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Sample records for ams-02 experiment model

  1. Pulsar Electrons Detection in AMS-02 Experiment. Model Status and Discovery Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochon, Jonathan

    2011-06-01

    The measurements of cosmic rays electrons (e±) have begun a new era a few years ago with high precision experiments like PAMELA and Fermi-LAT. Both experiments show an excess above 10 GeV. Studying Fermi-LAT data, the total electron flux seems to be steeper than expected. While these new measurements have not closed the debate, results from AMS-02 are expected to reach the accuracy needed to determine a full description of these excesses, and hopefully give some evidence on the possible source. We will present in this paper, the AMS-02 capacity in the case of positrons produced by pulsars.

  2. Recent results from the AMS-02 experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vecchi Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The main goals of the detector are the search for antimatter and dark matter in space, as well as the measurement of cosmic ray composition and flux. Precise measurements of cosmic ray positrons and electrons are presented in this document, based on 41×109 events collected during the first 30 months of operations.

  3. Astrophysics with the AMS-02 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Peireira, Rui

    2007-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), whose final version AMS-02 is to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) for at least 3 years, is a detector designed to measure charged cosmic ray spectra with energies up to the TeV region and with high energy photon detection capability up to a few hundred GeV, using state-of-the-art particle identification techniques. Following the successful flight of the detector prototype (AMS-01) aboard the space shuttle, AMS-02 is expected to provide a significant improvement on the current knowledge of the elemental and isotopic composition of hadronic cosmic rays due to its long exposure time (minimum of 3 years) and large acceptance (0.5 m^2 sr) which will enable it to collect a total statistics of more than 10^10 nuclei. Detector capabilities for charge, velocity and mass identification, estimated from ion beam tests and detailed Monte Carlo simulations, are presented. Relevant issues in cosmic ray astrophysics addressed by AMS-02, including the test of cosmic ...

  4. Pinpointing cosmic ray propagation with the AMS-02 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pato, Miguel [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Hooper, Dan [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Simet, Melanie, E-mail: pato@iap.fr, E-mail: dhooper@fnal.gov, E-mail: msimet@uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02), which is scheduled to be deployed onboard the International Space Station later this year, will be capable of measuring the composition and spectra of GeV-TeV cosmic rays with unprecedented precision. In this paper, we study how the projected measurements from AMS-02 of stable secondary-to-primary and unstable ratios (such as boron-to-carbon and beryllium-10-to-beryllium-9) can constrain the models used to describe the propagation of cosmic rays throughout the Milky Way. We find that within the context of fairly simple propagation models, all of the model parameters can be determined with high precision from the projected AMS-02 data. Such measurements are less constraining in more complex scenarios, however, which allow for departures from a power-law form for the diffusion coefficient, for example, or for inhomogeneity or stochasticity in the distribution and chemical abundances of cosmic ray sources.

  5. The electromagnetic calorimeter of the AMS-02 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchi, M.; Basara, L.; Bigongiari, G.; Cervelli, F.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Coignet, G.; Di Falco, S.; Elles, S.; Fiasson, A.; Fougeron, D.; Gallucci, G.; Goy, C.; Incagli, M.; Kossakowski, R.; Lepareur, V.; Li, Z. H.; Maire, M.; Paniccia, M.; Pilo, F.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Tang, X. W.; Vannini, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Zhuang, H. L.

    2012-12-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the AMS-02 experiment is a 3-dimensional sampling calorimeter, made of lead and scintillating fibers. The detector allows for a high granularity, with 18 samplings in the longitudinal direction, and 72 sampling in the lateral direction. The ECAL primary goal is to measure the energy of cosmic rays up to few TeV, however, thanks to the fine grained structure, it can also provide the separation of positrons from protons, in the GeV to TeV region. A direct measurement of high energy photons with accurate energy and direction determination can also be provided.

  6. The AMS-02 Experiment and the Dark Matter Search

    CERN Document Server

    Masi, Nicolo

    AMS-02 is running after great scientific goals since one year and a half: a final setting up for dark matter searches has been achieved, allowing to study the so important antiparticle to particle ratios, which will probably be the first dark matter signals ever corroborated. Even if primary cosmic rays fluxes are subjected to a lot of uncertainties sources, some statements can be done and have been written down about dark matter properties: DM should be a heavy Majorana fermion or Spin 0 or 1 boson, with a mass from about 1 TeV to 10 TeV - unveiling a new TeV-ish search age - which could be able to originate antiparticle fluxes enhancements at high energies, both for positrons and antiprotons. All the observations, direct and indirect, point to these new paradigms or can be traced back to them quite easily. These enhancements perfectly fall into the research window of AMS-02, allowing the experiment to attack each today credible theory. Also an investigation of the Sommerfeld effect-associated dark boson wil...

  7. Dark Matter search with the AMS-02 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardano, Francesco Maria [University of Perugia, Via Pascoli n. 1, Perugia (Italy)], E-mail: cardano@fisica.unipg.it

    2008-04-01

    Late astrophysical and cosmological measurements have shown how {approx}83% of matter of the Universe is dark and non-baryonic. Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model can provide a good candidate as main component of Dark Matter in the neutralino {chi}. In this framework, the magnetic spectrometer AMS-02 has been conceived for the precision measurement on board of the ISS of composition and energy spectrum of cosmic rays over a wide energy range, providing the potential to detect contribution to charged particle fluxes from neutralino annihilation. Due to the general faintness of expected Dark Matter contributions to cosmic ray spectra, interesting research channels are those for which the standard astrophysical background is expected to be low, like antimatter ones. Results of various MC analysis of AMS potential in the measurement of positron, antiproton and antideuteron fluxes are presented.

  8. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS02) experiment on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Behcet ALPAT

    2003-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment is realized in two phases. A precursor flight (STS-91)with a reduced experimental configuration (AMS01) has successfully flown on space shuttle Discovery in June 1998.The final version (AMS02) will be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) as an independent module inearly 2006 for an operational period of three years. The main scientific objectives of AMS02 include the searches forthe antimatter and dark matter in cosmic rays. In this work we will discuss the experimental details as well as the im-proved physics capabilities of AMS02 on ISS.

  9. Performance of a 3d Imaging Electromagnetic Calorimeter for the AMS02 Space Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adloff, C.; Coignet, G.; Girard, L.; Goy, C.; Kossakowski, R.; Lees-Rosier, S.; Pochon, J.; Vialle, J. P.; Cervelli, F.; di Falco, S.; Galeotti, S.; Incagli, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Spinella, F.; Venanzoni, G.; Falchini, E.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Paoletti, R.; Pilo, F.; Turini, N.; Valle, G.; Bolmont, J.; Jacholkowska, A.; Piron, F.; Sapinski, M.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Lu, Y.; Yang, C.

    2005-02-01

    A 3D imaging electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) based on a lead/scintillating-fiber sandwich has been developed for the AMS-02 experiment on the International Space Station. This calorimeter should fulfill the constraints due to the launch and to the operation conditions in space. The engineering model of the ECAL was put through space qualification tests. Results of the vibration and thermal-vacuum tests are presented. To satisfy the physics aims, precise energy measurement and high discrimination between hadronic and electromagnetic cascades are required on a large dynamic range. The ECAL performances were checked by exposing the engineering model to a test beam at CERN in July 2002.

  10. Explaining muon magnetic moment and AMS-02 positron excess in a gauged horizontal symmetric model

    CERN Document Server

    Tomar, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    We extended the standard model with a fourth generation of fermions to explain the discrepancy in the muon magnetic moment and to describe the positron excess observed by AMS-02 experiment. We introduce a gauged $SU(2)_{HV}$ horizontal symmetry between the muon and the 4th generation lepton families and identified the 4th generation right-handed neutrino as the dark matter with mass $\\sim 700$ GeV. The dark matter annihilates through $SU(2)_{HV}$ gauge boson into final states $(\\mu^+ \\mu^-)$ and $(\

  11. A reduced scale EM Calorimeter prototype for the AMS-02 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cervelli, F; Coignet, G; Di Falco, S; Falchini, E; Lorntadze, T; Liu, Z; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Paoletti, R; Pilo, F; Turini, N; Valle, G D; Vannini, C; Venanzoni, G; Yu, Z

    2002-01-01

    A reduced scale prototype of the Pb-SciFi sampling EM calorimeter for the AMS-02 experiment was tested at CERN SPS beam line X5 at energies from 5 to 250 GeV. The detector was equalized with minimum ionizing particles and calibrated with electron beams. The effective sampling thickness, linearity and energy resolution were measured. (7 refs).

  12. Impact of AMS-02 Measurements on Reducing GCR Model Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, T. C.; O'Neill, P. M.; Golge, S.; Norbury, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    For vehicle design, shield optimization, mission planning, and astronaut risk assessment, the exposure from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) poses a significant and complex problem both in low Earth orbit and in deep space. To address this problem, various computational tools have been developed to quantify the exposure and risk in a wide range of scenarios. Generally, the tool used to describe the ambient GCR environment provides the input into subsequent computational tools and is therefore a critical component of end-to-end procedures. Over the past few years, several researchers have independently and very carefully compared some of the widely used GCR models to more rigorously characterize model differences and quantify uncertainties. All of the GCR models studied rely heavily on calibrating to available near-Earth measurements of GCR particle energy spectra, typically over restricted energy regions and short time periods. In this work, we first review recent sensitivity studies quantifying the ions and energies in the ambient GCR environment of greatest importance to exposure quantities behind shielding. Currently available measurements used to calibrate and validate GCR models are also summarized within this context. It is shown that the AMS-II measurements will fill a critically important gap in the measurement database. The emergence of AMS-II measurements also provides a unique opportunity to validate existing models against measurements that were not used to calibrate free parameters in the empirical descriptions. Discussion is given regarding rigorous approaches to implement the independent validation efforts, followed by recalibration of empirical parameters.

  13. Precision measurements of nuclear CR energy spectra and composition with the AMS-02 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiandrini, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 02 (AMS-02) is a large acceptance high-energy physics experiment operating since May 2011 on board the International Space Station. More than 60 billion events have been collected by the instrument in the first four years of operation. AMS-02 offers a unique opportunity to study the Cosmic Rays (CRs) since it measures the spectra of all the species simultaneously. We report on the precision measurements of primary and secondary nuclear spectra, in the GeV-TeV energy interval. These measurements allow for the first time a detailed study of the spectral index variation with rigidity providing a new insight on the origin and propagation of CR.

  14. Measurement of the cosmic positrons' spectrum with the experiment AMS-02 and search for exotic signals; Mesure du spectre de positons cosmiques avec l'experience AMS-02 et recherche de signaux exotiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pochon, J

    2005-06-15

    The AMS-02 experiment is a particle detector that will be installed on the international space station (ISS) in 2008 for at least 3 years. The physics motivations are cosmic ray measurements (e-, e+, p, p-bar, {gamma}, He, C,...), antimatter search for Z>2 and gamma ray studies from GeV to TeV. The HEAT experiment has measured positron spectrum up to 30 GeV, and shown a possible distortion around 8 GeV, which can be interpreted as a dark matter signal. The cosmic positrons spectrum measurement needs positron/proton separation close to 10{sup 5}, which will be obtained combining all AMS-02 sub-detectors. A neural network analysis has been developed on test beam data taken in 2002, to estimate the electron/proton rejection for the electromagnetic calorimeter. This technique, based on discriminant variables and which was tuned on data, was used to determine the positron acceptance combining other sub-detectors information. The number of conventional positrons can be estimated and AMS ability to detect cold dark matter signals has been determined. This study was presented for signal from supersymmetric neutralinos and from Kaluza-Klein stable particles. Fluxes are naturally too low to be detected. Signal can be enhanced thanks to local dark matter over-densities which appear naturally in galaxy formation models. A model for those over-densities has been tuned and presented. (author)

  15. The RICH detector of the AMS-02 experiment: status and physics prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, Rui; Arruda, L; Barão, F; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barreira, G; Belmont, E; Berdugo, J; Borges, J; Buénerd, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cortina, E; Costado, M; Crespo, D; Delgado, C; Díaz, C; Derome, L; Gonçalves, P; Garcia-Lopez, R; de la Guia, C; Herrero, A; Lanciotti, E; Laurenti, G; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Marin, J; Mangin-Brinet, M; Martínez, G; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Palomares, C; Pimenta, M; Putze, A; Sallaz-Damaz, Y; Seo, E S; Sevilla, I; Torrento, A; Vargas-Trevino, M; Veziant, O

    2008-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), whose final version AMS-02 is to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) for at least 3 years, is a detector designed to measure charged cosmic ray spectra with energies up to the TeV region and with high energy photon detection capability up to a few hundred GeV. It is equipped with several subsystems, one of which is a proximity focusing RICH detector with a dual radiator (aerogel+NaF) that provides reliable measurements for particle velocity and charge. The assembly and testing of the AMS RICH is currently being finished and the full AMS detector is expected to be ready by the end of 2008. The RICH detector of AMS-02 is presented. Physics prospects are briefly discussed.

  16. Precise measurement of cosmic ray fluxes with the AMS-02 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchi, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.vecchi@ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 369, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The main goals of the detector are the search for antimatter and dark matter in space, as well as the measurement of cosmic ray composition and flux. In this document we present precise measurements of cosmic ray positrons, electrons and protons, collected during the first 30 months of operations.

  17. AMS-02 fits Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Balázs, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    In this work we perform a comprehensive statistical analysis of the AMS-02 electron, positron fluxes and the antiproton-to-proton ratio in the context of a simplified dark matter model. We include known, standard astrophysical sources and a dark matter component in the cosmic ray injection spectra. To predict the AMS-02 observables we use propagation parameters extracted from observed fluxes of heavier nuclei and the low energy part of the AMS-02 data. We assume that the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion coupling to third generation fermions via a spin-0 mediator, and annihilating to multiple channels at once. The simultaneous presence of various annihilation channels provides the dark matter model with additional flexibility, and this enables us to simultaneously fit all cosmic ray spectra using a simple particle physics model and coherent astrophysical assumptions. Our results indicate that AMS-02 observations are not only consistent with the dark matter hypothesis within the uncertainties, but add...

  18. Identification of positrons and electrons in the cosmic radiation with the electromagnetic calorimeter ECAL for the AMS-02 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080883

    2011-07-19

    In May 2011 AMS-02 detector has been successfully installed on the International Space Station (ISS), where it will take data on cosmic radiation from 1 to 1000 GeV for at least 10 years. Among all scientific objectives of the experiment, one of the most important is the search for Dark Matter (DM), which constitutes 80% of the Universe matter, but its nature is still unknown. A DM signal can be identified by studying the combined fluxes of positrons, photons, antiprotons and antideuterium. Thanks to its high acceptance and its performances, AMS-02 detector can extend primary cosmic ray physics search to a new energy range with high accuracy. A key role for these measurements, in particular for the electromagnetic channels, is played by ECAL calorimeter. This subdetector has been developed to measure e− and e+ energy with an accuracy of few %. Thanks to its 3D shower reconstruction imaging capabilities, it also has a high separation power between electromagnetic and hadronic showers (e/p rejection), essent...

  19. The AMS-02 lead-scintillating fibres Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adloff, C.; Basara, L.; Bigongiari, G.; Bosi, F.; Brun, P.; Cadoux, F.; Cervelli, F.; Chambert, V.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Coignet, G.; Cougoulat, G.; Di Falco, S.; Dubois, J. M.; Elles, S.; Falchini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Fougeron, D.; Fouque, N.; Galeotti, S.; Gallucci, G.; Gherarducci, F.; Girard, L.; Giuseppe, F.; Goy, C.; Hermel, R.; Incagli, M.; Jacquemier, J.; Journet, L.; Kossakowski, R.; Lepareur, V.; Li, Z. H.; Lieunard, B.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, Y. S.; Maestro, P.; Magazzù, C.; Maire, M.; Orsini, A.; Paniccia, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Peltier, F.; Piendibene, M.; Pilo, F.; Pochon, J.; Rambure, T.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Spinella, F.; Tang, X. W.; Tassan-Viol, J.; Tazzioli, A.; Vannini, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Zhuang, H. L.

    2013-06-01

    The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the AMS-02 experiment is a fine grained lead-scintillating fibres sampling calorimeter that allows for a precise three-dimensional imaging of the longitudinal and lateral shower development. It provides a high (≥106) electron/hadron discrimination with the other AMS-02 detectors [1] and good energy resolution. The calorimeter also provides a standalone photon trigger capability to AMS-02. The mechanical assembly was realized to ensure minimum weight, still supporting the intrinsically heavy calorimeter during launch. ECAL light collection system and electronics are designed to measure electromagnetic particles over a wide energy range, from GeV up to TeV. A full-scale flight-like model was tested using electrons and proton beams with energies ranging from 6 to 250 GeV.

  20. The AMS-02 lead-scintillating fibres Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adloff, C.; Basara, L. [LAPP, Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Bigongiari, G. [Universita' degli Studi di Siena, 53100 Siena (Italy); Bosi, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, 57023 Pisa (Italy); Brun, P.; Cadoux, F. [LAPP, Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Cervelli, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, 57023 Pisa (Italy); Chambert, V. [LAPP, Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Coignet, G.; Cougoulat, G. [LAPP, Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Di Falco, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, 57023 Pisa (Italy); Dubois, J.M.; Elles, S. [LAPP, Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Falchini, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, 57023 Pisa (Italy); Fiasson, A.; Fougeron, D.; Fouque, N. [LAPP, Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); and others

    2013-06-21

    The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the AMS-02 experiment is a fine grained lead-scintillating fibres sampling calorimeter that allows for a precise three-dimensional imaging of the longitudinal and lateral shower development. It provides a high (≥10{sup 6}) electron/hadron discrimination with the other AMS-02 detectors [1] and good energy resolution. The calorimeter also provides a standalone photon trigger capability to AMS-02. The mechanical assembly was realized to ensure minimum weight, still supporting the intrinsically heavy calorimeter during launch. ECAL light collection system and electronics are designed to measure electromagnetic particles over a wide energy range, from GeV up to TeV. A full-scale flight-like model was tested using electrons and proton beams with energies ranging from 6 to 250 GeV.

  1. The AMS-02 electromagnetic calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadoux, F.; Cervelli, F.; Chambert-Hermel, V.; Chen, G.; Chen, H.; Coignet, G.; Di Falco, S.; Dubois, J.M.; Falchini, E.; Franzoso, A.; Fougeron, D.; Fouque, N.; Galeotti, S.; Girard, L.; Goy, C.; Hermel, R.; Incagli, M.; Kossakowski, R.; Lieunard, B.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lomtadze, T.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Paoletti, R.; Pilo, F. E-mail: federico.pilo@pi.infn.it; Rosier-Lees, S.; Spinella, F.; Turini, N.; Valle, G.; Venanzoni, G.; Vialle, J.P.; Yu, Z.; Zhuang, H

    2002-12-01

    The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the AMS-02 experiment is a lead-scintillating fibers sampling calorimeter characterized by high granularity that allows to image the longitudinal and lateral showers development, a key issue to provide high electron/hadron discrimination. The light collection system and the FE electronics are designed to let the calorimeter operate over a wide energy range from few GeV up to 1 TeV. A full-scale prototype of the e.m. calorimeter was tested at CERN in October 2001 using electrons and pions beams with energy ranging from 3 to 100 GeV. Effective sampling thickness, linearity and energy resolution were measured.

  2. The AMS-02 electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Cadoux, F; Chambert-Hermel, V; Chen, G; Chen, H; Coignet, G; Di Falco, S; Dubois, J M; Falchini, E; Franzoso, A; Fougeron, D; Fouque, N; Galeotti, S; Girard, L; Goy, C; Hermel, R; Incagli, M; Kossakowski, R; Lieunard, B; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lomtadze, T A; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Paoletti, R; Pilo, F; Rosier-Lees, S; Spinella, F; Turini, N; Valle, G D; Venanzoni, G; Vialle, J P; Yu, Z; Zhuang, H

    2002-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the AMS-02 experiment is a lead-scintillating fibers sampling calorimeter characterized by high granularity that allows to image the longitudinal and lateral showers development, a key issue to provide high electron/hadron discrimination. The light collection system and the FE electronics are designed to let the calorimeter operate over a wide energy range from few GeV up to 1 TeV. A full-scale prototype of the e.m. calorimeter was tested at CERN in October 2001 using electrons and pions beams with energy ranging from 3 to 100 GeV. Effective sampling thickness, linearity and energy resolution were measured. (8 refs).

  3. Secondary cosmic ray nuclei in the light of the single source model and comparison with recent AMS-02 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2016-10-01

    Evidence for a local ‘single source’ of cosmic rays is amassing by way of the recent precise measurements of various cosmic ray energy spectra from the AMS-02 instrument. To observations of individual cosmic ray nuclei, electrons, positrons and antiprotons must now be added the determination of the boron-to-carbon ratio and the energy spectrum of lithium to 2000 GV with high precision. Our analysis leads us to claim that, with certain assumptions about propagation in the Galaxy, the results confirm our arguments regarding the presence of a local single source, perhaps, a supernova remnant (SNR). An attempt is made to determine some of the properties of this SNR and its progenitor star.

  4. Identifying electrons and positrons with AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Nikolas [RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The AMS-02 experiment is a multi-purpose detector for cosmic ray particles mounted on the International Space Station. It recorded over 40 billion events since its installation in 2011. The bulk of these events are protons, which are most abundant in cosmic rays. Electrons are 100 times and positrons 1000 times less abundant. Measuring the positrons as function of energy is especially interesting, as an excess over the expected astrophysical background may hint at an additional source of positrons in the galaxy or a new phenomena responsible for the excess, e.g. dark-matter annihilation. In order to measure positrons accurately with a small uncertainty, a large proton rejection of 10{sup 6} is needed. AMS-02 offers a transition radiation detector to separate positrons from protons and an electromagnetic calorimeter allowing a precise measurement of the kinetic energy of an incoming lepton. This talk covers the general strategy of identifying electrons/positrons with AMS-02 and presents the so-obtained electron/positron fluxes that were recently published.

  5. Performances of the AMS-02 Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adloff, C.; Coignet, G.; Girard, L.; Goy, C.; Kossakowski, R.; Lees-Rosier, S.; Pochon, J.; Vialle, J. P.; Cervelli, F.; di Falco, S.; Galeotti, S.; Incagli, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Spinella, F.; Venanzoni, G.; Falchini, E.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Paoletti, R.; Pilo, F.; Turini, N.; Valle, G.; Bolmont, J.; Jacholkowska, A.; Piron, F.; Sapinski, M.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Lu, Y.; Yang, C.

    2004-07-01

    A 3D imaging electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) made of scintillating fibers embedded in lead has been developed for the AMS-02 experiment to be installed on the International Space Station. A full scale ECAL prototype, partially instrumented, was tested in July 2002 in a beam at CERN. Several million events were recorded using muon, electron, proton, and antiproton beams, from which the ECAL behavior was determined. Results on the measurement of the ECAL parameters and performances are presented : radiation length, linearity, energy and angular resolutions, e/p separation.

  6. Mass of decaying wino from AMS-02 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibe, Masahiro, E-mail: ibe@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research (ICRR), Theory Group, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Matsumoto, Shigeki [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Shirai, Satoshi [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Yanagida, Tsutomu T. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)

    2015-02-04

    We revisit the decaying wino dark matter scenario in the light of the updated positron fraction, electron and positron fluxes in cosmic ray recently reported by the AMS-02 collaboration. We show the AMS-02 results favor the mass of the wino dark matter at around a few TeV, which is consistent with the prediction on the wino mass in the pure gravity mediation model.

  7. AMS-02 data confront acceleration of cosmic ray secondaries in nearby sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the model proposed earlier to account for the observed increase in the positron fraction in cosmic rays with increasing energy, in the light of new data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) experiment. The model accounts for the production and acceleration of secondary electrons...... and positrons in nearby supernova remnants which results in an additional, harder component that becomes dominant at high energies. By fitting this to AMS-02 data we can calculate the expected concomitant rise of the boron-to-carbon ratio, as well as of the fraction of antiprotons. If these predictions...... are confirmed by the forthcoming AMS-02 data it would conclusively rule out all other proposed explanations, in particular, dark matter annihilations or decays....

  8. Study of the photomultiplier R7600-00-M4 for the purpose of the electromagnetic calorimeter in the AMS-02 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kossakowski, R; Dubois, J M; Fougeron, D; Hermel-Richard; Sottile, R; Vialle, J P

    2002-01-01

    The properties of the 4-channels photomultiplier R7600-00-M4 from Hamamatsu were extensively studied for use in the AMS-02 electromagnetic calorimeter. A scan of the photocathode with a precision in position better than 0.1 mm was performed in order to measure the position dependence of the sensitivity and of the cross talk between pixels. The influence of the magnetic field applied in X, Y and Z directions was measured. The dynamic range of the photomultiplier was measured and optimized by the appropriate choice of the high voltage divider and of the value of the high voltage.

  9. Study of the photomultiplier R7600-00-M4 for the purpose of the electromagnetic calorimeter in the AMS-02 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossakowski, Roman; Audemer, Jean Charles; Dubois, Jean Marc; Fougeron, Denis; Hermel Richard; Sottile, Rico; Vialle, Jean Pierre [Laboratoire d' Annecy-Le-Vieux de Physique des Particules, LAPP, IN2P3-CNRS, BP 110, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France)

    2002-07-01

    The properties of the 4-channels photomultiplier R7600-00-M4 from Hamamatsu were extensively studied for use in the AMS-02 electromagnetic calorimeter. A scan of the photocathode with a precision in position better than 0.1 mm was performed in order to measure the position dependence of the sensitivity and of the cross talk between pixels. The influence of the magnetic field applied in X, Y and Z directions was measured. The dynamic range of the photomultiplier was measured and optimized by the appropriate choice of the high voltage divider and of the value of the high voltage. (authors)

  10. AMS-02 data confront acceleration of cosmic ray secondaries in nearby sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the model proposed earlier to account for the observed increase in the positron fraction in cosmic rays with increasing energy, in the light of new data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) experiment. The model accounts for the production and acceleration of secondary electrons...

  11. Performances of the AMS-02 electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Cervelli, F; Lomtadze, T A; Venanzoni, G; Falchini, E; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Paoletti, R; Pilo, F; Turini, N; Valle, G D; Coignet, G; Girard, L; Goy, C; Kossakowski, R; Lees-Rosier, S; Vialle, J P; Chen, G; Chen, H; Liu, Z; Lu, Y; Yu, Z; Zhuang, H L

    2002-01-01

    A full-scale prototype of the e.m. calorimeter for the AMS-02 experiment was tested at CERN in October 2001 using 100 GeV pion and electron beams with energy ranging from 3 to 100 GeV. The detector, a lead-scintillating fiber sampling calorimeter about 17 radiation lengths deep, is read out by an array of multianode photomultipliers. The calorimeter's high granularity allows to image the longitudinal and lateral showers development, a key issue to provide high electron /hadron discrimination. From the test beam data, linearity and energy resolution were measured as well as the effective sampling thickness. The latter was extracted from the data by fitting the longitudinal e.m. shower profiles at different energies. (9 refs).

  12. AMS-02 in Space: Physics Results

    CERN Document Server

    Tomassetti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a particle physics experiment designed to study origin and nature of Galactic Cosmic Rays (CRs) up to TeV energies from space. With its high sensitivity, long exposure and excellent identification capabilities, AMS is conducting a unique mission of fundamental physics research in space. To date, more than 60 billion CR events have been collected by AMS. The new results on CR leptons and the analysis and light-nuclei are presented and discussed. The new leptonic data indicate the existence of new sources of high-energy CR leptons, that may arise either by dark-matter particles annihilation or by nearby astrophysical sources of $e^{\\pm}$ pairs. Future data at higher energies and forthcoming measurements on the antiproton spectrum and the boron-to-carbon ratio will be crucial in providing the discrimination among the different scenario.

  13. Dark matter for excess of AMS-02 positrons and antiprotons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Hung Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a dark matter explanation to simultaneously account for the excess of antiproton-to-proton and positron power spectra observed in the AMS-02 experiment while having the right dark matter relic abundance and satisfying the current direct search bounds. We extend the Higgs triplet model with a hidden gauge symmetry of SU(2X that is broken to Z3 by a quadruplet scalar field, rendering the associated gauge bosons stable weakly-interacting massive particle dark matter candidates. By coupling the complex Higgs triplet and the SU(2X quadruplet, the dark matter candidates can annihilate into triplet Higgs bosons each of which in turn decays into lepton or gauge boson final states. Such a mechanism gives rise to correct excess of positrons and antiprotons with an appropriate choice of the triplet vacuum expectation value. Besides, the model provides a link between neutrino mass and dark matter phenomenology.

  14. AMS-02海量数据处理环境的研究%Study on AMS-02 Massive Data Processing Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨鹏

    2011-01-01

    AMS实验是近年来具有重要影响的大型国际合作太空物理实验,AMS-02探测器即将在2011年初发射升空.AMS-02实验将产生总量超过1PB的海量数据,这些数据不但类型多样,而且处理过程非常复杂.首先介绍了AMS-02海量数据处理环境的功能需求和主要构成部件,然后分析了AMS-02海量数据的主要类型及其处理流程,最后以AMS-02 SOC为重点,详细描述了AMS-02 SOC的分布式架构、主要功能以及基于网格的AMS-02 SOC@SEU 系统实现框架等,从而为AMS-02海量数据处理环境的研究和建设提供了有益的参考.%AMS (Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer) is an international coorperative physics experiment with great influence and significance,and the AMS-02 tracker will be launched at the beginning of 2011. AMS-02 experiment will produce more than 1PB of massive data that have different types and their handling processes are very complex. This paper firstly introduced the functional requirements and the key components of the massive data processing environment of AMS-02 experiment, and then analyzed the fundamental data types and the handling processes of AMS-02 massive data, finally,paid more attention to AMS-02 SOC, the distributed architecture and the principal function of AMS-02 SOC were discussed, and a Grid-based implementation framework of AMS-02 SOC@SEU was also dicsribed.

  15. Imprint of Multi-component Dark Matter on AMS-02

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Tsai, Lu-Hsing

    2013-01-01

    The multi-component decaying dark matter (DM) scenario is investigated to explain the possible excesses in the positron fraction by PAMELA and recently confirmed by AMS-02, and in the total $e^+ +e^-$ flux observed by Fermi-LAT. By performing the $\\chi^2$ fits, we find that two DM components are already enough to give a reasonable fit of both AMS-02 and Fermi-LAT data. The best-fitted results show that the heavier DM component with its mass 1.5 TeV dominantly decays through the $\\mu$-channel, while the lighter one of 100 GeV mainly through the $\\tau$-channel. As a byproduct, the fine structure around 100 GeV observed by AMS-02 and Fermi-LAT can be naturally explained by the dropping due to the lighter DM component. With the obtained model parameters by the fitting, we calculate the diffuse $\\gamma$-ray emission spectrum in this two-component DM scenario, and find that it is consistent with the data measured by Fermi-LAT. We also construct a microscopic particle DM model to naturally realize the two-component ...

  16. Identification of Light Cosmic-Ray Nuclei with AMS-02

    CERN Document Server

    Tomassetti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    AMS-02 is a wide acceptance (0.5 m2 sr) and long duration (up to 20 years) magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. Its main scientific objectives are the indirect research of Dark Matter, searches of primitive Anti-Matter and the precise measurement of the Cosmic-Ray (CR) spectra. Among charged CR species, AMS-02 will be able to measure relative abundances and absolute fluxes of CRs nuclei from Hydrogen up to at least Iron (Z = 26) in a kinetic energy range from hundreds MeV to TeV per nucleon. The high statistics measurement of the chemical composition of CRs in this extended energy range will reveal new insights about the CRs life in the Galaxy, from their origin to the propagation in the interstellar medium, giving new constraints to astrophysical models of Galactic CRs. The nucleus absolute charge, Z, is measured several times along the trajectory of the particle inside AMS-02 using different detection techniques: in the 9 planes of the Silicon Tracker, in t...

  17. Towards an antiproton measurement with AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachlechner, Andreas [RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    AMS-02 is a multi-purpose high-precision particle detector. It has been onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The antiprotons measurement is an important part of the AMS-02 physics program. An excess above the expected spectrum due to interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar matter can hint at exotic sources like dark matter annihilation. The antiproton-to-proton ratio and the antiproton flux itself may also improve the understanding of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays. Due to the very small fraction of antiprotons in the cosmic radiation of about 10{sup -5} compared to protons a very precise particle identification is needed. The main backgrounds are other singly charged particles like protons, electrons, and pions produced within the detector material itself. At lower energies the ring-imaging Cherenkov detector and the time-of-flight system help to separate light particles from protons. The electromagnetic calorimeter and the transition radiation detector redundantly suppress the electron background. The reconstruction of the charge sign by the magnetic spectrometer is limited by its resolution and has to be taken into account carefully. The strategies to identify antiprotons in the cosmic-ray measurement in different energy regions are presented. Methods to suppress and the effect of the backgrounds to the antiproton-to-proton ratio are discussed.

  18. Operation of the Electronics for the AMS-02RICH Detector Prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo, P.; Aguilar, M.; Berdugo, J.; Casaus, J.; Delgado, C.; Diaz, C.; Fernandez, C.; Garcia-Tabares, L.; Lanciotti, E.; Mana, C.; Marin, J.; Martinez, G.; Palomares, C.; Sanchez, E.; Sevilla, I.; Torrento, A.; Wilmott, C.; Yanez, J.

    2002-07-01

    The operation and behaviour of the RICH prototype electronics developed for the AMS-02 experiment is presented. It includes results and conclusions obtained from experimental tests data with cosmic rays. (Author)

  19. Operation of the Electronics for the AMS-02 RICH Detector Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Aguayo, P; Berdugo, J; Casaus, J; Delgado, C; Díaz, C; Fernández, C; Garcia-Tabares, L; Lanciotti, E; Marin, J; Martínez, G; Maña, C; Palomares, C; Sevilla, I; Sánchez, E; Torrento, A S; Wilmott, C; Yanez, J

    2002-01-01

    The operation and behaviour of the RICH prototype electronics developed for the AMS-02 experiment is presented. It includes results and conclusions obtained from experimental tests data with cosmic rays. (Author)

  20. AMS-02 antiprotons from annihilating or decaying dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Hamaguchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently the AMS-02 experiment reported an excess of cosmic ray antiprotons over the expected astrophysical background. We interpret the excess as a signal from annihilating or decaying dark matter and find that the observed spectrum is well fitted by adding contributions from the annihilation or decay of dark matter with mass of O(TeV or larger. Interestingly, Wino dark matter with mass of around 3 TeV, whose thermal relic abundance is consistent with present dark matter abundance, can explain the antiproton excess. We also discuss the implications for the decaying gravitino dark matter with R-parity violation.

  1. Analysis of charge-sign separation in AMS-02 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachlechner, Andreas [RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The AMS-02 experiment stationed at the International Space Station is taking cosmic-ray data since May 2011. Promising observables to improve the understanding of cosmic rays, antimatter-matter asymmetry and search for dark matter include the positron fraction, the antiproton to proton ratio and anti-helium search. For these observables a proper separation of charge sign up to the high energies is of great importance. For leptons the kinetic energy is determined redundantly by two sub-detectors: The electromagnetic calorimeter with 16 radiation lengths and the powerful spectrometer consisting of a silicon strip tracker combined with a permanent magnet. On the other hand the spectrometer is the only sub-detector in AMS-02 able separate particles according to their charge sign. This separation is limited by the resolution of the spectrometer and interactions in the detector. The resulting charge confusion needs to be understood and carefully taken into account. The preliminary results of this analysis to determine charge confusion from measured data and methods to correct for this misidentification are presented. The effect of charge confusion to the positron fraction and the antiproton proton ratio is discussed.

  2. Particle identification below threshold with AMS-02 RICH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ziyuan; Giovacchini, Francesca; Hoffman, Julia; Haino, Sadakazu

    2016-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) and it has been collecting data successfully since May 2011. The main goals of AMS-02 are the search for cosmic anti-matter, dark matter and the precise measurement of the relative abundance of elements and isotopes in galactic cosmic rays. In order to identify particle properties, AMS-02 includes several specialized sub-detectors. Among them, the AMS-02 Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) is designed to provide a very precise measurement of the velocity and electric charge of particles. A method to reject the dominant electron background in antiproton identification using the AMS-02 RICH detector as a veto will be described. By using the collected cosmic-rays data, electron contamination can be well suppressed within 3% with $\\beta \\approx 1$, while keeping 76% efficiency for antiprotons below the threshold.

  3. AMS02 results after 4 years of data taking on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incagli, M.; AMS02 Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    The AMS02 experiment is taking data on the International Space Station since May, 19, 2011. This report summarizes the key results published or presented in public conferences using the data collected in the first 4 years of the mission, trying to interpret them in terms of the latest models of Cosmic Ray (CR) propagation. In particular the fluxes of primary CR, like proton, Helium and Carbon, or of secondaries like Lithium and Boron, can be used to constraint the models and compare them with the observed anti-proton flux, to see if hints of Dark Matter (DM) can be identified. The same can be done in the lepton sector by looking at electrons and positrons. In the near future AMS02 will continue the observation of light nuclei, including isotopes like Deuterium, He-3 and He-4, and of anti-nuclei, like anti-Deuterium and anti-Helium, which represent, together with anti-protons and positrons, the golden channels in which to look for eventual Dark Matter or antimatter signals.

  4. Anomalous Galactic Cosmic Rays in the Framework of AMS-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiali, Behrouz; Haino, Sadakazu; Feng, Jie

    2017-02-01

    The cosmic-ray (CR) energy spectra of protons and helium nuclei, which are the most abundant components of cosmic radiation, exhibit a remarkable hardening at energies above 100 GeV/nucleon. Recent data from AMS-02 confirm this feature with a higher significance. These data challenge the current models of CR acceleration in Galactic sources and propagation in the Galaxy. Here, we explain the observed break in the spectra of protons and helium nuclei in light of recent advances in CR diffusion theories in turbulent astrophysical sources as being a result of a transition between different CR diffusion regimes. We reconstruct the observed CR spectra using the fact that a transition from normal diffusion to superdiffusion changes the efficiency of particle acceleration and causes the change in the spectral index. We find that calculated proton and helium spectra match the data very well.

  5. AMS-02, Strongly Self-Interacting Dark Matter, and QUD

    CERN Document Server

    White, Alan R

    2014-01-01

    The latest AMS-02 electron/positron precision data add to the spectrum knee as direct cosmic ray evidence for an electroweak scale strong interaction. In addition, there is significant evidence for a strong self-interaction of dark matter. QUD is a unique massless SU(5) field theory with an anomaly-generated bound-state S-Matrix that could be an unconventional origin for the Standard Model. The electroweak scale color sextet quark enhanced QCD interaction is the only new physics. Production of multiple vector bosons, that acquire masses via sextet quark pions, will give the AMS positron and electron cross-sections - related vector boson pair production having been seen at the LHC. Stable sextet quark neutrons (neusons) provide a novel form of very strongly interacting dark matter that has the desired experimental properties. Large rapidity hadronic production of neusons will produce the knee.

  6. AMS-02 Capabilities in Solar Energetic Particle Measurements for Space Weather Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolandi, Cristina; Bindi, Veronica; Corti, Claudio; Hoffman, Julia; Whitman, Kathryn

    2016-04-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02), thanks to its large acceptance of about 0.45 m2 sr, is the biggest Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) detector ever flown in space. AMS-02 was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) on May 19, 2011, where it will measure cosmic rays from 1 GV up to a few TV, for the duration of the ISS, currently extended till 2024. During these years of operation, AMS-02 measured several increases of the protons flux over the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) background associated to the strongest solar events. AMS-02 has observed the related SEP accelerated during M- and X-class flares and fast coronal mass ejections measuring an increase of the proton flux near 1 GV and above. Some of these solar events were also followed by the typical GCR suppression i.e. Forbush decrease, which makes even more evident the measurement of the SEP flux over the GCR background. Thanks to its large acceptance and particle detection capabilities, AMS-02 is able to perform precise measurements in a short period of time which is typical of these transient phenomena and to collect enough statistics to measure fine structures and time evolution of particle spectra. The events observed by AMS-02 since the beginning of its mission will be presented and some of the more interesting events will be shown. AMS-02 observations with their unprecedented resolution and high statistics, will improve the understanding of SEP behavior at high energies to constrain models of SEP production used in space weather physics.

  7. AMS-02 results support the secondary origin of cosmic ray positrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kfir; Katz, Boaz; Waxman, Eli

    2013-11-22

    We show that the recent AMS-02 positron fraction measurement is consistent with a secondary origin for positrons and does not require additional primary sources such as pulsars or dark matter. The measured positron fraction at high energy saturates the previously predicted upper bound for secondary production, obtained by neglecting radiative losses. This coincidence, which will be further tested by upcoming AMS-02 data at higher energy, is a compelling indication for a secondary source. Within the secondary model, the AMS-02 data imply a cosmic ray propagation time in the Galaxy of <10(6) yr and an average traversed interstellar matter density of ~1 cm(-3), comparable to the density of the Milky Way gaseous disk, at a rigidity of 300 GV.

  8. AMS02 results support the secondary origin of cosmic ray positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Kfir; Waxman, Eli

    2013-01-01

    We show that the recent AMS02 positron fraction measurement is consistent with a secondary origin for positrons, and does not require additional primary sources such as pulsars or dark matter. The measured positron fraction at high energy saturates the previously predicted upper bound for secondary production (Katz et al 2009), obtained by neglecting radiative losses. This coincidence, which will be further tested by upcoming AMS02 data at higher energy, is a compelling indication for a secondary source. Within the secondary model the AMS02 data imply a cosmic ray propagation time in the Galaxy of < Myr and an average traversed interstellar matter density of order 1/cc, comparable to the density of the Milky Way gaseous disk, at a rigidity of 300 GV.

  9. Antiproton identification below threshold with the AMS-02 RICH detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Yuan; Delgado Mendez, Carlos Jose; Giovacchini, Francesca; Haino, Sadakazu; Hoffman, Julia

    2017-05-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02), which is installed on the International Space Station (ISS), has been collecting data successfully since May 2011. The main goals of AMS-02 are the search for cosmic anti-matter, dark matter and the precise measurement of the relative abundance of elements and isotopes in galactic cosmic rays. In order to identify particle properties, AMS-02 includes several specialized sub-detectors. Among these, the AMS-02 Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) is designed to provide a very precise measurement of the velocity and electric charge of particles. We describe a method to reject the dominant electron background in antiproton identification with the use of the AMS-02 RICH detector as a veto for rigidities below 3 GV. A ray tracing integration method is used to maximize the statistics of p¯ with the lowest possible e- background, providing 4 times rejection power gain for e- background with respect to only 3% of p¯ signal efficiency loss. By using the collected cosmic-ray data, e- contamination can be well suppressed within 3% with β ≈ 1, while keeping 76% efficiency for p¯ below the threshold. Supported by China Scholarship Council (CSC) under Grant No.201306380027.

  10. Decaying WIMP dark matter for AMS-02 cosmic positron excess

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Ki-Young; Shin, Chang Sub

    2013-01-01

    For explaining the AMS-02 cosmic positron excess, which was recently reported, we consider a scenario of thermally produced and decaying dark matter (DM) into the standard model (SM) leptons with an extremely small decay rate, \\Gamma_{DM} \\sim 10^{-26} sec.^{-1}. Since the needed DM mass is relatively heavy (700 GeV < m_{DM} < 3000 GeV), we introduce another DM component apart from the lightest supersymmetric particle ("LSP"). For its (meta-) stability and annihilation into other particles, the new DM should be accompanied with another Z_2 symmetry apart from the R-parity. Sizable renormalizable couplings of the new DM with SM particles, which are necessary for its thermalization in the early universe, cannot destabilize the new DM because of the new Z_2 symmetry. Since the new DM was thermally produced, it can naturally explain the present energy density of the universe. The new DM can decay into the SM leptons (and the LSP) only through non-renormalizable operators suppressed by a superheavy squared m...

  11. Constraints on cosmic ray electrons and diffuse gamma rays with AMS-02 and HESS data

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ding; Jin, Hong-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Lately, AMS-02 and HAWC have reported their observations of cosmic rays(CRs), which promote the further exploration of CR origins. We choose some experimental data of CRs to focus the origins of CR electrons and estimate the spectrum of CR electrons. Based on the conventional diffusion model of CRs, we perform a global analysis on the spectrum feature of CR electrons with the data of AMS-02, HESS and Milagro. The results verify that the spectrum of CR electrons has the apparent structure beyond a simple power law. The difference between the power indices above and below the reference rigidity is greater than 0.2, which is near the momentum loss rate of CR electrons. The data of HESS electrons matches the TeV extension of AMS-02 electrons and the relevant spectrum of CR electrons does not have TeV breaks. By use of the difference between the CR electrons and primary electrons constrained by AMS-02 and HESS, the TeV bounds of positron excess are predicted. In the bounds, the flux relevant to the up-limit is bey...

  12. Indirect and inclusive search for dark matter with AMS02 space spectrometer; Recherche indirecte et inclusive de matiere noire avec le spectrometre spatial AMS02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Pierre [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-vieux de Physique des Particules, Chemin de Bellevue, BP 110, 74941 Annecy-le-Vieux Cedex (France)

    2007-07-01

    . The specific case of the clumping of dark matter particles around intermediate mass black holes has been studied, leading to quantitative predictions which are addressed. The spectrum generator is eventually used to estimate AMS02 sensitivity to dark matter signals and its capability to reconstruct the annihilation final state and thus the underlying new physics model. (author)

  13. AMS-02 in space: physics results, overview, and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Tomassetti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a state of the art particle detector measuring cosmic rays (CRs) on the International Space Station (ISS) since May 19th 2011. AMS-02 identifies CR leptons and nuclei in the energy range from hundreds MeV to few TeV per nucleon. Several sub-detector systems allow for redundant particle identification with unprecedented precision, a powerful lepton-hadron separation, and a high purity of the antimatter signal. The new AMS-02 leptonic data from 1 to 500 GeV are presented and discussed. These new data indicate that new sources of CR leptons need to be included to describe the observed spectra at high energies. Explanations of this anomaly may be found either in dark-matter particles annihilation or in the existence of nearby astrophysical sources of $e^{\\pm}$. Future data at higher energies and forthcoming measurements on the antiproton spectrum and the boron-to-carbon ratio will be crucial in providing the discrimination among the different scenario.

  14. Operation characteristics of AMS-02 loop heat pipe with bypass valve

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, N H; Xin, G M; Song, J W; Cui, Z; Burger, J; Du, W J; Luo, F; Cheng, L

    2011-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) were designed for the alpha magnetic spectrometer (AMS-02) to dissipate heat from the cryocoolers. A bypass valve is applied to the LHP to keep the cryocooler temperature above its limit (-20A degrees C) in cold environment. Extensive experiments were performed on operation characteristics of LHPs with the bypass valve for AMS-02 during thermal vacuum and thermal balance (TVTB) test. We found that the bypass valve can start up successfully in cold environment. With the bypass valve, the evaporator temperature is stable and can meet the requirement of the cryocooler. We analyzed three operating modes of the bypass valve. Set point temperature and regulation temperature shifts were observed and their relations with the bypass valve temperature were given.

  15. Revisiting Multi-Component Dark Matter with New AMS-02 Data

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lai, Chang

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the multi-component leptonically decaying dark matter (DM) scenario to explain the possible electron/positron excesses with the recently updated AMS-02 data. We find that both the single- and two-component DM models can fit the positron fraction and $e^+/e^-$ respective fluxes, in which the two-component ones provide better fits. However, for the single-component models, the recent AMS-02 data on the positron fraction limit the DM cutoff to be smaller than 1 TeV, which conflicts with the high-energy behavior of the AMS-02 total $e^++e^-$ flux spectrum, while the two-component DM models do not possess such a problem. We also discuss the constraints from the Fermi-LAT measurement of the diffuse $\\gamma$-ray spectrum. We show that the two-component DM models are consistent with the current DM lifetime bounds. In contrast, the best-fit DM lifetimes in the single-component models are actually excluded.

  16. Limits on the Dark Matter from AMS-02 antiproton and positron fraction data

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Bo-Qiang; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2015-01-01

    We derive limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section and lifetime using measurements of the AMS-02 antiproton ratio and positron fraction data. In deriving the limits, we consider the scenario of secondary particles accelerated in supernova remnants (SNRs) which has been argued to be able to reasonably account for the AMS-02 high energy positron/antiproton fraction data. We parameterize the contribution of secondary particles accelerated in SNRs and then fit the observational data within the conventional cosmic ray propagation model by adopting the GALPROP code. We use the likelihood ratio test to determine the 95$\\%$ confidence level upper limits of the possible dark matter (DM) contribution to the antiproton/positron fractions measured by AMS-02. Our limits are stronger than that set by the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray Pass 8 data of the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies. We also show that the solar modulation (cosmic ray propagation) parameters can play a non-negligible role in modifying the constraints...

  17. Probing the Pulsar Origin of the Anomalous Positron Fraction with AMS-02 and Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Linden, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations by PAMELA, Fermi-LAT, and AMS-02 have conclusively indicated a rise in the cosmic-ray positron fraction above 10 GeV, a feature which is impossible to mimic under the paradigm of secondary positron production with self-consistent Galactic cosmic-ray propagation models. A leading explanation for the rising positron fraction is an additional source of electron-positron pairs, for example one or more mature, energetic, and relatively nearby pulsars. We point out that any one of two well-known nearby pulsars, Geminga and Monogem, can satisfactorily provide enough positrons to reproduce AMS-02 observations. A smoking-gun signature of this scenario is an anisotropy in the arrival direction of the cosmic-ray electrons and positrons, which may be detectable by existing, or future, telescopes. The predicted anisotropy level is, at present, consistent with limits from Fermi-LAT and AMS-02. We argue that the large collecting area of Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ACTs) makes them optimal tools for...

  18. AMS-02远程中心自动化生产系统的设计与实现%The design and implementation of AMS-02 automatic production system in remote computing center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单雅辉

    2014-01-01

    AMS-02实验的目的是利用独特的太空环境来研究宇宙中的暗物质、反物质以及测量宇宙射线的来源和组成。由于该实验具有数据量大、生产过程复杂、计算中心分布广泛的特点,本文首先介绍了AMS-02实验的背景和数据需求,然后详细地分析了其数据类型以及处理流程,最后通过整合关键技术,为 AMS-02实验远程计算中心设计并实现了一套基于脚本语言、轻量级、易移植的自动化生产管理系统,大幅度地提高了该实验中数据生产的效率。%Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) experiment is using the unique environment of space to study the universe and its origin by searching for antimatter, dark matter while performing precision measurements of cosmic rays compositions. In consideration of the large amount of experimental data, the complexity of the production process, the widely dispersed regional center into account, this paper first introduces the background and data requirements of AMS-02 experiment, and then analyses experimental file types and data handling process in detail, and through the integration of key technologies, finally design and implement a lightweight, easy-transplant automatic data production system which is based on the scripting language for the remote computing centers, greatly improve the efficiency of the experimental data production in the AMS-02 experiment.

  19. AMS02 positron excess from decaying fermion DM with local dark gauge symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Positron excess observed by PAMELA, Fermi and AMS02 may be due to dark matter (DM pair annihilation or decay dominantly into muons. In this paper, we consider a scenario with thermal fermionic DM (χ with mass ∼O(1–2 TeV decaying into a dark Higgs (ϕ and an active neutrino (νa instead of the SM Higgs boson and νa. We first present a renormalizable model for this scenario with local dark U(1X gauge symmetry, in which the DM χ can be thermalized by Higgs portal and the gauge kinetic mixing. Assuming the dark Higgs (ϕ mass is in the range 2mμmodel is used, without conflict with constraints from antiproton and gamma-ray fluxes or direct detection experiments. Also, having such a light dark Higgs, the self-interaction of DM can be enhanced to some extent, and three puzzles in the CDM paradigm can be somewhat relaxed.

  20. AMS-02 Positron Excess and Indirect Detection of Three-body Decaying Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Low, Ian; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Yuan, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    We consider indirect detection of meta-stable dark matter particles decaying into a stable neutral particle and a pair of standard model fermions. Due to the softer energy spectra from the three-body decay, such models could potentially explain the AMS-02 positron excess without being constrained by the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray data and the cosmic ray anti-proton measurements. We scrutinize over different final state fermions, paying special attention to handling of the cosmic ray background and including various contributions from cosmic ray propagation with the help of the \\textsc{LikeDM} package. It is found that primary decays into an electron-positron pair and a stable neutral particle could give rise to the AMS-02 positron excess and, at the same time, stay unscathed against the gamma-ray and anti-proton constraints. Decays to a muon pair or a mixed flavor electron-muon pair may also be viable depending on the propagation models. Decays to all other standard model fermions are severely disfavored.

  1. AMS-02 positron excess and indirect detection of three-body decaying dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Huang, Wei-Chih; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Low, Ian; Sming Tsai, Yue-Lin; Yuan, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    We consider indirect detection of meta-stable dark matter particles decaying into a stable neutral particle and a pair of standard model fermions. Due to the softer energy spectra from the three-body decay, such models could potentially explain the AMS-02 positron excess without being constrained by the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray data and the cosmic ray anti-proton measurements. We scrutinize over different final state fermions, paying special attention to handling of the cosmic ray background and including various contributions from cosmic ray propagation with the help of the LIKEDM package. It is found that primary decays into an electron-positron pair and a stable neutral particle could give rise to the AMS-02 positron excess and, at the same time, stay unscathed against the gamma-ray and anti-proton constraints. Decays to a muon pair or a mixed flavor electron-muon pair may also be viable depending on the propagation models. Decays to all other standard model fermions are severely disfavored.

  2. Late decaying 2-component dark matter scenario as an explanation of the AMS-02 positron excess

    CERN Document Server

    Buch, Jatan; Rentala, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    The long standing anomaly in the positron flux as measured by the PAMELA and AMS-02 experiments could potentially be explained by dark matter annihilations. This scenario typically requires a large "boost factor" to be consistent with a thermal relic dark matter candidate produced via freeze-out. However, such an explanation has been considered to be disfavored by constraints from CMB observations on energy deposition during the recombination epoch. In this work, we construct a scenario for late-decaying two-component dark matter (LD2DM) with almost degenerate dark matter species. We show that such a scenario can explain the observed AMS-02 positron flux through an annihilation of the lighter dark matter species, while avoiding CMB constraints. The observed relic density can be correctly reproduced as well, with simple s-wave annihilation cross-sections. We demonstrate that the scenario is robust, subject to constraints from structure formation and CMB constraints on late-time energy depositions during the co...

  3. Systematic study of the uncertainties in fitting the cosmic positron data by AMS-02

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The launch of AMS-02 opens a new era for cosmic ray physics with unprecedented precision of data, which are comparable with the laboratory measurements. The high precision data allow a quantitative study on the cosmic ray physics and give strict constraints on the nature of cosmic ray sources. However, the intrinsic errors from theoretical models to interpret the data become dominant over the errors in data. In the present work we try to give a systematic study on these uncertainties to explain, as an explicit example, the first AMS-02 positron fraction data, which shows the cosmic ray positron/electron excesses together with the PAMELA, Fermi-LAT measurements. The excesses can be attributed to contributions from new positron/electron sources, like pulsars or dark matter annihilation. The precise data give strict constraints on properties of the new sources. We study the systematic uncertainties from cosmic ray propagation, solar modulation, the $pp$ interaction models, the nuclei injection spectrum and so on...

  4. Novel dark matter constraints from antiprotons in the light of AMS-02

    CERN Document Server

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Korsmeier, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate dark matter (DM) limits from cosmic-ray antiproton observations using the recent precise AMS-02 measurements. We properly take into account cosmic-ray propagation uncertainties fitting at the same time DM and propagation parameters, and marginalizing over the latter. We find a significant (~4.5 sigma) indication of a DM signal for DM masses near 80 GeV, with a hadronic annihilation cross-section close to the thermal value, sigma v ~3e-26 cm3s-1. Intriguingly, this signal is compatible with the DM interpretation of the Galactic center gamma-ray excess. Confirmation of the signal will require a more accurate study of the systematic uncertainties, i.e., the antiproton production cross-section, and modelling of the solar modulation effect. Interpreting the AMS-02 data in terms of upper limits on hadronic DM annihilation, we obtain strong constraints excluding a thermal annihilation cross-section for DM masses below about 50 GeV and in the range between approximately 150 and 500 GeV, even for conservat...

  5. A possible dark matter annihilation signal in the AMS-02 antiproton data

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Ming-Yang; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    A new approach has been adopted to probe the dark matter signal using the latest AMS-02 cosmic ray antiproton flux data. Different from previous studies, we do not assume specific propagation, injection, and solar modulation parameters when calculating the antiproton fluxes, but use the results inferred from the B/C ratio and proton data from the recent PAMELA/AMS-02 measurements instead. A joint likelihood method including the likelihood of these background parameters is established within the Bayesian framework. We find that a dark matter signal is favored with a high test statistic value of $\\sim 70$. The rest mass of the dark matter particles is $\\sim 30-70$ GeV and the velocity-averaged hadronic annihilation cross section is about $(1-6)\\times 10^{-26}$ cm$^{3}$s$^{-1}$, in agreement with that needed to account for the Galactic center GeV excess and/or the weak GeV emission from dwarf galaxies Reticulum 2 and Tucana III. Tight constraints on the dark matter annihilation models are also set in a wide mass...

  6. Spatial Dependent Diffusion of Cosmic Rays and the Excess of Primary Electrons Derived from High Precision Measurements by AMS-02

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, C; Hu, H B

    2016-01-01

    The precise spectra of Cosmic Ray (CR) electrons and positrons have been published by the measurement of AMS-02. It is reasonable to regard the difference between the electrons and positrons spectra ( $\\triangle \\Phi= \\Phi_{e^-}-\\Phi_{e^+}$ ) as being dominated by primary electrons. Noticing that the resulting electron spectrum shows no sign of spectral softening above 20 GeV, which is in contrast with the prediction of standard model. In this work, we generalize the analytic one dimensional two-halo model of diffusion to a three dimensional realistic calculation by implementing a spatial variant diffusion coefficients in DRAGON package. As a result, we can reproduce the spectral hardening of protons observed by several experiments, and predict an excess of high energy primary electrons which agrees with the measurement reasonably well. Unlike the break spectrum obtained for protons, the model calculation predicts a smooth electron excess and thus slightly over predicts the flux from tens of GeV to 100GeV. To...

  7. Galactic cosmic-ray propagation in the light of AMS-02: Analysis of protons, helium, and antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsmeier, Michael; Cuoco, Alessandro

    2016-12-01

    We present novel constraints on cosmic-ray propagation in the Galaxy using the recent precise measurements of proton and helium spectra from AMS-02, together with preliminary AMS-02 data on the antiproton over proton ratio. To explore efficiently the large (up to 11-dimensional) parameter space we employ the nested-sampling algorithm as implemented in the MultiNest package, interfaced with the Galprop code to compute the model-predicted spectra. We use VOYAGER proton and helium data, sampling the local interstellar spectra, to constrain the solar modulation potential. We find that the turbulence of the Galactic magnetic field is well constrained, i.e., δ =0.3 0-0.02+0.03(stat )-0.04+0.10(sys ) , with uncertainties dominated by systematic effects. Systematic uncertainties are determined checking the robustness of the results to the minimum rigidity cut used to fit the data (from 1 GV to 5 GV), to the propagation scenario (convection vs no convection), and to the uncertainties in the knowledge of the antiproton production cross section. Convection and reacceleration are found to be degenerate and not well constrained singularly when using data above 5 GV. Using data above 1 GV reacceleration is required, vA=25 ±2 km /s , although this value might be significantly affected by the low-energy systematic uncertainty in the solar modulation. In a forthcoming companion paper, we investigate the constraints imposed by AMS-02 measurements on lithium, boron, and carbon.

  8. Performance of the AMS-02 Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Doetinchem, P; Karpinski, W; Kirn, T; Lübelsmeyer, K; Orboeck, J; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Wallraff, W; Becker, U; Bürger, J; Henning, R; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V F; Wyatt, J

    2006-01-01

    For cosmic particle spectroscopy on the International Space Station the AMS experiment will be equipped with a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) to improve particle identification. The TRD has 20 layers of fleece radiator with Xe/CO2 proportional mode straw tube chambers. They are supported in a conically shaped octagon structure made of CFC-Al-honeycomb. For low power consumption VA analog multiplexers are used as front-end readout. A 20 layer prototype built from final design components has achieved proton rejections from 100 to 2000 at 90% electron efficiency for proton beam energies up to 250 GeV with cluster counting, likelihood and neural net selection algorithms.

  9. Fermi-LAT kills dark matter interpretations of AMS-02 data. Or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotsky, Konstantin; Budaev, Ruslan; Kirillov, Alexander; Laletin, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    A number of papers attempt to explain the positron anomaly in cosmic rays, observed by PAMELA and AMS-02, in terms of dark matter (DM) decays or annihilations. However, the recent progress in cosmic gamma-ray studies challenges these attempts. Indeed, as we show, any rational DM model explaining the positron anomaly abundantly produces final state radiation and Inverse Compton gamma rays, which inevitably leads to a contradiction with Fermi-LAT isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background measurements. Furthermore, the Fermi-LAT observation of Milky Way dwarf satellites, supposed to be rich in DM, revealed no significant signal in gamma rays. We propose a generic approach in which the major contribution to cosmic rays comes from the dark matter disc and prove that the tension between the DM origin of the positron anomaly and the cosmic gamma-ray observations can be relieved. We consider both a simple model, in which DM decay/annihilate into charged leptons, and a model-independent minimal case of particle production, and we estimate the optimal thickness of DM disk. Possible mechanisms of formation and its properties are briefly discussed.

  10. Fermi-LAT kills dark matter interpretations of AMS-02 data. Or not?

    CERN Document Server

    Belotsky, Konstantin; Kirillov, Alexander; Laletin, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    A number of papers attempt to explain the positron anomaly in cosmic rays, observed by PAMELA and AMS-02, in terms of dark matter (DM) decays or annihilations. However, the recent progress in cosmic gamma-ray studies challenges these attempts. Indeed, as we show, any rational DM model explaining the positron anomaly abundantly produces final state radiation and Inverse Compton gamma rays, which inevitably leads to a contradiction with Fermi-LAT isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background measurements. Furthermore, the Fermi-LAT observation of Milky Way dwarf satellites, supposed to be rich in DM, revealed no significant signal in gamma rays. We propose a generic approach in which the major contribution to cosmic rays comes from the dark matter disc and prove that the tension between the DM origin of the positron anomaly and the cosmic gamma-ray observations can be relieved. We consider both a simple model, in which DM decay/annihilate into charged leptons, and a model-independent minimal case of particle productio...

  11. Cosmic-Ray Positron Fraction Measurement with the AMS-02 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079577

    The study of Cosmic-Rays has proved to be of utmost importance in the understanding of the processes that govern our galaxy and has became a privileged field for the discovery of new physics. The current availability of precision measurements in a number of recent experiments such as PAMELA or Fermi, and in particular AMS-02, has provided a unique opportunity to challenge the theoretical framework that builds our comprehension of Nature. Certainly, the recent advent of new data on Cosmic-Ray electrons and positrons has raised disagreements with our current knowledge of production and propagation of Cosmic-Rays. The observation of an excess in the Cosmic-Ray electron spectrum has triggered enormous efforts to understand the origin of this anomaly, both from the theoretical and experimental points of view. In this context, AMS is a long awaited program, that among other objectives, will provide the most accurate measurement of the Cosmic-Ray electron spectrum, making possible to investigate a fundamental open q...

  12. Indirect and inclusive search for dark matter with AMS02 space spectrometer; Recherche indirecte et inclusive de matiere noire avec le spectrometre spatial AMS02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, P

    2007-06-15

    AMS02 is a particle physics detector designed for 3 years of data collecting aboard the International Space Station. Equipped with a superconducting magnet, it will allow to measure gamma and cosmic ray fluxes in the GeV to TeV region with high particle identification capabilities. Its performance is based on the redundancy of measurements in specific sub-detectors: a Time-Of-Flight counter, a Transition Radiation Detector, a Silicon Tracker, a Ring Imaging Cherenkov counter and an Electromagnetic calorimeter (Ecal). The Ecal is studied in details, in particular with the qualification of a stand-alone trigger devoted to gamma ray astronomy. This system allows the increase of the AMS02 sensitivity to photons, and the improvement of the reconstruction of electromagnetic events. The analog part of the trigger system has been tested with test benches and with a beam at CERN. The in-orbit calibration of the Ecal is studied, it may proceed in two steps. First, the Ecal cells responses have to be equalized with minimum ionizing particles data. Then an absolute calibration can be performed with cosmic electrons. For both the relative and the absolute calibration, possible procedures are defined and realistic calibration times are estimated. The second part deals with the indirect searches for dark matter and the study of the AMS02 sensitivity. Dark matter stands for 84% of the Universe mass and could consist in new particles. Dark matter particles are expected to surround our Galaxy and annihilate in high density regions. These annihilations could become observable exotic primary cosmic ray sources. Searches for anomalous excesses in (p-bar, e{sup +}, D-bar) and {gamma} ray fluxes will be performed by AMS02. A numerical tool allowing us to perform predictions for these exotic fluxes within supersymmetry or extra-dimension is developed and is presented in details. Phenomenological studies regarding possible enhancements of these signals by over-dense regions of the halo

  13. Discriminating the source of high-energy positrons with AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pato, Miguel; Bertone, Gianfranco [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zürich, Winterthurerst. 190, 8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Lattanzi, Massimiliano, E-mail: pato@iap.fr, E-mail: lattanzi@icra.it, E-mail: bertone@iap.fr [International Centre for Relativistic Astrophysics and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Piazzale A. Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy)

    2010-12-01

    We study the prospects for discriminating between the dark matter (DM) and pulsar origin of the PAMELA positron excess with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-02. We simulate the response of AMS-02 to positrons (and electrons) originating from DM annihilations, and determine the pulsar parameters (spin-down luminosity, distance and characteristic age) that produce a satisfactory fit to the mock AMS-02 data. It turns out that it is always possible to mimic a DM signal with pulsars. Although the fit in some cases requires values of spin-down luminosity and characteristic age different from those of known pulsars in the ATNF and Fermi-LAT catalogues, these catalogues are known to be incomplete, and therefore the pulsar interpretation can hardly be ruled out. We also show that if the positron excess is due to a single pulsar, it is always possible to find a DM candidate that provides a good fit to the mock AMS-02 data. The discrimination between the two scenarios will thus require a better knowledge of the underlying sources, or complementary data.

  14. Cross-calibration of the Transition Radiation Detector of AMS-02 for an Energy Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Obermeier, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Since May 2011 the AMS-02 experiment is installed on the International Space Station and is observing cosmic radiation. It consists of several state-of-the-art sub-detectors, which redundantly measure charge and energy of traversing particles. Due to the long exposure time of AMS-02 of many years the measurement of momentum for protons and ions is limited systematically by the spatial resolution and magnetic field strength of the silicon tracker. The maximum detectable rigidity for protons is about 1.8~TV, for helium about 3.6~TV. We investigate the possibility to extend the range of the energy measurement for heavy nuclei ($Z\\geq2$) with the transition radiation detector (TRD). The response function of the TRD shows a steep increase in signal from the level of ionization at a Lorentz factor $\\gamma$ of about 500 to $\\gamma\\approx20000$, where the transition radiation signal saturates. For heavy ions the signal fluctuations in the TRD are sufficiently small to allow an energy measurement with the TRD beyond t...

  15. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation through light mediators and a possible excess in AMS-02 $\\pbar/p$ data

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xian-Jun; Wu, Yue-Liang; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    We show that in the scenario where dark matter (DM) particles annihilate through light mediators, the energy spectra of the final state cosmic-ray particles depend strongly on the mediator mass. For final state antiprotons, a spectrum with relatively narrow peak occurs when the mediator mass is comparable to the $\\pbar p$ production threshold. Of interest, the latest AMS-02 data on the $\\pbar/p$ flux ratio hint at a bump-like excess over the expected background in the energy range $\\sim100-450$ GeV. We show that such a light mediator scenario is favoured by the latest AMS-02 data over the scenarios of DM direct annihilation into the standard model particles and that of antiprotons produced from inside supernova remnants (SNRs), and is consistent with the upper limits derived from the Fermi-LAT data on the gamma rays towards the dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The $\\pbar/p$ flux ratio with energy above 450 GeV is predicted to fall with energy quickly, which can be easily distinguished from the other two scenarios a...

  16. Galactic cosmic-ray propagation in the light of AMS-02: I. Analysis of protons, helium, and antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Korsmeier, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We present novel constraints on cosmic-ray propagation in the Galaxy using the recent precise measurements of proton and helium spectra from AMS-02, together with preliminary AMS-02 data on the antiproton over proton ratio. To explore efficiently the large (up to eleven-dimensional) parameter space we employ the nested-sampling algorithm as implemented in the \\textsc{MultiNest} package, interfaced with the \\textsc{Galprop} code to compute the model-predicted spectra. We use VOYAGER proton and helium data, sampling the local inter-stellar spectra, to constrain the solar modulation potential. We find that the turbulence of the Galactic magnetic field is well constrained, i.e., $\\delta=0.30^{+0.03}_{-0.02}(stat)^{+0.10}_{-0.04}(sys)$, with uncertainties dominated by systematic effects. Systematic uncertainties are determined checking the robustness of the results to the minimum rigidity cut used to fit the data (from 1 GV to 5 GV), to the propagation scenario (convection vs no-convection), and to the uncertainti...

  17. In-flight operations and status of the AMS-02 silicon tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosi, G; Battiston, R; Bertucci, b B; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Crispoltoni, M; Delgado, C; Duranti, M; Donnini, F; D'Urso, D; Fiandrini, cE; Formato, V; Graziani, M; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Ionica, M; Kanishchev, K; Nozzoli, F; Oliva, c A; Paniccia, M; Pizzolotto, C; Pohl, c M; Qin, X; Rapin, d D; Saouter, P; Tomassetti, N; Vitale, V; Vitillo, c S; Wu, X; Zhang, Z; Zuccon, P

    2016-01-01

    The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating on the International Space Station since May 2011. More than 60 billion events have been collected by the instrument as of today. One of the key subdetectors of AMS-02 is the microstrip silicon Tracker, designed to precisely measure the trajectory and absolute charge of cosmic rays in the GeV-TeV energy range. In addition, with the magnetic field, is also measuring the particle magnetic rigidity, defined as R = pc/Ze, and the sign of the charge. This report presents the Tracker on-line operations and calibration during the first four years of data taking in space. The track reconstruction efficiency and the resolution will be also reviewed.

  18. Indirect Dark Matter searches in the light of the recent AMS-02 observations

    CERN Document Server

    Salati, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    If the astronomical dark matter is made of weakly interacting, massive and stable species, it should annihilate on itself into particles. This process should produce rare antimatter cosmic rays and lead to distortions in their energy distributions. The AMS-02 spectrometer has been measuring them with unprecedented accuracy. It is timely to investigate if anomalies have been found in the positron and antiproton spectra and if so, if they indirectly point toward the presence of DM particles annihilating inside the Milky Way.

  19. Study of the Solar Modulation and Heliospheric Propagation of Galactic Cosmic Rays with AMS-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, C.; Bindi, V.; Consolandi, C.; Whitman, K.

    2014-12-01

    AMS-02 is a high-precision general-purpose magnetic spectrometer installed on the International Space Station on May 2011 to investigate fundamental questions shared by physics, astrophysics and cosmology on the origin and structure of the Universe, looking for antimatter and dark matter. The travel of cosmic rays through the heliosphere is disturbed by the magnetic field of the Sun which is known to vary with a period of 11 years; this induces a solar modulation in the propagation of cosmic rays which affects their fluxes up to few tens of GeV, modifying the shape and the intensity of the local interstellar spectrum (LIS). The monthly fluxes of protons detected by AMS-02 in the first three years of data taking will be shown. Using the framework of the force-field approximation, the solar modulation parameter will be extracted from the time dependent proton fluxes measured by AMS-02 (2011-2014) and PAMELA (2006-2009); the proton flux from Voyager 1 (October-November 2012) will be assumed as the LIS. The results will be compared with the modulation parameter inferred from the neutron monitors. The limitations of the force-field approximation and the differences between the minimum and the maximum of the solar cycle will be discussed. The availability of cosmic ray modulation data directly from space will be very useful to the heliophysics community, to understand in more details the long term solar activity during an entire solar cycle.

  20. Leptophilic dark matter confronts AMS-02 cosmic-ray positron flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Gong, Ti

    2017-02-01

    With the measurement of positron flux published recently by AMS-02 collaboration, we show how the leptophilic dark matter fits the observation. We obtain the percentages of different products of dark matter annihilation that can best describe the flux of high energy positrons observed by AMS. We show that dark matter annihilates predominantly into $\\tau\\tau$ pair, while both $ee$ and $\\mu\\mu$ final states should be less than $20\\%$. When gauge boson final states are included, the best branching ratio of needed $\\tau\\tau$ mode reduces.

  1. Cosmic gamma ray detection and discovery potential with the AMS-2 spectrometer; Detection de rayons {gamma} cosmiques et potentiel de decouvertes avec le spectrometre AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, L

    2004-12-15

    Yet designed to measure charged component of the cosmic rays, the foreseen Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) could also release {gamma}-ray studies, in the energy range from GeV to TeV, using the tracker system, for {gamma}-rays converted in e{sup +}e{sup -} pair, and the electromagnetic calorimeter. In the first part of the thesis are described the calibrations and the performances of the engineering model of the calorimeter, obtained from the analysis of data taken during a test-beam performed at CERN in July 2002. In the second part of the thesis, the AMS-02 discovery potential for {gamma}-astrophysics is presented. While exposure maps of the {gamma}--sky are computed for one year of data taking with the {gamma}--detectors, the acceptance of the calorimeter is obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations. The AMS-02 potential is then estimated for signals from the Vela pulsar and for some supersymmetric signals from the Galactic Center. (author)

  2. Particle identification with the AMS-02 RICH detector: search for dark matter with antideuterons

    CERN Document Server

    Arruda, Luísa; Pereira, Rui

    2007-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), whose final version AMS-02 is to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) for at least 3 years, is a detector designed to measure charged cosmic ray spectra with energies up to the TeV region and with high energy photon detection capability up to a few hundred GeV, using state-of-the art particle identification techniques. It is equipped with several subsystems, one of which is a proximity focusing Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector equipped with a dual radiator (aerogel+NaF), a lateral conical mirror and a detection plane made of 680 photomultipliers and light guides, enabling precise measurements of particle electric charge and velocity (Delta beta / beta ~ 10^-3 and 10^-4 for Z=1 and Z=10-20, respectively) at kinetic energies of a few GeV/nucleon. Combining velocity measurements with data on particle rigidity from the AMS-02 Tracker (Delta R / R ~ 2% for R=1-10 GV) it is possible to obtain a reliable measurement for particle mass. One of the main topi...

  3. Solar Modulation of the Local Interstellar Spectrum with Voyager 1, AMS-02, PAMELA, and BESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, C.; Bindi, V.; Consolandi, C.; Whitman, K.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the increasing precision of direct cosmic rays measurements opened the door to high-sensitivity indirect searches of dark matter and to more accurate predictions for radiation doses received by astronauts and electronics in space. The key ingredients in the study of these phenomena are the knowledge of the local interstellar spectrum (LIS) of galactic cosmic rays and the understanding of how the solar modulation affects the LIS inside the heliosphere. Voyager 1, AMS-02, PAMELA, and BESS measurements of proton and helium fluxes provide valuable information, allowing us to shed light on the shape of the LIS and the details of the solar modulation during solar cycles 22-24. A new parametrization of the LIS is presented, based on the latest data from Voyager 1 and AMS-02. Using the framework of the force-field approximation, the solar modulation parameter is extracted from the time-dependent fluxes measured by PAMELA and BESS. A modified version of the force-field approximation with a rigidity-dependent modulation parameter is introduced, yielding better fits than the force-field approximation. The results are compared with the modulation parameter inferred by neutron monitors.

  4. The AMS-02 detector on the International Space Station - The status after the first 5 years on orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duranti, Matteo

    2017-03-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, AMS-02, detector is operating on the International Space Station (ISS) since May the 19th, 2011. More than 80 billion events have been collected by the instrument in the first 5 years of data taking. This unprecedented amount of data is being used to perform accurate measurements of the different Cosmic Rays (CR) components. In this contribution a review of the published results will be presented.

  5. The AMS-02 detector on the International Space Station - The status after the first 5 years on orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duranti Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, AMS-02, detector is operating on the International Space Station (ISS since May the 19th, 2011. More than 80 billion events have been collected by the instrument in the first 5 years of data taking. This unprecedented amount of data is being used to perform accurate measurements of the different Cosmic Rays (CR components. In this contribution a review of the published results will be presented.

  6. El experimento AMS-02 como observatorio de rayos gamma desde la Estación Espacial Internacional

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilla Noarbe, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    AMS-02 es un experimento de física de partículas desde la Estación Espacial Internacional cuyo cometido es la medida precisa de rayos cósmicos hasta la carga del hierro. Dos docenas de instituciones de varios países, colaboran en su construcción y en la explotación de los datos. Su puesta en funcionamiento está prevista para el 2009, en una misión que durará más de 3 años. En esta tesis se analizan las capacidades de detección de rayos gamma de alta energía (1-100 GeV) de este instrumento, pa...

  7. Performance of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter of AMS-02 on the International Space Station ans measurement of the positronic fraction in the 1.5 – 350 GeV energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Basara, Laurent

    The AMS-02 experiment is a particle detector installed on the International Space Station (ISS) since May 2011, which measures the characteristics of the cosmic rays to bring answers to the problematics risen by the astroparticle physics since a few decades, in particular the study of dark matter and the search of antimatter. The phenomenological aspects of the physics of cosmic rays are reviewed in a first part. A second one describes the in-flight performances of the different subdetectors of AMS-02, in particular the electromagnetic calorimeter. It is shown, using particles at the ionizing minimum (MIPs), accounting for the main part of cosmic rays, that the calorimeter works as expected, and we find the same performances as on ground. This study is used to follow in time the evolution of the detector performances. It also allows to develop a charge estimator for the nuclei using the calorimeter. A third and final part, deals with the determination of the positronic fraction. The main difficulty of this me...

  8. Possible primary-electron-spectrum hardening at $\\sim 240$ GeV: Implications for AMS-02 observation and the physical origin of cosmic ray excesses

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Lei; He, Hao-Ning; Dong, Tie-Kuang; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Chang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The data collected by ATIC, CREAM and PAMELA all display remarkable cosmic-ray-nuclei spectrum hardening above the magnetic rigidity $\\sim$ 240 GV. One natural speculation is that the primary electron spectrum also gets hardened at $\\sim 240$ GeV, which can partly account for the electron/positron total spectrum excess discovered by ATIC, HESS and Fermi-LAT. The subsequent positron-to-electron ratio may get flattened or even decreased, depending on the degree of the primary electron spectrum hardening. Such modification is detectable for AMS-02, a mission dedicated to measure the high energy cosmic ray spectra with unprecedented accuracy. The spectrum hardening of both primary-electrons and nuclei at $\\sim 240$ GV, if confirmed by AMS-02 in the future, is likely attributed to a "nearby" supernova-remnant-like source with a lifetime $\\lesssim 10^{13}$ s. Possible dark matter origin of the positron excess revealed by PAMELA is also investigated.

  9. Model Experiments and Model Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Scott, Courtney J.; Shia, Run-Lie; Rodriguez, Jose; Sze, N. D.; Vohralik, Peter; Randeniya, Lakshman; Plumb, Ian

    1999-01-01

    The Second Workshop on Stratospheric Models and Measurements Workshop (M&M II) is the continuation of the effort previously started in the first Workshop (M&M I, Prather and Remsberg [1993]) held in 1992. As originally stated, the aim of M&M is to provide a foundation for establishing the credibility of stratospheric models used in environmental assessments of the ozone response to chlorofluorocarbons, aircraft emissions, and other climate-chemistry interactions. To accomplish this, a set of measurements of the present day atmosphere was selected. The intent was that successful simulations of the set of measurements should become the prerequisite for the acceptance of these models as having a reliable prediction for future ozone behavior. This section is divided into two: model experiment and model descriptions. In the model experiment, participant were given the charge to design a number of experiments that would use observations to test whether models are using the correct mechanisms to simulate the distributions of ozone and other trace gases in the atmosphere. The purpose is closely tied to the needs to reduce the uncertainties in the model predicted responses of stratospheric ozone to perturbations. The specifications for the experiments were sent out to the modeling community in June 1997. Twenty eight modeling groups responded to the requests for input. The first part of this section discusses the different modeling group, along with the experiments performed. Part two of this section, gives brief descriptions of each model as provided by the individual modeling groups.

  10. Modelling Urban Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christian; Vetner, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    How can urban designers develop an emotionally satisfying environment not only for today's users but also for coming generations? Which devices can they use to elicit interesting and relevant urban experiences? This paper attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the design of Zuidas, a new...

  11. Simulation - modeling - experiment; Simulation - modelisation - experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    After two workshops held in 2001 on the same topics, and in order to make a status of the advances in the domain of simulation and measurements, the main goals proposed for this workshop are: the presentation of the state-of-the-art of tools, methods and experiments in the domains of interest of the Gedepeon research group, the exchange of information about the possibilities of use of computer codes and facilities, about the understanding of physical and chemical phenomena, and about development and experiment needs. This document gathers 18 presentations (slides) among the 19 given at this workshop and dealing with: the deterministic and stochastic codes in reactor physics (Rimpault G.); MURE: an evolution code coupled with MCNP (Meplan O.); neutronic calculation of future reactors at EdF (Lecarpentier D.); advance status of the MCNP/TRIO-U neutronic/thermal-hydraulics coupling (Nuttin A.); the FLICA4/TRIPOLI4 thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling (Aniel S.); methods of disturbances and sensitivity analysis of nuclear data in reactor physics, application to VENUS-2 experimental reactor (Bidaud A.); modeling for the reliability improvement of an ADS accelerator (Biarotte J.L.); residual gas compensation of the space charge of intense beams (Ben Ismail A.); experimental determination and numerical modeling of phase equilibrium diagrams of interest in nuclear applications (Gachon J.C.); modeling of irradiation effects (Barbu A.); elastic limit and irradiation damage in Fe-Cr alloys: simulation and experiment (Pontikis V.); experimental measurements of spallation residues, comparison with Monte-Carlo simulation codes (Fallot M.); the spallation target-reactor coupling (Rimpault G.); tools and data (Grouiller J.P.); models in high energy transport codes: status and perspective (Leray S.); other ways of investigation for spallation (Audoin L.); neutrons and light particles production at intermediate energies (20-200 MeV) with iron, lead and uranium targets (Le Colley F

  12. PETN ignition experiments and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Michael L; Wente, William B; Kaneshige, Michael J

    2010-04-29

    Ignition experiments from various sources, including our own laboratory, have been used to develop a simple ignition model for pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The experiments consist of differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, beaker tests, one-dimensional time to explosion tests, Sandia's instrumented thermal ignition tests (SITI), and thermal ignition of nonelectrical detonators. The model developed using this data consists of a one-step, first-order, pressure-independent mechanism used to predict pressure, temperature, and time to ignition for various configurations. The model was used to assess the state of the degraded PETN at the onset of ignition. We propose that cookoff violence for PETN can be correlated with the extent of reaction at the onset of ignition. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating metal deformation produced from detonators encased in copper as well as comparing postignition photos of the SITI experiments.

  13. Bridging experiments, models and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carusi, Annamaria; Burrage, Kevin; Rodríguez, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    Computational models in physiology often integrate functional and structural information from a large range of spatiotemporal scales from the ionic to the whole organ level. Their sophistication raises both expectations and skepticism concerning how computational methods can improve our understan...... that contributes to defining the specific aspects of cardiac electrophysiology the MSE system targets, rather than being only an external test, and that this is driven by advances in experimental and computational methods and the combination of both....... of biovariability; 2) testing and developing robust techniques and tools as a prerequisite to conducting physiological investigations; 3) defining and adopting standards to facilitate the interoperability of experiments, models, and simulations; 4) and understanding physiological validation as an iterative process...... understanding of living organisms and also how they can reduce, replace, and refine animal experiments. A fundamental requirement to fulfill these expectations and achieve the full potential of computational physiology is a clear understanding of what models represent and how they can be validated. The present...

  14. Experiments beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, M.L.

    1984-09-01

    This paper is based upon lectures in which I have described and explored the ways in which experimenters can try to find answers, or at least clues toward answers, to some of the fundamental questions of elementary particle physics. All of these experimental techniques and directions have been discussed fully in other papers, for example: searches for heavy charged leptons, tests of quantum chromodynamics, searches for Higgs particles, searches for particles predicted by supersymmetric theories, searches for particles predicted by technicolor theories, searches for proton decay, searches for neutrino oscillations, monopole searches, studies of low transfer momentum hadron physics at very high energies, and elementary particle studies using cosmic rays. Each of these subjects requires several lectures by itself to do justice to the large amount of experimental work and theoretical thought which has been devoted to these subjects. My approach in these tutorial lectures is to describe general ways to experiment beyond the standard model. I will use some of the topics listed to illustrate these general ways. Also, in these lectures I present some dreams and challenges about new techniques in experimental particle physics and accelerator technology, I call these Experimental Needs. 92 references.

  15. Modeling the Experience of Emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Broekens, Joost

    2009-01-01

    Affective computing has proven to be a viable field of research comprised of a large number of multidisciplinary researchers resulting in work that is widely published. The majority of this work consists of computational models of emotion recognition, computational modeling of causal factors of emotion and emotion expression through rendered and robotic faces. A smaller part is concerned with modeling the effects of emotion, formal modeling of cognitive appraisal theory and models of emergent...

  16. Towards Generic Models of Player Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Noor; Shaker, Mohammad; Abou-Zleikha, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    further examine whether generic features of player be- haviour can be defined and used to boost the modelling per- formance. The accuracies obtained in both experiments in- dicate a promise for the proposed approach and suggest that game-independent player experience models can be built.......-dependent and their applicability is usually limited to the system and the data used for model construction. Establishing models of user experience that are highly scalable while maintaing the performance constitutes an important research direction. In this paper, we propose generic models of user experience in the computer games...... domain. We employ two datasets collected from players in- teractions with two games from different genres where accu- rate models of players experience were previously built. We take the approach one step further by investigating the mod- elling mechanism ability to generalise over the two datasets. We...

  17. Numerical experiments modelling turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trefilík Jiří

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work aims at investigation of the possibilities of modelling transonic flows mainly in external aerodynamics. New results are presented and compared with reference data and previously achieved results. For the turbulent flow simulations two modifications of the basic k – ω model are employed: SST and TNT. The numerical solution was achieved by using the MacCormack scheme on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability.

  18. Towards Generic Models of Player Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Noor; Shaker, Mohammad; Abou-Zleikha, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    -dependent and their applicability is usually limited to the system and the data used for model construction. Establishing models of user experience that are highly scalable while maintaing the performance constitutes an important research direction. In this paper, we propose generic models of user experience in the computer games...... further examine whether generic features of player be- haviour can be defined and used to boost the modelling per- formance. The accuracies obtained in both experiments in- dicate a promise for the proposed approach and suggest that game-independent player experience models can be built.......Context personalisation is a flourishing area of research with many applications. Context personalisation systems usually employ a user model to predict the appeal of the context to a particular user given a history of interactions. Most of the models used are context...

  19. Measurement of the cosmic $e^{+} + e^{-}$ Flux from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080883

    2014-11-14

    The measurement of positrons and electrons (e+/-) in cosmic rays provides fundamental information about the origin and the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. The interest in the e measurements is enhanced by the possibility to observe indirect evidences of Dark Matter annihilation in the e spectral shapes and arrival directions. The most precise space experiment for the detection of cosmic rays is the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). AMS is a large acceptance cosmic ray detector which has been installed on the International Space Station in May 2011 to conduct an unique long-duration ( ~20 years) mission of fundamental physics research in space. In this thesis, the events collected by AMS in the first 30 months of data taking have been analyzed to measure the (e+ + e-) energy spectrum. A total of 10.6 million events have been identified as e+/- and have been used for the measurement of the (e+ + e-) flux from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV. In this thesis the AMS detection capabilities, the e+/- identifica...

  20. Firn Model Intercomparison Experiment (FirnMICE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Jessica M.D.; Stevens, C. Max; Arthern, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Evolution of cold dry snow and firn plays important roles in glaciology; however, the physical formulation of a densification law is still an active research topic. We forced eight firn-densification models and one seasonal-snow model in six different experiments by imposing step changes in tempe......Evolution of cold dry snow and firn plays important roles in glaciology; however, the physical formulation of a densification law is still an active research topic. We forced eight firn-densification models and one seasonal-snow model in six different experiments by imposing step changes...... rate and temperature. Firn Model Intercomparison Experiment can provide a benchmark of results for future models, provide a basis to quantify model uncertainties and guide future directions of firn-densification modeling....

  1. Electron and Positron solar modulation and prediction for AMS-02

    CERN Document Server

    Bobik, P; Consolandi, C; Della Torre, S; Gervasi, M; Grandi, D; Kudela, K; Pensotti, S; Rancoita, P G

    2011-01-01

    The solar modulation, a combination of diffusion, convection, magnetic drift and energy loss inside the heliosphere is usually seen as a depletion in the Galactic cosmic ray (CR) flux at low energy (less than 10 GeV/nuc). Antiparticles such as antiprotons or positrons undergo the same processes of respective particles but with a different magnitude depending on the Solar magnetic field polarity. For electrons and positrons, due to the small mass, energy loss mechanisms as inverse compton, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung and ionization have to be taken into account, together with the typical adiabatic losses considered in the heliosphere. We developed a Monte Carlo stochastic simulation with the aim to compare the solar modulation of particles and antiparticles in the same observation period. We are able to estimate the different behaviours associated to the charge sign dependent processes of the heliospheric modulation. We compared the simulated positron fraction with measurements performed by AMS-01 and PAMELA. ...

  2. Firn Model Intercomparison Experiment (FirnMICE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Jessica M.D.; Stevens, C. Max; Arthern, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Evolution of cold dry snow and firn plays important roles in glaciology; however, the physical formulation of a densification law is still an active research topic. We forced eight firn-densification models and one seasonal-snow model in six different experiments by imposing step changes in tempe......Evolution of cold dry snow and firn plays important roles in glaciology; however, the physical formulation of a densification law is still an active research topic. We forced eight firn-densification models and one seasonal-snow model in six different experiments by imposing step changes...

  3. Data assimilation experiments with MPIESM climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyaev Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Further development of data assimilation technique and its application in numerical experiments with state-of-the art Max Plank Institute Earth System model have been carried out. In particularly, the stability problem of assimilation is posed and discussed In the experiments the sea surface height data from archive Archiving, Validating and Interpolating Satellite Ocean have been used. All computations have been realized on cluster system of German Climate Computing Center. The results of numerical experiments with and without assimilation were recorded and analyzed. A special attention has been focused on the Arctic zone. It is shown that there is a good coincidence of model tendencies and independent data.

  4. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-03

    This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiation. It is based on the model used to calculate temperatures and volume fractions in an annular vessel containing an aqueous solution of uranium . The experiment was repeated at several electron beam power levels, but the CFD analysis was performed only for the 12 kW irradiation, because this experiment came the closest to reaching a steady-state condition. The aim of the study is to compare results of the calculation with experimental measurements to determine the validity of the CFD model.

  5. CFD and FEM modeling of PPOOLEX experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J.; Timperi, A. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2011-01-15

    Large-break LOCA experiment performed with the PPOOLEX experimental facility is analysed with CFD calculations. Simulation of the first 100 seconds of the experiment is performed by using the Euler-Euler two-phase model of FLUENT 6.3. In wall condensation, the condensing water forms a film layer on the wall surface, which is modelled by mass transfer from the gas phase to the liquid water phase in the near-wall grid cell. The direct-contact condensation in the wetwell is modelled with simple correlations. The wall condensation and direct-contact condensation models are implemented with user-defined functions in FLUENT. Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) calculations of the PPOOLEX experiments and of a realistic BWR containment are also presented. Two-way coupled FSI calculations of the experiments have been numerically unstable with explicit coupling. A linear perturbation method is therefore used for preventing the numerical instability. The method is first validated against numerical data and against the PPOOLEX experiments. Preliminary FSI calculations are then performed for a realistic BWR containment by modeling a sector of the containment and one blowdown pipe. For the BWR containment, one- and two-way coupled calculations as well as calculations with LPM are carried out. (Author)

  6. Solar models, neutrino experiments, and helioseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, John N.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    1988-01-01

    The event rates and their recognized uncertainties are calculated for 11 solar neutrino experiments using accurate solar models. These models are also used to evaluate the frequency spectrum of the p and g oscillations modes of the sun. It is shown that the discrepancy between the predicted and observed event rates in the Cl-37 and Kamiokande II experiments cannot be explained by a 'likely' fluctuation in input parameters with the best estimates and uncertainties given in the present study. It is suggested that, whatever the correct solution to the solar neutrino problem, it is unlikely to be a 'trival' error.

  7. SSC 40 mm short model construction experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Carson, J.A.; Dickey, C.E.; Gonczy, I.; Koska, W.A.; Strait, J.B.

    1990-04-01

    Several short model SSC magnets have been built and tested at Fermilab. They establish a preliminary step toward the construction of SSC long models. Many aspects of magnet design and construction are involved. Experience includes coil winding, curing and measuring, coil end part design and fabrication, ground insulation, instrumentation, collaring and yoke assembly. Fabrication techniques are explained. Design of tooling and magnet components not previously incorporated into SSC magnets are described. 14 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Refining Grasp Affordance Models by Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, Renaud; Kraft, Dirk; Buch, Anders Glent;

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for learning object grasp affordance models in 3D from experience, and demonstrate its applicability through extensive testing and evaluation on a realistic and largely autonomous platform. Grasp affordance refers here to relative object-gripper configurations that yield stabl...

  9. Bicycle Rider Control: Observations, Modeling & Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, J.D.G.

    2012-01-01

    Bicycle designers traditionally develop bicycles based on experience and trial and error. Adopting modern engineering tools to model bicycle and rider dynamics and control is another method for developing bicycles. This method has the potential to evaluate the complete design space, and thereby dev

  10. Finds in Testing Experiments for Model Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ji; JIA Xiaoxia; LIU Chang; YANG Haiyan; LIU Chao

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the fault location and the failure prediction models, simulation-based and code-based experiments were conducted to collect the required failure data. The PIE model was applied to simulate failures in the simulation-based experiment. Based on syntax and semantic level fault injections, a hybrid fault injection model is presented. To analyze the injected faults, the difficulty to inject (DTI) and difficulty to detect (DTD) are introduced and are measured from the programs used in the code-based experiment. Three interesting results were obtained from the experiments: 1) Failures simulated by the PIE model without consideration of the program and testing features are unreliably predicted; 2) There is no obvious correlation between the DTI and DTD parameters; 3) The DTD for syntax level faults changes in a different pattern to that for semantic level faults when the DTI increases. The results show that the parameters have a strong effect on the failures simulated, and the measurement of DTD is not strict.

  11. Modeling Users' Experiences with Interactive Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Karapanos, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade the field of Human-Computer Interaction has evolved from the study of the usability of interactive products towards a more holistic understanding of how they may mediate desired human experiences.  This book identifies the notion of diversity in usersʼ experiences with interactive products and proposes methods and tools for modeling this along two levels: (a) interpersonal diversity in usersʽ responses to early conceptual designs, and (b) the dynamics of usersʼ experiences over time. The Repertory Grid Technique is proposed as an alternative to standardized psychometric scales for modeling interpersonal diversity in usersʼ responses to early concepts in the design process, and new Multi-Dimensional Scaling procedures are introduced for modeling such complex quantitative data. iScale, a tool for the retrospective assessment of usersʼ experiences over time is proposed as an alternative to longitudinal field studies, and a semi-automated technique for the analysis of the elicited exper...

  12. New physical model design for Vapex experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, A.; Maini, B.B. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Solvent extraction is gaining much attention as an in-situ recovery method for difficult to produce heavy oil and tar sand deposits. Vapour extraction (VAPEX) is similar to the steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process used in heavy oil production. In VAPEX, vaporized solvents are used instead of high temperature steam and the viscosity of the oil is reduced in situ. VAPEX is well suited for formations that are thin and where heat losses are unavoidable. It can be applied in the presence of overlying gas caps; bottom water aquifers; low thermal conductivity; high water saturation; clay swelling; and, formation damage. Modelling studies that use rectangular shaped models are limited at high reservoir pressures. This study presents a new design of physical models that overcomes this limitation. The annular space between two cylindrical pipes is used for developing slice-type and sand-filled models. This newly developed model is more compatible with high pressure. This paper compares results of VAPEX experiments using the cylindrical models and the rectangular models. The stabilized drainage rates from the newly developed cylindrical models are in very good agreement with those from the rectangular models. 16 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  13. Modeling variability in porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Bowen; Bao, Jie; Oostrom, Mart; Battiato, Ilenia; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2017-07-01

    Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e.,fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rate. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  14. Modeling variability in porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Bowen; Bao, Jie; Oostrom, Mart; Battiato, Ilenia; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2017-07-01

    Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e., fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rates. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  15. Background modeling for the GERDA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Becerici-Schmidt, N

    2013-01-01

    The neutrinoless double beta (0nubb) decay experiment GERDA at the LNGS of INFN has started physics data taking in November 2011. This paper presents an analysis aimed at understanding and modeling the observed background energy spectrum, which plays an essential role in searches for a rare signal like 0nubb decay. A very promising preliminary model has been obtained, with the systematic uncertainties still under study. Important information can be deduced from the model such as the expected background and its decomposition in the signal region. According to the model the main background contributions around Qbb come from Bi-214, Th-228, K-42, Co-60 and alpha emitting isotopes in the Ra-226 decay chain, with a fraction depending on the assumed source positions.

  16. Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiment Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chung-Chieng A.; Qian, Wen; Glenn, Scott M.

    1994-05-01

    The Institute for Naval Oceanography, in cooperation with Naval Research Laboratories and universities, executed the Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiment (DAMÉE) for the Gulf Stream region during fiscal years 1991-1993. Enormous effort has gone into the preparation of several high-quality and consistent datasets for model initialization and verification. This paper describes the preparation process, the temporal and spatial scopes, the contents, the structure, etc., of these datasets.The goal of DAMEE and the need of data for the four phases of experiment are briefly stated. The preparation of DAMEE datasets consisted of a series of processes: 1)collection of observational data; 2) analysis and interpretation; 3) interpolation using the Optimum Thermal Interpolation System package; 4) quality control and re-analysis; and 5) data archiving and software documentation.The data products from these processes included a time series of 3D fields of temperature and salinity, 2D fields of surface dynamic height and mixed-layer depth, analysis of the Gulf Stream and rings system, and bathythermograph profiles. To date, these are the most detailed and high-quality data for mesoscale ocean modeling, data assimilation, and forecasting research. Feedback from ocean modeling groups who tested this data was incorporated into its refinement.Suggestions for DAMEE data usages include 1) ocean modeling and data assimilation studies, 2) diagnosis and theorectical studies, and 3) comparisons with locally detailed observations.

  17. Ballistic Response of Fabrics: Model and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orphal, Dennis L.; Walker Anderson, James D., Jr.

    2001-06-01

    Walker (1999)developed an analytical model for the dynamic response of fabrics to ballistic impact. From this model the force, F, applied to the projectile by the fabric is derived to be F = 8/9 (ET*)h^3/R^2, where E is the Young's modulus of the fabric, T* is the "effective thickness" of the fabric and equal to the ratio of the areal density of the fabric to the fiber density, h is the displacement of the fabric on the axis of impact and R is the radius of the fabric deformation or "bulge". Ballistic tests against Zylon^TM fabric have been performed to measure h and R as a function of time. The results of these experiments are presented and analyzed in the context of the Walker model. Walker (1999), Proceedings of the 18th International Symposium on Ballistics, pp. 1231.

  18. Some Experiences with Numerical Modelling of Overflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Nielsen, L.; Jensen, B.

    2007-01-01

    Overflows are commonly applied in storm sewer systems to control flow and water surface level. Therefore overflows play a central role in the control of discharges of pollutants from sewer systems to the environment. The basic hydrodynamic principle of an overflow is the so-called critical flow...... across the edge of the overflow. To ensure critical flow across the edge, the upstream flow must be subcritical whereas the downstream flow is either supercritical or a free jet. Experimentally overflows are well studied. Based on laboratory experiments and Froude number scaling, numerous accurate...... the term for curvature of the water surface (the so-called Boussinesq approximation) 2. 2- and 3-dimensional so-called Volume of Fluid Models (VOF-models) based on the full Navier-Stokes equations (named NS3 and developed by DHI Water & Environment) As a general conclusion, the two numerical models show...

  19. The Geodynamo: Models and supporting experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, U.; Stieglitz, R.

    2003-03-01

    The magnetic field is a characteristic feature of our planet Earth. It shelters the biosphere against particle radiation from the space and offers by its direction orientation to creatures. The question about its origin has challenged scientists to find sound explanations. Major progress has been achieved during the last two decades in developing dynamo models and performing corroborating laboratory experiments to explain convincingly the principle of the Earth magnetic field. The article reports some significant steps towards our present understanding of this subject and outlines in particular relevant experiments, which either substantiate crucial elements of self-excitation of magnetic fields or demonstrate dynamo action completely. The authors are aware that they have not addressed all aspects of geomagnetic studies; rather, they have selected the material from the huge amount of literature such as to motivate the recently growing interest in experimental dynamo research. (orig.)

  20. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  1. How to teach friction: Experiments and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; Borghi, Lidia; De Ambrosis, Anna; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2007-12-01

    Students generally have difficulty understanding friction and its associated phenomena. High school and introductory college-level physics courses usually do not give the topic the attention it deserves. We have designed a sequence for teaching about friction between solids based on a didactic reconstruction of the relevant physics, as well as research findings about student conceptions. The sequence begins with demonstrations that illustrate different types of friction. Experiments are subsequently performed to motivate students to obtain quantitative relations in the form of phenomenological laws. To help students understand the mechanisms producing friction, models illustrating the processes taking place on the surface of bodies in contact are proposed.

  2. Experiments for foam model development and validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Mahoney, James F. (Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Russick, Edward Mark; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Kraynik, Andrew Michael; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Gorby, Allen D.

    2008-09-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to allow observation of the foaming process and the collection of temperature, rise rate, and microstructural data. Microfocus video is used in conjunction with particle image velocimetry (PIV) to elucidate the boundary condition at the wall. Rheology, reaction kinetics and density measurements complement the flow visualization. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to examine the cured foams to determine density gradients. These data provide input to a continuum level finite element model of the blowing process.

  3. Experience with the CMS Event Data Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, P.; /Princeton U.; Hegner, B.; /CERN; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; /Fermilab

    2009-06-01

    The re-engineered CMS EDM was presented at CHEP in 2006. Since that time we have gained a lot of operational experience with the chosen model. We will present some of our findings, and attempt to evaluate how well it is meeting its goals. We will discuss some of the new features that have been added since 2006 as well as some of the problems that have been addressed. Also discussed is the level of adoption throughout CMS, which spans the trigger farm up to the final physics analysis. Future plans, in particular dealing with schema evolution and scaling, will be discussed briefly.

  4. Multiaxial behavior of foams - Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheo, Laurent; Guérard, Sandra; Rio, Gérard; Donnard, Adrien; Viot, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Cellular materials are strongly related to pressure level inside the material. It is therefore important to use experiments which can highlight (i) the pressure-volume behavior, (ii) the shear-shape behavior for different pressure level. Authors propose to use hydrostatic compressive, shear and combined pressure-shear tests to determine cellular materials behavior. Finite Element Modeling must take into account these behavior specificities. Authors chose to use a behavior law with a Hyperelastic, a Viscous and a Hysteretic contributions. Specific developments has been performed on the Hyperelastic one by separating the spherical and the deviatoric part to take into account volume change and shape change characteristics of cellular materials.

  5. Forces between permanent magnets: experiments and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Manuel I.

    2017-03-01

    This work describes a very simple, low-cost experimental setup designed for measuring the force between permanent magnets. The experiment consists of placing one of the magnets on a balance, attaching the other magnet to a vertical height gauge, aligning carefully both magnets and measuring the load on the balance as a function of the gauge reading. A theoretical model is proposed to compute the force, assuming uniform magnetisation and based on laws and techniques accessible to undergraduate students. A comparison between the model and the experimental results is made, and good agreement is found at all distances investigated. In particular, it is also found that the force behaves as r -4 at large distances, as expected.

  6. Rotating, hydromagnetic laboratory experiment modelling planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Douglas H.

    2009-10-01

    This dissertation describes a series of laboratory experiments motivated by planetary cores and the dynamo effect, the mechanism by which the flow of an electrically conductive fluid can give rise to a spontaneous magnetic field. Our experimental apparatus, meant to be a laboratory model of Earth's core, contains liquid sodium between an inner, solid sphere and an outer, spherical shell. The fluid is driven by the differential rotation of these two boundaries, each of which is connected to a motor. Applying an axial, DC magnetic field, we use a collection of Hall probes to measure the magnetic induction that results from interactions between the applied field and the flowing, conductive fluid. We have observed and identified inertial modes, which are bulk oscillations of the fluid restored by the Coriolis force. Over-reflection at a shear layer is one mechanism capable of exciting such modes, and we have developed predictions of both onset boundaries and mode selection from over-reflection theory which are consistent with our observations. Also, motivated by previous experimental devices that used ferromagnetic boundaries to achieve dynamo action, we have studied the effects of a soft iron (ferromagnetic) inner sphere on our apparatus, again finding inertial waves. We also find that all behaviors are more broadband and generally more nonlinear in the presence of a ferromagnetic boundary. Our results with a soft iron inner sphere have implications for other hydromagnetic experiments with ferromagnetic boundaries, and are appropriate for comparison to numerical simulations as well. From our observations we conclude that inertial modes almost certainly occur in planetary cores and will occur in future rotating experiments. In fact, the predominance of inertial modes in our experiments and in other recent work leads to a new paradigm for rotating turbulence, starkly different from turbulence theories based on assumptions of isotropy and homogeneity, starting instead

  7. Full-Scale Cookoff Model Validation Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, M A; Rattanapote, M K; Heimdahl, E R; Erikson, W E; Curran, P O; Atwood, A I

    2003-11-25

    This paper presents the experimental results of the third and final phase of a cookoff model validation effort. In this phase of the work, two generic Heavy Wall Penetrators (HWP) were tested in two heating orientations. Temperature and strain gage data were collected over the entire test period. Predictions for time and temperature of reaction were made prior to release of the live data. Predictions were comparable to the measured values and were highly dependent on the established boundary conditions. Both HWP tests failed at a weld located near the aft closure of the device. More than 90 percent of unreacted explosive was recovered in the end heated experiment and less than 30 percent recovered in the side heated test.

  8. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J

  9. Experience economy meets business model design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudiksen, Sune Klok; Smed, Søren Graakjær; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig

    2012-01-01

    companies automatically get a higher prize when offering an experience setting to the customer illustrated by the coffee example. Organizations that offer experiences still have an advantage but when an increasing number of organizations enter the experience economy the competition naturally gets tougher...

  10. Modeling of titration experiments by a reactive transport model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hongyun; Samper Javier; Xin Xin

    2011-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is commonly treated by neutralization with alkaline substances. This treatment is supported by titration experiments that illustrate the buffering mechanisms and estimate the base neutralization capacity (BNC) of the AMD. Detailed explanation of titration curves requires modeling with a hydro-chemical model. In this study the titration curves of water samples from the drainage of the As Pontes mine and the corresponding dumps have been investigated and six buffers are selected by analyzing those curves. Titration curves have been simulated by a reactive transport model to discover the detailed buffering mechanisms. These simulations show seven regions involving different buffering mechanism. The BNC is primarily from buffers of dissolved Fe, Al and hydrogen sulfate. The BNC can be approximated by: BNC = 3(CFe + CAl) + 0.05Csulfate, where the units are mol/L. The BNC of the sample from the mine is 9.25 × 10-3 mol/L and that of the dumps sample is 1.28 × 10-2 mol/L.

  11. MODEL IMPROVEMENT AND EXPERI-MENT VALIDATION OF PNEUMATIC ARTIFICIAL MUSCLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Aiguo; Shi Guanglin; Zhong Tingxiu

    2004-01-01

    According to the deficiency of the present model of pneumatic artificial muscles (PAM), a serial model is built up based on the PAM's essential working principle with the elastic theory, it is validated by the quasi-static and dynamic experiment results, which are gained from two experiment systems.The experiment results and the simulation results illustrate that the serial model has made a great success compared with Chou's model, which can describe the force characteristics of PAM more precisely.A compensation item considering the braid's elasticity and the coulomb damp is attached to the serial model based on the analysis of the experiment results.The dynamic experiment proves that the viscous damp of the PAM could be ignored in order to simplify the model of PAM.Finally, an improved serial model of PAM is obtained.

  12. Designing Experiments for Nonlinear Models - An Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Rachel T.; Montgomery, Douglas C.

    2009-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/qre.1063 We illustrate the construction of Bayesian D-optimal designs for nonlinear models and compare the relative efficiency of standard designs with these designs for several models and prior distributions on the parameters. Through a relative efficiency analysis, we show that standard designs can perform well in situations where the nonlinear model is intrinsically linear. However, if the model is non...

  13. Freight modelling: an overview of international experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavasszy, L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Compared to passenger transportation modelling, the field of freight modelling is relatively young and developing quickly into different directions all over the world. The objective of this paper is to summarize the international state of the art in freight modelling, with a focus on developments in

  14. Cohesive mixed mode fracture modelling and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Rasmus; Olesen, John Forbes

    2008-01-01

    A nonlinear mixed mode model originally developed by Wernersson [Wernersson H. Fracture characterization of wood adhesive joints. Report TVSM-1006, Lund University, Division of Structural Mechanics; 1994], based on nonlinear fracture mechanics, is discussed and applied to model interfacial cracking...... in a steel–concrete interface. The model is based on the principles of Hillerborgs fictitious crack model, however, the Mode I softening description is modified taking into account the influence of shear. The model couples normal and shear stresses for a given combination of Mode I and II fracture...... curves, which may be interpreted using the nonlinear mixed mode model. The interpretation of test results is carried out in a two step inverse analysis applying numerical optimization tools. It is demonstrated how to perform the inverse analysis, which couples the assumed individual experimental load...

  15. Turbulent Boundary Layers - Experiments, Theory and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    DEVELOPMENT (ORGANISATION DU TRAITE DE L’ATLANTIQUE NORD ) AGARD Conference Proceedings No.271 TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS - EXPERIMENTS, THEORY AND...photographs of Figures 21 and 22. In this case, the photographs are taken with a single flash strobe and thus yield the instantaneous positions of the

  16. Nuclear reaction modeling, verification experiments, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, F.S.

    1995-10-01

    This presentation summarized the recent accomplishments and future promise of the neutron nuclear physics program at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scatter Center (MLNSC) and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility. The unique capabilities of the spallation sources enable a broad range of experiments in weapons-related physics, basic science, nuclear technology, industrial applications, and medical physics.

  17. Experiments and modelling on vertical flame spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O.; Mangs, J. [VTT Building and Transport, Espoo (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    he principle and some preliminary results are shown of a new vertical flame spread modelling effort. Quick experimental screenings on relevant phenomena are made, some models are evaluated, and a new set of needed measuring instruments is proposed. Finally a single example of FRNC cable is shown as application of the methods. (orig.)

  18. Model Experiments for the Determination of Airflow in Large Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    Model experiments are one of the methods used for the determination of airflow in large spaces. This paper will discuss the formation of the governing dimensionless numbers. It is shown that experiments with a reduced scale often will necessitate a fully developed turbulence level of the flow....... Details of the flow from supply openings are very important for the determination of room air distribution. It is in some cases possible to make a simplified supply opening for the model experiment....

  19. Silicon Carbide Derived Carbons: Experiments and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertesz, Miklos [Georgetown University, Washington DC 20057

    2011-02-28

    The main results of the computational modeling was: 1. Development of a new genealogical algorithm to generate vacancy clusters in diamond starting from monovacancies combined with energy criteria based on TBDFT energetics. The method revealed that for smaller vacancy clusters the energetically optimal shapes are compact but for larger sizes they tend to show graphitized regions. In fact smaller clusters of the size as small as 12 already show signatures of this graphitization. The modeling gives firm basis for the slit-pore modeling of porous carbon materials and explains some of their properties. 2. We discovered small vacancy clusters and their physical characteristics that can be used to spectroscopically identify them. 3. We found low barrier pathways for vacancy migration in diamond-like materials by obtaining for the first time optimized reaction pathways.

  20. Evaporation experiments and modelling for glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory test facility has been developed to measure evaporation rates of different volatile components from commercial and model glass compositions. In the set-up the furnace atmosphere, temperature level, gas velocity and batch composition are controlled. Evaporation rates have been measured

  1. Experiments with the Danish Eulerian Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatev, Z.; Dimov, I.; Georgiev, K.

    1995-01-01

    Contains the materials of the school for young scientists, which were available before the BIOMATH-95 Conference. (International Symposium and Young Scientists School on Mathematical Modelling and Information Systems in Biology, Ecology and Medicine, Sofia, Bulgaria, August 23-27, 1995). The abst......). The abstracts of the BIOMATH-95 conference are published in a seperate volume....

  2. Evaporation experiments and modelling for glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory test facility has been developed to measure evaporation rates of different volatile components from commercial and model glass compositions. In the set-up the furnace atmosphere, temperature level, gas velocity and batch composition are controlled. Evaporation rates have been measured f

  3. Flexible robot control: Modeling and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Irving J.; Shimoyama, Isao

    1989-01-01

    Described here is a model and its use in experimental studies of flexible manipulators. The analytical model uses the equivalent of Rayleigh's method to approximate the displaced shape of a flexible link as the static elastic displacement which would occur under end rotations as applied at the joints. The generalized coordinates are thereby expressly compatible with joint motions and rotations in serial link manipulators, because the amplitude variables are simply the end rotations between the flexible link and the chord connecting the end points. The equations for the system dynamics are quite simple and can readily be formulated for the multi-link, three-dimensional case. When the flexible links possess mass and (polar moment of) inertia which are small compared to the concentrated mass and inertia at the joints, the analytical model is exact and displays the additional advantage of reduction in system dimension for the governing equations. Four series of pilot tests have been completed. Studies on a planar single-link system were conducted at Carnegie-Mellon University, and tests conducted at Toshiba Corporation on a planar two-link system were then incorporated into the study. A single link system under three-dimensional motion, displaying biaxial flexure, was then tested at Carnegie-Mellon.

  4. An experience model for anyspeed motion

    CERN Document Server

    Fraundorf, P B

    2001-01-01

    Simple airtrack simulations, like those now possible with web-based 3D environments, can provide explorers of any age with experiential data sufficient to formulate their own models of motion. In particular, with a compressable spring, two gliders, a moving clock and two gate pairs with timers (pre and post collision), Newton's laws (or one's own version thereof) may emerge (or be tested) in the lab. With a high speed simulation, one may find instead Minkowski's spacetime version of Pythagoras' theorem (the metric equation) in the data, along with ``anyspeed'' expressions for momentum and kinetic energy.

  5. Experiments and Valve Modelling in Thermoacoustic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthil, P.; Baltean Carlès, D.; Bétrancourt, A.; François, M. X.; Yu, Z. B.; Thermeau, J. P.

    2006-04-01

    In a so called heat driven thermoacoustic refrigerator, using either a pulse tube or a lumped boost configuration, heat pumping is induced by Stirling type thermodynamic cycles within the regenerator. The time phase between acoustic pressure and flow rate throughout must then be close to that met for a purely progressive wave. The study presented here relates the experimental characterization of passive elements such as valves, tubes and tanks which are likely to act on this phase relationship when included in the propagation line of the wave resonator. In order to carry out a characterization — from the acoustic point of view — of these elements, systematic measurements of the acoustic field are performed varying various parameters: mean pressure, oscillations frequency, supplied heat power. Acoustic waves are indeed generated by use of a thermoacoustic prime mover driving a pulse tube refrigerator. The experimental results are then compared with the solutions obtained with various one-dimensional linear models including non linear correction factors. It turns out that when using a non symmetrical valve, and for large dissipative effects, the measurements disagree with the linear modelling and non linear behaviour of this particular element is shown.

  6. Indian Consortia Models: FORSA Libraries' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Y. M.; Birdie, C.; Bawdekar, N.; Barve, S.; Anilkumar, N.

    2007-10-01

    With increases in prices of journals, shrinking library budgets and cuts in subscriptions to journals over the years, there has been a big challenge facing Indian library professionals to cope with the proliferation of electronic information resources. There have been sporadic efforts by different groups of libraries in forming consortia at different levels. The types of consortia identified are generally based on various models evolved in India in a variety of forms depending upon the participants' affiliations and funding sources. Indian astronomy library professionals have formed a group called Forum for Resource Sharing in Astronomy and Astrophysics (FORSA), which falls under `Open Consortia', wherein participants are affiliated to different government departments. This is a model where professionals willingly come forward and actively support consortia formation; thereby everyone benefits. As such, FORSA has realized four consortia, viz. Nature Online Consortium; Indian Astrophysics Consortium for physics/astronomy journals of Springer/Kluwer; Consortium for Scientific American Online Archive (EBSCO); and Open Consortium for Lecture Notes in Physics (Springer), which are discussed briefly.

  7. The OECI model: the CRO Aviano experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Pieve, Lucia; Collazzo, Raffaele; Masutti, Monica; De Paoli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the "Centro di Riferimento Oncologico" (CRO) National Cancer Institute joined the accreditation program of the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) and was one of the first institutes in Italy to receive recognition as a Comprehensive Cancer Center. At the end of the project, a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis aimed at identifying the pros and cons, both for the institute and of the accreditation model in general, was performed. The analysis shows significant strengths, such as the affinity with other improvement systems and current regulations, and the focus on a multidisciplinary approach. The proposed suggestions for improvement concern mainly the structure of the standards and aim to facilitate the assessment, benchmarking, and sharing of best practices. The OECI accreditation model provided a valuable executive tool and a framework in which we can identify several important development projects. An additional impact for our institute is the participation in the project BenchCan, of which the OECI is lead partner.

  8. Large scale experiments as a tool for numerical model development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Jens; Hansen, Erik Asp; Fuchs, Jesper;

    2003-01-01

    for improvement of the reliability of physical model results. This paper demonstrates by examples that numerical modelling benefits in various ways from experimental studies (in large and small laboratory facilities). The examples range from very general hydrodynamic descriptions of wave phenomena to specific......Experimental modelling is an important tool for study of hydrodynamic phenomena. The applicability of experiments can be expanded by the use of numerical models and experiments are important for documentation of the validity of numerical tools. In other cases numerical tools can be applied...... hydrodynamic interaction with structures. The examples also show that numerical model development benefits from international co-operation and sharing of high quality results....

  9. Mooring Model Experiment and Mooring Line Force Calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向溢; 谭家华; 杨建民; 张承懿

    2001-01-01

    Mooring model experiment and mooring line tension determination are of significance to the design of mooring systems and berthing structures. This paper mainly involves: (a) description and analysis of a mooring model experiment;(b) derivation of static equilibrium equations for a moored ship subjected to wind, current and waves; (c) solution of mo.oring equations with the Monte Carlo method; (d) qualitative analysis of effects of pier piles on mooring line forces. Special emphasis is placed on the derivation ofstatic equilibrium equations, solution method and the mooring model experiment.

  10. Hydrodynamics of Explosion Experiments and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kedrinskii, Valery K

    2005-01-01

    Hydronamics of Explosion presents the research results for the problems of underwater explosions and contains a detailed analysis of the structure and the parameters of the wave fields generated by explosions of cord and spiral charges, a description of the formation mechanisms for a wide range of cumulative flows at underwater explosions near the free surface, and the relevant mathematical models. Shock-wave transformation in bubbly liquids, shock-wave amplification due to collision and focusing, and the formation of bubble detonation waves in reactive bubbly liquids are studied in detail. Particular emphasis is placed on the investigation of wave processes in cavitating liquids, which incorporates the concepts of the strength of real liquids containing natural microinhomogeneities, the relaxation of tensile stress, and the cavitation fracture of a liquid as the inversion of its two-phase state under impulsive (explosive) loading. The problems are classed among essentially nonlinear processes that occur unde...

  11. Model building experiences using Garp3: problems, patterns and debugging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, J.; Linnebank, F.E.; Bredeweg, B.; Žabkar, J.; Bratko, I.

    2009-01-01

    Capturing conceptual knowledge in QR models is becoming of interest to a larger audience of domain experts. Consequently, we have been training several groups to effectively create QR models during the last few years. In this paper we describe our teaching experiences, the issues the modellers encou

  12. "ABC's Earthquake" (Experiments and models in seismology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Ana Almeida, Portugal Almeida, Ana Escola Básica e Secundária Dr. Vieira de Carvalho Moreira da Maia, Portugal The purpose of this presentation, in poster format, is to disclose an activity which was planned and made by me, in a school on the north of Portugal, using a kit of materials simple and easy to use - the sismo-box. The activity "ABC's Earthquake" was developed under the discipline of Natural Sciences, with students from 7th grade, geosciences teachers and other areas. The possibility of work with the sismo-box was seen as an exciting and promising opportunity to promote science, seismology more specifically, to do science, when using the existing models in the box and with them implement the scientific method, to work and consolidate content and skills in the area of Natural Sciences, to have a time of sharing these materials with classmates, and also with other teachers from the different areas. Throughout the development of the activity, either with students or teachers, it was possible to see the admiration by the models presented in the earthquake-box, as well as, the interest and the enthusiasm in wanting to move and understand what the results after the proposed procedure in the script. With this activity, we managed to promote: - educational success in this subject; a "school culture" with active participation, with quality, rules, discipline and citizenship values; fully integration of students with special educational needs; strengthen the performance of the school as a cultural, informational and formation institution; provide activities to date and innovative; foment knowledge "to be, being and doing" and contribute to a moment of joy and discovery.Learn by doing!

  13. FIELD EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING AT CDG AIRPORTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaroson, R.

    2009-12-01

    Richard Ramaroson1,4, Klaus Schaefer2, Stefan Emeis2, Carsten Jahn2, Gregor Schürmann2, Maria Hoffmann2, Mikhael Zatevakhin3, Alexandre Ignatyev3. 1ONERA, Châtillon, France; 4SEAS, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA; 2FZK, Garmisch, Germany; (3)FSUE SPbAEP, St Petersburg, Russia. 2-month field campaigns have been organized at CDG airports in autumn 2004 and summer 2005. Air quality and ground air traffic emissions have been monitored continuously at terminals and taxi-runways, along with meteorological parameters onboard trucks and with a SODAR. This paper analyses the commercial engine emissions characteristics at airports and their effects on gas pollutants and airborne particles coupled to meteorology. LES model results for PM dispersion coupled to microphysics in the PBL are compared to measurements. Winds and temperature at the surface and their vertical profiles have been stored with turbulence. SODAR observations show the time-development of the mixing layer depth and turbulent mixing in summer up to 800m. Active low level jets and their regional extent have been observed and analyzed. PM number and mass size distribution, morphology and chemical contents are investigated. Formation of new ultra fine volatile (UFV) particles in the ambient plume downstream of running engines is observed. Soot particles are mostly observed at significant level at high power thrusts at take-off (TO) and on touch-down whereas at lower thrusts at taxi and aprons ultra the UFV PM emissions become higher. Ambient airborne PM1/2.5 is closely correlated to air traffic volume and shows a maximum beside runways. PM number distribution at airports is composed mainly by volatile UF PM abundant at apron. Ambient PM mass in autumn is higher than in summer. The expected differences between TO and taxi emissions are confirmed for NO, NO2, speciated VOC and CO. NO/NO2 emissions are larger at runways due to higher power. Reactive VOC and CO are more produced at low powers during idling at

  14. Nanoindentation shape effect: experiments, simulations and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabri, L [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Pugno, N [Department of Structural Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Rota, A [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Marchetto, D [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Valeri, S [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    AFM nanoindentation is nowadays commonly used for the study of mechanical properties of materials at the nanoscale. The investigation of surface hardness of a material using AFM means that the probe has to be able to indent the surface, but also to image it. Usually standard indenters are not sharp enough to obtain high-resolution images, but on the other hand measuring the hardness behaviour of a material with a non-standard sharp indenter gives only comparative results affected by a significant deviation from the commonly used hardness scales. In this paper we try to understand how the shape of the indenter affects the hardness measurement, in order to find a relationship between the measured hardness of a material and the corner angle of a pyramidal indenter. To achieve this we performed a full experimental campaign, indenting the same material with three focused ion beam (FIB) nanofabricated probes with a highly altered corner angle. We then compared the results obtained experimentally with those obtained by numerical simulations, using the finite element method (FEM), and by theoretical models, using a general scaling law for nanoindentation available for indenters with a variable size and shape. The comparison between these three approaches (experimental, numerical and theoretical approaches) reveals a good agreement and allowed us to find a theoretical relationship which links the measured hardness value with the shape of the indenter. The same theoretical approach has also been used to fit the hardness experimental results considering the indentation size effect. In this case we compare the measured data, changing the applied load.

  15. The Aqueous Alteration of CR Chondrites: Experiments and Geochemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perronnet, M.; Berger, G.; Zolensky, M. E.; Toplis, M. J.; Kolb, V. M.; Bajagic, M.

    2007-03-01

    Laboratory alteration experiments were performed on mineralogical assemblages having the unaltered CR composition. The mineralogy of reaction products was compared to that of Renazzo and GRO 95577 and to predictions of geochemical modeling.

  16. A Community Mentoring Model for STEM Undergraduate Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a community mentoring model for UREs that avoids some of the common pitfalls of the traditional paradigm while harnessing the power of learning communities to provide young scholars a stimulating collaborative STEM research experience.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of directional wetting: Comparing simulations to experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.P.; Sotthewes, K.; Swigchem, van J.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Kooij, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) simulations were performed on the dynamic behavior of liquid droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces, ultimately with the aim to develop a predictive tool enabling reliable design of future experiments. The simulations accurately mimic experimental results,

  18. Wind Tunnel Experiments with Active Control of Bridge Section Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henriette I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    the flutter wind velocity for future ultra-long span suspension bridges. The purpose of the wind tunnel experiments is to investigate the principle to use this active flap control system. The bridge section model used in the experiments is therefore not a model of a specific bridge but it is realistic......This paper describes results of wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section model where movable flaps are integrated in the bridge girder so each flap is the streamlined part of the edge of the girder. This active control flap system is patented by COWIconsult and may be used to increase...... compared with a real bridge. Five flap configurations are investigated during the wind tunnel experiments and depending on the actual flap configuration it is possible to decrease or increase the flutter wind velocity for the model....

  19. A user experience model for tangible interfaces for children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; van der Sluis, Frans; Volpe, G; Camurri, A.; Perloy, L.M.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2015-01-01

    Tangible user interfaces allow children to take advantage of their experience in the real world when interacting with digital information. In this paper we describe a model for tangible user interfaces specifically for children that focuses mainly on the user experience during interaction and on how

  20. Capillary Discharge Thruster Experiments and Modeling (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    PROPULSION MODELS & EXPERIMENTS Spacecraft Propulsion Relevant Plasma: From hall thrusters to plumes and fluxes on components Complex reaction physics i.e...PROPULSION MODELS & EXPERIMENTS Spacecraft Propulsion Relevant Plasma: From hall thrusters to plumes and fluxes on components Complex reaction ...Conductivity h is the Enthalpy Cs is the Sound Speed Θ is the Wall Energy Flux Pekker, 40th AIAA Plasmadynamics and Laser Conference, 2009. R.S. MARTIN (ERC INC

  1. Engineering teacher training models and experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tirados, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    Education Area, we renewed the programme, content and methodology, teaching the course under the name of "Initial Teacher Training Course within the framework of the European Higher Education Area". Continuous Training means learning throughout one's life as an Engineering teacher. They are actions designed to update and improve teaching staff, and are systematically offered on the current issues of: Teaching Strategies, training for research, training for personal development, classroom innovations, etc. They are activities aimed at conceptual change, changing the way of teaching and bringing teaching staff up-to-date. At the same time, the Institution is at the disposal of all teaching staff as a meeting point to discuss issues in common, attend conferences, department meetings, etc. In this Congress we present a justification of both training models and their design together with some results obtained on: training needs, participation, how it is developing and to what extent students are profiting from it.

  2. Model validation for karst flow using sandbox experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, M.; Pacheco Castro, R. B.; Tao, X.; Zhao, J.

    2015-12-01

    The study of flow in karst is complex due of the high heterogeneity of the porous media. Several approaches have been proposed in the literature to study overcome the natural complexity of karst. Some of those methods are the single continuum, double continuum and the discrete network of conduits coupled with the single continuum. Several mathematical and computing models are available in the literature for each approach. In this study one computer model has been selected for each category to validate its usefulness to model flow in karst using a sandbox experiment. The models chosen are: Modflow 2005, Modflow CFPV1 and Modflow CFPV2. A sandbox experiment was implemented in such way that all the parameters required for each model can be measured. The sandbox experiment was repeated several times under different conditions. The model validation will be carried out by comparing the results of the model simulation and the real data. This model validation will allows ud to compare the accuracy of each model and the applicability in Karst. Also we will be able to evaluate if the results of the complex models improve a lot compared to the simple models specially because some models require complex parameters that are difficult to measure in the real world.

  3. Enriching the Student Experience Through a Collaborative Cultural Learning Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInally, Wendy; Metcalfe, Sharon; Garner, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a knowledge and understanding of an international, collaborative, cultural learning model for students from the United States and Scotland. Internationalizing the student experience has been instrumental for student learning for the past eight years. Both countries have developed programs that have enriched and enhanced the overall student learning experience, mainly through the sharing of evidence-based care in both hospital and community settings. Student learning is at the heart of this international model, and through practice learning, leadership, and reflective practice, student immersion in global health care and practice is immense. Moving forward, we are seeking new opportunities to explore learning partnerships to provide this collaborative cultural learning experience.

  4. Dynamic modelling and analysis of biochemical networks: mechanism-based models and model-based experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, Natal A W

    2006-12-01

    Systems biology applies quantitative, mechanistic modelling to study genetic networks, signal transduction pathways and metabolic networks. Mathematical models of biochemical networks can look very different. An important reason is that the purpose and application of a model are essential for the selection of the best mathematical framework. Fundamental aspects of selecting an appropriate modelling framework and a strategy for model building are discussed. Concepts and methods from system and control theory provide a sound basis for the further development of improved and dedicated computational tools for systems biology. Identification of the network components and rate constants that are most critical to the output behaviour of the system is one of the major problems raised in systems biology. Current approaches and methods of parameter sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation are reviewed. It is shown how these methods can be applied in the design of model-based experiments which iteratively yield models that are decreasingly wrong and increasingly gain predictive power.

  5. Teaching Structures with Models: Experiences from Chile and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Beltran, M.G.; Borgart, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper states the importance of using scaled models for the teaching of structures in the curricula of Architecture and Structural Engineering studies. Based on 10 years’ experience working with models for different purposes, with a variety of materials and constructions methods, the authors wil

  6. Modelling the non-gravitational acceleration during Cassini's gravitation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolami, O; Gil, P J S; Páramos, J

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a computation of the thermally generated acceleration on the Cassini probe during its solar conjunction experiment, obtained from a model of the spacecraft. We use a point-like source method to build a thermal model of the vehicle and find that the results are in close agreement with the estimates of this effect performed through Doppler data analysis.

  7. Teaching Structures with Models: Experiences from Chile and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Beltran, M.G.; Borgart, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper states the importance of using scaled models for the teaching of structures in the curricula of Architecture and Structural Engineering studies. Based on 10 years’ experience working with models for different purposes, with a variety of materials and constructions methods, the authors wil

  8. Teaching Structures with Models: Experiences from Chile and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Beltran, M.G.; Borgart, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper states the importance of using scaled models for the teaching of structures in the curricula of Architecture and Structural Engineering studies. Based on 10 years’ experience working with models for different purposes, with a variety of materials and constructions methods, the authors

  9. Human strategic reasoning in dynamic games: Experiments, logics, cognitive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Sujata; Halder, Tamoghna; Sharma, Khyati; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2015-01-01

    © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015.This article provides a three-way interaction between experiments, logic and cognitive modelling so as to bring out a shared perspective among these diverse areas, aiming towards better understanding and better modelling of human strategic reasoning in

  10. Model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1994-01-01

    A series of scale model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm is described. The measurements are performed with a triggered spark source. The results are compared with data from an existing calculation model based upon uniform diffraction theory. Comparisons are made...

  11. Human strategic reasoning in dynamic games: Experiments, logics, cognitive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Sujata; Halder, Tamoghna; Sharma, Khyati; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2015-01-01

    © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015.This article provides a three-way interaction between experiments, logic and cognitive modelling so as to bring out a shared perspective among these diverse areas, aiming towards better understanding and better modelling of human strategic reasoning in dynami

  12. Enthalpy benchmark experiments for numerical ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kleiner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present benchmark experiments to test the implementation of enthalpy and the corresponding boundary conditions in numerical ice sheet models. The first experiment tests particularly the functionality of the boundary condition scheme and the basal melt rate calculation during transient simulations. The second experiment addresses the steady-state enthalpy profile and the resulting position of the cold–temperate transition surface (CTS. For both experiments we assume ice flow in a parallel-sided slab decoupled from the thermal regime. Since we impose several assumptions on the experiment design, analytical solutions can be formulated for the proposed numerical experiments. We compare simulation results achieved by three different ice flow-models with these analytical solutions. The models agree well to the analytical solutions, if the change in conductivity between cold and temperate ice is properly considered in the model. In particular, the enthalpy gradient at the cold side of the CTS vanishes in the limit of vanishing conductivity in the temperate ice part as required from the physical jump conditions at the CTS.

  13. Numerical Simulation and Cold Modeling experiments on Centrifugal Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthiprasad, Kestur Sadashivaiah; Murali, Mysore Seetharam; Mukunda, Pudukottah Gopaliengar; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2011-02-01

    In a centrifugal casting process, the fluid flow eventually determines the quality and characteristics of the final product. It is difficult to study the fluid behavior here because of the opaque nature of melt and mold. In the current investigation, numerical simulations of the flow field and visualization experiments on cold models have been carried out for a centrifugal casting system using horizontal molds and fluids of different viscosities to study the effect of different process variables on the flow pattern. The effects of the thickness of the cylindrical fluid annulus formed inside the mold and the effects of fluid viscosity, diameter, and rotational speed of the mold on the hollow fluid cylinder formation process have been investigated. The numerical simulation results are compared with corresponding data obtained from the cold modeling experiments. The influence of rotational speed in a real-life centrifugal casting system has also been studied using an aluminum-silicon alloy. Cylinders of different thicknesses are cast at different rotational speeds, and the flow patterns observed visually in the actual castings are found to be similar to those recorded in the corresponding cold modeling experiments. Reasonable agreement is observed between the results of numerical simulation and the results of cold modeling experiments with different fluids. The visualization study on the hollow cylinders produced in an actual centrifugal casting process also confirm the conclusions arrived at from the cold modeling experiments and numerical simulation in a qualitative sense.

  14. Designing experiments to discriminate families of logic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago eVidela

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Logic models of signaling pathways are a promising way of building effective in silico functional models of a cell, in particular of signaling pathways. The automated learning of Boolean logic models describing signaling pathways can be achieved by training to phosphoproteomics data, which is particularly useful if it is measured upon different combinations of perturbations in a high-throughput fashion. However, in practice the number and type of allowed perturbations is not exhaustive. Moreover, experimental data is unavoidably subject to noise. As a result, the learning process results in a family of feasible logical networks rather than in a single model. This family is composed of logic models implementing different internal wirings for the system and therefore the predictions of experiments from this family may present a significant level of variability, and hence uncertainty.In this paper, we introduce a method based on Answer Set Programming to propose an optimal experimental design that aims to narrow down the variability (in terms of input-output behaviors within families of logical models learned from experimental data. We study how the fitness with respect to the data can be improved after an optimal selection of signaling perturbations and how we learn optimal logic models with minimal number of experiments. The methods are applied on signaling pathways in human liver cells and phosphoproteomics experimental data. Using 25% of the experiments we obtained logical models with fitness scores (mean square error 15% close to the ones obtained using all experiments, illustrating the impact that our approach can have on the design of experiments for efficient model calibration.

  15. Astrophysical Probes of New Models of Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Kathryn

    One of the most pressing and relevant cosmological questions is on the nature of the dark matter. I propose a comprehensive program at the boundary of astrophysics and cosmology with particle physics, focused on the question on the nature of the Dark Matter (DM). Research at the boundary of the two fields is critically important as a plethora of experiments in both particle physics and astrophysics, such as direct and indirect detection of Dark Matter (DM) by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope (FGST), AMS-02, and Cosmic Microwave Background probes such as Planck, come online. At the same time, data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will probe fundamental questions about Electroweak Symmetry Breaking and its implications for astrophysics and cosmology, as concerns especially the nature of the DM and the generation of the baryon asymmetry. Physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) is required to explain the astrophysical observation that DM dominates over ordinary matter by a ratio 5:1, as we learned through WMAP, as well as large scale structure surveys. Despite lacking an understanding of the properties of the DM, its presence is crucial for the formation of structure in the universe. Particle physics provides a framework for understanding what the DM could be. This proposal centers on building new models of DM, as well as studying their signatures both in the galaxy and on earth. While particle physics has provided a few popular candidates for DM (such as the supersymmetric neutralino), whose signatures have been extensively studied in the literature, it is important to consider other theoretically motivated candidates which provide distinct signatures. This proposal focuses on such new models of DM, especially models of DM from hidden sectors. For example, recently, the PAMELA experiment has observed a rise in the ratio of positron to electron flux at high energies. The flux may likely come from astrophysical objects nearby, such as pulsars. An intriguing

  16. Cognitive Modeling of Video Game Player User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohil, Corey J.; Biocca, Frank A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues for the use of cognitive modeling to gain a detailed and dynamic look into user experience during game play. Applying cognitive models to game play data can help researchers understand a player's attentional focus, memory status, learning state, and decision strategies (among other things) as these cognitive processes occurred throughout game play. This is a stark contrast to the common approach of trying to assess the long-term impact of games on cognitive functioning after game play has ended. We describe what cognitive models are, what they can be used for and how game researchers could benefit by adopting these methods. We also provide details of a single model - based on decision field theory - that has been successfUlly applied to data sets from memory, perception, and decision making experiments, and has recently found application in real world scenarios. We examine possibilities for applying this model to game-play data.

  17. Neutral null models for diversity in serial transfer evolution experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpak, Arbel; Sella, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Evolution experiments with microorganisms coupled with genome-wide sequencing now allow for the systematic study of population genetic processes under a wide range of conditions. In learning about these processes in natural, sexual populations, neutral models that describe the behavior of diversity and divergence summaries have played a pivotal role. It is therefore natural to ask whether neutral models, suitably modified, could be useful in the context of evolution experiments. Here, we introduce coalescent models for polymorphism and divergence under the most common experimental evolution assay, a serial transfer experiment. This relatively simple setting allows us to address several issues that could affect diversity patterns in evolution experiments, whether selection is operating or not: the transient behavior of neutral polymorphism in an experiment beginning from a single clone, the effects of randomness in the timing of cell division and noisiness in population size in the dilution stage. In our analyses and discussion, we emphasize the implications for experiments aimed at measuring diversity patterns and making inferences about population genetic processes based on these measurements.

  18. Modeling a ponded infiltration experiment at Yucca Mountain, NV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, D.B.; Guertal, W.R. [Foothill Engineering, Inc., Mercury, NV (United States); Flint, A.L. [Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository for high level radioactive waste. As part of the site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, a field-scale ponded infiltration experiment was done to help characterize the hydraulic and infiltration properties of a layered dessert alluvium deposit. Calcium carbonate accumulation and cementation, heterogeneous layered profiles, high evapotranspiration, low precipitation, and rocky soil make the surface difficult to characterize.The effects of the strong morphological horizonation on the infiltration processes, the suitability of measured hydraulic properties, and the usefulness of ponded infiltration experiments in site characterization work were of interest. One-dimensional and two-dimensional radial flow numerical models were used to help interpret the results of the ponding experiment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of a ponded infiltration experiment done around borehole UE25 UZN {number_sign}85 (N85) at Yucca Mountain, NV. The effects of morphological horizons on the infiltration processes, lateral flow, and measured soil hydaulic properties were studied. The evaluation was done by numerically modeling the results of a field ponded infiltration experiment. A comparison the experimental results and the modeled results was used to qualitatively indicate the degree to which infiltration processes and the hydaulic properties are understood. Results of the field characterization, soil characterization, borehole geophysics, and the ponding experiment are presented in a companion paper.

  19. Blast Load Simulator Experiments for Computational Model Validation: Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    O’Daniel, 2016. Blast load simulator experiments for computational model validation – Report 1. ERDC/GSL TR-16-27. Vicksburg, MS: U.S. Army Engineer ...ER D C/ G SL T R- 16 -2 7 Blast Load Simulator Experiments for Computational Model Validation Report 2 G eo te ch ni ca l a nd S tr uc...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) solves the nation’s toughest

  20. Beyond the Standard Model Higgs Physics using the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of a Higgs-like boson with a mass of about 125 GeV has prompted the question of whether or not this particle is part of a much larger and more complex Higgs sector than that envisioned in the Standard Model. In this talk, we outline the current results from the ATLAS Experiment regarding Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) Higgs hypothesis tests. Searches for additional Higgs bosons are presented and interpreted in well motivated BSM Higgs frameworks, such as two Higgs doublet Models and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.

  1. Neural network models of learning and categorization in multigame experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide eMarchiori

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that regret-driven neural networks predict behavior in repeated completely mixed games remarkably well, substantially equating the performance of the most accurate established models of learning. This result prompts the question of what is the added value of modeling learning through neural networks. We submit that this modeling approach allows for models that are able to distinguish among and respond differently to different payoff structures. Moreover, the process of categorization of a game is implicitly carried out by these models, thus without the need of any external explicit theory of similarity between games. To validate our claims, we designed and ran two multigame experiments in which subjects faced, in random sequence, different instances of two completely mixed 2x2 games. Then, we tested on our experimental data two regret-driven neural network models, and compared their performance with that of other established models of learning and Nash equilibrium.

  2. Firn Model Inter-Comparison Experiment (FirnMICE) (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, J.; Arthern, R. J.; Buizert, C.; Cummings, E.; Essery, R.; Ligtenberg, S.; Orsi, A. J.; Simonsen, S. B.; Brook, E.; Leahy, W.; Stevens, C.; Harris, P.; Waddington, E. D.

    2013-12-01

    Firn evolution plays important roles in glaciology; however, the physical formulation of the compaction law, including sensitivities to temperature and accumulation rate, is an active research topic. We forced 10 firn-densification models in 6 different experiments by altering temperature and accumulation-rate boundary conditions and compared the steady-state and transient behavior of the models. We find that the models produce different results in both steady-state and transient modes for a suite of metrics, including depth-density and depth-age profiles. We use this study to quantitatively characterize the differences between firn models; to provide a benchmark of results for future models; to provide a basis to quantify model uncertainties; and to guide future directions of firn-densification modeling.

  3. Second-order model selection in mixture experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redgate, P.E.; Piepel, G.F.; Hrma, P.R.

    1992-07-01

    Full second-order models for q-component mixture experiments contain q(q+l)/2 terms, which increases rapidly as q increases. Fitting full second-order models for larger q may involve problems with ill-conditioning and overfitting. These problems can be remedied by transforming the mixture components and/or fitting reduced forms of the full second-order mixture model. Various component transformation and model reduction approaches are discussed. Data from a 10-component nuclear waste glass study are used to illustrate ill-conditioning and overfitting problems that can be encountered when fitting a full second-order mixture model. Component transformation, model term selection, and model evaluation/validation techniques are discussed and illustrated for the waste glass example.

  4. Modeling of detachment experiments at DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canik, J.M., E-mail: canikjm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Briesemeister, A.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Lasnier, C.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 700 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Leonard, A.W. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Lore, J.D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); McLean, A.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 700 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Watkins, J.G. [Sandia National Laboratories, 7011 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Edge fluid–plasma/kinetic–neutral modeling of well-diagnosed DIII-D experiments is performed in order to document in detail how well certain aspects of experimental measurements are reproduced within the model as the transition to detachment is approached. Results indicate, that at high densities near detachment onset, the poloidal temperature profile produced in the simulations agrees well with that measured in experiment. However, matching the heat flux in the model requires a significant increase in the radiated power compared to what is predicted using standard chemical sputtering rates. These results suggest that the model is adequate to predict the divertor temperature, provided that the discrepancy in radiated power level can be resolved.

  5. Mathematical modeling of isotope labeling experiments for metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargund, Shilpa; Sriram, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Isotope labeling experiments (ILEs) offer a powerful methodology to perform metabolic flux analysis. However, the task of interpreting data from these experiments to evaluate flux values requires significant mathematical modeling skills. Toward this, this chapter provides background information and examples to enable the reader to (1) model metabolic networks, (2) simulate ILEs, and (3) understand the optimization and statistical methods commonly used for flux evaluation. A compartmentalized model of plant glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway illustrates the reconstruction of a typical metabolic network, whereas a simpler example network illustrates the underlying metabolite and isotopomer balancing techniques. We also discuss the salient features of commonly used flux estimation software 13CFLUX2, Metran, NMR2Flux+, FiatFlux, and OpenFLUX. Furthermore, we briefly discuss methods to improve flux estimates. A graphical checklist at the end of the chapter provides a reader a quick reference to the mathematical modeling concepts and resources.

  6. Experiments and Modeling of G-Jitter Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, F. W.; Ramachandran, N.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    While there is a general understanding of the acceleration environment onboard an orbiting spacecraft, past research efforts in the modeling and analysis area have still not produced a general theory that predicts the effects of multi-spectral periodic accelerations on a general class of experiments nor have they produced scaling laws that a prospective experimenter can use to assess how an experiment might be affected by this acceleration environment. Furthermore, there are no actual flight experimental data that correlates heat or mass transport with measurements of the periodic acceleration environment. The present investigation approaches this problem with carefully conducted terrestrial experiments and rigorous numerical modeling for better understanding the effect of residual gravity and gentler on experiments. The approach is to use magnetic fluids that respond to an imposed magnetic field gradient in much the same way as fluid density responds to a gravitational field. By utilizing a programmable power source in conjunction with an electromagnet, both static and dynamic body forces can be simulated in lab experiments. The paper provides an overview of the technique and includes recent results from the experiments.

  7. Radon transport in fractured soil. Laboratory experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, A.

    1997-10-01

    Radon (Rn-222) transport in fractured soil has been investigated by laboratory experiments and by modelling. Radon transport experiments have been performed with two sand columns (homogeneous and inhomogeneous) and one undisturbed clayey till column containing a net of preferential flow paths (root holes). A numerical model (the finite-element model FRACTRAN) and an analytic model (a pinhole model) have been applied in simulations if soil gas and radon transport in fractured soil. Experiments and model calculations are included in a discussion of radon entry rates into houses placed on fractured soil. The main conclusion is, that fractures does not in general alter transport of internally generated radon out of soil, when the pressure and flow conditions in the soil is comparable to the conditions prevailing under a house. This indicates the important result, that fractures in soil have no impact on radon entry into a house beyond that of an increased gas permeability, but a more thorough investigation of this subject is needed. Only in the case where the soil is exposed to large pressure gradients, relative to gradients induced by a house, may it be possible to observe effects of radon exchange between fractures and matrix. (au) 52 tabs., 60 ill., 5 refs.

  8. Electron thermal transport barriers in RTP: experiment and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilham, A.M.R.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Cardozo, N. J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments in which very localized electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is scanned through the RTP plasma show sharp transitions, in which the electron temperature profile abruptly changes shape. The phenomenology-the profiles shapes, the sharp transitions-can be reproduced with a transport model which

  9. Design of spatial experiments: Model fitting and prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, V.V.

    1996-03-01

    The main objective of the paper is to describe and develop model oriented methods and algorithms for the design of spatial experiments. Unlike many other publications in this area, the approach proposed here is essentially based on the ideas of convex design theory.

  10. A Paired Compositions Model for Round-Robin Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, John R.; Halperin, Silas

    1975-01-01

    Investigation of the effects of a series of treatment conditions upon some social behaviors may require observation of subjects mutually paired, in round-robin fashion. Data arising from such experiments are difficult to analyze, partly because they do not fit neatly into standard designs. A model is presented. (Author/BJG)

  11. Design of Experiments, Model Calibration and Data Assimilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-30

    This presentation provides an overview of emulation, calibration and experiment design for computer experiments. Emulation refers to building a statistical surrogate from a carefully selected and limited set of model runs to predict unsampled outputs. The standard kriging approach to emulation of complex computer models is presented. Calibration refers to the process of probabilistically constraining uncertain physics/engineering model inputs to be consistent with observed experimental data. An initial probability distribution for these parameters is updated using the experimental information. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms are often used to sample the calibrated parameter distribution. Several MCMC algorithms commonly employed in practice are presented, along with a popular diagnostic for evaluating chain behavior. Space-filling approaches to experiment design for selecting model runs to build effective emulators are discussed, including Latin Hypercube Design and extensions based on orthogonal array skeleton designs and imposed symmetry requirements. Optimization criteria that further enforce space-filling, possibly in projections of the input space, are mentioned. Designs to screen for important input variations are summarized and used for variable selection in a nuclear fuels performance application. This is followed by illustration of sequential experiment design strategies for optimization, global prediction, and rare event inference.

  12. Design of Experiments, Model Calibration and Data Assimilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-30

    This presentation provides an overview of emulation, calibration and experiment design for computer experiments. Emulation refers to building a statistical surrogate from a carefully selected and limited set of model runs to predict unsampled outputs. The standard kriging approach to emulation of complex computer models is presented. Calibration refers to the process of probabilistically constraining uncertain physics/engineering model inputs to be consistent with observed experimental data. An initial probability distribution for these parameters is updated using the experimental information. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms are often used to sample the calibrated parameter distribution. Several MCMC algorithms commonly employed in practice are presented, along with a popular diagnostic for evaluating chain behavior. Space-filling approaches to experiment design for selecting model runs to build effective emulators are discussed, including Latin Hypercube Design and extensions based on orthogonal array skeleton designs and imposed symmetry requirements. Optimization criteria that further enforce space-filling, possibly in projections of the input space, are mentioned. Designs to screen for important input variations are summarized and used for variable selection in a nuclear fuels performance application. This is followed by illustration of sequential experiment design strategies for optimization, global prediction, and rare event inference.

  13. Experiments in Model-Checking Optimistic Replication Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Boucheneb, Hanifa

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a series of model-checking experiments to verify optimistic replication algorithms based on Operational Transformation (OT) approach used for supporting collaborative edition. We formally define, using tool UPPAAL, the behavior and the main consistency requirement (i.e. convergence property) of the collaborative editing systems, as well as the abstract behavior of the environment where these systems are supposed to operate. Due to data replication and the unpredictable nature of user interactions, such systems have infinitely many states. So, we show how to exploit some features of the UPPAAL specification language to attenuate the severe state explosion problem. Two models are proposed. The first one, called concrete model, is very close to the system implementation but runs up against a severe explosion of states. The second model, called symbolic model, aims to overcome the limitation of the concrete model by delaying the effective selection and execution of editing operations until th...

  14. Modelling and Experiments of a Standing Wave Piezomotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, B.; Helbo, Jan; Blanke, Mogens

    The paper presents a new contact model for standing wave piezomotors. The contact model is based on the Hertz theory for normal contact deformations and elastic contact theory for tangential loads. The contact theory is simplified into a model with discrete springs for normal and tangential loads...... which allows the calculation of slip/stick transitions. Simulations show that tip trajectories in general cannot be prescribed. The paper presents the principle of a bending resonator. Experiments indicate that the bending vibrations are too small to generate rotor rotations. However, due to unintended...

  15. Modelling and Experiments of a Standing Wave Piezomotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, B.; Helbo, Jan; Blanke, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a new contact model for standing wave piezomotors. The contact model is based on the Hertz theory for normal contact deformations and elastic contact theory for tangential loads. The contact theory is simplified into a model with discrete springs for normal and tangential loads...... which allows the calculation of slip/stick transitions. Simulations show that tip trajectories in general cannot be prescribed. The paper presents the principle of a bending resonator. Experiments indicate that the bending vibrations are too small to generate rotor rotations. However, due to unintended...

  16. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an EMIC intercomparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eby, M.; Weaver, A. J.; Alexander, K.;

    2012-01-01

    and continue through to 2005. The standard simulations include changes in forcing from solar luminosity, Earth's orbital configuration, CO2, additional greenhouse gases, land-use, and sulphate and volcanic aerosols. In spite of very different modelled pre-industrial global surface air temperatures......Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. Historical simulations start at 850 CE...

  17. PARAMETRIC MODELING, CREATIVITY, AND DESIGN: TWO EXPERIENCES WITH ARCHITECTURE’ STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Florio

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to reflect on the use of the parametric modeling in two didactic experiences. The first experiment involved resources of the Paracloud program and its relation with the Rhinoceros program, that resulted in the production of physical models produced with the aid of the laser cutting. In the second experiment, the students had produced algorithms in the Grasshopper, resulting in families of structures and coverings. The study objects are both the physical models and digital algorithms resultants from this experimentation. For the analysis and synthesis of the results, we adopted four important assumptions: 1. the value of attitudes and environment of work; 2. the importance of experimentation and improvisation; 3. understanding of the design process as a situated act and as a ill-defined problem; 4. the inclusion of creative and critical thought in the disciplines. The results allow us to affirm that the parametric modeling stimulates creativity, therefore allowing combination of different parameters, that result in unexpected discoveries. Keywords: Teach-Learning, Parametric Modeling, Laser Cutter, Grasshopper, Design Process, Creativity.

  18. Electromagnetic sunscreen model: design of experiments on particle specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécureux, Marie; Deumié, Carole; Enoch, Stefan; Sergent, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    We report a numerical study on sunscreen design and optimization. Thanks to the combined use of electromagnetic modeling and design of experiments, we are able to screen the most relevant parameters of mineral filters and to optimize sunscreens. Several electromagnetic modeling methods are used depending on the type of particles, density of particles, etc. Both the sun protection factor (SPF) and the UVB/UVA ratio are considered. We show that the design of experiments' model should include interactions between materials and other parameters. We conclude that the material of the particles is a key parameter for the SPF and the UVB/UVA ratio. Among the materials considered, none is optimal for both. The SPF is also highly dependent on the size of the particles.

  19. Drilling in tempered glass – modelling and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    The present paper reports experimentally and numerically obtained results for the process of drilling in tempered glass. The experimental results are drilling depths on the edge in 19mm tempered glass with a known residual stress state measured by a scattered light polariscope. The experiments have...... been modelled using a state-of-the-art model and compared with satisfying result to the performed experiments. The numerical model has been used for a parametric study, investigating the redistribution of residual stresses during the process of drilling. This is done for investigating the possibility...... of applying forces in such holes and thereby being able to mechanically assemble tempered glass without the need of drilling holes before the tempering process. The paper is the result of currently ongoing research and the results should be treated as so....

  20. Analytical models for the design of the LAPLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriz, A.R.; Lopez Cela, J.J.; Cortazar, O.D.; Serna Moreno, M.C.; Temporal, M. [ETSI Industriales and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Tahir, N.A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Hoffmann, D.H.H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    We review the theoretical activity at the University of Castilla-LaMancha directed to the design of the LAPLAS (Laboratory of Planetary Sciences) experiment in the framework of the HEDgeHOB international collaboration. We have developed analytical models for the different phases of LAPLAS, including models for the implosion of the cylindrical shell target, for the generation of an annular focal spot by means of a high-frequency wobbler system and for the hydrodynamic instabilities that could affect the performance of the target implosion. These models have been complemented with one and two-dimensional numerical simulations and such a combination have allowed us to have a powerful tool available for the design of the experiments as well as for the interpretation of their results. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Modeling of NIF Wetted-Foam Capsule Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robert; Olson, Richard; Kline, John

    2015-11-01

    Wetting of a foam with liquid DT or DD in an ICF capsule provides a mechanism of directly controlling the convergence ratio of the implosion. The density of the DD or DT vapor in the central void in the CH foam is set by the temperature of the liquid fuel, so the convergence ratio is easily adjustable. The capsule is driven by a two step laser pulse on NIF. The ablator is made of high density carbon in these experiments, but it could be beryllium. The experiments will test how well the modeling computer codes agree with experiment as the convergence ratio increases. It is possible that has the convergence ratio increases, a point will be reached were the modeling no longer agree with experiment. We wish to find this limit. In the presentation we will present computer model simulations in 1-D of the performance of NIF wetted-foam capsules, where the vapor density, the ablator type, and the choice of fuel (DD or DT) are varied.

  2. Dynamically Scaled Model Experiment of a Mooring Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Bergdahl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of mooring cables for marine structures is scale-dependent, and perfect dynamic similitude between full-scale prototypes and small-scale physical model tests is difficult to achieve. The best possible scaling is here sought by means of a specific set of dimensionless parameters, and the model accuracy is also evaluated by two alternative sets of dimensionless parameters. A special feature of the presented experiment is that a chain was scaled to have correct propagation celerity for longitudinal elastic waves, thus providing perfect geometrical and dynamic scaling in vacuum, which is unique. The scaling error due to incorrect Reynolds number seemed to be of minor importance. The 33 m experimental chain could then be considered a scaled 76 mm stud chain with the length 1240 m, i.e., at the length scale of 1:37.6. Due to the correct elastic scale, the physical model was able to reproduce the effect of snatch loads giving rise to tensional shock waves propagating along the cable. The results from the experiment were used to validate the newly developed cable-dynamics code, MooDy, which utilises a discontinuous Galerkin FEM formulation. The validation of MooDy proved to be successful for the presented experiments. The experimental data is made available here for validation of other numerical codes by publishing digitised time series of two of the experiments.

  3. Quantitative modeling and data analysis of SELEX experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Marko; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2006-03-01

    SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) is an experimental procedure that allows the extraction, from an initially random pool of DNA, of those oligomers with high affinity for a given DNA-binding protein. We address what is a suitable experimental and computational procedure to infer parameters of transcription factor-DNA interaction from SELEX experiments. To answer this, we use a biophysical model of transcription factor-DNA interactions to quantitatively model SELEX. We show that a standard procedure is unsuitable for obtaining accurate interaction parameters. However, we theoretically show that a modified experiment in which chemical potential is fixed through different rounds of the experiment allows robust generation of an appropriate dataset. Based on our quantitative model, we propose a novel bioinformatic method of data analysis for such a modified experiment and apply it to extract the interaction parameters for a mammalian transcription factor CTF/NFI. From a practical point of view, our method results in a significantly improved false positive/false negative trade-off, as compared to both the standard information theory based method and a widely used empirically formulated procedure.

  4. Experiences & Tools from Modeling Instruction Applied to Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenec, J.; Landis, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Framework for K-12 Science Education calls for stronger curricular connections within the sciences, greater depth in understanding, and tasks higher on Bloom's Taxonomy. Understanding atmospheric sciences draws on core knowledge traditionally taught in physics, chemistry, and in some cases, biology. If this core knowledge is not conceptually sound, well retained, and transferable to new settings, understanding the causes and consequences of climate changes become a task in memorizing seemingly disparate facts to a student. Fortunately, experiences and conceptual tools have been developed and refined in the nationwide network of Physics Modeling and Chemistry Modeling teachers to build necessary understanding of conservation of mass, conservation of energy, particulate nature of matter, kinetic molecular theory, and particle model of light. Context-rich experiences are first introduced for students to construct an understanding of these principles and then conceptual tools are deployed for students to resolve misconceptions and deepen their understanding. Using these experiences and conceptual tools takes an investment of instructional time, teacher training, and in some cases, re-envisioning the format of a science classroom. There are few financial barriers to implementation and students gain a greater understanding of the nature of science by going through successive cycles of investigation and refinement of their thinking. This presentation shows how these experiences and tools could be used in an Earth Science course to support students developing conceptually rich understanding of the atmosphere and connections happening within.

  5. New scotogenic model of neutrino mass with U(1){sub D} gauge interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ernest [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Picek, Ivica; Radovčić, Branimir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, P.O.B. 331, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2013-11-04

    We propose a new realization of the one-loop radiative model of neutrino mass generated by dark matter (scotogenic), where the particles in the loop have an additional U(1){sub D} gauge symmetry, which may be exact or broken to Z{sub 2}. This model is relevant to a number of astrophysical observations, including AMS-02 and the dark-matter distribution in dwarf galactic halos.

  6. New Scotogenic Model of Neutrino Mass with $U(1)_D$ Gauge Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Ernest; Radovcic, Branimir

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new realization of the one-loop radiative model of neutrino mass generated by dark matter (scotogenic), where the particles in the loop have an additional $U(1)_D$ gauge symmetry, which may be exact or broken to $Z_2$. This model is relevant to a number of astrophysical observations, including AMS-02 and the dark matter distribution in dwarf galactic halos.

  7. Design and modeling of small scale multiple fracturing experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuderman, J F

    1981-12-01

    Recent experiments at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have demonstrated the existence of three distinct fracture regimes. Depending on the pressure rise time in a borehole, one can obtain hydraulic, multiple, or explosive fracturing behavior. The use of propellants rather than explosives in tamped boreholes permits tailoring of the pressure risetime over a wide range since propellants having a wide range of burn rates are available. This technique of using the combustion gases from a full bore propellant charge to produce controlled borehole pressurization is termed High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF). Several series of HEGF, in 0.15 m and 0.2 m diameter boreholes at 12 m depths, have been completed in a tunnel complex at NTS where mineback permitted direct observation of fracturing obtained. Because such large experiments are costly and time consuming, smaller scale experiments are desirable, provided results from small experiments can be used to predict fracture behavior in larger boreholes. In order to design small scale gas fracture experiments, the available data from previous HEGF experiments were carefully reviewed, analytical elastic wave modeling was initiated, and semi-empirical modeling was conducted which combined predictions for statically pressurized boreholes with experimental data. The results of these efforts include (1) the definition of what constitutes small scale experiments for emplacement in a tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site, (2) prediction of average crack radius, in ash fall tuff, as a function of borehole size and energy input per unit length, (3) definition of multiple-hydraulic and multiple-explosive fracture boundaries as a function of boreholes size and surface wave velocity, (4) semi-empirical criteria for estimating stress and acceleration, and (5) a proposal that multiple fracture orientations may be governed by in situ stresses.

  8. E-health stakeholders experiences with clinical modelling and standardizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Elberg, Pia Britt; Højen, Anne Randorff

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholders in e-health such as governance officials, health IT-implementers and vendors have to co-operate to achieve the goal of a future-proof interoperable e-health infrastructure. Co-operation requires knowledge on the responsibility and competences of stakeholder groups. To increase awareness on clinical modeling and standardization we conducted a workshop for Danish and a few Norwegian e-health stakeholders' and made them discuss their views on different aspects of clinical modeling using a theoretical model as a point of departure. Based on the model, we traced stakeholders' experiences. Our results showed there was a tendency that stakeholders were more familiar with e-health requirements than with design methods, clinical information models and clinical terminology as they are described in the scientific literature. The workshop made it possible for stakeholders to discuss their roles and expectations to each other.

  9. Analysis of NIF experiments with the minimal energy implosion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, B., E-mail: bcheng@lanl.gov; Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; Merrill, F. E.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Cerjan, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We apply a recently developed analytical model of implosion and thermonuclear burn to fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility that used low-foot and high-foot laser pulse formats. Our theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental data. Our studies, together with neutron image analysis, reveal that the adiabats of the cold fuel in both low-foot and high-foot experiments are similar. That is, the cold deuterium-tritium shells in those experiments are all in a high adiabat state at the time of peak implosion velocity. The major difference between low-foot and high-foot capsule experiments is the growth of the shock-induced instabilities developed at the material interfaces which lead to fuel mixing with ablator material. Furthermore, we have compared the NIF capsules performance with the ignition criteria and analyzed the alpha particle heating in the NIF experiments. Our analysis shows that alpha heating was appreciable only in the high-foot experiments.

  10. Modelling the effect of shear strength on isentropic compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Stuart; Howell, Peter; Ockendon, John; Ockendon, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    Isentropic compression experiments (ICE) are a way of obtaining equation of state information for metals undergoing violent plastic deformation. In a typical experiment, millimetre thick metal samples are subjected to pressures on the order of 10 - 102 GPa, while the yield strength of the material can be as low as 10-2 GPa. The analysis of such experiments has so far neglected the effect of shear strength, instead treating the highly plasticised metal as an inviscid compressible fluid. However making this approximation belies the basic elastic nature of a solid object. A more accurate method should strive to incorporate the small but measurable effects of shear strength. Here we present a one-dimensional mathematical model for elastoplasticity at high stress which allows for both compressibility and the shear strength of the material. In the limit of zero yield stress this model reproduces the hydrodynamic models currently used to analyse ICEs. Numerical solutions of the governing equations will then be presented for problems relevant to ICEs in order to investigate the effects of shear strength compared with a model based purely on hydrodynamics.

  11. Pyrolysis of thermally thick wood particles - experiments and mathematical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller Andersen, S.; Thaaning Pedersen, S.; Goebel, B.; Houbak, N.; Henriksen, Ulrik [MEK - DTU, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Dall Bentzen, J. [COWI a/s, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2005-07-01

    A simple, dynamic, l-dimensional model describing heating, drying and pyrolysis of thermally thick wood particles with a l-dimensional geometry has been developed and implemented. The model output is the dynamic evolution of both the char yield and the amount of volatiles. The model is developed in such a simple and accessible way, that it easily can be implemented in a larger model for dimensioning and optimisation of applications where pyrolysis is a part of the overall process as for instance gasification. Experiments using a Thermo Gravimetric Analyser (TGA), built so pieces of wood can be fed into a hot atmosphere instantaneously, have been used to observe the influence of various parameters like temperature and size and wood types on the pyrolysis process. Results from the model have been compared with results from the experiments. The comparison showed good accordance when both wood particles with a well-defined geometry (a cylinder) and when beds of wood chips and wood pellets, respectively, were pyrolyzed. The model has proven that transport of heat to the wood; internal transport and accumulation of heat inside the wood and kinetics of pyrolysis are all important parameters. (au)

  12. New experimental model design for VAPEX process experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, J.A.; Maini, B.B. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The vast resources of heavy oil and bitumen deposits in Venezuela and Canada have become targets for finding less costly and more effective hydrocarbon recovery methods. Solvent extraction of heavy deposits is an attractive option that is gaining much attention as an in-situ recovery method. Vapour extraction (VAPEX) is analogous to the steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process for the recovery of heavy oil and tar sand reservoirs. However, in VAPEX, vaporized solvents are used instead of high temperature steam and the viscosity of the oil is reduced in situ. VAPEX is particularly suited for formations that are thin and where heat losses are unavoidable. It is also well suited in the presence of overlying gas caps; bottom water aquifers; low thermal conductivity; high water saturation; clay swelling; and, formation damage. Most modelling studies use rectangular shaped models, but these have limitations at high reservoir pressures. This study presents a new design of physical models that overcomes these limitations. The annular space between two cylindrical pipes is used for developing slice-type and sand-filled models. This newly developed model is more compatible with higher pressures. This paper compares results of VAPEX experiments using the cylindrical models and the rectangular models. The stabilized drainage rates from the newly developed cylindrical models are in very good agreement with those from the rectangular models. 16 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  13. Modeling HEDLA magnetic field generation experiments on laser facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatenejad, M.; Bell, A. R.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Crowston, R.; Drake, R. P.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Lamb, D.; Lee, D.; Marques, J. R.; Meinecke, J.; Miniati, F.; Murphy, C. D.; Park, H.-S.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Remington, B.; Reville, B.; Scopatz, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.; Woolsey, N.; Young, R.; Yurchak, R.

    2013-03-01

    The Flash Center is engaged in a collaboration to simulate laser driven experiments aimed at understanding the generation and amplification of cosmological magnetic fields using the FLASH code. In these experiments a laser illuminates a solid plastic or graphite target launching an asymmetric blast wave into a chamber which contains either Helium or Argon at millibar pressures. Induction coils placed several centimeters away from the target detect large scale magnetic fields on the order of tens to hundreds of Gauss. The time dependence of the magnetic field is consistent with generation via the Biermann battery mechanism near the blast wave. Attempts to perform simulations of these experiments using the FLASH code have uncovered previously unreported numerical difficulties in modeling the Biermann battery mechanism near shock waves which can lead to the production of large non-physical magnetic fields. We report on these difficulties and offer a potential solution.

  14. Modelling of binary alloy solidification in the MEPHISTO experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Eddie; de Vahl Davis, Graham; Timchenko, Victoria; Chen, Peter; Abbaschian, Reza

    2004-05-01

    A modified enthalpy method was used to numerically model experiments on solidification of a bismuth-tin alloy which were performed during the 1997 flight of the MEPHISTO-4 experiment on the US Space Shuttle Columbia. This modified enthalpy method was incorporated into an in-house code SOLCON and a commercial CFD code CFX; Soret effect was taken into account by including an additional thermo-diffusion term into the solute transport equation and the effects of thermal and solutal convection in the microgravity environment and of concentration-dependent melting temperature on the phase change processes were also included. In this paper an overview of the results obtained as part of MEPHISTO project is presented. The numerical solutions are compared with actual microprobe results obtained from the MEPHISTO experiment. To cite this article: E. Leonardi et al., C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  15. Calibration of Predictor Models Using Multiple Validation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for calibrating computational models using data from several and possibly dissimilar validation experiments. The offset between model predictions and observations, which might be caused by measurement noise, model-form uncertainty, and numerical error, drives the process by which uncertainty in the models parameters is characterized. The resulting description of uncertainty along with the computational model constitute a predictor model. Two types of predictor models are studied: Interval Predictor Models (IPMs) and Random Predictor Models (RPMs). IPMs use sets to characterize uncertainty, whereas RPMs use random vectors. The propagation of a set through a model makes the response an interval valued function of the state, whereas the propagation of a random vector yields a random process. Optimization-based strategies for calculating both types of predictor models are proposed. Whereas the formulations used to calculate IPMs target solutions leading to the interval value function of minimal spread containing all observations, those for RPMs seek to maximize the models' ability to reproduce the distribution of observations. Regarding RPMs, we choose a structure for the random vector (i.e., the assignment of probability to points in the parameter space) solely dependent on the prediction error. As such, the probabilistic description of uncertainty is not a subjective assignment of belief, nor is it expected to asymptotically converge to a fixed value, but instead it casts the model's ability to reproduce the experimental data. This framework enables evaluating the spread and distribution of the predicted response of target applications depending on the same parameters beyond the validation domain.

  16. A New Tube Gastrostomy Model in Animal Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Sezer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The orogastric route is the most preferred application method in the vast majority of the animal experiments in which application can be achieved by adding the material to the water of the experiment animal, through an orogastric tube or with a surgically managed ostomy. Material and Method: This experiment was constructed with twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats which were randomly assigned to one of two groups consist of control group ( group C, n: 6 and tube gastrostomy group ( group TG, n: 6.A novel and simple gastrostomy tube was derivated from a silicone foley catheter. Tube gastrostomy apparatus was constituted with a silicone foley catheter (6 French. In the group TG an incision was performed, and the stomach was visualized. A 1 cm incision was made in the midline and opening of the peritoneum. Anchoring sutures were placed and anterior gastric wall was lifted. The gastric wall is then opened. The apparatus was placed into the stomach and pulled through from a tunnel under the skin and fixed to the lateral abdominal wall with a 2/0 silk suture. Result: The procedure was ended in the 10th day of experiment. No mortality was observed in group C. The rats were monitored daily and no abnormal behavior consists of self harming incision site, resistance to oral intake or attending to displace. There was statistically significant difference in increasing alanine transaminase level (p<0.05 and decrease in the total protein and body weight (p<0.05 at the group TG at the end of experiment. There was significant increase in urea levels in Group C (p<0.05 at the end of experiment. The statistically significant decrease was observed in the same period in group C between aspartate transaminase, albumin, total protein, and body weight (p<0.05.  Glucose (p=0.047 and aspartate transaminase (p=0.050 level decrease changes and weight loose (p=0.034 from preoperative period to the end of the experiment between gastrostomy and laparotomy groups were

  17. Error Model of Curves in GIS and Digitization Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Tongde; WANG Jiayao; WANG Guangxia

    2006-01-01

    A stochastic error process of curves is proposed as the error model to describe the errors of curves in GIS. In terms of the stochastic process, four characteristics concerning the local error of curves, namely, mean error function, standard error function, absolute error function, and the correlation function of errors , are put forward. The total error of a curve is expressed by a mean square integral of the stochastic error process. The probabilistic meanings and geometric meanings of the characteristics mentioned above are also discussed. A scan digitization experiment is designed to check the efficiency of the model. In the experiment, a piece of contour line is digitized for more than 100 times and lots of sample functions are derived from the experiment. Finally, all the error characteristics are estimated on the basis of sample functions. The experiment results show that the systematic error in digitized map data is not negligible, and the errors of points on curves are chiefly dependent on the curvature and the concavity of the curves.

  18. Danish heathland manipulation experiment data in Model-Data-Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thum, Tea; Peylin, Philippe; Ibrom, Andreas; Van Der Linden, Leon; Beier, Claus; Bacour, Cédric; Santaren, Diego; Ciais, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    In ecosystem manipulation experiments (EMEs) the ecosystem is artificially exposed to different environmental conditions that aim to simulate circumstances in future climate. At Danish EME site Brandbjerg the responses of a heathland to drought, warming and increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are studied. The warming manipulation is realized by passive nighttime warming. The measurements include control plots as well as replicates for each three treatment separately and in combination. The Brandbjerg heathland ecosystem is dominated by heather and wavy hairgrass. These experiments provide excellent data for validation and development of ecosystem models. In this work we used a generic vegetation model ORCHIDEE with Model-Data-Fusion (MDF) approach. ORCHIDEE model is a process-based model that describes the exchanges of carbon, water and energy between the atmosphere and the vegetation. It can be run at different spatial scales from global to site level. Different vegetation types are described in ORCHIDEE as plant functional types. In MDF we are using observations from the site to optimize the model parameters. This enables us to assess the modelling errors and the performance of the model for different manipulation treatments. This insight will inform us whether the different processes are adequately modelled or if the model is missing some important processes. We used a genetic algorithm in the MDF. The data available from the site included measurements of aboveground biomass, heterotrophic soil respiration and total ecosystem respiration from years 2006-2008. The biomass was measured six times doing this period. The respiration measurements were done with manual chamber measurements. For the soil respiration we used results from an empirical model that has been developed for the site. This enabled us to have more data for the MDF. Before the MDF we performed a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters to different data streams. Fifteen most influential

  19. The creep experiment and theoretical model analysis of gascontaining coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Guang-zhi; ZHANG Dong-ming; WANG Wei-zhong

    2007-01-01

    A creep experiment of preformed molding coal under different confining pressures were carried out using self-developed 3-triaxial creep loading device for gas-containing coal, which loaded by Shimadzu AGI-250 kN electrical servo-controlled stiffness testing machine. Based on the experimental results, the variation trend of axial deformation under different stress states was studied, and creep failure characteristics of gascontaining coal under different confining pressures were analyzed. The experimental results were identified with seven-component nonlinear viscoelasto-plastic creep model (Hohai model), and the creep material parameters were obtained. The experimental result complies well with the theoretical value of this model. It indicates that creep constitutive relation of gas-containing coal can be expressed by nonlinear viscoelasto-plastic creep model correctly.

  20. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an EMIC intercomparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eby, M.; Weaver, A. J.; Alexander, K.

    2012-01-01

    Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. Historical simulations start at 850 CE...... and continue through to 2005. The standard simulations include changes in forcing from solar luminosity, Earth's orbital configuration, CO2, additional greenhouse gases, land-use, and sulphate and volcanic aerosols. In spite of very different modelled pre-industrial global surface air temperatures...... the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age estimated from paleoclimate reconstructions. This in turn could be a result of errors in the reconstructions of volcanic and/or solar radiative forcing used to drive the models or the incomplete representation of certain processes or variability within...

  1. Explanatory Models and Illness Experience of People Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, M Barton

    2016-09-01

    Research into explanatory models of disease and illness typically explores people's conceptual understanding, and emphasizes differences between patient and provider models. However, the explanatory models framework of etiology, time and mode of onset of symptoms, pathophysiology, course of sickness, and treatment is built on categories characteristic of biomedical understanding. It is unclear how well these map onto people's lived experience of illness, and to the extent they do, how they translate. Scholars have previously studied the experience of people living with HIV through the lenses of stigma and identity theory. Here, through in-depth qualitative interviews with 32 people living with HIV in the northeast United States, we explored the experience and meanings of living with HIV more broadly using the explanatory models framework. We found that identity reformation is a major challenge for most people following the HIV diagnosis, and can be understood as a central component of the concept of course of illness. Salient etiological explanations are not biological, but rather social, such as betrayal, or living in a specific cultural milieu, and often self-evaluative. Given that symptoms can now largely be avoided through adherence to treatment, they are most frequently described in terms of observation of others who have not been adherent, or the resolution of symptoms following treatment. The category of pathophysiology is not ordinarily very relevant to the illness experience, as few respondents have any understanding of the mechanism of pathogenesis in HIV, nor much interest in it. Treatment has various personal meanings, both positive and negative, often profound. For people to engage successfully in treatment and live successfully with HIV, mechanistic explanation is of little significance. Rather, positive psychological integration of health promoting behaviors is of central importance.

  2. Experiments and Modelling of Coal Pyrolysis under Fluidized Bed Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangYongzhe; XuXiangdong; 等

    1999-01-01

    The pyrolysis behavior of two Chinese coals has been investigated in a laboratory-scale bubbling fluidized bed system in Siegen University,Germany,Experimental equipment and procedure are introduced.The amounts of pyrolysis species of each coal were measured,calcuated and compared.A new method was presented to determine the needed parameters in FG-DVC model with the experimental results instead of other much more complicated experiments.

  3. Event-based Corpuscular Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Michielsen, K; De Raedt, H

    2010-01-01

    A corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one is presented. The event-based corpuscular model is shown to give a unified description of multiple-beam fringes of a plane parallel plate, single-photon Mach-Zehnder interferometer, Wheeler's delayed choice, photon tunneling, quantum erasers, two-beam interference, double-slit, and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm and Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiments.

  4. Reference analysis of the signal + background model in counting experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadei, D.

    2012-01-01

    The model representing two independent Poisson processes, labelled as ``signal'' and ``background'' and both contributing additively to the total number of counted events, is considered from a Bayesian point of view. This is a widely used model for the searches of rare or exotic events in presence of a background source, as for example in the searches performed by high-energy physics experiments. In the assumption of prior knowledge about the background yield, a reference prior is obtained for the signal alone and its properties are studied. Finally, the properties of the full solution, the marginal reference posterior, are illustrated with few examples.

  5. First experience with the new ATLAS analysis model

    CERN Document Server

    Cranshaw, Jack; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    During the Long shutdown of the LHC, the ATLAS collaboration overhauled its analysis model based on experience gained during Run 1. The main components are a new analysis format and Event Data Model which can be read directly by ROOT, as well as a "Derivation Framework" that takes the Petabyte-scale output from ATLAS reconstruction and produces smaller samples targeted at specific analyses, using the central production system. We will discuss the technical and operational aspects of this new system and review its performance during the first year of 13 TeV data taking.

  6. First experience with the new ATLAS analysis model

    CERN Document Server

    Cranshaw, Jack; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    During the Long shutdown of the LHC, the ATLAS collaboration overhauled its analysis model based on experience gained during Run 1. The main components are a new analysis format and Event Data Model which can be read directly by ROOT, as well as a "Derivation Framework" that takes the Petabyte-scale output from ATLAS reconstruction and produces smaller samples targeted at specific analyses, using the central production system. We will discuss the technical and operational aspects of this new system and review its performance during the first year of 13 TeV data taking.

  7. Sensitivity experiments to mountain representations in spectral models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schlese

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a set of sensitivity experiments to several formulations of orography. Three sets are considered: a "Standard" orography consisting of an envelope orography produced originally for the ECMWF model, a"Navy" orography directly from the US Navy data and a "Scripps" orography based on the data set originally compiled several years ago at Scripps. The last two are mean orographies which do not use the envelope enhancement. A new filtering technique for handling the problem of Gibbs oscillations in spectral models has been used to produce the "Navy" and "Scripps" orographies, resulting in smoother fields than the "Standard" orography. The sensitivity experiments show that orography is still an important factor in controlling the model performance even in this class of models that use a semi-lagrangian formulation for water vapour, that in principle should be less sensitive to Gibbs oscillations than the Eulerian formulation. The largest impact can be seen in the stationary waves (asymmetric part of the geopotential at 500 mb where the differences in total height and spatial pattern generate up to 60 m differences, and in the surface fields where the Gibbs removal procedure is successful in alleviating the appearance of unrealistic oscillations over the ocean. These results indicate that Gibbs oscillations also need to be treated in this class of models. The best overall result is obtained using the "Navy" data set, that achieves a good compromise between amplitude of the stationary waves and smoothness of the surface fields.

  8. Numerical Modeling of a Magnetic Flux Compression Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhin, Volodymyr; Bauer, Bruno S.; Awe, Thomas J.; Fuelling, Stephan; Goodrich, Tasha; Lindemuth, Irvin R.; Siemon, Richard E.; Garanin, Sergei F.

    2007-06-01

    A possible plasma target for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a stable diffuse z-pinch in a toroidal cavity, like that in MAGO experiments. To examine key phenomena of such MTF systems, a magnetic flux compression experiment with this geometry is under design. The experiment is modeled with 3 codes: a slug model, the 1D Lagrangian RAVEN code, and the 1D or 2D Eulerian Magneto-Hydro-Radiative-Dynamics-Research (MHRDR) MHD simulation. Even without injection of plasma, high- Z wall plasma is generated by eddy-current Ohmic heating from MG fields. A significant fraction of the available liner kinetic energy goes into Ohmic heating and compression of liner and central-core material. Despite these losses, efficiency of liner compression, expressed as compressed magnetic energy relative to liner kinetic energy, can be close to 50%. With initial fluctuations (1%) imposed on the liner and central conductor density, 2D modeling manifests liner intrusions, caused by the m = 0 Rayleigh-Taylor instability during liner deceleration, and central conductor distortions, caused by the m = 0 curvature-driven MHD instability. At many locations, these modes reduce the gap between the liner and the central core by about a factor of two, to of order 1 mm, at the time of peak magnetic field.

  9. Ontological and Epistemological Issues Regarding Climate Models and Computer Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezer, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Recent philosophical discussions (Parker 2009; Frigg and Reiss 2009; Winsberg, 2009; Morgon 2002, 2003, 2005; Gula 2002) about the ontology of computer simulation experiments and the epistemology of inferences drawn from them are of particular relevance to climate science as computer modeling and analysis are instrumental in understanding climatic systems. How do computer simulation experiments compare with traditional experiments? Is there an ontological difference between these two methods of inquiry? Are there epistemological considerations that result in one type of inference being more reliable than the other? What are the implications of these questions with respect to climate studies that rely on computer simulation analysis? In this paper, I examine these philosophical questions within the context of climate science, instantiating concerns in the philosophical literature with examples found in analysis of global climate change. I concentrate on Wendy Parker’s (2009) account of computer simulation studies, which offers a treatment of these and other questions relevant to investigations of climate change involving such modelling. Two theses at the center of Parker’s account will be the focus of this paper. The first is that computer simulation experiments ought to be regarded as straightforward material experiments; which is to say, there is no significant ontological difference between computer and traditional experimentation. Parker’s second thesis is that some of the emphasis on the epistemological importance of materiality has been misplaced. I examine both of these claims. First, I inquire as to whether viewing computer and traditional experiments as ontologically similar in the way she does implies that there is no proper distinction between abstract experiments (such as ‘thought experiments’ as well as computer experiments) and traditional ‘concrete’ ones. Second, I examine the notion of materiality (i.e., the material commonality between

  10. Numerical Modelling of Solitary Wave Experiments on Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, H. G.; Arikawa, T.; Baykal, C.; Yalciner, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    Performance of a rubble mound breakwater protecting Haydarpasa Port, Turkey, has been tested under tsunami attack by physical model tests conducted at Port and Airport Research Institute (Guler et al, 2015). It is aimed to understand dynamic force of the tsunami by conducting solitary wave tests (Arikawa, 2015). In this study, the main objective is to perform numerical modelling of solitary wave tests in order to verify accuracy of the CFD model IHFOAM, developed in OpenFOAM environment (Higuera et al, 2013), by comparing results of the numerical computations with the experimental results. IHFOAM is the numerical modelling tool which is based on VARANS equations with a k-ω SST turbulence model including realistic wave generation, and active wave absorption. Experiments are performed using a Froude scale of 1/30, measuring surface elevation and flow velocity at several locations in the wave channel, and wave pressure around the crown wall of the breakwater. Solitary wave tests with wave heights of H=7.5 cm and H=10 cm are selected which represent the results of the experiments. The first test (H=7.5 cm) is the case that resulted in no damage whereas the second case (H=10 cm) resulted in total damage due to the sliding of the crown wall. After comparison of the preliminary results of numerical simulations with experimental data for both cases, it is observed that solitary wave experiments could be accurately modeled using IHFOAM focusing water surface elevations, flow velocities, and wave pressures on the crown wall of the breakwater (Figure, result of sim. at t=29.6 sec). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSThe authors acknowledge developers of IHFOAM, further extend their acknowledgements for the partial supports from the research projects MarDiM, ASTARTE, RAPSODI, and TUBITAK 213M534. REFERENCESArikawa (2015) "Consideration of Characteristics of Pressure on Seawall by Solitary Waves Based on Hydraulic Experiments", Jour. of Japan. Soc. of Civ. Eng. Ser. B2 (Coast. Eng.), Vol 71, p I

  11. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an EMIC intercomparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Eby

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. Historical simulations start at 850 CE and continue through to 2005. The standard simulations include changes in forcing from solar luminosity, Earth's orbital configuration, CO2, additional greenhouse gases, land-use, and sulphate and volcanic aerosols. In spite of very different modelled pre-industrial global surface air temperatures, overall 20th century trends in surface air temperature and carbon uptake are reasonably well simulated when compared to observed trends. Land carbon fluxes show much more variation between models than ocean carbon fluxes, and recent land fluxes seem to be underestimated. It is possible that recent modelled climate trends or climate-carbon feedbacks are overestimated resulting in too much land carbon loss or that carbon uptake due to CO2 and/or nitrogen fertilization is underestimated.

    Several one thousand year long, idealized, 2x and 4x CO2 experiments are used to quantify standard model characteristics, including transient and equilibrium climate sensitivities, and climate-carbon feedbacks. The values from EMICs generally fall within the range given by General Circulation Models. Seven additional historical simulations, each including a single specified forcing, are used to assess the contributions of different climate forcings to the overall climate and carbon cycle response. The response of surface air temperature is the linear sum of the individual forcings, while the carbon cycle response shows considerable synergy between land-use change and CO2 forcings for some models. Finally, the preindustrial portions of the last millennium simulations are used to assess historical model carbon-climate feedbacks. Given

  12. Using Flume Experiments to Model Large Woody Debris Transport Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braudrick, C. A.; Grant, G. E.

    2001-05-01

    In the last decade there has been increasing interest in quantifying the transport dynamics of large woody debris in a variety of stream types. We used flume experiments to test theoretical models of wood entrainment, transport, and deposition in streams. Because wood moves infrequently during high flows where direct measurement and observation can be difficult and dangerous. Flume experiments provide an excellent setting to study wood dynamics because channel types, flow, log size, and other parameters can be varied relatively easily and extensive data can be collected over a short time period. Our flume experiments verified theoretical model predictions that piece movement is dependent on the diameter of the log and its orientation in large rivers (where piece length is less than channel width). Piece length, often reported as the most important factor in determining piece movement in field studies, was not a factor in these simulated large channels. This is likely due to the importance of banks and vegetation on inhibiting log movement in the field, particularly for pieces longer than channel width. Logs are often at least partially lodged on the banks sometimes upstream of vegetation or other logs which anchors the piece, and increases the force required for entrainment. Rootwads also increased the flow depth required to move individual logs. By raising logs off the channel bed, rootwads decrease the buoyant and drag forces acting on the log. We also developed a theoretical model of wood transport and deposition based upon the ratios of the piece length to channel width, piece length to the radius of curvature of the channel, and piece diameter to water depth. In these experiments we noted that individual logs tend to move down the channel parallel to the channel margin, and deposited on the outside of bends, heads of shallow and exposed bars, and bar crossovers. Our theoretical model was not borne out by the experiments, likely because there were few potential

  13. Coalescence of liquid drops: Different models versus experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Sprittles, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    The process of coalescence of two identical liquid drops is simulated numerically in the framework of two essentially different mathematical models, and the results are compared with experimental data on the very early stages of the coalescence process reported recently. The first model tested is the "conventional" one, where it is assumed that coalescence as the formation of a single body of fluid occurs by an instant appearance of a liquid bridge smoothly connecting the two drops, and the subsequent process is the evolution of this single body of fluid driven by capillary forces. The second model under investigation considers coalescence as a process where a section of the free surface becomes trapped between the bulk phases as the drops are pressed against each other, and it is the gradual disappearance of this "internal interface" that leads to the formation of a single body of fluid and the conventional model taking over. Using the full numerical solution of the problem in the framework of each of the two models, we show that the recently reported electrical measurements probing the very early stages of the process are better described by the interface formation/disappearance model. New theory-guided experiments are suggested that would help to further elucidate the details of the coalescence phenomenon. As a by-product of our research, the range of validity of different "scaling laws" advanced as approximate solutions to the problem formulated using the conventional model is established. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Exploration in free word association networks: models and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludueña, Guillermo A; Behzad, Mehran Djalali; Gros, Claudius

    2014-05-01

    Free association is a task that requires a subject to express the first word to come to their mind when presented with a certain cue. It is a task which can be used to expose the basic mechanisms by which humans connect memories. In this work, we have made use of a publicly available database of free associations to model the exploration of the averaged network of associations using a statistical and the adaptive control of thought-rational (ACT-R) model. We performed, in addition, an online experiment asking participants to navigate the averaged network using their individual preferences for word associations. We have investigated the statistics of word repetitions in this guided association task. We find that the considered models mimic some of the statistical properties, viz the probability of word repetitions, the distance between repetitions and the distribution of association chain lengths, of the experiment, with the ACT-R model showing a particularly good fit to the experimental data for the more intricate properties as, for instance, the ratio of repetitions per length of association chains.

  15. RANS Modeling of Benchmark Shockwave / Boundary Layer Interaction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nick; Vyas, Manan; Yoder, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the computations of a set of shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interaction (SWTBLI) test cases using the Wind-US code, as part of the 2010 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) shock / boundary layer interaction workshop. The experiments involve supersonic flows in wind tunnels with a shock generator that directs an oblique shock wave toward the boundary layer along one of the walls of the wind tunnel. The Wind-US calculations utilized structured grid computations performed in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes mode. Three turbulence models were investigated: the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, the Menter Shear Stress Transport wavenumber-angular frequency two-equation model, and an explicit algebraic stress wavenumber-angular frequency formulation. Effects of grid resolution and upwinding scheme were also considered. The results from the CFD calculations are compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) data from the experiments. As expected, turbulence model effects dominated the accuracy of the solutions with upwinding scheme selection indicating minimal effects.!

  16. Modeling of the jack rabbit series of experiments with a temperature based reactive burn model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbiens, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    The Jack Rabbit experiments, performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, focus on detonation wave corner turning and shock desensitization. Indeed, while important for safety or charge design, the behaviour of explosives in these regimes is poorly understood. In this paper, our temperature based reactive burn model is calibrated for LX-17 and compared to the Jack Rabbit data. It is shown that our model can reproduce the corner turning and shock desensitization behaviour of four out of the five experiments.

  17. Multi-scale modelling for HEDP experiments on Orion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Ramsay, M. G.; Hughes, S. J.; Hoarty, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    The Orion laser at AWE couples high energy long-pulse lasers with high intensity short-pulses, allowing material to be compressed beyond solid density and heated isochorically. This experimental capability has been demonstrated as a platform for conducting High Energy Density Physics material properties experiments. A clear understanding of the physics in experiments at this scale, combined with a robust, flexible and predictive modelling capability, is an important step towards more complex experimental platforms and ICF schemes which rely on high power lasers to achieve ignition. These experiments present a significant modelling challenge, the system is characterised by hydrodynamic effects over nanoseconds, driven by long-pulse lasers or the pre-pulse of the petawatt beams, and fast electron generation, transport, and heating effects over picoseconds, driven by short-pulse high intensity lasers. We describe the approach taken at AWE; to integrate a number of codes which capture the detailed physics for each spatial and temporal scale. Simulations of the heating of buried aluminium microdot targets are discussed and we consider the role such tools can play in understanding the impact of changes to the laser parameters, such as frequency and pre-pulse, as well as understanding effects which are difficult to observe experimentally.

  18. Medical students' emotional development in early clinical experience: a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Laan, Roland; Dornan, Tim; Koopmans, Raymond

    2014-08-01

    Dealing with emotions is a critical feature of professional behaviour. There are no comprehensive theoretical models, however, explaining how medical students learn about emotions. We aimed to explore factors affecting their emotions and how they learn to deal with emotions in themselves and others. During a first-year nursing attachment in hospitals and nursing homes, students wrote daily about their most impressive experiences, explicitly reporting what they felt, thought, and did. In a subsequent interview, they discussed those experiences in greater detail. Following a grounded theory approach, we conducted a constant comparative analysis, collecting and then interpreting data, and allowing the interpretation to inform subsequent data collection. Impressive experiences set up tensions, which gave rise to strong emotions. We identified four 'axes' along which tensions were experienced: 'idealism versus reality', 'critical distance versus adaptation', 'involvement versus detachment' and 'feeling versus displaying'. We found many factors, which influenced how respondents relieved those tensions. Their personal attributes and social relationships both inside and outside the medical community were important ones. Respondents' positions along the different dimensions, as determined by the balance between attributes and tensions, shaped their learning outcomes. Medical students' emotional development occurs through active participation in medical practice and having impressive experiences within relationships with patients and others on wards. Tensions along four dimensions give rise to strong emotions. Gaining insight into the many conditions that influence students' learning about emotions might support educators and supervisors in fostering medical students' emotional and professional development.

  19. Dynamic crack initiation toughness : experiments and peridynamic modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, John T.

    2009-10-01

    This is a dissertation on research conducted studying the dynamic crack initiation toughness of a 4340 steel. Researchers have been conducting experimental testing of dynamic crack initiation toughness, K{sub Ic}, for many years, using many experimental techniques with vastly different trends in the results when reporting K{sub Ic} as a function of loading rate. The dissertation describes a novel experimental technique for measuring K{sub Ic} in metals using the Kolsky bar. The method borrows from improvements made in recent years in traditional Kolsky bar testing by using pulse shaping techniques to ensure a constant loading rate applied to the sample before crack initiation. Dynamic crack initiation measurements were reported on a 4340 steel at two different loading rates. The steel was shown to exhibit a rate dependence, with the recorded values of K{sub Ic} being much higher at the higher loading rate. Using the knowledge of this rate dependence as a motivation in attempting to model the fracture events, a viscoplastic constitutive model was implemented into a peridynamic computational mechanics code. Peridynamics is a newly developed theory in solid mechanics that replaces the classical partial differential equations of motion with integral-differential equations which do not require the existence of spatial derivatives in the displacement field. This allows for the straightforward modeling of unguided crack initiation and growth. To date, peridynamic implementations have used severely restricted constitutive models. This research represents the first implementation of a complex material model and its validation. After showing results comparing deformations to experimental Taylor anvil impact for the viscoplastic material model, a novel failure criterion is introduced to model the dynamic crack initiation toughness experiments. The failure model is based on an energy criterion and uses the K{sub Ic} values recorded experimentally as an input. The failure model

  20. Diffusion imaging with stimulated echoes: signal models and experiment design

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) diffusion MRI can be advantageous over pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) for diffusion times that are long compared to $\\ttwo$. It is important therefore for biomedical diffusion imaging applications at 7T and above where $\\ttwo$ is short. However, imaging gradients in the STEAM sequence contribute much greater diffusion weighting than in PGSE, but are often ignored during post-processing. We demonstrate here that this can severely bias parameter estimates. Method: We present models for the STEAM signal for free and restricted diffusion that account for crusher and slice-select (butterfly) gradients to avoid such bias. The butterfly gradients also disrupt experiment design, typically by skewing gradient-vectors towards the slice direction. We propose a simple compensation to the diffusion gradient vector specified to the scanner that counterbalances the butterfly gradients to preserve the intended experiment design. Results: High-field data fixed monkey brain e...

  1. Surface-wave capillary plasmas in helium: modeling and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M.; Alves, L. L.; Noel, C.; Belmonte, T.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we use both simulations and experiments to study helium discharges (99.999% purity) sustained by surface-waves (2.45 GHz frequency), in capillary tubes (3 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. Simulations use a self-consistent homogeneous and stationary collisional-radiative model that solves the rate balance equations for the different species present in the plasma (electrons, the He^+ and He2^+ ions, the He(nexcimers) and the gas thermal balance equation, coupled to the two-term electron Boltzmann equation (including direct and stepwise collisions as well as electron-electron collisions). Experiments use optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to measure the electron density (Hβ Stark broadening), the gas temperature (ro-vibrational transitions of OH, present at trace concentrations), and the populations of different excited states. Model predictions at 1.7x10^13 cm-3 electron density (within the range estimated experimentally) are in good agreement with measurements (deviations < 10%) of (i) the excitation spectrum and the excitation temperatures (2795 ± 115 K, obtained from the Boltzmann-plot of the excited state populations, with energies lying between 22.7 and 24.2 eV), (ii) the power coupled to the plasma (˜ 180 ± 10 W), and (iii) the gas temperature (˜ 1700 ± 100 K). We discuss the extreme dependence of model results (particularly the gas temperature) on the power coupled to the plasma.

  2. Selection Experiments in the Penna Model for Biological Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, G.; Idiart, M. A.; de Almeida, R. M. C.

    We consider the Penna model for biological aging to investigate correlations between early fertility and late life survival rates in populations at equilibrium. We consider inherited initial reproduction ages together with a reproduction cost translated in a probability that mother and offspring die at birth, depending on the mother age. For convenient sets of parameters, the equilibrated populations present genetic variability in what regards both genetically programmed death age and initial reproduction age. In the asexual Penna model, a negative correlation between early life fertility and late life survival rates naturally emerges in the stationary solutions. In the sexual Penna model, selection experiments are performed where individuals are sorted by initial reproduction age from the equilibrated populations and the separated populations are evolved independently. After a transient, a negative correlation between early fertility and late age survival rates also emerges in the sense that populations that start reproducing earlier present smaller average genetically programmed death age. These effects appear due to the age structure of populations in the steady state solution of the evolution equations. We claim that the same demographic effects may be playing an important role in selection experiments in the laboratory.

  3. Nb{sub 3}Al insert experiment log book. 3rd experiment of CS model coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Makoto; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Isono, Takaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment] [and others

    2002-10-01

    The cool down of CS model coil and Nb{sub 3}Al insert was started on March 4, 2002. It took almost one month and immediately started coil charge since April 3, 2002. The charge test of Nb{sub 3}Al insert and CS model coil was completed on May 2, 2002. All of the experiments including the warm up was also completed on May 30, 2002. In this campaign, total shot numbers were 102 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was about 5.2 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. (author)

  4. Time dependence of electron and positron fluxes measured with the AMS-02 spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Graziani, Maura; Duranti, Matteo

    The electrons (e-) and positrons (e+) are a rare component of Cosmic Rays (CRs) since they constitute respectively only a 1% and 0.1% of cosmic radiation. However, the correct detection of e+- covers a great importance in the astrophysics field since, unlike the hadronic component, they are subjected to strong energy losses through the interaction with Interstellar Medium. As consequence e with energies above GeV that reach the Earth are galactic, with the source inside Kpc and through the study of their primary spectra it is possible to probe the local interstellar medium (LIS) and to indirectly detect new possible sources like pulsar or dark matter. However, these spectra, when measured near Earth, are significantly affected by the solar activity and we have the so-called solar modulation of CRs (SM). The solar activity has a cycle which period is ~11 years, during which it increases reaching a maximum and then decreases again. The intensity of cosmic ray radiation is correlated (or rather anticorrelated...

  5. Comment on AMS02 results support the secondary origin of cosmic ray positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Recently Blum, Katz and Waxman have claimed that the flux of high energy cosmic ray (CR) positrons near Earth that has been measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) aboard the International Space Station can be produced in the collisions of Galactic CR protons and nuclei with the ambient matter in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM). Their claim was based on an alleged "robust upper limit to the positron flux" which neglected the energy loss of e+'s in the ISM. Inclusion of this energy loss, however, yields a much smaller upper limit, which excludes secondary production in the ISM by the Galactic cosmic rays as the main origin of the CR e^+ flux above 10 GeV.

  6. Dynamic force spectroscopy on multiple bonds: experiments and model

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmann, T; Nassoy, P; Schwarz, U S

    2007-01-01

    We probe the dynamic strength of multiple biotin-streptavidin adhesion bonds under linear loading using the biomembrane force probe setup for dynamic force spectroscopy. Measured rupture force histograms are compared to results from a master equation model for the stochastic dynamics of bond rupture under load. This allows us to extract the distribution of the number of initially closed bonds. We also extract the molecular parameters of the adhesion bonds, in good agreement with earlier results from single bond experiments. Our analysis shows that the peaks in the measured histograms are not simple multiples of the single bond values, but follow from a superposition procedure which generates different peak positions.

  7. Triggering Standard Model Higgs processes in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Réale, V

    2004-01-01

    The search for the Higgs boson is a major physics goal of the future Large Hadron Collider. The potential to trigger on Standard Model Higgs boson with electrons or photons in the final state has been studied for the low mass range $m_{H}<2 m_{Z}$ for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Analyses for the $H \\to ZZ^{*}$, $H \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $H \\to WW^{*}$ decay modes have been studied using a realistic simulation of the expected detector performance for both the start--up and the design luminosity scenarios. The results obtained demonstrate that the ATLAS trigger is efficiently selecting Higgs candidates for these discovery channels.

  8. Experiments of reconstructing discrete atmospheric dynamic models from data (I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhenshan; Zhu, Yanyu; Deng, Ziwang

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, we give some experimental results of our study in reconstructing discrete atmospheric dynamic models from data. After a great deal of numerical experiments, we found that the logistic map, x n + 1 = 1- μx {2/n}, could be used in monthly mean temperature prediction when it was approaching the chaotic region, and its predictive results were in reverse states to the practical data. This means that the nonlinear developing behavior of the monthly mean temperature system is bifurcating back into the critical chaotic states from the chaotic ones.

  9. Blast Loading Experiments of Surrogate Models for Tbi Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, M. D.; Son, S. F.

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical models. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory test cell setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head near material interfaces due to impedance mismatches. In addition, significant relative displacement was observed between the interacting materials suggesting large strain values of nearly 5%. Further quantitative results were obtained through shadowgraph imaging of the blasts confirming a separation of time scales between blast interaction and bulk movement. These results lead to the conclusion that primary blast effects could cause TBI occurrences.

  10. Nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical education models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Hellström-Hyson, Eva; Persson, Elisabeth; Mårtensson, Gunilla

    2014-08-01

    Preceptors play an important role in the process of developing students' knowledge and skills. There is an ongoing search for the best learning and teaching models in clinical education. Little is known about preceptors' perspectives on different models. The aim of the study was to describe nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical models of clinical education: peer learning and traditional supervision. A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. Eighteen preceptors from surgical and medical departments at two hospitals were interviewed, ten representing peer learning (student work in pairs) and eight traditional supervision (one student follows a nurse during a shift). The findings showed that preceptors using peer learning created room for students to assume responsibility for their own learning, challenged students' knowledge by refraining from stepping in and encouraged critical thinking. Using traditional supervision, the preceptors' individual ambitions influenced the preceptorship and their own knowledge was empathized as being important to impart. They demonstrated, observed and gradually relinquished responsibility to the students. The choice of clinical education model is important. Peer learning seemed to create learning environments that integrate clinical and academic skills. Investigation of pedagogical models in clinical education should be of major concern to managers and preceptors.

  11. Radial structure of the constricted positive column: Modeling and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovskii, Yu.; Kalanov, D.; Maiorov, V.

    2017-08-01

    We present a detailed self-consistent model of a positive column in argon glow discharge at moderate pressures and currents. This model describes the discharge transition between diffuse and constricted states. The model includes an extensive set of plasma chemical reactions and equation for inhomogeneous gas heating. The nonequilibrium behavior of an electron distribution function is also considered. One of the main features of the model is an accurate treatment of radiation trapping by solving the Holstein-Biberman equation directly. Influence of the radiation trapping on macroscopic parameters of the constricted positive column is studied. We propose a method for solving a boundary-value problem, including particle and energy balance equations for electrons, ground state atoms, atomic and molecular ions, and excited species. Unlike traditional solution approaches for similar systems, the method provides continuous Z- and S-shaped characteristics of discharge parameters, describing hysteresis in transition between diffuse and constricted discharge regimes. Performed experiments include measurements of volt-ampere characteristics and spectroscopic study of radial density profiles of excited atoms by measuring line emission and absorption, and electrons by measuring bremsstrahlung intensity. The role of resonance radiation trapping in spatial redistribution of 1 s and 2 p states of argon is demonstrated. Results of modeling are compared to the experimental data.

  12. A new Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP experiment designed for climate and chemistry models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tilmes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A new Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP experiment "G4 specified stratospheric aerosols" (short name: G4SSA is proposed to investigate the impact of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering on atmospheric composition, climate, and the environment. In contrast to the earlier G4 GeoMIP experiment, which requires an emission of sulphur dioxide (SO2 into the model, a prescribed aerosol forcing file is provided to the community, to be consistently applied to future model experiments between 2020 and 2100. This stratospheric aerosol distribution, with a total burden of about 2 Tg S has been derived using the ECHAM5-HAM microphysical model, based on a continuous annual tropical emission of 8 Tg SO2 year−1. A ramp-up of geoengineering in 2020 and a ramp-down in 2070 over a period of two years are included in the distribution, while a background aerosol burden should be used for the last 3 decades of the experiment. The performance of this experiment using climate and chemistry models in a multi-model comparison framework will allow us to better understand the significance of the impact of geoengineering and the abrupt termination after 50 years on climate and composition of the atmosphere in a changing environment. The zonal and monthly mean stratospheric aerosol input dataset is available at https://www2.acd.ucar.edu/gcm/geomip-g4-specified-stratospheric-aerosol-data-set.

  13. Morphogenesis and pattern formation in biological systems experiments and models

    CERN Document Server

    Noji, Sumihare; Ueno, Naoto; Maini, Philip

    2003-01-01

    A central goal of current biology is to decode the mechanisms that underlie the processes of morphogenesis and pattern formation. Concerned with the analysis of those phenomena, this book covers a broad range of research fields, including developmental biology, molecular biology, plant morphogenesis, ecology, epidemiology, medicine, paleontology, evolutionary biology, mathematical biology, and computational biology. In Morphogenesis and Pattern Formation in Biological Systems: Experiments and Models, experimental and theoretical aspects of biology are integrated for the construction and investigation of models of complex processes. This collection of articles on the latest advances by leading researchers not only brings together work from a wide spectrum of disciplines, but also provides a stepping-stone to the creation of new areas of discovery.

  14. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amadio, G. [Sao Paulo State U.; Apostolakis, J. [CERN; Bandieramonte, M. [Catania Astrophys. Observ.; Bianchini, C. [Mackenzie Presbiteriana U.; Bitzes, G. [CERN; Brun, R. [CERN; Canal, P. [Fermilab; Carminati, F. [CERN; Licht, J.de Fine [U. Copenhagen (main); Duhem, L. [Intel, Santa Clara; Elvira, D. [Fermilab; Gheata, A. [CERN; Jun, S. Y. [Fermilab; Lima, G. [Fermilab; Novak, M. [CERN; Presbyterian, M. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Shadura, O. [CERN; Seghal, R. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Wenzel, S. [CERN

    2015-12-23

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  15. Investigation of laser tissue welding dynamics via experiment and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, W; Maitland, D J; Heredia, N J; Eder, D C; Celliers, P M; Da Silva, L B; London, R A; Matthews, D L

    1997-02-01

    An in vitro study of laser tissue welding mediated with a dye-enhanced protein solder was performed. Freshly harvested sections of porcine aorta were used for the experiments. Arteriotomies approximately 4 mm in length were treated using an 805 nm continuous-wave diode laser coupled to a 1-mm diameter fiber. Temperature histories of the surface of the weld site were obtained using a fiberoptic-based infrared thermometer. The experimental effort was complemented by the LATIS (LAser-TISsue) computer code, which numerically simulates the exposure of tissue to near-infrared radiation using coupled Monte Carlo, thermal transport, and mass transport models. Comparison of the experimental and simulated thermal results shows that the inclusion of water transport and evaporative losses in the model is necessary to determine the thermal distributions and hydration state in the tissue. The hydration state of the weld site was correlated with the acute weld strength.

  16. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, G.; Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bianchini, C.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; de Fine Licht, J.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Novak, M.; Presbyterian, M.; Shadura, O.; Seghal, R.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-12-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  17. Teaching as a fractal: from experience to model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia COMPAÑ-ROSIQUE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to improve students’ learning by designing a teaching model that seeks to increase student motivation to acquire new knowledge. To design the model, the methodology is based on the study of the students’ opinion on several aspects we think importantly affect the quality of teaching (such as the overcrowded classrooms, time intended for the subject or type of classroom where classes are taught, and on our experience when performing several experimental activities in the classroom (for instance, peer reviews and oral presentations. Besides the feedback from the students, it is essential to rely on the experience and reflections of lecturers who have been teaching the subject several years. This way we could detect several key aspects that, in our opinion, must be considered when designing a teaching proposal: motivation, assessment, progressiveness and autonomy. As a result we have obtained a teaching model based on instructional design as well as on the principles of fractal geometry, in the sense that different levels of abstraction for the various training activities are presented and the activities are self-similar, that is, they are decomposed again and again. At each level, an activity decomposes into a lower level tasks and their corresponding evaluation. With this model the immediate feedback and the student motivation are encouraged. We are convinced that a greater motivation will suppose an increase in the student’s working time and in their performance. Although the study has been done on a subject, the results are fully generalizable to other subjects.

  18. Tough and tunable adhesion of hydrogels: experiments and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Lin, Shaoting; Parada, German A.; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2017-06-01

    As polymer networks infiltrated with water, hydrogels are major constituents of animal and plant bodies and have diverse engineering applications. While natural hydrogels can robustly adhere to other biological materials, such as bonding of tendons and cartilage on bones and adhesive plaques of mussels, it is challenging to achieve such tough adhesions between synthetic hydrogels and engineering materials. Recent experiments show that chemically anchoring long-chain polymer networks of tough synthetic hydrogels on solid surfaces create adhesions tougher than their natural counterparts, but the underlying mechanism has not been well understood. It is also challenging to tune systematically the adhesion of hydrogels on solids. Here, we provide a quantitative understanding of the mechanism for tough adhesions of hydrogels on solid materials via a combination of experiments, theory, and numerical simulations. Using a coupled cohesive-zone and Mullins-effect model validated by experiments, we reveal the interplays of intrinsic work of adhesion, interfacial strength, and energy dissipation in bulk hydrogels in order to achieve tough adhesions. We further show that hydrogel adhesion can be systematically tuned by tailoring the hydrogel geometry and silanization time of solid substrates, corresponding to the control of energy dissipation zone and intrinsic work of adhesion, respectively. The current work further provides a theoretical foundation for rational design of future biocompatible and underwater adhesives.

  19. Update on PHELIX Pulsed-Power Hydrodynamics Experiments and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousculp, Christopher; Reass, William; Oro, David; Griego, Jeffery; Turchi, Peter; Reinovsky, Robert; Devolder, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    The PHELIX pulsed-power driver is a 300 kJ, portable, transformer-coupled, capacitor bank capable of delivering 3-5 MA, 10 μs pulse into a low inductance load. Here we describe further testing and hydrodynamics experiments. First, a 4 nH static inductive load has been constructed. This allows for repetitive high-voltage, high-current testing of the system. Results are used in the calibration of simple circuit models and numerical simulations across a range of bank charges (+/-20 < V0 < +/-40 kV). Furthermore, a dynamic liner-on-target load experiment has been conducted to explore the shock-launched transport of particulates (diam. ~ 1 μm) from a surface. The trajectories of the particulates are diagnosed with radiography. Results are compared to 2D hydro-code simulations. Finally, initial studies are underway to assess the feasibility of using the PHELIX driver as an electromagnetic launcher for planer shock-physics experiments. Work supported by United States-DOE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  20. Modeling the Interplay Between Psychological Processes and Adverse, Stressful Contexts and Experiences in Pathways to Psychosis : An Experience Sampling Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klippel, Annelie; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Chavez-Baldini, UnYoung; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Kempton, Matthew; Valmaggia, Lucia; Calem, Maria; So, Suzanne; Beards, Stephanie; Hubbard, Kathryn; Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; Onyejiaka, Adanna; Wichers, Marieke; McGuire, Philip; Murray, Robin; Garety, Philippa; van Os, Jim; Wykes, Til; Morgan, Craig; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Several integrated models of psychosis have implicated adverse, stressful contexts and experiences, and affective and cognitive processes in the onset of psychosis. In these models, the effects of stress are posited to contribute to the development of psychotic experiences via pathways through affec

  1. Computer modeling of a three-dimensional steam injection experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, S.; Castanier, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Petroleum Research Inst.

    1993-08-01

    The experimental results and CT scans obtained during a steam-flooding experiment with the SUPRI 3-D steam injection laboratory model are compared with the results obtained from a numerical simulator for the same experiment. Simulation studies were carried out using the STARS (Steam and Additives Reservoir Simulator) compositional simulator. The saturation and temperature distributions obtained and heat-loss rates measured in the experimental model at different stages of steam-flooding were compared with those calculated from the numerical simulator. There is a fairly good agreement between the experimental results and the simulator output. However, the experimental scans show a greater degree of gravity override than that obtained with the simulator for the same heat-loss rates. Symmetric sides of the experimental 5-spot show asymmetric heat-loss rates contrary to theory and simulator results. Some utility programs have been written for extracting, processing and outputting the required grid data from the STARS simulator. These are general in nature and can be useful for other STARS users.

  2. Modeling and Analysis of AGS (1998) Thermal Shock Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, J.R.; Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    An overview is provided on modeling and analysis of thermal shock experiments conducted during 1998 with high-energy, short-pulse energy deposition in a mercury filled container in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The simulation framework utilized along with the results of simulations for pressure and strain profiles are presented. While the magnitude of penk strain predictions versus data are in reasonable agreement, the temporal variations were found to differ significantly in selected cases, indicating lack of modeling of certain physical phenomena or due to uncertainties in the experimental data gathering techniques. Key thermal-shock related issues and uncertainties are highlighted. Specific experiments conducted at BNL's AGS facility during 1998 (the subject of this paper) involved high-energy (24 GeV) proton energy deposition in the mercury target over a time frame of - 0.1s. The target consisted of an - 1 m. long cylindrical stainless steel shell with a hemispherical dome at the leading edge. It was filled with mercury at room temperature and pressure. Several optical strain gages were attached to the surface of the steel target. Figure 1 shows a schematic representation of the test vessel along with the main dimensions and positions of three optical strain gages at which meaningful data were obtained. As

  3. Modeling of Carbon Migration During JET Injection Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, J. D.; Likonen, J.; Coad, P.; Rubel, M.; Widdowson, A.; Airila, M.; Andrew, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Corrigan, G.; Esser, H. G.; Jachmich, S.; Kallenbach, A.; Kirschner, A.; Kreter, A.; Matthews, G. F.; Philipps, V.; Pitts, R. A.; Spence, J.; Stamp, M.; Wiesen, S.

    2008-10-15

    JET has performed two dedicated carbon migration experiments on the final run day of separate campaigns (2001 and 2004) using {sup 13}CH{sub 4} methane injected into repeated discharges. The EDGE2D/NIMBUS code modelled the carbon migration in both experiments. This paper describes this modelling and identifies a number of important migration pathways: (1) deposition and erosion near the injection location, (2) migration through the main chamber SOL, (3) migration through the private flux region aided by E x B drifts, and (4) neutral migration originating near the strike points. In H-Mode, type I ELMs are calculated to influence the migration by enhancing erosion during the ELM peak and increasing the long-range migration immediately following the ELM. The erosion/re-deposition cycle along the outer target leads to a multistep migration of {sup 13}C towards the separatrix which is called 'walking'. This walking created carbon neutrals at the outer strike point and led to {sup 13}C deposition in the private flux region. Although several migration pathways have been identified, quantitative analyses are hindered by experimental uncertainty in divertor leakage, and the lack of measurements at locations such as gaps and shadowed regions.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of directional wetting: Comparing simulations to experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, H. Patrick; Sotthewes, Kai; van Swigchem, Jeroen; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Kooij, E. Stefan

    2013-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) simulations were performed on the dynamic behavior of liquid droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces, ultimately with the aim to develop a predictive tool enabling reliable design of future experiments. The simulations accurately mimic experimental results, which have shown that water droplets on such surfaces adopt an elongated shape due to anisotropic preferential spreading. Details of the contact line motion such as advancing of the contact line in the direction perpendicular to the stripes exhibit pronounced similarities in experiments and simulations. The opposite of spreading, i.e., evaporation of water droplets, leads to a characteristic receding motion first in the direction parallel to the stripes, while the contact line remains pinned perpendicular to the stripes. Only when the aspect ratio is close to unity, the contact line also starts to recede in the perpendicular direction. Very similar behavior was observed in the LBM simulations. Finally, droplet movement can be induced by a gradient in surface wettability. LBM simulations show good semiquantitative agreement with experimental results of decanol droplets on a well-defined striped gradient, which move from high- to low-contact angle surfaces. Similarities and differences for all systems are described and discussed in terms of the predictive capabilities of LBM simulations to model direction wetting.

  5. Space Weathering of Olivine: Samples, Experiments and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.; Christoffersen, R.

    2016-01-01

    Olivine is a major constituent of chondritic bodies and its response to space weathering processes likely dominates the optical properties of asteroid regoliths (e.g. S- and many C-type asteroids). Analyses of olivine in returned samples and laboratory experiments provide details and insights regarding the mechanisms and rates of space weathering. Analyses of olivine grains from lunar soils and asteroid Itokawa reveal that they display solar wind damaged rims that are typically not amorphized despite long surface exposure ages, which are inferred from solar flare track densities (up to 10 (sup 7 y)). The olivine damaged rim width rapidly approaches approximately 120 nm in approximately 10 (sup 6 y) and then reaches steady-state with longer exposure times. The damaged rims are nanocrystalline with high dislocation densities, but crystalline order exists up to the outermost exposed surface. Sparse nanophase Fe metal inclusions occur in the damaged rims and are believed to be produced during irradiation through preferential sputtering of oxygen from the rims. The observed space weathering effects in lunar and Itokawa olivine grains are difficult to reconcile with laboratory irradiation studies and our numerical models that indicate that olivine surfaces should readily blister and amorphize on relatively short time scales (less than 10 (sup 3 y)). These results suggest that it is not just the ion fluence alone, but other variable, the ion flux that controls the type and extent of irradiation damage that develops in olivine. This flux dependence argues for caution in extrapolating between high flux laboratory experiments and the natural case. Additional measurements, experiments, and modeling are required to resolve the discrepancies among the observations and calculations involving solar wind processing of olivine.

  6. Blast Loading Experiments of Developed Surrogate Models for TBI Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Matthew; Son, Steven

    2009-06-01

    This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical systems. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells followed by SLA prototyped skulls housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted with the simple geometries to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head due to impedance mismatches. Results from the strain correlations added to the theory of internal shearing between tissues.

  7. Ant colonies and foraging line dynamics: Modeling, experiments and computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Louis

    2005-11-01

    Ants are one of several types of insects that form robust and complex societies, and as such, provide rich theoretical ground for the exploration and understanding of collective dynamics and the behaviorial parameters that drive the dynamics. Many species of ants are nearly or completely blind, so they interact locally through behaviorial cues with nearby ants, and through pheromone trails left by other ants. Consistent with biological observation, two populations of ants are modeled, those seeking food and those returning to the nest with food. A simple constitutive model relating ant densities to pheromone concentrations yields a system of equations describing two interacting fluids and predicts left- and right-moving traveling waves. All the model parameters can be reduced to two Froude numbers describing the ratio between a chemical potential and the kinetic energy of the traveling ants. Laboratory experiments on Tetramorium caespitum (L) clearly indicate left and right-moving traveling density waves in agreement with the mathematical model. We focus on understanding the evolutionary utility of the traveling waves, and the optimality of the Froude numbers and other parameters.

  8. Rogue waves in a water tank: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Recently many rogue waves have been reported as the main cause of ship incidents on the sea. One of the main characteristics of rogue waves is its elusiveness: they present unexpectedly and disappear in the same wave. Some authors (Zakharov and al.2010) are attempting to find the probability of their appearances apart from studyingthe mechanism of the formation. As an effort on this topic we tried the generation of rogue waves in a water wave tank using a symmetric spectrum(Akhmediev et al. 2011) as input on the wave maker. The produced waves were clearly rogue waves with a rate (maximum wave height/ Significant wave height) of 2.33 and a kurtosis of 4.77 (Janssen 2003, Onorato 2006). These results were already presented (Lechuga 2012). Similar waves (in pattern aspect, but without being extreme waves) were described as crossing waves in a water tank(Shemer and Lichter1988). To go on further the next step has been to apply a theoretical model to the envelope of these waves. After some considerations the best model has been an analogue of the Ginzburg-Landau equation. This apparently amazing result is easily explained: We know that the Ginzburg-Landau model is related to some regular structures on the surface of a liquid and also in plasmas, electric and magnetic fields and other media. Another important characteristic of the model is that their solutions are invariants with respectto the translation group. The main aim of this presentation is to extract conclusions of the model and the comparison with the measured waves in the water tank.The nonlinear structure of waves and their regularity make suitable the use of the Ginzburg-Landau model to the envelope of generated waves in the tank,so giving us a powerful tool to cope with the results of our experiment.

  9. Thermodynamic model of Mars Oxygen ISRU Experiment (MOXIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyen, Forrest E.; Hecht, Michael H.; Hoffman, Jeffrey A.

    2016-12-01

    As humankind expands its footprint in the solar system, it is increasingly important to make use of the resources already in our solar system to make these missions economically feasible and sustainable. In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), the science of using resources at a destination to support exploration missions, unlocks potential destinations by significantly reducing the amount of resources that need to be launched from Earth. Carbon dioxide is an example of an in-situ resource that comprises 96% of the Martian atmosphere and can be used as a source of oxygen for propellant and life support systems. The Mars Oxygen ISRU Experiment (MOXIE) is a payload being developed for NASA's upcoming Mars 2020 rover. MOXIE will produce oxygen from the Martian atmosphere using solid oxide electrolysis (SOXE). MOXIE is on the order of magnitude of a 1% scale model of an oxygen processing plant that might enable a human expedition to Mars in the 2030s through the production of the oxygen needed for the propellant of a Mars ascent vehicle. MOXIE is essentially an energy conversion system that draws energy from the Mars 2020 rover's radioisotope thermoelectric generator and ultimately converts it to stored energy in oxygen and carbon monoxide molecules. A thermodynamic model of this novel system is used to understand this process in order to derive operating parameters for the experiment. This paper specifically describes the model of the SOXE component. Assumptions and idealizations are addressed, including 1D and 2D simplifications. Operating points are discussed as well as impacts of flow rates and production.

  10. Microcosm Experiments and Modeling of Microbial Movement Under Unsaturated Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockman, F.J.; Kapadia, N.; Williams, G.; Rockhold, M.

    2006-04-05

    Colonization of bacteria in porous media has been studied primarily in saturated systems. In this study we examine how microbial colonization in unsaturated porous media is controlled by water content and particle size. This is important for understanding the feasibility and success of bioremediation via nutrient delivery when contaminant degraders are at low densities and when total microbial populations are sparse and spatially discontinuous. The study design used 4 different sand sizes, each at 4 different water contents; experiments were run with and without acetate as the sole carbon source. All experiments were run in duplicate columns and used the motile organism Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC, a carbon tetrachloride degrader. At a given sand size, bacteria traveled further with increasing volumetric water content. At a given volumetric water content, bacteria generally traveled further with increasing sand size. Water redistribution, solute transport, gas diffusion, and bacterial colonization dynamics were simulated using a numerical finite-difference model. Solute and bacterial transport were modeled using advection-dispersion equations, with reaction rate source/sink terms to account for bacterial growth and substrate utilization, represented using dual Monod-type kinetics. Oxygen transport and diffusion was modeled accounting for equilibrium partitioning between the aqueous and gas phases. The movement of bacteria in the aqueous phase was modeled using a linear impedance model in which the term D{sub m} is a coefficient, as used by Barton and Ford (1995), representing random motility. The unsaturated random motility coefficients we obtained (1.4 x 10{sup -6} to 2.8 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/sec) are in the same range as those found by others for saturated systems (3.5 x 10{sup -6} to 3.5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/sec). The results show that some bacteria can rapidly migrate in well sorted unsaturated sands (and perhaps in relatively high porosity, poorly

  11. A global parallel model based design of experiments method to minimize model output uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazil, Jason N; Buzzard, Gregory T; Rundell, Ann E

    2012-03-01

    Model-based experiment design specifies the data to be collected that will most effectively characterize the biological system under study. Existing model-based design of experiment algorithms have primarily relied on Fisher Information Matrix-based methods to choose the best experiment in a sequential manner. However, these are largely local methods that require an initial estimate of the parameter values, which are often highly uncertain, particularly when data is limited. In this paper, we provide an approach to specify an informative sequence of multiple design points (parallel design) that will constrain the dynamical uncertainty of the biological system responses to within experimentally detectable limits as specified by the estimated experimental noise. The method is based upon computationally efficient sparse grids and requires only a bounded uncertain parameter space; it does not rely upon initial parameter estimates. The design sequence emerges through the use of scenario trees with experimental design points chosen to minimize the uncertainty in the predicted dynamics of the measurable responses of the system. The algorithm was illustrated herein using a T cell activation model for three problems that ranged in dimension from 2D to 19D. The results demonstrate that it is possible to extract useful information from a mathematical model where traditional model-based design of experiments approaches most certainly fail. The experiments designed via this method fully constrain the model output dynamics to within experimentally resolvable limits. The method is effective for highly uncertain biological systems characterized by deterministic mathematical models with limited data sets. Also, it is highly modular and can be modified to include a variety of methodologies such as input design and model discrimination.

  12. K-Pg Wildfires: modeling, experiments and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J.; Artemieva, N.; Belcher, C.; Hadden, R.; Rein, G.; Goldin, T.

    2013-09-01

    The discovery of soot in K-Pg boundary clays [1] started a long debate about whether the asteroid impact ignited global wildfires. The K-Pg layer is formed from material ejected from the Chicxulub site, which travelled at hypervelocities around the world. When such ejecta re-enters the Earth's atmosphere it decelerates and heats up, and delivers a pulse of radiation to the Earth's surface. Recent estimates of the radiation associated with ejecta re-entry [2] are argued to be large enough to have ignited fires globally [3]. Here, we present new 3D models of the thermal pulse that takes in to account the asymmetric distribution of ejecta, which depends on the angle and direction of the Chicxulub impact [4]. We have replicated some of the modeled thermal pulses with a Fire propagation Apparatus (FPA), to investigate their effect on both dry and living plant matter. The models, experiments and observational data are consistent with some wildfires being ignited as a direct result of the impact, but the mass flux of ejecta at sites uprange of Chicxulub is too low to ignite even the most susceptible of plant matter.

  13. Edge effect modeling and experiments on active lap processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haitao; Wu, Fan; Zeng, Zhige; Fan, Bin; Wan, Yongjian

    2014-05-05

    Edge effect is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues for fabricating large primary mirrors, especially for large polishing tools. Computer controlled active lap (CCAL) uses a large size pad (e.g., 1/3 to 1/5 workpiece diameters) to grind and polish the primary mirror. Edge effect also exists in the CCAL process in our previous fabrication. In this paper the material removal rules when edge effects happen (i.e. edge tool influence functions (TIFs)) are obtained through experiments, which are carried out on a Φ1090-mm circular flat mirror with a 375-mm-diameter lap. Two methods are proposed to model the edge TIFs for CCAL. One is adopting the pressure distribution which is calculated based on the finite element analysis method. The other is building up a parametric equivalent pressure model to fit the removed material curve directly. Experimental results show that these two methods both effectively model the edge TIF of CCAL.

  14. Attributing Sources of Variability in Regional Climate Model Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, C. G.; Sain, S. R.

    2008-12-01

    Variability in regional climate model (RCM) projections may be due to a number of factors, including the choice of RCM itself, the boundary conditions provided by a driving general circulation model (GCM), and the choice of emission scenario. We describe a new statistical methodology, Gaussian Process ANOVA, which allows us to decompose these sources of variability while also taking account of correlations in the output across space. Our hierarchical Bayesian framework easily allows joint inference about high probability envelopes for the functions, as well as decompositions of total variance that vary over the domain of the functions. These may be used to create maps illustrating the magnitude of each source of variability across the domain of the regional model. We use this method to analyze temperature and precipitation data from the Prudence Project, an RCM intercomparison project in which RCMs were crossed with GCM forcings and scenarios in a designed experiment. This work was funded by the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP).

  15. Atmospheric Climate Model Experiments Performed at Multiple Horizontal Resolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, T; Bala, G; Gleckler, P; Lobell, D; Mirin, A; Maxwell, R; Rotman, D

    2007-12-21

    This report documents salient features of version 3.3 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.3) and of three climate simulations in which the resolution of its latitude-longitude grid was systematically increased. For all these simulations of global atmospheric climate during the period 1980-1999, observed monthly ocean surface temperatures and sea ice extents were prescribed according to standard Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) values. These CAM3.3 resolution experiments served as control runs for subsequent simulations of the climatic effects of agricultural irrigation, the focus of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The CAM3.3 model was able to replicate basic features of the historical climate, although biases in a number of atmospheric variables were evident. Increasing horizontal resolution also generally failed to ameliorate the large-scale errors in most of the climate variables that could be compared with observations. A notable exception was the simulation of precipitation, which incrementally improved with increasing resolution, especially in regions where orography plays a central role in determining the local hydroclimate.

  16. Experiments and Modeling in Support of Generic Salt Repository Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourret, Suzanne Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weaver, Douglas James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Otto, Shawn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jordan, Amy B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zyvoloski, George Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johnson, Peter Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-19

    Salt is an attractive material for the disposition of heat generating nuclear waste (HGNW) because of its self-sealing, viscoplastic, and reconsolidation properties (Hansen and Leigh, 2012). The rate at which salt consolidates and the properties of the consolidated salt depend on the composition of the salt, including its content in accessory minerals and moisture, and the temperature under which consolidation occurs. Physicochemical processes, such as mineral hydration/dehydration salt dissolution and precipitation play a significant role in defining the rate of salt structure changes. Understanding the behavior of these complex processes is paramount when considering safe design for disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste (HGNW) in salt formations, so experimentation and modeling is underway to characterize these processes. This report presents experiments and simulations in support of the DOE-NE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for development of drift-scale, in-situ field testing of HGNW in salt formations.

  17. Modeling Experiment of Break of Debris-Flow Dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zunlan; GENG Xueyong; DANG Chao; LIU Jingjing

    2007-01-01

    Glaciers are extensively developed in the southwest of Tibet and the moraines are widely distributed with large depth. Large-scale debris flows are often reported which blocked rivers and formed dams. In this paper, seven large debris flows in four valleys are discussed, among which five dams developed. 13 sets of experiments have been conducted in laboratory to simulate the formation and failure of the dam. Finally, a model of dam failure is proposed and a formula is established to calculate the flood discharge:Q = kbhhk/T (B)/LG0.41, where bk is the outlet width of the dam atthe original water level, ht the erosive depth, T the time fromoverflow to final state of failure, the average width of lake; L thelength of the lake, and G the total potential energy of the water inthe lake.

  18. Three-dimensional antenna models for fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, M. D.; Wang, C. Y.; Hogan, J. T.; Harris, J. H.; Hoffman, D. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Ryan, P. M.; Stallings, D. S.; Batchelor, D. B.; Beaumont, B.; Hutter, T.; Saoutic, B.

    1996-02-01

    The development of the RANT3D code has permitted the systematic study of the effect of three-dimensional structures on the launched power spectrum for antennas in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. The code allows the septa between current straps to be modeled with arbitrary heights and permits the antenna to interact with other structures in the tokamak. In this paper we present comparisons of calculated loading with the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and Tore Supra experiments, demonstrate the effects on loading caused by positioning uncertainties for an antenna in Tore Supra, and show electric field patterns near the Tore Supra antenna. A poloidal component in the static magnetic field for the plasma response is included in the near-field calculations using the warm plasma code, GLOSI. Preliminary estimates for the heat flux on the bumper limiters during typical operation in Tore Supra are also presented.

  19. Three-dimensional antenna models for fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.D.; Wang, C.Y.; Hogan, J.T.; Harris, J.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Ryan, P.M.; Stallings, D.S.; Batchelor, D.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8071, (United States); Beaumont, B.; Hutter, T.; Saoutic, B. [Association Euratom-CEA, Department de Recherche sur la Fusion Controlee, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance, Cedex (France)

    1996-02-01

    The development of the RANT3D code has permitted the systematic study of the effect of three-dimensional structures on the launched power spectrum for antennas in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. The code allows the septa between current straps to be modeled with arbitrary heights and permits the antenna to interact with other structures in the tokamak. In this paper we present comparisons of calculated loading with the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and Tore Supra experiments, demonstrate the effects on loading caused by positioning uncertainties for an antenna in Tore Supra, and show electric field patterns near the Tore Supra antenna. A poloidal component in the static magnetic field for the plasma response is included in the near-field calculations using the warm plasma code, GLOSI. Preliminary estimates for the heat flux on the bumper limiters during typical operation in Tore Supra are also presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Electrostatic Model Applied to ISS Charged Water Droplet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Daan; Schaub, Hanspeter; Pettit, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    The electrostatic force can be used to create novel relative motion between charged bodies if it can be isolated from the stronger gravitational and dissipative forces. Recently, Coulomb orbital motion was demonstrated on the International Space Station by releasing charged water droplets in the vicinity of a charged knitting needle. In this investigation, the Multi-Sphere Method, an electrostatic model developed to study active spacecraft position control by Coulomb charging, is used to simulate the complex orbital motion of the droplets. When atmospheric drag is introduced, the simulated motion closely mimics that seen in the video footage of the experiment. The electrostatic force's inverse dependency on separation distance near the center of the needle lends itself to analytic predictions of the radial motion.

  1. The BaBar Experiment's Distributed Computing Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to face the expected increase in statistics between now and 2005,the Babar experiment at SLAC is evolving its computing model toward a distributed multitier system.It is foreseen that data will be spread among Tier-A centers and deleted from the SLAC center,A unifrom computing enviromment is being deployed in the centers,the network bandwidth is continuously increased and data distribution tools has been designed in order to reach a transfer rate of -100 TB of data per year,In parallel,smaller Tier-B and C sites receive subsets of data,presently in Kanga-Root[1] format and later in Objectivity[2] format,GRID tools will be used for remote job submission.

  2. A MODEL FOR RURAL PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES—RAIPUR RANI EXPERIENCE*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, N. N.; Murthy, R. Srinivasa; Harding, T. W.

    1981-01-01

    SUMMARY During the last five years efforts have been directed to understand the needs of the mentally ill persons residing in the rural areas. An outcome of our work involving 60,000 people living in a geographically defined area in Ambala District of Haryana has resulted in a realistic model for wider application in the country. The project work has led to the development of a number of research instruments and data regarding the prevalence of mental illness in the rural areas. A method for identifying mentally ill and to study the community attitudes has also been developed. The preparation of the Manual and simple training programmes has been a significant contribution. Knowledge regarding the practical problems of supervision and support of peripheral health workers in carrying out mental health work has been gained. The formation of the Mental Health Association by the village leaders has enhanced the community awareness and involvement in the ongoing programme of care. It is hoped that the experiences and the results of the above research work would act as a stimulant for similar experiments and further refining of the needed expertise and data for making mental health care a reality at the primary health care in the near future. PMID:22064674

  3. ITER transient consequences for material damage: modelling versus experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazylev, B [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, P O Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Janeschitz, G [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Fusion, P O Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Landman, I [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, P O Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Pestchanyi, S [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, P O Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Loarte, A [EFDA Close Support Unit Garching, Boltmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Federici, G [ITER International Team, Garching Working Site, Boltmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Merola, M [ITER International Team, Garching Working Site, Boltmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Linke, J [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM-Association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Zhitlukhin, A [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Podkovyrov, V [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Klimov, N [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Safronov, V [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2007-03-15

    Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) and tungsten macrobrush armours are foreseen as PFC for the ITER divertor. In ITER the main mechanisms of metallic armour damage remain surface melting and melt motion erosion. In the case of CFC armour, due to rather different heat conductivities of CFC fibres a noticeable erosion of the PAN bundles may occur at rather small heat loads. Experiments carried out in the plasma gun facilities QSPA-T for the ITER like edge localized mode (ELM) heat load also demonstrated significant erosion of the frontal and lateral brush edges. Numerical simulations of the CFC and tungsten (W) macrobrush target damage accounting for the heat loads at the face and lateral brush edges were carried out for QSPA-T conditions using the three-dimensional (3D) code PHEMOBRID. The modelling results of CFC damage are in a good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the experiments. Estimation of the droplet splashing caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability was performed.

  4. How Magnus Bends the Flying Ball - Experimenting and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timková, V.; Ješková, Z.

    2017-02-01

    Students are well aware of the effect of the deflection of sports balls when they have been given a spin. A volleyball, tennis, or table tennis ball served with topspin results in an additional downward force that makes the ball difficult to catch and return. In soccer, the effect of sidespin causes the ball to curve unexpectedly sideways, resulting in a so-called banana kick that can confuse the goalkeeper. These surprising effects attract students' attention such that the motion of sports balls can be used to capture the interest of students towards the physics behind it. However, to study and analyze the motion of a real ball kicked in a playfield is not an easy task. Instead of the large-scale full-size sports ball motion, there can be designed and studied simpler experiments that can be carried out in the classroom. Moreover, digital technologies that are available at schools enable students to collect data from the experiment easily in a reasonable time. The mathematical model based on the analysis of forces acting on the ball flying in the air can be used to simulate the motion in order to understand the basic physical principles of the motion so that the best correspondence may be found.

  5. Representing plants as rigid cylinders in experiments and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Luna, Andrés; Crosato, Alessandra; Calvani, Giulio; Uijttewaal, Wim S. J.

    2016-07-01

    Simulating the morphological adaptation of water systems often requires including the effects of plants on water and sediment dynamics. Physical and numerical models need representing vegetation in a schematic easily-quantifiable way despite the variety of sizes, shapes and flexibility of real plants. Common approaches represent plants as rigid cylinders, but the ability of these schematizations to reproduce the effects of vegetation on morphodynamic processes has never been analyzed systematically. This work focuses on the consequences of representing plants as rigid cylinders in laboratory tests and numerical simulations. New experiments show that the flow resistance decreases for increasing element Reynolds numbers for both plants and rigid cylinders. Cylinders on river banks can qualitatively reproduce vegetation effects on channel width and bank-related processes. A comparative review of numerical simulations shows that Baptist's method that sums the contribution of bed shear stress and vegetation drag, underestimates bed erosion within sparse vegetation in real rivers and overestimates the mean flow velocity in laboratory experiments. This is due to assuming uniform flow among plants and to an overestimation of the role of the submergence ratio.

  6. Modeling a ponded infiltration experiment at Yucca Mountain, NV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, D.B.; Guertal, W.R. [Foothill Engineering, Inc., Mercury, NV (United States); Flint, A.L. [Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    One-dimensional and two-dimensional radial flow numerical models were used to evaluate the results for a 60.5 h ponded infiltration experiment done around a 24 m deep, 0.15 m diameter, cased borehole at Yucca Mountain, NV. Nine distinct morphological horizons in the soil profile has been identified; physical and hydraulic properties had been measured for each horizon; and a porosity profile at the borehole had been measured. During the infiltration experiment, 10 cm of water was ponded in a 3.5 m diameter infiltrometer around the borehole, the volume of water applied was measured, and water content profiles were measured with a neutron moisture meter. The infiltrometer applied 86.9 cm of water during the first 60.5 h of infiltration, but only 52.8 cm of additional water was measured in the borehole profiles. Assuming a linear relationship between cumulative infiltration (I) and the square root of time (t{sup 0.5}), an experimental sorptivity of 11.5 cm h{sup {minus}1} was estimated for the first 4.5 h of infiltration. An assumed washout zone around the borehole casing accounted for the discrepancy between the measured water content profiles and the applied water. A uniform property, 1-D model with an applied flux upper boundary described by the sorptivity confirmed the probable washout zone, and indicated that significant lateral flow into the dry soil around the infiltrometer could occur. A 2-D radial flow model with the same properties and upper boundary demonstrated that significant lateral flow occurred. The upper boundary in this model caused the upper portion of the profile to drain. This suggested using a saturated upper boundary to keep the upper portion of the profile saturated. When the saturated upper boundary was used, the permeability of the soil was decreased from the measured value of 3.28 E-11 m{sup 2} to 1.5E-12 m{sup 2} so that the simulated wetting front at a similar depth as the observed wetting front after 60.5 h.

  7. Twentieth century Walker Circulation change: data analysis and model experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Qingjia [Leibniz-Institut fuer Meereswissenschaften, Kiel (Germany); Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, River and Coastal Environment Research Center, Beijing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Ocean Circulation and Waves, Institute of Oceanology, Qingdao (China); Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun; Keenlyside, Noel S.; Martin, Thomas [Leibniz-Institut fuer Meereswissenschaften, Kiel (Germany); Semenov, Vladimir A. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Meereswissenschaften, Kiel (Germany); A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-15

    Recent studies indicate a weakening of the Walker Circulation during the twentieth century. Here, we present evidence from an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) forced by the history of observed sea surface temperature (SST) that the Walker Circulation may have intensified rather than weakened. Observed Equatorial Indo-Pacific Sector SST since 1870 exhibited a zonally asymmetric evolution: While the eastern part of the Equatorial Pacific showed only a weak warming, or even cooling in one SST dataset, the western part and the Equatorial Indian Ocean exhibited a rather strong warming. This has resulted in an increase of the SST gradient between the Maritime Continent and the eastern part of the Equatorial Pacific, one driving force of the Walker Circulation. The ensemble experiments with the AGCM, with and without time-varying external forcing, suggest that the enhancement of the SST gradient drove an anomalous atmospheric circulation, with an enhancement of both Walker and Hadley Circulation. Anomalously strong precipitation is simulated over the Indian Ocean and anomalously weak precipitation over the western Pacific, with corresponding changes in the surface wind pattern. Some sensitivity to the forcing SST, however, is noticed. The analysis of twentieth century integrations with global climate models driven with observed radiative forcing obtained from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) database support the link between the SST gradient and Walker Circulation strength. Furthermore, control integrations with the CMIP models indicate the existence of strong internal variability on centennial timescales. The results suggest that a radiatively forced signal in the Walker Circulation during the twentieth century may have been too weak to be detectable. (orig.)

  8. Structure Modeling and Validation applied to Source Physics Experiments (SPEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmat, C. S.; Rowe, C. A.; Patton, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Source Physics Experiments (SPEs) comprise a series of small chemical explosions used to develop a better understanding of seismic energy generation and wave propagation for low-yield explosions. In particular, we anticipate improved understanding of the processes through which shear waves are generated by the explosion source. Three tests, 100, 1000 and 1000 kg yields respectively, were detonated in the same emplacement hole and recorded on the same networks of ground motion sensors in the granites of Climax Stock at the Nevada National Security Site. We present results for the analysis and modeling of seismic waveforms recorded close-in on five linear geophone lines extending radially from ground zero, having offsets from 100 to 2000 m and station spacing of 100 m. These records exhibit azimuthal variations of P-wave arrival times, and phase velocity, spreading and attenuation properties of high-frequency Rg waves. We construct a 1D seismic body-wave model starting from a refraction analysis of P-waves and adjusting to address time-domain and frequency-domain dispersion measurements of Rg waves between 2 and 9 Hz. The shallowest part of the structure we address using the arrival times recorded by near-field accelerometers residing within 200 m of the shot hole. We additionally perform a 2D modeling study with the Spectral Element Method (SEM) to investigate which structural features are most responsible for the observed variations, in particular anomalously weak amplitude decay in some directions of this topographically complicated locality. We find that a near-surface, thin, weathered layer of varying thickness and low wave speeds plays a major role on the observed waveforms. We anticipate performing full 3D modeling of the seismic near-field through analysis and validation of waveforms on the 5 radial receiver arrays.

  9. Kinetic modeling of molecular motors: pause model and parameter determination from single-molecule experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, José A.; Ibarra, Borja; Cao, Francisco J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule manipulation experiments of molecular motors provide essential information about the rate and conformational changes of the steps of the reaction located along the manipulation coordinate. This information is not always sufficient to define a particular kinetic cycle. Recent single-molecule experiments with optical tweezers showed that the DNA unwinding activity of a Phi29 DNA polymerase mutant presents a complex pause behavior, which includes short and long pauses. Here we show that different kinetic models, considering different connections between the active and the pause states, can explain the experimental pause behavior. Both the two independent pause model and the two connected pause model are able to describe the pause behavior of a mutated Phi29 DNA polymerase observed in an optical tweezers single-molecule experiment. For the two independent pause model all parameters are fixed by the observed data, while for the more general two connected pause model there is a range of values of the parameters compatible with the observed data (which can be expressed in terms of two of the rates and their force dependencies). This general model includes models with indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state, and also models with cycling in both directions. Additionally, assuming that detailed balance is verified, which forbids cycling, this reduces the ranges of the values of the parameters (which can then be expressed in terms of one rate and its force dependency). The resulting model interpolates between the independent pause model and the indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state model

  10. Recent Experiences in Aftershock Hazard Modelling in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenberger, M.; Rhoades, D. A.; McVerry, G.; Christophersen, A.; Bannister, S. C.; Fry, B.; Potter, S.

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of several sequences of earthquakes in New Zealand in the last few years has meant that GNS Science has gained significant recent experience in aftershock hazard and forecasting. First was the Canterbury sequence of events which began in 2010 and included the destructive Christchurch earthquake of February, 2011. This sequence is occurring in what was a moderate-to-low hazard region of the National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM): the model on which the building design standards are based. With the expectation that the sequence would produce a 50-year hazard estimate in exceedance of the existing building standard, we developed a time-dependent model that combined short-term (STEP & ETAS) and longer-term (EEPAS) clustering with time-independent models. This forecast was combined with the NSHM to produce a forecast of the hazard for the next 50 years. This has been used to revise building design standards for the region and has contributed to planning of the rebuilding of Christchurch in multiple aspects. An important contribution to this model comes from the inclusion of EEPAS, which allows for clustering on the scale of decades. EEPAS is based on three empirical regressions that relate the magnitudes, times of occurrence, and locations of major earthquakes to regional precursory scale increases in the magnitude and rate of occurrence of minor earthquakes. A second important contribution comes from the long-term rate to which seismicity is expected to return in 50-years. With little seismicity in the region in historical times, a controlling factor in the rate is whether-or-not it is based on a declustered catalog. This epistemic uncertainty in the model was allowed for by using forecasts from both declustered and non-declustered catalogs. With two additional moderate sequences in the capital region of New Zealand in the last year, we have continued to refine our forecasting techniques, including the use of potential scenarios based on the aftershock

  11. Experiments on an offshore platform model by FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongsheng; Li, Hongnan; Ren, Liang; Sun, Li; Zhou, Jing

    2004-07-01

    Optical fiber sensors show superior potential for structural health monitoring of civil structures to ensure their structural integrity, durability and reliability. Apparent advantages of applying fiber optic sensors to a marine structure include fiber optic sensors" immunity of electromagnetic interference and electrical hazard when used near metallic elements over a long distance. The strains and accelerations of the newly proposed model of a single post jacket offshore platform were monitored by fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. These FBG sensors were attached to the legs and the top of the platform model in parallel with electric strain gauges or traditional piezoelectric accelerometers, respectively. Experiments were conducted under a variety of loading conditions, including underwater base earthquake simulation dynamic tests and static loading tests. Underwater seismic shaking table was utilized to provide the appropriate excitations. The natural frequencies measured by the FBG accelerometer agree well with those measured by piezo-electrical accelerometers. The monitoring network shows the availability of applying different fiber optic sensors in long-distance structural health monitoring with frequency multiplexing technology. Finally, the existing problems of packaging, strain transferring ratio between the bare fiber and the host structure on which the fiber embedded, and installation and protection of fiber optic sensors are emphasized.

  12. Eulerian hydrocode modeling of a dynamic tensile extrusion experiment (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkett, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clancy, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Eulerian hydrocode simulations utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress flow stress model were performed to provide insight into a dynamic extrusion experiment. The dynamic extrusion response of copper (three different grain sizes) and tantalum spheres were simulated with MESA, an explicit, 2-D Eulerian continuum mechanics hydrocode and compared with experimental data. The experimental data consisted of high-speed images of the extrusion process, recovered extruded samples, and post test metallography. The hydrocode was developed to predict large-strain and high-strain-rate loading problems. Some of the features of the features of MESA include a high-order advection algorithm, a material interface tracking scheme and a van Leer monotonic advection-limiting. The Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) model was utilized to evolve the flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate and temperature for copper and tantalum. Plastic strains exceeding 300% were predicted in the extrusion of copper at 400 m/s, while plastic strains exceeding 800% were predicted for Ta. Quantitative comparisons between the predicted and measured deformation topologies and extrusion rate were made. Additionally, predictions of the texture evolution (based upon the deformation rate history and the rigid body rotations experienced by the copper during the extrusion process) were compared with the orientation imaging microscopy measurements. Finally, comparisons between the calculated and measured influence of the initial texture on the dynamic extrusion response of tantalum was performed.

  13. Precision Cosmic Ray physics with space-born experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incagli, Marco

    2016-07-01

    More than 100 years after their discoveries, cosmic rays have been extensively studied, both with balloon experiments and with ground observatories. More recently, the possibility of mounting detectors on satellites or on the International Space Station has allowed for a long duration (several years) continuous observation of primary cosmic rays, i.e. before their interaction with the earth atmosphere, thus opening a new regime of precision measurements. In this review, recent results from major space experiments, as Pamela, AMS02 and Fermi, as well as next generation experiments proposed for the International Space Station, for standalone satellites or for the yet to come Chinese Space Station, will be presented. The impact of these experiment on the knowledge of Cosmic Ray propagation will also be discussed.

  14. Induced polarization of clay-sand mixtures. Experiments and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okay, G.; Leroy, P.

    2012-04-01

    The complex conductivity of saturated unconsolidated sand-clay mixtures was experimentally investigated using two types of clay minerals, kaolinite and smectite (mainly Na-Montmorillonite) in the frequency range 1.4 mHz - 12 kHz. The experiments were performed with various clay contents (1, 5, 20, and 100 % in volume of the sand-clay mixture) and salinities (distilled water, 0.1 g/L, 1 g/L, and 10 g/L NaCl solution). Induced polarization measurements were performed with a cylindrical four-electrode sample-holder associated with a SIP-Fuchs II impedance meter and non-polarizing Cu/CuSO4 electrodes. The results illustrate the strong impact of the CEC of the clay minerals upon the complex conductivity. The quadrature conductivity increases steadily with the clay content. We observe that the dependence on frequency of the quadrature conductivity of sand-kaolinite mixtures is more important than for sand-bentonite mixtures. For both types of clay, the quadrature conductivity seems to be fairly independent on the pore fluid salinity except at very low clay contents. The experimental data show good agreement with predicted values given by our SIP model. This complex conductivity model considers the electrochemical polarization of the Stern layer coating the clay particles and the Maxwell-Wagner polarization. We use the differential effective medium theory to calculate the complex conductivity of the porous medium constituted of the grains and the electrolyte. The SIP model includes also the effect of the grain size distribution upon the complex conductivity spectra.

  15. Lava-substrate heat transfer: Laboratory experiments and thermodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C. W.; Wright, R.; Crawford, I.

    2012-12-01

    We have performed laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to investigate the heat transfer from a lava flow into various substrate materials, focusing on the effects of the differing thermophysical properties of substrate materials. Initial motivation for this project developed from the desire to understand the loss of solar wind volatiles embedded in lunar regolith deposits that were subsequently covered by a lava flow. The Moon lacks a significant atmosphere and magnetosphere, leaving the surface regolith exposed to bombardment by solar flare and solar wind particles, and by the cosmogenic products of galactic cosmic rays. Preservation of particle-rich regolith deposits may have occurred by the emplacement of an active lava flow on top of the regolith layer, provided the embedded particles survive heating by the lava. During future expeditions to the lunar surface, ancient regolith deposits could be sampled through surface drilling to extract the extra-lunar particles, revealing a history of the solar activity and galactic events not available on the Earth. This project also has important implications for terrestrial lava flows, particularly in the prediction of lava flow hazards. Lava erupted on Earth may be emplaced on various substrates, including solid lava rock, volcanic tephra, sands, soils, etc. The composition, grain size, consolidation, moisture content, etc. of these materials will vary greatly and have different effects on the cooling of the flow. Accounting for specific properties of the substrate could be an important improvement in lava flow models We have performed laboratory experiments in collaboration with the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in which ~5-6 kg of basalt, collected at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is melted to ~1200 °C. The lava is poured into a device constructed of calcium silicate sheeting that has been filled with a solid or particulate substrate material and embedded with thermocouples

  16. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eby, M.; Weaver, A. J.; Alexander, K.;

    2013-01-01

    and continue through to 2005. The standard simulations include changes in forcing from solar luminosity, Earth's orbital configuration, CO2, additional greenhouse gases, land use, and sulphate and volcanic aerosols. In spite of very different modelled pre-industrial global surface air temperatures, overall 20......Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. Historical simulations start at 850 CE...

  17. Experiences with a procedure for modeling product knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benjamin Loer; Hvam, Lars

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents experiences with a procedure for building configurators. The procedure has been used in an American company producing custom-made precision air conditioning equipment. The paper describes experiences with the use of the procedure and experiences with the project in general....

  18. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-09-26

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the “surge line” and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008.

  19. Review of free-surface MHD experiments and modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molokov, S.; Reed, C. B.

    2000-06-02

    This review paper was prepared to survey the present status of analytical and experimental work in the area of free surface MHD and thus provide a well informed starting point for further work by the Advanced Limiter-diverter Plasma-facing Systems (ALPS) program. ALPS were initiated to evaluate the potential for improved performance and lifetime for plasma-facing systems. The main goal of the program is to demonstrate the advantages of advanced limiter/diverter systems over conventional systems in terms of power density capability, component lifetime, and power conversion efficiency, while providing for safe operation and minimizing impurity concerns for the plasma. Most of the work to date has been applied to free surface liquids. A multi-disciplinary team from several institutions has been organized to address the key issues associated with these systems. The main performance goals for advanced limiters and diverters are a peak heat flux of >50 MW/m{sup 2}, elimination of a lifetime limit for erosion, and the ability to extract useful heat at high power conversion efficiency ({approximately}40%). The evaluation of various options is being conducted through a combination of laboratory experiments, modeling of key processes, and conceptual design studies.

  20. Review of free-surface MHD experiments and modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molokov, S.; Reed, C. B.

    2000-06-02

    This review paper was prepared to survey the present status of analytical and experimental work in the area of free surface MHD and thus provide a well informed starting point for further work by the Advanced Limiter-diverter Plasma-facing Systems (ALPS) program. ALPS were initiated to evaluate the potential for improved performance and lifetime for plasma-facing systems. The main goal of the program is to demonstrate the advantages of advanced limiter/diverter systems over conventional systems in terms of power density capability, component lifetime, and power conversion efficiency, while providing for safe operation and minimizing impurity concerns for the plasma. Most of the work to date has been applied to free surface liquids. A multi-disciplinary team from several institutions has been organized to address the key issues associated with these systems. The main performance goals for advanced limiters and diverters are a peak heat flux of >50 MW/m{sup 2}, elimination of a lifetime limit for erosion, and the ability to extract useful heat at high power conversion efficiency ({approximately}40%). The evaluation of various options is being conducted through a combination of laboratory experiments, modeling of key processes, and conceptual design studies.

  1. Modeling Orbital Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy Experiments at Carbonaceous Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Lucy F; Evans, Larry G; Parsons, Ann M; Zolensky, Michael E; Boynton, William V

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of measuring differences in bulk composition among carbonaceous meteorite parent bodies from an asteroid or comet orbiter, we present the results of a performance simulation of an orbital gamma-ray spectroscopy ("GRS") experiment in a Dawn-like orbit around spherical model asteroids with a range of carbonaceous compositions. The orbital altitude was held equal to the asteroid radius for 4.5 months. Both the asteroid gamma-ray spectrum and the spacecraft background flux were calculated using the MCNPX Monte-Carlo code. GRS is sensitive to depths below the optical surface (to ~20--50 cm depth depending on material density). This technique can therefore measure underlying compositions beneath a sulfur-depleted (e.g., Nittler et al. 2001) or desiccated surface layer. We find that 3\\sigma\\ uncertainties of under 1 wt% are achievable for H, C, O, Si, S, Fe, and Cl for five carbonaceous meteorite compositions using the heritage Mars Odyssey GRS design in a spacecraft- deck-mounted configu...

  2. Modeling orbital gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments at carbonaceous asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Starr, Richard D.; Evans, Larry G.; Parsons, Ann M.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Boynton, William V.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of measuring differences in bulk composition among carbonaceous meteorite parent bodies from an asteroid or comet orbiter, we present the results of a performance simulation of an orbital gamma-ray spectroscopy (GRS) experiment in a Dawn-like orbit around spherical model asteroids with a range of carbonaceous compositions. The orbital altitude was held equal to the asteroid radius for 4.5 months. Both the asteroid gamma-ray spectrum and the spacecraft background flux were calculated using the MCNPX Monte-Carlo code. GRS is sensitive to depths below the optical surface (to ≈20-50 cm depth depending on material density). This technique can therefore measure underlying compositions beneath a sulfur-depleted (e.g., Nittler et al.) or desiccated surface layer. We find that 3σ uncertainties of under 1 wt% are achievable for H, C, O, Si, S, Fe, and Cl for five carbonaceous meteorite compositions using the heritage Mars Odyssey GRS design in a spacecraft-deck-mounted configuration at the Odyssey end-of-mission energy resolution, FWHM = 5.7 keV at 1332 keV. The calculated compositional uncertainties are smaller than the compositional differences between carbonaceous chondrite subclasses.

  3. Modeling and Experiments of Spray System for Cable Painting Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jia-liang; Lü Tian-sheng; LI Bei-zhi

    2008-01-01

    Many cable-stayed bridges have been built in the world in the past decades,and cable-stayed structures have been adopted in many large constructions.The cable painting robot is safe and economically efficient for stay cable maintenance.In order to satisfy the need for spraying cables in hiigh attitude,an automatic cable spray system for cable painting robots is presented in this paper.Using the βdistribution,paint thickness distribution on a cylinder surface is modeled.The spray gun's number,angle and movement are analyzed to get coat evenness.Then a robotic spray system engineering prototype has been developed,which includes a cable electric running climbing base,a spray cover,four airless spray guns and a pressurized paint container.Experiments indicate that four airless spray guns can guarantee good coat quality for general stay cables.The field tests have been successfully conducted on Nanpu Bridge,Shanghai.

  4. Modelling and experiments on NTM stabilisation at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urso, Laura

    2009-07-27

    In the next fusion device ITER the so-called neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) are foreseen as being extremely detrimental to plasma confinement. This type of resistive instability is related to the presence in the plasma of magnetic islands. These are experimentally controlled with local electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) and the island width decay during NTM stabilisation is modelled using the so-called Modified Rutherford equation. In this thesis, a modelling of the Modified Rutherford equation is carried out and simulations of the island width decay are compared with the experimentally observed ones in order to fit the two free machine-independent parameters present in the equation. A systematic study on a database of NTM stabilisation discharges from ASDEX Upgrade and JT-60U is done within the context of a multi-machine benchmark for extrapolating the ECCD power requirements for ITER. The experimental measurements in both devices are discussed by means of consistency checks and sensitivity analysis and used to evaluate the two fitting parameters present in the Modified Rutherford equation. The influence of the asymmetry of the magnetic island on stabilisation is for the first time included in the model and the effect of ECCD on the marginal island after which the mode naturally decays is quantified. The effect of radial misalignment and over-stabilisation during the experiment are found to be the key quantities affecting the NTM stabilisation. As a main result of this thesis, the extrapolation to ITER of the NTM stabilisation results from ASDEX Upgrade and JT-60U shows that 10MW of ECCD power are enough to stabilise large NTMs as long as the O-point of the island and the ECCD beam are perfectly aligned. In fact, the high ratio between the island size at saturation and the deposition width of the ECCD beam foreseen for ITER is found to imply a maximum allowable radial misalignment of 2-3 cm and little difference in terms of gained performance between

  5. Molecular modeling of layered double hydroxide intercalated with benzoate, modeling and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovár, Petr; Pospísil, M; Nocchetti, M; Capková, P; Melánová, Klára

    2007-08-01

    The structure of Zn4Al2 Layered Double Hydroxide intercalated with benzencarboxylate (C6H5COO-) was solved using molecular modeling combined with experiment (X-ray powder diffraction, IR spectroscopy, TG measurements). Molecular modeling revealed the arrangement of guest molecules, layer stacking, water content and water location in the interlayer space of the host structure. Molecular modeling using empirical force field was carried out in Cerius(2) modeling environment. Results of modeling were confronted with experiment that means comparing the calculated and measured diffraction pattern and comparing the calculated water content with the thermogravimetric value. Good agreement has been achieved between calculated and measured basal spacing: d(calc) = 15.3 A and d(exp) = 15.5 A. The number of water molecules per formula unit (6H2O per Zn4Al2(OH)12) obtained by modeling (i.e., corresponding to the energy minimum) agrees with the water content estimated by thermogravimetry. The long axis of guest molecules are almost perpendicular to the LDH layers, anchored to the host layers via COO- groups. Mutual orientation of benzoate ring planes in the interlayer space keeps the parquet arrangement. Water molecules are roughly arranged in planes adjacent to host layers together with COO- groups.

  6. Impact of Domain Modeling Techniques on the Quality of Domain Model: An Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiqmat Nisa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The unified modeling language (UML is widely used to analyze and design different software development artifacts in an object oriented development. Domain model is a significant artifact that models the problem domain and visually represents real world objects and relationships among them. It facilitates the comprehension process by identifying the vocabulary and key concepts of the business world. Category list technique identifies concepts and associations with the help of pre defined categories, which are important to business information systems. Whereas noun phrasing technique performs grammatical analysis of use case description to recognize concepts and associations. Both of these techniques are used for the construction of domain model, however, no empirical evidence exists that evaluates the quality of the resultant domain model constructed via these two basic techniques. A controlled experiment was performed to investigate the impact of category list and noun phrasing technique on quality of the domain model. The constructed domain model is evaluated for completeness, correctness and effort required for its design. The obtained results show that category list technique is better than noun phrasing technique for the identification of concepts as it avoids generating unnecessary elements i.e. extra concepts, associations and attributes in the domain model. The noun phrasing technique produces a comprehensive domain model and requires less effort as compared to category list. There is no statistically significant difference between both techniques in case of correctness.

  7. Impact of Domain Modeling Techniques on the Quality of Domain Model: An Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiqmat Nisa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The unified modeling language (UML is widely used to analyze and design different software development artifacts in an object oriented development. Domain model is a significant artifact that models the problem domain and visually represents real world objects and relationships among them. It facilitates the comprehension process by identifying the vocabulary and key concepts of the business world. Category list technique identifies concepts and associations with the help of pre defined categories, which are important to business information systems. Whereas noun phrasing technique performs grammatical analysis of use case description to recognize concepts and associations. Both of these techniques are used for the construction of domain model, however, no empirical evidence exists that evaluates the quality of the resultant domain model constructed via these two basic techniques. A controlled experiment was performed to investigate the impact of category list and noun phrasing technique on quality of the domain model. The constructed domain model is evaluated for completeness, correctness and effort required for its design. The obtained results show that category list technique is better than noun phrasing technique for the identification of concepts as it avoids generating unnecessary elements i.e. extra concepts, associations and attributes in the domain model. The noun phrasing technique produces a comprehensive domain model and requires less effort as compared to category list. There is no statistically significant difference between both techniques in case of correctness.

  8. Experience of Macroeconomic Models Realization in Transition Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Naval

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article represents an issue about macroeconomic model realization under transition economy of Moldova Republic. Different macroeconomic model beginning with simple monetary model and growth model, and more complicated model as financial programming models, general equilibrium model, describing complex functioning of national economy and forecasting effect of various economic policies on economy development were considered. Some comparative analysis and conclusions were presented.

  9. Modeling of coherent ultrafast magneto-optical experiments: Light-induced molecular mean-field model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinschberger, Y. [Instituto de Física dos Materiais da Universidade do Porto, Departamento de Física et Astronomia, Rua do campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Hervieux, P.-A. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS UMR 7504 BP 43 - F-67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-12-28

    We present calculations which aim to describe coherent ultrafast magneto-optical effects observed in time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Our approach is based on a nonlinear semi-classical Drude-Voigt model and is used to interpret experiments performed on nickel ferromagnetic thin film. Within this framework, a phenomenological light-induced coherent molecular mean-field depending on the polarizations of the pump and probe pulses is proposed whose microscopic origin is related to a spin-orbit coupling involving the electron spins of the material sample and the electric field of the laser pulses. Theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data. The model successfully reproduces the observed experimental trends and gives meaningful insight into the understanding of magneto-optical rotation behavior in the ultrafast regime. Theoretical predictions for further experimental studies are also proposed.

  10. Model slope infiltration experiments for shallow landslides early warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, E.; Greco, R.; Guida, A.; Olivares, L.; Picarelli, L.

    2009-04-01

    simple empirical models [Versace et al., 2003] based on correlation between some features of rainfall records (cumulated height, duration, season etc.) and the correspondent observed landslides. Laboratory experiments on instrumented small scale slope models represent an effective way to provide data sets [Eckersley, 1990; Wang and Sassa, 2001] useful for building up more complex models of landslide triggering prediction. At the Geotechnical Laboratory of C.I.R.I.AM. an instrumented flume to investigate on the mechanics of landslides in unsaturated deposits of granular soils is available [Olivares et al. 2003; Damiano, 2004; Olivares et al., 2007]. In the flume a model slope is reconstituted by a moist-tamping technique and subjected to an artificial uniform rainfall since failure happens. The state of stress and strain of the slope is monitored during the entire test starting from the infiltration process since the early post-failure stage: the monitoring system is constituted by several mini-tensiometers placed at different locations and depths, to measure suction, mini-transducers to measure positive pore pressures, laser sensors, to measure settlements of the ground surface, and high definition video-cameras to obtain, through a software (PIV) appositely dedicated, the overall horizontal displacement field. Besides, TDR sensors, used with an innovative technique [Greco, 2006], allow to reconstruct the water content profile of soil along the entire thickness of the investigated deposit and to monitor its continuous changes during infiltration. In this paper a series of laboratory tests carried out on model slopes in granular pyroclastic soils taken in the mountainous area north-eastern of Napoli, are presented. The experimental results demonstrate the completeness of information provided by the various sensors installed. In particular, very useful information is given by the coupled measurements of soil water content by TDR and suction by tensiometers. Knowledge of

  11. A Model for Designing Adaptive Laboratory Evolution Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCroix, Ryan A; Palsson, Bernhard O; Feist, Adam M

    2017-04-15

    The occurrence of mutations is a cornerstone of the evolutionary theory of adaptation, capitalizing on the rare chance that a mutation confers a fitness benefit. Natural selection is increasingly being leveraged in laboratory settings for industrial and basic science applications. Despite increasing deployment, there are no standardized procedures available for designing and performing adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) experiments. Thus, there is a need to optimize the experimental design, specifically for determining when to consider an experiment complete and for balancing outcomes with available resources (i.e., laboratory supplies, personnel, and time). To design and to better understand ALE experiments, a simulator, ALEsim, was developed, validated, and applied to the optimization of ALE experiments. The effects of various passage sizes were experimentally determined and subsequently evaluated with ALEsim, to explain differences in experimental outcomes. Furthermore, a beneficial mutation rate of 10(-6.9) to 10(-8.4) mutations per cell division was derived. A retrospective analysis of ALE experiments revealed that passage sizes typically employed in serial passage batch culture ALE experiments led to inefficient production and fixation of beneficial mutations. ALEsim and the results described here will aid in the design of ALE experiments to fit the exact needs of a project while taking into account the resources required and will lower the barriers to entry for this experimental technique.IMPORTANCE ALE is a widely used scientific technique to increase scientific understanding, as well as to create industrially relevant organisms. The manner in which ALE experiments are conducted is highly manual and uniform, with little optimization for efficiency. Such inefficiencies result in suboptimal experiments that can take multiple months to complete. With the availability of automation and computer simulations, we can now perform these experiments in an optimized

  12. Fund choice behavior and estimation of switching models: an experiment*

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anufriev, M.; Bao, T.; Tuinstra, J.

    2013-01-01

    We run a laboratory experiment that contributes to the finance literature on "return chasing behavior" studying how investors switch between mutual funds driven by past performance of the funds. The subjects in this experiment make discrete choices between several (2, 3 or 4) experimental funds in m

  13. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Eby

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. Historical simulations start at 850 CE and continue through to 2005. The standard simulations include changes in forcing from solar luminosity, Earth's orbital configuration, CO2, additional greenhouse gases, land use, and sulphate and volcanic aerosols. In spite of very different modelled pre-industrial global surface air temperatures, overall 20th century trends in surface air temperature and carbon uptake are reasonably well simulated when compared to observed trends. Land carbon fluxes show much more variation between models than ocean carbon fluxes, and recent land fluxes appear to be slightly underestimated. It is possible that recent modelled climate trends or climate–carbon feedbacks are overestimated resulting in too much land carbon loss or that carbon uptake due to CO2 and/or nitrogen fertilization is underestimated. Several one thousand year long, idealized, 2 × and 4 × CO2 experiments are used to quantify standard model characteristics, including transient and equilibrium climate sensitivities, and climate–carbon feedbacks. The values from EMICs generally fall within the range given by general circulation models. Seven additional historical simulations, each including a single specified forcing, are used to assess the contributions of different climate forcings to the overall climate and carbon cycle response. The response of surface air temperature is the linear sum of the individual forcings, while the carbon cycle response shows a non-linear interaction between land-use change and CO2 forcings for some models. Finally, the preindustrial portions of the last millennium simulations are used to assess historical model carbon-climate feedbacks. Given the specified forcing, there

  14. Model-experiment interaction to improve representation of phosphorus limitation in land models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, R. J.; Yang, X.; Cabugao, K. G. M.; Childs, J.; Gu, L.; Haworth, I.; Mayes, M. A.; Porter, W. S.; Walker, A. P.; Weston, D. J.; Wright, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon-nutrient interactions play important roles in regulating terrestrial carbon cycle responses to atmospheric and climatic change. None of the CMIP5 models has included routines to represent the phosphorus (P) cycle, although P is commonly considered to be the most limiting nutrient in highly productive, lowland tropical forests. Model simulations with the Community Land Model (CLM-CNP) show that inclusion of P coupling leads to a smaller CO2 fertilization effect and warming-induced CO2 release from tropical ecosystems, but there are important uncertainties in the P model, and improvements are limited by a dearth of data. Sensitivity analysis identifies the relative importance of P cycle parameters in determining P availability and P limitation, and thereby helps to define the critical measurements to make in field campaigns and manipulative experiments. To improve estimates of P supply, parameters that describe maximum amount of labile P in soil and sorption-desorption processes are necessary for modeling the amount of P available for plant uptake. Biochemical mineralization is poorly constrained in the model and will be improved through field observations that link root traits to mycorrhizal activity, phosphatase activity, and root depth distribution. Model representation of P demand by vegetation, which currently is set by fixed stoichiometry and allometric constants, requires a different set of data. Accurate carbon cycle modeling requires accurate parameterization of the photosynthetic machinery: Vc,max and Jmax. Relationships between the photosynthesis parameters and foliar nutrient (N and P) content are being developed, and by including analysis of covariation with other plant traits (e.g., specific leaf area, wood density), we can provide a basis for more dynamic, trait-enabled modeling. With this strong guidance from model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, field studies are underway in Puerto Rico and Panama to collect model-relevant data on P

  15. Using the Bifocal Modeling Framework to Resolve "Discrepant Events" Between Physical Experiments and Virtual Models in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikstein, Paulo; Fuhrmann, Tamar; Salehi, Shima

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate an approach to supporting students' learning in science through a combination of physical experimentation and virtual modeling. We present a study that utilizes a scientific inquiry framework, which we call "bifocal modeling," to link student-designed experiments and computer models in real time. In this study, a group of high school students designed computer models of bacterial growth with reference to a simultaneous physical experiment they were conducting, and were able to validate the correctness of their model against the results of their experiment. Our findings suggest that as the students compared their virtual models with physical experiments, they encountered "discrepant events" that contradicted their existing conceptions and elicited a state of cognitive disequilibrium. This experience of conflict encouraged students to further examine their ideas and to seek more accurate explanations of the observed natural phenomena, improving the design of their computer models.

  16. Standard Model Higgs results from ATLAS and CMS experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00221190; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The properties of the Higgs boson particle were measured with the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC at the centre-of-mass energies 7 TeV and 8 TeV. The combined data samples of the ATLAS and CMS experiments were used for the measurements of the Higgs boson mass and couplings. Furthermore, the CP and spin analysis done separately with the CMS and ATLAS experiments are described. Moreover, first results of the Higgs boson cross section at the centre-of-mass energy 13 TeV in the channels H->ZZ->4leptons and H->gamma+gamma with the ATLAS detector are presented.

  17. Complementary experiments for hydraulic modeling of multi-box culverts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ho, H.-C; Muste, M; Plenner, S; Firoozfar, A.R

    2013-01-01

    ... flow–sediment interaction. This paper reports results from a series of laboratory experiments aimed at understanding the hydro and morpho-dynamic changes occurring in the vicinity of a three-box culvert...

  18. Experiment selection for the discrimination of semi-quantitative models of dynamical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vatcheva, [No Value; de Jong, H; Bernard, O; Mars, NJI

    2006-01-01

    Modeling an experimental system often results in a number of alternative models that are all justified by the available experimental data. To discriminate among these models, additional experiments are needed. Existing methods for the selection of discriminatory experiments in statistics and in arti

  19. Optimal experiment design for identification of grey-box models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Melgaard, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik

    1994-01-01

    Optimal experiment design is investigated for stochastic dynamic systems where the prior partial information about the system is given as a probability distribution function in the system parameters. The concept of information is related to entropy reduction in the system through Lindley's measure...... estimation results in a considerable reduction of the experimental length. Besides, it is established that the physical knowledge of the system enables us to design experiments, with the goal of maximizing information about the physical parameters of interest....

  20. Photo darkening in Ytterbium doped fibers: phenomenological model and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    2011-01-01

    Photo darkening (PD) of ytterbium co-doped silica fibers are experimentally investigated and a numeric model for PD is proposed. The spectral response of PD is discussed based on a chemical bond formation model.......Photo darkening (PD) of ytterbium co-doped silica fibers are experimentally investigated and a numeric model for PD is proposed. The spectral response of PD is discussed based on a chemical bond formation model....

  1. Photo darkening in Rare earth doped silica: Model and Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    2011-01-01

    A model for photo darkening based on chemical bond formation is presented. The formation process, color center spectral response and bleaching is discussed and model predictions is found to follow high power fiber laser operation......A model for photo darkening based on chemical bond formation is presented. The formation process, color center spectral response and bleaching is discussed and model predictions is found to follow high power fiber laser operation...

  2. SME International Business Models: The Role of Context and Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Child, John; Hsieh, Linda; Elbanna, Said

    2017-01-01

    models that SMEs follow? Three distinct international business models (traditional market-adaptive, technology exploiter, and ambidextrous explorer) are found among the SMEs studied. The likelihood of SMEs adopting one business model rather than another is to a high degree predictable with reference...

  3. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Final coupled 3D thermo-mechanical modeling. Preliminary particle mechanical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanne, Toivo; Johansson, Erik; Potyondy, David [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2004-02-01

    SKB is planning to perform a large-scale pillar stability experiment called APSE (Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment) at Aespoe HRL. The study is focused on understanding and control of progressive rock failure in hard crystalline rock and damage caused by high stresses. The elastic thermo-mechanical modeling was carried out in three dimensions because of the complex test geometry and in-situ stress tensor by using a finite-difference modeling software FLAC3D. Cracking and damage formation were modeled in the area of interest (pillar between two large scale holes) in two dimensions by using the Particle Flow Code (PFC), which is based on particle mechanics. FLAC and PFC were coupled to minimize the computer resources and the computing time. According to the modeling the initial temperature rises from 15 deg C to about 65 deg C in the pillar area during the heating period of 120 days. The rising temperature due to thermal expansion induces stresses in the pillar area and after 120 days heating the stresses have increased about 33% from the excavation induced maximum stress of 150 MPa to 200 MPa in the end of the heating period. The results from FLAC3D model showed that only regions where the crack initiation stress has exceeded were identified and they extended to about two meters down the hole wall. These could be considered the areas where damage may occur during the in-situ test. When the other hole is pressurized with a 0.8 MPa confining pressure it yields that 5 MPa more stress is needed to damage the rock than without confining pressure. This makes the damaged area in some degree smaller. High compressive stresses in addition to some tensile stresses might induce some AE (acoustic emission) activity in the upper part of the hole from the very beginning of the test and are thus potential areas where AE activities may be detected. Monitoring like acoustic emissions will be measured during the test execution. The 2D coupled PFC-FLAC modeling indicated that

  4. Longitudinal Mode Aeroengine Combustion Instability: Model and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. M.; Hibshman, J. R.; Proscia, W.; Rosfjord, T. J.; Wake, B. E.; McVey, J. B.; Lovett, J.; Ondas, M.; DeLaat, J.; Breisacher, K.

    2001-01-01

    Combustion instabilities in gas turbine engines are most frequently encountered during the late phases of engine development, at which point they are difficult and expensive to fix. The ability to replicate an engine-traceable combustion instability in a laboratory-scale experiment offers the opportunity to economically diagnose the problem more completely (to determine the root cause), and to investigate solutions to the problem, such as active control. The development and validation of active combustion instability control requires that the casual dynamic processes be reproduced in experimental test facilities which can be used as a test bed for control system evaluation. This paper discusses the process through which a laboratory-scale experiment and be designed to replicate an instability observed in a developmental engine. The scaling process used physically-based analyses to preserve the relevant geometric, acoustic, and thermo-fluid features, ensuring that results achieved in the single-nozzle experiment will be scalable to the engine.

  5. The model of localized business community economic development under limited financial resources: computer model and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Globalization processes now affect and are affected by most of organizations, different type resources, and the natural environment. One of the main restrictions initiated by these processes is the financial one: money turnover in global markets leads to its concentration in the certain financial centers, and local business communities suffer from the money lack. This work discusses the advantages of complementary currency introduction into a local economics. By the computer simulation with the engineered program model and the real economic experiment it was proved that the complementary currency does not compete with the traditional currency, furthermore, it acts in compliance with it, providing conditions for the sustainable business community development.

  6. A Model for Designing Adaptive Laboratory Evolution Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaCroix, Ryan A.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Feist, Adam M.

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of mutations is a cornerstone of the evolutionary theory of adaptation, capitalizing on the rare chance that a mutation confers a fitness benefit. Natural selection is increasingly being leveraged in laboratory settings for industrial and basic science applications. Despite...... increasing deployment, there are no standardized procedures available for designing and performing adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) experiments. Thus, there is a need to optimize the experimental design, specifically for determining when to consider an experiment complete and for balancing outcomes...... adaptive laboratory evolution can achieve....

  7. Fission neutrons experiments, evaluation, modeling and open problems

    CERN Document Server

    Kornilov, Nikolay

    2014-01-01

    Although the fission of heavy nuclei was discovered over 75 years ago, many problems and questions still remain to be addressed and answered. The reader will be presented with an old, but persistent problem of this field: The contradiction between Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) spectra measured with differential (microscopic) experiments and integral (macroscopic and benchmark) experiments (the Micro-Macro problem). The difference in average energy is rather small ~3% but it is stable and we cannot explain the difference due to experimental uncertainties. Can we measure the PFN spectrum with hig

  8. Technological Learning in Energy Models: Experience and Scenario Analysis with MARKAL and the ERIS Model Prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, L.; Kypreos, S.

    1999-09-01

    Understanding technology dynamics, a fundamental driving factor of the evolution of energy systems, is essential for sound policy formulation and decision making. Technological change is not an autonomous process, but evolves from a number of endogenous interactions within the social system. Technologies evolve and improve only if experience with them is possible. Efforts must be devoted to improve our analytical tools concerning the treatment given to the technological variable, recognising the cumulative and gradual nature of technological change and the important role played by learning processes. This report presents a collection of works developed by the authors concerning the endogenisation of technological change in energy optimisation models, as a contribution to the Energy Technology Dynamics andAdvanced Energy System Modelling Project (TEEM), developed in the framework of the Non Nuclear Energy Programme JOULE III of the European Union (DGXII). Here, learning curves, an empirically observed manifestation of the cumulative technological learning processes, are endogenised in two energy optimisation models. MARKAL, a widely used bottom-up model developed by the ETSAP programme of the IEA and ERIS, a model prototype, developed within the TEEM project for assessing different concepts and approaches. The methodological approach is described and some results and insights derived from the model analyses are presented. The incorporation of learning curves results in significantly different model outcomes than those obtained with traditional approaches. New, innovative technologies, hardly considered by the standard models, are introduced to the solution when endogenous learning is present. Up-front investments in initially expensive, but promising, technologies allow the necessary accumulation of experience to render them cost-effective. When uncertainty in emission reduction commitments is considered, the results point also in the direction of undertaking early

  9. Technological Learning in Energy Models: Experience and Scenario Analysis with MARKAL and the ERIS Model Prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, L.; Kypreos, S.

    1999-09-01

    Understanding technology dynamics, a fundamental driving factor of the evolution of energy systems, is essential for sound policy formulation and decision making. Technological change is not an autonomous process, but evolves from a number of endogenous interactions within the social system. Technologies evolve and improve only if experience with them is possible. Efforts must be devoted to improve our analytical tools concerning the treatment given to the technological variable, recognising the cumulative and gradual nature of technological change and the important role played by learning processes. This report presents a collection of works developed by the authors concerning the endogenisation of technological change in energy optimisation models, as a contribution to the Energy Technology Dynamics andAdvanced Energy System Modelling Project (TEEM), developed in the framework of the Non Nuclear Energy Programme JOULE III of the European Union (DGXII). Here, learning curves, an empirically observed manifestation of the cumulative technological learning processes, are endogenised in two energy optimisation models. MARKAL, a widely used bottom-up model developed by the ETSAP programme of the IEA and ERIS, a model prototype, developed within the TEEM project for assessing different concepts and approaches. The methodological approach is described and some results and insights derived from the model analyses are presented. The incorporation of learning curves results in significantly different model outcomes than those obtained with traditional approaches. New, innovative technologies, hardly considered by the standard models, are introduced to the solution when endogenous learning is present. Up-front investments in initially expensive, but promising, technologies allow the necessary accumulation of experience to render them cost-effective. When uncertainty in emission reduction commitments is considered, the results point also in the direction of undertaking early

  10. Applying the Job Characteristics Model to the College Education Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Steven J.; Vodanovich, Stephen J.; Khosravi, Jasmine Y.

    2011-01-01

    Boredom is one of the most common complaints among university students, with studies suggesting its link to poor grades, drop out, and behavioral problems. Principles borrowed from industrial-organizational psychology may help prevent boredom and enrich the classroom experience. In the current study, we applied the core dimensions of the job…

  11. Quantitative Modeling of Entangled Polymer Rheology: Experiments, Tube Models and Slip-Link Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Priyanka Subhash

    Rheology properties are sensitive indicators of molecular structure and dynamics. The relationship between rheology and polymer dynamics is captured in the constitutive model, which, if accurate and robust, would greatly aid molecular design and polymer processing. This dissertation is thus focused on building accurate and quantitative constitutive models that can help predict linear and non-linear viscoelasticity. In this work, we have used a multi-pronged approach based on the tube theory, coarse-grained slip-link simulations, and advanced polymeric synthetic and characterization techniques, to confront some of the outstanding problems in entangled polymer rheology. First, we modified simple tube based constitutive equations in extensional rheology and developed functional forms to test the effect of Kuhn segment alignment on a) tube diameter enlargement and b) monomeric friction reduction between subchains. We, then, used these functional forms to model extensional viscosity data for polystyrene (PS) melts and solutions. We demonstrated that the idea of reduction in segmental friction due to Kuhn alignment is successful in explaining the qualitative difference between melts and solutions in extension as revealed by recent experiments on PS. Second, we compiled literature data and used it to develop a universal tube model parameter set and prescribed their values and uncertainties for 1,4-PBd by comparing linear viscoelastic G' and G" mastercurves for 1,4-PBds of various branching architectures. The high frequency transition region of the mastercurves superposed very well for all the 1,4-PBds irrespective of their molecular weight and architecture, indicating universality in high frequency behavior. Therefore, all three parameters of the tube model were extracted from this high frequency transition region alone. Third, we compared predictions of two versions of the tube model, Hierarchical model and BoB model against linear viscoelastic data of blends of 1,4-PBd

  12. Experience-based model predictive control using reinforcement learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negenborn, R.R.; De Schutter, B.; Wiering, M.A.; Hellendoorn, J.

    2004-01-01

    Model predictive control (MPC) is becoming an increasingly popular method to select actions for controlling dynamic systems. TraditionallyMPC uses a model of the system to be controlled and a performance function to characterize the desired behavior of the system. The MPC agent finds actions over a

  13. Event-Based Corpuscular Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Jin, F.; Raedt, H. De

    2011-01-01

    A corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one is presented. The event-based corpuscular model is shown to give a u

  14. Event-Based Corpuscular Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Jin, F.; Raedt, H. De

    A corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one is presented. The event-based corpuscular model is shown to give a

  15. Event-based Simulation Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.; Jaeger, G; Khrennikov, A; Schlosshauer, M; Weihs, G

    2011-01-01

    We present a corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one. The event-based corpuscular model gives a unified

  16. The JCSS probabilistic model code: Experience and recent developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chryssanthopoulos, M.; Diamantidis, D.; Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M.

    2003-01-01

    The JCSS Probabilistic Model Code (JCSS-PMC) has been available for public use on the JCSS website (www.jcss.ethz.ch) for over two years. During this period, several examples have been worked out and new probabilistic models have been added. Since the engineering community has already been exposed t

  17. Identifying anaerobic digestion models using simultaneous batch experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flotats, X.; Palatsi, J.; Fernandez, B.; Colomer, M. A.; Illa, J.

    2009-07-01

    As in other wastewater treatment processes, anaerobic digestion models have become a valuable tool to increase the understanding of complex biodegradation processes, to teach and to communicate using a common language, to optimize design plants and operating strategies and for trying operators and process engineers. Models require accurate and significant parameter values for being useful. (Author) 2 refs.

  18. Pesticide leaching in macroporous clay soils: field experiment and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza Júnior, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords : pesticide leaching, macropores, preferential flow, preferential transport, cracked clay soil, pesticide leaching models, groundwater contamination, inverse modeling, bentazone and imidacloprid. The presence of macropores (i.e. shrinkage c

  19. Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP): experimental design and boundary conditions (Experiment 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, A.M.; Dowsett, H.J.; Robinson, M.M.; Stoll, D.K.; Dolan, A.M.; Lunt, D.J.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Chandler, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project has expanded to include a model intercomparison for the mid-Pliocene warm period (3.29 to 2.97 million yr ago). This project is referred to as PlioMIP (the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project). Two experiments have been agreed upon and together compose the initial phase of PlioMIP. The first (Experiment 1) is being performed with atmosphere-only climate models. The second (Experiment 2) utilises fully coupled ocean-atmosphere climate models. Following on from the publication of the experimental design and boundary conditions for Experiment 1 in Geoscientific Model Development, this paper provides the necessary description of differences and/or additions to the experimental design for Experiment 2.

  20. Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP): Experimental Design and Boundary Conditions (Experiment 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, A. M.; Dowsett, H. J.; Robinson, M. M.; Stoll, D. K.; Dolan, A. M.; Lunt, D. J.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Chandler, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project has expanded to include a model intercomparison for the mid-Pliocene warm period (3.29 to 2.97 million yr ago). This project is referred to as PlioMIP (the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project). Two experiments have been agreed upon and together compose the initial phase of PlioMIP. The first (Experiment 1) is being performed with atmosphere only climate models. The second (Experiment 2) utilizes fully coupled ocean-atmosphere climate models. Following on from the publication of the experimental design and boundary conditions for Experiment 1 in Geoscientific Model Development, this paper provides the necessary description of differences and/or additions to the experimental design for Experiment 2.

  1. Hydrocarbons Heterogeneous Pyrolysis: Experiments and Modeling for Scramjet Thermal Management

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchez, Marc; Visez, Nicolas; Herbinet, Olivier; Fournet, René; Marquaire, Paul-Marie

    2009-01-01

    The last years saw a renewal of interest for hypersonic research in general and regenerative cooling specifically, with a large increase of the number of dedicated facilities and technical studies. In order to quantify the heat transfer in the cooled structures and the composition of the cracked fuel entering the combustor, an accurate model of the thermal decomposition of the fuel is required. This model should be able to predict the fuel chemical composition and physical properties for a broad range of pressures, temperatures and cooling geometries. For this purpose, an experimental and modeling study of the thermal decomposition of generic molecules (long-chain or polycyclic alkanes) that could be good surrogates of real fuels, has been started at the DCPR laboratory located in Nancy (France). This successful effort leads to several versions of a complete kinetic model. These models do not assume any effect from the material that constitutes the cooling channel. A specific experimental study was performed ...

  2. Looking beyond Lewis Structures: A General Chemistry Molecular Modeling Experiment Focusing on Physical Properties and Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Cole, Renee S.; Sarkar, Somnath

    2011-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry experiment using Spartan Student Version, ready to be adapted and implemented into a general chemistry laboratory course. The experiment provides students an experience with Spartan Molecular Modeling software while discovering the relationships between the structure and properties of molecules. Topics discussed within…

  3. Basin Acoustic Seamount Scattering Experiment (BASSEX) Data Analysis and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Kauai source at various ranges and bearings. OBJECTIVES The primary objective of this work is to measure aspects of acoustic propagation that...range-dependent environments. The primary goal is to understand the physics of the acoustic propagation in complex environments. Three specific...During the test acoustic transmissions from sources used in the SPICEX and LOAPEX experiments (PI: Dr. Peter Worcester, SIO and Dr. Jim Mercer, APL-UW

  4. The Framed Standard Model (II) - A first Test against Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, HM

    2015-01-01

    Apart from the qualitative features described in \\cite{chm}, the renormalization group equation derived for the rotation of the fermion mass matrices are amenable to quantitative study. The equation depends on a coupling and a fudge factor and, on integration, on 3 integration constants. Its application to data analysis, however, requires the input from experiment of the heaviest generation masses $m_t, m_b, m_\\tau, m_{\

  5. An Acoustic Demonstration Model for CW and Pulsed Spectrosocopy Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, Torben; Mäder, Heinrich; Trueman, Trevor; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    High school and undergraduate students have often difficulties if new concepts are introduced in their physics or chemistry lectures. Lecture demonstrations and references to more familiar analogues can be of great help to the students in such situations. We have developed an experimental setup to demonstrate the principles of cw absorption and pulsed excitation - emission spectroscopies, using acoustical analogues. Our radiation source is a speaker and the detector is a microphone, both controlled by a computer sound card. The acoustical setup is housed in a plexiglas box, which serves as a resonator. It turns out that beer glasses are suitable samples; this also helps to keep the students interested! The instrument is controlled by a LabView program. In a cw experiment, the sound frequency is swept through a certain frequency range and the microphone response is recorded simultaneously as function of frequency. A background signal without sample is recorded, and background subtraction yields the beer glass spectrum. In a pulsed experiment, a short sound pulse is generated and the microphone is used to record the resulting emission signal of the beer glass. A Fourier transformation of the time domain signal gives then the spectrum. We will discuss the experimental setup and show videos of the experiments.

  6. Optical properties of CdTe: Experiment and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Sadao; Kimura, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Norihiro

    1993-09-01

    The real epsilon(sub 1) and imaginary epsilon(sub 2) portions of the dielectric function of CdTe were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in the 1.1-5.6 eV photon-energy range at room temperature. The data obtained were analyzed using different theoretical models, namely the harmonic-oscillator approximation, the standard critical point, and the model dielectric function. These models include the E(sub 0), E(sub 0) + Delta(sub 0), E(sub 1), E(sub 1) + Delta(sub 1), and E(sub 2) gaps as the main dispersion mechanisms. The consequences were reported and of particular interest was the difference in the analyzed results between these theoretical models. Dielectric-related optical constants of CdTe, such as the complex refractive index, the absorption coefficient, and normal-incidence reflectivity, were also investigated.

  7. Diode laser welding of ABS: Experiments and process modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Ilie, Mariana; Mattei, Simone; Cicala, Eugen; Stoica, Virgil; 10.1016/j.optlastec.2008.10.005

    2010-01-01

    The laser beam weldability of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene (ABS) plates is determined by combining both experimental and theoretical aspects. In modeling the process, an optical model is used to determine how the laser beam is attenuated by the first material and to obtain the laser beam profile at the interface. Using this information as the input data to a thermal model, the evolution of the temperature field within the two components can be estimated. The thermal model is based on the first principles of heat transfer and utilizes the temperature variation laws of material properties. Corroborating the numerical results with the experimental results, some important insights concerning the fundamental phenomena that govern the process could be extracted. This approach proved to be an efficient tool in determining the weldability of polimeric materials and assures a significant reduction of time and costs with the experimental exploration.

  8. A Local Mathematical Model for EPR-Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp, W.; Hess, K.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we give a detailed and simplified version of our original mathematical model published first in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. We hope that this will clarify some misinterpretations of our original paper.

  9. A Simple Analytic ICP Model and Comparison to Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Daniel R.; Hayden, Douglas B.; Ruzic, David N.

    1996-10-01

    An analytic model is developed for a cylindrically symmetric inductively coupled plasma system in order to find the electron temperature and density distribution. Boltzmann's equation is solved by a computer code using a 2-term spherical harmonic expansion. Analytic results are compared to experimental measurements made with a Langmuir probe. The apparatus is a magnetron system (magnetron system donated by MRC) with an RF coil or other ionization source inserted between the target and substrate. Far from the target, the resulting plasma is dominated by this ionization source, so the plasma at the magnetron target is not accounted for in the analytic model. In the model, electric and magnetic fields from the RF coil are found as a function of position and the power deposition profile is calculated. Insights gained from this model have been used to guide research efforts in ionizing the sputter flux in the magnetron.

  10. The Design of a Fire Source in Scale-Model Experiments with Smoke Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Brohus, Henrik; la Cour-Harbo, H.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the design of a fire and a smoke source for scale-model experiments with smoke ventilation. It is only possible to work with scale-model experiments where the Reynolds number is reduced compared to full scale, and it is demonstrated that special attention to the fire source...... (heat and smoke source) may improve the possibility of obtaining Reynolds number independent solutions with a fully developed flow. The paper shows scale-model experiments for the Ofenegg tunnel case. Design of a fire source for experiments with smoke ventilation in a large room and smoke movement...

  11. PMT waveform modeling at the Daya Bay experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S(o)ren JETTER; Dan DWYER; JIANG Wen-Qi; LIU Da-Wei; WANG Yi-Fang; WANG Zhi-Min; WEN Liang-Jian

    2012-01-01

    Detailed measurements of Hamamatsu R5912 photomultiplier signals are presented,including the single photoelectron charge response,waveform shape,nonlinearity,saturation,overshoot,oscillation,prepulsing,and afterpulsing.The results were used to build a detailed model of the PMT signal characteristics over a wide range of light intensities.Including the PMT model in simulated Daya Bay particle interactions shows no significant systematic effects that are detrimental to the experimental sensitivity.

  12. Selection between foreground models for global 21-cm experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Harker, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    The precise form of the foregrounds for sky-averaged measurements of the 21-cm line during and before the epoch of reionization is unknown. We suggest that the level of complexity in the foreground models used to fit global 21-cm data should be driven by the data, under a Bayesian model selection methodology. A first test of this approach is carried out by applying nested sampling to simplified models of global 21-cm data to compute the Bayesian evidence for the models. If the foregrounds are assumed to be polynomials of order n in log-log space, we can infer the necessity to use n=4 rather than n=3 with <2h of integration with limited frequency coverage, for reasonable values of the n=4 coefficient. Using a higher-order polynomial does not necessarily prevent a significant detection of the 21-cm signal. Even for n=8, we can obtain very strong evidence distinguishing a reasonable model for the signal from a null model with 128h of integration. More subtle features of the signal may, however, be lost if the...

  13. A business process modeling experience in a complex information system re-engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernonville, Stéphanie; Vantourout, Corinne; Fendeler, Geneviève; Beuscart, Régis

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to share a business process modeling experience in a re-engineering project of a medical records department in a 2,965-bed hospital. It presents the modeling strategy, an extract of the results and the feedback experience.

  14. Event-based computer simulation model of aspect-type experiments strictly satisfying Einstein's locality conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, Hans; De Raedt, Koen; Michielsen, Kristel; Keimpema, Koenraad; Miyashita, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    Inspired by Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohtn experiments with photons, we construct an event-based simulation model in which every essential element in the ideal experiment has a counterpart. The model satisfies Einstein's criterion of local causality and does not rely on concepts of quantum and probab

  15. Three-Dimensional Scale-Model Tank Experiment of the Hudson Canyon Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Three-Dimensional Scale-Model Tank Experiment of the Hudson Canyon Region Jason D. Sagers Applied Research Laboratories at The University of...planning for future experiments in ocean environments with slopes and canyons . APPROACH The development of fully 3D numerical acoustic propagation models...Experiment of the Hudson Canyon Region 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  16. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) network model for advanced satellite designs and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.; Hager, E. Paul

    1991-01-01

    The Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Network Model for Advanced Satellite Designs and Experiments describes a model suitable for discrete event simulations. A top-down model design uses the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as its basis. The ISDN modeling abstractions are added to permit the determination and performance for the NASA Satellite Communications Research (SCAR) Program.

  17. Wave chaotic experiments and models for complicated wave scattering systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jen-Hao

    Wave scattering in a complicated environment is a common challenge in many engineering fields because the complexity makes exact solutions impractical to find, and the sensitivity to detail in the short-wavelength limit makes a numerical solution relevant only to a specific realization. On the other hand, wave chaos offers a statistical approach to understand the properties of complicated wave systems through the use of random matrix theory (RMT). A bridge between the theory and practical applications is the random coupling model (RCM) which connects the universal features predicted by RMT and the specific details of a real wave scattering system. The RCM gives a complete model for many wave properties and is beneficial for many physical and engineering fields that involve complicated wave scattering systems. One major contribution of this dissertation is that I have utilized three microwave systems to thoroughly test the RCM in complicated wave systems with varied loss, including a cryogenic system with a superconducting microwave cavity for testing the extremely-low-loss case. I have also experimentally tested an extension of the RCM that includes short-orbit corrections. Another novel result is development of a complete model based on the RCM for the fading phenomenon extensively studied in the wireless communication fields. This fading model encompasses the traditional fading models as its high-loss limit case and further predicts the fading statistics in the low-loss limit. This model provides the first physical explanation for the fitting parameters used in fading models. I have also applied the RCM to additional experimental wave properties of a complicated wave system, such as the impedance matrix, the scattering matrix, the variance ratio, and the thermopower. These predictions are significant for nuclear scattering, atomic physics, quantum transport in condensed matter systems, electromagnetics, acoustics, geophysics, etc.

  18. "Comments on Slavin": Through the Looking Glass--Experiments, Quasi-Experiments, and the Medical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, Finbarr

    2008-01-01

    Slavin (2008) has called for changing the criteria used for the inclusion of basic research in national research synthesis clearinghouses. The author of this article examines a number of the assumptions made by Slavin, provides critique with alternatives, and asks what it means to fully implement the medical model in educational settings.…

  19. MODELING AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR DOUBLE MODULATION PHOTO REFLECTANCE EXPERIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hernández

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an improved method to be used in double modulation photo reflectance experiments, inorder to reduce the influence of parasitic effects in the useful signal. The method uses the inner and outer sectionsof a single chopper disk to modulate the monochromator and the laser beam, eliminating the need of complexelectronic filters, and two additional PIN photodiodes for scattered light compensation. The method has beennumerically simulated using LabVIEW in order to investigate the influence of the modulator finite switching timeand the finite resolution of the digital acquisition system. Results show that a relative error less than 1% can beachieved.

  20. Supercritical extraction of carqueja essential oil: experiments and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. F. Vargas

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Baccharis trimera is a native Brazilian plant which has medicinal properties. In this work a method of supercritical extraction was studied to obtain the popularly essential oil from Baccharis trimera, known as carqueja. The aim was to obtain experimental data and to compare two mathematical models used in the simulation of carqueja (Baccharis trimera oil extraction by supercritical CO2. The two mathematical models are based on mass transfer. One of the models, proposed by Reverchon, is solved numerically and requires two adjustable parameters from the experimental data. The other model chosen is the one proposed by Sovová. This model is solved analytically and requires four adjustable parameters. Numerical results are presented and discussed for the adjusted parameters. The experimental results are obtained in a temperature range of 313.15 K to 343.15 K at 90 bar. The extraction yield of carqueja essential oil using supercritical carbon dioxide ranged between 1.72 % (w/w at 323.15 K and 2.34 % (w/w at 343.15 K, 90 bar with a CO2 flow rate of 3.34.10-8 m³/s for a 0.0015 kg sample of Baccharis trimera.

  1. Numerical modeling of centrifuge cyclic lateral pile load experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikos Gerolymos; Sandra Escoffer; George Gazetas; Jacques Gamier

    2009-01-01

    To gain insight into the inelastic behavior of piles, the response of a vertical pile embedded in dry sand and subjected to cyclic lateral loading was studied experimentally in centrifuge tests conducted in Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussees. Three types of cyclic loading were applied, two asymmetric and one symmetric with respect to the unloaded pile. An approximately square-root variation of soil stiffness with depth was obtained from indirect in-flight density measurements, laboratory tests on reconstituted samples, and well-established empirical correlations. The tests were simulated using a cyclic nonlinear Winkler spring model, which describes the full range of inelastic phenomena, including separation and re-attachment of the pile from and to the soil. The model consists of three mathematical expressions capable of reproducing a wide variety of monotonic and cyclic experimental p-y curves. The physical meaning of key model parameters is graphically explained and related to soil behavior. Comparisons with the centrifuge test results demonstrate the general validity of the model and its ability to capture several features of pile-soil interaction, including: soil plastification at an early stage of loading, "pinching" behavior due to the formation of a relaxation zone around the upper part of the pile, and stiffness and strength changes due to cyclic loading. A comparison of the p-y curves derived from the test results and the proposed model, as well as those from the classical curves of Reese et al. (1974) for sand, is also presented.

  2. Fracture and ductile vs. brittle behavior -- Theory, modeling and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltz, G.E. [ed.] [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Selinger, R.L.B. [ed.] [Catholic Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Kim, K.S. [ed.] [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Marder, M.P. [ed.] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1999-08-01

    The symposium brought together the many communities that investigate the fundamentals of fracture, with special emphasis on the ductile/brittle transition across a broad spectrum of material classes, fracture at interfaces, and modelling fracture over various length scales. Theoretical techniques discussed ranged from first-principles electronic structure theory to atomistic simulation to mesoscale and continuum theories, along with studies of fractals and scaling in fracture. Experimental and theoretical talks were interspersed throughout all sessions, rather than being segregated. The contributions to this volume generally follow the topical outline upon which the symposium was organized. The first part, dealing with ductile vs. brittle behavior in metals, concerns itself with investigations of high-strength steel, magnesium alloys, ordered intermetallics, and Fe-Cr-Al alloys. The development of analytical methods based on micromechanical models, such as dislocation mechanics and cohesive/contact zone models, are covered in a follow-up section. Nonmetals, including silicon, are considered in Parts 3 and 4. Fractals, chaos, and scaling theories are taken up in Part 5, with a special emphasis on fracture in heterogeneous solids. Modelling based on large populations of dislocations has substantially progressed during the past three years; hence, a section devoted to crystal plasticity and mesoscale dislocation modelling appears next. Finally, the technologically significant area of interfacial fracture, with applications to composites and intergranular fracture, is taken up in Part 7. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in this book.

  3. Statistical traffic modeling of MPEG frame size: Experiments and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haniph A. Latchman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available For guaranteed quality of service (QoS and sufficient bandwidth in a communication network which provides an integrated multimedia service, it is important to obtain an analytical and tractable model of the compressed MPEG data. This paper presents a statistical approach to a group of picture (GOP MPEG frame size model to increase network traffic performance in a communication network. We extract MPEG frame data from commercial DVD movies and make probability histograms to analyze the statistical characteristics of MPEG frame data. Six candidates of probability distributions are considered here and their parameters are obtained from the empirical data using the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE. This paper shows that the lognormal distribution is the best fitting model of MPEG-2 total frame data.

  4. The fence experiment — a first evaluation of shelter models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Alfredo; Bechmann, Andreas; Conti, Davide; Angelou, Nikolas; Mann, Jakob

    2016-09-01

    We present a preliminary evaluation of shelter models of different degrees of complexity using full-scale lidar measurements of the shelter on a vertical plane behind and orthogonal to a fence. Model results accounting for the distribution of the relative wind direction within the observed direction interval are in better agreement with the observations than those that correspond to the simulation at the center of the direction interval, particularly in the far-wake region, for six vertical levels up to two fence heights. Generally, the CFD results are in better agreement with the observations than those from two engineering-like obstacle models but the latter two follow well the behavior of the observations in the far-wake region.

  5. Nonlinear time reversal of classical waves: experiment and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Matthew; Taddese, Biniyam; Xiao, Bo; Antonsen, Thomas; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M

    2013-12-01

    We consider time reversal of electromagnetic waves in a closed, wave-chaotic system containing a discrete, passive, harmonic-generating nonlinearity. An experimental system is constructed as a time-reversal mirror, in which excitations generated by the nonlinearity are gathered, time-reversed, transmitted, and directed exclusively to the location of the nonlinearity. Here we show that such nonlinear objects can be purely passive (as opposed to the active nonlinearities used in previous work), and we develop a higher data rate exclusive communication system based on nonlinear time reversal. A model of the experimental system is developed, using a star-graph network of transmission lines, with one of the lines terminated by a model diode. The model simulates time reversal of linear and nonlinear signals, demonstrates features seen in the experimental system, and supports our interpretation of the experimental results.

  6. Hands-on experience with active appearance models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the performance of Active Appearance Models (AAMs) in reconstruction and interpretation of bones in hand radiographs. AAM is a generative approach that unifies image segmentation and image understanding. Initial locations for the AAM search are generated...... is used (1) to define a measure of fit that allows the models to self-evaluate and chose between the multiple found solutions, (2) to overcome obstacles in the image in the form of rings by predicting the missing part, and (3) to detect anomalies, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis. The shape scores are used...

  7. Designing experiments and analyzing data a model comparison perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Maxwell, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    Through this book's unique model comparison approach, students and researchers are introduced to a set of fundamental principles for analyzing data. After seeing how these principles can be applied in simple designs, students are shown how these same principles also apply in more complicated designs. Drs. Maxwell and Delaney believe that the model comparison approach better prepares students to understand the logic behind a general strategy of data analysis appropriate for various designs; and builds a stronger foundation, which allows for the introduction of more complex topics omitt

  8. Tapped granular column dynamics: simulations, experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, A. D.; Zuo, L.; Blackmore, D.; Wu, H.; Horntrop, D. J.; Parker, D. J.; Windows-Yule, C.

    2016-07-01

    This paper communicates the results of a synergistic investigation that initiates our long term research goal of developing a continuum model capable of predicting a variety of granular flows. We consider an ostensibly simple system consisting of a column of inelastic spheres subjected to discrete taps in the form of half sine wave pulses of amplitude a/ d and period τ . A three-pronged approach is used, consisting of discrete element simulations based on linear loading-unloading contacts, experimental validation, and preliminary comparisons with our continuum model in the form of an integro-partial differential equation.

  9. Forced thermal cycling of catalytic reactions: experiments and modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Thorsteinsson, Sune;

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies of catalytic reactions subjected to fast forced temperature oscillations have revealed a rate enhancement increasing with temperature oscillation frequency. We present detailed studies of the rate enhancement up to frequencies of 2.5 Hz. A maximum in the rate enhancement is observed...... at about 1 Hz. A model for the rate enhancement that includes the surface kinetics and the dynamic partial pressure variations in the reactor is introduced. The model predicts a levelling off of the rate enhancement with frequency at about 1 Hz. The experimentally observed decrease above 1 Hz is explained...... by dynamic thermal limitations of the reactor. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  10. The fence experiment - a first evaluation of shelter models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo; Bechmann, Andreas; Conti, Davide;

    2016-01-01

    We present a preliminary evaluation of shelter models of different degrees of complexity using full-scale lidar measurements of the shelter on a vertical plane behind and orthogonal to a fence. Model results accounting for the distribution of the relative wind direction within the observed...... direction interval are in better agreement with the observations than those that correspond to the simulation at the center of the direction interval, particularly in the far-wake region, for six vertical levels up to two fence heights. Generally, the CFD results are in better agreement...

  11. Design of Experiments for Factor Hierarchization in Complex Structure Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kasmi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Modelling the power-grid network is of fundamental interest to analyse the conducted propagation of unintentional and intentional electromagnetic interferences. The propagation is indeed highly influenced by the channel behaviour. In this paper, we investigate the effects of appliances and the position of cables in a low voltage network. First, the power-grid architecture is described. Then, the principle of Experimental Design is recalled. Next, the methodology is applied to power-grid modelling. Finally, we propose an analysis of the statistical moments of the experimental design results. Several outcomes are provided to describe the effects induced by parameter variability on the conducted propagation of spurious compromising emanations.

  12. Rogue waves in a wave tank: experiments and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lechuga

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In past decades theoretical studies have been carried out with the double aim of improving the knowledge of rogue wave main characteristics and of attempting to predict its sudden appearance. As an effort on this topic we tried the generation of rogue waves in a water wave tank using a symmetric spectrum (Akhmediev et al., 2011a as input on the wave maker. To go on further the next step has been to apply a theoretical model to the envelope of these waves. After some considerations the best model has been an analogue of the Ginzburg–Landau equation.

  13. A review of experiments testing the shoving model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Tina; Dyre, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    interval over which the relaxation time increases by ten to fifteen decades. In this paper we have compiled all tests of the shoving model known to us. These involve rheological data obtained by different techniques, high-frequency sound-wave data, neutron scattering data for the vibrational mean......According to the shoving model the non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of supercooled liquids' relaxation time (or viscosity) derives from the fact that the high-frequency shear modulus is temperature dependent in the supercooled phase, often increasing a factor of three or four in the temperature...

  14. Pyrolysis of 3-carene: Experiment, Theory and Modeling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Sharath; H K Chakravarty; K P J Reddy; P K Barhai; E Arunan

    2015-12-01

    Thermal decomposition studies of 3-carene, a bio-fuel, have been carried out behind the reflected shock wave in a single pulse shock tube for temperature ranging from 920 K to 1220 K. The observed products in thermal decomposition of 3-carene are acetylene, allene, butadiene, isoprene, cyclopentadiene, hexatriene, benzene, toluene and p-xylene. The overall rate constant for 3-carene decomposition was found to be $$\\text{k/s}^{−1} = 10^{(9.95±0.54)} \\text{exp}(−40.88 ± 2.71 \\text{kcal mol}^{−1}/\\text{RT}).$$ Ab-initio theoretical calculations were carried out to find the minimum energy pathway that could explain the formation of the observed products in the thermal decomposition experiments. These calculations were carried out at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and G3 level of theories. A kinetic mechanism explaining the observed products in the thermal decomposition experiments has been derived. It is concluded that the linear hydrocarbons are the primary products in the pyrolysis of 3-carene.

  15. Tapped granular column dynamics: simulations, experiments and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosato, A.D.; Zuo, L.; Blackmore, D.; Wu, H.; Horntrop, D.J.; Parker, D.J.; Windows-Yule, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper communicates the results of a synergistic investigation that initiates our long term research goal of developing a continuum model capable of predicting a variety of granular flows. We consider an ostensibly simple system consisting of a column of inelastic spheres subjected to discrete t

  16. Coalescence of Liquid Drops: Different Models Versus Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Sprittles, James

    2012-01-01

    The process of coalescence of two identical liquid drops is simulated numerically in the framework of two essentially different mathematical models, and the results are compared with experimental data on the very early stages of the coalescence process reported recently. The first model tested is the `conventional' one, where it is assumed that coalescence as the formation of a single body of fluid occurs by an instant appearance of a liquid bridge smoothly connecting the two drops, and the subsequent process is the evolution of this single body of fluid driven by capillary forces. The second model under investigation considers coalescence as a process where a section of the free surface becomes trapped between the bulk phases as the drops are pressed against each other, and it is the gradual disappearance of this `internal interface' that leads to the formation of a single body of fluid and the conventional model taking over. Using the full numerical solution of the problem in the framework of each of the tw...

  17. SCGE modelling in cost-benefit analysis: the Dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, C.; Oosterhaven, J.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial computable general equilibrium (SCGE) models offer opportunities for computing wider economic effects in cost-benefit analysis (CBA) in a theoretically satisfactory way. This is important for the correct estimation of additional economic benefits and international relocation impacts. In the

  18. Methane emissions from rice paddies : experiments and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis describes model development and experimentation on the comprehension and prediction of methane (CH 4 ) emissions from rice paddies. The large spatial and temporal variability in CH 4 emissions and the dynamic non-linear relationships

  19. Testing the HTA core model: experiences from two pilot projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternack, Iris; Anttila, Heidi; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2009-01-01

    coordination in timing and distribution of work would probably help improve applicability and avoid duplication of work. CONCLUSIONS: The HTA Core Model can be developed into a platform that enables and encourages true HTA collaboration in terms of distribution of work and maximum utilization of a common pool...

  20. Tutoring and Multi-Agent Systems: Modeling from Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennane, Abdellah

    2010-01-01

    Tutoring systems become complex and are offering varieties of pedagogical software as course modules, exercises, simulators, systems online or offline, for single user or multi-user. This complexity motivates new forms and approaches to the design and the modelling. Studies and research in this field introduce emergent concepts that allow the…

  1. Modelling Drug Administration Regimes for Asthma: A Romanian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andras, Szilard; Szilagyi, Judit

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we present a modelling activity, which was a part of the project DQME II (Developing Quality in Mathematics Education, for more details see http://www.dqime.uni-dortmund.de) and some general observations regarding the maladjustments and rational errors arising in such type of activities.

  2. Low resistive trasparent conductors with metallic grids : modeling and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Rendering, H.; Mannetje, H.H 't; Klerk, L.; Hovestad, A.

    2012-01-01

    At present, transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are still superior in performance to most other transparent conductors. Results on opto-electronic modeling and design optimization of TCOs are presented using a monolithically integrated CIGS cell configuration as case. For various cell dimensions an

  3. Metallic grids for low resistive transparent conductors: modeling and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Rendering, H.; Mannetje, H. het; Klerk, L.; Hovestad, A.

    2012-01-01

    At present, transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are still superior in performance to most other transparent conductors. Results on opto-electronic modeling and design optimization of TCOs are presented using a monolithically integrated CIGS cell configuration as case. For various cell dimensions an

  4. Performance in model transformations: experiments with ATL and QVT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amstel, Marcel; Bosems, S.; Ivanov, Ivan; Ferreira Pires, Luis; Cabot, Jordi; Visser, Eelco

    Model transformations are increasingly being incorporated in software development processes. However, as systems being developed with transformations grow in size and complexity, the performance of the transformations tends to degrade. In this paper we investigate the factors that have an impact on

  5. Experiences with the Capability Maturity Model in a research environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, van der M.J.; Vreke, J.; Wal, van der B.; Symons, A.

    1996-01-01

    The project described here was aimed at evaluating the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) in the context of a research organization. Part of the evaluation was a standard CMM assessment. It was found that CMM could be applied to a research organization, although its five maturity levels were considered

  6. Quantification of fungal growth: models, experiments, and observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamour, A.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the growth of microscopic mycelial fungi (Section I), and that of macroscopic fungi, which form specialised hyphal structures such as rhizomorphs (Section II). A growth model is developed in Section I in relation to soil organic matter decompos

  7. Elastic scattering of surface plasmon polaritons: Modeling and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Coello, V.

    1998-01-01

    excitation wavelengths (594 and 633 nm) and different metal (silver and gold) films. The near-field optical images obtained are related to the calculated SPP intensity distributions demonstrating that the model developed can be successfully used in studies of SPP elastic scattering, e.g., to design...

  8. Enhacing CRM Business Intelligence Applications by Web User Experience Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natheer K. Gharaibeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available several trends are emerging in the field of CRM technology which promises a brighter future of more profitable customers and decreasing costs. One of the most critical trends is enhancing Business Intelligence applications using Web Technologies, Web technologies can improve the CRM BI implementation, but it still need evaluation, The Web has focused the attention of organizations towards the User Experience and the need to learn about their customer, The UX paradigm calls for enhancing CRMBI by Web technologies. This paper deals with this issue and provide a framework for building Web based CRMBI depending on the Process mapping between CRMBI and UX. It provides a conceptual overview of CRM and its relationship to the main disciplines BI, UX and Web.

  9. Little Earth Experiment: an instrument to model planetary cores

    CERN Document Server

    Aujogue, Kelig; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  10. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  11. OO Software and DataModel of AMS Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VitaliChoutko; AlexeiKlimentov

    2001-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer(AMS)is an experiment to search in space for dark matter,missing matter and antimatter scheduled for installation on the International SPace Station(ISS) Alpha.AMS detector had precursive flight in June 1998 on board the space shuttle Discovery during STS91,More than 100M events been collected and analyzed.The detector will have another flight in the fall of year 2003 for more than three years on ISS.The data will be transmitted from ISS to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center(Huntsvile,Alabama)and then to MIT and CERN for processing and analysis,In this report we describe AMS software in particular conditions database and data processing software.

  12. Tunnel fire testing and modeling the Morgex North tunnel experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Borghetti, Fabio; Gandini, Paolo; Frassoldati, Alessio; Tavelli, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This book aims to cast light on all aspects of tunnel fires, based on experimental activities and theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. In particular, the authors describe a transient full-scale fire test (~15 MW), explaining how they designed and performed the experimental activity inside the Morgex North tunnel in Italy. The entire organization of the experiment is described, from preliminary evaluations to the solutions found for management of operational difficulties and safety issues. This fire test allowed the collection of different measurements (temperature, air velocity, smoke composition, pollutant species) useful for validating and improving CFD codes and for testing the real behavior of the tunnel and its safety systems during a diesel oil fire with a significant heat release rate. Finally, the fire dynamics are compared with empirical correlations, CFD simulations, and literature measurements obtained in other similar tunnel fire tests. This book will be of interest to all ...

  13. Using the Bifocal Modeling Framework to Resolve "Discrepant Events" between Physical Experiments and Virtual Models in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikstein, Paulo; Fuhrmann, Tamar; Salehi, Shima

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate an approach to supporting students' learning in science through a combination of physical experimentation and virtual modeling. We present a study that utilizes a scientific inquiry framework, which we call "bifocal modeling," to link student-designed experiments and computer models in real time. In this…

  14. Lack of blinding of outcome assessors in animal model experiments implies risk of observer bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bello, Segun; Krogsbøll, Lasse T; Gruber, Jan

    2014-01-01

    and caused by three pesticides experiments with very large observer bias, pooled ROR was 0.20 (95% CI, 0.07, 0.59) in contrast to the pooled ROR in the other seven experiments, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.57, 1.17). CONCLUSION: Lack of blinding of outcome assessors in animal model experiments with subjective outcomes......OBJECTIVES: To examine the impact of not blinding outcome assessors on estimates of intervention effects in animal experiments modeling human clinical conditions. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We searched PubMed, Biosis, Google Scholar, and HighWire Press and included animal model experiments with both...... blinded and nonblinded outcome assessors. For each experiment, we calculated the ratio of odds ratios (ROR), that is, the odds ratio (OR) from nonblinded assessments relative to the corresponding OR from blinded assessments. We standardized the ORs according to the experimental hypothesis...

  15. The human operator in manual preview tracking /an experiment and its modeling via optimal control/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizuka, M.; Whitney, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    A manual preview tracking experiment and its results are presented. The preview drastically improves the tracking performance compared to zero-preview tracking. Optimal discrete finite preview control is applied to determine the structure of a mathematical model of the manual preview tracking experiment. Variable parameters in the model are adjusted to values which are consistent to the published data in manual control. The model with the adjusted parameters is found to be well correlated to the experimental results.

  16. EXPERIENCE WITH SYNCHRONOUS GENERATOR MODEL USING PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.RATHIKA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to the modeling of polyphase synchronous generator and minimization of power losses using Particle swarm optimization (PSO technique with a constriction factor. Usage of Polyphase synchronous generator mainly leads to the total power circulation in the system which can be distributed in all phases. Another advantage of polyphase system is the fault at one winding does not lead to the system shutdown. The Process optimization is the chastisement of adjusting a process so as to optimize some stipulated set of parameters without violating some constraint. Accurate value can be extracted using PSO and it can be reformulated. Modeling and simulation of the machine is executed. MATLAB/Simulink has been cast-off to implement and validate the result.

  17. Light scattering by neutrophils: model, simulation, and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Darya Yu; Yurkin, Maxim A; Hoekstra, Alfons G; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2008-01-01

    We studied the elastic light-scattering properties of human blood neutrophils, both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental study was performed with a scanning flow cytometer measuring the light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual cells over an angular range of 5-60 deg. We determined the absolute differential light-scattering cross sections of neutrophils. We also proposed an optical model for a neutrophil as a sphere filled by small spheres and prolate spheroids that correspond to granules and segmented nucleus, respectively. This model was used in simulations of LSPs using the discrete dipole approximation and different compositions of internal organelles. A comparison of experimentally measured and simulated LSPs gives a good qualitative agreement in LSP shape and quantitative agreement in overall magnitude of the differential light-scattering cross section.

  18. Modeling and simulation for phase coarsening: A comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K. G.; Glicksman, M. E.; Rajan, K.

    2004-06-01

    The phase coarsening of precipitates is modeled in the framework of Debye-Hückel theory. The interactions observed among a population of precipitates dispersed throughout a matrix can be described by diffusion screening. The relationship between the maximum particle radius and the volume fraction of the phases is established, and the rate of coarsening is related to the volume fraction and the self-similar particle size distribution. We simulated the dynamics of late-stage phase separation using multiparticle diffusion methods. Experimental measurements on the rates of coarsening of δ' ( Al3 Li) precipitates in binary Al-Li alloys are compared with our results using modeling and simulation. The theoretically predicted particle size distributions and the maximum radius expected for particles in the microstructure agree well with recent experimental results.

  19. Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several years, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has engaged in the design and development of an experimental research facility to investigate the use of diagonalized crossed-field magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerators as a possible thrust augmentation device for thermal propulsion systems. In support of this effort, a three-dimensional numerical MHD model has been developed for the purpose of analyzing and optimizing accelerator performance and to aid in understanding critical underlying physical processes and nonideal effects. This Technical Memorandum fully summarizes model development efforts and presents the results of pretest performance optimization analyses. These results indicate that the MHD accelerator should utilize a 45deg diagonalization angle with the applied current evenly distributed over the first five inlet electrode pairs. When powered at 100 A, this configuration is expected to yield a 50% global efficiency with an 80% increase in axial velocity and a 50% increase in centerline total pressure.

  20. Vocabulary and Experiences to Develop a Center of Mass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaar, Taylor; Pollack, Linda B.; Lerner, Michael E.; Engels, Robert J.

    2017-10-01

    The use of systems in many introductory courses is limited and often implicit. Modeling two or more objects as a system and tracking the center of mass of that system is usually not included. Thinking in terms of the center of mass facilitates problem solving while exposing the importance of using conservation laws. We present below three laboratory activities that build this systems thinking for introductory physics students.

  1. Brain Neuroendoscopy: Experience in Experimental Models and Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez Peña, Carlos; Departamento de Neurocirugía Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen EsSALUD Lima, Perú; Rocca, Uldarico; Departamento de Neurocirugía Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen EsSALUD Lima, Perú; Rosell, Pío; Departamento de Neurocirugía Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen EsSALUD Lima, Perú; Ramos, Aurora; Departamento de Neurocirugía Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen EsSALUD Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental models (EM) design to acquire brain neuroendoscopy (BNE) skill to be applied on patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Study performed in three phases. For the first two -design and training- we used bovine and human coipses randomly assigned to groups A and B according to physiological sodium chloride solution (SCS) volume needed to produce satisfactory hydrocephalus to perform BNE. During phase three, BNE was performed in 5 patients with brain pathology confirmed by CAT or ...

  2. EXPERIENCE WITH SYNCHRONOUS GENERATOR MODEL USING PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    N.RATHIKA; Dr.A.Senthil kumar; A.ANUSUYA

    2014-01-01

    This paper intends to the modeling of polyphase synchronous generator and minimization of power losses using Particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique with a constriction factor. Usage of Polyphase synchronous generator mainly leads to the total power circulation in the system which can be distributed in all phases. Another advantage of polyphase system is the fault at one winding does not lead to the system shutdown. The Process optimization is the chastisement of adjusting a process so as...

  3. Methane variations on orbital timescales: a transient modeling experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Y. M. Konijnendijk

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 variations on orbital timescales are often associated with variations in wetland coverage, most notably in the summer monsoon areas of the Northern Hemisphere. Here we test this assumption by simulating orbitally forced variations in global wetland emissions, using a simple wetland distribution and CH4 emissions model that has been run on the output of a climate model (CLIMBER-2 containing atmosphere, ocean and vegetation components. The transient climate modeling simulation extends over the last 650 000 yr and includes variations in land-ice distribution and greenhouse gases. Tropical temperature and global vegetation are found to be the dominant controls for global CH4 emissions and therefore atmospheric concentrations. The relative importance of wetland coverage, vegetation coverage, and emission temperatures depends on the specific climatic zone (boreal, tropics and Indian/Asian monsoon area and timescale (precession, obliquity and glacial-interglacial timescales. Despite the low spatial resolution of the climate model and crude parameterizations for methane production and release, simulated variations in CH4 emissions agree well with those in measured concentrations, both in their time series and spectra. The simulated lags between emissions and orbital forcing also show close agreement with those found in measured data, both on the precession and obliquity timescale. We find causal links between atmospheric CH4 concentrations and tropical temperatures and global vegetation, but only covariance between monsoon precipitation and CH4 concentrations. The primary importance of the first two factors explains the lags found in the CH4 record from ice cores. Simulation of the dynamical vegetation response to climate variation on orbital timescales would be needed to reduce the uncertainty in these preliminary attributions.

  4. Experiments in Error Propagation within Hierarchal Combat Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    and variances of Blue MTTK, Red MTTK, and P[Blue Wins] by Experimental Design are statistically different (Wackerly, Mendenhall III and Schaeffer...2008). Although the data is not normally distributed, the t-test is robust to non-normality (Wackerly, Mendenhall III and Schaeffer 2008). There is...this is handled by transforming the predicted values with a natural logarithm (Wackerly, Mendenhall III and Schaeffer 2008). The model considers

  5. MODELLING CONSUMERS' DEMAND FOR ORGANIC FOOD PRODUCTS: THE SWEDISH EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Manuchehr Irandoust

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to examine a few factors characterizing consumer preferences and behavior towards organic food products in the south of Sweden using a proportional odds model which captures the natural ordering of dependent variables and any inherent nonlinearities. The findings show that consumer's choice for organic food depends on perceived benefits of organic food (environment, health, and quality) and consumer's perception and attitudes towards labelling system, message framing, and ...

  6. Integrated modeling of cryogenic layered highfoot experiments at the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritcher, A. L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Clark, D.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Haan, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Landen, O.; Ma, T.; Meezan, N.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

    2016-05-15

    Integrated radiation hydrodynamic modeling in two dimensions, including the hohlraum and capsule, of layered cryogenic HighFoot Deuterium-Tritium (DT) implosions on the NIF successfully predicts important data trends. The model consists of a semi-empirical fit to low mode asymmetries and radiation drive multipliers to match shock trajectories, one dimensional inflight radiography, and time of peak neutron production. Application of the model across the HighFoot shot series, over a range of powers, laser energies, laser wavelengths, and target thicknesses predicts the neutron yield to within a factor of two for most shots. The Deuterium-Deuterium ion temperatures and the DT down scattered ratios, ratio of (10–12)/(13–15) MeV neutrons, roughly agree with data at peak fuel velocities <340 km/s and deviate at higher peak velocities, potentially due to flows and neutron scattering differences stemming from 3D or capsule support tent effects. These calculations show a significant amount alpha heating, 1–2.5× for shots where the experimental yield is within a factor of two, which has been achieved by increasing the fuel kinetic energy. This level of alpha heating is consistent with a dynamic hot spot model that is matched to experimental data and as determined from scaling of the yield with peak fuel velocity. These calculations also show that low mode asymmetries become more important as the fuel velocity is increased, and that improving these low mode asymmetries can result in an increase in the yield by a factor of several.

  7. Integrated modeling of cryogenic layered highfoot experiments at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritcher, A. L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Clark, D.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Haan, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Landen, O.; Ma, T.; Meezan, N.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S.; Spears, B.; Springer, P. T.; Thomas, C. A.; Town, R.; Celliers, P. M.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Integrated radiation hydrodynamic modeling in two dimensions, including the hohlraum and capsule, of layered cryogenic HighFoot Deuterium-Tritium (DT) implosions on the NIF successfully predicts important data trends. The model consists of a semi-empirical fit to low mode asymmetries and radiation drive multipliers to match shock trajectories, one dimensional inflight radiography, and time of peak neutron production. Application of the model across the HighFoot shot series, over a range of powers, laser energies, laser wavelengths, and target thicknesses predicts the neutron yield to within a factor of two for most shots. The Deuterium-Deuterium ion temperatures and the DT down scattered ratios, ratio of (10-12)/(13-15) MeV neutrons, roughly agree with data at peak fuel velocities <340 km/s and deviate at higher peak velocities, potentially due to flows and neutron scattering differences stemming from 3D or capsule support tent effects. These calculations show a significant amount alpha heating, 1-2.5× for shots where the experimental yield is within a factor of two, which has been achieved by increasing the fuel kinetic energy. This level of alpha heating is consistent with a dynamic hot spot model that is matched to experimental data and as determined from scaling of the yield with peak fuel velocity. These calculations also show that low mode asymmetries become more important as the fuel velocity is increased, and that improving these low mode asymmetries can result in an increase in the yield by a factor of several.

  8. Calibration of a finite element composite delamination model by experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaiotti, M.; Rizzo, C.M.; Branner, Kim;

    2013-01-01

    distinct sub-laminates. The work focuses on experimental validation of a finite element model built using the 9-noded MITC9 shell elements, which prevent locking effects and aiming to capture the highly non linear buckling features involved in the problem. The geometry has been numerically defined...... modes related to the production methods is presented in this paper. A microscopic analysis of the fracture surfaces was carried out in order to better understand the failure mechanisms. © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group....

  9. Mechanics of neutrophil phagocytosis: experiments and quantitative models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herant, Marc; Heinrich, Volkmar; Dembo, Micah

    2006-05-01

    To quantitatively characterize the mechanical processes that drive phagocytosis, we observed the FcgammaR-driven engulfment of antibody-coated beads of diameters 3 mum to 11 mum by initially spherical neutrophils. In particular, the time course of cell morphology, of bead motion and of cortical tension were determined. Here, we introduce a number of mechanistic models for phagocytosis and test their validity by comparing the experimental data with finite element computations for multiple bead sizes. We find that the optimal models involve two key mechanical interactions: a repulsion or pressure between cytoskeleton and free membrane that drives protrusion, and an attraction between cytoskeleton and membrane newly adherent to the bead that flattens the cell into a thin lamella. Other models such as cytoskeletal expansion or swelling appear to be ruled out as main drivers of phagocytosis because of the characteristics of bead motion during engulfment. We finally show that the protrusive force necessary for the engulfment of large beads points towards storage of strain energy in the cytoskeleton over a large distance from the leading edge ( approximately 0.5 microm), and that the flattening force can plausibly be generated by the known concentrations of unconventional myosins at the leading edge.

  10. Aluminum Laminates in Beverage Packaging: Models and Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Bolzon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum laminates are among the main components of beverage packaging. These layered material systems are coupled to paperboard plies except in the cap opening area, where the human force limit sets a requirement on the material properties to allow open-ability and the mechanical characteristics are of particular interest. Experimental investigations have been carried out on this composite and on its components by either traditional or full-field measurement techniques. The interpretation of the collected data has been supported by the simulation of the performed tests considering either a homogenized material model or the individual laminate layers. However, different results may be recovered from similar samples due to physical factors like the material processing route and the embedded defectiveness. In turn, the conclusions may vary depending on the model assumptions. This contribution focuses on the physical effects and on the modeling of the large localized deformation induced by material singularities. This topic is discussed at the light of some experimental results.

  11. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of nanocrystalline zinc oxide: Experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosni, Mongia [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, 99 av. J.B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Farhat, Samir, E-mail: farhat@lspm.cnrs.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, 99 av. J.B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Schoenstein, Frederic; Karmous, Farah; Jouini, Noureddine [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, 99 av. J.B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Viana, Bruno [LCMCP Chimie-Paristech, UPMC, Collège de France, 11 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Mgaidi, Arbi [Laboratoire de chimie minérale industrielle université Tunis el Manar (Tunisia)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • ZnO nanospheres and nanowires were grown using ultrasound and thermal activation techniques. • The growth uses forced hydrolysis of zinc acetate in diethylene glycol (DEG). • A thermochemical model was developed based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. • We estimate species distribution in the bubble in temperature range from 5000 K to ambient. • We propose a new mechanism for ZnO growth assisted by ultrasound irradiation. - Abstract: A fast and green approach is proposed for the preparation of nanocrystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) via ultrasonic (US) irradiation in polyol medium. The process uses forced hydrolysis of zinc acetate in diethylene glycol (DEG). The protocol is compared to thermal activation under the same chemical environment. The activation method is found to be playing a critical role in the selective synthesis of morphologically distinct nanostructures. As compared to thermally activated conventional polyol process, (US) permits to considerably reduce reaction time as well as size of particles. In addition, the shape of these nanoparticles was changed from long nanowires to small nanospheres, indicating different reaction mechanisms. To explain this difference, a thermochemical model was developed based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. The model estimate species distribution in the bubble in temperature range from 5000 K to ambient simulating quenching process during bubble formation and collapse. Our results indicate the presence of high density of zinc atoms that could be responsible of a high density of nucleation as compared to thermal activation.

  12. COS hydrolysis in the presence of oxygen: Experiment and modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Shudong Wang; Quan Yuan; Guanzhong Lu

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of COS hydrolysis on Al2O3, with fouling of catalyst, has been developed. Kinetic studies were carried out in a fixed bed reactor under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (40-70 °C). The effects of the COS inlet concentration, temperature, and relative humidity were analyzed. Experimental results of breakthrough curves were used to obtain kinetic parameters, which accounted for effects of S deposition on the inner-face of the catalyst. The model described the experimental breakthrough curves satisfactorily and well explained the performance of COS hydrolysis in the presence of oxygen. The exothermic heat of adsorption and activation energy, assuming Arrhenius type of temperature dependence of the equilibrium constant, were determined. Activation energy of COS hydrolysis and H2S oxidation were 35.9 kJ/mol, 19.6 kJ/mol; adsorption heat of H2O and H2S on AI2O3 were 45.1 and 60.1 kJ/mol respectively. Deactivation coefficient (a) was used to quantify the behavior of COS hydrolysis at different operating conditions. The effect of relative humidity on a is significant in the relative humidity range under study. Experimental data accorded well with model data in the studied range.

  13. A model for successful research partnerships: a New Brunswick experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamlyn, Karen; Creelman, Helen; Fisher, Garfield

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of a partnership model used to conduct a research study entitled "Needs of patients with cancer and their family members in New Brunswick Health Region 3 (NBHR3)" (Tamlyn-Leaman, Creelman, & Fisher, 1997). This partial replication study carried out by the three authors between 1995 and 1997 was a needs assessment, adapted with permission from previous work by Fitch, Vachon, Greenberg, Saltmarche, and Franssen (1993). In order to conduct a comprehensive needs assessment with limited resources, a partnership between academic, public, and private sectors was established. An illustration of this partnership is presented in the model entitled "A Client-Centred Partnership Model." The operations of this partnership, including the strengths, the perceived benefits, lessons learned by each partner, the barriers, and the process for conflict resolution, are described. A summary of the cancer care initiatives undertaken by NBHR3, which were influenced directly or indirectly by the recommendations from this study, is included.

  14. A First Test of the Framed Standard Model against Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bordes, J; Tsou, ST

    2014-01-01

    The framed standard model (FSM) is obtained from the standard model by incorporating, as field variables, the frame vectors (vielbeins) in internal symmetry space. It gives the standard Higgs boson and 3 generations of quarks and leptons as immediate consequences. It gives moreover a fermion mass matrix of the form: $m = m_T \\alpha \\alpha^\\dagger$, where $\\alpha$ is a vector in generation space independent of the fermion species and rotating with changing scale, which has already been shown to lead, generically, to up-down mixing, neutrino oscillations and mass hierarchy. In this paper, pushing the FSM further, one first derives to 1-loop order the RGE for the rotation of $\\alpha$, and then applies it to fit mass and mixing data as a first test of the model. With 7 real adjustable parameters, 18 measured quantities are fitted, most (12) to within experimental error or to better than 0.5 percent, and the rest (6) not far off. (A summary of this fit can be found in Table 2 in the text.) Two notable features, bo...

  15. A primary care Web-based Intervention Modeling Experiment replicated behavior changes seen in earlier paper-based experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Treweek, S.; Francis, JJ; Bonetti, D; Barnett, K; Eccles, MP; Hudson, J.; Jones, C.; Pitts, NB; Ricketts, IW; Sullivan, F; Weal, M; MacLennan, G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Intervention Modeling Experiments (IMEs) are a way of developing and testing behavior change interventions before a trial. We aimed to test this methodology in a Web-based IME that replicated the trial component of an earlier, paper-based IME. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Three-arm, Web-based randomized evaluation of two interventions (persuasive communication and action plan) and a "no intervention" comparator. The interventions were designed to reduce the number of antibiotic p...

  16. Modeling and Depletion Simulations for a High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle with a Representative Experiment Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Betzler, Ben [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Hirtz, Gregory John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Sunny, Eva [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a high-fidelity VESTA/MCNP High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core model that features a new, representative experiment loading. This model, which represents the current, high-enriched uranium fuel core, will serve as a reference for low-enriched uranium conversion studies, safety-basis calculations, and other research activities. A new experiment loading model was developed to better represent current, typical experiment loadings, in comparison to the experiment loading included in the model for Cycle 400 (operated in 2004). The new experiment loading model for the flux trap target region includes full length 252Cf production targets, 75Se production capsules, 63Ni production capsules, a 188W production capsule, and various materials irradiation targets. Fully loaded 238Pu production targets are modeled in eleven vertical experiment facilities located in the beryllium reflector. Other changes compared to the Cycle 400 model are the high-fidelity modeling of the fuel element side plates and the material composition of the control elements. Results obtained from the depletion simulations with the new model are presented, with a focus on time-dependent isotopic composition of irradiated fuel and single cycle isotope production metrics.

  17. Homeostatic role of heterosynaptic plasticity: models and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakova, Marina; Bannon, Nicholas M.; Chen, Jen-Yung; Bazhenov, Maxim; Volgushev, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    Homosynaptic Hebbian-type plasticity provides a cellular mechanism of learning and refinement of connectivity during development in a variety of biological systems. In this review we argue that a complimentary form of plasticity—heterosynaptic plasticity—represents a necessary cellular component for homeostatic regulation of synaptic weights and neuronal activity. The required properties of a homeostatic mechanism which acutely constrains the runaway dynamics imposed by Hebbian associative plasticity have been well-articulated by theoretical and modeling studies. Such mechanism(s) should robustly support the stability of operation of neuronal networks and synaptic competition, include changes at non-active synapses, and operate on a similar time scale to Hebbian-type plasticity. The experimentally observed properties of heterosynaptic plasticity have introduced it as a strong candidate to fulfill this homeostatic role. Subsequent modeling studies which incorporate heterosynaptic plasticity into model neurons with Hebbian synapses (utilizing an STDP learning rule) have confirmed its ability to robustly provide stability and competition. In contrast, properties of homeostatic synaptic scaling, which is triggered by extreme and long lasting (hours and days) changes of neuronal activity, do not fit two crucial requirements for a hypothetical homeostatic mechanism needed to provide stability of operation in the face of on-going synaptic changes driven by Hebbian-type learning rules. Both the trigger and the time scale of homeostatic synaptic scaling are fundamentally different from those of the Hebbian-type plasticity. We conclude that heterosynaptic plasticity, which is triggered by the same episodes of strong postsynaptic activity and operates on the same time scale as Hebbian-type associative plasticity, is ideally suited to serve a homeostatic role during on-going synaptic plasticity. PMID:26217218

  18. Homeostatic role of heterosynaptic plasticity: Models and experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eChistiakova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Homosynaptic Hebbian-type plasticity provides a cellular mechanism of learning and refinement of connectivity during development in a variety of biological systems. In this review we argue that a complimentary form of plasticity - heterosynaptic plasticity - represents a necessary cellular component for homeostatic regulation of synaptic weights and neuronal activity. The required properties of a homeostatic mechanism which acutely constrains the runaway dynamics imposed by Hebbian associative plasticity have been well-articulated by theoretical and modeling studies. Such mechanism(s should robustly support the stability of operation of neuronal networks and synaptic competition, include changes at non-active synapses, and operate on a similar time scale to Hebbian-type plasticity. The experimentally observed properties of heterosynaptic plasticity have introduced it as a strong candidate to fulfill this homeostatic role. Subsequent modeling studies which incorporate heterosynaptic plasticity into model neurons with Hebbian synapses (utilizing an STDP learning rule have confirmed its ability to robustly provide stability and competition. In contrast, properties of homeostatic synaptic scaling, which is triggered by extreme and long lasting (hours and days changes of neuronal activity, do not fit two crucial requirements for a hypothetical homeostatic mechanism needed to provide stability of operation in the face of on-going synaptic changes driven by Hebbian-type learning rules. Both the trigger and the time scale of homeostatic synaptic scaling are fundamentally different from those of the Hebbian-type plasticity. We conclude that heterosynaptic plasticity, which is triggered by the same episodes of strong postsynaptic activity and operates on the same time scale as Hebbian-type associative plasticity, is ideally suited to serve homeostatic role during on-going synaptic plasticity.

  19. Twenty years of experience with the rabbit model, a versatile model for tracheal transplantation research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Margot Den Hondt; Bart M Vanaudenaerde; Pierre Delaere; Jan J Vranckx

    2016-01-01

    Pathologies comprising more than half the length of the trachea are a challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Innovative tracheal transplantation techniques aim to offer the patient a curative solution with a sustained improvement in quality of life. This review summarizes the authors’ experience with the rabbit as a versatile model for research regarding tracheal transplantation. Because of the segmental blood supply of the trachea, it is not feasible to transplant the organ together with a well-defined vascular pedicle. As such, the key element of successful tracheal transplantation is the creation of a new blood supply. This vascularized construct is created by prelaminating the rabbit trachea heterotopically, within the lateral thoracic fascia. After prelamination, the construct and its vascular pedicle are transferred to the orthotopic position in the neck. This model has become gold standard because of the advantages of working with rabbits, the anatomy of the rabbit trachea, and the reliability of the lateral thoracic artery flap. In this paper, the key elements of surgery in the rabbit are discussed, as well as the tracheal anastomosis and the harvest of the lateral thoracic artery flap. Practical tips and tricks are presented. The data described in this review represent the fundaments of ongoing translational research in the center over the past twenty years.

  20. On Slip Transmission Criteria in Experiments and Crystal Plasticity Models

    CERN Document Server

    Bayerschen, E; Reddy, B D; Böhlke, T

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive overview is given on the slip transmission criteria for grain boundaries in the experimental literature, with a focus on slip system and grain boundary orientation. The use of these geometric criteria in continuum crystal plasticity models is briefly discussed. Perspectives on additional experimentally motivated criteria used in computational simulations are given. The theoretical framework of Gurtin (2008, J. Mech. Phys. Solids 56, p. 640) is reviewed for the single slip case with the aim of showing explicitly the connections to the experimentally developed criteria for slip transmission that are not discussed in the work itself.

  1. Modeling of taxi drivers’ experience for routing applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAW; ShihLung

    2010-01-01

    Taxi drivers drive on the roads every day and become very knowledgeable of the spatiotemporal traffic patterns in a city.It therefore is reasonable to assume that the routes chosen by taxi drivers often work out better than those selected by other drivers.Since dynamic navigation assistance based on real-time traffic information faces limitations such as the spatial coverage of real-time data collection sites,performance of real-time data processing and communications,and accuracy of short-term traffic forecasts in a large urban area,experiences gained by taxi drivers can be a valuable data source for improving the quality of vehicle navigation guidance.This paper develops a vehicle navigation guidance system based on taxis drivers’ knowledge derived from floating car data collected over an extended time period.We then classify road segments based on the spatiotemporal characteristics of taxi tracking data.A case study using taxi tracking data collected in Wuhan,China is presented in this paper to demonstrate the performance of this vehicle navigation system based on taxi tracking data.

  2. Modeling ultrafast shadowgraphy in laser-plasma interaction experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Siminos, E; Sävert, A; Cole, J M; Mangles, S P D; Kaluza, M C

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast shadowgraphy is a new experimental technique that uses few cycle laser pulses to image density gradients in a rapidly evolving plasma. It enables structures that move at speeds close to the speed of light, such as laser driven wakes, to be visualized. Here we study the process of shadowgraphic image formation during the propagation of a few cycle probe pulse transversely through a laser-driven wake using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. In order to construct synthetic shadowgrams a near-field snapshot of the ultrashort probe pulse is analyzed by means of Fourier optics, taking into account the effect of a typical imaging setup. By comparing synthetic and experimental shadowgrams we show that the generation of synthetic data is crucial for the correct interpretation of experiments. Moreover, we study the dependence of synthetic shadowgrams on various parameters such as the imaging system aperture, the position of the object plane and the probe pulse delay, duration and wavelength. Fina...

  3. Numerical modeling of oxygen exclusion experiments of anaerobic bioventing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihopoulos, Philip G.; Suidan, Makram T.; Sayles, Gregory D.; Kaskassian, Sebastien

    2002-10-01

    A numerical and experimental study of transport phenomena underlying anaerobic bioventing (ABV) is presented. Understanding oxygen exclusion patterns in vadose zone environments is important in designing an ABV process for bioremediation of soil contaminated with chlorinated solvents. In particular, the establishment of an anaerobic zone of influence by nitrogen injection in the vadose zone is investigated. Oxygen exclusion experiments are performed in a pilot scale flow cell (2×1.1×0.1 m) using different venting flows and two different outflow boundary conditions (open and partially covered). Injection gas velocities are varied from 0.25×10 -3 to 1.0×10 -3 cm/s and are correlated with the ABV radius of influence. Numerical simulations are used to predict the collected experimental data. In general, reasonable agreement is found between observed and predicted oxygen concentrations. Use of impervious covers can significantly reduce the volume of forcing gas used, where an increase in oxygen exclusion efficiency is consistent with a decrease in the outflow area above the injection well.

  4. Using 4P Marketing Model in Academic Libraries: An Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Alipour Hafezi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study mainly aims to demonstrate the weaknesses and strengths of using marketing principles in academic libraries and finally presenting some important suggestions in order to improve their marketing. This study proceeds through expressing the current marketing situation of studied academic libraries from the view point of 4P model. In this regard, the current situation is analyzed using a researcher-made questionnaire, and then the problems and shortcomings are highlighted in the field of marketing in the view point of 4P model which in turn enables us to introduce suggestions to overcome them. This research indicates that marketing principles in the studied libraries are not in a good state. The situation of product dimension is a bit farther up middle state (3.23. Also, the Place dimension with total average of 2.97, Promotion dimension with total average of 2.63 and finally the Price dimension with total average of 1.59 are below the middle state. Therefore, trying to make a good plan in marketing in the four mentioned dimensions is essential for studied academic libraries. Improving academic libraries' statement needs identifying their current situation in the view point of marketing. Consequently, this research studied the current situation of Isfahan governmental academic libraries in order to identify their weaknesses and suggest sufficient suggestions to cover them.

  5. The experiment of monthly mean circulation prediction using the analogy-dynamical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Ming; NI Yunqi; CHOU Jifan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the past related research work, a new analogy-dynamical monthly prediction model is established with the operational dynamic extended-range forecast model T63L16 (hereafter T63) as a dynamic kernel. The monthly mean circulation prediction with T63 is considered as a control experiment, and the prediction with the analogy-dynamical model as a contrast one. It is found that the analogy-dynamical model has more precise forecast skill than the T63 model through monthly mean numerical prediction experiment.

  6. Assembly and mechanosensory function of focal adhesions: experiments and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershadsky, Alexander D; Ballestrem, Christoph; Carramusa, Letizia; Zilberman, Yuliya; Gilquin, Benoit; Khochbin, Saadi; Alexandrova, Antonina Y; Verkhovsky, Alexander B; Shemesh, Tom; Kozlov, Michael M

    2006-04-01

    Initial integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions (focal complexes) appear underneath the lamellipodia, in the regions of the "fast" centripetal flow driven by actin polymerization. Once formed, these adhesions convert the flow behind them into a "slow", myosin II-driven mode. Some focal complexes then turn into elongated focal adhesions (FAs) associated with contractile actomyosin bundles (stress fibers). Myosin II inhibition does not suppress formation of focal complexes but blocks their conversion into mature FAs and further FA growth. Application of external pulling force promotes FA growth even under conditions when myosin II activity is blocked. Thus, individual FAs behave as mechanosensors responding to the application of force by directional assembly. We proposed a thermodynamic model for the mechanosensitivity of FAs, taking into account that an elastic molecular aggregate subject to pulling forces tends to grow in the direction of force application by incorporating additional subunits. This simple model can explain a variety of processes typical of FA behavior. Assembly of FAs is triggered by the small G-protein Rho via activation of two major targets, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and the formin homology protein, Dia1. ROCK controls creation of myosin II-driven forces, while Dia1 is involved in the response of FAs to these forces. Expression of the active form of Dia1, allows the external force-induced assembly of mature FAs, even in conditions when Rho is inhibited. Conversely, downregulation of Dia1 by siRNA prevents FA maturation even if Rho is activated. Dia1 and other formins cap barbed (fast growing) ends of actin filaments, allowing insertion of the new actin monomers. We suggested a novel mechanism of such "leaky" capping based on an assumption of elasticity of the formin/barbed end complex. Our model predicts that formin-mediated actin polymerization should be greatly enhanced by application of external pulling force. Thus, the formin-actin complex

  7. MODELLING CONSUMERS' DEMAND FOR ORGANIC FOOD PRODUCTS: THE SWEDISH EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuchehr Irandoust

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to examine a few factors characterizing consumer preferences and behavior towards organic food products in the south of Sweden using a proportional odds model which captures the natural ordering of dependent variables and any inherent nonlinearities. The findings show that consumer's choice for organic food depends on perceived benefits of organic food (environment, health, and quality and consumer's perception and attitudes towards labelling system, message framing, and local origin. In addition, high willingness to pay and income level will increase the probability to buy organic food, while the cultural differences and socio-demographic characteristics have no effect on consumer behaviour and attitudes towards organic food products. Policy implications are offered.

  8. The new JET phased ICRH array: first experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bures, M.; Bhatnagar, V.; Brown, T.; Fechner, B.; Gormezano, C.; Kaye, A.; Lennholm, M.; Righi, E.; Rimini, F.; Sibley, A.; Start, D.; Wade, T. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Goulding, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lamalle, P. [Ecole Royale Militaire, Brussels (Belgium). Lab. de Physique des Plasmas; Nguyen, F. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1994-07-01

    New ICRH antennas on JET were designed to couple to the new JET divertor plasma configurations and to improve the Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) capabilities. The A2 antenna consists of 4 straps whose currents can be phased at arbitrary angles. The real time automatic tuning acts on frequency, line length (line phase shifters) and stub length. Provision is made for the coupling resistance/plasma position feedback to accommodate the fast changes in antenna loading. The first coupling, tuning and heating results are reported in 0{pi}0{pi}, 0000 and 00{pi}{pi} phasing. A new antenna model is described, which was developed to simulate the measured antenna loading in terms of plasma parameters and to provide a starting point for the real time automatic tuning. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Experiences Supporting the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera: the Devops Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, A.; Estes, N. M.; Bowman-Cisnesros, E.; Hanger, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Science Operations Center (SOC) is responsible for instrument targeting, product processing, and archiving [1]. The LROC SOC maintains over 1,000,000 observations with over 300 TB of released data. Processing challenges compound with the acquisition of over 400 Gbits of observations daily creating the need for a robust, efficient, and reliable suite of specialized software. Development Environment: The LROC SOC's software development methodology has evolved over time. Today, the development team operates in close cooperation with the systems administration team in a model known in the IT industry as DevOps. The DevOps model enables a highly productive development environment that facilitates accomplishment of key goals within tight schedules[2]. The LROC SOC DevOps model incorporates industry best practices including prototyping, continuous integration, unit testing, code coverage analysis, version control, and utilizing existing open source software. Scientists and researchers at LROC often prototype algorithms and scripts in a high-level language such as MATLAB or IDL. After the prototype is functionally complete the solution is implemented as production ready software by the developers. Following this process ensures that all controls and requirements set by the LROC SOC DevOps team are met. The LROC SOC also strives to enhance the efficiency of the operations staff by way of weekly presentations and informal mentoring. Many small scripting tasks are assigned to the cognizant operations personnel (end users), allowing for the DevOps team to focus on more complex and mission critical tasks. In addition to leveraging open source software the LROC SOC has also contributed to the open source community by releasing Lunaserv [3]. Findings: The DevOps software model very efficiently provides smooth software releases and maintains team momentum. Scientists prototyping their work has proven to be very efficient

  10. Biomechanics of cells and tissues experiments, models and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The application of methodological approaches and mathematical formalisms proper to Physics and Engineering to investigate and describe biological processes and design biological structures has led to the development of many disciplines in the context of computational biology and biotechnology. The best known applicative domain is tissue engineering and its branches. Recent domains of interest are in the field of biophysics, e.g.: multiscale mechanics of biological membranes and films and filaments; multiscale mechanics of adhesion; biomolecular motors and force generation.   Modern hypotheses, models, and tools are currently emerging and resulting from the convergence of the methods and philosophical approaches of the different research areas and disciplines. All these emerging approaches share the purpose of disentangling the complexity of organisms, tissues, and cells and mimicking the function of living systems. The contributions presented in this book are current research highlights of six challenging an...

  11. Design of shape memory alloy pipe couplers: modeling and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabesh, Majid; Atli, Kadri C.; Rohmer, John; Franco, Brian E.; Karaman, Ibrahim; Boyd, James G.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2012-04-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) pipe couplers use the shape memory effect to apply a contact pressure onto the surface of the pipes to be coupled. In the current research, a SMA pipe coupler is designed, fabricated and tested. The thermally induced contact pressure depends on several factors such as the dimensions and properties of the coupler-pipe system. Two alloy systems are considered: commercially-available NiTiNb couplers and in-house developed NiTi couplers. The coupling pressure is measured using strain gages mounted on the internal surface of an elastic ring. An axisymmetric finite element model including SMA constitutive equations is also developed, and the finite element results are compared with the experimental results.

  12. Biomaterial nanotopography-mediated cell responses: experiment and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of fabrication and processing technologies in the past two decades has enabled researchers to introduce nanoscale features into materials which, interestingly, have been shown to greatly regulate the behavior and fate of biological cells. In particular, important cell responses (such as adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and filopodial growth have all been correlated with material nanotopography. Given its great potential, intensive efforts have been made, both experimentally and theoretically, to understand why and how cells respond to nanoscale surface features, and this article reviews recent progress in this field. Specifically, a brief overview on the fabrication and modification techniques to create nanotopography on different materials is given first. After that, a summary of important experimental findings on the mediation of nanoscale surface topography on the behavior of various cells, as well as the underlying mechanism, is provided. Finally, both classical and recently developed approaches for modeling nanotopography-mediated cell adhesion and filopodial growth are reviewed.

  13. Recent Advances in Enzymatic Fuel Cells: Experiments and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic fuel cells convert the chemical energy of biofuels into electrical energy. Unlike traditional fuel cell types, which are mainly based on metal catalysts, the enzymatic fuel cells employ enzymes as catalysts. This fuel cell type can be used as an implantable power source for a variety of medical devices used in modern medicine to administer drugs, treat ailments and monitor bodily functions. Some advantages in comparison to conventional fuel cells include a simple fuel cell design and lower cost of the main fuel cell components, however they suffer from severe kinetic limitations mainly due to inefficiency in electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. In this review article, the major research activities concerned with the enzymatic fuel cells (anode and cathode development, system design, modeling by highlighting the current problems (low cell voltage, low current density, stability will be presented.

  14. [An Experience Promoting the Interdisciplinary Care Model for Dengue Fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Fu; Ke, Ya-Ting

    2016-08-01

    Emergency departments represent the first line in facing major healthcare events. During major epidemic outbreaks, patients crowding into the emergency departments increase the wait time for patients and overload the staffs that are on duty. The dengue fever outbreak in southern Taiwan during the summer 2015 presented a huge management challenge for physicians and nurses in local hospitals. We responded to this challenge by integrating resources from different hospital departments. This strategy successfully increased group cohesiveness among the medical team, ensuring that they could not only ultimately cope with the outbreak together but also effectively provide patient-centered care. This interdisciplinary care model may serve as a reference for medical professionals for the management of future epidemics and similar events.

  15. Advanced Control of Active Bearings - Modelling, Design and Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theisen, Lukas Roy Svane

    In all rotating machines relative movements between the stationary parts and the rotating parts imply energy loss and, in many critical cases, vibration problems. This energy loss leads to higher overall energy consumption of the system. Research activities towards the reduction of friction......, the enhancement of damping, the extension of operating range and the minimisation of critical vibrations in machine elements are of fundamental importance. The main component to tackle the energy-loss-related problems is the bearing. The area of design of active bearings, while very promising, is still in its...... the critical speeds. The feedback control law is preferably designed from a simple model, which captures the dominant dynamics of the machine in the frequency range of interest. This thesis offers two main original contributions in the field of active bearings. First, an experimental technique is proposed...

  16. Overview of the NRL DPF program: Experiment and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A. S.; Jackson, S. L.; Angus, J. R.; Giuliani, J. L.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Schumer, J. W.; Mosher, D.

    2016-10-01

    Charged particle acceleration in imploding plasmas is an important phenomenon which occurs in various natural and laboratory plasmas. A new research project at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been started to investigate this phenomenon both experimentally-in a dense plasma focus (DPF) device-and theoretically using analytical and computational modeling. The DPF will be driven by the high-inductance (607 nH) Hawk pulsed-power generator, with a rise time of 1.2 μs and a peak current of 665 kA. In this poster we present an overview of the research project, and some preliminary results from fluid simulations of the m = 0 instability in an idealized DPF pinch. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  17. Thermal stability of n-dodecane : experiments and kinetic modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Herbinet, Olivier; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Fournet, René

    2007-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of n-dodecane, a component of some jet fuels, has been studied in a jet-stirred reactor at temperatures from 793 to 1093 K, for residence times between 1 and 5 s and at atmospheric pressure. Thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon fuel prior the entrance in the combustion chamber is an envisaged way to cool the wall of hypersonic vehicles. The products of the reaction are mainly hydrogen, methane, ethane, 1,3-butadiene and 1-alkenes from ethylene to 1-undecene. For higher temperatures and residence times acetylene, allene, propyne, cyclopentene, 1,3-cyclopentadiene and aromatic compounds from benzene to pyrene through naphthalene have also been observed. A previous detailed kinetic model of the thermal decomposition of n-dodecane generated using EXGAS software has been improved and completed by a sub-mechanism explaining the formation and the consumption of aromatic compounds.

  18. Climate Change under aggressive mitigation: The ENSEMBLES multi-model experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johns, T.C.; Royer, J.F.; Hoeschel, I.; Huebener, H.; Roeckner, E.; Manzini, E.; May, W.; Dufresne, J.L.; Ottera, O.H.; van Vuuren, D.P.; Salas y Melia, D.; Giorgetta, M.A.; Denvil, S.; Yang, S.; Fogli, P.G.; Koerper, J.; Tjiputra, J.F.; Stehfest, E.; Hewitt, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    We present results from multiple comprehensive models used to simulate an aggressive mitigation scenario based on detailed results of an Integrated Assessment Model. The experiment employs ten global climate and Earth System models (GCMs and ESMs) and pioneers elements of the long-term experimental

  19. Climate Change under aggressive mitigation: The ENSEMBLES multi-model experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johns, T.C.; Royer, J.F.; Hoeschel, I.; Huebener, H.; Roeckner, E.; Manzini, E.; May, W.; Dufresne, J.L.; Ottera, O.H.; van Vuuren, D.P.; Salas y Melia, D.; Giorgetta, M.A.; Denvil, S.; Yang, S.; Fogli, P.G.; Koerper, J.; Tjiputra, J.F.; Stehfest, E.; Hewitt, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    We present results from multiple comprehensive models used to simulate an aggressive mitigation scenario based on detailed results of an Integrated Assessment Model. The experiment employs ten global climate and Earth System models (GCMs and ESMs) and pioneers elements of the long-term experimental

  20. Beyond standard model Higgs boson searches in the ATLAS and CMS experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Mariotti, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Searches for a Higgs boson in models beyond the Standard Model at the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider are discussed. No sign of new physics is present in the data collected at 7 and 8 TeV proton center of mass energies. Limits on model parameters are set. Future studies at higher energy are presented.

  1. Natural gas and blends oxidation and ignition: Experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Y.; Dagaut, P.; Cathonnet, M.; Boettner, J.C. [CNRS, Orleans (France); Bachman, J.S.; Carlier, P. [Gaz de France, La Plaine-Saint-Denis (France)

    1994-12-31

    The kinetics of the oxidation of natural gas and blends (CH{sub 4}/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 4}/C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, CH{sub 4}/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}/C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) has been studied in a jet-stirred reactor (800 {<=} T/K {<=} 1240, 1 {<=} P/atm {<=} 10, 0.1 {<=} equivalence ratio {<=} 1.5). The concentration profiles of reactants, intermediates, and products measured in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) have been used to validate a detailed kinetic reaction mechanism. Literature ignition delay times measured in shock tube have also been modeled. A generally good agreement between the data and the model is found. The same mechanism has also been used to successfully represent the oxidation of methane, ethyne, ethene, ethane, propene, propane, n-butane, and 1-butene in various conditions including JSR, shock tube, and flame. The present study clearly shows the importance of trace hydrocarbons in the oxidation of methane. The computations indicate that the oxidation of methane is initiated by its reaction with O{sub 2} when no other hydrocarbon is present. In natural gas and blends, higher hydrocarbons react before methane, leading to the formation of OH, H, and O radicals, which in turn initiate methane oxidation. This work demonstrates that methane cannot be used safely to represent the kinetics of natural gas combustion. However, simple blends like methane-propane or methane-ethane-propane could be used.

  2. Discriminating between rival biochemical network models: three approaches to optimal experiment design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    August Elias

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The success of molecular systems biology hinges on the ability to use computational models to design predictive experiments, and ultimately unravel underlying biological mechanisms. A problem commonly encountered in the computational modelling of biological networks is that alternative, structurally different models of similar complexity fit a set of experimental data equally well. In this case, more than one molecular mechanism can explain available data. In order to rule out the incorrect mechanisms, one needs to invalidate incorrect models. At this point, new experiments maximizing the difference between the measured values of alternative models should be proposed and conducted. Such experiments should be optimally designed to produce data that are most likely to invalidate incorrect model structures. Results In this paper we develop methodologies for the optimal design of experiments with the aim of discriminating between different mathematical models of the same biological system. The first approach determines the 'best' initial condition that maximizes the L2 (energy distance between the outputs of the rival models. In the second approach, we maximize the L2-distance of the outputs by designing the optimal external stimulus (input profile of unit L2-norm. Our third method uses optimized structural changes (corresponding, for example, to parameter value changes reflecting gene knock-outs to achieve the same goal. The numerical implementation of each method is considered in an example, signal processing in starving Dictyostelium amœbæ. Conclusions Model-based design of experiments improves both the reliability and the efficiency of biochemical network model discrimination. This opens the way to model invalidation, which can be used to perfect our understanding of biochemical networks. Our general problem formulation together with the three proposed experiment design methods give the practitioner new tools for a systems

  3. Visual Prompts or Volunteer Models: An Experiment in Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Yin Lin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Successful long-term programs for urban residential food waste sorting are very rare, despite the established urgent need for them in cities for waste reduction, pollution reduction and circular resource economy reasons. This study meets recent calls to bridge policy makers and academics, and calls for more thorough analysis of operational work in terms of behavioral determinants, to move the fields on. It takes a key operational element of a recently reported successful food waste sorting program—manning of the new bins by volunteers—and considers the behavioral determinants involved in order to design a more scalable and cheaper alternative—the use of brightly colored covers with flower designs on three sides of the bin. The two interventions were tested in a medium-scale, real-life experimental set-up that showed that they had statistically similar results: high effective capture rates of 32%–34%, with low contamination rates. The success, low cost and simple implementation of the latter suggests it should be considered for large-scale use. Candidate behavioral determinants are prompts, emotion and knowledge for the yellow bin intervention, and for the volunteer intervention they are additionally social influence, modeling, role clarification, and moderators of messenger type and interpersonal or tailored messaging.

  4. (Im)precise nuclear forces: From experiment to model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Perez, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear force is the most fundamental building block in nuclear science. It is the cornerstone of every nuclear application from nuclear reactors to the production of heavy elements in supernovae. Despite being rigorously derived from the Standard Model, the actual determination of the nuclear force requires adjusting a set of parameters to reproduce experimental data. This introduces uncertainties that need to be quantified and propagated into all nuclear applications. I'll review a series of works on the determination of the Nucleon-Nucleon interaction from a collection of over 8000 elastic scattering data. Statistical tools used on the selection of data and the propagation of statistical uncertainties will be presented. The implications for charge independence of the pion-nucleon coupling constant and the predictive power of chiral interactions will be discussed. Although this is not the final word on theoretical nuclear uncertainties, as other sources of errors should be explored, this series of works allow to set the foundations for a new era for uncertainty quantification in nuclear applications. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Funding was also provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Award DE-SC0008511 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration)

  5. Current understanding of divertor detachment: experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wischmeier, W; Groth, M; Kallenbach, A; Chankin, A; Coster, D; Dux, R; Herrmann, A; Muller, H; Pugno, R; Reiter, D; Scarabosio, A; Watkins, J; Team, T D; Team, A U

    2008-05-23

    A qualitative as well as quantitative evaluation of experimentally observed plasma parameters in the detached regime proves to be difficult for several tokamaks. A series of ohmic discharges have been performed in ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D at similar as possible plasma parameters and at different line averaged densities, {bar n}{sub e}. The experimental data represent a set of well diagnosed discharges against which numerical simulations are compared. For the numerical modeling the fluid-code B2.5 coupled to the Monte Carlo neutrals transport code EIRENE is used. Only the combined enhancement of effects, such as geometry, drift terms, neutral conductance, increased radial transport and divertor target composition, explains a significant fraction of the experimentally observed asymmetries of the ion fluxes as a function of {bar n}{sub e} to the inner and outer target plates in ASDEX Upgrade. The relative importance of the mechanisms leading to detachment are different in DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade.

  6. Antibacterial kaolinite/urea/chlorhexidine nanocomposites: Experiment and molecular modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holešová, Sylva, E-mail: sylva.holesova@vsb.cz [Nanotechnology Centre, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17.listopadu 15/2172, CZ-708 33 Ostrava, Poruba (Czech Republic); IT4Innovations Centre of Excellence, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17.listopadu 15/2172, CZ-708 33 Ostrava, Poruba (Czech Republic); Valášková, Marta; Hlaváč, Dominik [Nanotechnology Centre, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17.listopadu 15/2172, CZ-708 33 Ostrava, Poruba (Czech Republic); IT4Innovations Centre of Excellence, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17.listopadu 15/2172, CZ-708 33 Ostrava, Poruba (Czech Republic); Madejová, Jana [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, SK-845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Samlíková, Magda; Tokarský, Jonáš [Nanotechnology Centre, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17.listopadu 15/2172, CZ-708 33 Ostrava, Poruba (Czech Republic); IT4Innovations Centre of Excellence, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17.listopadu 15/2172, CZ-708 33 Ostrava, Poruba (Czech Republic); Pazdziora, Erich [Institute of Public Health Ostrava, Centre of Clinical Laboratories, Partyzánské náměstí 7, CZ-702 00 Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-01

    Clay minerals are commonly used materials in pharmaceutical production both as inorganic carriers or active agents. The purpose of this study is the preparation and characterization of clay/antibacterial drug hybrids which can be further included in drug delivery systems for treatment oral infections. Novel nanocomposites with antibacterial properties were successfully prepared by ion exchange reaction from two types of kaolinite/urea intercalates and chlorhexidine diacetate. Intercalation compounds of kaolinite were prepared by reaction with solid urea in the absence of solvents (dry method) as well as with urea aqueous solution (wet method). The antibacterial activity of two prepared samples against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated by finding the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Antibacterial studies of both samples showed the lowest MIC values (0.01%, w/v) after 1 day against E. faecalis, E. coli and S. aureus. A slightly worse antibacterial activity was observed against P. aeruginosa (MIC 0.12%, w/v) after 1 day. Since samples showed very good antibacterial activity, especially after 1 day of action, this means that these samples can be used as long-acting antibacterial materials. Prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental data are supported by results of molecular modelling.

  7. Antibacterial kaolinite/urea/chlorhexidine nanocomposites: Experiment and molecular modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holešová, Sylva; Valášková, Marta; Hlaváč, Dominik; Madejová, Jana; Samlíková, Magda; Tokarský, Jonáš; Pazdziora, Erich

    2014-06-01

    Clay minerals are commonly used materials in pharmaceutical production both as inorganic carriers or active agents. The purpose of this study is the preparation and characterization of clay/antibacterial drug hybrids which can be further included in drug delivery systems for treatment oral infections. Novel nanocomposites with antibacterial properties were successfully prepared by ion exchange reaction from two types of kaolinite/urea intercalates and chlorhexidine diacetate. Intercalation compounds of kaolinite were prepared by reaction with solid urea in the absence of solvents (dry method) as well as with urea aqueous solution (wet method). The antibacterial activity of two prepared samples against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated by finding the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Antibacterial studies of both samples showed the lowest MIC values (0.01%, w/v) after 1 day against E. faecalis, E. coli and S. aureus. A slightly worse antibacterial activity was observed against P. aeruginosa (MIC 0.12%, w/v) after 1 day. Since samples showed very good antibacterial activity, especially after 1 day of action, this means that these samples can be used as long-acting antibacterial materials. Prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental data are supported by results of molecular modelling.

  8. Mapping Cyclists’ Experiences and Agent-Based Modelling of Their Wayfinding Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snizek, Bernhard

    This dissertation is about modelling cycling transport behaviour. It is partly about urban experiences seen by the cyclist and about modelling, more specifically the agent-based modelling of cyclists' wayfinding behaviour. The dissertation consists of three papers. The first deals with the develo......This dissertation is about modelling cycling transport behaviour. It is partly about urban experiences seen by the cyclist and about modelling, more specifically the agent-based modelling of cyclists' wayfinding behaviour. The dissertation consists of three papers. The first deals......-based model of cycling transport behaviour using geodata, data from the Danish travel survey as well as behavioural data extracted from trajectories recorded utilising GPS units. Mapping Bicyclists’ Experiences in Copenhagen This paper presents an approach to the collection, mapping and analysing of cyclists......’ experiences. By relating spatial experiences to urban indicators such as land-use, street characteristics, cycle infrastructure, centrality and other aspects of the urban environment, their influence on cyclists’ experiences were analysed. 398 cyclists responded and plotted their most recent cycle route...

  9. Benchmark experiments for higher-order and full-Stokes ice sheet models (ISMIP–HOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pattyn

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the first ice sheet model intercomparison project for higher-order and full-Stokes ice sheet models. These models are compared and verified in a series of six experiments of which one has an analytical solution obtained from a perturbation analysis. The experiments are applied to both 2-D and 3-D geometries; five experiments are steady-state diagnostic, and one has a time-dependent prognostic solution. All participating models give results that are in close agreement. A clear distinction can be made between higher-order models and those that solve the full system of equations. The full-Stokes models show a much smaller spread, hence are in better agreement with one another and with the analytical solution.

  10. Beyond the Standard Model Research at JLab - The DarkLight Experiment: Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyce, James R. [JLAB

    2012-02-01

    Interest in experiments probing physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) has increased in recent years. At Jefferson Lab, the LIPSS experiments demonstrated that new, high intensity accelerators can be used to explore regions of dark matter parameter space heretofore inaccessible. The status of promising experiments will be discussed, with a focus on DarkLight, one of three efforts at Jefferson Lab searching for the gauge boson '. DarkLight will use a high current electron beam scattering off a gaseous hydrogen target.

  11. Model-independent approach for dark matter phenomenology: Signatures in linear colliders and cosmic positron experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shigeki Matsumoto; Nobuchika Okada

    2007-11-01

    We have studied the phenomenology of dark matter at the ILC and cosmic positron experiments based on model-independent approach. We have found a strong correlation between dark matter signatures at the ILC and those in the indirect detection experiments of dark matter. Once the dark matter is discovered in the positron experiments such as the PAMELA, its nature will be investigated in detail at the ILC.

  12. Spectral ellipsometry of GaSb: Experiment and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charache, G.W.; Mu{tilde n}oz, M.; Wei, K.; Pollak, F.H.; Freeouf, J.L.

    1999-05-01

    The optical constants {epsilon}(E)[{equals}{epsilon}{sub 1}(E) + i{epsilon}{sub 2}(E)] of single crystal GaSb at 300K have been measured using spectral ellipsometry in the range of 0.3--5.3 eV. The {epsilon}(E) spectra displayed distinct structures associated with critical points (CPs) at E{sub 0}(direct gap), spin-orbit split E{sub 0} + {Delta}{sub 0} component, spin-orbit split (E{sub 1}), E{sub 1} + {Delta}{sub 1} and (E{sub 0}{prime}), E{sub 0}{prime} + {Delta}{sub 0}{prime} doublets, as well as E{sub 2}. The experimental data over the entire measured spectral range (after oxide removal) has been fit using the Holden model dielectric function [Phys.Rev.B 56, 4037 (1997)] based on the electronic energy-band structure near these CPs plus excitonic and band-to-band Coulomb enhancement effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 0} + {Delta}{sub 0}and the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1} + {Delta}{sub 1} doublet. In addition to evaluating the energies of these various band-to-band CPs, information about the binding energy (R{sub 1}) of the two-dimensional exciton related to the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1} + {Delta}{sub 1} CPS was obtained. The value of R{sub 1} was in good agreement with effective mass/{rvec k} {center_dot} {rvec p} theory. The ability to evaluate R{sub 1} has important ramifications for recent first-principles band structure calculations which include exciton effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 1}, and E{sub 2}.

  13. Comprehensive mechanisms for combustion chemistry: Experiment, modeling, and sensitivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryer, F.L.; Yetter, R.A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program is an integrated experimental/numerical effort to study pyrolysis and oxidation reactions and mechanisms for small-molecule hydrocarbon structures under conditions representative of combustion environments. The experimental aspects of the work are conducted in large diameter flow reactors, at pressures from one to twenty atmospheres, temperatures from 550 K to 1200 K, and with observed reaction times from 10{sup {minus}2} to 5 seconds. Gas sampling of stable reactant, intermediate, and product species concentrations provides not only substantial definition of the phenomenology of reaction mechanisms, but a significantly constrained set of kinetic information with negligible diffusive coupling. Analytical techniques used for detecting hydrocarbons and carbon oxides include gas chromatography (GC), and gas infrared (NDIR) and FTIR methods are utilized for continuous on-line sample detection of light absorption measurements of OH have also been performed in an atmospheric pressure flow reactor (APFR), and a variable pressure flow (VPFR) reactor is presently being instrumented to perform optical measurements of radicals and highly reactive molecular intermediates. The numerical aspects of the work utilize zero and one-dimensional pre-mixed, detailed kinetic studies, including path, elemental gradient sensitivity, and feature sensitivity analyses. The program emphasizes the use of hierarchical mechanistic construction to understand and develop detailed kinetic mechanisms. Numerical studies are utilized for guiding experimental parameter selections, for interpreting observations, for extending the predictive range of mechanism constructs, and to study the effects of diffusive transport coupling on reaction behavior in flames. Modeling using well defined and validated mechanisms for the CO/H{sub 2}/oxidant systems.

  14. Majorana fermions in semiconductor nanowires: fundamentals, modeling, and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, T D; Tewari, S

    2013-06-12

    After a recent series of rapid and exciting developments, the long search for the Majorana fermion-the elusive quantum entity at the border between particles and antiparticles-has produced the first positive experimental results, but is not over yet. Originally proposed by E Majorana in the context of particle physics, Majorana fermions have a condensed matter analogue in the zero-energy bound states emerging in topological superconductors. A promising route to engineering topological superconductors capable of hosting Majorana zero modes consists of proximity coupling semiconductor thin films or nanowires with strong spin-orbit interaction to conventional s-wave superconductors in the presence of an external Zeeman field. The Majorana zero mode is predicted to emerge above a certain critical Zeeman field as a zero-energy state localized near the order parameter defects, namely, vortices for thin films and wire ends for the nanowire. These Majorana bound states are expected to manifest non-Abelian quantum statistics, which makes them ideal building blocks for fault-tolerant topological quantum computation. This review provides an update on the current status of the search for Majorana fermions in semiconductor nanowires by focusing on the recent developments, in particular the period following the first reports of experimental signatures consistent with the realization of Majorana bound states in semiconductor nanowire-superconductor hybrid structures. We start with a discussion of the fundamental aspects of the subject, followed by considerations on the realistic modeling, which is a critical bridge between theoretical predictions based on idealized conditions and the real world, as probed experimentally. The last part is dedicated to a few intriguing issues that were brought to the fore by the recent encouraging experimental advances.

  15. Sensitivity experiments with an adaptation model of circulation of western tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bahulayan, N.; Shaji, C.; Rao, A.D.; Dube, S.K.

    One 18-level adaptation model of circulation with a flat bottom at 900 m depth has been used to study the sensitivity of the solution to different magnitudes of eddy viscosity and diffusivity coefficients. Three numerical experiments conducted...

  16. OPTIMUM PLANNING OF EXPERIMENTS AT MODELING FUEL CONSUMPTION IN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Koshevoy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of optimum experiments planning by cost expenses at studying the processes of fuel consumption internal combustion engines is shown. The mathematical models of these processes in different state of engine working are synthesized.

  17. Intracochlear Pressure Changes due to Round Window Opening: A Model Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mittmann, P; Ernst, A; Todt, I

    2014-01-01

    .... The experiments were performed in an artificial cochlea model. A round window was simulated with a polythene foil and a pressure sensor was placed in the helicotrema area to monitor intraluminal pressure changes...

  18. Intracochlear pressure changes due to round window opening: a model experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mittmann, P; Ernst, A; Todt, I

    2014-01-01

    .... The experiments were performed in an artificial cochlea model. A round window was simulated with a polythene foil and a pressure sensor was placed in the helicotrema area to monitor intraluminal pressure changes...

  19. Children's Experiences of Disability: Pointers to a Social Model of Childhood Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Clare; Stalker, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    The social model of disability has paid little attention to disabled children, with few attempts to explore how far it provides an adequate explanatory framework for their experiences. This paper reports findings from a two-year study exploring the lived experiences of 26 disabled children aged 7-15. They experienced disability in four ways--in…

  20. Information Retrieval eXperience (IRX): Towards a Human-Centered Personalized Model of Relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der Frans; Broek, van den Egon L.; Dijk, van Betsy; Hoeber, O.; Li, Y.; Huang, X.J.

    2010-01-01

    We approach Information Retrieval (IR) from a User eXperience (UX) perspective. Through introducing a model for Information Retrieval eXperience (IRX), this paper operationalizes a perspective on IR that reaches beyond topicality. Based on a document's topicality, complexity, and emotional value, a

  1. Modeling Valuations from Experience: A Comment on Ashby and Rakow (2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Dirk U.; Pachur, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    What are the cognitive mechanisms underlying subjective valuations formed on the basis of sequential experiences of an option's possible outcomes? Ashby and Rakow (2014) have proposed a sliding window model (SWIM), according to which people's valuations represent the average of a limited sample of recent experiences (the size of which is estimated…

  2. Corpuscular Model of Two-Beam Interference and Double-Slit Experiments with Single Photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Fengping; Yuan, Shengjun; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Miyashita, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    We introduce an event-based corpuscular simulation model that reproduces the wave mechanical results of single-photon double-slit and two-beam interference experiments and (of a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization) of a single-photon interference experiment with a Fresnel biprism. The sim

  3. Corpuscular Model of Two-Beam Interference and Double-Slit Experiments with Single Photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Fengping; Yuan, Shengjun; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Miyashita, Seiji

    We introduce an event-based corpuscular simulation model that reproduces the wave mechanical results of single-photon double-slit and two-beam interference experiments and (of a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization) of a single-photon interference experiment with a Fresnel biprism. The

  4. Test of the Behavioral Perspective Model in the Context of an E-Mail Marketing Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Menon, R. G. Vishnu; Sigurdarson, Johannes Pall; Kristjansson, Jon Skafti; Foxall, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    An e-mail marketing experiment based on the behavioral perspective model was conducted to investigate consumer choice. Conversion e-mails were sent to two groups from the same marketing database of registered consumers interested in children's books. The experiment was based on A-B-A-C-A and A-C-A-B-A withdrawal designs and consisted of sending B…

  5. Guided-Inquiry Experiments for Physical Chemistry: The POGIL-PCL Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, Sally S.; Grushow, Alexander; Whitnell, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The POGIL-PCL project implements the principles of process-oriented, guided-inquiry learning (POGIL) in order to improve student learning in the physical chemistry laboratory (PCL) course. The inquiry-based physical chemistry experiments being developed emphasize modeling of chemical phenomena. In each experiment, students work through at least…

  6. Prenatal Experiences of Containment in the Light of Bion's Model of Container/Contained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiello, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the idea of possible proto-experiences of the prenatal child in the context of Bion's model of container/contained. The physical configuration of the embryo/foetus contained in the maternal uterus represents the starting point for an enquiry into the unborn child's possible experiences of its state of being contained in a…

  7. Guided-Inquiry Experiments for Physical Chemistry: The POGIL-PCL Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, Sally S.; Grushow, Alexander; Whitnell, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The POGIL-PCL project implements the principles of process-oriented, guided-inquiry learning (POGIL) in order to improve student learning in the physical chemistry laboratory (PCL) course. The inquiry-based physical chemistry experiments being developed emphasize modeling of chemical phenomena. In each experiment, students work through at least…

  8. The Impact of Sexual Orientation on Women's Midlife Experience: A Transition Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Carol Anderson

    2007-01-01

    Sexual orientation is an integral part of identity affecting every stage of an individual's development. This literature review examines women's cultural experiences based on sexual orientation and their effect on midlife experience. A developmental model is offered that incorporates sexual orientation as a contextual factor in this developmental…

  9. A general model-based design of experiments approach to achieve practical identifiability of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvanin, Federico; Ballan, Carlo C; Barolo, Massimiliano; Bezzo, Fabrizio

    2013-08-01

    The use of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models is a common and widespread practice in the preliminary stages of drug development. However, PK-PD models may be affected by structural identifiability issues intrinsically related to their mathematical formulation. A preliminary structural identifiability analysis is usually carried out to check if the set of model parameters can be uniquely determined from experimental observations under the ideal assumptions of noise-free data and no model uncertainty. However, even for structurally identifiable models, real-life experimental conditions and model uncertainty may strongly affect the practical possibility to estimate the model parameters in a statistically sound way. A systematic procedure coupling the numerical assessment of structural identifiability with advanced model-based design of experiments formulations is presented in this paper. The objective is to propose a general approach to design experiments in an optimal way, detecting a proper set of experimental settings that ensure the practical identifiability of PK-PD models. Two simulated case studies based on in vitro bacterial growth and killing models are presented to demonstrate the applicability and generality of the methodology to tackle model identifiability issues effectively, through the design of feasible and highly informative experiments.

  10. Semiconductor Quantum Dash Broadband Emitters: Modeling and Experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2013-10-01

    Broadband light emitters operation, which covers multiple wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, has been established as an indispensable element to the human kind, continuously advancing the living standard by serving as sources in important multi-disciplinary field applications such as biomedical imaging and sensing, general lighting and internet and mobile phone connectivity. In general, most commercial broadband light sources relies on complex systems for broadband light generation which are bulky, and energy hungry. \\tRecent demonstration of ultra-broadband emission from semiconductor light sources in the form of superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLDs) has paved way in realization of broadband emitters on a completely novel platform, which offered compactness, cost effectiveness, and comparatively energy efficient, and are already serving as a key component in medical imaging systems. The low power-bandwidth product is inherent in SLDs operating in the amplified spontaneous emission regime. A quantum leap in the advancement of broadband emitters, in which high power and large bandwidth (in tens of nm) are in demand. Recently, the birth of a new class of broadband semiconductor laser diode (LDs) producing multiple wavelength light in stimulated emission regime was demonstrated. This very recent manifestation of a high power-bandwidth-product semiconductor broadband LDs relies on interband optical transitions via quantum confined dot/dash nanostructures and exploiting the natural inhomogeneity of the self-assembled growth technology. This concept is highly interesting and extending the broad spectrum of stimulated emission by novel device design forms the central focus of this dissertation. \\tIn this work, a simple rate equation numerical technique for modeling InAs/InP quantum dash laser incorporating the properties of inhomogeneous broadening effect on lasing spectra was developed and discussed, followed by a comprehensive experimental analysis

  11. Mathematical models as aids for design and development of experiments: the case of transgenic mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Michael A; Legros, Mathieu; Facchinelli, Luca; Valerio, Laura; Ramsey, Janine M; Scott, Thomas W; Gould, Fred; Lloyd, Alun L

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate the utility of models as aids in the design and development of experiments aimed at measuring the effects of proposed vector population control strategies. We describe the exploration of a stochastic, age-structured model that simulates field cage experiments that test the ability of a female-killing strain of the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) to suppress a wild-type population. Model output predicts that choices of release ratio and population size can impact mean extinction time and variability in extinction time among experiments. We find that unless fitness costs are >80% they will not be detectable in experiments with high release ratios. At lower release ratios, the predicted length of the experiment increases significantly for fitness costs >20%. Experiments with small populations may more accurately reflect field conditions, but extinction can occur even in the absence of a functional female-killing construct because of stochastic effects. We illustrate how the model can be used to explore experimental designs that aim to study the impact of density dependence and immigration; predictions indicate that cage population eradication may not always be obtainable in an operationally realistic time frame. We propose a method to predict the extinction time of a cage population based on the rate of population reduction with the goal of shortening the duration of the experiment. We discuss the model as a tool for exploring and assessing the utility of a wider range of scenarios than would be feasible to test experimentally because of financial and temporal restraints.

  12. Optimal experiment selection for parameter estimation in biological differential equation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Transtrum Mark K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parameter estimation in biological models is a common yet challenging problem. In this work we explore the problem for gene regulatory networks modeled by differential equations with unknown parameters, such as decay rates, reaction rates, Michaelis-Menten constants, and Hill coefficients. We explore the question to what extent parameters can be efficiently estimated by appropriate experimental selection. Results A minimization formulation is used to find the parameter values that best fit the experiment data. When the data is insufficient, the minimization problem often has many local minima that fit the data reasonably well. We show that selecting a new experiment based on the local Fisher Information of one local minimum generates additional data that allows one to successfully discriminate among the many local minima. The parameters can be estimated to high accuracy by iteratively performing minimization and experiment selection. We show that the experiment choices are roughly independent of which local minima is used to calculate the local Fisher Information. Conclusions We show that by an appropriate choice of experiments, one can, in principle, efficiently and accurately estimate all the parameters of gene regulatory network. In addition, we demonstrate that appropriate experiment selection can also allow one to restrict model predictions without constraining the parameters using many fewer experiments. We suggest that predicting model behaviors and inferring parameters represent two different approaches to model calibration with different requirements on data and experimental cost.

  13. Mixture experiment techniques for reducing the number of components applied for modeling waste glass sodium release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, G.; Redgate, T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States). Statistics Group

    1997-12-01

    Statistical mixture experiment techniques were applied to a waste glass data set to investigate the effects of the glass components on Product Consistency Test (PCT) sodium release (NR) and to develop a model for PCT NR as a function of the component proportions. The mixture experiment techniques indicate that the waste glass system can be reduced from nine to four components for purposes of modeling PCT NR. Empirical mixture models containing four first-order terms and one or two second-order terms fit the data quite well, and can be used to predict the NR of any glass composition in the model domain. The mixture experiment techniques produce a better model in less time than required by another approach.

  14. Update of the Computing Models of the WLCG and the LHC Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, I; Carminati, F; Cattaneo, M; Clarke, P; Fisk, I; Girone, M; Harvey, J; Kersevan, B; Mato, P; Mount, R; Panzer-Steindel, B; CERN. Geneva. The LHC experiments Committee; LHCC

    2014-01-01

    In preparation for the data collection and analysis in LHC Run 2, the LHCC and Computing Scrutiny Group of the RRB requested a detailed review of the current computing models of the LHC experiments and a consolidated plan for the future computing needs. This document represents the status of the work of the WLCG collaboration and the four LHC experiments in updating the computing models to reflect the advances in understanding of the most effective ways to use the distributed computing and storage resources, based upon the experience gained during LHC Run 1.

  15. Modelling TF ripple loss of alpha particles in TFTR DT experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S. [and others

    1995-07-01

    Modelling of TF ripple loss of alphas in DT experiments on TFTR now includes neoclassical calculations of first orbit loss, stochastic ripple diffusion, ripple trapping and collisional effects. A rapid way to simulate experiment has been developed which uses a simple stochastic domain model for TF ripple loss within the TRANSP analysis code, with the ripple diffusion threshold evaluated by comparison with more accurate but computationally expensive Hamiltonian coordinate guiding center code simulations. Typical TF collisional ripple loss predictions are 6-10% loss of alphas for TFTR D-T experiments at I{sub p} = 1.0-2.0 MA and R = 2.52 m.

  16. Ductile Fracture of AHSS Sheets under Multi-axial Loading: Experiments and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunand, M.; Mohr, D.

    2011-08-01

    Fracture experiments on TRIP-assisted steel sheets covering a wide range of stress states (from shear to equibiaxial tension) are performed to create a comprehensive experimental database to calibrate and evaluate the shear-modified Gurson model (Nielsen and Tvergaard, 2010) and the Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC) fracture model (Bai and Wierzbicki, 2010). The experimental program includes notched tensile tests as well as fracture experiments on butterfly-shaped specimens under combined tension and shear loading. Both phenomenological fracture models are physics-inspired and take the effect of the first and third stress tensor invariants into account in predicting the onset of ductile fracture. The MMC model is based on the assumption that the initiation of fracture is determined by a critical stress state, while the shear-modified Gurson model assumes void growth as the governing mechanism. The model accuracy is quantified based on the predictions of the displacements to fracture for experiments which have not been used for calibration. It is found that the MMC model predictions agree well with all experiments (less than 4% error), while less accurate predictions are observed for the shear-modified Gurson model. A comparison of plots of the strain to fracture as a function of the stress triaxiality and the normalized third invariant reveals significant differences between the two models except within the vicinity of stress states that have been used for calibration.

  17. EXPERIMENTS OF A REDUCED GRID IN LASG/IAP WORLD OCEAN GENERAL CIRCULATION MODELS (OGCMs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiying; LIU Hailong; ZHANG Xuehong; YU Rucong

    2006-01-01

    Due to the decrease in grid size associated with the convergence of meridians toward the poles in spherical coordinates, the time steps in many global climate models with finite-difference method are restricted to be unpleasantly small. To overcome the problem, a reduced grid is introduced to LASG/IAP world ocean general circulation models. The reduced grid is implemented successfully in the coarser resolutions version model L30T63 at first. Then, it is carried out in the improved version model LICOM with finer resolutions. In the experiment with model L30T63, under time step unchanged though, execution time per single model run is shortened significantly owing to the decrease of grid number and filtering execution in high latitudes. Results from additional experiments with L30T63 show that the time step of integration can be quadrupled at most in reduced grid with refinement ratio 3. In the experiment with model LICOM and with the model's original time step unchanged, the model covered area is extended to the whole globe from its original case with the grid point of North Pole considered as an isolated island and the results of experiment are shown to be acceptable.

  18. NEAR FIELD MODELING OF SPE1 EXPERIMENT AND PREDICTION OF THE SECOND SOURCE PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS (SPE2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoun, T; Xu, H; Vorobiev, O; Lomov, I

    2011-10-20

    Motion along joints and fractures in the rock has been proposed as one of the sources of near-source shear wave generation, and demonstrating the validity of this hypothesis is a focal scientific objective of the source physics experimental campaign in the Climax Stock granitic outcrop. A modeling effort has been undertaken by LLNL to complement the experimental campaign, and over the long term provide a validated computation capability for the nuclear explosion monitoring community. The approach involves performing the near-field nonlinear modeling with hydrodynamic codes (e.g., GEODYN, GEODYN-L), and the far-field seismic propagation with an elastic wave propagation code (e.g., WPP). the codes will be coupled together to provide a comprehensive source-to-sensor modeling capability. The technical approach involves pre-test predictions of each of the SPE experiments using their state of the art modeling capabilities, followed by code improvements to alleviate deficiencies identified in the pre-test predictions. This spiral development cycle wherein simulations are used to guide experimental design and the data from the experiment used to improve the models is the most effective approach to enable a transition from the descriptive phenomenological models in current use to the predictive, hybrid physics models needed for a science-based modeling capability for nuclear explosion monitoring. The objective of this report is to describe initial results of non-linear motion predictions of the first two SPE shots in the Climax Stock: a 220-lb shot at a depth of 180 ft (SPE No.1), and a 2570-lb shot at a depth of 150 ft (SPE No.2). The simulations were performed using the LLNL ensemble granite model, a model developed to match velocity and displacement attenuation from HARDHAT, PILE DRIVER, and SHOAL, as well as Russian and French nuclear test data in granitic rocks. This model represents the state of the art modeling capabilities as they existed when the SPE campaign was

  19. Modeling methods for mixture-of-mixtures experiments applied to a tablet formulation problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepel, G F

    1999-01-01

    During the past few years, statistical methods for the experimental design, modeling, and optimization of mixture experiments have been widely applied to drug formulation problems. Different methods are required for mixture-of-mixtures (MoM) experiments in which a formulation is a mixture of two or more "major" components, each of which is a mixture of one or more "minor" components. Two types of MoM experiments are briefly described. A tablet formulation optimization example from a 1997 article in this journal is used to illustrate one type of MoM experiment and corresponding empirical modeling methods. Literature references that discuss other methods for MoM experiments are also provided.

  20. The International Heat Stress Genotype Experiment for Modeling Wheat Response to Heat: Field Experiments and AgMIP-Wheat Multi-Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martre, Pierre; Reynolds, Matthew P.; Asseng, Senthold; Ewert, Frank; Alderman, Phillip D.; Cammarano, Davide; Maiorano, Andrea; Ruane, Alexander C.; Aggarwal, Pramod K.; Anothai, Jakarat; hide

    2017-01-01

    The data set contains a portion of the International Heat Stress Genotype Experiment (IHSGE) data used in the AgMIP-Wheat project to analyze the uncertainty of 30 wheat crop models and quantify the impact of heat on global wheat yield productivity. It includes two spring wheat cultivars grown during two consecutive winter cropping cycles at hot, irrigated, and low latitude sites in Mexico (Ciudad Obregon and Tlaltizapan), Egypt (Aswan), India (Dharwar), the Sudan (Wad Medani), and Bangladesh (Dinajpur). Experiments in Mexico included normal (November-December) and late (January-March) sowing dates. Data include local daily weather data, soil characteristics and initial soil conditions, crop measurements (anthesis and maturity dates, anthesis and final total above ground biomass, final grain yields and yields components), and cultivar information. Simulations include both daily in-season and end-of-season results from 30 wheat models.

  1. Early Phases of Business Model Innovation: An Ideation Experience Workshop in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoveskog, M.; Halila, F.; Danilovic, M.

    2015-01-01

    As the mantra "innovate your business model or die" increases in popularity among practitioners and academics, so does the need for novel and feasible business models. In this article, we describe an ideation experience workshop, conducted in an undergraduate business course, in which students, guided by their lecturers and two industry…

  2. Exploring a Comprehensive Model for Early Childhood Vocabulary Instruction: A Design Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. Christine; Christ, Tanya; Chiu, Ming Ming

    2014-01-01

    Addressing a critical need for effective vocabulary practices in early childhood classrooms, we conducted a design experiment to achieve three goals: (1) developing a comprehensive model for early childhood vocabulary instruction, (2) examining the effectiveness of this model, and (3) discerning the contextual conditions that hinder or facilitate…

  3. Sensitivity analysis and optimization of system dynamics models : Regression analysis and statistical design of experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    1995-01-01

    This tutorial discusses what-if analysis and optimization of System Dynamics models. These problems are solved, using the statistical techniques of regression analysis and design of experiments (DOE). These issues are illustrated by applying the statistical techniques to a System Dynamics model for

  4. Disconfirming User Expectations of the Online Service Experience: Inferred versus Direct Disconfirmation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Martin; Palmer, Adrian; Wright, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Disconfirmation models of online service measurement seek to define service quality as the difference between user expectations of the service to be received and perceptions of the service actually received. Two such models-inferred and direct disconfirmation-for measuring quality of the online experience are compared (WebQUAL, SERVQUAL). Findings…

  5. Early Phases of Business Model Innovation: An Ideation Experience Workshop in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoveskog, M.; Halila, F.; Danilovic, M.

    2015-01-01

    As the mantra "innovate your business model or die" increases in popularity among practitioners and academics, so does the need for novel and feasible business models. In this article, we describe an ideation experience workshop, conducted in an undergraduate business course, in which students, guided by their lecturers and two industry…

  6. Comparison of first principles model of beer microfiltration to experiments via systematic parameter identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.; Willigenburg, van G.; Vollebregt, H.M.; Eisner, V.; Mepschen, A.

    2015-01-01

    A first principles microfiltration model based on shear-induced diffusion is compared to experiments performed on the clarification of beer. After performing an identifiability and sensitivity analysis, the model parameters are estimated using global minimization of the sum of least squares. The

  7. Financial Stress, Shaming Experiences and Psychosocial Ill-Health: Studies into the Finances-Shame Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrin, Bengt; Aslund, Cecilia; Nilsson, Kent W.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test the Finances-Shame model and its explanatory power regarding the prevalence of psychosocial ill-health. The Finances-Shame model postulates that (i) the greater the financial stress and the more experiences of having been shamed, the greater the risk for psychosocial ill-health, (ii) the lesser the financial stress…

  8. Being a Deaf Role Model: Deaf People's Experiences of Working with Families and Deaf Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Katherine D.; Young, Alys M.

    2011-01-01

    The experiences of being a deaf role model have been little explored in the literature. This paper explores the role of the deaf role model as perceived by d/Deaf adults who carried out this role, when working with deaf young people, parents of deaf children, and professionals who work with them. The data were collected from part of the evaluation…

  9. Designing Informal Learning Experiences for Early Career Academics Using a Knowledge Ecosystem Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Faye; Partridge, Helen; Bruce, Christine; Hemmings, Brian

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a "knowledge ecosystem" model of how early career academics experience using information to learn while building their social networks for developmental purposes. Developed using grounded theory methodology, the model offers a way of conceptualising how to empower early career academics through (1) agency…

  10. Experience Report: Constraint-Based Modelling and Simulation of Railway Emergency Response Plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Sandberg, Lene

    2016-01-01

    We report on experiences from a case study applying a constraint-based process-modelling and -simulation tool, dcrgraphs.net, to the modelling and rehearsal of railway emergency response plans with domain experts. The case study confirmed the approach as a viable means for domain experts to analyse...... and security processes in the danish public transport sector and their dependency on ICT....

  11. Applying TSOI Hybrid Learning Model to Enhance Blended Learning Experience in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Mun Fie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Research on the nature of blended learning and its features has led to a variety of approaches to the practice of blended learning. The purpose of this paper is to provide an alternative practice model, the TSOI hybrid learning model (HLM) to enhance the blended learning experiences in science education. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  12. The Effects of Leadership Training and Experience: A Contingency Model Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Fred E.

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes recent studies based on the contingency model of leadership effectiveness, which suggest why research has failed to show that leadership training and experience increase organizational performance. The contingency model postulated that group performance depends on the match between situational favorableness, i.e., the leader's control…

  13. A Didactic Experiment and Model of a Flat-Plate Solar Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallitto, Aurelio Agliolo; Fiordilino, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    We report on an experiment performed with a home-made flat-plate solar collector, carried out together with high-school students. To explain the experimental results, we propose a model that describes the heating process of the solar collector. The model accounts quantitatively for the experimental data. We suggest that solar-energy topics should…

  14. Modelling plant interspecific interactions from experiments of perennial crop mixtures to predict optimal combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halty, Virginia; Valdés, Matías; Tejera, Mauricio; Picasso, Valentín; Fort, Hugo

    2017-07-28

    The contribution of plant species richness to productivity and ecosystem functioning is a long standing issue in Ecology, with relevant implications for both conservation and agriculture. Both experiments and quantitative modelling are fundamental to the design of sustainable agroecosystems and the optimization of crop production. We modelled communities of perennial crop mixtures by using a generalized Lotka-Volterra model, i.e. a model such that the interspecific interactions are more general than purely competitive. We estimated model parameters -carrying capacities and interaction coefficientsfrom, respectively, the observed biomass of monocultures and bicultures measured in a large diversity experiment of seven perennial forage species in Iowa, United States. The sign and absolute value of the interaction coefficients showed that the biological interactions between species pairs included amensalism, competition, and parasitism (asymmetric positive-negative interaction), with various degrees of intensity. We tested the model fit by simulating the combinations of more than two species and comparing them with the polycultures experimental data. Overall, theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experiments. Using this model, we also simulated species combinations that were not sown. From all possible mixtures (sown and not sown) we identified which are the most productive species combinations. Our results demonstrate that a combination of experiments and modelling can contribute to the design of sustainable agricultural systems in general and to the optimization of crop production in particular. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. The structure of self-reported emotional experiences : A mixed-effects Poisson factor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockenholt, U; Kamakura, WA; Wedel, M

    2003-01-01

    Multivariate count data are commonly analysed by using Poisson distributions with varying intensity parameters, resulting in a random-effects model. In the analysis of a data set on the frequency of different emotion experiences we find that a Poisson model with a single random effect does not yield

  16. Progressing towards a Model of Intrinsic Inclusion in a Mainstream Primary School: A SENCo's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Helen

    2012-01-01

    This article explores a Special Educational Needs Coordinator's experience of progressing from a "mainstream + SEN" approach to inclusion, defined as an extrinsically inclusive model, and perhaps more closely aligned to integration, towards a model of intrinsic inclusiveness. A three-tiered reading/spelling programme was implemented, using a…

  17. A unified modeling approach for physical experiment design and optimization in laser driven inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Haiyan [Mechatronics Engineering School of Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Huang, Yunbao, E-mail: Huangyblhy@gmail.com [Mechatronics Engineering School of Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Jiang, Shaoen, E-mail: Jiangshn@vip.sina.com [Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Jing, Longfei, E-mail: scmyking_2008@163.com [Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tianxuan, Huang; Ding, Yongkun [Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • A unified modeling approach for physical experiment design is presented. • Any laser facility can be flexibly defined and included with two scripts. • Complex targets and laser beams can be parametrically modeled for optimization. • Automatically mapping of laser beam energy facilitates targets shape optimization. - Abstract: Physical experiment design and optimization is very essential for laser driven inertial confinement fusion due to the high cost of each shot. However, only limited experiments with simple structure or shape on several laser facilities can be designed and evaluated in available codes, and targets are usually defined by programming, which may lead to it difficult for complex shape target design and optimization on arbitrary laser facilities. A unified modeling approach for physical experiment design and optimization on any laser facilities is presented in this paper. Its core idea includes: (1) any laser facility can be flexibly defined and included with two scripts, (2) complex shape targets and laser beams can be parametrically modeled based on features, (3) an automatically mapping scheme of laser beam energy onto discrete mesh elements of targets enable targets or laser beams be optimized without any additional interactive modeling or programming, and (4) significant computation algorithms are additionally presented to efficiently evaluate radiation symmetry on the target. Finally, examples are demonstrated to validate the significance of such unified modeling approach for physical experiments design and optimization in laser driven inertial confinement fusion.

  18. Characteristics of the Nordic Seas overflows in a set of Norwegian Earth System Model experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chuncheng; Ilicak, Mehmet; Bentsen, Mats; Fer, Ilker

    2016-08-01

    Global ocean models with an isopycnic vertical coordinate are advantageous in representing overflows, as they do not suffer from topography-induced spurious numerical mixing commonly seen in geopotential coordinate models. In this paper, we present a quantitative diagnosis of the Nordic Seas overflows in four configurations of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) family that features an isopycnic ocean model. For intercomparison, two coupled ocean-sea ice and two fully coupled (atmosphere-land-ocean-sea ice) experiments are considered. Each pair consists of a (non-eddying) 1° and a (eddy-permitting) 1/4° horizontal resolution ocean model. In all experiments, overflow waters remain dense and descend to the deep basins, entraining ambient water en route. Results from the 1/4° pair show similar behavior in the overflows, whereas the 1° pair show distinct differences, including temperature/salinity properties, volume transport (Q), and large scale features such as the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The volume transport of the overflows and degree of entrainment are underestimated in the 1° experiments, whereas in the 1/4° experiments, there is a two-fold downstream increase in Q, which matches observations well. In contrast to the 1/4° experiments, the coarse 1° experiments do not capture the inclined isopycnals of the overflows or the western boundary current off the Flemish Cap. In all experiments, the pathway of the Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water is misrepresented: a major fraction of the overflow proceeds southward into the West European Basin, instead of turning westward into the Irminger Sea. This discrepancy is attributed to excessive production of Labrador Sea Water in the model. The mean state and variability of the Nordic Seas overflows have significant consequences on the response of the AMOC, hence their correct representations are of vital importance in global ocean and climate modelling.

  19. Comparison of the CREATE-L plasma response model with experiments on TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, P.; Lister, J.B. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP); Villone, F. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA/CREATA, Univ. die Cassino, Cassino (Italy); Albanese, R. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA/CREATA, DIEMA, Univ. di Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    1997-06-01

    Experiments have been performed on the TCV tokamak to evaluate the response of Ohmic, L-Mode, limited and diverted plasmas to changes in the poloidal field coil voltages. The resulting closed loop plasma responses have been compared with the CREATE-L linearized MHD equilibrium model of TCV. The simulated responses show excellent agreement with the experiments in both the time and frequency domains. Tests with models derived using different assumptions indicate that the underlying physical assumptions of the nominal model are appropriate. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  20. Quantitative explanation of circuit experiments and real traffic using the optimal velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Akihiro; Kikuchi, Macoto; Shibata, Akihiro; Sugiyama, Yuki; Tadaki, Shin-ichi; Yukawa, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    We have experimentally confirmed that the occurrence of a traffic jam is a dynamical phase transition (Tadaki et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 103034, Sugiyama et al 2008 New J. Phys. 10 033001). In this study, we investigate whether the optimal velocity (OV) model can quantitatively explain the results of experiments. The occurrence and non-occurrence of jammed flow in our experiments agree with the predictions of the OV model. We also propose a scaling rule for the parameters of the model. Using this rule, we obtain critical density as a function of a single parameter. The obtained critical density is consistent with the observed values for highway traffic.