution implies analyzing and interpreting a high dimensional data set. This paper presents a method for such a hydrological model performance assessment with a high temporal resolution and illustrates its application for two very different rainfall-runoff modeling case studies. The first is the Wilde Weisseritz case study, a headwater catchment in the eastern Ore Mountains, simulated with the conceptual model WaSiM-ETH. The second is the Malalcahuello case study, a headwater catchment in the Chilean Andes, simulated with the physics-based model Catflow. The proposed time-resolved performance assessment starts with the computation of a large set of classically used performance measures for a moving window. The key of the developed approach is a data-reduction method based on self-organizing maps (SOMs and cluster analysis to classify the high-dimensional performance matrix. Synthetic peak errors are used to interpret the resulting error classes. The final outcome of the proposed method is a time series of the occurrence of dominant error types. For the two case studies analyzed here, 6 such error types have been identified. They show clear temporal patterns, which can lead to the identification of model structural errors.

  1. Temporal Dynamics of Cognitive Performance and Anxiety Across Older Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkus, Andrew J; Reynolds, Chandra A; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Kremen, William S; Gatz, Margaret

    2017-03-23

    Cognitive decline and anxiety symptoms commonly co-occur in later life, but the temporal order of changes on these two attributes is unclear. Specifically, it is unknown if greater anxiety leads to subsequent declines in cognitive performance or if worse cognitive performance leads to increased anxiety. In this study, we sought to elucidate the temporal dynamics between anxiety symptoms and cognitive performance across old age-that is, the extent to which level and change in one variable influence subsequent changes in a second variable. We examined data from 721 nondemented participants from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging. Participants completed as many as eight assessments of cognitive performance and anxiety over a 26-year period. Bivariate dual-change score models were fit to examine the dynamic association between anxiety and cognitive performance. Bidirectional associations between anxiety and cognitive performance were found among measures of processing speed, attention, and memory but not visuospatial abilities. Higher anxiety was associated with greater declines in processing speed over the duration of 6 years and worsening attention over a span of 3 years. The reverse direction was also significant in that slower processing speed, worse attention, and poorer nonverbal and working memory performance were associated with larger increases in anxiety 3 years later. These findings highlight that in cognitively intact older adults, the association between anxiety and worse cognitive performance is bidirectional and complex. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Temporal dynamics of glyoxalase 1 in secondary neuronal injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Pieroh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enhanced glycolysis leads to elevated levels of the toxic metabolite methylglyoxal which contributes to loss of protein-function, metabolic imbalance and cell death. Neurons were shown being highly susceptible to methylglyoxal toxicity. Glyoxalase 1 as an ubiquitous enzyme reflects the main detoxifying enzyme of methylglyoxal and underlies changes during aging and neurodegeneration. However, little is known about dynamics of Glyoxalase 1 following neuronal lesions so far. METHODS: To determine a possible involvement of Glyoxalase 1 in acute brain injury, we analysed the temporal dynamics of Glyoxalase 1 distribution and expression by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot analysis. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures were excitotoxically (N-methyl-D-aspartate, 50 µM for 4 hours lesioned in vitro (5 minutes to 72 hours. Additionally, permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed (75 minutes to 60 days. RESULTS: We found (i a predominant localisation of Glyoxalase 1 in endothelial cells in non-lesioned brains (ii a time-dependent up-regulation and re-distribution of Glyoxalase 1 in neurons and astrocytes and (iii a strong increase in Glyoxalase 1 dimers after neuronal injury (24 hours to 72 hours when compared to monomers of the protein. CONCLUSIONS: The high dynamics of Glyoxalase 1 expression and distribution following neuronal injury may indicate a novel role of Glyoxalase 1.

  3. Temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes at the Norman Landfill site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P.; McGuire, Jennifer T.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2013-01-01

    The temporal variability observed in redox sensitive species in groundwater can be attributed to coupled hydrological, geochemical, and microbial processes. These controlling processes are typically nonstationary, and distributed across various time scales. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate biogeochemical data sets from a municipal landfill site to identify the dominant modes of variation and determine the physical controls that become significant at different time scales. Data on hydraulic head, specific conductance, δ2H, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon were collected between 1998 and 2000 at three wells at the Norman Landfill site in Norman, OK. Wavelet analysis on this geochemical data set indicates that variations in concentrations of reactive and conservative solutes are strongly coupled to hydrologic variability (water table elevation and precipitation) at 8 month scales, and to individual eco-hydrogeologic framework (such as seasonality of vegetation, surface-groundwater dynamics) at 16 month scales. Apart from hydrologic variations, temporal variability in sulfate concentrations can be associated with different sources (FeS cycling, recharge events) and sinks (uptake by vegetation) depending on the well location and proximity to the leachate plume. Results suggest that nitrate concentrations show multiscale behavior across temporal scales for different well locations, and dominant variability in dissolved organic carbon for a closed municipal landfill can be larger than 2 years due to its decomposition and changing content. A conceptual framework that explains the variability in chemical concentrations at different time scales as a function of hydrologic processes, site-specific interactions, and/or coupled biogeochemical effects is also presented.

  4. Temporal nonlinear beam dynamics in infiltrated photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennet, Francis; Rosberg, Christian Romer; Neshev, Dragomir N.

    of nonlinear beam reshaping occurring on a short time scale before the establishment of a steady state regime. In experiment, a 532nm laser beam can be injected into a single hole of an infiltrated PCF cladding structure, and the temporal dynamics of the nonlinear response is measured by monitoring......Liquid-infiltrated photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) offer a new way of studying light propagation in periodic and discrete systems. A wide range of available fiber structures combined with the ease of infiltration opens up a range of novel experimental opportunities for optical detection and bio......-sensing as well as active devices for all-optical switching at low (mW) laser powers. Commercially available PCFs infiltrated with liquids also provide a versatile and compact tool for exploration of the fundamentals of nonlinear beam propagation in periodic photonic structures. To explore the full scientific...

  5. Noise-induced temporal dynamics in Turing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Schumacher, Linus J.

    2013-04-25

    We examine the ability of intrinsic noise to produce complex temporal dynamics in Turing pattern formation systems, with particular emphasis on the Schnakenberg kinetics. Using power spectral methods, we characterize the behavior of the system using stochastic simulations at a wide range of points in parameter space and compare with analytical approximations. Specifically, we investigate whether polarity switching of stochastic patterns occurs at a defined frequency. We find that it can do so in individual realizations of a stochastic simulation, but that the frequency is not defined consistently across realizations in our samples of parameter space. Further, we examine the effect of noise on deterministically predicted traveling waves and find them increased in amplitude and decreased in speed. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  6. Activity clocks: spreading dynamics on temporal networks of human contact

    CERN Document Server

    Gauvin, Laetitia; Cattuto, Ciro; Barrat, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical processes on time-varying complex networks are key to un- derstanding and modeling a broad variety of processes in socio-technical systems. Here we focus on empirical temporal networks of human proxim- ity and we aim at understanding the factors that, in simulation, shape the arrival time distribution of simple spreading processes. Abandoning the notion of wall-clock time in favour of node-specific clocks based on activ- ity exposes robust statistical patterns in the arrival times across different social contexts. Using randomization strategies and generative models constrained by data, we show that these patterns can be understood in terms of heterogeneous inter-event time distributions coupled with hetero- geneous numbers of events per edge. We also show, both empirically and by using a synthetic dataset, that significant deviations from the above behavior can be caused by the presence of edge classes with strong activity correlations.

  7. Temporal dynamics of connectivity and epidemic properties of growing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Babak; Shirkoohi, Mehrdad Khani

    2016-01-01

    Traditional mathematical models of epidemic disease had for decades conventionally considered static structure for contacts. Recently, an upsurge of theoretical inquiry has strived towards rendering the models more realistic by incorporating the temporal aspects of networks of contacts, societal and online, that are of interest in the study of epidemics (and other similar diffusion processes). However, temporal dynamics have predominantly focused on link fluctuations and nodal activities, and less attention has been paid to the growth of the underlying network. Many real networks grow: Online networks are evidently in constant growth, and societal networks can grow due to migration flux and reproduction. The effect of network growth on the epidemic properties of networks is hitherto unknown, mainly due to the predominant focus of the network growth literature on the so-called steady state. This paper takes a step towards alleviating this gap. We analytically study the degree dynamics of a given arbitrary network that is subject to growth. We use the theoretical findings to predict the epidemic properties of the network as a function of time. We observe that the introduction of new individuals into the network can enhance or diminish its resilience against endemic outbreaks and investigate how this regime shift depends upon the connectivity of newcomers and on how they establish connections to existing nodes. Throughout, theoretical findings are corroborated with Monte Carlo simulations over synthetic and real networks. The results shed light on the effects of network growth on the future epidemic properties of networks and offers insights for devising a priori immunization strategies.

  8. The initiation, temporal evolution and dynamics of deep mantle heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull-Aller, Abigail; Torsvik, Trond; Domeier, Mathew; Doubrovine, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the first-order dynamical structure and temporal evolution of Earth's mantle is a fundamental goal in solid-earth geophysics. Recent tomographic observations reveal a lower mantle characterised by higher-than-average shear-wave speeds beneath Asia and encircling the Pacific, consistent with cold slabs of descending lithosphere beneath regions of ancient subduction, and lower-than-average shear-wave speeds in broad regional areas beneath Africa and the Central Pacific (LLSVPs). The LLSVPs, although not as easily understood from a dynamical perspective, are inferred to be broad upwelling centres between Mesozoic and Cenozoic subduction zones. Heterogeneous mantle models place these anomalies into the context of thermochemical piles, characterised by an anomalously dense component, with their location and geometry being controlled by the movement of subducting slabs. The origin and temporal evolution of the LLSVPs remain enigmatic. Recent numerical studies propose that the LLSVP beneath Africa formed as a result of return flow in the mantle due to circum-Pacific subduction beneath the Pangean supercontinent. This suggests that prior to the formation of Pangea, the lower mantle was dominated by a degree-1 convection pattern, with a major upwelling centred close to the present-day Pacific LLSVP and subduction concentrated in the antipodal hemisphere. The African LLSVP would thus have developed within the time frame of the Pangean supercontinent (i.e., 300Ma-180Ma), in contrast to a much older Pacific LLSVP. It is further proposed that a cyclic alternation between a degree-1 pattern and a degree-2 pattern of mantle convection may accompany the supercontinent cycle and characterise the temporal convective evolution of Earth's mantle. In contrast, a more long-term persistence for both the African and Pacific LLSVPs, and thus for the planform of mantle convection within the Earth as a whole, is suggested by recent palaeomagnetic studies, which show that over

  9. Temporal Dynamics of Reproduction in Hemiramphus brasiliensis (Osteichthyes: Hemiramphidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Rocha de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The reproductive aspects of Hemiramphus brasiliensis were analyzed with a view to verify the temporal dynamics of reproduction. This paper presents data on sex ratio, length at first sexual maturity, macroscopic and histological aspects of gonad development, gonadosomatic index (GSI, reproductive period, and fecundity of H. brasiliensis. The fishes were captured from the coastal waters of Rio Grande do Norte, northeastern Brazil. Females of this species predominated in the sampled population and were larger in size than the males. The length at the first sexual maturation of males was 20.8 cm and that of females was 21.5 cm. The macroscopic characteristics of the gonads indicated four maturation stages. Histological studies of gonads of H. brasiliensis showed six phases of oocyte development and four phases of spermatocyte development. The batch fecundity of this species was 1153 (±258.22 mature oocytes for 50 g body weight of female. The microscopic characteristics of gonad development indicate that H. brasiliensis is a multiple spawner, presenting a prolonged reproductive period during the whole year, with a peak in the month of April, and is considered as an opportunistic strategist.

  10. Temporal dynamics of reward processing revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doñamayor, Nuria; Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Heldmann, Marcus; Schoenfeld, M Ariel; Münte, Thomas F

    2011-12-01

    Monetary gains and losses in gambling situations are associated with a distinct electroencephalographic signature: in the event-related potentials (ERPs), a mediofrontal feedback-related negativity (FRN) is seen for losses, whereas oscillatory activity shows a burst of in the θ-range for losses and in the β-range for gains. We used whole-head magnetoencephalography to pinpoint the magnetic counterparts of these effects in young healthy adults and explore their evolution over time. On each trial, participants bet on one of two visually presented numbers (25 or 5) by button-press. Both numbers changed color: if the chosen number turned green (red), it indicated a gain (loss) of the corresponding sum in Euro cent. For losses, we found the magnetic correlate of the FRN extending between 230 and 465 ms. Source localization with low-resolution electromagnetic tomography indicated a first generator in posterior cingulate cortex with subsequent activity in the anterior cingulate cortex. Importantly, this effect was sensitive to the magnitude of the monetary loss (25 cent > 5 cent). Later activation was also found in the right insula. Time-frequency analysis revealed a number of oscillatory components in the theta, alpha, and high-beta/low-gamma bands associated to gains, and in the high-beta band, associated to the magnitude of the loss. All together, these effects provide a more fine-grained picture of the temporal dynamics of the processing of monetary rewards and losses in the brain.

  11. Spatial-temporal dynamics of broadband terahertz Bessel beam propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, V. A.; Kulya, M. S.; Bespalov, V. G.

    2016-08-01

    The unique properties of narrowband and broadband terahertz Bessel beams have led to a number of their applications in different fields, for example, for the depth of focusing and resolution enhancement in terahertz imaging. However, broadband terahertz Bessel beams can probably be also used for the diffraction minimization in the short-range broadband terahertz communications. For this purpose, the study of spatial-temporal dynamics of the broadband terahertz Bessel beams is needed. Here we present a simulation-based study of the propagating in non-dispersive medium broadband Bessel beams generated by a conical axicon lens. The algorithm based on scalar diffraction theory was used to obtain the spatial amplitude and phase distributions of the Bessel beam in the frequency range from 0.1 to 3 THz at the distances 10-200 mm from the axicon. Bessel beam field is studied for the different spectral components of the initial pulse. The simulation results show that for the given parameters of the axicon lens one can obtain the Gauss-Bessel beam generation in the spectral range from 0.1 to 3 THz. The length of non-diffraction propagation for a different spectral components was measured, and it was shown that for all spectral components of the initial pulse this length is about 130 mm.

  12. The Temporal Dynamics of Scene Processing: A Multifaceted EEG Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Dwight J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our remarkable ability to process complex visual scenes is supported by a network of scene-selective cortical regions. Despite growing knowledge about the scene representation in these regions, much less is known about the temporal dynamics with which these representations emerge. We conducted two experiments aimed at identifying and characterizing the earliest markers of scene-specific processing. In the first experiment, human participants viewed images of scenes, faces, and everyday objects while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. We found that the first ERP component to evince a significantly stronger response to scenes than the other categories was the P2, peaking ∼220 ms after stimulus onset. To establish that the P2 component reflects scene-specific processing, in the second experiment, we recorded ERPs while the participants viewed diverse real-world scenes spanning the following three global scene properties: spatial expanse (open/closed), relative distance (near/far), and naturalness (man-made/natural). We found that P2 amplitude was sensitive to these scene properties at both the categorical level, distinguishing between open and closed natural scenes, as well as at the single-image level, reflecting both computationally derived scene statistics and behavioral ratings of naturalness and spatial expanse. Together, these results establish the P2 as an ERP marker for scene processing, and demonstrate that scene-specific global information is available in the neural response as early as 220 ms. PMID:27699208

  13. Forecasting temporal dynamics of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Northeast Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Lewnard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is a vector-borne disease of increasing importance in northeastern Brazil. It is known that sandflies, which spread the causative parasites, have weather-dependent population dynamics. Routinely-gathered weather data may be useful for anticipating disease risk and planning interventions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We fit time series models using meteorological covariates to predict CL cases in a rural region of Bahía, Brazil from 1994 to 2004. We used the models to forecast CL cases for the period 2005 to 2008. Models accounting for meteorological predictors reduced mean squared error in one, two, and three month-ahead forecasts by up to 16% relative to forecasts from a null model accounting only for temporal autocorrelation. SIGNIFICANCE: These outcomes suggest CL risk in northeastern Brazil might be partially dependent on weather. Responses to forecasted CL epidemics may include bolstering clinical capacity and disease surveillance in at-risk areas. Ecological mechanisms by which weather influences CL risk merit future research attention as public health intervention targets.

  14. The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Memory Formation in Amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael eLamprecht

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The central, lateral and basolateral amygdala nuclei are essential for the formation of long-term memories including emotional and drug-related memories. The study of cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning memory in amygdala may shed light on the formation of memory and on fear and addiction-related disorders. A challenge is to identify molecules activated by learning that subserve cellular changes needed for memory formation and maintenance in amygdala. Recent studies show that activation of synaptic receptors during fear and drug-related learning leads to alteration in actin cytoskeleton dynamics and structure in amygdala. Such changes in actin cytoskeleton in amygdala are essential for fear and drug-related memories formation. Moreover, the actin cytoskeleton subserves, after learning, changes in neuronal morphogenesis and glutamate receptors trafficking in amygdala. These cellular events are involved in fear and drug-related memories formation. Actin polymerization is also needed for the maintenance of drug-associated memories in amygdala. Thus, the actin cytoskeleton is a key mediator between receptor activation during learning and cellular changes subserving long-term memory in amygdala. The actin cytoskeleton may serve as a target for pharmacological treatment of fear memory associated with fear and anxiety disorders and drug addiction to prevent the debilitating consequences of these diseases.

  15. Temporally Dynamic, Spatially Static, Cobble Bedforms In Reversing Subtidal Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkade, Akirat; Carling, Paul; Zong, Quanli; Leyland, Julian; Thompson, Charlie

    2016-04-01

    Cobble bedforms, transverse to the reversing tidal currents, are exposed at extreme low-water Spring tides on an inter-tidal bedrock shelf in the macro-tidal Severn Estuary, UK. Near-bed flow velocities during Spring tides can exceed 1.5m/s, with water depths varying from zero to in excess of 10m. During neap tides the bedforms are not exposed, and sediment is expected to be of limited mobility. When exposed, the bedform geometry tends to be asymmetric; orientated down estuary with the ebb current. During Spring tides, vigorous bedload transport of gravel (including large cobbles) occurs during both flood and ebb over the crests and yet, despite this temporal dynamism, the bedforms remain spatially static over long time periods or show weak down-estuary migration. Stasis implies that the tidal bedload transport vectors are essentially in balance. Near-bed shear stress and bed roughness values vary systematically with the Spring-tide current speeds and the predicted grain-size of the bed load using the Shields criterion is in accord with observed coarser grain-sizes in transport. These hydrodynamic data, delimited by estimates of the threshold of motion, and integrated over either flood or ebb tides are being used to explain the apparent stability of the bedforms. The bulk hydraulic data are supplemented by particle tracer studies and laser-scanning of bed configurations between tides. The high-energy environment results in two forms of armouring. Pronounced steep imbrication of platy-cobbles visible on the exposed up-estuary side of dunes is probably disrupted during flood tides leading to rapid reworking of the toe deposits facing up-estuary. In contrast, some crest and leeside locations have been stable for prolonged periods such that closely-fitted fabrics result; these portions of the bedforms are static and effectively are 'armour-plated'. Ebb-tide deposits of finer, ephemeral sandy-units occur on the down estuary side of the bedforms. Sandy-units (although

  16. Management of spatio-temporal data for dynamic segmentation in transportation application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Lan; Gong, Jianya

    2005-10-01

    There have been many research studies focusing on linear data modeling for transportation application. However, research on spatio-temporal modeling is still in its infancy, which limits transportation agencies to implement improved solutions. Transportation applications offer challenges to GIS technology. Not only are the attributes of transportation features dynamic, but also many features are dynamic. The authors firstly review the definition and characteristics of dynamic segmentation, an important technology in transportation application. The paper then presents a data model for dynamic segmentation with timing dimension and its implementation. This paper shows the design of spatio-temporal data structure. Both linear elements and events are tagged with start and end temporal expressions, thus it makes temporal querying easier. Segment geocoding, segment overlay and data maintenance is discussed in detailed.

  17. Temporal artifacts in flat dynamic x-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdick, Michael; Solf, Torsten; Wischmann, Hans-Aloys

    2001-06-01

    Flat X-ray detectors based on CsI:Tl scintillators and amorphous silicon photodiodes are known to exhibit temporal artefacts (ghost images) which decay over time. Previously, these temporal artefacts have been attributed mainly to residual signals from the amorphous silicon photodiodes. More detailed experiments presented here show that a second class of effects, the so-called gain effects, also contributes significantly to the observed temporal artefacts. Both the residual signals and the photodiode gain effect have been characterized under various exposure conditions in the study presented here. The results of the experiments quantitatively show the decay of the temporal artefacts. Additionally, the influence of the detector's reset light on both effects in the photodiode has been studied in detail. The data from the measurements is interpreted based on a simple trapping model which suggests a strong link between the photodiode residual signals and the photodiode gain effect. For the residual signal effect a possible correction scheme is described. Furthermore, the relevance of the remaining temporal artefacts for the applications is briefly discussed for both the photodiode residual signals and the photodiode gain effect.

  18. Spatio-temporal dynamics of bumblebees foraging under predation risk

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Friedrich; Chittka, Lars; Chechkin, Aleksei V; Klages, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    We study bumblebees searching for nectar in a laboratory experiment with and without different types of artificial spiders as predators. We find that the flight velocities obey mixed probability distributions reflecting the access to the food sources while the threat posed by the spiders shows up only in the velocity correlations. This means that the bumblebees adjust their flight patterns spatially to the environment and temporally to the predation risk. Key information on response to environmental changes is thus contained in temporal correlation functions and not in spatial distributions.

  19. Progressively Disrupted Intrinsic Functional Connectivity of Basolateral Amygdala in Very Early Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Ortner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Very early Alzheimer’s disease (AD - i.e., AD at stages of mild cognitive impairment (MCI and mild dementia - is characterized by progressive structural and neuropathologic changes such as atrophy or tangle deposition in medial temporal lobes, including hippocampus and entorhinal cortex but also adjacent amygdala. While progressively disrupted intrinsic connectivity of hippocampus with other brain areas has been demonstrated by many studies, amygdala connectivity was rarely investigated in AD, notwithstanding its known relevance for emotion processing and mood disturbances, which are both important in early AD. Intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC patterns of hippocampus and amygdala overlap in healthy persons. Thus, we hypothesized that increased alteration of iFC patterns along AD is not limited to the hippocampus but also concerns the amygdala, independent from atrophy. To address this hypothesis, we applied structural and functional resting-state MRI in healthy controls (CON, n=33 and patients with AD in the stages of MCI (AD-MCI, n=38 and mild dementia (AD-D, n=36. Outcome measures were voxel-based morphometry (VBM values and region of interest-based intrinsic functional connectivity maps (iFC of basolateral amygdala, which has extended cortical connectivity. Amygdala VBM values were progressively reduced in patients (CON > AD-MCI and AD-D. Amygdala iFC was progressively reduced along impairment severity (CON > AD-MCI > AD-D, particularly for hippocampus, temporal lobes, and fronto-parietal areas. Notably, decreased iFC was independent of amygdala atrophy. Results demonstrate progressively impaired amygdala intrinsic connectivity in temporal and fronto-parietal lobes independent from increasing amygdala atrophy in very early AD. Data suggest that early AD disrupts intrinsic connectivity of medial temporal lobe key regions including that of amygdala.

  20. Cyto- and chemoarchitecture of the amygdala of a monotreme, Tachyglossus aculeatus (the short-beaked echidna).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Hardman, Craig D; Paxinos, George

    2005-10-01

    We have examined the cyto- and chemoarchitecture of the temporal and extended amygdala in the brain of a monotreme (the short-beaked echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus) using Nissl and myelin staining, enzyme histochemistry for acetylcholine esterase and NADPH diaphorase, immunohistochemistry for calcium binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin) and tyrosine hydroxylase. While the broad subdivisions of the eutherian temporal amygdala were present in the echidna brain, there were some noticeable differences. No immunoreactivity for parvalbumin or calretinin for somata was found in the temporal amygdala of the echidna. The nucleus of the lateral olfactory tract could not be definitively identified and the medial nucleus of amygdala appeared to be very small in the echidna. Calbindin immunoreactive neurons were most frequently found in the ventrolateral part of the lateral nucleus, intraamygdaloid parts of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the lateral part of the central nucleus. Neurons strongly reactive for NADPH diaphorase with filling of the dendritic tree were found mainly scattered through the cortical, central and lateral subnuclei, while neurons showing only somata reactivity for NADPH diaphorase were concentrated in the basomedial and basolateral subnuclei. Most of the components of the extended amygdala of eutherians could also be identified in the echidna. Volumetric analysis indicated that the temporal amygdala in both the platypus and echidna is small compared to the same structure in both insectivores and primates, with the central and medial components of the temporal amygdala being particularly small.

  1. RETRIEVAL TIME RESEARCH IN TEMPORAL KNOWLEDGE BASES WITH DYNAMIC CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Koroleva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of retrieval time research of actual data effectiveness search in temporal knowledge bases built in the basis of state of events have been proposed. This type of knowledge base gives the possibility for quick access to relevant states as well as for history based on events chronology. It is shown that data storage for deep retrospective increases significantly the search time due to the growth of the decision tree. The search time for temporal knowledge bases depending on the average number of events prior to the current state has been investigated. Experimental results confirm the advantage of knowledge bases in the basis of state of events over traditional methods for design of intelligent systems.

  2. Modeling of Spatial and Temporal Dynamics in Biological Olfactory Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-21

    anterior part of piriform cortex can be excited by the temporal encoding and processing. In static systems afferent input alone, the posterior areas...between different odors, but instead seem to encode 2.2.1 Synaptic organization. The piriform cortex (PC), odor concentration. The latency of their...the U.S. government. Nature 387: 285-288 Ketchum KL, Haberly LB (1993a) Synaptic events that generate fast oscillations in piriform cortex. I

  3. A dynamic appearance descriptor approach to facial actions temporal modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Bihan; Valstar, Michel; Martinez, Brais; Pantic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Both the configuration and the dynamics of facial expressions are crucial for the interpretation of human facial behavior. Yet to date, the vast majority of reported efforts in the field either do not take the dynamics of facial expressions into account, or focus only on prototypic facial expression

  4. Repetitive motor behavior: further characterization of development and temporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlmann, Amber M; Bliznyuk, Nikolay; Duerr, Isaac; Lewis, Mark H

    2015-03-01

    Repetitive behaviors are diagnostic for autism spectrum disorders, common in related neurodevelopmental disorders, and normative in typical development. In order to identify factors that mediate repetitive behavior development, it is necessary to characterize the expression of these behaviors from an early age. Extending previous findings, we characterized further the ontogeny of stereotyped motor behavior both in terms of frequency and temporal organization in deer mice. A three group trajectory model provided a good fit to the frequencies of stereotyped behavior across eight developmental time points. Group based trajectory analysis using a measure of temporal organization of stereotyped behavior also resulted in a three group solution. Additionally, as the frequency of stereotyped behavior increased with age, the temporal distribution of stereotyped responses became increasingly regular or organized indicating a strong association between these measures. Classification tree and principal components analysis showed that accurate classification of trajectory group could be done with fewer observations. This ability to identify trajectory group membership earlier in development allows for examination of a wide range of variables, both experiential and biological, to determine their impact on altering the expected trajectory of repetitive behavior across development. Such studies would have important implications for treatment efforts in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism.

  5. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder presenting with repeated hypersomnia due to involvement of the hypothalamus and hypothalamus-amygdala linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Kodai; Deguchi, Kazushi; Ikeda, Kazuyo; Takata, Tadayuki; Kokudo, Yohei; Kamada, Masaki; Touge, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-06-01

    We report the case of a 46-year-old Japanese woman with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder presenting with repeated hypersomnia accompanied by decreased CSF orexin level. First episode associated with hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction showed bilateral hypothalamic lesions that can cause secondary damage to the orexin neurons. The second episode associated with impaired memory showed a left temporal lesion involving the amygdala. The mechanism remains unknown, but the reduced blood flow in the hypothalamus ipsilateral to the amygdala lesion suggested trans-synaptic hypothalamic dysfunction secondary to the impaired amygdala. A temporal lesion involving the amygdala and hypothalamus could be responsible for hypersomnia due to neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

  6. Temporal Expectations Guide Dynamic Prioritization in Visual Working Memory through Attenuated α Oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ede, Freek; Niklaus, Marcel; Nobre, Anna C

    2017-01-11

    Although working memory is generally considered a highly dynamic mnemonic store, popular laboratory tasks used to understand its psychological and neural mechanisms (such as change detection and continuous reproduction) often remain relatively "static," involving the retention of a set number of items throughout a shared delay interval. In the current study, we investigated visual working memory in a more dynamic setting, and assessed the following: (1) whether internally guided temporal expectations can dynamically and reversibly prioritize individual mnemonic items at specific times at which they are deemed most relevant; and (2) the neural substrates that support such dynamic prioritization. Participants encoded two differently colored oriented bars into visual working memory to retrieve the orientation of one bar with a precision judgment when subsequently probed. To test for the flexible temporal control to access and retrieve remembered items, we manipulated the probability for each of the two bars to be probed over time, and recorded EEG in healthy human volunteers. Temporal expectations had a profound influence on working memory performance, leading to faster access times as well as more accurate orientation reproductions for items that were probed at expected times. Furthermore, this dynamic prioritization was associated with the temporally specific attenuation of contralateral α (8-14 Hz) oscillations that, moreover, predicted working memory access times on a trial-by-trial basis. We conclude that attentional prioritization in working memory can be dynamically steered by internally guided temporal expectations, and is supported by the attenuation of α oscillations in task-relevant sensory brain areas.

  7. Temporal and Spatio-Temporal Dynamic Instabilities: Novel Computational and Experimental approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doedel, Eusebius J.; Panayotaros, Panayotis; Lambruschini, Carlos L. Pando

    2016-11-01

    This special issue contains a concise account of significant research results presented at the international workshop on Advanced Computational and Experimental Techniques in Nonlinear Dynamics, which was held in Cusco, Peru in August 2015. The meeting gathered leading experts, as well as new researchers, who have contributed to different aspects of Nonlinear Dynamics. Particularly significant was the presence of many active scientists from Latin America. The topics covered in this special issue range from advanced numerical techniques to novel physical experiments, and reflect the present state of the art in several areas of Nonlinear Dynamics. It contains seven review articles, followed by twenty-one regular papers that are organized in five categories, namely (1) Nonlinear Evolution Equations and Applications, (2) Numerical Continuation in Self-sustained Oscillators, (3) Synchronization, Control and Data Analysis, (4) Hamiltonian Systems, and (5) Scaling Properties in Maps.

  8. Optogenetic dissection of amygdala functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eLalumiere

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies of amygdala functioning have occupied a significant place in the history of understanding how the brain controls behavior and cognition. Early work on the amygdala placed this small structure as a key component in the regulation of emotion and affective behavior. Over time, our understanding of its role in brain processes has expanded, as we have uncovered amygdala influences on memory, reward behavior, and overall functioning in many other brain regions. Studies have indicated that the amygdala has widespread connections with a variety of brain structures, from the prefrontal cortex to regions of the brainstem, that explain its powerful influence on other parts of the brain and behaviors mediated by those regions. Thus, many optogenetic studies have focused on harnessing the powers of this technique to elucidate the functioning of the amygdala in relation to motivation, fear, and memory as well as to determine how the amygdala regulates activity in other structures. For example, studies using optogenetics have examined how specific circuits within amygdala nuclei regulate anxiety. Other work has provided insight into how the basolateral and central amygdala nuclei regulate memory processing underlying aversive learning. Many experiments have taken advantage of optogenetics’ ability to target either genetically distinct subpopulations of neurons or the specific projections from the amygdala to other brain regions. Findings from such studies have provided evidence that particular patterns of activity in basolateral amygdala glutamatergic neurons are related to memory consolidation processes, while other work has indicated the critical nature of amygdala inputs to the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens in regulating behavior dependent on those downstream structures. This review will examine the recent discoveries on amygdala functioning made through experiments using optogenetics, placing these findings in the context of the major

  9. Neon color spreading in dynamic displays: temporal factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchini, Marco; Spillmann, Lothar

    2013-10-04

    When a red star is placed in the middle of an Ehrenstein figure so as to be collinear with the surrounding black rays, a reddish veil is perceived to fill the white center. This is called neon color spreading. To better understand the processes that give rise to this phenomenon, we studied the temporal properties of the effect. Specifically, we presented a "sustained" black Ehrenstein figure (rays) for 600 ms and a "transient" red star for 48 ms, or the converse pattern, at various stimulus onset asynchronies (-100-700 ms) and asked subjects to compare the strength of the neon color in the test stimulus to that of a reference pattern in which the transient star had an onset asynchrony of 300 ms. Additional exposure durations of 24 and 96 ms were used for each transient stimulus in order to study the effect of temporal integration. Simultaneity of the on- and off-transients of the star and the Ehrenstein rays were found to optimize neon color spreading, especially when both stimuli terminated together. Longer exposure durations of the transient stimulus up to 96 ms further improved the effect. Neon color spreading was much reduced when the transient stimulus was presented soon after the beginning of the sustained stimulus, with a gradual build-up towards the end. These results emphasize the importance of stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) and stimulus termination asynchrony (STA) for the perception of neon color spreading.

  10. Direct observation of the temporal and spatial dynamics during crumpling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharoni, Hillel; Sharon, Eran

    2010-12-01

    Crumpling occurs when a thin deformable sheet is crushed under an external load or grows within a confining geometry. Crumpled sheets have large resistance to compression and their elastic energy is focused into a complex network of localized structures. Different aspects of crumpling have been studied theoretically, experimentally and numerically. However, very little is known about the dynamic evolution of three-dimensional spatial configurations of crumpling sheets. Here we present direct measurements of the configurations of a fully elastic sheet evolving during the dynamic process of crumpling under isotropic confinement. We observe the formation of a network of ridges and vertices into which the energy is localized. The network is dynamic. Its evolution involves movements of ridges and vertices. Although the characteristics of ridges agree with theoretical predictions, the measured accumulation of elastic energy within the entire sheet is considerably slower than predicted. This could be a result of the observed network rearrangement during crumpling.

  11. Dynamic maps: a visual-analytic methodology for exploring spatio-temporal disease patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chui Kenneth KH

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiologic studies are often confounded by the human and environmental interactions that are complex and dynamic spatio-temporal processes. Hence, it is difficult to discover nuances in the data and generate pertinent hypotheses. Dynamic mapping, a method to simultaneously visualize temporal and spatial information, was introduced to elucidate such complexities. A conceptual framework for dynamic mapping regarding principles and implementation methods was proposed. Methods The spatio-temporal dynamics of Salmonella infections for 2002 in the U.S. elderly were depicted via dynamic mapping. Hospitalization records were obtained from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services. To visualize the spatial relationship, hospitalization rates were computed and superimposed onto maps of environmental exposure factors including livestock densities and ambient temperatures. To visualize the temporal relationship, the resultant maps were composed into a movie. Results The dynamic maps revealed that the Salmonella infections peaked at specific spatio-temporal loci: more clusters were observed in the summer months and higher density of such clusters in the South. The peaks were reached when the average temperatures were greater than 83.4°F (28.6°C. Although the relationship of salmonellosis rates and occurrence of temperature anomalies was non-uniform, a strong synchronization was found between high broiler chicken sales and dense clusters of cases in the summer. Conclusions Dynamic mapping is a practical visual-analytic technique for public health practitioners and has an outstanding potential in providing insights into spatio-temporal processes such as revealing outbreak origins, percolation and travelling waves of the diseases, peak timing of seasonal outbreaks, and persistence of disease clusters.

  12. High dynamic range multi-channel cross-correlator for single-shot temporal contrast measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, A.; Nishiuchi, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Ogura, K.; Mori, M.; Sakaki, H.; Kando, M.; Kondo, K.

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a multi-channel cross-correlator for high dynamic range (>1010), single-shot temporal contrast measurements. The correlator utilizes a third-order crosscorrelation technique and has a reference channel, to be normalized by the measured peak intensity, and four independent optical delay lines. The measurement results of the shot-to-shot temporal contrast clearly show the intensity fluctuations of short pre-pulses at -4.5 ps and -26 ps before main pulse.

  13. The temporal dynamics of first versus second language production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijkers, Kristof; Baus, Cristina; Runnqvist, Elin; Fitzpatrick, Ian; Costa, Albert

    2013-10-01

    In this study we explored the temporal origin of processing differences between first and second language production. Forty highly proficient bilinguals named objects of high and low lexical frequency aloud for both L1 and L2 separately while event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded. The first electrophysiological differences elicited by response language occurred at the same early P2 peak (∼140-220 ms) where we observed the onset of the lexical frequency effect, but only for those bilinguals who started naming in an L1 context and afterwards switched to an L2 naming context. The bilinguals who named objects in the reverse direction did not display a language effect in the ERPs. Taken together, the data show that the L2 naming disadvantage originates during the onset of lexical access and seems to be driven by both representational strength, which is lower for L2 words, and language control demands, which are higher for L2 words.

  14. Spectro-temporal dynamics of Kerr combs with parametric seeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guoping; Martinenghi, Romain; Diallo, Souleymane; Saleh, Khaldoun; Coillet, Aurélien; Chembo, Yanne K

    2015-03-20

    We report a joint theoretical and experimental investigation of the parametric seeding of a primary Kerr optical frequency comb. Electro-optic modulation sidebands matching multiple free-spectral ranges of an ultrahigh-Q millimeter-size magnesium fluoride disk resonator are used as seed signals. These seed signals interact through four-wave mixing with the spectral components of a stable primary comb and give rise to complex spectro-temporal patterns. We show that the new frequency combs feature multiscale frequency spacing, with major frequency gaps in the order of a few hundred gigahertz, and minor frequency spacing in the order of a few tens of gigahertz. The experimental results are in agreement with numerical simulations using the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We expect such versatile and coherent optical frequency combs to have potential applications in optical communications systems where frequency management assigns predefined spectral windows at the emitter stage.

  15. Spatial and temporal infiltration dynamics during managed aquifer recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racz, Andrew J; Fisher, Andrew T; Schmidt, Calla M; Lockwood, Brian S; Los Huertos, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Natural groundwater recharge is inherently difficult to quantify and predict, largely because it comprises a series of processes that are spatially distributed and temporally variable. Infiltration ponds used for managed aquifer recharge (MAR) provide an opportunity to quantify recharge processes across multiple scales under semi-controlled conditions. We instrumented a 3-ha MAR infiltration pond to measure and compare infiltration patterns determined using whole-pond and point-specific methods. Whole-pond infiltration was determined by closing a transient water budget (accounting for inputs, outputs, and changes in storage), whereas point-specific infiltration rates were determined using heat as a tracer and time series analysis at eight locations in the base of the pond. Whole-pond infiltration, normalized for wetted area, rose rapidly to more than 1.0 m/d at the start of MAR operations (increasing as pond stage rose), was sustained at high rates for the next 40 d, and then decreased to less than 0.1 m/d by the end of the recharge season. Point-specific infiltration rates indicated high spatial and temporal variability, with the mean of measured values generally being lower than rates indicated by whole-pond calculations. Colocated measurements of head gradients within saturated soils below the pond were combined with infiltration rates to calculate soil hydraulic conductivity. Observations indicate a brief period of increasing saturated hydraulic conductivity, followed by a decrease of one to two orders of magnitude during the next 50 to 75 d. Locations indicating the most rapid infiltration shifted laterally during MAR operation, and we suggest that infiltration may function as a "variable source area" processes, conceptually similar to catchment runoff.

  16. Temporal dynamics of high repetition rate pulsed single longitudinal mode dye laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Sridhar; V S Rawar; S Singh; L M Gantayet

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of temporal dynamics of grazing incidence grating (GIG) cavity, single-mode dye laser pumped by high repetition rate copper vapour laser (CVL) are presented. Spectral chirp of the dye laser as they evolve in the cavity due to transient phase dynamics of the amplifier gain medium is studied. Effect of grating efficiency, focal spot size, pump power and other cavity parameters on the temporal behaviour of narrow band dye laser such as build-up time, pulse shape and pulse width is studied using the four level dye laser rate equation and photon evolution equation. These results are compared with experimental observations of GIG single-mode dye laser cavity. The effect of pulse stretching of CVL pump pulse on the temporal dynamics of the dye laser is studied.

  17. A Dynamic Approach to Rhythm in Language Toward a Temporal Phonology

    CERN Document Server

    Port, R; Gasser, M; Port, Robert; Cummins, Fred; Gasser, Michael

    1995-01-01

    It is proposed that the theory of dynamical systems offers appropriate tools to model many phonological aspects of both speech production and perception. A dynamic account of speech rhythm is shown to be useful for description of both Japanese mora timing and English timing in a phrase repetition task. This orientation contrasts fundamentally with the more familiar symbolic approach to phonology, in which time is modeled only with sequentially arrayed symbols. It is proposed that an adaptive oscillator offers a useful model for perceptual entrainment (or `locking in') to the temporal patterns of speech production. This helps to explain why speech is often perceived to be more regular than experimental measurements seem to justify. Because dynamic models deal with real time, they also help us understand how languages can differ in their temporal detail---contributing to foreign accents, for example. The fact that languages differ greatly in their temporal detail suggests that these effects are not mere motor u...

  18. Spatio-temporal Dynamics and Mechanisms of Stress Granule Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ohshima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are non-membranous cytoplasmic aggregates of mRNAs and related proteins, assembled in response to environmental stresses such as heat shock, hypoxia, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, chemicals (e.g. arsenite, and viral infections. SGs are hypothesized as a loci of mRNA triage and/or maintenance of proper translation capacity ratio to the pool of mRNAs. In brain ischemia, hippocampal CA3 neurons, which are resilient to ischemia, assemble SGs. In contrast, CA1 neurons, which are vulnerable to ischemia, do not assemble SGs. These results suggest a critical role SG plays in regards to cell fate decisions. Thus SG assembly along with its dynamics should determine the cell fate. However, the process that exactly determines the SG assembly dynamics is largely unknown. In this paper, analyses of experimental data and computer simulations were used to approach this problem. SGs were assembled as a result of applying arsenite to HeLa cells. The number of SGs increased after a short latent period, reached a maximum, then decreased during the application of arsenite. At the same time, the size of SGs grew larger and became localized at the perinuclear region. A minimal mathematical model was constructed, and stochastic simulations were run to test the modeling. Since SGs are discrete entities as there are only several tens of them in a cell, commonly used deterministic simulations could not be employed. The stochastic simulations replicated observed dynamics of SG assembly. In addition, these stochastic simulations predicted a gamma distribution relative to the size of SGs. This same distribution was also found in our experimental data suggesting the existence of multiple fusion steps in the SG assembly. Furthermore, we found that the initial steps in the SG assembly process and microtubules were critical to the dynamics. Thus our experiments and stochastic simulations presented a possible mechanism regulating SG assembly.

  19. Annual and diurnal African biomass burning temporal dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Roberts

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Africa is the single largest continental source of biomass burning emissions. Here we conduct the first analysis of one full year of geostationary active fire detections and fire radiative power data recorded over Africa at 15-min temporal resolution and a 3 km sampling distance (at the sub-satellite point by the SEVIRI imaging radiometer onboard the Meteosat-8 satellite. We use these data to provide new insights into the rates and totals of African open biomass burning, particularly into the extremely strong seasonal and diurnal cycles that exist across the continent. We find peak daily biomass combustion totals are 9 and 6 million tonnes per day in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres respectively, and total fuel consumption between February 2004 and January 2005 is at least 855 million tonnes. Analysis is carried out with regard to fire pixel temporal persistence, and we note that the majority of African fires are detected only once in consecutive 15 min imaging slots, indicating the importance of optimizing the fire pixel detection strategy performance. An investigation of the variability of the diurnal fire cycle is carried out with respect to 20 land cover types, and whilst differences are noted between land covers, the diurnal characteristics for a given land cover type are similar in both African hemispheres. We compare the FRP-derived biomass combustion estimates to burned-areas, both at the scale of individual fires and over the entire continent at a 1-degree spatial scale. Fuel consumption estimates are found to be less than 2 kg/m2 for almost all land cover types, and for savanna grasslands where literature values are commonly reported the FRP-derived median fuel consumption estimate of 309 g/m2 appears reasonable. From mid-2008, geostationary FRP data of the type presented here will become available to interested users continuously and in near real-time from the EUMETSAT Land Surface Analysis Satellite

  20. Annual and diurnal african biomass burning temporal dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Roberts

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Africa is the single largest continental source of biomass burning emissions. Here we conduct the first analysis of one full year of geostationary active fire detections and fire radiative power data recorded over Africa at 15-min temporal interval and a 3 km sub-satellite spatial resolution by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI imaging radiometer onboard the Meteosat-8 satellite. We use these data to provide new insights into the rates and totals of open biomass burning over Africa, particularly into the extremely strong seasonal and diurnal cycles that exist across the continent. We estimate peak daily biomass combustion totals to be 9 and 6 million tonnes of fuel per day in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively, and total fuel consumption between February 2004 and January 2005 is estimated to be at least 855 million tonnes. Analysis is carried out with regard to fire pixel temporal persistence, and we note that the majority of African fires are detected only once in consecutive 15 min imaging slots. An investigation of the variability of the diurnal fire cycle is carried out with respect to 20 different land cover types, and whilst differences are noted between land covers, the fire diurnal cycle characteristics for most land cover type are very similar in both African hemispheres. We compare the Fire Radiative Power (FRP derived biomass combustion estimates to burned-areas, both at the scale of individual fires and over the entire continent at a 1-degree scale. Fuel consumption estimates are found to be less than 2 kg/m2 for all land cover types noted to be subject to significant fire activity, and for savanna grasslands where literature values are commonly reported the FRP-derived median fuel consumption estimate of 300 g/m2 is well within commonly quoted values. Meteosat-derived FRP data of the type presented here is now available freely to interested users continuously and in near

  1. Temporal dynamics of all-optical switching in Photonic Crystal Cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colman, Pierre; Heuck, Mikkel; Yu, Yi;

    2014-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of all-optical switching has been investigated in a Photonic Crystal Cavity with a 150fs-40aJ/pulse resolution. This allowed observing for the first time effects like pulse reshaping, pulse delay and intra-cavity Four-Wave-Mixing.......The temporal dynamics of all-optical switching has been investigated in a Photonic Crystal Cavity with a 150fs-40aJ/pulse resolution. This allowed observing for the first time effects like pulse reshaping, pulse delay and intra-cavity Four-Wave-Mixing....

  2. Electrical amygdala kindling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürmüller, N; Porsolt, R D

    2003-11-01

    This unit describes a method of electrical amygdala kindling in the rat. This procedure requires mastery of stereotaxic electrode implantation which is not covered in the current unit. Also, the investigator must have a sound knowledge of electronics and computing. The text gives instructions on how to render rats epileptic, how to determine the effects of compounds in kindled rats, and how to analyze the data. Results with three reference substances are illustrated. These substances are used in the clinic and give robust results in kindling.

  3. Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of China’s Terrestrial Biodiversity: A Dynamic Habitat Index Diagnostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity in China is analyzed based on the components of the Dynamic Habitat Index (DHI. First, observed field survey based spatial patterns of species richness including threatened species are presented to test their linear relationship with remote sensing based DHI (2001–2010 MODIS. Areas with a high cumulative DHI component are associated with relatively high species richness, and threatened species richness increases in regions with frequently varying levels of the cumulative DHI component. The analysis of geographical and statistical distributions yields the following results on interdependence, polarization and change detection: (1 The decadal mean Cumulative Annual Productivity (DHI-\\(\\overline{cum}\\ < 4 in Northwest China and (DHI-\\(\\overline{cum}\\ > 4 in Southeast China are in a stable (positive relation to the Minimum Annual Apparent Cover (DHI-\\(\\overline{min}\\ and is positively (negatively related to the Seasonal Variation of Greenness (DHI-\\(\\overline{sea}\\; (2 The decadal tendencies show bimodal frequency distributions aligned near DHI-\\(\\overline{min}\\~0.05 and DHI-\\(\\overline{sea}\\~0.5 which separated by zero slopes; that is, regions with both small DHI-min and DHI-sea are becoming smaller and vice versa; (3 The decadal tendencies identify regions of land-cover change (as revealed in previous research. That is, the relation of strong and significant tendencies of the three DHI components with climatic or anthropogenic induced changes provides useful information for conservation planning. These results suggest that the spatial-temporal dynamics of China’s terrestrial species and threatened species richness needs to be monitored by first and second moments of remote sensing based information of the DHI.

  4. STABILITY AND DYNAMICS OF SPATIO-TEMPORAL STRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann Riecke

    2005-10-21

    This document constitutes the final report for the grant. It provides a complete list of publications and presentations that arose from the project as well as a brief description of the highlights of the research results. The research funded by this grant has provided insights into the spontaneous formation of structures of increasing complexity in systems driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium. A classic example of such a system is thermally driven convection in a horizontal fluid layer. Highlights of the research are: (1) explanation of the localized traveling wave pulses observed in binary-mixture convection, (2) explanation of the localized waves in electroconvection, (3) introduction of a new diagnostics for spatially and temporally chaotic states, which is based on the statistics of defect trajectories, (4) prediction of complex states in thermally driven convection in rotating systems. Additional contributions provided insight into the localization mechanism for oscillons, the prediction of a new localization mechanism for traveling waves based on a resonant periodic forcing, and an analysis of the stability of quasi-periodic patterns.

  5. Temporal dynamics of restored communities in ecological engineering works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaunatre, Renaud; Rey, Freddy

    2015-04-01

    Among the numerous applications of ecological engineering are the creation of engineering structures made of living materials, of which objective is to perform a function (for instance, erosion mitigation). One distinctive characteristic of these living materials is that they have their own dynamics. Within a plant community constituting an engineering structure, diversity and species abundance may change. It is well-known that changes of the community structure can have a significant effect on the whole functioning, and the provided services. This is therefore of primary concern to determine if spontaneous dynamics of these engineering structures allows the preservation of expected services. Our questions are: (i) How vegetation develops on these structures? (ii) How community functional traits are changing with time? and (iii) Is sedimentation control expected service still efficient after 12 years. The study site is the Durance catchment on Jurassic black marls where erosion has led to bare gullies. Since 2002, about 2000 ecological engineering structures have been made up in order to control sedimentation. In spring 2014, we sampled 664 of on which vegetation was recorded on 1m² plot. Plant community traits were a community weighted mean calculated from 13 species representing >60% of overall abundances for which we had values related to erosion control. Sediment control markers were also measured on each structures. NMDS and RDA were used to determine the effect of age on plant communities, traits and sediment control. The results show that during the first years age does not have an effect on plant community dynamics, functional traits related to erosion or erosion control markers of engineering structures. From the fields, stochastic events (decanal floods, small land slides, etc.) seems to play a more major role.

  6. Practical Considerations for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, M; Boyden, K; Browning, N D; Campbell, G H; Colvin, J D; DeHope, B; Frank, A M; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F; Kim, J S; King, W E; LaGrange, T B; Pyke, B J; Reed, B W; Shuttlesworth, R M; Stuart, B C; Torralva, B R

    2006-05-01

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5 x 10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  7. Spatio-temporal reconstruction of brain dynamics from EEG with a Markov prior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-01-01

    of these are inherent to the Variational Garrote solver. We name our method the MarkoVG and demonstrate its ability to adapt to the temporal smoothness and spatial sparsity in simulated EEG data. Finally a benchmark EEG dataset is used to demonstrate MarkoVG's ability to recover non-stationary brain dynamics.......Electroencephalography (EEG) can capture brain dynamics in high temporal resolution. By projecting the scalp EEG signal back to its origin in the brain also high spatial resolution can be achieved. Source localized EEG therefore has potential to be a very powerful tool for understanding...... the functional dynamics of the brain. Solving the inverse problem of EEG is however highly ill-posed as there are many more potential locations of the EEG generators than EEG measurement points. Several well-known properties of brain dynamics can be exploited to alleviate this problem. More short ranging...

  8. Temporal Dynamics of the Interaction between Reward and Time Delay during Intertemporal Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Dan-Yang; Li, Jin-Zhen; Li, Xiaoli; Luo, Yue-jia

    2016-01-01

    Intertemporal choice involves the processes of valuation and choice. Choice is often the result of subjective valuation, in which reward is integrated with time delay. Here, using event-related potential (ERP) signals as temporal hallmarks, we aim to investigate temporal dynamics of how reward interacts with time delay during a delayed discounting task. We found that participants preferred immediate rewards when delayed rewards were small or over long-term delays. Our ERP results suggested that the P200 component reflected an initial valuation of reward and time delay, while the frontal N2 component correlated with individual choices of immediate option of rewards. The LPP component was modulated by the N2 component. These findings demonstrate that the N2 component is the key component in temporal dynamics of the interaction between reward and time valuation.

  9. Brazilian Amazon Roads and Parks: Temporal & Spatial Deforestation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, A.; Robalino, J.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneous Forest Impacts of Transport Infrastructure: spatial frontier dynamics & impacts of Brazilian Amazon road changes Prior research on road impacts has almost completely ignored heterogeneity of impacts and as a result both empirically understated potential impact and missed policy potential. We note von Thunen's model suggests not only heterogeneity with distance from market but also specifically road impacts rising then falling with distance ('non-monoThunicity') Endogenous development and partial adjustment dynamics support this for the short run. Causal effects result from studying Brazilian Amazon deforestation (1976-87, 2000-04) using matching for short-run responses to lagged new roads changes (1968-75, 1985-00). We show the critical role of prior development, proxied by 1968 and 1985 road distances, for which exact matching addresses development trends and transforms impact estimates. Splitting the sample on this measure finds confirmation of the nonmonotonic predictions: new road impacts are relatively low if a prior road was close, such that prior transport access and endogenous development dynamics compete with the new road for influence, but also if a prior road was far, since first-decade adjustment in pristine areas is limited; yet in between these bounds, investments immediately raise deforestation significantly. This pattern helps to explain lower estimates within research on a single average impact. It suggests potential for REDD if a country chooses to shift its spatial transport networks. Protected Areas & Brazilian Amazon Deforestation: modeling and testing the impacts of varied PA strategies We model and then estimate the impacts of multiple types of protected areas upon 2000 - 2004 deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Our modeling starts with federal versus state objectives and predicts differences in both choice and implementation of each PA strategy that we examine. Our empirical examination brings not only breakdowns sufficient

  10. Temporal and spatial dynamics of ephemeral drift-algae in eelgrass, Zostera marina, beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jonas; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Olesen, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Aggregations of unattached, filamentous macroalgae showed high temporal and spatial dynamics in two shallow and relatively sheltered eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds in Aarhus Bay and Isefjord, Denmark. The changes in algal abundance were followed in permanent plots at 1-3 days intervals during three...

  11. The temporal dynamics of cortisol and affective states in depressed and non-depressed individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, Sanne H.; Bos, Elisabeth H.; de Jonge, Peter; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cortisol levels have been related to mood disorders at the group level, but not much is known about how cortisol relates to affective states within individuals over time. We examined the temporal dynamics of cortisol and affective states in depressed and non-depressed individuals in dail

  12. Temporal variation of trace metal geochemistry in floodplain lake sediment subject to dynamic hydrological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griethuysen, van C.; Luitwieler, M.; Joziasse, J.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Climate change and land use may significantly influence metal cycling in dynamic river systems. We studied temporal variation of sediment characteristics in a floodplain lake, including concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, acid volatile sulfide and trace metals. The sampling period included a

  13. Superior Temporal Activation in Response to Dynamic Audio-Visual Emotional Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Diana L.; Hunyadi, Elinora; Schultz, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Perception of emotion is critical for successful social interaction, yet the neural mechanisms underlying the perception of dynamic, audio-visual emotional cues are poorly understood. Evidence from language and sensory paradigms suggests that the superior temporal sulcus and gyrus (STS/STG) play a key role in the integration of auditory and visual…

  14. GABA[subscript A] Receptors Determine the Temporal Dynamics of Memory Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Gavan P.; Augustyn, Katarzyna A.; Richardson, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments studied the role of GABA[subscript A] receptors in the temporal dynamics of memory retention. Memory for an active avoidance response was a nonmonotonic function of the retention interval. When rats were tested shortly (2 min) or some time (24 h) after training, retention was excellent, but when they were tested at intermediate…

  15. The Temporal Dynamics of Spoken Word Recognition in Adverse Listening Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Susanne; Bradlow, Ann R.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the temporal dynamics of spoken word recognition in noise and background speech. In two visual-world experiments, English participants listened to target words while looking at four pictures on the screen: a target (e.g. "candle"), an onset competitor (e.g. "candy"), a rhyme competitor (e.g.…

  16. Temporal dynamics of motor cortex excitability during perception of natural emotional scenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgomaneri, Sara; Gazzola, Valeria; Avenanti, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely assumed that emotions prime the body for action, the effects of visual perception of natural emotional scenes on the temporal dynamics of the human motor system have scarcely been investigated. Here, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess motor e

  17. Cortical Spatio-Temporal Dynamics Underlying Phonological Target Detection in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Edward F.; Edwards, Erik; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.; Fogelson, Noa; Dalal, Sarang S.; Canolty, Ryan T.; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Barbaro, Nicholas M.; Knight, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Selective processing of task-relevant stimuli is critical for goal-directed behavior. We used electrocorticography to assess the spatio-temporal dynamics of cortical activation during a simple phonological target detection task, in which subjects press a button when a prespecified target syllable sound is heard. Simultaneous surface potential…

  18. Spatio-temporal reconstruction of brain dynamics from EEG with a Markov prior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-12-13

    Electroencephalography (EEG) can capture brain dynamics in high temporal resolution. By projecting the scalp EEG signal back to its origin in the brain also high spatial resolution can be achieved. Source localized EEG therefore has potential to be a very powerful tool for understanding the functional dynamics of the brain. Solving the inverse problem of EEG is however highly ill-posed as there are many more potential locations of the EEG generators than EEG measurement points. Several well-known properties of brain dynamics can be exploited to alleviate this problem. More short ranging connections exist in the brain than long ranging, arguing for spatially focal sources. Additionally, recent work (Delorme et al., 2012) argues that EEG can be decomposed into components having sparse source distributions. On the temporal side both short and long term stationarity of brain activation are seen. We summarize these insights in an inverse solver, the so-called "Variational Garrote" (Kappen and Gómez, 2013). Using a Markov prior we can incorporate flexible degrees of temporal stationarity. Through spatial basis functions spatially smooth distributions are obtained. Sparsity of these are inherent to the Variational Garrote solver. We name our method the MarkoVG and demonstrate its ability to adapt to the temporal smoothness and spatial sparsity in simulated EEG data. Finally a benchmark EEG dataset is used to demonstrate MarkoVG's ability to recover non-stationary brain dynamics.

  19. A Test of Time : a temporal and dynamic approach to power and ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Giurge (Laura)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBoth behavior and cognitive processes are ongoing, dynamic, and temporal. They vary not only between individuals as a function of differences in personality and stable contextual characteristics, but also within. That is, the same person might engage in unethical behavior one day but not

  20. A Model of the Temporal Dynamics of Knowledge Brokerage in Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hukkinen, Janne I.

    2016-01-01

    I develop a conceptual model of the temporal dynamics of knowledge brokerage for sustainable development. Brokerage refers to efforts to make research and policymaking more accessible to each other. The model enables unbiased and systematic consideration of knowledge brokerage as part of policy evolution. The model is theoretically grounded in…

  1. Understanding the Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Denitrification in an Oregon Salt Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt marshes are highly susceptible to a range of climate change effects (e.g., sea-level rise, salinity changes, storm severity, shifts in vegetation across watershed). It is unclear how these effects will alter the spatial and temporal dynamics of denitrification, a potential p...

  2. Temporal Dynamics of Methane Fluxes in Temperate Urban Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, K. V.; Bohrer, G.; Naor, L.; Mouser, P. J.; Mitsch, W. J.; Wu, M.

    2011-12-01

    Recent concerns about wetland restoration have highlighted the potential conflict of the hydrological and ecological benefits of wetlands and greenhouse gas emissions particularly methane. Therefore it is pivotal to quantify emission rates and effects of meteorological, hydrological and ecological drivers of methane fluxes in wetlands. Novel fast methane (CH4) gas analyzers are now enabling continuous ecosystem scale measurements and assessment. We have set up two eddy flux stations - one in a constructed freshwater wetland in the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park (ORWRP) Ohio and one in a restored tidal salt marsh in the Meadowlands of New Jersey (MNJ). Continuous methane fluxes were measured with the LI7700 over one growing season and additional measurements with chambers were conducted at several locations in each site. Methane emissions were highly variable in space and time. The mean daily dynamics of methane emission are related to major drivers of methane production. In ORWRP a late afternoon peak of methane emission is correlated to soil temperature and no other meteorological or hydrological driver seem to explain the pattern observed. In MNJ a correlation of methane fluxes to night time CO2 fluxes was observed. At both sites methane production and emission is increasing at the beginning of the growing season.

  3. An assessment of the temporal dynamics of moral decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Koop

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the domain of moral decision making, models in which emotion and deliberation constitute competing dual-systems have become increasingly popular. Currently, the favored explanation of this interaction is what Evans (2008 termed a ``default-interventionist'' (DI process where moral decisions are the result of a prepotent emotional response, which can be overridden with substantial deliberative effort. Although this ``emotion-then-deliberation'' sequence is often assumed, existing methods have lacked the requisite process resolution to clearly depict the nature of this interaction. The present work utilized continuous mouse tracking, or response dynamics, to develop and test predictions of these DI models of moral decision making. Study 1 utilized previously published moral dilemmas to validate the method for use with such complex stimuli. Although the data replicated typical choice and RT patterns, the process metrics provided by the response trajectories did not demonstrate the online preference reversals predicted by DI models. Study 2 utilized more rigorously constructed stimuli and an alternative presentation format to provide the strongest possible test of DI predictions, but again failed to show the predicted reversals. In summary, neither experiment provided data in accordance with the predictions of popular DI dual-systems models, which suggests that researchers should consider models allowing for concurrent activation of deliberative and emotional systems, or reconceptualize moral decisions within the typical multiattribute decision framework.

  4. Detrending Changes the Temporal Dynamics of a Semantic Fluency Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenio, Steven; Lissemore, Frances M; Sajatovic, Martha; Smyth, Kathleen A; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Woyczynski, Wojbor A; Lerner, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the dynamics of clustering semantic fluency responses and switching between clusters. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of participants (N = 60) in a study of patient reported outcomes who were given the Saint Louis University Mental Status test. Sixty-second animal naming tests were scored for the timing of responses as well as the clustering of responses into semantic categories. Time scores were detrended to correct for exponential exhaustion and normalize the time scale across individuals. Results: Grouped by number of responses given, low performers (LP; Carter et al., 2012) switched between clusters fewer times than medium performers (MP) and high performers (HP). Prior to detrending, LP showed increased intracluster response times when compared to the other groups, but no differences were shown in intercluster response times. After detrending, however, the difference in intracluster response times disappeared and LP showed significantly faster detrended intercluster response times compared to both MP and HP. Conclusion: Prior to detrending, slower intracluster response times appear to be driving poorer performance. When time scores are detrended, our findings suggest that LP participants have quicker intercluster response times but exhaust more quickly as well. Detrending can help describe the interplay between the structure-loss and retrieval-slowing models of declining semantic fluency by isolating the component mechanisms involved in each.

  5. Detrending Changes the Temporal Dynamics of a Semantic Fluency Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Lenio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the dynamics of clustering semantic fluency responses and switching between clusters. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of participants (N=60 in a study of patient reported outcomes who were given the Saint Louis University Mental Status test. Sixty-second animal naming tests were scored for the timing of responses as well as the clustering of responses into semantic categories. Time scores were detrended to correct for exponential exhaustion and normalize the time scale across individuals. Results: Grouped by number of responses given, low performers (1 switched between clusters fewer times than medium performers (MP and high performers (HP. Prior to detrending, LP showed increased intracluster response times when compared to the other groups but no differences were shown in intercluster response times. After detrending, however, the difference in intracluster response times disappeared and LP showed significantly faster detrended intercluster response times compared to both MP and HP. Conclusion: Prior to detrending, slower intracluster response times appear to be driving poorer performance. When time scores are detrended, our findings suggest that LP participants have quicker intercluster response times but exhaust more quickly as well. Detrending can help describe the interplay between the structure-loss and retrieval-slowing models of declining semantic fluency by isolating the component mechanisms involved in each.

  6. Temporal and spatial neural dynamics in the perception of basic emotions from complex scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Tommaso; Cauda, Franco; Crini, Manuella; Tatu, Mona-Karina; Celeghin, Alessia; de Gelder, Beatrice; Tamietto, Marco

    2014-11-01

    The different temporal dynamics of emotions are critical to understand their evolutionary role in the regulation of interactions with the surrounding environment. Here, we investigated the temporal dynamics underlying the perception of four basic emotions from complex scenes varying in valence and arousal (fear, disgust, happiness and sadness) with the millisecond time resolution of Electroencephalography (EEG). Event-related potentials were computed and each emotion showed a specific temporal profile, as revealed by distinct time segments of significant differences from the neutral scenes. Fear perception elicited significant activity at the earliest time segments, followed by disgust, happiness and sadness. Moreover, fear, disgust and happiness were characterized by two time segments of significant activity, whereas sadness showed only one long-latency time segment of activity. Multidimensional scaling was used to assess the correspondence between neural temporal dynamics and the subjective experience elicited by the four emotions in a subsequent behavioral task. We found a high coherence between these two classes of data, indicating that psychological categories defining emotions have a close correspondence at the brain level in terms of neural temporal dynamics. Finally, we localized the brain regions of time-dependent activity for each emotion and time segment with the low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography. Fear and disgust showed widely distributed activations, predominantly in the right hemisphere. Happiness activated a number of areas mostly in the left hemisphere, whereas sadness showed a limited number of active areas at late latency. The present findings indicate that the neural signature of basic emotions can emerge as the byproduct of dynamic spatiotemporal brain networks as investigated with millisecond-range resolution, rather than in time-independent areas involved uniquely in the processing one specific emotion.

  7. Emergence of spatio-temporal dynamics from exact coherent solutions in pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Paul; Mellibovsky, Fernando; Avila, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent-laminar patterns are ubiquitous near transition in wall-bounded shear flows. Despite recent progress in describing their dynamics in analogy to non-equilibrium phase transitions, there is no theory explaining their emergence. Dynamical-system approaches suggest that invariant solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations, such as traveling waves and relative periodic orbits in pipe flow, act as building blocks of the disordered dynamics. While recent studies have shown how transient chaos arises from such solutions, the ensuing dynamics lacks the strong fluctuations in size, shape and speed of the turbulent spots observed in experiments. We here show that chaotic spots with distinct dynamical and kinematic properties merge in phase space and give rise to the enhanced spatio-temporal patterns observed in pipe flow. This paves the way for a dynamical-system foundation to the phenomenology of turbulent-laminar patterns in wall-bounded extended shear flows.

  8. SPATIAL-TEMPORAL DYNAMICS OF URBAN FIRE INCIDENTS: A CASE STUDY OF NANJING, CHINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fire and rescue service is one of the fundamental public services provided by government in order to protect people, properties and environment from fires and other disasters, and thus promote a safer living environment. Well understanding spatial-temporal dynamics of fire incidents can offer insights for potential determinants of various fire events and enable better fire risk estimation, assisting future allocation of prevention resources and strategic planning of mitigation programs. Using a 12-year (2002-2013 dataset containing the urban fire events in Nanjing, China, this research explores the spatial-temporal dynamics of urban fire incidents. A range of exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA approaches and tools, such as spatial kernel density and co-maps, are employed to examine the spatial, temporal and spatial-temporal variations of the fire events. Particular attention has been paid to two types of fire incidents: residential properties and local facilities, due to their relatively higher occurrence frequencies. The results demonstrated that the amount of urban fire has greatly increased in the last decade and spatial-temporal distribution of fire events vary among different incident types, which implies varying impact of potential influencing factors for further investigation.

  9. Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of Urban Fire Incidents: a Case Study of Nanjing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, J.; Zhang, X.

    2016-06-01

    Fire and rescue service is one of the fundamental public services provided by government in order to protect people, properties and environment from fires and other disasters, and thus promote a safer living environment. Well understanding spatial-temporal dynamics of fire incidents can offer insights for potential determinants of various fire events and enable better fire risk estimation, assisting future allocation of prevention resources and strategic planning of mitigation programs. Using a 12-year (2002-2013) dataset containing the urban fire events in Nanjing, China, this research explores the spatial-temporal dynamics of urban fire incidents. A range of exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA) approaches and tools, such as spatial kernel density and co-maps, are employed to examine the spatial, temporal and spatial-temporal variations of the fire events. Particular attention has been paid to two types of fire incidents: residential properties and local facilities, due to their relatively higher occurrence frequencies. The results demonstrated that the amount of urban fire has greatly increased in the last decade and spatial-temporal distribution of fire events vary among different incident types, which implies varying impact of potential influencing factors for further investigation.

  10. Three-stage approach for dynamic traffic temporal-spatial model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆化普; 孙智源; 屈闻聪

    2016-01-01

    In order to describe the characteristics of dynamic traffic flow and improve the robustness of its multiple applications, a dynamic traffic temporal-spatial model (DTTS) is established. With consideration of the temporal correlation, spatial correlation and historical correlation, a basic DTTS model is built. And a three-stage approach is put forward for the simplification and calibration of the basic DTTS model. Through critical sections pre-selection and critical time pre-selection, the first stage reduces the variable number of the basic DTTS model. In the second stage, variable coefficient calibration is implemented based on basic model simplification and stepwise regression analysis. Aimed at dynamic noise estimation, the characteristics of noise are summarized and an extreme learning machine is presented in the third stage. A case study based on a real-world road network in Beijing, China, is carried out to test the efficiency and applicability of proposed DTTS model and the three-stage approach.

  11. Modeling Temporal Behavior in Large Networks: A Dynamic Mixed-Membership Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, R; Gallagher, B; Neville, J; Henderson, K

    2011-11-11

    Given a large time-evolving network, how can we model and characterize the temporal behaviors of individual nodes (and network states)? How can we model the behavioral transition patterns of nodes? We propose a temporal behavior model that captures the 'roles' of nodes in the graph and how they evolve over time. The proposed dynamic behavioral mixed-membership model (DBMM) is scalable, fully automatic (no user-defined parameters), non-parametric/data-driven (no specific functional form or parameterization), interpretable (identifies explainable patterns), and flexible (applicable to dynamic and streaming networks). Moreover, the interpretable behavioral roles are generalizable, computationally efficient, and natively supports attributes. We applied our model for (a) identifying patterns and trends of nodes and network states based on the temporal behavior, (b) predicting future structural changes, and (c) detecting unusual temporal behavior transitions. We use eight large real-world datasets from different time-evolving settings (dynamic and streaming). In particular, we model the evolving mixed-memberships and the corresponding behavioral transitions of Twitter, Facebook, IP-Traces, Email (University), Internet AS, Enron, Reality, and IMDB. The experiments demonstrate the scalability, flexibility, and effectiveness of our model for identifying interesting patterns, detecting unusual structural transitions, and predicting the future structural changes of the network and individual nodes.

  12. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics and Value of Nature-Based Recreation, Estimated via Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonter, Laura J; Watson, Keri B; Wood, Spencer A; Ricketts, Taylor H

    2016-01-01

    Conserved lands provide multiple ecosystem services, including opportunities for nature-based recreation. Managing this service requires understanding the landscape attributes underpinning its provision, and how changes in land management affect its contribution to human wellbeing over time. However, evidence from both spatially explicit and temporally dynamic analyses is scarce, often due to data limitations. In this study, we investigated nature-based recreation within conserved lands in Vermont, USA. We used geotagged photographs uploaded to the photo-sharing website Flickr to quantify visits by in-state and out-of-state visitors, and we multiplied visits by mean trip expenditures to show that conserved lands contributed US $1.8 billion (US $0.18-20.2 at 95% confidence) to Vermont's tourism industry between 2007 and 2014. We found eight landscape attributes explained the pattern of visits to conserved lands; visits were higher in larger conserved lands, with less forest cover, greater trail density and more opportunities for snow sports. Some of these attributes differed from those found in other locations, but all aligned with our understanding of recreation in Vermont. We also found that using temporally static models to inform conservation decisions may have perverse outcomes for nature-based recreation. For example, static models suggest conserved land with less forest cover receive more visits, but temporally dynamic models suggest clearing forests decreases, rather than increases, visits to these sites. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding both the spatial and temporal dynamics of ecosystem services for conservation decision-making.

  13. Portraying Temporal Dynamics of Urban Spatial Divisions with Mobile Phone Positioning Data: A Complex Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial structure is a fundamental characteristic of cities that influences the urban functioning to a large extent. While administrative partitioning is generally done in the form of static spatial division, understanding a more temporally dynamic structure of the urban space would benefit urban planning and management immensely. This study makes use of a large-scale mobile phone positioning dataset to characterize the diurnal dynamics of the interaction-based urban spatial structure. To extract the temporally vibrant structure, spatial interaction networks at different times are constructed based on the movement connections of individuals between geographical units. Complex network community detection technique is applied to identify the spatial divisions as well as to quantify their temporal dynamics. Empirical analysis is conducted using data containing all user positions on a typical weekday in Shenzhen, China. Results are compared with official zoning and planned structure and indicate a certain degree of expansion in urban central areas and fragmentation in industrial suburban areas. A high level of variability in spatial divisions at different times of day is detected with some distinct temporal features. Peak and pre-/post-peak hours witness the most prominent fluctuation in spatial division indicating significant change in the characteristics of movements and activities during these periods of time. Findings of this study demonstrate great potential of large-scale mobility data in supporting intelligent spatial decision making and providing valuable knowledge to the urban planning sectors.

  14. Functional and structural amygdala - anterior cingulate connectivity correlates with attentional bias to masked fearful faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joshua M; Cha, Jiook; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R

    2013-10-01

    An attentional bias to threat has been causally related to anxiety. Recent research has linked nonconscious attentional bias to threat with variability in the integrity of the amygdala - anterior cingulate pathway, which sheds light on the neuroanatomical basis for a behavioral precursor to anxiety. However, the extent to which structural variability in amygdala - anterior cingulate integrity relates to the functional connectivity within this pathway and how such functional connectivity may relate to attention bias behavior, remain critical missing pieces of the puzzle. In 15 individuals we measured the structural integrity of the amygdala - prefrontal pathway with diffusion tensor-weighted MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), amygdala-seeded intrinsic functional connectivity to the anterior cingulate, and attentional bias toward backward masked fearful faces with a dot-probe task. We found that greater biases in attention to threat predicted greater levels of uncinate fasciculus integrity, greater positive amygdala - anterior cingulate functional connectivity, and greater amygdala coupling with a broader social perception network including the superior temporal sulcus, tempoparietal junction (TPJ), and somatosensory cortex. Additionally, greater levels of uncinate fasciculus integrity correlated with greater levels of amygdala - anterior cingulate intrinsic functional connectivity. Thus, high bias individuals displayed a heightened degree of amygdala - anterior cingulate connectivity during basal conditions, which we believe predisposes these individuals to focus their attention on signals of threat within their environment.

  15. Neuroticism and extraversion are associated with amygdala resting-state functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajani, Moji; Veer, Ilya M; van Tol, Marie-José; Aleman, André; van Buchem, Mark A; Veltman, Dick J; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van der Wee, Nic J

    2014-06-01

    The personality traits neuroticism and extraversion are differentially related to socioemotional functioning and susceptibility to affective disorders. However, the neurobiology underlying this differential relationship is still poorly understood. This discrepancy could perhaps best be studied by adopting a brain connectivity approach. Whereas the amygdala has repeatedly been linked to neuroticism and extraversion, no study has yet focused on the intrinsic functional architecture of amygdala-centered networks in relation to both traits. To this end, seed-based correlation analysis was employed to reveal amygdala resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) and its associations with neuroticism and extraversion in 50 healthy participants. Higher neuroticism scores were associated with increased amygdala RSFC with the precuneus, and decreased amygdala RSFC with the temporal poles, insula, and superior temporal gyrus (p neuroticism may relate to the less-adaptive perception and processing of self-relevant and socioemotional information that is frequently seen in neurotic individuals, whereas the amygdala RSFC pattern associated with extraversion may relate to the heightened reward sensitivity and enhanced socioemotional functioning in extraverts. We hypothesize that the variability in amygdala RSFC observed in the present study could potentially link neuroticism and extraversion to the neurobiology underlying increased susceptibility or resilience to affective disorders.

  16. High-dynamic-range cross-correlator for shot-to-shot measurement of temporal contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Akira; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Ogura, Koichi; Mori, Michiaki; Sakaki, Hironao; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Kiminori

    2017-01-01

    The temporal contrast of an ultrahigh-intensity laser is a crucial parameter for laser plasma experiments. We have developed a multichannel cross-correlator (MCCC) for single-shot measurements of the temporal contrast in a high-power laser system. The MCCC is based on third-order cross-correlation, and has four channels and independent optical delay lines. We have experimentally demonstrated that the MCCC system achieves a high dynamic range of ˜1012 and a large temporal window of ˜1 ns. Moreover, we were able to measure the shot-to-shot fluctuations of a short-prepulse intensity at -26 ps and long-pulse (amplified spontaneous emission, ASE) intensities at -30, -450, and -950 ps before the arrival of the main pulse at the interaction point.

  17. The influence of lexical statistics on temporal lobe cortical dynamics during spoken word listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibelli, Emily S.; Leonard, Matthew K.; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    Neural representations of words are thought to have a complex spatio-temporal cortical basis. It has been suggested that spoken word recognition is not a process of feed-forward computations from phonetic to lexical forms, but rather involves the online integration of bottom-up input with stored lexical knowledge. Using direct neural recordings from the temporal lobe, we examined cortical responses to words and pseudowords. We found that neural populations were not only sensitive to lexical status (real vs. pseudo), but also to cohort size (number of words matching the phonetic input at each time point) and cohort frequency (lexical frequency of those words). These lexical variables modulated neural activity from the posterior to anterior temporal lobe, and also dynamically as the stimuli unfolded on a millisecond time scale. Our findings indicate that word recognition is not purely modular, but relies on rapid and online integration of multiple sources of lexical knowledge. PMID:26072003

  18. Spatial clustering in the spatio-temporal dynamics of endemic cholera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emch Michael

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spatio-temporal patterns of infectious diseases that are environmentally driven reflect the combined effects of transmission dynamics and environmental heterogeneity. They contain important information on different routes of transmission, including the role of environmental reservoirs. Consideration of the spatial component in infectious disease dynamics has led to insights on the propagation of fronts at the level of counties in rabies in the US, and the metapopulation behavior at the level of cities in childhood diseases such as measles in the UK, both at relatively coarse scales. As epidemiological data on individual infections become available, spatio-temporal patterns can be examined at higher resolutions. Methods The extensive spatio-temporal data set for cholera in Matlab, Bangladesh, maps the individual location of cases from 1983 to 2003. This unique record allows us to examine the spatial structure of cholera outbreaks, to address the role of primary transmission, occurring from an aquatic reservoir to the human host, and that of secondary transmission, involving a feedback between current and past levels of infection. We use Ripley's K and L indices and bootstrapping methods to evaluate the occurrence of spatial clustering in the cases during outbreaks using different temporal windows. The spatial location of cases was also confronted against the spatial location of water sources. Results Spatial clustering of cholera cases was detected at different temporal and spatial scales. Cases relative to water sources also exhibit spatial clustering. Conclusions The clustering of cases supports an important role of secondary transmission in the dynamics of cholera epidemics in Matlab, Bangladesh. The spatial clustering of cases relative to water sources, and its timing, suggests an effective role of water reservoirs during the onset of cholera outbreaks. Once primary transmission has initiated an outbreak, secondary

  19. Altered temporal dynamics of neural adaptation in the aging human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Björn; Henry, Molly J; Johnsrude, Ingrid S; Obleser, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    Neural response adaptation plays an important role in perception and cognition. Here, we used electroencephalography to investigate how aging affects the temporal dynamics of neural adaptation in human auditory cortex. Younger (18-31 years) and older (51-70 years) normal hearing adults listened to tone sequences with varying onset-to-onset intervals. Our results show long-lasting neural adaptation such that the response to a particular tone is a nonlinear function of the extended temporal history of sound events. Most important, aging is associated with multiple changes in auditory cortex; older adults exhibit larger and less variable response magnitudes, a larger dynamic response range, and a reduced sensitivity to temporal context. Computational modeling suggests that reduced adaptation recovery times underlie these changes in the aging auditory cortex and that the extended temporal stimulation has less influence on the neural response to the current sound in older compared with younger individuals. Our human electroencephalography results critically narrow the gap to animal electrophysiology work suggesting a compensatory release from cortical inhibition accompanying hearing loss and aging.

  20. MR-guided dynamic PET reconstruction with the kernel method and spectral temporal basis functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosad, Philip; Reader, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve markedly improved end-point kinetic parameter maps by incorporating a temporal model of the radiotracer directly into the reconstruction algorithm. In this work we have developed a highly constrained, fully dynamic PET reconstruction algorithm incorporating both spectral analysis temporal basis functions and spatial basis functions derived from the kernel method applied to a co-registered T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) image. The dynamic PET image is modelled as a linear combination of spatial and temporal basis functions, and a maximum likelihood estimate for the coefficients can be found using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Following reconstruction, kinetic fitting using any temporal model of interest can be applied. Based on a BrainWeb T1-weighted MR phantom, we performed a realistic dynamic [18F]FDG simulation study with two noise levels, and investigated the quantitative performance of the proposed reconstruction algorithm, comparing it with reconstructions incorporating either spectral analysis temporal basis functions alone or kernel spatial basis functions alone, as well as with conventional frame-independent reconstruction. Compared to the other reconstruction algorithms, the proposed algorithm achieved superior performance, offering a decrease in spatially averaged pixel-level root-mean-square-error on post-reconstruction kinetic parametric maps in the grey/white matter, as well as in the tumours when they were present on the co-registered MR image. When the tumours were not visible in the MR image, reconstruction with the proposed algorithm performed similarly to reconstruction with spectral temporal basis functions and was superior to both conventional frame-independent reconstruction and frame-independent reconstruction with kernel spatial basis functions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a joint spectral

  1. MR-guided dynamic PET reconstruction with the kernel method and spectral temporal basis functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosad, Philip; Reader, Andrew J

    2016-06-21

    Recent advances in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve markedly improved end-point kinetic parameter maps by incorporating a temporal model of the radiotracer directly into the reconstruction algorithm. In this work we have developed a highly constrained, fully dynamic PET reconstruction algorithm incorporating both spectral analysis temporal basis functions and spatial basis functions derived from the kernel method applied to a co-registered T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) image. The dynamic PET image is modelled as a linear combination of spatial and temporal basis functions, and a maximum likelihood estimate for the coefficients can be found using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Following reconstruction, kinetic fitting using any temporal model of interest can be applied. Based on a BrainWeb T1-weighted MR phantom, we performed a realistic dynamic [(18)F]FDG simulation study with two noise levels, and investigated the quantitative performance of the proposed reconstruction algorithm, comparing it with reconstructions incorporating either spectral analysis temporal basis functions alone or kernel spatial basis functions alone, as well as with conventional frame-independent reconstruction. Compared to the other reconstruction algorithms, the proposed algorithm achieved superior performance, offering a decrease in spatially averaged pixel-level root-mean-square-error on post-reconstruction kinetic parametric maps in the grey/white matter, as well as in the tumours when they were present on the co-registered MR image. When the tumours were not visible in the MR image, reconstruction with the proposed algorithm performed similarly to reconstruction with spectral temporal basis functions and was superior to both conventional frame-independent reconstruction and frame-independent reconstruction with kernel spatial basis functions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a joint spectral

  2. Computational EEG modelling of decision making under ambiguity reveals spatio-temporal dynamics of outcome evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jollans, Lee; Whelan, Robert; Venables, Louise; Turnbull, Oliver H; Cella, Matteo; Dymond, Simon

    2017-03-15

    Complex human cognition, such as decision-making under ambiguity, is reflected in dynamic spatio-temporal activity in the brain. Here, we combined event-related potentials with computational modelling of the time course of decision-making and outcome evaluation during the Iowa Gambling Task. Measures of choice probability generated using the Prospect Valence Learning Delta (PVL-Delta) model, in addition to objective trial outcomes (outcome magnitude and valence), were applied as regressors in a general linear model of the EEG signal. The resulting three-dimensional spatio-temporal characterization of task-related neural dynamics demonstrated that outcome valence, outcome magnitude, and PVL-Delta choice probability were expressed in distinctly separate event related potentials. Our findings showed that the P3 component was associated with an experience-based measure of outcome expectancy.

  3. Dynamic Control of Response Criterion in Premotor Cortex during Perceptual Detection under Temporal Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Federico; de Lafuente, Victor; Romo, Ranulfo; Barak, Omri; Parga, Néstor

    2015-05-20

    Under uncertainty, the brain uses previous knowledge to transform sensory inputs into the percepts on which decisions are based. When the uncertainty lies in the timing of sensory evidence, however, the mechanism underlying the use of previously acquired temporal information remains unknown. We study this issue in monkeys performing a detection task with variable stimulation times. We use the neural correlates of false alarms to infer the subject's response criterion and find that it modulates over the course of a trial. Analysis of premotor cortex activity shows that this modulation is represented by the dynamics of population responses. A trained recurrent network model reproduces the experimental findings and demonstrates a neural mechanism to benefit from temporal expectations in perceptual detection. Previous knowledge about the probability of stimulation over time can be intrinsically encoded in the neural population dynamics, allowing a flexible control of the response criterion over time.

  4. Diverse spatio-temporal dynamical patterns of p53 and cell fate decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairambault, Jean; Eliaš, Ján

    2016-06-01

    The protein p53 as a tumour suppressor protein accumulates in cells in response to DNA damage and transactivates a large variety of genes involved in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and numerous other processes. Recent biological observations suggest that specific spatio-temporal dynamical patterns of p53 may be associated with specific cellular response, and thus the spatio-temporal heterogeneity of the p53 dynamics contributes to the overall complexity of p53 signalling. Reaction-diffusion equations taking into account spatial representation of the cell and motion of the species inside the cell can be used to model p53 protein network and could be thus of some help to biologists and pharmacologists in anticancer treatment.

  5. Laminar and Temporal Expression Dynamics of Coding and Noncoding RNAs in the Mouse Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Fertuzinhos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hallmark of the cerebral neocortex is its organization into six layers, each containing a characteristic set of cell types and synaptic connections. The transcriptional events involved in laminar development and function still remain elusive. Here, we employed deep sequencing of mRNA and small RNA species to gain insights into transcriptional differences among layers and their temporal dynamics during postnatal development of the mouse primary somatosensory neocortex. We identify a number of coding and noncoding transcripts with specific spatiotemporal expression and splicing patterns. We also identify signature trajectories and gene coexpression networks associated with distinct biological processes and transcriptional overlap between these processes. Finally, we provide data that allow the study of potential miRNA and mRNA interactions. Overall, this study provides an integrated view of the laminar and temporal expression dynamics of coding and noncoding transcripts in the mouse neocortex and a resource for studies of neurodevelopment and transcriptome.

  6. A possible low-level explanation of "temporal dynamics of brightness induction and White's illusion"

    CERN Document Server

    Karmakar, Subhajit

    2009-01-01

    Based upon physiological observation on time dependent orientation selectivity in the cells of macaque's primary visual cortex together with the psychophysical studies on the tuning of orientation detectors in human vision we suggest that time dependence in brightness perception can be accommodated through the time evolution of cortical contribution to the orientation tuning of the ODoG filter responses. A set of Difference of Gaussians functions has been used to mimic the time dependence of orientation tuning. The tuning of orientation preference and its inversion at a later time have been considered in explaining qualitatively the temporal dynamics of brightness perception observed in "Brief presentations reveal the temporal dynamics of brightness induction and White's illusion" for 58 and 82 ms of stimulus exposure.

  7. Laminar and temporal expression dynamics of coding and noncoding RNAs in the mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertuzinhos, Sofia; Li, Mingfeng; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Ivic, Vedrana; Franjic, Daniel; Singh, Darshani; Crair, Michael; Sestan, Nenad

    2014-03-13

    The hallmark of the cerebral neocortex is its organization into six layers, each containing a characteristic set of cell types and synaptic connections. The transcriptional events involved in laminar development and function still remain elusive. Here, we employed deep sequencing of mRNA and small RNA species to gain insights into transcriptional differences among layers and their temporal dynamics during postnatal development of the mouse primary somatosensory neocortex. We identify a number of coding and noncoding transcripts with specific spatiotemporal expression and splicing patterns. We also identify signature trajectories and gene coexpression networks associated with distinct biological processes and transcriptional overlap between these processes. Finally, we provide data that allow the study of potential miRNA and mRNA interactions. Overall, this study provides an integrated view of the laminar and temporal expression dynamics of coding and noncoding transcripts in the mouse neocortex and a resource for studies of neurodevelopment and transcriptome.

  8. Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of Urban Fire Incidents: a Case Study of Nanjing, China

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, J; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    Fire and rescue service is one of the fundamental public services provided by government in order to protect people, properties and\\ud environment from fires and other disasters, and thus promote a safer living environment. Well understanding spatial-temporal\\ud dynamics of fire incidents can offer insights for potential determinants of various fire events and enable better fire risk estimation,\\ud assisting future allocation of prevention resources and strategic planning of mitigation progra...

  9. SPATIAL-TEMPORAL DYNAMICS OF URBAN FIRE INCIDENTS: A CASE STUDY OF NANJING, CHINA

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, J; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    Fire and rescue service is one of the fundamental public services provided by government in order to protect people, properties and environment from fires and other disasters, and thus promote a safer living environment. Well understanding spatial-temporal dynamics of fire incidents can offer insights for potential determinants of various fire events and enable better fire risk estimation, assisting future allocation of prevention resources and strategic planning of mitigation programs. Using...

  10. Spatial and temporal dynamics of the microbial community in the Hanford unconfined aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Kaluzny, Rachael M.; Lauber, C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Knight, Robbie C.; Konopka, Allan

    2012-03-29

    Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes was used to study temporal dynamics of groundwater Bacteria and Archaea over 10 months within 3 well clusters separated by ~30 m and located 250 m from the Columbia River on the Hanford Site, WA. Each cluster contained 3 wells screened at different depths ranging from 10 to 17 m that differed in hydraulic conductivities. Representative samples were selected for analyses of prokaryotic 16S and eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene copy numbers. Temporal changes in community composition occurred in all 9 wells over the 10 month sampling period. However, there were particularly strong effects near the top of the water table when the seasonal rise in the Columbia River caused river water intrusion at the top of the aquifer. The occurrence and disappearance of some microbial assemblages (such as Actinobacteria ACK-M1) were correlated to river water intrusion. This seasonal impact on microbial community structure was greater in the shallow saturated zone than deeper in the aquifer. Spatial and temporal patterns for several 16S rRNA gene operational taxonomic units associated with particular physiological functions (e.g.methane oxidizers and metal reducers) suggests dynamic changes in fluxes of electron donors and acceptors over an annual cycle. In addition, temporal dynamics in eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene copies and the dominance of protozoa in 18S clone libraries suggest that bacterial community dynamics could be affected not only by the physical and chemical environment, but also by top-down biological control.

  11. Spatio-temporal patterns with hyperchaotic dynamics in diffusively coupled biochemical oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerold Baier

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We present three examples how complex spatio-temporal patterns can be linked to hyperchaotic attractors in dynamical systems consisting of nonlinear biochemical oscillators coupled linearly with diffusion terms. The systems involved are: (a a two-variable oscillator with two consecutive autocatalytic reactions derived from the Lotka–Volterra scheme; (b a minimal two-variable oscillator with one first-order autocatalytic reaction; (c a three-variable oscillator with first-order feedback lacking autocatalysis. The dynamics of a finite number of coupled biochemical oscillators may account for complex patterns in compartmentalized living systems like cells or tissue, and may be tested experimentally in coupled microreactors.

  12. Temporal nutrient dynamics in the Mediterranean Sea in response to anthropogenic inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Young; Lee, Kitack; Tanhua, Toste; Kress, Nurit; Kim, Il-Nam

    2016-05-01

    The temporal dynamics of the concentrations of nitrate (N), phosphate (P), and the N:P ratio in the upper water column (200-600 m) of the Mediterranean (MED) Sea were investigated using observational data (~123,100 data points) collected between 1985 and 2014. The studied variables were found to evolve similarly in the western and eastern MED Sea. In both basins, the N concentration increased during the first part of the observational period (1985-1998), and the temporal trend of N was broadly consistent with the history of riverine and atmospheric nitrogen input from populated areas in Europe, with a lag period of 20 years. In subsequent years, the N concentration was high and relatively constant between 1998 and 2005, after which N decreased gradually, although the decreasing trend was indistinct in the western basin. In particular, the trend of constant then declining N after 1998 is consistent with the history of pollutant nitrogen emissions from the European continent, allowing a 20 year lag following the introduction of regulation of pollutant nitrogen in the 1970s. The three-phase temporal transition in P in both basins was more consistent with the riverine phosphorus input, with a lag period of 20 years. Our analysis indicates that the recent dynamics of N and P in the upper MED Sea has been sensitive to the dynamics of anthropogenic nitrogen and phosphorus input from atmospheric deposition and rivers.

  13. Spatio-temporal dynamics of security investments in an interdependent risk environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Kamran; Bender, Axel; Zhong, Weicai; Abbass, Hussein A.

    2012-10-01

    In a globalised world where risks spread through contagion, the decision of an entity to invest in securing its premises from stochastic risks no longer depends solely on its own actions but also on the actions of other interacting entities in the system. This phenomenon is commonly seen in many domains including airline, logistics and computer security and is referred to as Interdependent Security (IDS). An IDS game models this decision problem from a game-theoretic perspective and deals with the behavioural dynamics of risk-reduction investments in such settings. This paper enhances this model and investigates the spatio-temporal aspects of the IDS games. The spatio-temporal dynamics are studied using simple replicator dynamics on a variety of network structures and for various security cost tradeoffs that lead to different Nash equilibria in an IDS game. The simulation results show that the neighbourhood configuration has a greater effect on the IDS game dynamics than network structure. An in-depth empirical analysis of game dynamics is carried out on regular graphs, which leads to the articulation of necessary and sufficient conditions for dominance in IDS games under spatial constraints.

  14. The Possible Contribution of the Amygdala to Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Babinsky

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The processing of episodic memories is believed to depend on the proper functioning of so-called bottleneck structures through which information apparently must pass in order to be stored long term. These regions are seen in the basal forebrain, the medial diencephalon, and the medial temporal lobe. We here report a case with circumscribed bilateral temporal lobe damage, principally involving the amygdaloid area. Neuropsychological investigation demonstrated preserved intelligence, intact general memory and several other undisturbed cognitive functions, but a specific, affect-related, memory disorder. We conclude from these findings that the role of the amygdala is to process mnemonic events in a way that a specific emotional significance can be found and reactivated. Therefore it is suggested that the amygdala is likely to be a bottleneck structure for affect-related long-term memory functions.

  15. The basolateral amygdala in reward learning and addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassum, Kate M; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2015-10-01

    Sophisticated behavioral paradigms partnered with the emergence of increasingly selective techniques to target the basolateral amygdala (BLA) have resulted in an enhanced understanding of the role of this nucleus in learning and using reward information. Due to the wide variety of behavioral approaches many questions remain on the circumscribed role of BLA in appetitive behavior. In this review, we integrate conclusions of BLA function in reward-related behavior using traditional interference techniques (lesion, pharmacological inactivation) with those using newer methodological approaches in experimental animals that allow in vivo manipulation of cell type-specific populations and neural recordings. Secondly, from a review of appetitive behavioral tasks in rodents and monkeys and recent computational models of reward procurement, we derive evidence for BLA as a neural integrator of reward value, history, and cost parameters. Taken together, BLA codes specific and temporally dynamic outcome representations in a distributed network to orchestrate adaptive responses. We provide evidence that experiences with opiates and psychostimulants alter these outcome representations in BLA, resulting in long-term modified action.

  16. The basolateral amygdala in reward learning and addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassum, Kate M.; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Sophisticated behavioral paradigms partnered with the emergence of increasingly selective techniques to target the basolateral amygdala (BLA) have resulted in an enhanced understanding of the role of this nucleus in learning and using reward information. Due to the wide variety of behavioral approaches many questions remain on the circumscribed role of BLA in appetitive behavior. In this review, we integrate conclusions of BLA function in reward-related behavior using traditional interference techniques (lesion, pharmacological inactivation) with those using newer methodological approaches in experimental animals that allow in vivo manipulation of cell type-specific populations and neural recordings. Secondly, from a review of appetitive behavioral tasks in rodents and monkeys and recent computational models of reward procurement, we derive evidence for BLA as a neural integrator of reward value, history, and cost parameters. Taken together, BLA codes specific and temporally dynamic outcome representations in a distributed network to orchestrate adaptive responses. We provide evidence that experiences with opiates and psychostimulants alter these outcome representations in BLA, resulting in long-term modified action. PMID:26341938

  17. Deep prepiriform cortex kindling and amygdala interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D Y; Moshé, S L

    1987-03-01

    The deep prepiriform cortex (DPC) has been recently suggested to be a crucial epileptogenic site in the rat brain. We investigated the susceptibility of the DPC to the development of electrical kindling as compared to that of the superficial prepiriform cortex (SPC) and amygdala as well as the transfer interactions between the two prepiriform sites and amygdala. Adult rats with electrodes implanted in the right prepiriform cortex (DPC or SPC) and left amygdala were divided into a DPC-amygdala and SPC-amygdala group while a third group consisted of rats with electrodes implanted in the ipsilateral DPC and amygdala. Within each group the rats were initially kindled from one site selected randomly and then rekindled from the other site. Both DPC and SPC were as sensitive to the development of kindling as the amygdala. The behavioral seizures elicited with DPC or SPC primary kindling were identical to those induced by amygdala kindling. Initial DPC kindling facilitated the development of kindling from either ipsilateral or contralateral amygdala with the ipsilateral transfer being significantly more potent than the contralateral. SPC kindling also facilitated the development of contralateral amygdala kindling but was less effective than DPC kindling. On the other hand, amygdala kindling did not facilitate contralateral SPC or DPC kindling although it transferred to the ipsilateral DPC. These results indicate that the prepiriform cortex can be readily kindled but not faster than the amygdala and that there are unequal kindling transfer interactions between prepiriform cortex and amygdala.

  18. Amygdala lesions selectively impair familiarity in recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farovik, Anja; Place, Ryan James; Miller, Danielle Renée; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2011-09-25

    A major controversy in the study of memory concerns whether there are distinct medial temporal lobe (MTL) substrates of recollection and familiarity. Studies using receiver operating characteristics analyses of recognition memory indicate that the hippocampus is essential for recollection, but not for familiarity. We found the converse pattern in the amygdala, wherein damage impaired familiarity while sparing recollection. Combined with previous findings, these results dissociate recollection and familiarity by selective MTL damage.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics and Value of Nature-Based Recreation, Estimated via Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Keri B.; Wood, Spencer A.; Ricketts, Taylor H.

    2016-01-01

    Conserved lands provide multiple ecosystem services, including opportunities for nature-based recreation. Managing this service requires understanding the landscape attributes underpinning its provision, and how changes in land management affect its contribution to human wellbeing over time. However, evidence from both spatially explicit and temporally dynamic analyses is scarce, often due to data limitations. In this study, we investigated nature-based recreation within conserved lands in Vermont, USA. We used geotagged photographs uploaded to the photo-sharing website Flickr to quantify visits by in-state and out-of-state visitors, and we multiplied visits by mean trip expenditures to show that conserved lands contributed US $1.8 billion (US $0.18–20.2 at 95% confidence) to Vermont’s tourism industry between 2007 and 2014. We found eight landscape attributes explained the pattern of visits to conserved lands; visits were higher in larger conserved lands, with less forest cover, greater trail density and more opportunities for snow sports. Some of these attributes differed from those found in other locations, but all aligned with our understanding of recreation in Vermont. We also found that using temporally static models to inform conservation decisions may have perverse outcomes for nature-based recreation. For example, static models suggest conserved land with less forest cover receive more visits, but temporally dynamic models suggest clearing forests decreases, rather than increases, visits to these sites. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding both the spatial and temporal dynamics of ecosystem services for conservation decision-making. PMID:27611325

  20. Dynamics of Electrocorticographic (ECoG) Activity in Human Temporal and Frontal Cortical Areas During Music Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-14

    REPORT Dynamics of electrocorticographic (ECoG) activity in human temporal and frontal cortical areas during music listening 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...information about the sound intensity of music . ECoG activity in the high gamma band recorded from the posterior part of the superior temporal 1. REPORT...ECoG) activity in human temporal and frontal cortical areas during music listening Report Title ABSTRACT Previous studies demonstrated that brain

  1. Spatio-temporal correlations in models of collective motion ruled by different dynamical laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagna, Andrea; Conti, Daniele; Giardina, Irene; Grigera, Tomas S.; Melillo, Stefania; Viale, Massimiliano

    2016-12-01

    Information transfer is an essential factor in determining the robustness of biological systems with distributed control. The most direct way to study the mechanisms ruling information transfer is to experimentally observe the propagation across the system of a signal triggered by some perturbation. However, this method may be inefficient for experiments in the field, as the possibilities to perturb the system are limited and empirical observations must rely on natural events. An alternative approach is to use spatio-temporal correlations to probe the information transfer mechanism directly from the spontaneous fluctuations of the system, without the need to have an actual propagating signal on record. Here we test this method on models of collective behaviour in their deeply ordered phase by using ground truth data provided by numerical simulations in three dimensions. We compare two models characterized by very different dynamical equations and information transfer mechanisms: the classic Vicsek model, describing an overdamped noninertial dynamics and the inertial spin model, characterized by an underdamped inertial dynamics. By using dynamic finite-size scaling, we show that spatio-temporal correlations are able to distinguish unambiguously the diffusive information transfer mechanism of the Vicsek model from the linear mechanism of the inertial spin model.

  2. Ethanol and corticotropin releasing factor receptor modulation of central amygdala neurocircuitry: An update and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2015-05-01

    The central amygdala is a critical brain region for many aspects of alcohol dependence. Much of the work examining the mechanisms by which the central amygdala mediates the development of alcohol dependence has focused on the interaction of acute and chronic ethanol with central amygdala corticotropin releasing factor signaling. This work has led to a great deal of success in furthering the general understanding of central amygdala neurocircuitry and its role in alcohol dependence. Much of this work has primarily focused on the hypothesis that ethanol utilizes endogenous corticotropin releasing factor signaling to upregulate inhibitory GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala. Work that is more recent suggests that corticotropin releasing factor also plays an important role in mediating anxiety-like behaviors via the enhancement of central amygdala glutamatergic transmission, implying that ethanol/corticotropin releasing factor interactions may modulate excitatory neurotransmission in this brain region. In addition, a number of studies utilizing optogenetic strategies or transgenic mouse lines have begun to examine specific central amygdala neurocircuit dynamics and neuronal subpopulations to better understand overall central amygdala neurocircuitry and the role of neuronal subtypes in mediating anxiety-like behaviors. This review will provide a brief update on this literature and describe some potential future directions that may be important for the development of better treatments for alcohol addiction.

  3. A general science-based framework for dynamical spatio-temporal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikle, C.K.; Hooten, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Spatio-temporal statistical models are increasingly being used across a wide variety of scientific disciplines to describe and predict spatially-explicit processes that evolve over time. Correspondingly, in recent years there has been a significant amount of research on new statistical methodology for such models. Although descriptive models that approach the problem from the second-order (covariance) perspective are important, and innovative work is being done in this regard, many real-world processes are dynamic, and it can be more efficient in some cases to characterize the associated spatio-temporal dependence by the use of dynamical models. The chief challenge with the specification of such dynamical models has been related to the curse of dimensionality. Even in fairly simple linear, first-order Markovian, Gaussian error settings, statistical models are often over parameterized. Hierarchical models have proven invaluable in their ability to deal to some extent with this issue by allowing dependency among groups of parameters. In addition, this framework has allowed for the specification of science based parameterizations (and associated prior distributions) in which classes of deterministic dynamical models (e. g., partial differential equations (PDEs), integro-difference equations (IDEs), matrix models, and agent-based models) are used to guide specific parameterizations. Most of the focus for the application of such models in statistics has been in the linear case. The problems mentioned above with linear dynamic models are compounded in the case of nonlinear models. In this sense, the need for coherent and sensible model parameterizations is not only helpful, it is essential. Here, we present an overview of a framework for incorporating scientific information to motivate dynamical spatio-temporal models. First, we illustrate the methodology with the linear case. We then develop a general nonlinear spatio-temporal framework that we call general quadratic

  4. Dynamic regulatory on/off minimization for biological systems under internal temporal perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleessen Sabrina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flux balance analysis (FBA together with its extension, dynamic FBA, have proven instrumental for analyzing the robustness and dynamics of metabolic networks by employing only the stoichiometry of the included reactions coupled with adequately chosen objective function. In addition, under the assumption of minimization of metabolic adjustment, dynamic FBA has recently been employed to analyze the transition between metabolic states. Results Here, we propose a suite of novel methods for analyzing the dynamics of (internally perturbed metabolic networks and for quantifying their robustness with limited knowledge of kinetic parameters. Following the biochemically meaningful premise that metabolite concentrations exhibit smooth temporal changes, the proposed methods rely on minimizing the significant fluctuations of metabolic profiles to predict the time-resolved metabolic state, characterized by both fluxes and concentrations. By conducting a comparative analysis with a kinetic model of the Calvin-Benson cycle and a model of plant carbohydrate metabolism, we demonstrate that the principle of regulatory on/off minimization coupled with dynamic FBA can accurately predict the changes in metabolic states. Conclusions Our methods outperform the existing dynamic FBA-based modeling alternatives, and could help in revealing the mechanisms for maintaining robustness of dynamic processes in metabolic networks over time.

  5. Influence of fluvial environments on sediment archiving processes and temporal pollutant dynamics (Upper Loire River, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhivert, E; Grosbois, C; Rodrigues, S; Desmet, M

    2015-02-01

    Floodplains are often cored to build long-term pollutant trends at the basin scale. To highlight the influences of depositional environments on archiving processes, aggradation rates, archived trace element signals and vertical redistribution processes, two floodplain cores were sampled near in two different environments of the Upper Loire River (France): (i) a river bank ridge and (ii) a paleochannel connected by its downstream end. The base of the river bank core is composed of sandy sediments from the end of the Little Ice Age (late 18th century). This composition corresponds to a proximal floodplain aggradation (aggradation rate depends on the topography and connection degree to the river channel. The temporal dynamics of anthropogenic trace element enrichments recorded in the distal floodplain are initially synchronous and present similar levels. Although the river bank core shows general temporal trends, the paleochannel core has a better resolution for short-time variations of trace element signals. After local water depth regulation began in the early 1930s, differences of connection degree were enhanced between the two cores. Therefore, large trace element signal divergences are recorded across the floodplain. The paleochannel core shows important temporal variations of enrichment levels from the 1930s to the coring date. However, the river bank core has no significant temporal variations of trace element enrichments and lower contamination levels because of a lower deposition of contaminated sediments and a pedogenetic trace elements redistribution.

  6. The importance of temporal stress variation and dynamic disequilibrium for the initiation of plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenković, V.; Höink, T.; Lenardic, A.

    2016-06-01

    We use 1-D thermal history models and 3-D numerical experiments to study the impact of dynamic thermal disequilibrium and large temporal variations of normal and shear stresses on the initiation of plate tectonics. Previous models that explored plate tectonics initiation from a steady state, single plate mode of convection concluded that normal stresses govern the initiation of plate tectonics, which based on our 1-D model leads to plate yielding being more likely with increasing interior heat and planet mass for a depth-dependent Byerlee yield stress. Using 3-D spherical shell mantle convection models in an episodic regime allows us to explore larger temporal stress variations than can be addressed by considering plate failure from a steady state stagnant lid configuration. The episodic models show that an increase in convective mantle shear stress at the lithospheric base initiates plate failure, which leads with our 1-D model to plate yielding being less likely with increasing interior heat and planet mass. In this out-of-equilibrium and strongly time-dependent stress scenario, the onset of lithospheric overturn events cannot be explained by boundary layer thickening and normal stresses alone. Our results indicate that in order to understand the initiation of plate tectonics, one should consider the temporal variation of stresses and dynamic disequilibrium.

  7. Dynamic impact of temporal context of Ca²⁺ signals on inhibitory synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Shin-Ya; Nagasaki, Nobuhiro; Hirano, Tomoo

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, a basis for learning and memory, is tightly correlated with the pattern of increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Here, using combined application of electrophysiological experiments and systems biological simulation, we show that such a correlation dynamically changes depending on the context of [Ca(2+)](i) increase. In a cerebellar Purkinje cell, long-term potentiation of inhibitory GABA(A) receptor responsiveness (called rebound potentiation; RP) was induced by [Ca(2+)](i) increase in a temporally integrative manner through sustained activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). However, the RP establishment was canceled by coupling of two patterns of RP-inducing [Ca(2+)](i) increase depending on the temporal sequence. Negative feedback signaling by phospho-Thr305/306 CaMKII detected the [Ca(2+)](i) context, and assisted the feedforward inhibition of CaMKII through PDE1, resulting in the RP impairment. The [Ca(2+)](i) context-dependent dynamic regulation of synaptic plasticity might contribute to the temporal refinement of information flow in neuronal networks.

  8. Temporal genetic analysis of the endangered tidewater goby: extinction-colonization dynamics or drift in isolation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinziger, Andrew P; Hellmair, Michael; McCraney, W Tyler; Jacobs, David K; Goldsmith, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Extinction and colonization dynamics are critical to understanding the evolution and conservation of metapopulations. However, traditional field studies of extinction-colonization are potentially fraught with detection bias and have rarely been validated. Here, we provide a comparison of molecular and field-based approaches for assessment of the extinction-colonization dynamics of tidewater goby (Eucyclogobius newberryi) in northern California. Our analysis of temporal genetic variation across 14 northern California tidewater goby populations failed to recover genetic change expected with extinction-colonization cycles. Similarly, analysis of site occupancy data from field studies (94 sites) indicated that extinction and colonization are very infrequent for our study populations. Comparison of the approaches indicated field data were subject to imperfect detection, and falsely implied extinction-colonization cycles in several instances. For northern California populations of tidewater goby, we interpret the strong genetic differentiation between populations and high degree of within-site temporal stability as consistent with a model of drift in the absence of migration, at least over the past 20-30 years. Our findings show that tidewater goby exhibit different population structures across their geographic range (extinction-colonization dynamics in the south vs. drift in isolation in the north). For northern populations, natural dispersal is too infrequent to be considered a viable approach for recolonizing extirpated populations, suggesting that species recovery will likely depend on artificial translocation in this region. More broadly, this work illustrates that temporal genetic analysis can be used in combination with field data to strengthen inference of extinction-colonization dynamics or as a stand-alone tool when field data are lacking.

  9. Investigating fine-scale spatio-temporal predator-prey patterns in dynamic marine ecosystems: a functional data analysis approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embling, C.B.; Illian, J.; Armstrong, E.; van der Kooij, J.; Sharples, J.; Camphuysen, K.C.J.; Scott, B.E.

    2012-01-01

    1. Spatial management of marine ecosystems requires detailed knowledge of spatio-temporal mechanisms linking physical and biological processes. Tidal currents, the main driver of ecosystem dynamics in temperate coastal ecosystems, influence predator foraging ecology by affecting prey distribution an

  10. Selective Maturation of Temporal Dynamics of Intracortical Excitatory Transmission at the Critical Period Onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Qinglong; Yao, Li; Rasch, Malte J; Ye, Qian; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-08-01

    Although the developmental maturation of cortical inhibitory synapses is known to be a critical factor in gating the onset of critical period (CP) for experience-dependent cortical plasticity, how synaptic transmission dynamics of other cortical synapses are regulated during the transition to CP remains unknown. Here, by systematically examining various intracortical synapses within layer 4 of the mouse visual cortex, we demonstrate that synaptic temporal dynamics of intracortical excitatory synapses on principal cells (PCs) and inhibitory parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing cells are selectively regulated before the CP onset, whereas those of intracortical inhibitory synapses and long-range thalamocortical excitatory synapses remain unchanged. This selective maturation of synaptic dynamics results from a ubiquitous reduction of presynaptic release and is dependent on visual experience. These findings provide an additional essential circuit mechanism for regulating CP timing in the developing visual cortex.

  11. Selective Maturation of Temporal Dynamics of Intracortical Excitatory Transmission at the Critical Period Onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglong Miao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the developmental maturation of cortical inhibitory synapses is known to be a critical factor in gating the onset of critical period (CP for experience-dependent cortical plasticity, how synaptic transmission dynamics of other cortical synapses are regulated during the transition to CP remains unknown. Here, by systematically examining various intracortical synapses within layer 4 of the mouse visual cortex, we demonstrate that synaptic temporal dynamics of intracortical excitatory synapses on principal cells (PCs and inhibitory parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing cells are selectively regulated before the CP onset, whereas those of intracortical inhibitory synapses and long-range thalamocortical excitatory synapses remain unchanged. This selective maturation of synaptic dynamics results from a ubiquitous reduction of presynaptic release and is dependent on visual experience. These findings provide an additional essential circuit mechanism for regulating CP timing in the developing visual cortex.

  12. Temporal stability in forest productivity increases with tree diversity due to asynchrony in species dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Xavier; Fahse, Lorenz; de Mazancourt, Claire; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Bugmann, Harald

    2014-12-01

    Theory predicts a positive relationship between biodiversity and stability in ecosystem properties, while diversity is expected to have a negative impact on stability at the species level. We used virtual experiments based on a dynamic simulation model to test for the diversity-stability relationship and its underlying mechanisms in Central European forests. First our results show that variability in productivity between stands differing in species composition decreases as species richness and functional diversity increase. Second we show temporal stability increases with increasing diversity due to compensatory dynamics across species, supporting the biodiversity insurance hypothesis. We demonstrate that this pattern is mainly driven by the asynchrony of species responses to small disturbances rather than to environmental fluctuations, and is only weakly affected by the net biodiversity effect on productivity. Furthermore, our results suggest that compensatory dynamics between species may enhance ecosystem stability through an optimisation of canopy occupancy by coexisting species.

  13. Effects of inhomogeneities and drift on the dynamics of temporal solitons in fiber cavities and microresonators

    CERN Document Server

    Parra-Rivas, P; Matías, M A; Colet, P; Gelens, L

    2014-01-01

    In Ref. [Parra-Rivas at al., 2013], using the Swift-Hohenberg equation, we introduced a mechanism that allows to generate oscillatory and excitable soliton dynamics. This mechanism was based on a competition between a pinning force at inhomogeneities and a pulling force due to drift. Here, we study the effect of such inhomogeneities and drift on temporal solitons and Kerr frequency combs in fiber cavities and microresonators, described by the Lugiato-Lefever equation with periodic boundary conditions. We demonstrate that for low values of the frequency detuning the competition between inhomogeneities and drift leads to similar dynamics at the defect location, confirming the generality of the mechanism. The intrinsic periodic nature of ring cavities and microresonators introduces, however, some interesting differences in the final global states. For higher values of the detuning we observe that the dynamics is no longer described by the same mechanism and it is considerably more complex.

  14. Effects of inhomogeneities and drift on the dynamics of temporal solitons in fiber cavities and microresonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Rivas, P; Gomila, D; Matías, M A; Colet, P; Gelens, L

    2014-12-15

    In [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 064103 (2013)], using the Swift-Hohenberg equation, we introduced a mechanism that allows to generate oscillatory and excitable soliton dynamics. This mechanism was based on a competition between a pinning force at inhomogeneities and a pulling force due to drift. Here, we study the effect of such inhomogeneities and drift on temporal solitons and Kerr frequency combs in fiber cavities and microresonators, described by the Lugiato-Lefever equation with periodic boundary conditions. We demonstrate that for low values of the frequency detuning the competition between inhomogeneities and drift leads to similar dynamics at the defect location, confirming the generality of the mechanism. The intrinsic periodic nature of ring cavities and microresonators introduces, however, some interesting differences in the final global states. For higher values of the detuning we observe that the dynamics is no longer described by the same mechanism and it is considerably more complex.

  15. Double dissociation of amygdala and hippocampal contributions to trace and delay fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybuck, Jonathan D; Lattal, K Matthew

    2011-01-19

    A key finding in studies of the neurobiology of learning memory is that the amygdala is critically involved in Pavlovian fear conditioning. This is well established in delay-cued and contextual fear conditioning; however, surprisingly little is known of the role of the amygdala in trace conditioning. Trace fear conditioning, in which the CS and US are separated in time by a trace interval, requires the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. It is possible that recruitment of cortical structures by trace conditioning alters the role of the amygdala compared to delay fear conditioning, where the CS and US overlap. To investigate this, we inactivated the amygdala of male C57BL/6 mice with GABA (A) agonist muscimol prior to 2-pairing trace or delay fear conditioning. Amygdala inactivation produced deficits in contextual and delay conditioning, but had no effect on trace conditioning. As controls, we demonstrate that dorsal hippocampal inactivation produced deficits in trace and contextual, but not delay fear conditioning. Further, pre- and post-training amygdala inactivation disrupted the contextual but the not cued component of trace conditioning, as did muscimol infusion prior to 1- or 4-pairing trace conditioning. These findings demonstrate that insertion of a temporal gap between the CS and US can generate amygdala-independent fear conditioning. We discuss the implications of this surprising finding for current models of the neural circuitry involved in fear conditioning.

  16. Aging and percolation dynamics in a Non-Poissonian temporal network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinet, Antoine; Starnini, Michele; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2016-08-01

    We present an exhaustive mathematical analysis of the recently proposed Non-Poissonian Activity Driven (NoPAD) model [Moinet et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 108701 (2015)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.114.108701], a temporal network model incorporating the empirically observed bursty nature of social interactions. We focus on the aging effects emerging from the non-Poissonian dynamics of link activation, and on their effects on the topological properties of time-integrated networks, such as the degree distribution. Analytic expressions for the degree distribution of integrated networks as a function of time are derived, exploring both limits of vanishing and strong aging. We also address the percolation process occurring on these temporal networks, by computing the threshold for the emergence of a giant connected component, highlighting the aging dependence. Our analytic predictions are checked by means of extensive numerical simulations of the NoPAD model.

  17. Aging and percolation dynamics in a Non-Poissonian temporal network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinet, Antoine; Starnini, Michele; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2016-08-01

    We present an exhaustive mathematical analysis of the recently proposed Non-Poissonian Activity Driven (NoPAD) model [Moinet et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 108701 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.108701], a temporal network model incorporating the empirically observed bursty nature of social interactions. We focus on the aging effects emerging from the non-Poissonian dynamics of link activation, and on their effects on the topological properties of time-integrated networks, such as the degree distribution. Analytic expressions for the degree distribution of integrated networks as a function of time are derived, exploring both limits of vanishing and strong aging. We also address the percolation process occurring on these temporal networks, by computing the threshold for the emergence of a giant connected component, highlighting the aging dependence. Our analytic predictions are checked by means of extensive numerical simulations of the NoPAD model.

  18. Aging and percolation dynamics in a Non-Poissonian temporal network model

    CERN Document Server

    Moinet, Antoine; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2016-01-01

    We present an exhaustive mathematical analysis of the recently proposed Non-Poissonian Ac- tivity Driven (NoPAD) model [Moinet et al. Phys. Rev. Lett., 114 (2015)], a temporal network model incorporating the empirically observed bursty nature of social interactions. We focus on the aging effects emerging from the Non-Poissonian dynamics of link activation, and on their effects on the topological properties of time-integrated networks, such as the degree distribution. Analytic expressions for the degree distribution of integrated networks as a function of time are derived, ex- ploring both limits of vanishing and strong aging. We also address the percolation process occurring on these temporal networks, by computing the threshold for the emergence of a giant connected component, highlighting the aging dependence. Our analytic predictions are checked by means of extensive numerical simulations of the NoPAD model.

  19. Distinct temporal filtering mechanisms are engaged during dynamic increases and decreases of noxious stimulus intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, Carsten Dahl; Frahm, Ken Steffen; Coghill, Robert C; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2015-10-01

    Physical stimuli are subject to pronounced temporal filtering during afferent processing such that changes occurring at certain rates are amplified and others are diminished. Temporal filtering of nociceptive information remains poorly understood. However, the phenomenon of offset analgesia, where a disproportional drop in perceived pain intensity is caused by a slight drop in noxious heat stimulation, indicates potent temporal filtering in the pain pathways. To develop a better understanding of how dynamic changes in a physical stimulus are constructed into an experience of pain, a transfer function between the skin temperature and the perceived pain intensity was modeled. Ten seconds of temperature-controlled near-infrared (970 nm) laser stimulations above the pain threshold with a 1°C increment, decrement, or constant temperature were applied to the dorsum of the hand of healthy human volunteers. The skin temperature was assessed by an infrared camera. Offset analgesia was evoked by laser heat stimulation. The estimated transfer functions showed shorter latencies when the temperature was increased by 1°C (0.53 seconds [0.52-0.54 seconds]) than when decreased by 1°C (1.15 seconds [1.12-1.18 seconds]) and smaller gains (increase: 0.89 [0.82-0.97]; decrease: 2.61 [1.91-3.31]). The maximal gain was observed at rates around 0.06 Hz. These results show that temperature changes occurring around 0.06 Hz are best perceived and that a temperature decrease is associated with a larger but slower change in pain perception than a comparable temperature increase. These psychophysical findings confirm the existence of differential mechanisms involved in temporal filtering of dynamic increases and decreases in noxious stimulus intensity.

  20. Reduced intrinsic connectivity of amygdala in adults with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamannar eRamasubbu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Imaging studies of major depressive disorder (MDD have demonstrated enhanced resting-state activity of the amygdala as well as exaggerated reactivity to negative emotional stimuli relative to healthy controls. However, the abnormalities in the intrinsic connectivity of the amygdala in MDD still remain unclear. As the resting-state activity and functional connectivity (RSFC reflect fundamental brain processes, we compared the RSFC of the amygdala between unmedicated MDD patients and healthy controls. Seventy-four subjects, 55 adults meeting the DSM IV criteria for MDD and 19 healthy controls, underwent a resting state 3-T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scan. An amygdala seed-based low frequency RSFC map for the whole brain was generated for each group. Compared with healthy controls, MDD patients showed a wide-spread reduction in the intrinsic connectivity of the amygdala with a variety of brain regions involved in emotional processing and regulation, including the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, insula, caudate, middle and superior temporal regions, occipital cortex, and cerebellum, as well as increased connectivity with the bilateral temporal poles (p< 0.05 corrected. The increase in the intrinsic connectivity of amygdala with the temporal poles was inversely correlated with symptom severity and anxiety scores. Although the directionality of connections between regions cannot be inferred from temporal correlations, the reduced intrinsic connectivity of the amygdala predominantly with regions involved in emotional processing may reflect impaired bottom-up signaling for top-down cortical modulation of limbic regions leading to abnormal affect regulation in MDD.

  1. A comprehensive model of audiovisual perception: both percept and temporal dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Besson

    Full Text Available The sparse information captured by the sensory systems is used by the brain to apprehend the environment, for example, to spatially locate the source of audiovisual stimuli. This is an ill-posed inverse problem whose inherent uncertainty can be solved by jointly processing the information, as well as introducing constraints during this process, on the way this multisensory information is handled. This process and its result--the percept--depend on the contextual conditions perception takes place in. To date, perception has been investigated and modeled on the basis of either one of two of its dimensions: the percept or the temporal dynamics of the process. Here, we extend our previously proposed audiovisual perception model to predict both these dimensions to capture the phenomenon as a whole. Starting from a behavioral analysis, we use a data-driven approach to elicit a bayesian network which infers the different percepts and dynamics of the process. Context-specific independence analyses enable us to use the model's structure to directly explore how different contexts affect the way subjects handle the same available information. Hence, we establish that, while the percepts yielded by a unisensory stimulus or by the non-fusion of multisensory stimuli may be similar, they result from different processes, as shown by their differing temporal dynamics. Moreover, our model predicts the impact of bottom-up (stimulus driven factors as well as of top-down factors (induced by instruction manipulation on both the perception process and the percept itself.

  2. Real-time characterization of the spatio-temporal dynamics of deformable mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, James; Apostol, Adela; Khizhnya, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir; Beresnev, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    Innovative technologies are needed to support and augment the development of various types of deformable mirrors (DM), such as Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), segmented, bimorph and membrane types that are currently used in adaptive-optic (AO) systems. The paper discusses the results of initial studies that, could, potentially, be employed for full characterization of the dynamic behavior of adaptive optics mirrors. The experimental data were obtained from a typical bimorph mirror using both, a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor (SHWFS) and an Imaging Laser Doppler Vibrometer (ILDV) developed exclusively by AS and T Inc. These two sensors were employed for quantitative measurement of both the spatial and temporal dynamics of the DM under broadband excitation via the piezo electric drive elements. The need to characterize the spatial and temporal dynamic response of current and future DM mirror designs is essential for optimizing their performance to a level adequate for high bandwidth AO systems, such as those employed for real-time compensation of wavefront perturbations.

  3. Temporal dynamics and subpopulation analysis of Theileria orientalis genotypes in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, C; Micallef, M; Alex, S M; Collins, D; Djordjevic, S P; Bogema, D R

    2015-06-01

    In Australia, outbreaks of clinical theileriosis caused by Theileria orientalis have been largely associated with the Ikeda genotype which can occur as a sole infection, or more commonly, as a mixture of genotypes. The most prevalent genotype, Chitose, frequently co-occurs with type Ikeda, however the role of this genotype in clinical disease has not been clearly established. Furthermore, the dynamics of individual genotypes in field infection of cattle have not been examined. In this study we developed quantitative PCR (qPCR) and genotyping methods to examine the role of the Chitose genotype in clinical disease and to investigate the temporal dynamics of T. orientalis Ikeda, Chitose and Buffeli genotypes in naïve animals introduced to a T. orientalis-endemic area. Analysis of the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) genes of Chitose isolates revealed the presence of two distinct phylogenetic clusters, Chitose A and Chitose B. A genotyping assay aimed at determining Chitose A/B allele frequency revealed that the Chitose A phylogenetic cluster is strongly associated with clinical disease but nearly always co-occurs with the Ikeda genotype. qPCR revealed that the Chitose genotype (particularly Chitose A), undergoes temporal switching in conjunction with the Ikeda genotype and contributes substantially to the overall parasite burden. The benign Buffeli genotype can also undergo temporal switching but levels of this genotype appear to remain low relative to the Ikeda and Chitose types. Interplay between vector and host immunological factors is presumed to be critical to the population dynamics observed in this study. Genotypic switching likely contributes to the persistence of T. orientalis in the host.

  4. Comparison study of temporal regularization methods for fully 5D reconstruction of cardiac gated dynamic SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yongyi; King, Michael A.

    2012-09-01

    Temporal regularization plays a critical role in cardiac gated dynamic SPECT reconstruction, of which the goal is to obtain an image sequence from a single acquisition which simultaneously shows both cardiac motion and tracer distribution change over the course of imaging (termed 5D). In our recent work, we explored two different approaches for temporal regularization of the dynamic activities in gated dynamic reconstruction without the use of fast camera rotation: one is the dynamic EM (dEM) approach which is imposed on the temporal trend of the time activity of each voxel, and the other is a B-spline modeling approach in which the time activity is regulated by a set of B-spline basis functions. In this work, we extend the B-spline approach to fully 5D reconstruction and conduct a thorough quantitative comparison with the dEM approach. In the evaluation of the reconstruction results, we apply a number of quantitative measures on two major aspects of the reconstructed dynamic images: (1) the accuracy of the reconstructed activity distribution in the myocardium and (2) the ability of the reconstructed dynamic activities to differentiate perfusion defects from normal myocardial wall uptake. These measures include the mean square error (MSE), bias-variance analysis, accuracy of time-activity curves (TAC), contrast-to-noise ratio of a defect, composite kinetic map of the left ventricle wall and perfusion defect detectability with channelized Hotelling observer. In experiments, we simulated cardiac gated imaging with the NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom and Tc99m-Teboroxime as the imaging agent, where acquisition with the equivalent of only three full camera rotations was used during the imaging period. The results show that both dEM and B-spline 5D could achieve similar overall accuracy in the myocardium in terms of MSE. However, compared to dEM 5D, the B-spline approach could achieve a more accurate reconstruction of the voxel TACs; in particular, B-spline 5D could

  5. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Pond Use and Recruitment in Florida Gopher Frogs (Rana Capito aesopus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, C.H.

    2000-05-16

    We examined spatio-temporal dynamics of the Florida Gopher frog breeding and juvenile recruitment. Ponds were situated in a hardwood or pine-savanna matrix of upland forest. Movement was monitored from 1994-1999. Adult pond use was low but relatively constant. Juvenile recruitment was higher in the upland savanna matrix. Body size was negatively correlated with the number of juveniles exiting the pond in only one year suggesting intraspecific competition is one of many factors. Most immigration occurred in May through August and was unrelated to rainfall.

  6. Amygdala kindling elevates plasma vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, R S; Meeker, R B; Hayward, J N

    1991-01-01

    Acute and chronic effects of epilepsy on endocrine function are known to occur in humans with partial seizures of limbic origin and in animals with limbic kindled seizures. The amygdala, a component of the limbic system, has dense hypothalamic connections and amygdala stimulation in monkeys and cats result in vasopressin release. In the present study we sought to determine if amygdala stimulation in the rats results in an immediate acute release of vasopressin and to determine if acute or chronic changes occur in vasopressin release in the fully kindled animal. Plasma vasopressin, osmolality and hematocrit were measured in blood samples drawn from rats with implanted venous catheters before and after stimulation and at different stages of kindling. Low-frequency (15 Hz) electrical stimulation of the amygdala was followed by an immediate, 3-fold increase in plasma vasopressin concentration. Moreover, although the 60 Hz kindling stimulus did not result in a significant immediate rise in plasma vasopressin prior to kindling, after kindling to stage 5 seizures the 60 Hz kindling stimulus resulted in seizures and a significant immediate rise in plasma vasopressin. In addition, we found that kindling was followed by a significant, though modest, rise in the resting plasma vasopressin without an accompanying change in osmolality or hematocrit. We conclude that kindling results in a persistent alteration in the vasopressinergic neuroendocrine system.

  7. Sensory modality-specific spatio-temporal dynamics in response to counting tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohel, Bakul; Jeong, Yong

    2014-10-01

    From perception to behavior, the human brain processes information in a flexible and abstract manner independent of an input sensory modality. However, the mechanism of such multisensory neural information processing in the brain remains under debate. Relatedly, studies often aim to investigate whether certain brain regions behave in a modality-specific manner or invariantly. Previous studies regarding multisensory information processing have commonly reported only on the activation of brain regions in response to unimodal or multimodal sensory stimuli. However, less attention has been given to the modality effect on the dynamics of such regions, which could advance our understanding of neuronal information processing. In this study, we investigated whether brain regions show modality-specific or invariant high-temporal dynamics. Electrocardiogram (EEG) was recorded from healthy, normal subjects during beep-, flash- and click-counting tasks, which corresponded to auditory, visual and tactile modalities, respectively. EEG dynamics regarding event-related spectral perturbations (ERSP) in ICA time-series data were compared across the sensory modalities using a multivariate pattern analysis. We found modality-specific EEG dynamics in the prefrontal cortex, whereas we found modality-specific and cross-modal dynamics in the early visual cortex.

  8. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wallach

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc. contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner.

  9. Temporal dynamics underlying the modulation of social status on social attention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Dalmaso

    Full Text Available Fixating someone suddenly moving the eyes is known to trigger a corresponding shift of attention in the observer. This phenomenon, known as gaze-cueing effect, can be modulated as a function of the social status of the individual depicted in the cueing face. Here, in two experiments, we investigated the temporal dynamics underlying this modulation. To this end, a gaze-cueing paradigm was implemented in which centrally-placed faces depicting high- and low-status individuals suddenly shifted the eyes towards a location either spatially congruent or incongruent with that occupied by a subsequent target stimulus. Social status was manipulated by presenting fictive Curriculum Vitae before the experimental phase. In Experiment 1, in which two temporal intervals (50 ms vs. 900 ms occurred between the direct-gaze face and the averted-gaze face onsets, a stronger gaze-cueing effect in response to high-status faces than low-status faces was observed, irrespective of the time participants were allowed for extracting social information. In Experiment 2, in which two temporal intervals (200 ms vs. 1000 ms occurred between the averted-gaze face and target onset, a stronger gaze cueing for high-status faces was observed at the shorter interval only. Taken together, these results suggest that information regarding social status is extracted from faces rapidly (Experiment 1, and that the tendency to selectively attend to the locations gazed by high-status individuals may decay with time (Experiment 2.

  10. Temporal dynamics of gene expression in the lung in a baboon model of E. coli sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Hua

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial invasion during sepsis induces disregulated systemic responses that could lead to fatal lung failure. The purpose of this study was to relate the temporal dynamics of gene expression to the pathophysiological changes in the lung during the first and second stages of E. coli sepsis in baboons. Results Using human oligonucleotide microarrays, we have explored the temporal changes of gene expression in the lung of baboons challenged with sublethal doses of E. coli. Temporal expression pattern and biological significance of the differentially expressed genes were explored using clustering and pathway analysis software. Expression of selected genes was validated by real-time PCR. Cytokine levels in tissue and plasma were assayed by multiplex ELISA. Changes in lung ultrastructure were visualized by electron microscopy. We found that genes involved in primary inflammation, innate immune response, and apoptosis peaked at 2 hrs. Inflammatory and immune response genes that function in the stimulation of monocytes, natural killer and T-cells, and in the modulation of cell adhesion peaked at 8 hrs, while genes involved in wound healing and functional recovery were upregulated at 24 hrs. Conclusion The analysis of gene expression modulation in response to sepsis provides the baseline information that is crucial for the understanding of the pathophysiology of systemic inflammation and may facilitate the development of future approaches for sepsis therapy.

  11. Temporal dynamics of the knowledge-mediated visual disambiguation process in humans: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakawa, Tomokazu; Ogata, Katsuya; Kimura, Takahiro; Kume, Yuko; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2015-01-01

    Disambiguation of a noisy visual scene with prior knowledge is an indispensable task of the visual system. To adequately adapt to a dynamically changing visual environment full of noisy visual scenes, the implementation of knowledge-mediated disambiguation in the brain is imperative and essential for proceeding as fast as possible under the limited capacity of visual image processing. However, the temporal profile of the disambiguation process has not yet been fully elucidated in the brain. The present study attempted to determine how quickly knowledge-mediated disambiguation began to proceed along visual areas after the onset of a two-tone ambiguous image using magnetoencephalography with high temporal resolution. Using the predictive coding framework, we focused on activity reduction for the two-tone ambiguous image as an index of the implementation of disambiguation. Source analysis revealed that a significant activity reduction was observed in the lateral occipital area at approximately 120 ms after the onset of the ambiguous image, but not in preceding activity (about 115 ms) in the cuneus when participants perceptually disambiguated the ambiguous image with prior knowledge. These results suggested that knowledge-mediated disambiguation may be implemented as early as approximately 120 ms following an ambiguous visual scene, at least in the lateral occipital area, and provided an insight into the temporal profile of the disambiguation process of a noisy visual scene with prior knowledge.

  12. Temporal dynamics underlying the modulation of social status on social attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmaso, Mario; Galfano, Giovanni; Coricelli, Carol; Castelli, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Fixating someone suddenly moving the eyes is known to trigger a corresponding shift of attention in the observer. This phenomenon, known as gaze-cueing effect, can be modulated as a function of the social status of the individual depicted in the cueing face. Here, in two experiments, we investigated the temporal dynamics underlying this modulation. To this end, a gaze-cueing paradigm was implemented in which centrally-placed faces depicting high- and low-status individuals suddenly shifted the eyes towards a location either spatially congruent or incongruent with that occupied by a subsequent target stimulus. Social status was manipulated by presenting fictive Curriculum Vitae before the experimental phase. In Experiment 1, in which two temporal intervals (50 ms vs. 900 ms) occurred between the direct-gaze face and the averted-gaze face onsets, a stronger gaze-cueing effect in response to high-status faces than low-status faces was observed, irrespective of the time participants were allowed for extracting social information. In Experiment 2, in which two temporal intervals (200 ms vs. 1000 ms) occurred between the averted-gaze face and target onset, a stronger gaze cueing for high-status faces was observed at the shorter interval only. Taken together, these results suggest that information regarding social status is extracted from faces rapidly (Experiment 1), and that the tendency to selectively attend to the locations gazed by high-status individuals may decay with time (Experiment 2).

  13. Temporal dynamics of hot desert microbial communities reveal structural and functional responses to water input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Alacia; Valverde, Angel; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Jansson, Janet K.; Hopkins, David W.; Aspray, Thomas J.; Seely, Mary; Trindade, Marla I.; Cowan, Don A.

    2016-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of desert soil microbial communities are poorly understood. Given the implications for ecosystem functioning under a global change scenario, a better understanding of desert microbial community stability is crucial. Here, we sampled soils in the central Namib Desert on sixteen different occasions over a one-year period. Using Illumina-based amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we found that α-diversity (richness) was more variable at a given sampling date (spatial variability) than over the course of one year (temporal variability). Community composition remained essentially unchanged across the first 10 months, indicating that spatial sampling might be more important than temporal sampling when assessing β-diversity patterns in desert soils. However, a major shift in microbial community composition was found following a single precipitation event. This shift in composition was associated with a rapid increase in CO2 respiration and productivity, supporting the view that desert soil microbial communities respond rapidly to re-wetting and that this response may be the result of both taxon-specific selection and changes in the availability or accessibility of organic substrates. Recovery to quasi pre-disturbance community composition was achieved within one month after rainfall. PMID:27680878

  14. The temporal dynamics of heading perception in the presence of moving objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Oliver W; Fajen, Brett R

    2016-01-01

    Many forms of locomotion rely on the ability to accurately perceive one's direction of locomotion (i.e., heading) based on optic flow. Although accurate in rigid environments, heading judgments may be biased when independently moving objects are present. The aim of this study was to systematically investigate the conditions in which moving objects influence heading perception, with a focus on the temporal dynamics and the mechanisms underlying this bias. Subjects viewed stimuli simulating linear self-motion in the presence of a moving object and judged their direction of heading. Experiments 1 and 2 revealed that heading perception is biased when the object crosses or almost crosses the observer's future path toward the end of the trial, but not when the object crosses earlier in the trial. Nonetheless, heading perception is not based entirely on the instantaneous optic flow toward the end of the trial. This was demonstrated in Experiment 3 by varying the portion of the earlier part of the trial leading up to the last frame that was presented to subjects. When the stimulus duration was long enough to include the part of the trial before the moving object crossed the observer's path, heading judgments were less biased. The findings suggest that heading perception is affected by the temporal evolution of optic flow. The time course of dorsal medial superior temporal area (MSTd) neuron responses may play a crucial role in perceiving heading in the presence of moving objects, a property not captured by many existing models.

  15. Reuse, Temporal Dynamics, Interest Sharing, and Collaboration in Social Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Santos-Neto, Elizeu; Andrade, Nazareno; Iamnitchi, Adriana; Ripeanu, Matei

    2013-01-01

    User-generated content is shaping the dynamics of the World Wide Web. Indeed, an increasingly large number of systems provide mechanisms to support the growing demand for content creation, sharing, and management. Tagging systems are a particular class of these systems where users share and collaboratively annotate content such as photos and URLs. This collaborative behavior and the pool of user-generated metadata create opportunities to improve existing systems and to design new mechanisms. However, to realize this potential, it is necessary to understand the usage characteristics of current systems. This work addresses this issue characterizing three tagging systems (CiteULike, Connotea and del.icio.us) while focusing on three aspects: i) the patterns of information (tags and items) production; ii) the temporal dynamics of users' tag vocabularies; and, iii) the social aspects of tagging systems.

  16. Somatic growth dynamics of West Atlantic hawksbill sea turtles: a spatio-temporal perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorndal, Karen A.; Chaloupka, Milani; Saba, Vincent S.; Diez, Carlos E.; van Dam, Robert P.; Krueger, Barry H.; Horrocks, Julia A.; Santos, Armando J. B.; Bellini, Cláudio; Marcovaldi, Maria A. G.; Nava, Mabel; Willis, Sue; Godley, Brendan J.; Gore, Shannon; Hawkes, Lucy A.; McGowan, Andrew; Witt, Matthew J.; Stringell, Thomas B.; Sanghera, Amdeep; Richardson, Peter B.; Broderick, Annette C.; Phillips, Quinton; Calosso, Marta C.; Claydon, John A. B.; Blumenthal, Janice; Moncada, Felix; Nodarse, Gonzalo; Medina, Yosvani; Dunbar, Stephen G.; Wood, Lawrence D.; Lagueux, Cynthia J.; Campbell, Cathi L.; Meylan, Anne B.; Meylan, Peter A.; Burns Perez, Virginia R.; Coleman, Robin A.; Strindberg, Samantha; Guzmán-H, Vicente; Hart, Kristen M.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Hillis-Starr, Zandy; Lundgren, Ian; Boulon, Ralf H.; Connett, Stephen; Outerbridge, Mark E.; Bolten, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic growth dynamics are an integrated response to environmental conditions. Hawksbill sea turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) are long-lived, major consumers in coral reef habitats that move over broad geographic areas (hundreds to thousands of kilometers). We evaluated spatio-temporal effects on hawksbill growth dynamics over a 33-yr period and 24 study sites throughout the West Atlantic and explored relationships between growth dynamics and climate indices. We compiled the largest ever data set on somatic growth rates for hawksbills – 3541 growth increments from 1980 to 2013. Using generalized additive mixed model analyses, we evaluated 10 covariates, including spatial and temporal variation, that could affect growth rates. Growth rates throughout the region responded similarly over space and time. The lack of a spatial effect or spatio-temporal interaction and the very strong temporal effect reveal that growth rates in West Atlantic hawksbills are likely driven by region-wide forces. Between 1997 and 2013, mean growth rates declined significantly and steadily by 18%. Regional climate indices have significant relationships with annual growth rates with 0- or 1-yr lags: positive with the Multivariate El Niño Southern Oscillation Index (correlation = 0.99) and negative with Caribbean sea surface temperature (correlation = −0.85). Declines in growth rates between 1997 and 2013 throughout the West Atlantic most likely resulted from warming waters through indirect negative effects on foraging resources of hawksbills. These climatic influences are complex. With increasing temperatures, trajectories of decline of coral cover and availability in reef habitats of major prey species of hawksbills are not parallel. Knowledge of how choice of foraging habitats, prey selection, and prey abundance are affected by warming water temperatures is needed to understand how climate change will affect productivity of consumers that live in association with coral reefs. Main

  17. Rank-sparsity constrained, spectro-temporal reconstruction for retrospectively gated, dynamic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. P.; Lee, C. L.; Kirsch, D. G.; Badea, C. T.

    2015-03-01

    Relative to prospective projection gating, retrospective projection gating for dynamic CT applications allows fast imaging times, minimizing the potential for physiological and anatomic variability. Preclinically, fast imaging is attractive due to the rapid clearance of low molecular weight contrast agents and the rapid heart rate of rodents. Clinically, retrospective gating is relevant for intraoperative C-arm CT. More generally, retrospective sampling provides an opportunity for significant reduction in x-ray dose within the framework of compressive sensing theory and sparsity-constrained iterative reconstruction. Even so, CT reconstruction from projections with random temporal sampling is a very poorly conditioned inverse problem, requiring high fidelity regularization to minimize variability in the reconstructed results. Here, we introduce a highly novel data acquisition and regularization strategy for spectro-temporal (5D) CT reconstruction from retrospectively gated projections. We show that by taking advantage of the rank-sparse structure and separability of the temporal and spectral reconstruction sub-problems, being able to solve each sub-problem independently effectively guarantees that we can solve both problems together. In this paper, we show 4D simulation results (2D + 2 energies + time) using the proposed technique and compare them with two competing techniques— spatio-temporal total variation minimization and prior image constrained compressed sensing. We also show in vivo, 5D (3D + 2 energies + time) myocardial injury data acquired in a mouse, reconstructing 20 data sets (10 phases, 2 energies) and performing material decomposition from data acquired over a single rotation (360°, dose: ~60 mGy).

  18. The temporal dynamics of detached versus positive reappraisal: An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Senqing; Li, Yangping; Tang, Xuemei; Zeng, Qinghong; Diao, Liuting; Li, Xiying; Li, Hong; Hu, Weiping

    2017-01-23

    Detached reappraisal and positive reappraisal are regarded as two distinct types of cognitive reappraisal strategy, and the former is considered more disengaging than the latter. The conceptual framework of emotion regulation choice posits that strategies involving disengagement operate earlier and more efficiently than engagement strategies. Here, we compare for the first time the temporal dynamics of detached and positive reappraisal during the regulation and re-exposure phases thereof by measuring event-related potentials. During the regulation phase, pictures were viewed or regulated using detached or positive reappraisal. During the re-exposure phase, the same pictures were viewed again. Results showed that during regulation, central-parietal late positive potentials (LPPs) were greatly attenuated under both strategy types, with the regulation effect of detached reappraisal occurring earlier than that of positive reappraisal and resulting in a stronger attenuation of LPP amplitudes. Upon re-exposure, detached reappraisal exerted enduring effects on self-reported arousal and the central-parietal LPP, whereas positive reappraisal had an enduring effect only on pleasantness. These findings demonstrate the differential effects of detached and positive reappraisal on valence, arousal, and neural responses, and underline the striking differences in the temporal dynamics of these reappraisal strategies.

  19. Temporal dynamics of microbial communities in microcosms in response to pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Shuo; Zhang, Zhengqing; Yang, Fan; Lin, Yanbing; Chen, Weimin; Wei, Gehong

    2017-02-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms underlying microbial succession is a major goal of microbial ecology research. Given the increasing human pressure on the environment and natural resources, responses to the repeated introduction of organic and inorganic pollutants are of particular interest. To investigate the temporal dynamics of microbial communities in response to pollutants, we analysed the microbial community structure in batch microcosms that were inoculated with soil bacteria following exposure to individual or combined pollutants (phenanthrene, n-octadecane, phenanthrene + n-octadecane and phenanthrene + n-octadecane + CdCl2 ). Subculturing was performed at 10-day intervals, followed by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The dynamics of microbial communities in response to different pollutants alone and in combination displayed similar patterns during enrichment. Specifically, the repression and induction of microbial taxa were dominant, and the fluctuation was not significant. The rate of appearance for new taxa and the temporal turnover within microbial communities were higher than the rates reported in other studies of microbial communities in air, water and soil samples. In addition, conditionally rare taxa that were specific to the treatments exhibited higher betweenness centrality values in the co-occurrence network, indicating a strong influence on other interactions in the community. These results suggest that the repeated introduction of pollutants could accelerate microbial succession in microcosms, resulting in the rapid re-equilibration of microbial communities.

  20. Temporal dynamics and impact of event interactions in cyber-social populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Qing; Li, Xiang

    2013-03-01

    The advance of information technologies provides powerful measures to digitize social interactions and facilitate quantitative investigations. To explore large-scale indoor interactions of a social population, we analyze 18 715 users' Wi-Fi access logs recorded in a Chinese university campus during 3 months, and define event interaction (EI) to characterize the concurrent interactions of multiple users inferred by their geographic coincidences—co-locating in the same small region at the same time. We propose three rules to construct a transmission graph, which depicts the topological and temporal features of event interactions. The vertex dynamics of transmission graph tells that the active durations of EIs fall into the truncated power-law distributions, which is independent on the number of involved individuals. The edge dynamics of transmission graph reports that the transmission durations present a truncated power-law pattern independent on the daily and weekly periodicities. Besides, in the aggregated transmission graph, low-degree vertices previously neglected in the aggregated static networks may participate in the large-degree EIs, which is verified by three data sets covering different sizes of social populations with various rendezvouses. This work highlights the temporal significance of event interactions in cyber-social populations.

  1. Temporal dynamics of different cases of bi-stable figure-ground perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogo, Naoki; Hermans, Lore; Stuer, David; van Ee, Raymond; Wagemans, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of a visual scene in "figure" and "ground" is essential for perception of the three-dimensional layout of a scene. In cases of bi-stable perception, two distinct figure-ground interpretations alternate over time. We were interested in the temporal dynamics of these alternations, in particular when the same image is presented repeatedly, with short blank periods in-between. Surprisingly, we found that the intermittent presentation of Rubin's classical "face-or-vase" figure, which is frequently taken as a standard case of bi-stable figure-ground perception, often evoked perceptual switches during the short presentations and stabilization was not prominent. Interestingly, bi-stable perception of Kanizsa's anomalous transparency figure did strongly stabilize across blanks. We also found stabilization for the Necker cube, which we used for comparison. The degree of stabilization (and the lack of it) varied across stimuli and across individuals. Our results indicate, against common expectation, that the stabilization phenomenon cannot be generally evoked by intermittent presentation. We argue that top-down feedback factors such as familiarity, semantics, expectation, and perceptual bias contribute to the complex processes underlying the temporal dynamics of bi-stable figure-ground perception.

  2. Temporal dynamics of categorization: Forgetting as the basis of abstraction and generalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haley eVlach

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Historically, models of categorization have focused on how learners track frequencies and co-occurrence information to abstract relevant category features for generalization. The current study takes a different approach by examining how the temporal dynamics of categorization affect abstraction and generalization. In the learning phase of the experiment, all relevant category features were presented an equal number of times across category exemplars. However, the relevant features were presented on one of two learning schedules: massed or interleaved. At a series of immediate and delayed tests, learners were asked to generalize to novel exemplars that contained massed features, interleaved features, or all novel features. The results of this experiment revealed that, at an immediate test, learners more readily generalized based upon features presented on a massed schedule. Conversely, at a delayed test, learners more readily generalized based upon features presented on an interleaved schedule, until information was no longer readily retrievable from memory. These findings suggest that forgetting and retrieval processes engendered by the temporal dynamics of learning are used as a basis of abstraction, implicating forgetting as a central mechanism of generalization.

  3. The effects of rhythmic sensory cues on the temporal dynamics of human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejdić, Ervin; Fu, Yingying; Pak, Alison; Fairley, Jillian A; Chau, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Walking is a complex, rhythmic task performed by the locomotor system. However, natural gait rhythms can be influenced by metronomic auditory stimuli, a phenomenon of particular interest in neurological rehabilitation. In this paper, we examined the effects of aural, visual and tactile rhythmic cues on the temporal dynamics associated with human gait. Data were collected from fifteen healthy adults in two sessions. Each session consisted of five 15-minute trials. In the first trial of each session, participants walked at their preferred walking speed. In subsequent trials, participants were asked to walk to a metronomic beat, provided through visually, aurally, tactile or all three cues (simultaneously and in sync), the pace of which was set to the preferred walking speed of the first trial. Using the collected data, we extracted several parameters including: gait speed, mean stride interval, stride interval variability, scaling exponent and maximum Lyapunov exponent. The extracted parameters showed that rhythmic sensory cues affect the temporal dynamics of human gait. The auditory rhythmic cue had the greatest influence on the gait parameters, while the visual cue had no statistically significant effect on the scaling exponent. These results demonstrate that visual rhythmic cues could be considered as an alternative cueing modality in rehabilitation without concern of adversely altering the statistical persistence of walking.

  4. The effects of rhythmic sensory cues on the temporal dynamics of human gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin Sejdić

    Full Text Available Walking is a complex, rhythmic task performed by the locomotor system. However, natural gait rhythms can be influenced by metronomic auditory stimuli, a phenomenon of particular interest in neurological rehabilitation. In this paper, we examined the effects of aural, visual and tactile rhythmic cues on the temporal dynamics associated with human gait. Data were collected from fifteen healthy adults in two sessions. Each session consisted of five 15-minute trials. In the first trial of each session, participants walked at their preferred walking speed. In subsequent trials, participants were asked to walk to a metronomic beat, provided through visually, aurally, tactile or all three cues (simultaneously and in sync, the pace of which was set to the preferred walking speed of the first trial. Using the collected data, we extracted several parameters including: gait speed, mean stride interval, stride interval variability, scaling exponent and maximum Lyapunov exponent. The extracted parameters showed that rhythmic sensory cues affect the temporal dynamics of human gait. The auditory rhythmic cue had the greatest influence on the gait parameters, while the visual cue had no statistically significant effect on the scaling exponent. These results demonstrate that visual rhythmic cues could be considered as an alternative cueing modality in rehabilitation without concern of adversely altering the statistical persistence of walking.

  5. Temporal Unmixing of Dynamic Fluorescent Images by Blind Source Separation Method with a Convex Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duofang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By recording a time series of tomographic images, dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT allows exploring perfusion, biodistribution, and pharmacokinetics of labeled substances in vivo. Usually, dynamic tomographic images are first reconstructed frame by frame, and then unmixing based on principle component analysis (PCA or independent component analysis (ICA is performed to detect and visualize functional structures with different kinetic patterns. PCA and ICA assume sources are statistically uncorrelated or independent and don’t perform well when correlated sources are present. In this paper, we deduce the relationship between the measured imaging data and the kinetic patterns and present a temporal unmixing approach, which is based on nonnegative blind source separation (BSS method with a convex analysis framework to separate the measured data. The presented method requires no assumption on source independence or zero correlations. Several numerical simulations and phantom experiments are conducted to investigate the performance of the proposed temporal unmixing method. The results indicate that it is feasible to unmix the measured data before the tomographic reconstruction and the BSS based method provides better unmixing quality compared with PCA and ICA.

  6. Collective non-equilibrium dynamics at surfaces and the spatio-temporal edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, M.; Gambassi, A.; Pleimling, M.

    2012-11-01

    Symmetries represent a fundamental constraint for physical systems and relevant new phenomena often emerge as a consequence of their breaking. An important example is provided by space- and time-translational invariance in statistical systems, which hold at a coarse-grained scale in equilibrium and are broken by spatial and temporal boundaries, the former being implemented by surfaces —unavoidable in real samples— the latter by some initial condition for the dynamics which causes a non-equilibrium evolution. While the separate effects of these two boundaries are well understood, we demonstrate here that additional, unexpected features arise upon approaching the effective edge formed by their intersection. For this purpose, we focus on the classical semi-infinite Ising model with spin-flip dynamics evolving out of equilibrium at its critical point. Considering both subcritical and critical values of the coupling among surface spins, we present numerical evidence of a scaling regime with universal features which emerges upon approaching the spatio-temporal edge and we rationalise these findings within a field-theoretical approach.

  7. Mass spectrometric analysis of spatio-temporal dynamics of crustacean neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OuYang, Chuanzi; Liang, Zhidan; Li, Lingjun

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptides represent one of the largest classes of signaling molecules used by nervous systems to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Over the past several years, mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategies have revolutionized the discovery of neuropeptides in numerous model organisms, especially in decapod crustaceans. Here, we focus our discussion on recent advances in the use of MS-based techniques to map neuropeptides in the spatial domain and monitoring their dynamic changes in the temporal domain. These MS-enabled investigations provide valuable information about the distribution, secretion and potential function of neuropeptides with high molecular specificity and sensitivity. In situ MS imaging and in vivo microdialysis are highlighted as key technologies for probing spatio-temporal dynamics of neuropeptides in the crustacean nervous system. This review summarizes the latest advancement in MS-based methodologies for neuropeptide analysis including typical workflow and sample preparation strategies as well as major neuropeptide families discovered in decapod crustaceans. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in Neuroscience and Neurology.

  8. Genetic diversity, temporal dynamics, and host specificity in blood parasites of passerines in north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xi; Dong, Lu; Zhang, Chenglin; Zhang, Yanyun

    2015-12-01

    Avian blood parasites have been preliminarily studied in East Asia, but no data are available from long-term monitoring. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, genetic diversity, and temporal dynamics of Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, and Leucocytozoon in two passerine communities (one forest and one urban) in north China from 2008 to 2013, as well as the association between infected lineages and host specificities. Out of 633 birds from 40 species, 157 individuals (24.8 %) were infected; overall prevalence was 26.7 % and 16.8 % in two sites, respectively. The dominant avian blood parasite genus in the forest park changed yearly between Plasmodium and Haemoproteus, while the Leucocytozoon maintained a low infection level. Forty-four haplotypes were identified by sequencing a 432-bp fragment of the cytochrome b (cyt b) gene; more than 70 % were novel (six Plasmodium lineages, 16 Haemoproteus lineages, and nine Leucocytozoon lineages). Based on our data gathered over consecutive years, we found that the highly observed lineages of Haemoproteus showed higher host diversities than those of Plasmodium, and the most infected lineage EMEL01 (100 % identity with SGS1) take on the highest host diversity but low temporal diversity of the two genera, implying that this lineage infected a great diversity of species in certain years, but maintained a lower infection level or even disappeared in other years. The results suggest that genetic diversity of avian blood parasites in East Asia is high and provides scope for further research. In addition, compared with overall analysis, yearly prevalence monitoring is important in uncovering the temporal dynamic and host specificity variations over time.

  9. Temporal dynamics of distinct CA1 cell populations during unconscious state induced by ketamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Kuang

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a widely used dissociative anesthetic which can induce some psychotic-like symptoms and memory deficits in some patients during the post-operative period. To understand its effects on neural population dynamics in the brain, we employed large-scale in vivo ensemble recording techniques to monitor the activity patterns of simultaneously recorded hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells and various interneurons during several conscious and unconscious states such as awake rest, running, slow wave sleep, and ketamine-induced anesthesia. Our analyses reveal that ketamine induces distinct oscillatory dynamics not only in pyramidal cells but also in at least seven different types of CA1 interneurons including putative basket cells, chandelier cells, bistratified cells, and O-LM cells. These emergent unique oscillatory dynamics may very well reflect the intrinsic temporal relationships within the CA1 circuit. It is conceivable that systematic characterization of network dynamics may eventually lead to better understanding of how ketamine induces unconsciousness and consequently alters the conscious mind.

  10. The changing spatio-temporal dynamics of thaw lake development, Seward Peninsula, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Michael; Rees, Gareth; Bartsch, Annett

    2014-05-01

    Contemporary anthropogenic climatic warming is having an accelerated, and more pronounced effect upon Arctic regions than any other environment on Earth. Increased surface temperatures have led to widespread permafrost degradation and a shift in dynamics. One landscape manifestation of localised permafrost decay, seen to be ubiquitous across low-lying tundra regions of Alaska, Canada and Siberia, is the thermokarst lake - or 'thaw' lake. These features are seen to be truly dynamic, with a relatively rapid evolution and decay. The exact impacts of climatic perturbation on thaw lake development are in contention; however, recent studies have suggested an increased vulnerability of these features, owing to the susceptibility of the fundamental processes of initiation, expansion and drainage to climatic variation. It is often hypothesised that with current trends, thaw lakes will see a net increase in expansion rate, and areal extent, with a potential for increased drainage events. Increased permafrost thaw and thermokarst activity has also led to shifts in biogeochemical cycles, leading to an amplified release from large carbon reservoirs currently sequestered within permafrost. An example of carbon release exhibited from thaw lakes is that of methane ebullition (gas bubble formation); this has been theorised to have the potential to initiate a major positive climatic feedback leading to a continued rise in global temperatures. Due to the remote nature and large area over which these landforms occur, remotely sensed data has been widely used in order to both accurately classify features and measure change over spatially large and great temporal extents. As well as studies interpreting data collected in the visible and near-infrared spectra, studies have recently made use of radar or microwave products in order to capture imagery avoiding adverse atmospheric conditions, most notably cloud cover. Data from Envisat ASAR operating in Wide Swath Mode was acquired for this

  11. Coseismic temporal changes of slip direction: the effect of absolute stress on dynamic rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guatteri, Mariagiovanna; Spudich, P.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of rupture at low-stress level. We show that one main difference between the dynamics of high- and low-stress events is the amount of coseismic temporal rake rotation occurring at given points on the fault. Curved stations on exposed fault surfaces and earthquake dislocation models derived from ground-motion inversion indicate that the slip direction may change with time at a pointon the fault during dynamic rupture. We use a 3D boundary integral method to model temporal rake variations during dynamic rupture propagation assuming a slip-weakening friction law and isotropic friction. The points at which the slip rotates most are characterized by an initial shear stress direction substantially different from the average stress direction over the fault plane. We show that for a given value of stress drop, the level of initial shear stress (i.e., the fractional stress drop) determines the amount of rotation in slip direction. We infer that seismic events that show evidence of temporal rake rorations are characterized by a low initial shear-stress level with spatially variable direction on the fault (possibly due to changes in fault surface geometry) and an almost complete stress drop. Our models motivate a new interpretation of curved and cross-cutting striations and put new constraints on their analysis. The initial rake is in general collinear with the initial stress at the hypocenter zone, supporting the assumptions made in stress-tensor inversion from first-motion analysis. At other points on the fualt, especially away from the hypocenter, the initial slip rake may not be collinear with the initial shear stress, contradicting a common assumption of structural geology. On the other hand, the later part of slip in our models is systematically more aligned withi the average stress direction than the early slip. Our modeling suggests that the length of the straight part of curved striations is usually an upper bound of the slip

  12. Amygdala neurons differentially encode motivation and reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye, Kay M; Janak, Patricia H

    2007-04-11

    Lesion studies demonstrate that the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) is important for assigning motivational significance to sensory stimuli, but little is known about how this information is encoded. We used in vivo electrophysiology procedures to investigate how the amygdala encodes motivating and reinforcing properties of cues that induce reinstatement of reward-seeking behavior. Two groups of rats were trained to respond to a sucrose reward. The "paired" group was trained with a reward-predictive cue, whereas the "unpaired" group was trained with a randomly presented cue. Both groups underwent identical extinction and reinstatement procedures during which the reward was withheld. The proportion of neurons that were phasically cue responsive during reinstatement was significantly higher in the paired group (46 of 100) than in the unpaired group (8 of 112). Cues that induce reward-seeking behavior can do so by acting as incentives or reinforcers. Distinct populations of neurons responded to the cue in trials in which the cue acted as an incentive, triggering a motivated reward-seeking state, or as a reinforcer, supporting continued instrumental responding. The incentive motivation-encoding population of neurons (34 of 46 cue-responsive neurons; 74%) extinguished in temporal agreement with a decrease in the rate of instrumental responding. The conditioned reinforcement-encoding population of neurons (12 of 46 cue-responsive neurons; 26%) maintained their response for the duration of cue-reinforced instrumental responding. These data demonstrate that separate populations of cue-responsive neurons in the BLA encode the motivating or reinforcing properties of a cue previously associated with a reward.

  13. Rapid Amygdala Kindling Causes Motor Seizure and Comorbidity of Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shang-Der; Wang, Yu-Lin; Liang, Sheng-Fu; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala kindling is a model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with convulsion. The rapid amygdala kindling has an advantage on quick development of motor seizures and for antiepileptic drugs screening. The rapid amygdala kindling causes epileptogenesis accompanied by an anxiolytic response in early isolation of rat pups or depressive behavior in immature rats. However, the effect of rapid amygdala kindling on comorbidity of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors is unexplored in adult rats with normal breeding. In the present study, 40 amygdala stimulations given within 2 days were applied in adult Wistar rats. Afterdischarge (AD) and seizure stage were recorded throughout the amygdala kindling. Anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated by the elevated plus maze (EPM) test and open field (OF) test, whereas depression-like behaviors were assessed by the forced swim (FS) and sucrose consumption (SC) tests. A tonic-clonic convulsion was provoked in the kindle group. Rapid amygdala kindling resulted in a significantly lower frequency entering an open area of either open arms of the EPM or the central zone of an OF, lower sucrose intake, and longer immobility of the FS test in the kindle group. Our results suggest that rapid amygdala kindling elicited severe motor seizures comorbid with anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. PMID:27445726

  14. Rapid Amygdala Kindling Causes Motor Seizure and Comorbidity of Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shang-Der; Wang, Yu-Lin; Liang, Sheng-Fu; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala kindling is a model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with convulsion. The rapid amygdala kindling has an advantage on quick development of motor seizures and for antiepileptic drugs screening. The rapid amygdala kindling causes epileptogenesis accompanied by an anxiolytic response in early isolation of rat pups or depressive behavior in immature rats. However, the effect of rapid amygdala kindling on comorbidity of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors is unexplored in adult rats with normal breeding. In the present study, 40 amygdala stimulations given within 2 days were applied in adult Wistar rats. Afterdischarge (AD) and seizure stage were recorded throughout the amygdala kindling. Anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated by the elevated plus maze (EPM) test and open field (OF) test, whereas depression-like behaviors were assessed by the forced swim (FS) and sucrose consumption (SC) tests. A tonic-clonic convulsion was provoked in the kindle group. Rapid amygdala kindling resulted in a significantly lower frequency entering an open area of either open arms of the EPM or the central zone of an OF, lower sucrose intake, and longer immobility of the FS test in the kindle group. Our results suggest that rapid amygdala kindling elicited severe motor seizures comorbid with anxiety- and depression-like behaviors.

  15. Spatio-temporal dynamics of the penetration resistance of recultivated soils formed after open cast mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zhukov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of studying the spatio-temporal dynamics of soil penetration resistance we proved the existence of the technozem ecomorphs as above horizon soil formations. Research was carried out at a research center for study of recultivation processes in Ordzhonikidze city. Measurement of soils penetration was made in field conditions using an Eijkelkamp penetrometer on a regular grid at depths of up to50 cmwith intervals of5 cm. Calculation of average values and degrees of variation was performed by means of descriptive statistical tools. The extent of soil penetration spatial dependence was assessed and the existence of ecomorphs was proved by means of geostatistical analysis. The degree of associativity of spatial distribution of indicators of a soil body in different years of research was established by means of correlation analysis. The level of variation in space and in time of  technozem penetration generated on loess-like loams, grey-green, red-brown clays, and also pedozems was revealed. The degree of spatial dependence of  technozem penetration within soil layers and also the linear sizes of ecomorphs as above horizon soil structures was established. The time dynamics of  penetration of various recultozems were described. As a result of research into the spatio-temporal dynamics of penetration of technozems, data confirming the hypothesis of the existence of ecomorphs as above horizon morphological soil formations were obtained. An ecomorphic approach to the study of the morphological structure of technozems is proposed. The comparative characteristics of ecomorphs from various types of technozem are presented. The results obtained solve the problem of combining the higher and lowest levels in the hierarchical system of soil organisation as a natural body, which should raise the efficiency of the analysis of relations of morphological elements as a basis for detailed reconstruction of recultivation processes, soil formation, and

  16. Application of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Wu; Wang, Xiaoyi; Xie, Fangfang; Liao, Weihua [Dept. of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital of Central South Univ., Changsha (China)], e-mail: doctoring@sina.com

    2013-02-15

    Background: Accurately locatithe epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is important in clinical practice. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) have been widely used in the lateralization of TLE, but both have limitations. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging can accurately and reliably reflect differences in cerebral blood flow and volume. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in TLE. Material and Methods: Conventional MRI and DSC-MRI scanning was performed in 20 interictal cases of TLE and 20 healthy volunteers. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes of the TLE cases and healthy control groups were calculated. The differences in the perfusion asymmetry indices (AIs), derived from the rCBV and rCBF of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes, were pared between the two groups. Results: In the control group, there were no statistically significant differences between the left and right sides in terms of rCBV (left 1.55 {+-} 0.32, right 1.57 {+-} 0.28) or rCBF (left 99.00 {+-} 24.61, right 100.38 {+-} 23.46) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes. However, in the case group the ipsilateral rCBV and rCBF values (1.75 {+-} 0.64 and 96.35 {+-} 22.63, respectively) were markedly lower than those of the contralateral side (2.01 {+-} 0.79 and 108.56 {+-} 26.92; P < 0.05). Both the AI of the rCBV (AIrCBV; 13.03 {+-} 10.33) and the AI of the rCBF (AIrCBF; 11.24 {+-} 8.70) of the case group were significantly higher than that of the control group (AIrCBV 5.55 {+-} 3.74, AIrCBF 5.12 {+-} 3.48; P < 0.05). The epileptogenic foci of nine patients were correctly lateralized using the 95th percentile of the AIrCBV and AIrCBF of the control group as the normal upper limits. Conclusion: In

  17. The importance of accurate anatomic assessment for the volumetric analysis of the amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bonilha

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a wide range of values reported in volumetric studies of the amygdala. The use of single plane thick magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may prevent the correct visualization of anatomic landmarks and yield imprecise results. To assess whether there is a difference between volumetric analysis of the amygdala performed with single plane MRI 3-mm slices and with multiplanar analysis of MRI 1-mm slices, we studied healthy subjects and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We performed manual delineation of the amygdala on T1-weighted inversion recovery, 3-mm coronal slices and manual delineation of the amygdala on three-dimensional volumetric T1-weighted images with 1-mm slice thickness. The data were compared using a dependent t-test. There was a significant difference between the volumes obtained by the coronal plane-based measurements and the volumes obtained by three-dimensional analysis (P < 0.001. An incorrect estimate of the amygdala volume may preclude a correct analysis of the biological effects of alterations in amygdala volume. Three-dimensional analysis is preferred because it is based on more extensive anatomical assessment and the results are similar to those obtained in post-mortem studies.

  18. Spatially-temporal dynamics of a passively Q-switched Raman-active solid-state oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashnikov, V L; Yumashev, K V

    2009-01-01

    The spatially-temporal model of an all-solid-state passively Q-switched oscillator with an active medium providing the stimulated Raman scattering is presented. The model does not presume a Gaussian shape of the cylindrically symmetric modes at both fundamental and Stokes wavelengths. It is found, that the highly-nontrivial spatially-temporal dynamics can be regularized by the optimal choice of the oscillator parameters, viz. initial transmission of a saturable absorber, curvature of a spherical mirror, and output mirror transmission at the fundamental and Stokes wavelengths. As a result, the pulse can be substantially temporally squeezed and spatially broadened at both fundamental and Stokes wavelengths.

  19. Population responses to environmental change in a tropical ant: the interaction of spatial and temporal dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Jackson

    Full Text Available Spatial structure can have a profound, but often underappreciated, effect on the temporal dynamics of ecosystems. Here we report on a counterintuitive increase in the population of a tree-nesting ant, Azteca sericeasur, in response to a drastic reduction in the number of potential nesting sites. This surprising result is comprehensible when viewed in the context of the self-organized spatial dynamics of the ants and their effect on the ants' dispersal-limited natural enemies. Approximately 30% of the trees in the study site, a coffee agroecosystem in southern Mexico, were pruned or felled over a two-year period, and yet the abundance of the ant nests more than doubled over the seven-year study. Throughout the transition, the spatial distribution of the ants maintained a power-law distribution - a signal of spatial self organization - but the local clustering of the nests was reduced post-pruning. A cellular automata model incorporating the changed spatial structure of the ants and the resulting partial escape from antagonists reproduced the observed increase in abundance, highlighting how self-organized spatial dynamics can profoundly influence the responses of ecosystems to perturbations.

  20. When meaning matters: The temporal dynamics of semantic influences on visual attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Floor; Huettig, Falk; Olivers, Christian N L

    2016-02-01

    An important question is, to what extent is visual attention driven by the semantics of individual objects, rather than by their visual appearance? This study investigates the hypothesis that timing is a crucial factor in the occurrence and strength of semantic influences on visual orienting. To assess the dynamics of such influences, the authors presented the target instruction either before or after visual stimulus onset, while eye movements were continuously recorded throughout the search. The results show a substantial but delayed bias in orienting toward semantically related objects compared with visually related objects when target instruction is presented before visual stimulus onset. However, this delay can be completely undone by presenting the visual information before the target instruction (Experiment 1). Moreover, the absence or presence of visual competition does not change the temporal dynamics of the semantic bias (Experiment 2). Visual orienting is thus driven by priority settings that dynamically shift between visual and semantic representations, with each of these types of bias operating largely independently. The findings bridge the divide between the visual attention and the psycholinguistic literature. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Stress Leads to Contrasting Effects on the Levels of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Hippocampus and Amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Harini Lakshminarasimhan; Sumantra Chattarji

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings on stress induced structural plasticity in rodents have identified important differences between the hippocampus and amygdala. The same chronic immobilization stress (CIS, 2 h/day) causes growth of dendrites and spines in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), but dendritic atrophy in hippocampal area CA3. CIS induced morphological changes also differ in their temporal longevity--BLA hypertrophy, unlike CA3 atrophy, persists even after 21 days of stress-free recovery. Furthermore, a ...

  2. Spatial, temporal, and environmental dynamics of a multi-species epinephelid spawning aggregation in Pohnpei, Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, K. L.; Nemeth, R. S.; Kadison, E.; Joseph, E.

    2014-09-01

    Long-term and short-term underwater visual censuses using SCUBA, technical Nitrox, and closed circuit rebreathers (CCR) were carried out in Pohnpei, Micronesia, to define spatial and temporal dynamics within a semi-protected multi-species epinephelid (fish) spawning aggregation (FSA) of brown-marbled grouper, Epinephelus fuscoguttatus, camouflage grouper, Epinephelus polyphekadion, and squaretail coralgrouper, Plectropomus areolatus. Results identified species-specific patterns of habitat use, abundance, residency, and dispersal of FSAs. Fish spawning aggregations formed and dispersed monthly within a 21-160-d period after winter solstice within adjacent yet distinct outer reef habitats. The reproductive season coincided with periods of seasonally low sub-surface seawater temperature. Peaks in density varied among species both within the calendar year and relative to the winter solstice. Significant long-term declines in FSA density were observed for all three species, suggesting population-level fishery-induced impacts, similar to those previously reported for E. polyphekadion. Differences in density estimates were also observed between dive gear, with a threefold difference in densities measured by CCR for E. polyphekadion versus SCUBA that suggest a disturbance effect from exhaled SCUBA bubbles for this species. CCR also allowed surveys to be conducted over a larger area in a single dive, thereby improving the potential to gauge actual abundance and density within FSAs. Based on these findings, a combination of long-term and intensive short-term monitoring strategies is recommended to fully characterize trends in seasonal abundance and habitat use for aggregating species at single or multi-species FSA sites. Inherent variations in the timing and distribution of species within FSA make fine-scale temporal management protocols less effective than blanket protective coverage of these species at (e.g., marine protected areas covering FSAs and adjacent migratory

  3. Fish and phytoplankton exhibit contrasting temporal species abundance patterns in a dynamic north temperate lake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen J A Hansen

    Full Text Available Temporal patterns of species abundance, although less well-studied than spatial patterns, provide valuable insight to the processes governing community assembly. We compared temporal abundance distributions of two communities, phytoplankton and fish, in a north temperate lake. We used both 17 years of observed relative abundance data as well as resampled data from Monte Carlo simulations to account for the possible effects of non-detection of rare species. Similar to what has been found in other communities, phytoplankton and fish species that appeared more frequently were generally more abundant than rare species. However, neither community exhibited two distinct groups of "core" (common occurrence and high abundance and "occasional" (rare occurrence and low abundance species. Both observed and resampled data show that the phytoplankton community was dominated by occasional species appearing in only one year that exhibited large variation in their abundances, while the fish community was dominated by core species occurring in all 17 years at high abundances. We hypothesize that the life-history traits that enable phytoplankton to persist in highly dynamic environments may result in communities dominated by occasional species capable of reaching high abundances when conditions allow. Conversely, longer turnover times and broad environmental tolerances of fish may result in communities dominated by core species structured primarily by competitive interactions.

  4. Dynamics of Disagreement: Large-Scale Temporal Network Analysis Reveals Negative Interactions in Online Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkova, Milena; García-Gavilanes, Ruth; Yasseri, Taha

    2016-11-01

    Disagreement and conflict are a fact of social life. However, negative interactions are rarely explicitly declared and recorded and this makes them hard for scientists to study. In an attempt to understand the structural and temporal features of negative interactions in the community, we use complex network methods to analyze patterns in the timing and configuration of reverts of article edits to Wikipedia. We investigate how often and how fast pairs of reverts occur compared to a null model in order to control for patterns that are natural to the content production or are due to the internal rules of Wikipedia. Our results suggest that Wikipedia editors systematically revert the same person, revert back their reverter, and come to defend a reverted editor. We further relate these interactions to the status of the involved editors. Even though the individual reverts might not necessarily be negative social interactions, our analysis points to the existence of certain patterns of negative social dynamics within the community of editors. Some of these patterns have not been previously explored and carry implications for the knowledge collection practice conducted on Wikipedia. Our method can be applied to other large-scale temporal collaboration networks to identify the existence of negative social interactions and other social processes.

  5. Remote sensing and geographic information systems in the spatial temporal dynamics modeling of infectious diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG; Peng

    2006-01-01

    Similar to species immigration or exotic species invasion, infectious disease transmission is strengthened due to the globalization of human activities. Using schistosomiasis as an example, we propose a conceptual model simulating the spatio-temporal dynamics of infectious diseases. We base the model on the knowledge of the interrelationship among the source, media, and the hosts of the disease. With the endemics data of schistosomiasis in Xichang, China, we demonstrate that the conceptual model is feasible; we introduce how remote sensing and geographic information systems techniques can be used in support of spatio-temporal modeling; we compare the different effects caused to the entire population when selecting different groups of people for schistosomiasis control. Our work illustrates the importance of such a modeling tool in supporting spatial decisions. Our modeling method can be directly applied to such infectious diseases as the plague, lyme disease, and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. The application of remote sensing and geographic information systems can shed light on the modeling of other infectious disease and invasive species studies.

  6. Lattice dynamical wavelet neural networks implemented using particle swarm optimization for spatio-temporal system identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua-Liang; Billings, Stephen A; Zhao, Yifan; Guo, Lingzhong

    2009-01-01

    In this brief, by combining an efficient wavelet representation with a coupled map lattice model, a new family of adaptive wavelet neural networks, called lattice dynamical wavelet neural networks (LDWNNs), is introduced for spatio-temporal system identification. A new orthogonal projection pursuit (OPP) method, coupled with a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, is proposed for augmenting the proposed network. A novel two-stage hybrid training scheme is developed for constructing a parsimonious network model. In the first stage, by applying the OPP algorithm, significant wavelet neurons are adaptively and successively recruited into the network, where adjustable parameters of the associated wavelet neurons are optimized using a particle swarm optimizer. The resultant network model, obtained in the first stage, however, may be redundant. In the second stage, an orthogonal least squares algorithm is then applied to refine and improve the initially trained network by removing redundant wavelet neurons from the network. An example for a real spatio-temporal system identification problem is presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed new modeling framework.

  7. Spatio-temporal dynamics induced by competing instabilities in two asymmetrically coupled nonlinear evolution equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schüler, D.; Alonso, S.; Bär, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Torcini, A. [CNR-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi - Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sez. Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    Pattern formation often occurs in spatially extended physical, biological, and chemical systems due to an instability of the homogeneous steady state. The type of the instability usually prescribes the resulting spatio-temporal patterns and their characteristic length scales. However, patterns resulting from the simultaneous occurrence of instabilities cannot be expected to be simple superposition of the patterns associated with the considered instabilities. To address this issue, we design two simple models composed by two asymmetrically coupled equations of non-conserved (Swift-Hohenberg equations) or conserved (Cahn-Hilliard equations) order parameters with different characteristic wave lengths. The patterns arising in these systems range from coexisting static patterns of different wavelengths to traveling waves. A linear stability analysis allows to derive a two parameter phase diagram for the studied models, in particular, revealing for the Swift-Hohenberg equations, a co-dimension two bifurcation point of Turing and wave instability and a region of coexistence of stationary and traveling patterns. The nonlinear dynamics of the coupled evolution equations is investigated by performing accurate numerical simulations. These reveal more complex patterns, ranging from traveling waves with embedded Turing patterns domains to spatio-temporal chaos, and a wide hysteretic region, where waves or Turing patterns coexist. For the coupled Cahn-Hilliard equations the presence of a weak coupling is sufficient to arrest the coarsening process and to lead to the emergence of purely periodic patterns. The final states are characterized by domains with a characteristic length, which diverges logarithmically with the coupling amplitude.

  8. Temporal development of anticipatory reflex modulation to dynamical interactions during arm movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toshitaka; Gomi, Hiroaki

    2009-10-01

    It is known that somatosensory reflex during voluntary arm movement is modulated anticipatorily according to given tasks or environments. However, when and how reflex amplitude is set remains controversial. Is the reflex modulation completed preparatorily before movement execution or does it vary with the movement? Is the reflex amplitude coded in a temporal manner or in a spatial (or state-dependent) manner? Here we studied these issues while subjects performed planar reaching movements with upcoming opposite (rightward/leftward) directions of force fields. Somatosensory reflex responses of shoulder muscles induced by a small force perturbation were evaluated at several points before the arm encountered predictable force fields after movement start. We found that the shoulder flexor reflex responses were generally higher for the rightward than for the leftward upcoming force fields, whereas the extensor reflex responses were higher for the leftward force field. This reflex amplitude depending on the upcoming force field direction became prominent as the reflex was evoked closer to the force fields, indicating continuous changes in reflex modulation during movement. An additional experiment further showed that the reflex modulation developed as a function of the temporal distance to the force fields rather than the spatial distance. Taken together, the results suggest that, in the force field interaction task, somatosensory reflex amplitude during the course of movement is set anticipatorily on the basis of an estimate of the time-to-contact rather than the state-to-contact, to upcoming dynamical interaction during voluntary movement.

  9. Spatio-temporal dynamics in the phenology of croplands across the Indo-Gangetic Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, John M. A.; Dash, Jadunandan; Atkinson, Peter M.

    2014-08-01

    Spatio-temporal dynamics in land surface phenology parameters observed over croplands can inform on crop-climate interactions and, elucidate local to regional scale vulnerabilities either due to climate change or prevailing sub-optimal agricultural practices. Here, we observe spatio-temporal trends in land surface phenology parameters (cropping intensity, length of growing season and productivity) for kharif and rabi cropping seasons from satellite data across the Indo-Gangetic Plains from 1982 to 2006. The productivity of the Indo-Gangetic Plains croplands is of regional importance and is a vital component of Indian national food security efforts. Aside from local and intra-state heterogeneity in observed trends there was a clear west-to-east gradient in cropping intensity. Key observed trends include increasing cropping intensity in the eastern IGP, increasing number of growing days per year in Bihar, Uttar Pradesh and Haryana and increasing productivity in both cropping seasons across the IGP. This information is a crucial input to integrated assessments of the croplands to ensure management of the agricultural system shifts towards a trajectory of climate-resilience and environmental sustainability. To create spatially explicit time-series, at a spatial resolution of 8 km across the IGP of the following LSP parameters: (i) cropping intensity, (ii) LGS and (iii) agro-ecosystem productivity. To quantify normal conditions, inter-annual variation and long-term trends in these LSP parameters at an 8 km spatial resolution across the IGP croplands.

  10. Universally Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of Spontaneous Superfluidity Breakdown within Synthetic Gauge Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Shuyuan; Xu, Jun; Lee, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    According to the famous Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM), the universality of spontaneous defect generation in continuous phase transitions (CPTs) can be understood by the critical slowing down. In most CPTs of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), the universality of spontaneous defect generations has been explained by the divergent relaxation time associated with the nontrivial gapless Bogoliubov excitations. However, for atomic BECs in synthetic gauge fields, their spontaneous superfluidity breakdown is resulted from the divergent correlation length associated with the zero Landau critical velocity. Here, by considering an atomic BEC ladder subjected to a synthetic magnetic field, we reveal that the spontaneous superfluidity breakdown obeys the KZM. The Kibble-Zurek scalings are derived from the Landau critical velocity which determines the correlation length. In further, the critical exponents are numerically extracted from the critical spatial-temporal dynamics of the bifurcation delay and the spontaneous...

  11. Environmental Factors Affecting Temporal and Spatial Dynamics of Soil Erosion in Xingguo County, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ku; SHI Xue-Zheng; YU Dong-Sheng; SHI De-Ming; CHEN Jing-Ming; XU Bin-Bin; LIANG Yin; LI De-Cheng

    2005-01-01

    By using soil erosion maps of four different time periods and a digital elevation model (DEM), in combination with the remote sensing and GIS technologies, soil erosion dynamics in Xingguo County of Jiangxi Province in South China were analyzed on both temporal and spatial scales in soils of different parent materials, altitudes and slopes. The results showed that from 1958 to 2000 severe soil erosion was coming under control with a decreasing percentage of the land under severe erosion. It was also found that the soils developed from Quaternary red clay, granite and purple shale were more susceptible to soil erosion and that areas sitting between 200 to 500 m in altitude with a slope less than 3° or between 7° to 20° where human activities were frequent remained to be zones where soil erosion was most likely to occur. These areas deserve special attention in monitoring and controlling.

  12. Temporal dynamics of the response to Al stress in Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus camaldulensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice K. de Alcântara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipid peroxidation and root elongation of Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus camaldulensis were studied under stress conditions in response to aluminum (Al, a metal known to limit agricultural productivity in acidic soils primarily due to reduced root elongation. In Brazil, the Grancam 1277 hybrid (E. grandis × E. camaldulensis has been planted in the "Cerrado", a region of the country with a wide occurrence of acidic soils. The present study demonstrated that the hybrid exhibited root growth reduction and increased levels of lipid peroxidation after 24h of treatment with 100 µM of Al, which was followed by a reduction in lipid peroxidation levels and the recovery of root elongation after 48h of Al exposure, suggesting a rapid response to the early stressful conditions induced by Al. The understanding of the temporal dynamics of Al tolerance may be useful for selecting more tolerant genotypes and for identifying genes of interest for applications in bioengineering.

  13. Formal analysis of temporal dynamics in anxiety states and traits for virtual patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Azizi Ab; Ahmad, Faudziah; Yusof, Nooraini; Ahmad, Farzana Kabir; Yusof, Shahrul Azmi Mohd

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a temporal dynamic model of anxiety states and traits for an individual. Anxiety is a natural part of life, and most of us experience it from time to time. But for some people, anxiety can be extreme. Based on several personal characteristics, traits, and a representation of events (i.e. psychological and physiological stressors), the formal model can represent whether a human that experience certain scenarios will fall into an anxiety states condition. A number of well-known relations between events and the course of anxiety are summarized from the literature and it is shown that the model exhibits those patterns. In addition, the formal model has been mathematically analyzed to find out which stable situations exist. Finally, it is pointed out how this model can be used in therapy, supported by a software agent.

  14. Spatio-temporal patterns in ultra-slow domain wall creep dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrero, Ezequiel E; Giamarchi, Thierry; Kolton, Alejandro B; Rosso, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    In presence of impurities, ferromagnetic and ferroelectric domain walls slide only above a finite external field. Close to this depinning threshold, the wall proceeds by large and abrupt jumps, called avalanches, while, at much smaller field, it creeps by thermal activation. In this work we develop a novel numerical technique that captures the ultra-slow creep regime over huge time scales. We point out the existence of activated events that involve collective reorganizations similar to avalanches, but, at variance with them, display correlated spatio-temporal patterns that resemble the complex sequence of aftershocks observed after a large earthquake. Remarkably, we show that events assembly in independent clusters owning the same scale-free statistics as critical depinning avalanches. This correlated dynamics should be experimentally accessible by magneto-optical imaging of ferro- magnetic films.

  15. Spatio-temporal correlations in models of collective motion ruled by different dynamical laws

    CERN Document Server

    Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene; Grigera, Tomas S; Melillo, Stefania; Viale, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Information transfer is an essential factor in determining the robustness of collective behaviour in biological systems with distributed control. The most direct way to study the information transfer mechanisms is to experimentally detect the propagation across the system of a signal triggered by some perturbation. However, for field experiments this method is inefficient, as the possibilities of the observer to perturb the group are limited and empirical observations must rely on rare natural perturbations. An alternative way is to use spatio-temporal correlations to assess the information transfer mechanism directly from the spontaneous fluctuations of the system, without the need to have an actual propagating signal on record. We test the approach on ground truth data provided by numerical simulations in three dimensions of two models of collective behaviour characterized by very different dynamical equations and information transfer mechanisms: the classic Vicsek model, describing an overdamped noninertia...

  16. Monitoring of rock glacier dynamics by multi-temporal UAV images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra di Cella, Umberto; Pogliotti, Paolo; Diotri, Fabrizio; Cremonese, Edoardo; Filippa, Gianluca; Galvagno, Marta

    2015-04-01

    During the last years several steps forward have been made in the comprehension of rock glaciers dynamics mainly for their potential evolution into rapid mass movements phenomena. Monitoring the surface movement of creeping mountain permafrost is important for understanding the potential effect of ongoing climate change on such a landforms. This study presents the reconstruction of two years of surface movements and DEM changes obtained by multi-temporal analysis of UAV images (provided by SenseFly Swinglet CAM drone). The movement rate obtained by photogrammetry are compared to those obtained by differential GNSS repeated campaigns on almost fifty points distributed on the rock glacier. Results reveals a very good agreements between both rates velocities obtained by the two methods and vertical displacements on fixed points. Strengths, weaknesses and shrewdness of this methods will be discussed. Such a method is very promising mainly for remote regions with difficult access.

  17. Self-Organization of Spatio-Temporal Hierarchy via Learning of Dynamic Visual Image Patterns on Action Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minju; Hwang, Jungsik; Tani, Jun

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the visual cortex efficiently processes high-dimensional spatial information by using a hierarchical structure. Recently, computational models that were inspired by the spatial hierarchy of the visual cortex have shown remarkable performance in image recognition. Up to now, however, most biological and computational modeling studies have mainly focused on the spatial domain and do not discuss temporal domain processing of the visual cortex. Several studies on the visual cortex and other brain areas associated with motor control support that the brain also uses its hierarchical structure as a processing mechanism for temporal information. Based on the success of previous computational models using spatial hierarchy and temporal hierarchy observed in the brain, the current report introduces a novel neural network model for the recognition of dynamic visual image patterns based solely on the learning of exemplars. This model is characterized by the application of both spatial and temporal constraints on local neural activities, resulting in the self-organization of a spatio-temporal hierarchy necessary for the recognition of complex dynamic visual image patterns. The evaluation with the Weizmann dataset in recognition of a set of prototypical human movement patterns showed that the proposed model is significantly robust in recognizing dynamically occluded visual patterns compared to other baseline models. Furthermore, an evaluation test for the recognition of concatenated sequences of those prototypical movement patterns indicated that the model is endowed with a remarkable capability for the contextual recognition of long-range dynamic visual image patterns.

  18. DUSTER: dynamic contrast enhance up-sampled temporal resolution analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Gilad; Louzoun, Yoram; Artzi, Moran; Nadav, Guy; Ewing, James R; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI using Tofts' model for estimating vascular permeability is widely accepted, yet inter-tissue differences in bolus arrival time (BAT) are generally ignored. In this work we propose a method, incorporating the BAT in the analysis, demonstrating its applicability and advantages in healthy subjects and patients. A method for DCE Up Sampled TEmporal Resolution (DUSTER) analysis is proposed which includes: baseline T1 map using DESPOT1 analyzed with flip angle (FA) correction; preprocessing; raw-signal-to-T1-to-concentration time curves (CTC) conversion; automatic arterial input function (AIF) extraction at temporal super-resolution; model fitting with model selection while incorporating BAT in the pharmacokinetic (PK) model, and fits contrast agent CTC while using exhaustive search in the BAT dimension in super-resolution. The method was applied to simulated data and to human data from 17 healthy subjects, six patients with glioblastoma, and two patients following stroke. BAT values were compared to time-to-peak (TTP) values extracted from dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging. Results show that the method improved the AIF estimation and allowed extraction of the BAT with a resolution of 0.8 s. In simulations, lower mean relative errors were detected for all PK parameters extracted using DUSTER compared to analysis without BAT correction (vp:5% vs. 20%, Ktrans: 9% vs. 24% and Kep: 8% vs. 17%, respectively), and BAT estimates demonstrated high correlations (r = 0.94, p resolution (2 s) and sub-sampled standard resolution data (6 s) (mean r = 0.85,p < 1e− 10). BAT and TTP values were significantly correlated in the different brain regions in healthy subjects (mean r = 0.72,p = < 1e− 3), as were voxel-wise comparisons in patients (mean r = 0.89, p < 1e− 10). In conclusion, incorporating BAT in DCE analysis improves estimation accuracy for the AIF and the PK parameters while providing an additional clinically important parameter.

  19. SPATIAL-TEMPORAL DYNAMICS OF REGIONAL CONVERGENCE AT COUNTY LEVEL IN JIANGSU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Ying-xia; MA Rong-hua; GE Ying; HUANG Xing-yuan

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of regional convergence include spatial and temporal dimensions. Spatial Markov chain can be used to explore how regions evolve by considering both individual regions and their geographic neighbors.Based on per capita GDP data set of 77 counties from 1978 to 2000, this paper attempts to investigate the spatial-temporal dynamics of regional convergence in Jiangsu. First, traditional Markov matrix for five per capita GDP classes is constructed for later comparison. Moreover, each region's spatial lag is derived by averaging all its neighbors' per capita GDP data. Conditioning on per capita GDP class of its spatial lag at the beginning of each year, spatial Markov transition probabilities of each region are calculated accordingly. Quantitatively, for a poor region, the probability of moving upward is 3.3% ifit is surrounded by its poor neighbors, and even increases to 18.4% ifit is surrounded by its rich neighbors, but it goes down to 6.2% on average if ignoring regional context. For a rich region, the probability of moving down ward is 1.2% if it is surrounded by its rich neighbors, but increases to 3.0% if it is surrounded by its poor neighbors, and averages 1.5% irrespective of regional context. Spatial analysis of regional GDP class transitions indicates those 10 upward moves of both regions and their neighbors are unexceptionally located in the southern Jiangsu,while downward moves of regions or their neighbors are almost in the northern Jiangsu. These empirical results provide a spatial explanation to the "convergence clubs" detected by traditional Markov chain.

  20. Temporal dynamics of abundance and composition of nitrogen-fixing communities across agricultural soils.

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    Michele C Pereira E Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the fact that the fixation of nitrogen is one of the most significant nutrient processes in the terrestrial ecosystem, a thorough study of the spatial and temporal patterns in the abundance and distribution of N-fixing communities has been missing so far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to understand the dynamics of diazotrophic communities and their resilience to external changes, we quantified the abundance and characterized the bacterial community structures based on the nifH gene, using real-time PCR, PCR-DGGE and 454-pyrosequencing, across four representative Dutch soils during one growing season. In general, higher nifH gene copy numbers were observed in soils with higher pH than in those with lower pH, but lower numbers were related to increased nitrate and ammonium levels. Results from nifH gene pyrosequencing confirmed the observed PCR-DGGE patterns, which indicated that the N fixers are highly dynamic across time, shifting around 60%. Forward selection on CCA analysis identified N availability as the main driver of these variations, as well as of the evenness of the communities, leading to very unequal communities. Moreover, deep sequencing of the nifH gene revealed that sandy soils (B and D had the lowest percentage of shared OTUs across time, compared with clayey soils (G and K, indicating the presence of a community under constant change. Cosmopolitan nifH species (present throughout the season were affiliated with Bradyrhizobium, Azospirillum and Methylocistis, whereas other species increased their abundances progressively over time, when appropriate conditions were met, as was notably the case for Paenibacilus and Burkholderia. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides the first in-depth pyrosequencing analysis of the N-fixing community at both spatial and temporal scales, providing insights into the cosmopolitan and specific portions of the nitrogen fixing bacterial communities in soil.

  1. Altered fMRI connectivity dynamics in temporal lobe epilepsy might explain seizure semiology

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    Helmut eLaufs

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE can be conceptualized as a network disease. The network can be characterized by inter-regional functional connectivity, i.e. blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal correlations between any two region pairs. However, functional connectivity is not constant over time, thus computing correlation at a given time and then at some later time could give different results (non-stationarity. We hypothesized (1 that non-stationarities can be induced by epilepsy (e.g. interictal epileptic activity increasing local signal variance and that (2 these transient events contribute to fluctuations in connectivity leading to pathological functioning, i.e. TLE semiology. We analyzed fMRI data from 27 patients with TLE and 22 healthy controls focusing on EEG-confirmed wake epochs only to protect against sleep-induced connectivity changes. Testing hypothesis (1, we identified brain regions where the BOLD signal variance was significantly greater in TLE than in controls: the temporal pole - including the hippocampus. Taking the latter as the seed region and testing hypothesis (2 we calculated the time-varying interregional correlation values (dynamic functional connectivity to other brain regions and found greater connectivity variance in the TLE than the control group mainly in the precuneus, the supplementary and sensori-motor and the frontal cortices.We conclude that the highest BOLD signal variance in the hippocampi is highly suggestive of a specific epilepsy-related effect. The altered connectivity dynamics in TLE patients might help to explain the hallmark semiological features of dyscognitive seizures including impaired consciousness (precuneus, frontal cortex, sensory disturbance and motor automatisms (sensorimotor cortices, supplementary motor cortex. Accounting for the non-stationarity and state-dependence of functional connectivity are a prerequisite in the search for potential connectivity-derived biomarkers in TLE.

  2. Spatial and temporal dynamics of root exudation: how important is heterogeneity in allelopathic interactions?

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    Weidenhamer, Jeffrey D; Mohney, Brian K; Shihada, Nader; Rupasinghe, Maduka

    2014-08-01

    Understanding allelopathy has been hindered by the lack of methods available to monitor the dynamics of allelochemicals in the soil. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microtubing (silicone tubing microextraction, or STME) to construct sampling devices to monitor the release of lipophilic allelochemicals from plant roots. The objective of this study was to use such sampling devices to intensively monitor thiophene fluxes beneath marigolds over several weeks to gain insight into the magnitude of temporal and spatial heterogeneity in these fluxes. Marigolds were grown in rhizoboxes (20.5 x 20.5 x 3.0 cm) with 16 individual STME samplers per box. Thiophene sampling and HPLC analysis began 45 days after planting. At the end of the study, roots around each sampler were analyzed by HPLC. Results confirmed the tremendous spatial and temporal heterogeneity in thiophene production seen in our previous studies. STME probes show that thiophene concentrations generally increase over time; however, these effects were sampling-port specific. When sampling ports were monitored at 12 h intervals, fluxes at each port ranged from 0 to 2,510 ng day(-1). Fluxes measured over daylight hr averaged 29 % higher than those measured overnight. Fluxes were less than 1 % on average of the total thiophene content of surrounding roots. While the importance of such heterogeneity, or "patchiness", in the root zone has been recognized for soil nutrients, the potential importance in allelopathic interactions has seldom been considered. The reasons for this variability are unclear, but are being investigated. Our results demonstrate that STME can be used as a tool to provide a more finely-resolved picture of allelochemical dynamics in the root zone than has previously been available.

  3. Kindling-Induced Changes in Plasticity of the Rat Amygdala and Hippocampus

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    Schubert, Manja; Siegmund, Herbert; Pape, Hans-Christian; Albrecht, Doris

    2005-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is often accompanied by interictal behavioral abnormalities, such as fear and memory impairment. To identify possible underlying substrates, we analyzed long-term synaptic plasticity in two relevant brain regions, the lateral amygdala (LA) and the CA1 region of the hippocampus, in the kindling model of epilepsy. Wistar…

  4. The Temporal Dynamics of Coastal Phytoplankton and Bacterioplankton in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

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    Ofrat Raveh

    Full Text Available This study considers variability in phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterial abundances and production rates, in one of the most oligotrophic marine regions in the world-the Levantine Basin. The temporal dynamics of these planktonic groups were studied in the coastal waters of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea approximately every two weeks for a total of two years. Heterotrophic bacteria were abundant mostly during late summer and midwinter, and were positively correlated with bacterial production and with N2 fixation. Based on size fractionating, picophytoplankton was abundant during the summer, whereas nano-microphytoplankton predominated during the winter and early spring, which were also evident in the size-fractionated primary production rates. Autotrophic abundance and production correlated negatively with temperature, but did not correlate with inorganic nutrients. Furthermore, a comparison of our results with results from the open Levantine Basin demonstrates that autotrophic and heterotrophic production, as well as N2 fixation rates, are considerably higher in the coastal habitat than in the open sea, while nutrient levels or cell abundance are not different. These findings have important ecological implications for food web dynamics and for biological carbon sequestration in this understudied region.

  5. Effect of node attributes on the temporal dynamics of network structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Naghmeh; Fotouhi, Babak

    2017-03-01

    Many natural and social networks evolve in time and their structures are dynamic. In most networks, nodes are heterogeneous, and their roles in the evolution of structure differ. This paper focuses on the role of individual attributes on the temporal dynamics of network structure. We focus on a basic model for growing networks that incorporates node attributes (which we call "quality"), and we focus on the problem of forecasting the structural properties of the network in arbitrary times for an arbitrary initial network. That is, we address the following question: If we are given a certain initial network with given arbitrary structure and known node attributes, then how does the structure change in time as new nodes with given distribution of attributes join the network? We solve the model analytically and obtain the quality-degree joint distribution and degree correlations. We characterize the role of individual attributes in the position of individual nodes in the hierarchy of connections. We confirm the theoretical findings with Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Spatio-temporal dynamics of sources of hard X-ray pulsations in solar flares

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    Kuznetsov, S A; Morgachev, A S; Struminsky, A B

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic analysis of spatio-temporal evolution of sources of hard X-ray (HXR) pulsations in solar flares. We concentrate on disk flares whose impulsive phase are accompanied by a series of more than three peaks (pulsations) of HXR emission detected in the RHESSI 50-100 keV channel with 4-second cadence. 29 such flares observed from February 2002 to June 2015 with time differences between successive peaks of 8-270 s are studied. The main observational result is that sources of HXR pulsations in all flares are not stationary, they demonstrate apparent displacements from pulsation to pulsation. The flares can be subdivided into two groups depending on character of dynamics of HXR sources. The group-1 consists of 16 flares (55%) with systematic dynamics of HXR sources from pulsation to pulsation with respect to a magnetic polarity inversion line (MPIL), which has simple extended trace on the photosphere. The group-2 consists of 13 flares (45%) with more chaotic displacements of HXR sources with respe...

  7. Temporal dynamics of deep-sea latitudinal species diversity gradient based on paleoceanographic/micropaleontologic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, M.; Hunt, G.; Okahashi, H.

    2009-12-01

    Macroecology investigates large-scale ecological phenomena, such as regional-global trends in ecosystem properties and biodiversity, and is used to better understand recent human-induced ecosystem degradation. Paleoceanography investigates physical/chemical parameters, biogeochemical cycles, ocean circulation, and ocean-atmosphere interaction, but rarely includes ecosystem-scale biological processes. Here we adopt a macroecological approach to paleoceanography and present sediment core records of the temporal dynamics of deep-sea species diversity gradients using ostracodes from the equatorial Atlantic Ocean for the past four glacial-interglacial cycles. Results show unexpected instability and high amplitude fluctuations in species diversity in the tropical deep ocean. The results imply that the modern deep-sea latitudinal species diversity gradient is unexpectedly dynamic over short time intervals and collapsed during glacial periods. Unstable tropical diversity requires reconsideration of current ecological hypotheses about the generation and maintenance of biodiversity as they apply to the deep sea, and underscores the potential vulnerability and conservation importance of tropical deep-sea ecosystems.

  8. Temporal dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of microalgal biomass in recently reclaimed intertidal flats of the Saemangeum area, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Bong-Oh; Lee, Yeonjung; Park, Jinsoon; Ryu, Jongseong; Hong, Seongjin; Son, SeungHyun; Lee, Shing Yip; Nam, Jungho; Koh, Chul-Hwan; Khim, Jong Seong

    2016-10-01

    Trophodynamics of intertidal mudflats are significantly driven by microphytobenthos (MPB) production but spatial and temporal dynamics of this production source is poorly known. To understand the temporal dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of intertidal MPB, benthic chlorophyll a, phaeopigments, and sediment properties were determined in Gyehwa (sandy) and Gwanghwal (muddy) tidal flats of Saemangeum area over a year at 97 stations. This study set out to: (i) characterize the spatial-temporal patterns in MPB biomass on a year-round basis, (ii) identify the abiotic and biotic factors associated with MPB distributions, (iii) investigate the use of satellite-derived chlorophyll a data and verify with in field measurements, and (iv) determine minimum required sample size for in situ biomass measurement. Concentrations of benthic chlorophyll a and phaeopigments were greater in winter and spring with a high magnitude of variance than in summer and fall at both areas. Benthic chlorophyll a and phaeopigments tended to decrease approaching lower tidal zone, being associated with the corresponding decrease in shore level and/or exposure duration. Compared to available data on macrozoobenthos distribution, the spatial variation of microalgal biomass seems to be attributed to distribution of deposit-feeders. A significant positive correlation (p design for spatio-temporal mapping of MPB should consider the sampling season and/or abiotic and biotic features of study area. Overall, spatio-temporal dynamics of intertidal MPB seem to be influenced by a combination of abiotic and biotic factors.

  9. Cortico-amygdala-striatal circuits are organized as hierarchical subsystems through the primate amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngsun T; Ernst, Monique; Fudge, Julie L

    2013-08-28

    The prefrontal and insula cortex, amygdala, and striatum are key regions for emotional processing, yet the amygdala's role as an interface between the cortex and striatum is not well understood. In the nonhuman primate (Macaque fascicularis), we analyzed a collection of bidirectional tracer injections in the amygdala to understand how cortical inputs and striatal outputs are organized to form integrated cortico-amygdala-striatal circuits. Overall, diverse prefrontal and insular cortical regions projected to the basal and accessory basal nuclei of the amygdala. In turn, these amygdala regions projected to widespread striatal domains extending well beyond the classic ventral striatum. Analysis of the cases in aggregate revealed a topographic colocalization of cortical inputs and striatal outputs in the amygdala that was additionally distinguished by cortical cytoarchitecture. Specifically, the degree of cortical laminar differentiation of the cortical inputs predicted amygdalostriatal targets, and distinguished three main cortico-amygdala-striatal circuits. These three circuits were categorized as "primitive," "intermediate," and "developed," respectively, to emphasize the relative phylogenetic and ontogenetic features of the cortical inputs. Within the amygdala, these circuits appeared arranged in a pyramidal-like fashion, with the primitive circuit found in all examined subregions, and subsequent circuits hierarchically layered in discrete amygdala subregions. This arrangement suggests a stepwise integration of the functions of these circuits across amygdala subregions, providing a potential mechanism through which internal emotional states are managed with external social and sensory information toward emotionally informed complex behaviors.

  10. What can flux tracking teach us about water age distributions and their temporal dynamics?

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    M. Hrachowitz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The complex interactions of runoff generation processes underlying the hydrological response of streams remain incompletely understood at the catchment scale. Extensive research has demonstrated the utility of tracers for both inferring flow paths distributions and constraining model parameterizations. While useful, the common use of linearity assumptions, i.e. time-invariance and complete mixing, in these studies provides only partial understanding of actual process dynamics. Here we use long term (< 20 yr precipitation, flow and tracer (chloride data of three contrasting upland catchments in the Scottish Highlands to inform integrated conceptual models investigating different mixing assumptions. Using the models as diagnostic tools in a functional comparison, water and tracer fluxes were tracked with the objective of characterizing water age distributions in the three catchments and establishing the wetness-dependent temporal dynamics of these distributions.

    The results highlight the potential importance of partial mixing which is dependent on the hydrological functioning of a catchment. Further, tracking tracer fluxes showed that the various components of a model can be characterized by fundamentally different water age distributions which may be highly sensitive to catchment wetness, available storage, mixing mechanisms, flow path connectivity and the relative importance of the different hydrological processes involved. Flux tracking also revealed that, although negligible for simulating the runoff response, the omission of processes such as interception evaporation can result in considerably biased water age distributions. Finally, the modeling indicated that water age distributions in the three study catchments do have long, power-law tails, which are generated by the interplay of flow path connectivity, the relative importance of different flow paths as well as by the mixing mechanisms involved. In general this study highlights

  11. Temporal dynamics and decay of putatively allochthonous and autochthonous viral genotypes in contrasting freshwater lakes.

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    Hewson, Ian; Barbosa, Jorge G; Brown, Julia M; Donelan, Ryan P; Eaglesham, James B; Eggleston, Erin M; LaBarre, Brenna A

    2012-09-01

    Aquatic viruses play important roles in the biogeochemistry and ecology of lacustrine ecosystems; however, their composition, dynamics, and interactions with viruses of terrestrial origin are less extensively studied. We used a viral shotgun metagenomic approach to elucidate candidate autochthonous (i.e., produced within the lake) and allochthonous (i.e., washed in from other habitats) viral genotypes for a comparative study of their dynamics in lake waters. Based on shotgun metagenomes prepared from catchment soil and freshwater samples from two contrasting lakes (Cayuga Lake and Fayetteville Green Lake), we selected two putatively autochthonous viral genotypes (phycodnaviruses likely infecting algae and cyanomyoviruses likely infecting picocyanobacteria) and two putatively allochthonous viral genotypes (geminiviruses likely infecting terrestrial plants and circoviruses infecting unknown hosts but common in soil libraries) for analysis by genotype-specific quantitative PCR (TaqMan) applied to DNAs from viruses in the viral size fraction of lake plankton, i.e., 0.2 μm > virus > 0.02 μm. The abundance of autochthonous genotypes largely reflected expected host abundance, while the abundance of allochthonous genotypes corresponded with rainfall and storm events in the respective catchments, suggesting that viruses with these genotypes may have been transported to the lake in runoff. The decay rates of allochthonous and autochthonous genotypes, assessed in incubations where all potential hosts were killed, were generally lower (0.13 to 1.50% h(-1)) than those reported for marine virioplankton but similar to those for freshwater virioplankton. Both allochthonous and autochthonous viral genotypes were detected at higher concentrations in subsurface sediments than at the water-sediment interface. Our data indicate that putatively allochthonous viruses are present in lake plankton and sediments, where their temporal dynamics reflect active transport to the lake during

  12. Exploring the isotopic niche: isotopic variance, physiological incorporation, and the temporal dynamics of foraging

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    Justin Douglas Yeakel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumer foraging behaviors are dynamic, changing in response to prey availability, seasonality, competition, and even the consumer's physiological state. The isotopic composition of a consumer is a product of these factors as well as the isotopic `landscape' of its prey, i.e. the isotopic mixing space. Stable isotope mixing models are used to back-calculate the most likely proportional contribution of a set of prey to a consumer's diet based on their respective isotopic distributions, however they are disconnected from ecological process. Here we build a mechanistic framework that links the ecological and physiological processes of an individual consumer to the isotopic distribution that describes its diet, and ultimately to the isotopic composition of its own tissues, defined as its `isotopic niche’. By coupling these processes, we systematically investigate under what conditions the isotopic niche of a consumer changes as a function of both the geometric properties of its mixing space and foraging strategies that may be static or dynamic over time. Results of our derivations reveal general insight into the conditions impacting isotopic niche width as a function of consumer specialization on prey, as well as the consumer's ability to transition between diets over time. We show analytically that moderate specialization on isotopically unique prey can serve to maximize a consumer's isotopic niche width, while temporally dynamic diets will tend to result in peak isotopic variance during dietary transitions. We demonstrate the relevance of our theoretical findings by examining a marine system composed of nine invertebrate species commonly consumed by sea otters. In general, our analytical framework highlights the complex interplay of mixing space geometry and consumer dietary behavior in driving expansion and contraction of the isotopic niche. Because this approach is established on ecological mechanism, it is well-suited for enhancing the

  13. Physical Exercise Leads to Rapid Adaptations in Hippocampal Vasculature : Temporal Dynamics and Relationship to Cell Proliferation and Neurogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Borght, Karin; Kobor-Nyakas, Dora E.; Klauke, Karin; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Nyakas, Csaba; Van der Zee, Eddy A.; Meerlo, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Increased levels of angiogenesis and neurogenesis possibly mediate the beneficial effects of physical activity on hippocampal plasticity. This study was designed to investigate the temporal dynamics of exercise-induced changes in hippocampal angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Mice were housed with

  14. Effects of temporal modeling on the statistical uncertainty of spatiotemporal distributions estimated directly from dynamic SPECT projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2001-04-30

    Artifacts can result when reconstructing a dynamic image sequence from inconsistent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) projections acquired by a slowly rotating gantry. The artifacts can lead to biases in kinetic parameters estimated from time-activity curves generated by overlaying volumes of interest on the images. To overcome these biases in conventional image based dynamic data analysis, we have been investigating the estimation of time-activity curves and kinetic model parameters directly from dynamic SPECT projection data by modeling the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiopharmaceutical throughout the projected field of view. In previous work we developed computationally efficient methods for fully four-dimensional (4-D) direct estimation of spatiotemporal distributions [1] and their statistical uncertainties [2] from dynamic SPECT projection data, using a spatial segmentation and temporal B-splines. In addition, we studied the bias that results from modeling various orders of temporal continuity and using various time samplings [1]. In the present work, we use the methods developed in [1, 2] and Monte Carlo simulations to study the effects of the temporal modeling on the statistical variability of the reconstructed distributions.

  15. Temporal dynamics of visual attention measured with event-related potentials.

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    Yoshiyuki Kashiwase

    Full Text Available How attentional modulation on brain activities determines behavioral performance has been one of the most important issues in cognitive neuroscience. This issue has been addressed by comparing the temporal relationship between attentional modulations on neural activities and behavior. Our previous study measured the time course of attention with amplitude and phase coherence of steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP and found that the modulation latency of phase coherence rather than that of amplitude was consistent with the latency of behavioral performance. In this study, as a complementary report, we compared the time course of visual attention shift measured by event-related potentials (ERPs with that by target detection task. We developed a novel technique to compare ERPs with behavioral results and analyzed the EEG data in our previous study. Two sets of flickering stimulus at different frequencies were presented in the left and right visual hemifields, and a target or distracter pattern was presented randomly at various moments after an attention-cue presentation. The observers were asked to detect targets on the attended stimulus after the cue. We found that two ERP components, P300 and N2pc, were elicited by the target presented at the attended location. Time-course analyses revealed that attentional modulation of the P300 and N2pc amplitudes increased gradually until reaching a maximum and lasted at least 1.5 s after the cue onset, which is similar to the temporal dynamics of behavioral performance. However, attentional modulation of these ERP components started later than that of behavioral performance. Rather, the time course of attentional modulation of behavioral performance was more closely associated with that of the concurrently recorded SSVEPs analyzed. These results suggest that neural activities reflected not by either the P300 or N2pc, but by the SSVEPs, are the source of attentional modulation of behavioral performance.

  16. Temporal analysis of genetic structure to assess population dynamics of reintroduced swift foxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullingham, Catherine I; Moehrenschlager, Axel

    2013-12-01

    Reintroductions are increasingly used to reestablish species, but a paucity of long-term postrelease monitoring has limited understanding of whether and when viable populations subsequently persist. We conducted temporal genetic analyses of reintroduced populations of swift foxes (Vulpes velox) in Canada (Alberta and Saskatchewan) and the United States (Montana). We used samples collected 4 years apart, 17 years from the initiation of the reintroduction, and 3 years after the conclusion of releases. To assess program success, we genotyped 304 hair samples, subsampled from the known range in 2000 and 2001, and 2005 and 2006, at 7 microsatellite loci. We compared diversity, effective population size, and genetic connectivity over time in each population. Diversity remained stable over time and there was evidence of increasing effective population size. We determined population structure in both periods after correcting for differences in sample sizes. The geographic distribution of these populations roughly corresponded with the original release locations, which suggests the release sites had residual effects on the population structure. However, given that both reintroduction sites had similar source populations, habitat fragmentation, due to cropland, may be associated with the population structure we found. Although our results indicate growing, stable populations, future connectivity analyses are warranted to ensure both populations are not subject to negative small-population effects. Our results demonstrate the importance of multiple sampling years to fully capture population dynamics of reintroduced populations. Análisis Temporal de la Estructura Genética para Evaluar la Dinámica Poblacional de Zorros (Vulpes velox) Reintroducidos.

  17. Using the relational event model (REM) to investigate the temporal dynamics of animal social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranmer, Mark; Marcum, Christopher Steven; Morton, F Blake; Croft, Darren P; de Kort, Selvino R

    2015-03-01

    Social dynamics are of fundamental importance in animal societies. Studies on nonhuman animal social systems often aggregate social interaction event data into a single network within a particular time frame. Analysis of the resulting network can provide a useful insight into the overall extent of interaction. However, through aggregation, information is lost about the order in which interactions occurred, and hence the sequences of actions over time. Many research hypotheses relate directly to the sequence of actions, such as the recency or rate of action, rather than to their overall volume or presence. Here, we demonstrate how the temporal structure of social interaction sequences can be quantified from disaggregated event data using the relational event model (REM). We first outline the REM, explaining why it is different from other models for longitudinal data, and how it can be used to model sequences of events unfolding in a network. We then discuss a case study on the European jackdaw, Corvus monedula, in which temporal patterns of persistence and reciprocity of action are of interest, and present and discuss the results of a REM analysis of these data. One of the strengths of a REM analysis is its ability to take into account different ways in which data are collected. Having explained how to take into account the way in which the data were collected for the jackdaw study, we briefly discuss the application of the model to other studies. We provide details of how the models may be fitted in the R statistical software environment and outline some recent extensions to the REM framework.

  18. Detecting Temporal Change in Dynamic Sounds: On the Role of Stimulus Duration, Speed, and Emotion

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    Annett eSchirmer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For dynamic sounds, such as vocal expressions, duration often varies alongside speed. Compared to longer sounds, shorter sounds unfold more quickly. Here, we asked whether listeners implicitly use this confound when representing temporal regularities in their environment. In addition, we explored the role of emotions in this process. Using a mismatch negativity (MMN paradigm, we asked participants to watch a silent movie while passively listening to a stream of task-irrelevant sounds. In Experiment 1, one surprised and one neutral vocalization were compressed and stretched to create stimuli of 378 and 600 ms duration. Stimuli were presented in four blocks, two of which used surprised and two of which used neutral expressions. In one surprised and one neutral block, short and long stimuli served as standards and deviants, respectively. In the other two blocks, the assignment of standards and deviants was reversed. We observed a climbing MMN-like negativity shortly after deviant onset, which suggests that listeners implicitly track sound speed and detect speed changes. Additionally, this MMN-like effect emerged earlier and was larger for long than short deviants, suggesting greater sensitivity to duration increments or slowing down than to decrements or speeding up. Last, deviance detection was facilitated in surprised relative to neutral blocks, indicating that emotion enhances temporal processing. Experiment 2 was comparable to Experiment 1 with the exception that sounds were spectrally rotated to remove vocal emotional content. This abolished the emotional processing benefit, but preserved the other effects. Together, these results provide insights into listener sensitivity to sound speed and raise the possibility that speed biases duration judgments implicitly in a feed-forward manner. Moreover, this bias may be amplified for duration increments relative to decrements and within an emotional relative to a neutral stimulus context.

  19. Spatial-temporal feeding dynamics of benthic communities in an estuary-marine gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Emily S.; Kasai, Akihide; Ueno, Masahiro; Ishihi, Yuka; Yokoyama, Hisashi; Yamashita, Yoh

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the fluctuations of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in benthic consumers and their potential food sources to determine the spatial and temporal variations in the utilization of available organic matter, indicating the origin and pathways of energy from Yura Estuary to Tango Sea, Japan. Field samplings were conducted from the upper estuary to offshore with sampling frequency of twice per season from April (spring) 2006 to February (winter) 2007. The δ13C signatures of the upper and lower estuary benthos showed depleted and in wide range (-28.9‰ to -13.5‰) compared to the enriched and within narrow range signatures of marine benthos (-20.6‰ to -14.0‰) in all seasons. On the contrary, the δ15N signatures of benthic communities showed decreasing trend seaward and summer values were different from the other seasons. Using the dual isotope and multisource mixing models, we estimated the relative contributions of potential food sources to the benthos diet. River POM played an important source of energy for the estuarine benthos, especially in winter when river discharge was high. Marine POM served as an important alternative food for the estuarine benthos from spring to autumn when seawater intruded the bottom estuary. Benthic microalgae were the major food source at the shallow coast throughout the year, while marine POM fueled the deep coast and offshore benthic food webs. Spatial and temporal feeding variations in estuarine benthic communities were driven by the hydrology of the estuary, whereas primary production and transport of food source dictated diet variations of marine benthic communities. The elucidation of the dynamic energy subsidy among aquatic systems highlights the importance of the land-sea transition zones that is crucial for benthic secondary productions.

  20. Dynamic temporal change of cerebral microbleeds: long-term follow-up MRI study.

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    Seung-Hoon Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral microbleeds (MBs are understood as an important radiologic marker of intracerebral hemorrhage. We sought to investigate the temporal changes of MBs and clinical factors associated with the changes using long-term follow-up MRI. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From October 2002 to July 2006, we prospectively enrolled patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack, and followed-up their brain MRIs with an interval >12 mo. We compared demographic factors, vascular risk factors, laboratory findings, and radiologic factors according to the presence or changes of MBs. A total of 224 patients successfully completed the follow-up examinations (mean, 27 months. Newly developed MBs were noted in 10 patients (6.8% among those without MBs at baseline (n = 148, and in those with MBs at baseline (n = 76, the MB count had decreased in 11 patients (14.5%, and increased in 41 patients (53.9%. The estimated annual rate of change of MB numbers was 0.80 lesions per year in all patients, a value which became greater in those patients who exhibited MBs at baseline (MBs≥5, 5.43 lesions per year. Strokes due to small vessel occlusion and intracerebral hemorrhage, as well as white matter lesions were independently associated with an increased MB count, whereas the highest quartile of low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol was associated with a decreased MB count. CONCLUSION: During the follow-up period, most of MBs showed dynamic temporal change. Symptomatic or asymptomatic small vessel diseases appear to act as risk factors while in contrast, a high level of LDL cholesterol may act as a protective factor against MB increase.

  1. Dynamic temporal signal processing in the inferior colliculus of echolocating bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Philip H.-S.; Wu, Chung Hsin; Wang, Xin

    2012-01-01

    In nature, communication sounds among animal species including humans are typical complex sounds that occur in sequence and vary with time in several parameters including amplitude, frequency, duration as well as separation, and order of individual sounds. Among these multiple parameters, sound duration is a simple but important one that contributes to the distinct spectral and temporal attributes of individual biological sounds. Likewise, the separation of individual sounds is an important temporal attribute that determines an animal's ability in distinguishing individual sounds. Whereas duration selectivity of auditory neurons underlies an animal's ability in recognition of sound duration, the recovery cycle of auditory neurons determines a neuron's ability in responding to closely spaced sound pulses and therefore, it underlies the animal's ability in analyzing the order of individual sounds. Since the multiple parameters of naturally occurring communication sounds vary with time, the analysis of a specific sound parameter by an animal would be inevitably affected by other co-varying sound parameters. This is particularly obvious in insectivorous bats, which rely on analysis of returning echoes for prey capture when they systematically vary the multiple pulse parameters throughout a target approach sequence. In this review article, we present our studies of dynamic variation of duration selectivity and recovery cycle of neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the frequency-modulated bats to highlight the dynamic temporal signal processing of central auditory neurons. These studies use single pulses and three biologically relevant pulse-echo (P-E) pairs with varied duration, gap, and amplitude difference similar to that occurring during search, approach, and terminal phases of hunting by bats. These studies show that most collicular neurons respond maximally to a best tuned sound duration (BD). The sound duration to which these neurons are

  2. Framing effect following bilateral amygdala lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Deborah; Hurlemann, René; Patin, Alexandra; Dolan, Raymond J

    2010-05-01

    A paradigmatic example of an emotional bias in decision making is the framing effect, where the manner in which a choice is posed--as a potential loss or a potential gain--systematically biases an ensuing decision. Two fMRI studies have shown that the activation in the amygdala is modulated by the framing effect. Here, contrary to an expectation based on these studies, we show that two patients with Urbach-Wiethe (UW) disease, a rare condition associated with congenital, complete bilateral amygdala degeneration, exhibit an intact framing effect. However, choice preference in these patients did show a qualitatively distinct pattern compared to controls evident in an increased propensity to gamble, indicating that loss of amygdala function does exert an overall influence on risk-taking. These findings suggest either that amygdala does contribute to decision making but does not play a causal role in framing, or that UW is not a pure lesion model of amygdala function.

  3. Altered effective connectivity network of the amygdala in social anxiety disorder: a resting-state FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liao

    Full Text Available The amygdala is often found to be abnormally recruited in social anxiety disorder (SAD patients. The question whether amygdala activation is primarily abnormal and affects other brain systems or whether it responds "normally" to an abnormal pattern of information conveyed by other brain structures remained unanswered. To address this question, we investigated a network of effective connectivity associated with the amygdala using Granger causality analysis on resting-state functional MRI data of 22 SAD patients and 21 healthy controls (HC. Implications of abnormal effective connectivity and clinical severity were investigated using the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS. Decreased influence from inferior temporal gyrus (ITG to amygdala was found in SAD, while bidirectional influences between amygdala and visual cortices were increased compared to HCs. Clinical relevance of decreased effective connectivity from ITG to amygdala was suggested by a negative correlation of LSAS avoidance scores and the value of Granger causality. Our study is the first to reveal a network of abnormal effective connectivity of core structures in SAD. This is in support of a disregulation in predescribed modules involved in affect control. The amygdala is placed in a central position of dysfunction characterized both by decreased regulatory influence of orbitofrontal cortex and increased crosstalk with visual cortex. The model which is proposed based on our results lends neurobiological support towards cognitive models considering disinhibition and an attentional bias towards negative stimuli as a core feature of the disorder.

  4. Temporal dominance of emotions: Measuring dynamics of food-related emotions during consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, G.; Schlich, P.; Tijssen, I.O.J.M.; Yao, Y.J.; Visalli, M.; Graaf, de C.; Stieger, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Mapping food-evoked emotions in addition to sensory profiling is topical. In sensory profiling, the Temporal Dominance of Sensation (TDS) method focuses on the assessment of the temporal evolution of dominant sensory attributes over time. We hypothesize that food-evoked emotions also show temporal d

  5. The effect of STDP temporal kernel structure on the learning dynamics of single excitatory and inhibitory synapses.

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    Yotam Luz

    Full Text Available Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP is characterized by a wide range of temporal kernels. However, much of the theoretical work has focused on a specific kernel - the "temporally asymmetric Hebbian" learning rules. Previous studies linked excitatory STDP to positive feedback that can account for the emergence of response selectivity. Inhibitory plasticity was associated with negative feedback that can balance the excitatory and inhibitory inputs. Here we study the possible computational role of the temporal structure of the STDP. We represent the STDP as a superposition of two processes: potentiation and depression. This allows us to model a wide range of experimentally observed STDP kernels, from Hebbian to anti-Hebbian, by varying a single parameter. We investigate STDP dynamics of a single excitatory or inhibitory synapse in purely feed-forward architecture. We derive a mean-field-Fokker-Planck dynamics for the synaptic weight and analyze the effect of STDP structure on the fixed points of the mean field dynamics. We find a phase transition along the Hebbian to anti-Hebbian parameter from a phase that is characterized by a unimodal distribution of the synaptic weight, in which the STDP dynamics is governed by negative feedback, to a phase with positive feedback characterized by a bimodal distribution. The critical point of this transition depends on general properties of the STDP dynamics and not on the fine details. Namely, the dynamics is affected by the pre-post correlations only via a single number that quantifies its overlap with the STDP kernel. We find that by manipulating the STDP temporal kernel, negative feedback can be induced in excitatory synapses and positive feedback in inhibitory. Moreover, there is an exact symmetry between inhibitory and excitatory plasticity, i.e., for every STDP rule of inhibitory synapse there exists an STDP rule for excitatory synapse, such that their dynamics is identical.

  6. Elaboration of a video processing platform to analyze the temporal dynamics of hydrothermal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, M.; Sarrazin, J.; Sarradin, P.; Mercier, G.

    2010-12-01

    Located on oceanic ridges, hydrothermal ecosystems are characterized by strong physicochemical gradients and the presence of a unique fauna, sustained by microbial chemosynthesis. Several studies have shown that the spatial distribution and composition of vent faunal assemblages were strongly correlated to geological, physical and chemical processes at different spatial and temporal scales, but almost no data are available on the temporal dynamics of these peculiar ecosystems. The objective of our research is to develop a video processing platform to automatically extract the biological, physical and geological data from video imagery in order to study the dynamics of the fauna and its habitat in hydrothermal ecosystems. The video data was acquired from the Tempo-mini module deployed at 100m depth in the Saanich inlet (BC, Canada) and connected to the VENUS cable observatory (http://www.venus.uvic.ca/). This submarine color video-camera acquired four months of video footage, representing 487944 images of typical benthic habitat. A first manual extraction of the data allowed us to identify the key data available on a small subset of the video sequences. The objective of the new processing tool is to automatically extract these key data on the whole dataset, using unsupervized or lightly supervized image processing technique adapted to the specificity of submarines images. Firstly, all the moving objects in the video frames were segmented and labelled, allowing us to use statistical methods to process very large datasets. Secondly, computer vision techniques were used in order to get metric and 3D information from the images. For example, the speed of the moving objects and the image surface area were computed. The method implies the calibration of the camera with a calibration target, i.e. computing the projective geometric properties of the camera and the scene. Lastly, the developed tools will be integrated in a user-friendly processing platform that will be used

  7. 识别负性表情时抑郁症患者杏仁核的磁源性影像动态变化%The dynamic characteristics of the magnetic source imaging of amygdala in major depressive disorder about recognizing dynamically negative expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩颖琳; 姚志剑; 江海腾; 卢青

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨识别负性动态表情时抑郁症患者杏仁核的动态变化及其功能偏侧化特点在抑郁症病理机制中的作用.方法:利用脑磁图检测14例抑郁症患者及14名年龄、性别、受教育年限近似匹配的健康对照者识别表情时的脑部反应.结果:与对照组相比,患者组双侧杏仁核在50~150 ms、100~200 ms、150~250 ms、300~400 ms、450~550 ms以及600~700 m8时间段过度激活(P<0.05);左侧杏仁在50~150 ms、100~200 ms、150~250 ms、300~400 ms以及750~850 m8 B~1h]段过度激活(P<0.05);右侧杏仁核在50~150 ms、100~200 ms、150~250 m8、250~350 ms、300~400 ms、450~550ms、550~650 ms、600~700 ms以及750~850 ms时间段过度激活(P<0.05);而且右侧杏仁核功能激活水平始终高于左侧杏仁核(P<0.05).结论:抑郁症患者情绪障碍发生可能与抑郁症患者杏仁核异常及杏仁核功能偏侧化协调异常有关.%Objective: To explore the dynamic features of the bilateral amygdala and their functional lateralization about recognizing dynamically negative expression using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and the paradigm of expressional experiment,further to examine its neurological pathogenesis. Method:14 depressed patients and 14 age-and education-matched healthy controls participated to recognize the expression during MEG scanning. Results:Compared with healthy controls,depressed patients showed abnormal overactivities in bilateral amygdala at the some time periods (50 ~ 150 ms, 100 ~200 ms, 150 ~ 250 ms,300 ~ 400 ms ,450 ~ 550 ms and 600 ~700 ms) ,in the left amygdala at (50 ~ 150 ms,100~200 ms,150 ~250 ms,300 ~400 ms and 750 ~850 ms) ,and in the right amygdala at (50~ 150 ms,100 ~200 ms,150 ~250 ms,250 ~350 ms,300 ~400 ms,450 ~550 ms,550 ~650 ms,600 ~700 ms and 750 ~850 ms) (all P<0.05). Conclusion:Abnormal activities and lateralization of amygdale may be associated with emotional

  8. Temporal soil organic carbon dynamics following land-use change for lignocellulosic bioenergy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Gary; Rowe, Rebecca; Sohi, Saran; Heal, Kate

    2014-05-01

    As the demand for renewable energy crops increases to assist in reducing anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, the projected future expansion in bioenergy crop production is expected to cause significant land-use change (LUC). It has been reported that lignocellulosic crops such as Miscanthus and willow short rotation coppice (SRC) have the potential to mitigate CO2 emissions through fossil fuel replacement and by soil organic carbon (SOC) accumulation following direct LUC. Many studies have been carried out with the purpose of measuring site-specific changes, however results are often mixed demonstrating both increasing and decreasing carbon (C) stocks over time. Such variation demonstrates the sensitivity of SOC to many factors such as climate, soil texture, previous land-use and initial SOC content. This study examined a chronosequence of ~100 Miscanthus and willow plantations established on arable and grassland across Britain to provide an improved understanding of general effects on temporal SOC dynamics during LUC. Soil was sampled at each site to a depth of 30 cm and SOC stocks assessed over a 14 year time period. For each of the 4 LUCs no significant differences were observed between measured C stocks after 14 years and expected baseline values for land under arable and grassland management. Evidence will be presented that shows in all cases a 0% change lies within the 95% confidence intervals indicating no true average increase or decrease can be reported for the first 14 years of establishment. Therefore we find no evidence to suggest a short term CO2 mitigation effect provided from SOC storage following the establishment of Miscanthus or willow on arable or grassland. However, longer term measurements are required to assess SOC dynamics beyond this initial period.

  9. The Ecuadorian Artisanal Fishery for Large Pelagics: Species Composition and Spatio-Temporal Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ortiz, Jimmy; Aires-da-Silva, Alexandre M; Lennert-Cody, Cleridy E; Maunder, Mark N

    2015-01-01

    The artisanal fisheries of Ecuador operate within one of the most dynamic and productive marine ecosystems of the world. This study investigates the catch composition of the Ecuadorian artisanal fishery for large pelagic fishes, including aspects of its spatio-temporal dynamics. The analyses of this study are based on the most extensive dataset available to date for this fishery: a total of 106,963 trip-landing inspection records collected at its five principal ports during 2008 ‒ 2012. Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries remove a substantial amount of biomass from the upper trophic-level predatory fish community of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. It is estimated that at least 135 thousand metric tons (mt) (about 15.5 million fish) were landed in the five principal ports during the study period. The great novelty of Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries is the "oceanic-artisanal" fleet component, which consists of mother-ship (nodriza) boats with their towed fiber-glass skiffs (fibras) operating with pelagic longlines. This fleet has fully expanded into oceanic waters as far offshore as 100°W, west of the Galapagos Archipelago. It is estimated that nodriza operations produce as much as 80% of the total catches of the artisanal fishery. The remainder is produced by independent fibras operating in inshore waters with pelagic longlines and/or surface gillnets. A multivariate regression tree analysis was used to investigate spatio-environmental effects on the nodriza fleet (n = 6,821 trips). The catch species composition of the nodriza fleet is strongly influenced by the northwesterly circulation of the Humboldt Current along the coast of Peru and its associated cold waters masses. The target species and longline gear-type used by nodrizas change seasonally with the incursion of cool waters (Coryphaena hippurus) dominates the catches. However, in warmer waters, the fishery changes to tuna-billfish-shark longline gear and the catch composition becomes much more diverse.

  10. How music alters a kiss: superior temporal gyrus controls fusiform-amygdalar effective connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrs, Corinna; Deserno, Lorenz; Bakels, Jan-Hendrik; Schlochtermeier, Lorna H; Kappelhoff, Hermann; Jacobs, Arthur M; Fritz, Thomas Hans; Koelsch, Stefan; Kuchinke, Lars

    2014-11-01

    While watching movies, the brain integrates the visual information and the musical soundtrack into a coherent percept. Multisensory integration can lead to emotion elicitation on which soundtrack valences may have a modulatory impact. Here, dynamic kissing scenes from romantic comedies were presented to 22 participants (13 females) during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. The kissing scenes were either accompanied by happy music, sad music or no music. Evidence from cross-modal studies motivated a predefined three-region network for multisensory integration of emotion, consisting of fusiform gyrus (FG), amygdala (AMY) and anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG). The interactions in this network were investigated using dynamic causal models of effective connectivity. This revealed bilinear modulations by happy and sad music with suppression effects on the connectivity from FG and AMY to aSTG. Non-linear dynamic causal modeling showed a suppressive gating effect of aSTG on fusiform-amygdalar connectivity. In conclusion, fusiform to amygdala coupling strength is modulated via feedback through aSTG as region for multisensory integration of emotional material. This mechanism was emotion-specific and more pronounced for sad music. Therefore, soundtrack valences may modulate emotion elicitation in movies by differentially changing preprocessed visual information to the amygdala.

  11. Phylogenetic and temporal dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF01_AE in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingrong Ye

    Full Text Available To explore the epidemic history of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in China, 408 fragments of gag gene sequences of CRF01_AE sampled in 2002-2010 were determined from different geographical regions and risk populations in China. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the CRF01_AE sequences can be grouped into four clusters, suggesting that at least four genetically independent CRF01_AE descendants are circulating in China, of which two were closely related to the isolates from Thailand and Vietnam. Cluster 1 has the most extensive distribution in China. In North China, cluster 1 and cluster 4 were mainly transmitted through homosexuality.The real substance of the recent HIV-1 epidemic in men who have sex with men(MSM of North China is a rapid spread of CRF01_AE, or rather two distinctive natives CRF01_AE.The time of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA of four CRF01_AE clusters ranged from the years 1990.9 to 2003.8 in different regions of China. This is the first phylogenetic and temporal dynamics study of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in China.

  12. Exploring Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Cellular Automata for Pattern Recognition in Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Gisele Helena Barboni; Machicao, Jeaneth; Bruno, Odemir Martinez

    2016-11-01

    Network science is an interdisciplinary field which provides an integrative approach for the study of complex systems. In recent years, network modeling has been used for the study of emergent phenomena in many real-world applications. Pattern recognition in networks has been drawing attention to the importance of network characterization, which may lead to understanding the topological properties that are related to the network model. In this paper, the Life-Like Network Automata (LLNA) method is introduced, which was designed for pattern recognition in networks. LLNA uses the network topology as a tessellation of Cellular Automata (CA), whose dynamics produces a spatio-temporal pattern used to extract the feature vector for network characterization. The method was evaluated using synthetic and real-world networks. In the latter, three pattern recognition applications were used: (i) identifying organisms from distinct domains of life through their metabolic networks, (ii) identifying online social networks and (iii) classifying stomata distribution patterns varying according to different lighting conditions. LLNA was compared to structural measurements and surpasses them in real-world applications, achieving improvement in the classification rate as high as 23%, 4% and 7% respectively. Therefore, the proposed method is a good choice for pattern recognition applications using networks and demonstrates potential for general applicability.

  13. Long-term spatio-temporal dynamics of the mosquito Aedes aegypti in temperate Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, S; De Majo, M S; Quiroga, L; Paez, M; Schweigmann, N

    2017-04-01

    Buenos Aires city is located near the southern limit of the distribution of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). This study aimed to assess long-term variations in the abundance of Ae. aegypti in Buenos Aires in relation to changes in climatic conditions. Ae. aegypti weekly oviposition activity was analyzed and compared through nine warm seasons from 1998 to 2014, with 200 ovitraps placed across the whole extension of the city. The temporal and spatial dynamics of abundances were compared among seasons, and their relation with climatic variables were analyzed. Results showed a trend to higher peak abundances, a higher number of infested sites, and longer duration of the oviposition season through subsequent years, consistent with a long-term colonization process. In contrast, thermal favorability and rainfall pattern did not show a consistent trend of changes. The long-term increase in abundance, and the recently documented expansion of Ae. aegypti to colder areas of Buenos Aires province suggest that local populations might be adapting to lower temperature conditions. The steadily increasing abundances may have implications on the risk of dengue transmission.

  14. Temporal dynamics of optical bistability and modulation instability in colloidal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Morteza A.; Ghafary, Bijan; Majles Ara, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles are attractive optical materials for their low threshold nonlinear response and thus all-optical, nondestructive features which are important in biomedical optics and optical processing. We develop a theoretical scheme based on numerical solution of Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation and nonideal gas model of nonlinearity to investigate temporal analysis of optical bistability (OB) and modulation instability in colloidal nanoparticles. Our scheme determines the dependence of a nanosuspension system dynamic state on characteristic/control parameters including external feedback depth, nanosuspension length, and the initial density of nanoparticles as well as the optical input power. We show that these parameters are intensely correlated. We also indicate that the nonlinear response of nanosuspension may be saturated over a threshold of input power, and thus an unexpected procedure of system evolution toward stability rather than transition to chaos will occur. Consequently, provided that internal feedback is present inside the nanosuspension controlling chaos will be attainable by simply adjusting the optical input power as the control parameter in contrast to the other chaos control methods which require external injection. Finally, we propose an approach which gives a measure of switching time to optimize OB. The optimum results are obtained for the lowest taken values of characteristic/control parameters.

  15. Temporal dynamics and determinants of whole brain tissue volume changes during recovery from alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazdzinski, Stefan; Durazzo, Timothy C; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2005-06-01

    Brain shrinkage and its partial reversibility with abstinence is a common neuroimaging finding in alcohol dependent individuals. We used an automated three-dimensional whole brain magnetic resonance imaging method (boundary shift integral) in 23 alcohol dependent individuals to measure the temporal dynamics of cerebral tissue and spinal fluid volume changes over a 12-month interval and to examine the major determinants of brain tissue change rates during abstinence and non-abstinence. We found more rapid brain tissue gain during the first month of sobriety than in the following months. The most rapid volume recovery was observed in abstinent individuals with the greatest baseline brain shrinkage and drinking severity. The rapid reversal of brain volume gains in non-abstinent individuals and tissue volume changes are modulated by duration of abstinence and non-abstinence periods, as well as recency of non-abstinence. Age, family history density of alcoholism, relapse severity, and duration or age of onset of heavy drinking were not major determinants of brain shrinkage and brain volume recovery rates. Treatment providers may use this tangible information to reinforce the biomedical benefits of sobriety. Previous quantitative measurements of brain volumes in alcohol dependent individuals performed after several weeks of abstinence likely underestimated the full extent of chronic alcohol-associated brain shrinkage.

  16. A hybrid dynamic Bayesian network approach for modelling temporal associations of gene expressions for hypertension diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutekwe, Arinze; Seker, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Computational and machine learning techniques have been applied in identifying biomarkers and constructing predictive models for diagnosis of hypertension. Strategies such as improved classification rules based on decision trees have been proposed. Other techniques such as Fuzzy Expert Systems (FES) and Neuro-Fuzzy Systems (NFS) have recently been applied. However, these methods lack the ability to detect temporal relationships among biomarker genes that will aid better understanding of the mechanism of hypertension disease. In this paper we apply a proposed two-stage bio-network construction approach that combines the power and computational efficiency of classification methods with the well-established predictive ability of Dynamic Bayesian Network. We demonstrate our method using the analysis of male young-onset hypertension microarray dataset. Four key genes were identified by the Least Angle Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) and three Support Vector Machine Recursive Feature Elimination (SVM-RFE) methods. Results show that cell regulation FOXQ1 may inhibit the expression of focusyltransferase-6 (FUT6) and that ABCG1 ATP-binding cassette sub-family G may also play inhibitory role against NR2E3 nuclear receptor sub-family 2 and CGB2 Chromatin Gonadotrophin.

  17. Spatial Temporal Dynamics and Molecular Evolution of Re-Emerging Rabies Virus in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Cheng Lin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan has been recognized by the World Organization for Animal Health as rabies-free since 1961. Surprisingly, rabies virus (RABV was identified in a dead Formosan ferret badger in July 2013. Later, more infected ferret badgers were reported from different geographic regions of Taiwan. In order to know its evolutionary history and spatial temporal dynamics of this virus, phylogeny was reconstructed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods based on the full-length of glycoprotein (G, matrix protein (M, and nucleoprotein (N genes. The evolutionary rates and phylogeographic were determined using Beast and SPREAD software. Phylogenetic trees showed a monophyletic group containing all of RABV isolates from Taiwan and it further separated into three sub-groups. The estimated nucleotide substitution rates of G, M, and N genes were between 2.49 × 10−4–4.75 × 10−4 substitutions/site/year, and the mean ratio of dN/dS was significantly low. The time of the most recent common ancestor was estimated around 75, 89, and 170 years, respectively. Phylogeographic analysis suggested the origin of the epidemic could be in Eastern Taiwan, then the Formosan ferret badger moved across the Central Range of Taiwan to western regions and separated into two branches. In this study, we illustrated the evolution history and phylogeographic of RABV in Formosan ferret badgers.

  18. Spatial Temporal Dynamics and Molecular Evolution of Re-Emerging Rabies Virus in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Cheng; Chu, Pei-Yu; Chang, Mei-Yin; Hsiao, Kuang-Liang; Lin, Jih-Hui; Liu, Hsin-Fu

    2016-03-17

    Taiwan has been recognized by the World Organization for Animal Health as rabies-free since 1961. Surprisingly, rabies virus (RABV) was identified in a dead Formosan ferret badger in July 2013. Later, more infected ferret badgers were reported from different geographic regions of Taiwan. In order to know its evolutionary history and spatial temporal dynamics of this virus, phylogeny was reconstructed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods based on the full-length of glycoprotein (G), matrix protein (M), and nucleoprotein (N) genes. The evolutionary rates and phylogeographic were determined using Beast and SPREAD software. Phylogenetic trees showed a monophyletic group containing all of RABV isolates from Taiwan and it further separated into three sub-groups. The estimated nucleotide substitution rates of G, M, and N genes were between 2.49 × 10(-4)-4.75 × 10(-4) substitutions/site/year, and the mean ratio of dN/dS was significantly low. The time of the most recent common ancestor was estimated around 75, 89, and 170 years, respectively. Phylogeographic analysis suggested the origin of the epidemic could be in Eastern Taiwan, then the Formosan ferret badger moved across the Central Range of Taiwan to western regions and separated into two branches. In this study, we illustrated the evolution history and phylogeographic of RABV in Formosan ferret badgers.

  19. On the temporal dynamics of sign production: An ERP study in Catalan Sign Language (LSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baus, Cristina; Costa, Albert

    2015-06-03

    This study investigates the temporal dynamics of sign production and how particular aspects of the signed modality influence the early stages of lexical access. To that end, we explored the electrophysiological correlates associated to sign frequency and iconicity in a picture signing task in a group of bimodal bilinguals. Moreover, a subset of the same participants was tested in the same task but naming the pictures instead. Our results revealed that both frequency and iconicity influenced lexical access in sign production. At the ERP level, iconicity effects originated very early in the course of signing (while absent in the spoken modality), suggesting a stronger activation of the semantic properties for iconic signs. Moreover, frequency effects were modulated by iconicity, suggesting that lexical access in signed language is determined by the iconic properties of the signs. These results support the idea that lexical access is sensitive to the same phenomena in word and sign production, but its time-course is modulated by particular aspects of the modality in which a lexical item will be finally articulated.

  20. Spatio-temporal dynamic climate model for Neoleucinodes elegantalis using CLIMEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ricardo Siqueira; Kumar, Lalit; Shabani, Farzin; da Silva, Ezio Marques; da Silva Galdino, Tarcisio Visintin; Picanço, Marcelo Coutinho

    2016-10-01

    Seasonal variations are important components in understanding the ecology of insect population of crops. Ecological studies through modeling may be a useful tool for enhancing knowledge of seasonal patterns of insects on field crops as well as seasonal patterns of favorable climatic conditions for species. Recently CLIMEX, a semi-mechanistic niche model, was upgraded and enhanced to consider spatio-temporal dynamics of climate suitability through time. In this study, attempts were made to determine monthly variations of climate suitability for Neoleucinodes elegantalis (Guenée) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) in five commercial tomato crop localities through the latest version of CLIMEX. We observed that N. elegantalis displays seasonality with increased abundance in tomato crops during summer and autumn, corresponding to the first 6 months of the year in monitored areas in this study. Our model demonstrated a strong accord between the CLIMEX weekly growth index (GIw) and the density of N. elegantalis for this period, thus indicating a greater confidence in our model results. Our model shows a seasonal variability of climatic suitability for N. elegantalis and provides useful information for initiating methods for timely management, such as sampling strategies and control, during periods of high degree of suitability for N. elegantalis. In this study, we ensure that the simulation results are valid through our verification using field data.

  1. Analysing the temporal water quality dynamics of Lake Basaka, Central Rift Valley of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olumana Dinka, Megersa

    2017-01-01

    This study presents the general water quality status and temporal quality dynamics of Lake Basaka water in the past about 5 decades. Water samples were collected and analysed for important physico-chemical quality parameters following standard procedures. The result showed that Lake Basaka water is highly saline and alkaline and experiencing a general reducing trends in ionic concentrations of quality parameters due to the dilution effect. About 10-fold reduction of total ionic concentration occurred in the Lake over the period of 2 decades (1960-1980). There was a sharp and fast decline in EC, Cl, SO4, Na, and K ions from early 1960s up to the late 1980s, and then became relatively stable. Some ions (eg. Na, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4) are showing increment in recent years. This characteristics of the lake water is terrible in relation to its potential to inundate the nearby areas in the near future. The expansion of such quality water has negative effects on the water resources of the region, especially soil quality, drainage and groundwater, in terms of salinity, sodicity and specific ion toxicity. The regimes of soil moisture, solute and groundwater could be affected, concurrently affecting the productivity and sustainability of the sugar estate. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify the potential sources of water and chemicals to the lake and devise an appropriate mitigation and/or remedial measures.

  2. Spatial–Temporal Dynamics of Wetland Vegetation Related to Water Level Fluctuations in Poyang Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological properties are driving forces of wetland systems. The influence of water level fluctuations on vegetation distribution is of growing interest as wetlands are increasingly disturbed by climate change and intensive human activity. Based on time series MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer imagery from 2000 to 2012, we investigated the spatial–temporal dynamics of wetland vegetation in Poyang Lake using a combined Sen’s slope and Mann–Kendall (MK test approach, and explored their correlations with water level fluctuations in different hydrological periods. The results showed that more than 34% of wetlands at lower elevations of Poyang Lake had experienced an increasing trend in the enhanced vegetation index (EVI, whereas EVI in about 11% of the wetlands at higher elevations decreased significantly. Responses of grassland area extracted from MODIS EVI were found to be more sensitive to water level fluctuations in the southern lakes. The change rate of grassland area decreased with the rising water level during the rising period, but increased with the rising water level during the retreating period. Correlations between grassland area and water level were much weaker in the dry period. In addition, we found fluctuations of the main water body had negligible effect on grassland area since the water level at Xingzi station was below 14 m. These results provide new insights for predicting future changes of wetland vegetation influenced by the ongoing threats from climate change and human activity, and form a foundation for ecosystem management of Poyang Lake.

  3. Spatio-temporal dynamics of impulse responses to figure motion in optic flow neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Lee

    Full Text Available White noise techniques have been used widely to investigate sensory systems in both vertebrates and invertebrates. White noise stimuli are powerful in their ability to rapidly generate data that help the experimenter decipher the spatio-temporal dynamics of neural and behavioral responses. One type of white noise stimuli, maximal length shift register sequences (m-sequences, have recently become particularly popular for extracting response kernels in insect motion vision. We here use such m-sequences to extract the impulse responses to figure motion in hoverfly lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs. Figure motion is behaviorally important and many visually guided animals orient towards salient features in the surround. We show that LPTCs respond robustly to figure motion in the receptive field. The impulse response is scaled down in amplitude when the figure size is reduced, but its time course remains unaltered. However, a low contrast stimulus generates a slower response with a significantly longer time-to-peak and half-width. Impulse responses in females have a slower time-to-peak than males, but are otherwise similar. Finally we show that the shapes of the impulse response to a figure and a widefield stimulus are very similar, suggesting that the figure response could be coded by the same input as the widefield response.

  4. Dynamics of multifractal and correlation characteristics of the spatio-temporal distribution of regional seismicity before the strong earthquakes

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    D. Kiyashchenko

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of the distribution of regional seismicity and the results of numerical simulations of the seismic process show the increase of inhomogenity in spatio-temporal distribution of the seismicity prior to large earthquakes and formation of inhomogeneous clusters in a wide range of scales. Since that, the multifractal approach is appropriate to investigate the details of such dynamics. Here we analyze the dynamics of the seismicity distribution before a number of strong earthquakes occurred in two seismically active regions of the world: Japan and Southern California. In order to study the evolution of spatial inhomogeneity of the seismicity distribution, we consider variations of two multifractal characteristics: information entropy of multifractal measure generation process and the higher-order generalized fractal dimension of the continuum of the earthquake epicenters. Also we studied the dynamics of the level of spatio-temporal correlations in the seismicity distribution. It is found that two aforementioned multifractal characteristics tend to decrease and the level of spatio-temporal correlations tends to increase before the majority of considered strong earthquakes. Such a tendency can be considered as an earthquake precursory signature. Therefore, the results obtained show the possibility to use multifractal and correlation characteristics of the spatio-temporal distribution of regional seismicity for seismic hazard risk evaluation.

  5. Limbic encephalitis: Potential impact of adaptive autoimmune inflammation on neuronal circuits of the amygdala

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    Nico eMelzer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Limbic encephalitis is characterized by adaptive autoimmune inflammation of the gray matter structures of the limbic system. It has recently been identified as major cause of temporal lobe epilepsy accompanied by progressive declarative – mainly episodic – memory disturbance as well as a variety of rather poorly defined emotional and behavioral changes. While autoimmune inflammation of the hippocampus is likely to be responsible for declarative memory disturbance, consequences of autoimmune inflammation of the amygdala are largely unknown. The amygdala is central for the generation of adequate homoeostatic behavioral responses to emotionally significant external stimuli following processing in a variety of parallel neuronal circuits. Here, we hypothesize, that adaptive cellular and humoral autoimmunity may target and modulate distinct inhibitory or excitatory neuronal networks within the amygdala and thereby strongly impact processing of emotional stimuli and corresponding behavioral responses. This may explain some of the rather poorly understood neuropsychiatric symptoms in limbic encephalitis.

  6. Dynamic link between ECG and clinical data by a CORBA-based query engine and temporal mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Ohe, K; Kaihara, S

    1997-01-01

    It is important to create a dynamic link method to link distributed patient data across multiple hospitals on an "as needed" basis because the pre-defined links (an item of data has a character or group of characters that indicates the storage of another item of data) are difficult to be managed, or can only be established in part, or are not necessary to be pre-defined in many cases, especially in linking the descriptive data such as history data with the corresponding examination data across multiple hospitals. A method of linking electrocardiogram (ECG) with clinical data dynamically in a Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) environment has been achieved and verified in a real computing environment to approach to this goal. By this method, distributed patient data can be linked dynamically by a CORBA-based query engine and temporal mapping no matter where they are located on the Internet. The necessary temporal information is provided by either computing or human being. Since multiple time-axes for different databases are involved in, some temporal reasoning methods (such as mapping occurrences across temporal contexts and determining bounds for absolute occurrences, etc.) are applied to this study, and a series of temporal mappings including the first mapping, the secondary mapping, the contextual mapping, the extended mapping, the previous mapping and the next mapping are created. In comparison with the pre-defined link, the major strengths of this method are the dynamic link on an "as needed" basis, no limitation of institutional boundaries, easy creation, simplifying the data storage, and the high flexibility, etc.

  7. The amygdala: securing pleasure and avoiding pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Anushka B. P.; Murray, Jennifer E.; Milton, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    The amygdala has traditionally been associated with fear, mediating the impact of negative emotions on memory. However, this view does not fully encapsulate the function of the amygdala, nor the impact that processing in this structure has on the motivational limbic corticostriatal circuitry of which it is an important structure. Here we discuss the interactions between different amygdala nuclei with cortical and striatal regions involved in motivation; interconnections and parallel circuitries that have become increasingly understood in recent years. We review the evidence that the amygdala stores memories that allow initially motivationally neutral stimuli to become associated through pavlovian conditioning with motivationally relevant outcomes which, importantly, can be either appetitive (e.g. food) or aversive (e.g. electric shock). We also consider how different psychological processes supported by the amygdala such as conditioned reinforcement and punishment, conditioned motivation and suppression, and conditioned approach and avoidance behavior, are not only psychologically but also neurobiologically dissociable, being mediated by distinct yet overlapping neural circuits within the limbic corticostriatal circuitry. Clearly the role of the amygdala goes beyond encoding aversive stimuli to also encode the appetitive, requiring an appreciation of the amygdala's mediation of both appetitive and fearful behavior through diverse psychological processes. PMID:24367307

  8. Population dynamics of two antilisterial cheese surface consortia revealed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis

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    Hasler Madlen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surface contamination of smear cheese by Listeria spp. is of major concern for the industry. Complex smear ecosystems have been shown to harbor antilisterial potential but the microorganisms and mechanisms involved in the inhibition mostly remain unclear, and are likely related to complex interactions than to production of single antimicrobial compounds. Bacterial biodiversity and population dynamics of complex smear ecosystems exhibiting antilisterial properties in situ were investigated by Temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE, a culture independent technique, for two microbial consortia isolated from commercial Raclette type cheeses inoculated with defined commercial ripening cultures (F or produced with an old-young smearing process (M. Results TTGE revealed nine bacterial species common to both F and M consortia, but consortium F exhibited a higher diversity than consortium M, with thirteen and ten species, respectively. Population dynamics were studied after application of the consortia on fresh-produced Raclette cheeses. TTGE analyses revealed a similar sequential development of the nine species common to both consortia. Beside common cheese surface bacteria (Staphylococcus equorum, Corynebacterium spp., Brevibacterium linens, Microbacterium gubbeenense, Agrococcus casei, the two consortia contained marine lactic acid bacteria (Alkalibacterium kapii, Marinilactibacillus psychrotolerans that developed early in ripening (day 14 to 20, shortly after the growth of staphylococci (day 7. A decrease of Listeria counts was observed on cheese surface inoculated at day 7 with 0.1-1 × 102 CFU cm-2, when cheeses were smeared with consortium F or M. Listeria counts went below the detection limit of the method between day 14 and 28 and no subsequent regrowth was detected over 60 to 80 ripening days. In contrast, Listeria grew to high counts (105 CFU cm-2 on cheeses smeared with a defined surface culture

  9. A network of amygdala connections predict individual differences in trait anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, Steven G; Mitchell, Derek G V

    2015-12-01

    In this study we demonstrate that the pattern of an amygdala-centric network contributes to individual differences in trait anxiety. Individual differences in trait anxiety were predicted using maximum likelihood estimates of amygdala structural connectivity to multiple brain targets derived from diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic tractography on 72 participants. The prediction was performed using a stratified sixfold cross validation procedure using a regularized least square regression model. The analysis revealed a reliable network of regions predicting individual differences in trait anxiety. Higher trait anxiety was associated with stronger connections between the amygdala and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, an area implicated in the generation of emotional reactions, and inferior temporal gyrus and paracentral lobule, areas associated with perceptual and sensory processing. In contrast, higher trait anxiety was associated with weaker connections between amygdala and regions implicated in extinction learning such as medial orbitofrontal cortex, and memory encoding and environmental context recognition, including posterior cingulate cortex and parahippocampal gyrus. Thus, trait anxiety is not only associated with reduced amygdala connectivity with prefrontal areas associated with emotion modulation, but also enhanced connectivity with sensory areas. This work provides novel anatomical insight into potential mechanisms behind information processing biases observed in disorders of emotion.

  10. BOLD temporal dynamics of rat superior colliculus and lateral geniculate nucleus following short duration visual stimulation.

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    Condon Lau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The superior colliculus (SC and lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN are important subcortical structures for vision. Much of our understanding of vision was obtained using invasive and small field of view (FOV techniques. In this study, we use non-invasive, large FOV blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD fMRI to measure the SC and LGN's response temporal dynamics following short duration (1 s visual stimulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Experiments are performed at 7 tesla on Sprague Dawley rats stimulated in one eye with flashing light. Gradient-echo and spin-echo sequences are used to provide complementary information. An anatomical image is acquired from one rat after injection of monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MION, a blood vessel contrast agent. BOLD responses are concentrated in the contralateral SC and LGN. The SC BOLD signal measured with gradient-echo rises to 50% of maximum amplitude (PEAK 0.2±0.2 s before the LGN signal (p<0.05. The LGN signal returns to 50% of PEAK 1.4±1.2 s before the SC signal (p<0.05. These results indicate the SC signal rises faster than the LGN signal but settles slower. Spin-echo results support these findings. The post-MION image shows the SC and LGN lie beneath large blood vessels. This subcortical vasculature is similar to that in the cortex, which also lies beneath large vessels. The LGN lies closer to the large vessels than much of the SC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The differences in response timing between SC and LGN are very similar to those between deep and shallow cortical layers following electrical stimulation, which are related to depth-dependent blood vessel dilation rates. This combined with the similarities in vasculature between subcortex and cortex suggest the SC and LGN timing differences are also related to depth-dependent dilation rates. This study shows for the first time that BOLD responses in the rat SC and LGN following short duration visual stimulation are

  11. Spatial-Temporal dynamics of surface water flooding and consequences for emergency services accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Ian; Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Bosher, Lee; Wilby, Rob; Yang, Lili; Ryley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas are increasingly susceptible to surface water flooding, with more intense precipitation and intensification of land development. Flooding has both direct impacts i.e. locations inundated with water, and indirect impacts i.e. transport networks, utility e.g. electricity/water services etc. The direct areas flooded evolve in space through the event, and are predicted by standard inundation models. However, the wider indirect impacts and the spatial-temporal patterns are less constrained and it is these that are needed to manage the impacts in real-time. This paper focusses on the Category One responders of the Fire and Rescue and Ambulance Services in the City of Leicester, East Midlands, UK. Leicester is ranked 16th out of 4215 settlements at risk of surface water flooding in the UK based upon the population at risk (15,200 people) (DEFRA, 2009). The analysis undertaken involved overlaying the flood extent with the Integrated Transport Network (ITN) data within a GIS framework. Then a simple transport routing algorithm was used to predict the travel time from specific nodes representing ambulance or fire stations to different parts of the city. Flood magnitudes with 1:20, 1:100 and 1:1000 return periods have been investigated. Under a scenario of no flooding, 100% of the city is accessible by the six fire stations in the city. However, in the 1 in 20 year surface water flood event the peak inundation results in 66.5% being accessible in the 10 minute permitted time and 6% is totally inaccessible. This falls to 40% and 13% respectively for the 1 in 100 year event. Maps show the area of the city that are accessible by two or more stations within the permitted response time, which shows these areas are the most resilient to surface water flooding. However, it isn't just the peak water depths at every location which impacts accessibility within the city but the spatial-temporal patterns of the inundation. The areas within the 10 minute response time expand

  12. Relation between Amygdala Structure and Function in Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmar, Jessica H.; Wang, Fei; Chepenik, Lara G.; Womer, Fay Y.; Jones, Monique M.; Pittman, Brian; Shah, Maulik P.; Martin, Andres; Constable, R. Todd; Blumberg, Hilary P.

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents with bipolar disorder showed decreased amygdala volume and increased amygdala response to emotional faces. Amygdala volume is inversely related to activation during emotional face processing.

  13. Use of soil moisture dynamics and patterns at different spatio-temporal scales for the investigation of subsurface flow processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Blume

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial patterns as well as temporal dynamics of soil moisture have a major influence on runoff generation. The investigation of these dynamics and patterns can thus yield valuable information on hydrological processes, especially in data scarce or previously ungauged catchments. The combination of spatially scarce but temporally high resolution soil moisture profiles with episodic and thus temporally scarce moisture profiles at additional locations provides information on spatial as well as temporal patterns of soil moisture at the hillslope transect scale. This approach is better suited to difficult terrain (dense forest, steep slopes than geophysical techniques and at the same time less cost-intensive than a high resolution grid of continuously measuring sensors. Rainfall simulation experiments with dye tracers while continuously monitoring soil moisture response allows for visualization of flow processes in the unsaturated zone at these locations. Data was analyzed at different spacio-temporal scales using various graphical methods, such as space-time colour maps (for the event and plot scale and binary indicator maps (for the long-term and hillslope scale. Annual dynamics of soil moisture and decimeter-scale variability were also investigated. The proposed approach proved to be successful in the investigation of flow processes in the unsaturated zone and showed the importance of preferential flow in the Malalcahuello Catchment, a data-scarce catchment in the Andes of Southern Chile. Fast response times of stream flow indicate that preferential flow observed at the plot scale might also be of importance at the hillslope or catchment scale. Flow patterns were highly variable in space but persistent in time. The most likely explanation for preferential flow in this catchment is a combination of hydrophobicity, small scale heterogeneity in rainfall due to redistribution in the canopy and strong gradients in unsaturated conductivities leading to

  14. Temporal scales, ecosystem dynamics, stakeholders and the valuation of ecosystems services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hein, Lars; Koppen, van C.S.A.K.; Ierland, van Ekko C.; Leidekker, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Temporal dimensions are highly relevant to the analysis of ecosystem services and their economic value. In this paper, we provide a framework that can be used for analyzing temporal dimensions of ecosystem services, we present a case study including an analysis of the supply of three ecosystem se

  15. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses of substrate-dependent bacterial temporal dynamics in microbial fuel cells.

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    Husen Zhang

    Full Text Available Understanding the microbial community structure and genetic potential of anode biofilms is key to improve extracellular electron transfers in microbial fuel cells. We investigated effect of substrate and temporal dynamics of anodic biofilm communities using phylogenetic and metagenomic approaches in parallel with electrochemical characterizations. The startup non-steady state anodic bacterial structures were compared for a simple substrate, acetate, and for a complex substrate, landfill leachate, using a single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell. Principal coordinate analysis showed that distinct community structures were formed with each substrate type. The bacterial diversity measured as Shannon index decreased with time in acetate cycles, and was restored with the introduction of leachate. The change of diversity was accompanied by an opposite trend in the relative abundance of Geobacter-affiliated phylotypes, which were acclimated to over 40% of total Bacteria at the end of acetate-fed conditions then declined in the leachate cycles. The transition from acetate to leachate caused a decrease in output power density from 243±13 mW/m2 to 140±11 mW/m2, accompanied by a decrease in Coulombic electron recovery from 18±3% to 9±3%. The leachate cycles selected protein-degrading phylotypes within phylum Synergistetes. Metagenomic shotgun sequencing showed that leachate-fed communities had higher cell motility genes including bacterial chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, and increased gene abundance related to metal resistance, antibiotic resistance, and quorum sensing. These differentially represented genes suggested an altered anodic biofilm community in response to additional substrates and stress from the complex landfill leachate.

  16. On the temporal dynamics of spatial stimulus-response transfer between spatial incompatibility and Simon tasks

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    Jason eIvanoff

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Simon effect refers to the performance (response time and accuracy advantage for responses that spatially correspond to the task-irrelevant location of a stimulus. It has been attributed to a natural tendency to respond toward the source of stimulation. When location is task-relevant, however, and responses are intentionally directed away (incompatible or towards (compatible the source of the stimulation, there is also an advantage for spatially compatible responses over spatially incompatible responses. Interestingly, a number of studies have demonstrated a reversed, or reduced, Simon effect following practice with a spatial incompatibility task. One interpretation of this finding is that practicing a spatial incompatibility task disables the natural tendency to respond toward stimuli. Here, the temporal dynamics of this stimulus-response (S-R transfer were explored with speed-accuracy trade-offs (SATs. All experiments used the mixed-task paradigm in which Simon and spatial compatibility/incompatibility tasks were interleaved across blocks of trials. In general, bidirectional S-R transfer was observed: while the spatial incompatibility task had an influence on the Simon effect, the task-relevant S-R mapping of the Simon task also had a small impact on congruency effects within the spatial compatibility and incompatibility tasks. These effects were generally greater when the task contexts were similar. Moreover, the SAT analysis of performance in the Simon task demonstrated that the tendency to respond to the location of the stimulus was not eliminated because of the spatial incompatibility task. Rather, S-R transfer from the spatial incompatibility task appeared to partially mask the natural tendency to respond to the source of stimulation with a conflicting inclination to respond away from it. These findings support the use of SAT methodology to quantitatively describe rapid response tendencies.

  17. Spatial and temporal dynamics of hepatitis B virus D genotype in Europe and the Mediterranean Basin.

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    Gianguglielmo Zehender

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus genotype D can be found in many parts of the world and is the most prevalent strain in south-eastern Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, the Middle East, and the Indian sub-continent. The epidemiological history of the D genotype and its subgenotypes is still obscure because of the scarcity of appropriate studies. We retrieved from public databases a total of 312 gene P sequences of HBV genotype D isolated in various countries throughout the world, and reconstructed the spatio-temporal evolutionary dynamics of the HBV-D epidemic using a bayesian framework.The phylogeographical analysis showed that India had the highest posterior probability of being the location of the tree root, whereas central Asia was the most probable location of the common ancestor of subgenotypes D1-D3. HBV-D5 (identified in native Indian populations diverged from the tree root earlier than D1-D3. The time of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA of the tree root was 128 years ago, which suggests that the common ancestor of the currently circulating subgenotypes existed in the second half of the XIX century. The mean tMRCA of subgenotypes D1-D3 was between the 1940s and the 1950-60s. On the basis of our phylogeographic reconstruction, it seems that HBV-D reached the Mediterranean area in the middle of the XX century by means of at least two routes: the first pathway (mainly due to the spread of subgenotype D1 crossing the Middle East and reaching north Africa and the eastern Mediterranean, and the second pathway (closely associated with D2 that crossed the former Soviet Union and reached eastern Europe and the Mediterranean through Albania. We hypothesise that the main route of dispersion of genotype D was the unsafe use of injections and drug addiction.

  18. Short-term temporal dynamics of yeast abundance on the tall fescue phylloplane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, Shannon S; Burpee, Leon L; Jackson, Kimberly L; Buck, James W

    2008-04-01

    Six replicate trials were conducted to determine the short-term temporal dynamics and the effects of foliar applications of nutrients on the phylloplane yeast community of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.). In each trial, 2% sucrose + 0.5% yeast extract solution or sterile deionized water (control) was applied to the experiment plots. Twelve hours post-treatment (at 0600 hours), leaf samples were collected and yeast colony-forming units (cfu) were enumerated by dilution plating. This process was repeated at 1200, 1800, and 2400 hours in each trial. Significant differences were observed between the number of yeast cfu and the time at which the samples were collected. On average, the number of yeast cfu recovered was significantly less at 1800 hours and significantly greatest at 2400 hours when compared with all other sampling times. Averaged over all time intervals, we observed a trend of increased yeast abundance in turf treated with the nutrient solution compared with control treatments. In a separate investigation, atmospheric yeast abundance above the canopy of tall fescue was assessed in the morning (0900) and in the afternoon (1500) using a Thermo Andersen single stage viable particle sampler. In 5 of the 6 trials of this experiment, atmospheric yeast abundance was significantly greater in the morning than in the afternoon. Results suggest the following colonization model: phylloplane yeasts on tall fescue reproduce during the late evening and early morning, stabilize during the late morning and early afternoon through exchange of immigrants and emigrants, and decline during the late afternoon and (or) early evening.

  19. The temporal dynamics of the fourteenth-century Black Death: new evidence from English ecclesiastical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, James W; Ferrell, Rebecca J; Dewitte-Aviña, Sharon N

    2003-08-01

    Recent research has questioned whether the European Black Death of 1347-1351 could possibly have been caused by the bubonic plague bacillus Yersinia pestis, as has been assumed for over a century. Central to the arguments both for and against involvement of Y. pestis has been a comparison of the temporal dynamics observed in confirmed outbreaks of bubonic plague in early-20th-century India, versus those reconstructed for the Black Death from English church records--specifically, from lists of institutions (appointments) to vacated benefices contained in surviving bishops' registers. This comparison is, however, based on a statistical error arising from the fact that most of the bishops' registers give only the dates of institution and not the dates of death. Failure to correct for a distributed (as opposed to constant) lag time from death to institution has made it look as if the Black Death passed slowly through specific localities. This error is compounded by a failure to disaggregate the information from the bishops' registers to a geographical level that is genuinely comparable to the modern data. A sample of 235 deaths from the bishop's register of Coventry and Lichfield, the only English register to list both date of death and date of institution, shows that the Black Death swept through local areas much more rapidly than has previously been thought. This finding is consistent with those of earlier studies showing that the Black Death spread too rapidly between locales to have been a zoonosis such as bubonic plague. A further analysis of the determinants of the lag between death and institution, designed to provide a basis for reexamining other bishops' registers that do not provide information on date of death, shows that the distribution of lags could vary significantly by time and space even during a single epidemic outbreak.

  20. Temporal dynamics of amino and fatty acid composition in the razor clam Ensis siliqua (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Lopes, Vanessa M.; Narciso, Luis; Marques, António; Bandarra, Narcisa; Rosa, Rui

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the temporal dynamics of both amino acid (AA) and fatty acid (FA) profiles in marine bivalves. We investigated the seasonal variation of these compounds in the pod razor clam Ensis siliqua in relation to food availability, salinity, water temperature and reproductive cycle. AA content varied between 46.94 and 54.67 % dry weight (DW), and the AAs found in greater quantity were glutamic acid, glycine and aspartic acid. FA content varied between 34.02 and 87.94 mg g-1 DW and the FAs found in greater quantity were 16:0 and 22:6 n-3. Seasonal trends were observed for AAs and FAs. FAs increased with gametogenesis and decreased with spawning while AA content increased throughout spawning. The effect of increasing temperature and high food availability during the spawning season masked the loss of AAs resulting from gamete release. Still, a comparatively greater increase in the contents of glutamic acid and leucine with spawning indicate their possible involvement in a post-spawning gonad recovery mechanism. A post-spawning decrease in 14:0, 16:0, 16:1 n-7, 18:1 n-7 and 18:1 n-9 is indicative of the importance of these FAs in bivalve eggs. An increase in 18:3 n-3, 18:4 n-3, 20:1 n-9 and 20:2 n-6 during gametogenesis suggests their involvement in oocyte maturation. The FA 22:4 n-6, while increasing with spawning, appears to play a role in post-spawning gonad recovery. Salinity did not have an effect on the AA composition. None of the environmental parameters measured had an effect on FA composition.

  1. Cerebellar inhibitory output shapes the temporal dynamics of its somatosensory inferior olivary input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogri, Roni; Segalis, Eyal; Mintz, Matti

    2014-08-01

    The cerebellum is necessary and sufficient for the acquisition and execution of adaptively timed conditioned motor responses following repeated paired presentations of a conditioned stimulus and an unconditioned stimulus. The underlying plasticity depends on the convergence of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli signals relayed to the cerebellum by the pontine nucleus and the inferior olive (IO), respectively. Adaptive timing of conditioned responses relies on the correctly predicted onset of the unconditioned stimulus, usually a noxious somatosensory stimulus. We addressed two questions: First, does the IO relay information regarding the duration of somatosensory stimuli to the cerebellum? Multiple-unit recordings from the IO of anesthetized rats that received periorbital airpuffs of various durations revealed that sustained somatosensory stimuli are invariably transformed into phasic IO outputs. The phasic response was followed by a post-peak depression in IO activity as compared to baseline, providing the cerebellum with a highly synchronous signal, time-locked to the stimulus' onset. Second, we sought to examine the involvement of olivocerebellar interactions in this signal transformation. Cerebello-olivary inhibition was interrupted using temporary pharmacological inactivation of cerebellar output nuclei, resulting in more sustained (i.e., less synchronous) IO responses to sustained somatosensory stimuli, in which the post-peak depression was substituted with elevated activity as compared to baseline. We discuss the possible roles of olivocerebellar negative-feedback loops and baseline cerebello-olivary inhibition levels in shaping the temporal dynamics of the IO's response to somatosensory stimuli and the consequences of this shaping for cerebellar plasticity and its ability to adapt to varying contexts.

  2. Temporal-spatial dynamics in orthoptera in relation to nutrient availability and plant species richness.

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    Rob J J Hendriks

    Full Text Available Nutrient availability in ecosystems has increased dramatically over the last century. Excess reactive nitrogen deposition is known to negatively impact plant communities, e.g. by changing species composition, biomass and vegetation structure. In contrast, little is known on how such impacts propagate to higher trophic levels. To evaluate how nitrogen deposition affects plants and herbivore communities through time, we used extensive databases of spatially explicit historical records of Dutch plant species and Orthoptera (grasshoppers and crickets, a group of animals that are particularly susceptible to changes in the C:N ratio of their resources. We use robust methods that deal with the unstandardized nature of historical databases to test whether nitrogen deposition levels and plant richness changes influence the patterns of richness change of Orthoptera, taking into account Orthoptera species functional traits. Our findings show that effects indeed also propagate to higher trophic levels. Differences in functional traits affected the temporal-spatial dynamics of assemblages of Orthoptera. While nitrogen deposition affected plant diversity, contrary to our expectations, we could not find a strong significant effect of food related traits. However we found that species with low habitat specificity, limited dispersal capacity and egg deposition in the soil were more negativly affected by nitrogen deposition levels. Despite the lack of significant effect of plant richness or food related traits on Orthoptera, the negative effects of nitrogen detected within certain trait groups (e.g. groups with limited disperse ability could be related to subtle changes in plant abundance and plant quality. Our results, however, suggest that the changes in soil conditions (where many Orthoptera species lay their eggs or other habitat changes driven by nitrogen have a stronger influence than food related traits. To fully evaluate the negative effects of nitrogen

  3. Microbial Dynamics During a Temporal Sequence of Bioreduction Stimulated by Emulsified Vegetable Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadt, C. W.; Gihring, T. M.; Yang, Z.; Wu, W.; Green, S.; Overholt, W.; Zhang, G.; Brandt, C. C.; Campbell, J. H.; Carroll, S. C.; Criddle, C.; Jardine, P. M.; Lowe, K.; Mehlhorn, T.; Kostka, J. E.; Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Amendments of slow-release substrates (e.g. emulsified vegetable oil; EVO) are potentially pragmatic alternatives to short-lived labile substrates for sustained uranium bioimmobilization within groundwater systems. The spatial and temporal dynamics of geochemical and microbial community changes during EVO amendment are likely to differ significantly from populations stimulated by readily utilizable soluble substrates (e.g. ethanol or acetate). We tracked dynamic changes in geochemistry and microbial communities for 270 days following a one-time EVO injection at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site that resulted in decreased groundwater U concentrations for ~4 months. Pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA) genes from monitoring well samples revealed a rapid decline in bacterial community richness and evenness after EVO injection, concurrent with increased 16S rRNA copy levels, indicating the selection of a narrow group consisting of 10-15 dominant OTUs, rather than a broad community stimulation. By association of the known physiology of close relatives identified in the pyrosequencing analysis, it is possible to infer a hypothesized sequence of microbial functions leading the major changes in electron donors and acceptors in the system. Members of the Firmicutes family Veillonellaceae dominated after injection and most likely catalyzed the initial oil decomposition and utilized the glycerol associated with the oils. Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulforegula, known for LCFA oxidation to acetate, also dominated shortly after EVO amendment and are thought to catalyze this process. Acetate and H2 production during LCFA degradation appeared to stimulate NO3-, Fe(III), U(VI), and SO42- reduction by members of the Comamonadaceae, Geobacteriaceae, and Desulfobacterales. Methanogenic archaea flourished late in the experiment and in some samples constituted over 25 % of the total

  4. The Ecuadorian Artisanal Fishery for Large Pelagics: Species Composition and Spatio-Temporal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ortiz, Jimmy; Aires-da-Silva, Alexandre M.; Lennert-Cody, Cleridy E.; Maunder, Mark N.

    2015-01-01

    The artisanal fisheries of Ecuador operate within one of the most dynamic and productive marine ecosystems of the world. This study investigates the catch composition of the Ecuadorian artisanal fishery for large pelagic fishes, including aspects of its spatio-temporal dynamics. The analyses of this study are based on the most extensive dataset available to date for this fishery: a total of 106,963 trip-landing inspection records collected at its five principal ports during 2008 ‒ 2012. Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries remove a substantial amount of biomass from the upper trophic-level predatory fish community of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. It is estimated that at least 135 thousand metric tons (mt) (about 15.5 million fish) were landed in the five principal ports during the study period. The great novelty of Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries is the “oceanic-artisanal” fleet component, which consists of mother-ship (nodriza) boats with their towed fiber-glass skiffs (fibras) operating with pelagic longlines. This fleet has fully expanded into oceanic waters as far offshore as 100°W, west of the Galapagos Archipelago. It is estimated that nodriza operations produce as much as 80% of the total catches of the artisanal fishery. The remainder is produced by independent fibras operating in inshore waters with pelagic longlines and/or surface gillnets. A multivariate regression tree analysis was used to investigate spatio-environmental effects on the nodriza fleet (n = 6,821 trips). The catch species composition of the nodriza fleet is strongly influenced by the northwesterly circulation of the Humboldt Current along the coast of Peru and its associated cold waters masses. The target species and longline gear-type used by nodrizas change seasonally with the incursion of cool waters (< 25°C) from the south and offshore. During this season, dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) dominates the catches. However, in warmer waters, the fishery changes to tuna

  5. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Sources of Hard X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Zimovets, I. V.; Morgachev, A. S.; Struminsky, A. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the spatio-temporal evolution of sources of hard X-ray (HXR) pulsations in solar flares. We concentrate on disk flares whose impulsive phases are accompanied by a series of more than three successive peaks (pulsations) of HXR emission detected in the RHESSI 50 - 100 keV energy channel with a four-second time cadence. Twenty-nine such flares observed from February 2002 to June 2015 with characteristic time differences between successive peaks P ≈8 - 270 s are studied. The main observational result of the analysis is that sources of HXR pulsations in all flares are not stationary, they demonstrate apparent movements or displacements in the parent active regions from pulsation to pulsation. The flares can be subdivided into two main groups depending on the character of the dynamics of the HXR sources. Group 1 consists of 16 flares ( 55~%) that show systematic dynamics of the HXR sources from pulsation to pulsation with respect to a magnetic polarity inversion line (MPIL), which has a simple extended trace on the photosphere. Group 2 consists of 13 flares ( 45~%) that show more chaotic displacements of the HXR sources with respect to an MPIL with a more complex structure, and sometimes several MPILs are present in the parent active regions of such flares. Based on the observations, we conclude that the mechanism of the flare HXR pulsations (at least with time differences of the considered range) is related to successive triggering of the flare energy release process in different magnetic loops (or bundles of loops) of the parent active regions. Group 1 flare regions consist of loops stacked into magnetic arcades that are extended along MPILs. Group 2 flare regions have more complex magnetic structures, and the loops are arranged more chaotically and randomly there. We also found that at least 14 ( 88~%) group 1 flares and 11 ( 85~%) group 2 flares are accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), i.e. the absolute majority of the

  6. The Ecuadorian Artisanal Fishery for Large Pelagics: Species Composition and Spatio-Temporal Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Martínez-Ortiz

    Full Text Available The artisanal fisheries of Ecuador operate within one of the most dynamic and productive marine ecosystems of the world. This study investigates the catch composition of the Ecuadorian artisanal fishery for large pelagic fishes, including aspects of its spatio-temporal dynamics. The analyses of this study are based on the most extensive dataset available to date for this fishery: a total of 106,963 trip-landing inspection records collected at its five principal ports during 2008 ‒ 2012. Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries remove a substantial amount of biomass from the upper trophic-level predatory fish community of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. It is estimated that at least 135 thousand metric tons (mt (about 15.5 million fish were landed in the five principal ports during the study period. The great novelty of Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries is the "oceanic-artisanal" fleet component, which consists of mother-ship (nodriza boats with their towed fiber-glass skiffs (fibras operating with pelagic longlines. This fleet has fully expanded into oceanic waters as far offshore as 100°W, west of the Galapagos Archipelago. It is estimated that nodriza operations produce as much as 80% of the total catches of the artisanal fishery. The remainder is produced by independent fibras operating in inshore waters with pelagic longlines and/or surface gillnets. A multivariate regression tree analysis was used to investigate spatio-environmental effects on the nodriza fleet (n = 6,821 trips. The catch species composition of the nodriza fleet is strongly influenced by the northwesterly circulation of the Humboldt Current along the coast of Peru and its associated cold waters masses. The target species and longline gear-type used by nodrizas change seasonally with the incursion of cool waters (< 25°C from the south and offshore. During this season, dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus dominates the catches. However, in warmer waters, the fishery changes to tuna

  7. Impact of drought on the temporal dynamics of wood formation in Pinus sylvestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Andreas; Strobl, Stefan; Veit, Barbara; Oberhuber, Walter

    2010-04-01

    We determined the temporal dynamics of cambial activity and xylem cell differentiation of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) within a dry inner Alpine valley (750 m a.s.l., Tyrol, Austria), where radial growth is strongly limited by drought in spring. Repeated micro-sampling of the developing tree ring of mature trees was carried out during two contrasting years at two study plots that differ in soil water availability (xeric and dry-mesic sites). In 2007, when air temperature at the beginning of the growing season in April exceeded the long-term mean by 6.4 degrees C, cambial cell division started in early April at both study plots. A delayed onset of cambial activity of c. 2 weeks was found in 2008, when average climate conditions prevailed in spring, indicating that resumption of cambial cell division after winter dormancy is temperature controlled. Cambial cell division consistently ended about the end of June/early July in both study years. Radial enlargement of tracheids started almost 3 weeks earlier in 2007 compared with 2008 at both study plots. At the xeric site, the maximum rate of tracheid production in 2007 and 2008 was reached in early and mid-May, respectively, and c. 2 weeks later at the dry-mesic site. Since in both study years more favorable growing conditions (i.e., an increase in soil water content) were recorded during summer, we suggest a strong sink competition for carbohydrates to mycorrhizal root and shoot growth. Wood formation stopped c. 4 weeks earlier at the xeric compared with the dry-mesic site in both years, indicating a strong influence of drought stress on cell differentiation. This is supported by radial widths of earlywood cells, which were found to be significantly narrower at the xeric than at the dry-mesic site (P analyses during the two growing seasons revealed that, although spatial variability in the dynamics and duration of cell differentiation processes in P. sylvestris exposed to drought is strongly influenced by water

  8. High Spatio-Temporal-Resolution Detection of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Dynamics from a Single Chloroplast with Confocal Imaging Fluorometer

    CERN Document Server

    Tseng, Yi-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) is a key indicator to study plant physiology or photosynthesis efficiency. Conventionally, CF is characterized by fluorometers, which only allows ensemble measurement through wide-field detection. For imaging fluorometers, the typical spatial and temporal resolutions are on the order of millimeter and second, far from enough to study cellular/sub-cellular CF dynamics. In addition, due to the lack of optical sectioning capability, conventional imaging fluorometers cannot identify CF from a single cell or even a single chloroplast. Here we demonstrated a novel fluorometer based on confocal imaging, that not only provides high contrast images, but also allows CF measurement with spatiotemporal resolution as high as micrometer and millisecond. CF transient (the Kautsky curve) from a single chloroplast is successfully obtained, with both the temporal dynamics and the intensity dependences corresponding well to the ensemble measurement from conventional studies. The significance of con...

  9. Fragile X syndrome and the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvrathan, Aparna; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2011-06-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most commonly inherited form of mental impairment and autism. Current understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying FXS symptoms is derived mainly from studies on the hippocampus and cortex. However, FXS is also associated with strong emotional symptoms, which are likely to involve changes in the amygdala. Unfortunately, the synaptic basis of amygdalar dysfunction in FXS remains largely unexplored. Here we describe recent findings from mouse models of FXS that have identified synaptic defects in the basolateral amygdala that are in many respects distinct from those reported earlier in the hippocampus. Long-term potentiation and surface expression of AMPA-receptors are impaired. Further, presynaptic defects are seen at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Remarkably, some of these synaptic defects in the amygdala are also amenable to pharmacological rescue. These results also underscore the need to modify the current hippocampus-centric framework to better explain FXS-related synaptic dysfunction in the amygdala.

  10. Reduced size of the amygdala in individuals with 47,XXY and 47,XXX karyotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Anil J; Brown, Wendy E; Bender, Bruce G; Linden, Mary G; Eliez, Stephan; Reiss, Allan L

    2002-01-01

    The excess of 47,XXX and 47,XXY karyotypes found in cytogenetic screening studies of individuals with schizophrenia has given support for an increased risk of psychiatric illness among men and women with sex chromosomal aneuploidy (SCA). Mesial temporal lobe structures, including the amygdala and hippocampus, are thought to be associated with abnormalities of mood and behavior in humans and in the neurobiology of schizophrenia. This study focuses on variations in volumes of mesial temporal lobe structures in men and women with SCA. Utilizing an unselected birth cohort of subjects with SCA and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we investigated the neuroanatomical consequences of a supernumerary X chromosome on the morphology of the amygdala and hippocampus. Regional and total brain volumes were measured in 10 subjects with 47,XXY, 10 subjects with 47,XXX, and 20 euploid controls. Amygdala volumes were significantly reduced in men with 47,XXY, compared to control men, while the decrease in women with 47,XXX was not as pronounced. Hippocampus volumes were preserved in both groups, compared to same-gender controls. Longitudinal studies of SCA individuals have shown an increased incidence of mild psychopathology and behavioral dysfunction in men with 47,XXY and more overt psychiatric illness in women with 47,XXX, compared to control populations. The alteration in amygdala volumes in individuals with a supernumerary X chromosome may provide a neuroanatomic basis for these findings.

  11. Analyzing dune dynamics at the dune-field scale based on multi-temporal analysis of Landsat-TM images

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, I.N.L.; Verstraeten, G.

    2012-01-01

    Studying dune dynamics at the dune-field scale requires intensive fieldwork and a relatively huge dataset. However, this is not always possible with the high cost and the limited availability of data. Here, we present a technique based on the analysis of multi-temporal Landsat-TM images for studying the dynamics of different dune morphologies from five dune-field sites around the world. A pair of Landsat-TM images for each site has been used after performing several steps of image pre-process...

  12. Serotonin, Amygdala and Fear: Assembling the Puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Bocchio, Marco; McHugh, Stephen B.; Bannerman, David M; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The fear circuitry orchestrates defense mechanisms in response to environmental threats. This circuitry is evolutionarily crucial for survival, but its dysregulation is thought to play a major role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric conditions in humans. The amygdala is a key player in the processing of fear. This brain area is prominently modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). The 5-HT input to the amygdala has drawn particular interest because genetic an...

  13. Subthreshold K+ Channel Dynamics Interact With Stimulus Spectrum to Influence Temporal Coding in an Auditory Brain Stem Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Mitchell L.; Doiron, Brent; Rinzel, John

    2013-01-01

    Neurons in the auditory brain stem encode signals with exceptional temporal precision. A low-threshold potassium current, IKLT, present in many auditory brain stem structures and thought to enhance temporal encoding, facilitates spike selection of rapid input current transients through an associated dynamic gate. Whether the dynamic nature of IKLT interacts with the timescales in spectrally rich input to influence spike encoding remains unclear. We examine the general influence of IKLT on spike encoding of stochastic stimuli using a pattern classification analysis between spike responses from a ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) model containing IKLT, and the same model with the dynamics removed. The influence of IKLT on spike encoding depended on the spectral content of the current stimulus such that maximal IKLT influence occurred for stimuli with power concentrated at frequencies low enough (<500 Hz) to allow IKLT activation. Further, broadband stimuli significantly decreased the influence of IKLT on spike encoding, suggesting that broadband stimuli are not well suited for investigating the influence of some dynamic membrane nonlinearities. Finally, pattern classification on spike responses was performed for physiologically realistic conductance stimuli created from various sounds filtered through an auditory nerve (AN) model. Regardless of the sound, the synaptic input arriving at VCN had similar low-pass power spectra, which led to a large influence of IKLT on spike encoding, suggesting that the subthreshold dynamics of IKLT plays a significant role in shaping the response of real auditory brain stem neurons. PMID:18057115

  14. Temporal bird community dynamics are strongly affected by landscape fragmentation in a Central American tropical forest region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandón, A.C.; Perelman, S.B.; Ramírez, M.; López, A.; Javier, O.; Robbins, Chandler S.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are considered the main causes of species extinctions, particularly in tropical ecosystems. The objective of this work was to evaluate the temporal dynamics of tropical bird communities in landscapes with different levels of fragmentation in eastern Guatemala. We evaluated five bird community dynamic parameters for forest specialists and generalists: (1) species extinction, (2) species turnover, (3) number of colonizing species, (4) relative species richness, and (5) a homogeneity index. For each of 24 landscapes, community dynamic parameters were estimated from bird point count data, for the 1998–1999 and 2008–2009 periods, accounting for species’ detection probability. Forest specialists had higher extinction rates and a smaller number of colonizing species in landscapes with higher fragmentation, thus having lower species richness in both time periods. Alternatively, forest generalists elicited a completely different pattern, showing a curvilinear association to forest fragmentation for most parameters. Thus, greater community dynamism for forest generalists was shown in landscapes with intermediate levels of fragmentation. Our study supports general theory regarding the expected negative effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on the temporal dynamics of biotic communities, particularly for forest specialists, providing strong evidence from understudied tropical bird communities.

  15. Structural Connectivity of the Developing Human Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygin, Zeynep M.; Osher, David E.; Koldewyn, Kami; Martin, Rebecca E.; Finn, Amy; Saxe, Rebecca; Gabrieli, John D.E.; Sheridan, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    A large corpus of research suggests that there are changes in the manner and degree to which the amygdala supports cognitive and emotional function across development. One possible basis for these developmental differences could be the maturation of amygdalar connections with the rest of the brain. Recent functional connectivity studies support this conclusion, but the structural connectivity of the developing amygdala and its different nuclei remains largely unstudied. We examined age related changes in the DWI connectivity fingerprints of the amygdala to the rest of the brain in 166 individuals of ages 5-30. We also developed a model to predict age based on individual-subject amygdala connectivity, and identified the connections that were most predictive of age. Finally, we segmented the amygdala into its four main nucleus groups, and examined the developmental changes in connectivity for each nucleus. We observed that with age, amygdalar connectivity becomes increasingly sparse and localized. Age related changes were largely localized to the subregions of the amygdala that are implicated in social inference and contextual memory (the basal and lateral nuclei). The central nucleus’ connectivity also showed differences with age but these differences affected fewer target regions than the basal and lateral nuclei. The medial nucleus did not exhibit any age related changes. These findings demonstrate increasing specificity in the connectivity patterns of amygdalar nuclei across age. PMID:25875758

  16. Structural connectivity of the developing human amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep M Saygin

    Full Text Available A large corpus of research suggests that there are changes in the manner and degree to which the amygdala supports cognitive and emotional function across development. One possible basis for these developmental differences could be the maturation of amygdalar connections with the rest of the brain. Recent functional connectivity studies support this conclusion, but the structural connectivity of the developing amygdala and its different nuclei remains largely unstudied. We examined age related changes in the DWI connectivity fingerprints of the amygdala to the rest of the brain in 166 individuals of ages 5-30. We also developed a model to predict age based on individual-subject amygdala connectivity, and identified the connections that were most predictive of age. Finally, we segmented the amygdala into its four main nucleus groups, and examined the developmental changes in connectivity for each nucleus. We observed that with age, amygdalar connectivity becomes increasingly sparse and localized. Age related changes were largely localized to the subregions of the amygdala that are implicated in social inference and contextual memory (the basal and lateral nuclei. The central nucleus' connectivity also showed differences with age but these differences affected fewer target regions than the basal and lateral nuclei. The medial nucleus did not exhibit any age related changes. These findings demonstrate increasing specificity in the connectivity patterns of amygdalar nuclei across age.

  17. The amygdala: securing pleasure and avoiding pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anushka B P Fernando

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The amygdala has traditionally been associated with fear, mediating the impact of negative emotions on memory. However, this view does not fully encapsulate the function of the amygdala, nor the impact that processing in this structure has on the motivational limbic corticostriatal circuitry of which it is an important structure. Here we discuss the interactions between different amygdala nuclei with cortical and striatal regions involved in motivation; interconnections and parallel circuitries that have become increasingly understood in recent years. We review the evidence that the amygdala stores memories that allow initially motivationally neutral stimuli to become associated through pavlovian conditioning with motivationally relevant outcomes which, importantly, can be either appetitive (e.g. food or aversive (e.g. electric shock. We also consider how different psychological processes supported by the amygdala such as conditioned reinforcement and punishment, conditioned motivation and suppression, and conditioned approach and avoidance behavior, are not only psychologically but also neurobiologically dissociable, being mediated by distinct yet overlapping neural circuits within the limbic corticostriatal circuitry. Clearly the role of the amygdala goes beyond encoding aversive stimuli to also encode the appetitive, requiring an appreciation of the amygdala’s mediation of both appetitive and fearful behavior through diverse psychological processes.

  18. Temporal and spatial dynamics of large lake hypoxia: Integrating statistical and three-dimensional dynamic models to enhance lake management criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocaniov, Serghei A.; Scavia, Donald

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxia or low bottom water dissolved oxygen (DO) is a world-wide problem of management concern requiring an understanding and ability to monitor and predict its spatial and temporal dynamics. However, this is often made difficult in large lakes and coastal oceans because of limited spatial and temporal coverage of field observations. We used a calibrated and validated three-dimensional ecological model of Lake Erie to extend a statistical relationship between hypoxic extent and bottom water DO concentrations to explore implications of the broader temporal and spatial development and dissipation of hypoxia. We provide the first numerical demonstration that hypoxia initiates in the nearshore, not the deep portion of the basin, and that the threshold used to define hypoxia matters in both spatial and temporal dynamics and in its sensitivity to climate. We show that existing monitoring programs likely underestimate both maximum hypoxic extent and the importance of low oxygen in the nearshore, discuss implications for ecosystem and drinking water protection, and recommend how these results could be used to efficiently and economically extend monitoring programs.

  19. Spatial and temporal water quality dynamics during baseflow in an agricultural headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Weiler, Markus; Saroos, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    . In a 110 m stream reach without detectable groundwater inflows biogeochemical in-stream processes were studied with a focus on nitrate transport and uptake kinetics. Air temperatures, incoming radiation, discharges, T and EC data were analysed and a kinetic first-order uptake model was applied to explain regularly measured reach scale nitrate data sets. Resulting process rates and drivers allowed the up-scaling of in-stream nitrate-uptake processes to the whole stream network. Due to the spatially explicit baseflow contributions we used the snap shots of stream and drainage network major ion/ nitrate composition and the kinetic first-order uptake model to simulate the space/time variant impact of sub-catchments on catchment nitrate export. Thus we could distinguish between conservative mixing and dilution processes and biogeochemical in-stream processes on the network scale. Considering these findings, we could draw a comprehensive picture how the transition of dominant runoff source areas and their dynamic impact on observable spatio-temporal variations of nitrate loadings is functioning in the study catchment.

  20. Repeatedly stressed rats have enhanced vulnerability to amygdala kindling epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nigel C; Lee, Han Ee; Yang, Meng; Rees, Sandra M; Morris, Margaret J; O'Brien, Terence J; Salzberg, Michael R

    2013-02-01

    Psychiatric disorders associated with elevated stress levels, such as depression, are present in many epilepsy patients, including those with mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (mTLE). Evidence suggests that these psychiatric disorders can predate the onset of epilepsy, suggesting a causal/contributory role. Prolonged exposure to elevated corticosterone, used as a model of chronic stress/depression, accelerates limbic epileptogenesis in the amygdala kindling model. The current study examined whether exposure to repeated stress could similarly accelerate experimental epileptogenesis. Female adult non-epileptic Wistar rats were implanted with a bipolar electrode into the left amygdala, and were randomly assigned into stressed (n=18) or non-stressed (n=19) groups. Rats underwent conventional amygdala kindling (two electrical stimulations per day) until 5 Class V seizures had been experienced ('the fully kindled state'). Stressed rats were exposed to 30min restraint immediately prior to each kindling stimulation, whereas non-stressed rats received control handling. Restraint stress increased circulating corticosterone levels (pre-stress: 122±17ng/ml; post-stress: 632±33ng/ml), with no habituation observed over the experiment. Stressed rats reached the 'fully kindled state' in significantly fewer stimulations than non-stressed rats (21±1 vs 33±3 stimulations; p=0.022; ANOVA), indicative of a vulnerability to epileptogenesis. Further, seizure durations were significantly longer in stressed rats (p<0.001; ANOVA). These data demonstrate that exposure to repeated experimental stress accelerates the development of limbic epileptogenesis, an effect which may be related to elevated corticosterone levels. This may have implications for understanding the effects of chronic stress and depression in disease onset and progression of mTLE in humans.

  1. A Statistical Physics Characterization of the Complex Systems Dynamics: Quantifying Complexity from Spatio-Temporal Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hana Koorehdavoudi; Paul Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Biological systems are frequently categorized as complex systems due to their capabilities of generating spatio-temporal structures from apparent random decisions. In spite of research on analyzing biological systems, we lack a quantifiable framework for measuring their complexity. To fill this gap, in this paper, we develop a new paradigm to study a collective group of N agents moving and interacting in a three-dimensional space. Our paradigm helps to identify the spatio-temporal states of t...

  2. Temporal dynamics of attentional selection in adult male carriers of the fragile X premutation allele and adult controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Mei Wong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Carriers of the fragile X premutation allele (fXPCs have an expanded CGG trinucleotide repeat size within the emph{FMR1} gene and are at increased risk of developing Fragile X-associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS. Previous research has shown that male fXPCs with FXTAS exhibit cognitive decline, predominantly in executive functions such as inhibitory control and working memory. Recent evidence suggests fXPCs may also exhibit impairments in processing temporal information. The attentional blink (AB task is often used to examine the dynamics of attentional selection, but disagreements exist as to whether the AB is due to excessive or insufficient attentional control. In this study, we used a variant of the AB task and neuropsychological testing to explore the dynamics of attentional selection, relate AB performance to attentional control, and determine whether fXPCs exhibited temporal and/or attentional control impairments. Participants were adult male fXPCs, aged 18--48 years and asymptomatic for FXTAS (emph{n} = 19 and age-matched male controls (emph{n} = 20. We found that fXPCs did not differ from controls in the AB task, indicating that the temporal dynamics of attentional selection were intact. However, they were impaired in the letter-number sequencing task, a test of attentional control. In the combined fXPC and control group, letter-number sequencing performance correlated positively with AB magnitude. This finding supports models that posit the AB is due to excess attentional control. In our two-pronged analysis approach, we contribute to the theoretical literature in controls by extending the AB literature, and we enhance our understanding of fXPCs by demonstrating that at least some aspects of temporal processing may be spared.

  3. Amazon River dissolved load: temporal dynamics and annual budget from the Andes to the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moquet, Jean-Sébastien; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Crave, Alain; Viers, Jérôme; Filizola, Naziano; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Oliveira, Tereza Cristina; Sánchez, Liz Stefanny Hidalgo; Lagane, Christelle; Casimiro, Waldo Sven Lavado; Noriega, Luis; Pombosa, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to estimate the export fluxes of major dissolved species at the scale of the Amazon basin, to identify the main parameters controlling their spatial distribution and to identify the role of discharge variability in the variability of the total dissolved solid (TDS) flux through the hydrological cycle. Data are compiled from the monthly hydrochemistry and daily discharge database of the "Programa Climatologico y Hidrologico de la Cuenca Amazonica de Bolivia" (PHICAB) and the HYBAM observatories from 34 stations distributed over the Amazon basin (for the 1983-1992 and 2000-2012 periods, respectively). This paper consists of a first global observation of the fluxes and temporal dynamics of each geomorphological domain of the Amazon basin. Based on mean interannual monthly flux calculations, we estimated that the Amazon basin delivered approximately 272 × 10(6) t year(-1) (263-278) of TDS during the 2003-2012 period, which represents approximately 7 % of the continental inputs to the oceans. This flux is mainly made up by HCO3, Ca and SiO2, reflecting the preferential contributions of carbonate and silicate chemical weathering to the Amazon River Basin. The main tributaries contributing to the TDS flux are the Marañon and Ucayali Rivers (approximately 50 % of the TDS production over 14 % of the Amazon basin area) due to the weathering of carbonates and evaporites drained by their Andean tributaries. An Andes-sedimentary area-shield TDS flux (and specific flux) gradient is observed throughout the basin and is first explained by the TDS concentration contrast between these domains, rather than variability in runoff. This observation highlights that, under tropical context, the weathering flux repartition is primarily controlled by the geomorphological/geological setting and confirms that sedimentary areas are currently active in terms of the production of dissolved load. The log relationships of concentration vs discharge have

  4. Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of High-Resolution Animal Networks: What Can We Learn from Domestic Animals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Chen

    Full Text Available Animal social network is the key to understand many ecological and epidemiological processes. We used real-time location system (RTLS to accurately track cattle position, analyze their proximity networks, and tested the hypothesis of temporal stationarity and spatial homogeneity in these networks during different daily time periods and in different areas of the pen. The network structure was analyzed using global network characteristics (network density, subgroup clustering (modularity, triadic property (transitivity, and dyadic interactions (correlation coefficient from a quadratic assignment procedure at hourly level. We demonstrated substantial spatial-temporal heterogeneity in these networks and potential link between indirect animal-environment contact and direct animal-animal contact. But such heterogeneity diminished if data were collected at lower spatial (aggregated at entire pen level or temporal (aggregated at daily level resolution. The network structure (described by the characteristics such as density, modularity, transitivity, etc. also changed substantially at different time and locations. There were certain time (feeding and location (hay that the proximity network structures were more consistent based on the dyadic interaction analysis. These results reveal new insights for animal network structure and spatial-temporal dynamics, provide more accurate descriptions of animal social networks, and allow more accurate modeling of multiple (both direct and indirect disease transmission pathways.

  5. The joyful, yet balanced, amygdala: moderated responses to positive but not negative stimuli in trait happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, William A; Kirkland, Tabitha

    2014-06-01

    Although much is known about the neural dynamics of maladaptive affective styles, the mechanisms of happiness and well-being are less clear. One possibility is that the neural processes of trait happiness are the opposite of those involved in depression/anxiety: 'rose-colored glasses' cause happy people to focus on positive cues while remaining oblivious to threats. Specifically, because negative affective styles have been associated with increased amygdala activation to negative stimuli, it may be happy people will not show this enhanced response, and may even show reduced amygdala activation to negative stimuli. Alternatively, if well-being entails appropriate sensitivity to information, happy people may process any relevant cues-positive or negative-to facilitate appropriate responding. This would mean that happiness is associated with increased amygdala activation to both positive and negative stimuli. Forty-two participants viewed affective stimuli during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Happier participants showed greater amygdala responses to positive stimuli. Moreover, no significant relationships were found between happiness and responses to negative stimuli. In other words, for happy people, a tuning toward positive did not come at the cost of losing sensitivity to negativity. This work suggests that trait happiness is associated with a balanced amygdala response to positivity and negativity.

  6. Transient brain activity disentangles fMRI resting-state dynamics in terms of spatially and temporally overlapping networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahanoğlu, Fikret Işik; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2015-07-16

    Dynamics of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provide a new window onto the organizational principles of brain function. Using state-of-the-art signal processing techniques, we extract innovation-driven co-activation patterns (iCAPs) from resting-state fMRI. The iCAPs' maps are spatially overlapping and their sustained-activity signals temporally overlapping. Decomposing resting-state fMRI using iCAPs reveals the rich spatiotemporal structure of functional components that dynamically assemble known resting-state networks. The temporal overlap between iCAPs is substantial; typically, three to four iCAPs occur simultaneously in combinations that are consistent with their behaviour profiles. In contrast to conventional connectivity analysis, which suggests a negative correlation between fluctuations in the default-mode network (DMN) and task-positive networks, we instead find evidence for two DMN-related iCAPs consisting the posterior cingulate cortex that differentially interact with the attention network. These findings demonstrate how the fMRI resting state can be functionally decomposed into spatially and temporally overlapping building blocks using iCAPs.

  7. Time-resolved PIV technique for high temporal resolution measurement of mechanical prosthetic aortic valve fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, R; Morbiducci, U; Rossi, M; Scalise, L; Verdonck, P; Grigioni, M

    2007-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) have been used to replace diseased native valves for more than five decades. Among these, mechanical PHVs are the most frequently implanted. Unfortunately, these devices still do not achieve ideal behavior and lead to many complications, many of which are related to fluid mechanics. The fluid dynamics of mechanical PHVs are particularly complex and the fine-scale characteristics of such flows call for very accurate experimental techniques. Adequate temporal resolution can be reached by applying time-resolved PIV, a high-resolution dynamic technique which is able to capture detailed chronological changes in the velocity field. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the evolution of the flow field in a detailed time domain of a commercial bileaflet PHV in a mock-loop mimicking unsteady conditions, by means of time-resolved 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The investigated flow field corresponded to the region immediately downstream of the valve plane. Spatial resolution as in "standard" PIV analysis of prosthetic valve fluid dynamics was used. The combination of a Nd:YLF high-repetition-rate double-cavity laser with a high frame rate CMOS camera allowed a detailed, highly temporally resolved acquisition (up to 10000 fps depending on the resolution) of the flow downstream of the PHV. Features that were observed include the non-homogeneity and unsteadiness of the phenomenon and the presence of large-scale vortices within the field, especially in the wake of the valve leaflets. Furthermore, we observed that highly temporally cycle-resolved analysis allowed the different behaviors exhibited by the bileaflet valve at closure to be captured in different acquired cardiac cycles. By accurately capturing hemodynamically relevant time scales of motion, time-resolved PIV characterization can realistically be expected to help designers in improving PHV performance and in furnishing comprehensive validation with experimental data

  8. Ganaxolone Suppression of Behavioral and Electrographic Seizures in the Mouse Amygdala Kindling Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Doodipala S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Ganaxolone (3α-hydroxy-3β-methyl-5α-pregnan-20-one), a synthetic analog of the endogenous neurosteroid allopregnanolone and a positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptors, may represent a new treatment approach for epilepsy. Here we demonstrate that pretreatment with ganaxolone (1.25–20 mg/kg, s.c.) causes a dose-dependent suppression of behavioral and electrographic seizures in fully amygdala kindled female mice, with nearly complete seizure protection at the highest dose tested. The ED50 for suppression of behavioral seizures was 6.6 mg/kg. The seizure suppression produced by ganaxolone was comparable to that of clonazepam (ED50, 0.1 mg/kg, s.c.). To the extent that amygdala kindling represents a model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, this study supports the utility of ganaxolone in the treatment of patients with temporal lobe seizures. PMID:20172694

  9. Abolition of lifelong specific phobia: a novel therapeutic consequence of left mesial temporal lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, S; Chan, D; Medford, N

    2015-02-01

    Numerous imaging studies have confirmed the amygdala as prominent within a neural network mediating specific phobia, including arachnophobia. We report the case of a patient in whom arachnophobia was abolished after left temporal mesial lobectomy, with unchanged fear responses to other stimuli. The phenomenon of abolition of specific phobia after amygdala removal has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported.

  10. Dynamical disease: Identification, temporal aspects and treatment strategies of human illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélair, Jacques; Glass, Leon; an der Heiden, Uwe; Milton, John

    1995-03-01

    Dynamical diseases are characterized by sudden changes in the qualitative dynamics of physiological processes, leading to abnormal dynamics and disease. Thus, there is a natural matching between the mathematical field of nonlinear dynamics and medicine. This paper summarizes advances in the study of dynamical disease with emphasis on a NATO Advanced Research Worshop held in Mont Tremblant, Québec, Canada in February 1994. We describe the international effort currently underway to identify dynamical diseases and to study these diseases from a perspective of nonlinear dynamics. Linear and nonlinear time series analysis combined with analysis of bifurcations in dynamics are being used to help understand mechanisms of pathological rhythms and offer the promise for better diagnostic and therapeutic techniques.

  11. Features of the Jovian DAM radiation dynamic spectra as observed by modern receivers with high frequency-temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, G.; Konovalenko, A.; Zakharenko, V.; Vinogradov, V.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Zarka, Ph.

    2012-09-01

    One of the promising approaches to investigating features of the Jovian decameter radio emission (DAM) is application of novel experimental techniques with a further detailed analysis of the obtained data using both well-known and modern mathematical methods. Several observational campaigns were performed in November 2009 with the use of the UTR-2 radio telescope (Kharkov, Ukraine) and efficient registration systems with high frequency and temporal resolutions (the antenna effective area is about 105 m2, the frequency resolution is 4 kHz, the temporal resolution is 0.25 ms, and the dynamic range is 70 dB) [1]. The main goal of these campaigns was to experimentally investigate new properties of the Jovian DAM emission which could be detected using the above mentioned equipment. Also an original software package was developed for control the digital receiver and for off-line data analysis at the postprocessing stage.

  12. Wide-field multiphoton imaging of cellular dynamics in thick tissue by temporal focusing and patterned illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, O. D.; Aubé, B.; Pagès, S.; Koninck, P. De; Côté, D.

    2011-01-01

    Wide-field temporal focusing is a novel technique that provides optical sectioning for imaging without the need for beam scanning. However, illuminating over large areas greatly reduces the photon density which limits the technique applicability to small regions, precluding functional imaging of cellular networks. Here we present a strategy that combines beam shaping and temporal focusing of amplified pulses (>1 µJ/pulse) for fast imaging of cells from the central nervous system in acute slices. Multiphoton video-rate imaging over total areas as wide as 4800 µm2 with an optical sectioning under 10 µm at 800 nm is achieved with our setup, leading to imaging of calcium dynamics of multiple cells simultaneously in thick tissue. PMID:21412473

  13. Spatio-temporal dynamics of mosquitoes in stream pools of a biosphere reserve of Southern Western Ghats, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbalagan, S; Arunprasanna, V; Kannan, M; Dinakaran, S; Krishnan, M

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and temporal dynamics of mosquitoes in stream pools were examined in a biosphere reserve of the Southern Western Ghats, India. The immature mosquitoes in stream pools were collected from stream substrates of bedrock pool, boulder cavity and sand puddle. The collected larvae and pupae were reared and identified. In total, 16 species from four genera of mosquitoes were collected. The mosquito species from Culex and Anopheles were predominantly occurred. The bedrock pool had the highest diversity and abundance of mosquitoes. The statistical analyses showed that the substrate specificity and the seasons were positively related to the distribution of mosquitoes rather than spatial pattern. This study described the spatial and temporal pattern of mosquitoes in stream pools of the Southern Western Ghats. This information would be helpful to National Vector borne disease control program for surveillance and control.

  14. Green light: gross primary production influences seasonal stream N export by controlling fine-scale temporal N dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, S.; Lupon, A.; Sabater, F.; Martí Roca, E.

    2015-12-01

    The contribution of in-stream processes to nitrogen (N) exports remains unclear because stream water chemistry integrates biogeochemical processes occurring at different spatial and temporal scales within upland, riparian and aquatic ecosystems. Monitoring nutrient concentrations at fine-scale temporal resolution can provide insights on in-stream N processing. Yet, the mechanisms underlying fine-scale temporal nutrient dynamics and their implications for flux budgets at catchment scale are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated patterns and controls of diel variation in stream nitrate (NO3-) concentration and the influence of these on N fluxes along a stream continuum with increasing riparian area and channel width. We tested two alternative hypotheses: that diel variation in stream NO3- concentration is driven (a) by stream metabolism, or (b) by riparian groundwater inputs. Although productivity in this stream was extremely low, patterns of diel variation in stream NO3- concentration emerged in early-spring and they were highly correlated with the daily regime of irradiance and gross primary production (GPP). In addition, diel NO3- patterns agreed with those predicted from GPP and biofilm C:N ratios, but not with diel variations predicted from changes in riparian groundwater inputs. These results point at in-stream photoautotrophic N uptake as the most likely driver of diel fluctuations in stream NO3- concentration. From a network perspective, the occurrence of diel variations in stream NO3- concentration, and thus their influence on stream N fluxes, increased along the stream continuum likely because of increases in light inputs and water temperature. This study evidences that monitoring of nutrient concentrations at fine-scale temporal resolution can provide mechanistic explanations about the relevance of in-stream and terrestrial processes on regulating stream N dynamics and their contribution to N export at catchment scale.

  15. Nitrate sinks and sources as controls of spatio-temporal water quality dynamics in an agricultural headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Durand, Patrick; Weiler, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Several controls are known to affect water quality of stream networks during flow recession periods, such as solute leaching processes, surface water-groundwater interactions as well as biogeochemical in-stream turnover processes. Throughout the stream network, combinations of specific water and solute export rates and local in-stream conditions overlay the biogeochemical signals from upstream sections. Therefore, upstream sections can be considered functional units which could be distinguished and ordered regarding their relative contribution to nutrient dynamics at the catchment outlet. Based on snapshot sampling of flow and nitrate concentrations along the stream in an agricultural headwater during the summer flow recession period, we determined spatial and temporal patterns of water quality for the whole stream. A data-driven, in-stream-mixing-and-removal model was developed and applied for analysing the spatio-temporal in-stream retention processes and their effect on the spatio-temporal fluxes of nitrate from subcatchments. Thereby, we have been able to distinguish quantitatively between nitrate sinks, sources per stream reaches, and subcatchments, and thus we could disentangle the overlay of nitrate sink and source signals. For nitrate sources, we determined their permanent and temporal impact on stream water quality and for nitrate sinks, we found increasing nitrate removal efficiencies from upstream to downstream. Our results highlight the importance of distinct nitrate source locations within the watershed for in-stream concentrations and in-stream removal processes, respectively. Thus, our findings contribute to the development of a more dynamic perception of water quality in streams and rivers concerning ecological and sustainable water resource management.

  16. Approximate Entropy as a measure of complexity in sap flow temporal dynamics of two tropical tree species under water deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo M. Souza

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Approximate Entropy (ApEn, a model-independent statistics to quantify serial irregularities, was used to evaluate changes in sap flow temporal dynamics of two tropical species of trees subjected to water deficit. Water deficit induced a decrease in sap flow of G. ulmifolia, whereas C. legalis held stable their sap flow levels. Slight increases in time series complexity were observed in both species under drought condition. This study showed that ApEn could be used as a helpful tool to assess slight changes in temporal dynamics of physiological data, and to uncover some patterns of plant physiological responses to environmental stimuli.Entropia Aproximada (ApEn, um modelo estatístico independente para quantificar irregularidade em séries temporais, foi utilizada para avaliar alterações na dinâmica temporal do fluxo de seiva em duas espécies arbóreas tropicais submetidas à deficiência hídrica. A deficiência hídrica induziu uma grande redução no fluxo de seiva em G. ulmifolia, enquanto que na espécie C. legalis manteve-se estável. A complexidade das séries temporais foi levemente aumentada sob deficiência hídrica. O estudo mostrou que ApEn pode ser usada como um método para detectar pequenas alterações na dinâmica temporal de dados fisiológicos, e revelar alguns padrões de respostas fisiológicas a estímulos ambientais.

  17. Temporal dynamics of spectral bioindicators evidence biological and ecological differences among functional types in a cork oak open woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasoli, Sofia; Costa e Silva, Filipe; Silva, João M. N.

    2016-06-01

    The application of spectral vegetation indices for the purpose of vegetation monitoring and modeling increased largely in recent years. Nonetheless, the interpretation of biophysical properties of vegetation through their spectral signature is still a challenging task. This is particularly true in Mediterranean oak forest characterized by a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. In this study, the temporal dynamics of vegetation indices expected to be related with green biomass and photosynthetic efficiency were compared for the canopy of trees, the herbaceous layer, and two shrub species: cistus ( Cistus salviifolius) and ulex ( Ulex airensis). coexisting in a cork oak woodland. All indices were calculated from in situ measurements with a FieldSpec3 spectroradiometer (ASD Inc., Boulder, USA). Large differences emerged in the temporal trends and in the correlation between climate and vegetation indices. The relationship between spectral indices and temperature, radiation, and vapor pressure deficit for cork oak was opposite to that observed for the herbaceous layer and cistus. No correlation was observed between rainfall and vegetation indices in cork oak and ulex, but in the herbaceous layer and in the cistus, significant correlations were found. The analysis of spectral vegetation indices with fraction of absorbed PAR (fPAR) and quantum yield of chlorophyll fluorescence ( ΔF/ Fm') evidenced strongest relationships with the indices Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI)512, respectively. Our results, while confirms the ability of spectral vegetation indices to represent temporal dynamics of biophysical properties of vegetation, evidence the importance to consider ecosystem composition for a correct ecological interpretation of results when the spatial resolution of observations includes different plant functional types.

  18. Geospatial Narratives and Their Spatio-Temporal Dynamics: Commonsense Reasoning for High-Level Analyses in Geographic Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul Bhatt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The modeling, analysis and visualization of dynamic geospatial phenomenahas been identified as a key developmental challenge for next-generation GeographicInformation Systems (GIS. In this context, the envisaged paradigmatic extensions tocontemporary foundational GIS technology raises fundamental questions concerning theontological, formal representational and (analytical computational methods that wouldunderlie their spatial information theoretic underpinnings. We present the conceptualoverview and architecture for the development of high-level semantic and qualitativeanalytical capabilities for dynamic geospatial domains. Building on formal methods in theareas of commonsense reasoning, qualitative reasoning, spatial and temporal representationand reasoning, reasoning about actions and change and computational models of narrative,we identify concrete theoretical and practical challenges that accrue in the context offormal reasoning about space, events, actions and change. With this as a basis and withinthe backdrop of an illustrated scenario involving the spatio-temporal dynamics of urbannarratives, we address specific problems and solution techniques chiefly involving qualitativeabstraction, data integration and spatial consistency and practical geospatial abduction.

  19. Hot spot detection and spatio-temporal dynamics of dengue in Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naish, S.; Tong, S.

    2014-11-01

    Dengue has been a major public health concern in Australia since it re-emerged in Queensland in 1992-1993. This study explored spatio-temporal distribution and clustering of locally-acquired dengue cases in Queensland State, Australia and identified target areas for effective interventions. A computerised locally-acquired dengue case dataset was collected from Queensland Health for Queensland from 1993 to 2012. Descriptive spatial and temporal analyses were conducted using geographic information system tools and geostatistical techniques. Dengue hot spots were detected using SatScan method. Descriptive spatial analysis showed that a total of 2,398 locally-acquired dengue cases were recorded in central and northern regions of tropical Queensland. A seasonal pattern was observed with most of the cases occurring in autumn. Spatial and temporal variation of dengue cases was observed in the geographic areas affected by dengue over time. Tropical areas are potential high-risk areas for mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue. This study demonstrated that the locally-acquired dengue cases have exhibited a spatial and temporal variation over the past twenty years in tropical Queensland, Australia. There is a clear evidence for the existence of statistically significant clusters of dengue and these clusters varied over time. These findings enabled us to detect and target dengue clusters suggesting that the use of geospatial information can assist the health authority in planning dengue control activities and it would allow for better design and implementation of dengue management programs.

  20. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  1. A Developmental Examination of Amygdala Response to Facial Expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Guyer, Amanda E.; Monk, Christopher S.; McClure-Tone, Erin B.; Nelson, Eric E.; Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Adler, Abby D.; Fromm, Stephen J.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Daniel S Pine; Ernst, Monique

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate the amygdala in face– emotion processing, particularly for fearful facial expressions. Related findings suggest that face–emotion processing engages the amygdala within an interconnected circuitry that can be studied using a functional-connectivity approach. Past work also underscores important functional changes in the amygdala during development. Taken together, prior research on amygdala function and development reveals a need for more work examining dev...

  2. Observation of genuine wave vector (k or β) gap in a dynamic transmission line and temporal photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Ayona, J. R.; Halevi, P., E-mail: halevi@inaoep.mx [Electronics Department, Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840 (Mexico)

    2015-08-17

    By definition, a temporal photonic crystal (TPC) has a permittivity ε(t) that varies periodically with time. We prove that, in the long wavelength limit, a TPC is accurately mimicked by a dynamic transmission line (DTL) having a capacitance (inductance) per unit length equal to ε(t) (μ). Employing a DTL in the microwave region, we measured the photonic band structure, which results to display a genuine wave vector (k or β) gap, in very good agreement with our theoretical model and the equivalent TPC.

  3. Observation of genuine wave vector (k or β) gap in a dynamic transmission line and temporal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ayona, J. R.; Halevi, P.

    2015-08-01

    By definition, a temporal photonic crystal (TPC) has a permittivity ɛ(t) that varies periodically with time. We prove that, in the long wavelength limit, a TPC is accurately mimicked by a dynamic transmission line (DTL) having a capacitance (inductance) per unit length equal to ɛ(t) (μ). Employing a DTL in the microwave region, we measured the photonic band structure, which results to display a genuine wave vector (k or β) gap, in very good agreement with our theoretical model and the equivalent TPC.

  4. Short environmental enrichment in adulthood reverses anxiety and basolateral amygdala hypertrophy induced by maternal separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koe, A S; Ashokan, A; Mitra, R

    2016-02-02

    Maternal separation during early childhood results in greater sensitivity to stressors later in adult life. This is reflected as greater propensity to develop stress-related disorders in humans and animal models, including anxiety and depression. Environmental enrichment (EE) reverses some of the damaging effects of maternal separation in rodent models when provided during peripubescent life, temporally proximal to the separation. It is presently unknown if EE provided outside this critical window can still rescue separation-induced anxiety and neural plasticity. In this report we use a rat model to demonstrate that a single short episode of EE in adulthood reduced anxiety-like behaviour in maternally separated rats. We further show that maternal separation resulted in hypertrophy of dendrites and increase in spine density of basolateral amygdala neurons in adulthood, long after initial stress treatment. This is congruent with prior observations showing centrality of basolateral amygdala hypertrophy in anxiety induced by stress during adulthood. In line with the ability of the adult enrichment to rescue stress-induced anxiety, we show that enrichment renormalized stress-induced structural expansion of the amygdala neurons. These observations argue that behavioural plasticity induced by early adversity can be rescued by environmental interventions much later in life, likely mediated by ameliorating effects of enrichment on basolateral amygdala plasticity.

  5. Mapping and Characterization of Hydrological Dynamics in a Coastal Marsh Using High Temporal Resolution Sentinel-1A Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Cazals

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In Europe, water levels in wetlands are widely controlled by environmental managers and farmers. However, the influence of these management practices on hydrodynamics and biodiversity remains poorly understood. This study assesses advantages of using radar data from the recently launched Sentinel-1A satellite to monitor hydrological dynamics of the Poitevin marshland in western France. We analyze a time series of 14 radar images acquired in VV and HV polarizations from December 2014 to May 2015 with a 12-day time step. Both polarizations are used with a hysteresis thresholding algorithm which uses both spatial and temporal information to distinguish open water, flooded vegetation and non-flooded grassland. Classification results are compared to in situ piezometric measurements combined with a Digital Terrain Model derived from LiDAR data. Results reveal that open water is successfully detected, whereas flooded grasslands with emergent vegetation and fine-grained patterns are detected with moderate accuracy. Five hydrological regimes are derived from the flood duration and mapped. Analysis of time steps in the time series shows that decreased temporal repetitivity induces significant differences in estimates of flood duration. These results illustrate the great potential to monitor variations in seasonal floods with the high temporal frequency of Sentinel-1A acquisitions.

  6. Single-molecule diffusion and conformational dynamics by spatial integration of temporal fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2014-10-06

    Single-molecule localization and tracking has been used to translate spatiotemporal information of individual molecules to map their diffusion behaviours. However, accurate analysis of diffusion behaviours and including other parameters, such as the conformation and size of molecules, remain as limitations to the method. Here, we report a method that addresses the limitations of existing single-molecular localization methods. The method is based on temporal tracking of the cumulative area occupied by molecules. These temporal fluctuations are tied to molecular size, rates of diffusion and conformational changes. By analysing fluorescent nanospheres and double-stranded DNA molecules of different lengths and topological forms, we demonstrate that our cumulative-area method surpasses the conventional single-molecule localization method in terms of the accuracy of determined diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, the cumulative-area method provides conformational relaxation times of structurally flexible chains along with diffusion coefficients, which together are relevant to work in a wide spectrum of scientific fields.

  7. Analysis of Stochastic Radio Channels with Temporal Birth-Death Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Morten Lomholt; Pedersen, Troels; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2014-01-01

    We employ the theory of spatial point processes to revisit and reinterpret a particular class of time-variant stochastic radio channel models. Common for all models in this class is that individual multipath components are emerging and vanishing in a temporal birth-death like manner, with the und......We employ the theory of spatial point processes to revisit and reinterpret a particular class of time-variant stochastic radio channel models. Common for all models in this class is that individual multipath components are emerging and vanishing in a temporal birth-death like manner......, with the underlying stochastic birth-death mechanism governed by two facilitating assumptions. Well-known analytical properties of this class of channel models are reestablished by simple arguments and several new results are derived. The primary tool used to obtain these results is Campbell's Theorem which enables...

  8. Direct observation of the spatial and temporal dynamics of polaron diffusion in SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohmoto, T.; Ikeda, D.; Liang, X.; Moriyasu, T.

    2013-06-01

    The generation, relaxation, and diffusion dynamics of optically induced lattice distortion in the relaxed excited state of SrTiO3 are studied by using polarization spectroscopy with the pump-probe technique. The relaxed excited state is generated with a rise time on the order of 100 ps. Three kinds of thermal activation processes of the localized lattice distortion are found, and these processes are considered to be caused by photogenerated carriers in trapped states, which play important roles in photoluminescence or photoconductivity. We observed the lattice distortion induced by a separated pump beam from the probe beam to investigate its itineracy. The lattice-distortion signal appears later as the separation along the [100] axis becomes larger. The temperature dependence of the mobility suggests that the observed diffusive lattice distortion is caused by photogenerated electrons accompanied by lattice distortion, or electron polarons. Thus, the spatial and temporal dynamics of polaron diffusion were observed directly in our experiment.

  9. The effects of spatial and temporal heterogeneity on the population dynamics of four animal species in a Danish landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forchhammer Mads C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation in carrying capacity and population return rates is generally ignored in traditional studies of population dynamics. Variation is hard to study in the field because of difficulties controlling the environment in order to obtain statistical replicates, and because of the scale and expense of experimenting on populations. There may also be ethical issues. To circumvent these problems we used detailed simulations of the simultaneous behaviours of interacting animals in an accurate facsimile of a real Danish landscape. The models incorporate as much as possible of the behaviour and ecology of skylarks Alauda arvensis, voles Microtus agrestis, a ground beetle Bembidion lampros and a linyphiid spider Erigone atra. This allows us to quantify and evaluate the importance of spatial and temporal heterogeneity on the population dynamics of the four species. Results Both spatial and temporal heterogeneity affected the relationship between population growth rate and population density in all four species. Spatial heterogeneity accounted for 23–30% of the variance in population growth rate after accounting for the effects of density, reflecting big differences in local carrying capacity associated with the landscape features important to individual species. Temporal heterogeneity accounted for 3–13% of the variance in vole, skylark and spider, but 43% in beetles. The associated temporal variation in carrying capacity would be problematic in traditional analyses of density dependence. Return rates were less than one in all species and essentially invariant in skylarks, spiders and beetles. Return rates varied over the landscape in voles, being slower where there were larger fluctuations in local population sizes. Conclusion Our analyses estimated the traditional parameters of carrying capacities and return rates, but these are now seen as varying continuously over the landscape depending on habitat quality and the mechanisms

  10. Temporal, spatial and ecological dynamics of speciation among amphi-Beringian small mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Andrew G.; Takebayashi, Naoki; Galbreath, Kurt E.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Cook, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Quaternary climate cycles played an important role in promoting diversification across the Northern Hemisphere, although details of the mechanisms driving evolutionary change are still poorly resolved. In a comparative phylogeographical framework, we investigate temporal, spatial and ecological components of evolution within a suite of Holarctic small mammals. We test a hypothesis of simultaneous divergence among multiple taxon pairs, investigating time to coalescence and demographic change for each taxon in response to a combination of climate and geography.

  11. Temporal dynamics of the metabolically active rumen bacteria colonizing fresh perennial ryegrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huws, Sharon A; Edwards, Joan E; Creevey, Christopher J; Rees Stevens, Pauline; Lin, Wanchang; Girdwood, Susan E; Pachebat, Justin A; Kingston-Smith, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated successional colonization of fresh perennial ryegrass (PRG) by the rumen microbiota over time. Fresh PRG was incubated in sacco in the rumens of three Holstein × Friesian cows over a period of 8 h, with samples recovered at various times. The diversity of attached bacteria was assessed using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA (cDNA). Results showed that plant epiphytic communities either decreased to low relative abundances or disappeared following rumen incubation, and that temporal colonization of the PRG by the rumen bacteria was biphasic with primary (1 and 2 h) and secondary (4-8 h) events evident with the transition period being with 2-4 h. A decrease in sequence reads pertaining to Succinivibrio spp. and increases in Pseudobutyrivibrio, Roseburia and Ruminococcus spp. (the latter all order Clostridiales) were evident during secondary colonization. Irrespective of temporal changes, the continually high abundances of Butyrivibrio, Fibrobacter, Olsenella and Prevotella suggest that they play a major role in the degradation of the plant. It is clear that a temporal understanding of the functional roles of these microbiota within the rumen is now required to unravel the role of these bacteria in the ruminal degradation of fresh PRG.

  12. Spatio-temporal dynamics and laterality effects of face inversion, feature presence and configuration, and face outline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija eMarinkovic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although a crucial role of the fusiform gyrus in face processing has been demonstrated with a variety of methods, converging evidence suggests that face processing involves an interactive and overlapping processing cascade in distributed brain areas. Here we examine the spatio-temporal stages and their functional tuning to face inversion, presence and configuration of inner features, and face contour in healthy subjects during passive viewing. Anatomically-constrained magnetoencephalography (aMEG combines high-density whole-head MEG recordings and distributed source modeling with high-resolution structural MRI. Each person's reconstructed cortical surface served to constrain noise-normalized minimum norm inverse source estimates. The earliest activity was estimated to the occipital cortex at ~100 ms after stimulus onset and was sensitive to an initial coarse level visual analysis. Activity in the right-lateralized ventral temporal area (inclusive of the fusiform gyrus peaked at ~160ms and was largest to inverted faces. Images containing facial features in the veridical and rearranged configuration irrespective of the facial outline elicited intermediate level activity. The M160 stage may provide structural representations necessary for downstream distributed areas to process identity and emotional expression. However, inverted faces additionally engaged the left ventral temporal area at ~180 ms and were uniquely subserved by bilateral processing. This observation is consistent with the dual route model and spared processing of inverted faces in prosopagnosia. The subsequent deflection, peaking at ~240ms in the anterior temporal areas bilaterally, was largest to normal, upright faces. It may reflect initial engagement of the distributed network subserving individuation and familiarity. These results support dynamic models suggesting that processing of unfamiliar faces in the absence of a cognitive task is subserved by a distributed and

  13. Temporal dynamics of Trichodesmium erythraeum (Cyanophyta) in the National Park "Sistema Arrecifal Veracruzano" in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aké-Castillo, José A

    2011-07-01

    Trichodesmium erythraeum Ehrenberg ex Gomont is a microalga worldwide distributed in tropical seas. This filamentous microalga was detected in phytoplankton samples collected in the Protected NaturalArea "Parque Nacional SistemaArrecifal Veracruzano", and because of its ecological importance, its temporal dynamics was studied using net samples (30 microm) collected in one year period. Samples were studied with a light microscope recording the presence, morphological characteristics, life form and relative abundance. Trichodesmium erythraeum occurred as single filaments and was rare in April 2007 and March 2008; as single filaments from May to August and December 2007; as single filaments and small aggregates in September 2007 and January 2008; in aggregates of large size (> 3mm) and high relative abundance in October 2007; and was absence in November 2007 and April 2008. Although the relative abundance of the species was not important comparing with other members of phytoplankton, its occurrence was frequent with a bloom at the beginning of the north winds period. The observed temporal dynamics of this microalga in this coral reef region comes up on the alert in the monitoring red tides programs being implemented in Veracruz coast.

  14. Improvement of Lambert-Beer law dynamic range by the use of temporal gates on transmitted light pulse through a scattering medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Hironori; Wada, Kenji; Horinaka, Hiromichi; Cho, Yoshio [Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Coll. of Engineering; Umeda, Tokuo; Osawa, Masahiko

    1995-09-01

    The Lambert-Beer law holding for pulsed lights transmitted through a scattering medium was examined using a streak camera. The Lambert-Beer law dynamic range is found to be limited by floor levels that are caused by scattered photons and are controllable by the use of a temporal gate on the transmitted pulse. The dynamic range improvement obtained for a scattering medium of 2.8 cm{sup -1} scattering coefficient of a thickness of 80 mm by a temporal gate of 60 ps was as much as 50 dB and the Lambert-Beer law dynamic rang reached to 140 dB. (author).

  15. Temporal dynamics of perisylvian activation during language processing in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Jens; Neumann, Jane; Friederici, Angela D

    2008-07-15

    The perisylvian region of the human cortex is known to play a major role in language processing. Especially the superior temporal cortex (STC) and the inferior frontal cortex (IFC) have been investigated with respect to their particular involvement in language comprehension. In the present research, the timing of recruitment of these language-related brain areas in both hemispheres was examined as a function of age using functional imaging data of 6-year-old children and adults with a special focus on blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response time courses. The results show that children's activation time courses differ from that of adults. First, children show an overall later peak of BOLD responses. Second, children's IFC responds much later than their STC, while in adults the difference between both regions is less pronounced. Within the STC, both groups show similar regionally U-shaped activation patterns with fastest peaks in voxels at the STC's mid-portion around Heschl's gyrus and longer latencies in anterior and posterior directions, suggesting a coarsely similar information flow in adults and children in the temporal region. Finally, children in contrast to adults, display a temporal primacy of right over left hemispheric activation. The observed overall latency differences between children and adults are in line with the assumption of ongoing maturation in perisylvian brain regions and the connections between them. A functional perspective on BOLD timing argues for a developmental change from higher processing costs in children compared to adults due to slower and less automatic language processes, in particular those located in the IFC. The observed hemispheric differences are discussed in the context of developmental models assuming a high reliance on right-hemisphere-based suprasegmental information processing during language comprehension in childhood.

  16. Temporal dynamics of a chain of Josephson junctions in the Coulomb blockade regime.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Jared; Marthaler, Michael [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Recent experiments have studied the transport of individual charge carriers through a one-dimensional array of small Josephson junctions, in the limit of small Josephson coupling. Modern time resolved charge detection techniques allow the direct measurement of temporal correlations between these carriers. We study such a system theoretical with the aim of understanding the transport properties within the array, in both the normal and superconducting regimes. Of particular interest are the effects of Coulomb repulsion between the carriers and the resulting transport through the array.

  17. A neural model of the temporal dynamics of figure-ground segregation in motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudies, Florian; Neumann, Heiko

    2010-03-01

    How does the visual system manage to segment a visual scene into surfaces and objects and manage to attend to a target object? Based on psychological and physiological investigations, it has been proposed that the perceptual organization and segmentation of a scene is achieved by the processing at different levels of the visual cortical hierarchy. According to this, motion onset detection, motion-defined shape segregation, and target selection are accomplished by processes which bind together simple features into fragments of increasingly complex configurations at different levels in the processing hierarchy. As an alternative to this hierarchical processing hypothesis, it has been proposed that the processing stages for feature detection and segregation are reflected in different temporal episodes in the response patterns of individual neurons. Such temporal epochs have been observed in the activation pattern of neurons as low as in area V1. Here, we present a neural network model of motion detection, figure-ground segregation and attentive selection which explains these response patterns in an unifying framework. Based on known principles of functional architecture of the visual cortex, we propose that initial motion and motion boundaries are detected at different and hierarchically organized stages in the dorsal pathway. Visual shapes that are defined by boundaries, which were generated from juxtaposed opponent motions, are represented at different stages in the ventral pathway. Model areas in the different pathways interact through feedforward and modulating feedback, while mutual interactions enable the communication between motion and form representations. Selective attention is devoted to shape representations by sending modulating feedback signals from higher levels (working memory) to intermediate levels to enhance their responses. Areas in the motion and form pathway are coupled through top-down feedback with V1 cells at the bottom end of the hierarchy

  18. Evolution of predator dispersal in relation to spatio-temporal prey dynamics: how not to get stuck in the wrong place!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin M J Travis

    Full Text Available The eco-evolutionary dynamics of dispersal are recognised as key in determining the responses of populations to environmental changes. Here, by developing a novel modelling approach, we show that predators are likely to have evolved to emigrate more often and become more selective over their destination patch when their prey species exhibit spatio-temporally complex dynamics. We additionally demonstrate that the cost of dispersal can vary substantially across space and time. Perhaps as a consequence of current environmental change, many key prey species are currently exhibiting major shifts in their spatio-temporal dynamics. By exploring similar shifts in silico, we predict that predator populations will be most vulnerable when prey dynamics shift from stable to complex. The more sophisticated dispersal rules, and greater variance therein, that evolve under complex dynamics will enable persistence across a broader range of prey dynamics than the rules which evolve under relatively stable prey conditions.

  19. Quantifying spatial and temporal discharge dynamics of an event in a first order stream, using Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Westhoff

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding spatial distribution of discharge can be important for water quality and quantity modeling. Non-steady flood waves can influence small headwater streams significantly, particularly as a result of short high intensity summer rainstorms. The aim of this paper is to quantify the spatial and temporal dynamics of stream flow in a headwater catchment during a summer rainstorm. These dynamics include gains and losses of stream water, the effect of bypasses that become active and hyporheic exchange fluxes that may vary over time as a function of discharge. We use an advection-dispersion model coupled with an energy balance model to simulate in-stream water temperature, which we confront with high resolution temperature observations obtained with Distributed Temperature Sensing. This model was used as a learning tool to stepwise unravel the complex puzzle of in-stream processes subject to varying discharge. Hypotheses were tested and rejected, which led to more insight in spatial and temporal dynamics in discharge and hyporheic exchange processes. We showed that infiltration losses increase during a rain event, while gains of water remained constant over time. We conclude that, eventually, part of the stream water bypassed the main channel during peak discharge. It also seems that hyporheic exchange varies with varying discharge in the first 250 of the stream; while further downstream it remains constant. Because we relied on solar radiation as the main energy input, we were only able to apply this method during a small event and low flow. However, when additional (artificial energy is available, the presented method is also applicable in larger streams, or during higher flow conditions.

  20. Temporal dynamic of wood formation in Pinus cembra along the alpine treeline ecotone and the effect of climate variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Andreas; Baumgartner, Daniel; Zimmermann, Jolanda; Oberhuber, Walter

    2009-06-01

    We determined the temporal dynamic of cambial activity and xylem development of stone pine (Pinus cembra L.) throughout the treeline ecotone. Repeated micro-sampling of the developing tree ring was carried out during the growing seasons 2006 and 2007 at the timberline (1950 m a.s.l.), treeline (2110 m a.s.l.) and within the krummholz belt (2180 m a.s.l.) and the influence of climate variables on intra-annual wood formation was determined.At the beginning of both growing seasons, highest numbers of cambial and enlarging cells were observed at the treeline. Soil temperatures at time of initiation of cambial activity were c. 1.5 °C higher at treeline (open canopy) compared to timberline (closed canopy), suggesting that a threshold root-zone temperature is involved in triggering onset of above ground stem growth.The rate of xylem cell production determined in two weekly intervals during June through August 2006-2007 was significantly correlated with air temperature (temperature sums expressed as degree-days and mean daily maximum temperature) at the timberline only. Lack of significant relationships between tracheid production and temperature variables at the treeline and within the krummholz belt support past dendroclimatological studies that more extreme environmental conditions (e.g., wind exposure, frost desiccation, late frost) increasingly control tree growth above timberline.Results of this study revealed that spatial and temporal (i.e. year-to-year) variability in timing and dynamic of wood formation of Pinus cembra is strongly influenced by local site factors within the treeline ecotone and the dynamics of seasonal temperature variation, respectively.

  1. A Statistical Physics Characterization of the Complex Systems Dynamics: Quantifying Complexity from Spatio-Temporal Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorehdavoudi, Hana; Bogdan, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Biological systems are frequently categorized as complex systems due to their capabilities of generating spatio-temporal structures from apparent random decisions. In spite of research on analyzing biological systems, we lack a quantifiable framework for measuring their complexity. To fill this gap, in this paper, we develop a new paradigm to study a collective group of N agents moving and interacting in a three-dimensional space. Our paradigm helps to identify the spatio-temporal states of the motion of the group and their associated transition probabilities. This framework enables the estimation of the free energy landscape corresponding to the identified states. Based on the energy landscape, we quantify missing information, emergence, self-organization and complexity for a collective motion. We show that the collective motion of the group of agents evolves to reach the most probable state with relatively lowest energy level and lowest missing information compared to other possible states. Our analysis demonstrates that the natural group of animals exhibit a higher degree of emergence, self-organization and complexity over time. Consequently, this algorithm can be integrated into new frameworks to engineer collective motions to achieve certain degrees of emergence, self-organization and complexity.

  2. Locating Temporal Functional Dynamics of Visual Short-Term Memory Binding using Graph Modular Dirichlet Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Keith; Ricaud, Benjamin; Shahid, Nauman; Rhodes, Stephen; Starr, John M.; Ibáñez, Augustin; Parra, Mario A.; Escudero, Javier; Vandergheynst, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Visual short-term memory binding tasks are a promising early marker for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To uncover functional deficits of AD in these tasks it is meaningful to first study unimpaired brain function. Electroencephalogram recordings were obtained from encoding and maintenance periods of tasks performed by healthy young volunteers. We probe the task’s transient physiological underpinnings by contrasting shape only (Shape) and shape-colour binding (Bind) conditions, displayed in the left and right sides of the screen, separately. Particularly, we introduce and implement a novel technique named Modular Dirichlet Energy (MDE) which allows robust and flexible analysis of the functional network with unprecedented temporal precision. We find that connectivity in the Bind condition is less integrated with the global network than in the Shape condition in occipital and frontal modules during the encoding period of the right screen condition. Using MDE we are able to discern driving effects in the occipital module between 100–140 ms, coinciding with the P100 visually evoked potential, followed by a driving effect in the frontal module between 140–180 ms, suggesting that the differences found constitute an information processing difference between these modules. This provides temporally precise information over a heterogeneous population in promising tasks for the detection of AD.

  3. The temporal dynamics of early visual cortex involvement in behavioral priming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianne Jacobs

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS allows for non-invasive interference with ongoing neural processing. Applied in a chronometric design over early visual cortex (EVC, TMS has proved valuable in indicating at which particular time point EVC must remain unperturbed for (conscious vision to be established. In the current study, we set out to examine the effect of EVC TMS across a broad range of time points, both before (pre-stimulus and after (post-stimulus the onset of symbolic visual stimuli. Behavioral priming studies have shown that the behavioral impact of a visual stimulus can be independent from its conscious perception, suggesting two independent neural signatures. To assess whether TMS-induced suppression of visual awareness can be dissociated from behavioral priming in the temporal domain, we thus implemented three different measures of visual processing, namely performance on a standard visual discrimination task, a subjective rating of stimulus visibility, and a visual priming task. To control for non-neural TMS effects, we performed electrooculographical recordings, placebo TMS (sham, and control site TMS (vertex. Our results suggest that, when considering the appropriate control data, the temporal pattern of EVC TMS disruption on visual discrimination, subjective awareness and behavioral priming are not dissociable. Instead, TMS to EVC disrupts visual perception holistically, both when applied before and after the onset of a visual stimulus. The current findings are discussed in light of their implications on models of visual awareness and (subliminal priming.

  4. The temporal dynamics of early visual cortex involvement in behavioral priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christianne; de Graaf, Tom A; Goebel, Rainer; Sack, Alexander T

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows for non-invasive interference with ongoing neural processing. Applied in a chronometric design over early visual cortex (EVC), TMS has proved valuable in indicating at which particular time point EVC must remain unperturbed for (conscious) vision to be established. In the current study, we set out to examine the effect of EVC TMS across a broad range of time points, both before (pre-stimulus) and after (post-stimulus) the onset of symbolic visual stimuli. Behavioral priming studies have shown that the behavioral impact of a visual stimulus can be independent from its conscious perception, suggesting two independent neural signatures. To assess whether TMS-induced suppression of visual awareness can be dissociated from behavioral priming in the temporal domain, we thus implemented three different measures of visual processing, namely performance on a standard visual discrimination task, a subjective rating of stimulus visibility, and a visual priming task. To control for non-neural TMS effects, we performed electrooculographical recordings, placebo TMS (sham), and control site TMS (vertex). Our results suggest that, when considering the appropriate control data, the temporal pattern of EVC TMS disruption on visual discrimination, subjective awareness and behavioral priming are not dissociable. Instead, TMS to EVC disrupts visual perception holistically, both when applied before and after the onset of a visual stimulus. The current findings are discussed in light of their implications on models of visual awareness and (subliminal) priming.

  5. Modeling and estimating change in temporal networks via a dynamic degree corrected stochastic block model

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, James D; Woodall, William H

    2016-01-01

    In many applications it is of interest to identify anomalous behavior within a dynamic interacting system. Such anomalous interactions are reflected by structural changes in the network representation of the system. We propose and investigate the use of a dynamic version of the degree corrected stochastic block model (DCSBM) as a means to model and monitor dynamic networks that undergo a significant structural change. Our model provides a means to simulate a variety of local and global changes in a time-varying network. Furthermore, one can efficiently detect such changes using the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters that characterize the DCSBM. We assess the utility of the dynamic DCSBM on both simulated and real networks. Using a simple monitoring strategy on the DCSBM, we are able to detect significant changes in the U.S. Senate co-voting network that reflects both times of cohesion and times of polarization among Republican and Democratic members. Our analysis suggests that the dynamic DCSBM pr...

  6. Spatial and temporal dynamics of macrophyte cover in a large regulated river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, A; Vericat, D; Gonzalo, L E; Batalla, R J

    2016-11-24

    The River Ebro basin is extensively dammed. Dams alter the geomorphological functioning of the river by altering its flow regime (e.g. reducing mean and maximum discharges), increasing bed stability (armouring) and decreasing turbidity (water clarity). These effects, together with an increase in nutrient concentrations and water temperature, have generated optimal conditions for the proliferation of aquatic macrophytes. In this paper, we analyse the temporal and spatial changes of macrophyte cover in the lowermost Ebro through a series of field campaigns carried out between 2009 and 2010. Special attention was paid to the spatial distribution of macrophytes in relation to flow hydraulics, channel geometry and bed sedimentology. Temporal changes in macrophyte cover were analysed in relation to the frequency and magnitude of both natural floods and flushing flows (artificial flow releases from dams with generally a magnitude that equates around a2-year flood in the river). Spatially, the proportion of macrophytes along the reaches showed a variable pattern, with a succession of areas with both high and low plant density, coinciding with the alternation of riffles and pools in the channel. The highest values of plant cover (>65%) occurred in riffles and in transition to riffle areas, while the lowest densities (1% or almost negligible) were observed in pools and transition to pool areas. Water depth and the grain-size distribution of the riverbed materials (i.e. D84), are found to be the main factors controlling the degree of plant cover in the lower Ebro. Temporally, the macrophyte proportion varied during the hydrological year, with a clear increment from late spring to early autumn (i.e. vegetation cover reached 40%, on average, of the channel surface). Macrophyte coverage decreases immediately following a flushing flow but in the long term, vegetation re-occupied the area again, even slightly increasing in some sections; overall, the mean percentage of macrophyte

  7. Modelling above-ground carbon dynamics using multi-temporal airborne lidar: insights from a Mediterranean woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, W.; Ruiz-Benito, P.; Valladares, F.; Coomes, D.

    2016-02-01

    Woodlands represent highly significant carbon sinks globally, though could lose this function under future climatic change. Effective large-scale monitoring of these woodlands has a critical role to play in mitigating for, and adapting to, climate change. Mediterranean woodlands have low carbon densities, but represent important global carbon stocks due to their extensiveness and are particularly vulnerable because the region is predicted to become much hotter and drier over the coming century. Airborne lidar is already recognized as an excellent approach for high-fidelity carbon mapping, but few studies have used multi-temporal lidar surveys to measure carbon fluxes in forests and none have worked with Mediterranean woodlands. We use a multi-temporal (5-year interval) airborne lidar data set for a region of central Spain to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) and carbon dynamics in typical mixed broadleaved and/or coniferous Mediterranean woodlands. Field calibration of the lidar data enabled the generation of grid-based maps of AGB for 2006 and 2011, and the resulting AGB change was estimated. There was a close agreement between the lidar-based AGB growth estimate (1.22 Mg ha-1 yr-1) and those derived from two independent sources: the Spanish National Forest Inventory, and a tree-ring based analysis (1.19 and 1.13 Mg ha-1 yr-1, respectively). We parameterised a simple simulator of forest dynamics using the lidar carbon flux measurements, and used it to explore four scenarios of fire occurrence. Under undisturbed conditions (no fire) an accelerating accumulation of biomass and carbon is evident over the next 100 years with an average carbon sequestration rate of 1.95 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. This rate reduces by almost a third when fire probability is increased to 0.01 (fire return rate of 100 years), as has been predicted under climate change. Our work shows the power of multi-temporal lidar surveying to map woodland carbon fluxes and provide parameters for carbon

  8. Modelling above-ground carbon dynamics using multi-temporal airborne lidar: insights from a Mediterranean woodland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Simonson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Woodlands represent highly significant carbon sinks globally, though could lose this function under future climatic change. Effective large-scale monitoring of these woodlands has a critical role to play in mitigating for, and adapting to, climate change. Mediterranean woodlands have low carbon densities, but represent important global carbon stocks due to their extensiveness and are particularly vulnerable because the region is predicted to become much hotter and drier over the coming century. Airborne lidar is already recognized as an excellent approach for high-fidelity carbon mapping, but few studies have used multi-temporal lidar surveys to measure carbon fluxes in forests and none have worked with Mediterranean woodlands. We use a multi-temporal (five year interval airborne lidar dataset for a region of central Spain to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB and carbon dynamics in typical mixed broadleaved/coniferous Mediterranean woodlands. Field calibration of the lidar data enabled the generation of grid-based maps of AGB for 2006 and 2011, and the resulting AGB change were estimated. There was a close agreement between the lidar-based AGB growth estimate (1.22 Mg ha−1 year−1 and those derived from two independent sources: the Spanish National Forest Inventory, and a~tree-ring based analysis (1.19 and 1.13 Mg ha−1 year−1, respectively. We parameterised a simple simulator of forest dynamics using the lidar carbon flux measurements, and used it to explore four scenarios of fire occurrence. Under undisturbed conditions (no fire occurrence an accelerating accumulation of biomass and carbon is evident over the next 100 years with an average carbon sequestration rate of 1.95 Mg C ha−1 year−1. This rate reduces by almost a third when fire probability is increased to 0.01, as has been predicted under climate change. Our work shows the power of multi-temporal lidar surveying to map woodland carbon fluxes and provide parameters for carbon

  9. Spatial-temporal dynamics of cavitation bubble clouds in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-09-01

    Cavitation bubbles have been recognized as being essential to many applications of ultrasound. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cavitation bubble clouds induced by a focused ultrasound transducer of 1.2 MHz center frequency are investigated by high-speed photography. It is revealed that at a total acoustic power of 72 W the cavitation bubble cloud first emerges in the focal region where cavitation bubbles are observed to generate, grow, merge and collapse during the initial 600 micros. The bubble cloud then grows upward to the post-focal region, and finally becomes visible in the pre-focal region. The structure of the final bubble cloud is characterized by regional distribution of cavitation bubbles in the ultrasound field. The cavitation bubble cloud structure remains stable when the acoustic power is increased from 25 W to 107 W, but it changes to a more violent form when the acoustic power is further increased to 175 W.

  10. Dynamic parabolic pulse generation using temporal shaping of wavelength to time mapped pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dat; Piracha, Mohammad Umar; Mandridis, Dimitrios; Delfyett, Peter J

    2011-06-20

    Self-phase modulation in fiber amplifiers can significantly degrade the quality of compressed pulses in chirped pulse amplification systems. Parabolic pulses with linear frequency chirp are suitable for suppressing nonlinearities, and to achieve high peak power pulses after compression. In this paper, we present an active time domain technique to generate parabolic pulses for chirped pulse amplification applications. Pulses from a mode-locked laser are temporally stretched and launched into an amplitude modulator, where the drive voltage is designed using the spectral shape of the input pulse and the transfer function of the modulator, resulting in the generation of parabolic pulses. Experimental results of pulse shaping with a pulse train from a mode-locked laser are presented, with a residual error of less than 5%. Moreover, an extinction ratio of 27 dB is achieved, which is ideal for chirped pulse amplification applications.

  11. Spatial and Temporal Signatures of Flux Transfer Events in Global Simulations of Magnetopause Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Sibeck, David Gary; Hesse, Michael; Berrios, David; Rastaetter, Lutz; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas I.

    2011-01-01

    Flux transfer events (FTEs) were originally identified by transient bipolar variations of the magnetic field component normal to the nominal magnetopause centered on enhancements in the total magnetic field strength. Recent Cluster and THEMIS multi-point measurements provided a wide range of signatures that are interpreted as evidence for FTE passage (e.g., crater FTE's, traveling magnetic erosion regions). We use the global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code BATS-R-US developed at the University of Michigan to model the global three-dimensional structure and temporal evolution of FTEs during multi-spacecraft magnetopause crossing events. Comparison of observed and simulated signatures and sensitivity analysis of the results to the probe location will be presented. We will demonstrate a variety of observable signatures in magnetic field profile that depend on space probe location with respect to the FTE passage. The global structure of FTEs will be illustrated using advanced visualization tools developed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

  12. Temporal dynamics of demersal chondrichthyan species in the central western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Mulas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid expansion of fisheries and globalized trade are emerging as the principal drivers of coastal and ocean threat. Considering the important role of Chondrichthyes as predators at the top of food chain in marine ecosystems, knowledge on their biology remains scarce in the Mediterranean. In this regard, our objective is to give information on their spatial distribution, abundance and population structure. Data were collected for 25 demersal species, including batoid species, sharks and holocephalans from 1994 to 2013 during scientific bottom trawl surveys (MEDITS project carried out around the Sardinian seas. The total frequency of occurrence (f%, the Biomass Index (BI, kg/km2, and the Density Index (DI, N/km2 were estimated for the continental shelf (10-200 m, slope (200-800 m, and overall (10-800 m depth strata. Size trends were also calculated for the most abundant species considering all depth strata. The correlation among MEDITS figures (f%, BI, DI, size structure and years were assessed by species computing the Pearson linear coefficient. From f% and abundance indexes investigation, only the small spotted catshark Scyliorhinus canicula and the thornback ray Raja clavata were ubiquitous in all strata investigated, instead, all the other species showed a preferential distribution for the shelf or the slope. In general, the temporal trends of BI and DI were stable or positive for both macro-strata, except for the longnose spurdog Squalus blainville which seemed to show a statistically significant decreasing trend. All analyzed species displayed temporal stable trends in size structure analysis, apart from Raja brachyura and Dipturus oxyrinchus that showed a statistically significant increase. Despite the time series analysis revealed stable or positive trends, it appears clear the need of urgent management measures to protect the demersal chondrichthyan species extending the monitoring over time and implementing the data collected by

  13. Final report on characterizing the dynamics of spatio-temporal data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostelich, E.J.; Armbruster, H.D.

    1998-09-01

    One principal goal of the grant was to model and analyze the dynamics of spatially extended chaotic systems. One of the principal tools used in the analysis was KLTOOL, a computer package developed by the principal investigators for Karhunen-Loeve analysis. The package was used to analyze video data from a laboratory experiment on cellular flames. A second goal of the project was to analyze complex time series whose underlying dynamics may be low dimensionally chaotic. Particular emphasis was placed on systems of possible relevance to energy production and distribution. The work attempted to characterize low-dimensional aspects of the dynamics of a fluidized bed, in particular, a transition from periodic to irregular behavior. Finally, collaborators worked on aspects of targeting in chaotic dynamical systems. This work showed that it is possible to switch a moderately high-dimensional chaotic process rapidly between prespecified periodic saddle orbits embedding within the attractor. Additional work extended previously-developed algorithms for the highly accurate computation of stable manifolds of periodic saddle orbits, which is essential to the successful application of targeting algorithms.

  14. Microscale spatio-temporal patterns of oxygen dynamics in permeable intertidal sediments (Skallingen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walpersdorf, Eva Christine; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Elberling, Bo;

     Intertidal permeable sediments are, even more than subtidal sediments (Cook et al. 2007), subject to extreme dynamics due to fast changing environ-mental conditions during inundation and emergence. In such systems, a quasi steady state is rarely reached. Integrative in-situ studies covering...

  15. Temporal dynamics of two-photon-pumped amplified spontaneous emission in slab organic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Chen, Qi-Dai; Ding, Ran; Yang, Jie; Ma, Yu-Guang; Wang, Hai-Yu; Gao, Bing-Rong; Feng, Jing; Sun, Hong-Bo; Fang, Honghua

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the ultrafast dynamics of two-photon-pumped amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from a single crystal by the time-resolved fluorescence upconversion technique. With the increase of two-photon pump intensities, the emission decay time is dramatically shortened by 30 times (from 3 ns

  16. Temporal condensation and dynamic λ-transition within the complex network: an application to real-life market evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiliński, Mateusz; Szewczak, Bartłomiej; Gubiec, Tomasz; Kutner, Ryszard; Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2015-02-01

    We fill a void in merging empirical and phenomenological characterisation of the dynamical phase transitions in complex networks by identifying and thoroughly characterising a triple sequence of such transitions on a real-life financial market. We extract and interpret the empirical, numerical, and analytical evidences for the existence of these dynamical phase transitions, by considering the medium size Frankfurt stock exchange (FSE), as a typical example of a financial market. By using the canonical object for the graph theory, i.e. the minimal spanning tree (MST) network, we observe: (i) the (initial) dynamical phase transition from equilibrium to non-equilibrium nucleation phase of the MST network, occurring at some critical time. Coalescence of edges on the FSE's transient leader (defined by its largest degree) is observed within the nucleation phase; (ii) subsequent acceleration of the process of nucleation and the emergence of the condensation phase (the second dynamical phase transition), forming a logarithmically diverging temporal λ-peak of the leader's degree at the second critical time; (iii) the third dynamical fragmentation phase transition (after passing the second critical time), where the λ-peak logarithmically relaxes over three quarters of the year, resulting in a few loosely connected sub-graphs. This λ-peak (comparable to that of the specific heat vs. temperature forming during the equilibrium continuous phase transition from the normal fluid I 4He to the superfluid II 4He) is considered as a prominent result of a non-equilibrium superstar-like superhub or a dragon-king's abrupt evolution over about two and a half year of market evolution. We capture and meticulously characterise a remarkable phenomenon in which a peripheral company becomes progressively promoted to become the dragon-king strongly dominating the complex network over an exceptionally long period of time containing the crash. Detailed analysis of the complete trio of the

  17. Long-term analysis of spatio-temporal patterns in population dynamics and demography of juvenile Pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacin, D. H.; Switzer, T. S.; Ainsworth, C. H.; Stallings, C. D.

    2016-12-01

    In estuarine systems, proximity to the ocean has the potential to directly and indirectly drive patterns of fish distribution and population dynamics. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of fisheries-independent data and quantified patterns of density, biomass, and growth rates of juvenile Pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides) across spatial and temporal scales in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Spatially, the highest density and biomass were found in the outermost regions (closest to the Gulf of Mexico) of the Bay, and these patterns were generally consistent temporally. Inter-annually, Pinfish density and biomass were the highest during periods coinciding with favorable oceanographic conditions (e.g., anomalously intense and prolonged upwelling) for across-shelf transport of larvae from spawning grounds in the Gulf to Tampa Bay. Intra-annually, density and biomass were the highest during spring and summer likely due to the combined effects of spawning timing (and delivery of new settlers), and high somatic growth fueled by increased secondary and primary productivity. Declines in density and biomass during the late summer through early winter were possibly due to high post-settlement mortality and egress to offshore habitats. Pinfish increased predictably in size across the months of the calendar year, and tended to be larger and grew faster in the innermost regions of the Bay, which were located farthest from the Gulf. Pinfish density was related to the proximity to the Gulf of Mexico, with the outermost regions of the Bay having greater seagrass cover, higher salinity, and being closer to the offshore larval pool where spawning occurs. Thus, this study provided evidence that distance to the ocean was an important driver of biotic and abiotic factors that influenced Pinfish demographic rates across spatial and temporal scales in the largest estuary in Florida.

  18. Complex, dynamic combination of physical, chemical and nutritional variables controls spatio-temporal variation of sandy beach community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Cisneros, Kelly; Smit, Albertus J; Laudien, Jürgen; Schoeman, David S

    2011-01-01

    Sandy beach ecological theory states that physical features of the beach control macrobenthic community structure on all but the most dissipative beaches. However, few studies have simultaneously evaluated the relative importance of physical, chemical and biological factors as potential explanatory variables for meso-scale spatio-temporal patterns of intertidal community structure in these systems. Here, we investigate macroinfaunal community structure of a micro-tidal sandy beach that is located on an oligotrophic subtropical coast and is influenced by seasonal estuarine input. We repeatedly sampled biological and environmental variables at a series of beach transects arranged at increasing distances from the estuary mouth. Sampling took place over a period of five months, corresponding with the transition between the dry and wet season. This allowed assessment of biological-physical relationships across chemical and nutritional gradients associated with a range of estuarine inputs. Physical, chemical, and biological response variables, as well as measures of community structure, showed significant spatio-temporal patterns. In general, bivariate relationships between biological and environmental variables were rare and weak. However, multivariate correlation approaches identified a variety of environmental variables (i.e., sampling session, the C∶N ratio of particulate organic matter, dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations, various size fractions of photopigment concentrations, salinity and, to a lesser extent, beach width and sediment kurtosis) that either alone or combined provided significant explanatory power for spatio-temporal patterns of macroinfaunal community structure. Overall, these results showed that the macrobenthic community on Mtunzini Beach was not structured primarily by physical factors, but instead by a complex and dynamic blend of nutritional, chemical and physical drivers. This emphasises the need to recognise ocean-exposed sandy

  19. Varying the resolution of the Rouse model on temporal and spatial scales: application to multiscale modelling of DNA dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rolls, Edward; Erban, Radek

    2016-01-01

    A multi-resolution bead-spring model for polymer dynamics is developed as a generalization of the Rouse model. A polymer chain is described using beads of variable sizes connected by springs with variable spring constants. A numerical scheme which can use different timesteps to advance the positions of different beads is presented and analyzed. The position of a particular bead is only updated at integer multiples of the timesteps associated with its connecting springs. This approach extends the Rouse model to a multiscale model on both spatial and temporal scales, allowing simulations of localized regions of a polymer chain with high spatial and temporal resolution, while using a coarser modelling approach to describe the rest of the polymer chain. A method for changing the model resolution on-the-fly is developed using the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. It is shown that this approach maintains key statistics of the end-to-end distance and diffusion of the polymer filament and makes computational savings whe...

  20. The relationship between employees' perceptions of human resource systems and organizational performance: examining mediating mechanisms and temporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piening, Erk P; Baluch, Alina M; Salge, Torsten Oliver

    2013-11-01

    Given the limited understanding of temporal issues in extant theorizing about the link between human resource management (HRM) and performance, in this study we aim to shed light on how, when, and why HR interventions affect organizational performance. On the basis of longitudinal, multi-informant and multisource data from public hospital services in England, we provide new insights into the complex interplay between employees' perceptions of HR systems, job satisfaction, and performance outcomes over time. The dynamic panel data analyses provide support for changes in employees' experience of an HR system being related to subsequent changes in customer satisfaction, as mediated by changes in job satisfaction, albeit these effects decrease over time. Moreover, our longitudinal analyses highlight the importance of feedback effects in the HRM-performance chain, which otherwise appears to evolve in a cyclical manner.

  1. Temporal dynamics of the face familiarity effect: bootstrap analysis of single-subject event-related potential data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Prieto, Esther; Pancaroglu, Raika; Dalrymple, Kirsten A; Handy, Todd; Barton, Jason J S; Oruc, Ipek

    2015-01-01

    Prior event-related potential studies using group statistics within a priori selected time windows have yielded conflicting results about familiarity effects in face processing. Our goal was to evaluate the temporal dynamics of the familiarity effect at all time points at the single-subject level. Ten subjects were shown faces of anonymous people or celebrities. Individual results were analysed using a point-by-point bootstrap analysis. While familiarity effects were less consistent at later epochs, all subjects showed them between 130 and 195 ms in occipitotemporal electrodes. However, the relation between the time course of familiarity effects and the peak latency of the N170 was variable. We concluded that familiarity effects between 130 and 195 ms are robust and can be shown in single subjects. The variability of their relation to the timing of the N170 potential may lead to underestimation of familiarity effects in studies that use group-based statistics.

  2. Sensory neural pathways revisited to unravel the temporal dynamics of the Simon effect: A model-based cognitive neuroscience approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Yael; de Hollander, Gilles; Forstmann, Birte U

    2017-02-24

    The Simon task is one of the most prominent interference tasks and has been extensively studied in experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Despite years of research, the underlying mechanism driving the phenomenon and its temporal dynamics are still disputed. Within the framework of the review, we adopt a model-based cognitive neuroscience approach. We first go over key findings in the literature of the Simon task, discuss competing qualitative cognitive theories and the difficulty of testing them empirically. We then introduce sequential sampling models, a particular class of mathematical cognitive process models. Finally, we argue that the brain architecture accountable for the processing of spatial ('where') and non-spatial ('what') information, could constrain these models. We conclude that there is a clear need to bridge neural and behavioral measures, and that mathematical cognitive models may facilitate the construction of this bridge and work towards revealing the underlying mechanisms of the Simon effect.

  3. Temporal and spatial dynamical simulation of groundwater characteristics in Minqin Oasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO DuNing; LI XiaoYu; SONG DongMei; YANG GuoJing

    2007-01-01

    Application scope of geostatistics has been gradually extended from original geologic field to soil science and ecological field, etc. And its successful application results have been widely demonstrated. But little information is reported as to the direct use of geostatistical method to work out the distribution map of groundwater characteristics. In this paper the semivariogram of geostatistics, in combination with GIS, was used to quantitatively study the spatial variation characteristics of groundwater table depth and mineralization degree and their relation to the landuse changes. F test of the used spherical model reached a very significant level, and the theoretical model can well reflect the spatial structural characteristics of groundwater table depth and mineralization degree and achieve an ideal result. This shows that the application of the method in the dynamical simulation of groundwater is feasible. And this paper also provides useful reference for the application of geostatistics in the study of the dynamical variations of groundwater resources in the oasis.

  4. Weak temporal signals can synchronize and accelerate the transition dynamics of biopolymers under tension

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Won Kyu; Sung, Wokyung

    2012-01-01

    In addition to thermal noise, which is essential to promote conformational transitions in biopolymers, cellular environment is replete with a spectrum of athermal fluctuations that are produced from a plethora of active processes. To understand the effect of athermal noise on biological processes, we studied how a small oscillatory force affects the thermally induced folding and unfolding transition of an RNA hairpin, whose response to constant tension had been investigated extensively in both theory and experiments. Strikingly, our molecular simulations performed under overdamped condition show that even at a high (low) tension that renders the hairpin (un)folding improbable, a weak external oscillatory force at a certain frequency can synchronously enhance the transition dynamics of RNA hairpin and increase the mean transition rate. Furthermore, the RNA dynamics can still discriminate a signal with resonance frequency even when the signal is mixed among other signals with nonresonant frequencies. In fact, o...

  5. Serotonin, amygdala and fear: assembling the puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eBocchio

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The fear circuitry orchestrates defense mechanisms in response to environmental threats. This circuitry is evolutionarily crucial for survival, but its dysregulation is thought to play a major role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric conditions in humans. The amygdala is a key player in the processing of fear. This brain area is prominently modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT. The 5-HT input to the amygdala has drawn particular interest because genetic and pharmacological alterations of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT affect amygdala activation in response to emotional stimuli. Nonetheless, the impact of 5-HT on fear processing remains poorly understood.The aim of this review is to elucidate the physiological role of 5-HT in fear learning via its action on the neuronal circuits of the amygdala. Since 5-HT release increases in the BLA during both fear memory acquisition and expression, we examine whether and how 5-HT neurons encode aversive stimuli and aversive cues. Next, we describe pharmacological and genetic alterations of 5-HT neurotransmission that, in both rodents and humans, lead to altered fear learning.To explore the mechanisms through which 5-HT could modulate conditioned fear, we focus on the rodent basolateral amygdala (BLA. We propose that a circuit-based approach taking into account the localization of specific 5-HT receptors on neurochemically-defined neurons in the BLA may be essential to decipher the role of 5-HT in emotional behavior. In keeping with a 5-HT control of fear learning, we review electrophysiological data suggesting that 5-HT regulates synaptic plasticity, spike synchrony and theta oscillations in the BLA via actions on different subcellular compartments of principal neurons and distinct GABAergic interneuron populations. Finally, we discuss how recently developed optogenetic tools combined with electrophysiological recordings and behavior could progress the knowledge of the

  6. A Developmental Examination of Amygdala Response to Facial Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, Amanda E.; Monk, Christopher S.; McClure-Tone, Erin B.; Nelson, Eric E.; Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Adler, Abby D.; Fromm, Stephen J.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2010-01-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate the amygdala in face– emotion processing, particularly for fearful facial expressions. Related findings suggest that face–emotion processing engages the amygdala within an interconnected circuitry that can be studied using a functional-connectivity approach. Past work also underscores important functional changes in the amygdala during development. Taken together, prior research on amygdala function and development reveals a need for more work examining developmental changes in the amygdala’s response to fearful faces and in amygdala functional connectivity during face processing. The present study used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare 31 adolescents (9–17 years old) and 30 adults (21–40 years old) on activation to fearful faces in the amygdala and other regions implicated in face processing. Moreover, these data were used to compare patterns of amygdala functional connectivity in adolescents and adults. During passive viewing, adolescents demonstrated greater amygdala and fusiform activation to fearful faces than did adults. Functional connectivity analysis revealed stronger connectivity between the amygdala and the hippocampus in adults than in adolescents. Within each group, variability in age did not correlate with amygdala response, and sex-related developmental differences in amygdala response were not found. Eye movement data collected outside of the magnetic resonance imaging scanner using the same task suggested that developmental differences in amygdala activation were not attributable to differences in eye-gaze patterns. Amygdala hyperactivation in response to fearful faces may explain increased vulnerability to affective disorders in adolescence; stronger amygdala–hippocampus connectivity in adults than adolescents may reflect maturation in learning or habituation to facial expressions. PMID:18345988

  7. Weak temporal signals can synchronize and accelerate the transition dynamics of biopolymers under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Kyu; Hyeon, Changbong; Sung, Wokyung

    2012-01-01

    In addition to thermal noise, which is essential to promote conformational transitions in biopolymers, the cellular environment is replete with a spectrum of athermal fluctuations that are produced from a plethora of active processes. To understand the effect of athermal noise on biological processes, we studied how a small oscillatory force affects the thermally induced folding and unfolding transition of an RNA hairpin, whose response to constant tension had been investigated extensively in both theory and experiments. Strikingly, our molecular simulations performed under overdamped condition show that even at a high (low) tension that renders the hairpin (un)folding improbable, a weak external oscillatory force at a certain frequency can synchronously enhance the transition dynamics of RNA hairpin and increase the mean transition rate. Furthermore, the RNA dynamics can still discriminate a signal with resonance frequency even when the signal is mixed among other signals with nonresonant frequencies. In fact, our computational demonstration of thermally induced resonance in RNA hairpin dynamics is a direct realization of the phenomena called stochastic resonance and resonant activation. Our study, amenable to experimental tests using optical tweezers, is of great significance to the folding of biopolymers in vivo that are subject to the broad spectrum of cellular noises. PMID:22908254

  8. Weak temporal signals can synchronize and accelerate the transition dynamics of biopolymers under tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Kyu; Hyeon, Changbong; Sung, Wokyung

    2012-09-04

    In addition to thermal noise, which is essential to promote conformational transitions in biopolymers, the cellular environment is replete with a spectrum of athermal fluctuations that are produced from a plethora of active processes. To understand the effect of athermal noise on biological processes, we studied how a small oscillatory force affects the thermally induced folding and unfolding transition of an RNA hairpin, whose response to constant tension had been investigated extensively in both theory and experiments. Strikingly, our molecular simulations performed under overdamped condition show that even at a high (low) tension that renders the hairpin (un)folding improbable, a weak external oscillatory force at a certain frequency can synchronously enhance the transition dynamics of RNA hairpin and increase the mean transition rate. Furthermore, the RNA dynamics can still discriminate a signal with resonance frequency even when the signal is mixed among other signals with nonresonant frequencies. In fact, our computational demonstration of thermally induced resonance in RNA hairpin dynamics is a direct realization of the phenomena called stochastic resonance and resonant activation. Our study, amenable to experimental tests using optical tweezers, is of great significance to the folding of biopolymers in vivo that are subject to the broad spectrum of cellular noises.

  9. The biological traits of the large red scorpionfish, Scorpaena scrofa: Temporal and ontogenetic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matić-Skoko, Sanja; Stagličić, Nika; Kraljević, Miro; Pallaoro, Armin; Dulčić, Jakov

    2015-01-01

    Large red scorpionfish, Scorpaena scrofa, is a prevalent, important and highly valued commercial species throughout the rocky coastal areas of the Mediterranean Sea. Despite this, there is a surprising scarcity of biological and ecological information for this species. As artisanal fisheries have a very long tradition in the whole Mediterranean, a considerable impact of continuous fishing pressure is expected on this valuable rockfish. To elucidate some biological parameters that indicate the status of S. scrofa in the Adriatic Sea and to show which consequences high fishery effort may have on its age, growth and reproduction, sampling was carried out in the middle Adriatic using trammel nets. Temporal trends in body size/weight of S. scrofa were also assessed using long-term data including specimens caught from 1960 to 2010. Temporal trends of S. scrofa in the middle Adriatic indicated significant decreases of 19% in length and 43% in total weight over time. In contrast, official landings for the last five years showed an increase of 13%. However, this increasing trend most likely reflects the continuous change in national policies for reporting the catches. Both catch data and landings statistics showed peak in catch per unit effort during summer which coincides with spawning period of S. scrofa. Length at first sexual maturity was observed at 29.0 cm for females and 24.9 cm for males. All specimens larger than 32 cm were mature. Age analysis revealed 15 age classes with a 25 year old female as the oldest specimen. However, age classes 3+ and 4+ were predominant in the total catch. The growth rate is relatively high during the first four years of life and afterwards it considerably slows down, with females growing at slightly slower rate and attaining slightly larger sizes than males. Given the identified biological implications that confirm our assumptions of inherent vulnerabilities and negative effects arising from continued artisanal fisheries practice

  10. A Model of the Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Drosophila Eye Disc Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Patrick; Sánchez-Aragón, Máximo; Lehtinen, Birgitta; Casares, Fernando; Iber, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Patterning and growth are linked during early development and have to be tightly controlled to result in a functional tissue or organ. During the development of the Drosophila eye, this linkage is particularly clear: the growth of the eye primordium mainly results from proliferating cells ahead of the morphogenetic furrow (MF), a moving signaling wave that sweeps across the tissue from the posterior to the anterior side, that induces proliferating cells anterior to it to differentiate and become cell cycle quiescent in its wake. Therefore, final eye disc size depends on the proliferation rate of undifferentiated cells and on the speed with which the MF sweeps across the eye disc. We developed a spatio-temporal model of the growing eye disc based on the regulatory interactions controlled by the signals Decapentaplegic (Dpp), Hedgehog (Hh) and the transcription factor Homothorax (Hth) and explored how the signaling patterns affect the movement of the MF and impact on eye disc growth. We used published and new quantitative data to parameterize the model. In particular, two crucial parameter values, the degradation rate of Hth and the diffusion coefficient of Hh, were measured. The model is able to reproduce the linear movement of the MF and the termination of growth of the primordium. We further show that the model can explain several mutant phenotypes, but fails to reproduce the previously observed scaling of the Dpp gradient in the anterior compartment. PMID:27626238

  11. Plant reproductive allocation predicts herbivore dynamics across spatial and temporal scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tom E X; Tyre, Andrew J; Louda, Svata M

    2006-11-01

    Life-history theory suggests that iteroparous plants should be flexible in their allocation of resources toward growth and reproduction. Such plasticity could have consequences for herbivores that prefer or specialize on vegetative versus reproductive structures. To test this prediction, we studied the response of the cactus bug (Narnia pallidicornis) to meristem allocation by tree cholla cactus (Opuntia imbricata). We evaluated the explanatory power of demographic models that incorporated variation in cactus relative reproductive effort (RRE; the proportion of meristems allocated toward reproduction). Field data provided strong support for a single model that defined herbivore fecundity as a time-varying, increasing function of host RRE. High-RRE plants were predicted to support larger insect populations, and this effect was strongest late in the season. Independent field data provided strong support for these qualitative predictions and suggested that plant allocation effects extend across temporal and spatial scales. Specifically, late-season insect abundance was positively associated with interannual changes in cactus RRE over 3 years. Spatial variation in insect abundance was correlated with variation in RRE among five cactus populations across New Mexico. We conclude that plant allocation can be a critical component of resource quality for insect herbivores and, thus, an important mechanism underlying variation in herbivore abundance across time and space.

  12. A spatio-temporal analysis of landscape dynamics under changing environmental regimes in southern African savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Erin L.

    The United Nations and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) deem many regions of southern Africa as vulnerable landscapes due to changing climatic regimes, ecological condition, and low adaptive capacity. The savanna ecosystems of southern Africa are of great ecological importance due to the high biodiversity they sustain, their high level of productivity, and the great role they play in the global carbon cycle. Given the dependence of humans on the lands it is essential to explore landscape level trends in patterns and processes in an effort to inform management practices. Even if climate change mitigation strategies were put in place, this is still a region heavily dependent on rain-fed agriculture and tourism of the biological diverse lands. Therefore analysis of climate variability, both interannual and intra-annual, and the changing role it plays on the landscape is critical. This body of research analyzes the role of climate variability and climate on environmental condition and socio-economic development via research on (1) spatial and temporal vegetation patterns, (2) the underlying processes that influence savanna ecosystem resilience, (3) local perception of risk to livelihood development, and (4) potential consequences of climate change on vegetation patterns. As a whole this demonstrates the key role that climate plays on savanna landscapes, which would be highly beneficial when developing conservation or mitigation strategies. Increased climate variability is occurring, but what is still open to debate is the resilience of savanna landscape and vulnerability of socio-economic development.

  13. Temporal Dynamics of Task Switching and Abstract-Concept Learning in Pigeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Alexander Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined whether pigeons could learn to use abstract concepts as the basis for conditionally switching behavior as a function of time. Using a mid-session reversal task, experienced pigeons were trained to switch from matching-to-sample (MTS to non-matching-to-sample (NMTS conditional discriminations within a session. One group had prior training with MTS, while the other had prior training with NMTS. Over training, stimulus set size was progressively doubled from 3 to 6 to 12 stimuli to promote abstract concept development. Prior experience had an effect on the initial learning at each of the set sizes but by the end of training there were no group differences, as both groups showed similar within-session linear matching functions. After acquiring the 12-item set, abstract-concept learning was tested by placing novel stimuli at the beginning and end of a test session. Prior matching and non-matching experience affected transfer behavior. The matching experienced group transferred to novel stimuli in both the matching and non-matching portion of the sessions using a matching rule. The non-matching experienced group transferred to novel stimuli in both portions of the session using a non-matching rule. The representations used as the basis for mid-session reversal of the conditional discrimination behaviors and subsequent transfer behavior appears to have different temporal sources. The implications for the flexibility and organization of complex behaviors are considered.

  14. Temporal Evolution of Coronagraphic Dynamic Range, and Constraints on Companions to Vega

    CERN Document Server

    Hinkley, S; Soummer, R; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Roberts, L C; Kühn, J; Makidon, R B; Perrin, M D; Lloyd, J P; Kratter, K M; Brenner, D; Hinkley, Sasha; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Soummer, Remi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Jr., Lewis C. Roberts; Kuhn, Jeffrey; Makidon, Russell B.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Lloyd, James P.; Kratter, Kaitlin; Brenner, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    The major obstacle to the direct detection of companions to nearby stars is the overwhelming brightness of the host star. Current instruments employing the combination of adaptive optics (AO) and coronagraphy can typically detect objects within 2'' of the star that are 10^{4-5} times fainter. Correlated speckle noise is one of the biggest obstacles limiting such high-contrast imaging. We have obtained a series of 284 8 s, AO-corrected, coronagraphically occulted H-band images of the star Vega at the 3.63 m AEOS telescope located on Haleakala, Hawaii. This dataset is unique for studying the temporal behavior of speckle noise, and represents the first time such a study on highly corrected _coronagraphic_ AO images has been carried out in a quantitative way. We find the speckle pattern to be highly stable in both position and time in our data. This is due to the fact that the AO system corrects disturbances to the stellar wave front at the level where the instrumental wave front errors dominate. Because of this,...

  15. Interaction dynamics of temporal and spatial separated cavitation bubbles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinne, N.; Ripken, T.; Lubatschowski, H.

    2010-02-01

    The LASIK procedure is a well established laser based treatment in ophthalmology. Nowadays it includes a cutting of the corneal tissue bases on ultra short pulses which are focused below the tissue surface to create an optical breakdown and hence a dissection of the tissue. The energy of the laser pulse is absorbed by non-linear processes that result in an expansion of a cavitation bubble and rupturing of the tissue. Due to a reduction of the duration of treatment the current development of ultra short laser systems points to higher repetition rates. This in turn results in a probable interaction between different cavitation bubbles of adjacent optical breakdowns. While the interaction of one single laser pulse with biological tissue is analyzed reasonably well experimentally and theoretically, the interaction of several spatial and temporal following pulses is scarcely determined yet. We present a high-speed photography analysis of cavitation bubble interaction for two spatial separated laser-induced optical breakdowns varying the laser pulse energy as well as the spatial distance. Depending on a change of these parameters different kinds of interactions such as a flattening and deformation of bubble shape, asymmetric water streams and jet formation were observed. The results of this research can be used to comprehend and optimize the cutting effect of ultra short pulse laser systems with high repetition rates (> 1 MHz).

  16. Modeling Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Optimum Tilt Angles for Solar Collectors in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Kulcu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying spatial and temporal variations in optimal tilt angle of a solar collector relative to a horizontal position assists in maximizing its performance for energy collection depending on changes in time and space. In this study, optimal tilt angles were quantified for solar collectors based on the monthly global and diffuse solar radiation on a horizontal surface across Turkey. The dataset of monthly average daily global solar radiation was obtained from 158 places, and monthly diffuse radiation data were estimated using an empirical model in the related literature. Our results showed that high tilt angles during the autumn (September to November and winter (December to February and low tilt angles during the summer (March to August enabled the solar collector surface to absorb the maximum amount of solar radiation. Monthly optimum tilt angles were estimated devising a sinusoidal function of latitude and day of the year, and their validation resulted in a high R2 value of 98.8%, with root mean square error (RMSE of 2.06o.

  17. Spatial-temporal dynamics of Newtonian and viscoelastic turbulence in channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sung-Ning; Shekar, Ashwin; Graham, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Introducing a trace amount of polymer into liquid turbulent flows can result in substantial reduction of friction drag. This phenomenon has been widely used in fluid transport; however, the mechanism is not well understood. Past studies have found that in minimal domain turbulent simulations, there areoccasional time periods when flow exhibits features such as weaker vortices, lower friction drag and larger log-law slope; these have been denoted as "hibernatingturbulence". Here we address the question of whether similar behavior arises spatio-temporally in extended domains, focusing on turbulence at friction Reynolds numbers near transition and Weissenberg numbers resulting in low-medium drag reduction. By using image analysis and conditional sampling tools, we identify the hibernating states in extended domains and show that they display striking similarity as those in minimal domains. The hibernating states among different Weissenberg numbers exhibit similar flow statistics, suggesting they are unaltered by low to medium viscoelasticity. In addition, the polymer is much less stretched during hibernation. Finally, these hibernating states vanish as Reynolds number increases. However, they reoccur and gradually become dominant with increasing viscoelasticity.

  18. A multicrystal diffraction data-collection approach for studying structural dynamics with millisecond temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Schubert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Many biochemical processes take place on timescales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds. Accordingly, any time-resolved experiment must be matched to the speed of the structural changes of interest. Therefore, the timescale of interest defines the requirements of the X-ray source, instrumentation and data-collection strategy. In this study, a minimalistic approach for in situ crystallization is presented that requires only a few microlitres of sample solution containing a few hundred crystals. It is demonstrated that complete diffraction data sets, merged from multiple crystals, can be recorded within only a few minutes of beamtime and allow high-resolution structural information of high quality to be obtained with a temporal resolution of 40 ms. Global and site-specific radiation damage can be avoided by limiting the maximal dose per crystal to 400 kGy. Moreover, analysis of the data collected at higher doses allows the time-resolved observation of site-specific radiation damage. Therefore, our approach is well suited to observe structural changes and possibly enzymatic reactions in the low-millisecond regime.

  19. The temporal dynamics of metacognition: Dissociating task-related activity from later metacognitive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desender, Kobe; Van Opstal, Filip; Hughes, Gethin; Van den Bussche, Eva

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, neuroscience research spent much effort in revealing brain activity related to metacognition. Despite this endeavor, it remains unclear exactly when metacognitive experiences develop during task performance. To investigate this, the current study used EEG to temporally and spatially dissociate task-related activity from metacognitive activity. In a masked priming paradigm, metacognitive experiences of difficulty were induced by manipulating congruency between prime and target. As expected, participants more frequently rated incongruent trials as difficult and congruent trials as easy, while being completely unable to perceive the masked primes. Results showed that both the N2 and the P3 ERP components were modulated by congruency, but that only the P3 modulation interacted with metacognitive experiences. Single-trial analysis additionally showed that the magnitude of the P3 modulation by congruency accurately predicted the metacognitive response. Source localization indicated that the N2 task-related activity originated in the ACC, whereas the P3-interplay between task-related activation and metacognitive experiences originated from the precuneus. We conclude that task-related activity can be dissociated from later metacognitive processing.

  20. Temporal dynamics of prediction error processing during reward-based decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philiastides, Marios G; Biele, Guido; Vavatzanidis, Niki; Kazzer, Philipp; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2010-10-15

    Adaptive decision making depends on the accurate representation of rewards associated with potential choices. These representations can be acquired with reinforcement learning (RL) mechanisms, which use the prediction error (PE, the difference between expected and received rewards) as a learning signal to update reward expectations. While EEG experiments have highlighted the role of feedback-related potentials during performance monitoring, important questions about the temporal sequence of feedback processing and the specific function of feedback-related potentials during reward-based decision making remain. Here, we hypothesized that feedback processing starts with a qualitative evaluation of outcome-valence, which is subsequently complemented by a quantitative representation of PE magnitude. Results of a model-based single-trial analysis of EEG data collected during a reversal learning task showed that around 220ms after feedback outcomes are initially evaluated categorically with respect to their valence (positive vs. negative). Around 300ms, and parallel to the maintained valence-evaluation, the brain also represents quantitative information about PE magnitude, thus providing the complete information needed to update reward expectations and to guide adaptive decision making. Importantly, our single-trial EEG analysis based on PEs from an RL model showed that the feedback-related potentials do not merely reflect error awareness, but rather quantitative information crucial for learning reward contingencies.

  1. Dynamic changes during evacuation of a left temporal abscess in open MRI: technical case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernays, R.L.; Yonekawa, Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Kollias, S.S. [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-05-01

    We demonstrate the usefulness of ''near real-time'' neuro-navigation by open MRI systems for guidance of stereotactic evacuation of intracranial abscesses. A 70-year-old patient was referred to our institution with an intracranial left temporal abscess. He presented with headache, senso-motor aphasia and mild right hemiparesis. The abscess (35 x 25 mm) was stereotactically evacuated under MRI guidance, and a recurrence of a daughter abscess was again evacuated on the 9th postoperative day. ''Near real-time'' imaging showed an indentation of the abscess wall of 11 mm along the trajectory. A thermosensitive MRI protocol demonstrated a higher temperature around the abscess capsule than in the brain tissue more distant to the capsule, demonstrating the inflammatory process. The patient had 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy for gram-negative bacteria and was discharged with improved clinical symptoms 5 weeks after admission. Follow-up CT 2 months postoperatively showed a complete resolution of the abscess. Open MRI-guided interventions with ''near real-time'' imaging demonstrate the anatomical changes during an ongoing procedure and can be accommodated for enhancing the overall precision of stereotactic procedures. Thermosensitive MRI protocols are capable of revealing temperature gradients around inflammatory processes. (orig.)

  2. Spatio-temporal dynamics of tularemia in French wildlife: 2002-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinet, Marie; Decors, Anouk; Mendy, Christiane; Faure, Eva; Durand, Benoit; Madani, Nora

    2016-08-01

    Tularemia, caused by Francisella tularensis, is endemic in France. The surveillance of this disease in wildlife is operated by the SAGIR Network and by the National Reference Laboratory for Tularemia. Wild animals found dead or dying collected by the SAGIR network are necropsied and when tularemia is suspected culture and/or PCR are performed to confirm the diagnosis. The aim of this study was to present the results of tularemia surveillance in wildlife and to investigate the spatial and temporal pattern of tularemia observed between the 2002-2003 and 2012-2013 hunting seasons in French wildlife. Fourty-one to 121 cases were collected each hunting season for a total of 693 confirmed cases and 46 additional suspected cases. The main species affected was the European Brown Hare (Lepus europaeus) but 4 rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), 2 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and one wild boar (Sus scrofa) were also found positive. The Standard Mortality Ratio was mapped and Kulldorff's retrospective space-time scan statistic was implemented and allowed the detection of several clusters: the nationwide outbreak of 2007-2008; 2 clusters in northern and central-western France in high hare-abundance areas and another in North-eastern France where the abundance of hares is low. Our results confirm the usefulness of brown hare as a sentinel of environmental risk.

  3. Spatio-temporal dynamics of solar shading for a parametrically defined roof system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardaljevic, J. [Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development (IESD), De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The evaluation of shading devices is generally carried out using a sequence of shadow-pattern images showing the progression of solar penetration for particular times of the day or year. This approach can reveal when solar penetration may occur, say at the summer solstice, but it cannot give a quantitative measure of the degree and likelihood of solar penetration over a representative period of a full year. This paper describes a new image-based technique to quantify the effectiveness of shading devices. It is founded on predictions of direct solar irradiation using hourly meteorological data for a full year. In addition to numerical output, the technique produces synoptic images that reveal the spatial and temporal variation of solar irradiation. There are no practical limits on the scene geometry and buildings with thousands of individual shading elements can be evaluated. The technique is designed to be both fast and highly scalable making it suitable for the evaluation of a large number of design variants. This is demonstrated in the paper using a parametrically defined model of a complex roof shading system based on the Changi Airport Terminal 3 design. The 3600 fins that comprise the roof shading system were generated using a parametric scheme where the fin orientation has a random component. A total of 42 design variants of the roof shading system were evaluated using the new technique. (author)

  4. Rural Poverty Dynamics and Refugee Communities in South Africa: A Spatial-Temporal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Kurt; Sartorius, Benn; Tollman, Stephen; Schatz, Enid; Kirsten, Johann; Collinson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The assimilation of refugees into their host community economic structures is often problematic. The paper investigates the ability of refugees in rural South Africa to accumulate assets over time relative to their host community. Bayesian spatial-temporal modelling was employed to analyse a longitudinal database that indicated that the asset accumulation rate of former Mozambican refugee households was similar to their host community; however, they were unable to close the wealth gap. A series of geo-statistical wealth maps illustrate that there is a spatial element to the higher levels of absolute poverty in the former refugee villages. The primary reason for this is their physical location in drier conditions that are established further away from facilities and infrastructure. Neighbouring South African villages in close proximity, however, display lower levels of absolute poverty, suggesting that the spatial location of the refugees only partially explains their disadvantaged situation. In this regard, the results indicate that the wealth of former refugee households continues to be more compromised by higher mortality levels, poorer education, and less access to high-return employment opportunities. The long-term impact of low initial asset status appears to be perpetuated in this instance by difficulties in obtaining legal status in order to access state pensions, facilities, and opportunities. The usefulness of the results is that they can be used to sharpen the targeting of differentiated policy in a given geographical area for refugee communities in rural Africa. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Waterborne zinc alters temporal dynamics of guppy Poecilia reticulata epidermal response to Gyrodactylus turnbulli (Monogenea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, Cristina; Marcogliese, David J; Scott, Marilyn E

    2012-03-20

    The present study assessed the histological changes in the epidermis of Poecilia reticulata induced by the combined effects of an ectoparasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli and differing concentrations of waterborne zinc (Zn). Infected guppies were exposed to 0, 15, 30, 60, or 120 µg Zn l-1 and monitored over 3 wk during the exponential increase in parasite numbers on the fish. The fish epidermis responded within 3 d to G. turnbulli infection with a rapid increase in epidermal thickness and a modest increase in number, but not size or composition, of mucous cells. In contrast, in the presence of combined waterborne Zn and infection, mucous cell numbers declined rapidly. As the parasite numbers increased, the epidermis remained thicker than normal, and the number and size of mucous cells decreased. The addition of Zn led to a dramatic thickening of the epidermis during the exponential growth of the parasite population. Mucous cell numbers remained depressed. Temporal changes in mucous cell size were Zn concentration dependent. At 60 µg Zn l-1, cells returned to normal size as infection progressed, whereas they remained extremely small at 120 µg Zn l-1. Changes in mucin composition previously reported in response to Zn alone were subdued in the presence of the parasite except at 60 µg Zn l-1, where all cells contained only acidic mucins. Together these results demonstrate that, on exposure to both Zn and G. turnbulli infection, the epidermal response is initially a protective response to both stressors, and then mainly driven by the increased parasite burden.

  6. Dynamical and temporal characterization of the total ozone column over Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, D.; Antón, M.; Sáenz, G.; Bañón, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.; García, J. A.

    2015-04-01

    As the ozone is one of the most relevant variables in the climate system, to get further in its long-term characterization is a critical issue. In this study, measurements of total ozone column (TOC) from five well-calibrated Brewer spectrophotometers placed in the Iberian Peninsula are analyzed. The temporal trend rate for TOC is +9.3 DU per decade for the period 1993-2012 in Central Iberian Peninsula. However, the low TOC levels during 2011 and 2012 over the study region notably reduce this rate. Empirical linear relationships are established between TOC and pressure, height, and temperature of the tropopause. The linear fits showed seasonal and latitudinal dependence, with stronger relationships during winter and spring. Events with the presence of a double tropopause (DT) are proved to be characteristic of the study region. The decrease in TOC levels when these anomalous events occur is quantified around 10 % in winter and spring with respect to the usual cases with a single tropopause. The total weight of the DT events with respect to the annual values is about 20 %, with a negligible occurrence in summer and autumn and being latitudinal-dependent. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index explains 30 % of the total ozone variability in winter. The DT events are found to be more frequent during phases with positive NAO.

  7. Temporal dynamics of task switching and abstract-concept learning in pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Thomas A; Cook, Robert G; Katz, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined whether pigeons could learn to use abstract concepts as the basis for conditionally switching behavior as a function of time. Using a mid-session reversal task, experienced pigeons were trained to switch from matching-to-sample (MTS) to non-matching-to-sample (NMTS) conditional discriminations within a session. One group had prior training with MTS, while the other had prior training with NMTS. Over training, stimulus set size was progressively doubled from 3 to 6 to 12 stimuli to promote abstract concept development. Prior experience had an effect on the initial learning at each of the set sizes but by the end of training there were no group differences, as both groups showed similar within-session linear matching functions. After acquiring the 12-item set, abstract-concept learning was tested by placing novel stimuli at the beginning and end of a test session. Prior matching and non-matching experience affected transfer behavior. The matching experienced group transferred to novel stimuli in both the matching and non-matching portion of the sessions using a matching rule. The non-matching experienced group transferred to novel stimuli in both portions of the session using a non-matching rule. The representations used as the basis for mid-session reversal of the conditional discrimination behaviors and subsequent transfer behavior appears to have different temporal sources. The implications for the flexibility and organization of complex behaviors are considered.

  8. Analysis of temporal dynamics in imagery during acute limb ischemia and reperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, John M.; Regan, John; Spain, Tammy A.; Caruso, Joseph D.; Rodriquez, Maricela; Luthra, Rajiv; Forsberg, Jonathon; Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion injuries present major challenges for both military and civilian medicine. Improved methods for assessing the effects and predicting outcome could guide treatment decisions. Specific issues related to ischemia and reperfusion injury can include complications arising from tourniquet use, such as microvascular leakage in the limb, loss of muscle strength and systemic failures leading to hypotension and cardiac failure. Better methods for assessing the viability of limbs/tissues during ischemia and reducing complications arising from reperfusion are critical to improving clinical outcomes for at-risk patients. The purpose of this research is to develop and assess possible prediction models of outcome for acute limb ischemia using a pre-clinical model. Our model relies only on non-invasive imaging data acquired from an animal study. Outcome is measured by pathology and functional scores. We explore color, texture, and temporal features derived from both color and thermal motion imagery acquired during ischemia and reperfusion. The imagery features form the explanatory variables in a model for predicting outcome. Comparing model performance to outcome prediction based on direct observation of blood chemistry, blood gas, urinalysis, and physiological measurements provides a reference standard. Initial results show excellent performance for the imagery-base model, compared to predictions based direct measurements. This paper will present the models and supporting analysis, followed by recommendations for future investigations.

  9. Spatial and temporal dynamics of superspreading events in the 2014–2015 West Africa Ebola epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Max S. Y.; Dalziel, Benjamin Douglas; Funk, Sebastian; McClelland, Amanda; Tiffany, Amanda; Riley, Steven; Metcalf, C. Jessica E.; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2017-01-01

    The unprecedented scale of the Ebola outbreak in Western Africa (2014–2015) has prompted an explosion of efforts to understand the transmission dynamics of the virus and to analyze the performance of possible containment strategies. Models have focused primarily on the reproductive numbers of the disease that represent the average number of secondary infections produced by a random infectious individual. However, these population-level estimates may conflate important systematic variation in the number of cases generated by infected individuals, particularly found in spatially localized transmission and superspreading events. Although superspreading features prominently in first-hand narratives of Ebola transmission, its dynamics have not been systematically characterized, hindering refinements of future epidemic predictions and explorations of targeted interventions. We used Bayesian model inference to integrate individual-level spatial information with other epidemiological data of community-based (undetected within clinical-care systems) cases and to explicitly infer distribution of the cases generated by each infected individual. Our results show that superspreaders play a key role in sustaining onward transmission of the epidemic, and they are responsible for a significant proportion (∼61%) of the infections. Our results also suggest age as a key demographic predictor for superspreading. We also show that community-based cases may have progressed more rapidly than those notified within clinical-care systems, and most transmission events occurred in a relatively short distance (with median value of 2.51 km). Our results stress the importance of characterizing superspreading of Ebola, enhance our current understanding of its spatiotemporal dynamics, and highlight the potential importance of targeted control measures. PMID:28193880

  10. Optimized Temporal Window for Detection and Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinomas with Dynamic CT Scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhong Wang; Peijun Wang; Xiaohu Zhao; Xinqin Mao; Xiaolong Gao; Jun Liu

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the optimized time period for detection and characterization of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) when the specific CT features appear during spiral dynamic CT scanning, and to optimize an effective scanning protocol of spiral CT for evaluating RCC.METHODS Twenty-four patients with RCC verified by pathology had undergone a dynamic CT (D-CT) scan. A plain scan was employed to select the target slice. Single-level dynamic scanning started at 14-17 s after the intravenous contrast media had been administered, with a scan interval of 4.9 s acquiring a total number of 17~24 frames. A regular CT scan of the whole kidney followed by a delayed single slice acquisition through the target slice in the excretory phase was performed. Images were assessed in two ways: (1) A group of experienced radiologists reviewed the CT images to find when the specific signs appeared and when the CT features of RCC were optimally displayed; (2) Data measurement of the time-density curves (T-DC) of RCC. The exact time was obtained when the densities of the tumor, renal parenchyma, medulla and aorta reached their peak enhancement, thus also the time when the density difference between tumor and parenchyma was at maximum (Max T-M). Based on the slope of the contrast media uptake curve, T-DC types were ranked from the smallest to the biggest of slope as type A, B and C.RESULTS 1. The review of the CT images by the radiologists showed that the CT features of RCC were optimally demonstrated at 70.2 s. The earliest time at which RCC CT features were examined was at 23.9 s. 2. Image data analysis: the time that the density (or CT value) of the tumor mass reached peak enhancement was at 54 s and peak value was at 80.4 Hu for RCC. The time of the maximal difference of densities between tumor and renal parenchyma was at 102 s.CONCLUSION The following proposal is the scanning protocol for detecting RCC recommended by our research: After a plain scan to determine the target level, a

  11. Temporal and spatial dynamics of ephemeral macroalgal communities in eelgrass, Zostera marina, beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jonas; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Olesen, Birgit;

    in algal cover was inversely correlated with the cover of eelgrass, Zostera marina, suggesting that algae were retained by the eelgrass leaves. At the larger spatial scale algal cover was less variable and significant changes occurred just a few times during the study periods. Variability was caused either...... by algal growth, as indicated by a steady increase in cover, or by physical forces moving large aggregations of algae into or out of the study area leading to significant changes in cover within few days. Thus, in shallow coastal ecosystems aggregations of ephemeral macroalgae can be highly dynamic, algae...

  12. Parametric sensitivity and temporal dynamics of sapphire crystal growth via the micro-pulling-down method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Gaurab; Yeckel, Andrew; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2012-11-01

    The micro-pulling-down (μ-PD) crystal growth of sapphire fibers, whose steady-state limits were the focus of our prior study [Samanta et al., Journal of Crystal Growth 335 (2011) 148-159], is further examined using a parametric sensitivity computation derived by linearizing the nonlinear model around a quasi-steady-state (QSS). In addition, transient analyses are performed to assess inherent stability and dynamic responses in this μ-PD system. Information from these two approaches enlarges our understanding of this particular process, and the approaches themselves are put forth as valuable complements to classical QSS analysis.

  13. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in agroforestry systems. Temporal patterns of some important soil processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyberg, Gert [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    2001-07-01

    The ameliorative effects of different tree species on soils in some agroforestry systems were studied. The temporal pattern of nutrient release from tree organic material is important to achieve synchrony with crop uptake. When, as in many tropical agroforestry systems, trees (C{sub 3}-plants) are planted on C{sub 4}-carbon dominated soils, the difference of around 12-16 per mille in natural abundance of {sup 13}C between C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} plants makes the natural abundance of {sup 13}C a particularly sensitive indicator of the influence of trees on the soil. An increase of 3-5% of the percentage C was proven to derive from trees by this method, only five years after planting. By using the difference of around 10 per mille in natural abundance of {sup 13}C between the endogenous soil C (mainly C{sub 4}) and the applied C (C{sub 3}) in green manure experiments, the contributions of the two C sources to soil respiration can be calculated. The microbial response to the additions of leaves was an immediate increase in respiration. This non-destructive method allows repeated measurements of the actual rate of C mineralisation and facilitates decomposition studies with high temporal resolution in the field. The mineralisation of N was also very rapid and the concentration of NH{sub 4}{sup +} in the soil correlated well with respiration of added C. In our studies, 3-4% of the added C was respired daily, for the first 10 days after addition of Sesbania sesban leaves. Although respiration rates decline with time, we estimated 70-90% to be respired in as short time as 40 days. Weight losses of around 80% after 52 days, from high quality residues in litter bags, also indicate substantial C losses. Measurable build-up of soil organic matter is, hence, unlikely. For immediate soil fertility, addition of high quality green manure may, however, be a viable management option. To achieve synchrony with crop demand, caution is needed in management as large amounts of N are

  14. Swim-training changes the spatio-temporal dynamics of skeletogenesis in zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaz, Ansa W; Léon-Kloosterziel, Karen M; Gort, Gerrit; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; van Leeuwen, Johan L; Kranenbarg, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Fish larvae experience many environmental challenges during development such as variation in water velocity, food availability and predation. The rapid development of structures involved in feeding, respiration and swimming increases the chance of survival. It has been hypothesized that mechanical loading induced by muscle forces plays a role in prioritizing the development of these structures. Mechanical loading by muscle forces has been shown to affect larval and embryonic bone development in vertebrates, but these investigations were limited to the appendicular skeleton. To explore the role of mechanical load during chondrogenesis and osteogenesis of the cranial, axial and appendicular skeleton, we subjected zebrafish larvae to swim-training, which increases physical exercise levels and presumably also mechanical loads, from 5 until 14 days post fertilization. Here we show that an increased swimming activity accelerated growth, chondrogenesis and osteogenesis during larval development in zebrafish. Interestingly, swim-training accelerated both perichondral and intramembranous ossification. Furthermore, swim-training prioritized the formation of cartilage and bone structures in the head and tail region as well as the formation of elements in the anal and dorsal fins. This suggests that an increased swimming activity prioritized the development of structures which play an important role in swimming and thereby increasing the chance of survival in an environment where water velocity increases. Our study is the first to show that already during early zebrafish larval development, skeletal tissue in the cranial, axial and appendicular skeleton is competent to respond to swim-training due to increased water velocities. It demonstrates that changes in water flow conditions can result into significant spatio-temporal changes in skeletogenesis.

  15. Spatial and temporal dynamics of microbial communities in a human-perturbed estuary of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, A.; Yu, C. P.; Hou, L.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries are responsible for the transport and transformation of nutrients and organic matters from the continent to the adjacent coastal zone, and therefore play critical roles in global biogeochemical cycles. They are under increasing stress from human activities, especially in China, yet we still know little about the responses of microbial communities that mediate biogeochemical processes. Here, we investigated planktonic and benthic microbial communities in the human-perturbed Jiulong River estuary (JRE), southern China by using Illumina 16S ribosomal RNA amplicon sequencing. The results of taxonomic assignments indicated that Beta- (23.32%), Alpha- (22.21%), Gammaproteobacteria (14.83%), Actinobacteria (8.67%), and Flavobacteria (7.56%) were the five most abundant classes in estuarine surface waters, while benthic microbial communities were dominated by Gamma- (20.09%), Delta- (14.68%), Beta- (9.82%), Alphaproteobacteria (7.63%), and Anaerolineae (7.25%). The results of Adnois and ANOSIM tests confirmed that the compositions of microbial communities from waters and sediments of the JRE were significantly different from each other, and then salinity may be the primary factor controlling spatial distributions of planktonic and benthic microbial communities in this estuary. At the temporal scale, planktonic communities showed a more clear variation pattern. Remarkably, the ratios of Thaumarchaeota (putative ammonia-oxidizing archaea) to Nitrosomonadales (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) either in water or sediments of the JRE increased from freshwater to marine end, suggesting that bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers occupy low-salinity and high-salinity niches, respectively. The nutrient concentrations and salinity might be the most important factors which are responsible for this niche diversification. Overall, this study shed light on our understanding of the biogeographic patterns and its ecological drivers of estuarine microbial communities.

  16. Spatio-temporal dynamics of African swine fever outbreaks in Nigeria, 2002-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolodun, O A; Yakubu, B; Antiabong, J F; Ogedengbe, M E; Luka, P D; John Audu, B; Ekong, P S; Shamaki, D

    2010-10-01

    African swine fever (ASF) was first introduced into Nigeria through Lagos state in 1997. The disease rapidly spread to Ogun state in 1998 and extended to the Niger Delta (Delta, Rivers and Akwa Ibom states) in the same year. In 1998, Kaduna, Plateau and Benue states all north of the country experienced ASF for the first time. Poor farm biosecurity, bad abattoir practices and extensive/free range pig farming systems led to extensive spread of the diseases to about 16 Nigerian states excluding the far northwest and north east. A total of 1036 field samples collected over a 6-year period covering 19 Nigerian states were analysed during the period under review; 805 samples were PCR positive and 231 negative. Positive samples were detected in all three surveillance phases and from all agroecological zones across the country. For the first time since its incursion, ASF was identified in some states; Bauchi, Adamawa Taraba and Gombe with chances of control very slim and further spread of the virus northward envisaged. Outbreaks of the disease are now a perennial problem with an increasing disease burden in areas where high numbers of pigs are produced in the country. The National Veterinary Research Institute (NVRI), Vom, since 2002 investigated ASF based on tissue submissions and reports made by individuals, private & commercial farms and agricultural bodies. We present an analysis of geographical and temporal distribution of ASF in the country from 2002 to 2007 and a review of historic outbreaks since the first incursion. Risk factors and prospects for control are discussed.

  17. Spatio-temporal dynamics of global H5N1 outbreaks match bird migration patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yali; Skidmore, Andrew K; Wang, Tiejun; de Boer, Willem F; Debba, Pravesh; Toxopeus, Albert G; Li, Lin; Prins, Herbert H T

    2009-11-01

    The global spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 in poultry, wild birds and humans, poses a significant pandemic threat and a serious public health risk. An efficient surveillance and disease control system relies on the understanding of the dispersion patterns and spreading mechanisms of the virus. A space-time cluster analysis of H5N1 outbreaks was used to identify spatio-temporal patterns at a global scale and over an extended period of time. Potential mechanisms explaining the spread of the H5N1 virus, and the role of wild birds, were analyzed. Between December 2003 and December 2006, three global epidemic phases of H5N1 influenza were identified. These H5N1 outbreaks showed a clear seasonal pattern, with a high density of outbreaks in winter and early spring (i.e., October to March). In phase I and II only the East Asia Australian flyway was affected. During phase III, the H5N1 viruses started to appear in four other flyways: the Central Asian flyway, the Black Sea Mediterranean flyway, the East Atlantic flyway and the East Africa West Asian flyway. Six disease cluster patterns along these flyways were found to be associated with the seasonal migration of wild birds. The spread of the H5N1 virus, as demonstrated by the space-time clusters, was associated with the patterns of migration of wild birds. Wild birds may therefore play an important role in the spread of H5N1 over long distances. Disease clusters were also detected at sites where wild birds are known to overwinter and at times when migratory birds were present. This leads to the suggestion that wild birds may also be involved in spreading the H5N1 virus over short distances.

  18. Spatial and temporal dynamics of drosophilid larval assemblages associated to fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Alves da Mata

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of organisms and their resources is critical to further understanding population dynamics in space and time. Although drosophilids have been widely used as biological models, their relationship with breeding and feeding sites has received little attention. Here, we investigate drosophilids breeding in fruits in the Brazilian Savanna, in two contrasting vegetation types, throughout 16 months. Specifically, larval assemblages were compared between savannas and forests, as well as between rainy and dry seasons. The relationships between resource availability and drosophilid abundance and richness were also tested. The community (4,022 drosophilids of 23 species and 2,496 fruits of 57 plant taxa varied widely in space and time. Drosophilid assemblages experienced a strong bottleneck during the dry season, decreasing to only 0.5% of the abundance of the rainy season. Additionally, savannas displayed lower richness and higher abundance than the forests, and were dominated by exotic species. Both differences in larval assemblages throughout the year and between savannas and gallery forests are consistent with those previously seen in adults. Although the causes of this dynamic are clearly multifactorial, resource availability (richness and abundance of rotten fruits was a good predictor of the fly assemblage structure.

  19. Temporal dynamics of motivation-cognitive control interactions revealed by high-resolution pupillometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Sarah Chiew

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivational manipulations, such as the presence of performance-contingent reward incentives, can have substantial influences on cognitive control. Previous evidence suggests that reward incentives may enhance cognitive performance specifically through increased preparatory, or proactive, control processes. The present study examined reward influences on cognitive control dynamics in the AX-Continuous Performance Task (AX-CPT, using high-resolution pupillometry. In the AX-CPT, contextual cues must be actively maintained over a delay in order to appropriately respond to ambiguous target probes. A key feature of the task is that it permits dissociable characterization of preparatory, proactive control processes (i.e., utilization of context and reactive control processes (i.e., target-evoked interference resolution. Task performance profiles suggested that reward incentives enhanced proactive control (context utilization. Critically, pupil dilation was also increased on reward incentive trials during context maintenance periods, suggesting trial-specific shifts in proactive control, particularly when context cues indicated the need to overcome the dominant target response bias. Reward incentives had both transient (i.e., trial-by-trial and sustained (i.e., block-based effects on pupil dilation, which may reflect distinct underlying processes. The transient pupillary effects were present even when comparing against trials matched in task performance, suggesting a unique motivational influence of reward incentives. These results suggest that pupillometry may be a useful technique for investigating reward motivational signals and their dynamic influence on cognitive control.

  20. Temporal dynamics of motivation-cognitive control interactions revealed by high-resolution pupillometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiew, Kimberly S; Braver, Todd S

    2013-01-01

    Motivational manipulations, such as the presence of performance-contingent reward incentives, can have substantial influences on cognitive control. Previous evidence suggests that reward incentives may enhance cognitive performance specifically through increased preparatory, or proactive, control processes. The present study examined reward influences on cognitive control dynamics in the AX-Continuous Performance Task (AX-CPT), using high-resolution pupillometry. In the AX-CPT, contextual cues must be actively maintained over a delay in order to appropriately respond to ambiguous target probes. A key feature of the task is that it permits dissociable characterization of preparatory, proactive control processes (i.e., utilization of context) and reactive control processes (i.e., target-evoked interference resolution). Task performance profiles suggested that reward incentives enhanced proactive control (context utilization). Critically, pupil dilation was also increased on reward incentive trials during context maintenance periods, suggesting trial-specific shifts in proactive control, particularly when context cues indicated the need to overcome the dominant target response bias. Reward incentives had both transient (i.e., trial-by-trial) and sustained (i.e., block-based) effects on pupil dilation, which may reflect distinct underlying processes. The transient pupillary effects were present even when comparing against trials matched in task performance, suggesting a unique motivational influence of reward incentives. These results suggest that pupillometry may be a useful technique for investigating reward motivational signals and their dynamic influence on cognitive control.

  1. Spatio-temporal dynamics of maize yield water constraints under climate change in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Rosana; Lima, Mauricio; Gonzalez-Andujar, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have analyzed the impact of climate change on crop productivity, but comparing the performance of water management systems has rarely been explored. Because water supply and crop demand in agro-systems may be affected by global climate change in shaping the spatial patterns of agricultural production, we should evaluate how and where irrigation practices are effective in mitigating climate change effects. Here we have constructed simple, general models, based on biological mechanisms and a theoretical framework, which could be useful in explaining and predicting crop productivity dynamics. We have studied maize in irrigated and rain-fed systems at a provincial scale, from 1996 to 2009 in Spain, one of the most prominent "hot-spots" in future climate change projections. Our new approach allowed us to: (1) evaluate new structural properties such as the stability of crop yield dynamics, (2) detect nonlinear responses to climate change (thresholds and discontinuities), challenging the usual linear way of thinking, and (3) examine spatial patterns of yield losses due to water constraints and identify clusters of provinces that have been negatively affected by warming. We have reduced the uncertainty associated with climate change impacts on maize productivity by improving the understanding of the relative contributions of individual factors and providing a better spatial comprehension of the key processes. We have identified water stress and water management systems as being key causes of the yield gap, and detected vulnerable regions where efforts in research and policy should be prioritized in order to increase maize productivity.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics in the Ionic Driving Force for GABAA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly apparent that the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission is dynamic. One parameter that can establish differences in the actions of GABAergic synapses is the ionic driving force for the chloride-permeable GABAA receptor (GABAAR. Here we review some of the sophisticated ways in which this ionic driving force can vary within neuronal circuits. This driving force for GABAARs is subject to tight spatial control, with the distribution of Cl− transporter proteins and channels generating regional variation in the strength of GABAAR signalling across a single neuron. GABAAR dynamics can result from short-term changes in their driving force, which involve the temporary accumulation or depletion of intracellular Cl−. In addition, activity-dependent changes in the expression and function of Cl− regulating proteins can result in long-term shifts in the driving force for GABAARs. The multifaceted regulation of the ionic driving force for GABAARs has wide ranging implications for mature brain function, neural circuit development, and disease.

  3. Effects of corticotropin releasing factor on spontaneous burst activity in the piriform-amygdala complex of in vitro brain preparations from newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Tomoko; Onimaru, Hiroshi; Homma, Ikuo

    2011-10-01

    The amygdala is an important higher regulatory center of the autonomic nervous system, involved in respiratory and cardiovascular control, and it also plays a role in the formation of emotions. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a neuropeptide involved in stress responses. We have examined the effects of CRF on the spontaneous burst activity in the piriform-amygdala complex of rat brain preparations in vitro. Limbic-brainstem-spinal cord preparations of 0- to 1-day-old Wistar rats were isolated under deep ether anesthesia, and were superperfused in a modified Krebs solution. Bath application of 50nM CRF substantially increased the frequency of burst activity in the piriform-amygdala complex, whereas this polypeptide exerted only minor effects on C4 inspiratory activity. The excitatory effect of CRF on the amygdala burst was effectively blocked by the CRF1 antagonist, antalarmin, but not the CRF2 antagonist, astressin-2B, suggesting that CRF1 mediated the excitatory effect. The spatio-temporal pattern of the burst activity according to optical recordings was basically identical to the controls; the burst activity initially appeared in the piriform cortex and then propagated to the amygdala. The present experimental model could be useful for the study of role of the limbic system, including the amygdala, in stress responses.

  4. Automated on-line liquid–liquid extraction system for temporal mass spectrometric analysis of dynamic samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Kai-Ta; Liu, Pei-Han [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Rd, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Urban, Pawel L. [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Rd, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Rd, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-09-24

    Most real samples cannot directly be infused to mass spectrometers because they could contaminate delicate parts of ion source and guides, or cause ion suppression. Conventional sample preparation procedures limit temporal resolution of analysis. We have developed an automated liquid–liquid extraction system that enables unsupervised repetitive treatment of dynamic samples and instantaneous analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). It incorporates inexpensive open-source microcontroller boards (Arduino and Netduino) to guide the extraction and analysis process. Duration of every extraction cycle is 17 min. The system enables monitoring of dynamic processes over many hours. The extracts are automatically transferred to the ion source incorporating a Venturi pump. Operation of the device has been characterized (repeatability, RSD = 15%, n = 20; concentration range for ibuprofen, 0.053–2.000 mM; LOD for ibuprofen, ∼0.005 mM; including extraction and detection). To exemplify its usefulness in real-world applications, we implemented this device in chemical profiling of pharmaceutical formulation dissolution process. Temporal dissolution profiles of commercial ibuprofen and acetaminophen tablets were recorded during 10 h. The extraction-MS datasets were fitted with exponential functions to characterize the rates of release of the main and auxiliary ingredients (e.g. ibuprofen, k = 0.43 ± 0.01 h{sup −1}). The electronic control unit of this system interacts with the operator via touch screen, internet, voice, and short text messages sent to the mobile phone, which is helpful when launching long-term (e.g. overnight) measurements. Due to these interactive features, the platform brings the concept of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) to the chemistry laboratory environment. - Highlights: • Mass spectrometric analysis normally requires sample preparation. • Liquid–liquid extraction can isolate analytes from complex matrices. • The proposed system automates

  5. Temporal changes in vegetation of a virgin beech woodland remnant: stand-scale stability with intensive fine-scale dynamics governed by stand dynamic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Standovár

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this resurvey study is to check if herbaceous vegetation on the forest floor exhibits overall stability at the stand-scale in spite of intensive dynamics at the scale of individual plots and stand dynamic events (driven by natural fine scale canopy gap dynamics. In 1996, we sampled a 1.5 ha patch using 0.25 m² plots placed along a 5 m × 5 m grid in the best remnant of central European montane beech woods in Hungary. All species in the herbaceous layer and their cover estimates were recorded. Five patches representing different stand developmental situations (SDS were selected for resurvey. In 2013, 306 plots were resurveyed by using blocks of four 0.25 m² plots to test the effects of imperfect relocation. We found very intensive fine-scale dynamics in the herbaceous layer with high species turnover and sharp changes in ground layer cover at the local-scale (< 1 m2. A decrease in species richness and herbaceous layer cover, as well as high species turnover, characterized the closing gaps. Colonization events and increasing species richness and herbaceous layer cover prevailed in the two newly created gaps. A pronounced decrease in the total cover, but low species turnover and survival of the majority of the closed forest specialists was detected by the resurvey at the stand-scale. The test aiming at assessing the effect of relocation showed a higher time effect than the effect of imprecise relocation. The very intensive fine-scale dynamics of the studied beech forest are profoundly determined by natural stand dynamics. Extinction and colonisation episodes even out at the stand-scale, implying an overall compositional stability of the herbaceous vegetation at the given spatial and temporal scale. We argue that fine-scale gap dynamics, driven by natural processes or applied as a management method, can warrant the survival of many closed forest specialist species in the long-run. Nomenclature: Flora Europaea (Tutin et al. 2010 for

  6. Temporal and spatial dynamical simulation of groundwater characteristics in Minqin Oasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Application scope of geostatistics has been gradually extended from original geologic field to soil science and ecological field, etc. and its successful application results have been widely demonstrated. But little information is reported as to the direct use of geostatistical method to work out the distribu- tion map of groundwater characteristics. In this paper the semivariogram of geostatistics, in combina- tion with GIS, was used to quantitatively study the spatial variation characteristics of groundwater table depth and mineralization degree and their relation to the landuse changes. F test of the used spherical model reached a very significant level, and the theoretical model can well reflect the spatial structural characteristics of groundwater table depth and mineralization degree and achieve an ideal result. This shows that the application of the method in the dynamical simulation of groundwater is feasible. And this paper also provides useful reference for the application of geostatistics in the study of the dy- namical variations of groundwater resources in the oasis.

  7. Spatio-temporal dynamics of word selection in speech production: Insights from electrocorticography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie K Ries

    2015-04-01

    Our results suggest that the posterior inferior LTC is involved in word selection as semantic concepts become available. Posterior medial and left PFC regions may be involved in trial-by-trial top-down control over LTC to help overcome interference caused by semantically-related alternatives in word selection. The single-case result supports this hypothesis and suggests that the posterior medial PFC plays a causal role in resolving this interference in word selection. Lastly, the sensitivity to semantic interference of the post-vocal onset posterior LTC activity suggests the semantic interference effect does not only reflect word selection difficulty but is also present at post-selection stages such as verbal response monitoring. In sum, this study reveals a dynamic network of interacting brain regions that support word selection in language production.

  8. Temporal window system: A new approach for dynamic detection application to surface acoustic wave gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordieu, C.; Rebiere, D.; Pistre, J. [and others

    1996-12-31

    Pattern recognition techniques based on artificial neural networks are now frequently used with good results for gas sensor signal processing (this includes the detection, the identification and the quantification of gases). In the literature, data sets needed for neural networks are practically always built with steady state sensor responses. This situation prevents these techniques from being used in real time applications. Nevertheless, for example in the case of surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors, because of quite long response times due to kinetic factors concerning the gas adsorption and because gases are sometimes extremely dangerous and/or toxic (NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organophosphorus compounds,...), the detection speed is an essential parameter and hence must be monitored in a real time mode. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new dynamic approach and to illustrate it with SAW sensor responses.

  9. Dynamical Analysis of Blocking Events: Spatial and Temporal Fluctuations of Covariant Lyapunov Vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schubert, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    One of the most relevant weather regimes in the mid latitudes atmosphere is the persistent deviation from the approximately zonally symmetric jet stream to the emergence of so-called blocking patterns. Such configurations are usually connected to exceptional local stability properties of the flow which come along with an improved local forecast skills during the phenomenon. It is instead extremely hard to predict onset and decay of blockings. Covariant Lyapunov Vectors (CLVs) offer a suitable characterization of the linear stability of a chaotic flow, since they represent the full tangent linear dynamics by a covariant basis which explores linear perturbations at all time scales. Therefore, we will test whether CLVs feature a signature of the blockings. We examine the CLVs for a quasi-geostrophic beta-plane two-layer model in a periodic channel baroclinically driven by a meridional temperature gradient $\\Delta T$. An orographic forcing enhances the emergence of localized blocked regimes. We detect the blockin...

  10. Direct observation of spatio-temporal dynamics of short electron bunches in storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Evain, C; Parquier, M Le; Szwaj, C; Tordeux, M -A; Manceron, L; Brubach, J -B; Roy, P; Bielawski, S

    2016-01-01

    In recent synchrotron radiation facilities, the use of short (picosecond) electron bunches is a powerful method for producing giant pulses of Terahertz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (THz CSR). Here we report on the first direct observation of these pulse shapes with a few picoseconds resolution, and of their dynamics over a long time. We thus confirm in a very direct way the theories predicting an interplay between two physical processes. Below a critical bunch charge, we observe a train of identical THz pulses (a broadband Terahertz comb) stemming from the shortness of the electron bunches. Above this threshold, a large part of the emission is dominated by drifting structures, which appear through spontaneous self-organization. These challenging single-shot THz recordings are made possible by using a recently developed photonic time stretch detector with a high sensitivity. The experiment has been realized at the SOLEIL storage ring.

  11. Temporal and spatial dynamics of thalamus-evoked activity in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Chih; Lee, Chia-Ming; Shyu, Bai-Chuang

    2012-10-11

    In the present study, multielectrode array (MEA) recording was used to illustrate the spatial-temporal progression of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) activity following stimulation of the thalamus in a thalamocingulate pathway-preserved slice. The MEA was placed under the slice that contained the ACC, and 60 channels of extracellular local field potentials evoked by bipolar electrical stimulation within the thalamus were analyzed. Several distinct thalamic-evoked responses were identified. The early negative component (N1; amplitude, -35.7 ± 5.9 μV) emerged in layer VI near the cingulum 8.4 ± 0.5 ms after stimulation. N1 progressed upward to layers V and II/III in a lateral-to-medial direction. Subsequently, a positive component (P; amplitude, 27.0 ± 3.2 μV) appeared 12.0 ± 0.6 ms after stimulation in layer VI. At 26.8 ± 1.1 ms, a second negative component (N2; amplitude, -20.9 ± 2.7 μV) became apparent in layers II/III and V, followed by a more ventrolateral component (N3; amplitude, -18.9 ± 2.9 μV) at 42.8 ± 2.6 ms. These two late components spread downward to layer VI in a medial-to-lateral direction. The trajectory paths of the evoked components were consistently represented with varied medial thalamic stimulation intensities and sites. Both AMPA/kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors involved in monosynaptic and polysynaptic transmission participated in this thalamocortical pathway. Morphine mainly diminished the two negative synaptic components, and this suppressive effect was reversed by naloxone. The present study confirmed that functional thalamocingulate activity was preserved in the brain-slice preparation. The thalamus-evoked responses were activated and progressed along a deep surface-deep trajectory loop across the ACC layers. Glutamatergic neurotransmitters were crucially involved in information processing. Opioid interneurons may play a modulatory role in regulating the signal flows in the cingulate cortex.

  12. Dysfunctional amygdala activation and connectivity with the prefrontal cortex in current cocaine users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crunelle, C.L.; Kaag, A.M.; Munkhof, H.E. van den; Reneman, L.; Homberg, J.R.; Sabbe, B.; Brink, W. van den; Wingen, G. van

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Stimulant use is associated with increased anxiety and a single administration of dexamphetamine increases amygdala activation to biologically salient stimuli in healthy individuals. Here, we investigate how current cocaine use affects amygdala activity and amygdala connectivity with the

  13. FAST and SLOW amygdala kindling rat strains: comparison of amygdala, hippocampal, piriform and perirhinal cortex kindling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, D C; Kelly, M E; Dufresne, C

    1999-07-01

    In our companion paper, we selectively bred offspring of a Long Evans Hooded and Wistar rat cross for either fast or slow rates of amygdala kindling (Racine et al., 1999. Development of kindling-prone and kindling resistant rats: Selective breeding and electrophysiological studies, Epilepsy Res. 35, 183-195). Within 10 generations, there was no overlap in the distribution of kindling rates between these newly developed FAST and SLOW kindling strains. In the present report, we compared the local excitability, kindling rates, and convulsion profiles of kindling sites in either the amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, piriform cortex or perirhinal cortex in the two strains. Local excitability, measured as the local afterdischarge (AD) threshold and its duration, showed varied effects between structures and strains. Before kindling, the AD threshold was lower in the FAST than the SLOW rats in the hippocampus, piriform and perirhinal cortices, but not the amygdala (the selection structure). Also, the duration of the AD threshold duration was significantly longer in the FAST than in the SLOW rats in all structures, except the CA1 hippocampus. Most of these differences were maintained after kindling. Kindling itself was significantly faster in the FAST compared with the SLOW rats in all structures; however, the different structural kindling rates showed proportional differences between strains that were about five times different in the amygdala compared with only about two times different in the hippocampus. This suggested a selection bias for the amygdala and its networks. As in other rat strains, the fastest kindling rates were seen in the perirhinal cortex followed by the piriform cortex, amygdala and hippocampus in both FAST and SLOW rats. Other important differences between strains and structures occurred in the stage-5 convulsion profiles, including latency to forelimb clonus, clonus duration and duration of associated local afterdischarges. The differences in kindling

  14. Surface morphology of amygdala is associated with trait anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyu Li

    Full Text Available Previous neuroimaging studies have suggested a role of amygdala in trait anxiety level, in which amygdala was typically treated as a whole. To date, it remains unknown whether the morphology of specific subregions of amygdala are associated with trait anxiety. Here, we employed a shape analysis approach to locate the association between its morphology and trait anxiety on the surface of amygdala. 24 healthy young participants were included. The boundary of amygdala for each subject was first manually outlined using high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR image, followed by 3D surface reconstruction and parameterization using spherical harmonic description. Two point-wise metrics, direct displacement between the individual surface and atlas surface and its normal projection, were used to quantify the surface morphology of amygdala. Statistical analysis revealed significant correlations between the two surface metrics and trait anxiety levels, which were located around the lateral and central nucleus of right amygdala. Our results provided localized information for the association between amygdala and trait anxiety, and suggested a central role of the lateral and central nucleus of right amygdala on trait anxiety.

  15. Impact of family history and depression on amygdala volume.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saleh, Karim

    2012-07-30

    Family history of depression significantly impacts life-long depression risk. Family history could impact the stress and emotion regulation system that involves the amygdala. This study\\'s purpose was to investigate family history\\'s effect on amygdala volumes, and differences in first degree relatives with and without major depressive disorder (MDD). Participants, aged 18-65, were healthy volunteers (N=52) with (n=26) and without (n=26) first degree family history, and patients with MDD (N=48) with (n=27) and without (n=21)first-degree family history recruited for structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants underwent clinical assessment followed by manual amygdala tracing. Patients with MDD without family history showed significantly larger right amygdala without a family history of MDD. These effects had larger right amygdala than healthy controls without MDD family history. These effects were pronounced in females. Family history and gender impacted amygdala volumes in all participants, providing a rationale for the inconsistent results in MDD amygdala studies. Higher familial risk in depression seems to be associated with smaller amygdala volumes, whereas depression alone is associated with larger amygdala volumes. Ultimately, these findings highlight consideration of family history and gender in research and treatment strategies.

  16. Childhood Cumulative Risk Exposure and Adult Amygdala Volume and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gary W; Swain, James E; King, Anthony P; Wang, Xin; Javanbakht, Arash; Ho, S Shaun; Angstadt, Michael; Phan, K Luan; Xie, Hong; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-06-01

    Considerable work indicates that early cumulative risk exposure is aversive to human development, but very little research has examined the neurological underpinnings of these robust findings. This study investigates amygdala volume and reactivity to facial stimuli among adults (mean 23.7 years of age, n = 54) as a function of cumulative risk exposure during childhood (9 and 13 years of age). In addition, we test to determine whether expected cumulative risk elevations in amygdala volume would mediate functional reactivity of the amygdala during socioemotional processing. Risks included substandard housing quality, noise, crowding, family turmoil, child separation from family, and violence. Total and left hemisphere adult amygdala volumes were positively related to cumulative risk exposure during childhood. The links between childhood cumulative risk exposure and elevated amygdala responses to emotionally neutral facial stimuli in adulthood were mediated by the corresponding amygdala volumes. Cumulative risk exposure in later adolescence (17 years of age), however, was unrelated to subsequent adult amygdala volume or function. Physical and socioemotional risk exposures early in life appear to alter amygdala development, rendering adults more reactive to ambiguous stimuli such as neutral faces. These stress-related differences in childhood amygdala development might contribute to the well-documented psychological distress as a function of early risk exposure.

  17. Impact of family history and depression on amygdala volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Karim; Carballedo, Angela; Lisiecka, Danutia; Fagan, Andrew J; Connolly, Gerald; Boyle, Gerard; Frodl, Thomas

    2012-07-30

    Family history of depression significantly impacts life-long depression risk. Family history could impact the stress and emotion regulation system that involves the amygdala. This study's purpose was to investigate family history's effect on amygdala volumes, and differences in first degree relatives with and without major depressive disorder (MDD). Participants, aged 18-65, were healthy volunteers (N=52) with (n=26) and without (n=26) first degree family history, and patients with MDD (N=48) with (n=27) and without (n=21)first-degree family history recruited for structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants underwent clinical assessment followed by manual amygdala tracing. Patients with MDD without family history showed significantly larger right amygdala compared to patients with a MDD family history.MDD without family history also had larger right amygdala than healthy controls without MDD family history.These effects were pronounced in females. Family history and gender impacted amygdala volumes in all participants providing rationale for the inconsistent results in MDD amygdala studies [corrected]. Higher familial risk in depression seems to be associated with smaller amygdala volumes, whereas depression alone is associated with larger amygdala volumes. Ultimately, these findings highlight consideration of family history and gender in research and treatment strategies.

  18. Basolateral amygdala response to food cues in the absence of hunger is associated with weight gain susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xue; Kroemer, Nils B; Veldhuizen, Maria G; Babbs, Amanda E; de Araujo, Ivan E; Gitelman, Darren R; Sherwin, Robert S; Sinha, Rajita; Small, Dana M

    2015-05-20

    In rodents, food-predictive cues elicit eating in the absence of hunger (Weingarten, 1983). This behavior is disrupted by the disconnection of amygdala pathways to the lateral hypothalamus (Petrovich et al., 2002). Whether this circuit contributes to long-term weight gain is unknown. Using fMRI in 32 healthy individuals, we demonstrate here that the amygdala response to the taste of a milkshake when sated but not hungry positively predicts weight change. This effect is independent of sex, initial BMI, and total circulating ghrelin levels, but it is only present in individuals who do not carry a copy of the A1 allele of the Taq1A polymorphism. In contrast, A1 allele carriers, who have decreased D2 receptor density (Blum et al., 1996), show a positive association between caudate response and weight change. Regardless of genotype, however, dynamic causal modeling supports unidirectional gustatory input from basolateral amygdala (BLA) to hypothalamus in sated subjects. This finding suggests that, as in rodents, external cues gain access to the homeostatic control circuits of the human hypothalamus via the amygdala. In contrast, during hunger, gustatory inputs enter the hypothalamus and drive bidirectional connectivity with the amygdala. These findings implicate the BLA-hypothalamic circuit in long-term weight change related to nonhomeostatic eating and provide compelling evidence that distinct brain mechanisms confer susceptibility to weight gain depending upon individual differences in dopamine signaling.

  19. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Coastal Bluff Erosion near Barrow Alaska over the Past Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, K. B.; Lopez, A. F.; Aguirre, A.; Aiken, Q.; Cody, R. P.; Gaylord, A. G.; Manley, W. F.; Green, E.; Nelson, L.; Lougheed, V.; Velasco, A. A.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic coastal systems are recognized as being one of the most climate change - vulnerable ecosystems on Earth and represent a complex nexus for examining change at the interface between marine, terrestrial, atmospheric, cryospheric and social systems. Although coastal erosion has received increased attention in the Arctic, few studies have examined the fine scale spatiotemporal dynamics and variability in erosion rates relative to the range of factors that act concomitantly to control erosion (e.g. duration of ice free seas, bathymetry, wave action, sea and air temperature, landscape morphology). This study reports on the spatiotemporal dynamics of annual DGPS surveys of eroding coastal bluffs in northern Alaska near the city of Barrow. Surveys along ca. 11km of the Elson Lagoon coast have been conducted since 2002 and additional surveys along ca. 120km of Elson Lagoon and Chuckhi Sea coast have been conducted since 2013. There has been strong inter-annual spatiotemporal variability in erosion rates with no indication of a long term change in erosion rates over time. Factors controlling wave intensity (e.g. wind run, off shore bathymetry, aspect of the coast relative to prevailing winds) explain most variability in erosion rates over time but during relatively calm periods, landscape history and morphology become more important. These findings highlight the extreme fine scale spatiotemporal heterogeneity in erosion rates along the Arctic Coast, and the importance of incorporating both storm-related climatic events and landscape characteristics when forecasting future environmental states in Arctic coastal landscapes. Case studies outlining new remote sensing technologies and future directions of study will also be outlined including terrestrial and airborne LiDAR, and Kite, UAV, and satellite imagery that is being used to derive and monitor topographic and hydrological change near eroding coastal bluffs; a wireless sensor network of micrometeorological and optical

  20. Market Orientation within University Schools of Business: Can a Dynamical Systems Viewpoint Applied to a Non-Temporal Data Set Yield Valuable Insights for University Managers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John C.; Webster, Robert L.; Hammond, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the use of using complexity theory--the study of nonlinear dynamical systems of which chaos and catastrophe theory are subsets--in the analysis of a non temporal data set to derive valuable insights into the functioning of university schools of business. The approach is unusual in that studies of nonlinearity in complex…

  1. Spatial and temporal dynamics of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) health indicators: linking individual-based indicators to a management-relevant endpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tyler; Jones, Michael L.; Ebener, Mark P.; Arts, Michael T.; Brenden, Travis O.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Wright, Gregory M.; Faisal, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    We examined the spatial and temporal dynamics of health indicators in four lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) stocks located in northern lakes Michigan and Huron from 2003 to 2006. The specific objectives were to (1) quantify spatial and temporal variability in health indicators; (2) examine relationships among nutritional indicators and stock-specific spatial and temporal dynamics of pathogen prevalence and intensity of infection; and (3) examine relationships between indicators measured on individual fish and stock-specific estimates of natural mortality. The percent of the total variation attributed to spatial and temporal sources varied greatly depending on the health indicator examined. The most notable pattern was a downward trend in the concentration of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs), observed in all stocks, in the polar lipid fraction of lake whitefish dorsal muscle tissue over the three study years. Variation among stocks and years for some indicators were correlated with the prevalence and intensity of the swimbladder nematode Cystidicola farionis, suggesting that our measures of fish health were related, at some level, with disease dynamics. We did not find relationships between spatial patterns in fish health indicators and estimates of natural mortality rates for the stocks. Our research highlights the complexity of the interactions between fish nutritional status, disease dynamics, and natural mortality in wild fish populations. Additional research that identifies thresholds of health indicators, below (or above) which survival may be reduced, will greatly help in understanding the relationship between indicators measured on individual fish and potential population-level effects.

  2. Integrating real-time and manual monitored data to predict hillslope soil moisture dynamics with high spatio-temporal resolution using linear and non-linear models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing; Zhou, Zhiwen; Duncan, Emily W.; Lv, Ligang; Liao, Kaihua; Feng, Huihui

    2017-02-01

    Spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture (θ) is a challenge that remains to be better understood. A trade-off exists between spatial coverage and temporal resolution when using the manual and real-time θ monitoring methods. This restricted the comprehensive and intensive examination of θ dynamics. In this study, we integrated the manual and real-time monitored data to depict the hillslope θ dynamics with good spatial coverage and temporal resolution. Linear (stepwise multiple linear regression-SMLR) and non-linear (support vector machines-SVM) models were used to predict θ at 39 manual sites (collected 1-2 times per month) with θ collected at three real-time monitoring sites (collected every 5 mins). By comparing the accuracies of SMLR and SVM for each depth and manual site, an optimal prediction model was then determined at this depth of this site. Results showed that θ at the 39 manual sites can be reliably predicted (root mean square errors model. The subsurface flow dynamics was an important factor that determined whether the relationship was linear or non-linear. Depth to bedrock, elevation, topographic wetness index, profile curvature, and θ temporal stability influenced the selection of prediction model since they were related to the subsurface soil water distribution and movement. Using this approach, hillslope θ spatial distributions at un-sampled times and dates can be predicted. Missing information of hillslope θ dynamics can be acquired successfully.

  3. Temporal Dynamics of Antioxidant Defence System in Relation to Polyamine Catabolism in Rice under Direct-Seeded and Transplanted Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manisha KUMARI; Bavita ASTHIR; Navtej Singh BAINS

    2014-01-01

    Six rice cultivars viz. PR120, PR116, Feng Ai Zan, PR115, PAU201 and Punjab Mehak 1 under the direct-seeded and transplanted conditions were used to investigate the involvement of antioxidative defence system in relation to polyamine catabolism in temporal regulation of developing grains. Activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APx), guaiacol peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), polyamine oxidases (PAO) and contents of ascorbate,α-tocopherol, proline and polyamines increased gradually until mid-milky stage and then declined towards maturity stage under both planting conditions. The transplanted condition led to higher activities of antioxidative enzymes (APx, GPx and CAT) and contents of ascorbate,α-tocopherol and proline whereas the direct-seeded condition had elevated levels of PAO and SOD activities and contents of polyamines, lipid peroxide and hydrogen peroxide. Cultivars Feng Ai Zan and PR120 exhibited superior tolerance over other cultivars by accumulating higher contents of ascorbate,α-tocopherol and proline with increasing level of PAO and SOD activities under the direct-seeded condition. However, under the transplanted condition PR116 and PAU201 showed higher activities of antioxidative enzymes with decreasing content of lipid peroxide. Therefore, we concluded that under the direct-seeded condition, enhancements of polyamines content and PAO activity enabled rice cultivars more tolerant to oxidative stress, while under the transplanted condition, antioxidative defence with decreasing of lipid peroxide content was closely associated with the protection of grains by maintaining membrane integrity during rice grain filling. The results indicated that temporal dynamics of H2O2 metabolic machinery was strongly up-regulated especially at the mid-milky stage.

  4. The temporal dynamics of implicit processing of non-letter, letter, and word-forms in the human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Lawrence G; Liotti, Mario; Perez, Ricardo; Fox, Sarabeth P; Woldorff, Marty G

    2009-01-01

    The decoding of visually presented line segments into letters, and letters into words, is critical to fluent reading abilities. Here we investigate the temporal dynamics of visual orthographic processes, focusing specifically on right hemisphere contributions and interactions between the hemispheres involved in the implicit processing of visually presented words, consonants, false fonts, and symbolic strings. High-density EEG was recorded while participants detected infrequent, simple, perceptual targets (dot strings) embedded amongst a of character strings. Beginning at 130 ms, orthographic and non-orthographic stimuli were distinguished by a sequence of ERP effects over occipital recording sites. These early latency occipital effects were dominated by enhanced right-sided negative-polarity activation for non-orthographic stimuli that peaked at around 180 ms. This right-sided effect was followed by bilateral positive occipital activity for false-fonts, but not symbol strings. Moreover the size of components of this later positive occipital wave was inversely correlated with the right-sided ROcc180 wave, suggesting that subjects who had larger early right-sided activation for non-orthographic stimuli had less need for more extended bilateral (e.g., interhemispheric) processing of those stimuli shortly later. Additional early (130-150 ms) negative-polarity activity over left occipital cortex and longer-latency centrally distributed responses (>300 ms) were present, likely reflecting implicit activation of the previously reported 'visual-word-form' area and N400-related responses, respectively. Collectively, these results provide a close look at some relatively unexplored portions of the temporal flow of information processing in the brain related to the implicit processing of potentially linguistic information and provide valuable information about the interactions between hemispheres supporting visual orthographic processing.

  5. Impact of Leaf Traits on Temporal Dynamics of Transpired Oxygen Isotope Signatures and Its Impact on Atmospheric Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Kübert, Angelika; Werner, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen isotope signatures of transpiration (δE) are powerful tracers of water movement from plant to global scale. However, a mechanistic understanding of how leaf morphological/physiological traits effect δE is missing. A laser spectrometer was coupled to a leaf-level gas-exchange system to measure fluxes and isotopic signatures of plant transpiration under controlled conditions in seven distinct species (Fagus sylvatica, Pinus sylvestris, Acacia longifolia, Quercus suber, Coffea arabica, Plantago lanceolata, Oxalis triangularis). We analyzed the role of stomatal conductance (gs) and leaf water content (W) on the temporal dynamics of δE following changes in relative humidity (rH). Changes in rH were applied from 60 to 30% and from 30 to 60%, which is probably more than covering the maximum step changes occurring under natural conditions. Further, the impact of gs and W on isotopic non-steady state isofluxes was analyzed. Following changes in rH, temporal development of δE was well described by a one-pool modeling approach for most species. Isofluxes of δE were dominantly driven by stomatal control on E, particularly for the initial period of 30 min following a step change. Hence, the deviation of isofluxes from isotopic steady state can be large, even though plants transpire near to isotopic steady state. Notably, not only transpiration rate and stomatal conductance, but also the leaf traits stomatal density (as a measure of gmax) and leaf water content are significantly related to the time constant (τ) and non-steady-state isofluxes. This might provide an easy-to-access means of a priori assumptions for the impact of isotopic non-steady-state transpiration in various ecosystems. We discuss the implications of our results from leaf to ecosystem scale. PMID:28149303

  6. DISCOVERY 2010: Spatial and temporal variability in a dynamic polar ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarling, G. A.; Ward, P.; Atkinson, A.; Collins, M. A.; Murphy, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    DIC deficits, the South Georgia bloom was found to contain the strongest seasonal carbon uptake in the ice-free zone of the Southern Ocean. The surveys also encountered low-production, iron-limited regions, a situation more typical of the wider Southern Ocean. The response of primary and secondary consumers to spatial and temporal heterogeneity in production was complex. Many of the life-cycles of small pelagic organisms showed a close coupling to the seasonal cycle of food availability. For instance, Antarctic krill showed a dependence on early, non-ice-associated blooms to facilitate early reproduction. Strategies to buffer against environmental variability were also examined, such as the prevalence of multiyear life-cycles and variability in energy storage levels. Such traits were seen to influence the way in which Scotia Sea communities were structured, with biomass levels in the larger size classes being higher than in other ocean regions. Seasonal development also altered trophic function, with the trophic level of higher predators increasing through the course of the year as additional predator-prey interactions emerged in the lower trophic levels. Finally, our studies re-emphasised the role that the simple phytoplankton-krill-higher predator food chain plays in this Southern Ocean region, particularly south of the SACCF. To the north, alternative food chains, such as those involving copepods, macrozooplankton and mesopelagic fish, were increasingly important. Continued ocean warming in this region is likely to increase the prevalence of such alternative such food chains with Antarctic krill predicted to move southwards.

  7. Spatio-temporal dynamic of Tuber magnatum mycelium in natural truffle grounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Iotti

    Full Text Available Tuber magnatum produces the world's most expensive truffle. This fungus produces very rare ectomycorrhizas which are difficult or even impossible to detect in the field. A "real-time" PCR assay was recently developed to quantify and to track T. magnatum mycelium in soil. Here, this technique was used to investigate the spatial distribution of T. magnatum extra-radical mycelium in soil productive patches and its dynamic across seasons. This study was carried out in four different natural T. magnatum truffle grounds located in different Italian regions. During the fruiting seasons, the amount of T. magnatum mycelium was significantly higher around the fruiting points and decreased going farther away from them. Moreover, T. magnatum mycelium inside the productive patches underwent seasonal fluctuations. In early spring, the amount of T. magnatum mycelium was significantly higher than in summer. In summer, probably due to the hot and dry season, T. magnatum mycelium significantly decreased, whereas in autumn it increased again and was concentrated at the putative fruiting points. These results give new insights on T. magnatum ecology and are useful to plan the most appropriate sampling strategy for evaluating the management of a truffle ground.

  8. Study of spatio-temporal dynamics of laser-hole boring in near critical plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, Sergei; Gong, Chao; Fiuza, Frederico; Pigeon, Jeremy; Joshi, Chan

    2015-11-01

    At high-intensities of light, radiation pressure becomes one of the dominant mechanisms in laser-plasma interaction. The radiation pressure of an intense laser pulse can steepen and push the critical density region of an overdense plasma creating a cavity or a hole. This hole boring phenomenon is of importance in fast-ignition fusion, high-gradient laser-plasma ion acceleration, and formation of collisionless shocks. Here multi-frame picosecond optical interferometry is used for the first direct measurements of space and time dynamics of the density cavity as it is pushed forward by a train of CO2 laser pulses in a helium plasma. The measured values of the hole boring velocity into an overdense plasma as a function of laser intensity are consistent with a theory based on energy and momentum balance between the heated plasma and the laser and with two-dimensional numerical simulations. We show possibility to extract a relative plasma electron temperature within the laser pulse by applying an analytical theory to the measured hole boring velocities. This work was supported by DOE grant DE-SC0010064.

  9. Dynamical phenotyping: using temporal analysis of clinically collected physiologic data to stratify populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D J Albers

    Full Text Available Using glucose time series data from a well measured population drawn from an electronic health record (EHR repository, the variation in predictability of glucose values quantified by the time-delayed mutual information (TDMI was explained using a mechanistic endocrine model and manual and automated review of written patient records. The results suggest that predictability of glucose varies with health state where the relationship (e.g., linear or inverse depends on the source of the acuity. It was found that on a fine scale in parameter variation, the less insulin required to process glucose, a condition that correlates with good health, the more predictable glucose values were. Nevertheless, the most powerful effect on predictability in the EHR subpopulation was the presence or absence of variation in health state, specifically, in- and out-of-control glucose versus in-control glucose. Both of these results are clinically and scientifically relevant because the magnitude of glucose is the most commonly used indicator of health as opposed to glucose dynamics, thus providing for a connection between a mechanistic endocrine model and direct insight to human health via clinically collected data.

  10. The temporal dynamics of reversal learning: P3 amplitude predicts valence-specific behavioral adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Kayla R; Ait Oumeziane, Belel; Hélie, Sebastien; Foti, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Adapting behavior to dynamic stimulus-reward contingences is a core feature of reversal learning and a capacity thought to be critical to socio-emotional behavior. Impairment in reversal learning has been linked to multiple psychiatric outcomes, including depression, Parkinson's disorder, and substance abuse. A recent influential study introduced an innovative laboratory reversal-learning paradigm capable of disentangling the roles of feedback valence and expectancy. Here, we sought to use this paradigm in order to examine the time-course of reward and punishment learning using event-related potentials among a large, representative sample (N=101). Three distinct phases of processing were examined: initial feedback evaluation (reward positivity, or RewP), allocation of attention (P3), and sustained processing (late positive potential, or LPP). Results indicate a differential pattern of valence and expectancy across these processing stages: the RewP was uniquely related to valence (i.e., positive vs. negative feedback), the P3 was uniquely associated with expectancy (i.e., unexpected vs. expected feedback), and the LPP was sensitive to both valence and expectancy (i.e., main effects of each, but no interaction). The link between ERP amplitudes and behavioral performance was strongest for the P3, and this association was valence-specific. Overall, these findings highlight the potential utility of the P3 as a neural marker for feedback processing in reversal-based learning and establish a foundation for future research in clinical populations.

  11. Neural substrates and behavioral profiles of romantic jealousy and its temporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Yu, Hongbo; Chen, Jie; Liang, Jie; Lu, Lin; Zhou, Xiaolin; Shi, Jie

    2016-06-07

    Jealousy is not only a way of experiencing love but also a stabilizer of romantic relationships, although morbid romantic jealousy is maladaptive. Being engaged in a formal romantic relationship can tune one's romantic jealousy towards a specific target. Little is known about how the human brain processes romantic jealousy by now. Here, by combining scenario-based imagination and functional MRI, we investigated the behavioral and neural correlates of romantic jealousy and their development across stages (before vs. after being in a formal relationship). Romantic jealousy scenarios elicited activations primarily in the basal ganglia (BG) across stages, and were significantly higher after the relationship was established in both the behavioral rating and BG activation. The intensity of romantic jealousy was related to the intensity of romantic happiness, which mainly correlated with ventral medial prefrontal cortex activation. The increase in jealousy across stages was associated with the tendency for interpersonal aggression. These results bridge the gap between the theoretical conceptualization of romantic jealousy and its neural correlates and shed light on the dynamic changes in jealousy.

  12. [Spatial and temporal dynamics of the weed community in the Zoysia matrella lawn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Qi; Li, You-Han; Zeng, Ying; Xie, Xin-Ming

    2014-02-01

    The heterogeneity of species composition is one of the main attributes in weed community dynamics. Based on species frequency and power law, this paper studied the variations of weed community species composition and spatial heterogeneity in a Zoysia matrella lawn in Guangzhou at different time. The results showed that there were 43 weed species belonging to 19 families in the Z. matrella lawn from 2007 to 2009, in which Gramineae, Compositae, Cyperaceae and Rubiaceae had a comparative advantage. Perennial weeds accounted for the largest proportion of weeds and increased gradually in the three years. Weed communities distributed in higher heterogeneity than in a random model. Dominant weeds varied with season and displayed regularity in the order of 'dicotyledon-monocotyledon-dicotyledon weeds' and 'perennial-annual-perennial weeds'. The spatial heterogeneity of weed community in Z. matrella lawn was higher in summer than in winter. The diversity and evenness of weed community were higher in summer and autumn than in winter and spring. The number of weed species with high heterogeneity in summer was higher than in the other seasons. The spatial heterogeneity and diversity of weed community had no significant change in the three years, while the evenness of weed community had the tendency to decline gradually.

  13. Assessment of temporal dynamics of evaporation in the Itumbiara reservoir, GO, using remote sensing data

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    João Antônio Lorenzzetti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this work was to study the dynamics of evaporation in the Itumbiara reservoir, located in Central Brazil, using MODIS-derived water surface temperature (product MOD11A1 and meteorological data acquired over the water surface. The evaporation rates were derived from latent heat flux, estimated through a mass transfer model. The estimates were carried out for the period between 1/1/2010 and 31/12/2010. The results showed that evaporation rate tends to increase from January to September and then decrease from September to December. The evaporation rate reached values near 20 mm day-1 in Itumbiara reservoir during the dry season in 2010. The mean evaporation rate for the wet season was 3.66 mm day-1 and 8.25 mm day-1 for the dry season. The total water volume evaporated from Itumbiara reservoir during 2010 was estimated at about 1.7 billion m³ (2,300 mm which represents 10% of total reservoir volume. The results suggest that advection is the main transport mechanism which drives the evaporation in Itumbiara. The convective processes contribute secondarily to evaporation in Itumbiara reservoir.

  14. Genetic diversity and temporal dynamics of phytoplankton viruses in East Lake, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Niang; Wang; Xing-Yi; Ge; Yong-Quan; Wu; Xing-Lou; Yang; Bing; Tan; Yu-Ji; Zhang; Zheng-Li; Shi

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton viruses are important components of aquatic ecosystems. However, their prevalence and genetic diversity in marine and freshwater systems are largely under estimated owing to the immense size of water bodies and limitations in virus discovery techniques. In this study, we conducted a 1-year survey of phytoplankton virus communities by collecting surface water monthly from an inland lake(East Lake) in China between May 2012 and April 2013. We examined four phytoplankton viruses, i.e., myoviruses, podoviruses, siphoviruses, and phycodnaviruses, and seven sets of primers were used to target conserved genes within these four species. In this year-long investigation, a total of 358 different virus-related sequences from four virus families were obtained. All virus families were detected in all months, except for cyanopodoviruses, which were only identified during eight of the 12 months surveyed. Moreover, virus abundance and diversity changed dynamically over time. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the majority of viral sequences from East Lake, China displayed distinct clustering patterns compared with published sequences. These results supported the existence of a highly diverse and unique phytoplankton virus community in East Lake, China.

  15. Dynamics of imports of sheep meat in Brazil: analysis of temporal components

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    João Garibaldi Almeida Viana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The sheep production is an important livestock activity in Brazil. Its production stretches away into the country, a source of income and livelihood. On the demand side, there is an increase in domestic consumption, driven by the increased purchasing power of the population. To meet the growing demand, Brazil access international markets through of sheep meat imports. In this context, the work aims to analyze the dynamics of sheep meat imports in Brazil from 2000 to 2012, giving particular attention to the tendency and seasonality of the quantity imported. The data of volume and value of imports were collected from the system AliceWeb. Statistical analysis followed the multiplicative time series model. Identified an upward tendency of sheep meat import, with annual growth of 5.09% in the period. Still, the total quantity commercialized, there is the purchase of sheep bone cuts. There was the seasonal behavior in the import of sheep meat, focusing primarily in the months of the end of the year, with import volumes 68% higher than the average of the total amount. The main trading partner of Brazil is the Uruguay, market responsible for at least 80% of the annual volume of import.

  16. Quantitative imaging with Fucci and mathematics to uncover temporal dynamics of cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitou, Takashi; Imamura, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is strictly coordinated to ensure proper tissue growth, development, and regeneration of multicellular organisms. Spatiotemporal visualization of cell cycle phases directly helps us to obtain a deeper understanding of controlled, multicellular, cell cycle progression. The fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) system allows us to monitor, in living cells, the G1 and the S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle in red and green fluorescent colors, respectively. Since the discovery of Fucci technology, it has found numerous applications in the characterization of the timing of cell cycle phase transitions under diverse conditions and various biological processes. However, due to the complexity of cell cycle dynamics, understanding of specific patterns of cell cycle progression is still far from complete. In order to tackle this issue, quantitative approaches combined with mathematical modeling seem to be essential. Here, we review several studies that attempted to integrate Fucci technology and mathematical models to obtain quantitative information regarding cell cycle regulatory patterns. Focusing on the technological development of utilizing mathematics to retrieve meaningful information from the Fucci producing data, we discuss how the combined methods advance a quantitative understanding of cell cycle regulation.

  17. Spatio-temporal dynamics of surface water quality in a Portuguese peri-urban catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carla; Walsh, Rory; Coelho, Celeste; Ferreira, António

    2016-04-01

    Urban development poses great pressure on water resources, but the impact of different land-uses on streamwater quality in partly urbanized catchments is not well understood. Focussing on a Portuguese peri-urban catchment, this paper explores the impact of a mosaic of different urban and non-urban land-uses on streamwater quality, and the influence of a seasonal Mediterranean climate on pollutant dynamics. The catchment has a 40% urban cover, dispersed amongst patches of woodland (56%) and agricultural fields (4%). Apart from the catchment outlet, streamwater quality was assessed at three sub-catchment sites: (i) Porto Bordalo, encompassing a 39% urban area with a new major road; (ii) Espírito Santo, draining a sub-catchment with 49% urban cover, mostly comprising detached houses surrounded by gardens; and (iii) Quinta, with a 25% urban cover. The Porto Bordalo sub-catchment is underlain by limestone, whereas the Espírito Santo and Quinta sub-catchments overlie sandstone. Water quality variables (notably nutrients, heavy metals and COD) were assessed for samples collected at different stages in the storm hydrograph responses to ten rainfall events occurring between October 2011 and March 2013. Urban areas had great impacts on COD, with highest median concentrations in Espírito Santo (18.0 mg L-1) and lowest in Quinta (9.5 mgL-1). In Espírito Santo, the management of gardens triggered greatest median concentrations of N-NO3 (1.46 mgL-1, pwater quality dynamics. COD and nutrient variables (N-Nk, N-NH4, N-NO3 and P) attained highest concentrations after the summer. Low discharges led to high pollutant concentrations at baseflow of N-NH4 in ESAC and Porto Bordalo (up to 1.63 mgL-1 and 1.04 mgL-1, respectively). The first storm events after the summer led to flushing of accumulated pollutants to produce serious concentrations of N-Nk in Porto Bordalo (2.05 mgL-1) and Zn at ESAC and Porto Bordalo (up to 0.55 mgL-1 and 0.59 mgL-1, respectively), all recorded at peak

  18. Spatial and temporal dynamics of phytoplankton and bacterioplankton biomass in Sanya Bay, northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Weihua; LI Tao; XU Jirong; WANG Hankui; CAI Chuanghua; DONG Junde; ZHANG Si

    2009-01-01

    The composition of phytoplankton and the dynamics of phytoplankton and bacterioplankton biomass (PB and BB, respectively) of Sanya Bay, South China Sea, were determined. A total of 168 species (67 genera) phytoplankton were identified, including Bacillariophyta (diatom, 128 species), Pyrrophyta (35 species), Cyanophyta (3 species), and Chrysophyta (2 species). Annual average abundance of phytoplankton was 1.2 × 107 cells/m3, with the highest abundance in autumn, and the lowest in summer. Annual average diversity index (H′) and evenness (J) values were 3.86 and 0.70, respectively. Average chlorophyll a was 2.5 mg/m3, and the average PB was 124 mg C/m3, with the highest value in autumn. Surface PB was higher than the bottom, except for summer. Annual mean bacterioplankton abundance and BB were 6.9 × 1011 cells/m3 and 13.8 mg C/m3, respectively. The highest BB was found in summer, followed by winter, spring, and autumn. Surface BB was higher than bottom all year round. The spatial distribution patterns of PB and BB were very similar with the highest biomass in the estuary and decreasing seaward, primarily due to terrestrial input from the Sanya River and influx of oceanic water. The main factor influencing on PB and BB was DIN, with other factors such as temperature, which was above 22℃ throughout the year, having a negligible impact. The correlation between BB and PB was significant (P < 0.01). The annual average ratio of BB/PB was 0.12 (0.06--0.15). Phytoplankton primary production was one of the most important factors in controlling the distribution of bacterioplankton.

  19. Dynamical Analysis of Blocking Events: Spatial and Temporal Fluctuations of Covariant Lyapunov Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Sebastian; Lucarini, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    One of the most relevant weather regimes in the mid latitudes atmosphere is the persistent deviation from the approximately zonally symmetric jet stream to the emergence of so-called blocking patterns. Such configurations are usually connected to exceptional local stability properties of the flow which come along with an improved local forecast skills during the phenomenon. It is instead extremely hard to predict onset and decay of blockings. Covariant Lyapunov Vectors (CLVs) offer a suitable characterization of the linear stability of a chaotic flow, since they represent the full tangent linear dynamics by a covariant basis which explores linear perturbations at all time scales. Therefore, we will test whether CLVs feature a signature of the blockings. We examine the CLVs for a quasi-geostrophic beta-plane two-layer model in a periodic channel baroclinically driven by a meridional temperature gradient ΔT. An orographic forcing enhances the emergence of localized blocked regimes. We detect the blocking events of the channel flow with a Tibaldi-Molteni scheme adapted to the periodic channel. When blocking occurs, the global growth rates of the fastest growing CLVs are significantly higher. Hence against intuition, globally the circulation is more unstable in blocked phases. Such an increase in the finite time Lyapunov exponents with respect to the long term average is attributed to stronger barotropic and baroclinic conversion in the case of high temperature gradients, while for low values of ΔT, the effect is only due to stronger barotropic instability. For the localization of the CLVs, we compare the meridionally averaged variance of the CLVs during blocked and unblocked phases. We find that on average the variance of the CLVs is clustered around the center of blocking. These results show that the blocked flow affects all time scales and processes described by the CLVs.

  20. Spatio-temporal water dynamics in mature Banksia menziesii trees during drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Martin K-F; Ehrenberger, Wilhelm; Bitter, Rebecca; Stevens, Jason; Miller, Ben P; Chopard, Jerome; Rüger, Simon; Hardy, Giles E S J; Poot, Pieter; Dixon, Kingsley W; Zimmermann, Ulrich; Veneklaas, Erik J

    2014-10-01

    Southwest Australian Banksia woodlands are highly diverse plant communities that are threatened by drought- or temperature-induced mortality due to the region's changing climate. We examined water relations in dominant Banksia menziesii R. Br. trees using magnetic leaf patch clamp pressure (ZIM-) probes that allow continuous, real-time monitoring of leaf water status. Multiple ZIM-probes across the crown were complemented by traditional ecophysiological measurements. During summer, early stomatal downregulation of transpiration prevented midday balancing pressures from exceeding 2.5 MPa. Diurnal patterns of ZIM-probe and pressure chamber readings agreed reasonably well, however, ZIM-probes recorded short-term dynamics, which are impossible to capture using a pressure chamber. Simultaneous recordings of three ZIM-probes evenly spaced along leaf laminas revealed intrafoliar turgor gradients, which, however, did not develop in a strictly basi- or acropetal fashion and varied with cardinal direction. Drought stress manifested as increasing daily signal amplitude (low leaf water status) and occasionally as rising baseline at night (delayed rehydration). These symptoms occurred more often locally than across the entire crown. Microclimate effects on leaf water status were strongest in crown regions experiencing peak morning radiation (East and North). Extreme spring temperatures preceded the sudden death of B. menziesii trees, suggesting a temperature- or humidity-related tipping point causing rapid hydraulic failure as evidenced by collapsing ZIM-probe readings from an affected tree. In a warmer and drier future, increased frequency of B. menziesii mortality will result in significantly altered community structure and ecosystem function.

  1. Diversity of Fusarium head blight populations and trichothecene toxin types reveals regional differences in pathogen composition and temporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Amy C; Clear, Randall M; O'Donnell, Kerry; McCormick, Susan; Turkington, T Kelly; Tekauz, Andy; Gilbert, Jeannie; Kistler, H Corby; Busman, Mark; Ward, Todd J

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of genetic diversity, trichothecene genotype composition, and population structure were conducted using 4086 Fusarium graminearum isolates collected from wheat in eight Canadian provinces over a three year period between 2005 and 2007. The results revealed substantial regional differences in Fusarium head blight pathogen composition and temporal population dynamics. The 3ADON trichothecene type consistently predominated in Maritime provinces (91%) over the sampled years, and increased significantly (P<0.05) between 2005 and 2007 in western Canada, accounting for 66% of the isolates in Manitoba by the end of the sampling period. In contrast, 3ADON frequency was lower (22%, P<0.001) in the eastern Canadian provinces of Ontario and Québec and did not change significantly between 2005 and 2007, resulting in two distinct longitudinal clines in 3ADON frequency across Canada. Overall, genetic structure was correlated with toxin type, as the endemic population (NA1) was dominated by 15ADON isolates (86%), whereas a second population (NA2) consisted largely of 3ADON isolates (88%). However, the percentage of isolates with trichothecene genotypes that were not predictive of their genetic population assignment (recombinant genotypes) increased from 10% in 2005 to 17% in 2007, indicating that trichothecene type became an increasingly unreliable marker of population identity over time. In addition, there were substantial regional differences in the composition of recombinant genotypes. In western and maritime provinces, NA2 isolates with 15ADON genotypes were significantly more common than NA1 isolates with 3ADON genotypes (P<0.001), and the reverse was true in the eastern provinces of Québec and Ontario. Temporal trends in recombinant genotype composition also varied regionally, as the percentage of 15ADON isolates with NA2 genetic backgrounds increased approximately three fold in western and Maritime provinces, while the opposite trends were observed in Québec and

  2. Spatio-temporal dynamics in the response of woodland caribou and moose to the passage of grey wolf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latombe, Guillaume; Fortin, Daniel; Parrott, Lael

    2014-01-01

    Predators impact prey populations not only by consuming individuals, but also by altering their behaviours. These nonlethal effects can influence food web properties as much as lethal effects. The mechanisms of nonlethal effects include chronic and temporary anti-predator behaviours, the nature of which depends on the spatial dynamics of predators and the range over which prey perceive risk. The relation between chronic and ephemeral responses to risk determines predator-prey interactions, with consequences that can ripple across the food web. Nonetheless, few studies have quantified the spatio-temporal scales over which prey respond to predation threat, and how this response varies with habitat features. We evaluated the reaction of radio-collared caribou and moose to the passage of radio-collared wolves, by considering changes in movement characteristics during winter and summer. We used an optimization algorithm to identify the rate at which the impact of prior passage of wolves decreases over time and with the predator's distance. The spatial and temporal scales of anti-predator responses varied with prey species and season. Caribou and moose displayed four types of behaviour following the passage of wolves: lack of response, increased selection of safe land cover types, decreased selection of risky cover types and increased selection of food-rich forest stands. For example, moose increased their avoidance of open conifer stands with lichen in summer, which are selected by wolves in this season. Also in winter, caribou increased their selection of conifer stands with lichen for nearly 10 days following a wolf's passage. This stronger selection for food-rich patches could indicate that the recent passage of wolves informs caribou on the current predator distribution and reveals the rate at which this information become less reliable over time. Caribou and moose used anti-predator responses that combine both long- and short-term behavioural adjustments. The

  3. Lifespan anxiety is reflected in human amygdala cortical connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ye; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The amygdala plays a pivotal role in processing anxiety and connects to large‐scale brain networks. However, intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) between amygdala and these networks has rarely been examined in relation to anxiety, especially across the lifespan. We employed resting‐state functional MRI data from 280 healthy adults (18–83.5 yrs) to elucidate the relationship between anxiety and amygdala iFC with common cortical networks including the visual network, somatomotor network, dorsal attention network, ventral attention network, limbic network, frontoparietal network, and default network. Global and network‐specific iFC were separately computed as mean iFC of amygdala with the entire cerebral cortex and each cortical network. We detected negative correlation between global positive amygdala iFC and trait anxiety. Network‐specific associations between amygdala iFC and anxiety were also detectable. Specifically, the higher iFC strength between the left amygdala and the limbic network predicted lower state anxiety. For the trait anxiety, left amygdala anxiety–connectivity correlation was observed in both somatomotor and dorsal attention networks, whereas the right amygdala anxiety–connectivity correlation was primarily distributed in the frontoparietal and ventral attention networks. Ventral attention network exhibited significant anxiety–gender interactions on its iFC with amygdala. Together with findings from additional vertex‐wise analysis, these data clearly indicated that both low‐level sensory networks and high‐level associative networks could contribute to detectable predictions of anxiety behaviors by their iFC profiles with the amygdala. This set of systems neuroscience findings could lead to novel functional network models on neural correlates of human anxiety and provide targets for novel treatment strategies on anxiety disorders. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1178–1193, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping

  4. Lifespan anxiety is reflected in human amygdala cortical connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ye; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Wei; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2016-03-01

    The amygdala plays a pivotal role in processing anxiety and connects to large-scale brain networks. However, intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) between amygdala and these networks has rarely been examined in relation to anxiety, especially across the lifespan. We employed resting-state functional MRI data from 280 healthy adults (18-83.5 yrs) to elucidate the relationship between anxiety and amygdala iFC with common cortical networks including the visual network, somatomotor network, dorsal attention network, ventral attention network, limbic network, frontoparietal network, and default network. Global and network-specific iFC were separately computed as mean iFC of amygdala with the entire cerebral cortex and each cortical network. We detected negative correlation between global positive amygdala iFC and trait anxiety. Network-specific associations between amygdala iFC and anxiety were also detectable. Specifically, the higher iFC strength between the left amygdala and the limbic network predicted lower state anxiety. For the trait anxiety, left amygdala anxiety-connectivity correlation was observed in both somatomotor and dorsal attention networks, whereas the right amygdala anxiety-connectivity correlation was primarily distributed in the frontoparietal and ventral attention networks. Ventral attention network exhibited significant anxiety-gender interactions on its iFC with amygdala. Together with findings from additional vertex-wise analysis, these data clearly indicated that both low-level sensory networks and high-level associative networks could contribute to detectable predictions of anxiety behaviors by their iFC profiles with the amygdala. This set of systems neuroscience findings could lead to novel functional network models on neural correlates of human anxiety and provide targets for novel treatment strategies on anxiety disorders.

  5. Divergent responses of inflammatory med