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Sample records for amusic brain lost

  1. The amusic brain: lost in music, but not in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Barbara; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Ishihara, Masami; Gosselin, Nathalie; Bertrand, Olivier; Rossetti, Yves; Peretz, Isabelle

    2010-04-21

    Congenital amusia is a neurogenetic disorder of music processing that is currently ascribed to a deficit in pitch processing. A recent study challenges this view and claims the disorder might arise as a consequence of a general spatial-processing deficit. Here, we assessed spatial processing abilities in two independent samples of individuals with congenital amusia by using line bisection tasks (Experiment 1) and a mental rotation task (Experiment 2). Both amusics and controls showed the classical spatial effects on bisection performance and on mental rotation performance, and amusics and controls did not differ from each other. These results indicate that the neurocognitive impairment of congenital amusia does not affect the processing of space.

  2. The amusic brain: lost in music, but not in space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Tillmann

    Full Text Available Congenital amusia is a neurogenetic disorder of music processing that is currently ascribed to a deficit in pitch processing. A recent study challenges this view and claims the disorder might arise as a consequence of a general spatial-processing deficit. Here, we assessed spatial processing abilities in two independent samples of individuals with congenital amusia by using line bisection tasks (Experiment 1 and a mental rotation task (Experiment 2. Both amusics and controls showed the classical spatial effects on bisection performance and on mental rotation performance, and amusics and controls did not differ from each other. These results indicate that the neurocognitive impairment of congenital amusia does not affect the processing of space.

  3. The Amusic Brain: In Tune, Out of Key, and Unaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle; Brattico, Elvira; Jarvenpaa, Miika; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2009-01-01

    Like language, music engagement is universal, complex and present early in life. However, approximately 4% of the general population experiences a lifelong deficit in music perception that cannot be explained by hearing loss, brain damage, intellectual deficiencies or lack of exposure. This musical disorder, commonly known as tone-deafness and now…

  4. California Amusement Rides and Liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Adam

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-three-year-old Cristina Moreno traveled from Spain to California for her honeymoon in 2000. As part of her visit, she rode the Indiana Jones amusement ride at Disneyland with her new husband. On June 25, 2000, she suffered a brain injury, and she eventually died on September 1, 2000, as a result of injuries allegedly sustained while riding…

  5. Brain Drain in Higher Education: Lost Hope or Opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhiambo, George

    2012-01-01

    The flight of human capital is a phenomenon that has been of concern to academics and development practitioners for decades but unfortunately, there is no systematic record of the number of skilled professionals that many African countries have continued to lose to the developed world. Termed the "brain drain", it represents the loss of…

  6. Endothelial glycocalyx on brain endothelial cells is lost in experimental cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hyttel, Poul; Kurtzhals, Jørgen Al

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that the glycocalyx, which is important for endothelial integrity, is lost in severe malaria. C57BL/6 mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, resulting in cerebral malaria, or P. chabaudi AS, resulting in uncomplicated malaria. We visualized the glycocalyx with transmission...... electron microscopy and measured circulating glycosaminoglycans by dot blot and ELISA. The glycocalyx was degraded in brain vasculature in cerebral and to a lesser degree uncomplicated malaria. It was affected on both intact and apoptotic endothelial cells. Circulating glycosaminoglycan levels suggested...

  7. Non destructive testing in amusement park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez Marrero, Humberto; Hernandez Torres, Debora; Sendoya Puente, Felix; Herrera Palma, Victoria; Suarez Guerra, Yarelis; Moreno Hernandez, Eduardo; Lopez Hernandez, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 began the installation of Chinese amusement parks at several places in Havana City. Structural security is one of the principal tasks that should be done, since the beginning of the services of these installations. The use on Non Destructive Testing Techniques (NDT), has to be development and implemented in order to avoid the possibility of failure during services with a consequence threat to safety for the public presented. In this work it is shown the results of application of NDT techniques and recommendations for the quality control of the different welds and mechanical components presented. Techniques as Visual Examination, Liquid Penetrant and Ultrasonic have been used for these purposes in order to obtain a structural diagnostic in the amusement parks. There are also exposed the use and implementation of international recommendations and Standards, which are very rigorous in its applications for the case of recreation industry. This is a consequence to its social service fundamentally to children and teenage people. (Author)

  8. Lost Polarization of Aquaporin4 and Dystroglycan in the Core Lesion after Traumatic Brain Injury Suggests Functional Divergence in Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To understand how aquaporin4 (AQP4 and dystroglycan (DG polarized distribution change and their roles in brain edema formation after traumatic brain injury (TBI. Methods. Brain water content, Evans blue detection, real-time PCR, western blot, and immunofluorescence were used. Results. At an early stage of TBI, AQP4 and DG maintained vessel-like pattern in perivascular endfeet; M1, M23, and M1/M23 were increased in the core lesion. At a later stage of TBI, DG expression was lost in perivascular area, accompanied with similar but delayed change of AQP4 expression; expression of M1, M23, and DG and the ratio of M1/M2 were increased. Conclusion. At an early stage, AQP4 and DG maintained the polarized distribution. Upregulated M1 and M23 could retard the cytotoxic edema formation. At a later stage AQP4 and DG polarized expression were lost from perivascular endfeet and induced the worst cytotoxic brain edema. The alteration of DG expression could regulate that of AQP4 expression after TBI.

  9. 25 CFR 141.13 - Amusement company licenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amusement company licenses. 141.13 Section 141.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES BUSINESS PRACTICES ON THE NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Licensing Requirements and Procedures § 141.13 Amusement company...

  10. Sensorimotor Network Crucial for Inferring Amusement from Smiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paracampo, Riccardo; Tidoni, Emmanuele; Borgomaneri, Sara; di Pellegrino, Giuseppe; Avenanti, Alessio

    2017-11-01

    Understanding whether another's smile reflects authentic amusement is a key challenge in social life, yet, the neural bases of this ability have been largely unexplored. Here, we combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with a novel empathic accuracy (EA) task to test whether sensorimotor and mentalizing networks are critical for understanding another's amusement. Participants were presented with dynamic displays of smiles and explicitly requested to infer whether the smiling individual was feeling authentic amusement or not. TMS over sensorimotor regions representing the face (i.e., in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and ventral primary somatosensory cortex (SI)), disrupted the ability to infer amusement authenticity from observed smiles. The same stimulation did not affect performance on a nonsocial task requiring participants to track the smiling expression but not to infer amusement. Neither TMS over prefrontal and temporo-parietal areas supporting mentalizing, nor peripheral control stimulations, affected performance on either task. Thus, motor and somatosensory circuits for controlling and sensing facial movements are causally essential for inferring amusement from another's smile. These findings highlight the functional relevance of IFG and SI to amusement understanding and suggest that EA abilities may be grounded in sensorimotor networks for moving and feeling the body. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Lost for emotion words: What motor and limbic brain activity reveals about autism and semantic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Rachel L.; Shtyrov, Yury; Mohr, Bettina; Lombardo, Michael V.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are characterised by deficits in understanding and expressing emotions and are frequently accompanied by alexithymia, a difficulty in understanding and expressing emotion words. Words are differentially represented in the brain according to their semantic category and these difficulties in ASC predict reduced activation to emotion-related words in limbic structures crucial for affective processing. Semantic theories view ‘emotion actions’ as critical for learning the semantic relationship between a word and the emotion it describes, such that emotion words typically activate the cortical motor systems involved in expressing emotion actions such as facial expressions. As ASC are also characterised by motor deficits and atypical brain structure and function in these regions, motor structures would also be expected to show reduced activation during emotion-semantic processing. Here we used event-related fMRI to compare passive processing of emotion words in comparison to abstract verbs and animal names in typically-developing controls and individuals with ASC. Relatively reduced brain activation in ASC for emotion words, but not matched control words, was found in motor areas and cingulate cortex specifically. The degree of activation evoked by emotion words in the motor system was also associated with the extent of autistic traits as revealed by the Autism Spectrum Quotient. We suggest that hypoactivation of motor and limbic regions for emotion word processing may underlie difficulties in processing emotional language in ASC. The role that sensorimotor systems and their connections might play in the affective and social-communication difficulties in ASC is discussed. PMID:25278250

  12. A Practical Route Search System for Amusement Parks Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Shibuya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is very difficult to find the minimum route to travel in amusement park navigation. A searching system for visitors would be useful. Therefore, we constructed a system to find the route with the minimum total traveling time. Facility visitors can employ this system on a smart phone. The system is composed of Java and a Java Servlet. We conclude that our system is useful and can greatly shorten travel time within a typical amusement park.

  13. Brain implants for substituting lost motor function: state of the art and potential impact on the lives of motor-impaired seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, N F; Aarnoutse, E J; Vansteensel, M J

    2014-01-01

    Recent scientific achievements bring the concept of neural prosthetics for reinstating lost motor function closer to medical application. Current research involves severely paralyzed people under the age of 65, but implications for seniors with stroke or trauma-induced impairments are clearly on the horizon. Demographic changes will lead to a shortage of personnel to care for an increasing population of senior citizens, threatening maintenance of an acceptable level of care and urging ways for people to live longer at their home independent from personal assistance. This is particularly challenging when people suffer from disabilities such as partial paralysis after stroke or trauma, where daily personal assistance is required. For some of these people, neural prosthetics can reinstate some lost motor function and/or lost communication, thereby increasing independence and possibly quality of life. In this viewpoint article, we present the state of the art in decoding brain activity in the service of brain-computer interfacing. Although some noninvasive applications produce good results, we focus on brain implants that benefit from better quality brain signals. Fully implantable neural prostheses for home use are not available yet, but clinical trials are being prepared. More sophisticated systems are expected to follow in the years to come, with capabilities of interest for less severe paralysis. Eventually the combination of smart robotics and brain implants is expected to enable people to interact well enough with their environment to live an independent life in spite of motor disabilities. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Dancing out a nation's state of pity and amusement: Kelani's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dancing out a nation's state of pity and amusement: Kelani's retelling of Ogunde's Yoruba Ronu. ... EJOTMAS: Ekpoma Journal of Theatre and Media Arts ... In this paper there is an affirmation that with Kelani's adaptation of Hubert Ogunde's Yoruba Ronu, the imaginative communication in the context of dance has become ...

  15. From amusic to musical?--Improving pitch memory in congenital amusia with transcranial alternating current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Nora K; Pfeifer, Jasmin; Krause, Vanessa; Pollok, Bettina

    2015-11-01

    Brain imaging studies highlighted structural differences in congenital amusia, a life-long perceptual disorder that is associated with pitch perception and pitch memory deficits. A functional anomaly characterized by decreased low gamma oscillations (30-40 Hz range) in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during pitch memory has been revealed recently. Thus, the present study investigates whether applying transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) at 35 Hz to the right DLPFC would improve pitch memory. Nine amusics took part in two tACS sessions (either 35 Hz or 90 Hz) and completed a pitch and visual memory task before and during stimulation. 35 Hz stimulation facilitated pitch memory significantly. No modulation effects were found with 90 Hz stimulation or on the visual task. While amusics showed a selective impairment of pitch memory before stimulation, the performance during 35 Hz stimulation was not significantly different to healthy controls anymore. Taken together, the study shows that modulating the right DLPFC with 35 Hz tACS in congenital amusia selectively improves pitch memory performance supporting the hypothesis that decreased gamma oscillations within the DLPFC are causally involved in disturbed pitch memory and highlight the potential use of tACS to interact with cognitive processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Topological Structure of Manipulators Used in Amusement Parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Marian Ungureanu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the mobility analysis of spatial and planar manipulators used in amusement parks. In this paper is presented a topological structure analysis for many types of serial and parallel manipulators, referring to the calculation of mobility (degree of freedom of these types of complex mechanisms. It is used a new formula to calculate the mobility according to the number of drivelines, which are considered having identical operations.

  17. Lost parcel

    CERN Multimedia

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    A parcel containing 20 boxes of DECAdry business cards, weighing about 5.5 kg, has been lost. It had been placed on the red file shelves in the Library. Anyone finding this parcel is urgently requested to call 16 06 02. Thank you for your assistance. FP Department

  18. The Effect of Amusement and Task-Framing on Convergent and Divergent Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Tulloch, Claire

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of amusement and task-framing on measures of divergent (fluency, average creativity and creativity x usefulness) and convergent thinking (insight). To expand existing literature on the mood-creativity paradigm, the effect of a discrete positive emotion (amusement) on the remote associates (RAT) and alternative uses tasks (AUT) was investigated in comparison to a neutral control group. The effect of task-framing on creative performance was also examined. Amus...

  19. Effect of amusement park rides on programmable shunt valve settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, Jennifer; Collins, Kelly; Stetler, William R; Smith, Brandon W; Garton, Thomas; Garton, Catherine; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2013-01-01

    Magnetically programmable shunt valves are susceptible to environmental factors including magnetic fields and accelerative forces. It is unknown if rollercoasters with or without magnetic brakes or linear induction motors (LIMs) are capable of altering the setting of a programmable shunt valve. Two different valve types (type A, n = 10; type B, n = 9) were tested at varying resistance settings in 2 trials on 6 different amusement park rides including 2 rides with LIMs, 2 rides with magnetic brakes, and 2 rides without magnetic technology. The performance level of valve type A and the setting of valve type B changed on rollercoasters with magnets (A = 2.5% [2/80]; B = 5.6% [4/72]) and without magnets (A = 7.5% [3/40]; B = 2.8% [1/36]). Neither valve setting changed when exposed to a Ferris wheel or during ambulation throughout the park. Magnetically programmable valves are susceptible to changes in pressure settings when exposed to amusement park rides with elevated vertical gravitational forces, irrespective of the presence of LIMs or magnetic brakes. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Intraspinal Rewiring of the Corticospinal Tract Requires Target-Derived Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Compensates Lost Function after Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaki; Hayano, Yasufumi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2012-01-01

    Brain injury that results in an initial behavioural deficit is frequently followed by spontaneous recovery. The intrinsic mechanism of this functional recovery has never been fully understood. Here, we show that reorganization of the corticospinal tract induced by target-derived brain-derived neurotrophic factor is crucial for spontaneous recovery…

  1. Changing Patterns of Organ Donation: Brain Dead Donors Are Not Being Lost by Donation After Circulatory Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Helen M; Glazier, Alexandra K; Delmonico, Francis L

    2016-02-01

    The clinical characteristics of all New England Organ Bank (NEOB) donors after circulatory death (DCD) donors were analyzed between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2014. During that 5-year period, there were 494 authorized medically suitable potential DCDs that the NEOB evaluated, constituting more than 30% of deceased donors coordinated annually by the NEOB. From the cohort of 494 authorized potential DCDs, 331 (67%) became actual DCD, 82 (17%) were attempted as a DCD but did not progress to donation, and 81 (16%) transitioned to an actual donor after brain death (DBD). Two hundred seventy-six organs were transplanted from the 81 donors that transitioned from DCD to actual DBD, including 24 heart, 70 liver, 12 single and 14 bilateral lung, and 12 pancreas transplants. When patients with devastating brain injury admitted to the intensive care units are registered donors, the Organ Procurement Organization staff should share the patient's donation decision with the health care team and the patient's family, as early as possible after the comfort measures only discussion has been initiated. The experience of the NEOB becomes an important reference of the successful implementation of DCD that enables an expansion of deceased donation (inclusive of DBD).

  2. Categorical Perception of Lexical Tones in Mandarin-speaking Congenital Amusics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Ting Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research suggests that within Mandarin-speaking congenital amusics, only a subgroup has behavioral lexical tone perception impairments (tone agnosia, whereas the rest of amusics do not. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the categorical nature of lexical tone perception in Mandarin-speaking amusics with and without behavioral lexical tone deficits. Three groups of listeners (controls, pure amusics and amusics with tone agnosia participated in tone identification and discrimination tasks. Indexes of the categorical perception of a physical continuum of fundamental frequencies ranging from a rising to level tone were measured. Specifically, the stimulus durations were manipulated at 100 and 200 ms. For both stimulus durations, all groups exhibited similar categorical boundaries. The pure amusics showed sharp identification slopes and significantly peaked discrimination functions similar to those of normal controls. However, such essential characteristics for the categorical perception of lexical tones were not observed in amusics with tone agnosia. An enlarged step-size from 20 Hz to 35 Hz was not able to produce any discrimination peaks in tone agnosics either. The current study revealed that only amusics with tone agnosia showed a lack of categorical tone perception, while the pure amusics demonstrated typical categorical perception of lexical tones, indicating that the deficit of pitch processing in music does not necessarily result in the deficit in the categorical perception of lexical tones. The different performance between congenital amusics with and without tone agnosia provides a new perspective on the proposition of the relationship between music and speech perception.

  3. Years of potential life lost for brain and CNS tumors relative to other cancers in adults in the United States, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Chaturia; Gittleman, Haley; Ostrom, Quinn T; Kruchko, Carol; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2016-01-01

    Years of potential life lost (YPLL) complement incidence and survival rates by measuring how much a patient's life is likely to be shortened by his or her cancer. In this study, we examine the impact of death due to brain and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors compared to other common cancers in adults by investigating the YPLL of adults in the United States. Mortality and life table data were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics Vital Statistics Data for 2010. The study population included individuals aged 20 years or older at death who died from one of the selected cancers. YPLL was calculated by taking an individual's age at death and finding the corresponding expected remaining years of life using life table data. The cancers with the greatest mean YPLL were other malignant CNS tumors (20.65), malignant brain tumors (19.93), and pancreatic cancer (15.13) for males and malignant brain tumors (20.31), breast cancer (18.78), and other malignant CNS tumors (18.36) for females. For both sexes, non-Hispanic whites had the lowest YPLL, followed by non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics. Malignant brain and other CNS tumors have the greatest mean YPLL, thereby reflecting their short survival time post diagnosis. These findings will hopefully motivate more research into mitigating the impact of these debilitating tumors. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The households purchase behavior and visitors shopping – amusing centre Olympia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Foret

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The first part of the paper is devoted to the problems of the households purchase behavior in the Czech Republic. The main part is based on own empirical results from own marketing research conducted in 2005–2006. The results concerns on influences of food-stuffs purchases, clothes and shoes purchases, household equipments purchases and differences among them. In the second part is presented increasing number of shopping – amusing centres in the Czech Republic. These trends are changing purchase behavior our consumers. In Spring 2006 was conducted own marketing research of visitors shopping – amusing centre Olympia in Brno Modřice. Some more detail results give their basic sociodemographic characteristics as well as shopping orientations. The purchase in the shopping – amusing centres is a part of the contemporary life style, leisure and amusement.

  5. Does going to an amusement park alleviate low back pain? A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakakibara T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Toshihiko Sakakibara, Zhuo Wang, Yuichi KasaiDepartment of Spinal Surgery and Medical Engineering, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu City, Mie Prefecture, JapanBackground: Low back pain is often called nonspecific pain. In this type of low back pain, various emotions and stress are known to strongly affect pain perception. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the degree of low back pain changes in people with chronic mild low back pain when they are inside and outside of an amusement park where people are supposed to have physical and psychological enjoyment.Methods: The subjects were 23 volunteers (13 males and 10 females aged 18 to 46 years old with a mean age of 24.0 years who had chronic low back pain. Visual analog scale (VAS scores of low back pain and salivary amylase levels (kIU/L of all subjects were measured at five time points: immediately after getting on the bus heading for the amusement park; 10 minutes, 1 hour (immediately after boarding the roller coaster, and 3 hours (immediately after exiting the haunted house after arriving at the amusement park; and immediately before getting off the bus returning from the park.Results: The three VAS values in the amusement park (10 minutes, 1 hour, and 3 hours after arriving at the amusement park measured were significantly lower (P < 0.05 when compared with the other two values measured immediately after getting on the bus heading for the amusement park and immediately before getting off the return bus. In salivary amylase levels, there were no statistically significant differences among the values measured at the five time points.Conclusion: Low back pain was significantly alleviated when the subjects were in the amusement park, which demonstrated that enjoyable activities, though temporarily, alleviated their low back pain.Keywords: low back pain, emotion, salivary alpha-amylase activity, enjoyment activities, psychological stress

  6. Vowel and tone recognition in quiet and in noise among Mandarin-speaking amusics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Wang, Xi-Jian; Li, Jia-Qi; Liu, Chang; Dong, Qi; Nan, Yun

    2018-03-06

    Music and language are two intricately linked communication modalities in humans. A deficit in music pitch processing as manifested in the condition of congenital amusia has been related to difficulties in lexical tone processing for both tone and non-tonal languages. However, it is still unclear whether amusia also affects the perception of vowel phonemes in quiet and in noise. In this study, we examined vowel-plus-tone identification in quiet and noise conditions among Mandarin-speaking amusics with and without speech tone difficulties (tone agnosics and pure amusics, respectively), and IQ- and age-matched controls. Overall, pure amusics showed vowel and tone identification comparable to the controls in both quiet and noise conditions. Compared to pure amusics and controls, tone agnosics showed deficits in tone perception in both quiet and noise conditions. More importantly, their vowel perception was lower than pure amusics and controls in noise conditions, e.g., at a signal-to-noise ratio of -4 dB, although they showed normal-like performance in quiet and at a signal-to-noise ratio of -8 dB. These results suggest that when amusia affected speech tone processing (e.g., tone agnosics), it could also compromise vowel processing in noise. However, amusia alone does not affect tone or vowel perception in Mandarin Chinese either in quiet or in noise. Overall, the current study highlights the necessity of taking heterogeneity within the amusic group into account when considering the related speech deficits in this group. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fatal Amusements: Contemplating the Tempest of Contemporary Media and American Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Our use of the electronic media to conduct serious discourse raises the question of whether "we are amusing ourselves to death," as Neil Postman argued. The approach known as "media ecology," the study of media as environments, which emphasizes the need to understand context and find balance, provides a basis for the analysis…

  8. Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke as Amusement Park Injury: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby Baumgartle

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Strokes as amusement park injuries are rare, but have been reported in the literature. Only about 20 cases of cerebrovascular accidents after amusement park visits have been described. We report a healthy 12-year-old boy who presented with facial droop, slurred speech, and inability to use his right arm after riding roller coasters at a local amusement park. He was evaluated and found to have a left middle cerebral artery (MCA infarction. The patient was treated with anticoagulants and has recovered with no major residual symptoms. It is likely that his neurological symptoms occurred due to the high head accelerations experienced on the roller coasters, which are more detrimental to children due to immature cervical spine development and muscle strength. Early diagnosis of dissection and stroke results in a favorable prognosis. Providers and parents should be aware of the potential risk of roller coasters and act quickly on neurologic changes in children that have recently been to an amusement park.

  9. Perceiving differences in linguistic and non-linguistic pitch: A pilot study with German congenital amusics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamann, S.; Exter, M.; Pfeifer, J.; Krause-Burmester, M.; Cambouropoulos, F.; Tsougras, C.; Mavromatis, P.; Pastiadis, K.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the perception of pitch differences by seven German congenital amusics in speech and two types of non-speech material (sinusoidal waves and pulse trains). Congenital amusia is defined by a deficit in musical pitch perception, and recent studies indicate that at least a

  10. Congenital amusics use a secondary pitch mechanism to identify lexical tones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bones, Oliver; Wong, Patrick C M

    2017-09-01

    Amusia is a pitch perception disorder associated with deficits in processing and production of both musical and lexical tones, which previous reports have suggested may be constrained to fine-grained pitch judgements. In the present study speakers of tone-languages, in which lexical tones are used to convey meaning, identified words present in chimera stimuli containing conflicting pitch-cues in the temporal fine-structure and temporal envelope, and which therefore conveyed two distinct utterances. Amusics were found to be more likely than controls to judge the word according to the envelope pitch-cues. This demonstrates that amusia is not associated with fine-grained pitch judgements alone, and is consistent with there being two distinct pitch mechanisms and with amusics having an atypical reliance on a secondary mechanism based upon envelope cues. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. OECD Ülkelerinde Eğlence Vergisi Uygulamaları(Amusement Tax Applications in the OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernur AÇIKGÖZ ERSOY

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 17th century, “the right of the poor” was a transitory tax on the income of entertainment in favor of public assistance in France. “The right of the poor” was abolished later by the regime of Vichy, which created a permanent tax on games and entertainment to the direct benefit of the communes. Later, other European countries followed the example of France by introducing a so-called amusement tax. The paper is organized as follows: The first part presents the historical development and theoretical base of amusement tax and amusement tax applications in the OECD countries. The second part shows the amusement tax application in Turkey, and the last part resumes arguments in favor of the maintenance or an abolishment of the tax on entertainment.

  12. (Non)Financial Reporting (A)Symmetries in the Case of Amusement Parks in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Calu, Daniela Artemisa; Dumitru, Madalina; Glavan, Mariana Elena; Gușe, Raluca Gina

    2016-01-01

    Financial and non-financial reporting concerns in various industries are current challenges. With respect to tourism – the case of amusement parks – the existing research is scarce. In this context, the objectives of our research are the following: (i) to identify and critically analyse the key financial and non-financial reporting frameworks applicable in tourism, and respectively (ii) to identify the general trend and specific features of the financial and non-financial reporting of compani...

  13. Amusement Park Physics in Panggon Lunjak (Trampoline: Analysis of Kinematics and Energy Use Video Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmad Yusuf

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Panggon Lunjak (trampoline is one of the famous amusement parks among the people that we can use as a recreation to enjoy a pleasant sensation. Without us knowing the amusement park that we often encounter is actually the result of the application of science and technology, especially in the field of physics, because it is amusement park for student of science is a real laboratory or the giant laboratory that we can use as a study of physics concepts and as research materials. Panggon Lunjak (trampoline motion is very close to the harmonic  motion where the resulting graph of the sinus so that on the graph will be in the analysis of  kinematics and energy phenomena, so that research on simple harmonic motion materials is not limited to research using pendulum motion and spring load motion which is often exemplified as research on harmonic motion. The purpose of this study is to analyze the physical aspects of Panggon Lunjak (trampoline motion based on the laws of physics on the concept of kinematics and analyze energy, Where the mechanical energy of addition between potential energy and kinetic energy (Conservation of energy. The analysis is done by using video tracking. Based on the analysis done using people as a mass, the result of the amplitude, the spring constant, angular frequency, and the law of conservation of energy on the Panggon Lunjak (trampoline is true. This analysis activity will be well used as a physics learning for students.

  14. (NonFinancial Reporting (ASymmetries in the Case of Amusement Parks in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Artemisa Calu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Financial and non-financial reporting concerns in various industries are current challenges. With respect to tourism – the case of amusement parks – the existing research is scarce. In this context, the objectives of our research are the following: (i to identify and critically analyse the key financial and non-financial reporting frameworks applicable in tourism, and respectively (ii to identify the general trend and specific features of the financial and non-financial reporting of companies that manage major amusement parks in Europe. To achieve these objectives, we analysed the most recent sets of annual reports and other reports containing non-financial information, published by a number of five companies that hold the top 20 amusement parks in Europe. We followed a set of non-financial indicators that we selected based on the following reporting frameworks: Global Reporting Initiative (GRI, Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB, European Federation of Financial Analysts (EFFAS, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD, European Tourism Indicators System (ETIS. The results obtained indicate the following existing trends: (i in terms of financial reporting, there is symmetry for four of the 13 analysed aspects, others being reported differently and (ii in terms of non-financial reporting, the degree of symmetry for the information disclosed is much lower that of financial reporting, only two of the 46 selected non-financial indicators (customer satisfaction and number of customers being consistently reported by all the investigated companies.

  15. Lost spoiler practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürsimsek, Ödül; Drotner, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    and collective content production, thus negotiating purposes and interpretive practices with producers and amongst themselves. Through critical discourse analysis of key instances where the Lost community collaborates over resources beyond the official Lost transmedia narratives, this article argues......The American television network ABC’s serialized drama Lost (2004-10) is a key example of recent media culture where both viewers and producers utilize a range of digital media tools to advance the narrative: producers through transmedia storytelling strategies and the creation of complex...... narratives, and viewers through tracing, dismantling – and sometimes questioning – content in order to create coherent meanings in the maze of narratives. Online audiences, such as spoiler communities, may uncover components of transmedia storytelling, discuss their validity and enhance them with individual...

  16. The lateralized arcuate fasciculus in developmental pitch disorders among mandarin amusics: left for speech and right for music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xizhuo; Zhao, Yanxin; Zhong, Suyu; Cui, Zaixu; Li, Jiaqi; Gong, Gaolang; Dong, Qi; Nan, Yun

    2018-05-01

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) is a neural fiber tract that is critical to speech and music development. Although the predominant role of the left AF in speech development is relatively clear, how the AF engages in music development is not understood. Congenital amusia is a special neurodevelopmental condition, which not only affects musical pitch but also speech tone processing. Using diffusion tensor tractography, we aimed at understanding the role of AF in music and speech processing by examining the neural connectivity characteristics of the bilateral AF among thirty Mandarin amusics. Compared to age- and intelligence quotient (IQ)-matched controls, amusics demonstrated increased connectivity as reflected by the increased fractional anisotropy in the right posterior AF but decreased connectivity as reflected by the decreased volume in the right anterior AF. Moreover, greater fractional anisotropy in the left direct AF was correlated with worse performance in speech tone perception among amusics. This study is the first to examine the neural connectivity of AF in the neurodevelopmental condition of amusia as a result of disrupted music pitch and speech tone processing. We found abnormal white matter structural connectivity in the right AF for the amusic individuals. Moreover, we demonstrated that the white matter microstructural properties of the left direct AF is modulated by lexical tone deficits among the amusic individuals. These data support the notion of distinctive pitch processing systems between music and speech.

  17. Feynman's Lost Lecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 5. Feynman's Lost Lecture - The Motion of the Planets Around the Sun. Shailesh A Shirali. Book Review Volume 3 Issue 5 May 1998 pp 78-80. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Processing melodic contour and speech intonation in congenital amusics with Mandarin Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cunmei; Hamm, Jeff P; Lim, Vanessa K; Kirk, Ian J; Yang, Yufang

    2010-07-01

    Congenital amusia is a disorder in the perception and production of musical pitch. It has been suggested that early exposure to a tonal language may compensate for the pitch disorder (Peretz, 2008). If so, it is reasonable to expect that there would be different characterizations of pitch perception in music and speech in congenital amusics who speak a tonal language, such as Mandarin. In this study, a group of 11 adults with amusia whose first language was Mandarin were tested with melodic contour and speech intonation discrimination and identification tasks. The participants with amusia were impaired in discriminating and identifying melodic contour. These abnormalities were also detected in identifying both speech and non-linguistic analogue derived patterns for the Mandarin intonation tasks. In addition, there was an overall trend for the participants with amusia to show deficits with respect to controls in the intonation discrimination tasks for both speech and non-linguistic analogues. These findings suggest that the amusics' melodic pitch deficits may extend to the perception of speech, and could potentially result in some language deficits in those who speak a tonal language. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lost: loss of chance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Sara

    2010-09-01

    Loss of chance claims involve an allegation that a patient has lost the chance of a better medical outcome, in terms of treatment and/or prognosis, as a result of the negligence of the medical practitioner. A recent High Court of Australia judgment confirmed that monetary damages are not available for the loss of a chance of a better medical outcome. This article discusses the judgment and its implications for medical practitioners in Australia.

  20. Lost in Location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2009-01-01

    The article investigates how users of personal satellite navigation devices (often referred to as sat-nav) are sometimes lost and led astray and argues that the satnav's aim to remove every insecurity about the correct route seems to remove the individual's conscious perception of the space...... performance, the article examines how the growing locative media industry can learn from the location-aware performative strategies employed by artists who create situated and urban performances for the curious participant. The academic frames employed in the analysis draw on psychogeography, site...

  1. The Lost Guidewire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Shah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 44-year-old female called 911 complaining of abdominal pain, but was unresponsive upon arrival by emergency medical services (EMS. She presented to the emergency department (ED as a full cardiac arrest and had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and epinephrine. The patient had a splenic embolization 1 week prior to presentation. Bedside ultrasound demonstrated free fluid throughout the abdomen. As part of the resuscitation, femoral central venous access was obtained by the Emergency Department (ED physician, and a medical student was allowed to place a Cordis over the guidewire. The attending was next to the student, though became distracted when the patient again lost pulses. The student lost control of the guidewire upon re-initiation of CPR. Another Cordis was placed in the same location by the ED physician after the guidewire was seen on a chest radiograph. The patient was taken to the operating room with massive transfusion protocol, and the guidewire was left in the vena caval system until the patient could be stabilized. Two days later, interventional radiology removed the guidewire via a right internal jugular (IJ approach without complications. The patient had a prolonged and complicated course, but was discharged home two weeks later at her baseline. Significant findings: Initial chest radiograph shows a guidewire in the inferior vena cava (IVC, superior vena cava (SVC, and right IJ veins. Discussion: Central line complications include failure to place the catheter, improper catheter location, hemothorax from vascular injury, infection, arrhythmia, and cardiac arrest1. Complications from lost guidewires include cardiac dysrhythmias, cardiac conduction abnormalities, perforation of vessels/heart chambers, kinking/looping/knotting of the wire, entanglement of previously placed intravascular devices, breakage of the tip of the wire and subsequent embolization and

  2. 26 CFR 1.274-2 - Disallowance of deductions for certain expenses for entertainment, amusement, recreation, or travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... room maintained by an employer for lodging of his employees while in business travel status, or (c) an... for entertainment, amusement, recreation, or travel. 1.274-2 Section 1.274-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL..., or travel. (a) General rules—(1) Entertainment activity. Except as provided in this section, no...

  3. Getting Lost in Tokyo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Lucas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential for using alternative forms of inscriptive practice to describe the urban space of the Tokyo Subway. I begin with an account of the process of getting lost in Shinjuku Subway Station in the heart of Tokyo. This station represents a limit condition of place, being dense and complex beyond the powers of traditional architectural representation. The station is explored through serial translations, beginning with narrative, moving to a flowchart diagram, Laban dance notation, recurring motifs and archetypes, architectural drawing, photography, and cartography. As Claudia Brodsky Lacour and Tim Ingold describe, the form our inscriptive practices take are crucial to the ways in which we conceptualise those places. How much of the experience of a place is lost in the traditional inscriptive practices of the architect? This description of the urban space of the Tokyo subway forms the basis for an extended study exploring the description of this experience of place, and the power of such description to theorise space. The ultimate aim of this is to shift the focus of urban design away from geometric principles and towards the experiences that might be enjoyed in such places.

  4. Crowdsourcing Lost Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulou, E. K.; Georgopoulos, A.; Panagiotopoulos, G.; Kaliampakos, D.

    2015-08-01

    Cultural Heritage all over the world is at high risk. Natural and human activities endanger the current state of monuments and sites, whereas many of them have already been destroyed especially during the last years. Preventive actions are of utmost importance for the protection of human memory and the prevention of irreplaceable. These actions may be carried out either in situ or virtually. Very often in situ preventive, or protective or restoration actions are difficult or even impossible, as e.g. in cases of earthquakes, fires or war activity. Digital preservation of cultural heritage is a challenging task within photogrammetry and computer vision communities, as efforts are taken to collect digital data, especially of the monuments that are at high risk. Visit to the field and data acquisition is not always feasible. To overcome the missing data problem, crowdsourced imagery is used to create a visual representation of lost cultural heritage objects. Such digital representations may be 2D or 3D and definitely help preserve the memory and history of the lost heritage. Sometimes they also assist studies for their reconstruction. An initiative to collect imagery data from the public and create a visual 3D representation of a recently destroyed stone bridge almost 150 years old is being discussed in this study. To this end, a crowdsourcing platform has been designed and the first images collected have been processed with the use of SfM algorithms.

  5. Deficits of congenital amusia beyond pitch: Evidence from impaired categorical perception of vowels in Cantonese-speaking congenital amusics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caicai; Shao, Jing; Huang, Xunan

    2017-01-01

    Congenital amusia is a lifelong disorder of fine-grained pitch processing in music and speech. However, it remains unclear whether amusia is a pitch-specific deficit, or whether it affects frequency/spectral processing more broadly, such as the perception of formant frequency in vowels, apart from pitch. In this study, in order to illuminate the scope of the deficits, we compared the performance of 15 Cantonese-speaking amusics and 15 matched controls on the categorical perception of sound continua in four stimulus contexts: lexical tone, pure tone, vowel, and voice onset time (VOT). Whereas lexical tone, pure tone and vowel continua rely on frequency/spectral processing, the VOT continuum depends on duration/temporal processing. We found that the amusic participants performed similarly to controls in all stimulus contexts in the identification, in terms of the across-category boundary location and boundary width. However, the amusic participants performed systematically worse than controls in discriminating stimuli in those three contexts that depended on frequency/spectral processing (lexical tone, pure tone and vowel), whereas they performed normally when discriminating duration differences (VOT). These findings suggest that the deficit of amusia is probably not pitch specific, but affects frequency/spectral processing more broadly. Furthermore, there appeared to be differences in the impairment of frequency/spectral discrimination in speech and nonspeech contexts. The amusic participants exhibited less benefit in between-category discriminations than controls in speech contexts (lexical tone and vowel), suggesting reduced categorical perception; on the other hand, they performed inferiorly compared to controls across the board regardless of between- and within-category discriminations in nonspeech contexts (pure tone), suggesting impaired general auditory processing. These differences imply that the frequency/spectral-processing deficit might be manifested

  6. Nostalgia and lost identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourtova, Elena

    2013-02-01

    Nostalgia for the Soviet Union is a major social phenomenon in Russia today due to the irrevocable losses of the recent past in which Soviet citizens involuntarily became immigrants in their own country. With reference to discussions of nostalgia in philosophical and psychoanalytic literature, I suggest that nostalgia may represent either a defensive regression to the past or a progressive striving for wholeness through re-connecting with what has been lost in the service of a greater integration. I compare this with the processes of adaptation seen in immigrants and provide a clinical illustration of a young man coming to terms with loss and change in the post-Soviet era. When nostalgia is recognized as a legitimate emotional experience it may facilitate mourning and enable the integration of the past with the present and the development of a new identity. © 2013, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  7. Lost in translation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granas, Anne Gerd; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The "Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire" (BMQ) assess balance of necessity and concern of medicines. The BMQ has been translated from English to many languages. However, the original meaning of statements, such as "My medicine is a mystery to me", may be lost in translation. The aim...... of this study is to compare three Scandinavian translations of the BMQ. (1) How reliable are the translations? (2) Are they still valid after translation? METHODS: Translated Norwegian, Swedish and Danish versions of the BMQ were scrutinized by three native Scandinavian researchers. Linguistic differences...... and ambiguities in the 5-point Likert scale and the BMQ statements were compared. RESULTS: In the Scandinavian translations, the Likert scale expanded beyond the original version at one endpoint (Swedish) or both endpoints (Danish). In the BMQ statements, discrepancies ranged from smaller inaccuracies toward...

  8. Lost in transformation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlyk, Annelise; Haahr, Anita; Dreyer, Pia

    2017-01-01

    and values from evidence-based medicine are being lost in the transformation into the current evidence-based hospital culture which potentially leads to a McDonaldization of nursing practice reflected as ‘one best way’. We argue for reviving ethics of care perspectives in today’s evidence practice...... as the fundamental values of nursing may potentially bridge conflicts between evidence-based practice and the ideals of patient participation thus preventing a practice of ‘McNursing’. Key words: nursing practice, evidence-based practice, nursing theory, nursing theorists, ethics of care, hospital culture, patient......’ individual perspectives in an evidence-based practice as seen from the point of view of nursing theory. The paper highlights two conflicting courses of development. One is a course of standardisation founded on evidence-based recommendations, which specify a set of rules that the patient must follow...

  9. Lost in Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Wiebke; Reusswig, Fritz

    2014-05-01

    Lost in Translation? Introducing Planetary Boundaries into Social Systems. Fritz Reusswig, Wiebke Lass Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany Identifying and quantifying planetary boundaries by interdisciplinary science efforts is a challenging task—and a risky one, as the 1972 Limits to Growth publication has shown. Even if we may be assured that scientific understanding of underlying processes of the Earth system has significantly improved since then, the challenge of translating these findings into the social systems of the planet remains crucial for any kind of action, and in many respects far more challenging. We would like to conceptualize what could also be termed a problem of coupling social and natural systems as a nested set of social translation processes, well aware of the limited applicability of the language-related translation metaphor. Societies must, first, perceive these boundaries, and they have to understand their relevance. This includes, among many other things, the organization of transdisciplinary scientific cooperation. They will then have to translate this understood perception into possible actions, i.e. strategies for different local bodies, actors, and institutional settings. This implies a lot of 'internal' translation processes, e.g. from the scientific subsystem to the mass media, the political and the economic subsystem. And it implies to develop subsystem-specific schemes of evaluation for these alternatives, e.g. convincing narratives, cost-benefit analyses, or ethical legitimacy considerations. And, finally, societies do have to translate chosen action alternatives into monitoring and evaluation schemes, e.g. for agricultural production or renewable energies. This process includes the continuation of observing and re-analyzing the planetary boundary concept itself, as a re-adjustment of these boundaries in the light of new scientific insights cannot be excluded. Taken all together, societies may well

  10. Smartphone lost - Privacy gone

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2012-01-01

    Who doesn't own an iPhone, Android or Blackberry mobile phone today? Lucky you if you don’t! In previous issues (Issue 06/07, 2012 and Issue 32/33/34, 2011) we have pointed out their lack of security. But what happens if you lose your smartphone or it gets stolen?   Today, a smartphone clones your personality into the digital world. Your phone archives all your emails and messaging communications with your family, friends, peers and colleagues; contains photos and videos of the top moments of your life; holds your favourite music and movies and zillions of other bits of personal information stored in the apps of your choice (like GPS information of your jogging paths, a vault of your passwords, access to your Facebook or Twitter profiles, bank access information, flight and hotel bookings). In the future, your phone might also be used for making payments in shops. Have you ever thought of how you would feel if you lost your smartphone or it got stolen? Nak...

  11. An Analysis of Lost Sales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey E. Jarrett

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this manuscript is to shed light on problems associated with lost sales and the incurring of cost associated with lost sales. An investigation is made to determine if seasonality in sales and lost sales have effects on the efficient operations of supply chains. Optimization is always a goal of management supply chains, but cost increases due to insufficient inventory, low-quality product and the like lead to customers not returning. These are lost sales that occur for many reasons. We study a data set to determine if the ignoring of time series component also has an effect on the variation in lost sales. If so, can we measure the magnitude of the effects of seasonal variation in lost sales, and what are their consequences?

  12. AMUSE: an advanced ATM platform for residential interactive and distributive television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Concetto, M.; Gallassi, G.; Rosa, C.

    1996-12-01

    There is presently a strong expectation for the opportunities offered by the deployment of new and sophisticated telecommunication services with increasing interactivity, ranging from distributive to highly interactive, covering heterogeneous areas, like entertainment, tourism, commercial and information. The Project AMUSE (Advanced MUltimedia SErvices to residential users), which s being carried out in the framework of the Advanced Communication Technologies and Services Programme sponsored by the European Union, is proposing effective solutions to various open issues related to the implementation and provisioning of new multimedia services. After an overview of the project and the relevant platform, the paper will introduce a description of the advanced services the project is going to provide to real residential users by means of a state-of-then-art Asynchronous Transfer Mode end-to-end infrastructure. Emphasis will be put on the outcomes of the experiences gained during the first project year, stemming from the implementation and deployment of complex multimedia services developed by means of innovative authoring tools. Particular attention will be paid to the facts and findings resulting from the activities so far performed in the Italian trial island. In particular, the role of contents provisioning and service design, as well as the monitoring of service acceptance and usability by the final users are emerging as outstanding topics, even beyond network technological issues. Finally, an outline of major unsolved problems in the area of interactive multimedia s presented.

  13. Deficits of congenital amusia beyond pitch: Evidence from impaired categorical perception of vowels in Cantonese-speaking congenital amusics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caicai Zhang

    Full Text Available Congenital amusia is a lifelong disorder of fine-grained pitch processing in music and speech. However, it remains unclear whether amusia is a pitch-specific deficit, or whether it affects frequency/spectral processing more broadly, such as the perception of formant frequency in vowels, apart from pitch. In this study, in order to illuminate the scope of the deficits, we compared the performance of 15 Cantonese-speaking amusics and 15 matched controls on the categorical perception of sound continua in four stimulus contexts: lexical tone, pure tone, vowel, and voice onset time (VOT. Whereas lexical tone, pure tone and vowel continua rely on frequency/spectral processing, the VOT continuum depends on duration/temporal processing. We found that the amusic participants performed similarly to controls in all stimulus contexts in the identification, in terms of the across-category boundary location and boundary width. However, the amusic participants performed systematically worse than controls in discriminating stimuli in those three contexts that depended on frequency/spectral processing (lexical tone, pure tone and vowel, whereas they performed normally when discriminating duration differences (VOT. These findings suggest that the deficit of amusia is probably not pitch specific, but affects frequency/spectral processing more broadly. Furthermore, there appeared to be differences in the impairment of frequency/spectral discrimination in speech and nonspeech contexts. The amusic participants exhibited less benefit in between-category discriminations than controls in speech contexts (lexical tone and vowel, suggesting reduced categorical perception; on the other hand, they performed inferiorly compared to controls across the board regardless of between- and within-category discriminations in nonspeech contexts (pure tone, suggesting impaired general auditory processing. These differences imply that the frequency/spectral-processing deficit might be

  14. Potential risk and sodium content of children's ready-to-eat foods distributed at major amusement parks in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, N-Y; Park, S-Y; Lee, Y-M; Choi, S-Y; Jeong, S-H; Chung, M-S; Chang, Y-S; Choi, S-H; Bae, D-H; Ha, S-D

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to help better understand the current sodium intake of Korean children and to establish children's good eating habits through investigation of the sodium content of ready-to-eat foods collected from nine major amusement parks in Korea. The sodium content of a total of 322 products was analysed by using ICP and then the potential risk based on the recommended daily intake of sodium as described in the Korean dietary reference intakes was determined. The results showed that sodium content was the lowest in muffins (245 mg/100 g) and the highest in seasoned dried filefish (1825 mg/100 g). The average amounts of sodium per serving of seasoned dried filefish, tteokbokki and fish paste were 1150, 1248 and 1097 mg, respectively. The values were above 50% of the daily intake of sodium recommended by the Korean dietary reference intake. The ready-to-eat foods were also classified into high, medium and low sodium content on the basis of standards recommended by the Korean Food and Drug Administration. Most snacks were classified as high sodium foods because they exceeded "300 mg (84.5% of the total daily allowance)". Furthermore, the meal substitution foods such as kimbab, tteokbokki, mandus, sandwiches and hamburgers exceeded "600 mg (90.3% of the total daily allowance)" and were also classified as high sodium foods. In addition, ready-to-eat foods in amusement parks are similar to foods eaten on streets and foods around school zones, which contain high sodium content; thus, the intake frequency might be high, which would induce high risk to children health. Koreans already consume a high amount of sodium daily via their usual diets. So, the sodium content in snacks and substitution foods needs to be reduced. Consequently, this study noted that parents and guardians should carefully consider their children's consumption of ready-to-eat foods from Korean amusement parks.

  15. Lost in a Transmedia Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Smith

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo (previamente publicado como um capítulo de minha tese analisa os mecanismos transmidiáticos de storytelling por trás da narrativa do seriado Lost, da ABC. Por ter sua narrativa sustentada em uma complexa mitologia, Lost faz um grande esforço para suplementar a narrativa de seu programa de TV através de valiosas e distintas extensões narrativas. Em um primeiro momento, eu examino como as técnicas de construção de mundo em Lost encorajam os fãs mais ávidos a “jogar” com o espaço narrativo. Eu então faço avaliações sobre as extensões que Lost oferece como opcionais, através de experiências convincentes em seus textos expandido. Ao  ser muito bem-sucedida ao balancear seus fãs mais ávidos com os casuais espectadores, Lost representa o futuro de muitos programas de televisão que se propõem a colocar os fãs em situações imersivas, usando um vasto universo transmídia, ao mesmo tempo prometendo um programa de televisão coerente em seu interior

  16. Preserved appreciation of aesthetic elements of speech and music prosody in an amusic individual: A holistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutrari, Ariadne; Lorch, Marjorie Perlman

    2017-07-01

    We present a follow-up study on the case of a Greek amusic adult, B.Z., whose impaired performance on scale, contour, interval, and meter was reported by Paraskevopoulos, Tsapkini, and Peretz in 2010, employing a culturally-tailored version of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia. In the present study, we administered a novel set of perceptual judgement tasks designed to investigate the ability to appreciate holistic prosodic aspects of 'expressiveness' and emotion in phrase length music and speech stimuli. Our results show that, although diagnosed as a congenital amusic, B.Z. scored as well as healthy controls (N=24) on judging 'expressiveness' and emotional prosody in both speech and music stimuli. These findings suggest that the ability to make perceptual judgements about such prosodic qualities may be preserved in individuals who demonstrate difficulties perceiving basic musical features such as melody or rhythm. B.Z.'s case yields new insights into amusia and the processing of speech and music prosody through a holistic approach. The employment of novel stimuli with relatively fewer non-naturalistic manipulations, as developed for this study, may be a useful tool for revealing unexplored aspects of music and speech cognition and offer the possibility to further the investigation of the perception of acoustic streams in more authentic auditory conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of lost alpha particle by concealed lost ion probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, A; Isobe, M; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M

    2010-10-01

    Full orbit-following calculation is performed for the final orbit of the lost alpha particles, showing some orbits escaping from the last closed flux surface could be detected by a concealed lost ion probe (CLIP) installed under the shadow of the original first wall surface. While both passing and trapped orbits hit the same wall panel, detecting a trapped orbit by the CLIP is easier than detecting passing orbits. Whether the final orbit is detected or not is determined by the position of the reflection point. The CLIP successfully detects the trapped orbits, which are reflected before they hit to a first wall. Then the pitch angles of the orbits at the CLIP are close to and smaller than 90°. Optimization of the position of the CLIP in terms of broader detection window is investigated.

  18. Lost Causes in and Beyond Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Streater, R F

    2007-01-01

    Lost Causes in and Beyond Physics deals with a selection of research topics mostly from theoretical physics that have been shown to be a dead-end or continue at least to be highly controversial. Nevertheless, whether it is about Bohmian mechanics, physics from Fisher information or the quantum theory of the brain, small but dedicated research communities continue to work on these issues. R.F. Streater, renowned mathematical physicist and co-author of the famous book "PCT, Spin and Statistics, and all that", in a series of essays describes the work and struggle of these research commnities, as well as the chances of any breakthrough in these areas. This book is written as both an entertainment and serious study and should be accessible to anyone with a background in theoretical physics and mathematics.

  19. Jungmann's translation of Paradise Lost

    OpenAIRE

    Janů, Karel

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines Josef Jungmann's translation of John Milton's Paradise Lost. Josef Jungmann was one of the leading figures of the Czech National Revival and translated Milton 's poem between the years 1800 and 1804. The thesis covers Jungmann's theoretical model of translation and presents Jungmann's motives for translation of Milton's epic poem. The paper also describes the aims Jungmann had with his translation and whether he has achieved them. The reception Jungmann's translation rece...

  20. Blogging Family-like Relations when Visiting Theme and Amusement Parks: The Use of Children in Displays Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Li Lindgren

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper combines sociological perspectives on family display, internet studies on family and private photography and a child studies perspective on the display of children. The paper proposes that blogging practices related to visits to theme and amusement parks in Sweden provide a new arena for people to display family-like relationships. In the different displays, adults mainly use pictures of children in the blogs to demonstrate their ability to perform family-like relationships. The paper suggests that this form of child-centred display, a visualized child-centredness, done during the park visit as well as in the blogging, is part of the construction of contemporary childhoods and what it means to be a child today and has not been theorized in earlier research on the display of family-like relations.

  1. (Amusicality in Williams syndrome: Examining relationships among auditory perception, musical skill, and emotional responsiveness to music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam eLense

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS, a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder, is of keen interest to music cognition researchers because of its characteristic auditory sensitivities and emotional responsiveness to music. However, actual musical perception and production abilities are more variable. We examined musicality in WS through the lens of amusia and explored how their musical perception abilities related to their auditory sensitivities, musical production skills, and emotional responsiveness to music. In our sample of 73 adolescents and adults with WS, 11% met criteria for amusia, which is higher than the 4% prevalence rate reported in the typically developing population. Amusia was not related to auditory sensitivities but was related to musical training. Performance on the amusia measure strongly predicted musical skill but not emotional responsiveness to music, which was better predicted by general auditory sensitivities. This study represents the first time amusia has been examined in a population with a known neurodevelopmental genetic disorder with a range of cognitive abilities. Results have implications for the relationships across different levels of auditory processing, musical skill development, and emotional responsiveness to music, as well as the understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in individuals with WS and typically developing individuals with and without amusia.

  2. LOST FOAM CASTING OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval

    2007-01-01

    The lost foam casting process has been successfully used for making aluminum and cast iron thin walled castings of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on cast magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings. The plate castings were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate castings were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window castings were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  3. Hidden costs, value lost: uninsurance in America

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance; Board on Health Care Services; Institute of Medicine; National Academy of Sciences

    2003-01-01

    Hidden Cost, Value Lost , the fifth of a series of six books on the consequences of uninsurance in the United States, illustrates some of the economic and social losses to the country of maintaining...

  4. Ben Franklin's Scientific Amusements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschbach, Dudley

    2003-04-01

    As an American icon, Benjamin Franklin is often portrayed as wise and canny in business and politics, earnestly pursuing and extolling diligence, sensible conduct, pragmatism, and good works. Also legendary are some of his inventions, particularly the lightning rod, bifocals, and an efficient wood-burning stove. The iconic image is misleading in major respects. Today, surprisingly few people appreciate that, in the 18th century, Franklin was greatly esteemed throughout Europe as a scientist (termed then a "natural philosopher.") He was hailed as the "Newton of Electricity." Indeed, until Franklin, electricity seemed more mysterious than had gravity in Newton's time, and lightning was considered the wrath of God. By his own account, Franklin's studies of electricity and many other phenomena were prompted not by practical aims, but by his playful curiosity--which often became obsessive. Also not generally appreciated is the importance of Franklin's scientific reputation in enhancing his efforts to obtain French support for the American Revolution.

  5. Lost Cause: an interactive movie project

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    One of the challenges in designing an interactive cinematic experience is to offer interactive choices which do not distract from immersion into the story. The interactive movie project, Lost Cause focuses on the life of the main character explored through the inter-related perspectives of three other characters. Lost Cause supports an immersive interactive story experience through its correlated design of an interface, narrative content and narrative structure. The movie project is examined ...

  6. A Physicist Who Never Lost Her Humanity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 3. Lise Meitner (1878–1968): A Physicist Who Never Lost Her Humanity. Vandana Nanal. Article-in-a-Box Volume 22 Issue 3 March 2017 pp 193-197. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Clubbed fingers: the claws we lost?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, A.A.M.; Vermeij-Keers, C.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van; Gooren, L.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Clubbed digits resemble the human embryonic fingers and toes, which took like the digits of a claw. Clubbed digits, thus, may represent the return of the embryonic claw and may even represent the claws man has lost during evolution, if ontogenesis realty recapitulates phylogenesis. We put forward

  8. Lost-sales inventory theory : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvank, Marco; Vis, Iris F. A.

    2011-01-01

    In classic inventory models it is common to assume that excess demand is backordered. However, studies analyzing customer behavior in practice show that most unfulfilled demand is lost or an alternative item/location is looked for in many retail environments. Inventory systems that include this

  9. Concern about Lost Talent: Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Joanna; Saha, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Lost talent? The occupational ambitions and attainments of young Australians", and is an added resource for further information. The purpose of this supplement is to provide greater detail about the background of research into the topic of human talent in…

  10. Lost Near-Earth Object Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Peter; Farnocchia, Davide; Williams, Gareth; Keys, Sonia; Boardman, Ian; Holman, Matthew J.; Payne, Matthew J.

    2017-10-01

    The number of discovered Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) increases rapidly, currently exceeding 16,000 NEOs. 2016 was the most productive year ever with 1,888 NEO discoveries. The NEO discovery process typically begins with three to five detections of a previously unidentified object that are reported to the Minor Planet Center (MPC). According to the plane-of-sky motion, the MPC ranks all of the new candidate discoveries for the likelihood of being NEOs using the so-called digest score. If the digest score is greater than 65 the observations appear on the publicly accessible NEO Confirmation Page (NEOCP). Objects on the NEOCP are followed up in subsequent hours and days. When enough observations are collected to ensure that the object is real and that the orbit is determined, the NEO is officially announced with its new designation by a Minor Planet Electronic Circular. However, 14% of NEO candidates never get confirmed and are therefore lost due to the lack of follow-up observations. We analyzed the lost NEO candidates that appeared on NEOCP in 2013-2016 and investigated the reasons why they were not confirmed. In particular, we studied the properties of the lost NEO candidates with a digest score of 100 that were reported by the two most prolific discovery sites - Pan-STARRS1 (F51) and Mt. Lemmon Survey (G96). We derived their plane-of-sky positions and rates, brightness, and ephemeris uncertainties, and assessed correlations with the phase of the moon and seasonal effects apparent in the given observatory’s data. We concluded that lost NEO candidates typically have a larger rate of motion and larger uncertainties than those of confirmed objects. However, many of the lost candidates could be recovered. In fact, the 1-sigma plane-of-sky uncertainty was still within ±0.5 deg in 79% (F51) and 69% (G96) of the cases 24 hours after discovery and in 31% (F51) and 30% (G96) of the cases 48 hours after discovery. If all of the NEO candidates with a digest score of 100 had

  11. Lost lake - restoration of a Carolina bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlin, H.G.; McLendon, J.P. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; Wike, L.D. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Dietsch, B.M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Carolina bays are shallow wetland depressions found only on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Although these isolated interstream wetlands support many types of communities, they share the common features of having a sandy margin, a fluctuating water level, an elliptical shape, and a northwest to southeast orientation. Lost Lake, an 11.3 hectare Carolina bay, was ditched and drained for agricultural production before establishment of the Savannah River Site in 1950. Later it received overflow from a seepage basin containing a variety of chemicals, primarily solvents and some heavy metals. In 1990 a plan was developed for the restoration of Lost Lake, and restoration activities were complete by mid-1991. Lost Lake is the first known project designed for the restoration and recovery of a Carolina bay. The bay was divided into eight soil treatment zones, allowing four treatments in duplicate. Each of the eight zones was planted with eight species of native wetland plants. Recolonization of the bay by amphibians and reptiles is being evaluated by using drift fences with pitfall traps and coverboard arrays in each of the treatment zones. Additional drift fences in five upland habitats were also established. Hoop turtle traps, funnel minnow traps, and dip nets were utilized for aquatic sampling. The presence of 43 species common to the region has been documented at Lost Lake. More than one-third of these species show evidence of breeding populations being established. Three species found prior to the restoration activity and a number of species common to undisturbed Carolina bays were not encountered. Colonization by additional species is anticipated as the wetland undergoes further succession.

  12. The lost art of finding our way

    CERN Document Server

    Huth, Edward John

    2013-01-01

    Long before GPS, Google Earth, and global transit, humans traveled vast distances using only environmental clues and simple instruments. John Huth asks what is lost when modern technology substitutes for our innate capacity to find our way. Encyclopedic in breadth, weaving together astronomy, meteorology, oceanography, and ethnography, The Lost Art of Finding Our Way puts us in the shoes, ships, and sleds of early navigators for whom paying close attention to the environment around them was, quite literally, a matter of life and death. Haunted by the fate of two young kayakers lost in a fogbank off Nantucket, Huth shows us how to navigate using natural phenomena—the way the Vikings used the sunstone to detect polarization of sunlight, and Arab traders learned to sail into the wind, and Pacific Islanders used underwater lightning and “read” waves to guide their explorations. Huth reminds us that we are all navigators capable of learning techniques ranging from the simplest to the most sophisticated skil...

  13. 50 CFR 25.22 - Lost and found articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lost and found articles. 25.22 Section 25.22 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Lost and found articles. Lost articles or money found on a national wildlife refuge are to be...

  14. Lost Talent? The Occupational Ambitions and Attainments of Young Australians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Joanna; Saha, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    Given ongoing interest in increasing productivity and participation in the workforce, understanding when talent is lost is a useful exercise. The term "lost talent" describes the underutilisation or wastage of human potential. Focusing on young people, Sikora and Saha define lost talent as occurring when students in the top 50% of…

  15. 21 CFR 1305.26 - Lost electronic orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lost electronic orders. 1305.26 Section 1305.26... CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Electronic Orders § 1305.26 Lost electronic orders. (a) If a purchaser determines that an unfilled electronic order has been lost before or after receipt, the purchaser must provide, to...

  16. Advanced lost foam from casting technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C. E.; Littleton, H. E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B. A.; Sheldon, D. S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects Task 4: Pattern Gating Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas in the period of October 1, 1994 through December 31, 1995. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers.

  17. Sociology: a lost connection in social psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Kesebir, Selin; Snyder, Benjamin H

    2009-11-01

    For the first half of the 20th century, sociology was one of the closest allies of social psychology. Over the past four decades, however, the connection with sociology has weakened, whereas new connections with neighboring disciplines (e.g., biology, economics, political science) have formed. Along the way, the sociological perspective has been largely lost in mainstream social psychology in the United States. Most social psychologists today are not concerned with collective phenomena and do not investigate social structural factors (e.g., residential mobility, socioeconomic status, dominant religion, political systems). Even when the social structural factors are included in the analysis, psychologists typically treat them as individual difference variables. Sociologist C. Wright Mills famously promoted sociological imagination, or the ability to see distal yet important social forces operating in a larger societal context. By comparing sociological perspectives to psychological perspectives, this article highlights the insights that the sociological perspective and sociological imagination can bring to social psychology.

  18. (A)musicality in Williams syndrome: examining relationships among auditory perception, musical skill, and emotional responsiveness to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D; Shivers, Carolyn M; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder, is of keen interest to music cognition researchers because of its characteristic auditory sensitivities and emotional responsiveness to music. However, actual musical perception and production abilities are more variable. We examined musicality in WS through the lens of amusia and explored how their musical perception abilities related to their auditory sensitivities, musical production skills, and emotional responsiveness to music. In our sample of 73 adolescents and adults with WS, 11% met criteria for amusia, which is higher than the 4% prevalence rate reported in the typically developing (TD) population. Amusia was not related to auditory sensitivities but was related to musical training. Performance on the amusia measure strongly predicted musical skill but not emotional responsiveness to music, which was better predicted by general auditory sensitivities. This study represents the first time amusia has been examined in a population with a known neurodevelopmental genetic disorder with a range of cognitive abilities. Results have implications for the relationships across different levels of auditory processing, musical skill development, and emotional responsiveness to music, as well as the understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in individuals with WS and TD individuals with and without amusia.

  19. (A)musicality in Williams syndrome: examining relationships among auditory perception, musical skill, and emotional responsiveness to music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Shivers, Carolyn M.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder, is of keen interest to music cognition researchers because of its characteristic auditory sensitivities and emotional responsiveness to music. However, actual musical perception and production abilities are more variable. We examined musicality in WS through the lens of amusia and explored how their musical perception abilities related to their auditory sensitivities, musical production skills, and emotional responsiveness to music. In our sample of 73 adolescents and adults with WS, 11% met criteria for amusia, which is higher than the 4% prevalence rate reported in the typically developing (TD) population. Amusia was not related to auditory sensitivities but was related to musical training. Performance on the amusia measure strongly predicted musical skill but not emotional responsiveness to music, which was better predicted by general auditory sensitivities. This study represents the first time amusia has been examined in a population with a known neurodevelopmental genetic disorder with a range of cognitive abilities. Results have implications for the relationships across different levels of auditory processing, musical skill development, and emotional responsiveness to music, as well as the understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in individuals with WS and TD individuals with and without amusia. PMID:23966965

  20. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology - Phase V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanliang Sun; Harry E. Littleton; Charles E. Bates

    2004-04-29

    Previous research, conducted under DOE Contracts DE-FC07-89ID12869, DE-FC07-93ID12230 and DE-FC07-95ID113358 made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional developments were needed to improve the process and make it more functional in industrial environments. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--Computational Model for the Process and Data Base to Support the Model; Task 2--Casting Dimensional Accuracy; Task 3--Pattern Production; Task 4--Improved Pattern Materials; Task 5--Coating Control; Task 6--In-Plant Case Studies; Task 7--Energy and the Environmental Data; and Task 8--Technology Transfer. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2004. The results obtained in each task and subtask are summarized in this Executive Summary and details are provided in subsequent sections of the report.

  1. A case of a 'lost' nasogastric tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, V; Shakeel, M; Keh, S; Ah-See, K W

    2012-12-01

    To present the case of a 'lost' nasogastric tube and to highlight the importance of imaging and/or chest X-ray after nasogastric tube insertion, especially in unreliable patients. A 50-year-old man, undergoing radiotherapy treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue base, was admitted for pain control and nasogastric tube feeding. This patient required multiple nasogastric tubes over a two-week period. The patient repeatedly denied pulling the nasogastric tube out and we were unable to establish the exact mode of nasogastric tube removal. On one such occasion another tube was inserted and a check X-ray showed two feeding tubes; the latest one was lying in the left main bronchus and the old nasogastric tube was observed in the oesophagus, with its upper end jutting above the hypopharynx. It was apparent that the patient had somehow cut the tube and swallowed it. This case not only illustrates the importance of flexible nasendoscopy and/or chest X-ray for checking the position of the nasogastric tube, but also highlights that some patients are not tolerant of nasogastric tubes. The use of nasogastric tubes should be avoided in these patients to prevent any self-inflicted injury.

  2. The lost honour of Henrietta Leavitt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puerto, C.

    2011-11-01

    The first scene opens with the music of Shirley Bassey. The astronomer Henrietta Swan Leavitt is writing a diary when visited by the famous CBS reporter Edward Roscoe Murrow. Henrietta is surprised that this American television channel should want to pay such a tribute to her, but she agrees to be interviewed. Annie Jump Cannon, her friend and colleague from Harvard College Observatory, accompanies her during most of the sessions. Everything goes so well that the journalist tries to touch on certain issues that Henrietta seems to want to keep secret, such as her relationship with Edward Charles Pickering, Director of the Observatory, and the reason why she failed to get the recognition for her work that she deserved.This is the argument of the play The Lost Honor of Henrietta Leavitt, a project of the Museo de la Ciencia y el Cosmos (Museum of Science and the Cosmos), run by the Organismo Autonomo de Museos y Centros of Cabildo de Tenerife (Autonomous Organism of Museums and Centres of the island government, Cabildo of Tenerife), with funding from the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT) and designed for the International Year of Astronomy 2009. The play, written and directed by the author, Carmen del Puerto, has been staged eight times in Tenerife and Pamplona. The poster values this experience as a resource for scientific popularization.

  3. [How much water is lost during breathing?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Jakub; Przybylski, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Arising from the Antoine equation and the ideal gas law, the volume of exhaled water has been calculated. Air temperature, humidity and minute ventilation has been taken into account. During physical exercise amount of exhaled H(2)O is linear, but not proportional to heart rate. And so at the heart rate of 140 bpm amount of exhaled water is approximately four times higher than during the rest and equals about 60-70 ml/h. The effect of external temperature and humidity on water lost via lungs was assessed as well. When temperature of inspired air and its humidity is 35°C an 75% respectively loss of water is 7 ml/h. Whereas when above parameters are changed to minus 10°C and 25% lung excretion of H(2)O increases up to 20 ml/h. The obtained results may become the basis for the assessment of osmolarity changes on the surface of the lower airways. The increase of which is recently considered as one of the factors responsible for exercise induced bronchospasm.

  4. America’s Lost Innocence and Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Włodek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In my paper America’s Lost Innocence I intend to focus on American cinema of the ’50s, part of ’60s, and contemporary throwbacks to those decades. The ’50s have been called “the last decade of American innocence”, “the happiest decade in America’s history – when things were going on – that everybody misses” (by Jean Baudrillard. That era symbolically ceased on 22 November 1963; however, many scholars and publicists undermine the belief in its very existence. Michael Wood calls the ’50s a time of “self-deception”; therefore, the question raised is – has America ever been innocent? By concentrating on the message conveyed by mostly genre (e.g. drama, melodrama, musical, romantic comedy and mainstream movies made in the ’50s and early ’60s (e.g. A Place In the Sun, Cat on the Hot, Tin Roof, Home From the Hill, I intend to analyze the portrait of American society of that time, it’s rules and expectations towards individuals and system as a whole. In the second part of my paper I will focus on contemporary throwbacks to those times depicted mostly in movies made in the 21st century, although not exclusively (e.g. Far From Heaven, The Hours, Revolutionary Road, the TV series Mad Men [2007–], Pleasantville. Using those and other movies as examples, I intend to prove the thesis that the phenomenon of retro and contemporary retromania are not always and not by definition conservative, and can serve as a means to a critical approach towards society.

  5. Cause-specific measures of life years lost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; Keiding, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Background: A new measure of the number of life years lost due to specific causes of death is introduced. Methods: This measure is based on the cumulative incidence of death, it does not require "independence" of causes, and it satisfies simple balance equations: "total number of life years lost...... = sum of cause-specific life years lost", and "total number of life years lost before age x + temporary life expectancy between birth and age x = x". Results: The measure is contrasted to alternatives suggested in the demographic literature and all methods are illustrated using Danish and Russian...

  6. Lost-sales inventory systems with a service level criterion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvank, Marco; Vis, Iris F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Competitive retail environments are characterized by service levels and lost sales in case of excess demand. We contribute to research on lost-sales models with a service level criterion in multiple ways. First, we study the optimal replenishment policy for this type of inventory system as well as

  7. 36 CFR 327.16 - Lost and found articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lost and found articles. 327... CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.16 Lost and found articles. All articles found shall be deposited by the finder at the Manager's office or with a ranger. All such articles shall be disposed of in accordance with...

  8. 42 CFR 102.32 - Benefits for lost employment income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... smallpox vaccine recipients or vaccinia contacts may be able to receive benefits for loss of employment... may pay benefits for lost employment income to the estate of a deceased smallpox vaccine recipient or... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benefits for lost employment income. 102.32 Section...

  9. Calculation of Additional Lost Green Time at Closely Spaced Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available At closely spaced signalized intersections or interchanges, additional lost green time can occur at upstream intersections when there is a queue spillback. For an accurate estimation of capacities and delays at closely spaced intersections, it is necessary to account such additional lost time. The Highway Capacity Manual (HCM 2010 provides a model for the estimation of the additional lost time due to the presence of a downstream queue. However, case studies indicate that the HCM model does not provide a very accurate estimation when the distance to the downstream queue is short. In this paper, a new model is developed for the estimation of additional lost time considering queue discharge patterns and traffic flow patterns. Simulation results show that the proposed model provides a more accurate estimation of additional lost time compared with the HCM model when the distance to the downstream queue is limited.

  10. Idiopathic focal epilepsies: the "lost tribe".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Deb K; Ferrie, Colin; Addis, Laura; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Caraballo, Roberto; de Saint-Martin, Anne; Fejerman, Natalio; Guerrini, Renzo; Hamandi, Khalid; Helbig, Ingo; Ioannides, Andreas A; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Lal, Dennis; Lesca, Gaetan; Muhle, Hiltrud; Neubauer, Bernd A; Pisano, Tiziana; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Seegmuller, Caroline; Shibata, Takashi; Smith, Anna; Striano, Pasquale; Strug, Lisa J; Szepetowski, Pierre; Valeta, Thalia; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Koutroumanidis, Michalis

    2016-09-01

    The term idiopathic focal epilepsies of childhood (IFE) is not formally recognised by the ILAE in its 2010 revision (Berg et al., 2010), nor are its members and boundaries precisely delineated. The IFEs are amongst the most commonly encountered epilepsy syndromes affecting children. They are fascinating disorders that hold many "treats" for both clinicians and researchers. For example, the IFEs pose many of the most interesting questions central to epileptology: how are functional brain networks involved in the manifestation of epilepsy? What are the shared mechanisms of comorbidity between epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders? How do focal EEG discharges impact cognitive functioning? What explains the age-related expression of these syndromes? Why are EEG discharges and seizures so tightly locked to slow-wave sleep? In the last few decades, the clinical symptomatology and the respective courses of many IFEs have been described, although they are still not widely appreciated beyond the specialist community. Most neurologists would recognise the core syndromes of IFE to comprise: benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes or Rolandic epilepsy (BECTS/RE); Panayiotopoulos syndrome; and the idiopathic occipital epilepsies (Gastaut and photosensitive types). The Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the related (idiopathic) epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves in sleep (CSWS or ESES) are also often included, both as a consequence of the shared morphology of the interictal discharges and their potential evolution from core syndromes, for example, CSWS from BECTS. Atypical benign focal epilepsy of childhood also has shared electro-clinical features warranting inclusion. In addition, a number of less well-defined syndromes of IFE have been proposed, including benign childhood seizures with affective symptoms, benign childhood epilepsy with parietal spikes, benign childhood seizures with frontal or midline spikes, and benign focal seizures of adolescence. The

  11. The cognitive cost of sleep lost

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, John G.; Strecker, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial body of literature supports the intuitive notion that a good night’s sleep can facilitate human cognitive performance the next day. Deficits in attention, learning & memory, emotional reactivity, and higher-order cognitive processes, such as executive function and decision making, have all been documented following sleep disruption in humans. Thus, whilst numerous clinical and experimental studies link human sleep disturbance to cognitive deficits, attempts to develop valid and reliable rodent models of these phenomena are fewer, and relatively more recent. This review focuses primarily on the cognitive impairments produced by sleep disruption in rodent models of several human patterns of sleep loss/sleep disturbance. Though not an exclusive list, this review will focus on four specific types of sleep disturbance: total sleep deprivation, experimental sleep fragmentation, selective REM sleep deprivation, and chronic sleep restriction. The use of rodent models can provide greater opportunities to understand the neurobiological changes underlying sleep loss induced cognitive impairments. Thus, this review concludes with a description of recent neurobiological findings concerning the neuroplastic changes and putative brain mechanisms that may underlie the cognitive deficits produced by sleep disturbances. PMID:21875679

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  13. Paradise Lost Dressed in the Costume of History: John Martin’s Rendition of Paradise Lost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Atashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The story of the loss of paradise has been read and interpreted in different ages. Commentary on Milton's Paradise Lost is not limited to verbal texts; painters and illustrators have contributed greatly to the poem by presenting their own time-bound readings and interpretations of the poem through their illustrations that are far beyond mere decorations. John Martin, in the aftermath of the Industrial Revolution, deletes the Father and the Son from his illustrations. Only angels such as Raphael are the representations of deity and are as powerless and tiny as Adam and Eve. Adam and Eve, after the Fall seem as small, powerless and as subjugated to the natural surrounding as they were before the Fall. Satan is the only powerful figure in his elegant palace. Through a new historical outlook, the researchers aim at exposing the workings of ideology and dominant discourses that informed John Martin's pictorial reading of Milton's poem in the early 19th century

  14. Lost in Location:- on how (not) to situate aliens

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2009-01-01

    Udgivelsesdato: June The article investigates how users of personal satellite navigation devices (often referred to as sat-nav) are sometimes lost and led astray and argues that the satnav's aim to remove every insecurity about the correct route seems to remove the individual's conscious perception of the space traversed. While becoming destination aware, the individual loses her location awareness. The article proposes that the reason people get lost when using sat-nav is due to a wrong l...

  15. Measurement of water lost from heated geologic salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlfelder, J.J.

    1979-07-01

    This report describes three methods used to measure the rate at which water is lost from heated geologic salt. The three methods were employed in each of a series of proof tests which were performed to evaluate instrumentation designed to measure the water-loss rate. It was found that the water lost from heated, 1-kg salt specimens which were measured according to these three methods was consistent to within an average 9 percent

  16. Neural Plasticity and Neurorehabilitation: Teaching the New Brain Old Tricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleim, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Following brain injury or disease there are widespread biochemical, anatomical and physiological changes that result in what might be considered a new, very different brain. This adapted brain is forced to reacquire behaviors lost as a result of the injury or disease and relies on neural plasticity within the residual neural circuits. The same…

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses ...

  20. Years of potential life lost and life expectancy in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten; Stürup, Anne Emilie; McGrath, John J

    2017-01-01

    had little effect on results. INTERPRETATION: The effects of schizophrenia on years potential life lost and life expectancy seem to be substantial and not to have lessened over time. Development and implementation of interventions and initiatives to reduce this mortality gap are urgently needed......BACKGROUND: Several studies and meta-analyses have shown that mortality in people with schizophrenia is higher than that in the general population but have used relative measures, such as standardised mortality ratios. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate years of potential life...... lost and life expectancy in schizophrenia, which are more direct, absolute measures of increased mortality. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, Cinahl, and Web of Science for published studies on years of potential life lost and life expectancy in schizophrenia. Data from individual studies...

  1. Preventing customer defection and stimulating return of the lost customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senić Radoslav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Customers represent company's most valuable asset. Company can assure its survival, further growth and development by retaining existing, attracting new and returning lost customers. Retaining existing, loyal customers is the most profitable business activity, attracting new ones is the most expensive, while returning lost and frequently forgotten customers is a type of business activity that still generates modest interest among researchers and practitioners. So far, marketing strategies have been mainly directed towards the first two categories of customers. The objective of this paper is dedicated to customer defection and returning lost customers. Paper discusses customer relationship life-cycle and the significance of managing customer return within it, types of customer defections, the process of managing return, as well as, the reasons that led to customer defection.

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ...

  3. Gayatri Spivak leitora de Paradise Lost: um texto transdisciplinar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Ferreira Sá

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Em Paradise Lost, de John Milton, épico e império se encontram dissociados. Contrário a muitas leituras tradicionais, essa escrita do início da Era Moderna inglesa intersecta o pensamento pós-colonial de várias maneiras. Ao usar o circuito pós-colonial de teoria e prática textual de Gayatri Spivak, este artigo desenvolve uma desleitura em contraponto desse texto de Milton: Paradise Lost poderá finalmente libertarse de seu conteúdo colonial e liberar seu conteúdo pós-colonial.

  4. MILTON’S PARADISE LOST AND A POSTCOLONIAL FALL

    OpenAIRE

    LUIZ FERNANDO FERREIRA DE SÁ

    2006-01-01

    In John Milton’s Paradise Lost epic and empire are dissociated. Contrary to many misreadings, this all-important work of the English Renaissance intersects postcolonial thinking in a number of ways. By using Gayatri Spivak’s circuit of postcolonial theory and practice, this paper enacts a counterpointal (mis)reading of Milton’s text: Paradise Lost may at last free its (post-)colonial (dis)content. Since every reading is a misreading, my (mis)reading of Milton’s paradis...

  5. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  6. Case Report: The story of a lost guidewire | Bagaria | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seldinger's technique is widely used to place central venous and arterial catheters, and is generally considered to be safe. The technique does, however, have multiple potential risks. Guidewire-related complications are rare but potentially serious. We describe a case of a lost guidewire during central venous catheter ...

  7. Lost but not forgotten: finding pages on the unarchived web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C. Huurdeman; J. Kamps; T. Samar (Thaer); A.P. de Vries (Arjen); A. Ben-David; R.A. Rogers (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractWeb archives attempt to preserve the fast changing web, yet they will always be incomplete. Due to restrictions in crawling depth, crawling frequency, and restrictive selection policies, large parts of the Web are unarchived and, therefore, lost to posterity. In this paper, we propose an

  8. Satan's Temptation of Eve in "Paradise Lost": A Rhetorical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dee Ann Duke

    John Milton employs classical rhetorical techniques in "Paradise Lost" to accomplish Satan's temptation of Eve which begins on line 524 and ends with line 732 of Book 9; however, Satan's oration resembles pejorative sophistry and Milton uses Ciceronian arrangement for Satan's argument. Milton envisions Satan as a clever, cunning creature…

  9. Lost in localization: A solution with neuroinformatics 2.0?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    2009-01-01

    The commentary by Derrfuss and Mar (Derrfuss, J., Mar, R.A., 2009. Lost in localization: The need for a universal coordinate database. NeuroImage, doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.01.053.) discusses some of the limitations of the present databases and calls for a universal coordinate database. Here I...

  10. 78 FR 4768 - Lost Securityholders and Unresponsive Payees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ...''. The additional language parallels the language applicable to recordkeeping transfer agents and... universe of ``clearing firms''. \\29\\ Letter from SIFMA, supra note 14. \\30\\ Letter from ABA, supra note 14... broker's or dealer's obligation to search for lost securityholders applies to the same universe of...

  11. Societal impact pitch for 'Lost building traditions' project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Daniël

    2016-01-01

    In de video vertelt Daniël over zijn onderzoeksproject 'Lost building traditions: turf construction and early medieval architecture in the southern North Sea area'. Voor dit project bouwde hij samen met tientallen vrijwilligers de eerste reconstructie van een vroegmiddeleeuws zodenhuis. Rondom de

  12. Paradise Lost: Introducing Students to Climate Change through Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennon, Brady

    2013-01-01

    "This country has been the basis of my being. And when it's no longer there, you know, it's unthinkable." Ueantabo Mackenzie's haunting words in the PBS NOW documentary "Paradise Lost" shook the author. He knew he wanted to teach a unit on global warming, especially after participating in the Portland-area Rethinking Schools…

  13. Brain Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Health Brain Health Home 10 Ways to Love Your Brain Stay Physically Active Adopt a Healthy Diet Stay ... risk factors slowed cognitive decline. 10 Ways to Love Your Brain > 10 tips to help reduce your risk of ...

  14. Lignite zone as an indicator to lost circulation belt: a case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighteen (18) water boreholes were studied for lost circulation. When locations of the boreholes associated with lost circulation were plotted on the map of Anambra State a lost circulation belt was observed around the River Niger – Onitsha – Oba – Nnewi axis. Lost circulation intervals range between 20-50m and 75-90m ...

  15. MILTON’S PARADISE LOST AND A POSTCOLONIAL FALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUIZ FERNANDO FERREIRA DE SÁ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In John Milton’s Paradise Lost epic and empire are dissociated. Contrary to many misreadings, this all-important work of the English Renaissance intersects postcolonial thinking in a number of ways. By using Gayatri Spivak’s circuit of postcolonial theory and practice, this paper enacts a counterpointal (misreading of Milton’s text: Paradise Lost may at last free its (post-colonial (discontent. Since every reading is a misreading, my (misreading of Milton’s paradise is amo(vement of resistance against and intervention in a so-called grand narrative of power (Milton’s epic with a view to proposing a postcolonial conversation with this text.

  16. Polymer grouts for plugging lost circulation in geothermal wells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbreath, D. (Green Mountain International, Waynesvile, NC); Mansure, Arthur James; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2004-12-01

    We have concluded a laboratory study to evaluate the survival potential of polymeric materials used for lost circulation plugs in geothermal wells. We learned early in the study that these materials were susceptible to hydrolysis. Through a systematic program in which many potential chemical combinations were evaluated, polymers were developed which tolerated hydrolysis for eight weeks at 500 F. The polymers also met material, handling, cost, and emplacement criteria. This screening process identified the most promising materials. A benefit of this work is that the components of the polymers developed can be mixed at the surface and pumped downhole through a single hose. Further strength testing is required to determine precisely the maximum temperature at which extrusion through fractures or voids causes failure of the lost circulation plug.

  17. Net lost revenue adjustment (NLRA) mechanisms for utility DSM programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the experiences that states and utilities are having with the NLRA approach. Contrary to concerns raised by some industry analysts, our results indicate the NLRA is a feasible approach to the lost-revenue disincentive. Seven of the 10 states we studied report no substantial problems with their approach. We observe several conditions linked to effective NLRA implementation and, for those states reporting problems, conditions linked to implementation difficulties. Finally, observed changes in utility-investment behavior occur after implementation of DSM rate reforms, which include deployment of NLRA mechanisms. We find that utilities in states with lost revenue recovery invest more than twice as much in DSM as do utilities in other states. (Author)

  18. Life years lost among patients with a given disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh

    2017-01-01

    A number of suggested measures of life years lost among patients with a given disease are reviewed, and some new ones are proposed. The methods are all phrased in the framework of a (Markov or non-Markov) illness-death model in combination with a population life table. The methods are illustrated...... using data on Danish male patients with bipolar disorder, and some recommendations are given. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  19. The Lost Art of Whole Blood Transfusion in Austere Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    risks of TTD and transfusion reactions in relation with the potential benefit of transfusion . In Norway, the serocon- version rate (HIV and hepatitis B...The Lost Art of Whole Blood Transfusion in Austere Environments Geir Strandenes, MD1,2; Tor A. Hervig, MD, PhD2; Christopher K. Bjerkvig, MD3; Steve...saving interventions must be performed quickly before hemorrhagic shock be- comes irreversible. Fresh whole blood transfusions in the field may be a

  20. Is Ecotourism Just Another Story of Paradise Lost?

    OpenAIRE

    English, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper uses Milton’s epic Paradise Lost as a metaphor to highlight the pitfalls of the label “ecotourism”. Critics of ecotourism view the label as a misnomer and an advertising ploy. Therefore, in order to provide a balanced perspective of ecotourism, this paper will review the definition of ecotourism, discuss the challenges of implementing successful ecotourism projects and provide some examples of ecotourism-gone-wrong. Since seeking economic benefits of increased tourism is contradict...

  1. Notes from the Lost Property Department. Bridget Pitt. Cape Town ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    contrast, an injury to the brain leaves its subterranean mark in more subtle ways. This kind of trauma is not ... dementia and brain injury on a mother and daughter, her novel seeks to address the difficulties involved in ... share a love of poetry and roses (the rose being a motif that is already announced pictographically on the ...

  2. Restoration of Lost Lake, recovery of an impacted Carolina Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wike, L.D.; Gladden, J.B.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Rogers, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    Lost Lake is one of approximately 200 Carolina bays found on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Until 1984 Lost Lake was contaminated by heavy metals and solvents overflowing from a nearby settling basin. Up to 12 inches of surface soil and all vegetation was removed from the bay as part of a RCRA removal action. A plan for restoration was initiated in 1989 and implemented in 1990 and 1991. Extensive planning led to defined objectives, strategies, treatments, and monitoring programs allowing successful restoration of Lost Lake. The primary goal of the project was to restore the wetland ecosystem after a hazardous waste clean up operation. An additional goal was to study the progress of the project and the success of the restoration activity. Several strategy considerations were necessary in the restoration plan. The removal of existing organic soils had to have compensation, a treatment scheme for planting and the extent of manipulation of the substrate had to be considered, monitoring decisions had to be made, and the decision whether or not to actively control the hydrology of the restored system

  3. Development of environmental friendly lost circulation material from banana peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauki, Arina; Hasan, Nur â.€˜Izzati; Naimi, Fardelen Binti Md; Othman, Nur Hidayati

    2017-12-01

    Loss of expensive mud could lead to major financial problem in executing a drilling project and is one of the biggest problems that need to be tackled during drilling. Synthetic Based Mud (SBM) is the most stable state of the art drilling mud used in current drilling technologies. However, the problem with lost circulation is still inevitable. The focus of this project is to develop a new potential waste material from banana peel in order to combat lost circulation in SBM. Standard industrial Lost Circulation Material (LCM) is used to compare the performance of banana peel as LCM in SBM. The effects of different sizing of banana peels (600 micron, 300 micron and 100 micron) were studied on the rheological and filtration properties of SBM and the bridging performance of banana peel as LCM additive. The tests were conducted using viscometer, HTHP filter press and sand bed tester. Thermal analysis of banana peel was also studied using TGA. According to the results obtained, 300 and 100 micron size of banana peel LCM exhibited an improved bridging performance by 65% as compared to industrial LCM. However, banana peel LCM with the size of 600 micron failed to act as LCM due to the total invasion of mud into the sand bed.

  4. Restoration of lost connectivity of partitioned wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virender Ranga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The lost connectivity due to failure of large scale nodes plays major role to degrade the system performance by generating unnecessary overhead or sometimes totally collapse the active network. There are many issues and challenges to restore the lost connectivity in an unattended scenario, i.e. how many recovery nodes will be sufficient and on which locations these recovery nodes have to be placed. A very few centralized and distributed approaches have been proposed till now. The centralized approaches are good for a scenario where information about the disjoint network, i.e. number of disjoint segments and their locations are well known in advance. However, for a scenario where such information is unknown due to the unattended harsh environment, a distributed approach is a better solution to restore the partitioned network. In this paper, we have proposed and implemented a semi-distributed approach called Relay node Placement using Fermat Point (RPFP. The proposed approach is capable of restoring lost connectivity with small number of recovery relay nodes and it works for any number of disjoint segments. The simulation experiment results show effectiveness of our approach as compared to existing benchmark approaches.

  5. The Lost Apple Plays: Performing Operation Pedro Pan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly del Busto Ramírez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available From 1960 to 1962, more than 14,000 unaccompanied minors took flight from Cuba to the United States, establishing the largest recorded exodus in the Western Hemisphere. The displaced children and the country they left behind are often metaphorized using a popular Latin American nursery rhyme, “The Lost Apple.” Now, more than four decades later, Operation Pedro Pan persists through a revealing body of performance by and about a nation’s exiled children. The Lost Apple Plays investigates how memory, identity formation, nationhood, citizenship, and migration have been dramatized through these performances. Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Nilo Cruz, director/actor/playwright Mario Ernesto Sánchez, singers Willy Chirino and Lissette, performance artist Ana Mendieta, sculptor María Brito, prolific dramatist Eduardo Machado, and new playwright Melinda López compose a Cuba that can be neither lost nor recovered for Pedro Pans, but remains an impenetrable illusion like the restless, liminal condition of lifelong exile.

  6. "They Will Leave You Lost": Experiences of a Gifted Black Male with a Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Renae D.

    2018-01-01

    An increased body of research on twice exceptionality provides insight on recruitment and retention issues concerning gifted students with dis/abilities, particularly those with specific learning dis/abilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or autism spectrum disorder. However, little research on twice exceptionality incorporates…

  7. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  8. Reprogramming Cells for Brain Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall D. McKinnon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available At present there are no clinical therapies that can repair traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury or degenerative brain disease. While redundancy and rewiring of surviving circuits can recover some lost function, the brain and spinal column lack sufficient endogenous stem cells to replace lost neurons or their supporting glia. In contrast, pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that exogenous transplants can have remarkable efficacy for brain repair in animal models. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs can provide paracrine factors that repair damage caused by ischemic injury, and oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC grafts give dramatic functional recovery from spinal cord injury. These studies have progressed to clinical trials, including human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived OPCs for spinal cord repair. However, ESC-derived allografts are less than optimal, and we need to identify a more appropriate donor graft population. The cell reprogramming field has developed the ability to trans-differentiate somatic cells into distinct cell types, a technology that has the potential to generate autologous neurons and glia which address the histocompatibility concerns of allografts and the tumorigenicity concerns of ESC-derived grafts. Further clarifying how cell reprogramming works may lead to more efficient direct reprogram approaches, and possibly in vivo reprogramming, in order to promote brain and spinal cord repair.

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ... grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading ... how the brain is wired and how the normal brain's structure develops and matures helps scientists understand ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  15. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict who ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  19. Earthworms lost from pesticides application in potato crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Santos, Glenda; Forrer, Karin; Binder, Claudia R.

    2010-05-01

    Bioturbation from earthworm's activity contributes to soil creep and soil carbon dynamics, and provide enough aeration conditions for agricultural practices all over the world. In developing countries where there is a long term misuse of pesticides for agricultural purposes, lost of these benefits from earthworms activity might already yielded negative effects in the current crop production. Little research has been performed on earthworms avoidance to pesticides in developing countries located in the tropics. Furthermore, the complete avoidance reaction (from attraction to 100% avoidance) from earthworms to most of the pesticides used in potato cultivation in developing countries like Colombia is incomplete as yet. Hence the aim of this study is to assess the lost of earthworm on the soils caused by different concentrations of pesticides and associated agricultural impacts caused by a lost in the soil bioturbation. As a first stage, we have studied earthworm's avoidance to pesticide concentration in a potato agricultural area located in Colombia. Local cultivated Eisenia fetida were exposed to four of the most frequent applied active ingredients in potato crops i.e. carbofuran, mancozeb, methamidophos and chlorpyriphos. Adult earthworm toxicity experiments were carried out in two soils, untreated grasslands under standard (ISO guidelines) and undisturbed conditions, and exposed to six different concentrations of the active ingredients. The results of the avoidance reaction on the standard soils were significant for carbofuran, mancoceb and chlorpyrifos. For each of the three active ingredients, we found i) overuse of pesticide, ii) applied dose of carbofuran, mancoceb and chlorpyrifos by the farmers potentially caused 20%, 11% and 9% of earthworms avoidance on the cultivated soils, respectively.

  20. Abnormal degree centrality of functional hubs associated with negative coping in older Chinese adults who lost their only child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Liu, HuiJuan; Wei, Dongtao; Sun, Jiangzhou; Yang, Junyi; Meng, Jie; Wang, Lihong; Qiu, Jiang

    2015-12-01

    The loss of an only child is a negative life event and may potentially increase the risk of psychiatric disorders. However, the psychological consequences of the loss of an only child and the associated neural mechanisms remain largely unexplored. Degree centrality (DC), derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), was used to examine network communication in 22 older adults who lost their only child and 23 matched controls. The older adults who lost their only child exhibited an ineffective coping style. They also showed decreased distant and local DC in the precuneus and left inferior parietal lobule and decreased distant DC in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Furthermore, the decreased local and distant DC of these regions and the decreased DLPFC-precuneus connectivity strength were negatively correlated with negative coping scores in the loss group but not in the controls. Overall, the results suggested a model that the impaired neural network communication of brain hubs within the default mode network (DMN) and central executive network (CEN) were associated with a negative coping style in older adults who lost their only child. The decreased connectivity of the hubs can be identified as a neural risk factor that is related to future psychopathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Years of life lost due to infectious diseases in Poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bryla

    Full Text Available An evaluation of mortality due to infectious diseases in Poland in 1999-2012 and an analysis of standard expected years of life lost due to the above diseases.The study material included a database created on the basis of 5,219,205 death certificates of Polish inhabitants, gathered between 1999 and 2012 and provided by the Central Statistical Office. Crude Death Rates (CDR, Standardized Death Rates (SDR and Standard Expected Years of Life Lost (SEYLL due to infectious and parasitic diseases were also evaluated in the study period as well as Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per living person (SEYLLp and Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per dead person (SEYLLd. Time trends were evaluated with the application of joinpoint models and an annual percentage change in their values.Death certificates report that 38,261 people died due to infectious diseases in Poland in the period 1999-2012, which made up 0.73% of the total number of deaths. SDR caused by these diseases decreased, particularly in the male group: Annual Percentage Change (APC = -1.05; 95% CI:-2.0 to -0.2; p<0.05. The most positive trends were observed in mortality caused by tuberculosis (A15-A19 (APC = -5.40; 95% CI:-6.3 to -4.5; p<0.05 and also meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and encephalomyelitis (G03-G04 (APC = -3.42; 95% CI:-4.7 to -2.1; p<0.05. The most negative mortality trends were observed for intestinal infectious diseases (A00-A09 Annual Average Percentage Change (AAPC = 7.3; 95% CI:3.1 to 11.7; p<0.05. SDR substantially decreased in the first half of the study period, but then significantly increased in the second half. Infectious and parasitic diseases contributed to a loss of around 37,000 standard expected years of life in 1999 and more than 28,000 in 2012. During the study period, the SEYLLp index decreased from 9.59 to 7.39 per 10,000 population and the SEYLLd index decreased from 14.26 to 10.34 years (AAPC = 2.3; 95% CI:-2,9 to -1.7; p<0.05.Despite smaller

  2. Feynman's lost lecture the motion of planet's around the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Goodstein, David L

    1997-01-01

    On 14 March 1964 Richard Feynman, one of the greatest scientific thinkers of the 20th Century, delivered a lecture entitled 'The Motion of the Planets Around the Sun'. For thirty years this remarkable lecture was believed to be lost. But now Feynman's work has been reconstructed and explained in meticulous, accessible detail, together with a history of ideas of the planets' motions. The result is a vital and absorbing account of one of the fundamental puzzles of science, and an invaluable insight into Feynman's charismatic brilliance.

  3. Remittances in the Republic of Moldova:Lost opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel CHISTRUGA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article covers the problem of the relationship between remittances and economic growth as well as the use of remittances for productive investment in order to contribute to long-run development. Also, there are given some stylized facts of remittances in the Republic of Moldova and their impact over the national economy. Because of its business and investment climate, because of its financial system and macroeconomic policies that were conducted, Moldova has lost almost all opportunities to benefit from remittances.

  4. Potential years lost and life expectancy in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granbichler, Claudia A; Zimmermann, Georg; Oberaigner, Willi; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Taylor, Alexandra; Luef, Gerhard; Bathke, Arne C; Trinka, Eugen

    2017-11-01

    Studies using relative measures, such as standardized mortality ratios, have shown that patients with epilepsy have an increased mortality. Reports on more direct and absolute measure such as life expectancy are sparse. We report potential years lost and how life expectancy has changed over 40 years in a cohort of patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. We analyzed life expectancy in a cohort of adult patients diagnosed with definite epilepsy between 1970 and 2010. Those with brain tumor as cause of epilepsy were excluded. By retrospective probabilistic record linkage, living or death status was derived from the national death registry. We estimated life expectancy by a Weibull regression model using gender, age at diagnosis, epilepsy etiology, and year of diagnosis as covariates at time of epilepsy diagnosis, and 5, 10, 15, and 20 years after diagnosis. Results were compared to the general population, and 95% confidence intervals are given. There were 249 deaths (105 women, age at death 19.0-104.0 years) in 1,112 patients (11,978.4 person-years, 474 women, 638 men). A substantial decrease in life expectancy was observed for only a few subgroups, strongly depending on epilepsy etiology and time of diagnosis: time of life lost was highest in patients with symptomatic epilepsy diagnosed between 1970 and 1980; the impact declined with increasing time from diagnosis. Over half of the analyzed subgroups did not differ significantly from the general population. This effect was reversed in the later decades, and life expectancy was prolonged in some subgroups, reaching a maximum in those with newly diagnosed idiopathic and cryptogenic epilepsy between 2001 and 2010. Life expectancy is reduced in symptomatic epilepsies. However, in other subgroups, a prolonged life expectancy was found, which has not been reported previously. Reasons may be manifold and call for further study. © 2017 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International

  5. Ecological aspects of the use of lost foam patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Żółkiewicz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses some aspects of ecology in the use of lost foam patterns for piece production of large castings poured from ferrousalloys under the conditions of Metalodlew SA. Foundry. The technological processes used in the manufacture of castings are related with numerous hazards. Numerous problems requiring prompt solution occur also during the process of foundry mould pouring, to mention only various contaminants, air pollution, noise and other factors harmful to the human health and natural environment. Varioustechnological processes cause strenuous work conditions in foundry shops. Many of the publications that have appeared so far dealing withthe problems of environmental protection and hard work conditions in foundries [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9] discuss in both general anddetailed way problems related with various pollutants, noise and other factors harmful to the human health and natural environment,responsible for hazards faced by foundry workers. Studies carried out by various R&D centres are mainly focussed on the problem of howto reduce the harmful effect of technological processes on the environment through modification of the already existing or development of new ecological and energy-saving materials and technologies. This paper shows the opportunities and threats resulting from the application of the Lost Foam Process in a foundry, which up to now has been using a more traditional technology.

  6. Automated dose estimation for lost or damaged dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.L.; Deininger, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that some dosimetry vendors will compute doses for their customers' lost/damaged dosimeters based upon an average of recent dosimeter readings. However, the vendors usually require authorization from the customer for each such occurrence. Therefore, the tedious task of keeping track of the overdue status of each missing dosimeter and constantly notifying the vendor is still present. Also, depending on the monthly variability of a given person's doses, it may be more valid to use the employee's average dose, his/her highest dose over a recent period, an average dose of other employees with similar job duties for that period, or the maximum permissible dose. Thus, the task of estimating doses for lost/damaged dosimeters cannot be delegated to dosimetry vendor. Instead, the radiation safety department must sue the data supplied by the vendor as input for performing estimates. The process is performed automatically at the Medical Center Hospital of Vermont using a personal computer and a relational database

  7. Light's labour's lost - policies for energy-efficient lighting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    When William Shakepeare wrote Love's Labour's Lost he would have used light from tallow candles at a cost (today) of 12,000 British pounds per million-lumen hours. The same amount of light from electric lamps now costs only 2 pounds. But today's low-cost illumination still has a dark side. Globally, lighting consumes more electricity than is produced by either hydro or nuclear power and results in CO2 emissions equivalent to two thirds of the world's cars. A standard incandescent lamp may be much more efficient than a tallow candle, but it is far less efficient than a high-pressure sodium lamp. Were inefficient light sources to be replaced by the equivalent efficient ones, global lighting energy demand would be up to 40% less at a lower overall cost. Larger savings still could be realised through the intelligent use of controls, lighting levels and daylight. But achieving efficient lighting is not just a question of technology; it requires policies to transform current practice. This book documents the broad range of policy measures to stimulate efficient lighting that have already been implemented around the world and suggests new ways these could be strengthened to prevent light's labour's from being lost

  8. Measuring the societal burden of cancer: the cost of lost productivity due to premature cancer-related mortality in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Paul; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Sharp, Linda

    2015-02-15

    Every cancer-related death in someone of working age represents an economic loss to society. To inform priorities for cancer control, we estimated costs of lost productivity due to premature cancer-related mortality across Europe, for all cancers and by site, gender, region and country. Cancer deaths in 2008 were obtained from GLOBOCAN for 30 European countries across four regions. Costs were valued using the human capital approach. Years of productive life lost (YPLL) were computed by multiplying deaths between 15 and 64 years by working-life expectancy, then by country-, age- and gender-specific annual wages, corrected for workforce participation and unemployment. Lost productivity costs due to premature cancer-related mortality in Europe in 2008 were €75 billion. Male costs (€49 billion) were almost twice female costs (€26 billion). The most costly sites were lung (€17 billion; 23% of total costs), breast (€7 billion; 9%) and colorectum (€6 billion; 8%). Stomach cancer (in Southern and Central-Eastern Europe) and pancreatic cancer (in Northern and Western Europe) were also among the most costly sites. The average lost productivity cost per cancer death was €219,241. Melanoma had the highest cost per death (€312,798), followed by Hodgkin disease (€306,628) and brain and CNS cancer (€288,850). Premature mortality costs were 0.58% of 2008 European gross domestic product, highest in Central-Eastern Europe (0.81%) and lowest in Northern Europe (0.51%). Premature cancer-related mortality costs in Europe are significant. These results provide a novel perspective on the societal cancer burden and may be used to inform priority setting for cancer control. © 2014 UICC.

  9. Comparison of Lost Foam Casting of AM60B Alloy and A356 Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval; Nedkova, Teodora [Kaiser Aluminum

    2007-01-01

    The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings in order to compare the difference in castability between magnesium alloys and aluminum alloy using the lost foam casting process. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... setback at work, she lost interest in her job. She had problems getting to sleep and generally ... NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science Education : Resources for science educators Pillbox: How to identify ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... time in healthy people and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental ... the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

  12. 5 CFR 839.1003 - How will OPM compute the amount of lost earnings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... earnings? 839.1003 Section 839.1003 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED... ERRONEOUS RETIREMENT COVERAGE CORRECTIONS ACT Lost Earnings for Certain Make-up Contributions to the TSP § 839.1003 How will OPM compute the amount of lost earnings? (a) Lost earnings will generally be...

  13. The Two Lost-Work Statements and the Combined First- and Second-Law Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nevers, Noel; Seader, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The adoption and use of the lost-work concept has been strongly hindered by the existence in the literature of two different quantities which bear the name "lost work." These two different concepts are discussed, focusing on their similarities and differences. Also discussed are advantages of the lost-work approach over other approaches.…

  14. 21 CFR 1305.16 - Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222. 1305.16 Section... II CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES DEA Form 222 § 1305.16 Lost and stolen DEA Forms 222. (a) If a purchaser ascertains that an unfilled DEA Form 222 has been lost, he or she must execute another in triplicate and...

  15. Mother tongue lost while second language intact: insights into aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ana M; Egido, Jose A; Barquero, Maria Sagrario

    2010-01-01

    Cortical representations of the native language and a second language may have different anatomical distribution. The relationships between the phonologic and orthographic forms of words continue to be debated. We present a bilingual patient whose competence in his mother tongue was disrupted following brain ischaemia. Semantic units were accessible only as isolated letters in written as well as oral language presentation. His second language appeared completely unaffected. Whole word system disturbance of both orthography and phonology pathways of the native language could explain this presentation. It is a great opportunity to learn about the language neural network when a bilingual subject presents with brain ischaemia.

  16. Advanced lost foam casting technology. 1995 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C.E.; Littleton, H.E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B.A.; Sheldon, D.S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production; Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency; Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects; Task 4: Pattern Gating; and Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers. This report summarizes the work done in the past two years and the conclusions drawn from the work.

  17. Challenges in lost foam casting of AZ91 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bichler, L.; Ravindran, C.; Machin, A. [Center for Near-net-shape Casting of Materials, Ryerson Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    There is an enhanced interest in magnesium alloy castings for automotive and aerospace applications, often with a view to replacing aluminum alloy castings. Lost foam casting (LFC) is a favored process mainly due to its near-net-shape capability. However, LFC of magnesium alloys poses unique challenge mainly because of the endothermic nature of the process, and hence the tendency of the magnesium alloy to 'freeze' before filling the pattern assembly. In this pioneering research, magnesium alloy AZ91-E was cast to study the effects of melt superheat, mold medium preheating, foam density and coating permeability on freezing range, mold filling and metal flow. Image analysis of microstructural features was carried out. (orig.)

  18. Advanced Lost Foam Casting technology: 1997 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--pyrolysis defects and sand distortion; Task 2--bronze casting technology; Task 3--steel casting technology; Task 4--sand filling and compaction; Task 5--coating technology; Task 6--precision pattern production; Task 7--computational modeling; and Task 8--project management and technology transfer. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all eight tasks in the period of October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1997.

  19. A foam ablation model for lost foam casting of aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barone, M.R.; Caulk, D.A. [General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI (United States)

    2005-09-01

    A model is developed for heat transfer, polymer vaporization, and gas diffusion at the interface between the advancing liquid metal and the receding foam pattern during mold filling in lost foam casting of aluminum. Most of the pattern interior decomposes by ablation, but the boundary cells decompose by a collapse mechanism, which creates an undercut in the pattern next to the coating. By regulating how much of the pattern coating is exposed to gas diffusion, the undercut controls the overall filling speed of the metal through the mold. Computed values for the foam decomposition energy from this model compare very well with experimental data on foam pyrolysis, and predicted filling speeds are consistent with observations in published experiments. In addition, the model explains several unusual observations about mold filling that until now have not been understood. (author)

  20. Status quo and development trend of lost foam casting technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zitian

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lost foam casting (LFC technology has been widely applied to cast iron and cast steel. However, the development of LFC for Al and Mg alloys was relatively slower than that for cast iron and cast steel. The application of LFC to Al and Mg alloys needs more effort, especially in China. In this paper, the development history of LFC is reviewed, and the application situations of LFC to Al and Mg alloys are mainly discussed. Meanwhile, the key problems of LFC for Al and Mg alloys are also pointed out. Finally, the prospects for LFC technology are discussed, and some special new LFC technologies are introduced for casting Al and Mg alloys. In future, the development trends of green LFC technology mainly focus on the special new LFC methods, metal material, coating, heat treatment, new foam materials as well as purification technology of tail gas, etc.

  1. A foam melting model for lost foam casting of aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulk, D.A. [Manufacturing Systems Research Laboratory, General Motors Research and Development Center, 30500 Mound Road, Warren, MI 48090-9055 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    In lost foam casting of aluminum the liquid metal normally decomposes the foam pattern by ablation. But sometimes polymer vapor bubbling through the liquid metal accumulates along an upward-facing flow front until it opens a finite gap between the liquid metal and the decomposing foam. This changes the foam decomposition mechanism along that front from direct ablation to melting. A mathematical model is formulated for heat conduction, convection, and radiation across the gap, coupled with the vaporization of the excess polymer liquid behind the metal front and the resulting buoyant movement of polymer vapor bubbles through the liquid metal. Both models are combined to obtain an analytical solution for one-dimensional bottom filling of a pattern with uniform thickness. The results from this solution not only compare well with available experimental data, but they also explain how part thickness, metal temperature, and pressure affect filling speeds in bottom-fill situations. (author)

  2. Response to The Lost Thing: Notes from a Secondary Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandie Mourão

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses students’ responses to the picturebook The Lost Thing (Tan, 2000 and its film (2010. It describes a small-scale project in a secondary school in Portugal, which involved 16-18 year-old students, learning English as a foreign language. Following a socio-constructivist approach to language learning and the basic tenets of reader response theory, discussion and an interpretative stance to meaning making were encouraged. The aim was to foster students’ appreciation of the visual during their interpretative discussions as well as developing their English language skills. This paper demonstrates how the picturebook in particular afforded the students with opportunities for language development through talk. It closes with notes on the implications of using picturebooks and their films in the classroom.

  3. The Ethics of Gender in Milton's Paradise Lost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra S. F. Erickson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Existe uma acirrada discussao entre os estudiosos do classico ingles Paradise Lost (John Milton, 1674 sobre o suposto misogenismo do autor. A maioria dos estudiosos, inclusive mulheres sustentam que náo. A analise da Eva Miltoniana apresentada abaixo deixa claro que náo so Milton de é fato misogenista, mas seu misogenismo vai alem da opiniáo comum de uma epoca que via a mulher como encarnaçáo do mal. Milton, atraves de sua Eva, justifica esta visáo da mulher, aprofundando e perpetuando com sua mitopoetica a visáo etica-teologica da mulher. Sua visáo, longe de ser "moderna ", representa a reafirmaçáo do ethos paternalistico da tradicáo judaico-cristá.

  4. Lost in Interpretation – Communicating Risk to the Public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meschenmoser, P.

    2016-01-01

    Communicating radiation incidents and emergencies to the public always has been challenging. No other type of emergency is related to such disproportional risk perception, so little public knowledge about the subject matter and so many contradicting expert analyses when it comes to public communications. The rise of social media and citizen journalism resulted in a dramatic acceleration of global communications and widespread misinformation. News does not break on television anymore but on Twitter, Facebook & Co. As a consequence, professional communicators not only have to take initiative considerably faster than in the past and deal with rumours. Their message has to be brief and on the point and is sometimes limited to just some 140 characters, the maximum length of a Tweet. More than ever it is essential to timely communicate in plain language and to clearly tell what needs to be done to be safe and to remain safe. Otherwise, the public will be lost in interpretation. (author)

  5. Blinded: Modern Art, Astronomy, and the Lost Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, G.

    2016-01-01

    For today's casual visual observer, the night sky has become lost. Pollution, light glare, and the constructed environment have created a blindness through which the night sky is only imperfectly seen, when seen at all. Can the night sky, then, still inspire art if it has become invisible? In this paper, I would like to explore the question of the inspiration of the night sky in the absence of direct observation. In particular, I suggest that the absence of the visual night sky has forced artists to consider the problems of representing an “invisible” subject from nature. The implications of this “invisible” sky are not just a matter of stylistic expression, but also of cultural interpretation.

  6. Lost in Interpretation – Communicating Risk to the Public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meschenmoser, P.

    2017-01-01

    Communicating radiation incidents and emergencies to the public always has been challenging. No other type of emergency is related to such disproportional risk perception, so little public knowledge about the subject matter and so many contradicting expert analyses when it comes to public communications. The rise of social media and citizen journalism resulted in a dramatic acceleration of global communications and widespread misinformation. News does not break on television anymore but on Twitter, Facebook & Co. As a consequence, professional communicators not only have to take initiative considerably faster than in the past and deal with rumours. Their message has to be brief and on the point and is sometimes limited to just some 140 characters, the maximum length of a Tweet. More than ever it is essential to timely communicate in plain language and to clearly tell what needs to be done to be safe and to remain safe. Otherwise, the public will be lost in interpretation. (author)

  7. Psychological distress in Ghana: associations with employment and lost productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, Maureen E; Sipsma, Heather L; Adhvaryu, Achyuta; Ofori-Atta, Angela; Jack, Helen; Udry, Christopher; Osei-Akoto, Isaac; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2013-03-07

    Mental health disorders account for 13% of the global burden of disease, a burden that low-income countries are generally ill-equipped to handle. Research evaluating the association between mental health and employment in low-income countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, is limited. We address this gap by examining the association between employment and psychological distress. We analyzed data from the Ghana Socioeconomic Panel Survey using logistic regression (N = 5,391 adults). In multivariable analysis, we estimated the association between employment status and psychological distress, adjusted for covariates. We calculated lost productivity from unemployment and from excess absence from work that respondents reported was because of their feelings of psychological distress. Approximately 21% of adults surveyed had moderate or severe psychological distress. Increased psychological distress was associated with increased odds of being unemployed. Men and women with moderate versus mild or no psychological distress had more than twice the odds of being unemployed. The association of severe versus mild or no distress with unemployment differed significantly by sex (P-value for interaction 0.004). Among men, the adjusted OR was 12.4 (95% CI: 7.2, 21.3), whereas the association was much smaller for women (adjusted OR = 3.8, 95% CI: 2.5, 6.0). Extrapolating these figures to the country, the lost productivity associated with moderate or severe distress translates to approximately 7% of the gross domestic product of Ghana. Psychological distress is strongly associated with unemployment in Ghana. The findings underscore the importance of addressing mental health issues, particularly in low-income countries.

  8. The transcription factor REST is lost in aggressive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Wagoner

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The function of the tumor suppressor RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST is lost in colon and small cell lung cancers and is known to induce anchorage-independent growth in human mammary epithelial cells. However, nothing is currently known about the role of this tumor suppressor in breast cancer. Here, we test the hypothesis that loss of REST function plays a role in breast cancer. To assay breast tumors for REST function, we developed a 24-gene signature composed of direct targets of the transcriptional repressor. Using the 24- gene signature, we identified a previously undefined RESTless breast tumor subtype. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we confirmed the aberrant expression of REST target genes in the REST-less tumors, including neuronal gene targets of REST that are normally not expressed outside the nervous system. Examination of REST mRNA identified a truncated splice variant of REST present in the REST-less tumor population, but not other tumors. Histological analysis of 182 outcome-associated breast tumor tissues also identified a subpopulation of tumors that lack full-length, functional REST and over-express the neuroendocrine marker and REST target gene Chromogranin A. Importantly, patients whose tumors were found to be REST-less using either the 24-gene signature or histology had significantly poorer prognosis and were more than twice as likely to undergo disease recurrence within the first 3 years after diagnosis. We show here that REST function is lost in breast cancer, at least in part via an alternative splicing mechanism. Patients with REST-less breast cancer undergo significantly more early disease recurrence than those with fully functional REST, regardless of estrogen receptor or HER2 status. Importantly, REST status may serve as a predictor of poor prognosis, helping to untangle the heterogeneity inherent in disease course and response to treatment. Additionally, the alternative splicing observed in REST

  9. Radionuclide brain scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Dayem, H.

    1992-01-01

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ''allied advances'' with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  10. How lost "passenger" ants find their way home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Mandyam V

    2018-03-01

    Animal navigation has fascinated biologists and engineers for centuries, and some of the most illuminating discoveries have come from the study of creatures with a brain no larger than a sesame seed. In an elegant recent study, Pfeiffer and Wittlinger (Science, 353, 1155-1157, 2016) have shown the means by which desert ants, carried from one nest to another by a relative, find their own way back home if they are accidentally dropped en route.

  11. Forgetting, reminding, and remembering: the retrieval of lost spatial memory.

    OpenAIRE

    Livia de Hoz; Stephen J Martin; Richard G M Morris

    2004-01-01

    Retrograde amnesia can occur after brain damage because this disrupts sites of storage, interrupts memory consolidation, or interferes with memory retrieval. While the retrieval failure account has been considered in several animal studies, recent work has focused mainly on memory consolidation, and the neural mechanisms responsible for reactivating memory from stored traces remain poorly understood. We now describe a new retrieval phenomenon in which rats' memory for a spatial location in a ...

  12. Ecosystem of silicon utilizing organisms in the lost world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.

    2010-12-01

    It was Charles Darwin who first conceived the idea of “the Lost World” which spanned more than 80% of Earth History. This is about the rocks of the Precambrian period, in which Charles Darwin did not find any fossils during his study in 1859. Although Logan’s Foraminosphere and The Cyanosphere were the proposed concepts of the possible Precambrian life, however, these studies were flawed with non-biological artifacts, post-depositional contamination etc. Although now scientists believe the ‘hydrothermal cradle for life’ following the important studies in deep-sea vents, this is still a hypothetic view. All important experiments on the origin of life which were done with a reducing atmosphere, were also not correct. Scientists recently opined that probably life originated as silicon utilizing coacervates spontaneously in cosmos, and are transferred on the Earth in the Precambrian. These silicon utilizing coacervates could originate spontaneously in the Interstellar Medium (ISM) dust particles containing silicates with carbon, many organic molecules, and with mantles of ices. Thus ultraviolet ray from molecular hydrogen after collision excitation by electrons produced by cosmic-ray ionization may initiate seeds of life with formation of silicon utilizing coacervates; which are then scattered throughout the Universe. Similarly they can also originate in the GMCs, which have the clouds of dust and gases. These were also probably the last common ancestor (LCA) of all living creatures on the Earth. They are also still entering the surface of the Earth in small numbers during volcanic eruptions, blue lightning etc., but are quickly lost in the thickly inhabited Earth surface with ~ 1,00,000 diversified earthly species. These coacervates showed a direct correlation with non-cultivable spherical clusters found in the stratosphere, and the unknown spheroid bodies in microfossils ( ~ 3,200 Ma to >3,700 Ma) recovered in Australia, Africa and in Greenland. Both

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ... of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that causes the gene ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in ... obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form a ...

  16. Brain Basics

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  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in mental illnesses. Scientists have already begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy ... Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict who ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

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    Full Text Available ... and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ... people and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues ...

  3. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thin tissues covering the brain. This type of hemorrhagic stroke is called a subarachnoid hemorrhage. A ruptured aneurysm quickly becomes life-threatening and requires prompt medical treatment. Most brain aneurysms, however, don't rupture, create ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... their final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons ...

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    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

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    Full Text Available ... technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's ... resonance imaging (MRI) mdash;An imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's ...

  7. Brain Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Reviews significant findings of recent brain research, including the concept of five minds: automatic, subconscious, practical, creative, and spiritual. Suggests approaches to training the brain that are related to this hierarchy of thinking. (JOW)

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. Some people who develop a mental illness may recover completely; ... how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Evidence shows that they can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the ... brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain can lead to mental disorders, ...

  11. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... Barnett J, Mohanty A, Desai SK, Patterson JT. Neurosurgery. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

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    Full Text Available ... the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in ... occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, such as ...

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    Full Text Available ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues ...

  15. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain ... the normal brain's structure develops and matures helps scientists understand what goes wrong in mental illnesses. Scientists ...

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  6. Brain Basics

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  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  8. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Through research, we know that mental disorders are brain disorders. Evidence shows that they can be related to ... work with each other How changes in the brain can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the ...

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of lost foam cast 356 alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-gui Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure and mechanical properties of lost foam cast aluminum alloys have been investigated in both primary A356 (0.13% Fe and secondary 356 (0.47%. As expected, secondary 356 shows much higher content of Fe-rich intermetallic phases, and in particular the porosity in comparison with primary A356. The average area percent and size (length of Fe-rich intermetallics change from about 0.5% and 6 祄 in A356 to 2% and 25 祄 in 356 alloy. The average area percent and maximum size of porosity also increase from about 0.4% and 420 祄 to 1.4% and 600 祄, respectively. As a result, tensile ductility decreases about 60% and ultimate tensile strength declines about 8%. Lower fatigue strength was also experienced in the secondary 356 alloy. Low cycle fatigue (LCF strength decreased from 187 MPa in A356 to 159 MPa in 356 and high cycle fatigue (HCF strength also declined slightly from 68 MPa to 64 MPa.

  11. Years of potential life lost due to motorcycle accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Emília Cavalcante Valença Fernandes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traffic accidents represent a serious public health problem, because they kill approximately 1.24 million persons annually, and leave another 20 to 50 million with non-fatal lesions and traumatisms worldwide. In Brazil, in the year 2011, motorcyclists alone were responsible for one third of these deaths. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the years of potential life lost due to motorcycle accidents, according to sex and age group, and analyze the trend of the indicator for the state of Pernambuco in the period from 2005 to 2014. Methods and Results an ecological study based on data from the System of Information about Mortality was used. The indicator and rate were calculated by using the age limit of 70 years. The linear regression model and Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used, at the level of significance of 5% and confidence of 95%. The most affected sex and age-range were men between 20-29 years of age. The rates followed a trend of growth in both sexes, in the young population with the exception of those from 10 to 19 years of age. Conclusions: This context points out the magnitude and precociousness of motorcycle accidents in both sexes and the young population.

  12. Lost Productivity in Stroke Survivors: An Econometrics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manav V; Hackam, Daniel G; Silver, Frank L; Laporte, Audrey; Kapral, Moira K

    2016-01-01

    Stroke leads to a substantial societal economic burden. Loss of productivity among stroke survivors is a significant contributor to the indirect costs associated with stroke. We aimed to characterize productivity and factors associated with employability in stroke survivors. We used the Canadian Community Health Survey 2011-2012 to identify stroke survivors and employment status. We used multivariable logistic models to determine the impact of stroke on employment and on factors associated with employability, and used Heckman models to estimate the effect of stroke on productivity (number of hours worked/week and hourly wages). We included data from 91,633 respondents between 18 and 70 years and identified 923 (1%) stroke survivors. Stroke survivors were less likely to be employed (adjusted OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.33-0.46) and had hourly wages 17.5% (95% CI 7.7-23.7) lower compared to the general population, although there was no association between work hours and being a stroke survivor. We found that factors like older age, not being married, and having medical comorbidities were associated with lower odds of employment in stroke survivors in our sample. Stroke survivors are less likely to be employed and they earn a lower hourly wage than the general population. Interventions such as dedicated vocational rehabilitation and policies targeting return to work could be considered to address this lost productivity among stroke survivors. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Social class of origin, lost potential, and hopelessness in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewine, Richard R J

    2005-07-15

    Among schizophrenia patients, young (under 35 years of age), men within the first 5 years of illness onset are a particularly vulnerable group for suicide. It has been hypothesized that suicide in this group is related to the experience of the loss of functioning from pre- to post-morbid state and/or to the discrepancy between high expectations and actual achievements. The purpose of this study is to initiate the deconstruction of the sociocultural context of family of origin among schizophrenia patients as a means of better understanding "lost potential" and its relationship to indices of suicide risk such as hopelessness. Eighteen young, White, unemployed male schizophrenia patients were asked to indicate what job they thought they would have before the onset of schizophrenia and completed depression and hopelessness questionnaires. The results suggest that job expectation was significantly positively correlated with socioeconomic status of family of origin and patients' depression and hopelessness. The theoretical and treatment (especially with respect to vocational services) implications are discussed. Finally, this study formally introduces the concept that "advantaged" socioeconomic status may confer paradoxical disadvantage in coping with the vocational losses consequent to schizophrenia.

  14. Estimation of diver survival time in a lost bell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipton, M.J.; Franks, C. [Surrey Univ., Guildford (United Kingdom); Meneilly, G.S. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Medicine; Mekjavic, I.B. [Simon Fraser University, Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Kinesiology

    1997-04-01

    Mathematical models of the human thermoregulatory system have been used to make predictions of the likely survival of divers in a ``lost bell`` who can be exposed to very low ambient temperatures. The circumstances considered are not the most extreme but those where, partly by shivering, the individual can re-enter thermal balance. The ability accurately to predict the level and duration of metabolic heat production is critical for the estimation of survival time under these conditions. Limitations on the accuracy of current models arise from the lack of precision in modelling the intensity and duration of the metabolic (shivering) response. A different basis for predicting shivering endurance using the time to hypogylcaemia (blood glucose level less than 2.5 mmol/1) is proposed. This leads to predicted survival times ranging from 10 to over 24 hours for those individuals able to stabilise deep body temperature. This seems to be more consistent with the limited experimental data which exists than the 8-9 hours predicted by other models. In order to help maintain blood sugar levels, and hence metabolic heat production, it is recommended that emergency rations within bells should provide 500g of carbohydrate a day. (59 figures; 221 references). (UK)

  15. Novel technologies for the lost foam casting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenming; Fan, Zitian

    2018-03-01

    Lost foam casting (LFC) is a green precision casting process categorized as a near net forming technology. Yet, despite its popularity, it still suffers from some technological problems, such as poor filling ability of the castings, coarse and non-dense microstructure, low mechanical properties for the Al and Mg LFC processes, and defective carburization for the low carbon steel LFC process. These drawbacks restrict the development and widespread application of the LFC process. To solve these problems, the present study developed several novel LFC technologies, namely, LFC technologies under vacuum and low pressure, vibration solidification, and pressure solidification conditions; expendable shell casting technology; and preparation technology of bimetallic castings based on the LFC process. The results showed that the LFC under vacuum and low pressure evidently improved the filling ability and solved the oxidization problem of the alloys, which is suitable for producing complex and thinwall castings. The vibration and pressure solidifications increased the compactness of the castings and refined the microstructure, significantly improving the mechanical properties of the castings. The expendable shell casting technology could solve the pore, carburization, and inclusion defects of the traditional LFC method, obtaining castings with acceptable surface quality. Moreover, the Al/Mg and Al/Al bimetallic castings with acceptable metallurgical bonding were successfully fabricated using the LFC process. These proposed novel LFC technologies can solve the current technological issues and promote the technological progress of the LFC process.

  16. Who cares? The lost legacy of Archie Cochrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askheim, Clemet; Sandset, Tony; Engebretsen, Eivind

    2017-03-01

    Over the last 20 years, the evidence-based medicine (EBM) movement has sought to develop standardised approaches to patient treatment by drawing on research results from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The Cochrane Collaboration and its eponym, Archie Cochrane, have become symbols of this development, and Cochrane's book Effectiveness and Efficiency from 1972 is often referred to as the first sketch of what was to become EBM. In this article, we claim that this construction of EBM's historical roots is based on a selective reading of Cochrane's text. Through a close reading of this text, we show that the principal aim of modern EBM, namely to warrant clinical decisions based on evidence drawn from RCTs, is not part of Cochrane's original project. He had more modest ambitions for what RCTs can accomplish, and, more importantly, he was more concerned with care and equality than are his followers in the EBM movement. We try to reconstruct some of Cochrane's lost legacy and to articulate some of the important silences in Effectiveness and Efficiency From these clues it might be possible, we argue, to remodel EBM in a broader, more pluralistic, more democratic and less authoritarian manner. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Big Bang Day : Afternoon Play - Torchwood: Lost Souls

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Martha Jones, ex-time traveller and now working as a doctor for a UN task force, has been called to CERN where they're about to activate the Large Hadron Collider. Once activated, the Collider will fire beams of protons together recreating conditions a billionth of a second after the Big Bang - and potentially allowing the human race a greater insight into what the Universe is made of. But so much could go wrong - it could open a gateway to a parallel dimension, or create a black hole - and now voices from the past are calling out to people and scientists have started to disappear... Where have the missing scientists gone? What is the secret of the glowing man? What is lurking in the underground tunnel? And do the dead ever really stay dead? Lost Souls is a spin-off from the award-winning BBC Wales TV production Torchwood. It stars John Barrowman, Freema Agyeman, Eve Myles, Gareth David-Lloyd, Lucy Montgomery (of Titty Bang Bang) and Stephen Critchlow.

  18. The Brains Behind the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Marcia

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with five neuroscientists--Martin Diamond, Pat Wolfe, Robert Sylwester, Geoffrey Caine, and Eric Jensen--disclose brain-research findings of practical interest to educators. Topics include brain physiology, environmental enrichment, memorization, windows of learning opportunity, brain learning capacity, attention span, student interest,…

  19. 29 CFR 779.251 - Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity. 779.251... Coverage Interstate Inflow Test Under Prior Act § 779.251 Goods that have lost their out-of-State identity... been processed or manufactured so as to have lost their identity as out-of-State goods before they are...

  20. Is the `Lost World' really lost? Palaeoecological insights into the origin of the peculiar flora of the Guayana Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rull, Valentí

    The peculiar biogeography of the so-called `Lost World', i.e. the summits of sandstone tableaux (tepuis) in the Neotropical Guyana region of Venezuela, has generated a debate regarding the factors that are thought to account for modern vegetation patterns in the region. Some argue that plant communities on these high-elevation summits reflect a long history of evolution in isolation, while others surmise that there has been substantial biotic interchange with the surrounding lowlands during glacial times. Until now, these apparently competing hypotheses have not been tested using palaeoecological methods. I used pollen analysis of Quaternary sediments and documented past vertical migrations of vegetation in response to climate changes, which supports the second hypothesis. Physiographical analysis, however, shows that about half the tableaux summits are too high for their flora to have reached the lowlands during the last glaciation, suggesting that a portion of the tableaux vegetation has always experienced some degree of biotic isolation. Thus, a component of the summit vegetation evolved in isolation, whereas other taxa experienced interchange, as reflected in endemism patterns among the tableaux summits. Biogeographical patterns on the summits are the result of complex evolutionary processes. The two hypotheses invoked to explain the vegetation patterns are not mutually exclusive, but instead complement one another.

  1. Space Radar Image of the Lost City of Ubar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of the region around the site of the lost city of Ubar in southern Oman, on the Arabian Peninsula. The ancient city was discovered in 1992 with the aid of remote sensing data. Archeologists believe Ubar existed from about 2800 B.C. to about 300 A.D. and was a remote desert outpost where caravans were assembled for the transport of frankincense across the desert. This image was acquired on orbit 65 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 13, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The SIR-C image shown is centered at 18.4 degrees north latitude and 53.6 degrees east longitude. The image covers an area about 50 by 100 kilometers (31 miles by 62 miles). The image is constructed from three of the available SIR-C channels and displays L-band, HH (horizontal transmit and receive) data as red, C-band HH as blue, and L-band HV (horizontal transmit, vertical receive) as green. The prominent magenta colored area is a region of large sand dunes, which are bright reflectors at both L-and C-band. The prominent green areas (L-HV) are rough limestone rocks, which form a rocky desert floor. A major wadi, or dry stream bed, runs across the middle of the image and is shown largely in white due to strong radar scattering in all channels displayed (L and C HH, L-HV). The actual site of the fortress of the lost city of Ubar, currently under excavation, is near the Wadi close to the center of the image. The fortress is too small to be detected in this image. However, tracks leading to the site, and surrounding tracks, appear as prominent, but diffuse, reddish streaks. These tracks have been used in modern times, but field investigations show many of these tracks were in use in ancient times as well. Mapping of these tracks on regional remote sensing images was a key to recognizing the site as Ubar in 1992. This image, and ongoing field investigations, will help shed light on a little known early civilization. Spaceborne

  2. Training and replacing a 'lost generation' of uranium professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalmers, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    It wasn't long ago, actually only a few years ago, when uranium companies and skilled uranium professionals receive little attention and limited interest from other sections of the mining and resource industries. Actually, there were many uranium professionals, whom in some cases, spent over a decade unwinding their CV's to limit the emphasis on uranium exploration and development from the past. Actually, when the bottom fell out of the uranium industry in the late 70's and early 80's there were literally tens of thousands of professionals internationally that were in a major regroup with their careers to get back into mining proper without the uranium connection and believe me, that wasn't always easy. As in most cases, there was no or limited places for uranium professionals wanting to stay in the industry and consequently, virtually all were forced to leave the sector. Who could have predicted that, after nearly 25 years of limited international investment and significant interest in new uranium exploration and development, that the price for yellowcake today would be in excess of US$100/pound? Concerns over energy security and global warming on top of the all-time high uranium price have really come together to make a true uranium renaissance. A renaissance which looks sounder and more sustainable than ever before. So, how is the industry facing a chronic shortage of experience and the huge task of training a multidisciplinary professional workforce going to cope? Effectively there is a 'lost generation' of professionals and very few people available or knowledgeable enough to train those new to the industry. This is a unique problem in the industry and likely more chronic than the other mining sectors, as typically the economic cycles are seven or eight years, not 25 years as has been seen with uranium

  3. Acromegalic patients lost to follow-up: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuki, Leandro; Marques, Nelma Verônica; Nuez, Maria José Braga La; Leal, Vera Lucia Gomes; Chinen, Renata N; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 50 % of all acromegalic patients will require lifelong medical treatment to normalize mortality rates and reduce morbidity. Thus, adherence to therapy is essential to achieve treatment goals. To date, no study has evaluated the frequency and reasons for loss to follow-up in the acromegalic population. The current study aimed at evaluating the frequency of acromegalic patient loss to follow-up in three reference centers and the reasons responsible for their low compliance with treatment. All of the files for the acromegalic patients in the three centers were reviewed. Those patients, who had not followed up with the hospital for more than a year, were contacted via phone and/or mail and invited to participate. Patients who agreed to participate were interviewed, and blood samples were collected. A total of 239 files were reviewed; from these 42 patients (17.6 %) were identified who were lost to follow-up. It was possible to contact 27 of these patients, 10 of whom did not attend the appointments for more than one time and 17 of whom agreed to participate in the study. Fifteen of these 17 patients had active disease (88.2 %), and all of the patients restarted treatment in the original centers. The main reason for loss to follow-up was an absence of symptoms. High-quality follow-up is important in acromegaly to successfully achieve the aims of the treatment. An active search for patients may allow the resumption of treatment in a significant proportion of these cases, contributing to reduced morbidity and mortality in this patient population.

  4. Lost-Wax Casting in Ancient China: New Discussion on Old Debates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weirong; Huang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The possible use of lost-wax casting in China has long been a matter of controversy. Based on the study of pertinent ancient texts concerning the technical origins of lost-wax casting in China, direct examination of questioned ancient Chinese bronzes as well as definite lost-wax castings from both overseas and China, and modern production of objects using piece-mold casting, the authors point out their own conceptual ideas about ancient lost-wax casting as follows. First, the lost-wax casting technique does not have its earliest origins in ancient China but rather from the Sumerians in Mesopotamia, where it was predominantly used to cast small human and animal figures (statuettes). Next, some essential characteristics of the lost-wax casting technique can be identified from the point of view of a distortable soft starting model. The locally deformed shape of lost-wax castings is found to be variable. Finally, it is improper to consider the ease of extraction from the mold as the criterion for distinguishing lost-wax casting from piece-mold casting. It is therefore incorrect to conclude that the three-dimensional openwork decorations present on Chinese bronzes from the Spring and Autumn Period, and the Warring States Period, are fabricated using lost-wax castings.

  5. 77 FR 21152 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel LOST SOUL; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... SOUL; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY: Maritime Administration, Department of Transportation... the intended service of the vessel LOST SOUL is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Pleasure charter...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... she lost interest in her job. She had problems getting to sleep and generally felt tired, listless, and had no ... executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as ... and sleep. synapse —The tiny gap between neurons, where nerve ...

  7. Exploring "Lost Childhood": A Study of the Narratives of Palestinians Who Grew Up during the First Intifada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netland, Marit

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of life narratives of 20 West Bank Palestinians who grew up during First Intifada revealed an experience of having "lost childhood'. This experience included various aspects categorized into "lost child-friendliness" and "lost childlikeness". Participants attributed their sense of lost childhood to having grown up…

  8. An AP Calculus Classroom Amusement Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the school year, AP Calculus teachers strive to teach course content comprehensively and swiftly in an effort to finish all required material before the AP Calculus exam. As early May approaches and the AP Calculus test looms, students and teachers nervously complete lessons, assignments, and assessments to ensure student preparation.…

  9. The man that lost (part of) his mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Finlay; Vahidassr, Djamil

    2018-02-27

    An 84-year-old man presented to the emergency department following recurrent falls over several weeks and onset of new left-sided weakness. CT of the brain revealed a large air cavity (pneumatocoele) in the right frontal lobe thought to be secondary to an ethmoidal osteoma communicating through the cribriform plate allowing air to be forced into the skull under pressure. Subsequent MRI confirmed these findings and also revealed a small focal area of acute infarction in the adjacent corpus callosum. The patient had a prolonged hospital stay, declined neurosurgical intervention and was discharged home on secondary stroke prevention. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common neurotransmitter, glutamate has many roles throughout the brain and nervous ...

  12. 29 CFR 779.250 - Goods that have not lost their out-of-State identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Goods that have not lost their out-of-State identity. 779...-State identity. Goods which are purchased or received by the enterprise from within the State will be... and have not lost their identity as out-of-State goods before they are purchased or received by the...

  13. Lignite Zone as an Indicator to Lost Circulation Belt: A Case Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    circulation and the occurrence of lignite. Lost circulation is loss of substantial quantities of drilling mud to an encountered formation during borehole drilling. This is evidenced by a total or ... of the bit, drilling fluid may be totally lost, hence increased cost of operation, time .... lithologic logs of the boreholes. When lignite occurs.

  14. 19 CFR 158.4 - Liability of carrier for lost or missing packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liability of carrier for lost or missing packages... EXPORTED Lost or Missing Packages and Deficiencies in Contents of Packages § 158.4 Liability of carrier for... forth in § 158.1 (a) or (b) resulting in the merchandise being “permitted,” the carrier shall be...

  15. Getting Lost Behavior in Patients with Mild Alzheimer’s Disease: A Cognitive and Anatomical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chathuri Yatawara

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundGetting lost behavior (GLB in the elderly is believed to involve poor top-down modulation of visuospatial processing, by impaired executive functions. However, since healthy elderly and elderly with Alzheimer’s disease (AD experience a different pattern of cognitive decline, it remains unclear whether this hypothesis can explain GLB in dementia.ObjectiveWe sought to identify whether poor executive functions and working memory modulate the relationship between visuospatial processing and prevalence of GLB in healthy elderly and patients with AD. Complementary to this, we explored whether brain regions critical for executive functions modulate the relationship between GLB and brain regions critical for visuospatial processing.MethodNinety-two participants with mild AD and 46 healthy age-matched controls underwent neuropsychological assessment and a structural MRI. GLB was assessed using a semistructured clinical interview. Path analysis was used to explore interactions between visuospatial deficits, executive dysfunction/working memory, and prevalence of GLB, in AD and controls independently.ResultsFor both healthy controls and patients with mild AD, visuospatial processing deficits were associated with GLB only in the presence of poor working memory. Anatomically, GLB was associated with medial temporal atrophy in patients with mild AD, which was not strengthened by low frontal gray matter (GM volume as predicted. Instead, medial temporal atrophy was more strongly related to GLB in patients with high frontal GM volumes. For controls, GLB was not associated with occipital, parietal, medial temporal, or frontal GM volume.ConclusionCognitively, a top-down modulation deficit may drive GLB in both healthy elderly and patients with mild AD. This modulation effect may be localized in the medial temporal lobe for patients with mild AD. Thus, anatomical substrates of GLB in mild AD may not follow the typical top-down modulation mechanisms

  16. Lost Muon Study for the Muon G-2 Experiment at Fermilab*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguly, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Crnkovic, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morse, W. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-05-19

    The Fermilab Muon g-2 Experiment has a goal of measuring the muon anomalous magnetic moment to a precision of 140 ppb - a fourfold improvement over the 540 ppb precision obtained by the BNL Muon g-2 Experiment. Some muons in the storage ring will interact with material and undergo bremsstrahlung, emitting radiation and loosing energy. These so called lost muons will curl in towards the center of the ring and be lost, but some of them will be detected by the calorimeters. A systematic error will arise if the lost muons have a different average spin phase than the stored muons. Algorithms are being developed to estimate the relative number of lost muons, so as to optimize the stored muon beam. This study presents initial testing of algorithms that can be used to estimate the lost muons by using either double or triple detection coincidences in the calorimeters.

  17. Estimation of lost circulation amount occurs during under balanced drilling using drilling data and neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouria Behnoud far

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lost circulation can cause an increase in time and cost of operation. Pipe sticking, formation damage and uncontrolled flow of oil and gas may be consequences of lost circulation. Dealing with this problem is a key factor to conduct a successful drilling operation. Estimation of lost circulation amount is necessary to find a solution. Lost circulation is influenced by different parameters such as mud weight, pump pressure, depth etc. Mud weight, pump pressure and flow rate of mud should be designed to prevent induced fractures and have the least amount of lost circulation. Artificial neural network is useful to find the relations of parameters with lost circulation. Genetic algorithm is applied on the achieved relations to determine the optimum mud weight, pump pressure, and flow rate. In an Iranian oil field, daily drilling reports of wells which are drilled using UBD technique are studied. Asmari formation is the most important oil reservoir of the studied field and UBD is used only in this interval. Three wells with the most, moderate and without lost circulation are chosen. In this article, the effect of mud weight, depth, pump pressure and flow rate of pump on lost circulation in UBD of Asmari formation in one of the Southwest Iranian fields is studied using drilling data and artificial neural network. In addition, the amount of lost circulation is predicted precisely with respect to two of the studied parameters using the presented correlations and the optimum mud weight, pump pressure and flow rate are calculated to minimize the lost circulation amount.

  18. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Lost Foam Thin Wall - Feasibility of Producing Lost Foam Castings in Aluminum and Magnesium Based Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasoyinu, Yemi [CanmetMATERIALS; Griffin, John A. [University of Alabama - Birmingham

    2014-03-31

    With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, production of near-net shape components by lost foam casting will make significant inroad into the next-generation of engineering component designs. The lost foam casting process is a cost effective method for producing complex castings using an expandable polystyrene pattern and un-bonded sand. The use of un-bonded molding media in the lost foam process will impose less constraint on the solidifying casting, making hot tearing less prevalent. This is especially true in Al-Mg and Al-Cu alloy systems that are prone to hot tearing when poured in rigid molds partially due to their long freezing range. Some of the unique advantages of using the lost foam casting process are closer dimensional tolerance, higher casting yield, and the elimination of sand cores and binders. Most of the aluminum alloys poured using the lost foam process are based on the Al-Si system. Very limited research work has been performed with Al-Mg and Al-Cu type alloys. With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, and given the high-strength-to-weight-ratio of magnesium, significant weight savings can be achieved by casting thin-wall (≤ 3 mm) engineering components from both aluminum- and magnesium-base alloys.

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ... imaging (MRI) mdash;An imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation — ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response ... neurotransmitters) or electrical signals. amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which helps activate the fight-or-flight response ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... mental illnesses. Search the NIMH Website: Home Health & Education Mental Health Information Statistics Consumer Health Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at ... Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain ...

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    Full Text Available ... the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She ... containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ... increases neuronal activity, is involved in early brain development, and may ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... MSC 9663 Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 Follow Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Google Plus NIMH Newsletter NIMH RSS ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. ... brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse —An ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or MEG, can capture split-second ... Contact Us U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health USA.gov The National ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  10. Forgetting, reminding, and remembering: the retrieval of lost spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoz, Livia; Martin, Stephen J; Morris, Richard G M

    2004-08-01

    Retrograde amnesia can occur after brain damage because this disrupts sites of storage, interrupts memory consolidation, or interferes with memory retrieval. While the retrieval failure account has been considered in several animal studies, recent work has focused mainly on memory consolidation, and the neural mechanisms responsible for reactivating memory from stored traces remain poorly understood. We now describe a new retrieval phenomenon in which rats' memory for a spatial location in a watermaze was first weakened by partial lesions of the hippocampus to a level at which it could not be detected. The animals were then reminded by the provision of incomplete and potentially misleading information-an escape platform in a novel location. Paradoxically, both incorrect and correct place information reactivated dormant memory traces equally, such that the previously trained spatial memory was now expressed. It was also established that the reminding procedure could not itself generate new learning in either the original environment, or in a new training situation. The key finding is the development of a protocol that definitively distinguishes reminding from new place learning and thereby reveals that a failure of memory during watermaze testing can arise, at least in part, from a disruption of memory retrieval.

  11. Forgetting, reminding, and remembering: the retrieval of lost spatial memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia de Hoz

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Retrograde amnesia can occur after brain damage because this disrupts sites of storage, interrupts memory consolidation, or interferes with memory retrieval. While the retrieval failure account has been considered in several animal studies, recent work has focused mainly on memory consolidation, and the neural mechanisms responsible for reactivating memory from stored traces remain poorly understood. We now describe a new retrieval phenomenon in which rats' memory for a spatial location in a watermaze was first weakened by partial lesions of the hippocampus to a level at which it could not be detected. The animals were then reminded by the provision of incomplete and potentially misleading information-an escape platform in a novel location. Paradoxically, both incorrect and correct place information reactivated dormant memory traces equally, such that the previously trained spatial memory was now expressed. It was also established that the reminding procedure could not itself generate new learning in either the original environment, or in a new training situation. The key finding is the development of a protocol that definitively distinguishes reminding from new place learning and thereby reveals that a failure of memory during watermaze testing can arise, at least in part, from a disruption of memory retrieval.

  12. Spatial patterns of progressive brain volume loss after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Amy; de Simoni, Sara; Bourke, Niall; Patel, Maneesh C; Scott, Gregory; Sharp, David J

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury leads to significant loss of brain volume, which continues into the chronic stage. This can be sensitively measured using volumetric analysis of MRI. Here we: (i) investigated longitudinal patterns of brain atrophy; (ii) tested whether atrophy is greatest in sulcal cortical regions; and (iii) showed how atrophy could be used to power intervention trials aimed at slowing neurodegeneration. In 61 patients with moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (mean age = 41.55 years ± 12.77) and 32 healthy controls (mean age = 34.22 years ± 10.29), cross-sectional and longitudinal (1-year follow-up) brain structure was assessed using voxel-based morphometry on T1-weighted scans. Longitudinal brain volume changes were characterized using a novel neuroimaging analysis pipeline that generates a Jacobian determinant metric, reflecting spatial warping between baseline and follow-up scans. Jacobian determinant values were summarized regionally and compared with clinical and neuropsychological measures. Patients with traumatic brain injury showed lower grey and white matter volume in multiple brain regions compared to controls at baseline. Atrophy over 1 year was pronounced following traumatic brain injury. Patients with traumatic brain injury lost a mean (± standard deviation) of 1.55% ± 2.19 of grey matter volume per year, 1.49% ± 2.20 of white matter volume or 1.51% ± 1.60 of whole brain volume. Healthy controls lost 0.55% ± 1.13 of grey matter volume and gained 0.26% ± 1.11 of white matter volume; equating to a 0.22% ± 0.83 reduction in whole brain volume. Atrophy was greatest in white matter, where the majority (84%) of regions were affected. This effect was independent of and substantially greater than that of ageing. Increased atrophy was also seen in cortical sulci compared to gyri. There was no relationship between atrophy and time since injury or age at baseline. Atrophy rates were related to memory performance at the end of the

  13. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  14. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the ... a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... to produce a specific protein. Scientists believe epigenetics play a major role in mental disorders and the ... thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... another as chemical or electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the ... how she's responding to the treatment. She also begins regular talk therapy sessions with her psychiatrist. In ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common neurotransmitter, glutamate has many roles throughout the brain and nervous system. Glutamate is an excitatory transmitter: when it is ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... studied in mental health research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural " ... confront or escape from a dangerous situation. The amygdala also appears to be involved in learning to ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... environment; this all helps the cell maintain its balance with the environment. Synapses are tiny gaps between ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict who ... that regulates many functions, including mood, appetite, and sleep. synapse —The tiny gap between neurons, where nerve ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... specific protein. Scientists believe epigenetics play a major role in mental disorders and the effects of medications. ... feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of ... other. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) mdash;An imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... know that mental disorders are brain disorders. Evidence shows that they can be related to changes in ... functions, such as mood, appetite, and sleep. Research shows that people with depression often have lower than ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take ... slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare ... listless, and had no appetite most of the time. Weeks later, Sarah realized she was having trouble ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and information that the cell needs for growth, metabolism, and repair. Cytoplasm is the substance that fills ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ... brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in the ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... or "working" memory and in retrieving long-term memories. This area of the brain also helps to control the amygdala during stressful events. Some research shows that people who have PTSD or ADHD ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... Ann Wagner Named as National Autism Coordinator More General Health Information from NIH MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... Coordinator Twitter Chat on Seasonal Affective Disorder More General Health Information from NIH MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Funding Home Opportunities & Announcements Funding Strategy for Grants Application Process Managing Grants Clinical Research Training Small Business ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, and responds to ... brain's structure develops and matures helps scientists understand what goes wrong in mental illnesses. Scientists have already ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. ... and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it increases the chance that the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells ... for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... it increases the chance that the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells ... for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... each other How changes in the brain can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing ... understanding of genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and information that the cell needs for growth, metabolism, and repair. Cytoplasm is the substance that fills ... possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on neurons communicating with ...

  2. Brain Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contents/search. Accessed Aug. 14, 2017. Sports-related concussion. Merck Manual Professional Version http://www.merckmanuals.com/ ... injuries-poisoning/traumatic-brain-injury-tbi/sports-related-concussion. Accessed Aug. 14, 2017. Jan. 11, 2018 Original ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and Groups Strategic Plan Offices and Divisions Budget Careers at ... electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the outer layer of a ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and memory. anterior cingulate cortex —Is involved in ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and information that the cell needs for growth, metabolism, and repair. Cytoplasm is the substance that fills ... functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. Knowing ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare that ... that everyone gets "the blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using ... as many neurons working together form a circuit, many circuits working together ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, and responds ... via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC ... a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... fear, such as overcoming a fear of spiders. Studying how the amygdala helps create memories of fear ... her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's ... as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone or together in complex ways, to change ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on neurons communicating with ... axon, most neurons release a chemical message (a neurotransmitter) which crosses the synapse and binds to receptors ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ... how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... deciding her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred ... helpful, but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... embryo. As the cells grow and differentiate, neurons travel from a central "birthplace" to their final destination. ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... amount of serotonin in the brain and help reduce symptoms of depression. Sarah also has several follow- ... Knowing who might respond to such medications could reduce the amount of trial and error and frustration ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... stay focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... bind onto, leading to more normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the ... reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... doctor that she had experienced long periods of deep sadness throughout her teenage years, but had never ... the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... heart rate to responding when we sense a mistake, helping us feel motivated and stay focused on ... peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for mental disorders. ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... cell. Axons can range in length from a fraction of an inch to several feet. Each neuron ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... health research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" ... also appears to be involved in learning to fear an event, such as touching a hot stove, ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, such as ... medication used to treat depression. SSRIs boost the amount of serotonin in the brain and help reduce ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. Knowing how the ... as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control and memory. serotonin —A neurotransmitter ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, ... studies suggest that having too little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions ...

  13. Brain glutaminases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Javier; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Segura, Juan A; Matés, José M; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Alonso, Francisco J

    2010-05-01

    Glutaminase is considered as the main glutamate producer enzyme in brain. Consequently, the enzyme is essential for both glutamatergic and gabaergic transmissions. Glutamine-derived glutamate and ammonia, the products of glutaminase reaction, fulfill crucial roles in energy metabolism and in the biosynthesis of basic metabolites, such as GABA, proteins and glutathione. However, glutamate and ammonia are also hazardous compounds and danger lurks in their generation beyond normal physiological thresholds; hence, glutaminase activity must be carefully regulated in the mammalian brain. The differential distribution and regulation of glutaminase are key factors to modulate the metabolism of glutamate and glutamine in brain. The discovery of novel isoenzymes, protein interacting partners and subcellular localizations indicate new functions for brain glutaminase. In this short review, we summarize recent findings that point consistently towards glutaminase as a multifaceted protein able to perform different tasks. Finally, we will highlight the involvement of glutaminase in pathological states and its consideration as a potential therapeutic target.

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... people with depression often have lower than normal levels of serotonin. The types of medications most commonly ...

  15. Chemo Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chemo brain is a widely used term, it's misleading. It's unlikely that chemotherapy is the sole cause ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She ... body. dopamine —A neurotransmitter mainly involved in controlling movement, managing the release of various hormones, and aiding ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into ... factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ...

  19. 8 CFR 324.3 - Women, citizens of the United States at birth, who lost or are believed to have lost citizenship...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SPECIAL CLASSES OF PERSONS WHO MAY BE NATURALlZED: WOMEN WHO HAVE LOST UNITED STATES CITIZENSHIP BY MARRIAGE AND FORMER CITIZENS WHOSE NATURALIZATION IS AUTHORIZED BY PRlVATE LAW § 324.3 Women, citizens of... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Women, citizens of the United States at...

  20. Brain imaging and brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokoloff, L.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage

  1. Visibly marked and microchipped lost dogs have a higher chance to find their owners in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Vučinić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyse the demographic characteristics of lost and found dogs in Belgrade, Serbia. The demographic data concerning the 246 lost and 81 found dogs in the period of 5 consecutive years (January, 2009 to January 2014 was sampled and analysed from the data bases of four organizations for animal protection in Belgrade. The recovery rate of lost dogs and the chance to be reunited again with their owners was 33%. The highest recovery rate was estimated in the category of lost dogs with visible marks such as tags or collars (30%.The chi-square test disclosed that besides dogs with special visible marks, significantly more females, light colour coated, friendly/sociable and neutered dogs were reunited with their owners (P<0.0001.

  2. Ductile cast iron obtaining by Inmold method with use of LOST FOAM process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pacyniak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of manufacturing of ductile cast iron castings by Inmold method with use of LOST FOAM process was presented in this work. The spheroidization was carried out by magnesium master alloy in amounts of 1% casting mass. Nodulizer was located in the reactive chamber in the gating system made of foamed polystyrene. Pretests showed, that there are technical possibilities of manufacturing of casts from ductile cast iron in the LOST FOAM process with use of spheroidization in mould.

  3. The impact of temperature on years of life lost in Brisbane, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cunrui; Barnett, Adrian G.; Wang, Xiaoming; Tong, Shilu

    2012-04-01

    Temperature is an important determinant of health. A better knowledge of how temperature affects population health is important not only to the scientific community, but also to the decision-makers who develop and implement early warning systems and intervention strategies to mitigate the health effects of extreme temperatures. The temperature-health relationship is also of growing interest as climate change is projected to shift the overall temperature distribution higher. Previous studies have examined the relative risks of temperature-related mortality, but the absolute measure of years of life lost is also useful as it combines the number of deaths with life expectancy. Here we use years of life lost to provide a novel measure of the impact of temperature on mortality in Brisbane, Australia. We also project the future temperature-related years of life lost attributable to climate change. We show that the association between temperature and years of life lost is U-shaped, with increased years of life lost for cold and hot temperatures. The temperature-related years of life lost will worsen greatly if future climate change goes beyond a 2°C increase and without any adaptation to higher temperatures. This study highlights that public health adaptation to climate change is necessary.

  4. [Comparative adaptation of crowns of selective laser melting and wax-lost-casting method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-qiang; Shen, Qing-yi; Gao, Jian-hua; Wu, Xue-ying; Chen, Li; Dai, Wen-an

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the marginal adaptation of crowns fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM) and wax-lost-casting method, so as to provide an experimental basis for clinic. Co-Cr alloy full crown were fabricated by SLM and wax-lost-casting for 24 samples in each group. All crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate cement and cut along longitudinal axis by line cutting machine. The gap between crown tissue surface and die was measured by 6-point measuring method with scanning electron microscope (SEM). The marginal adaptation of crowns fabricated by SLM and wax-lost-casting were compared statistically. The gap between SLM crowns were (36.51 ± 2.94), (49.36 ± 3.31), (56.48 ± 3.35), (42.20 ± 3.60) µm, and wax-lost-casting crowns were (68.86 ± 5.41), (58.86 ± 6.10), (70.62 ± 5.79), (69.90 ± 6.00) µm. There were significant difference between two groups (P < 0.05). Co-Cr alloy full crown fabricated by wax-lost-casting method and SLM method provide acceptable marginal adaptation in clinic, and the marginal adaptation of SLM is better than that of wax-lost-casting method.

  5. Brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feistel, H.

    1991-01-01

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Brain computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah N. Abdulkader

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface technology represents a highly growing field of research with application systems. Its contributions in medical fields range from prevention to neuronal rehabilitation for serious injuries. Mind reading and remote communication have their unique fingerprint in numerous fields such as educational, self-regulation, production, marketing, security as well as games and entertainment. It creates a mutual understanding between users and the surrounding systems. This paper shows the application areas that could benefit from brain waves in facilitating or achieving their goals. We also discuss major usability and technical challenges that face brain signals utilization in various components of BCI system. Different solutions that aim to limit and decrease their effects have also been reviewed.

  7. The monetary value of human lives lost due to neglected tropical diseases in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirigia, Joses Muthuri; Mburugu, Gitonga N

    2017-12-18

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are an important cause of death and disability in Africa. This study estimates the monetary value of human lives lost due to NTDs in the continent in 2015. The lost output or human capital approach was used to evaluate the years of life lost due to premature deaths from NTDs among 10 high/upper-middle-income (Group 1), 17 middle-income (Group 2) and 27 low-income (Group 3) countries in Africa. The future losses were discounted to their present values at a 3% discount rate. The model was re-analysed using 5% and 10% discount rates to assess the impact on the estimated total value of human lives lost. The estimated value of 67 860 human lives lost in 2015 due to NTDs was Int$ 5 112 472 607. Out of that, 14.6% was borne by Group 1, 57.7% by Group 2 and 27.7% by Group 3 countries. The mean value of human life lost per NTD death was Int$ 231 278, Int$ 109 771 and Int$ 37 489 for Group 1, Group 2 and Group 3 countries, respectively. The estimated value of human lives lost in 2015 due to NTDs was equivalent to 0.1% of the cumulative gross domestic product of the 53 continental African countries. Even though NTDs are not a major cause of death, they impact negatively on the productivity of those affected throughout their life-course. Thus, the case for investing in NTDs control should also be influenced by the value of NTD morbidity, availability of effective donated medicines, human rights arguments, and need to achieve the NTD-related target 3.3 of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3 (on health) by 2030.

  8. The man who lost his body: Suboptimal multisensory integration yields body awareness problems after a right temporoparietal brain tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Miranda; Van Stralen, Haike E; Van den Munckhof, Bart; Snijders, Tom J; Dijkerman, Hendrik Christiaan

    2018-03-12

    Reports on patients who lack ownership over their entire body are extremely rare. Here, we present patient SA who suffered from complete body disownership after a tumour resection in the right temporoparietal cortex. Neuropsychological assessment disclosed selective bilateral ownership problems, despite intact primary visual and somatosensory senses. SA's disownership seems to stem from a suboptimal multimodal integration, as shown by the rubber hand illusion and the beneficial effect during and after simple exercises aiming at multisensory recalibration. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Neuropsychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.

  9. [Life years lost and epidemiological transition in the Sfax region (Tunisia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsairi, M; Fekih, H; Fakhfakh, R; Kassis, M; Achour, N; Dammak, J

    2003-03-01

    To assess the burden of disease in the Sfax region and identify the main diseases that are the cause of lost life years due to premature death. The calculation of lost life years due to premature death was conducted using the demographic mortality data for the region obtained from the National Institute of Statistics combined with data on the classification of the causes of death collected through a survey on these causes conducted through a random sample taken from half of the deaths in the region. As described by Murray and Lopez, years of life lost as a result of premature death represent the difference between the age of death and an age corresponding to life expectancy falling between 65 and 85 years. Out of a total of 52,316 life years lost that were recorded 27,902 were in the male population and 24,414 in the female. The main diseases found in males which cause lost life years are accidents (24.9%), cardiovascular diseases (17.3%), communicable diseases (17%), respiratory diseases (10.8%), prenatal problems (59.5%), and cancer (7.5%). For women the main causes were cardiovascular diseases (26.5%), respiratory illness (15.5%), accidents (11.5%), communicable diseases (10.3%) and cancer (9.5%). These results marking the epidemiological transition in the region should serve to steer decision-makers to better rationalize and plan for health care costs and expenditure.

  10. Risk evaluation of lost-time injuries in the coal mining industry of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadoon, K.G.; Edwards, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Lost-time accidents frequently occur in underground coal mining, which result in a substantial amount of lost workdays. In order to evaluate injury risks for the underground mining industry in Pakistan, two years record of lost time accidents were collected and analysed. Risk indices were computed for different variables, such as cause of accidents; age and job of the injured person; place of accidents; and part of the body injured. These indices incorporate information that has not been used in traditional accident analysis. Fall of ground type accidents were the major cause followed by haulage and transport. More than 50 % of accidents occurred at or Near the working faces and coal cutters/ face workers were found to be at a higher risk as compared to all other job categories. Injuries to hand and foot for all group of workers were comparatively higher than those to all other parts of the body; Workers in the age group of (21-30) years were involved in the majority of the lost time accidents. Regular and systematic analysis of lost time accidents should be made which may be helpful in reducing the frequency and severity of these accidents. (author)

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ... NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science Education : Resources for science educators Pillbox: How to identify ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... ClinicalTrials.gov : Federally and privately supported research using human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... National Institutes of Health (NIH), a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Top

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive ... events. Some research shows that people who have PTSD or ADHD have reduced activity in their PFCs. ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such ... for growing, staying alive, and making new neurons. prefrontal cortex —A highly developed area at the front of ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... different roles, from controlling blood pressure and heart rate to responding when we sense a mistake, helping us feel motivated and stay focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this brain ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... to control the amygdala during stressful events. Some research shows that people who ... social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as mood, ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... common neurotransmitter in a person's body, which increases neuronal activity, is involved in early brain development, and ... rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... She continues taking SSRIs and has joined an online support group. Sharing her experiences with others also dealing with depression helps Sarah to better cope with her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help us talk, help us make sense of what we see, and help us to solve a problem. Some of the regions most commonly studied in mental health research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ... medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ... had experienced long periods of deep sadness throughout her teenage years, ...

  3. Smart Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1995-01-01

    New techniques have opened windows to the brain. Although the biochemistry of learning remains largely a mystery, the following findings seem to have clear implications for education: (1) the importance of early-learning opportunities for the very young; (2) the connection between music and abstract reasoning; and (3) the importance of good…

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... making it faster, easier, and more affordable to study genes. Scientists have found many different genes and groups of ... environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists to make ... Mental Health supports many studies on mental health and the brain. You can ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... helps create memories of fear and safety may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Join A Study News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About Us About Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... supports many studies on mental health and the brain. You can read about some of these studies online at www.nimh.nih.gov . Glossary action potential —Transmission of signal from the cell body to the ...

  8. Brain Fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relationship with your doctor(s): • Always report changes in cognition/memory and mood (depression, anxiety). • Make sure your physician ... joint pain. • Exercise regularly. Adequate physical exercise enhances cognition/memory. • Train the Brain! “If you don’t use ...

  9. Neurologic disorders, in-hospital deaths, and years of potential life lost in the USA, 1988-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Kelly, Michael L; Kshettry, Varun R; Weil, Robert J

    2014-11-01

    Premature mortality is a public health concern that can be quantified as years of potential life lost (YPLL). Studying premature mortality can help guide hospital initiatives and resource allocation. We investigated the categories of neurologic and neurosurgical conditions associated with in-hospital deaths that account for the highest YPLL and their trends over time. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), we calculated YPLL for patients hospitalized in the USA from 1988 to 2011. Hospitalizations were categorized by related neurologic principal diagnoses. An estimated 2,355,673 in-hospital deaths accounted for an estimated 25,598,566 YPLL. The traumatic brain injury (TBI) category accounted for the highest annual mean YPLL at 361,748 (33.9% of total neurologic YPLL). Intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral ischemia, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and anoxic brain damage completed the group of five diagnoses with the highest YPLL. TBI accounted for 12.1% of all inflation adjusted neurologic hospital charges and 22.4% of inflation adjusted charges among neurologic deaths. The in-hospital mortality rate has been stable or decreasing for all of these diagnoses except TBI, which rose from 5.1% in 1988 to 7.8% in 2011. Using YPLL, we provide a framework to compare the burden of premature in-hospital mortality on patients with neurologic disorders, which may prove useful for informing decisions related to allocation of health resources or research funding. Considering premature mortality alone, increased efforts should be focused on TBI, particularly in and related to the hospital setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Headaches Seizures Memory Depression Mood Swings & Cognitive Changes Fatigue Other Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us ...

  11. Anatomy of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us Our Founders Board ... Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning Donate to the ABTA Help ...

  12. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  13. Site restoration: Restoring Lost Lake, a Carolina bay at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, P.R.; Jackson, D.A.; Smith, T.O. III; Strawbridge, J.D.; Gladden, J.B.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Rogers, V.A.; Moorhead, K.K.

    1992-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC, is part of the U.S. Department of Energy complex for production of materials for U.S. Government defense activities. From 1958 to 1985 mixed wastes (wastes which are both hazardous and radioactive) generated by aluminum forming/metal finishing processes at SRS were discharged to a settling basin with overflow directed to an adjacent Carolina bay known as Lost Lake. Use of the basin system was discontinued in 1985, and physical closure in situ began in 1988. The project's Closure Plan required that Lost Lake be restored to a 'natural wetland system'. An on-site interdisciplinary team designed the restoration project to demonstrate the effectiveness of various levels of active remediation of Carolina bays as well as restoring Lost Lake. Closure was completed in August 1991, and the site will be maintained for at least 30 years. (author)

  14. A novel method for Al/SiC composite fabrication. Lost foam casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guler, Kerem A.; Kisasoz, Alptekin; Karaaslan, Ahmet [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, an innovative manufacturing approach to cast metal-matrix composite is proposed. Aluminum matrix composite production by lost foam casting has been investigated. In order to produce metal-matrix composite by lost foam casting, expanded polystyrene boards were designed as sandwich shaped and three layered. SiC particulates with 60 {mu}m average grain size were settled between the board layers, while A6063 and A413 aluminum alloys were used as matrix materials. The effect of the matrix materials on the mechanical properties of the composite specimens was investigated and fabricated specimens were characterized using image analysis, hardness tests, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results show that in the lost foam casting method, the hardness of the A6063 and the A413 materials specimens increases with SiC reinforcement up to 70% and 80%, respectively. (orig.)

  15. Paradise Lost: Difference between Adam and Eve’s Lament on Leaving Paradise - A Contrastive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Torres Servín

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The difference between Adam and Eve’s lament on leaving Paradise in Milton’s Paradise Lost is striking in its contrastive content and depth. This paper analyzes the difference that exists between the feelings and spiritual attitudes that Adam and Eve express on the occasion when they are informed by the angel Michael that they have to abandon the Garden of Eden. It is a comparison of their lament in order to understand the contrast of the two attitudes that Milton wove in the tapestry that Paradise Lost is. The paper also explores male and female roles in Paradise Lost and concludes that Adam and Eve are equal yet different, that difference being the cause of their contrastive ways of expressing their sorrow. Adam and Eve manifest two contrastive worldviews in opposition, one spiritual (heavenly, and the other material (earthly.

  16. Optimal Control of the Lost to Follow Up in a Tuberculosis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Emvudu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of optimal control for the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis (TB. A TB model that considers the existence of a new class (mainly in the African context is considered: the lost to follow up individuals. Based on the model formulated and studied in the work of Plaire Tchinda Mouofo, (2009, the TB control is formulated and solved as an optimal control theory problem using the Pontryagin's maximum principle (Pontryagin et al., 1992. This control strategy indicates how the control of the lost to follow up class can considerably influence the basic reproduction ratio so as to reduce the number of lost to follow up. Numerical results show the performance of the optimization strategy.

  17. Design, Development and Testing of a Drillable Straddle Packer for Lost Circulation Control in Geothermal Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabaldon, J.; Glowka, D.A.; Gronewald, P.; Knudsen, S.D.; Raymond, D.W.; Staller, G.E.; Westmoreland, J.J.; Whitlow, G.L.; Wise, J.L.; Wright, E.K.

    1999-04-01

    Lost Circulation is a widespread problem encountered when drilling geothermal wells, and often represents a substantial portion of the cost of drilling a well. The U.S. Department of Energy sponsors research and development work at Sandia National Laboratories in an effort to reduce these lost circulation expenditures. Sandia has developed a down hole tool that improves the effectiveness and reduces th cost of lost circulation cement treatment while drilling geothermal wells. This tool, the Drillable Straddle Packer, is a low-cost disposable device that is used to isolate the loss zone and emplace the cement treatment directly into the region of concern. This report documents the design and development of the Drillabe Straddle Packer, the laboratory and field test results, and the design package that is available to transfer this technology to industry users.

  18. A predictive scoring instrument for tuberculosis lost to follow-up outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment is troublesome, due to long therapy duration, quick therapeutic response which allows the patient to disregard about the rest of their treatment and the lack of motivation on behalf of the patient for improved. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system to predict the probability of lost to follow-up outcome in TB patients as a way to identify patients suitable for directly observed treatments (DOT) and other interventions to improve adherence. Methods Two prospective cohorts, were used to develop and validate a logistic regression model. A scoring system was constructed, based on the coefficients of factors associated with a lost to follow-up outcome. The probability of lost to follow-up outcome associated with each score was calculated. Predictions in both cohorts were tested using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC). Results The best model to predict lost to follow-up outcome included the following characteristics: immigration (1 point value), living alone (1 point) or in an institution (2 points), previous anti-TB treatment (2 points), poor patient understanding (2 points), intravenous drugs use (IDU) (4 points) or unknown IDU status (1 point). Scores of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 points were associated with a lost to follow-up probability of 2,2% 5,4% 9,9%, 16,4%, 15%, and 28%, respectively. The ROC curve for the validation group demonstrated a good fit (AUC: 0,67 [95% CI; 0,65-0,70]). Conclusion This model has a good capacity to predict a lost to follow-up outcome. Its use could help TB Programs to determine which patients are good candidates for DOT and other strategies to improve TB treatment adherence. PMID:22938040

  19. Location-based technologies for supporting elderly pedestrian in "getting lost" events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido Herrera, Edith

    2017-05-01

    Localization-based technologies promise to keep older adults with dementia safe and support them and their caregivers during getting lost events. This paper summarizes mainly technological contributions to support the target group in these events. Moreover, important aspects of the getting lost phenomenon such as its concept and ethical issues are also briefly addressed. Papers were selected from scientific databases and gray literature. Since the topic is still in its infancy, other terms were used to find contributions associated with getting lost e.g. wandering. Trends of applying localization systems were identified as personal locators, perimeter systems and assistance systems. The first system barely considered the older adult's opinion, while assistance systems may involve context awareness to improve the support for both the elderly and the caregiver. Since few studies report multidisciplinary work with a special focus on getting lost, there is not a strong evidence of the real efficiency of localization systems or guidelines to design systems for the target group. Further research about getting lost is required to obtain insights for developing customizable systems. Moreover, considering conditions of the older adult might increase the impact of developments that combine localization technologies and artificial intelligence techniques. Implications for Rehabilitation Whilst there is no cure for dementia such as Alzheimer's, it is feasible to take advantage of technological developments to somewhat diminish its negative impact. For instance, location-based systems may provide information to early diagnose the Alzheimer's disease by assessing navigational impairments of older adults. Assessing the latest supportive technologies and methodologies may provide insights to adopt strategies to properly manage getting lost events. More user-centered designs will provide appropriate assistance to older adults. Namely, customizable systems could assist older adults

  20. New neurons for injured brains? The emergence of new genetic model organisms to study brain regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Hernández, Ismael; Rhiner, Christa

    2015-09-01

    Neuronal circuits in the adult brain have long been viewed as static and stable. However, research in the past 20 years has shown that specialized regions of the adult brain, which harbor adult neural stem cells, continue to produce new neurons in a wide range of species. Brain plasticity is also observed after injury. Depending on the extent and permissive environment of neurogenic regions, different organisms show great variability in their capacity to replace lost neurons by endogenous neurogenesis. In Zebrafish and Drosophila, the formation of new neurons from progenitor cells in the adult brain was only discovered recently. Here, we compare properties of adult neural stem cells, their niches and regenerative responses from mammals to flies. Current models of brain injury have revealed that specific injury-induced genetic programs and comparison of neuronal fitness are implicated in brain repair. We highlight the potential of these recently implemented models of brain regeneration to identify novel regulators of stem cell activation and regenerative neurogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Telomerase lost?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, J. M.; Randall, T. A.; Čapková Frydrychová, Radmila

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 125, č. 1 (2016), s. 65-73 ISSN 0009-5915 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-07172S Grant - others:GA JU(CZ) 052/2013/P; GA JU(CZ) 038/2014/P; European Union Seventh Framework Programme(CZ) 316304 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : telomerase * DNA sequences * Bombyx mori Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.414, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00412-015-0528-7

  2. Conformality lost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, David B.; Lee, Jong-Wan; Son, Dam T.; Stephanov, Mikhail A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider zero-temperature transitions from conformal to nonconformal phases in quantum theories. We argue that there are three generic mechanisms for the loss of conformality in any number of dimensions: (i) fixed point goes to zero coupling, (ii) fixed point runs off to infinite coupling, or (iii) an IR fixed point annihilates with a UV fixed point and they both disappear into the complex plane. We give both relativistic and nonrelativistic examples of the last case in various dimensions and show that the critical behavior of the mass gap behaves similarly to the correlation length in the finite temperature Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition in two dimensions, ξ∼exp(c/|T-T c | 1/2 ). We speculate that the chiral phase transition in QCD at large number of fermion flavors belongs to this universality class, and attempt to identify the UV fixed point that annihilates with the Banks-Zaks fixed point at the lower end of the conformal window.

  3. Lost criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Egorovich Manoylov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians have been found to be inadequately aware of the structure of the causes of headache, vertigo, and their clinical importance in patients with essential hypertension. Incorrect ideas lead to the unfounded application of diagnostic techniques for imaging the great arteries of the head and to extremely simplified approaches to treating cerebrovascular diseases as short-term courses of therapy with vasoactive and metabolic agents.

  4. LOST FLIGHTCASE

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A big orange flight-case, of approximate dimensions H=1.5m x W=0.6m x D=0.7m, belonging to the San Francisco Exploratorium has disappeared from building 193 (AD power supplies). Anybody detaining information about it please contact Silvano de Gennaro or Django Manglunki . Many thanks in advance

  5. Lost foam casting of aluminum alloy-SiC{sub p} composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baalasuburamaniam, R.; Cvetnic, C.; Ravindran, C. [Ryerson Univ., Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Industrial Engineering, Centre for the Near-Net-Shape Processing of Materials, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: rbalasub@ryerson.ca; ccvetnic@ryerson.ca; rravindr@ryerson.ca

    2002-07-01

    Metal matrix composites are a viable alternative to cast irons in automotive components with possible increase in strength-to-weight ratio. Lost foam casting of aluminum alloy matrix composite containing 20 volume percent SiC was carried out at 690, 730, and 770{sup o}C with a view to determining the effects of cooling rate on microstructure, particle distribution, microporosity and mechanical properties. These results were compared with those for the matrix material cast under similar conditions. The results and the correlations are of particular interest as there is no published literature on lost foam casting of composite materials. (author)

  6. The M/M/1 queue with inventory, lost sale and general lead times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffari, Mohammad; Asmussen, Søren; Haji, Rasoul

    We consider an M/M/1 queueing system with inventory under the (r,Q) policy and with lost sales, in which demands occur according to a Poisson process and service times are exponentially distributed. All arriving customers during stockout are lost. We derive the stationary distributions of the joint...... queue length (number of customers in the system) and on-hand inventory when lead times are random variables and can take various distributions. The derived stationary distributions are used to formulate long-run average performance measures and cost functions in some numerical examples....

  7. Lost Opportunities in the Buildings Sector: Energy-Efficiency Analysis and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirks, James A.; Anderson, David M.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2008-09-12

    This report summarizes the results and the assumptions used in an analysis of the potential “lost efficiency opportunities” in the buildings sector. These targets of opportunity are those end-uses, applications, practices, and portions of the buildings market which are not currently being addressed, or addressed fully, by the Building Technologies Program (BTP) due to lack of resources. The lost opportunities, while a significant increase in effort and impact in the buildings sector, still represent only a small portion of the full technical potential for energy efficiency in buildings.

  8. Love in Love’s Labour’s Lost: Ontological Foundation or Laughing Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Mousley, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Love’s labour is often lost in Shakespeare’s (un)romantic comedy because love is folly and lovers, ridiculous. We know, however, that Shakespeare delights in paradoxes and reversals which alert us to the possibility of finding wisdom in folly and folly in self-professed wisdom. Given the insisted-upon interchangeability of wisdom and folly in Shakespeare’s plays, how can we be confident of being able to tell them apart? If lovers are foolish in Love’s Labour’s Lost then what wisdom might ther...

  9. The Old English Genesis and Milton’s Paradise Lost: the characterisation of Satan

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Ramazzina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether and to what extent the English poet John Milton may have been influenced in the composition of Paradise Lost by the Old English poem known as Genesis B. The paper will examine similarities and dif-ferences in the characterisation of Satan and of the temptation of Adam and Eve in both poems. The comparison between two of the illuminations of the Junius 11 ms. and the corresponding passages in Paradise Lost will be part of the analysis.

  10. The Old English Genesis and Milton's Paradise Lost: the characterisation of Satan

    OpenAIRE

    Ramazzina, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether and to what extent the English poet John Milton may have been influenced in the composition of Paradise Lost by the Old English poem known as Genesis B. The paper will examine similarities and differences in the characterisation of Satan and of the temptation of Adam and Eve in both poems. The comparison between two of the illuminations of the Junius 11 ms. and the corresponding passages in Paradise Lost will be part of the analysis.

  11. The Old English Genesis and Milton’s Paradise Lost: the characterisation of Satan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Ramazzina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine whether and to what extent the English poet John Milton may have been influenced in the composition of Paradise Lost by the Old English poem known as Genesis B. The paper will examine similarities and dif-ferences in the characterisation of Satan and of the temptation of Adam and Eve in both poems. The comparison between two of the illuminations of the Junius 11 ms. and the corresponding passages in Paradise Lost will be part of the analysis.

  12. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the various imaging tools with examples of the different diseases shown best with each modality. It includes 100 case presentations covering the gamut of brain diseases. These examples are grouped according to the clinical presentation of the patient: headache, acute headache, sudden unilateral weakness, unilateral weakness of gradual onset, speech disorders, seizures, pituitary and parasellar lesions, sensory disorders, posterior fossa and cranial nerve disorders, dementia, and congenital lesions

  13. Advanced lost foam casting quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Objective is to advance the state of the art in lost foam casting technology, in order to improve the competitiveness of the US metals casting industries. The following tasks are reported on pyrolysis defects and sand distortion, bronze casting technology, steel casting technology, sand filling and compaction, coating technology, precision pattern production, and computational modeling.

  14. 27 CFR 24.65 - Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond. 24.65 Section 24.65 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND... fermentation in bottles, by artificial carbonation, and by bulk processing; and (3) Claims covering losses of...

  15. The orphaning experience: descriptions from Ugandan youth who have lost parents to HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ssebunnya Joshua

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The HIV/AIDS epidemic has continued to pose significant challenges to countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Millions of African children and youth have lost parents to HIV/AIDS leaving a generation of orphans to be cared for within extended family systems and communities. The experiences of youth who have lost parents to the HIV/AIDS epidemic provide an important ingress into this complex, evolving, multi-dimensional phenomenon. A fundamental qualitative descriptive study was conducted to develop a culturally relevant and comprehensive description of the experiences of orphanhood from the perspectives of Ugandan youth. A purposeful sample of 13 youth who had lost one or both parents to HIV/AIDS and who were affiliated with a non-governmental organization providing support to orphans were interviewed. Youth orphaned by HIV/AIDS described the experience of orphanhood beginning with parental illness, not death. Several losses were associated with the death of a parent including lost social capitol, educational opportunities and monetary assets. Unique findings revealed that youth experienced culturally specific stigma and conflict which was distinctly related to their HIV/AIDS orphan status. Exploitation within extended cultural family systems was also reported. Results from this study suggest that there is a pressing need to identify and provide culturally appropriate services for these Ugandan youth prior to and after the loss of a parent(s.

  16. Lost Instruction: The Disparate Impact of the School Discipline Gap in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losen, Daniel J.; Whitaker, Amir

    2017-01-01

    This report is the first to analyze California's school discipline data as measured by days of missed instruction due to suspension. The state reports the number of suspensions for each district, disaggregated by racial/ethnic groups, but it does not provide any information on how much instructional time was lost. The authors used information from…

  17. 75 FR 25864 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Lost People Finder System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Lost People Finder System SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the... (NIH) has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve the...

  18. MARKET RISK ASSESSMENT USING EXPECTED TAIL LOST (ETL – PECULIARITIES AND APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Radukanov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Measuring market risk is explained by using Expected Tail Lost in the article. Its advantages, disadvantages and range of application are pointed out. The basic calculation stages are emphasized in MS EXCEL. Market risk measurement is carried out towards the shares of the company General Motors Company (GM

  19. On possible parent bodies of Innisfree, Lost City and Prgibram meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozaev, A. E.

    1994-12-01

    Minor planets 1981 ET3 and Seleucus are possible parent bodies of Innisfree and Lost City meteorites, asteroid Mithra is the most probable source of Prgibram meteorite. The conclusions are based on the Southworth - Hawkins criterion with taking into account of the motion constants (Tisserand coefficient, etc.) and minimal distances between orbits at present time.

  20. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer between...

  1. Matthew's Messianic Shepherd-king: In search of “the lost sheep of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article intends to grasp the meaning of the phrase “the lost sheep of the house of Israel” in the Matthean logia of 10:5b-6 (and 15:24). It shows that in recent Matthean research the phrase has become an abstract salvation-historical category disconnected from narrative and historical particularity. However, generally ...

  2. The Wind Lost its Direction | Ezenwa-Ohaeto | UJAH: Unizik Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UJAH: Unizik Journal of Arts and Humanities. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Special Edition 2011 >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. The Wind Lost its Direction. C Ezenwa-Ohaeto. Abstract.

  3. Marine magnetic studies over a lost wellhead in Palk Bay, Cauvery Basin, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Seshavataram, B.T.V.

    Close grid marine magnetic surveys in the vicinity of a drill well site PH 9-1 in Palk Bay revealed that the area is characterized by smooth magnetic field except for a local anomaly caused by a lost wellhead. The smooth magnetic field is attributed...

  4. Thick methacrylate sections devoid of lost caps simplify stereological quantifications based on the optical fractionator design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stine Hasselholt; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In neuroscience, the optical fractionator technique is frequently used for unbiased cell number estimations. Although unbiased in theory, the practical application of the technique is often biased by the necessity of introducing a guard zone at one side of the disector to counter lost caps...

  5. Active RFID Attached Object Clustering Method with New Evaluation Criterion for Finding Lost Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Tanbo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An active radio frequency identification (RFID tag that can communicate with smartphones using Bluetooth low energy technology has recently received widespread attention. We have studied a novel approach to finding lost objects using active RFID. We hypothesize that users can deduce the location of a lost object from information about surrounding objects in an environment where RFID tags are attached to all personal belongings. To help find lost objects from the proximity between RFID tags, the system calculates the proximity between pairs of RFID tags from the RSSI series and estimates the groups of objects in the neighborhood. We developed a method for calculating the proximity of the lost object to those around it using a distance function between RSSI series and estimating the group by hierarchical clustering. There is no method to evaluate whether a combination is suitable for application purposes directly. Presently, different combinations of distance functions and clustering algorithms yield different clustering results. Thus, we propose the number of nearest neighbor candidates (NNNC as the criterion to evaluate the clustering results. The simulation results show that the NNNC is an appropriate evaluation criterion for our system because it is able to exhaustively evaluate the combination of distance functions and clustering algorithms.

  6. Base-stock policies for lost-sales models: Aggregation and asymptotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Arts (Joachim); R. Levi (Retsef); G.J.J.A.N. van Houtum (Geert-Jan); A.P. Zwart (Bert)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThis paper considers the optimization of the base-stock level for the classical periodic review lost-sales inventory system. The optimal policy for this system is not fully understood and computationally expensive to obtain. Base-stock policies for this system are asymptotically

  7. Economic Lot-Sizing Problem with Bounded Inventory and Lost-Sales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C. Hwang (Hark-Chin)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we consider an economic lot-sizing problem with bounded inventory and lost-sales. Different structural properties are characterized based on the system parameters such as production and inventory costs, selling prices, and storage capacities. Using these properties and the

  8. On two-echelon inventory systems with Poisson demand and lost sales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez, Elisa; van der Heijden, Matthijs C.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a two-echelon, continuous review inventory system under Poisson demand and a one-for-one replenishment policy. Demand is lost if no items are available at the local warehouse, the central depot, or in the pipeline in between. We give a simple, fast and accurate approach to approximate

  9. Psychology's Lost Boy: Will the Real Little Albert Please Stand Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    This article is concerned with the recent debate about the identity of psychology's lost boy-Little Albert, the infant subject in Watson and Rayner's classic experiment on fear conditioning. For decades, psychologists and psychology students have been intrigued by the mystery of Albert's fate. Now two evidentiary-based solutions to…

  10. September 1930, Lisbon: Aleister Crowley’s lost diary of his Portuguese trip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aleister Crowley’s diary for the period of his travel to Portugal and his meeting with Fernando Pessoa has long been considered lost or inaccessible. However, a copy has been finally found and is here presented and published for the first time. The analysis of the diary allows us to have a fuller

  11. On the (S-1, S) Lost Sales Inventory Model with Priority Demand Classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Dekker (Rommert); R.M. Hill; M.J. Kleijn (Marcel)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper an inventory model with several demand classes, prioritised according to importance, is analysed. We consider a lot-for-lot or (S-1,S) inventory model with lost sales. For each demand class there is a critical stock level at and below which demand from that class is not

  12. Parametric replenishment policies for inventory systems with lost sales and fixed order cost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvank, M.; Bhulai, S.; Huh, W.T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider a single-item inventory system with lost sales and fixed order cost. We numerically illustrate the lack of a clear structure in optimal replenishment policies for such systems. However, policies with a simple structure are preferred in practical settings. Examples of

  13. Inventory rationing in an (s, Q) inventory model with lost sales a two demand classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph. Melchiors; R. Dekker (Rommert); M.J. Kleijn (Marcel)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractWhenever demand for a single item can be categorized into classes of different priority, an inventory rationing policy should be considered. In this paper we analyse a continuous review (s,Q) model with lost sales and two demand classes. A so-called critical level policy is applied to

  14. Surviving a Lost War | van der Merwe | Journal for the Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afrikaans writers have often found themselves in a marginal position. During the time of apartheid, they vehemently criticised racial discrimination, thus dissociating themselves from the centre of power. After the demise of apartheid, Afrikaans writers were marginalised in a different way, when the Afrikaans language lost its ...

  15. The Ripples and Waves of Educational Effectiveness Research: Some Comments to "Getting Lost in Translation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheerens, Jaap

    2013-01-01

    The article "Getting lost in translation" by Harris, Chapman, Muijs and Reynolds addresses the engagement of policy-makers and educational practitioners with (the results of) educational effectiveness and improvement research. In this commentary the article is discussed from the perspectives of research utilisation, the solidity of the…

  16. Little Gandhi —The Lost Truth of the Syrian Uprising screening in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... An event featuring excerpts from the IDRC-supported documentary Little Gandhi —The Lost Truth of the Syrian Uprising is being co-hosted by the permanent missions of Canada and the EU to the United Nations and the National Coalition of Syrian Revolution and Opposition Forces, on September 7, 2017, ...

  17. The aesthetic treatment for anterior teeth with lost crown by endorestoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanik Zubaidah

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aesthetic has an important role in social life, especially the anterior teeth. The aesthetic abnormality of anterior teeth i.e. discoloration, malpotition or the anterior teeth with crown damage for more than one third or all part of crown is lost due to caries or other causes, will influence its appearance especially during smile. Purpose: The aim of this case report, therefore, is to show how teeth with clinical crown lost or only the root left still can be treated by endorestoration treatment in order to reconstruct the shape and function of the teeth similar to the original ones. Case: Female 52 years old with the lost crown of anterior teeth. The patient did not want her teeth to be extracted. Case Management: The abnormality of these teeth are still able to be reconstructed by endorestoration i.e. endodontic treatment with post and core insertion in the root canal will increase its retention and recovery by the porcelain crown fused to metal to recover the original formation and aesthetic and thus has the normal refunction. The treatment, it improve the confidence of the patient, and also can function normally. The patient did not feel pain. Ronsenography showed the periapical lesion diminished, the neighbor gingival was going better in both function and color. Conclusion: Endorestoration treatment on the anterior teeth with lost crown could recover the normal function, dental aesthetic and self confidence.

  18. Lost in Form, Found in Line: An Exhibition of Works by Robert Motherwell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author profiles Robert Motherwell (1915-1991) who is universally regarded as one of the most important painters and printmakers of the mid-20th century, and was a prominent figure in the movement known as Abstract Expressionism. The author also discusses the exhibition, "Lost in Form, Found in Line: An Exhibition of Works by…

  19. The Lost City Hydrothermal Field: A Spectroscopic and Astrobiological Analogue for Nili Fossae, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Elena S.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Brazelton, William J.; Kelley, Deborah

    2017-11-01

    Low-temperature serpentinization is a critical process with respect to Earth's habitability and the Solar System. Exothermic serpentinization reactions commonly produce hydrogen as a direct by-product and typically produce short-chained organic compounds indirectly. Here, we present the spectral and mineralogical variability in rocks from the serpentine-driven Lost City Hydrothermal Field on Earth and the olivine-rich region of Nili Fossae on Mars. Near- and thermal-infrared spectral measurements were made from a suite of Lost City rocks at wavelengths similar to those for instruments collecting measurements of the martian surface. Results from Lost City show a spectrally distinguishable suite of Mg-rich serpentine, Ca carbonates, talc, and amphibole minerals. Aggregated detections of low-grade metamorphic minerals in rocks from Nili Fossae were mapped and yielded a previously undetected serpentine exposure in the region. Direct comparison of the two spectral suites indicates similar mineralogy at both Lost City and in the Noachian (4-3.7 Ga) bedrock of Nili Fossae, Mars. Based on mapping of these spectral phases, the implied mineralogical suite appears to be extensive across the region. These results suggest that serpentinization was once an active process, indicating that water and energy sources were available, as well as a means for prebiotic chemistry during a time period when life was first emerging on Earth. Although the mineralogical assemblages identified on Mars are unlikely to be directly analogous to rocks that underlie the Lost City Hydrothermal Field, related geochemical processes (and associated sources of biologically accessible energy) were once present in the subsurface, making Nili Fossae a compelling candidate for a once-habitable environment on Mars.

  20. Years of life lost due to external causes of death in the lodz province, poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Pikala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of the study is the analysis of years of life lost due to external causes of death, particularly due to traffic accidents and suicides. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study material includes a database containing information gathered from 376,281 death certificates of inhabitants of the Lodz province who died between 1999 and 2010. The Lodz province is characterized by the highest mortality rates in Poland. The SEYLLp (Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per living person and the SEYLLd (per death indices were used to determine years of life lost. Joinpoint models were used to analyze time trends. RESULTS: In 2010, deaths due to external causes constituted 6.0% of the total number of deaths. The standardized death rate (SDR due to external causes was 110.0 per 100,000 males and was five times higher than for females (22.0 per 100,000 females. In 2010, the SEYLLp due to external causes was 3746 per 100,000 males and 721 per 100,000 females. Among males, suicides and traffic accidents were the most common causes of death (the values of the SEYLLp were: 1098 years and 887 years per 100,000 people, respectively. Among females, the SEYLLp values were 183 years due to traffic accidents and 143 years due to suicides (per 100,000 people. CONCLUSIONS: A decrease in the number of years of life lost due to external causes is much higher among females. The authors observe that a growing number of suicides contribute to an increase in the value of the SEYLLp index. This directly contributes to over-mortality of males due to external causes. The analysis of the years of life lost focuses on the social and economic aspects of premature mortality due to external causes.

  1. The sigma-1 receptor enhances brain plasticity and functional recovery after experimental stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruscher, Karsten; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Rickhag, Karl Mattias

    2011-01-01

    Stroke leads to brain damage with subsequent slow and incomplete recovery of lost brain functions. Enriched housing of stroke-injured rats provides multi-modal sensorimotor stimulation, which improves recovery, although the specific mechanisms involved have not been identified. In rats housed......)piperazine dihydrochloride, an agonist of the sigma-1 receptor, starting two days after injury, enhanced the recovery of lost sensorimotor function without decreasing infarct size. The sigma-1 receptor was found in the galactocerebroside enriched membrane microdomains of reactive astrocytes and in neurons. Sigma-1 receptor...... of biomolecules required for brain repair, thereby stimulating brain plasticity. Pharmacological targeting of the sigma-1 receptor provides new opportunities for stroke treatment beyond the therapeutic window of neuroprotection....

  2. Brain Gain am Beispiel Österreich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aschbacher Christine

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BrainGain is a common trend within the last ten years in Europe and all-over the world. Managers, key players and scientists are allowed to choose wherever they want to work in the world. As there is a lack of qualified individuals for companies and universities, BrainGain has become a necessity, and mostly – the higher educated individuals are moving away according to a better offer elsewhere in the world. Therefore, a lot of expats are moving around with their families. Many times, the lack of integration at the current place, country or city, is the critical success factor for staying or leaving. Furthermore, if the family does not feel happy in the current location, then the manager or scientist will move away or return home and the investment will be lost.

  3. Evaluation of a 99Tcm bound brain scanning agent for single photon emission computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A R; Hasselbalch, S G; Paulson, O B

    1986-01-01

    D,L HM-PAO-99Tcm (PAO) is a lipophilic tracer complex which is avidly taken up by the brain. We have compared the regional distribution of PAO with regional cerebral blood flow (CBF). CBF was measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) by Tomomatic 64 after 133Xe inhalation in ...... of the (decay corrected) brain counts were lost during 24 hours....

  4. Brains that are out of tune but in time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Krista L; Peretz, Isabelle

    2004-05-01

    It is estimated that about 4% of the general population may have amusia (or tone deafness). Congenital amusia is a lifelong disability for processing music despite normal intellectual, memory, and language skills. Here we present evidence that the disorder stems from a deficit in fine-grained pitch perception. Amusic and control adults were presented with monotonic and isochronous sequences of five tones (i.e., constant pitch and intertone interval). They were required to detect when the fourth tone was displaced in pitch or time. All amusic participants were impaired in detecting the pitch changes, and showed no sign of improvement with practice. In contrast, they detected time changes as well as control adults and exhibited similar improvements with practice. Thus, the degraded pitch perception seen in the amusic individuals cannot be ascribed to nonspecific problems with the task or to poor hearing in general. Rather, the data point to the presence of a congenital neural anomaly that selectively impairs pitch processing.

  5. THE LOST-CITY DAN LOST-SPACE KARENA PERKEMBANGAN PENGEMBANGAN TATA-RUANG KOTA Kasus Koridor Komersial Jalan Tunjungan Kotamadya Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Poerbantanoe

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Every town hss its own architectural performance. And architecture is not merely a physical landscape of buildings in a town,, as seen by the observer, but it has a deeper mening, which displays the art of structures and constructions. It is a sequence of buildings along the course of its history (Aldo Rossi, 1980. A Town is a complete work of art, performed by men of urban knowledge. Tehe concept of a town or urban workmanship arises from time to time as a work of art in multiple variations, together and according to spirit of the time, included its aspects of belief and religion. The urban work of art or urban artefact is always related to location, historical events and the spesific urban look. Generally a town has particular rythm and dynamics, at least it does not remain static. Therefore it is quite right, when we say, that a town represents the course of its history and technology during the period of its existence. But when we scrutinise alongthe historical and visual systems, it turns out that so many physical and sociqal spaces have been altered with regard to their quality and quantity, as result mis management ot the physical and social spaces by less careful urban reformists. they may bring about certain inbalancy in the system, destroying public imagination and memory about the identity and message conceived at the time of their construction. At the this may affect a condition, commonly called the lost space. Surabaya is one of the larger towns in Indonesia, which afrtime possessed a number of urban artefacts and workmanship. One of which is the Tunjungan Street, designed and developed by the Gemeente Administration of the Duutch as comercial corriodor of the town, with all its advantages and shortcomings. In spite of the fact that it has never been touched by the hands of the prominent urban planner Mr. Thomas C. Karsten, who has prepared and worked out the architecture of the bigger towns of the former Netherlands Indies like

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  7. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  8. Brain-based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ruth Palombo

    2000-01-01

    Discusses brain research and how new imaging technologies allow scientists to explore how human brains process memory, emotion, attention, patterning, motivation, and context. Explains how brain research is being used to revise learning theories. (JOW)

  9. Teaching help-seeking when lost to individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlile, Kelly A; DeBar, Ruth M; Reeve, Sharon A; Reeve, Kenneth F; Meyer, Linda S

    2018-03-09

    Deficits in safety skills and communication deficits place individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at an increased risk of danger. We used a multiple-probe across-participants design to evaluate the effects of video modeling and programming common stimuli to teach low- and high-tech help-seeking responses to children with ASD when lost. Participants acquired answering or making a FaceTime® call and exchanging an identification card in contrived and natural settings. Responses generalized to novel community settings and maintained during a one- and two-week follow-up. Social validity measures showed that the procedures and outcomes of the study were acceptable to indirect and direct consumers, and immediate and extended community members. Implications are that children with ASD can effectively be taught both low- and high-tech help-seeking responses when lost. © 2018 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  10. Growing the lost crops of eastern North America's original agricultural system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Natalie G; Fritz, Gayle J; Patton, Paul; Carmody, Stephen; Horton, Elizabeth T

    2017-07-05

    Thousands of years before the maize-based agriculture practiced by many Native American societies in eastern North America at the time of contact with Europeans, there existed a unique crop system only known through archaeological evidence. There are no written or oral records of how these lost crops were cultivated, but several domesticated subspecies have been identified in the archaeological record. Growth experiments and observations of living progenitors of these crops can provide insights into the ancient agricultural system of eastern North America, the role of developmental plasticity in the process of domestication, and the creation and maintenance of diverse landraces under cultivation. In addition, experimental gardens are potent tools for public education, and can also be used to conserve remaining populations of lost crop progenitors and explore the possibility of re-domesticating these species.

  11. Infinity and Voracity of Lists in John Milton’s Paradise Lost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Ferreira Sá

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tomando uma sugestão de Stanley Fish, o foco deste artigo cairá sobre as formas de “emaranhamento” que lêem como um jogo de clausura e um estado de liberdade ilimitada, duas noções aparentemente opostas que, no entanto, sustentam a poética miltoniana. O que propomos estudar aqui é a forma como esses termos são postos em prática nas listas literárias, inventários, catálogos e acumulações encontradas no poema épico Paradise Lost. Mais especificamente, este artigo sustenta que os paradoxos do cativeiro e antídotos ao cativeiro que vemos operando nas listas de Paradise Lost são encenadas em um tratamento que lhes empresta a qualidade de ser ao mesmo tempo infinitas e vorazes.

  12. Mortality rate and years of life lost from unintentional injury and suicide in South India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bose, Anuradha; Konradsen, Flemming; John, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    We calculated mortality rates and years of life lost because of unintentional injuries and suicides using community based information obtained prospectively over a 7-year period, from 1998 to 2004, among a rural and peri-urban population of 108,000 in South India. Per 100,000 population the total...... over the study period while 18.9% of all deaths in the population were attributable to unintentional injuries and suicides in the same period. The high burden is particularly notable in the 15-29 age group, where up to 70% of years of life lost are due to injury. The burden of injuries reported...... in this study is significantly higher than the figures reflected in available reports for India and is likely due to the under reporting in routine mortality statistics, particularly of suicides....

  13. What we regret most are lost opportunities: a theory of regret intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beike, Denise R; Markman, Keith D; Karadogan, Figen

    2009-03-01

    A recent theory (Roese & Summerville, 2005) has suggested that regret is intensified by perceptions of future opportunity. In this work, however, it is proposed that feelings of regret are more likely elicited by perceptions of lost opportunity: People regret outcomes that could have been changed in the past but can no longer be changed and for which people experience low psychological closure. Consistent with the lost opportunity principle, Study 1 revealed that regretted experiences in the most commonly regretted life domains are perceived as offering the least opportunity for improvement in the future, Study 2 indicated that people experience the most regret for outcomes that are not repeatable, and Study 3 revealed that perceptions of higher past than future opportunities and low psychological closure predict regret intensity. Discussion focuses on the hope-inducing yet ephemeral nature of perceived future opportunity and on the relationship between dissonance reduction and closure.

  14. Where is my mind? How sponges and placozoans may have lost neural cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph F; Chiodin, Marta

    2015-12-19

    Recent phylogenomic evidence suggests that ctenophores may be the sister group to the rest of animals. This phylogenetic arrangement opens the possibility that sponges and placozoans could have lost neural cell types or that the ctenophore nervous system evolved independently. We critically review evidence to date that has been put forth in support of independent evolution of neural cell types in ctenophores. We observe a reluctance in the literature to consider a lost nervous system in sponges and placozoans and suggest that this may be due to historical bias and the commonly misconstrued concept of animal complexity. In support of the idea of loss (or modification beyond recognition), we provide hypothetical scenarios to show how sponges and placozoans may have benefitted from the loss and/or modification of their neural cell types. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Lost-to-follow-up bias in an occupational mortality analysis: a quantitative consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquavella, J.F.; Tietjen, G.L.; Wilkinson, G.S.

    1982-12-01

    A major problem in occupational cohort studies is how to treat study subjects who are lost to follow-up (LTF). The assumptions made concerning their vital status may affect the results of comparative mortality analyses. The problem was considered within the context of an occupational follow-up study of white male employees at a nuclear facility in Colorado. In this analysis, 568 or 8% of cohort members were LTF. Comparative mortality for the entire cohort was estimated by treating LTF workers as lost at employment termination date, as living at the end-of-study date, and with cumulative mortality simulated between 0% and 100%. Results indicate that simulations of cumulative mortality among employees LTF can be useful in assessing the potential bias caused by LTF mortality assumptions. Further, a general method for assessing LTF bias in occupational analyses is proposed

  16. The Anomalous Currents In The Front Foils of the JET Lost Alpha Diagnostic KA-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecil, F. E.; Kiptily, V.; Salmi, A.; Horton, A.; Fullard, K.; Murari, A.; Darrow, D.; Hill, K.

    2011-05-04

    We have examined the observed currents in the front foils of the JET Faraday cup lost alpha particle diagnostic KA-2. In particular, we have sought to understand the currents during Ohmic plasmas for which the ion flux at the detectors was initially assumed to be negligible. We have considered two sources of this current: plasma ions both deuterium and impurity in the vicinity of the detector including charge exchange neutrals and photoemission from scattered UV radiation. Based upon modeling and empirical observation, the latter source appears most likely and, moreover, seems to be applicable to the currents in the front foil during ELMy H-mode plasmas. A very thin gold or nickel foil attached to the present detector aperture is proposed as a solution to this problem, and realistic calculations of expected fluxes of lost energetic neutral beam ions during TF ripple experiments are presented as justification of this proposed solution.

  17. Evaluation of performance approximations for (r, q) inventory policies in a lost-sales setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhagwan Bendre, Abhijit; Thorstenson, Anders

    The (r, q) inventory policy, in which the replenishment quantity q is ordered, when the inventory position reaches the reorder point r, is one of the most widely practiced control policies for single-stage, single-item inventory systems. This policy has been thoroughly studied under the scenario...... observed as the standard business practice in case of shortages. Moreover, analyses of this setting can assist in better understanding of more complex settings, such as when (r, q) inventory control systems are employed as building blocks of supply chain structures in which lost sales play a significant...... role. In this paper, we consider a single-item inventory system with lost sales controlled by a continuous review (r, q) policy. Demand is Poisson and lead times are assumed to be constant. For a standard cost structure our focus is on analyzing the long-run average cost and fill-rate performance...

  18. Fully implanted brain-computer interface in a locked-in patient with ALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vansteensel, Mariska J.; Pels, Elmar G M; Bleichner, Martin G.; Branco, Mariana P.; Denison, Timothy; Freudenburg, Zachary V.; Gosselaar, Peter; Leinders, Sacha; Ottens, Thomas H.; Van Den Boom, Max A.; Van Rijen, Peter C.; Aarnoutse, Erik J.; Ramsey, Nick F.

    2016-01-01

    Options for people with severe paralysis who have lost the ability to communicate orally are limited. We describe a method for communication in a patient with late-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), involving a fully implanted brain-computer interface that consists of subdural electrodes

  19. Idabloki unustatud kino : Ülevaade konverentiskogumikust "Via Transversa : Lost Cinema of the Former Eastern Bloc" / Martin Oja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Oja, Martin, 1978-

    2009-01-01

    2007. a. oktoobris Tallinnas toimunud konverentsi "Via Transversa : Lost Cinema of the Former Eastern Bloc" ettekannetel põhinevast kogumikust: Via Transversa : Lost Cinema of the Former Eastern Bloc / editors Eva Näripea, Andreas Trossek. Tallinn : Eesti Kunstiakadeemia, 2008. (Koht ja paik ; 7)

  20. 27 CFR 25.286 - Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit between breweries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... tax on beer lost in transit between breweries. 25.286 Section 25.286 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Refund or Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.286 Claims for remission of tax on beer lost in transit...

  1. Symmetrization in jellyfish: reorganization to regain function, and not lost parts

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, Michael J.; Goentoro, Lea

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported a previously unidentified strategy of self-repair in the moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita. Rather than regenerating lost parts, juvenile Aurelia reorganize remaining parts to regain essential body symmetry. This process that we called symmetrization is rapid and frequent, and is not driven by cell proliferation or cell death. Instead, the swimming machinery generates mechanical forces that drive symmetrization. We found evidence for symmetrization across three other species ...

  2. In search of 'lost' knowledge and outsourced expertise in flood risk managment

    OpenAIRE

    Haughton, Graham; Bankoff, Greg; Coulthard, Tom J

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the parallel discourses of ‘lost’ local flood expertise and the growing use of commercial consultancies to outsource aspects of flood risk work. We critically examine the various claims and counter-claims about lost, local and external expertise in flood management, focusing on the aftermath of the 2007 floods in East Yorkshire, England. Drawing on interviews with consultants, drainage engineers and others, we caution against claims that privilege ‘local’ floods knowledge ...

  3. Disability-adjusted Life Years Lost to Ischemic Heart Disease in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández de Larrea-Baz, Nerea; Morant-Ginestar, Consuelo; Catalá-López, Ferrán; Gènova-Maleras, Ricard; Álvarez-Martín, Elena

    2015-11-01

    The health indicator disability-adjusted life years combines the fatal and nonfatal consequences of a disease in a single measure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the burden of ischemic heart disease in 2008 in Spain by calculating disability-adjusted life years. The years of life lost due to premature death were calculated using the ischemic heart disease deaths by age and sex recorded in the Spanish National Institute of Statistics and the life-table in the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. The years lived with disability, calculated for acute coronary syndrome, stable angina, and ischemic heart failure, used hospital discharge data and information from population studies. Disability weights were taken from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. We calculated crude and age standardized rates (European Standard Population). Univariate sensitivity analyses were performed. In 2008, 539 570 disability-adjusted life years were lost due to ischemic heart disease in Spain (crude rate, 11.8/1000 population; standardized, 8.6/1000). Of the total years lost, 96% were due to premature death and 4% due to disability. Among the years lost due to disability, heart failure accounted for 83%, stable angina 15%, and acute coronary syndrome 2%. In the sensitivity analysis, weighting by age was the factor that changed the results to the greatest degree. Ischemic heart disease continues to have a huge impact on the health of our population, mainly because of premature death. The results of this study provide an overall vision of the epidemiologic situation in Spain and could serve as the basis for evaluating interventions targeting the acute and chronic manifestations of cardiac ischemia. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. How to get lost customers back? : a study of antecedents of relationship revival

    OpenAIRE

    Homburg, Christian; Hoyer, Wayne D.; Stock-Homburg, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Most research in the field of customer relationship management has focused on keeping existing customers. However, some companies also systematically address lost customers and try to revive these relationships. This facet of customer relationship management has been largely neglected by academic research. Our study provides a theoretical discussion and an empirical analysis of factors driving the success of relationship revival activities. Drawing on equity theory we find that the cust...

  5. Ambient air pollution and years of life lost in Ningbo, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tianfeng; Yang, Zuyao; Liu, Tao; Shen, Yueping; Fu, Xiaohong; Qian, Xujun; Zhang, Yuelun; Wang, Yong; Xu, Zhiwei; Zhu, Shankuan; Mao, Chen; Xu, Guozhang; Tang, Jinling

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the burden of air pollution on years of life lost (YLL) in addition to mortality, we conducted a time series analysis based on the data on air pollution, meteorological conditions and 163,704 non-accidental deaths of Ningbo, China, 2009-2013. The mean concentrations of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter population for both outcomes. These findings clarify the burden of air pollution on YLL and highlight the importance and urgency of air pollution control in China.

  6. Keterpenjaraan Perempuan dalam Ruang Kota di dalam Lost In Translation (2003) dan The Good Girl (2002)

    OpenAIRE

    Saraswati, Asri

    2009-01-01

    The urban space offers more challenges to the female self. Two motion pictures,Lost in translation (2003) and The good girl (2002), depict the issue of gender andspace by conveying the city as prison for the female characters. This articleanalyses the urban space and argues that in the two movies, the female charactersstruggle and eventually create meaning in the urban room. Applying feminismand urban geography in analysing the position of female characters within thecity, the paper finds tha...

  7. Visionnement du film Little Gandhi —The Lost Truth of the Syrian ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    6 sept. 2017 ... Une projection d'extraits du documentaire subventionné par le CRDI intitulé Little Gandhi —The Lost Truth of the Syrian Uprising, organisée conjointement par les missions permanentes du Canada et de l'Union européenne auprès des Nations Unies et la Coalition nationale des forces de l'opposition et ...

  8. Game Behavior Analysis between the Local Government and Land-Lost Peasants in the Urbanization Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available China is entering a period of rapid urban development. With the rapid expansion of cities, a large number of peasants have lost their land as a result. Given the development of urbanization, safeguarding the rights and interests of land-lost peasants in the process of urbanization has become a new topic of interest in China. In this study, based on game theory, we analyze the interests of the local government and land-lost peasants in several rounds of the citizenization process. The result demonstrated the following: (1 this paper proposed that overall interest declines in the entire game, in which the peasant can obtain a greater share of benefits from bargaining with the local government; (2 However, a long bargaining process would lead to the diminishment of peasants’ rights and benefits. In contrast, the local government would obtain greater share of benefits than the peasant and would obtain fewer benefits than at the beginning of the process. Therefore, both sides expect to end the game process early; (3 Under the “rational economic man” process, this process will always tend to be one in which one party struggles while the other compromises. Therefore, in the game, the game process will not reach a game equilibrium state and both sides will be at a stalemate; (4 The local government, as the power owner, is expected to surrender its interests as the “rational economic man” for the Pareto optimality; (5 Finally, we proposed policy recommendations for the sustainability of citizenization. Increasing the public service benefits, establishing the system of subsistence allowances and raising the minimum living allowance of citizenization, improving the training and employment service system for the peasant can improve land-lost peasants’ acceptance in the game.

  9. In search of the "lost capital". A theory for valuation, investment decisions, performance measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Magni, Carlo Alberto

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for valuation, investment decisions, and performance measurement based on a nonstandard theory of residual income. It is derived from the notion of "unrecovered" capital, which is here named "lost" capital because it represents the capital foregone by the investors. Its theoretical strength and meaningfulness is shown by deriving it from four main perspectives: financial, microeconomic, axiomatic, accounting. Implications for asset valuation, cap...

  10. Smoking: An independent risk factor for lost productivity in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Adam P; Hoehle, Lloyd P; Phillips, Katie M; Caradonna, David S; Gray, Stacey T; Sedaghat, Ahmad R

    2017-08-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is associated with a significant loss of patient productivity that costs billions of dollars every year. Smoking is associated with worsening sinonasal symptoms, but its effect on lost productivity in CRS patients has yet to be described. Therefore, we sought to determine the association between smoking and productivity in patients with CRS. Prospective cross-sectional cohort study of 140 patients with CRS. Sinonasal symptom severity was measured using the 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcomes Test. Lost productivity was assessed by asking participants how many days of work and/or school they missed in the last 3 months due to CRS. Associations were sought between lost productivity and smoking. Participants missed a mean of 3.0 days (standard deviation = 12.8 days) of work or school due to CRS. Having any history of smoking was associated with 6 days of lost productivity due to CRS (adjusted β = 6.20, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.64 to 11.77, P = .031). Although the number of active smokers in our study cohort was very small (N = 6), we performed a univariate association between smoking status, considering former smokers and active smokers separately, and found that active smoking (β = 11.75, 95% CI: 2.11 to 21.40, P = .018) had a much larger impact on CRS-related productivity loss than that experienced by former smokers (β = 4.45, 95% CI: -0.32 to 9.23, P = .070). Smoking (likely driven by active smoking) is independently associated with missed days of work or school in patients with CRS. Further study is needed to determine whether interventions directed at smoking may impact CRS-related productivity loss. 2c Laryngoscope, 127:1742-1745, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Lost and Found, Letters and Methods: Assessing Attitudes toward Chiropractic and Medical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Kern

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes toward traditional and chiropractic medicine were compared using Milgram's lost letter technique. A total of 192 letters were placed on the windshields of vehicles in parking lots at six restaurants and department stores in each of four quadrants of a medium-sized, Southeastern city. These letters were addressed to "Admissions" at either a fictitious Institute of Medicine or Institute of Chiropractic Care. Return addresses included either a male or a female name. Thus, those who found a lost letter were faced with the option of returning or not returning a letter from either a male or a female, addressed to an Institute of traditional or non-traditional medicine. After examining previous studies which had used the lost letter technique, numerous methodological improvements were implemented. For example, letters were randomly assigned to potential drop spots for each of 24 study locations (six study locations in each of four city quadrants, and a Latin square design was used to control for possible order effects in the four study conditions that were implemented. Nearly 65% of the letters (124 of 192 were returned. We found: 1 letters addressed to a fictitious Institute of Chiropractic Care were just as likely to be returned as those addressed to a fictitious Institute of Medicine; 2 letters with female return addresses were as likely to be returned as those with male return addresses; 3 there was no interaction between study conditions; 4 based on what was essentially a replication study, a comparison of the pattern of returns using the first and second cycle of lost letters (n = 96 for each cycle revealed an equivalent pattern of no-difference findings. DOI: 10.2458/azu_jmmss.v1i1.78

  12. Lost trophies: Hunting animals and the imperial souvenir in Walton Ford’s Pancha Tantra

    OpenAIRE

    Whittle, MJ

    2016-01-01

    This article argues that the work of contemporary American artist Walton Ford stages the paradoxical role that trophy hunting played in both establishing and undermining the strict racial, biological, and ecological hierarchization of colonial environments. American Flamingo (1992) and Lost Trophy (2005), from the 2009 collection Pancha Tantra, foreground how the tradition of nineteenth-century naturalist art, characterized by John James Audubon, and popular narratives of trophy hunting exped...

  13. Cinema advertising and the Sea Witch ‘Lost Island’ film (1965)

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Cinema advertising films have for many decades constituted an important element of British cinema programmes, yet they remain relatively under-researched. This article examines the production, distribution and reception of one such film, a 90-second mini-epic called ‘Lost Island’, which was made in 1965 to promote Sea Witch hair dyes. As well as outlining the technological and experiential aspects of the cinema and cinemagoing that continued to make film an attractive medium for advertisers e...

  14. Paradise Lost: The cost of removing tax and trade provisions from the Compact of Free Association

    OpenAIRE

    Brazys, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Upon implementing the Compact of Free Association between the United States and the Federated States of Micronesia, the US Congress unilaterally stripped tax and trade provisions that would have encouraged investment in the Federated States of Micronesia. I quantify what was lost to the Federated States of Micronesia by arguing that the provisions would have made the Federated States of Micronesia an explicitly sanctioned tax haven through empirical estimates of the impact of tax havens on gr...

  15. Paradise Lost: The Cost of Removing Tax and Trade Provisions from the Compact of Free Association

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Rueckert Brazys

    2014-01-01

    Upon implementing the Compact of Free Association between the United States and the Federated States of Micronesia, the US Congress unilaterally stripped tax and trade provisions that would have encouraged investment in the Federated States of Micronesia. I quantify what was lost to the Federated States of Micronesia by arguing that the provisions would have made the Federated States of Micronesia an explicitly sanctioned tax haven through empirical estimates of the impact of tax havens on gr...

  16. Race/skin color differentials in potential years of life lost due to external causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Edna Maria de; Costa, Maria da Conceição N; Hogan, Vijaya K; Mota, Eduardo Luiz Andrade; Araújo, Tânia Maria de; Oliveira, Nelson Fernandes

    2009-06-01

    Deaths by external causes represent one of the most important challenges for public health and are the second cause of death in Brazil. The aim of this study was to analyze differentials in mortality by external causes according to race/skin color. A descriptive study was carried out in Salvador, Northeastern Brazil, using 9,626 cases of deaths by external causes between 1998 and 2003. Data were obtained from the Forensic Medicine Institute and from Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics). The indicator 'potential years of life lost' was utilized to identify the existence of differences among age groups, sex groups and race/skin color groups. Deaths by external causes provoked the loss of 339,220 potential years of life, of which 210,000 were due to homicides. Nonwhite individuals died at earlier ages and lost 12.2 times as much potential years of life due to deaths by homicidies than white individuals. Although the nonwhite (black and mixed) population was three times larger than the white population, its number of potential years of life lost was 30 times higher. The population of blacks was 11.4 % smaller than the white population, but its loss of potential years of life was almost three times higher. Even after the adjustment for age, the differences observed in the indicator potential years of life lost/100,000 inhabitants and in the ratios between strata according to race/skin color were maintained. The results showed differentials in mortality by external causes according to race/skin color in Salvador. The nonwhite population had greater loss of potential years of life, higher average number of years not lived and, on average, they died at an earlier age due to homicides, traffic accidents an all other external causes.

  17. Colonial waterbird predation on Lost River and Shortnose suckers in the Upper Klamath Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Allen F.; Hewitt, David A.; Payton, Quinn; Cramer, Bradley M.; Collis, Ken; Roby, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated predation on Lost River Suckers Deltistes luxatus and Shortnose Suckers Chasmistes brevirostris by American white pelicans Pelecanus erythrorhynchos and double-crested cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus nesting at mixed-species colonies in the Upper Klamath Basin of Oregon and California during 2009–2014. Predation was evaluated by recovering (detecting) PIT tags from tagged fish on bird colonies and calculating minimum predation rates, as the percentage of available suckers consumed, adjusted for PIT tag detection probabilities but not deposition probabilities (i.e., probability an egested tag was deposited on- or off-colony). Results indicate that impacts of avian predation varied by sucker species, age-class (adult, juvenile), bird colony location, and year, demonstrating dynamic predator–prey interactions. Tagged suckers ranging in size from 72 to 730 mm were susceptible to cormorant or pelican predation; all but the largest Lost River Suckers were susceptible to bird predation. Minimum predation rate estimates ranged annually from of the available PIT-tagged Lost River Suckers and from of the available Shortnose Suckers, and predation rates were consistently higher on suckers in Clear Lake Reservoir, California, than on suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. There was evidence that bird predation on juvenile suckers (species unknown) in Upper Klamath Lake was higher than on adult suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, where minimum predation rates ranged annually from 5.7% to 8.4% of available juveniles. Results suggest that avian predation is a factor limiting the recovery of populations of Lost River and Shortnose suckers, particularly juvenile suckers in Upper Klamath Lake and adult suckers in Clear Lake Reservoir. Additional research is needed to measure predator-specific PIT tag deposition probabilities (which, based on other published studies, could increase predation rates presented herein by a factor of roughly 2.0) and to better understand

  18. Modeling Lost-Particle Accelerator Backgrounds in PEP-II Using LPTURTLE

    CERN Document Server

    Fieguth, Theodore; Kozanecki, Witold

    2005-01-01

    Background studies during the design, construction, commissioning, operation and improvement of BaBar and PEP-II have been greatly influenced by results from a program referred to as LPTURTLE (Lost Particle TURTLE a modified version of Decay TURTLE) which was originally conceived for the purpose of studying gas background for SLC. This venerable program is still in use today. We describe its use, capabilities and improvements and refer to current results now being applied to BaBar.

  19. Patients amputated by work accidents: characteristics and years accumulated of potential productive life lost

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho-Conchucos, Herminio Teófilo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the accumulated years of potential productive life lost in amputated patients by work accidents. Design: Descriptive, retrospective, cross-sectional study. Setting: Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion, Callao, Peru. Participants: Amputated patients by work accidents. Interventions: Review of 1 290 medical records of amputated patients attended from January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2007, 108 due to work accidents. The accumulated years of potential productive life los...

  20. Brain SPECT in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyot, M.; Baulieu, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Brain SPECT in child involves specific trends regarding the patient cooperation, irradiation, resolution and especially interpretation because of the rapid scintigraphic modifications related to the brain maturation. In a general nuclear medicine department, child brain SPECT represents about 2 % of the activity. The choice indications are the perfusion children: thallium and MIBI in brain tumours, pharmacological and neuropsychological interventions. In the future, brain dedicated detectors and new radiopharmaceuticals will promote the development of brain SPECT in children. (author)

  1. Finding the 'lost years' in green turtles: insights from ocean circulation models and genetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Nathan F; Naro-Maciel, Eugenia

    2013-10-07

    Organismal movement is an essential component of ecological processes and connectivity among ecosystems. However, estimating connectivity and identifying corridors of movement are challenging in oceanic organisms such as young turtles that disperse into the open sea and remain largely unobserved during a period known as 'the lost years'. Using predictions of transport within an ocean circulation model and data from published genetic analysis, we present to our knowledge, the first basin-scale hypothesis of distribution and connectivity among major rookeries and foraging grounds (FGs) of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) during their 'lost years'. Simulations indicate that transatlantic dispersal is likely to be common and that recurrent connectivity between the southwestern Indian Ocean and the South Atlantic is possible. The predicted distribution of pelagic juvenile turtles suggests that many 'lost years hotspots' are presently unstudied and located outside protected areas. These models, therefore, provide new information on possible dispersal pathways that link nesting beaches with FGs. These pathways may be of exceptional conservation concern owing to their importance for sea turtles during a critical developmental period.

  2. A "reverence for strong drink": the lost generation and the elevation of alcohol in American culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Room, R

    1984-11-01

    Over one-half of famous American authors with reputations for drunkenness were born between 1888 and 1900. Although college students of their generation seem to have been "drier" than earlier or later cohorts, many of the writers were already drinking heavily in college. Several reasons are suggested. After World War I, many fledgling authors spent time in Paris, becoming known as the "lost generation" and adding French and other drinking styles to their existing drinking patterns. Bohemian Americans during Prohibition found a resonance with the residual political symbolism of drinking in France as a statement of autonomy against the state. The community of expatriate writers provided a supportive environment for heavy drinking. In turn, the lost generation became a transmitter of new values concerning drinking to American culture in general. Their writings inadvertently promoted mass middle-class tourism to Paris in the late 1920s. Their lives and works strengthened the association between writing and drinking as a model for later literary generations. Both in written form and as films, their works conveyed an attractive image of drinking and often of drunkenness to the wider public. The decisive shift in drinking patterns among middle-class youth in the late 1920s ushered in a lasting change in the cultural position of drinking, as it became a cosmopolitan, progressive and eventually respectable behavior. At a minimum, the writers of the lost generation served as harbingers, carriers and catalysts of this change.

  3. U12 type introns were lost at multiple occasions during evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartschat Sebastian

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two categories of introns are known, a common U2 type and a rare U12 type. These two types of introns are removed by distinct spliceosomes. The phylogenetic distribution of spliceosomal RNAs that are characteristic of the U12 spliceosome, i.e. the U11, U12, U4atac and U6atac RNAs, suggest that U12 spliceosomes were lost in many phylogenetic groups. We have now examined the distribution of U2 and U12 introns in many of these groups. Results U2 and U12 introns were predicted by making use of available EST and genomic sequences. The results show that in species or branches where U12 spliceosomal components are missing, also U12 type of introns are lacking. Examples are the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis, Entamoeba histolytica, green algae, diatoms, and the fungal lineage Basidiomycota. Furthermore, whereas U12 splicing does not occur in Caenorhabditis elegans, U12 introns as well as U12 snRNAs are present in Trichinella spiralis, which is deeply branching in the nematode tree. A comparison of homologous genes in T. spiralis and C. elegans revealed different mechanisms whereby U12 introns were lost. Conclusions The phylogenetic distribution of U12 introns and spliceosomal RNAs give further support to an early origin of U12 dependent splicing. In addition, this distribution identifies a large number of instances during eukaryotic evolution where such splicing was lost.

  4. Revisiting Einstein's brain in Brain Awareness Week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Chen, Su; Zeng, Lidan; Zhou, Lin; Hou, Shengtao

    2014-10-01

    Albert Einstein's brain has long been an object of fascination to both neuroscience specialists and the general public. However, without records of advanced neuro-imaging of his brain, conclusions regarding Einstein's extraordinary cognitive capabilities can only be drawn based on the unique external features of his brain and through comparison of the external features with those of other human brain samples. The recent discovery of 14 previously unpublished photographs of Einstein's brain taken at unconventional angles by Dr. Thomas Stoltz Harvey, the pathologist, ignited a renewed frenzy about clues to explain Einstein's genius. Dr. Dean Falk and her colleagues, in their landmark paper published in Brain (2013; 136:1304-1327), described in such details about the unusual features of Einstein's brain, which shed new light on Einstein's intelligence. In this article, we ask what are the unique structures of his brain? What can we learn from this new information? Can we really explain his extraordinary cognitive capabilities based on these unique brain structures? We conclude that studying the brain of a remarkable person like Albert Einstein indeed provides us a better example to comprehensively appreciate the relationship between brain structures and advanced cognitive functions. However, caution must be exercised so as not to over-interpret his intelligence solely based on the understanding of the surface structures of his brain.

  5. The cultural route of present and lost landscapes in the centre of Bucharest - digital model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostenaru-Dan, Maria

    2015-04-01

    to be used. Second, we focus on the lost landscape. The lost natural and the lost cultural landscape. The lost natural landscape includes lost gardens of the area, about which our colleague Cerasella Craciun conducted archive research. The lost cultural landscape includes buildings which collapsed in the 1977 earthquake. We developed a digital model of guided tours for these landmarks. First, the lost items are identified on today's map. Second, a game is created in order to identify what replaces them on the historic map. We developed the code for these in Adobe Director and already experimented it for the city of Cologne in Germany, and tested for applicability for the landmarks of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake, where a similar concept is suitable. The nodes of the route are to be mapped as landscape through photography using the COMOB application, which allows inclusion of intangible heritage items such as the world of words.

  6. Evaluation of Novel Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Derived Lipid Mediators of Inflammation to Ameliorate the Deleterious Effects of Blast Overpressure on Eye and Brain Visual Processing Centers in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    animal was lost to histopathology, due to its unexpected death shortly after being ERG tested for the final time. A total of 108 eye and 432 brain...Moderate 5 = Severe 6 = Catastrophic ( pitch black) Judged by intensity of silver stain coloration * * * * Efficacy Order Right: RVD1 > PDX...PDX SHAM + RVD1 Brain optic tracts Brain optic tract injury scoring scale: 1 = None 2 = Slight 3 = Mild 4 = Moderate 5 = Severe 6 = Catastrophic ( pitch

  7. Lateral extrusion of tailor welded aluminum alloy pipes with a lost core of low temperature melting alloy

    OpenAIRE

    T. Ohashi; G. Liu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper, the authors employ tailor welded aluminum alloy pipes for lateral extrusion process with a lost core to perform a hollow light-weight-part.Design/methodology/approach: The pipe is welded longitudinally by YAG-laser. “The lateral extrusion process with a lost core (LELC)” consists of lateral extrusion of pipes with a soluble solid core, called the “lost core”, which serves as a plastic mandrel. The process proceeds as follows. First, the pipe cavity is filled with the l...

  8. Improving maintenance of lost weight following a commercial liquid meal replacement program: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Gretchen E; Patel, Roshni H; McMullen, Jillian S; Thomas, Colleen S; Crook, Julia E; Lynch, Scott A; Lutes, Lesley D

    2014-01-01

    Clinic-based liquid meal replacement (800kcals/day) programs produce substantial weight loss. Nevertheless, long-term maintenance remains a challenge. A limitation of maintenance programs is that they continue to promote large behavior changes that are initially required to induce weight loss which may be unsustainable long-term. The study aims were to conduct a preliminary assessment of the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of a small changes maintenance intervention (SCM) for 30 patients who completed liquid meal replacement program (LMR). The 20-session SCM delivered over 52 weeks offered no preset goals for maintenance behaviors and all changes in behavior were self-selected. Participants had a median BMI of 40.9 kg/m(2) and weight of 111 kg at the start of LMR. At LMR completion, they lost 18% (21 kg) of body weight. The SCM was completed by 22 patients (73%); 19 completers (86%) attended ≥ 17 of 20 sessions with a median satisfaction rating of 9 (on a scale of 1 to 9). Completers were asked to record self-selected maintenance behaviors daily (median 351 days recorded). The most commonly reported daily behaviors were self-weighing, use of meal replacements and step counting. Median percent regain at week 52 was 14% (2.8 kg) of lost weight (range, -42 to 74%), significantly less than a median of 56% (11 kg) percent regain of lost weight (range, -78 to 110%) in a demographically similar historical control group with no maintenance intervention after LMR completion (P<0.001). Thus, SCM holds promise for improving weight maintenance. Future research should compare SCM to standard maintenance programs that promote large program-directed changes. © 2013.

  9. Waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis: effects on sick leaves and cost of lost workdays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana I Halonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2007, part of a drinking water distribution system was accidentally contaminated with waste water effluent causing a gastroenteritis outbreak in a Finnish town. We examined the acute and cumulative effects of this incidence on sick leaves among public sector employees residing in the clean and contaminated areas, and the additional costs of lost workdays due to the incidence. METHODS: Daily information on sick leaves of 1789 Finnish Public Sector Study participants was obtained from employers' registers. Global Positioning System-coordinates were used for linking participants to the clean and contaminated areas. Prevalence ratios (PR for weekly sickness absences were calculated using binomial regression analysis. Calculations for the costs were based on prior studies. RESULTS: Among those living in the contaminated areas, the prevalence of participants on sick leave was 3.54 (95% confidence interval (CI 2.97-4.22 times higher on the week following the incidence compared to the reference period. Those living and working in the clean area were basically not affected, the corresponding PR for sick leaves was 1.12, 95% CI 0.73-1.73. No cumulative effects on sick leaves were observed among the exposed. The estimated additional costs of lost workdays due to the incidence were 1.8-2.1 million euros. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of sickness absences among public sector employees residing in affected areas increased shortly after drinking water distribution system was contaminated, but no long-term effects were observed. The estimated costs of lost workdays were remarkable, thus, the cost-benefits of better monitoring systems for the water distribution systems should be evaluated.

  10. Affect and Nostalgia in Eva Hoffman’s Lost in Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kella Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the affective terrain of Poland, Canada, and the US in Eva Hoffman’s autobiographical account of her migration and exile in Lost in Translation: A Life in a New Language (1989, the text that launched Hoffman’s reputation as a writer and intellectual. Hoffman’s Jewish family left Poland for Vancouver in 1959, when restrictions on emigration were lifted. Hoffman was 13 when she emigrated to Canada, where she lived until she went to college in the US and began her career. Lost in Translation represents her trajectory in terms of “Paradise,” “Exile,” and “The New World,” and the narrative explicitly thematizes nostalgia. While Hoffman’s nostalgia for post-war Poland has sometimes earned censure from critics who draw attention to Polish anti-Semitism and the failings of Communism, this article stresses how Hoffman’s nostalgia for her Polish childhood is saturated with self-consciousness and an awareness of the politics of remembering and forgetting. Thus, Hoffman’s work helps nuance the literary and critical discourse on nostalgia. Drawing on theories of nostalgia and affect developed by Svetlana Boym and Sara Ahmed, and on Adriana Margareta Dancus’s notion of “affective displacement,” this article examines Hoffman’s complex understanding of nostalgia. It argues that nostalgia in Lost in Translation is conceived as an emotion which offers the means to critique cultural practices and resist cultural assimilation. Moreover, the lyricism of Hoffman’s autobiography becomes a mode for performing the ambivalence of nostalgia and diasporic feeling.

  11. Years of Life Lost due to early death from road traffic injuries in Mazandaran province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Yazdani Charati

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Disasters and traffic accidents as the leading causes of disability and death throughout the world are the most significant health problems which have usually been predictable and, therefore, possible to prevent. The present study, as the first attempt, was conducted to calculate the burden of life years lost due to early death caused by traffic accidents in Mazandaran Province. Materials and Methods: The current study was cross-sectional, and the data was collected from the center of Mazandaran Legal Medicine. The number of years of life lost due to premature death was calculated by using the instructions GBD2010 age and gender composition of the province was taken in the last census in 2012 from the Statistical Center. Then the SPSS Software was used to key in all the collected information in order to perform the analysis. Results: Of the total population in 2015, 729 deaths were recorded due to car accidents with 77.9 percent of them being male. Mean age was 43.07±21.18 and 44.67±23.34 in women. The number of years of life lost due to premature death was 24972.7 years in men, 6965.3 years in women, and the total of two genders was 31938 years (10.6 years per thousand people which were calculated, and it was the highest in the age group ranging from 20 to 24 years old. Discussion: According to the high rate of deaths from traffic accidents and damages resulted from it, and in order to reduce these losses, it is necessary to take appropriate preventive measures.

  12. The significance of presenteeism for the value of lost production: the case of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Søgaard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Rikke Søgaard1, Jan Sørensen1, Louise Linde2, Merete L Hetland2,31CAST – Centre for Applied Health Services Research and Technology Assessment, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark; 2Department of Rheumatology, Hvidovre and Glostrup Hospitals, Denmark; 3The DANBIO registry, Hvidovre and Glostrup Hospitals, DenmarkAbstract: Lost production can be due to individuals’ time lost to work (absenteeism, as well as their time at work with reduced productivity because of ill health (presenteeism. A sound methodological framework for the assessment of presenteeism remains to be established but given its significance, ignoring it would lead to severe underestimations, eg, in cost-of-illness studies. The objective of this study was to assess the empirical significance of absenteeism and presenteeism in terms of production loss using the case of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Selected modules from the Health and Labor Questionnaire were applied in a cross-sectional study of 3,704 patients with RA. The costs of absenteeism and presenteeism were estimated using the Human Capital approach, and the impact of including multipliers adjusting for the productivity effect of a workers’ absence or impaired presenteeism on societal productivity was demonstrated. RA-related absenteeism over the last 14 days was 22.31 hours (standard deviation [SD], 26.51 with a resulting cost of €473 (SD, 575 and €762 (SD, 926 depending on whether a multiplier was included. Presenteeism was found to affect 7.98 (SD, 3.24 working days over the last 14 days with a resulting cost of €168 (SD, 203 and €203 (SD, 245, again depending on whether a multiplier was included. Overall, this article demonstrates that the value of lost production due to RA could be subject to an almost factor 2 increase if productivity effects of presenteeism and general multipliers are included.Keywords: work limitations, Health and Labor Questionnaire, productivity, production loss

  13. Healthy Life-Years Lost and Excess Bed-Days Due to 6 Patient Safety Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaolin; Vincent, Charles; Smith, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is little satisfactory evidence on the harm of safety incidents to patients, in terms of lost potential health and life-years. Objective: To estimate the healthy life-years (HLYs) lost due to 6 incidents in English hospitals between the years 2005/2006 and 2009/2010, to compare burden across incidents, and estimate excess bed-days. Research Design: The study used cross-sectional analysis of the medical records of all inpatients treated in 273 English hospitals. Patients with 6 types of preventable incidents were identified. Total attributable loss of HLYs was estimated through propensity score matching by considering the hypothetical remaining length and quality of life had the incident not occurred. Results: The 6 incidents resulted in an annual loss of 68 HLYs and 934 excess bed-days per 100,000 population. Preventable pressure ulcers caused the loss of 26 HLYs and 555 excess bed-days annually. Deaths in low-mortality procedures resulted in 25 lost life-years and 42 bed-days. Deep-vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolisms cost 12 HLYs, and 240 bed-days. Postoperative sepsis, hip fractures, and central-line infections cost incidents is roughly comparable with the UK burden of Multiple Sclerosis (80 DALYs per 100,000), HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis (63 DALYs), and Cervical Cancer (58 DALYs). There were marked differences in the harm caused by the incidents, despite the public attention all of them receive. Decision makers can use the results to prioritize resources into further research and effective interventions. PMID:27753744

  14. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-12-19

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel brain pathways and functions of the nervous system. Here, we review and further develop some insights to a new hypothesis on one mechanism that may contribute to nervous system evolution, in particular by brain pathway duplication. Like gene duplication, we propose that whole brain pathways can duplicate and the duplicated pathway diverge to take on new functions. We suggest that one mechanism of brain pathway duplication could be through gene duplication, although other mechanisms are possible. We focus on brain pathways for vocal learning and spoken language in song-learning birds and humans as example systems. This view presents a new framework for future research in our understanding of brain evolution and novel behavioural traits. © 2015 The Authors.

  15. Maintenance of Lost Weight and Long-Term Management of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kevin D; Kahan, Scott

    2018-01-01

    Weight loss can be achieved through a variety of modalities, but long-term maintenance of lost weight is much more challenging. Obesity interventions typically result in early weight loss followed by a weight plateau and progressive regain. This review describes current understanding of the biological, behavioral, and environmental factors driving this near-ubiquitous body weight trajectory and the implications for long-term weight management. Treatment of obesity requires ongoing clinical attention and weight maintenance-specific counseling to support sustainable healthful behaviors and positive weight regulation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. [An Epistemological Analysis of] Predestination and Free-Will in John Milton’s Paradise Lost

    OpenAIRE

    Sayyed Vahid Abtahi

    2014-01-01

    Paradise Lost by John Milton is one of the most important literary works of the seventeenth century. In this epic in verse Milton, by displaying a portrait that combines Greek Mythology and Christian teachings, seeks to elucidate Divine Providence and man’s relation with God’s decree. He puts together Divine will-power and human determination to make the meaning understood of the Man’s Fall. Milton first adhered to Calvin’s school with regard to determinism and free will but afterward he turn...

  17. Exit points, on plasma, of lost fast ions during NBI in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of the exit points, on plasma border, for the lost fast ions during tangential balanced NBI in TJ-II helical axis Stellarator is theoretically analysed, as well for direct as for delayed losses. The link between, the position of those exit points and the corresponding at birth, orbits and drifts is analysed also. It is shown that such relation is rather independent of beam energy and plasma density and is mainly related to the magnetic configuration characteristics. This study is a needed intermediate step to the analysis of impacts of those ions on the vacuum vessel of TJ-II. (Author) 2 refs

  18. Exit points, on plasma, of lost fast ions during NBI in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.

    1995-09-01

    The distribution of the exit points, on plasma border, for the lost fast ions during tangential balanced NBI in TJ-II helical axis Stellarator is theoretically analysed, as well for direct as for delayed losses. The link between the position of those exit points and the corresponding at birth, orbits and drifts is analysed also, it is shown that such relation is rather independent of beam energy and plasma density and is mainly related to the magnetic configuration characteristics. This study is a needed intermediate step to the analysis of impacts of those ions on the vacuum vessel of TJ-II

  19. Life years lost attributable to late effects after radiotherapy for early stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechner, Laura Ann; Maraldo, Maja Vestmø; Vogelius, Ivan Richter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Due to the long life expectancy after treatment, the risk of late effects after radiotherapy (RT) is of particular importance for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Both deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) and proton therapy have been shown to reduce the dose to normal...... tissues for mediastinal HL, but the impact of these techniques in combination is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the life years lost (LYL) attributable to late effects after RT for mediastinal HL using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in free breathing (FB) and DIBH...

  20. Initial Results from the Lost Alpha Diagnostics on Joint European Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, Doug; Baeumel, Stefan; Cecil, Ed; Ellis, Bob; Fullard, Keith; Hill, Ken; Horton, Alan; Kiptily, Vasily; Pedrick, Les; Reich, Matthias; Werner, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Two devices have been installed in the Joint European Torus (JET) vacuum vessel near the plasma boundary to investigate the loss of energetic ions and fusion products in general and alpha particles in particular during the upcoming JET experiments. These devices are (i) a set of multichannel thin foil Faraday collectors, and (ii) a well collimated scintillator which is optically connected to a charge-coupled device. Initial results, including the radial energy and poloidal dependence of lost ions from hydrogen and deuterium plasmas during the 2005-06 JET restart campaign, will be presented.

  1. Ambient air pollution and years of life lost in Ningbo, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tianfeng; Yang, Zuyao; Liu, Tao; Shen, Yueping; Fu, Xiaohong; Qian, Xujun; Zhang, Yuelun; Wang, Yong; Xu, Zhiwei; Zhu, Shankuan; Mao, Chen; Xu, Guozhang; Tang, Jinling

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the burden of air pollution on years of life lost (YLL) in addition to mortality, we conducted a time series analysis based on the data on air pollution, meteorological conditions and 163,704 non-accidental deaths of Ningbo, China, 2009-2013. The mean concentrations of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter air pollution lasted for four days (lag 0-3), and were more significant in the elderly than in the young population for both outcomes. These findings clarify the burden of air pollution on YLL and highlight the importance and urgency of air pollution control in China.

  2. Love’s Labour’s Lost and Much Ado About Nothing: An Early Dipt

    OpenAIRE

    Chiari, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    In his Palladis Tamia published in 1598, Francis Meres gave a list of popular plays, already a fairly long one, written by a young playwright aged 34, William Shakespeare. In Meres’s inventory, an intriguing, unknown play called Love’s Labour’s Won is paired with Love’s Labour’s Lost, a mention which has so far remained a complete mystery. This paper aims at reconsidering the hypothesis according to which Much Ado About Nothing might be the comedy designated under the title of Love’s Labour’s...

  3. Keterpenjaraan perempuan dalam ruang kota di dalam Lost in translation (2003 dan The good girl (2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asri Saraswati

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The urban space offers more challenges to the female self. Two motion pictures,Lost in translation (2003 and The good girl (2002, depict the issue of gender andspace by conveying the city as prison for the female characters. This articleanalyses the urban space and argues that in the two movies, the female charactersstruggle and eventually create meaning in the urban room. Applying feminismand urban geography in analysing the position of female characters within thecity, the paper finds that the two films offer their perception on, and solutions to,the imprisonment of women by the urban environment which is stereotypicallymasculine.

  4. Paradise Lost: Difference Between Adam and Eve's Lament on Leaving Paradise - a Contrastive Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Servín, Sara Torres

    2013-01-01

    The difference between Adam and Eve’s lament on leaving Paradise in Milton’s Paradise Lost is striking in its contrastive content and depth. This paper analyzes the difference that exists between the feelings and spiritual attitudes that Adam and Eve express on the occasion when they are informed by the angel Michael that they have to abandon the Garden of Eden. It is a comparison of their lament in order to understand the contrast of the two attitudes that Milton wove in the tapestry that Pa...

  5. The lost archive, the myth of philology, and the study of the Qur’an

    OpenAIRE

    Marx, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A reaction to the article „The Lost Archive“, The Wall Street Journal 12.1.2008, page 1 (US edition) http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120008793352784631.html The belief in the myth that old manuscripts should be mysterious and powerful is part and parcel of the age of Modernity. That such expectations were operative in the discussion on the Qumran fragments is still remembered, and more recently the Da Vinci Code, in itself a quite shallow story, sold extremely well. The fact that the Wall Str...

  6. Search for lost or orphan radioactive sources based on NaI gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aage, H.K.; Korsbech, U.

    2003-01-01

    Within recent decades many radioactive sources have been lost, stolen, or abandoned, and some have caused contamination or irradiation of people. Therefore reliable methods for source recovery are needed. The use of car borne NaI(Tl) detectors is discussed. Standard processing of spectra in general can disclose strong and medium level signals from manmade nuclides. But methods for detecting low level signals from weak, distant or shielded sources can be improved. New methods for source detection and identification based on noise adjusted singular value decomposition and on area specific stripping of spectra are presented

  7. Initial Results from the Lost Alpha Diagnostics on Joint European Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, Doug; Cecil, Ed; Ellis, Bob; Fullard, Keith; Hill, Ken; Horton, Alan; Kiptily, Vasily; Pedrick, Les; Reich, Matthias

    2007-07-25

    Two devices have been installed in the Joint European Torus (JET) vacuum vessel near the plasma boundary to investigate the loss of energetic ions and fusion products in general and alpha particles in particular during the upcoming JET experiments. These devices are (i) a set of multichannel thin foil Faraday collectors, and (ii) a well collimated scintillator which is optically connected to a charge-coupled device. Initial results, including the radial energy and poloidal dependence of lost ions from hydrogen and deuterium plasmas during the 2005–06 JET restart campaign, will be presented.

  8. Milton’s Pro-Feminist Presentation of Eve in Paradise Lost

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah F. Al-Badarneh

    2014-01-01

    This paper absolves John Milton from any critical and feminist accusation of being anti-feminist in Paradise Lost. Such defense of Milton is based on the close reading and analysis of the passages that focus on Adam and Eve in the text. This study highlights Milton’s modern view of women as independent, free, and responsible. It also presents his iconoclasm in representing women as leaders and initiative takers when decision is to be taken. This study shows Milton reversing traditional gender...

  9. Drilling fluids and lost circulation in hot-dry-rock geothermal wells at Fenton Hill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuckols, E.B.; Miles, D.; Laney, R.; Polk, G.; Friddle, H.; Simpson, G.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal hot dry rock drilling at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico encountered problems of catastrophic lost circulation in cavernous areas of limestones in the Sandia Formation, severe corrosion due to temperatures of up to 320/sup 0/C, and torque problems caused by 35/sup 0/ hole angle and the abrasiveness of Precambrian crystalline rock. The use of polymeric flocculated bentonite fluid, clear water, fibrous material, dry drilling, oxygen scavengers, a biodegradable lubricant mixture of modified triglicerides and alcohol, and maintenance of a high pH, were some of the approaches taken toward solving these problems.

  10. Palmyra as it Once Was: 3d Virtual Reconstruction and Visualization of AN Irreplacable Lost Treasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, A.

    2017-05-01

    Palmyra was a mosaic which was composed through its colourful past, by Assyrians, Parthians, Greeks and Romans. For centuries, the spectacular ruins and impressive panorama of the antique city used to captivate and inspire the visitors as the witnesses of its illustrious history. As a grim consequence of the horrific conflict that engulfed Syria, since May 2015 they are no more to be seen. Palmyra has been purposely targeted and obliterated, the ruins have been reduced to rubble. The immense beauty and rich heritage of Palmyra which has been lost forever is reconstructed here as it was once was, at the top of its glory, with the hope of preserving its memory.

  11. Search for lost or orphan radioactive sources based on Nal gamma spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Within recent decades many radioactive sources have been lost, stolen, or abandoned, and some have caused contamination or irradiation of people. Therefore reliable methods for source recovery are needed. The use of car borne NaI(Tl) detectors is discussed. Standard processing of spectra in general...... can disclose strong and medium level signals from manmade nuclides. But methods for detecting low level signals from weak, distant or shielded sources can be improved. New methods for source detection and identification based on noise adjusted singular value decomposition and on area specific...

  12. 76 FR 37160 - Notice of Availability of Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Lost Creek In...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... assessed the environmental impacts from the construction, operation, aquifer restoration, and..., operate, conduct aquifer restoration, and decommission an ISR facility at Lost Creek. Alternatives that were considered, but were eliminated from detailed analysis, included conventional mining and milling...

  13. What turns assistive into restorative brain-machine interfaces?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Gharabaghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMI may support motor impaired patients during activities of daily living by controlling external devices such as prostheses (assistive BMI. Moreover, BMIs are applied in conjunction with robotic orthoses for rehabilitation of lost motor function via neurofeedback training (restorative BMI. Using assistive BMI in a rehabilitation context does not automatically turn them into restorative devices. This perspective article suggests key features of restorative BMI and provides the supporting evidence:In summary, BMI may be referred to as restorative tools when demonstrating subsequently (i operant learning and progressive evolution of specific brain states/dynamics, (ii correlated modulations of functional networks related to the therapeutic goal, (iii subsequent improvement in a specific task, and (iv an explicit correlation between the modulated brain dynamics and the achieved behavioral gains. Such findings would provide the rationale for translating BMI-based interventions into clinical settings for reinforcement learning and motor rehabilitation following stroke.

  14. What Turns Assistive into Restorative Brain-Machine Interfaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) may support motor impaired patients during activities of daily living by controlling external devices such as prostheses (assistive BMI). Moreover, BMIs are applied in conjunction with robotic orthoses for rehabilitation of lost motor function via neurofeedback training (restorative BMI). Using assistive BMI in a rehabilitation context does not automatically turn them into restorative devices. This perspective article suggests key features of restorative BMI and provides the supporting evidence: In summary, BMI may be referred to as restorative tools when demonstrating subsequently (i) operant learning and progressive evolution of specific brain states/dynamics, (ii) correlated modulations of functional networks related to the therapeutic goal, (iii) subsequent improvement in a specific task, and (iv) an explicit correlation between the modulated brain dynamics and the achieved behavioral gains. Such findings would provide the rationale for translating BMI-based interventions into clinical settings for reinforcement learning and motor rehabilitation following stroke.

  15. Are lutein, lycopene, and β-carotene lost through the digestive process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Rachel E; Gleize, Béatrice; Borel, Patrick; Desmarchelier, Charles; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine

    2017-04-19

    The bioavailability of many carotenoids has been assessed, but little attention has been given to the metabolism of these antioxidant compounds during digestion. The isomerization and loss of lutein, lycopene, and β-carotene incorporated into a lipid-rich liquid meal was determined in vitro through the gastric, duodenal, and jejunal phases in the presence and absence of digestive enzymes, and in the presence and absence of known oxidizing agents often found in mixed meals (metmyoglobin in red meat and ferrous sulfate in supplemental iron). Carotenoids were quantitated using HPLC-PDA. In the absence of enzymes, lutein and lycopene were lost during earlier phases of the digestive process. In the presence of enzymes, lutein and lycopene were robust through the gastric and duodenal phases, with statistically significant losses of 40% and 20%, respectively, observed only during the jejunal phase. Regardless of the presence or absence of enzymes, an initial 25% of β-carotene was lost during the gastric phase, but no further loss was observed. Ferrous sulfate had no significant impact on any carotenoid level. Metmyoglobin had no impact on lutein, but significantly reduced lycopene and β-carotene levels by 30% and 80%, respectively, by the end of the jejunal phase. No significant isomerization was observed between the initial and jejunal phases for any of the carotenoids.

  16. Multilocus genotypes from Charles Darwin's finches: biodiversity lost since the voyage of the Beagle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petren, Kenneth; Grant, Peter R; Grant, B Rosemary; Clack, Andrew A; Lescano, Ninnia V

    2010-04-12

    Genetic analysis of museum specimens offers a direct window into a past that can predate the loss of extinct forms. We genotyped 18 Galápagos finches collected by Charles Darwin and companions during the voyage of the Beagle in 1835, and 22 specimens collected in 1901. Our goals were to determine if significant genetic diversity has been lost since the Beagle voyage and to determine the genetic source of specimens for which the collection locale was not recorded. Using 'ancient' DNA techniques, we quantified variation at 14 autosomal microsatellite loci. Assignment tests showed several museum specimens genetically matched recently field-sampled birds from their island of origin. Some were misclassified or were difficult to classify. Darwin's exceptionally large ground finches (Geospiza magnirostris) from Floreana and San Cristóbal were genetically distinct from several other currently existing populations. Sharp-beaked ground finches (Geospiza difficilis) from Floreana and Isabela were also genetically distinct. These four populations are currently extinct, yet they were more genetically distinct from congeners than many other species of Darwin's finches are from each other. We conclude that a significant amount of the finch biodiversity observed and collected by Darwin has been lost since the voyage of the Beagle.

  17. Reasserting the primacy of human needs to reclaim the 'lost half' of sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark; Longhurst, James W S

    2018-04-15

    The concept of sustainable development evolved from growing awareness of the interdependence of social and economic progress with the limits of the supporting natural environment, becoming progressively integrated into global agreements and transposition into local regulatory and implementation frameworks. We argue that transposition of the concept into regulation and supporting tools reduced the focus to minimal environmental and social standards, perceived as imposing constraints rather than opportunities for innovation to meet human needs. The aspirational 'half' of the concept of sustainable development specifically addressing human needs was thus lost in transposing high ideals into regulatory instruments. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) restore focus on interlinked human needs, stimulating innovation of products and processes to satisfy them. Through three case studies - PVC water pipes, river quality management in England, and UK local air quality management - we explore the current operationalisation of the concept in diverse settings, using the SDG framework to highlight the broader societal purposes central to sustainable development. Partnerships involving civil society support evolution of regulatory instruments and their implementation, optimising social and ecological benefits thereby serving more human needs. Restoring the visionary 'lost half' of sustainable development - meeting human needs in sustainable ways - creates incentives for innovation and partnership; an innovation framework rather than a perceived constraint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Numerical simulation and analysis of mould filling process in lost foam casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Junxia

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In lost foam casting (LFC the foam pattern is the key criterion, and the filling process is crucial to ensure the high quality of the foam pattern. Filling which lacks uniformity and denseness will cause various defects and affect the surface quality of the casting. The infl uential factors of the fi lling process are realized in this research. Optimization of the fi lling process, enhancement of effi ciency, decrease of waste, etc., are obtained by the numerical simulation of the fi lling process using a computer.The equations governing the dense gas-solid two-phase flow are established, and the physical significance of each equation is discussed. The Euler/Lagrange numerical model is used to simulate the fluid dynamic characteristics of the dense two-phase fl ow during the mould fi lling process in lost foam casting. The experiments and numerical results showed that this method can be a very promising tool in the mould fi lling simulation of beads' movement.

  19. Lost at sea: the medicine, physiology and psychology of prolonged immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Heather; Leach, John; Davis, Michael; Vertongen, Vicki

    2017-12-01

    In most countries, immersion represents the second most common cause of accidental death in children and the third in adults. Between 2010 and 2013, 561 deaths worldwide involving recreational divers were recorded by the Divers Alert Network. Consequently, there is no room for complacency when diving. Being lost at sea is a diver's worst nightmare. In 2006, a diver was lost at sea off the coast of New Zealand for 75 hours. It is unprecedented that, after such a long time immersed in temperate (16-17°C) waters, he was found and survived. His case is presented and utilised to illustrate the many physiological and psychological factors involved in prolonged immersion and what might determine survival under such circumstances. We also briefly review options for enhancing diver location at sea and a few issues related to search and rescue operations are discussed. Copyright: This article is the copyright of the authors who grant Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine a non-exclusive licence to publish the article in printed and other forms.

  20. Assessing Implicit Cognition Among Patients Lost to Follow-up for HIV Care: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Eric; Lyons, Thomas; Wolfe, Brenda; Rolfsen, Norma; Williams, Maryanne; Rucker, Monique; Glick, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While a growing body of research indicates that implicit cognitive processes play an important role in a range of health behaviors, the assessment of these impulsive, associative mental processes among patients living with HIV has received little attention. This preliminary study explored how multidimensional scaling (MDS) could be used to assess implicit cognitive processes among patients lost to follow-up for HIV care and develop interventions to improve their engagement. Method: The sample consisted of 33 patients who were identified as lost to follow up for HIV care at two urban hospitals. Participants were randomly assigned to either the MDS assessment program or control group. All participants underwent measures designed to gauge behavioral change intentions and treatment motivation. Assessment group participants were interviewed to determine their reactions to the assessment program. Results: The MDS assessment program identified cognitive processes and their relationship to treatment-related behaviors among assessment group participants. Assessment group participants reported significantly greater behavior change intentions than those in the control group (p =.02; Cohen’s d = 0.84). Conclusion: MDS shows promise as a tool to identify implicit cognitive processes related to treatment-related behaviors. Assessments based on MDS could serve as the basis for patient-centered clinical interventions designed to improve treatment adherence and HIV care engagement in general. PMID:27347274

  1. A SOLAR CYCLE LOST IN 1793-1800: EARLY SUNSPOT OBSERVATIONS RESOLVE THE OLD MYSTERY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usoskin, Ilya G.; Mursula, Kalevi; Arlt, Rainer; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the lack of reliable sunspot observations, the quality of the sunspot number series is poor in the late 18th century, leading to the abnormally long solar cycle (1784-1799) before the Dalton minimum. Using the newly recovered solar drawings by the 18-19th century observers Staudacher and Hamilton, we construct the solar butterfly diagram, i.e., the latitudinal distribution of sunspots in the 1790s. The sudden, systematic occurrence of sunspots at high solar latitudes in 1793-1796 unambiguously shows that a new cycle started in 1793, which was lost in the traditional Wolf sunspot series. This finally confirms the existence of the lost cycle that has been proposed earlier, thus resolving an old mystery. This Letter brings the attention of the scientific community to the need of revising the sunspot series in the 18th century. The presence of a new short, asymmetric cycle implies changes and constraints to sunspot cycle statistics, solar activity predictions, and solar dynamo theories, as well as for solar-terrestrial relations.

  2. A Solar Cycle Lost in 1793-1800: Early Sunspot Observations Resolve the Old Mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usoskin, Ilya G.; Mursula, Kalevi; Arlt, Rainer; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.

    2009-08-01

    Because of the lack of reliable sunspot observations, the quality of the sunspot number series is poor in the late 18th century, leading to the abnormally long solar cycle (1784-1799) before the Dalton minimum. Using the newly recovered solar drawings by the 18-19th century observers Staudacher and Hamilton, we construct the solar butterfly diagram, i.e., the latitudinal distribution of sunspots in the 1790s. The sudden, systematic occurrence of sunspots at high solar latitudes in 1793-1796 unambiguously shows that a new cycle started in 1793, which was lost in the traditional Wolf sunspot series. This finally confirms the existence of the lost cycle that has been proposed earlier, thus resolving an old mystery. This Letter brings the attention of the scientific community to the need of revising the sunspot series in the 18th century. The presence of a new short, asymmetric cycle implies changes and constraints to sunspot cycle statistics, solar activity predictions, and solar dynamo theories, as well as for solar-terrestrial relations.

  3. Nasopharynx- The Secret Vault for Lost Foreign Bodies of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arijit Jotdar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Foreign bodies in the upper aerodigestive tract often get lost following inappropriate attempts at removal. Children may present late with localized infection, posing a challenge to the otolaryngologists in a referral set-up in diagnosing and retrieving such foreign bodies.   Case Report: A two-year-old boy presented with refractory purulent rhinorrhea and intermittent low-grade fever. The symptoms suggested rhinosinusitis; however, following a high index of suspicion, he was referred for further evaluation, with the possibility of any hidden foreign object in the upper aerodigestive tract. His soft palate appeared bulged, and his mother informed that he had ingested the cap of a plastic bottle about a month back which could not be retrieved despite several attempts by her. X-ray of soft tissue nasopharynx revealed a radiolucent shadow of a round object resulting in palatal bulging. It was eventually removed by combined endoscopic/transoral approach.   Conclusion: In a child with a lost foreign body, the nasopharynx should be meticulously explored. This is less common for ingested objects compared to inhaled ones. The diagnosis becomes furthermore challenging when it is not radio-opaque. Naïve manipulations must be avoided and prompt referral should be made to the otolaryngologists for guided removal and minimizing complications.

  4. Light's labour's lost - policies for energy-efficient lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-29

    When William Shakepeare wrote Love's Labour's Lost he would have used light from tallow candles at a cost (today) of 12,000 British pounds per million-lumen hours. The same amount of light from electric lamps now costs only 2 pounds! But today's low-cost illumination still has a dark side. Globally, lighting consumes more electricity than is produced by either hydro or nuclear power and results in CO2 emissions equivalent to two thirds of the world's cars. A standard incandescent lamp may be much more efficient than a tallow candle, but it is far less efficient than a high-pressure sodium lamp. Were inefficient light sources to be replaced by the equivalent efficient ones, global lighting energy demand would be up to 40% less at a lower overall cost. Larger savings still could be realised through the intelligent use of controls, lighting levels and daylight. But achieving efficient lighting is not just a question of technology; it requires policies to transform current practice. This book documents the broad range of policy measures to stimulate efficient lighting that have already been implemented around the world and suggests new ways these could be strengthened to prevent light's labour's from being lost.

  5. First satellite tracks of neonate sea turtles redefine the ‘lost years’ oceanic niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Katherine L.; Wyneken, Jeanette; Porter, Warren P.; Luo, Jiangang

    2014-01-01

    Few at-sea behavioural data exist for oceanic-stage neonate sea turtles, a life-stage commonly referred to as the sea turtle ‘lost years’. Historically, the long-term tracking of small, fast-growing organisms in the open ocean was logistically or technologically impossible. Here, we provide the first long-term satellite tracks of neonate sea turtles. Loggerheads (Caretta caretta) were remotely tracked in the Atlantic Ocean using small solar-powered satellite transmitters. We show that oceanic-stage turtles (i) rarely travel in Continental Shelf waters, (ii) frequently depart the currents associated with the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, (iii) travel quickly when in Gyre currents, and (iv) select sea surface habitats that are likely to provide a thermal benefit or refuge to young sea turtles, supporting growth, foraging and survival. Our satellite tracks help define Atlantic loggerhead nursery grounds and early loggerhead habitat use, allowing us to re-examine sea turtle ‘lost years’ paradigms. PMID:24598420

  6. Time Trend of the People lost follow up on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART Services in Nepal: A Epidemiological Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Sathian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The real state about the spread of the HIV epidemic in Nepal is not clear since the details available are on the basis of repeated integrated biological and behavioral surveillance. Objective To study the trends of People lost follow up on ART in future. Material and methods: A retrospective study was carried out on the data collected from the Health ministry records of Nepal, between 2006 and 2012. Descriptive statistics and statistical modelling were used for the analysis and forecasting of data. Results: Including the constant term from the equation, the quadratic model was the best fit, for the forecasting of People lost follow up on ART. Using quadratic equation, it is estimated that 4331 reported number of People lost follow up on ART will be there in Nepal by the year 2020. Conclusion: The People lost follow up on ART in Nepal are having an increasing trend. Estimates of the total number of People lost follow up on ART attributable to the major routes of infection make an important contribution to public health policy. They can be used for the planning of healthcare services and for contributing to estimates of the future numbers with People lost follow up on ART used for planning health promotion programmes.

  7. Development of double density whole brain fNIRS with EEG system for brain machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, A; Udagawa, H; Masuda, Y; Kohno, S; Amita, T; Inoue, Y

    2011-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) are expected as new man-machine interfaces. Non-invasive BMI have the potential to improve the quality of life of many disabled individuals with safer operation. The non-invasive BMI using the functional functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) with the electroencephalogram (EEG) has potential applicability beyond the restoration of lost movement and rehabilitation in paraplegics and would enable normal individuals to have direct brain control of external devices in their daily lives. To shift stage of the non-invasive BMI from laboratory to clinical, the key factor is to develop high-accuracy signal decoding technology and highly restrictive of the measurement area. In this article, we present the development of a high-accuracy brain activity measurement system by combining fNIRS and EEG. The new fNIRS had high performances with high spatial resolution using double density technique and a large number of measurement channels to cover a whole human brain.

  8. What Is Lost During Dreamless Sleep: The Relationship Between Neural Connectivity Patterns and Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Klimova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep is characterised by reduced consciousness; thus, studying its neural characteristics acts as a useful indication of what is needed for conscious experience. The integrated information theory (Tononi, 2008 states that the ability of different thalamocortical regions to interact is crucial for consciousness, thereby motivating research concerning connectivity changes in the thalamocortical system that accompany changing consciousness levels. This review aims to discuss investigations of functional connectivity of resting-state and large-scale brain networks, applying correlational approaches to neuroimaging data as well as studies that used brain stimulation to investigate effective connectivity. Most findings suggest a reorganisation of functional brain networks where inter-region connectivity is reduced and intra-region connectivity is stronger in deep sleep than wakefulness.

  9. Measuring brain glucose phosphorylation with labeled glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brondsted, H.E.; Gjedde, A.

    1988-01-01

    This study tested whether glucose labeled at the C-6 position generates metabolites that leave brain so rapidly that C-6-labeled glucose cannot be used to measure brain glucose phosphorylation (CMRGlc). In pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, the parietal cortex uptake of [ 14 C]glucose labeled in the C-6 position was followed for times ranging from 10 s to 60 min. We subtracted the observed radioactivity from the radioactivity expected with no loss of labeled metabolites from brain by extrapolation of glucose uptake in an initial period when loss was negligible. The observed radioactivity was a monoexponentially declining function of the total radioactivity expected in the absence of metabolite loss. The constant of decline was 0.0077.min-1 for parietal cortex. Metabolites were lost from the beginning of the experiment. However, with correction for the loss of labeled metabolites, it was possible to determine an average CMRGlc between 4 and 60 min of circulation of 64 +/- 4 (SE; n = 49) mumol.hg-1.min-1

  10. The influence of the parameters of lost foam process on the quality of aluminum alloys castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aćimović-Pavlović Zagorka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research results of application of Lost foam process for aluminum alloys castings of a simple geometry. The process characteristic is that patterns and gating of moulds, made of polymers, stay in the mould till the liquid metal inflow. In contact with the liquid metal, pattern intensely and in relatively short time decomposes and evaporates, which is accompanied by casting crystallization. As a consequence of polymer pattern decomposition and evaporation a great quantity of liquid and gaseous products are produced, which is often the cause of different types of casting errors. This paper presents the results of a research with a special consideration given to detecting and analyzing the errors of castings. In most cases the cause of these errors are defects of polymer materials used for evaporable patterns production, as well as defects of materials for refractory coatings production for polymer patterns. The researches have shown that different types of coatings determine properties of the obtained castings. Also, the critical processing parameters (polymer pattern density, casting temperature, permeability of refractory coating and sand, construction of patterns and gating of moulds significantly affect on castings quality. During the research a special consideration was given to control and optimization of these parameters with the goal of achieving applicable castings properties. The study of surface and internal error of castings was performed systematically in order to carry out preventive measures to avoid errors and minimize production costs. In order to achieve qualitative and profitable castings production by the method of Lost foam it is necessary to reach the balance in the system: evaporable polymer pattern - liquid metal - refractory coating - sandy cast in the phase of metal inflow, decomposition and evaporation of polymer pattern, formation and solidification of castings. By optimizing the processing

  11. Calculating expected years of life lost for assessing local ethnic disparities in causes of premature death

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    Katcher Brian S

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A core function of local health departments is to conduct health assessments. The analysis of death certificates provides information on diseases, conditions, and injuries that are likely to cause death – an important outcome indicator of population health. The expected years of life lost (YLL measure is a valid, stand-alone measure for identifying and ranking the underlying causes of premature death. The purpose of this study was to rank the leading causes of premature death among San Francisco residents, and to share detailed methods so that these analyses can be used in other local health jurisdictions. Methods Using death registry data and population estimates for San Francisco deaths in 2003–2004, we calculated the number of deaths, YLL, and age-standardized YLL rates (ASYRs. The results were stratified by sex, ethnicity, and underlying cause of death. The YLL values were used to rank the leading causes of premature death for men and women, and by ethnicity. Results In the years 2003–2004, 6312 men died (73,627 years of life lost, and 5726 women died (51,194 years of life lost. The ASYR for men was 65% higher compared to the ASYR for women (8971.1 vs. 5438.6 per 100,000 persons per year. The leading causes of premature deaths are those with the largest average YLLs and are largely preventable. Among men, these were HIV/AIDS, suicide, drug overdose, homicide, and alcohol use disorder; and among women, these were lung cancer, breast cancer, hypertensive heart disease, colon cancer, and diabetes mellitus. A large health disparity exists between African Americans and other ethnic groups: African American age-adjusted overall and cause-specific YLL rates were higher, especially for homicide among men. Except for homicide among Latino men, Latinos and Asians have comparable or lower YLL rates among the leading causes of death compared to whites. Conclusion Local death registry data can be used to measure, rank, and

  12. Nourish Your Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does your brain. You can’t stop normal cognitive decline, just as you can’t stop other parts of normal aging. However, you can maintain your body and brain health by making healthy choices about your lifestyle, diet, ...

  13. Aneurysm in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/001414.htm Aneurysm in the brain To use the sharing features on this page, ... aneurysm occurs in a blood vessel of the brain, it is called a cerebral, or intracranial, aneurysm. ...

  14. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  15. Genetic Brain Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  16. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  17. Brain AVM (Arteriovenous Malformation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... middle age, however, brain AVMs tend to remain stable and are less likely to cause symptoms. Some ... path because it isn't slowed down by channels of smaller blood vessels. Surrounding brain tissues can' ...

  18. Biomechanics of the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol

    2011-01-01

    With contributions from scientists at major institutions, this book presents an introduction to brain anatomy for engineers and scientists. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive resource in the field of brain biomechanics.

  19. Insulin and the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosu Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain represents an important site for the action of insulin. Besides the traditionally known importance in glucoregulation, insulin has significant neurotrophic properties and influences the brain activity: insulin influences eating behavior, regulates the storage of energy and several aspects concerning memory and knowledge. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism could be associated with brain aging, vascular and metabolic pathologies. Elucidating the pathways and metabolism of brain insulin could have a major impact on future targeted therapies.

  20. Brain cancer spreads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perryman, Lara; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that ~20% of patients with brain cancer have circulating tumor cells breaks the dogma that these cells are confined to the brain and has important clinical implications (Müller et al., this issue).......The discovery that ~20% of patients with brain cancer have circulating tumor cells breaks the dogma that these cells are confined to the brain and has important clinical implications (Müller et al., this issue)....