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Sample records for ams radiocarbon dating

  1. AMS radiocarbon dating of cemetery of Jin Marquises in China

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, X; Wang, J; Guo, Z; Liu, K; Lü, X; Ma, H; Li, K; Yuan, J; Cai, L

    2000-01-01

    Bones are very important samples to determine the hosts of the cemetery of Jin Marquises which were excavated at Tianma-Qucun site in Shanxi Province in China. In order to obtain accurate AMS radiocarbon dates, bones were pretreated by two kinds of methods, the gelatin-extraction method and the amino-acid method. Charcoals collected from the same sites were also used. The measured dates agree with historical record.

  2. Radiocarbon Dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A

    2007-12-20

    Radiocarbon dating can be used to determine the age of objects that contain components that were once alive. In the case of human remains, a radiocarbon date can distinguish between a crime scene and an archeological site. Documents, museum artifacts and art objects can be dated to determine if their age is correct for the historical context. A radiocarbon date does not confirm authenticity, but it can help identify a forgery.

  3. AMS radiocarbon dating on Campos Basin, Southeast Brazilian Continental Slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macario, K.D.; Anjos, R.M.; Gomes, P.R.S. E-mail: paulogom@if.uff.br; Figueiredo, A.G.; Lacerda de Souza, C.; Barbosa, C.F.; Coimbra, M.M.; Elmore, D

    2004-08-01

    We present results on radiocarbon dating of foraminifera shell samples, collected on the upper slope of Campos Basin, in Southern Brazil. This is the first time that the sedimentation rate of this area is measured with a fine scale (cm) stratigraphy. {sup 14}C ages vary from (2560 {+-} 80) years. BP at the top to (7260 {+-} 80) years. BP at the bottom of the sediment column. The mean accumulation ratio for the whole column is (6.2 {+-} 0.7) cm/kyears.

  4. The use of AMS radiocarbon dating for Xia-Shang-Zhou chronology

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Z Y; LiuKeXin; Lu Xiang Yang; Ma Hong Ji; Wu Xiao Hon; Yuan Si Xun

    2000-01-01

    The possibility and problems of using radiocarbon dating to historical chronology are discussed. The current situation of ancient Chinese chronology and the project of Xia-Shang-Zhou chronology are introduced. A chronological study requires the AMS radiocarbon dating with high precision, high reliability and high efficiency. The Peking University AMS facility (PKUAMS) has been upgraded and a series of quality control steps were adopted. To reduce the error of calendar age, wiggle matching with serial samples should be used. Some preliminary results of Xia-Shang-Zhou chronology are presented.

  5. Preliminary study on radiocarbon AMS dating of pollen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周卫建; 周杰; 萧家仪; D.Donahue; A.J.T.Jull

    1999-01-01

    17 samples were collected from aeolian and lacustrine profiles within the environment sensitive zone of the Loess Plateau, and an experimental method was established which is suitable for pollen extraction from aeolian sediment. A comparative study of pollen dating was carried out using the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating of known age samples, and then an experiment with the pollen concentrates was performed. The results indicate that pollen that has been deposited simultaneously with sediment in a stable environment can provide reliable ages. This technique will provide a way of improving the chronological framework for the Loess Plateau since the late Pleistocene. The 14C dating was combined with field investigations, and from the geological record within this zone, evidence was extracted of four major monsoon precipitation changes during the transition from the late Pleistocene to Holoeene.

  6. From scrolls to Picasso: AMS radiocarbon dating applied to textiles, art works and artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jull, A.J.T.; Donahue, D.J.; Beck, J.W.; Burr, G.S.; O`Malley, J.; Hewitt, L.; Biddulph, D.; Hatheway, A.L.; Lange, T.E.; Toolin, J. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). NSF Arizona Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Facility

    1997-12-31

    Full text: The use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for radiocarbon dating allows us to use very small samples of carbon, <1 mg. This has opened a vast array of applications of radiocarbon dating which were difficult to do before AMS, due to sample size limitations of decay counting. We have successfully applied AMS {sup 14}C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory and bone. For many of these types of samples, the results are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. This has encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt and Picasso. Most recently, we have also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document which shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages. An important issue in such studies is also the radiocarbon calibration curve. For some periods, most notably 1700-1950 AD we know that several changes in the {sup 14}C composition of the atmosphere make it almost impossible to date a sample during this period more precisely than the entire range. However, before this period, we have successfully dated materials to high precision. We have also studied the use of the period l900-1950 AD for {sup 14}C measurements and will present some examples where the rapid decline in {Delta} {sup 14}C can be used to date art works. The period after 1950AD also allows us to identify works fabricated from recent materials using the `spike` in {sup 14}C due to atmospheric nuclear testing. This bomb {sup 14}C has also been successfully used to identify originals from copies of works purporting to be the originals. We will discuss some artifacts, art works and forgeries, where {sup 14}C can resolve problems of authenticity (authors).

  7. AMS radiocarbon dating of mortar: The case study of the medieval UNESCO site of Modena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmine, Lubritto; Caroselli, Marta; Lugli, Stefano; Marzaioli, Fabio; Nonni, Sara; Marchetti Dori, S.; Terrasi, Filippo

    2015-10-01

    The carbon dioxide contributing to binder formation during the set of a lime mortar reflects the atmospheric 14C content at the time of construction of a building. For this reason, the 14C dating of mortars is used with increasing frequencies in archaeological and architectural research. Mortars, however, may also contain carbonaceous contaminants potentially affecting radiocarbon dating. The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) of the Second University of Naples (SUN) has recently obtained some promising results in mortar radiocarbon dating thanks to the development of a procedure (i.e. CryoSoniC/Cryo2SoniC) aiming to eliminate exogenous C contamination that may occur in a mortar. The construction history of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Modena (Italy) is still controversial and represents a challenging case study for the application of absolute dating methodologies for different reasons. From the point of view of 14C dating, for example, given the high percentage of carbonate aggregates composing these samples, Modena mortars represent an experimental test particularly indicative of exogenous carbon sources suppression ensuring methodology accuracy. In this paper several AMS Radiocarbon dates were carried out on lime lumps with the aim to: (i) verify procedure accuracy by a comparison of the results obtainable from lime lumps dated after different treatments (i.e. bulk lime lumps vs. CryoSoniC purified lime lumps); (ii) compare different building phases absolute chronology for the medieval UNESCO site of Modena, with that assumed by historical sources in order to assess preliminary the 14C dating feasibility for of the site. Historical temporal constraints and mortar clustering, based on petrography, have been applied to define a temporal framework of the analyzed structure. Moreover, a detailed petrographic characterization of mortars was used both as a preliminary tool for the choice of samples and to infer about the

  8. AMS radiocarbon dating of pollen concentrates in a karstic lake system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, William; Zielhofer, Christoph; Mischke, Steffen; Campbell, Jennifer; Bryant, Charlotte; Fink, David; Xu, Xiaomei

    2016-04-01

    In lake sediments where terrestrial macrofossils are rare or absent, AMS radiocarbon dating of pollen concentrates represents an important alternative solution for developing a robust and high resolution chronology suitable for Bayesian modelling of age-depth relationships. Here we report an application of the dense media separation approach (Vandergoes and Prior, Radiocarbon 45:479-492, 2003) to Holocene lake sediments from karstic Lake Sidi Ali, Morocco (33° 03'N, 05° 00'W; 2,080 m a.s.l.). Paired dates on terrestrial (macrofossil) and aquatic (ostracod) samples, and dating of bulk sediment surface material at the site indicate varying reservoir effects of up to 900 yr and highlight the need to date terrestrial carbon sources. Dating of pollen concentrates is a viable approach at Lake Sidi Ali, as pollen concentrations are high (~200,000 grains/cc), and pollen assemblages typically contain only minor percentages (wood) were prepared and dated following the heavy liquid (sodium polytungstate, SPT) density separation protocol. A series of SPT solutions of progressively decreasing density (1.9-1.15 s.g.) were used to divide the samples into several fractions. The pollen purity of these fractions was evaluated by microscopic analysis of smear slides, and the richest fraction(s) were selected for dating. Sieving at 10 μm and at 50/125 μm (depending on the size of predominant pollen grains) was used to further concentrate the pollen grains, and the samples were freeze dried to determine the dry weight of material. The results show that the highest purity of pollen is sample dependent and may typically be achieved in the fractions precipitating at 1.4-1.2 s.g. With sieving, terrestrial pollen purity of ~50-80% can be achieved, offering a considerable improvement in terms of terrestrial carbon content over bulk sediment. These values reflect the challenge in some samples of fully separating pollen grains from common aquatic algae, e.g. Pediastrum and Botryococcus

  9. A reevaluation of the Pallett Creek earthquake chronology based on new AMS radiocarbon dates, San Andreas fault, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharer, K.M.; Biasi, G.P.; Weldon, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Pallett Creek paleoseismic record occupies a keystone position in most attempts to develop rupture histories for the southern San Andreas fault. Previous estimates of earthquake ages at Pallett Creek were determined by decay counting radiocarbon methods. That method requires large samples which can lead to unaccounted sources of uncertainty in radiocarbon ages because of the heterogeneous composition of organic layers. In contrast, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dates may be obtained from small samples that have known carbon sources and also allow for a more complete sampling of the section. We present 65 new AMS radiocarbon dates that span nine ground-rupturing earthquakes at Pallett Creek. Overall, the AMS dates are similar to and reveal no dramatic bias in the conventional dates. For many layers, however, individual charcoal samples were younger than the conventional dates, leading to earthquake ages that are overall slightly younger than previously reported. New earthquake ages are determined by Bayesian refinement of the layer ages based on stratigraphic ordering and sedimentological constraints. The new chronology is more regular than previously published records in large part due to new samples constraining the age of event R. The closed interval from event C to 1857 has a mean recurrence of 135years (?? = 83.2 years) and a quasiperiodic coefficient of variation (COV) of 0.61. We show that the new dates and resultant earthquake chronology have a stronger effect on COV than the specific membership of this long series and dating precision improvements from sedimentation rates. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Radiocarbon dating of artworks

    OpenAIRE

    Krajcar Bronić, Ines; Horvatinčić, Nada; Barešić, Jadranka; Sironić, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    Absolute dating of artworks and cultural heritage objects is one of the most important issues in art history studies and essential for evaluating original art objects, differentiating between originals and later imitations and/or frauds and recognizing subsequent repairs and restauration works. The radiocarbon dating (14C dating) method is one of the most well-known radiometric methods of absolute dating, which can be applied for dating materials of biogenic origin, such as wood, charcoal, bo...

  11. AMS radiocarbon dating of medieval textile relics: The frocks and the pillow of St. Francis of Assisi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since natural textiles usually originate from short-lived organisms, they can represent a useful material to date samples from historical periods with a good accuracy. In this work, we present a set of radiocarbon measurements on medieval textile relics: two woollen habits and a pillow traditionally associated with St. Francis of Assisi, the saint patron of Italy. The strategy in choosing samples for radiocarbon dating is first discussed and the procedures for measurements - performed at the 3 MV Tandetron accelerator of Laboratorio di Tecniche Nucleari per i Beni Culturali (LABEC), Florence - are described; AMS results for the two frocks showed that only one of them, presently kept in the church of St. Francis in Cortona, is compatible with the Saint's period of life, as is the pillow also kept in Cortona. Another frock attributed to St. Francis appears to date from at least 80 years after his death. However, the goal of these measurements was not a bare authentication/disconfirmation of the relics; they just represent an example of how scientific analysis can integrate with humanistic studies. Indeed, AMS results, combined with a thorough analysis of the textiles typologies, confirmed the historical hypotheses based on documentary studies and on tradition. The overall conclusions contributed to the decisions taken for conservation, and have as a whole enhanced the religious importance of the relics

  12. Radiocarbon Dating the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, M. A.; Gajewski, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Anthropocene has no agreed start date since current suggestions for its beginning range from Pre-Industrial times to the Industrial Revolution, and from the mid-twentieth century to the future. To set the boundary of the Anthropocene in geological time, we must first understand when, how and to what extent humans began altering the Earth system. One aspect of this involves reconstructing the effects of prehistoric human activity on the physical landscape. However, for global reconstructions of land use and land cover change to be more accurately interpreted in the context of human interaction with the landscape, large-scale spatio-temporal demographic changes in prehistoric populations must be known. Estimates of the relative number of prehistoric humans in different regions of the world and at different moments in time are needed. To this end, we analyze a dataset of radiocarbon dates from the Canadian Archaeological Radiocarbon Database (CARD), the Palaeolithic Database of Europe and the AustArch Database of Australia, as well as published dates from South America. This is the first time such a large quantity of dates (approximately 60,000) has been mapped and studied at a global scale. Initial results from the analysis of temporal frequency distributions of calibrated radiocarbon dates, assumed to be proportional to population density, will be discussed. The utility of radiocarbon dates in studies of the Anthropocene will be evaluated and potential links between population density and changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, climate, migration patterning and fire frequency coincidence will be considered.

  13. Peat record reflecting Holocene climatic change in the Zoige Plateau and AMS radiocarbon dating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Through the use of reliable AMS dating of high resolution (15-30 years) peat and the establishment of monsoon climate proxies sequence, we have been able to recognize several cold, dry events in the Tibetan Plateau during the Holocene. The more obvious ones occurred around 12800, 11300, 10200, 9580, 8900, 6400, 4400, 3700, 2800 and 1500 cal. aBP. These events correlate well with both ice rafting events recorded in high latitude North Atlantic Ocean sediment cores and cooling events in the low latitude SST. Spectral analysis indicates high frequency climate variation on centennial-millennial time scale during the Holocene. This further reflects Holocene climate instability and the existence of centennial-millenium scale rhythm in mid latitude areas as well.

  14. Radiocarbon dates XXI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This list includes 105 radiocarbon age determinations on 104 geological samples made by the Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory. They are on samples from various areas as follows: Labrador Shelf (2); Newfoundland (12); Nova Scotia (2); New Brunswick (1); Quebec (3); Ontario (1); Manitoba (1); Alberta (2); British Columbia (15); Yukon Territory (35); Northwest Territories, Mainland (10); Northwest Territories, Arctic Archipelago (21). Details of background and standard for the 2 L and 5 L counters during the period from November 4, 1980 to October 31, 1981 are summarized in Tables 1 and 2; Table 3 gives the number of counts used to determine the average background and standard counting rates; and Table 4 lists the number of different background and standard gas preparations used for counting

  15. Radiocarbon dating of ancient Japanese documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, H. [Nagoya Univ., Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    History is a reconstruction of past human activity, evidence of which is remained in the form of documents or relics. For the reconstruction of historic period, the radiocarbon dating of ancient documents provides important information. Although radiocarbon age is converted into calendar age with the calibration curve, the calibrated radiocarbon age is still different from the historical age when the document was written. The difference is known as 'old wood effect' for wooden cultural property. The discrepancy becomes more serious problem for recent sample which requires more accurate age determination. Using Tandetron accelerator mass spectrometer at Nagoya University, we have measured radiocarbon ages of Japanese ancient documents, sutras and printed books written dates of which are clarified from the paleographic standpoint. The purpose is to clarify the relation between calibrated radiocarbon age and historical age of ancient Japanese document by AMS radiocarbon dating. This paper reports 23 radiocarbon ages of ancient Japanese documents, sutras and printed books. The calibrated radiocarbon ages are in good agreement with the corresponding historical ages. It was shown by radiocarbon dating of the ancient documents that Japanese paper has little gap by 'old wood effect'; accordingly, ancient Japanese paper is a suitable sample for radiocarbon dating of recent historic period. (author)

  16. Radiocarbon dating of the silk fabrics laced with colored threads 'Ezo Nishiki' by AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezo Nishiki are silk fabrics in which elegant designs of dragon or peony were laced with color threads. They were made originally in China and imported into Japan by way of the Amur Basin and Sakhalin. Although the foreign commerce flourished actively during Quing dynasty (1616-1912), a few ancient records suggests that the origin ascends to Yuan (1271-1368) or early Ming dynasty (1368-1644). We measured radiocarbon ages of 34 Ezo Nishiki samples. Although most of them showed the period of Quing dynasty, a sample indicated that the origin of the trade can be traced back to the middle 14th or the early 15th century. (author)

  17. Radiocarbon Dating, Memories, and Hopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, W. F.

    1972-10-01

    The history of radiocarbon dating from 1939 to the present is reviewed. The basic principles of radiocarbon dating are that cosmic rays make living things radioactive with {sup 14}C to a certain level fixed by the environment and that at death the intake of food stops so no replenishment of the {sup 14}C steadily lost by the immutable decay occurs. Therefore measurement of the degree of decay gives the time lapse since death, i.e., the radiocarbon age. The equipment developed and experiments performed to measure the specific activity of specimens to be dated are described. The results obtained by world-wide experimenters are discussed. These showed that on simultaneity radiocarbon dating is apparently reliable but that absolute dates may be incorrect by as much as 600 to 700 y. The value of radiocarbon dating to archaeologists, geologists, climatologists, and historians is stressed. (LCL)

  18. Radiocarbon dating: use and abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the problems associated with radiocarbon dating are discussed with particular reference to the British neolithic site of Briar Hill, Northampton, England. The problems arise when co-ordinating the radiocarbon dates with observed stratigraphy. In particular, three dates are much earlier than expected and no explanation of the early dates can be given as they represent neither sequence nor context. Doubts as to the validity of the dating and, hence, interpretation are expressed. (U.K.)

  19. AMS radiocarbon dating of wood trunks in the pumiceous deposits of the Kikai-Akahoya eruption in Yakushima Island, SW Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Mitsuru, E-mail: okuno@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth System Science, Faculty of Science, Fukuoka University, 814-0180 Fukuoka (Japan); AIG Collaborative Research Institute for International Study on Eruptive History and Informatics, Fukuoka University, 814-0180 Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Toshio [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, 464-8602 Nagoya (Japan); Geshi, Nobuo [Geological Survey of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Science and Technology, 305-8567 Tsukuba (Japan); Kimura, Katsuhiko [Division of Environment System Management, Faculty of Symbiotic System Science, Fukushima University, 960-1296 Fukushima (Japan); Saito-Kokubu, Yoko [Tono Geoscience Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 959-31 Jorinji, Toki, Gifu 509-5102 (Japan); Kobayashi, Tetsuo [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 890-0065 Kagoshima (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Radiocarbon dating using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was performed on numerous wood trunks from pumiceous deposits along the Nagata, Isso and Miyanoura rivers on the northern side of Yakushima Island, 60 km south of Kyushu Island. The obtained {sup 14}C dates were around 6.5 ka BP, which, in combination with the geological characteristics of the pumiceous deposits indicates that these specimens were buried during the Kikai-Akahoya (K-Ah) eruption from the Kikai caldera. However, the fact that they are not charred suggests that the origin of these deposits are not pyroclastic flows. Fourteen taxa (Pinus subgen. Diploxylon, Tsuga, Cryptomeria, Chamaecyparis, Myrica, Castanea, Castanopsis, Quercus subgen. Cyclobalanopsis, Trochodendron, Phellodendron, Lagerstroemia, Rhododendron, Myrsine and Symplocos) were identified through anatomical characteristics. This is the first discovery of forest species on the Yakushima Island before the devastating eruption.

  20. Microscale radiocarbon dating of paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Laura; Hajdas, Irka; McIntyre, Cameron; Küffner, Markus; Scherrer, Nadim C.; Ferreira, Ester S. B.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, radiocarbon dating of paintings using minimal sample sizes has been investigated, in an effort to address the problem of limited access to sample material in paintings. 14C analyses were conducted on signed and dated paintings from two Swiss artists of the twentieth century. The selected paintings dated from the 1930s and 1960s, provided the opportunity to evaluate the dating accuracy on paintings realized before and after 1950 AD when the 14C bomb peak was created, as a result of the nuclear tests conducted in the 1950/1960s. The work focused on the one hand on minimizing the size of the canvas sample required for accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurement on the gas ion source of the MICADAS and, on the other hand, on testing the possibility of dating the organic binder of the paint. Following careful characterization of the paint composition by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, paints containing no other carbon source than the natural organic binder were identified and dated.

  1. Microscale radiocarbon dating of paintings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendriks, Laura; Hajdas, Irka; McIntyre, Cameron [ETH Zurich, Ion Beam Physics, Zurich (Switzerland); Kueffner, Markus; Ferreira, Ester S.B. [SIK-ISEA, Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Scherrer, Nadim C. [Bern University of Applied Sciences, HKB, Bern (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, radiocarbon dating of paintings using minimal sample sizes has been investigated, in an effort to address the problem of limited access to sample material in paintings. {sup 14}C analyses were conducted on signed and dated paintings from two Swiss artists of the twentieth century. The selected paintings dated from the 1930s and 1960s, provided the opportunity to evaluate the dating accuracy on paintings realized before and after 1950 AD when the {sup 14}C bomb peak was created, as a result of the nuclear tests conducted in the 1950/1960s. The work focused on the one hand on minimizing the size of the canvas sample required for accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurement on the gas ion source of the MICADAS and, on the other hand, on testing the possibility of dating the organic binder of the paint. Following careful characterization of the paint composition by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, paints containing no other carbon source than the natural organic binder were identified and dated. (orig.)

  2. Radiocarbon dating with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has two great advantages over conventional dating: 1) much smaller samples can be handled and 2) counting time is significantly shorter. Three examples are given for Holocene-age material from east-central Ellesmere Island. The results demonstrate the potential use of this technique as a powerful research tool in studies of Quaternary chronology. Individual fragments of marine shells as small as 0.1 g have been dated successfully at the IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto. In the case of an aquatic moss from a lake sediment core, an increment 0.5 cm thick could be used instead of a 5 cm-thick slice, thus allowing a much more precise estimate of the onset of organic sedimentation

  3. Radiocarbon dating of medieval manuscripts from the University of Seville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, F.J., E-mail: fsantos@us.e [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA), Avda. Thomas Alva Edison 7, Isla de la Cartuja, 41092 Seville (Spain); Gomez-Martinez, I.; Garcia-Leon, M. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA), Avda. Thomas Alva Edison 7, Isla de la Cartuja, 41092 Seville (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Eleven samples (parchment and paper) from different medieval manuscripts belonging to the cultural heritage of the University of Seville have been radiocarbon dated on the 1 MV AMS facility at the CNA in Seville (Spain). The objective of this study is double. First of all, these are the first real 'unknown' samples treated in the radiocarbon laboratory and dated on our AMS facility, SARA (Spanish Accelerator for Radionuclide Analysis). Besides, some useful information about the manuscripts can be obtained, either to corroborate the dates, or in some cases, to decide between possible dates. As expected, a general agreement is found between radiocarbon results and palaeographical data. Nevertheless, some interesting facts have been learned through this study. We present in this paper the procedure to prepare the samples and the ages obtained with a brief discussion of the results.

  4. Radiocarbon dating of medieval manuscripts from the University of Seville

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven samples (parchment and paper) from different medieval manuscripts belonging to the cultural heritage of the University of Seville have been radiocarbon dated on the 1 MV AMS facility at the CNA in Seville (Spain). The objective of this study is double. First of all, these are the first real 'unknown' samples treated in the radiocarbon laboratory and dated on our AMS facility, SARA (Spanish Accelerator for Radionuclide Analysis). Besides, some useful information about the manuscripts can be obtained, either to corroborate the dates, or in some cases, to decide between possible dates. As expected, a general agreement is found between radiocarbon results and palaeographical data. Nevertheless, some interesting facts have been learned through this study. We present in this paper the procedure to prepare the samples and the ages obtained with a brief discussion of the results.

  5. NERC radiocarbon dating: 1975-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the work of the Natural Environment Research Council Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory in connection with Quaternary research, over the last decade. A description is given of the development of the dating service and in-house research. Quaternary research investigations aided by radiocarbon dating are described under the topic headings: The late Devensian glacial maximum, late glacial, middle Devensian, palaeomagnetic secular variation in lake sediments, vegetational history, faunal history, palaeolimnology, ground water, volcanology, periglacial research, palaoeohydrology, geomorphology, quaternary events in low-latitudes, environmental archaeology, archaeology, deep sea sediments, continental shelf, coastal geomorphology, and radiocarbon dating in Antarctica. (U.K.)

  6. AMS radiocarbon dating at Oxford and its contribution to issues of the extinction of Neanderthals and the spread of Homo sapiens sapiens across Eurasia

    CERN Document Server

    Pettitt, P B; Hedges, R E M; Hodgins, G W L

    2000-01-01

    The Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit has participated in a number of projects central to the question of the evolutionary fate of the Neanderthals and the spread of our own species across Eurasia. This paper outlines some of the key issues in this field and reports on some dating projects which have refined our knowledge of these momentous events in human history.

  7. AMS radiocarbon dating at Oxford and its contribution to issues of the extinction of Neanderthals and the spread of Homo sapiens sapiens across Eurasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit has participated in a number of projects central to the question of the evolutionary fate of the Neanderthals and the spread of our own species across Eurasia. This paper outlines some of the key issues in this field and reports on some dating projects which have refined our knowledge of these momentous events in human history

  8. Time range for accumulation of shell middens from Higashimyo (western Japan) and Kimhae (southern Korea) by AMS radiocarbon dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshio, E-mail: nakamura@nendai.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Matsui, Akira [National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Nara, Nijyo-cho, Nara 630-8577 (Japan); Nishida, Iwao; Nakano, Mitsuru [Saga-City Board of Education, Sakae-machi, Saga 840-8501 (Japan); Omori, Takayuki [University Museum, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Numerous large and small shell middens have been reported throughout the world. An interesting question is when the huge and thick shell middens were formed, and how many years were required to build up the whole midden. Shell middens contain not only shell fragments but also organic substances such as bones, nuts, acorn, and plant residues, which are suitable substances with which to establish {sup 14}C chronology of the middens. We have conducted {sup 14}C dating on terrestrial and marine materials collected from two lowland shell middens, the Higashimyo site in Japan (the Earliest Jomon period) and the Kimhae site in Korea (the Proto-Three Kingdom period), to establish high precision {sup 14}C chronologies and determine the time required for shell accumulation. According to Bayesian analysis of {sup 14}C ages from terrestrial samples, accumulation of Midden No. 1 at Higashimyo (altitude from -1.1 to -2.3 m a.s.l., {Delta}d = 1.2 m) started at around 8050-7950 cal BP and ended at 7950-7750 cal BP, lasting for ca. 100 cal yr, while accumulation of Midden No. 2 (altitude from -0.5 to -2.0 m a.s.l., {Delta}d = 1.5 m) started at around 8050-7800 cal BP and ended at 7800-7650 cal BP, lasting for ca. 200 cal yr. Thus the Midden No. 1 was abandoned a bit earlier than Midden No. 2, but the time range for sediment accumulation overlaps each other. Accumulation at the Kimhae shell midden (altitude from 5 to 14 m a.s.l., {Delta}d = 9 m) started at around the middle of the 1st C cal BC and ended at around the middle of the 3rd C cal AD, lasting for ca. 250 to 300 cal yr.

  9. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synal, H.-A., E-mail: synal@phys.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, Building HPK, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Schulze-Koenig, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L. [ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, Building HPK, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV {sup 14}C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  10. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synal, H.-A.; Schulze-König, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV 14C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  11. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    of magnitude and degree of variability of the freshwater reservoir effect over short and long timescales. Radiocarbon dating of recent water samples, aquatic plants, and animals, shows that age differences of up to 2000 14C years can occur within one river. The freshwater reservoir effect has also implications...... for radiocarbon dating of Mesolithic pottery from inland sites of the Ertebølle culture in Northern Germany. The surprisingly old ages of the earliest pottery most probably are caused by a freshwater reservoir effect. In a sediment core from the Limfjord, northern Denmark, the impact of the freshwater reservoir...... effect on radiocarbon dating in an estuarine environment is examined. Here, freshwater influence causes reservoir ages to vary between 250 and 700 14C years during the period 5400 BC - AD 700. The examples in this study show clearly that the freshwater reservoir effect can seriously corrupt radiocarbon...

  12. Radiocarbon dates to access the origin of the ice man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different samples from the Late and Final Neolithic in Northern Italy were radiocarbon dated at the AMS Facility in Zurich, Switzerland in order to determine the origin of the Ice Man from the Hauslabjoch. The cultural classification was obtained on the basis of topological studies of the cooper axe and of the flint dagger as well as studies of artefact materials (the flint or the wood of a composite arrow), while the chronological classification of the Ice Man was obtained with the help of new and old radiocarbon dates. 9 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  13. Radiocarbon dates to access the origin of the ice man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niklaus, R. [Institute of Particle Physics, ETH Zurich, Hongerberg (Switzerland)]|[Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Bonani, G. [Institute of Particle Physics, ETH Zurich, Hongerberg (Switzerland); Prinoth-Fornwagner, R. [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria)

    1996-12-31

    Different samples from the Late and Final Neolithic in Northern Italy were radiocarbon dated at the AMS Facility in Zurich, Switzerland in order to determine the origin of the Ice Man from the Hauslabjoch. The cultural classification was obtained on the basis of topological studies of the cooper axe and of the flint dagger as well as studies of artefact materials (the flint or the wood of a composite arrow), while the chronological classification of the Ice Man was obtained with the help of new and old radiocarbon dates. 9 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  14. Radiocarbon dating prehistoric pottery from Northern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente; Craig, Oliver; Heron, Carl;

    2012-01-01

    -depositional contamination with organic carbon, such as humic acids, may also be problematic. We present these data with radiocarbon datings of contemporaneous terrestrial and aquatic samples to find out the true age of the pottery and estimate the reservoir age. Lipid analysis and bulk carbon and nitrogen stable isotope......Direct dating of the pottery is an important goal in archaeological research and many attempts have been made using radiocarbon. One important goal has been to date the earliest pottery in a region to assess the origin and dispersal of ceramic technology. Also with the increasing application of...... organic residue analysis to study pottery use, it has become important to combine residue data with direct dates on the artefact being investigated. In this study we have radiocarbon dated different organic materials associated with archaeological potsherds from three Ertebølle sites in Northern Germany...

  15. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    case studies will show the degree of variability of the freshwater reservoir effect over short and long timescales. Radiocarbon dating of recent water samples, aquatic plants and animals, shows that age differences of up to 2000 years can occur within one river. In the Limfjord, freshwater influence...... caused reservoir ages to vary between 250 and 700 years during the period 5400 BC - AD 700. Finally, I will discuss the implications of the freshwater reservoir effect for radiocarbon dating of Mesolithic pottery from inland sites of the Ertebølle culture in Northern Germany....

  16. Use of radiocarbon technique for archaelogic dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear technique based on the beta radiation measurements emitted by the radiocarbon is applied an the geochronologycal dating of organic samples of prehistoric fires and sambaqui shells. This paper describes the origin of the method, the technique used and its applications, the analysis method, the equipments and the experiences performed. (Author)

  17. Radiocarbon dating of interlaboratory check samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This note presents the results of a series of interlaboratory age determinations in which the Geological Survey of Canada's Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory has been involved. There is good agreement between laboratories, although there may be other problems related to the interpretation of individual samples

  18. Geological Survey of Canada radiocarbon dates XXIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This list presents 622 radiocarbon age determinations made by the Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory. All samples dated more than two years ago have now been reported in date lists. The total number (609) of samples from various areas are as follows: Offshore (43); Newfoundland (42); Labrador (11); Nova Scotia (39); New Brunswick (7); Champlain Sea (38); Quebec (54); Ontario (23); Manitoba (3); Saskatchewan (9); Alberta (6); British Columbia (92); Yukon Territory (71); Northwest Territories, mainland (33); Northwest Territories, Arctic Archipelago (126); U.S.A. - New York (6); Washington (1); Denmark Greenland (3). Tables 1 and 2 summarize the details of background and standard counts for the 2 L and 5 L counters during the period from December 6, 1988 to January 9, 1990. (author). Refs

  19. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  20. Radiocarbon Dates from a Tomb in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, P T

    1965-02-01

    The first series of radiocarbon dates to be obtained from a deep shaft-and-chamber tomb of the type restricted in Mesoamerica to parts of Nayarit, Jalisco, and Colima in western Mexico ranges from 2230 +/- 100 years to 1710 +/- 80 years. Examination of the evidence indicates that for the present a date equivalent to A.D. 250 should be accepted for at least one phase, possibly a late phase, of the shaft tomb culture and for the hollow, polychrome figurines associated with the tombs.

  1. Radiocarbon dating in groundwater systems: Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, L.N.; Glynn, P.D.

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive isotope of carbon, radiocarbon (14C), was first produced artificially in 1940 by Martin Kamen and Sam Ruben, who bombarded graphite in a cyclotron at the Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley, CA, in an attempt to produce a radioactive isotope of carbon that could be used as a tracer in biological systems (Kamen (1963) [101]; Ruben and Kamen (1941) [102]). Carbon-14 of cosmogenic origin was discovered in atmospheric CO2 in 1946 by Willard F. Libby, who determined a half-life of 5568 a. Libby and his co-workers (Anderson et al. (1947) [103]; Libby et al. (1949) [104]) developed radiocarbon dating of organic carbon of biological origin, which revolutionized research in a number of fields, including archaeology and quaternary geology/climatology, by establishing ages and chronologies of events that have occurred over the past approximately 45 ka.

  2. Using accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating of textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jull, A.J.T.

    1997-12-01

    Since 1981 we have operated an NSF Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility at the University of Arizona. The AMS method allows us to use very small samples of carbon, <1 mg for radiocarbon dating in contrast to earlier counting techniques. This has opened a vast array of applications of radiocarbon dating that was difficult to do before AMS because of sample size limitations of decay counting. Some of the many applications of AMS include paleoclimatic studies, archaeological research and the age of first settlement of North America by man, dating of art works and artifacts, fall times and terrestrial residence ages of meteorites, production of {sup 14}C in lunar samples by galactic and solar cosmic rays, studies of in situ {sup 14}C produced by cosmic ray spallation in rocks and ice, and studies of {sup 14}C in groundwater dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved organic carbon. At our laboratory, we have also successfully applied AMS {sup 14}C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory, and bone. The results for many of these samples are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. Our studies have encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin, and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt, and Picasso. Recently, we also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document that shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages.

  3. Radiocarbon Dating of Vertisols in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIULIANGWU

    1996-01-01

    Vertisols,which are mainly developed on fluvial and lacustrine deposits and basalt,are extensively distributed in China.66 samples of them for radiocarbon dating were collected across 5 porvinces and 1 autonomous region,ranging from warm-temperate to subtropical and tropical zones in China.The soil organic matter was dated via surface horizon,black soil horizon and dark-colour horizon of the vertisols,whereas carbonate through calcareous concretions and dispersed carbonate in soil profile using radiocarbon method.The present article elucidates the dates of genetic horizons,and of surface and buried vertisols as well.14C dating indicates that the surface vertisols were formed during the end of the late Pleistocene.ca.15600 years ageo.Correlation between depth of sampling and measured 14C age shows that age characteristics of the vertisols of China are close to those of West Germany,Italy,TUrnisia,Australia and Argentina,However,two buried vertisols developed on fluvial and lacustrine deposits were formed during different geological periods,The buried soils in warm-temperate zone were formed in the mid Holocene,while those in subtropics were buried at 12930 years B.P., and formed in the end of the late Pleistocene.

  4. A combined PIXE-PIGE approach for the assessment of the diagenetic state of cremated bones submitted to AMS radiocarbon dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quarta, Gianluca, E-mail: gianluca.quarta@unisalento.it [CEDAD-Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Calcagnile, Lucio; D' Elia, Marisa; Maruccio, Lucio; Gaballo, Valentina; Caramia, Annalisa [CEDAD-Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Bone samples from a Bronze age necropolis in Northern Italy, exposed to different combustion temperatures, were submitted to XRD (X-ray Diffraction), PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) and PIGE (Particle Induced Gamma Ray Emission) analyses in order to obtain information about their diagenetic state. Structural carbonate was then extracted by acid hydrolysis and used for {sup 14}C-AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) dating. These analytical techniques permitted the study of the effects of the combustion temperature on the crystallinity of the bone apatite and on its elemental chemical composition in terms of major, minor and trace elements. The results indicate that combustion at temperatures above {approx}700 Degree-Sign C induces changes in the bone crystalline structure, reducing the diagenetic uptake of elements from the burial environment.

  5. Precision and reproducibility in AMS radiocarbon measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkis, M.A.; Fink, D.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.E.; Lawson, E. M.; Smith, A.M.; Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a technique by which rare radioisotopes such as {sup 14}C can be measured at environmental levels with high efficiency. Instead of detecting radioactivity, which is very weak for long-lived environmental radioisotopes, atoms are counted directly. The sample is placed in an ion source, from which a negative ion beam of the atoms of interest is extracted, mass analysed, and injected into a tandem accelerator. After stripping to positive charge states in the accelerator HV terminal, the ions are further accelerated, analysed with magnetic and electrostatic devices and counted in a detector. An isotopic ratio is derived from the number of radioisotope atoms counted in a given time and the beam current of a stable isotope of the same element, measured after the accelerator. For radiocarbon, {sup 14}C/{sup 13}C ratios are usually measured, and the ratio of an unknown sample is compared to that of a standard. The achievable precision for such ratio measurements is limited primarily by {sup 14}C counting statistics and also by a variety of factors related to accelerator and ion source stability. At the ANTARES AMS facility at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories we are currently able to measure {sup 14}C with 0.5% precision. In the two years since becoming operational, more than 1000 {sup 14}C samples have been measured. Recent improvements in precision for {sup 14}C have been achieved with the commissioning of a 59 sample ion source. The measurement system, from sample changing to data acquisition, is under common computer control. These developments have allowed a new regime of automated multi-sample processing which has impacted both on the system throughput and the measurement precision. We have developed data evaluation methods at ANTARES which cross-check the self-consistency of the statistical analysis of our data. Rigorous data evaluation is invaluable in assessing the true reproducibility of the measurement system and aids in

  6. Radiocarbon determinations for Chillagoe rock paintings: small sample AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armitage, R.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M. W. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States). Department of Chemistry; David, B. [Queensland Univ St. Lucia, QLD (Australia); Tuniz, C.; Lawson, E.; Jacobsen, G.; Hua, G. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Indirect dating methods have been applied to the rock paintings of Chillagoe, north Queensland, revealing patterns of superimposition, depictions of items of known antiquity, the use of fragile paints such as mud, and in-situ pigment stratigraphies (David 1994). These patterns suggest that the Chillagoe rock paintings are relatively young, likely less than 3000 years old. A change in the geographical distribution of rock painting styles suggests a regionalization of the styles starting around 3000 years BP. Such regionalization implies that major cultural changes accompanied the changes in rock painting styles. This model of temporal change is now being investigated through a collaboration between the University of Queensland, ANSTO and the Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University to directly analyze radiocarbon in the charcoal pigments in several of the Chillagoe rock paintings. Samples collected from fourteen separate charcoal rock drawings at five rock shelters in the Chillagoe region were submitted to plasma chemical treatment. Though unreactive, the excited and energetic argon atoms in the plasma remove surface-absorbed CO{sub 2} through inelastic collisions. Samples yielding less than 100 micrograms carbon required special handling for AMS analysis. An isotope dilution technique utilizing {sup 14}C-free carbon was chosen. Radiocarbon analysis were also performed and the results will be presented. Paper No. 25; 2 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Radiocarbon dating of late pleistocene marine shells from the southern north sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busschers, F.S.; Wesselingh, F.P.; Kars, R.H.; Versluijs-Helder, M.; Wallinga, J.; Bosch, J.H.A.; Timmner, J.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Meijer, T.; Bunnik, F.P.M.; Wolf, De H.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a set of Late Pleistocene marine mollusk radiocarbon (AMS) age estimates of 30-50 C-14 kyr BP, whereas a MIS5 age (>75 ka) is indicated by quartz and feldspar OSL dating, biostratigraphy, U-Th dating, and age-depth relationships with sea level. These results indicate that th

  8. Radiocarbon dating of late pleistocene marine shells from the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busschers, F.S.; Wesselingh, F.P.; Kars, R.H.; Versluijs-Helder, M.; Wallinga, J.; Bosch, J.H.A.; Timmner, J.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Meijer, T.; Bunnik, F.P.M.; Wolf, H. de

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a set of Late Pleistocene marine mollusk radiocarbon (AMS) age estimates of 30-50 14C kyr BP, whereas a MIS5 age (>75 ka) is indicated by quartz and feldspar OSL dating, biostratigraphy, U-Th dating, and age-depth relationships with sea level. These results indicate that the 14

  9. Assessing screening criteria for the radiocarbon dating of bone mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon dating of bone mineral (carbonate in the apatite lattice) has been the target of sporadic research for the last 40 years. Results obtained by different decontamination protocols have, however, failed to provide a consistent agreement with reference ages. In particular, quality criteria to assess bone mineral radiocarbon dating reliability are still lacking. Systematic research was undertaken to identify optimal preservation criteria for bone mineral in archeological bones. Six human long bones, originating from a single site, were radiocarbon-dated both for collagen and apatite, with the level of agreement between the dates providing an indication of exogenous carbon contamination. Several techniques (Histology, FTIR, TEM, LA-ICP-MS) were employed to determine the preservation status of each sample. Research results highlight the importance of a micro-scale approach in establishing bone preservation, in particular the use of trace element concentration profiles demonstrated its potential use as a viable sample selection criterion for bone carbonate radiocarbon dating.

  10. Assessing screening criteria for the radiocarbon dating of bone mineral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Ricardo, E-mail: ldv1452@gmail.com [Leibniz Labor for Isotopic and Radiometric Dating, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Christian Albrecht University, Kiel (Germany); Huels, Matthias [Leibniz Labor for Isotopic and Radiometric Dating, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Nadeau, Marie-Josee; Grootes, Pieter M. [Leibniz Labor for Isotopic and Radiometric Dating, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Christian Albrecht University, Kiel (Germany); Garbe-Schoenberg, C.-Dieter [Institute of Geosciences, Marine Climate Research and ICPMS Lab, Kiel University, Ludewig-Meyn-Str. 10, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Christian Albrecht University, Kiel (Germany); Hollund, Hege I. [Institute for Geo- and Bioarchaeology, The VU University, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lotnyk, Andriy [Faculty of Engineering, Institute for Material Science, Synthesis and Real Structure, Kiel University, Kaiserstr. 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification (IOM), Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Kienle, Lorenz [Faculty of Engineering, Institute for Material Science, Synthesis and Real Structure, Kiel University, Kaiserstr. 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Christian Albrecht University, Kiel (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Radiocarbon dating of bone mineral (carbonate in the apatite lattice) has been the target of sporadic research for the last 40 years. Results obtained by different decontamination protocols have, however, failed to provide a consistent agreement with reference ages. In particular, quality criteria to assess bone mineral radiocarbon dating reliability are still lacking. Systematic research was undertaken to identify optimal preservation criteria for bone mineral in archeological bones. Six human long bones, originating from a single site, were radiocarbon-dated both for collagen and apatite, with the level of agreement between the dates providing an indication of exogenous carbon contamination. Several techniques (Histology, FTIR, TEM, LA-ICP-MS) were employed to determine the preservation status of each sample. Research results highlight the importance of a micro-scale approach in establishing bone preservation, in particular the use of trace element concentration profiles demonstrated its potential use as a viable sample selection criterion for bone carbonate radiocarbon dating.

  11. Underground water dating and age corrections using radiocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describe a method that correlate underground water dating using radiocarbon and other environmental isotopes in order to estimate recharge conditions of an aquifer located in Romania. Radiocarbon ages were corrected by six correction models. Obtained data conducted to a mean transit velocity of studied aquifer of 0.55 m/year, value which is specific for this type of aquifer. Although radiocarbon measurement method proposed in this paper is a classical one, optimizations to the preparation technique allow reduction of time and financial costs and can be successfully applied to a large number of samples, common in hydrological studies. (author)

  12. Radiocarbon dating of ancient bronze statues: Preliminary results from the Riace statues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagnile, L., E-mail: lucio.calcagnile@unile.i [CEDAD, Department of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, Via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); D' Elia, M.; Quarta, G. [CEDAD, Department of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, Via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Vidale, M. [Istituto Centrale per il Restauro, Piazza San Francesco di Paola, 9, 00184 Rome (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    The low amount of material needed for the measurements makes AMS radiocarbon a technique suitable for the dating of ancient bronze artefacts through the analysis of the organic residues contained into the casting cores. We present the results of the AMS radiocarbon dating analyses carried out on the organic remains extracted from the casting cores of the Riace bronzes, among the most famous and well preserved sculptures of the Greek-Classical period. Although different dating hypotheses have been suggested on the base of stylistic considerations, no conclusive answers are, so far, available. The sample selection and preparation protocols of the different kind of organic materials (charred wood, vegetal remains and animal hairs) are described as well as the interpretation of the results in the frame of the current dating hypotheses and available analytical information about the casting technology.

  13. Radiocarbon dates from Wairau Bar and their implications for the prehistoric colonisation of New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of thirteen moa eggshell samples from burial features at the Wairau Bar site were used for dating. The samples were obtained from the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch where they have been displayed as part of a permanent exhibition.Three marine shell samples were also analysed. Radiocarbon dating of the samples was carried out using conventional and AMS techniques. The results will be presented and the archaeological implications for the prehistoric colonization of New Zealand will be discussed

  14. Micadas: A versatile radiocarbon dating system in routine operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, Lukas; Hajdas, Irena; Synal, Hans-Arno [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Kromer, Bernd [Heidelberg Academy of Sciences (Germany); Nemec, Mojmir; Ruff, Matthias [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    The mini carbon dating system (Micadas) at ETH Zuerich was built 4 years ago. While it was mainly used for experimental development the first 3 years, we present our first experiences in routine operation for gaseous and solid radiocarbon samples. We show the prospects of the direct measurement of carbon dioxide with the gas ion source for either small samples or samples where low precision is required. Beyond that, we demonstrate the excellent stability and reproducibility of the Micadas system on high-precision measurements of solid samples. This ends in a discussion about the perspectives of our mini radiocarbon dating system.

  15. Radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) sample preparation laboratory in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macario, Kita D.; Gomes, Paulo R. S.; Anjos, Roberto M. dos; Linares, Roberto; Queiroz, Eduardo; Oliveira, Fabiana M. de; Cardozo, Laio [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, Carla R.A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: For decades Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been widely used for radiocarbon measurements all over the world with application in several fields of science from archaeology to geosciences. This technique provides ultrasensitive analysis of reduced size samples or even specific compounds since sample atoms are accelerated to high energies and measured using nuclear particle detectors. Sample preparation is extremely important for accurate radiocarbon measurement and includes chemical pre-treatment to remove all possible contaminants. For beam extraction in the accelerator ion source, samples are usually converted to graphite. In this work we report a new radiocarbon sample preparation facility installed at the Physics Institute of Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), in Brazil. At the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory (LACRON) samples are chemically treated and converted to carbon dioxide by hydrolysis or combustion. A stainless steel based vacuum line was constructed for carbon dioxide separation and graphitization is performed in sealed quartz tubes in a muffle oven. Successful graphite production is important to provide stable beam currents and to minimize isotopic fractionation. Performance tests for graphite production are currently under way and isotopic analysis will soon be possible with the acquisition of a Single Stage AMS System by our group. The Single Stage Accelerator produced by National Electrostatic Corporation is a 250 kV air insulated accelerator especially constructed to measure the amount of {sup 14}C in small modern graphite samples to a precision of 0.3 % or better. With the installation of such equipment in the first half of 2012, UFF will be ready to perform the 14C -AMS technique. (author)

  16. Radiocarbon dating of ancient rock paintings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilger, W.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Southon, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-06-20

    This report presents progress made on a technique for {sup 14}C dating pictographs. A low-temperature oxygen plasma is used coupled with high-vacuum technologies to selectively remove C-containing material in the paints without contamination from inorganic carbon from rock substrates or accretions.

  17. Molecular sieve sampling of CO2 from decomposition of soil organic matter for AMS radiocarbon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A molecular sieve based procedure has been established for sampling CO2 of decomposing soil organic matter for AMS radiocarbon measurements. The sampling and desorption lines are capable to produce well measurable (>1 mg) AMS targets.

  18. Radiocarbon dating of East african lake levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, K W; Isaac, G L; Richardson, J L; Washbourn-Kamau, C

    1972-03-10

    The fluctuations of the key East African lakes discussed are summarized in Fig. 4 which also includes the available evidence from Lake Rukwa (42) and Lake Chad (43) Exceot for Lake Victoria, all of these now lack surface outlets and are situated in much drier climates than the major lakes of the Western Rift Valley, which remain filled to their overflow levels. The apparent differendes among the fluctuations of the lakes are partly due to differendes in the nature of the evidence or the intensity of research or both, although there must also have been important local differences in the histories of the lakes Yet the consistencies are far more striking, most notably the coincidence of early Holocene high stands. Between 10,000 and 8,000 years ago, it seems that lakes in many parts of tropical Africa were greatly enlarged. Where evidence for the previous span of time is well resolved, it appears that transgressions leading to this high stand began about 12,000 years ago, and evidende from three basins (Victoria, Nakuru, and Chad) indicates a pause or minor recession just at or before 10,000 years ago. Wherever information is available for the period preceding 12,000 years ago, it can consistentlybe shown that lakes were much small-er . Several basins (Rudolf, Nakuru, and Chad) also show traces of much earlier phases of lake expansion. which are not yet well dated but which all occurred more then 20,000 years ago. The Holocene record subsequent to the maximum of 10,00 to 8,000 years ago is more complex. Three basins (Rudolf, Nakuru, and Chad) show an apparently concordant, positive oscillation at some point between 6000 and 4000 years ago, but it is uncertain how widely this episode is represented. Although many of these lakes that are now closed filled to overflowing at least once during the late Quaternary, it is evident from Fig. 4 that the periods of expansion were short-lived compared with phases of contraction to levels near those of today. This pattern may be

  19. Reevaluation of dating results for some {sup 14}C - AMS applications on the basis of the new calibration curves available

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macario, K.D.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Anjos, R.M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2007-03-15

    In this paper we describe briefly some characteristics of the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique and the need of corrections in the radiocarbon ages by specific calibration curves. Then we discuss previous results of some Brazilian projects where radiocarbon AMS had been applied in order to reevaluate the dates obtained on the basis of the new calibration curves available. (author)

  20. Radiocarbon dating of Mesolithic pottery from Northern Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    The earliest pottery in Schleswig-Holstein, Northern Germany, was produced by the Final Mesolithic Ertebølle culture. Radiocarbon dating of food crusts on Ertebølle pottery indicated that ceramics from inland sites were substantially older than those from the coast. Therefore, a freshwater...... reservoir effect was suspected. For assessing the risk of a reservoir effect in the food crust, the presence of aquatic products such as fish has to be identified. It was tested whether stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes can be used for this purpose. In the study presented here I measured the order of...... magnitude and the degree of variability of the freshwater reservoir effect in Schleswig-Holstein. Experiments with copies of Ertebølle vessels yielded reference material for radiocarbon dating and stable isotope analysis. Food crusts, terrestrial samples and fishbones from two Ertebølle inland sites were...

  1. Radiocarbon dates from Wairau Bar and their implications for the prehistoric colonisation of New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higham, T.F.G. [Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand); Anderson, A.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    A set of thirteen moa eggshell samples from burial features at the Wairau Bar site were used for dating. The samples were obtained from the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch where they have been displayed as part of a permanent exhibition.Three marine shell samples were also analysed. Radiocarbon dating of the samples was carried out using conventional and AMS techniques. The results will be presented and the archaeological implications for the prehistoric colonization of New Zealand will be discussed. Paper no. 39; Extended abstract. 7 refs.

  2. Radiocarbon dates on bones of extinct birds from Hawaii.

    OpenAIRE

    James, H.F.; Stafford, T.W.; Steadman, D W; Olson, S.L.; Martin, P. S.; Jull, A J; McCoy, P C

    1987-01-01

    Bones from a stratified sedimentary deposit in the Puu Naio Cave site on Maui, Hawaiian Islands, reveal the late Holocene extinction of 19 species of birds. The age of the sediment and associated fauna was determined by direct radiocarbon dating (tandem particle accelerator-mass spectrometer; TAMS) of amino acids extracted from bones weighing as little as 450 mg. The 14C dates indicate that sediment has been accumulating in the lava tube for at least the last 7750 years, a suitable time frame...

  3. Year of Birth Determination Using Radiocarbon Dating of Dental Enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 (14C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, 14C levels in the enamel represent 14C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists.

  4. Year of Birth Determination Using Radiocarbon Dating of Dental Enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A; Spalding, K L

    2009-03-10

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, {sup 14}C levels in the enamel represent {sup 14}C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists.

  5. Accelerator radiocarbon dating of evidence for prehistoric horticulture in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, N.; Asch, D.L.; Asch, N.B.; Elmore, D.; Gove, H.; Rubin, M.; Brown, J.A.; Wiant, M.D.; Farnsworth, K.B.; Cook, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    With the development of direct detection radiocarbon dating, which uses an accelerator as part of a highly selective mass spectrometer, it is now possible to determine the age of milligram samples of organic materials1-5. One application of accelerator dating is in evaluating scanty, sometimes controversial evidence for early horticulture throughout the world. We have now used the technique to date small samples of carbonized, cultivated plant remains from archaeological sites in Illinois. The results, reported here, establish (1) that squash was introduced by 7,000 yr ago, 2,500 yr before eastern North American records previously reported; (2) that horticulture involving indigenous plants had begun by 4,000 BP in eastern North America with domestication of Iva annua, a small-seeded annual; (3) that anomalous discoveries of Archaic period maize represent contaminants; and (4) that introduction of maize by initial Middle Woodland times (???2,000 BP) is questionable. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. New radiocarbon dates for Milu (Elaphurus davidianus) sub-fossils from southeast China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, X.F. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shen, C.D., E-mail: cdshen@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Isotope Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510640 Guangzhou (China); Ding, P.; Yi, W.X. [State Key Laboratory of Isotope Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510640 Guangzhou (China); Fu, D.P.; Liu, K.X. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Milu (Elaphurus davidianus, Pere David's deer) is one of the few species of large mammals that became extinct in the wild, but survived domestically. A good understanding of expansion and habitat is required if the reintroduction of Milu into the wild is to be implemented. Among the widely reported findings of Milu sub-fossils, only a small fraction have been dated. Here we report new AMS radiocarbon dates on Milu sub-fossil samples unearthed from two sites at Qingdun, Jiangsu and Fujiashan, Zhejiang in southeast China. These AMS {sup 14}C ages of Milu sub-fossils provide new evidence for the presence of Milu expansion in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River during the Holocene Optimum interval from 5000 yr BC to 3000 yr BC. These new ages also have important implications for the reconstruction of the paleoclimate and paleogeography during the Neolithic Period in southeast China.

  7. Accelerator radiocarbon dating of evidence for prehistoric horticulture in Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have now used direct detection radiocarbon dating (which uses an accelerator as part of a highly selective mass spectrometer) to date small samples of carbonized, cultivated plant remains from archaeological sites in Illinois. The results, reported here, establish (1) that squash was introduced by 7,000 yr ago, 2,500 yr before eastern North American records previously reported; (2) that horticulture involving indigenous plants had begun by 4,000 BP in eastern North American with domestication of Iva annua, a small-seeded annual; (3) that anomalous discoveries of Archaic period maize represent contaminants; and (4) that introduction of maize by initial Middle Woodland times (approx. 2,000 BP) is questionable. (author)

  8. The impact on archaeology of radiocarbon dating by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon dating by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is based on direct determination of the ratio of 14C: 12C atoms rather than on counting the radioactivity of 14C. It is therefore possible to measure much lower levels of 14C in a sample much more rapidly than the conventional technique allows. Consequently, minimum sample size is reduced approximately 1000-fold and the datable time span of the method can, theoretically, be doubled. Greater selectivity, in the field and the laboratory, is the most important archaeological attribute of AMS 14C dating. It allows on-site chronological consistency to be tested by multiple sampling; archaeological materials to be dated that contain too little C, or are too rare or valuable, to be dated by the conventional method; and the validity of a date to be tested by isolating and independently dating particular fractions in chemically complex samples. In this paper, recent archaeological applications of the new technique are reviewed under these two headings: verification dating applied to the origin and spread of anatomically modern humans in Europe and the Americas, to putative evidence for early (pre-Neolithic) agriculture in Israel and Egypt, and to the dating of rare Palaeolithic and later artefacts; and the building of new and more-detailed chronologies illustrated by reference to Upper Palaeolithic sequences in Europe, Mesolithic-Neolithic sequences in Southwest Asia, and Neolithic-Bronze Age chronologies in Britain. (author)

  9. Radiocarbon dating of VIRI bone samples using ultrafiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, Masayo, E-mail: minami@nendai.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yamazaki, Kana [Faculty of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Omori, Takayuki [University Museum, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nakamura, Toshio [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Ultrafiltration can effectively remove low-molecular-weight (LMW) contaminants from bone gelatin to extract high-molecular-weight (HMW) proteins that are derived from original bone collagen, though it cannot remove HMW collagen crosslinked with humic acids. Therefore, ultrafiltration is often used to obtain more accurate {sup 14}C dates of bones. However, ultrafiltration may introduce new contaminants to bone gelatins, mainly from ultrafilters used. To study the effects of ultrafiltration on {sup 14}C age, we analyzed the C/N ratio, {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} and {delta}{sup 15}N{sub AIR} values, and {sup 14}C ages of acid-soluble bone collagen obtained by decalcification, gelatin extracted from acid-insoluble bone collagen, and the HMW gelatin and LMW fractions produced during ultrafiltration of the extracted gelatin. Bone samples from the Fifth International Radiocarbon Intercomparison (VIRI) were used: VIRI-E (mammoth), -F (horse), -G (human), and -I (whale). In this study, carbon and nitrogen content and gelatin yields were used to evaluate collagen preservation in the VIRI bone samples. Radiocarbon ages, {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} and {delta}{sup 15}N{sub AIR} values of unfiltered and HMW gelatins were obtained and compared with the published consensus values. The LMW fraction was found to exhibit different values from those of the other fractions, indicating the possible presence of extraneous contamination. The Vivaspin Trade-Mark-Sign 6 ultrafilters used in this study were analyzed and radiocarbon dated both before and after cleaning. We present evidence to suggest that LMW fraction contaminants could be derived from the ultrafilters rather than humic substances. Excessively long ultrafiltration time was suspected to have contaminated the bone samples with material from the ultrafilter, because those samples exhibited older {sup 14}C ages than did those filtered for shorter durations. The results in this study indicate that {sup 14}C ages of unfiltered

  10. Radiocarbon dating of VIRI bone samples using ultrafiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrafiltration can effectively remove low-molecular-weight (LMW) contaminants from bone gelatin to extract high-molecular-weight (HMW) proteins that are derived from original bone collagen, though it cannot remove HMW collagen crosslinked with humic acids. Therefore, ultrafiltration is often used to obtain more accurate 14C dates of bones. However, ultrafiltration may introduce new contaminants to bone gelatins, mainly from ultrafilters used. To study the effects of ultrafiltration on 14C age, we analyzed the C/N ratio, δ13CPDB and δ15NAIR values, and 14C ages of acid-soluble bone collagen obtained by decalcification, gelatin extracted from acid-insoluble bone collagen, and the HMW gelatin and LMW fractions produced during ultrafiltration of the extracted gelatin. Bone samples from the Fifth International Radiocarbon Intercomparison (VIRI) were used: VIRI-E (mammoth), -F (horse), -G (human), and -I (whale). In this study, carbon and nitrogen content and gelatin yields were used to evaluate collagen preservation in the VIRI bone samples. Radiocarbon ages, δ13CPDB and δ15NAIR values of unfiltered and HMW gelatins were obtained and compared with the published consensus values. The LMW fraction was found to exhibit different values from those of the other fractions, indicating the possible presence of extraneous contamination. The Vivaspin™ 6 ultrafilters used in this study were analyzed and radiocarbon dated both before and after cleaning. We present evidence to suggest that LMW fraction contaminants could be derived from the ultrafilters rather than humic substances. Excessively long ultrafiltration time was suspected to have contaminated the bone samples with material from the ultrafilter, because those samples exhibited older 14C ages than did those filtered for shorter durations. The results in this study indicate that 14C ages of unfiltered gelatin extracted from well-preserved bones can be sufficiently accurate, and that care should be taken not to

  11. The Geological Survey of Canada Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory of the Geological Survey of Canada began routine 14C age determinations in 1961 using a 2 litre copper, proportional counter and CO2 as the counting gas. This counter is operated routinely at a pressure of 2 atmospheres where the maximum dating limit is approximately 40 000 years using the 4σ criterion. In 1964 a 5 litre counter was put into operation. Routinely this counter is operated at a pressure of 1 atmosphere where its dating limit is approximately 40 000 years. When operated at 4 atmospheres its age limit increases to about 54 000 years. Organic samples are burned in a stream of oxygen and the CO2 released is purified on passage through a series of chemicals and traps. Inorganic samples are dissolved in phosphoric acid. Up to the end of 1983 more than 3700 age determinations have been carried out on various types of sample material. Since 1963 twenty-three Geological Survey of Canada Date Lists have been published. The Laboratory also carries out a program of 14C determinations of samples of known age for the purpose of assessing the accuracy of the method and learning more about the natural and man-made 14C distribution and circulation in nature

  12. Radiocarbon dating and compositional analysis of pre-Columbian human bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of ancient human bones found in “El Cóporo”, an archaeological site in Guanajuato, Mexico; were performed using a multi techniques scheme: 14C radiocarbon dating, IBA (Ion Beam Analysis), SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscope Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). We measured the elemental composition of the bones, especially some with a superficial black pigmentation. Soil samples collected from the burial place were also analyzed. The 14C dating was performed with a new High Voltage Europe 1 MV Tandentron Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) recently installed in the IFUNAM (Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México). The radiocarbon dating allowed us to determine the date of death of the individual in a period between the year 890 and 975 AD, which is consistent with the late period of the Cóporo civilization. The element sample analysis of bones with the surface black pigmentation show higher levels of Fe, Mn and Ba compared when bone’s black surface was mechanically removed. These three elements were found in soil samples from the skeleton burial place. These results indicate more likely that the bone black coloration is due to a postmortem alteration occurring in the burial environment

  13. Radiocarbon dating and compositional analysis of pre-Columbian human bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, E., E-mail: andrade@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México D.F. (Mexico); Solís, C.; Canto, C.E.; Lucio, O.G. de [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México D.F. (Mexico); Chavez, E. [ESIME-Z, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ALM Zacatenco, 07738 México D.F. (Mexico); Rocha, M.F.; Villanueva, O.; Torreblanca, C.A. [Centro INAH Zacatecas, Miguel Auza No. 205, Col. Centro, Zacatecas/Zacatecas CP 98000 (Mexico)

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of ancient human bones found in “El Cóporo”, an archaeological site in Guanajuato, Mexico; were performed using a multi techniques scheme: {sup 14}C radiocarbon dating, IBA (Ion Beam Analysis), SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscope Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). We measured the elemental composition of the bones, especially some with a superficial black pigmentation. Soil samples collected from the burial place were also analyzed. The {sup 14}C dating was performed with a new High Voltage Europe 1 MV Tandentron Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) recently installed in the IFUNAM (Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México). The radiocarbon dating allowed us to determine the date of death of the individual in a period between the year 890 and 975 AD, which is consistent with the late period of the Cóporo civilization. The element sample analysis of bones with the surface black pigmentation show higher levels of Fe, Mn and Ba compared when bone’s black surface was mechanically removed. These three elements were found in soil samples from the skeleton burial place. These results indicate more likely that the bone black coloration is due to a postmortem alteration occurring in the burial environment.

  14. Are the ‘new’ AMS Varna dates older?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Dzhanfezova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper elaborates on the AMS dating results obtained for the Chalcolithic cemetery near Varna, located on the western Black Sea coast in northeastern Bulgaria. The focus here is not on the comparison between absolute dates acquired for various sites from the middle and late Chalcolithic period in the region. It is rather on the examination of the main approaches towards suggested chronological frameworks. Divided into three parts, the text reviews regional methods for proceeding conventional radiocarbon dates (II A and such, related to the later AMS measurement of bone collagen (II B. Both approaches are considered as deserving more attention with regard to the problematic aspects that may affect the acquisition of reliable results. The 19 new AMS Varna dates are found important for chronological revisions. However, at this stage they alone are not considered sufficient for inarguable modifications of the schemes (III. Along with identification of major factors that should be taken into account when dealing with the chronological debates in the specified region, strategies for solving some of the issues are also suggested.

  15. Study of a metallurgical site in Tuscany (Italy) by radiocarbon dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartocci, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita e I.N.F.N. Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Fedi, M.E. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita e I.N.F.N. Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: fedi@fi.infn.it; Taccetti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita e I.N.F.N. Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Benvenuti, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra dell' Universita di Firenze, via La Pira 4, 50121 Florence (Italy); Chiarantini, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra dell' Universita di Firenze, via La Pira 4, 50121 Florence (Italy); Guideri, S. [Societa Parchi Val di Cornia S.p.a., via G. Lerario, Piombino, Livorno (Italy)

    2007-06-15

    Tuscany represents one of the most important ancient mining districts of Italy. Metalworking activities have been present in the area since ancient times and several mining centres have been active in the region since the Etruscan period. Two of the more notable mining locations are the island of Elba and the towns of Populonia and Massa Marittima. In order to reconstruct the development of metallurgical techniques in the past, a multi-disciplinary approach is required, involving both archaeological study and archaeometric analysis of the sites of interest. One of the most complex problems is establishing the chronological history of metallurgical exploitation in ancient sites: archaeological remains are sometimes incomplete and the stratigraphy of archaeological horizons might have been deeply altered. Thus, direct dating of metallurgical slags and other remains of mining and metalworking activities using radiocarbon measurements is particularly useful for developing site chronologies. Charcoal samples from a recent excavation in Populonia were dated by AMS radiocarbon in order to reconstruct the chronological evolution of ancient metallurgical production; results reported here are consistent with archaeological observations.

  16. Mortar radiocarbon dating: preliminary accuracy evaluation of a novel methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzaioli, Fabio; Lubritto, Carmine; Nonni, Sara; Passariello, Isabella; Capano, Manuela; Terrasi, Filippo

    2011-03-15

    Mortars represent a class of building and art materials that are widespread at archeological sites from the Neolithic period on. After about 50 years of experimentation, the possibility to evaluate their absolute chronology by means of radiocarbon ((14)C) remains still uncertain. With the use of a simplified mortar production process in the laboratory environment, this study shows the overall feasibility of a novel physical pretreatment for the isolation of the atmospheric (14)CO(2) (i.e., binder) signal absorbed by the mortars during their setting. This methodology is based on the assumption that an ultrasonic attack in liquid phase isolates a suspension of binder carbonates from bulk mortars. Isotopic ((13)C and (14)C), % C, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were performed to characterize the proposed methodology. The applied protocol allows suppression of the fossil carbon (C) contamination originating from the incomplete burning of the limestone during the quick lime production, providing unbiased dating for "laboratory" mortars produced operating at historically adopted burning temperatures.

  17. Dating the time of birth: A radiocarbon calibration curve for human eye-lens crystallines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Henrik; Heinemeier, Jan; Heegaard, Steffen;

    2010-01-01

    Radiocarbon bomb-pulse dating has been used to measure the formation age of human eye-lens crystallines. Lens crystallines are special proteins in the eye-lens that consist of virtually inert tissue. The experimental data show that the radiocarbon ages to a large extent reflect the time of birth...

  18. ‘Old wood’ effect in radiocarbon dating of prehistoric cremated bones?

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Jesper; Heinemeier, Jan; Hornstrup, Karen Margrethe; Bennike, Pia; Thrane, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Numerous reports of successful radiocarbon dating of cremated bones have emerged during the last decade. The success of radiocarbon dating cremated bones depends on the temperature during burning and the degree of recrystallisation of the inorganic bone matrix. During cremation bones undergo major morphological and mineralogical changes which have raised some interesting questions and discussion on the origin of the carbon source in archaeologically cremated bones. Recent laboratory experimen...

  19. VARIABILITY IN RADIOCARBON DATES IN MIDDLE PLENIGLACIAL WOOD FROM KURTAK (CENTRAL SIBERIA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haesaerts, P.; Damblon, F.; Drozdov, N.; Checha, V.; van der Plicht, J.

    2014-01-01

    The chronology of long Upper Pleistocene loess sequences in Eurasia is based on combined pedostratigraphy and radiocarbon dating of high-quality charcoal. The accuracy of such a chronology depends on the reproducibility and precision of the C-14 dates. However, certain dates may show discrepancies w

  20. Radiocarbon dating of archaeological geological and groundwater samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the project VIE/8/003 sponsored by the IAEA, a regular and complete C14 laboratory was installed at the Centre of the Nuclear Techniques in 1986. In this paper the authors present the procedure of sample treatment and saple activity measurement of the radiocarbon method and some preliminary results obtained after more than one year of operation of the laboratory

  1. Radiocarbon dating of travertines precipitated from fresh-water

    OpenAIRE

    Mas-Pla, Josep; Trilla Arrufat, José; Valls, Maria Luïsa

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the isotopic composition of recently precipitated travertines to determine the initial 14C activity of ancient travertine deposits. We found that the 14C activity of recent travertines of northeastern Spain was a function of the distance from the spring, resulting in variations in the initial 14C activity of the ancient travertine formations. We calculated the ancient travertine radiocarbon ages by using the ratio between the 14C activity of recent travertines and that of pres...

  2. Relevance of medieval, Egyptian and American dates to the study of climatic and radiocarbon variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic radiocarbon dating and dendrochronology have been combined to yield calibrated dates that are more accurate than conventional radiocarbon dates. This has been shown to be true for medieval and Egyptian dynastic dating. Because radiocarbon is a cosmogenically produced radioisotope, heliomagnetic and geomagnetic fields play a major role in its synthesis in the Earth's upper atmosphere. Inasmuch as a calibrated radiocarbon record exists for nearly 10 000 years, we now seem to possess in the short-time variations of the production rate a history of solar activity expressed via heliomagnetic fields carried by the solar wind. In turn, solar activity has a controlling effect on climate on Earth within modifications provided by the complex interactions of the atmosphere-Earth-ocean system. Both radiocarbon measurements and other empirical research methods agree on variations of climate during historically more recent periods on Earth. This leads to the suggestion that the radiocarbon calibration curve may be also a significant indicator or tracer for climatic changes for the Holocene or the Neolithic-Mesolithic. (author)

  3. Establishing the date of Maori environmental impact in New Zealand through pollen analysis and radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Over the last decade there has been an intense debate about whether New Zealand prehistory is long ( > 1500 years) or short ( < 800 years). Pollen and charcoal analyses have played a key role in this debate by helping to pinpoint the transition from relatively undisturbed environments to those deforested by anthropogenic fires. Problems with in situ contamination, reworking of sediments, confusion of natural with anthropogenic impacts, and different theoretical expectations of growth, spread and impact of early Maori populations have led to disparate conclusions. We review pollen based studies carried out on a variety of fossil sites, including peat bogs, swamps, estuaries and lakes, and contribute new results. Different sedimentary environments show varying susceptibilities to contamination and have resulted in a wide spread of ages for initial Maori impact. Datable materials least susceptible to contamination by old or young carbon are pure peat and macrofossils, whereas lake, swamp and silty sediments are most susceptible. Analysis of the radiocarbon ages obtained for the start of Maori deforestation show that ages falling in the 'long' prehistory period are exclusively derived from lake sediments and swamps. In contrast, the bulk of the ages falling in the 'short' prehistory period are from pure peat and selected plant fragments. We conclude from our analysis of radiocarbon ages for pollen based deforestation that the first evidence of Maori environmental impact began about 700-550 calendar years BP (1250-1400 AD). Finer age resolution is limited by dating techniques, site limitations and the uncertainty associated with identifying the first signs of human impact. The period we have identified corresponds with the oldest dated archaeological sites and supports the short prehistory hypothesis. We discuss how to distinguish reliable fossil sites from those that have a high risk of giving misleading results

  4. Radiocarbon dating and 13 C/12 C ratio of soils under tropical and subtropical climates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was used an association radiocarbon dates with the carbon isotopic composition of soil organic matter, where 14 C dating gives elements of chronology, and δ13 C is used as indicator of the vegetation types in the environment. The total soil organic matter was dried, floated and sieved. The humin fraction was extracted from the 0,250 mm fraction. Radiocarbon datings were performed by a liquid scintillation method. The carbon of the soil organic matter and humin fraction are transformed into benzene, that was analyzed in low level liquid scintillation spectrometer. Based on results of carbon isotope analysis and Radiocarbon dating of soil samples of Londrina, Piracicaba and Altamira, it is concluded that probable changes of vegetation and climate occurred in the South and Southeast regions of Brazil in the mid-Holocene. (author). 81 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Accelerator and radiometric radiocarbon dates on a range of materials from colluvial deposits at Holywell Coombe, Folkestone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports preliminary results of a radiocarbon dating study, involving both conventional and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) techniques, on a range of materials recovered from colluvial deposits at Holywell Coombe, Folkestone. Materials dated by conventional means include wood, hazel-nuts, organic detritus and tufa. The tufa dates were measured at Harwell and at Gliwice, Poland; all other conventional dates were determined at the Godwin Laboratory (Cambridge). Accelerator dates have been obtained from seeds, charcoal, bone and shells of the land snail Arianta arbustorum, and were all measured at the Oxford Laboratory. The results shed light on the following issues: (1) the reproducibility of dates from adjacent sections; (2) comparisons of shell and charcoal dates from the same stratigraphical horizons; (3) comparisons of tufa dates with others based on organic material from the same profiles; (4) assessment of multiple dates from different components of the same material or replicate dates on the same object; and (5) stratigraphical conformity of dates from different laboratories. A replicate biostratigraphical and dating study of two adjacent profiles, reassuringly, gave comparable results. Shell and charcoal samples from a Lateglacial palaeosol likewise produced paired dates that were statistically indistinguishable. All the dates based on organic materials, whether conventional or AMS, were stratigraphically consistent. However, the determinations from all the tufa samples from Holywell Coombe gave apparent ages that were anomalously old. This is thought to be due to contamination from the Chalk bedrock. A parallel study of another tufa in Kent, this time on Atherfield Clay, produced dates very close to expected values. (Author)

  6. {sup 14}C AMS dating Yongcheon cave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.H., E-mail: jefflee@snu.ac.kr [AMS Lab., NCIRF, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, K. [AMS Lab., NCIRF, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.C. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, S.H.; Kang, J.; Song, S.; Song, Y.M. [AMS Lab., NCIRF, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, J.G. [Jeju National Museum, Jeju 690-782 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    The biggest island in South Korea is Jeju Island, which lies 80 km south of the mainland and has one shield volcano, Mt. Halla. The volcanic island and its lava tubes were added to the world heritage list by UNESCO in 2007. Among the many lava tubes on the island, a unique cave had been accidentally found in 2005 while some workers were replacing a telephone pole. Until the discovery, it had been completely isolated from the outside by naturally-built sand blocks. Yongcheon cave is a lime-decorated lava tube showing both the properties of a volcanic lava tube and a limestone cave. This cave, about 3 km in length, is acknowledged to be the best of this type in the world and includes a large clean-water lake, lava falls, and richly developed speleothems inside it. Even though there is archaeological evidence from well preserved pottery that ancient people entered this place, the preservation of artifacts was ensured by a geological change that made later entrance difficult. We have collected charcoal samples scattered around the cave and dated them using AMS. Ages were in the range of ca. 1570-1260 BP (A.D. 340-880) and this corresponds to the Ancient Three Kingdoms and the Unified Silla era in Korean history. The {sup 14}C AMS measurement results presented in this paper on wood charcoal provide precise dates which will be very useful not only to clarify the nature of human activities in this cave but also to provide reference dates when comparing other dating methods.

  7. Analysis of Artificial Radiocarbon in Different Skeletal and Dental Tissue Types to Evaluate Date of Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubelaker, D H; Buchholz, B A; Stewart, J

    2005-07-19

    Radiocarbon dating, with special reference to the modern bomb-curve, can provide useful information to elucidate the date of death of skeletonized human remains. Interpretation can be enhanced with analysis of different types of tissues within a single skeleton because of the known variability of formation times and remodeling rates. Analysis of radiocarbon content of teeth, especially the enamel in tooth crowns provides information about the date of formation in the childhood years and in consideration of the known timing of tooth formation can be used to estimate the birth date after 1950 A.D. Radiocarbon analysis of modern cortical and trabecular bone samples from the same skeleton may allow proper placement on the pre-1963 or post-1963 sides of the bomb-curve since most trabecular bone generally undergoes more rapid remodeling than does most cortical bone. Pre-1963 bone formation would produce higher radiocarbon values for most trabecular bone than for most cortical bone. This relationship is reversed for formation after 1963. Radiocarbon analysis was conducted in this study on dental, cortical and trabecular bone samples from two adult individuals of known birth (1925 and 1926) and death dates (1995 and 1959). As expected, the dental results correspond to pre-bomb bomb-curve values reflecting conditions during the childhoods of the individuals. The curve radiocarbon content of most bone samples reflected the higher modern bomb-curve values. Within the bone sample analyses, the values of the trabecular bone were higher than those of cortical bone and supported the known placement on the pre-1963 side of the bomb-curve.

  8. Radiocarbon dating of old groundwater - History, potential, limits and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The principles of groundwater dating up to about 40 000 yr by means of 14C were elaborated about fifty years ago. Prior this time hydrologic estimates of the recharge rate and flow velocities of groundwater were poor. Already the first 14C dates proved that any elderly water budget or geohydraulic concept had to be substantially revised especially in arid zones. Groundwater is usually considerably older than expected before the introduction of the 14C method. During one decade of gathering experience with groundwater dating it was recognized that absolute dates of groundwater require a so-called reservoir correction either based on the carbon isotope or hydrochemical compositions of the inorganic carbon species or both. A variety of simple to complex correction models for conventional 14C dates was elaborated besides more easily applicable empirical correction methods. Attempts to date groundwater with 14C in the dissolved organic constituents elucidated other kinds of hydrological problems. The requirement of absolute dates is primarily restricted, however, to scientific-relevant paleohydrological studies. In applied hydrology geohydraulic estimates of the budget of fresh groundwater directly profit from easily determinable relative groundwater ages. Such 14C dates allow estimates of regional geohydraulic parameters of the aquifer and its over and underlain aquitards, monitoring of the groundwater movement and detection of overexploitation. In any case the interpretation of groundwater ages requires a good understanding of the hydrodynamics of the system to be dated beside that of the hydrochemical composition. In arid and semi-arid zones, these dates allow to differentiate between renewable and non-renewable groundwater resources. This information is indispensable for numerical modeling as neglecting of non-stationary recharge conditions results in overestimated recharge rates. The difficulty to determine absolute 14C dates of groundwater has supported

  9. Holocene Fire History of an Eastern Oregon Forest Based on Soil Charcoal Radiocarbon Dates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, R. J.; Malkemus, D.; Clifton, C. F.

    2006-12-01

    Limited research has been done on long-term forest fire histories in northeastern Oregon. As part of an investigation to determine the minimum age of a 300 ha landslide in the Blue Mountains, a pit was excavated near the toe of the slide. The pit, located in a depression between the landslide and a ridge, contains massive clays and silts, and an 8000-year sequence of forest fires recorded in 7 buried charcoal layers. Eight- thousand-year-old Mazama Ash (Crater Lake, Oregon) is common in the area, but no tephra was found in the excavation. The upper 17 cm is organic rich soil. Seven horizons of charcoal are present; the upper six are subhorizontal and occur at depths of 17, 36, 41, 46, 52, and 57 cm. The lowest charcoal horizon follows a disconformity that cuts diagonally across the pit from 85 to 125 cm below the surface; oxidation in the form of orange mottling occurs above this disconformity (interpreted to be a paleoslope) and is prominent below it. The charcoal horizons provide evidence of large-scale forest fires in the vicinity, with differing intensities represented by the amount of charcoal in each horizon. The layers vary in thickness from 2 to 6 cm. Five charcoal horizons were radiocarbon dated (AMS) and calendar calibrated. The charcoal at the base of the soil (at 17 cm) provided an age of AD 1670 to 1960; this horizon correlates with widespread fires in the Blue Mountains in AD 1855. The horizon second closest to the surface (at 36 cm) provided an age of 1310 ± 40 B.P. The thickest horizon (at 46 cm) yielded an age of 2420 ± 40 B.P. The lowest horizontal horizon (at 57 cm) provided an age of 3460 ± 40 B.P. The lowest charcoal (at the disconformity) yielded an age of 7990 ± 40 B.P. Based on radiocarbon dates, the mean rate of sedimentation in the closed depression is approximately 1.2 cm/century. Fire episodes (which correspond remarkably well with a lake core site approximately 150 km south), indicate relatively long periods (from 400 to over 4000

  10. Compound-specific radiocarbon dating of the varved Holocene sedimentary record of Saanich Inlet, Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Smittenberg, R.H.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Hayes, J.M.; Eglinton, T.I.

    2004-01-01

    The radiocarbon contents of various biomarkers extracted from the varve-counted sediments of Saanich Inlet, Canada, were determined to assess their applicability for dating purposes. Calibrated ages obtained from the marine planktonic archaeal biomarker crenarchaeol compared favorably with varve-cou

  11. Radiocarbon dating of fluvial organic matter reveals land-use impacts in boreal peatlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulatt, Chris J.; Kaartokallio, Hermanni; Oinonen, Markku;

    2014-01-01

    This study measured the effects of land use on organic matter released to surface waters in a boreal peat catchment using radiocarbon dating of particulate and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC), DOC concentration, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition, and optical measurements...

  12. The most direct and precise radiocarbon date for the Minoan eruption of Santorini

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrich, Walter L.; Heinemeier, Jan

    for the Minoan eruption. Together with a second olive tree, excavated only 9 meters from the first one, it enables us to repeat the earlier measurements of the first tree 2006 (Friedrich, W.L . Kromer, B Friedrich, M. Heinemeier, J. Pfeiffer, T. Talamo, S. Santorini Eruption Radiocarbon Dated to 1627-1600 BC...

  13. Radiocarbon Dating and age Inversions in Lake Chapala Late Holocene Sediments, Western Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate-Del Valle, P.; Israde-Alcantara, I.; Ramírez-Sánchez, H.; Gómez-Salazar, S.; Ríos-Donato, N.

    2006-12-01

    Neotectonic Lake Chapala, the major Mexican freshwater reservoir lies at the north and northeast of the Citala Rift and is linked to history of the active Plio-Quaternary Transmexican Volcanic Belt geological province. Eight radiocarbon 14C dates were obtained on shallow sediment samples from a gravity corer (T46) of 5 cm in diameter and 1.7 m long. The core was collected from the western sector of Lake Chapala (103° 15.43' W, 20° 14.45' N) at water depth of 3.7 m (june 2000). In general, shallow sediments (Lake Chapala are dark and silty with granulometric median ranging from 10 to 50 μm. Major oxides in sediments are: SiO2 (54.05%), Al2O3 (18.94%), Fe2O3 (6.75%) and CaO (2.57%). The major mineralogical composition of sediments is as follows: plagioclases (25.86%), quartz (20.92%), clays (38.5%), carbonates (2.99%) and TiO2 (1.05%). Radiocarbon ages were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and were obtained through the organic carbon fraction extracted from the bulk sediment samples sliced every 20 cm taken from the whole core. Stratigraphically ordered from highest to lowest, the eight ages reported are: 1) 2,000 ±40 yr on sediments at 30 cm deep; 2) 1,920 ±35 yr on sediments at 50 cm deep; 3) 1,900 ±35 yr on sediments at 70 cm deep; 4) 2,080 ±35 yr on sediments at 90 cm deep; 5) 2,090 ±50 yr on sediments at 110 cm deep; 6) 2,190 ±35 yr on sediments at 130 cm deep; 7) 2,050 ±35 yr on sediments at 150 cm deep and, 8) 1,500 ±35 yr on sediments at 170 cm deep. From the top until 70 cm and from 130 to bottom we observe two age inversions; the interval apparently with no age inversions is from 70cm to 130cm. As it is known the age inversions observed may be due to a) ancient carbon being incorporated into the sediment during deposition; b) unrecognized bioturbation, c) Postdepositional alteration and, d) variations in the apparent geological ages of the different chemical phases comprising the total sediment. Basically, the factors probably

  14. Radiocarbon AMS determination of the biogenic component in CO{sub 2} emitted from waste incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagnile, L., E-mail: lucio.calcagnile@unisalento.it [CEDAD-Department of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Quarta, G., E-mail: gianluca.quarta@unisalento.it [CEDAD-Department of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); D' Elia, M., E-mail: marisa.delia@unisalento.it [CEDAD-Department of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Ciceri, G., E-mail: giovanni.ciceri@erse-web.it [Ricerca sul Sistema Energetico-RSE spa, Dipartimento Ambiente e Sviluppo Sostenibile, Via R. Rubattino, 54, 20134 Milano (Italy); Martinotti, V., E-mail: valter.Martinotti@erse-web.it [Ricerca sul Sistema Energetico-RSE spa, Dipartimento Ambiente e Sviluppo Sostenibile, Via R. Rubattino, 54, 20134 Milano (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    The thermal utilization of waste for energy production is gaining importance in European countries. Nevertheless, the combustion of waste leads to significant CO{sub 2} emissions in the atmosphere which, depending on the fraction of biogenic and fossil materials, have to be only partially accounted for the national greenhouse gas inventory. For this reason the development of proper methodologies for the measurement of the biogenic fraction in the combusted waste is an active research field. In fact the determination of the radiocarbon concentration in the carbon dioxide stack emissions allows to have a direct indication of the biogenic component in the burned fuel. We present the results of the AMS radiocarbon analyses carried out on carbon dioxide sampled at the stack of three power plants located in Northern Italy burning natural gas, landfill biogas and SRF (Solid Recovered Fuel) derived from MSW (Municipal Solid Waste). The sampling apparatus and the applied processing protocols are described together with the calculation procedures used to determine, from the measured radiocarbon concentrations, the proportion of biogenic and fossil component in the flue gas and in the combusted fuel. The results confirm the high potentialities of this approach in the analysis of industrial CO{sub 2} emissions.

  15. Radiocarbon AMS determination of the biogenic component in CO 2 emitted from waste incineration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagnile, L.; Quarta, G.; D'Elia, M.; Ciceri, G.; Martinotti, V.

    2011-12-01

    The thermal utilization of waste for energy production is gaining importance in European countries. Nevertheless, the combustion of waste leads to significant CO 2 emissions in the atmosphere which, depending on the fraction of biogenic and fossil materials, have to be only partially accounted for the national greenhouse gas inventory. For this reason the development of proper methodologies for the measurement of the biogenic fraction in the combusted waste is an active research field. In fact the determination of the radiocarbon concentration in the carbon dioxide stack emissions allows to have a direct indication of the biogenic component in the burned fuel. We present the results of the AMS radiocarbon analyses carried out on carbon dioxide sampled at the stack of three power plants located in Northern Italy burning natural gas, landfill biogas and SRF (Solid Recovered Fuel) derived from MSW (Municipal Solid Waste). The sampling apparatus and the applied processing protocols are described together with the calculation procedures used to determine, from the measured radiocarbon concentrations, the proportion of biogenic and fossil component in the flue gas and in the combusted fuel. The results confirm the high potentialities of this approach in the analysis of industrial CO 2 emissions.

  16. Radiocarbon microanalysis on ice impurities for dating of Alpine glaciers

    OpenAIRE

    May, Barbara Luise

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is the deployment of radiometric dating on Alpine ice archives, where conventional, stratigraphical dating techniques fail. To this end a 14C analysis of particulate and, in a novel attempt, also of dissolved organic carbon contained in the ice matrix is developed. Aimed at minimizing the required ice sample size, the designed ice processing line allows for handling of up to 700 g ice and is shown to involve blank levels small enough to ensure reliable 14C an...

  17. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia L Harvey

    Full Text Available Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N. Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands, chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six (14C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae, recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP. All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated (14C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 1(4C analysis.

  18. Pushing the limits of high-precision radiocarbon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is mostly used for radiocarbon dating, because it allows determining efficiently 14C without isobaric or molecular background. While for many years these measurements were performed on large tandem accelerators (3 - 6 MV), this has changed over the last 10 years and compact AMS systems (2 and allows for the first time precise routine radiocarbon dating of micro-gram samples. The impact of the new-generation compact radiocarbon dating systems is discussed.

  19. The first radiocarbon dating of pollen from syngenetic ice-wadge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methodology for extracting the pollen concentrate from the syngenetic ice-wadge for the pollen radiocarbon dating with application of the acceleration mass-spectrometry is described. The results of the radiocarbon dating of pollen and spores (the extracted spore-pollen concentrate) sampled directly from the syngenetic ice-wadge, are obtained for the first time through this methodology. It is established, that the sample from the upper ice-wadge at the height of 20.2 m has the oldest date of 25200 years; the lower sample, positioned at the height of 17.2 m, is aged 21170 years; and the lowest sample, located at the height of 10.0 m, is aged 22400 years

  20. Radiocarbon dating in near-Eastern contexts: Confusion and quality control

    OpenAIRE

    van der Plicht, J.; Bruins, HJ; Bruins, Hendrik J.; Boaretto, E; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    Near-Eastern archaeology has long remained oblivious to radiocarbon dating as unique historical calendars brought about a perception that C-14 dating is superfluous. Circular chronological reasoning may occur as a result. There is now strong C-14 evidence that the early part of Egyptian history seems older than age assessments currently in vogue among scholars. It is vital to apply systematic and high-quality C-14 dating to each and every excavation in the Near East to measure time with the s...

  1. Radiocarbon dates of the medieval period stone anchors from Dabhol, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.; Vora, K.H.

    and Gallivats being of deep draught could not get up above the junction of Jogburi river with the sacred Washisti, but lay at anchor in deep water in the land locked basin at Dabhol’. This reference indicates that Dabhol was an active maritime trade centre... Dabhol jetty. radiocarbon dates of the same were ob- tained from the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, Lucknow. Explorations Onshore and inter-tidal zone explorations were undertaken in and around Dabhol jetty. Towards the east...

  2. Matanchen complex: new radiocarbon dates on early coastal adaptation in west Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountjoy, J B; Taylor, R E; Feldman, L H

    1972-03-17

    Samples of marine shell from archeological context on the coast of Nayarit, Mexico, have given radiocarbon determinations of 1810 +/- 80 B.C., 2000 +/- 100 B.C., and 2100 +/- 100 B.C. Even with maximum correction for upwelling these are the earliest dates for coastal occupation in West Mexico north of Acapulco, Guerrero. Analysis of the midden contents has provided new insights regarding early coastal adaptation.

  3. From 14C/12C measurements towards radiocarbon dating of ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Roijen, J.J. van; Raynaud, D.; Borg, K. van der; Jong, A.F.M. de; Lipenkov, V.; Huybrechts, P.

    1994-01-01

    A dry extraction method of CO2 included in glacier ice adds a contamination equivalent to 1.8 μg modern carbon for a 35 μg C sample. This enables radiocarbon dating by accelerator mass spectrometry of 35 μg C samples to about 25 000 BP. Measured 14C/12C ratios are presented for a part of the Vostok

  4. From 14C/12C measurements towards radiocarbon dating of ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dry extraction method of CO2 included in glacier ice adds a contamination equivalent to 1.8 μg modern carbon for a 35 μg C sample. This enables radiocarbon dating by accelerator mass spectrometry of 35 μg C samples to about 25 000 BP. Measured 14C/12C ratios are presented for a part of the Vostok ice core, and for some surface samples; high 14C/12C values ranging between 65 and 105 pm C indicate in-situ 14C production during the ablation. The reproducibility of radiocarbon dating of ice is demonstrated by results for some parts of the Caroline core, yielding an age versus depth profile, in which the age does not simply increases with depth. The results indicate that the accuracy of radiocarbon dating of ice is not limited by the statistical error arising in the accelerator measurements, but by the uncertainty in the contamination background of the samples and by the in-situ production of 14C. 12 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Rewriting the Central European Early Bronze Age Chronology: Evidence from Large-Scale Radiocarbon Dating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp W Stockhammer

    Full Text Available The transition from the Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe has often been considered as a supra-regional uniform process, which led to the growing mastery of the new bronze technology. Since the 1920s, archaeologists have divided the Early Bronze Age into two chronological phases (Bronze A1 and A2, which were also seen as stages of technical progress. On the basis of the early radiocarbon dates from the cemetery of Singen, southern Germany, the beginning of the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe was originally dated around 2300/2200 BC and the transition to more complex casting techniques (i.e., Bronze A2 around 2000 BC. On the basis of 140 newly radiocarbon dated human remains from Final Neolithic, Early and Middle Bronze Age cemeteries south of Augsburg (Bavaria and a re-dating of ten graves from the cemetery of Singen, we propose a significantly different dating range, which forces us to re-think the traditional relative and absolute chronologies as well as the narrative of technical development. We are now able to date the beginning of the Early Bronze Age to around 2150 BC and its end to around 1700 BC. Moreover, there is no transition between Bronze (Bz A1 and Bronze (Bz A2, but a complete overlap between the type objects of the two phases from 1900-1700 BC. We thus present a revised chronology of the assumed diagnostic type objects of the Early Bronze Age and recommend a radiocarbon-based view on the development of the material culture. Finally, we propose that the traditional phases Bz A1 and Bz A2 do not represent a chronological sequence, but regionally different social phenomena connected to the willingness of local actors to appropriate the new bronze technology.

  6. Radiocarbon dating of the Early Natufian at el-Wad Terrace, Mount Carmel, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmeier, E.; Yeshurun, R.; Weinstein-Evron, M.; Mintz, E.; Boaretto, E.

    2012-04-01

    The Natufian culture (15-11.5 kyr BP) of the Levant played an integral role in the transition from nomadic hunter-gatherers to the establishment of sedentism and, finally, to food producing societies of the Neolithic. The Natufian sites in the Southern Levant are characterised by a lack of macrobotanical remains, including charcoal, and a poor preservation of bone collagen. A result of the scarcity of radiocarbon dateable material is that only about 30 reliable radiocarbon dates from the Natufian are available for constructing a chronology of this period, which would enable a better synchronisation of archaeological and environmental data. A key question of Natufian research is if and to what extent past climate changes influenced the lifestyle of the Natufian communities, but the prerequisite for the correlation of cultural and environmental events in time are accurate chronologies. Therefore, a chronological framework with dates from well-defined contexts and samples of good quality is essential for the investigation of the Natufian. We present new C-14 data from the site of el-Wad Terrace, one of the major Natufian hamlets of the 'core area' of this culture. The samples (12 charcoals and 34 bones, of which 6 charcoals and 5 bones were suitable for dating) were derived from Early Natufian (15-13 kyr BP) living surfaces, dwellings and burials. Using FTIR, we investigated the environmental factors that influenced the preservation of material for radiocarbon dating of the site, and we tested a modified pre-treatment method for poorly preserved charcoal samples. We found that the usual pre-treatment protocol for C-14 samples (W-ABA) removed more charcoal material than the method modified by Rebollo et al. (2008) which omits the first acid treatment (W-BA). This first acid step enhanced the extraction of humic substances during the subsequent base step. The modified W-BA method is a promising tool for dating poorly preserved charcoals which needs further testing with

  7. Correlating the ancient Maya and modern European calendars with high-precision AMS 14C dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, Douglas J; Hajdas, Irka; Culleton, Brendan J; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Martin, Simon; Neff, Hector; Awe, Jaime; Graham, Heather V; Freeman, Katherine H; Newsom, Lee; Lentz, David L; Anselmetti, Flavio S; Robinson, Mark; Marwan, Norbert; Southon, John; Hodell, David A; Haug, Gerald H

    2013-01-01

    The reasons for the development and collapse of Maya civilization remain controversial and historical events carved on stone monuments throughout this region provide a remarkable source of data about the rise and fall of these complex polities. Use of these records depends on correlating the Maya and European calendars so that they can be compared with climate and environmental datasets. Correlation constants can vary up to 1000 years and remain controversial. We report a series of high-resolution AMS (14)C dates on a wooden lintel collected from the Classic Period city of Tikal bearing Maya calendar dates. The radiocarbon dates were calibrated using a Bayesian statistical model and indicate that the dates were carved on the lintel between AD 658-696. This strongly supports the Goodman-Martínez-Thompson (GMT) correlation and the hypothesis that climate change played an important role in the development and demise of this complex civilization.

  8. Chemical treatment method for AMS-measurement of radiocarbon in seawater samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramaki, Takafumi [Mutsu Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Mutsu, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    To reveal a migration behavior of radionuclides in the marine environment, it is necessary to make clear the seawater movement in the ocean. The dissolved inorganic radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in seawater is supplied only from the air at the sea surface and flows with seawater. The absolute quantity of the {sup 14}C decreases with the passage of time. Therefore, it is used as `Tracer of seawater`. The accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) was installed in JAERI Mutsu establishment at April, 1997. It can measure {sup 14}C/C (or {sup 129}I/I) extensively. To measure the {sup 14}C/C in seawater samples by AMS, two chemical processes are necessary in stripping carbon dioxde (CO{sub 2}) from the inorganic carbonic acid dissolved in seawater and making graphite from this CO{sub 2}. Present processing methods requires time (40 min/sample) and complicated procedures. In contrast with it, newly developed method of CO{sub 2} stripping accomplished to reduce the processing time to one half and increase the yield. On the other hand, the new method of graphite forming is simplified by the improvement of present method. (author)

  9. Stratigraphic assignment of sample from quaternary age using radiocarbon dating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon dating for quaternary samples from Watuadeg, Kalasan, Sleman Yogyakarta has been carried out. The samples are taken from Tuffaceous sand layer (top sample) which overlies a paleosoil (bottom sample). After pretreatment, the weight of the samples was optimized in order to reach same or more than 20 inHg pressure from CO2 gas or 3 ml volume benzene. The result of the dating of the samples are expected to enable stratigraphic assignment of the layers where the samples were taken. The dating result of the Tuffaceous sand = 5835.69 ± 66.91 BP (3885.69 ± 66.91 BC) and Paleosoil sample = 6127.87± 66.12 BP (4177.87 ± 66.12 BC). From the stratigraphic aspect, the dating results show the two layers, are in conformable relation without any abnormality. (author)

  10. NON-DESTRUCTIVE RADIOCARBON DATING: NATURALLY MUMMIFIED INFANT BUNDLE FROM SW TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steelman, K L; Rowe, M W; Turpin, S A; Guilderson, T P; Nightengale, L

    2004-09-07

    Plasma oxidation was used to obtain radiocarbon dates on six different materials from a naturally mummified baby bundle from the Lower Pecos River region of southwest Texas. This bundle was selected because it was thought to represent a single event and would illustrate the accuracy and precision of the plasma oxidation method. Five of the materials were clearly components of the original bundle with 13 dates combined to yield a weighted average of 2135 {+-} 11 B.P. Six dates from a wooden stick of Desert Ash averaged 939 {+-} 14 B.P., indicating that this artifact was not part of the original burial. Plasma oxidation is shown to be a virtually non-destructive alternative to combustion. Because only sub-milligram amounts of material are removed from an artifact over its exposed surface, no visible change in fragile materials has been observed, even under magnification. The method is best applied when natural organic contamination is unlikely and serious consideration of this issue is needed in all cases. If organic contamination is present, it will have to be removed before plasma oxidation to obtain accurate radiocarbon dates.

  11. Comparative radiocarbon dating of lignite, pottery, and charcoal samples from Babeldaob Island, Republic of Palau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, A.; Chappell, J.; Clark, G.; Phear, S. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    It is difficult to construct archaeological chronologies for Babeldaob, the main island of Palau (western Micronesia), because the saprolitic clays of the dominant terraced-hill sites and associated ceramic sherds often contain old carbon that originated in lignites. This has implications, as well, for chronologies of sedimentary sequences. Comparative analysis of the dating problem using lignite, pottery, and charcoal samples indicates that, in fact, there are both old and young sources of potential contamination. It is concluded that radiocarbon samples from Babeldaob need to be tested for appropriate carbon content rather than relying solely upon material identification.

  12. Radiocarbon dating of groundwater in tertiary sediments of the eastern Murray Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tertiary sediments located in the eastern part of the Murray Basin contain one of the most important low salinity groundwater resources in New South Wales. It is imperative that the hydrogeological environment in which the groundwater occurs be thoroughly understood to allow adequate management of the resource. A radiocarbon dating project was carried out on 37 groundwater samples from bores screened in these unconsolidated sediments. The results indicate water ages in the range 'modern' to 15 800 years. Groundwater recharge areas are indicated and rates of groundwater recharge and movement determined. The latter shows close correlation with velocity values quantitatively determined by Darcy's law

  13. Prehistoric peyote use: alkaloid analysis and radiocarbon dating of archaeological specimens of Lophophora from Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Seedi, Hesham R; De Smet, Peter A G M; Beck, Olof; Possnert, Göran; Bruhn, Jan G

    2005-10-01

    Two archaeological specimens of peyote buttons, i.e. dried tops of the cactus Lophophora williamsii (Lem.) Coulter, from the collection of the Witte Museum in San Antonio, was subjected to radiocarbon dating and alkaloid analysis. The samples were presumably found in Shumla Cave No. 5 on the Rio Grande, Texas. Radiocarbon dating shows that the calibrated 14C age of the weighted mean of the two individual dated samples corresponds to the calendric time interval 3780-3660 BC (one sigma significance). Alkaloid extraction yielded approximately 2% of alkaloids. Analysis with thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) led to the identification of mescaline in both samples. No other peyote alkaloids could be identified. The two peyote samples appear to be the oldest plant drug ever to yield a major bioactive compound upon chemical analysis. The identification of mescaline strengthens the evidence that native North Americans recognized the psychotropic properties of peyote as long as 5700 years ago.

  14. Radiocarbon dating of prehistoric phytoliths: a preliminary study of archaeological sites in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xinxin; Lu, Houyuan; Zhang, Jianping; Wang, Can; Sun, Guoping; Zheng, Yunfei

    2016-05-01

    Phytoliths can occlude some organic carbon during their deposition in plants. This carbon fraction is recognised as an ideal dating material because of its high resistance to decomposition and post-deposition contamination at the time of phytolith formation. However, the reliability of phytolith radiocarbon dating has recently been questioned. The development of a new extraction protocol for phytoliths, with paired dating between phytoliths and other materials from the same sediment, may provide further evidence for the reliability of phytolith dating. We present an improved method for extracting phytoliths from soils. We compared the dating of phytoliths and other materials (e.g., charcoal and plant seeds) recovered at the same depth from seven pits at six archaeological sites in China. The estimated ages of the phytoliths and other materials were generally consistent, except for one outlier. We attribute this inconsistency to the post-depositional processes of phytoliths in soil, rather than to the uptake of old carbon from the soil. Our results clearly show the potential for phytolith carbon dating at archaeological sites in the absence of other dating materials.

  15. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  16. Radiocarbon dating of silica sinter deposits in shallow drill cores from the Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Hurwitz, Shaul; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the timing of hydrothermal activity at the Upper Geyser Basin (UGB) in Yellowstone National Park, we obtained seven new accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon 14C ages of carbonaceous material trapped within siliceous sinter. Five samples came from depths of 15-152 cm within the Y-1 well, and two samples were from well Y-7 (depths of 24 cm and 122 cm). These two wells, at Black Sand and Biscuit Basins, respectively, were drilled in 1967 as part of a scientific drilling program by the U.S. Geological Survey (White et al., 1975). Even with samples as small as 15 g, we obtained sufficient carbonaceous material (a mixture of thermophilic mats, pollen, and charcoal) for the 14C analyses. Apparent time of deposition ranged from 3775 ± 25 and 2910 ± 30 14C years BP at the top of the cores to about 8000 years BP at the bottom. The dates are consistent with variable rates of sinter formation at individual sites within the UGB over the Holocene. On a basin-wide scale, though, these and other existing 14C dates hint that hydrothermal activity at the UGB may have been continuous throughout the Holocene.

  17. Radiocarbon dating of silica sinter deposits in shallow drill cores from the Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Hurwitz, Shaul; McGeehin, John

    2016-01-01

    To explore the timing of hydrothermal activity at the Upper Geyser Basin (UGB) in Yellowstone National Park, we obtained seven new accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon 14C ages of carbonaceous material trapped within siliceous sinter. Five samples came from depths of 15–152 cm within the Y-1 well, and two samples were from well Y-7 (depths of 24 cm and 122 cm). These two wells, at Black Sand and Biscuit Basins, respectively, were drilled in 1967 as part of a scientific drilling program by the U.S. Geological Survey (White et al., 1975). Even with samples as small as 15 g, we obtained sufficient carbonaceous material (a mixture of thermophilic mats, pollen, and charcoal) for the 14C analyses. Apparent time of deposition ranged from 3775 ± 25 and 2910 ± 30 14C years BP at the top of the cores to about 8000 years BP at the bottom. The dates are consistent with variable rates of sinter formation at individual sites within the UGB over the Holocene. On a basin-wide scale, though, these and other existing 14C dates hint that hydrothermal activity at the UGB may have been continuous throughout the Holocene.

  18. Rapidly Melting Ice Caps of Northern Baffin Island: Insights From Cosmogenic and Conventional Radiocarbon Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. K.; Miller, G. H.; Briner, J. P.; Lifton, N.; Devogel, S. B.

    2006-12-01

    The interior plateau of northern Baffin Island in the eastern Canadian Arctic is home to several small (lichen trimlines across much of the plateau. These trimlines represent previous multi-year snow or ice cover and their aerial extent can be measured via satellite imagery. Based on these measurements, modern ice caps represent only ~3% of ice-cap extent during the Little Ice Age. Radiocarbon dating of moss, preserved beneath the ice caps due to their cold-based nature, suggests a sudden expansion of ice cover around 520 calendar years before present (cal BP), indicated by a mode of 7 dates of approximately this age. This coincides with a pulse of global volcanic activity; predicted cooling from increased aerosol loading may have triggered rapid ice-cap growth. However, dead moss emerging at three sites is more than 1000 years old, with a maximum age of 1326±15 cal BP, indicating that portions of the remaining ice caps have remained intact from more than 1000 years Further constraints on ice cap size are provided by 14C cosmogenic exposure dating. 14C concentrations in rocks at the modern ice margin are too low to be the result of continuous exposure since deglaciation followed by shielding for 500-1000 years by ice cover. Exposure history modeling indicates at least one additional prior period of ice cover of approximately 1000 years. This cold interval most likely occurred sometime since 4 ka, after the Holocene Thermal Maximum in the Arctic and coeval with the onset of Neoglaciation. Radiocarbon dating reveals that some plateau ice caps have been continuously present for more than 1000 years, whereas others formed early in the Little Ice Age (~520 cal BP). Even without additional warming, continuation of current climatic conditions on northern Baffin Island will result in the demise of all ice on the plateau, a condition that has not occurred for more than 1300 years.

  19. Direct radiocarbon dates for prehistoric paintings at the Altamira, El Castillo and Niaux caves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among things that most strikingly distinguish modern humans from other hominids and the rest of the animal kingdom is the ability to represent things and events pictorially. Complex paintings of the type discovered in the Altamira, El Castillo, Niaux and Lascaux caves represent an important stepping stone in the cultural evolution of humankind. Until now dates were derived from style or dated remains left by prehistoric visitors and could be biased by prolonged occupation or visits unrelated to painting activity. Here we report the first radiocarbon dates for the charcoal used to draw stylistically similar bisons in these caves: 14,000 ± 400 yr BP in the Spanish caves of Altamira, 12,990 ± 200 yr BP in El Castillo, and 12,890 ± 160 yr BP for a bison of different style in the French Pyrenean cave of Niaux. Our results demonstrate the imprecise nature of stylistic dating and show that painting dates derived from remains of human activities should be used with caution. (Author)

  20. Radiocarbon dating of prehistoric rock paintings by selective oxidation of organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, J.; Hyman, M.; Shafer, H.J.; Rowe, M.W. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA))

    1990-12-27

    Dating of prehistoric rock paintings (pictographs) has traditionally relied on indirect evidence. This includes inferences based on the archaeological context, such as superpositions of pictorial styles and the depiction of images that constrain their ages, as well as dating of deposits that either cover the art in situ or contain separated fragments of the painted surface. Migration of ions between the bulk rock and the natural coatings that form on a newly exposed surface has also been exploited to date petroglyphs (rock carvings) in desert regions. Until recently, however, direct dating (by radiocarbon techniques) of pictographs has not been possible, mainly because of the problem of separating inorganic carbon from the organic material in the pigments. Here we report on a new technique which allows this separation to be effected by using a low-temperature, low-pressure oxygen plasma to oxidize selectively the organic component; this may then be analysed using standard {sup 14}C methods. We have applied this technique to a portion of a pictograph from the Lower Pecos region of southwest Texas. The date obtained, 3,865{plus minus}100 yr BP (before present) is consistent with that expected on the basis of archaeological inference. As organic carbon is a ubiquitous component of pictograph paints, this technique should be applicable to rock paintings throughout the world. (author).

  1. Radiocarbon-dating and ancient DNA reveal rapid replacement of extinct prehistoric penguins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Perry, George L. W.; Smith, Ian W. G.; Scofield, R. Paul; Tennyson, Alan J. D.; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth A.; Boessenkool, Sanne; Austin, Jeremy J.; Waters, Jonathan M.

    2015-03-01

    Prehistoric faunal extinctions dramatically reshaped biological assemblages around the world. However, the timing of such biotic shifts is often obscured by the fragmentary nature and limited temporal resolution of fossil records. We use radiocarbon-dating and ancient-DNA analysis of prehistoric (ca A.D. 1450-1834) Megadyptes penguin specimens to assess the time-frame of biological turnover in coastal New Zealand following human settlement. These data suggest that the final extirpation of the endemic Megadyptes waitaha, and subsequent replacement by the previously sub-Antarctic-limited Megadyptes antipodes, likely occurred within a narrow temporal window (e.g. a century or less). This transition represents one of the most rapid prehistoric faunal turnover events documented, and is likely linked to human demographic and cultural transitions during the 15th Century. Our results suggest that anthropogenic forces can trigger rapid biogeographic shifts.

  2. 14C-AMS at the Leibniz-Labor: radiometric dating and isotope research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Leibniz-Labor was founded to provide radiometric dating services using AMS and measured over 15 000 samples and 26 800 targets up to September 2002. Research and development have primarily been directed at improving the efficiency and reliability of AMS measurements, optimising existing sample preparation procedures for AMS and developing new ones. The standard chemical pre-treatment of organic radiocarbon samples produces often two fractions: one from which contaminants have been removed, and one in which they have been enriched. Dating both fractions reveals the degree of sample contamination. This provides a useful indication of the reliability of the sample age obtained and of the environmental conditions where the sample was taken. Upgrades to reduce maintenance include replacing four cryo- by turbo pumps, installing a deionizer loop, which keeps conductivity between 100 and 150 μS/cm to control corrosion, in the closed cooling water circuit, and developing a new sample wheel, which holds target holders with a groove and spring clip. Long term stability is demonstrated by the results obtained for IAEA reference materials, measured routinely and regularly over the years. Tests made as part of the FIRI project demonstrate that reliable measurements down to <0.1 mg C can be made

  3. Collection of radiocarbon dates on the mammoths ( Mammuthus primigenius) and other genera of Wrangel Island, northeast Siberia, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanyan, Sergey L.; Arslanov, Khikmat A.; Karhu, Juha A.; Possnert, Göran; Sulerzhitsky, Leopold D.

    2008-07-01

    We present and discuss a full list of radiocarbon dates for woolly mammoth and other species of the Mammoth fauna available from Wrangel Island, northeast Siberia, Russia. Most of the radiocarbon dates are published here for the first time. Of the124 radiocarbon dates on mammoth bone, 106 fall between 3700 and 9000 yr ago. We believe these dates bracket the period of mammoth isolation on Wrangel Island and their ultimate extinction, which we attribute to natural causes. The absence of dates between 9-12 ka probably indicates a period when mammoths were absent from Wrangel Island. Long bone dimensions of Holocene mammoths from Wrangel Island indicate that these animals were comparable in size to those on the mainland; although they were not large animals, neither can they be classified as dwarfs. Occurrence of mammoth Holocene refugia on the mainland is suggested. Based on other species of the Mammoth fauna that have also been radiocarbon on Wrangel Island, including horse, bison, musk ox and woolly rhinoceros, it appears that the mammoth was the only species of that fauna that inhabited Wrangel Island in the mid-Holocene.

  4. Sun, Ocean, Nuclear Bombs, and Fossil Fuels: Radiocarbon Variations and Implications for High-Resolution Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Koushik

    2016-06-01

    Radiocarbon, or 14C, is a radiometric dating method ideally suited for providing a chronological framework in archaeology and geosciences for timescales spanning the last 50,000 years. 14C is easily detectable in most common natural organic materials and has a half-life (5,730±40 years) relevant to these timescales. 14C produced from large-scale detonations of nuclear bombs between the 1950s and the early 1960s can be used for dating modern organic materials formed after the 1950s. Often these studies demand high-resolution chronology to resolve ages within a few decades to less than a few years. Despite developments in modern, high-precision 14C analytical methods, the applicability of 14C in high-resolution chronology is limited by short-term variations in atmospheric 14C in the past. This article reviews the roles of the principal natural drivers (e.g., solar magnetic activity and ocean circulation) and the anthropogenic perturbations (e.g., fossil fuel CO2 and 14C from nuclear and thermonuclear bombs) that are responsible for short-term 14C variations in the environment. Methods and challenges of high-resolution 14C dating are discussed.

  5. Integration of radiocarbon dating in the hydrodynamic scheme of north western Sahara aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ould Baba Sy, M.; Besbes, M.

    2003-04-01

    Radiocarbon dating methods can be applied to obtain the age of ground water. Carbon exists in several naturally occurring isotopes, l2C, 13C, and 14C. Carbon 14 is formed in the atmosphere by the bombardment of 14N by cosmic radiation (DeVries 1959). The l4C forms CO2, so that the atmospheric CO2 has a constant radioactivity due to modern 14C. If the CO2 is incorporated into a form in which it is isolated from modern 14C, age determinations can be made from the 14C radioactivity as a percent of the original. The half-life of l4C is 5730 y, so that if one-fourth of the original activity is present, two half-lives, or 11,460 y, have elapsed. When precipitation soaks into the ground, it is saturated with respect to CO2, with a known 14C activity. Once the water has entered the soil, additional carbon may come from soil CO2 and the solution of carbonate minerals. The modern carbon is diluted by the inactive carbon from carbonate minerals. The raw dates obtained must be adjusted for this dilution. In the present research, we present a contribution of radiocarbon dating in the North Western Sahara Aquifer System, the NWSAS, shared by three countries (Algeria, Libya and Tunisia). This will be done while showing the utility of the log-linear function gotten by regression of some values representing the age of water by the activity of the carbon 14. This function has permitted to estimate the age of water for a sample of 72 water points. It leads, by interpolation on a cartographic support, to the distribution of the carbon 14 activities measured to the wells, translated in equivalent ages of water in the Continental Intercalaire aquifer, which is part of NWSAS and extends over one million square km. The reading of this ages map shows well the hydaulic behavior of the aquifer system.

  6. Direct radiocarbon dating and stable isotopes of the neandertal femur from Les Rochers-de-Villeneuve (Lussac-les-Châteaux, Vienne)

    OpenAIRE

    Beauval, C.; Lacrampe-Cuyaubère, F.; B. Maureille; Trinkaus, E

    2010-01-01

    Direct radiocarbon dating of the Neandertal femoral diaphysis from the Rochers-de-Villeneuve (Lussac-les-Châteaux, Vienne) has yielded an age of 45,200 ± 1,100 14C years B.P. (OxA-15257) [48,455 ± 1,878 cal. years B.P.], and stable isotope values of δ13C = - 19.0‰ and δ15N = 11.6‰. The direct radiocarbon date makes it the oldest directly dated European Neandertal specimen, even though others have securely associated radiocarbon dates in the same time range. The stable isotopes are similar to ...

  7. AMS dating of early shellmounds of the Southeastern Brazilian coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, T. A. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Museu Nacional. Dept. de Antropologia; Macario, K.D.; Anjos, R.M.; Gomes, P.R.S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Coimbra, M.M. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Elmore, D. [Purdue Univ., IN (United States). Purdue Rare Isotopes Measurement Lab.

    2003-06-01

    This paper discusses the chronology of prehistoric settlements of the central-south Brazilian coast. A charcoal sample from a coastal shell mound of Rio de Janeiro State was dated by {sup 14} C-AMS to 7, 860+- 80 years B P as part of an interdisciplinary project between physicists and archaeologists. This is an unexpected result that reinforces two similar previous early dates for the same region, which were questioned by Brazilian archaeologists because they implied in pulling back by some two thousand years the antiquity consensually accepted for the settlement of that region. (author)

  8. Co-development of Conceptual Understanding and Critical Attitude: Analyzing texts on radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décamp, N.; Viennot, L.

    2015-08-01

    This research documents the impact of a teaching interview aimed at developing a critical attitude in students, and focused on a particular topic: radiocarbon dating. This teaching interview is designed to observe students' reaction to limited written explanations of the phenomenon under study, and their possible frustration or intellectual satisfaction in relation to these texts. We aim to document the possible link between students' developing conceptual understanding of a topic and their ability to express their frustration when presented with very incomplete explanations, or their intellectual satisfaction when presented with complete explanation. As a side product, we intend to observe some of their a priori ideas concerning this topic. Ten teaching interviews conducted with fourth-year University students were recorded, transcribed and coded. Beyond a series of results concerning students' a priori understanding of the domain, the analysis of the interviews suggests that, when students are presented with texts of increasing completeness and discuss these with the interviewer, their critical reactions evolve in time in a very specific way. We propose a tentative model for this co-evolution of student conceptual command and critical stance. The discussion bears on possible interpretations for the 'anesthesia of judgment' observed in most students at the beginning of the interview, and for a few of them throughout the discussion. Keeping in mind the 'competence vs concepts' current alternative, the conditions that seem to free students' critical potential are analyzed in relation to their evolving command of the topic and their degree of intellectual satisfaction.

  9. Recurrence analysis of the mass movement activity at Stambach (Austria) based on radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkel, Ingmar; Ehret, Dominik; Rohn, Joachim

    2013-05-01

    The Stambach mass movement (Austria) is a large and deep-seated mass movement in the Austrian Alps. It consists of a complex and compound mass movement system. The latest major reactivation of the Stambach mass movement was initiated in 1982 by rock fall activity that triggered an earth flow, which transformed into a mud flow. Six sediment cores were taken along the entire earth flow body showing a complex mixture of rock fall blocks and earth flow material. Whenever the earth flow was active, numerous wooden remains were buried within the flow mass. Thirteen of these remains sampled from the sediment cores were radiocarbon dated. The results indicate that the first activation of the Stambach mass movement occurred at least around 9750-9900 cal BP, followed by at least three further events during the Holocene, around 6310-5650, 2320-1880, and 1600-1180 cal BP. Accumulation of toppled rock towers in the head area of the earth flow, followed by a sudden collapse and saturated, undrained loading of the earth flow body, is the main trigger for activating the earth flow. These long lasting preparatory processes make it difficult to determine certain recurrence intervals. However, our data show that the Stambach mass movement was (and most probably still can be) reactivated after more than 3000 years of dormancy.

  10. Preceramic, Aceramic or Early Ceramic? The radiocarbon dated beginning of the Neolithic in the Aegean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Reingruber

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pre-Pottery-Neolithic refers to a period in the Eastern Mediterranean when ceramic containers were not yet in use (although small objects made of clay were already being created. This concept, which reflects a specific and quite unique stage in the development of human history, was introduced to Aegean prehistory under the term of Preceramic during the 1950’s (e.g., in Argissa Magoula and Sesklo. Shortly thereafter, a different term, the Aceramic, was applied in the Aegean (e.g., in Knossos for levels devoid of pottery, although ceramic products were supposedly used in the wider region. In some cases, the thin levels interpreted as Preceramic or as Aceramic contained sherds that were regarded as being intrusive from above (e.g., Argissa-Magoula, Franchthi Cave. The new sequences of radiocarbon dates allow a more precise description of this early period and thereby contribute, not least, also to the clarification of terminological issues.

  11. Radiocarbon dating of the Peruvian Chachapoya/Inca site at the Laguna de los Condores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: An archaeological site with several funerary houses built in the cliffs of the Laguna de los Condores by the Chachapoya people was discovered in 1997 in the cloud forest at a sea level of 2500 m in the Amazonas/San Martin area in Peru. The Chachapoya people and their culture is not fully understood until now and some myths entwine around the origin of that South American ancient civilisation. The Chachapoya are described as people of warriors, which were finally subdued by the Incas. A typical characteristic of their culture is the special burial of their dead in funeral bundles containing the remains of the bodies. At the Laguna de los Condores more that 200 mummies have been found and transferred to Leymebamba. During the rescue work of the mummies, which were in danger to be destroyed by looters, it turned out that two different burial patterns could be detected. It is assumed, that after conquering of the Chachapoyas, the Inca people took over also the burial cliff houses and used it for their own burials. The Incas themselves were subdued by the Spanish Conquistadors in 1532 AD. In order to shed light on the transition from the Chachapoya to the Inka dominance, which is connected with the history of the Laguna de los Condores funeral site, a multidisciplinary project between archaeologists, anthropologists and physicists has been started. VERA contributes to this project with several radiocarbon dates of archaeological objects and of the mummies from this Chachapoya/Inca site. (author)

  12. Dynamics of nival and glacial slope processes in the Baksan and Teberda river basins from radiocarbon dating of buried soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Solomina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon and tree-ring dating of the soil horizons, buried in the slope and fluvioglacial deposits in Baksan and Teberda valleys, bring evidence of the reduction of the avalanche activity, stabilization of the slopes and soil formation on their surfaces. In the Baksan section three such horizons are identified, while in the Teberda section only one. The radiocarbon dates of the two thickest soil horizons in the Baksan section are 170±50 BP (1650–1890 CE and 380±60 BP (1430–1650 CE. The dendrochronological date of the wood (after 1677 in the upper layer of the buried soil horizon in the in the Dombai section probably indicate the increase of the river runoff and debris flow activity in relation with the glacier advance in the upperstream of Ammanauz river. However it is also close to the Terskoye earth quake occurred in 1688. The radiocarbon dates of the buried soils cluster in three groups (270–290, 340–440, 1280–1440 yrs BP. It is possible that their burial is connected to the climatic (increase in precipitation, especially extreme ones or seismic causes.

  13. Radiocarbon calibration - past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plicht, J

    2004-01-01

    Calibration of the Radiocarbon timescale is traditionally based on tree-rings dated by dendrochronology. At present, the tree-ring curve dates back to about 9900 BC. Beyond this limit, marine datasets extend the present calibration curve INTCAL98 to about 15600 years ago. Since 1998, a wealth of AMS

  14. Correlation of Radiocarbon Dating on Surowono Temple to Other Temples in Central Java and East of Java

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon dating on charcoal sample have been carried out from Surowono Temple sites, Canggu village, Pare district, Kediri East Java Province. Sampling carried out by excavation on a few location with 5 test holes, that is LU1, LU2, LU3. LU4, LU5. Laboratorium analysis on significant charcoal sample only gained from LU3 test hole. After being processed and prepared to be benzene by using Benzene Synthesizer and counted by Liquid Scintillation Counter Packard 2000CA/LL, was found that age of radiocarbon dating is 885 ± 51.46 BP or 1052.61 ± 51.46 BP. Correction result tree ring correction resulting confidence level 68.3 % : 1052 - 1245 AD while confidence level on 95.4 % : 1038 - 1262 AD. Compare to recent research shows that radiocarbon dating result on Surowono temple and other temples in East of Java around 13th - 15th century and other temples in Southern of Central Java around 10th century, while other temples in Northern of Central Java around 8'th century. (author)

  15. Blank corrections for ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon dating of sedimentary and soil organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Alvaro; Santos, Guaciara M; Williams, Elizabeth K; Pendergraft, Matthew A; Vetter, Lael; Rosenheim, Brad E

    2014-12-16

    Ramped pyrolysis (RP) targets distinct components of soil and sedimentary organic carbon based on their thermochemical stabilities and allows the determination of the full spectrum of radiocarbon ((14)C) ages present in a soil or sediment sample. Extending the method into realms where more precise ages are needed or where smaller samples need to be measured involves better understanding of the blank contamination associated with the method. Here, we use a compiled data set of RP measurements of samples of known age to evaluate the mass of the carbon blank and its associated (14)C signature, and to assess the performance of the RP system. We estimate blank contamination during RP using two methods, the modern-dead and the isotope dilution method. Our results indicate that during one complete RP run samples are contaminated by 8.8 ± 4.4 μg (time-dependent) of modern carbon (MC, fM ∼ 1) and 4.1 ± 5.5 μg (time-independent) of dead carbon (DC, fM ∼ 0). We find that the modern-dead method provides more accurate estimates of uncertainties in blank contamination; therefore, the isotope dilution method should be used with caution when the variability of the blank is high. Additionally, we show that RP can routinely produce accurate (14)C dates with precisions ∼100 (14)C years for materials deposited in the last 10,000 years and ∼300 (14)C years for carbon with (14)C ages of up to 20,000 years.

  16. New insights into the radiocarbon calibration based on 14C and U-Th dating of corals drilled offshore Tahiti (IODP Expedition #310)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Nicolas; Deschamps, Pierre; Bard, Edouard; Hamelin, Bruno; Camoin, Gilbert; Thomas, Alexander L.; Henderson, Gideon M.; Yokoyama, Yusuke

    2010-05-01

    Beyond the high-precision tree-ring calibration, the fossil corals are the most reliable archive that can be used to calibrate the radiocarbon time scale. In this contribution, we present a new radiocarbon dataset based on paired 14C and U-Th dating of fossil shallow-water tropical corals drilled offshore Tahiti during the IODP Expedition 310 'Tahiti Sea-Level'. Before 14C and U-Th analyses, rigorous screening criteria have been applied in order to select pristine aragonitic coral skeletons and avoid those displaying any post-mortem diagenesis that alters original ages. In particular, we made a significant effort to improve detection and quantification of very small amount of secondary calcite in the aragonitic coral lattice using X-ray diffraction measurements [1]. In addition, we apply a strict screening criterion based on δ234U. However, the new Tahiti dataset allow to refine the previous tolerance ranges previously adopted. More than 60 radiocarbon dates were processed at the Laboratoire de Mesure du Carbone 14 (Saclay, France) with the ARTEMIS AMS facility. This new Tahiti record provides new data to the radiocarbon calibration for two distinct time windows: for the interval between 29,200 and 36,200 years BP and for the last deglaciation period, with especially, a higher resolution (40 data) for the 14,000 - 16,000 years BP time interval. These new data extend the previous Tahiti record beyond 13,900 years BP which was the oldest U-Th age obtained on cores drilled onshore in the modern Tahiti barrier reef [2, 3]. These new results are compared with 14C chronologies from other corals, those of Barbados [4, 5] and those from other Pacific islands (Mururoa, Vanuatu, Marquesas, Christmas), and from the Cariaco Basin sediment [6, 7], the Iberian Margin sediment [8, 9] and the Bahamian speleothem [10] records. The new 14C dataset from the corals drilled offshore Tahiti allows to validate the precision and accuracy of other records either directly dated by U-Th or

  17. Radiocarbon dating of the human eye lens crystallines reveal proteins without carbon turnover throughout life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Lynnerup

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lens crystallines are special proteins in the eye lens. Because the epithelial basement membrane (lens capsule completely encloses the lens, desquamation of aging cells is impossible, and due to the complete absence of blood vessels or transport of metabolites in this area, there is no subsequent remodelling of these fibers, nor removal of degraded lens fibers. Human tissue ultimately derives its (14C content from the atmospheric carbon dioxide. The (14C content of the lens proteins thus reflects the atmospheric content of (14C when the lens crystallines were formed. Precise radiocarbon dating is made possible by comparing the (14C content of the lens crystallines to the so-called bomb pulse, i.e. a plot of the atmospheric (14C content since the Second World War, when there was a significant increase due to nuclear-bomb testing. Since the change in concentration is significant even on a yearly basis this allows very accurate dating. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results allow us to conclude that the crystalline formation in the lens nucleus almost entirely takes place around the time of birth, with a very small, and decreasing, continuous formation throughout life. The close relationship may be further expressed as a mathematical model, which takes into account the timing of the crystalline formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Such a life-long permanence of human tissue has hitherto only been described for dental enamel. In confront to dental enamel it must be held in mind that the eye lens is a soft structure, subjected to almost continuous deformation, due to lens accommodation, yet its most important constituent, the lens crystalline, is never subject to turnover or remodelling once formed. The determination of the (14C content of various tissues may be used to assess turnover rates and degree of substitution (for example for brain cell DNA. Potential targets may be nervous tissues in terms of senile or pre

  18. Thermal history of the Acoculco geothermal system, eastern Mexico: Insights from numerical modeling and radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canet, Carles; Trillaud, Frederic; Prol-Ledesma, Rosa María; González-Hernández, Galia; Peláez, Berenice; Hernández-Cruz, Berenice; Sánchez-Córdova, María M.

    2015-10-01

    Acoculco is a geothermal prospective area hosted by a volcanic caldera complex in the eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Surface manifestations are scarce and consist of gas discharges (CO2-rich) and acid-sulfate springs of low temperature, whereas hydrothermal explosive activity is profusely manifested by meter-scale craters and mounds of hydrothermal debris and breccias. Silicic alteration extends for several square kilometers around the zone with gas manifestations and explosive features, affecting surficial volcanic rocks, primarily tuffs and breccias. In the subsurface, an argillic alteration zone (ammonium illite) extends down to a depth of ∼ 600 m, and underneath it a propylitic zone (epidote-calcite-chlorite) occurs down to ∼ 1000 m. Thermal logs from an exploratory borehole (EAC-1, drilled in 1995 down to 1810 m) showed a conductive heat transfer regime under high geothermal gradient (∼ 140 °C/1000 m). In contrast, the thermal profile established from temperatures of homogenization of fluid inclusions-measured on core samples from the same drill hole-suggests that convection occurred in the past through the upper ~ 1400 m of the geothermal system. A drop in permeability due to the precipitation of alteration minerals would have triggered the cessation of the convective heat transfer regime to give place to a conductive one. With the purpose of determining when the transition of heat transfer regime occurred, we developed a 1D model that simulates the time-depth distribution of temperature. According to our numerical simulations, this transition happened ca. 7000 years ago; this date is very recent compared to the lifespan of the geothermal system. In addition, radiocarbon chronology indicates that the hydrothermal explosive activity postdates the end of the convective heat transfer regime, having dated at least three explosive events, at 4867-5295, 1049-1417 and 543-709 y cal. BP. Therefore, hydrothermal explosions arise from the self-sealing of

  19. Molecular Radiocarbon Dating of Tropical Lake Sediments: Insights into the Chronology of Leaf Wax Stable Isotope Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P. M.; Pagani, M.; Eglinton, T. I.; Brenner, M.; Curtis, J. H.; Hodell, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Leaf wax δD and δ13C measurements in marine and lacustrine sediment cores are promising proxies for past climatic and environmental change. However, a number of studies of marine sediments indicate centennial to millennial scale offsets between the radiocarbon ages of leaf waxes and the age of surrounding sediments due to long-term storage of these lipids in soils. These offsets present a complication for the interpretation of leaf wax stable isotope records that has not been thoroughly addressed. We present leaf wax δD, δ13C and Δ14C values for a sediment core from Lake Chichancanab in southeastern Mexico. This lake was previously studied using mineralogical (gypsum) and carbonate isotopic (δ18O) climate proxies, which indicated a sequence of severe droughts from 750 to 1000 AD, coincident with the collapse of the Classic Maya civilization. A suite of leaf wax δD values was plotted against the original sediment core chronology, which was developed using radiocarbon dates on terrestrial macrofossils. The leaf wax results also indicated major hydrological variability over the past 3000 years, but were not temporally coherent with the other climate proxy records. Leaf wax radiocarbon ages are 400 to 1200 years older than terrestrial macrofossil radiocarbon ages from the same depths, suggesting that leaf waxes are retained in the watershed for extended periods prior to deposition in the lake. We fit a 2nd-order polynomial equation to the depth profile of leaf wax radiocarbon ages (r2 =0.99) and refit the leaf wax δD profile to this “leaf wax age model”. This approach yielded much greater coherence with mineralogical and carbonate isotopic proxy records, including evidence for a period of severe drought (35‰ D-enrichment) from 750 to 1000 A.D. Our results indicate that long-term storage of leaf waxes in drainage basin soils can lead to temporal inaccuracies in leaf wax stable isotope records. These inaccuracies, however, can be corrected using a

  20. Youngest reported radiocarbon age of a moa (Aves : Dinornithiformes) dated from a natural site in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extinction date of the giant flightless New Zealand ratite bird, the crested moa (Pachyornis australis), is of considerable interest because the youngest verified remains are dated to the Pleistocene–Holocene transition c. 10,000 yr BP, which was characterised by severe climatic and habitat change, and are considerably earlier than the late Holocene extinctions of the other eight moa species. Analysis of a partial crested moa skeleton (NMNZ S23569) from Castle Keep Entrance, Bulmer Cave System, Mount Owen, South Island, generated a radiocarbon date of 564±26 yr BP (544-508 cal yr BP; 95.4% AD 1396-1442). As a result the Bulmer Cave specimen represents the youngest moa yet found from a natural site in New Zealand. Combined with additional crested moa remains dated to the late Holocene from Cheops Cave (Mount Arthur) and Magnesite Quarry (Cobb Valley), this indicates that crested moa did not go extinct during the Pleistocene–Holocene transition but survived until after Polynesian colonisation in c. AD 1280. The new radiocarbon dates reported here have important implications for the timing of moa extinction and the late survival of moa in alpine areas of New Zealand. (author). 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Radiocarbon calibration - past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plicht, J. van der E-mail: plicht@phys.rug.nl

    2004-08-01

    Calibration of the Radiocarbon timescale is traditionally based on tree-rings dated by dendrochronology. At present, the tree-ring curve dates back to about 9900 BC. Beyond this limit, marine datasets extend the present calibration curve INTCAL98 to about 15 600 years ago. Since 1998, a wealth of AMS measurements became available, covering the complete {sup 14}C dating range. No calibration curve can presently be recommended for the older part of the dating range until discrepancies are resolved.

  2. Towards an absolute chronology for the Aegean iron age: new radiocarbon dates from Lefkandi, Kalapodi and Corinth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Toffolo

    Full Text Available The relative chronology of the Aegean Iron Age is robust. It is based on minute stylistic changes in the Submycenaean, Protogeometric and Geometric styles and their sub-phases. Yet, the absolute chronology of the time-span between the final stages of Late Helladic IIIC in the late second millennium BCE and the archaic colonization of Italy and Sicily toward the end of the 8(th century BCE lacks archaeological contexts that can be directly related to events carrying absolute dates mentioned in Egyptian/Near Eastern historical sources, or to well-dated Egyptian/Near Eastern rulers. The small number of radiocarbon dates available for this time span is not sufficient to establish an absolute chronological sequence. Here we present a new set of short-lived radiocarbon dates from the sites of Lefkandi, Kalapodi and Corinth in Greece. We focus on the crucial transition from the Submycenaean to the Protogeometric periods. This transition is placed in the late 11(th century BCE according to the Conventional Aegean Chronology and in the late 12(th century BCE according to the High Aegean Chronology. Our results place it in the second half of the 11(th century BCE.

  3. Towards an absolute chronology for the Aegean iron age: new radiocarbon dates from Lefkandi, Kalapodi and Corinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffolo, Michael B; Fantalkin, Alexander; Lemos, Irene S; Felsch, Rainer C S; Niemeier, Wolf-Dietrich; Sanders, Guy D R; Finkelstein, Israel; Boaretto, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    The relative chronology of the Aegean Iron Age is robust. It is based on minute stylistic changes in the Submycenaean, Protogeometric and Geometric styles and their sub-phases. Yet, the absolute chronology of the time-span between the final stages of Late Helladic IIIC in the late second millennium BCE and the archaic colonization of Italy and Sicily toward the end of the 8(th) century BCE lacks archaeological contexts that can be directly related to events carrying absolute dates mentioned in Egyptian/Near Eastern historical sources, or to well-dated Egyptian/Near Eastern rulers. The small number of radiocarbon dates available for this time span is not sufficient to establish an absolute chronological sequence. Here we present a new set of short-lived radiocarbon dates from the sites of Lefkandi, Kalapodi and Corinth in Greece. We focus on the crucial transition from the Submycenaean to the Protogeometric periods. This transition is placed in the late 11(th) century BCE according to the Conventional Aegean Chronology and in the late 12(th) century BCE according to the High Aegean Chronology. Our results place it in the second half of the 11(th) century BCE. PMID:24386150

  4. Hard-water dynamics and their reservoir effects on radiocarbon dating of Lake Heihai sediments (NE Tibetan Plateau, Qinghai, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockot, Gregori; Hartmann, Kai; Wünnemann, Bernd; Ramisch, Arne; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Age determination of lake sediments with radiocarbon dating can always entail a perturbation with hard water. Atmospheric carbon (expressing the "real" ages) can be mixed with older carbon from allochthonous input (e.g. marl or limestone), causing an overestimation of 14C ages. The usual approach to eliminate this effect is to date living plants or shells to determine the modern offset in age. Subsequently, this offset is subtracted from 14C ages of a sediment core to attain hard water corrected ages. However, this approach assumes a constant hard water effect over the entire period under consideration, which generally is unlikely. Here we present a highly variable hard water effect through time determined from a combined chronology of two long sediment cores from Lake Heihai (NE Tibetan Plateau). The chronology is based on 20 14C AMS dates of Potamogeton spec. Based on the relation between 14C ages and the input of allochthonous carbonates as well as calculated sedimentation rates, we developed an age-depth-model that estimates the actual ages of the sediments and allows the quantification of hard water effect through time. As a result this model suggests a fluctuating hard water effect varying between 102 to 103 ka. Ages in the lower 3 meter of the core, which corresponds to late glacial times, strongly correlate with the input of dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2). The correlation suggests a strong linkage between the allochthonous input of old carbon and the variations in dating results. In this section, the estimated hard water effect shows its highest values. Results of XRD, grain size and pollen data confirm a shallow lake with high rates of detrital input. The Late Glacial - Holocene transition to warmer and wetter conditions is marked by prominent changes in the mineralogy of lacustrine carbonates and the composition of pollen taxa. During this time the lake constantly rose and increasingly buffered the influence of allochthonous carbonates. The episode is

  5. Radiometric dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on radiometric dating is a chapter in a handbook of Holocene Palaeoecology and Palaeohydrology. This chapter is part of a section on dating methods. Radiocarbon dating is discussed with respect to the apparent ages of lake sediments, seawater, sea creatures and plants. Isotope dating methods for the late Holocene deposits involving 210Pb, 137Cs, sup(239, 240)Pu, 241Am, 32Si and 39Ar are also described. (U.K.)

  6. Radiocarbon dating of charcoal fragments from the cave A5-3 in Arsanjan, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern humans (Homo-sapiens), who originated in East Africa about 200,000 years ago, migrated out of Africa about 130,000-60,000 years ago, dispersed in West Asia, and finally replaced Neanderthals in Europe and Asia. The region of West Asia, especially southern Iran, therefore, is very important to understand the evolution of modem humans. The Japan-Iran international research group, led by Professor Tsuneki of Tsukuba University, has investigated A5-3 cave in the Arsanjan archeological site in southern Iran since 2011. The sequence of layers in the cave is estimated to belong Middle Paleolithic to the Proto-Neolithic period, based on the type of lithic artifacts excavated. In this study, we measured AMS-14C dates of charcoal fragments collected from the layers to reveal the chronology of the Arsanjan site. Charcoal samples collected from surface layer to Layer 4 in Trench E5 (total 6 layers) and Layers 2 and 3 in Trench B3 (total 10 layers) in the A5-3 cave were used. In Trench E5, charcoal samples of surface layer were dated at modern, samples of Layer 1 at 300-115 BP, samples of Layer 2 at 26,750-26,370 BP, and one sample of Layer 3 and samples of Layer 4 were older than 14C-detection limit. In Trench B3, charcoal samples of Layer 2 were dated at 36,500-35,300 BP, and one sample of Layer 3 was dated at 36,890±190 BP. The layers in both Trenches E5 and B3 had been considered to correspond to each other base on the type of lithic artifacts, but the 14C results show that the layers of Trench B3 are about 10,000 BP older than those of Trench E5. Layers 2 and 3 in Trench B3 belong to the early Upper Paleolithic period, contemporary with the result reported for AH IV layer in Ghar-e Boof archeological site at Dasht-e Rostam region, southwestern Iran. This study is the second finding of use of these micro-blades at 37,000 BP in Iran, following the Ghar-e Boof site. Layer 4 in Trench B3 includes Middle Paleolithic artifacts, and so 37,000 BP obtained for Layer 3 in

  7. Fully automated radiocarbon AMS measurements with elemental analyser and gas ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruff, Matthias; Gaeggeler, Heinz [University of Berne (Switzerland)]|[Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Suter, Martin [ETH Zurich (Switzerland)]|[PSI/ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Synal, Hans-Arno [PSI/ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Szidat, Soenke [University of Berne (Switzerland); Lukas, Wacker [ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    The MIACADAS gas ion source in Zurich for measuring radiocarbon in small samples in the range of 2-50 ug carbon is now routinely running semi-automated for more than one and a half years. So far the carbon dioxide to be measured is supplied in glass ampoules and released in an ampoule cracker. The gas is flushed into a syringe with helium and transported onto the surface of a titanium gas target in the Cs sputter ion source. Thereby, the syringe acts as an adjustable tool according to the sample size and can also be moved by a stepping motor to keep a constant flow into the source. For full automation of this system an elemental analyser has been connected for combustion of the sample and separation of the combustion gases. The isolated carbon dioxide leaves the elemental analyser in a high helium stream of about 80 ml/min and has to be first concentrated on a small trap before feeding it into the syringe. Some technical solutions and first results of this automated online system are discussed.

  8. Radiocarbon dating of the late pleistocene syngenetic ice-wedges at the Bison sequence, lower Kolyma river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon dating of organic microinclusions from syngenetic ice-wedges was made using the method of accelerating mass-spectrometry to determine the time of the ice wedges formation at the Bison sequence in the lower Kolyma river. It was ascertained that the ice was formed at least 33-26 thousand years gas, moreover, the ice vertical growth rate did not exceed 0.8 m per 1 thousand years. Isotopic data obtained confirmed vertical stratification of the ice in wedges so that younger ice is located above ancient ice

  9. A radiocarbon-dated cave sequence and the Pleistocene/Holocene transition in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümegi, Pál; Náfrádi, Katalin

    2015-11-01

    The Petény Cave located on the Hungarian Highlands yielded one of the most well-documented vertebrate fauna of the Late Pleistocene and Holocene in Hungary. In addition to the vertebrate remains, considerable numbers of mollusc shells and charcoals were retrieved from the profile of the rock shelter. Furthermore, a pollen sequence close to the cavewas also evaluated in order to reconstruct the flora of the region. A new radiocarbon analysis of samples from the Petény Cave was used to correlate data of different methods and to correct the earlier outcomes. The cave sequence exposes layers from 15.180 cal BP to 483 cal BP. Nevertheless, based on our new radiocarbon data, the sequence is incomplete and layers corresponding to the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary are missing from the profile. The results of our radiocarbon analysis clearly support considerable amounts of thermo-mesophylous gastropod species appearing as early as 15.180 cal BP. The appearance of deciduous woodlands in the Carpathian Basin along with the concomitant mollusc elements is much earlier than previously assumed, supporting the presence of temperate woodland refugia in the study area.

  10. The contribution of 14C AMS dating to the Greater Angkor archaeological project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For well over five centuries, the Khmer kingdom ruled over a vast territory, including most of what is now known as Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam and Laos. Between the 9th and 14th century AD, the Khmer Kings developed the Angkor area into a remarkable administrative and religious centre for their society. According to new estimates by the Greater Angkor Project, the entire urban complex of the capital city covered about 1000 square km making it probably the largest archaeological site in the world. Great stone temples and some other monumental structures and earthworks are the only visible remains of this fascinating civilisation. Thankfully, there is a substantial on-going multinational effort to preserve and restore what is left and in 1992 UNESCO (United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation) declared Angkor a World Heritage Site. This paper presents two particular aspects of the Greater Angkor Project where radiocarbon dating by AMS specifically added to our knowledge of the history of this ancient capital city

  11. Development of a method for fast and automatic radiocarbon measurement of aerosol samples by online coupling of an elemental analyzer with a MICADAS AMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, G.; Zhang, Y. L.; Agrios, K.; Szidat, S.

    2015-10-01

    A fast and automatic method for radiocarbon analysis of aerosol samples is presented. This type of analysis requires high number of sample measurements of low carbon masses, but accepts precisions lower than for carbon dating analysis. The method is based on online Trapping CO2 and coupling an elemental analyzer with a MICADAS AMS by means of a gas interface. It gives similar results to a previously validated reference method for the same set of samples. This method is fast and automatic and typically provides uncertainties of 1.5-5% for representative aerosol samples. It proves to be robust and reliable and allows for overnight and unattended measurements. A constant and cross contamination correction is included, which indicates a constant contamination of 1.4 ± 0.2 μg C with 70 ± 7 pMC and a cross contamination of (0.2 ± 0.1)% from the previous sample. A Real-time online coupling version of the method was also investigated. It shows promising results for standard materials with slightly higher uncertainties than the Trapping online approach.

  12. Reliable 14-C AMS dates on bird and Pacific rat Rattus exulans bone gelatin, from a CaCO3-rich deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We tested the reliability of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dates on bone gelatin by dating samples whose maximum or minimum age was constrained by stratigraphic position relative to well-dated volcanic tephra layers. The tephra layers were not reworked, and were thick enough to preclude the possibility of redeposition resulting in specimens being found outside the age bounds set by the tephras. The damp, fossiliferous, carbonate-rich sediment was in a relatively constant, cool environment in a small cave at nearly 900 m altitude. Bones from four species of bird with different diets (a pigeon, a rail, an owlet-nightjar, and a large ratite) and one rodent, the Pacific rate Rattus exulans, were dated. The calibrated (calendar) AMS age of each bone was compared to ages predicted from their stratigraphic position and calculated sedimentation rates, inferred from the age of each tephra layer. Samples of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) eggshell were also dated by AMS, providing an independent dating material. None of the bone gelatin or eggshell dates displayed any significant in-built (reservoir) age relative to the marker horizons, nor were any AMS ages significantly younger than expected. Our results agree with previous studies in showing that 14C AMS dates on bone gelatin from deposits that have always had a relatively cool, and stable physical environment are likely to be reliable. For bones protected from weathering before burial, and then incorporated in a stable, carbonate-rich environment, the filtered bone gelatin procedure used in this study is adequate to give reliable AMS ages. Possible reasons for discrepancies in bone gelatin AMS dates relative to marine shell, or charcoal dates from archaeological sites in dune deposits, are also discussed. (author). 70 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  13. The use of AMS {sup 14}C dating to explore issues of occupation and demise at the medieval city of Angkor, Cambodia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penny, Dan [School of Geosciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hua, Quan [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: qhx@ansto.gov.au; Pottier, Christophe [Ecole Francaise d' Extreme Orient, P.O. Box 93300, Siem Reap (Cambodia); Fletcher, Roland [Department of Archaeology, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Barbetti, Mike [Department of Archaeology, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Radiogenic Isotope Laboratory, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2007-06-15

    Angkorian temples are characterised by one or more encircling moats that are excavated into the alluvial substrate. As a key part of the overall design of the temple, the moats are important symbolically and are presumed to be contemporaneous with the associated temple. They also represent important depositional basins for sediment and other materials and can therefore yield vertical profiles of sediment that has accumulated since the moat was originally excavated. Unconformities in these moat profiles can be dated absolutely using small-sample, high-precision AMS radiocarbon techniques. These unconformities are likely to represent periodic re-excavation or maintenance of the moat and therefore indicate the presence of large, presumably centrally organised workforces. In some instances, presumed anthropogenic unconformities occur centuries after Angkor was supposedly abandoned. In this way, radiocarbon dates themselves are being used as a proxy indicator of cultural activity and are being used to challenge the historiography of Angkor's famous demise.

  14. The use of AMS 14C dating to explore issues of occupation and demise at the medieval city of Angkor, Cambodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angkorian temples are characterised by one or more encircling moats that are excavated into the alluvial substrate. As a key part of the overall design of the temple, the moats are important symbolically and are presumed to be contemporaneous with the associated temple. They also represent important depositional basins for sediment and other materials and can therefore yield vertical profiles of sediment that has accumulated since the moat was originally excavated. Unconformities in these moat profiles can be dated absolutely using small-sample, high-precision AMS radiocarbon techniques. These unconformities are likely to represent periodic re-excavation or maintenance of the moat and therefore indicate the presence of large, presumably centrally organised workforces. In some instances, presumed anthropogenic unconformities occur centuries after Angkor was supposedly abandoned. In this way, radiocarbon dates themselves are being used as a proxy indicator of cultural activity and are being used to challenge the historiography of Angkor's famous demise

  15. Environmental changes in the western Amazonia: morphological framework, geochemistry, palynology and radiocarbon dating data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sediments from the Coari lake, a 'terra firme' lake sculpted into Plio-Pleistocene deposits, and the Acara lake, a flooding-type lake developed on Quaternary sediments in the flood plain of the mid-Solimoes river, in the western Amazonia, Brazil, were studied to investigate the environmental condition of their developing. This study includes mineral composition, geochemistry, Pb isotope, palinology, radiocarbon-age and morphological framework of the lakes obtained from SRTM satellite images. The geological and the environmental conditions in the two lakes are highly variable and suggest that their evolution reflect autogenic processes under humid rain forest condition. Although kaolinite, quartz, muscovite, illite, and smectite are the main minerals in both lakes, the geochemistry indicates distinct source, the Acara lake sediments have higher concentrations of Al2O3, Fe2O3, Fe O, Ca O, K2O, Mg O, Na2O, P2O5, Ba, V, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb, Sr, Li, Y and La and have more radiogenic Pb than the Coari lake sediments. The radiocarbon ages suggest that at 10160 yr BP the Coari lake started to be developed due to avulsion of the Solimoes river, and the Acara lake was formed by the meander abandonment of Solimoes river retaining its grass dominated shore at ca. 3710 yr BP. (author)

  16. Environmental changes in the western Amazonia: morphological framework, geochemistry, palynology and radiocarbon dating data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sediments from the Coari lake, a 'terra firme' lake sculpted into Plio-Pleistocene deposits, and the Acara lake, a flooding-type lake developed on Quaternary sediments in the flood plain of the mid-Solimoes river, in the western Amazonia, Brazil, were studied to investigate the environmental condition of their developing. This study includes mineral composition, geochemistry, Pb isotope, palynology, radiocarbon-age and morphological framework of the lakes obtained from SRTM satellite images. The geological and the environmental conditions in the two lakes are highly variable and suggest that their evolution reflect autogenic processes under humid rain forest condition. Although kaolinite, quartz, muscovite, illite, and smectite are the main minerals in both lakes, the geochemistry indicates distinct source, the Acara lake sediments have higher concentrations of Al2O3, Fe2O3, FeO, CaO, K2O, MgO, Na2O, P2O5, Ba, V, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb, Sr, Li, Y and La and have more radiogenic Pb than the Coari lake sediments. The radiocarbon ages suggest that at 10160 yr BP the Coari lake started to be developed due to avulsion of the Solimoes river, and the Acara lake was formed by the meander abandonment of Solimoes river retaining its grass dominated shore at ca. 3710 yr BP. (author)

  17. Environmental changes in the western Amazonia: morphological framework, geochemistry, palynology and radiocarbon dating data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horbe, Adriana M.C., E-mail: ahorbe@ufam.edu.b [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Dept. de Geociencias; Behling, Hermann [Georg August Universitaet Goettingen (Germany). Albrecht von Haller Institut fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften. Abteilung fuer Palynologie und Klimadynamik; Nogueira, Afonso C.R. [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias; Mapes, Russell [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Geological Science

    2011-09-15

    The sediments from the Coari lake, a 'terra firme' lake sculpted into Plio-Pleistocene deposits, and the Acara lake, a flooding-type lake developed on Quaternary sediments in the flood plain of the mid-Solimoes river, in the western Amazonia, Brazil, were studied to investigate the environmental condition of their developing. This study includes mineral composition, geochemistry, Pb isotope, palynology, radiocarbon-age and morphological framework of the lakes obtained from SRTM satellite images. The geological and the environmental conditions in the two lakes are highly variable and suggest that their evolution reflect autogenic processes under humid rain forest condition. Although kaolinite, quartz, muscovite, illite, and smectite are the main minerals in both lakes, the geochemistry indicates distinct source, the Acara lake sediments have higher concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeO, CaO, K{sub 2}O, MgO, Na{sub 2}O, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Ba, V, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb, Sr, Li, Y and La and have more radiogenic Pb than the Coari lake sediments. The radiocarbon ages suggest that at 10160 yr BP the Coari lake started to be developed due to avulsion of the Solimoes river, and the Acara lake was formed by the meander abandonment of Solimoes river retaining its grass dominated shore at ca. 3710 yr BP. (author)

  18. Peeking Under the Ice… Literally: Records of Arctic Climate Change from Radiocarbon Dating Moss Emerging from Beneath Retreating Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briner, J. P.; Schweinsberg, A.; Miller, G. H.; Lifton, N. A.; Beel, C. R.; Bennike, O.

    2014-12-01

    Dramatic changes are taking place throughout the Arctic. Many glaciers have already melted away completely, and most others are well on their way as rising snowline elevations promise continued glacier retreat. Emerging from beneath retreating glacier margins is a landscape rich in information about past climate and glacier changes. Within newly exposed bedrock is an inventory of cosmogenic nuclides that archive past ice cover timing and duration. Lake basins re-appearing due to retreating ice preserve sediment archives that tell of cooling climate and advancing ice. And ancient surfaces vegetated with tundra communities that have long been entombed beneath frozen-bedded ice caps are now being revealed for the first time in millennia. This presentation will focus on the climate and glacier record derived from radiocarbon dating of in situ moss recently exhumed from retreating local ice cap margins on western Greenland. Dozens of radiocarbon ages from moss group into several distinct modes, which are interpreted as discrete times of persistent summer cooling and resultant glacier expansion. The data reveal a pattern of glacier expansion beginning ~5000 years ago, followed by periods of glacier growth around 3500 and 1500 years ago. Because these times of glacier expansion are recorded at many sites in western Greenland and elsewhere in the Arctic, they are interpreted as times of step-wise summer cooling events during the Holocene. These non-linear climate changes may be a result of feedbacks that amplify linear insolation forcing of Holocene climate. In addition to these insights into the Arctic climate system, the antiquity of many radiocarbon ages of ice-killed moss indicate that many arctic surfaces are being re-exposed for the first time in millennia due to retreating ice, emphasizing the unprecedented nature of current summer warming.

  19. IBA analyses and lead concentration measurements of AMS-14C dated bones from two medieval sites in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) radiocarbon dated human bone samples recovered in the deserted medieval village of Quattro Macine, Lecce, in Southern Italy, were analyzed by PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) and PIGE (particle induced gamma ray emission). The optimization of the PIXE-PIGE experimental set-up in term of beam energy and detection geometry resulted in the possibility to obtain information about major, minor and trace elements of the samples. Unexpectedly, all the analyzed samples showed a Pb concentration higher than 50 ppm. Two possible explanations of the measured high Pb concentration are discussed in the paper: the pre-mortem intake associated with the use of Pb-rich glazed pottery and the post-mortem intake from soil as the result of diagenetic processes

  20. Radiocarbon dating of organic compounds in sediments using preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Masao [Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Shibata, Yasuyuki; Yoneda, Minoru; Mukai, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Uehiro, Takashi; Morita, Masatoshi [National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kawamura, Kimitaka [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Hirota, Masashi [National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    CG-AMS system, combining two-dimensional gas chromatography and accelerator mass spectroscopy, has been developed for compound-specific carbon 14 measurement. Samples from shallow sea sediments in Sanbanse, Tokyo bay ware collected, six typical fatty acids were separated therefrom. Ages were estimated from the carbon 14 measurement. Acids of carbon number 15 and 16 has nearly contemporary age, whereas acids of carbon number 22 has age of 17000 years. (A. Yamamoto)

  1. Age validation of canary rockfish (Sebastes pinniger) using two independent otolith techniques: lead-radium and bomb radiocarbon dating.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Cailliet, G M; Brown, T A; Lundstrom, C C; Stanley, R D

    2007-11-04

    Canary rockfish (Sebastes pinniger) have long been an important part of recreational and commercial rockfish fishing from southeast Alaska to southern California, but localized stock abundances have declined considerably. Based on age estimates from otoliths and other structures, lifespan estimates vary from about 20 years to over 80 years. For the purpose of monitoring stocks, age composition is routinely estimated by counting growth zones in otoliths; however, age estimation procedures and lifespan estimates remain largely unvalidated. Typical age validation techniques have limited application for canary rockfish because they are deep dwelling and may be long lived. In this study, the unaged otolith of the pair from fish aged at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada was used in one of two age validation techniques: (1) lead-radium dating and (2) bomb radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) dating. Age estimate accuracy and the validity of age estimation procedures were validated based on the results from each technique. Lead-radium dating proved successful in determining a minimum estimate of lifespan was 53 years and provided support for age estimation procedures up to about 50-60 years. These findings were further supported by {Delta}{sup 14}C data, which indicated a minimum estimate of lifespan was 44 {+-} 3 years. Both techniques validate, to differing degrees, age estimation procedures and provide support for inferring that canary rockfish can live more than 80 years.

  2. THE EFFECTS OF POSSIBLE CONTAMINATION ON THE RADIOCARBON DATING OF THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS II : EMPIRICAL METHODS TO REMOVE CASTOR OIL AND SUGGESTIONS FOR REDATING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen, Kaare Lund; van der Plicht, Johannes; Doudna, Gregory; Nielsen, Frederik; Hojrup, Peter; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Pedersen, Carl Th; Højrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    While kept at the Rockefeller Museum in East Jerusalem, many Dead Sea Scroll fragments were exposed to castor oil by the original team of editors in the course of cleaning the parchments. Castor oil must be regarded as a serious contaminant in relation to radiocarbon dating. If modern castor oil is

  3. Radiocarbon dating of palaeosol components in moraines in Lapland, northern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormes, Anne; Karlén, Wibjörn; Possnert, Göran

    2004-10-01

    Accurate geochronologies are the key for comparison of palaeoclimate records. In order to clarify problems concerning the geochronology of glacier fluctuations we dated palaeosols in moraines in the Kebnekaise mountain region of Swedish Lapland. These palaeosols already have been dated several years ago using bulk samples of the palaeosols and yielded ages of 6180-5790 and 2750-2100 cal yr BP. In an attempt to evaluate the sources of contamination associated with bulk samples these soils were re-dated by using Coleoptera fragments, Cenococcum geophilum spores, humic acids and woody plant tissues. The new dates reveal that the two palaeosols found within the moraines represent much longer periods of time than was previously assumed. Soil formation periods can be distinguished for periods 7800-7580, 6300-4080, 2450-2000 and 1170-740 cal yr BP. These age groups point to differentiated soil formation processes, resedimentation, bioturbation and/or cryoturbation. The results show that dated terrestrial macrofossils from glacial moraines indicate climate changes that are in accordance with other proxy records in northern and central Scandinavia and in certain times off-phase with glacier fluctuations in southern maritime Norway. This throws light on possible changing interaction of forcing factors during the Holocene.

  4. Radiocarbon datings and glacial striae from the innar part of Boknfjord area, South Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whale bones overlain by moraine at Borgoey island have been dated to 12,380+-150 B.P. At Tveit, further east, whale bones overlain by littoral material were dated to 11,970+-100 B.P. These datings, together with the glacial striae in the area, show that Borgoe was covered by ice during a glacial advance at about Older Dryas Chronozone, while Tveit was not, and that a calving bay existed in the inner part of the Boknfjord area at the same time. At the mouth of Vindafjord, east of Tveit, and 3-4 km outside terminal moraines of Younger Dryas age, shells overlain by ground moraine were dated to 11,630+-100 B.P. This shows that the ice front in an early phase of the Younger Dryas glacial advance was situated at least 3-4 km beyond the pronounced Ra moraines in Vindafjord. The main trend of the shore line displacement between 12,000 and 9,500 B.P., based upon the whale bones and earlier investigations, can be established. (Auth.)

  5. A chronology of the PY608E-PC sediment core (Lake Pumoyum Co, southern Tibetan Plateau) based on radiocarbon dating of total organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Takahiro, E-mail: twatanabe@geo.kankyo.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-20 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Nakamura, Toshio [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Matsunaka, Tetsuya [School of Marine Science and Technology, Tokai University, 3-20-1 Orido, Shimizu, Shizuoka 424-0902 (Japan); Nara, Fumiko Watanabe [Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Zhu Liping; Wang Junbo [Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Science, No. 18 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Kakegawa, Takeshi [Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Nishimura, Mitsugu [School of Marine Science and Technology, Tokai University, 3-20-1 Orido, Shimizu, Shizuoka 424-0902 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Paleoclimatic records from the Tibetan Plateau provide important clues for understanding the Asian monsoon and Asian climate systems. To reconstruct climatic and environmental changes in the southern Tibetan Plateau, a 3.77-m-long sediment core (PY608E-PC) was taken from the southeastern part of Lake Pumoyum Co in August 2006. Because terrestrial plant residues are extremely rare in this core, we performed radiocarbon dating on the total organic carbon fraction. We also estimated the old carbon effect and radiocarbon reservoir age of the total organic carbon fraction. Using these estimates, we propose a new radiocarbon chronology for past climatic changes from ca. 12,500 to 700 cal BP. The linear sedimentation rate of the core was founded to be constant at 32.0 cm/kyr, indicating stable sedimentation conditions in Lake Pumoyum Co from the period of the Younger Dryas to the Holocene.

  6. Inland Ertebølle Culture: the importance of aquatic resources and the freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dates from pottery food crusts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Philippsen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Ertebølle culture is a late Mesolithic hunter-gatherer-fisher culture in southern Scandinavia, northern Germany and Poland. Archaeological finds as well as scientific analyses of humans and their artefacts indicate the great importance of aquatic resources, both marine and freshwater, to Ertebølle subsistence. In northern Germany, modern freshwater fish samples can have very high apparent radiocarbon ages (up to 3000 years. If such dramatic 'freshwater reservoir effects' also existed during the late Mesolithic, they could lead to artificially old radiocarbon dates for the bones of Ertebølle humans and domestic dogs, and for carbonised food crusts on cooking pots. Conversely, if we can demonstrate radiocarbon age 'offsets' in such samples, we can often attribute them to the exploitation of freshwater food resources. This article discusses methods of identifying freshwater resources in prehistoric pottery, including radiocarbon reservoir effects. We consider the results of radiocarbon, stable isotope and elemental analyses of food crusts on prehistoric pottery from four sites in the Alster and Trave valleys: Kayhude, Schlamersdorf, Bebensee and Seedorf.

  7. Qualitative application based on IR spectroscopy for bone sample quality control in radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone samples suffer from contamination and deterioration, depending on their conservation state and previous restoration and consolidation processes. The sample preparation laboratory of the CEDAD (Center for Dating and Diagnostics) of University of Lecce is developing a quality control protocol for bone samples based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to identify the presence of collagen in bone samples and to assess its quality. FTIR measurements were carried out on collagen extracted from many ancient samples dated at CEDAD. Efforts to shift the FTIR quality control test from the filtration step to a check-in treatment are proceeding to optimize the time for preparation and to reduce the overall turnaround time. A standard fast demineralization treatment was set up and applied to a variety of ancient samples of different origin and age

  8. Qualitative application based on IR spectroscopy for bone sample quality control in radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfrate, G.; D'Elia, M.; Quarta, G.; Giotta, L.; Valli, L.; Calcagnile, L.

    2007-06-01

    Bone samples suffer from contamination and deterioration, depending on their conservation state and previous restoration and consolidation processes. The sample preparation laboratory of the CEDAD (Center for Dating and Diagnostics) of the University of Lecce is developing a quality control protocol for bone samples based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to identify the presence of collagen in bone samples and to assess its quality. FTIR measurements were carried out on collagen extracted from many ancient samples dated at CEDAD. Efforts to shift the FTIR quality control test from the filtration step to a check-in treatment are proceeding to optimize the time for preparation and to reduce the overall turnaround time. A standard fast demineralization treatment was set up and applied to a variety of ancient samples of different origin and age.

  9. Investigations on alluvial deposits through borehole stratigraphy, radiocarbon dating and passive seismic technique (Carnic Alps, NE Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viero, Alessia; Marchi, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Marco; Crema, Stefano; Fontana, Alessandro; Mozzi, Paolo; Venturini, Corrado

    2016-04-01

    Alluvial sediment investigations provide fundamental tools to infer the processes that control geomorphological evolution of mountain environments. By analyzing sediment stratigraphy in depth, it is possible to retrieve the source, the geology, the time of deposition, the relative distance travelled by material as well as to distinguish among different type of transport (i.e., gravitational, fluvial or glacial). In this work, we present a combination of log stratigraphy, radiocarbon dating and geophysical surveys carried out on the valley floor of the But River (Carnic Alps, North East Italy). The But River basin drains an area of 326 km2 with a range in elevation from 2769 to 323 m a.s.l.; the bedrock mainly consists of carbonates and quartz arenites with minor inclusions of effusive rocks. After Pleistocene the gravitational deposits from mountain slopes have impounded the But River several times. In particular, we analyzed a sector of the upper portion of the But valley close to the confluence of the Moscardo Torrent, frequently affected by debris flows. A borehole was drilled in the But River floodplain, at the intersection with the Moscardo Torrent alluvial fan, down to a depth of 80 m. The analysis of the core samples allowed discerning three sedimentary levels rich in clay and organic materials, which testify the presence of small dam lakes, originated from the Moscardo debris-flow deposits. Three samples of wood and plant debris were collected from 13, 14 and 23 m of depth, respectively. They were analyzed through radiocarbon dating in order to determine the age of the lakes and, thus, to infer the activity of the debris flows building the Moscardo cone. The calibrated ages of the 3 samples are close to the younger limit of the radiocarbon method indicating a fast aggradation of the valley floor, starting from a period ranging between 1450 - 1632 AD. Historical maps and documents confirm the presence of the lakes until 19th century and they permit to assess

  10. AMS14C dating and stable isotope plots of Late Pleistocene ice-wedge ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strategy for AMS14C dating of organic micro inclusions from syngenetic ice-wedge ice is considered. AMS14C dates are interpreted in terms of fictitious aging of ice-wedge and permafrost sediments due to high concentration of allochthonous organic material. The dating of organic material from small sample, gives the reliable 14C age. The 14C dates from syngenetic ice-wedges are compared with the dates of the host sediments surrounding syngenetic ice wedges. AMS14C dating of small samples of ice-wedge ice yields to set δ18O plots from ice-wedges to the time scale and to correlate them with ice core δ18O record

  11. Ancient Mtdna Sequences And Radiocarbon Dating Of Human Bones From The Chalcolithic Caves Of Wadi El-Makkukh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, M.; Tzur, S.; Arensburg, B.; Zias, J.; Nagar, Y.; Weiner, S.; Boaretto, E.

    DNA from fossil human bones can provide valuable information for understanding intra- and inter-population relationships. Using the DNA preserved inside crystal aggregates from human fossil bones containing relatively large amounts of collagen, we demonstrate the presence of reproducible mtDNA control region sequences. Radiocarbon dates from each bone show that the burial caves were used for up to 600 years during the Chalcolithic period (5th-4th millennium BP). A comparison of the ancient DNA sequences with modern mtDNA databases indicates that all samples can most likely be assigned to the R haplogroup sub-clades, which are common in West-Eurasia. In four cases more precise and confident haplogroup identifications could be achieved (H, U3a and H6). The H haplogroup is present in three out of the four assigned ancient samples. This haplogroup is prevalent today in West - Eurasia. The results reported here tend to genetically link this Chalcolithic group of individuals to the current West Eurasian populations.

  12. AMS-dating of Late Pleistocene and Holocene syngenetic ice-wedges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the 14C dating (both conventional and AMS) of Siberian permafrost sediments and ice-wedge ice. Direct dating of Late Pleistocene and Holocene syngenetic ice-wedges was done on organic material included in the ice. The time of ice formation (in 14C years) is 21,000-14,000 BP for Seyaha, and 7100 BP for Shchuch'ya. The AMS dates show that the ice-wedges stratification is normal, i.e., the older ice is located below the younger. The 14C dates yield for the first time a timescale (in 14C years) for paleoclimatic indicators (oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios from the ice)

  13. Developments in radiocarbon calibration for archaeology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Buck, Caitlin E.; Manning, Sturt W.; Reimer, Paula; van der Plicht, Hans

    2006-01-01

    This update on radiocarbon calibration results from the 19th International Radiocarbon Conference at Oxford in April 2006, and is essential reading for all archaeologists. The way radiocarbon dates and absolute dates relate to each other differs in three periods: back to 12400 cal BR radiocarbon dat

  14. Radiocarbon dating of the human eye lens crystallines reveal proteins without carbon turnover throughout life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Kjeldsen, Henrik; Heegaard, Steffen;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lens crystallines are special proteins in the eye lens. Because the epithelial basement membrane (lens capsule) completely encloses the lens, desquamation of aging cells is impossible, and due to the complete absence of blood vessels or transport of metabolites in this area, there is ......BACKGROUND: Lens crystallines are special proteins in the eye lens. Because the epithelial basement membrane (lens capsule) completely encloses the lens, desquamation of aging cells is impossible, and due to the complete absence of blood vessels or transport of metabolites in this area...... dating is made possible by comparing the (14)C content of the lens crystallines to the so-called bomb pulse, i.e. a plot of the atmospheric (14)C content since the Second World War, when there was a significant increase due to nuclear-bomb testing. Since the change in concentration is significant even...... turnover rates and degree of substitution (for example for brain cell DNA). Potential targets may be nervous tissues in terms of senile or pre-senile degradation, as well as other highly specialised structures of the eyes. The precision with which the year of birth may be calculated points to forensic uses...

  15. THE EFFECTS OF POSSIBLE CONTAMINATION ON THE RADIOCARBON DATING OF THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS II: EMPIRICAL METHODS TO REMOVE CASTOR OIL AND SUGGESTIONS FOR REDATING

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Kaare Lund; Van der Plicht, Johannes; Doudna, Gregory; Nielsen, Frederik; Hojrup, Peter; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Pedersen, Carl Th; Højrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    While kept at the Rockefeller Museum in East Jerusalem, many Dead Sea Scroll fragments were exposed to castor oil by the original team of editors in the course of cleaning the parchments. Castor oil must be regarded as a serious contaminant in relation to radiocarbon dating. If modern castor oil is present and is not removed prior to dating, the (14)C dates will be skewed artificially towards modern values. In Rasmussen et al. (2001), it was shown that the standard AAA pretreatment procedure ...

  16. Carbon isotopes: variations of their natural abundance. Application to correction of radiocarbon dates, to the study of plant metabolism and to paleoclimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiocarbon activity of contemporaneous samples shows: i) variations in the specific activity of the atmospheric C14, which varies with time and locality. ii) variations due to isotope discrimination, or fractionation, of the carbon isotope ratio during the fixation of carbon by organic or inorganic matter. The variation in the atmospheric concentration of carbon 14 as observed in tree rings are synchronous and of the same amplitude for both hemispheres (southern and northern). A curve for correction of radiocarbon dates of the southern hemisphere is given for the last 500 years. The activity of atmospheric radiocarbon as measured in tree rings varies with latitude, showing a difference of (4.5+-1) per mille between the northern and southern hemispheres, the latter having lower concentration of radiocarbon, equivalent to an age difference of about 35 years. This variation can be explained by a larger exchange of carbon 14 between the atmosphere and the sea in the southern hemisphere to a larger free ocean surface (40%) and a higher agitation by winds. The main differences of the isotope fractionation by different types of plants are correlated to their photosynthetic pathways and thus to the enzyme which effects the primary fixation of carbon. The delta C13 values can be used as basis of a paleoclimate indicator

  17. Coastal rainforest boundary dynamics during the late Holocene in monsoonal Australia: evidence from radiocarbon dates of abandoned nests of Orange-footed Scrubfowl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, D.M.J.S.; Panton, W.J. [Parks and Wildlife Commission of the Northern Territory, Darwin, NT (Australia); Head, J. [Australian National Univ, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Quaternary Dating Research Centre

    1997-12-31

    The late Holocene history of monsoon rainforest retreat was explored by radiocarbon dating abandoned Orange-footed Scrubfowl (Megapodius reinwardt Gaimard) nests in coastal savannas in the Northern Territory of Australia. Previous work has demonstrated that in savanna environments this rainforest bird can not build nor maintain the large heaps of soil and leaf litter that it uses for nests. Excavations of two earthen mounds in a savanna habitat verified that they were abandoned Scrubfowl nests, and not Aboriginal middens, given their lack of stratigraphy, non-sequential dating of charcoal in a vertical profile, and absence of archaeological material. Radiocarbon dates of material taken from the surface of abandoned nests were determined for three sites on the coast of the Northern Territory. These analyses revealed that for all three sites, rainforests have contracted within the last 1800 years BP. On Elcho Island an abandoned nest was found to contain the land snail Xanthomelon spheroidea Le Guillou (known to prefer rainforest habitat) with a modern radiocarbon age, suggesting recent contraction of rainforest. The results of this study further weaken the theory that Aboriginal burning was a major cause of rain forest fragmentation in the monsoon tropics, and possibly elsewhere in Australia.

  18. Groundwater dating with radiocarbon: application to an aquifer under semi-arid conditions in the south of Morocco (Guelmime)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon dating is based on measuring the loss of the parent radionuclide (14C) in a given sample. This assumes two key features of the system. The first is that the initial concentration of the parent is known and has remained constant in the past. The second is that the system is closed to subsequent gains or losses of the parent, except through radioactive decay. But, the reaction and evolution of the carbonate system strongly dilute the initial 14C activity in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The result is an artificial 'aging' of groundwater by dilution of 14C. Unravelling the relevant processes and distinguishing 14C decay from 14C dilution is an engaging geochemical problem. Several attempts to overcome these problems have been made during the past 30 years and a number of possible correction procedures have been presented by different authors. Environmental isotopes study (13C, 14C) from the aquifers of the Guelmime under semi-arid conditions provides new information on recharge zones, mixing zones and the circulation routes of water. The combination of logPCO2, the saturation index of dolomite and calcite, HCO3-, δ13C, 14C and pH along flow paths can provide an indication of open- and closed-system conditions in the Oumlaachar and Seyyad sub-basins. This approach of geochemical analysis, when combined with correction procedures, allows us to understand age and recharge in the Guelmime aquifer. 14C groundwater ages range from modern to about 2700 years in this aquifer, and indicate recharge values of 0.55-15 mm/yr

  19. Groundwater dating with radiocarbon: application to an aquifer under semi-arid conditions in the south of Morocco (Guelmime).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlassa, S; Aiachi, A

    2002-04-01

    Radiocarbon dating is based on measuring the loss of the parent radionuclide (14C) in a given sample. This assumes two key features of the system. The first is that the initial concentration of the parent is known and has remained constant in the past. The second is that the system is closed to subsequent gains or losses of the parent, except through radioactive decay. But, the reaction and evolution of the carbonate system strongly dilute the initial 14C activity in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The result is an artificial "aging" of groundwater by dilution of 14C. Unravelling the relevant processes and distinguishing 14C decay from 14C dilution is an engaging geochemical problem. Several attempts to overcome these problems have been made during the past 30 years and a number of possible correction procedures have been presented by different authors. Environmental isotopes study (13C, 14C) from the aquifers of the Guelmime under semi-arid conditions provides new information on recharge zones, mixing zones and the circulation routes of water. The combination of logP(CO2), the saturation index of dolomite and calcite, HCO3, delta13C, 14C and pH along flow paths can provide an indication of open- and closed-system conditions in the Oumlaachar and Seyyad sub-basins. This approach of geochemical analysis, when combined with correction procedures, allows us to understand age and recharge in the Guelmime aquifer. 14C groundwater ages range from modern to about 2700 years in this aquifer, and indicate recharge values of 0.55-15 mm/yr. PMID:11999164

  20. The necessity of sample quality assessment in {sup 14}C AMS dating: The case of Cova des Pas (Menorca - Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydonck, Mark Van, E-mail: mark.vanstrydonck@kikirpa.b [Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Jubelpark 1, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Boudin, Mathieu [Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Jubelpark 1, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Guerrero Ayuso, Victor M.; Calvo, Manuel [Universidad de las Islas Baleares, Edifici Ramon Llull, C. Valldemossa km 7.5, E-07071 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Fullola, Josep M.; Angeles Petit, M. [Seminari d' Estudis i Recerques Prehistoriques (S.E.R.P.), Dept. of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archaeology, University of Barcelona Montalegre St. 6, E-08001 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    The Cova des Pas cave is a karstic cave in the cliffs of the Barranc (canyon) de Trebaluger. It is a small cave only 6.5 m deep, 4.5 m wide and 1.7 m high. Yet more than 70 burials, in foetal position, from the Early Iron Age were found in this small cave. The conservation of the archaeological remains was very unusual. Not only wood, ropes and other plant material was found, but also remains of body tissue, hair and leather. In spite of the remarkable preservation of the bodies and artefacts, the state of conservation of the bone material was very bad. The bones contained little and heavily deteriorated collagen and the organic plant material was very fragile. The special environmental conditions of the cave are the cause of these unusual preservation conditions. Although the cave is situated in a limestone cliff, the soil of the cave is very acid. Unexpectedly bad sample quality seemed to be the major drawback for AMS radiocarbon dating on hair, wood, ropes and bone collagen, as well as on bio-apatite.

  1. Radiocarbon dates of the Iron Age hillfort of O Achadizo (Boiro, A Coruña, NW Iberia: an approach to the dating of marine shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubinos Pérez, Antonio

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The excavation of the hillfort of O Achadizo has brought to light several domestic structures intermingled with rubish heaps, belonging to the Iron Age Castro culture of NW Iberia. The abundant organic remains have constituted the basis for a systematic programme of radiocarbon dating of the different stratigraphic levels, which shows that the main occupation of the site took place between the VI and the II centuries cal. BC. Moreover, we have checked the 14C dates obtained from terrestrial samples (bones and charcoal against those made on marine shells coming from the same strata. As a result, we have found that the latter have an apparent age of 316±I9 years, caused by the reservoir effect. Therefore, we stress the need for taking into account -and correcting whenever possible- such a deviation before using samples of marine origin for chronological purposes.

    La excavación del castro de O Achadizo (Boiro, A Coruña puso al descubierto una serie de estructuras domésticas, así como varios basureros, encuadrables todos ellos dentro de la cultura castreña del Noroeste ibérico. El hecho de poder disponer de una gran cantidad de material orgánico procedente de los distintos niveles de habitación ha permitido llevar a cabo un programa sistemático de datación mediante el radiocarbono. Como resultado de los análisis radiométricos se deduce que la principal ocupación del yacimiento tuvo lugar entre los siglos VI al II cal BC. Por otra parte hemos cotejado las dataciones obtenidas sobre muestras con la misma procedencia estratigráfica, de origen terrestre (huesos y carbones y oceánico (conchas, a fin de evaluar el efecto de reserva marina. El valor medio de la edad aparente de las conchas de O Achadizo (316 ±19 es semejante al calculado para la costa portuguesa y subraya la necesidad de efectuar una corrección de las dataciones hechas sobre material orgánico de origen marino.

  2. Radiocarbon dating of charred human bone remains preserved in urns excavated from medieval Buddhist cemetery in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshio, E-mail: nakamura@nendai.nagoya-u.ac.j [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Sagawa, Shinichi; Yamada, Tetsuya [Gangoji Institute for Research of Cultural Properties, Nakain, Nara 630-8392 (Japan); Kanehara, Masaaki [School of Science Education, Nara University of Education, Takabatake, Nara 630-8528 (Japan); Tsuchimoto, Norio [Ichinomiya City Museum, Yamato, Ichinomiya 491-0922 (Japan); Minami, Masayo [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Omori, Takayuki [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Okuno, Mitsuru [Faculty of Science, Fukuoka University, Jonan, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Ohta, Tomoko [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    For a preliminary test of {sup 14}C dating of cremated human remains, we have collected charred bone and wood-charcoal fragments from cremated remains contained in cinerary urns that had been excavated from medieval Buddhist cemetery at the Hoenji temple in Aichi prefecture, central Japan. More than 230 urn vessels were discovered from the excavated area of ca. 14 m wide and 14 m long. The identification of charred bone or charcoal fragments among the remains was performed by observation of surface appearance, inspection of fine structures by a microscope, bubble formation during the HCl treatments in preparing target material for AMS {sup 14}C dating, carbon and nitrogen contents, delta{sup 13}C and delta{sup 15}N values of the fragments. All {sup 14}C ages obtained for the samples that were identified as charred bone remains were almost consistent with the archeological age estimated based on typological analysis of respective urns. On the other hand, some {sup 14}C ages for the remains identified as wood charcoal, which had been produced from firewood or a wooden coffin during the cremation, were not consistent with archeological estimation, shifting toward older {sup 14}C ages, most probably as the result of old wood effect.

  3. Radiocarbon dating of charred human bone remains preserved in urns excavated from medieval Buddhist cemetery in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a preliminary test of 14C dating of cremated human remains, we have collected charred bone and wood-charcoal fragments from cremated remains contained in cinerary urns that had been excavated from medieval Buddhist cemetery at the Hoenji temple in Aichi prefecture, central Japan. More than 230 urn vessels were discovered from the excavated area of ca. 14 m wide and 14 m long. The identification of charred bone or charcoal fragments among the remains was performed by observation of surface appearance, inspection of fine structures by a microscope, bubble formation during the HCl treatments in preparing target material for AMS 14C dating, carbon and nitrogen contents, δ13C and δ15N values of the fragments. All 14C ages obtained for the samples that were identified as charred bone remains were almost consistent with the archeological age estimated based on typological analysis of respective urns. On the other hand, some 14C ages for the remains identified as wood charcoal, which had been produced from firewood or a wooden coffin during the cremation, were not consistent with archeological estimation, shifting toward older 14C ages, most probably as the result of old wood effect.

  4. Redundant 230Th/ 234U/ 238U, 231Pa/ 235U and 14C dating of fossil corals for accurate radiocarbon age calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Tzu-Chien; Fairbanks, Richard G.; Mortlock, Richard A.; Cao, Li; Fairbanks, Todd W.; Bloom, Arthur L.

    2006-09-01

    230Th/ 234U/ 238U dating of fossil corals by mass spectrometry is remarkably precise, but some samples exposed to freshwater over thousands of years may gain and/or lose uranium and/or thorium and consequently yield inaccurate ages. Although a δ 234U initial value equivalent to modern seawater and modern corals has been an effective quality control criterion, for samples exposed to freshwater but having δ 234U initial values indistinguishable from modern seawater and modern corals, there remains a need for additional age validation in the most demanding applications such as the 14C calibration (Fairbanks et al., 2005. Radiocarbon calibration curve spanning 0 to 50,000 years BP based on paired 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 14C dates on pristine corals. Quaternary Science Reviews 24(16-17), 1781-1796). In this paper we enhance screening criteria for fossil corals older than 30,000 years BP in the Fairbanks0805 radiocarbon calibration data set (Fairbanks et al., 2005) by measuring redundant 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 231Pa/ 235U dates via multi-collector magnetic sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-MS-ICPMS) using techniques described in Mortlock et al. (2005. 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 231Pa/ 235U ages from a single fossil coral fragment by multi-collector magnetic-sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 69(3), 649-657.). In our present study, we regard paired 231Pa/ 235U and 230Th/ 234U/ 238U ages concordant when the 231Pa/ 235U age (±2 σ) overlaps with the associated 230Th/ 234U/ 238U age (±2 σ). Out of a representative set of 11 Fairbanks0805 (Fairbanks et al., 2005) radiocarbon calibration coral samples re-measured in this study, nine passed this rigorous check on the accuracy of their 230Th/ 234U/ 238U ages. The concordancy observed between 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 231Pa/ 235U dates provides convincing evidence to support closed system behavior of these fossil corals and validation of their 230Th/ 234U/ 238U

  5. Atmospheric radiocarbon variations 11,000 years ago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajdas, I.; Bonani, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland); Peteet, D. [LDEO of Columbia Univ. (United States); Boden, P. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    1997-09-01

    Records of climate changes were {sup 14}C dated using AMS method. High resolution dating allowed reconstruction of the atmospheric {sup 14}C variations at the time of deglaciation. An abrupt rise of up to 100%o in the atmospheric {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio was found at 11`000 BP (radiocarbon age) which coincides with the limit of an abrupt cooling and a decrease in ocean ventilation. (author) 1 fig., 6 refs.

  6. The neolithic demographic transition in Europe: correlation with juvenility index supports interpretation of the summed calibrated radiocarbon date probability distribution (SCDPD as a valid demographic proxy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean S Downey

    Full Text Available Analysis of the proportion of immature skeletons recovered from European prehistoric cemeteries has shown that the transition to agriculture after 9000 BP triggered a long-term increase in human fertility. Here we compare the largest analysis of European cemeteries to date with an independent line of evidence, the summed calibrated date probability distribution of radiocarbon dates (SCDPD from archaeological sites. Our cemetery reanalysis confirms increased growth rates after the introduction of agriculture; the radiocarbon analysis also shows this pattern, and a significant correlation between both lines of evidence confirms the demographic validity of SCDPDs. We analyze the areal extent of Neolithic enclosures and demographic data from ethnographically known farming and foraging societies and we estimate differences in population levels at individual sites. We find little effect on the overall shape and precision of the SCDPD and we observe a small increase in the correlation with the cemetery trends. The SCDPD analysis supports the hypothesis that the transition to agriculture dramatically increased demographic growth, but it was followed within centuries by a general pattern of collapse even after accounting for higher settlement densities during the Neolithic. The study supports the unique contribution of SCDPDs as a valid demographic proxy for the demographic patterns associated with early agriculture.

  7. Numerical dating of a Late Quaternary spit-shoreline complex at the northern end of Silver Lake playa, Mojave Desert, California: A comparison of the applicability of radiocarbon, luminescence, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide, electron spin resonance, U-series and amino acid racemization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, L.A.; Bright, Jordon; Finkel, R.C.; Jaiswal, M.K.; Kaufman, D.S.; Mahan, S.; Radtke, U.; Schneider, J.S.; Sharp, W.; Singhvi, A.K.; Warren, C.N.

    2007-01-01

    A Late Quaternary spit-shoreline complex on the northern shore of Pleistocene Lake Mojave of southeastern California, USA was studied with the goal of comparing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon, luminescence, electron spin resonance (ESR), terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclide (TCN) surface exposure, amino acid racemization (AAR) and U-series dating methods. The pattern of ages obtained by the different methods illustrates the complexity of processes acting in the lakeshore environment and highlights the utility of a multi-method approach. TCN surface exposure ages (mostly ???20-30 ka) record the initial erosion of shoreline benches, whereas radiocarbon ages on shells (determined in this and previous studies) within the spit, supported by AAR data, record its construction at fluctuating lake levels from ???16 to 10 ka. Luminescence ages on spit sediment (???6-7 ka) and ESR ages on spit shells (???4 ka) are anomalously young relative to radiocarbon ages of shells within the same deposits. The significance of the surprisingly young luminescence ages is not clear. The younger ESR ages could be a consequence of post-mortem enrichment of U in the shells. High concentrations of detrital thorium in tufa coating spit gravels inhibited the use of single-sample U-series dating. Detailed comparisons such as this provide one of the few means of assessing the accuracy of Quaternary dating techniques. More such comparisons are needed. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  8. New biomedical applications of radiocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.C.

    1990-12-01

    The potential of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and radiocarbon in biomedical applications is being investigated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A measurement of the dose-response curve for DNA damage caused by a carcinogen in mouse liver cells was an initial experiment. This demonstrated the sensitivity and utility of AMS for detecting radiocarbon tags and led to numerous follow-on experiments. The initial experiment and follow-on experiments are discussed in this report. 12 refs., 4 figs. (SM)

  9. Radiocarbon and Indian archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing use of radiocarbon (C14) dating techniques in Indian archaeology has been described in detail. Work done in Microlithic cultures, Neolithic period, Indus civilization and Iron age cultures have been reported. C14 dates of various archaeological sites are listed. (K.B.)

  10. Environmental changes in the western Amazônia: morphological framework, geochemistry, palynology and radiocarbon dating data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbe, Adriana M C; Behling, Hermann; Nogueira, Afonso C R; Mapes, Russell

    2011-09-01

    The sediments from the Coari lake, a "terra firme" lake sculpted into Plio-Pleistocene deposits, and the Acará lake, a flooding-type lake developed on Quaternary sediments in the floodplain of the mid-Solimões river, in the western Amazônia, Brazil, were studied to investigate the environmental condition of their developing. This study includes mineral composition, geochemistry, Pb isotope, palinology, radiocarbon-age and morphological framework of the lakes obtained from SRTM satellite images. The geological and the environmental conditions in the two lakes are highly variable and suggest that their evolution reflect autogenic processes under humid rainforest condition. Although kaolinite, quartz, muscovite, illite, and smectite are the main minerals in both lakes, the geochemistry indicates distinct source, the Acará lake sediments have higher concentrations of Al(2)O(3), Fe(2)O(3), FeO, CaO, K(2)O, MgO, Na(2)O, P(2)O(5), Ba, V, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb, Sr, Li, Y and La and have more radiogenic Pb than the Coari lake sediments. The radiocarbon ages suggest that at 10160 yr BP the Coari lake started to be developed due to avulsion of the Solimões river, and the Acará lake was formed by the meander abandonment of Solimões river retaining its grass dominated shore at ca. 3710 yr BP. PMID:21830005

  11. AMS 14C dating at CIRCE: The Major Temple in Cumae (NA - Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capano, M.; Rescigno, C.; Sirleto, R.; Passariello, I.; Marzaioli, F.; D'Onofrio, A.; Terrasi, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present here one recent CIRCE (Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage) - Caserta (Italy) project on cultural heritage field, analysing several mice bones, discovered in the Major Temple on the acropolis of Cumae (Napoli, Southern Italy). The bones were found in a vase linked to the holy context. In order to know their dating and formulate an hypothesis on their presence on the site, if it was an accidental rodent inclusion (believed on the base of archaeological context to have occurred during building abandonment periods (IV-V or XIII centuries AD)) or an intentional and ritual remain, the bones were 14C dated by AMS at CIRCE. The results indicate that the mice bones date to the IV century BC and are contemporaneous with building construction. This dating seems to exclude an accidental rodent presence and it supports the hypothesis of Apollo veneration in the temple, based on the already known link between mice and Apollo worship rituals.

  12. Development of a nanofiltration method for bone collagen 14C AMS dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudin, Mathieu; Boeckx, Pascal; Buekenhoudt, Anita; Vandenabeele, Peter; Van Strydonck, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating of bones is usually performed on the collagen fraction. However, this collagen can contain exogenous molecules, including humic substances (HSs) and/or other soil components that may have a different age than the bone. Incomplete removal can result in biased 14C dates. Ultrafiltration of collagen, dissolved as gelatin (molecular weight (MW) ∼100,000 Dalton), has received considerable attention to obtain more reliable dates. Ultrafiltration is an effective method of removal of low-molecular weight contaminants from bone collagen but it does not remove high-molecular weight contaminants, such as cross-linked humic collagen complexes. However, comparative dating studies have raised the question whether this cleaning step itself may introduce contamination with carbon from the filters used. In this study, a nanofiltration method was developed using a ceramic filter to avoid a possible extraneous carbon contamination introduced by the filter. This method should be applicable to various protein materials e.g. collagen, silk, wool, leather and should be able to remove low-molecular and high molecular weight HSs. In this study bone collagen was hot acid hydrolyzed to amino acids and nanofiltrated. A filter with a molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) of 450 Dalton was chosen in order to collect the amino acids in the permeate and the HSs in the retentate. Two pilot studies were set up. Two nanofiltration types were tested in pilot study 1: dead end and cross flow filtration. Humic substance (HS)-solutions with fossil carbon and modern hydrolyzed collagen contaminated with HSs were filtrated and analyzed with spectrofluorescence to determine the HS removal. Cross flow nanofiltration showed the most efficient HS removal. A second pilot study based upon these results was set up wherein only cross flow filtration was performed. 14C measurements of the permeates of hydrolyzed modern collagen contaminated with fossil HSs demonstrate a significant but incomplete

  13. Development of a nanofiltration method for bone collagen 14C AMS dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon dating of bones is usually performed on the collagen fraction. However, this collagen can contain exogenous molecules, including humic substances (HSs) and/or other soil components that may have a different age than the bone. Incomplete removal can result in biased 14C dates. Ultrafiltration of collagen, dissolved as gelatin (molecular weight (MW) ∼100,000 Dalton), has received considerable attention to obtain more reliable dates. Ultrafiltration is an effective method of removal of low-molecular weight contaminants from bone collagen but it does not remove high-molecular weight contaminants, such as cross-linked humic collagen complexes. However, comparative dating studies have raised the question whether this cleaning step itself may introduce contamination with carbon from the filters used. In this study, a nanofiltration method was developed using a ceramic filter to avoid a possible extraneous carbon contamination introduced by the filter. This method should be applicable to various protein materials e.g. collagen, silk, wool, leather and should be able to remove low-molecular and high molecular weight HSs. In this study bone collagen was hot acid hydrolyzed to amino acids and nanofiltrated. A filter with a molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) of 450 Dalton was chosen in order to collect the amino acids in the permeate and the HSs in the retentate. Two pilot studies were set up. Two nanofiltration types were tested in pilot study 1: dead end and cross flow filtration. Humic substance (HS)-solutions with fossil carbon and modern hydrolyzed collagen contaminated with HSs were filtrated and analyzed with spectrofluorescence to determine the HS removal. Cross flow nanofiltration showed the most efficient HS removal. A second pilot study based upon these results was set up wherein only cross flow filtration was performed. 14C measurements of the permeates of hydrolyzed modern collagen contaminated with fossil HSs demonstrate a significant but incomplete

  14. Development of a nanofiltration method for bone collagen {sup 14}C AMS dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudin, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.boudin@ugent.be [Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Jubelpark 1, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Ghent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Laboratory of Applied Physical Chemistry, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Boeckx, Pascal [Ghent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Laboratory of Applied Physical Chemistry, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Buekenhoudt, Anita [Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Separation and Conversion Technology, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Vandenabeele, Peter [Ghent University, Department of Archaeology, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 35, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Strydonck, Mark [Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Jubelpark 1, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-01-15

    Radiocarbon dating of bones is usually performed on the collagen fraction. However, this collagen can contain exogenous molecules, including humic substances (HSs) and/or other soil components that may have a different age than the bone. Incomplete removal can result in biased {sup 14}C dates. Ultrafiltration of collagen, dissolved as gelatin (molecular weight (MW) {approx}100,000 Dalton), has received considerable attention to obtain more reliable dates. Ultrafiltration is an effective method of removal of low-molecular weight contaminants from bone collagen but it does not remove high-molecular weight contaminants, such as cross-linked humic collagen complexes. However, comparative dating studies have raised the question whether this cleaning step itself may introduce contamination with carbon from the filters used. In this study, a nanofiltration method was developed using a ceramic filter to avoid a possible extraneous carbon contamination introduced by the filter. This method should be applicable to various protein materials e.g. collagen, silk, wool, leather and should be able to remove low-molecular and high molecular weight HSs. In this study bone collagen was hot acid hydrolyzed to amino acids and nanofiltrated. A filter with a molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) of 450 Dalton was chosen in order to collect the amino acids in the permeate and the HSs in the retentate. Two pilot studies were set up. Two nanofiltration types were tested in pilot study 1: dead end and cross flow filtration. Humic substance (HS)-solutions with fossil carbon and modern hydrolyzed collagen contaminated with HSs were filtrated and analyzed with spectrofluorescence to determine the HS removal. Cross flow nanofiltration showed the most efficient HS removal. A second pilot study based upon these results was set up wherein only cross flow filtration was performed. {sup 14}C measurements of the permeates of hydrolyzed modern collagen contaminated with fossil HSs demonstrate a significant

  15. Accelerator mass spectrometry dating at Catalhoeyuek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goektuerk, E.H. [Dept. of Chemistry, Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Hillegonds, D.J.; Lipschutz, M.E. [Dept. of Chemistry, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Hodder, I. [Dept. of Cultural and Social Anthropology, Standford Univ., Standford, CA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Several charred plant and charcoal samples from various stratigraphic levels of the Neolithic Site, Catalhoeyuek - Turkey, were dated in the AMS facility of Purdue University (PRIME Lab). Radiocarbon dates reveal a complicated chronology, as was foreseen from archeological investigations. Our measurements suggest that this unique Neolithic town may have been initiated at the East mound around 8390 BP. (orig.)

  16. Radiocarbon dates of late quaternary mammals in the Archangelsk Region and their contribution to reconstructions of the last glaciation in Eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarev, D. V.; Markova, A. K.; van Kolfschoten, T.; van der Plicht, J.; Yushkin, N.P.

    2012-01-01

    Twelve new AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) dates of large Quaternary mammal remains were reported: mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius, bison (Bison priscus), and musk ox (Ovibos pallantis) found in the Archangelsk Region. The absolute age of the identified samples varies from 46 000 to 22 000 calibr

  17. Radiocarbon dating of archaeological samples (sambaqui) using CO(2) absorption and liquid scintillation spectrometry of low background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Maria Lúcia T G; Godoy, José M; da Cruz, Rosana P; Perez, Rhoneds A R

    2006-01-01

    Sambaqui means, in the Tupi language, a hill of shells. The sambaquis are archaeological sites with remains of pre-historical Brazilian occupation. Since the sambaqui sites in the Rio de Janeiro state region are older than 10,000 years, the applicability of CO(2) absorption on Carbo-sorb and (14)C determination by counting on a low background liquid scintillation counter was tested. In the present work, sambaqui shells were treated with H(3)PO(4) in a closed vessel in order to generate CO(2). The produced CO(2) was absorbed on Carbo-sorb. On saturation about 0.6g of carbon, as CO(2), was mixed with commercial liquid scintillation cocktail (Permafluor), and the (14)C activity determined by counting on a low background counter, Packard Tricarb 3170 TR/SL, for a period of 1000 mins to enable detection of a radiocarbon age of 22,400 BP. But only samples with ages up to 3500 BP were submitted to the method because the samples had been collected in the municipality of Guapimirim, in archaeological sambaqui-type sites belonging to this age range. The same samples were sent to the (14)C Laboratory of the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP) where similar results were obtained.

  18. Towards a radiocarbon chronology of the Late-Glacial: Sample selection strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, M.J.C.; Bryant, C.; Coope, G R; Harkness, D. D.; J. J. Lowe; Scott, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper outlines a dating program designed to test the reproducibility of radiocarbon dates on different materials of Late-Glacial age (plant macrofossils, fossil beetle remains, and the "humic" and "humin" chemical fractions of limnic sediments) using a combination of radiometric (beta counting) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) techniques. The results have implications for the design of sampling strategies and for the development of improved dating protocols, both of which are impo...

  19. Environmental changes in the western Amazônia: morphological framework, geochemistry, palynology and radiocarbon dating data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M.C. Horbe

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sediments from the Coari lake, a “terra firme” lake sculpted into Plio-Pleistocene deposits, and the Acará lake, a flooding-type lake developed on Quaternary sediments in the floodplain of the mid-Solimões river, in the western Amazônia, Brazil, were studied to investigate the environmental condition of their developing. This study includes mineral composition, geochemistry, Pb isotope, palinology, radiocarbon-age and morphological framework of the lakes obtained from SRTM satellite images. The geological and the environmental conditions in the two lakes are highly variable and suggest that their evolution reflect autogenic processes under humid rainforest condition. Although kaolinite, quartz, muscovite, illite, and smectite are the main minerals in both lakes, the geochemistry indicates distinct source, the Acará lake sediments have higher concentrations of Al2O3, Fe2O3, FeO, CaO, K2O, MgO, Na2O, P2O5, Ba, V, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb, Sr, Li, Y and La and have more radiogenic Pb than the Coari lake sediments. The radiocarbon ages suggest that at 10160 yr BP the Coari lake started to be developed due to avulsion of the Solimões river, and the Acará lake was formed by the meander abandonment of Solimões river retaining its grass dominated shore at ca. 3710 yr BP.Os sedimentos do lago Coari, de ambiente de terra firme eesculpido nos depósitos do Plio-Pleistocenos, e o Acará, típico lago de várzea e ambos formados nos sedimentos quaternários da planície de inundação do médio Solimões, no oeste da Amazônia, Brasil, foram estudados para investigar as condições ambientais durante sua formação. Este estudo inclui dados da composição mineralógica, química, isótopos de Pb, palinologia, datações de radiocarbono e a configuração morfológica dos lagos obtida por imagens SRTM. As condições geológica e ambiental dos lagos variam e sugerem que suas evoluções refletem processos autogenéticos em condições de floresta úmida

  20. Revised stratigraphy and eruption rates of Ceboruco stratovolcano and surrounding monogenetic vents (Nayarit, Mexico) from historical documents and new radiocarbon dates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieron, Katrin; Siebe, Claus

    2008-09-01

    More than a dozen new radiocarbon dates reconstruct the eruptive history of Ceboruco volcano. Six of these further constrain previous results for the important plinian Jala eruption, which occurred near 1060 ± 55 yr BP. A calibrated radiocarbon age of AD 990-1020 was obtained as best overlap range for all samples. Pottery fragments found directly underneath the pumice deposit indicate that this area was inhabited by human populations that witnessed the eruption. This age therefore represents an important time marker in the prehistory of this region, because an area of > 560 km2 was devastated and covered by a thickness of > 50 cm of pumice and ash fallout. After the prominent Jala eruption (VEI = 6), at least seven major lava flows and several smaller domes were issued from Ceboruco's crater. Analysis of historical documents allows us to conclude that most of these eruptions took place well before the arrival of the Spanish conquerors to this area in 1528. Ceboruco's last historic eruption (1870-1872) produced a ca. 7 km long viscous dacite lava flow. Its emplacement was accompanied by block-and-ash flow activity and deposition of ash fallout. Because a repeat of such an eruption in the future would seriously endanger the nearby population and disrupt important life-lines, a detailed discussion of eyewitness accounts and other documents, including drawings and paintings is provided. Some of these materials are made available to the broader public for the first time in the present article. Several surrounding monogenetic vents were previously dated by others using the K-Ar and the Ar-Ar methods. Because these dating methods are often not suitable for very young rocks, we also dated several Holocene monogenetic vents by the radiocarbon method. These dates together with geologic mapping allowed calculating eruption rates and recurrence intervals of different types of eruptions. Accordingly, an andesite/dacite lava flow (accompanied by block-and-ash flow activity) was

  1. Concordant 241Pu-241Am Dating of Environmental Samples: Results from Forest Fire Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, S. J.; Oldham, W. J.; Murrell, M. T.; Katzman, D.

    2010-12-01

    We have measured the Pu, 237Np, 241Am, and 151Sm isotopic systematics for a set of forest fire ash samples from various locations in the western U.S. including Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and New Mexico. The goal of this study is to develop a concordant 241Pu (t1/2 = 14.4 y)-241Am dating method for environmental collections. Environmental samples often contain mixtures of components including global fallout. There are a number of approaches for subtracting the global fallout component for such samples. One approach is to use 242Pu/239Pu as a normalizing isotope ratio in a three-isotope plot, where this ratio for the non-global fallout component can be estimated or assumed to be small. This study investigates a new, complementary method of normalization using the long-lived fission product, 151Sm (t1/2 = 90 y). We find that forest fire ash concentrates actinides and fission products with ~1E10 atoms 239Pu/g and ~1E8 atoms 151Sm/g, allowing us to measure these nuclides by mass spectrometric (MIC-TIMS) and radiometric (liquid scintillation counting) methods. The forest fire ash samples are characterized by a western U.S. regional isotopic signature representing varying mixtures of global fallout with a local component from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Our results also show that 151Sm is well correlated with the Pu nuclides in the forest fire ash, suggesting that these nuclides have similar geochemical behavior in the environment. Results of this correlation indicate that the 151Sm/239Pu atom ratio for global fallout is ~0.164, in agreement with an independent estimate of 0.165 based on 137Cs fission yields for atmospheric weapons tests at the NTS. 241Pu-241Am dating of the non-global fallout component in the forest fire ash samples yield ages in the late 1950’s-early 1960’s, consistent with a peak in NTS weapons testing at that time. The age results for this component are in agreement using both 242Pu and 151Sm normalizations

  2. Progress in AMS measurement of natural {sup 32}Si for glacier ice dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenstern, Uwe, E-mail: u.morgenstern@gns.cri.n [GNS Science, National Isotope Centre, P.O. Box 30368, Avalon, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Keith Fifield, L.; Tims, Stephen G. [Department of Nuclear Physics, RSPhysSE, The Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Ditchburn, Robert G. [GNS Science, National Isotope Centre, P.O. Box 30368, Avalon, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2010-04-15

    AMS measurement of {sup 32}Si can allow for ice core dating over the last thousand years. Technique developments are reported. Necessary negative-ion yields of 20-30% can now be consistently achieved, and permit an overall efficiency from ice sample to detector of approx1%. A {sup 30}Si-spike technique has overcome the problem of extremely low intrinsic silicon concentration, with the added benefit of allowing determination of ppb-level silicon via isotope dilution. Improvements have also been made to the ionization detector in the gas-filled magnet that separates the accelerated {sup 32}Si ions from the intense flux of {sup 32}S ions. Preliminary {sup 32}Si AMS results of snow and ice samples from Mt. Cook National Park, New Zealand, are reproducible, and with {sup 32}Si concentrations 1.2-7.2 mBq/m{sup 3} comparable to results from mid-latitude snow samples measured previously via the radiometric technique, demonstrating the feasibility of the method. With these developments, the potential of {sup 32}Si as ice core dating tool is close to being realized, and attempts to determine chronologies for both alpine and Antarctic glaciers are underway.

  3. The effects of possible contamination on the radiocarbon dating of the Dead Sea Scrolls I : Castor oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen, KL; van der Plicht, J; Cryer, FH; Doudna, G; Cross, FM; Strugnell, J; Rasmussen, Kaare L.; Cryer, Frederick H.; Cross, Frank M.

    2001-01-01

    Some fragments of the Dead Sea Scroll manuscripts were contaminated with castor oil in the late 1950s. We have conducted experiments in order to establish if the AAA pretreatment cleaning procedures conducted on Dead Sea Scroll manuscript samples in the last two dating series (Bonani et al. 1992; Ju

  4. Dating stratified settlement sites at Kom K and Kom W: Fifth millennium BCE radiocarbon ages for the Fayum Neolithic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendrich, W. [Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 92521 (United States); Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 92521 (United States); Taylor, R.E., E-mail: retaylor@ucr.ed [Department of Anthropology, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 92521 (United States); Keck Carbon Cycle Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Southon, J. [Keck Carbon Cycle Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The earliest evidence of the use of domesticated plants, a traditional hallmark of Neolithic societies in the ancient Near East, first appears in Egypt in archaeological sites in the Fayum depression. Due to wind erosion often resulting in deflation of sediments in this region, stratified sites containing organic materials are rare and the depositional contexts of some earlier {sup 14}C measurements on Fayum Neolithic materials are not precisely documented. We report the results of 29 AMS-based {sup 14}C determinations on charcoal recovered from stratified contexts in two Fayum Neolithic village sites, Kom K and Kom W. These data assign a mid-5th millennium BCE age to these sites and permit an estimate of the length of their occupation to be approximately three centuries.

  5. Dating raised bogs : New aspects of AMS C-14 wiggle matching, a reservoir effect and climatic change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilian, MR; VanDerPlicht, J; VanGeel, B; Geel, B. van

    1995-01-01

    High resolution AMS dating of Holocene raised bog deposits (Engbertsdijksvenen, The Netherlands) shows natural C-14 variations (wiggles) which can be matched with the dendrochronological calibration curve. Comparison of our results with other, conventionally dated peat cores and the Delta(14)C recor

  6. Examining sources of bias in radiocarbon ages of New Zealand Kiore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent AMS dates for the Pacific rat (Rattus exulans / Kiore) from natural and archaeological sites are significantly older than the generally accepted time for human arrival in New Zealand. Because Rattus exulans is recognized as a human commensal for Polynesian colonization in Oceania, radiocarbon ages for Kiore could be used as an indicator of earliest human contact with New Zealand. A strictly chronological interpretation of the radiocarbon ages assembled, though, raises serious questions about this arrival time. Therefore, factors that could affect the age determinations were also examined. A research programme in progress at the Rafter Radiocarbon Laboratory aims to identify the range and influence of natural bias and variance in radiocarbon ages in kiore bone samples. It was found that the main factors that could bias these ages were the incomplete removal of contaminants by the current bone preparation methods, and dietary carbon reservoir effects. Preliminary results of the various analytical techniques employed are presented

  7. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Petrillo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the large size and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the time scales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD decay of Picea abies (L. Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests have been poorly investigated and are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the five-decay class system commonly employed for forest surveys, based on a macromorphological and visual assessment. For the decay classes 1 to 3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings and some others not having enough tree rings, radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model. In the decay classes 1 to 3, the ages of the CWD were similar varying between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1–3 are therefore not indicative for deadwood age. We found, however, distinct tree species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were 0.012 to 0.018 yr−1 for spruce and 0.005 to 0.012 yr−1 for larch. Cellulose and lignin time trends half-lives (using a multiple-exponential model could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 yr for spruce and 50 yr for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than 100 years in larch CWD.

  8. Analysis of past recurrent methane seep activity using radiocarbon dating of Calyptogena spp. shells in the eastern Nankai subduction zone, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Kazuhiro; Ashi, Juichiro; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Miyairi, Yosuke; Kuramoto, Shin'ichi

    2016-04-01

    analysis that show multiple shallow faults and chaotic sediment structure below the colony site, the Calyptogena spp. shells have a strong connection to the coseismic faulting activity and could show potential for radiocarbon dating to be applied on marine samples providing the necessary calibration tools are available.

  9. Upper Pleistocene Radiocarbon-Dated Artefacts from the Northern Yukon: Man was in Beringia 27,000 years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, W N; Harington, C R

    1973-01-26

    The evidence presented here indicates that man lived in the eastern part of the Beringian refugium before the peak of the late Wisconsin glaciation (27). He had sharp, stone tools intended for working bone and means of breaking large mammoth bones. Probably he hunted mammoth and caribou, and prepared the skins of the caribou for use as clothing and perhaps shelter. It is possible that he migrated to southern North America, although evidence for the presence of man there prior to the peak of the Wisconsin glaciation is at present in dispute (28). We do not know whether his culture should be classified as Mousteroid or Aurignacoid in Müller-Beck's scheme (23), whose criteria are taken from stone implements of which we have none, although we infer their presence. Our data suggest that in Beringia, and therefore probably in Siberia and the Far East, the transition from Middle Paleolithic to Upper Paleolithic levels of technology occurred at a relatively early date. This raises the larger question: Did the transition from Middle to Upper Paleolithic occur simultaneously in many parts of the world, or did it begin in and spread from one area (23)?

  10. Radiocarbon dating and the 36Cl/Cl evolution of three Great Artesian Basin wells at Dalhousie, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Risha, Usama A.

    2016-06-01

    The use of 14C (half-life = 5,730 years) in modeling the evolution of the 36Cl/Cl ratios in groundwater is reported for the first time. The complexity of the Cl-36Cl system due to the occurrence of different Cl and 36Cl sources and the difficulty of the determination of the initial groundwater 36Cl/Cl ratios have raised concerns about the reliability of using 36Cl (half-life = 301 thousand years, a) as a groundwater-dating tool. This work uses groundwater 14C age as a calibrating parameter of the Cl-36Cl/Cl decay-mixing models of three wells from the southwestern Great Artesian Basin (GAB), Australia. It aims to allow for the different sources of Cl and 36Cl in the southwestern GAB aquifer. The results show that the initial Cl concentrations range from 245 to 320 mg/l and stable Cl is added to groundwater along flowpaths at rates ranging from 1.4 to 3.5 mg/l/ka. The 36Cl content of the groundwater is assumed to be completely of atmospheric origin. The samples have different Cl-36Cl/Cl mixing-decay models reflecting recharge under different conditions as well as the heterogeneity of the aquifer.

  11. Causal links between Nile floods and eastern Mediterranean sapropel formation during the past 125 kyr confirmed by OSL and radiocarbon dating of Blue and White Nile sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. A. J.; Duller, G. A. T.; Williams, F. M.; Woodward, J. C.; Macklin, M. G.; El Tom, O. A. M.; Munro, R. N.; El Hajaz, Y.; Barrows, T. T.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been hypothesised that beds of highly organic mud or sapropels seen in marine sediment cores retrieved from the floor of the eastern Mediterranean accumulated during times of high Nile fluvial discharge. Our recent fieldwork in the valleys of the Blue Nile, the White Nile and the main Nile has for the first time revealed a sequence of extreme flood episodes synchronous with sapropel units S5 (124 kyr), S4 (102 kyr), S3 (81 kyr), S2 (55 kyr) and S1 (13.5-6.5 kyr). There are more weakly defined links with Nile floods and sapropel units S9 (240 kyr), S8 (217 kyr), S7 (195 kyr), S6 (172 kyr), but the dating error terms are too large to allow us to be too definite. During times of extreme floods over the past 125 kyr, wide distributary channels of the Blue Nile flowed across the Gezira alluvial fan in central Sudan and transported a bed load of sand and gravel into the lower White Nile valley. The sands were reworked by wind to form source-bordering dunes, all of which contain heavy minerals of Ethiopian provenance. These source-bordering dunes were active at 115-105 kyr, 60 kyr and 12-7 kyr, all times of extreme Blue Nile floods. The flood and dune sediments were dated using a combination of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon analyses. The Quaternary record of Nile floods discussed here shows a precessional signal and reflects episodes of stronger summer monsoon and more northerly seasonal movement of the ITCZ, linked to times of higher insolation in northern tropical latitudes. Progressive aggradation of Holocene Nile channels in northern Sudan has had a profound influence upon human settlement in the last 8 kyr.

  12. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Due to the large size (e.g. sections of tree trunks) and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the timescales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the chronosequence approach and the five-decay class system that is based on a macromorphological assessment. For the decay classes 1-3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose, and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model, a regression approach, and the stage-based matrix model. In the decay classes 1-3, the ages of the CWD were similar and varied between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch, with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative of deadwood age. This seems to be due to a time lag between the death of a standing tree and its contact with the soil. We found distinct tree-species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were estimated to be in the range 0.018 to 0.022 y-1 for spruce and to about 0.012 y-1 for larch. Snapshot sampling (chronosequences) may overestimate the age and mean residence time of CWD. No sampling bias was, however, detectable using the stage-based matrix model. Cellulose and lignin time trends could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 years for spruce and 50 years for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than

  13. Palaeoecological caracterisation of the mammoth steppe at Final Pleistocene in Central Ukraine from zooarchaeology, stable isotope analyses and direct radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péan, Stéphane; Drucker, Dorothée.; Bocherens, Hervé; Haesaerts, Paul; Valladas, Hélène; Stupak, Dmytro; Nuzhnyi, Dmytro

    2010-05-01

    that a modification of the regional plant and climatic context may have inferred a change of food resource for mammoths, which could have been put into food competition with horses. Mammoths from Central Ukraine at late OIS 2 may have formed an isolated local population, under the pressure of modified ecological conditions, compared to the period of maximal extension of the mammoth steppe. Thus, thanks to a combined approach of zooarchaeology, stable isotopes and radiocarbon dating, in the stratigraphic context, a better knowledge of the palaeoecological context of the last mammoths at late Pleniglacial in Central Ukraine is expected.

  14. Accuracy of radiocarbon analyses at ANTARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, E.M.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.; Smith, A.M.; Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accuracy in Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) measurements, as distinct from precision, requires the application of a number of corrections. Most of these are well known except in extreme circumstances and AMS can deliver radiocarbon results which are both precise and accurate in the 0.5 to 1.0% range. The corrections involved in obtaining final radiocarbon ages are discussed. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  15. New radiocarbon dates for the transition from middle to upper palaeolithic at El Castillo (Cantabria); La transition paleolithique moyen-paleolithique superieur a El Castillo (Cantabrie): nouvelles datations par le carbone-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valladas, H. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Centre des Faibles Radioactivites; Gomez, M.H. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain); Cabrera-Valdes, V.; De Quiros, F.B.

    1996-06-13

    The stratigraphic sequence at the El Castillo cave in Cantabria, Spain, extends from Lower to Upper Palaeolithic. The transition from Middle to Upper Palaeolithic is represented by levels assigned to Quina Mousterian and Early Aurignacian. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Radiocarbon dates put the archaic Aurignacian industries at ca. 40,000 years ago and indicate that in northern Spain the Upper Palaeolithic began several millennia earlier than in other parts of western Europe. (authors). 16 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Evolution of chemical and isotopic composition of inorganic carbon in a complex semi-arid zone environment: Consequences for groundwater dating using radiocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, K. T.; Han, L. F.; Hollins, S. E.; Cendón, D. I.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Baker, A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating groundwater age is important for any groundwater resource assessment and radiocarbon (14C) dating of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) can provide this information. In semi-arid zone (i.e. water-limited environments), there are a multitude of reasons why 14C dating of groundwater and traditional correction models may not be directly transferable. Some include; (1) the complex hydrological responses of these systems that lead to a mixture of different ages in the aquifer(s), (2) the varied sources, origins and ages of organic matter in the unsaturated zone and (3) high evaporation rates. These all influence the evolution of DIC and are not easily accounted for in traditional correction models. In this study, we determined carbon isotope data for; DIC in water, carbonate minerals in the sediments, sediment organic matter, soil gas CO2 from the unsaturated zone, and vegetation samples. The samples were collected after an extended drought, and again after a flood event, to capture the evolution of DIC after varying hydrological regimes. A graphical method (Han et al., 2012) was applied for interpretation of the carbon geochemical and isotopic data. Simple forward mass-balance modelling was carried out on key geochemical processes involving carbon and agreed well with observed data. High values of DIC and δ13CDIC, and low 14CDIC could not be explained by a simple carbonate mineral-CO2 gas dissolution process. Instead it is suggested that during extended drought, water-sediment interaction leads to ion exchange processes within the top ∼10-20 m of the aquifer which promotes greater calcite dissolution in saline groundwater. This process was found to contribute more than half of the DIC, which is from a mostly 'dead' carbon source. DIC is also influenced by carbon exchange between DIC in water and carbonate minerals found in the top 2 m of the unsaturated zone. This process occurs because of repeated dissolution/precipitation of carbonate that is dependent on

  17. Mid- to Late-Holocene estuarine infilling processes studied by radiocarbon dates, high resolution seismic and biofacies at Vitoria Bay, Espirito Santo, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex C. Bastos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Vitoria Bay is a 20 km long estuary, morphologically narrow, with a microtidal regime and, as other modern estuaries, was formed during the last post-glacial transgression. The estuarine bed morphology is characterised by a main natural channel limited by tidal flats with developed mangroves. Original radiocarbon dates were obtained for the site. Five radiocarbon ages ranging from 1,010 to 7,240 years BP were obtained from two sedimentary cores, which represent a 5 m thick stratigraphic sequence. The results indicate that, until about 4,000 cal. yrs BP, environmental conditions in Vitoria Bay were still of an open bay, with a free and wide connection with marine waters. During the last 4,000 yrs, the bay has experienced a major regression phase, by becoming more restricted in terms of seawater circulation and probably increasing tidal energy. Three main stratigraphic surfaces were recognised, which limit trangressive, trangressive/highstand and regressive facies. The present channel morphology represents a tidal scouring surface or a tidal diastem, which erodes and truncates regressive facies bedding. Foraminiferal biofacies, which change from marine to brackish and mangrove tidal-flat environments, support the seismic stratigraphic interpretation. Absence of mangrove biofacies at one of the two cores is also an indication of modern tidal ravinement.A Baía de Vitória é um estuário com 20 km de comprimento, morfologicamente estreito, com um regime de micromaré e, como outros estuários modernos, formado durante a última transgressão pós-glacial. A morfologia de fundo do estrato estuarino é caracterizada por um canal natural principal limitado por planícies de maré com manguezais desenvolvidos. Datações de radiocarbono originais foram obtidas para a área. Cinco idades de radiocarbono estendendo-se de 1.010 a 7.240 anos AP foram obtidas através de dois testemunhos de sedimento, representando uma sequência estratigráfica de 5 m de

  18. Radiocarbon Dates from Volcanic Deposits of the Chaos Crags and Cinder Cone Eruptive Sequences and Other Deposits, Lassen Volcanic National Park and Vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynne, Michael A.; Christiansen, Robert L.; Trimble, Deborah A.; McGeehin, John P.

    2008-01-01

    This contribution reports radiocarbon ages obtained from charcoal, wood and other samples collected between 1979 and 2001 in Lassen Volcanic National Park and vicinity and a few samples from other nearby localities. Most of the samples are from the Chaos Crags and Cinder Cone eruptive sequences. Brief summaries are given of the Chaos Crags and Cinder Cone eruptive sequences.

  19. Bringing AMS radiocarbon into the Anthropocene: Potential and drawbacks in the determination of the bio-fraction in industrial emissions and in carbon-based products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarta, Gianluca; Ciceri, Giovanni; Martinotti, Valter; D'Elia, Marisa; Calcagnile, Lucio

    2015-10-01

    In the frame of the general efforts to reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions different efforts are being carried out to stimulate the use of non-fossil energy sources and raw materials. Among these a significant role is played by the use of waste in Waste to Energy (WTE) plants. In this case a relevant problem is related to the determination of the proportion between the bio and the fossil derived fraction in CO2 atmospheric emissions since only the share of energy derived from the bio-fraction combustion can be labelled as "renewable". We discuss the potential of radiocarbon in this field by presenting the results of different campaigns carried out by analysing CO2 sampled at the stack of different power plants in Italy with different expected bio-content of the released carbon dioxide. The still open issues related to the calculation procedures and the achievable precision and accuracy levels are discussed.

  20. Adult Human Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cells Display Limited Turnover and Long Lifespan as Determined by In-Vivo Thymidine Analog Incorporation and Radiocarbon Dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, S; Kushner, J A; Buchholz, B A; Meeker, A K; Stein, G M; Hsieh, M; Kirby, M; Pechhold, S; Liu, E H; Harlan, D M; Tisdale, J F

    2010-03-15

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. The adult human beta-cell's turnover rate remains unknown. We employed novel techniques to examine adult human islet beta-cell turnover and longevity in vivo. Subjects enrolled in NIH clinical trials received thymidine analogues [iododeoxyuridine (IdU) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] 8-days to 4-years prior to death. Archival autopsy samples from ten patients (aged 17-74 years) were employed to assess beta-cell turnover by scoring nuclear analog labeling within insulin staining cells. Human adult beta-cell longevity was determined by estimating the cells genomic DNA integration of atmospheric carbon-14 ({sup 14}C). DNA was purified from pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors; whole islet prep DNA was obtained from a 15 year old donor, and purified beta-cell DNA was obtained from two donors (age 48 and 80 years). {sup 14}C levels were then determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Cellular 'birth date' was determined by comparing the subject's DNA {sup 14}C content relative to a well-established {sup 14}C atmospheric prevalence curve. In the two subjects less than age 20 years, 1-2% of the beta-cell nuclei co-stained for BrdU/IdU. No beta-cell nuclei co-stained in the eight patients more than 30 years old. Consistent with the BrdU/IdU turnover data, beta-cell DNA {sup 14}C content indicated the cells 'birth date' occurred within the subject's first 30 years of life. Under typical circumstances, adult human beta-cells and their cellular precursors are established by young adulthood.

  1. Adult Human Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cells Display Limited Turnover and Long Lifespan as Determined by In-Vivo Thymidine Analog Incorporation and Radiocarbon Dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. The adult human beta-cell's turnover rate remains unknown. We employed novel techniques to examine adult human islet beta-cell turnover and longevity in vivo. Subjects enrolled in NIH clinical trials received thymidine analogues [iododeoxyuridine (IdU) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] 8-days to 4-years prior to death. Archival autopsy samples from ten patients (aged 17-74 years) were employed to assess beta-cell turnover by scoring nuclear analog labeling within insulin staining cells. Human adult beta-cell longevity was determined by estimating the cells genomic DNA integration of atmospheric carbon-14 (14C). DNA was purified from pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors; whole islet prep DNA was obtained from a 15 year old donor, and purified beta-cell DNA was obtained from two donors (age 48 and 80 years). 14C levels were then determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Cellular 'birth date' was determined by comparing the subject's DNA 14C content relative to a well-established 14C atmospheric prevalence curve. In the two subjects less than age 20 years, 1-2% of the beta-cell nuclei co-stained for BrdU/IdU. No beta-cell nuclei co-stained in the eight patients more than 30 years old. Consistent with the BrdU/IdU turnover data, beta-cell DNA 14C content indicated the cells 'birth date' occurred within the subject's first 30 years of life. Under typical circumstances, adult human beta-cells and their cellular precursors are established by young adulthood.

  2. Erosion of soil organic carbon at high latitudes and its delivery to Arctic Ocean sediments: New source to sink insight from radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Robert; Galy, Valier; Gaillardet, Jerome; Dellinger, Mathieu; Bryant, Charlotte; O'Regan, Matt; Grocke, Darren; Coxall, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Soils of the northern high latitudes store carbon over thousands of years and contain almost double the carbon stock of the atmosphere. Erosion processes can mobilise this pre-aged soil organic carbon from the landscape and supply it to rivers. If it escapes degradation during river transport and is delivered to the coastal ocean, this carbon may be sequestered for much longer periods of time (>104 yr) as a geological CO2 sink. Despite this recognition, the erosional flux and fate of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large rivers draining the high latitudes remains poorly constrained. Using radiocarbon activity, we quantify POC source, flux and fate in the Mackenzie River, the main sediment supplier to the Arctic Ocean. When combined with stable carbon isotopes and element ratios, the radiocarbon activity of POC allows us to distinguish inputs of POC from sedimentary rocks and quantify the average age of biospheric POC (from vegetation and soil) transported through the river system. We find that the eroded biospheric POC has resided in the basin for millennia, with a mean radiocarbon age of 5800±800 years. This is much older than large tropical rivers where we have equivalent data (Amazon River, Ganges River), and likely reflects the longer residence time of organic matter in cold, wet, high latitude soils. Based on the measured biospheric POC content and annual sediment flux, we calculate a biospheric POC flux of 2.2 (+1.3/-0.9) TgC yr-1 from the Mackenzie River. This is the largest input of aged organic carbon to the Arctic Ocean, more than the combined POC flux from the Eurasian Rivers. Offshore, we use a marine core to investigate organic carbon burial over the Holocene period. Radiocarbon measurements of bulk organic carbon reveal a significant offset from benthic foraminifera radiocarbon ages throughout the core, which is dependent upon the grain size of the sediments. Organic matter in sediments >63μm are offset from foraminifera by ˜ 6,000 14C years

  3. Influence of self-absorption corrections in the quantification of 210Pb and 241Am for sediment dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, J. Carrazana; Vargas, M. Jurado; Castillo, R. Gil

    2016-10-01

    The nuclides 210Pb and 241Am are used in geochronological studies. In this work, we examine the influence of the sediment chemical composition on the self-attenuation corrections needed for the accurate determination of specific activities for 210Pb and 241Am used for sediment dating. A theoretical exercise was carried out evaluating the relative bias obtained by four different analytical laboratories in the quantification of the 210Pb and 241Am activity concentration by gamma-ray spectrometry. The laboratories considered the same density for the sediment sample, but each one used a different chemical composition in the Monte Carlo calculations, and six different HPGe detectors (including n and p-types). An estimate of the impact that would have the relative biases found in the estimation of the 210Pb sediment ages, applying the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) dating model, is also given. In addition, the performance scores that the laboratories would have obtained in a hypothetical IAEA proficiency test are also presented.

  4. ESR and AMS-based C-14 dating of Mousterian levels at Mujina Pecina, Dalmatia, Croatia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rink, WJ; Karavanic, [No Value; Pettitt, PB; Van der Plicht, J; Smith, FH; Bartoll, J

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the first chronometric dates for sediments that contain a Mousterian industry in Dalmatia (south Croatia). Electron spin resonance (ESR) dating was conducted on two teeth from the Mousterian level E1 at the site of Mujina Pecina. Additionally five bone and one charcoal sample fro

  5. Microgram level radiocarbon (14C) determination on carbonaceous particles in ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenk, Theo Manuel; Szidat, S.; Schwikowski, M.;

    2007-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry; Organic carbon; Elemental carbon; Radiocarbon dating; Ice cores; Paleo-record Udgivelsesdato: June......Accelerator mass spectrometry; Organic carbon; Elemental carbon; Radiocarbon dating; Ice cores; Paleo-record Udgivelsesdato: June...

  6. Le programme ARTEMIS : nouvel outil pour la datation radiocarbone AMS (Spectromètre de Masse par Accélérateur et nouvelles problématiques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Billard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available La mise en route du nouvel équipement ARTEMIS (Accélérateur pour la Recherche en sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Muséologie, Implanté à Saclay à partir de 2004 ouvre de nouvelles perspectives scientifiques et conduit à de nouvelles procédures de soumission des échantillons destinés à une datation 14C. Le MCC dispose aujourd’hui de droits alloués aux services régionaux de l'archéologie, services du ministère de la Culture, confrontés à ce type de demandes (musées, monuments historiques. Il impose désormais une nouvelle démarche de programmation scientifique des datations, associant une analyse critique des demandes.Since 2004, the availability at Saclay of a new ARTEMIS installation (Accélérateur pour la Recherche en sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Muséologie has opened new scientific perspectives and led to new procedures for submitting samples for carbon-14 dating. The French Ministry of Culture has the possibility of using this tool for radiocarbon dating at the request of its regional archaeological services or other services, such as museums and the historic monuments administration. This use now implies a new approach to the scientific planning for dating problems, associated with a critical analysis of the requests.

  7. Dating Danish textiles and skins from bog finds by means of 14C AMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannering, Ulla; Possnert, Göran; Heinemeier, Jan;

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of 44 new 14C analyses of Danish Early Iron Age textiles and skins. Of 52 Danish bog finds containing skin and textile items, 30 are associated with bog bodies. Until now, only 18 of these have been dated. In this paper we add dates to the remaining finds....... The results demonstrate that the Danish custom of depositing clothed bodies in a bog is centred to the centuries immediately before and at the beginning of the Common Era. Most of these bodies are carefully placed in the bog - wrapped or dressed in various textile and/or skin garments....

  8. AMS exposure dating: evolution of river valley profiles across Himalayas during late Quaternary-Holocene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    River valley profile is one geomorphic feature, which contain relict landforms inherited from past periods with changing intensities of tectonic and climatic parameters. This aspect has been a subject of current research interest, using exposure dating technique. The results of some recent studies from major river valleys across Himalayas are being discussed

  9. In situ determination of 241Am on Enewetak Atoll. Date of survey: July 1977-December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in situ gamma ray spectrometer system was operated at Enewetak Atoll from July 1977 to December 1979 in support of the Enewetak Cleanup Project. The system employed a high purity germanium planar detector suspended at a height of 7.4 m above ground. Conversion factors were established to relate measured photopeak count rate data to source concentration in the soil. Data obtained for 241Am, together with plutonium-to-americium ratios obtained from soil sample analyses, were used to establish area-averaged surface (0 to 3 cm) transuranic concentration values. In areas which exceeded cleanup criteria, measurements were made in an iterative fashion to guide soil removal until levels were reduced below the cleanup criteria. Final measurements made after soil removal had been completed were used to document remaining surface transuranic concentration values and to establish external exposure rate levels due to 137Cs and 60Co

  10. Identifying sources of dissolved organic carbon in agriculturally dominated rivers using radiocarbon age dating: Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickman, James O.; DiGiorgio, Carol L.; Davisson, M. Lee; Lucero, Delores M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    We used radiocarbon measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to resolve sources of riverine carbon within agriculturally dominated landscapes in California. During 2003 and 2004, average Δ14C for DOC was -254‰ in agricultural drains in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, -218‰ in the San Joaquin River, -175‰ in the California State Water Project and -152‰ in the Sacramento River. The age of bulk DOC transiting the rivers of California's Central Valley is the oldest reported for large rivers and suggests wide-spread loss of soil organic matter caused by agriculture and urbanization. Using DAX 8 adsorbent, we isolated and measured 14C concentrations in hydrophobic acid fractions (HPOA); river samples showed evidence of bomb-pulse carbon with average Δ14C of 91 and 76‰ for the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers, respectively, with older HPOA, -204‰, observed in agricultural drains. An operationally defined non-HPOA fraction of DOC was observed in the San Joaquin River with seasonally computed Δ14C values of between -275 and -687‰; the source of this aged material was hypothesized to be physically protected organic-matter in high clay-content soils and agrochemicals (i.e., radiocarbon-dead material) applied to farmlands. Mixing models suggest that the Sacramento River contributes about 50% of the DOC load in the California State Water Project, and agricultural drains contribute approximately one-third of the load. In contrast to studies showing stabilization of soil carbon pools within one or two decades following land conversion, sustained loss of soil organic matter, occurring many decades after the initial agricultural-land conversion, was observed in California's Central Valley.

  11. First direct dating of Late Pleistocene ice-wedges by AMS

    OpenAIRE

    Vasil'chuk, YK; Van Der Plicht, J.; Jungner, H.; Sonninen, E; Vasil'chuk, AC; Vasil'chuk, Yurij K.; Vasil'chuk, Alla C.

    2000-01-01

    We present the first direct dating by C-14-accelerator mass spectrometry of three Late Pleistocene syngenetic ice-wedges from the Seyaha cross-section. They are representative of permafrost with multistage ice-wedges from the North of Western Siberia. The most important result is the clear vertical age stratification of the ice, i.e. the old ice is located beneath the young. This shows that a timescale can be assigned to these ice-wedges penetrating down into the permafrost. The age of the ic...

  12. Radiocarbon (AMS) dating the Classic Aurignacian, Proto-Aurignacian and Vasconian Mousterian at Gatzarria Cave (Pyrénées-Atlantiques, France)

    OpenAIRE

    Barshay-Szmidt, Carolyn C.; Eizenberg, Laura; Deschamps, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    The site of Gatzarria (Pyrenean France) was excavated in the 1960s and 1970s by Georges Laplace. The importance of the site lies in the fact that it contains a stratified sequence of Aurignacian industries (Proto-Aurignacian — Classic Aurignacian — Late Aurignacian), a Châtelperronian layer, as well as a long sequence of Mousterian layers (including what has been termed the Vasconian Mousterian). It is thus a key site for assessing the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition as well as the te...

  13. Radiocarbon application in dating 'complex' hot and cold CO{sub 2}-rich mineral water systems: A review of case studies ascribed to the northern Portugal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreira, Paula M. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Departamento de Quimica, Estrada Nacional No 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)], E-mail: carreira@itn.pt; Marques, Jose M.; Graca, Rui C.; Aires-Barros, Luis [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Laboratorio de Mineralogia e Petrologia, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2008-10-15

    The use of radioactive isotopes plays a very important role in dating groundwater, providing an apparent age of the systems in the framework of the aquifers conceptual modelling making available important features about the water fluxes, such as recharge, horizontal flow rates and discharge. In this paper, special emphasis has been put on isotopic constraints in the use of {delta}{sup 13}C and {sup 14}C content as a dating tool in some hot (76 deg. C) and cold (17 deg. C) CO{sub 2}-rich mineral waters discharging in the Vilarelho da Raia-Pedras Salgadas region (N-Portugal). The radiocarbon content determined in these CO{sub 2}-rich mineral waters ({sup 14}C activity from 4.3 up to 9.9 pmc) is incompatible with the systematic presence of {sup 3}H (from 1.7 to 7.9 TU). The {delta}{sup 13}C values of the studied CO{sub 2}-rich mineral waters indicate that the total C in the recharge waters is being masked by larger quantities of CO{sub 2} ({sup 14}C-free) introduced from deep-seated (upper mantle) sources. This paper demonstrates that a good knowledge of mineral water systems is essential to allow hydrologists to make sound conclusions on the use of C isotopic data in each particular situation.

  14. Applications of radiocarbon measurements in environmental studies at INFN-LABEC, Florence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiari M.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon is one of the most widespread radionuclides in nature. Although it is probably best known for dating in archaeology, in the case of the general public, it represents a useful tracer to study our environment, both in the past and nowadays. For instance, carbonaceous particles, which are in many cases the most abundant among aerosols constituents, are believed to play a major role in both health and climatic effects of aerosols. In particular, measurement of radiocarbon concentration in particulate matter samples can give information on the contributions of the fossil fuels combustion and of natural sources to the carbonaceous fraction in aerosols. These measurements are especially effective when separately performed on different carbonaceous fractions, like elemental and organic carbon (EC and OC, respectively. Past climate is also studied thanks to old archives, as e.g. marine sediments can be. In this case, instead of radiocarbon dating the bulk sediment, a reliable method to fix chronological markers is represented by dating foraminifera tests of CaCO3 picked from different layers in the sediment. Both the aforementioned applications are characterized by the fact that the samples that can be collected for 14C measurements are typically very small, i.e. few mg or less (before any treatment. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS is thus the only technique that can be applied to measure radiocarbon in such samples. Anyway, measurements cannot be so straightforward. In the case of the measurement of radiocarbon concentration in aerosol samples, a preparation line especially dedicated to the extraction of only the carbonaceous fraction of interest is mandatory. Actually, this line should include a combustion oven, from which either total carbon or EC and OC can separately evolve, and a system of traps to purify and collect the CO2. In the case of foraminifera tests (inorganic carbon, special care must be taken in the pre-treatment phase

  15. AMS-dated mollusks in beach ridges and berms document Holocene sea-level and coastal changes in northeastern Kuwait Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinink-Smith, Linda M.

    2015-09-01

    In northeastern Kuwait, ancient beach ridges and associated berms are separated from the present shoreline by a 4-6 km-wide sabkha. A diverse mollusk fauna in the beach ridges attests to a former open marine environment. A total of 21 AMS dates were obtained in this study. Thirteen mollusk samples from beach ridges yielded AMS dates ranging from ~ 6990 cal yr BP in the southeast to ~ 3370 cal yr BP in the northwest, suggesting a southeast to northwest age progression during the Holocene transgression. In contrast, four samples from berms throughout the study area yielded AMS dates of 5195-3350 cal yr BP showing no age progression; these berms consist largely of Conomurex persicus gastropods that aggregated by storms during a highstand at ~ 5000-3500 cal yr BP. The berms are presently at ~ + 6 m above sea level, 2-3 m above the beach ridges. Human settlements were common on the ridge crests before and after the highstand. Regression to present-day sea level commenced after the highstand, which is when the sabkha began forming. A landward, marine-built terrace, which yielded AMS dates > 43,500 14C yr BP, probably formed during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 5e and hence is not genetically related to the beach ridges.

  16. Changes in solar activity and Holocene climatic shifts derived from 14C wiggle-match dated peat deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauquoy, Dmitri; Geel, Bas van; Blaauw, Maarten; Speranza, Alessandra; Plicht, Johannes van der

    2004-01-01

    Closely spaced sequences of accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) 14C dates of peat deposits display century-scale wiggles which can be fitted to the radiocarbon calibration curve. By wiggle-matching such sequences, high-precision calendar age chronologies can be generated which show that changes in m

  17. Extraneous carbon assessment in ultra-microscale radiocarbon analysis using benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Ulrich M.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the natural abundance of radiocarbon (14C) concentrations in inorganic and organic carbon-containing materials can be used to investigate their date of origin. Particularly, the biogeochemical cycling of specific compounds in the environment may be investigated applying molecular marker analyses. However, the isolation of specific molecules from environmental matrices requires a complex processing procedure resulting in small sample sizes that often contain less than 30 μg C. Such small samples are sensitive to extraneous carbon (Cex) that is introduced during the purification of the compounds (Shah and Pearson, 2007). We present a thorough radiocarbon blank assessment for benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA), a proxy for combustion products that are formed during the oxidative degradation of condensed polyaromatic structures (Wiedemeier et al, in press). The extraneous carbon assessment includes reference material for (1) chemical extraction, (2) preparative liquid chromatography (3) wet chemical oxidation which are subsequently measured with gas ion source AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometer, 5-100 μg C). We always use pairs of reference materials, radiocarbon depleted (14Cfossil) and modern (14Cmodern) to determine the fraction modern (F14C) of Cex.Our results include detailed information about the quantification of Cex in radiocarbon molecular marker analysis using BPCA. Error propagation calculations indicate that ultra-microscale samples (20-30 μg) are feasible with uncertainties of less than 10 %. Calculations of the constant contamination reveal important information about the source (F14C) and mass (μg) of Cex (Wacker and Christl, 2011) for each sub procedure. An external correction of compound specific radiocarbon data is essential for robust results that allow for a high degree of confidence in the 14C results. References Shah and Pearson, 2007. Ultra-microscale (5-25μg C) analysis of individual lipids by 14C AMS: Assessment and

  18. Radiocarbon concentration of lake sediment cellulose from Lake Erhai in southwest China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve age models for lake sediment cores without suitable 14C dating materials such as terrestrial plant fossils, we investigated the radiocarbon dating of lake sediment cellulose. The cellulose fraction in the sediments was obtained by a sequential decomposition of other organic matter, and subsequently dated by AMS. In general, 14C ages of the lake sediment cellulose obtained from a 10-m sediment core from Lake Erhai on the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau are in agreement with 14C dates from terrestrial plant fossils. For the early Holocene, however, differences of up to 1000 14C years are observed between lake sediment cellulose and terrestrial plant fossils. This disagreement is probably caused by the contribution of 14C-depleted cellulose synthesized by aquatic plants/algae in the lake. To obtain a precise and accurate chronology based on 14C ages of lake sediment cellulose, the origin of lake sediment cellulose needs to be established

  19. Dating Cactus: Annual and Sub-annual Variations of Oxygen-18, Carbon-13 and Radiocarbon in Spines of a Columnar Cactus, Carnegiea gigantea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettman, D. L.; English, N. B.; Sandquist, D. R.; Williams, D. G.

    2006-12-01

    We measured δ18O, δ13C and F14C of spines from a long-lived columnar cactus, Carnegiea gigantea (saguaro), to resolve a record of plant physiological responses to annual and sub-annual climate variation in the eastern Sonoran Desert. Spines grow from the apex of the cactus and are arranged serially along the side of the cactus oldest at the base, youngest at the apex. To establish the age of the spine series, we measured F14C of spines collected at 8 different heights from the apex (3.77 m) to the base of a naturally occurring saguaro. These spines yielded fractions of modern carbon (F14C) from 0.9679 and 1.5537, indicating the presence of carbon in spine tissue derived from atmospheric nuclear testing. We used the F14C of spine tissue to calculate the year of spine emergence for each of the 11 spines, assuming minimal re-allocation of stored carbon to growing spines. At the same 8 heights, we interpolated the date of spine emergence from observed height measurements made between 1964 and 2002. A very strong positive correlation (linear regression, r2 = 0.99, P < 0.0001) between the F14C age of spines and ages determined from direct height measurements was observed, with a two year offset suggesting incorporation of carbon from fossil fuel combustion sources in the Tucson basin. Additionally, spine tips from 97 spines collected serially from the top half of the same saguaro (between 1.77 and 3.50 m) and representing ~15 years of growth, yielded δ18O variations in spine bulk organic material from 38° to 50° (VSMOW) and in δ13C from ° to 11.5° (VPDB). The δ18O and δ13C values were positively correlated over the entire record (linear regression, r2 = 0.22, P < 0.0001). These variations occurred at or near an annual frequency. The most negative δ18O and δ13C values in bulk spine organic material from the naturally occurring cactus were observed in spines grown shortly following the 1983 and 1993 strong El Niño winter precipitation events in Tucson

  20. AMS-14C Dating of the Holocene Loess Sequence at Lantian, Shaanxi and Reflected Environmental Change%陕西蓝田全新世黄土AMS-14C测年与环境变迁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婷; 祝一志; 杨亚长; 邵晶

    2011-01-01

    AMS-14C dating provides a new way in archaeology studies because of its high precision and speed and applicability in micro-sample dating. It is widely used in late Quaternary and Neolithic archaeological research. Based on AMS-14C dating of loess-paleosol sequence of the Xinjie profile at Lantian County of Shaanxi Province, the archaeological chronology of this sequence was obtained by using Bayesian method. Combining the stratigraphic sequence, magnetic susceptibility and pollen analysis, we got the conclusion that the weather was dry and cold during Malan loess period, and warm in Holocene, humid and warm in Yangshao period, dry and warm in Longshan period, dry and cold in recent Loess forming period.%加速器质谱计14C(AMS-14C)测年技术具有精度高、速度快以及样品需求量少的特点,已广泛用于晚第四纪和新石器时期的断代研究.通过对蓝田县新街遗址旁的全新世黄土-古土壤序列进行AMS-14C测年,并利用贝叶斯分析方法,建立了该地层序列的年代学框架.结合新街遗址考察、黄土-古土壤地层划分、磁化率测量和孢粉分析,表明马兰黄土晚期气候偏凉干,进入全新世时期气候转暖,仰韶时期温暖湿润,龙山时期气候暖偏于,新黄土堆积时期气候转于冷.

  1. State of the Art of the all-Optical Radiocarbon Detection (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio Pastor, P.; Mazzotti, D.; Galli, I.; Giusfredi, G.; Bartalini, S.; Cappelli, F.; De Natale, P.

    2013-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C), the 'natural clock' for dating organic matter, is a very elusive atom. Its present concentration is about one part per trillion. For the past 30 years, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been adopted as the standard method for detecting such carbon isotope at concentrations well below its natural abundance (3 parts per quadrillion). AMS requires a smaller carbon mass and shorter measurement times than the old standard method of liquid scintillation counting. However, AMS requires huge, expensive and high-maintenance experimental facilities. We have developed a laser spectroscopy technique that is sensitive enough to detect the radiocarbon dioxide molecules at very low concentrations with an all-optical setup that is orders of magnitude more compact and less expensive than AMS [1]. The optical spectroscopy approach is based in the detection of very weak absorption of IR laser light by a 14C-containing molecule as 14C-Carbon Dioxide. Spectroscopic techniques as Cavity Ring Down (CRD) spectroscopy that uses the kilometric absorption paths provided by high-Finesse Fabry-Perot cavities have revolutionized the trace gas detection of molecular species in terms of ultimate sensitivity. Nevertheless CRD has been not capable to detect very elusive molecules as radiocarbon Dioxide. The new developed technique, named SCAR (saturated-absorption cavity ring-down), makes use of molecular absorption saturation to enhance resolution and sensitivity with respect to conventional CRD [2]. By combining SCAR with a frequency-comb-linked CW coherent source, which delivers tunable radiation (around 4.5-μm wavelength) [3], we could set an unprecedented limit in trace gas detection, accessing the part-per-quadrillion concentration range. Comparison between AMS and SCAR techniques to detect 14C by measuring the same carbon samples shows SCAR-based results are currently one order of magnitude shy of challenging AMS, but there is still room for improvement [4

  2. ESR and AMS-based 14C Dating of Mousterian Levels at Mujina Pećina, Dalmatia, Croatia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rink, W.J.; Karavanić, I.; Pettitt, P.B.; Plicht, J. van der; Smith, F.H.; Bartoll, J.; Karavanic, I.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the first chronometric dates for sediments that contain a Mousterian industry in Dalmatia (south Croatia). Electron spin resonance (ESR) dating was conducted on two teeth from the Mousterian level E1 at the site of Mujina Pećina. Additionally five bone and one charcoal sample fro

  3. 14C AMS dates on Rattus exulans bones from natural and archaeological contexts on Norfolk Island, south-west Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pacific rat (Rattus exulans) was transported throughout the western Pacific by migrant peoples in prehistory. Meredith et al (1985) reported a minimum date for the presence of Rattus exulans on Norfolk Island using dates on charcoal from an apparently enclosing layer (the upper part of their Unit C4) in Cemetery Bay. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  4. Unprecedented tools of animal origin in the prehistoric copper mines of La Profunda (León and their C14 dating (AMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel de BLAS CORTINA

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available La Profunda mine, in Leon, has been acknowledged for decades as a prehistoric mining, site generally attributed to the Bronze Age on account of the appearance of several copper axes (never duly described and which have now disappeared, a strange piece of the same metal and the characteristic, though chrono-culturally ambiguous pebble hammers. The recent finding of tools made from animal material, namely deer antler and tibia (Cervus elaphus as well as goat horn (Capra hircus, provide knowledge not only of a type of instrument well-documented in the significant copper mines of nearby Asturias (prehistoric workings at El Aramo and El Milagro, but also radiocarbon dating that situates the mining works of La Profunda in the second half of the third millennium B.C. This rich copper vein was to provide ore and metal to societies of a much greater scope than that corresponding to the mountainous area where the mines were opened, reaching Copper Age village communities (the so-called “Horizonte las Pozas” in the sedimentary lands of the northern plateau of Castile and also, probably, the authors of the Chalcolithic walled settlements that existed at the time in the south-eastern sector of the extensive Duero River Basin.

  5. Changes in the radiocarbon reservoir age in Lake Xingyun, Southwestern China during the Holocene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aifeng Zhou

    Full Text Available Chronology is a necessary component of paleoclimatology. Radiocarbon dating plays a central role in determining the ages of geological samples younger than ca. 50 ka BP. However, there are many limitations for its application, including radiocarbon reservoir effects, which may cause incorrect chronology in many lakes. Here we demonstrate temporal changes in the radiocarbon reservoir age of Lake Xingyun, Southwestern China, where radiocarbon ages based on bulk organic matter have been reported in previous studies. Our new radiocarbon ages, determined from terrestrial plant macrofossils suggest that the radiocarbon reservoir age changed from 960 to 2200 years during the last 8500 cal a BP years. These changes to the reservoir effect were associated with inputs from either pre-aged organic carbon or 14C-depleted hard water in Lake Xingyun caused by hydrological change in the lake system. The radiocarbon reservoir age may in return be a good indicator for the carbon source in lake ecosystems and depositional environment.

  6. AMS and controversies in history The Spanish conquest of Peru

    CERN Document Server

    Zoppi, U; Jacobsen, G; Laurencich-Minelli, L; Lawson, E M; Sarkisian, G; Tuniz, C

    2000-01-01

    The quest for understanding the past often contains a subjective component. Legends, myths, traditions and personal beliefs can unconsciously influence the interpretation of the scientific outcomes or, in the worst instances, even lead to forgery. Fortunately, an increasing number of scientific tools are available nowadays and can be combined to discredit such detriments and offer more reliable foundations for an objective analysis. Radiocarbon dating by AMS is a relatively non-invasive method and is particularly useful when valuable historical artefacts are involved. In this paper, we will present controversial cases where AMS is playing an important role in understanding the past. In particular, we will discuss the use of AMS to authenticate historical documents revealing a new version of the conquest of Peru by Pizarro in the early 1530s.

  7. AMS and controversies in history: The Spanish conquest of Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quest for understanding the past often contains a subjective component. Legends, myths, traditions and personal beliefs can unconsciously influence the interpretation of the scientific outcomes or, in the worst instances, even lead to forgery. Fortunately, an increasing number of scientific tools are available nowadays and can be combined to discredit such detriments and offer more reliable foundations for an objective analysis. Radiocarbon dating by AMS is a relatively non-invasive method and is particularly useful when valuable historical artefacts are involved. In this paper, we will present controversial cases where AMS is playing an important role in understanding the past. In particular, we will discuss the use of AMS to authenticate historical documents revealing a new version of the conquest of Peru by Pizarro in the early 1530s

  8. Characterization of recent Lake Tahoe fault activity: Combining Sub-Meter Resolution Seismic Imagery with AMS C-14 Dated Submerged Paleo-Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingler, J. A.; Kent, G. M.; Babcock, J. A.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Gayes, P. T.; Karlin, B.; Morgan, C. W.; Heyvaert, A.; Richards, B. C.

    2002-12-01

    Deformational strain within the Lake Tahoe Basin was mapped during previous campaigns using a combination of high resolution seismic CHIRP, multi-beam swath bathymetry, and airborne laser altimetry. These previous campaigns identified submerged paleo-shorelines of Pleistocene to early Holocene age, which act as a tectonic strain marker due to fault related disruptions of this once flat surface, as well as significantly offset fault scarps. Building upon this previous work, specific sites were selected for additional investigation with seismic CHIRP and AMS C-14 dated vibra and piston cores. The combination of these three techniques is ideally suited for quantifying recent fault activity through the correlation of paleo-surfaces and accurate age determinations. Initial analysis of seismic CHIRP and piston coring conducted in Emerald Bay shows a complex normal fault system with a sedimentation rate much higher than other parts of the lake. Seismic CHIRP conducted near Zephyr Cove was able to image multiple paleo-shorelines. Vibra coring of these same surfaces recovered sands of the same consistency as beach sand. Additional piston cores were collected at various lake locations below 400 m depth, including two cores taken across the Stateline Fault. Core analysis and AMS C-14 dating combined with site-specific seismic CHIRP, and previous mapping, will improve chronological control on the fault activity within the Lake Tahoe Basin.

  9. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Uno, Kevin T.; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E.

    2013-01-01

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon (14C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric 14C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa...

  10. AMS dating of a recently rediscovered juvenile human mandible from Solutré (Saône-et-Loire, France)

    OpenAIRE

    Pestle, William; Colvard, Michael; Pettitt, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Nearly 150 years of excavation at the Upper Paleolithic type-site of Solutré has yielded substantial evidence for Late Pleistocene human occupation, food procurement, and tool manufacture in the Mâconnais. To date, however, no human skeletal material from the Solutrean phase of this eponymous site has been discovered. Among the finds curated by the Field Museum of Natural History resulting from a relatively obscure and poorly documented excavation conducted at the heart of the site in 1896 is...

  11. Constraining the shallow subtropical overturning circulation with archived radiocarbon records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheim, B. E.; Swart, P. K.; Thorrold, S. R.; Roberts, M. L.

    2007-12-01

    Archived radiocarbon records in accretionary skeletons can be used to constrain the shallow overturning subtropical cells (STC's) that transport significant amounts of tropical heat poleward in the world's oceans. Radiocarbon values of DIC in the world's oceans reflect a continuum between waters residing on the surface over long periods (high Δ14C due to equilibration with "modern" atmosphere) and waters decoupled from the atmosphere in the abyss (low Δ14C due to radioisotope decay), as well as mixtures between water masses of different ages. Thus, measurements of radiocarbon have demonstrated utility in assessing convective heat tranport such as the Meridional Overturning Circulation that is central to global climate. A prominent radiocarbon gradient is also present between the subsiding subtropical surface waters and the upwelling equatorial surface waters in the world's oceans due to the presence of STC's. These convection cells transport a major proportion of tropical heat in the Pacific and a significant proportion of tropical heat in the Atlantic towards the poles. Archived radiocarbon records in surface corals and subsurface sclerosponges constrain the N. Atlantic STC's on a centennial time scale. Published short records from Cape Verde corals indicate significant changes in radiocarbon content; this is potentially related to migration of the front between upwelled tropical waters and downwelled subtropical waters. An approach is outlined to estimate the proportion of tropical to subtropical waters at Cape Verde using as endmembers high-resolution sclerosponge radiocarbon records from Bahamas subsurface waters and coral radiocarbon records from São Tome and Principe in the Gulf of Guinea. Preliminary data from Bahamas sclerosponges indicate the need for high-resolution subsampling of the skeletons. Initial novel AMS measurements from fine scale laser-decomposition of the skeletons are presented.

  12. Methodological study on exposure date of Tiankeng by AMS measurement of in situ produced cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Kejun [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); Li Shizhuo [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); CNNC China North Nuclear Fuel Company Ltd., Baotou 014035 (China); He Ming [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); Sasa, Kimikazu [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Matsushi, Yuki [Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University (Japan); Huang Baojian [Institute of Karst Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Guilin 541004 (China); Ruan Xiangdong; Guan Yongjing [College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Takahashi, Tsutomu [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Sueki, Keisuke [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Li Chaoli; Wu Shaoyong [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); Wang Xianggao [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); Institute of Karst Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Guilin 541004 (China); Shen Hongtao [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); College of Physics and Technology, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541004 (China); Nagashima, Yasuo [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Jiang Shan, E-mail: jiangs@ciae.ac.cn [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Tiankeng is a typical Karst relief of the late Quaternary Period. Studies on the exposure ages of Tiankeng are very important in geographical research to elucidate the formation condition, the developing process, and the features of biological species. {sup 36}Cl on the surface layer of the rupture cross-section of Tiankeng is largely produced by cosmogenic high-energy neutron induced reactions {sup 40}Ca(n, {alpha}p) and {sup 39}K(n, {alpha}), and has accumulated since the formation of the Tiankeng. Low-energy neutron reaction {sup 35}Cl(n, {gamma}) contributes a small portion of {sup 36}Cl. In this work, the concentration of the cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in rock samples taken from Dashiwei Tiankeng, Leye County, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China, was measured jointly by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratories of CIAE and University of Tsukuba in an effort to estimate the formation time (or exposure age) of the Tiankeng. The results show that the exposure time of Da Shiwei Tiankeng is about 26 {+-} 9.6 ka (without erosion correction). The sampling strategy and procedures, experimental set-up, and preliminary results will be presented in detail.

  13. Comment on "Radiocarbon Calibration Curve Spanning 0 to 50,000 Years B.P. Based on Paired 230Th/234U/238U and 14C Dates on Pristine Corals" by R.G. Fairbanks, R. A. Mortlock, T.-C. Chiu, L. Cao, A. Kaplan, T. P. Guilderson, T. W. Fairbanks, A. L. Bloom, P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimer, P J; Baillie, M L; Bard, E; Beck, J W; Blackwell, P G; Buck, C E; Burr, G S; Edwards, R L; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T P; Hogg, A G; Hughen, K A; Kromer, B; McCormac, G; Manning, S; Reimer, R W; Southon, J R; Stuiver, M; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C E

    2005-10-02

    Radiocarbon calibration curves are essential for converting radiocarbon dated chronologies to the calendar timescale. Prior to the 1980's numerous differently derived calibration curves based on radiocarbon ages of known age material were in use, resulting in ''apples and oranges'' comparisons between various records (Klein et al., 1982), further complicated by until then unappreciated inter-laboratory variations (International Study Group, 1982). The solution was to produce an internationally-agreed calibration curve based on carefully screened data with updates at 4-6 year intervals (Klein et al., 1982; Stuiver and Reimer, 1986; Stuiver and Reimer, 1993; Stuiver et al., 1998). The IntCal working group has continued this tradition with the active participation of researchers who produced the records that were considered for incorporation into the current, internationally-ratified calibration curves, IntCal04, SHCal04, and Marine04, for Northern Hemisphere terrestrial, Southern Hemisphere terrestrial, and marine samples, respectively (Reimer et al., 2004; Hughen et al., 2004; McCormac et al., 2004). Fairbanks et al. (2005), accompanied by a more technical paper, Chiu et al. (2005), and an introductory comment, Adkins (2005), recently published a ''calibration curve spanning 0-50,000 years''. Fairbanks et al. (2005) and Chiu et al. (2005) have made a significant contribution to the database on which the IntCal04 and Marine04 calibration curves are based. These authors have now taken the further step to derive their own radiocarbon calibration extending to 50,000 cal BP, which they claim is superior to that generated by the IntCal working group. In their papers, these authors are strongly critical of the IntCal calibration efforts for what they claim to be inadequate screening and sample pretreatment methods. While these criticisms may ultimately be helpful in identifying a better set of protocols, we feel that there are

  14. Ancient Egypt measured by radio-carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors recall how carbon dating has been used for decades in Egyptian archaeology, and how biases and errors have been solved. They also describe how this technique is now supported by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), and thus allowed a better chronological knowledge of the Egyptian history. AMS indeed allows the measuring of extremely small isotopic rates from very small archaeological samples

  15. Impact of fossil fuel emissions on atmospheric radiocarbon and various applications of radiocarbon over this century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, Heather D

    2015-08-01

    Radiocarbon analyses are commonly used in a broad range of fields, including earth science, archaeology, forgery detection, isotope forensics, and physiology. Many applications are sensitive to the radiocarbon ((14)C) content of atmospheric CO2, which has varied since 1890 as a result of nuclear weapons testing, fossil fuel emissions, and CO2 cycling between atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Over this century, the ratio (14)C/C in atmospheric CO2 (Δ(14)CO2) will be determined by the amount of fossil fuel combustion, which decreases Δ(14)CO2 because fossil fuels have lost all (14)C from radioactive decay. Simulations of Δ(14)CO2 using the emission scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, the Representative Concentration Pathways, indicate that ambitious emission reductions could sustain Δ(14)CO2 near the preindustrial level of 0‰ through 2100, whereas "business-as-usual" emissions will reduce Δ(14)CO2 to -250‰, equivalent to the depletion expected from over 2,000 y of radioactive decay. Given current emissions trends, fossil fuel emission-driven artificial "aging" of the atmosphere is likely to occur much faster and with a larger magnitude than previously expected. This finding has strong and as yet unrecognized implications for many applications of radiocarbon in various fields, and it implies that radiocarbon dating may no longer provide definitive ages for samples up to 2,000 y old.

  16. PROGRESS AT THE GRONINGEN AMS FACILITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOUS, DJW; GOTTDANG, A; VANDERPLICHT, J; WIJMA, S; ZONDERVAN, A

    1995-01-01

    A new generation accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) is operational since May 1994 at the Centre for Isotope Research in Groningen, The Netherlands. The fully automated and high throughput AMS system, manufactured by High Voltage Engineering Europa (HVEE) is dedicated to radiocarbon analysis. The mo

  17. Studies on the radiocarbon sample from the shroud of turin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1988, radiocarbon laboratories at Arizona, Cambridge, and Zurich determined the age of a sample from the Shroud of Turin. They reported that the date of the cloth's production lay between A.D. 1260 and 1390 with 95% confidence. This came as a surprise in view of the technology used to produce the cloth, its chemical composition, and the lack of vanillin in its lignin. The results prompted questions about the validity of the sample. Preliminary estimates of the kinetics constants for the loss of vanillin from lignin indicate a much older age for the cloth than the radiocarbon analyses. The radiocarbon sampling area is uniquely coated with a yellow-brown plant gum containing dye lakes. Pyrolysis-mass-spectrometry results from the sample area coupled with microscopic and microchemical observations prove that the radiocarbon sample was not part of the original cloth of the Shroud of Turin. The radiocarbon date was thus not valid for determining the true age of the shroud

  18. Studies on the radiocarbon sample from the shroud of turin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Raymond N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of California, 1961 Cumbres Patio, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)]. E-mail: rnrogers@att.net

    2005-01-20

    In 1988, radiocarbon laboratories at Arizona, Cambridge, and Zurich determined the age of a sample from the Shroud of Turin. They reported that the date of the cloth's production lay between A.D. 1260 and 1390 with 95% confidence. This came as a surprise in view of the technology used to produce the cloth, its chemical composition, and the lack of vanillin in its lignin. The results prompted questions about the validity of the sample. Preliminary estimates of the kinetics constants for the loss of vanillin from lignin indicate a much older age for the cloth than the radiocarbon analyses. The radiocarbon sampling area is uniquely coated with a yellow-brown plant gum containing dye lakes. Pyrolysis-mass-spectrometry results from the sample area coupled with microscopic and microchemical observations prove that the radiocarbon sample was not part of the original cloth of the Shroud of Turin. The radiocarbon date was thus not valid for determining the true age of the shroud.

  19. In search of in-situ radiocarbon in Law Dome ice and firn

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, A M; Etheridge, D M; Lowe, D C; Hua, Q; Trudinger, C M; Zoppi, U; El-Cheikh, A

    2000-01-01

    Results of AMS radiocarbon measurements on CO and CO sub 2 separated from firn air directly pumped from the ice sheet, and on CO sub 2 separated from air extracted from ice cores by a dry grating technique, are presented. The firn air samples and ice cores used in this study were collected from the region of Law Dome, Antarctica. No evidence of in-situ sup 1 sup 4 CO sub 2 was found in the firn air samples or the ice core air samples from one site although a slight enhancement of sup 1 sup 4 CO above expected polar atmospheric concentrations was observed for some firn air samples. A clear in-situ sup 1 sup 4 CO sub 2 signal for ice pre-dating the radiocarbon bomb pulse was found, however, in air samples extracted from an ice core from a second site. We compare these results and propose an hypothesis to explain this apparent contradiction. The degree to which in-situ sup 1 sup 4 C is released from the ice crystals during trapping and bubble formation is considered and discussed. The selectivity of the dry grat...

  20. In search of in-situ radiocarbon in Law Dome ice and firn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of AMS radiocarbon measurements on CO and CO2 separated from firn air directly pumped from the ice sheet, and on CO2 separated from air extracted from ice cores by a dry grating technique, are presented. The firn air samples and ice cores used in this study were collected from the region of Law Dome, Antarctica. No evidence of in-situ 14CO2 was found in the firn air samples or the ice core air samples from one site although a slight enhancement of 14CO above expected polar atmospheric concentrations was observed for some firn air samples. A clear in-situ 14CO2 signal for ice pre-dating the radiocarbon bomb pulse was found, however, in air samples extracted from an ice core from a second site. We compare these results and propose an hypothesis to explain this apparent contradiction. The degree to which in-situ 14C is released from the ice crystals during trapping and bubble formation is considered and discussed. The selectivity of the dry grating technique for the extraction of trapped atmospheric gases from ice cores is also discussed and compared with other methods

  1. Radiocarbon application in environmental science and archaeology in Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajcar Bronic, I., E-mail: krajcar@irb.h [Radiocarbon Laboratory, Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Obelic, B.; Horvatincic, N.; Baresic, J.; Sironic, A. [Radiocarbon Laboratory, Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Minichreiter, K. [Institute of Archaeology, Ulica grada Vukovara 68, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-07-21

    Radiocarbon is a cosmogenic radioisotope equally distributed throughout the troposphere and biosphere. This fact enables its most common application-radiocarbon dating. Natural equilibrium of radiocarbon has been disturbed by diverse anthropogenic activities during the last {approx}150 years, enabling also the use of {sup 14}C in various environmental applications. Here we present three types of studies by using {sup 14}C that were performed in the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory. {sup 14}C in atmospheric CO{sub 2} has been monitored at several sites with various anthropogenic influences and the difference between the clean-air sites, the industrial city and the vicinity of a nuclear power plant has been established. {sup 14}C has been applied in geochronology of karst areas, especially in dating of tufa, speleothems and lake sediments, as well as in studies of geochemical carbon cycle. {sup 14}C has been used in various archaeological studies, among which the dating of the early Neolithic settlements in Croatia is presented. In these studies {sup 14}C was measured by radiometric techniques, i.e., by gas proportional counting and more recently by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Two sample preparation techniques for LSC measurement were used: benzene synthesis for archaeological dating and other applications that require better precision, and direct absorption of CO{sub 2} for monitoring purposes. The presented results show that various studies by using {sup 14}C can be successfully performed by the LSC technique, providing a large enough sample (>1 g of carbon).

  2. A new system for the simultaneous measurement of δ13C and δ15N by IRMS and radiocarbon by AMS on gaseous samples: Design features and performances of the gas handling interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braione, Eugenia; Maruccio, Lucio; Quarta, Gianluca; D'Elia, Marisa; Calcagnile, Lucio

    2015-10-01

    We present the general design features and preliminary performances of a new system for the simultaneous AMS-14C and IRMS δ13C and δ15N measurements on samples with masses in the μg range. The system consists of an elemental analyzer (EA), a gas splitting unit (GSU), a IRMS system, a gas handling interface (GHI) and a sputtering ion source capable of accepting gaseous samples. A detailed description of the system and of the control software supporting unattended operation are presented together with the first performance tests carried out by analyzing samples with masses ranging from 8 μgC to 2.4 mgC. The performances of the system were tested in term of stability of the ion beam extracted from the ion source, precision and accuracy of the results by comparing the measured isotopic ratios with those expected for reference materials.

  3. Holocene environmental changes of the Godavari Delta, east coast of India, inferred from sediment core analyses and AMS 14C dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswara Rao, Kakani; Saito, Yoshiki; Nagakumar, K. Ch. V.; Demudu, G.; Basavaiah, N.; Rajawat, A. S.; Tokanai, Fuyuki; Kato, Kazuhiro; Nakashima, Rei

    2012-11-01

    The Godavari delta in India is a major wave dominated delta of a tropical monsoon-fed river with one of the largest sediment deliveries in the world. While several earlier studies revealed the nature of landforms and progradation style of the delta plain during the Holocene, the present study attempts to reconstruct the depositional environment of the Godavari delta through the analysis of core sediment and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating from three locations. The sediment core obtained from a 27.06 m deep borehole at Vilasavilli (VV) supported by 13 14C dates revealed the complete succession of the Holocene deposits unconformably overlying Pleistocene sediments. Textural analysis indicates the lower upward-fining and upper upward-coarsening units in the Holocene succession. Total organic carbon (TOC)/total nitrogen (TN) ratios of > 20; high content of TOC around 1.5-2.5%; and black to very dark colored sediment throughout the muddy part of the Holocene succession indicated a predominance of terrigenous material. The VV core and two other cores (DRP and SDG) with 14 14C dates indicated the thickness of the Holocene sediments in the Godavari delta plain is in the order of ~ 20-50 m, unconformably resting on a seaward sloping Pleistocene basement. Sediment facies and sediment accumulation of the three cores show the evolution of the Godavari delta. A transgressive phase is recognized as an upward-fining succession in the VV core, 8.4-8.0 cal ky BP, followed by a low accumulation period, 8.0-6.3 cal ky BP including the Holocene maximum transgression in the Godavari delta. After 6.3 cal ky BP, areas of high accumulation rates have changed laterally between the central part (VV site) and southwestern part (DRP and SDG sites), may be controlled by the location of river-mouths. Further analysis coupled with 11 more 14C dates compiled from earlier works indicated that the strandplain of the Godavari delta prograded seaward in three stages, and that the rate

  4. Bomb-spike dating of a mummified baboon in Ludwig Cave, Namibia

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgins Greg; Brook George A.; Marais Eugene

    2007-01-01

    In 1982 a mummified adult female baboon was discovered on a ledge in Ludwig Cave in Namibia. A toe bone was removed for dating in July 1995. AMS radiocarbon dating of bone collagen, tendon, and skin indicates a post-modern age. Application of the atomic bomb-spike calibration curve suggests death in late 1977 and an age at death of around 19 years. Baboons roost in the cave and the mummified female, along with a mummified juvenile male discovered in 2002 and three rotting corpses discovered i...

  5. New radiocarbon data to study the history of roman and medieval Florence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florence is a town worldwide known for its Renaissance masterpieces. It is often forgotten that it was founded during Roman times and remained a small village until the end of the early Middle Ages, practically confined within the ancient Roman boundaries. Since 2003, an extended archaeological research executed by the University of Sienna has studied the most ancient layers in the centre of Florence with the aim to enhance both the archaeological and paleo-environmental reconstruction of this area. One of the peculiarities of these excavations is that the early medieval layers were poor in datable ceramics, thus charcoals were sampled from different stratigraphic layers in order to contribute to the dating. Several data have already been published; here we focus on the excavation site of Palazzo Vecchio, now the seat of the municipality of Florence. This area is located close to the Arno river, along the eastern margin of the slightly elevated height upon which the Roman town was founded; actually, in the layers beneath the surface, the Roman theatre is still preserved. Radiocarbon dating of charcoals was performed in the LABEC laboratory in Florence, at the AMS beam line of the AMS-IBA 3 MV Tandetron accelerator. Comparison of these new data with the former ones and with the archaeological and geological data adds new information especially on natural phenomena like floods and on the human occupation of this area in the past.

  6. New radiocarbon data to study the history of roman and medieval Florence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnoldus-Huyzendveld, A. [Dipartimento di Archeologia e Storia delle Arti, Universita di Siena, via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Fedi, M.E., E-mail: fedi@fi.infn.i [INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Cantini, F.; Bruttini, J. [Dipartimento di Archeologia e Storia delle Arti, Universita di Siena, via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Cartocci, A. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Calabrisotto, C. Scire [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Florence is a town worldwide known for its Renaissance masterpieces. It is often forgotten that it was founded during Roman times and remained a small village until the end of the early Middle Ages, practically confined within the ancient Roman boundaries. Since 2003, an extended archaeological research executed by the University of Sienna has studied the most ancient layers in the centre of Florence with the aim to enhance both the archaeological and paleo-environmental reconstruction of this area. One of the peculiarities of these excavations is that the early medieval layers were poor in datable ceramics, thus charcoals were sampled from different stratigraphic layers in order to contribute to the dating. Several data have already been published; here we focus on the excavation site of Palazzo Vecchio, now the seat of the municipality of Florence. This area is located close to the Arno river, along the eastern margin of the slightly elevated height upon which the Roman town was founded; actually, in the layers beneath the surface, the Roman theatre is still preserved. Radiocarbon dating of charcoals was performed in the LABEC laboratory in Florence, at the AMS beam line of the AMS-IBA 3 MV Tandetron accelerator. Comparison of these new data with the former ones and with the archaeological and geological data adds new information especially on natural phenomena like floods and on the human occupation of this area in the past.

  7. Youngest radiocarbon age for Jefferson's ground sloth, Megalonyx jeffersonii (Xenarthra, Megalonychidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregory McDonald, H.; Stafford jr., Thomas; Gnidovec, Dale M.

    2015-01-01

    A partial skeleton of the extinct ground sloth, Megalonyx jeffersonii, recovered from a farm near Millersburg, Ohio in 1890, was radiocarbon dated for the first time. The ungual dated is part of a skeleton mounted for exhibit at the Orton Geological Museum at Ohio State University and was the first...... mounted skeleton of this animal. From its initial discovery the bones were treated with multiple organic compounds that had the potential to compromise the radiocarbon age and the specimen required special treatments in order to obtain a valid radiocarbon age. The 14C measurement on the ungual from...

  8. The impact of varying depositional processes on the preservation of lignin from the Mississippi and Amazon Rivers: A dual application of compound-specific and ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. K.; Rosenheim, B. E.; McNichol, A. P.; Roberts, M.; Xu, L.

    2012-12-01

    The establishment of reliable terrestrial-marine particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes is important to understanding biogeochemical cycling of carbon, reconstructing environmental and depositional processes, and organic carbon (OC) storage in continental margins. Marine preservation of riverine POC differs between river systems and depositional settings, determined by a combination of fluvial and marine processes. In this study, we compare the preservation of terrestrial OC in two depositional sediments related to major river systems - the Amazon and the Mississippi - using a combination of compound class extraction and radiocarbon determination and ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon determination that targets the bulk POC by separating it along lines of thermochemical stability. Submarine mudbanks emanating from the Amazon are continuously re-oxygenated on decadal timescales and have high iron and marine sulfate content. Conversely, subaerial marshes dominate the Mississippi delta, marked by low oxygen, iron, and sulfate content. These factors potentially result in a higher degree of selective preservation of terrestrial OC and different molecular components (Canfield, 1994; Zonneveld et al., 2010; Hedges et al., 1995) in Mississippi deltaic sediments than in the Amazon mudbank deposits. Because of these differing depositional conditions, we anticipate that more degradation-resistant terrestrial compounds, such as lignin, will be greater preserved in deltaic Mississippi River sediments versus in Amazon mudbank sediments. Preliminary results show that the Mississippi deltaic sediments have higher concentrations of lignin phenols (0.632 mg/mgOC) compared to the Amazon (Guianas mudbanks) sediments (0.176 mg/mgOC), consistent with rapid burial and less post-depositional marine processing in the wetlands. For both rivers, lignin phenol concentrations in the deposited sediment were higher than reported (Hedges et al., 1986; Onsted et al., 2000) suspended sediment lignin

  9. AMS 14 C dating controlled records of monsoon and Indonesian throughflow variability from the eastern Indian Ocean of the past 32,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z. Y.; Chen, M. T.; Shi, X.; Liu, S.; Wang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Zi-Ye Li a, Min-Te Chen b, Hou-Jie Wang a, Sheng-Fa Liu c, Xue-Fa Shi ca College of Marine Geosciences, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, P.R. Chinab Institute of Applied Geosciences, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan 20224, ROCc First Institute of Oceanography, SOA, Qingdao 266100, P.R. China Indonesian throughflow (ITF) is one of the most important currents responsible for transporting heat and moisture from the western Pacific to the Indian Oceans. The ITF is also well-known as effectively in modulating the global climate change with the interactions among ENSO and Asian monsoons. Here we present an AMS 14C dating controlled sea surface temperature (SST) record from core SO184-10043 (07°18.57'S, 105°03.53'E), which was retrieved from 2171m water depth at a north-south depression located at the southeastern offshore area of Sumatera in the eastern Indian Ocean. Based on our high-resolution SST using Mg/Ca analyses based on planktonic foraminifera shells of Globigerinoides ruber and alkenone index, U k'37-SST, oxygen isotope stratigraphy, and AMC 14C age-controls, our records show that, during the past 32,000 years, the SSTs were decreased which imply weaker ITF during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 and 3. The weaker UTF may respond to strengthened northeast monsoon during the boreal winter. During 21 to 15ka, the southeast monsoon had been stronger and the northeast monsoon was relatively weaker. During 15 to 8ka, rapid sea level rising may allow the opening of the gateways in the Makassar Strait and Lombok Strait that may have further strengthened the ITF. During the early Holocene, the northeast and southeast monsoons seem to be both strengthened. We will discuss the implications of the hydrographic variability and their age uncertainties in this paper during the meeting.

  10. Dating of pollen samples from the sediment core of Lake St Anne in the East Carpathian Mountains, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubay, Katalin; Katalin Magyari, Enikö; Braun, Mihály; Schabitz, Frank; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Lake St Anne (950 m a.s.l.) is situated in the Ciomadul volcano crater, the youngest volcano in the Carpathians. Aims driving forward the studies there are twofold, one is dating the latest eruption of the Ciomadul volcano and the other is the multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of this region. The sediment of Lake St Anne was sampled several times already, but never reached the bottom of the lake before. During the winter of 2013 at a new core location drilling started at 600 cm water depth and finally reached the bottom of the lake sediment at approximately 2300 cm including water depth. As for all multi-proxy studies essential requirement was to build a reliable chronology. Sediments were dated by radiocarbon method. Previous radiocarbon dates were measured on plant macrofossils, charcoal, Cladocera eggs, chironomid head capsules and bulk lake sediments. Lake St Anne has volcanic origin and there is intensive upwelling of CO2it is important to study and take into consideration, whether there is any local reservoir effect at the case of samples where it could be problematic. Furthermore the late part of the sediment section (between 15,000 and 30,000 cal. yr BP) has low organic matter content (less than 2-4%) with scarcity of datable plant macrofossil material. In this review a different fraction of pollen samples with terrestrial origin was tested and studied as a novel sample type for the radiocarbon dating. Pollen samples were extracted from the lake sediment cores. This type of organic material could be an ideal candidate for radiocarbon based chronological studies as it has terrestrial source and is present in the whole core in contrast with the terrestrial macrofossils. Although the pollen remains were present in the whole core, in many cases their amount give a challenge even for the AMS technic. Samples were measured with EnvironMICADAS AMS and its gas ion source in the HEKAL laboratory (Debrecen, Hungary). We examine the reliability the

  11. 41 CFR 301-11.10 - Am I required to record departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim? 301-11.10 Section 301-11.10 Public Contracts and... dates and times on my travel claim? You must record the date of departure from, and arrival at, the... visited. You do not have to record departure/arrival times, but you must annotate your travel claim...

  12. Status of mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection at ETHZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Martin; Maxeiner, Sascha; Wacker, Lukas; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of a mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection instrument without accelerator stage was built for the first time and set into operation at ETH Zurich. The system is designed as an experimental platform to optimize performance of 14C detection at low ion energies and to study the most relevant processes that may limit system performance. The optimized stripper unit incorporates differential pumping to maintain a low gas outflow and a revised tube design to better match the phase space volume of the ion beam at low energies. The system is fully operational and has demonstrated true radiocarbon dating capabilities. The overall beam transmission through the stripper tube is about 40% for the 1+ charge state. Radiocarbon analyses with an overall precision of 0.6% were obtained on a single sample under regular measurement conditions. By analyzing multiple targets of the same sample material an uncertainty level of 0.3% has been reached. The background level corresponds to a radiocarbon age of 40,000 years.

  13. Carbon 14 dating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gives a first introduction to 14C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the 14C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of 14C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  14. Increase of radiocarbon concentration in tree rings from Kujawy (SE Poland) around AD 774-775

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z.; Krąpiec, Marek; Huels, Mathias; Pawlyta, Jacek; Dreves, Alexander; Meadows, John

    2015-10-01

    Evidence of a rapid increase in atmospheric radiocarbon (14C) content in AD 774-775 was presented by Miyake et al. (2012), who observed an increase of about 12‰ in the 14C content in annual tree rings from Japanese cedar. Usoskin et al. (2013) report a similar 14C spike in German oak, and attribute it to exceptional solar activity. If this phenomenon is global in character, such rapid changes in 14C concentration may affect the accuracy of calibrated dates, as the existing calibration curve is composed mainly of decadal samples. Single-year samples of dendro-chronologically dated tree rings of deciduous oak (Quercus robur) from Kujawy, a village near Krakow (SE Poland), spanning the years AD 765-796, were collected and their 14C content was measured using the AMS system in the Leibniz Laboratory. The results clearly show a rapid increase of 9.2 ± 2.1‰ in the 14C concentration in tree rings between AD 774 and AD 775, with maximum Δ14C = 4.1 ± 2.3‰ noted in AD 776.

  15. How to convert biological carbon into graphite for AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getachew, G; Kim, S; Burri, B J; Kelly, P B; Haack, K W; Ognibene, T J; Buchholz, B A; Vogel, J S; Modrow, J; Clifford, A J

    2006-07-27

    Isotope tracer studies, particularly radiocarbon measurements, play a key role in biological, nutritional, and environmental research. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is now the most sensitive detection method for radiocarbon, but AMS is not widely used in kinetic studies of humans. Part of the reason is the expense, but costs would decrease if AMS were used more widely. One component in the cost is sample preparation for AMS. Biological and environmental samples are commonly reduced to graphite before they are analyzed by AMS. Improvements and mechanization of this multi-step procedure is slowed by a lack of organized educational materials for AMS sample preparation that would allow new investigators to work with the technique without a substantial outlay of time and effort. We present a detailed sample preparation protocol for graphitizing biological samples for AMS and include examples of nutrition studies that have used this procedure.

  16. Radiocarbon chronologies and extinction dynamics of the Late Quaternary mammalian megafauna of the Taimyr Peninsula, Russian Federation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacPhee, RDE; Tikhonov, AN; Mol, D; Maliave, CD; Van der Plicht, H; Greenwood, AD; Flemming, C; Agenbroad, L; MacPhee, Ross D.E.; Tikhonov, Alexei N.; Marliave, Christian de; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents 75 new radiocarbon dates based on late Quaternary mammal remains recovered from eastern Taimyr Peninsula and adjacent parts of the northern Siberian lowlands, Russian Federation, including specimens of woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), steppe bison (Bison priscus), muskox (

  17. Dating the Bibong-ri Neolithic site in Korea: Excavating the oldest ancient boat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The remains of an ancient wooden boat were unearthed at the Bibong-ri shell mound site. The site was located at Bibong-ri, Bugog-myeon, Changnyeong-gun, Gyeongsangnam-do in South Korea. A substantial fragment of the vessel was discovered in the lowest layer of the site. We collected 17 samples of charcoal and wood from pebble, sand, and shell layers. Sample preparation extracted the carbon from each sample material and converted it into graphite for AMS radiocarbon dating. Radiocarbon dates of the samples indicate that they belong to the Neolithic period and that the boat dates from ca. 5700 BC. To this point, the oldest known boat in the world has been a wooden boat dating from ca. 5500 BC in China. Other ancient boats from around the world include a logboat dating from ca. 3600 BC in Japan and a fleet of wooden boats dating from ca. 3000 BC in Egypt. The Bibong-ri boat is the first boat from the Neolithic period ever found in South Korea and must represent one of the world's oldest known boats.

  18. Dating the Bibong-ri Neolithic site in Korea: Excavating the oldest ancient boat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gyujun, E-mail: danielp@kigam.re.k [Geochemical Analysis Center, Geologic Environment Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Chan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Minyoung; Yun, Chongcheol; Kang, Jin; Song, Yong-Mi; Song, Su-Jin; Noh, Hye-Jin [Electrostatic Accelerator Research Center, NCIRF, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do-Kyun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Hack-Jong [Gimhae National Museum, Gimhae, Gyeongsangnam-do 621-060 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The remains of an ancient wooden boat were unearthed at the Bibong-ri shell mound site. The site was located at Bibong-ri, Bugog-myeon, Changnyeong-gun, Gyeongsangnam-do in South Korea. A substantial fragment of the vessel was discovered in the lowest layer of the site. We collected 17 samples of charcoal and wood from pebble, sand, and shell layers. Sample preparation extracted the carbon from each sample material and converted it into graphite for AMS radiocarbon dating. Radiocarbon dates of the samples indicate that they belong to the Neolithic period and that the boat dates from ca. 5700 BC. To this point, the oldest known boat in the world has been a wooden boat dating from ca. 5500 BC in China. Other ancient boats from around the world include a logboat dating from ca. 3600 BC in Japan and a fleet of wooden boats dating from ca. 3000 BC in Egypt. The Bibong-ri boat is the first boat from the Neolithic period ever found in South Korea and must represent one of the world's oldest known boats.

  19. Determination of radiocarbon in stratospheric CO2, obtained through AirCore sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-04-01

    The concentration of Greenhouse Gases (GHG), with carbon dioxide as the most prominent example, has been and still is increasing, predominantly due to emissions from fossil fuel combustion. CO2 is also the most important component of the global carbon cycle. Among other tracers, radiocarbon (Carbon-14) is a unique and an important atmospheric tracer used in the understanding of the global carbon cycle. Radiocarbon is a naturally occurring isotope (radioactive, t 1/2 = 5730 ± 40 years) of carbon produced through the interaction of thermalized neutrons and nitrogen in the upper atmosphere. Generally, for performing atmospheric radiocarbon measurements in the higher atmosphere, large samples (few liters of air) were collected using aircrafts and balloons. However, collecting stratospheric samples on a regular basis for radiocarbon analysis is extremely expensive. Here we describe the determination of radiocarbon concentrations in stratospheric CO2, collected using AirCore sampling. AirCore is an innovative sampling technique for obtaining vertical atmospheric profiles and, in Europe, is done on a regular basis at Sodankylä, Finland for CO2, CH4 and CO. The stratospheric parts of two such AirCore profiles were used in this study as a proof-of-principle. CO2 from the stratospheric air samples were extracted and converted to elemental carbon, which were then measured at the Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) facility of the Centre for Isotope Research (CIO) at the University of Groningen. The stratospheric part of the AirCore profile was divided into six sections, each contained approximately 10 μg C. A detailed description of the extraction, graphitization, AMS analysis and the derivation of the stratospheric radiocarbon profile will be the main focus. Through our results, we will show that AirCore is a viable sampling method for performing high-precision radiocarbon measurements of stratospheric CO2 with reasonably good spatial resolution on a regular basis

  20. PRIME lab AMS performance, upgrades and research applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, P. E-mail: sharma@purdue.edu; Bourgeois, M.; Elmore, D.; Granger, D.; Lipschutz, M.E.; Ma, X.; Miller, T.; Mueller, K.; Rickey, F.; Simms, P.; Vogt, S

    2000-10-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is a dedicated research and service facility for AMS that provides the scientific community with timely, reliable and high quality chemical processing ({approx}600 samples/year) and AMS measurements ({approx}3000 samples/year) of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca and {sup 129}I. The AMS system is based on an upgraded FN (7 MV) tandem accelerator that has recently been modified to improve performance. The precision is 1% for {sup 14}C and it is 3-5% for the other nuclides for radioisotope/stable isotope ratios at the 10{sup -12} levels. System background for {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca is 1-10x10{sup -15} while for {sup 129}I the natural abundance limits it to 20x10{sup -15}. Research is being carried out in Earth, planetary, and biomedical sciences. Geoscience applications include determination of exposure ages of glacial moraines, volcanic eruptions, river terraces, and fault scarps. Burial histories of sand are being determined to decipher the timing of human expansion and climatic history. Environmental applications are tracing the release of radioactivity from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, water tracing, and neutron dosimetry. The applications using meteoric nuclides are oil field brines, sediment subduction, radiocarbon dating, and groundwater {sup 36}Cl mapping. Radionuclide concentrations are also determined in meteorites and tektites for deciphering space and terrestrial exposure histories.

  1. L’apport des analyses 14C à l’étude de la nécropole de l’âge du Bronze de“ La Croix de la Mission ” à Marolles-sur-Seine The contribution of radiocarbon dating in the study of the Bronze Age cemetery of Marolles-sur-Seine “ La Croix de la Mission ”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Peake

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Quatorze des 41 sépultures de la nécropole de “ la Croix de la Mission ” à Marolles-sur-Seine ont récemment fait l’objet d’une datation par le radiocarbone aux laboratoires de Groningen (Pays-Bas et de Lyon (France. Les résultats obtenus mettent en évidence l'utilisation en continu de la nécropole pendant plus d’un millénaire entre 2000 et 800 av. n. è. La corrélation entre ces nouvelles dates et les données archéologiques permet de cerner, avec plus de précision, l’éventail des différentes étapes chrono-culturelles représentées à travers les sépultures de la nécropole. [Les analyses 14C ont été effectuées par les laboratoires de Groningen (Centrum voor Isotopen Onderzoek Rijksuniversiteit Groningen Nijenborgh 4 NL-9747 AG Groningen et Lyon (Centre de Datation par le Radiocarbone Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 43, bd du 11 Novembre 1918 F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex.]Fourteen of the 41 burials of the “ la Croix de la Mission ” Bronze Age cemetery at Marolles-sur-Seine have recently been carbon dated by the Lyon (France and Groningen (Netherlands laboratories. These new dates confirm the site’s occupation for more than 1000 years from 2000 BC to 800 BC and determine more precisely the different cultural and chronological phases of the cemetery illustrated by the great range of its burials.

  2. The role of inter-comparisons in radiocarbon quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Marian; Cook, Gordon; Naysmith, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon dating is used widely in many geochronology projects as a basis for the creation and testing of chronological constructs. Radiocarbon measurements are by their nature complex and the degree of sample pre-treatment varies considerably depending on the material. Within the UK and Europe, there are a number of well-established laboratories and increasingly, scientists are not just commissioning new dates, but also using statistical modelling of assemblages of dates, perhaps measured in different laboratories, to provide formal date estimates for their investigations. The issue of comparability of measurements (and thus bias, accuracy and precision of measurement) from the diverse laboratories is one which has been the focus of some attention both within the 14C community and the wider user communities for some time. As a result of this but also as part of laboratory benchmarking and quality assurance, the 14C community has undertaken a wide-scale, far-reaching and evolving programme of inter-comparisons, to the benefit of laboratories and users alike. This paper presents the results from the most recent exercise SIRI. The objectives of SIRI included, through choice of material, to contribute to the discussion concerning laboratory offsets and error multipliers in the context of IntCal (the International Calibration Programme) and to gain a better understanding of differences in background derived from a range of infinite age material types.

  3. Agriculture, population growth, and statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, H Jabran; Robinson, Erick; Kelly, Robert L

    2016-01-26

    The human population has grown significantly since the onset of the Holocene about 12,000 y ago. Despite decades of research, the factors determining prehistoric population growth remain uncertain. Here, we examine measurements of the rate of growth of the prehistoric human population based on statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record. We find that, during most of the Holocene, human populations worldwide grew at a long-term annual rate of 0.04%. Statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record shows that transitioning farming societies experienced the same rate of growth as contemporaneous foraging societies. The same rate of growth measured for populations dwelling in a range of environments and practicing a variety of subsistence strategies suggests that the global climate and/or endogenous biological factors, not adaptability to local environment or subsistence practices, regulated the long-term growth of the human population during most of the Holocene. Our results demonstrate that statistical analyses of large ensembles of radiocarbon dates are robust and valuable for quantitatively investigating the demography of prehistoric human populations worldwide.

  4. Performance report for the low energy compact radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometer at Uppsala University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, M.; Håkansson, K.; Possnert, G.; Wacker, L.; Synal, H.-A.

    2016-03-01

    A range of ion beam analysis activities are ongoing at Uppsala University, including Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Various isotopes are used for AMS but the isotope with the widest variety of applications is radiocarbon. Up until recently, only the 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator had been used at our site for radiocarbon AMS, ordinarily using 12 MeV 14,13,12C3+ ions. Recently a new radiocarbon AMS system, the Green-MICADAS, developed at the ion physics group at ETH Zurich, was installed. The system has a number of outstanding features which will be described. The system operates at a terminal voltage of 175 kV and uses helium stripper gas, extracting singly charged carbon ions. The low- and high energy mass spectrometers in the system are stigmatic dipole permanent magnets (0.42 and 0.97 T) requiring no electrical power nor cooling water. The system measures both the 14C/12C and the 13C/12C ratios on-line. Performance of the system is presented for both standard mg samples as well as μg-sized samples.

  5. Youngest radiocarbon age for Jefferson's ground sloth, Megalonyx jeffersonii (Xenarthra, Megalonychidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory McDonald, H.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Gnidovec, Dale M.

    2015-03-01

    A partial skeleton of the extinct ground sloth, Megalonyx jeffersonii, recovered from a farm near Millersburg, Ohio in 1890, was radiocarbon dated for the first time. The ungual dated is part of a skeleton mounted for exhibit at the Orton Geological Museum at Ohio State University and was the first mounted skeleton of this animal. From its initial discovery the bones were treated with multiple organic compounds that had the potential to compromise the radiocarbon age and the specimen required special treatments in order to obtain a valid radiocarbon age. The 14C measurement on the ungual from this skeleton (11,235 ± 40 14C yr BP = 13,180-13,034 cal yr BP) is the youngest 14C age presently determined for M. jeffersonii.

  6. Quaternary dating methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers in this book cover absolute, relative and multiple dating methods, and have been written by specialists from a number of different earth sciences disciplines - their common interest being the dating of geological materials within the Quaternary. Papers on absolute dating methods discuss radiocarbon, uranium-series, potassium argon, 40Ar/39Ar, paleomagnetic, obsidian hydration, thermoluminescence, amino acid racemization, tree rings, and lichenometric techniques. Those on relative dating include discussions on various geomorphic relative age indicators such as drainage density changes, hypsometric integrals, bifurcation ratios, stream junction angles, spur morphology, hillslope geometry, and till sheet characteristics. The papers on multiple dating cite examples from the Rocky Mountains, Australia, Lake Agassiz Basin, and the Southern Andes. Also included is the panel discussion which reviews and assesses the information presented, and a field trip guide which discusses the sequences of Wisconian tills and interlayered lacustrine and fluvial sediments. (orig.)

  7. Marine reservoir corrections for bowhead whale radiocarbon age determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-two pairs of radiocarbon dates on driftwood and bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) bones from raised beaches, dates on whale bone and terrestrial plant detritus from a stratigraphic section, and 25 additional dates on whale bones from the lowest (≤ 1 ka BP) raised beaches in the eastern Canadian Arctic suggest that a marine reservoir correction of about -200 years is appropriate for normalized age determinations on bone collagen from the bowhead whale in this region. This is less than the correction (-400 years) normally applied to carbonate shells of marine molluscs from this region. The carbon in bowhead collagen appears to be derived from the whales' zooplankton food rather than from marine bicarbonate. (author). 39 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  8. Holocene environmental changes disclosed from anoxic fjord sediments by biomarkers and their radiocarbon content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smittenberg, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    The power and validity of compound-specific radiocarbon dating was evaluated using sediments from Saanich Inlet, Canada, in age ranging from recent to 5000 yr BP. Compounds characteristic of higher plants, phytoplankton and archaea, were isolated by preparative GC and semi-preparativ

  9. Atmospheric radiocarbon calibration to 45,000 yr BP : Late glacial fluctuations and cosmogenic isotope production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kitagawa, H; van der Plicht, J

    1998-01-01

    More than 250 carbon-14 accelerator mass spectrometry dates of terrestrial macrofossils from annually laminated sediments from Lake Suigetsu (Japan) provide a first atmospheric calibration for almost the total range of the radiocarbon method (45,000 years before the present), The results confirm the

  10. TELL SABI ABYAD, SYRIA : RADIOCARBON CHRONOLOGY, CULTURAL CHANGE, AND THE 8.2 KA EVENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plicht, J.; Akkermans, P. M. M. G.; Nieuwenhuyse, O.; Kaneda, A.; Russell, A.

    2011-01-01

    At Tell Sabi Abyad, Syria, we obtained a robust chronology for the 7th to early 6th millennium BC, the Late Neolithic. The chronology was obtained using a large set of radiocarbon dates, analyzed by Bayesian statistics. Cultural changes observed at similar to 6200 BC are coeval with the 8.2 ka clima

  11. Future directions of the AMS program at Lucas Heights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1998-12-31

    The research program based on the ANTARES AMS spectrometer involves applications of the long-lived radionuclides {sup 14}C, {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 129}I in earth sciences and archaeology. Examples of environmental applications of AMS at Lucas Heights include: use of the {sup 14}C bomb pulse to determine the age and age-spread of air trapped in Antarctic ice bubbles, key parameters to study the variability of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases in the past; analyses of {sup 14}C bomb-pulse curves in tree rings from tropical regions and the southern hemisphere to improve our understanding of the carbon cycle and air-sea interactions, important processes for the global climate; analyses of {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl produced in-situ in polished glacial bedrock and moraine boulders from Tasmania, New Zealand and Antarctica, as part of a major national project to unravel the timing of glacial cycles in the southern hemisphere. A recent archaeological application has been the radiocarbon dating of charcoal fragments from the rock shelter at Jinmium in the Northern Territory demonstrating that this site was occupied by Aboriginal people only during the late Holocene. In environmental monitoring, the analysis of {sup 129}I, {sup 14}C and {sup 36}Cl in water specimens from Mururoa and Fangatauga contributed to an IAEA study regarding residual radioactivity in the Pacific after the French nuclear program Extended abstract. 5 refs.

  12. Marine04 Marine radiocarbon age calibration, 26 ? 0 ka BP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughen, K; Baille, M; Bard, E; Beck, J; Bertrand, C; Blackwell, P; Buck, C; Burr, G; Cutler, K; Damon, P; Edwards, R; Fairbanks, R; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T; Kromer, B; McCormac, F; Manning, S; Bronk-Ramsey, C; Reimer, P; Reimer, R; Remmele, S; Southon, J; Stuiver, M; Talamo, S; Taylor, F; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C

    2004-11-01

    New radiocarbon calibration curves, IntCal04 and Marine04, have been constructed and internationally ratified to replace the terrestrial and marine components of IntCal98. The new calibration datasets extend an additional 2000 years, from 0-26 ka cal BP (Before Present, 0 cal BP = AD 1950), and provide much higher resolution, greater precision and more detailed structure than IntCal98. For the Marine04 curve, dendrochronologically dated tree-ring samples, converted with a box-diffusion model to marine mixed-layer ages, cover the period from 0-10.5 ka cal BP. Beyond 10.5 ka cal BP, high-resolution marine data become available from foraminifera in varved sediments and U/Th-dated corals. The marine records are corrected with site-specific {sup 14}C reservoir age information to provide a single global marine mixed-layer calibration from 10.5-26.0 ka cal BP. A substantial enhancement relative to IntCal98 is the introduction of a random walk model, which takes into account the uncertainty in both the calendar age and the radiocarbon age to calculate the underlying calibration curve. The marine datasets and calibration curve for marine samples from the surface mixed layer (Marine04) are discussed here. The tree-ring datasets, sources of uncertainty, and regional offsets are presented in detail in a companion paper by Reimer et al.

  13. {sup 14}C dating of soil samples from the Unzen volcano scientific drilling boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Sheng E-mail: s.xu@suerc.gla.ac.uk; Hoshizumi, Hideo; Ochiai, Yoji; Aoki, Harumi; Uto, Kozo

    2004-08-01

    Soil samples were collected from the upper layers of two Unzen volcano Scientific Drilling Project boreholes and dated by radiocarbon using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The humic soils underlying volcanic related lahar flow deposits at a depth of 56.42 m of the USDP-1 borehole gave a {sup 14}C age of 18.8 ka BP, suggesting that the accumulation of the lahar flow deposits was caused by the Kureishibaru pyroclastic eruption (19 ka BP) dated at the surface. The humic soils underlying a pyroclastic flow deposit at depths of 71.60-71.90 m of the USDP-2 borehole gave {sup 14}C ages of 27.5 and 29.3 ka BP at the top and bottom layers, respectively. This reveals that the initial activity of Fugendake volcano occurred around 27 ka BP and the collapse of Myokendake volcano around 29 ka BP.

  14. Complexities in the Use of Bomb-Curve Radiocarbon to Determine Time Since Death of Human Skeletal Remains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubelaker, D H; Buchholz, B A

    2005-04-26

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and early 1960s doubled the level of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the atmosphere. From the peak in 1963, the level of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} has decreased exponentially with a mean life of about 16 years, not due to radioactive decay, but due to mixing with large marine and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Since radiocarbon is incorporated into all living things, the bomb-pulse is an isotopic chronometer of the past half century. The absence of bomb radiocarbon in skeletonized human remains generally indicates a date of death before 1950. Comparison of the radiocarbon values with the post 1950 bomb-curve may also help elucidate when in the post 1950 era, the individual was still alive. Such interpretation however, must consider the age at death of the individual and the type of tissue sampled.

  15. Age estimation in forensic sciences: Application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Ohtani, S; Yamamoto, T; Druid, H; Spalding, S L

    2009-11-02

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster, since the age at death, birth date and year of death, as well as gender, can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this paper we analyze teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that above-ground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) which have been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel and ten of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R2=0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 0.6 {+-} 04 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 {+-} 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  16. 基于137Cs、241Am和210Pb计年的上级湖沉积速率研究%Determination of Sedimentation Rates in Higher-up Lake Using 137Cs, 241Am and 210Pb Dating Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁兆运; 杨浩; 王小雷; 张明礼; 杨本俊

    2012-01-01

    利用放射性核素210pb、137Cs及241Am测年方法,确定上级湖表层沉积物的年龄、沉积速率及其变化,分析湖泊沉积速率变化与自然环境演化、人类活动(尤其是修筑堤坝等水利工程)之间的关系,为合理开发利用湖泊资源、保护生态环境提供理论依据.137Cs测年结果表明,沉积柱芯中137 Cs 1964年时标不明显,不存在1975年、1986年时标;利用241Am及210Pbex辅助计年,确定质量深度6.37 g· cm2处为1964年,至表层的平均沉积速率为0.135 g·cm-2·a-1.利用210Pbex CRS模式计算出每个样品深度所对应的年代,与历史资料较吻合.210Pbex CRS计年结果显示,自1859年以来上级湖的沉积速率不稳定,以二级坝建成使用的1960年为界,划分为建坝前平均沉积速率低及建坝后沉积速率上升两个大的时段.上级湖沉积速率的变化与流域旱、涝变化及人类活动有关.%Using radioactive nuclides 210Pb,137Cs and 241 Am dating methods, to make sure that the age and sedimentation rate change of surface sediment of higher-up lake,analyze the connection between lake sedimentation rate changes and natural environment evolution,human activities (especially the construction of dams and other water conservancy projects) ,offering the theory basis to utilize lake resources and protect the ecological environment reasonably. The result of 137 Cs dating shows that137 Cs time mark of 1964 was not obvious and time marks of 1975 and 1986 did not exist in DS sediment core. With the assist of 241 Am and 210Pbex dating,it was made sure that the age at mass depth of 6. 37 g·cm-2 was 1964 and the average sedimentation rate from the mass depth to surface of DS core was 0. 135 g·cm-2 o a-1. The ages of the samples calculated by 210 Pbex modal were a-greed with historical information. The result of 210PbexCRS dating showed that sedimentation rate of higher-up lake had changed since 1859. The deposition process of higher-up lake can be divided

  17. Nauru Island Radiocarbon Data for 1994 to 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nauru-2 coral radiocarbon (14C) timeseries. (166E, 0.5S, 14m bottom depth). Coral radiocarbon (Delta-14C) on untreated, low-speed drilled samples. Precision is +/-...

  18. Rarotonga Radiocarbon (delta 14C) for 1950 to 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rarotonga coral radiocarbon (14C) timeseries. Coral radiocarbon (Delta-14C) on untreated, low-speed drilled samples. Precision is +/- 4 per mil as documented by an...

  19. Growth rate determinations from radiocarbon in bamboo corals (genus Keratoisis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jesse R.; Robinson, Laura F.; Hönisch, Bärbel

    2015-11-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements are an important tool for determining growth rates of bamboo corals, a cosmopolitan group of calcitic deep-sea corals. Published growth rate estimates for bamboo corals are highly variable, with potential environmental or ecological drivers of this variability poorly constrained. Here we systematically investigate the application of 14C for growth rate determinations in bamboo corals using 55 14C dates on the calcite and organic fractions of six bamboo corals (identified as Keratoisis sp.) from the western North Atlantic Ocean. Calcite 14C measurements on the distal surface of these corals and five previously published bamboo corals exhibit a strong one-to-one relationship with the 14C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DI14C) in ambient seawater (r2=0.98), confirming the use of Keratoisis sp. calcite 14C as a proxy for seawater 14C activity. Radial growth rates determined from 14C age-depth regressions, 14C plateau tuning and bomb 14C reference chronologies range from 12 to 78 μm y-1, in general agreement with previously published radiometric growth rates. We document potential biases to 14C growth rate determinations resulting from water mass variability, bomb radiocarbon, secondary infilling (ontogeny), and growth rate nonlinearity. Radial growth rates for Keratoisis sp. specimens do not correlate with ambient temperature, suggesting that additional biological and/or environmental factors may influence bamboo coral growth rates.

  20. The role of radiometric dating method in field of the archaeology and geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of radiocarbon dating method in the field of geology and archaeology and 210Pb dating in the field of geology has been done. Radiocarbon dating method is a dating method with a maximum age restriction is 45,000 years old. This study is to review dating methods by using synthesis process that uses radioactive carbon (14C) in the sample which is converted to benzene (14C6H6) and counted by liquid scintillation counter, while 210Pb dating method is that dating based on the measurement of 210Pb activity. This dating is special for sediments sample, with the maximum age of 150 years old. Some samples in the environment around the archaeological research and the geological site have been successfully carried out by radiocarbon dating analysis. Radiocarbon dating can also provide data as a contribution to support research on paleotsunami, so it can be used to estimate probability of the occurrence of tsunami in the future, while for 210Pb method dating has done research on the sedimentation rate as well as research on the existence of harmful algal (harmful algal bloom, HAB) sample in the sediments which is very dangerous to the environment and has been examined in certain areas. From the results of the study indicate that radiocarbon dating which based on the counting of the activity of 14C, in the future experts of radiocarbon dating is prefer to use of “modern” radiocarbon dating or radiocarbon dating by using mass spectrometry based on cyclotron method, because samples needed and standard deviation of the results relatively much smaller. (author)

  1. Radiocarbon signal of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility in nearby trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovics, R; Kelemen, D I; Kern, Z; Kapitány, S; Veres, M; Jull, A J T; Molnár, M

    2016-03-01

    Tree ring series were collected from the vicinity of a Hungarian radioactive waste treatment and disposal facility and from a distant control background site, which is not influenced by the radiocarbon discharge of the disposal facility but it represents the natural regional (14)C level. The (14)C concentration of the cellulose content of tree rings was measured by AMS. Data of the tree ring series from the disposal facility was compared to the control site for each year. The results were also compared to the (14)C data of the atmospheric (14)C monitoring stations at the disposal facility and to international background measurements. On the basis of the results, the excess radiocarbon of the disposal facility can unambiguously be detected in the tree from the repository site.

  2. Dating the introduction of cereal cultivation to the British Isles: early palaeoecological evidence from the Isle of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, James B.; Blackford, Jeffrey J.; Davey, Peter J.

    2003-10-01

    The adoption of cereal cultivation is a key benchmark in the transition from Mesolithic hunter-gatherer foraging to Neolithic farming economies, but the nature, timing and ecological-cultural context of the earliest cereal use in the British Isles and northwest Europe is still uncertain. We present AMS radiocarbon dating and fine-resolution pollen evidence from the Isle of Man for cereal growing in the latter stages of a distinct episode of forest disturbance at almost 6000 yr BP (uncalibrated). The coherent ecological structure of this phase at the fine resolution level suggests that it records cereal cultivation well before the Ulmus decline, rather than wild grass pollen grains. This example is one of a cluster of early dates for cereal-type pollen near the start of the sixth millenium BP, including several around the Irish Sea, which indicate that the introduction of cereal agriculture probably occurred as early in the central British Isles as in the northern European plain. This early cereal phase is followed later by a probable phase of pre-Ulmus decline pastoral activity. We also report Mesolithic age woodland disturbance around 7000 yr BP (uncalibrated) and the first radiocarbon dates for mid-Holocene forest history of the Isle of Man. Copyright

  3. Construction of reliable radiocarbon-based chronologies for speleothems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleitner, Franziska; Fohlmeister, Jens; McIntyre, Cameron; Baldini, Lisa M.; Jamieson, Robert A.; Hercman, Helena; Gasiorowski, Michal; Pawlak, Jacek; Stefaniak, Krzysztof; Socha, Pawel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Baldini, James U. L.

    2016-04-01

    Speleothems have become one of the most widely applied archives for paleoclimate research. One of their key advantages is their amenability for U-series dating, often producing excellent high precision chronologies. However, stalagmites with high detrital Th or very low U concentrations are problematic to date using U-series, and sometimes need to be discarded from further paleoclimate analysis. Radiocarbon chronologies could present an alternative for stalagmites that cannot be dated using U-series, if offsets from the "dead carbon fraction" (DCF) can be resolved. The DCF is a variable reservoir effect introduced by the addition of 14C-dead carbon from host rock dissolution and soil organic matter. We present a novel age modeling technique that provides accurate 14C-based chronologies for stalagmites. As this technique focuses on the long-term decay pattern of 14C, it is only applicable on stalagmites that show no secular variability in their 14C-depth profiles, but is independent of short-term DCF variations. In order to determine whether a stalagmite is suitable for this method without direct knowledge of long-term trends in the DCF, we highlight how other geochemical proxies (δ13C, Mg/Ca) can provide additional information on changes in karst hydrology, soil conditions, and climate that would affect DCF. We apply our model on a previously published U-Th dated stalagmite 14C dataset from Heshang Cave, China with excellent results, followed by a previously 'undateable' stalagmite from southern Poland.

  4. Amino acid racemisation dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray-Wallace, C.V. [University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia). School of Geosciences

    1999-11-01

    The potential of the time-dependent amino acid racemisation reaction as a method of age assessment was first reported by Hare and Abelson (1968). They noted that in specimens of the bivalve mollusc Mercenaria sp., greater concentrations of amino acids in the D-configuration with increasing fossil age. Hare and Abelson (1968) also reported negligible racemisation in a modern specimen of Mecanaria sp. On this basis they suggested that the extent of amino acid racemisation (epimerisation in the case of isoleucine) may be used to assess the age of materials within and beyond the range of radiocarbon dating. For the past thirty years amino acid racemisation has been extensively applied in Quaternary research as a method of relative and numeric dating, and a particularly large literature has emerged on the subject 12 refs.

  5. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) 1977-1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gove, H. E.; Purser, K. H.; Litherland, A. E.

    2010-04-01

    The eleventh Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS 11) Conference took place in September 2008, the Thirtieth Anniversary of the first Conference. That occurred in 1978 after discoveries with nuclear physics accelerators in 1977. Since the first Conference there have now been ten further conferences on the development and applications of what has become known as AMS. This is the accepted acronym for the use of accelerators, together with nuclear and atomic physics techniques, to enhance the performance of mass spectrometers for the detection and measurement of rare long-lived radioactive elements such as radiocarbon. This paper gives an outline of the events that led to the first conference together with a brief account of the first four conferences before the introduction of the second generation of accelerator mass spectrometers at AMS 5.

  6. Hydropyrolysis: implications for radiocarbon pre-treatment and characterization of Black Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Ascough, P.; M. I. Bird; Meredith, W.; Wood, R. E.; Snape, C.E.; Brock, F.; Higham, T.F.; Large, D.J.; Apperley, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    Charcoal is the result of natural and anthropogenic burning events, when biomass is exposed to elevated temperatures under conditions of restricted oxygen. This process produces a range of materials, collectively known as pyrogenic carbon, the most inert fraction of which is known as Black Carbon (BC). BC degrades extremely slowly, and is resistant to diagenetic alteration involving the addition of exogenous carbon making it a useful target substance for radiocarbon dating particularly of ...

  7. Atmospheric Radiocarbon Calibration to 45,000 yr B.P. : Late Glacial Fluctuations and Cosmogenic Isotope Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kitagawa, H.; Plicht, J. van der

    1998-01-01

    More than 250 carbon-14 accelerator mass spectrometry dates of terrestrial macrofossils from annually laminated sediments from Lake Suigetsu (Japan) provide a first atmospheric calibration for almost the total range of the radiocarbon method (45,000 years before the present). The results confirm the

  8. Application of Bomb Radiocarbon Chronologies to Shortfin Mako (Isurus oxyrinchus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardizzone, D; Cailliet, G M; Natanson, L J; Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Brown, T A

    2007-07-16

    and the number of samples for MIA analysis was insufficient for some months. Hence, unequivocal validation of shortfin mako age estimates has yet to be accomplished. Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices in the 1950s and 1960s effectively doubled the natural atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C). The elevated {sup 14}C levels were first recorded in 1957-58, with a peak around 1963. As a consequence, {sup 14}C entered the ocean through gas exchange with the atmosphere at the ocean surface and in terrestrial runoff. Despite variable oceanographic conditions, a worldwide rise of the bomb {sup 14}C signal entered the ocean mixed layer as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in 1957-58. The large amounts of {sup 14}C released from the bomb tests produced a signature that can be followed through time, throughout the marine food web, and into deeper waters. The marked increase of radiocarbon levels was first measured in the DIC of seawater and in biogenic marine carbonates of hermatypic corals in Florida. Subsequently, this record was documented in corals from other regions and in the thallus of rhodoliths. The accumulation of radiocarbon in the hard parts of most marine organisms in the mixed layer (such as fish otoliths and bivalves) was synchronous with the coral time-series. This technique has been used to validate age estimates and longevity of numerous bony fishes to date, as well as to establish bomb radiocarbon chronologies from different oceans. In the first application of this technique to lamnoid sharks, validated annual band-pair deposition in vertebral growth bands for the porbeagle (Lamna nasus) aged up to 26 years. Radiocarbon values from samples obtained from 15 porbeagle caught in the western North Atlantic Ocean (some of which were known-age) produced a chronology similar in magnitude to the reference carbonate chronology for that region. The observed phase shift of about 3 years was attributed to different sources of carbon between vertebrae and those for

  9. Dating of two paleolithic human fossils from Romania by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we have dated two human fossil remains from Romania by the method of radiocarbon using the technique of the accelerator mass spectrometry at the Pelletron system of Lund University, Sweden. Two fossil remains appear to be the most ancient human remains ever dated in our country: 1. A skull, a scapula and a tibia found in Baia de Fier in the Women's Cave, in Gorj county in the province Oltenia, by Constantin Nicolaescu-Plopsor in 1952; 2. A skull found in Cioclovina cave, near commune Bosorod, Hunedoara county in Transilvania by a worker at the exploitation of phosphate deposits in the year 1941. The skull was examined by Francisc Rainer, anthropologist, and Ioan Simionescu, geologist, who published a study. The lack of stratigraphic observations made very difficult the cultural and chronological assignments of this skull. These authors advanced the hypothesis that the skull belongs to the man of the type Homo sapiens fossilis. At the same time, a number of archaeologists believed that the skull might belong to a modern man, but there have been doubts about this matter. Under this circumstance, dating of the two skulls by physical analysis methods appears to be decisive. Samples of bone were taken from the scapula and tibia from Woman's cave, Baia de Fier and from the skull from Cioclovina cave. The content of Carbon 14 have been determined in the two samples by using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), performed at the AMS system of Lund University, in Sweden. Usually, the collagen amount sufficient for AMS measurements can be extracted from bone fragments with masses of 1 g or more (what provides 5 to 10% of the original collagen content). But, in the situation of the present studied fossil remains, because of the small quantity of bone samples and because the bones were very old, the determination of radiocarbon in the skulls was not so simple. For the preparation of the bone samples, we have essentially applied the Longin method

  10. Radiocarbon measurements at LAC-UFF: Recent performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Roberto; Macario, Kita D.; Santos, Guaciara M.; Carvalho, Carla; dos Santos, Hellen C.; Gomes, Paulo R. S.; Castro, Maikel D.; Oliveira, Fabiana M.; Alves, Eduardo Q.

    2015-10-01

    In 2012 a single stage accelerator mass spectrometer from NEC was installed at the Radiocarbon Laboratory of Universidade Federal Fluminense (LAC-UFF), Niterói, Brazil. Here, we present a status report of our facility. We discuss some modifications applied to our combustion protocol in an attempt to reduce our procedural blank, mostly to processed organic samples. Measurements of reference materials indicate low precision and accuracy that are partially related to beam optics through the acceleration tube. We observed that once the beam current intensity increases the measured 13C+/12C+ becomes erratic. Therefore, in order to maintain the AMS-δ13C values within reasonable values, so that fractionation corrections using the spectrometer 13C+/12C+ values does not affect the final 14C results, we are forced to limit the 12C- beam intensity to ⩽30 μA. This requirement was confirmed during our accuracy tests, when measuring selected annual tree-rings wood samples from a Parana pine (Araucaria angustifolia) between 1927 and 1997 previously measured at the Keck Carbon Cycle AMS Facility (KCCAMS), at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). At the LAC-UFF tree-ring wood samples were processed and measured in 4 different batches during a period of about 5 months. The 14C results were later compared to the high-precision data obtained at KCCAMS/UCI and reached a good agreement. Recently a problem associated with graphitization yield were finally identified and new measurements with secondary standards are promising.

  11. Extracting growth rates from the non-laminated coralline sponge Astrosclera willeyana using "bomb" radiocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallon, S; Guilderson, T

    2004-06-30

    Coralline sponges have the potential to fill in gaps in our understanding of subsurface oceanographic variability. However, one disadvantage they have compared to hermatypic reef building coral proxies is that they do not have annual density bands and need to be radiometrically dated for an age determination. To elucidate growth rate variability we have measured radiocarbon in 1 mm increments from Astrosclera willeyana sponges collected off the Central and Northern Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and from Truk in the Caroline Islands and compared these radiocarbon profiles to independently dated coral radiocarbon records. Growth rates of the GBR sponges average 1.2 {+-} 0.3 and 1.0 {+-} 0.3 mm yr{sup -1}, north and central respectively but can vary by a factor of two. The growth rate of the Truk sponge averages 1.2 {+-} 0.1 mm yr{sup -1}. These growth rates are significantly faster to those measured for other GBR Astrosclera willeyana sponges (0.2 mm yr{sup -1}) by Calcein staining (Woerheide 1988).

  12. Eye lens radiocarbon reveals centuries of longevity in the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Julius; Hedeholm, Rasmus B; Heinemeier, Jan; Bushnell, Peter G; Christiansen, Jørgen S; Olsen, Jesper; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Brill, Richard W; Simon, Malene; Steffensen, Kirstine F; Steffensen, John F

    2016-08-12

    The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus), an iconic species of the Arctic Seas, grows slowly and reaches >500 centimeters (cm) in total length, suggesting a life span well beyond those of other vertebrates. Radiocarbon dating of eye lens nuclei from 28 female Greenland sharks (81 to 502 cm in total length) revealed a life span of at least 272 years. Only the smallest sharks (220 cm or less) showed signs of the radiocarbon bomb pulse, a time marker of the early 1960s. The age ranges of prebomb sharks (reported as midpoint and extent of the 95.4% probability range) revealed the age at sexual maturity to be at least 156 ± 22 years, and the largest animal (502 cm) to be 392 ± 120 years old. Our results show that the Greenland shark is the longest-lived vertebrate known, and they raise concerns about species conservation. PMID:27516602

  13. Eye lens radiocarbon reveals centuries of longevity in the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Julius; Hedeholm, Rasmus B; Heinemeier, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus), an iconic species of the Arctic Seas, grows slowly and reaches >500 centimeters (cm) in total length, suggesting a life span well beyond those of other vertebrates. Radiocarbon dating of eye lens nuclei from 28 female Greenland sharks (81 to 502 cm...... in total length) revealed a life span of at least 272 years. Only the smallest sharks (220 cm or less) showed signs of the radiocarbon bomb pulse, a time marker of the early 1960s. The age ranges of prebomb sharks (reported as midpoint and extent of the 95.4% probability range) revealed the age at sexual...... maturity to be at least 156 ± 22 years, and the largest animal (502 cm) to be 392 ± 120 years old. Our results show that the Greenland shark is the longest-lived vertebrate known, and they raise concerns about species conservation....

  14. Eye lens radiocarbon reveals centuries of longevity in the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Julius; Hedeholm, Rasmus B; Heinemeier, Jan; Bushnell, Peter G; Christiansen, Jørgen S; Olsen, Jesper; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Brill, Richard W; Simon, Malene; Steffensen, Kirstine F; Steffensen, John F

    2016-08-12

    The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus), an iconic species of the Arctic Seas, grows slowly and reaches >500 centimeters (cm) in total length, suggesting a life span well beyond those of other vertebrates. Radiocarbon dating of eye lens nuclei from 28 female Greenland sharks (81 to 502 cm in total length) revealed a life span of at least 272 years. Only the smallest sharks (220 cm or less) showed signs of the radiocarbon bomb pulse, a time marker of the early 1960s. The age ranges of prebomb sharks (reported as midpoint and extent of the 95.4% probability range) revealed the age at sexual maturity to be at least 156 ± 22 years, and the largest animal (502 cm) to be 392 ± 120 years old. Our results show that the Greenland shark is the longest-lived vertebrate known, and they raise concerns about species conservation.

  15. Application of combined nuclear methods for dating of geological and archaeological objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper presents some results in dating of geological and archaeological objects using thermoluminescence and radiocarbon methods. The results were evaluated comparatively to each other and to foreign laboratories. (NHA)

  16. Constraining the Late Pleistocene history of the Laurentide Ice Sheet by dating the Missinaibi Formation, Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, April S.; Finkelstein, Sarah A.; Barnett, Peter J.; Forman, Steven L.

    2016-08-01

    Well-dated paleorecords from periods prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are important for validating models of ice sheet build-up and growth. However, owing to glacial erosion, most Late Pleistocene records lie outside of the previously glaciated region, which limits their ability to inform about the dynamics of paleo-ice sheets. Here, we evaluate new and previously published chronology data from the Missinaibi Formation, a Pleistocene-aged deposit in the Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL), Canada, located near the geographic center of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). Available radiocarbon (AMS = 44, conventional = 36), amino acid (n = 13), uranium-thorium (U-Th, n = 14), thermoluminescence (TL, n = 15) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL, n = 5) data suggest that an ice-free HBL may have been possible during parts of Marine Isotope Stage 7 (MIS 7; ca. 243,000 to ca. 190,000 yr BP), MIS 5 (ca. 130,000 to ca. 71,000 yr BP) and MIS 3 (ca. 29,000 to ca. 57,000). While MIS 7 and MIS 5 are well-documented interglacial periods, the development of peat, forest bed and fluvial deposits dating to MIS 3 (n = 20 radiocarbon dates; 4 TL dates, 3 OSL dates), suggests that the LIS retreated and remained beyond, or somewhere within, the boundaries of the HBL during this interstadial. Ice sheet models approximate the margin of the LIS to Southern Ontario during this time, which is 700 km south of the HBL. Therefore, if correct, our data help constrain a significantly different configuration and dynamicity for the LIS than previously modelled. We can find no chronological basis to discount the MIS 3 age assignments. However, since most data originate from radiocarbon dates lying close to the reliable limit of this geochronometer, future work on dating the Missinaibi Formation using other geochronological methods (e.g. U-Th, OSL) is necessary in order to confirm the age estimates and strengthen the boundaries of the LIS during this period.

  17. New radiocarbon chronology of a late Holocene landslide event in the Mont Blanc massif, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdas, Irka; Sojc, Ursula; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Akçar, Naki; Deline, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The Ferret valley Arp Nouva peat bog located in the Mont Blanc massif was critically evaluated since previously published radiocarbon dates have led to controversial conclusions on the formation of the swamp. Radiocarbon dating of roots from three pits of up to 1 m depth was applied to discuss the question whether the historical documented rock avalanche occurring in AD 1717 overran the peat bog or formed it at a later stage. Our results indicate that the rock avalanche formed the Arp Nouva peat bog by downstream blockage of the Bellecombe torrent. Furthermore, careful sample preparation with consequent separation of roots from the bulk peat sample provides possible explanation for the too old 14C ages of bulk peat samples dated previously (Deline and Kirkbride, 2009 and references therein). This work demonstrates that a combined geomorphological and geochronological approach is the most reliable way to reconstruct landscape evolution, especially in light of apparent chronological problems. The key to successful 14C dating is a careful sample selection and the identification of material that might be not ideal for chronological reconstructions. References Deline, Philip, and Martin P. Kirkbride. "Rock avalanches on a glacier and morainic complex in Haut Val Ferret (Mont Blanc Massif, Italy)".Geomorphology 103 (2009): 80-92.

  18. Date Rape

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Date Rape KidsHealth > For Teens > Date Rape Print A A ... en español Violaciones durante citas What Is Date Rape? When people think of rape , they might picture ...

  19. Radiocarbon analyses along the EDML ice core in Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples, 17 in total, from the EDML core drilled at Kohnen station Antarctica are analysed for 14CO and 14CO2 with a dry-extraction technique in combination with accelerator mass spectrometry. Results of the in situ produced 14CO fraction show a very low concentration of in situ produced 14CO. Despite these low levels in carbon monoxide, a significant in situ production is observed in the carbon dioxide fraction. For the first time we found background values for the ice samples which are equal to line blanks. The data set is used to test a model for the production of 14C in the ice matrix, in combination with a degassing as 14CO2 and possibly as 14CO into the air bubbles. Application of the model, for which no independent validation is yet possible, offers the opportunity to use radiocarbon analysis as dating technique for the air bubbles in the ice. Assigning an arbitrary error of 25% to the calculation of the in situ production leads to age estimates, after correction for the in situ production, which are in agreement with age estimates based on a volcanic layer match of EDML to the Dome C timescale in combination with a correction for firn diffusion

  20. Integrated Tree-Ring-Radiocarbon High-Resolution Timeframe to Resolve Earlier Second Millennium BCE Mesopotamian Chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Carol B.; Lorentzen, Brita; Barjamovic, Gojko; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Kromer, Bernd; Wild, Eva Maria

    2016-01-01

    500 years of ancient Near Eastern history from the earlier second millennium BCE, including such pivotal figures as Hammurabi of Babylon, Šamši-Adad I (who conquered Aššur) and Zimrilim of Mari, has long floated in calendar time subject to rival chronological schemes up to 150+ years apart. Texts preserved on clay tablets provide much information, including some astronomical references, but despite 100+ years of scholarly effort, chronological resolution has proved impossible. Documents linked with specific Assyrian officials and rulers have been found and associated with archaeological wood samples at Kültepe and Acemhöyük in Turkey, and offer the potential to resolve this long-running problem. Here we show that previous work using tree-ring dating to place these timbers in absolute time has fundamental problems with key dendrochronological crossdates due to small sample numbers in overlapping years and insufficient critical assessment. To address, we have integrated secure dendrochronological sequences directly with radiocarbon (14C) measurements to achieve tightly resolved absolute (calendar) chronological associations and identify the secure links of this tree-ring chronology with the archaeological-historical evidence. The revised tree-ring-sequenced 14C time-series for Kültepe and Acemhöyük is compatible only with the so-called Middle Chronology and not with the rival High, Low or New Chronologies. This finding provides a robust resolution to a century of uncertainty in Mesopotamian chronology and scholarship, and a secure basis for construction of a coherent timeframe and history across the Near East and East Mediterranean in the earlier second millennium BCE. Our re-dating also affects an unusual tree-ring growth anomaly in wood from Porsuk, Turkey, previously tentatively associated with the Minoan eruption of the Santorini volcano. This tree-ring growth anomaly is now directly dated ~1681–1673 BCE (68.2% highest posterior density range), ~20

  1. Integrated Tree-Ring-Radiocarbon High-Resolution Timeframe to Resolve Earlier Second Millennium BCE Mesopotamian Chronology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturt W Manning

    Full Text Available 500 years of ancient Near Eastern history from the earlier second millennium BCE, including such pivotal figures as Hammurabi of Babylon, Šamši-Adad I (who conquered Aššur and Zimrilim of Mari, has long floated in calendar time subject to rival chronological schemes up to 150+ years apart. Texts preserved on clay tablets provide much information, including some astronomical references, but despite 100+ years of scholarly effort, chronological resolution has proved impossible. Documents linked with specific Assyrian officials and rulers have been found and associated with archaeological wood samples at Kültepe and Acemhöyük in Turkey, and offer the potential to resolve this long-running problem. Here we show that previous work using tree-ring dating to place these timbers in absolute time has fundamental problems with key dendrochronological crossdates due to small sample numbers in overlapping years and insufficient critical assessment. To address, we have integrated secure dendrochronological sequences directly with radiocarbon (14C measurements to achieve tightly resolved absolute (calendar chronological associations and identify the secure links of this tree-ring chronology with the archaeological-historical evidence. The revised tree-ring-sequenced 14C time-series for Kültepe and Acemhöyük is compatible only with the so-called Middle Chronology and not with the rival High, Low or New Chronologies. This finding provides a robust resolution to a century of uncertainty in Mesopotamian chronology and scholarship, and a secure basis for construction of a coherent timeframe and history across the Near East and East Mediterranean in the earlier second millennium BCE. Our re-dating also affects an unusual tree-ring growth anomaly in wood from Porsuk, Turkey, previously tentatively associated with the Minoan eruption of the Santorini volcano. This tree-ring growth anomaly is now directly dated ~1681-1673 BCE (68.2% highest posterior density

  2. The 14C-AMS Laboratory at IF-UFF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macario, K.D.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Anjos, R.M.; Linares, R.; Carvalho, C.R.A.; Castro, M.D.; Oliveira, F.M.; Alves, E.Q.; Chanca, I.S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: In 2009 a radiocarbon sample preparation laboratory dedicated to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was installed at the Physics Institute of the Fluminense Federal University. At the Radiocarbon Laboratory samples of several kinds of materials such as charcoal, sediments, wood and shells go through specific chemical treatment and conversion to carbon dioxide. Graphite reduction is performed in sealed Pyrex tubes, using Zinc, Titanium Hydrate, and iron catalyst within an inner tube. Samples have been successfully produced yielding fluffy homogeneous graphite leading to high and stable currents in the ion source. For sample measurement an accelerator system produced by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC), was installed in the Physics Institute. The machine, specially developed to carbon analysis, is the State of the Art in 14C - AMS studies and its acquisition represent a very important step for Brazil towards the development of science and technology regarding radiocarbon studies. The system includes an open air deck 250 kV single stage electrostatic accelerator with magnetic and electrostatic analyzers that enable isotope separation and detection. Radiocarbon concentrations are measured to 1 part in 10{sup 15} with precision of 0.3 The Nuclear Applied Physics group on Chronological Studies is now performing multidisciplinary research in collaboration with Brazilian and foreign groups from several fields of science such as Archaeology, Geophysics, Oceanography and Biology, in studies on the evolution of marine, terrestrial and Antarctic ecosystems. (author)

  3. Radiocarbon Age Variability of Deep Sea Corals from the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, N.; Gerlach, D. S.; Roberts, M.; McNichol, A. P.; Thresher, R.; Adkins, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    Deep-sea corals are a relatively new and unique archive in paleoceanography. They have large banded unbioturbated skeletons that allow for high resolution records. They also have a high uranium content allowing for accurate calendar ages independent of radiocarbon age measurements. One problem of using deep-sea corals for long records is that it is difficult to date a large numbers of corals accurately and precisely. Unlike sediment cores, fossil fields have no inherent stratigraphy and each coral must be separately dated. Here we present the results of ‘reconnaissance radiocarbon age analyses’ made at NOSAMS on Desmophyllum Dianthus (D. Dianthus) collected from the New England Seamounts and South of Tasmania. Reconnaissance radiocarbon age analyses are much more rapid compared to traditional hydrolysis methods allowing for many more corals to be dated. The corals dated with the reconnaissance method yielded similar ages as corals analyzed with the traditional hydrolysis method within 1σ error. A single coral with multiple measurements (n=9) yielded a standard error of 59 years. We report 14C ages of 228 D. Dianthus of 5000 fossil D. Dianthus collected from the New England Seamounts (32-42N, 46-70W, 1188-2546 m). Similar to earlier results (Robinson et al, 2007), we find that coral populations migrate both in depth and across the seamount chain through time. During periods of rapid climate change events (Heinrich Events and Younger Dryas), the coral population spreads through the water column and across the seamount chain. However, during the Holocene, the coral population migrates to shallower depths of less than 1250m. During the LGM, the coral population retreats to a restricted depth range of 1500-2000m. We also find that the coral population expanded during the Little Ice Age, a result missed with the smaller sample set. We also will present the result of 250 radiocarbon analyses, from a collection of over 9000 fossil D. dianthus, from the Tasman sea (44

  4. Marine04 marine radiocarbon age calibration, 0-26 cal kyr BP

    OpenAIRE

    Hughen, Konrad A.; Baillie, Mike G.L.; Bard, Edouard; Beck, J. Warren; Bertrand, Chanda J.H.; Blackwell, Paul G.; Caitlin E. Buck; Burr, George S; Cutler, Kirsten B.; Damon, Paul E.; Edwards, Richard L.; Fairbanks, Richard G.; Friedrich, Michael; Guilderson, Thomas P; Kromer, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    New radiocarbon calibration curves, IntCal04 and Marine04, have been constructed and internationally ratified to replace the terrestrial and marine components of IntCal98. The new calibration data sets extend an additional 2000 yr, from 0–26 cal kyr BP (Before Present, 0 cal BP = AD 1950), and provide much higher resolution, greater precision, and more detailed structure than IntCal98. For the Marine04 curve, dendrochronologically-dated tree-ring samples, converted with a box diffusion model ...

  5. Stable lead (Pb) isotopes and concentrations - A useful independent dating tool for Baltic Sea sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zillén, L.; Lenz, C.; Jilbert, T.

    2012-01-01

    The prehistory of the Baltic Sea has for a long time suffered from imprecise dating, due to the large uncertainties associated with bulk radiocarbon dating of Baltic Seasediments. To constrain the timing of environmental changes in the Baltic Sea it is critical to apply new dating approaches. This s

  6. Radiocarbon ages of upper quaternary deposit in central Nepal and their geomorphological significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author visited Nepal from October, 1980, to February, 1981, investigated the geomorphology and upper Quaternary geology in Central Nepal, and collected a number of samples for radiocarbon dating. After returning to his university, he dated ten samples by himself. In Nepal, radiocarbon age has been scarcely reported as yet, besides in Kathmandu valley. Therefore, the author's ten data of the age are very important for the late Quaternary chronological study of Nepal Himalayas. In this paper, the author describes sampling localities and horizons, dating results and their geomorphological significance. These ten samples included Pokhara valley, Marsyandi Kohla, Modi Khola, Madi Khola and Muktinath samples. Some conclusion was derived as for the geomorphological development in central Nepal: The last Himalayan glacial age had already ended before 9,000 yr BP (years before A.D. 1950); In the Midland region, from 4,300 to 600 yr BP, some large-scale mudflows broke out nearly contemporaneously in the upper valleys, and they flowed down torrentially and catastrophically to deposit in the middle course of rivers. But the cause of vast quantity of material suddenly brought down from the Great Himalayas has been still left unexplained. The conclusion like this also was able to be applied to the middle Marsyandi Khola and the Pokhara valley. The wide-spread schema that the river was aggraded in the glacial age and degraded in the interglacial age may not be applicable to the rivers in the Midland region of Nepal Himalayas. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kevin T.; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E.

    2013-07-01

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon (14C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric 14C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa. Herbivore samples include teeth, tusks, soft tissue, hair, and horn. Tissues formed after 1955 are dated to within 0.3-1.3 y of formation, depending on the tissue type, whereas tissues older than ca. 1955 have high age uncertainties (>17 y) due to the Suess effect. 14C dating of tissues has applications to stable isotope (paleo)ecology and wildlife forensics. We use data from 41 additional samples to determine growth rates of tusks, molars, and hair, which improve interpretations of serial stable isotope data for (paleo)ecological studies. 14C dating can also be used to calculate the time interval represented in periodic histological structures in dental tissues (i.e., perikymata), which in turn may be used as chronometers in fossil teeth. Bomb-curve 14C dating of confiscated animal tissues (e.g., ivory statues) can be used to determine whether trade of the item is legal, because many Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species restrictions are based on the age of the tissue, and thus can serve as a powerful forensic tool to combat illegal trade in animal parts.

  8. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kevin T; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E

    2013-07-16

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon ((14)C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric (14)C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa. Herbivore samples include teeth, tusks, soft tissue, hair, and horn. Tissues formed after 1955 are dated to within 0.3-1.3 y of formation, depending on the tissue type, whereas tissues older than ca. 1955 have high age uncertainties (>17 y) due to the Suess effect. (14)C dating of tissues has applications to stable isotope (paleo)ecology and wildlife forensics. We use data from 41 additional samples to determine growth rates of tusks, molars, and hair, which improve interpretations of serial stable isotope data for (paleo)ecological studies. (14)C dating can also be used to calculate the time interval represented in periodic histological structures in dental tissues (i.e., perikymata), which in turn may be used as chronometers in fossil teeth. Bomb-curve (14)C dating of confiscated animal tissues (e.g., ivory statues) can be used to determine whether trade of the item is legal, because many Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species restrictions are based on the age of the tissue, and thus can serve as a powerful forensic tool to combat illegal trade in animal parts. PMID:23818577

  9. Investigating bomb radiocarbon transport in the southern Pacific Ocean with otolith radiocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, G. L.; Fallon, S. J.; Izzo, C.; Wood, R.; Gillanders, B. M.

    2015-08-01

    To explore the transport of carbon into water masses from the surface ocean to depths of ∼ 1000 m in the southwest Pacific Ocean, we generated time series of radiocarbon (Δ14C) from fish otoliths. Otoliths (carbonate earstones) from long-lived fish provide an indirect method to examine the "bomb pulse" of radiocarbon that originated in the 1950s and 1960s, allowing identification of changes to distributions of 14C that has entered and mixed within the ocean. We micro-sampled ocean perch (Helicolenus barathri) otoliths, collected at ∼ 400- 500 m in the Tasman Sea, to obtain measurements of Δ14C for those depths. We compared our ocean perch Δ14C series to published otolith-based marine surface water Δ14C values (Australasian snapper (Chrysophrys auratus) and nannygai (Centroberyx affinis)) and to published deep-water values (800-1000 m; orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus)) from the southwest Pacific to establish a mid-water Δ14C series. The otolith bomb 14C results from these different depths were consistent with previous water mass results in the upper 1500 m of the southwest Pacific Ocean (e.g. World Ocean Circulation Experiment and Geochemical Ocean Sections Study). A comparison between the initial Δ14C bomb pulse rise at 400-500 m suggested a ventilation lag of 5 to 10 yr, whereas a comparison of the surface and depths of 800-1000 m detailed a 10 to 20 yr lag in the time history of radiocarbon invasion at this depth. Pre-bomb reservoir ages derived from otolith 14C located in Tasman Sea thermocline waters were ∼ 530 yr, while reservoir ages estimated for Tasman Antarctic intermediate water were ∼ 730 yr.

  10. Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stader, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Dating violence is a form of student-on-student victimization and is a serious school safety issue. Research indicates that at a minimum, 10 percent of high school students are victims of dating violence in one form or another. Among female high school students that date, some data indicate that as many as 30 percent may be victims of dating…

  11. Reconciling radiocarbon and ice core timescales over the Holocene - Cosmogenic radionuclides as synchronization tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscheler, R.; Adolphi, F.; Mekhaldi, F.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric production rates of cosmogenic radionuclides, such as 14C and 10Be, vary globally due to external processes, namely the solar and geomagnetic modulation of the galactic cosmic ray flux as well as solar proton events. This signature is recorded in various archives such as ice cores (10Be) and tree-rings (14C). Hence, cosmogenic radionuclides offer a means to continuously assess timescale differences between two of the most widely used timescales in paleoclimatology - the radiocarbon and the ice core timescales. Short lived solar proton events additionally provide distinct marker horizons that allow synchronization of discrete horizons at annual precision. We will present a cosmogenic radionuclide based synchronization of the Greenland ice core timescale (GICC05, Svensson et al., 2008) and the radiocarbon timescale (IntCal13, Reimer et al., 2013) over the Holocene. This synchronization allows radiocarbon dated and ice core paleoclimate records to be compared on a common timescale at down to sub-decadal precision. We will compare these results to independent discrete isochrones obtained from tephrochronology and solar proton events. In addition, we will discuss implications for the accuracy and uncertainty estimates of GICC05 over the Holocene. Reimer, P. J., Bard, E., Bayliss, A., Beck, J. W., Blackwell, P. G., Bronk Ramsey, C., Buck, C. E., Cheng, H., Edwards, R. L., Friedrich, M., Grootes, P. M., Guilderson, T. P., Haflidason, H., Hajdas, I., Hatté, C., Heaton, T. J., Hoffmann, D. L., Hogg, A. G., Hughen, K. A., Kaiser, K. F., Kromer, B., Manning, S. W., Niu, M., Reimer, R. W., Richards, D. A., Scott, E. M., Southon, J. R., Staff, R. A., Turney, C. S. M., and van der Plicht, J.: IntCal13 and Marine13 Radiocarbon Age Calibration Curves 0-50,000 Years cal BP, Radiocarbon, 55, 1869-1887, 10.2458/azu_js_rc.55.16947, 2013. Svensson, A., Andersen, K. K., Bigler, M., Clausen, H. B., Dahl-Jensen, D., Davies, S. M., Johnsen, S. J., Muscheler, R., Parrenin

  12. Refining 14C dating of bone >30,000 BP : establishing an accurate chronology for the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in France.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talamo, Sahra

    2012-01-01

    This thesis aims to improve the chronology of the transition from the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic in France through the radiocarbon dating of bone collagen samples. This requires accurate calibration of the radiocarbon time scale for this time interval, reliable extraction of collagen from prehisto

  13. Radiocarbon measurements of dissolved organic carbon in sewage-treatment-plant effluent and domestic sewage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an attempt to better characterize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in several specific sources to Lake Kasumigaura, such as sewage-treatment-plant effluent (STPE), domestic sewage (DS) and forest stream (FS), we analyzed radiocarbon (14C) and stable carbon isotopic compositions (13C) of the DOCs. The measurements of 14C for DOC were performed by an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES-TERRA) in Japan. The Δ14C and δ13C values of the DOCs in several sources to Lake Kasumigaura, have low carbon isotopic values, ranging from -470 per mille to -79 per mille and from -27.9 per mille to -24.2 per mille , respectively. These carbon isotopic values are substantially different from those of Lake Kasumigaura. These results imply different origins for the DOC in Lake Kasumigaura. The 14C and 13C analyses of DOC led to a useful classification for DOCs in Lake Kasumigaura, Japan.

  14. Southern Appalachian hillslope erosion rates measured by soil and detrital radiocarbon in hollows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, T.C.; Scharer, K.M.; Wooten, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of sediment generation and transport on hillslopes provides important constraints on the rate of sediment output from orogenic systems. Hillslope sediment fluxes are recorded by organic material found in the deposits infilling unchanneled convergent topographic features called hollows. This study describes the first hollow infilling rates measured in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Infilling rates (and bedrock erosion rates) were calculated from the vertical distribution of radiocarbon ages at two sites in the Coweeta drainage basin, western North Carolina. At each site we dated paired charcoal and silt soil organic matter samples from five different horizons. Paired radiocarbon samples were used to bracket the age of the soil material in order to capture the range of complex soil forming processes and deposition within the hollows. These dates constrain hillslope erosion rates of between 0.051 and 0.111mmyr-1. These rates are up to 4 times higher than spatially-averaged rates for the Southern Appalachian Mountains making creep processes one of the most efficient erosional mechanisms in this mountain range. Our hillslope erosion rates are consistent with those of forested mountain ranges in the western United States, suggesting that the mechanisms (dominantly tree throw) driving creep erosion in both the western United States and the Southern Appalachian Mountains are equally effective. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Searching for the oldest baobab of Madagascar: radiocarbon investigation of large Adansonia rubrostipa trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Patrut

    Full Text Available We extended our research on the architecture, growth and age of trees belonging to the genus Adansonia, by starting to investigate large individuals of the most widespread Malagasy species. Our research also intends to identify the oldest baobabs of Madagascar. Here we present results of the radiocarbon investigation of the two most representative Adansonia rubrostipa (fony baobab specimens, which are located in south-western Madagascar, in the Tsimanampetsotse National Park. We found that the fony baobab called "Grandmother" consists of 3 perfectly fused stems of different ages. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was found to be 1136 ± 16 BP. We estimated that the oldest part of this tree, which is mainly hollow, has an age close to 1,600 yr. This value is comparable to the age of the oldest Adansonia digitata (African baobab specimens. By its age, the Grandmother is a major candidate for the oldest baobab of Madagascar. The second investigated specimen, called the "polygamous baobab", consists of 6 partially fused stems of different ages. According to dating results, this fony baobab is 1,000 yr old. This research is the first investigation of the structure and age of Malagasy baobabs.

  16. Evidence of 11-year solar cycles in tree rings from 1010 to 1110 AD - Progress on high precision AMS measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guettler, D., E-mail: guettler@phys.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, HPK G31, Schafmattstrasse 20, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Wacker, L. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, HPK G31, Schafmattstrasse 20, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Kromer, B.; Friedrich, M. [Heidelberg Academy of Sciences, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Botany, University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart (Germany); Synal, H.-A. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, HPK G31, Schafmattstrasse 20, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    Oak tree rings from Southern Germany covering the AD 1010-1110 years have been analyzed for radiocarbon with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at the laboratory at ETH Zurich. High-precision measurements with a precision down to 12 years radiocarbon age and a time resolution of 2 years aimed to identify modulations of the {sup 14}C concentration in tree ring samples caused by the 11 years solar cycles, a feature that so far is not visible in the IntCal calibration curve. Our results are in good agreement with the current calibration curve IntCal09. However, we observed an offset in radiocarbon age of 25-40 years towards older values. An evaluation of our sample preparation, that included variations of e.g.: chemicals, test glasses and processing steps did not explain this offset. The numerous measurements using the AMS-MICADAS system validated its suitability for high precision measurements with high repeatability.

  17. Radiocarbon and seismic evidence of ice-sheet extent and the last deglaciation on the mid-Norwegian continental shelf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reconstruction of the ice extent and glacier chronology on the continental shelf off mid-Norway has been severely hampered by the lack of dates from the glacial deposits. Seismic interpretation and new accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon dates show that the ice sheet extended to the edge of the continental shelf at the last glacial maximum. The two youngest till units near the shelf edge were deposited about 15000 and 13500 BP. The results indicate that the ice sheet partly reached the shelf break as late as 11000 BP followed by a deglaciation of most of the continental shelf in less than 1000 years

  18. Efficient Collection of Methane from Extremely Large Volumes of Water for Natural Radiocarbon Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, K. J.; Kessler, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Collecting sufficient amounts of natural methane sample for a high precision radiocarbon (14C-CH4) analysis was previously unfeasible when sampling from low methane concentration waters like the open ocean. A new method incorporating dissolved gas extraction technology (Liqui-Cel® membrane contactors) has been developed to circumvent the challenges that natural 14C-CH4 sampling presents. With this method, adequate amounts of methane-carbon for a traditional 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis can be cleanly and efficiently extracted from 1000s L water in a few hours. This technique is currently being improved to enable sampling from > 11,000 L water in less than 1 hr. For transport from the field to the laboratory, each extracted gas sample is compressed into a small (1.68 L) high-pressure aluminum cylinder using an oil-free compressor pump. Due to the small size and portability of the sample cylinders, high resolution sampling plans composed of 30+ samples are possible even in remote locations. The laboratory preparation of these methane samples for 14C-AMS analyses is carried out on a new flow-through vacuum line. While the bulk water vapor and carbon dioxide (CO2) are removed before the sample is compressed in the field, the residual trace amounts of these constituents are cryogenically removed from the sample in the initial phase of the vacuum line. Carbon monoxide in the sample is quantitatively oxidized at 290°C to CO2 and cryogenically removed. Finally, the sample methane is quantitatively oxidized at 950°C to products CO2 and water and then cryogenically isolated. The new vacuum line technique achieves low blanks and purifies and oxidizes the methane contained in the extracted gas sample with high efficiency. At an AMS facility, an aliquot of the methane-produced CO2 is graphitized and analyzed for radiocarbon content using traditional 14C-AMS. Supporting dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometry measurements are conducted to determine both

  19. C-14 dated paleoenvironmental changes on Lake Kolon during the last 25000 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. One of Hungary's geological and environmental treasures is nestled in the heart of the Great Hungarian Plain. The catchment basin of Lake Kolon was subjected to detailed environmental historical studies starting in 2005. Undisturbed cores taken along transects of the basin were subjected to detailed sedimentological, paleoecological, and geochemical studies (Figure 1). To establish a reliable timeframe of the lacustrine and marshland sedimentary sequence identified, 22 samples were analyzed by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in the radiocarbon laboratories of Poznan and Tucson. With the new results in hand (Figure 2), we had the opportunity to elucidate the geological evolution of the area for the past 25,000 yr. This sequence is highly beneficial, as it is probably the most well-dated profile of the Quaternary from the area studied. The new absolute dates enabled the comparison of local geological evolution of the studied area with those of global climatic changes. As seen from our findings, the geological evolution of the catchment basin was congruent with major climatic events during the Pleistocene and the entire Holocene. However, a very peculiar trajectory was identified for the terminal part of the Pleistocene and the opening of the Holocene regarding the evolution of the landscape, the vegetation, and the fauna of this part of the Great Hungarian Plain.

  20. Bomb-spike dating of a mummified baboon in Ludwig Cave, Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodgins Greg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1982 a mummified adult female baboon was discovered on a ledge in Ludwig Cave in Namibia. A toe bone was removed for dating in July 1995. AMS radiocarbon dating of bone collagen, tendon, and skin indicates a post-modern age. Application of the atomic bomb-spike calibration curve suggests death in late 1977 and an age at death of around 19 years. Baboons roost in the cave and the mummified female, along with a mummified juvenile male discovered in 2002 and three rotting corpses discovered in 1995, were probably chased by other baboons or by leopards down a ca. 6 m drop during the rainy season, and were unable to climb the steep and very slippery slope to escape. The large number of baboons trapped in the cave in less than 20 years, and mummification of two individuals on dry, dusty ledges in the cave, may explain why large numbers of baboon skeletons have been discovered in ancient bone breccias (up to 4 Ma old in a number of caves throughout Southern Africa.

  1. The AMS experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) detector will be installed as a particle physics experiment on the International Space Station. It will look for antimatter pockets in space. AMS is a CERN recognised experiment.

  2. Developing inorganic carbon-based radiocarbon chronologies for Holocene lake sediments in arid NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiawu; Ma, Xueyang; Qiang, Mingrui; Huang, Xiaozhong; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Henderson, Andrew C. G.; Holmes, Jonathan A.; Chen, Fahu

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic carbonates are often used to establish radiocarbon (14C) chronologies for lake sediments when terrestrial plant remains (TPR) are rare or when bulk organic matter is insufficient for dating, a problem that is common for many lakes in arid regions. However, the reservoir effect (RE), as well as old carbon contributed from the lakes catchment make it difficult to establish reliable chronologies. Here we present a systematic study of inorganic 14C ages of two lake-sediment sequences, one from a small-enclosed saline lake - Lake Gahai in Qaidam Basin, and the other from a large freshwater lake - Lake Bosten in Xinjiang. Modern dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of the lakes, paleo-lake sediments exposed in the catchment, and mollusk shells in core sediments from Lake Gahai were dated to assess the RE and the contribution of pre-aged carbon to the old ages in the cores. We propose a statistical regression to assess more than one RE for the 14C carbonate ages within our sedimentary sequences. Old radiocarbon ages contributed by detrital carbonates were assessed by comparing the ages of mollusk shells with those of carbonates at the same sediment depths. We established the RE of the authigenic component and assessed detrital old carbon contributions to our two sites, and this was used to correct the 14C ages. Based on this approach, we developed age models for both cores, and tested them using 210Pb ages in both cores and TPR-based 14C-ages recovered from Lake Bosten. We further tested our age models by comparing carbonate-based oxygen isotope (δ18O) records from both lakes to an independently-dated regional speleothem δ18O record. Our results suggest if sedimentary sequences are densely dated and the RE and the contribution of old carbon from detrital carbonates can be ascertained, robust chronological frameworks based on carbonate-based 14C determinations can be established.

  3. 14C dates from Tel Rehov: Iron-Age chronology, pharaohs, and Hebrew kings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruins, Hendrik J; van der Plicht, Johannes; Mazar, Amihai

    2003-04-11

    Stratified radiocarbon dates provide an independent chronological link between archaeological layers and historical data. The invasion by Pharaoh Shoshenq I (Shishak) is a key historical synchronism, approximately 925 B.C.E., mentioned in both Egyptian inscriptions and the Hebrew Bible. The list of places raided by Shoshenq, mentioned at Karnak (Egypt), includes Rehov (Israel). The site yielded a consistent series of radiocarbon dates from the 12th to 9th century B.C.E. Our results (i) suggest a revised Iron-Age chronology; (ii) date an archaeological stratum to Shoshenq's campaign; (iii) indicate the similarity of "Solomonic" and "Omride" pottery; and (iv) provide correlation with Greece and Cyprus.

  4. Coral Radiocarbon Records of Indian Ocean Water Mass Mixing and Wind-Induced Upwelling Along the Coast of Sumatra, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilderson, T P; Grumet, N S; Abram, N J; Beck, J W; Dunbar, R B; Gagan, M K; Hantoro, W S; Suwargadi, B W

    2004-02-06

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the skeletal aragonite of annually banded corals track radiocarbon concentrations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in surface seawater. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, oceanic uptake of excess {sup 14}C in the atmosphere has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean {sup 14}C concentrations. We present accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) measurements of radiocarbon isotope ({Delta}{sup 14}C) in Porites corals from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0 S, 98 E) and Watamu, Kenya (3 S, 39 E) to document the temporal and spatial evolution of the {sup 14}C gradient in the tropical Indian Ocean. The rise in {Delta}{sup 14}C in the Sumatra coral, in response to the maximum in nuclear weapons testing, is delayed by 2-3 years relative to the rise in coral {Delta}{sup 14}C from the coast of Kenya. Kenya coral {Delta}{sup 14}C values rise quickly because surface waters are in prolonged contact with the atmosphere. In contrast, wind-induced upwelling and rapid mixing along the coast of Sumatra entrains {sup 14}C-depleted water from the subsurface, which dilutes the effect of the uptake of bomb-laden {sup 14}C by the surface-ocean. Bimonthly AMS {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements on the Mentawai coral reveal mainly interannual variability with minor seasonal variability. The interannual signal may be a response to changes in the Walker circulation, the development of easterly wind anomalies, shoaling of the eastern thermocline, and upwelling of {sup 14}C-depleted water along the coast of Sumatra. Singular spectrum analysis of the Sumatra coral {Delta}{sup 14}C record reveals a significant 3-year periodicity. The results lend support to the concept that ocean atmosphere interactions between the Pacific and Indian Oceans operate in concert with the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  5. Bats: A new tool for AMS data reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, L., E-mail: Wacker@phys.ethz.c [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Christl, M.; Synal, H.-A. [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-04-15

    A data evaluation program was developed at ETH Zurich to meet the requirements of the new compact AMS systems MICADAS and TANDY in addition to the large EN-Tandem accelerator. The program, called 'BATS', is designed to automatically calculate standard and blank corrected results for measured samples. After almost one year of routine operation with the MICADAS C-14 system BATS has proven to be an easy to use data reduction tool that requires minimal user input. Here we present the fundamental principle and the algorithms used in BATS for standard-sized radiocarbon measurements.

  6. Urvina Bay, Galapagos Coral Radiocarbon (delta 14C) Data for 1956 to 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Urvina Bay coral radiocarbon (14C) timeseries. (90 deg W, 0.5 deg S) Coral radiocarbon (Delta-14C) on untreated, low-speed drilled samples. Precision is +/- 4 per...

  7. High-precision radiocarbon chronometry of ancient Egypt, and comparisons with Nubia, Palestine and Mesopotamia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radiocarbon age measurements in historical chronology is examined for ancient Egypt and neighbouring regions. A methodology is presented aimed at improving the reliability and precision of radiocarbon age determinations. (UK)

  8. High-precision radiocarbon chronometry of ancient Egypt, and comparisons with Nubia, Palestine and Mesopotamia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, F.A.; Robinson, S.W.

    1987-03-01

    The use of radiocarbon age measurements in historical chronology is examined for ancient Egypt and neighbouring regions. A methodology is presented aimed at improving the reliability and precision of radiocarbon age determinations.

  9. Radiocarbon in tropical tree rings during the Little Ice Age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross-dated tree-ring cores (Pinus maker's) from north-central Thailand, spanning AD 1620-1780, were used to investigate atmospheric 14C for the tropics during the latter part of the Little Ice Age. In addition, a cross-dated section of Huon pine from western Tasmania, covering the same period of time, was investigated. A total of 16 pairs of decadal samples were extracted to alpha-cellulose for AMS 14C analysis using the ANTARES facility at ANSTO. The 14C results from Thailand follow the trend of the southern hemisphere, rather than that of the northern hemisphere. This is a surprising result, and we infer that atmospheric 14C for north-central Thailand, at 17 deg. N, was strongly influenced by the entrainment of southern hemisphere air parcels during the southwest Asian monsoon, when the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone moves to the north of our sampling site. Such atmospheric transport and mixing are therefore considered to be one of the principal mechanisms for regional 14C offsets

  10. First Direct Dating for the Construction and Modification of the Baphuon Temple Mountain in Angkor, Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Leroy

    Full Text Available Architecture represents key evidence of dynastic practice and change in the archaeological world. Chronologies for many important buildings and sequences, including the iconic temples of medieval Angkor in Cambodia, are based solely on indirect associations from inscriptions and architectural styles. The Baphuon temple, one of the last major buildings in Angkor without textual or scientifically-derived chronological evidence, is crucial both for the context and date of its construction and the period when its western façade was modified into a unique, gigantic Reclining Buddha. Its construction was part of a major dynastic change and florescence of the Hindu-Mahayana Buddhist state and the modification is the key evidence of Theravada Buddhist power after Angkor's decline in the 15th century. Using a newly-developed approach based on AMS radiocarbon dating to directly date four iron crampons integrated into the structure we present the first direct evidence for the history of the Baphuon. Comprehensive study of ferrous elements shows that both construction and modification were critically earlier than expected. The Baphuon can now be considered as the major temple associated with the imperial reformations and territorial consolidation of Suryavarman I (1010-1050 AD for whom no previous building to legitimize his reign could be identified. The Theravada Buddhist modification is a hundred years prior to the conventional 16th century estimation and is not associated with renewed use of Angkor. Instead it relates to the enigmatic Ayutthayan occupation of Angkor in the 1430s and 40s during a major period of climatic instability. Accurately dating iron with relatively low carbon content is a decisive step to test long-standing assumptions about architectural histories and political processes for states that incorporated iron into buildings (e.g., Ancient Greece, medieval India. Furthermore, this new approach has the potential to revise chronologies

  11. Radiocarbon method in environmental monitoring of CO{sub 2} emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z., E-mail: arakowski@leibniz.uni-kiel.de [Leibniz Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Isotope Research, University of Kiel, Max Eyth Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Radiocarbon Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Boleslawa Krzywoustego 2, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Nadeau, Marie-Josee [Leibniz Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Isotope Research, University of Kiel, Max Eyth Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Nakamura, Toshio [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa-ku, 64-8602 Nagoya (Japan); Pazdur, Anna; Pawelczyk, Slawomira; Piotrowska, Natalia [Radiocarbon Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Boleslawa Krzywoustego 2, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2013-01-15

    New results of carbon isotopic composition from tree rings have been analyzed. {Delta}{sup 14}C and {delta}{sup 13}C data, representing the isotopic composition of carbon in 'clean air', were obtained from annual rings of a pine tree (Pinus sylvestris) taken in the Niepolomice area, 25 km east Krakow, Poland. All samples were processed to extract {alpha}-cellulose, and the radiocarbon concentration in each annual ring was measured using AMS at University of Nagoya. Stable isotopic composition of carbon was determined using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The dataset covers the growth period between 1960 and 2003. The average difference between radiocarbon concentrations in Niepolomice and the North Hemisphere zone 1 (NH zone 1) for the period between 1960 and 1999 is 3.5 {+-} 1.6 Per-Mille-Sign . These data are compared with previously presented results from the city of Krakow, where a local decrease in {sup 14}C concentration was observed due to local CO{sub 2} emission from fossil fuel use. The differences in observed {sup 14}C concentrations were used to estimate a magnitude of the local Suess effect in Krakow. Based on mass balance equations for CO{sub 2}{sup 14}C concentrations, it was possible to calculate the CO{sub 2} concentration associated with fossil fuel emission (C{sub foss}) into the atmosphere. The highest values of C{sub foss} were recorded in the years 1986 (11.9 {+-} 1.4 ppm V) and 1983 (8.1 {+-} 1.3 ppm V), while the lowest value of 0.6 {+-} 1.8 ppm V was recorded in 2001.

  12. Radiocarbon dating of elk (Alces alces), an economic and symbolic resource in prehistory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    resource. We can never be certain of the precise meaning of the elk and what it symbolized for prehistoric peoples. Contrary to what one would expect, however, natural sciences could contribute to this discussion by elucidating the nutrition and behavior of the elk: aquatic plants can have very high......The European elk, “moose” in American English, was an important resource in the prehistory of Northern Europe. On some sites, it was the most important species in the economy. Furthermore, numerous examples of mobile and non-mobile art show the importance of the elk as a symbolic or ritualistic...... animal belonging to “two worlds”, the terrestrial and the aquatic....

  13. Radiocarbon dating reveals different past managements of adjacent forest soils in the Campine region, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiti, T.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Janssens, I. A.; Certini, G.; Yuste, J. Curiel; Sirignano, C.

    2009-01-01

    The soils of adjacent first generation monospecific stands of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) in the Campine region, Belgium, apparently developed under the same forming factors, were studied for carbon dynamics to disentangle eventual different past land uses

  14. Dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating of conifer trees and buried logs from the Stanley River, Tasmania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, E. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Tree-Ring Lab; Barbetti, M.; Taylor, G.; Yu, Z.; Thompson, B.; Weeks, L. [Sydney Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia). The NWG Macintosh Centre for Quaternary Dating; Buckley, B. [Tasmania Univ., Sandy Bay, TAS (Australia). Inst of Antarctic and Southern Ocean Studies

    1997-12-31

    Full text: Dendrochronological studies are being carried out on two endemic conifer species in the Stanley River area of western Tasmania. Living trees are growing along the river banks, adjacent floodplain areas, and occasionally on the lower hill-slopes. Many ancient logs are exposed in the bed and banks of the river, and several major excavations have been carried out in floodplain sediments up to a hundred metres distant from the present river channel. A tree-ring chronology for Huon pine (Lagarostrobos franklinii) now extends from the present back to 571 BC. This chronology has been constructed using cores from living trees (up to 1400 years old), sections from trees felled during logging operations in the early 1980s, and sections from subfossil logs in the river banks and floodplain sediments. Living celery-top pine (Phyllocladus aspleniifolius) trees are up to 500 years old, and a short chronology is being developed for this species as well. Large excavations have been carried out over several years in floodplain sediments, and sections have now been taken from a total of 350 subfossil logs. Both Huon and celery-top pine are represented in the collection. They range in age from >38 ka to modern, with good coverage for the periods 9-3.5 ka and from 2.5 ka to the present. A floating tree-ring chronology for Huon pine has been established for the period ca. 7200-3500 cal BP, and is gradually being augmented. In the collection of about 350 ancient conifer logs from the Stanley River, about 150 currently have known ages while the remaining 200 have yet to be studied. Most of them have ages less than 9000 cal BP, but about 10% of them are older. Four of them are more than 30,000 years old, and may be Last Interglacial in age. Nine of them are known to be between 18,000 and 10,000 years old, and six are between 10,000 and 9,000 years old. Our augmented collection has become an increasingly important archive for further tree-ring and carbon isotope studies. Paper no. 35; 1 fig.

  15. Water dating in groundwater resources management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely accepted that groundwater dating by tritium or radiocarbon can give valuable data on the groundwater age and, as a consequence, can provide information on the age structure and dynamics of the groundwater bodies. The question is: can they and to what extend can they give us a key to decide on the future dynamics on the man-impacted groundwater bodies? The three examples presented below attempt to demonstrate that the benefits and results can be gained from its use do not so much depend on the tool itself but on the art of using that tool

  16. Geographic and temporal trends in proboscidean and human radiocarbon histories during the late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugan, Andrew; Byers, David

    2007-12-01

    The causes of large animal extinctions at the end of the Pleistocene remain a hotly debated topic focused primarily on the effects of human over hunting and climate change. Here we examine multiple, large radiocarbon data sets for humans and extinct proboscideans and explore how variation in their temporal and geographic distributions were related prior to proboscidean extinction. These data include 4532 archaeological determinations from Europe and Siberia and 1177 mammoth and mastodont determinations from Europe, Siberia, and North America. All span the period from 45,000 to 12,000 calendar years BP. We show that while the geographic ranges of dated human occupations and proboscidean remains overlap across the terminal Pleistocene of the Old World, the two groups remain largely segregated and increases in the frequency of human occupations do not coincide with declines in proboscidean remains. Prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; ca 21,000 years BP), archaeological 14C determinations increase slightly in frequency worldwide while the frequency of dated proboscidean remains varies depending on taxon and location. After the LGM, both sympatric and allopatric groups of humans and proboscideans increase sharply as climatic conditions ameliorate. Post-LGM radiocarbon frequencies among proboscideans peak at different times, also depending upon taxon and location. Woolly mammoths in Beringia reach a maximum and then decline beginning between 16,000 and 15,500 years BP, woolly mammoths in Europe and Siberia ca 14,500 and 13,500 BP, and Columbian mammoth and American mastodont only after 13,000 BP. Declines among woolly mammoths appear to coincide with the restructuring of biotic communities following the Pleistocene-Holocene transition.

  17. AMS Data Analysis Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malchow, Russell L. [National Security Technologies, LLC

    2015-04-20

    This presentation discusses standard techniques and processes used for radiation mapping (RM) via an AMS, Aerial Measurement System. The advantages and shortcomings of standard AMS-based RM are presented, along with some suggested areas for improvement. Issues touched on include what gets counted, data quality, background correction, data processing, altitude correction, isotope extraction, contouring, and time shift.

  18. A new AMS facility in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solís, C., E-mail: corina@fisica.unam.mx; Chávez-Lomelí, E.; Ortiz, M.E.; Huerta, A.; Andrade, E.; Barrios, E.

    2014-07-15

    A new Accelerator Mass Spectrometry system has been installed at the Institute of Physics of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). A sample preparation chemistry laboratory equipped with computer controlled graphitization equipment (AGEIII) has also been established. Together both facilities constitute the LEMA (Laboratorio de Espectrometría de Masas con Aceleradores) first of its kind in Mexico. High sensitivity characterization of the concentration in a sample of {sup 14}C as well as {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 129}I and Pu are now possible. Since the demand for {sup 14}C dating is far more abundant, a data analysis program was developed in the cross-platform programming language Python in order to calculate radiocarbon age. Results from installation, acceptance tests and the first results of {sup 14}C analyses of reference materials prepared in our own facility are presented.

  19. A new AMS facility in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís, C.; Chávez-Lomelí, E.; Ortiz, M. E.; Huerta, A.; Andrade, E.; Barrios, E.

    2014-07-01

    A new Accelerator Mass Spectrometry system has been installed at the Institute of Physics of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). A sample preparation chemistry laboratory equipped with computer controlled graphitization equipment (AGEIII) has also been established. Together both facilities constitute the LEMA (Laboratorio de Espectrometría de Masas con Aceleradores) first of its kind in Mexico. High sensitivity characterization of the concentration in a sample of 14C as well as 10Be, 26Al, 129I and Pu are now possible. Since the demand for 14C dating is far more abundant, a data analysis program was developed in the cross-platform programming language Python in order to calculate radiocarbon age. Results from installation, acceptance tests and the first results of 14C analyses of reference materials prepared in our own facility are presented.

  20. Who Am I?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇福燕

    2006-01-01

    Hello, boys and girls. We all know summer is coming and days become long and nights become short. It’ssohot!Comeon, baby! I can make you cool. I am white. I am sweet, cool and soft. I live in a colorful paper box. I’m made from milk, chocolate and water. Many children like me very much. But if you eat too much, you will have got a stomachache(肚子疼). Guess! Who am I? Yes, you are very clever. I am an ice cream.★指导老师: 施俊亚 难度系数: ☆☆☆☆Who Am I?$海门实验学校小学部五(1)班@仇福燕

  1. Dating the Little Ice Age Advance of Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland, Using Pro-glacial Lake Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, H. A.; Briner, J. P.; Csatho, B. M.

    2009-05-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet's (GIS) largest and fastest outlet glacier, Jakobshavn Isbrae, is one of the most significant contributors to GIS mass loss, draining an estimated 6.5% of the GIS area (Rignot and Kanagaratnam, 2006). Jakobshavn Isbrae has retreated significantly since the Little Ice Age (LIA, ca. 1250- 1900; Csatho et al., 2008), and continues to exhibit rapid changes in velocity and ice calving front position (Joughin et al., 2004). However, it is unknown for how long Jakobshavn Isbrae was at or near its extensive LIA position because there is a lack of chronological control on the LIA advance phase. We collected sediment cores from lakes just beyond the LIA margin to constrain the time when the advancing glacier's silt-laden meltwater entered the lake basins. Sediment cores from South Oval and Ice Boom lakes (informal names), which no longer receive glacial meltwater from Jakobshavn Isbrae because it has retreated out of their catchments, contain gyttja/glacial-silt/gyttja sequences that represent their non-glacial/pro-glacial/non-glacial histories. One additional site, ice-dammed Lake Morten (informal name), completely drained sometime between 1985 and 2001 AD. Outcrops of laminated sediments in the lake basin overly an intact tundra landscape. Four AMS radiocarbon dates from macrofossils immediately below the LIA sediments from the three lake basins reveal that Jakobshavn Isbrae reached its LIA maximum extent between 530±10 and 370±60 cal yr BP (1400-1640 AD). Furthermore, the continuous nature of the LIA-sediment units in all sites indicates that Jakobshavn Isbrae remained at or near its LIA maximum position between 1400-1640 AD and into the 20th century. Finally, pre-LIA organic-rich sediments at all sites continue uninterrupted down to basal sediments deposited during regional deglaciation in the Early Holocene. AMS radiocarbon ages on macrofossils from basal sediments at all sites range from 7220±40 to 8130±60 cal yr BP. We therefore interpret

  2. Radiometric Dating of tephras from Pre-caldera and Caldera-forming stages, Towada volcano, Northeast Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towada volcano is an active volcano located in the northern part of the Northeast Japan arc. We carried out fission-track (FT) and AMS radiocarbon (14C) dating of tephras from Towada and Hakkoda volcanoes to establish a detailed eruptive history during the Pre-caldera and Caldera-forming stages of Towada volcano. The obtained FT ages were 0.23 ± 0.05 Ma for Shirobeta tephra (WP), 0.19 ± 0.05 Ma for T-6 tephra, 0.08 ± 0.03 Ma for Zarame 1 tephra (ZP1), and 0.09 ± 0.03 Ma for Okuse Pyroclastic Flow Deposits. Although these FT ages are consistent with stratigraphy, they have large error ranges of several tens of thousands of years. Therefore, further examinations including application of other chronological dating methods are necessary to obtain more precise estimates of the eruptive age of these tephras. The obtained 14C age was 17,730 ± 70 BP for Biscuit 2 tephra (BP2). Based on stratigraphical consistency, this 14C age is appropriate for the eruptive age of BP2. (author)

  3. AMS ready for launch

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    On 29 April, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) will complete its long expedition to the International Space Station on board the space shuttle Endeavour. The Endeavour is set to lift off from NASA’s Kennedy Space Station at 15:47 EST (21:47 CET).   Samuel Ting, principal investigator for the AMS project, and Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General, visit the Kennedy Space Centre before the AMS launch.  Courtesy of NASA and Kennedy Space Center. AMS is a CERN recognised experiment, created by an internal collaboration of 56 institutes. It will be the first large magnetic spectrometer to be used in space, and has been designed to function as an external module on the ISS. AMS will measure cosmic rays without atmospheric interference, allowing researchers on the ground to continue their search for dark matter and antimatter in the Universe. Data collected by AMS will be analysed in CERN’s new AMS Control Centre in Building 946 (due for completion in June 2011). The End...

  4. Online coupling of pure O2 thermo-optical methods - 14C AMS for source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrios, Konstantinos; Salazar, Gary; Zhang, Yan-Lin; Uglietti, Chiara; Battaglia, Michael; Luginbühl, Marc; Ciobanu, Viorela Gabriela; Vonwiller, Matthias; Szidat, Sönke

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports on novel separation methods developed for the direct determination of 14C in organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), two sub-fractions of total carbon (TC) of atmospheric air particulate matter. Until recently, separation of OC and EC has been performed off-line by manual and time-consuming techniques that relied on the collection of massive CO2 fractions. We present here two on-line hyphenated techniques between a Sunset OC/EC analyzer and a MICADAS (MIni radioCArbon DAting System) accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) equipped with a gas ion source. The first implementation facilitates the direct measurement in the low sample size range (<10 μg C) with high throughput on a routine basis, while the second explores the potential for a continuous-flow real-time CO2 gas feed into the ion source. The performance achieved with reference materials and real atmospheric samples will be discussed to draw conclusions on the improvement offered in the field of 14C aerosol source apportionment.

  5. AMS-02 Antiprotons Reloaded

    CERN Document Server

    Kappl, Rolf; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The AMS-02 collaboration has released preliminary data on the antiproton fraction in cosmic rays. The surprisingly hard antiproton spectrum at high rigidity has triggered speculations about a possible primary antiproton component originating from dark matter annihilations. In this note, we employ newly available AMS-02 boron to carbon data to update the secondary antiproton flux within the standard two-zone diffusion model. The new background permits a considerably better fit to the measured antiproton fraction compared to previous estimates. This is mainly a consequence of the smaller slope of the diffusion coefficient favored by the new AMS-02 boron to carbon data.

  6. AMS analyses at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, E.M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Physics Division

    1998-03-01

    The major use of ANTARES is Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) with {sup 14}C being the most commonly analysed radioisotope - presently about 35 % of the available beam time on ANTARES is used for {sup 14}C measurements. The accelerator measurements are supported by, and dependent on, a strong sample preparation section. The ANTARES AMS facility supports a wide range of investigations into fields such as global climate change, ice cores, oceanography, dendrochronology, anthropology, and classical and Australian archaeology. Described here are some examples of the ways in which AMS has been applied to support research into the archaeology, prehistory and culture of this continent`s indigenous Aboriginal peoples. (author)

  7. Vertebral Bomb Radiocarbon Suggests Extreme Longevity in White Sharks

    OpenAIRE

    Li Ling Hamady; Natanson, Lisa J.; Skomal, Gregory B.; Simon R Thorrold

    2013-01-01

    Conservation and management efforts for white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) remain hampered by a lack of basic demographic information including age and growth rates. Sharks are typically aged by counting growth bands sequentially deposited in their vertebrae, but the assumption of annual deposition of these band pairs requires testing. We compared radiocarbon (Δ(14)C) values in vertebrae from four female and four male white sharks from the northwestern Atlantic Ocean (NWA) with reference c...

  8. Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

    2008-08-15

    Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

  9. Dating North European mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius Blum.): a nearly continuous record from 53 ka to 11 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukkonen, P.; Aaris-Sørensen, K.; Arppe, L.; Clark, P. U.; Daugnora, L.; Lister, A.; Lõugas, L.; Seppä, H. A.; Stuart, A. J.; Wojtal, P.; Zupins, I.

    2010-05-01

    Remains of the woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius Blumenbach) are found all over Eurasia except in mountainous areas of Scandinavia and in western Iberian Peninsula. In the core area of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet, they are the only group of animal remains to have survived until today in abundant numbers, and so are an important source of information about the past fauna, their environment, and the climate. Our data include mammoth remains found in Sweden, Denmark, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia and Finland. Mammoth finds from northern Germany are not included in this study, but some dates have been published elsewhere. We lack data from northern Poland, but we include finds from southern Poland, approximately 500 km directly south of the main study area, as a point of comparison. Approximately 300 localities with mammoth molars, tusks and bones are known from the study area. Most of the finds (90%) are isolated skeletal elements. In marginal areas of the SIS, in Denmark and Lithuania, associated elements are also found together at some localities, but whole or partial skeletons are found only in southern Poland. The mammoth data were collected by the authors from published papers and reports as well as by direct survey of museum collections. A total of 104 radiocarbon dates were documented: 78 from the circum-Baltic area and 26 from southern Poland. From the dates, 73 were previously published by the authors, and eight by other researchers. A total of 23 dates are new. Most of the specimens (93) were dated using AMS, and 11 using conventional radiocarbon dating. Finite dates were calibrated using the download version of CalPal-2007 (Weninger et al., 2008) with calibration data set CalPal-2007Hulu (Weninger and Jöris, 2007). The spatio-temporal distribution of mammoth remains around the Baltic Sea suggests that the species was widely spread in north-eastern Europe during ice-free intervals of the Weichselian glaciation. Mammoths were present in north-eastern Europe

  10. Why Am I Dizzy?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Video: "Why Am I Dizzy?" A few of the more common balance orders that affect older adults ... disease, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, or BPPV. Video excerpts courtesy of Johns Hopkins Center for Hearing ...

  11. Elements in biological AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) provides high detection sensitivity for isotopes whose half-lives are between 10 years and 100 million years. 14C is the most developed of such isotopes and is used in tracing natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the Earth's biosphere. Thirty-three elements in the main periodic table and 17 lanthanides or actinides have long lived isotopes, providing potential tracers for research in elemental biochemistry. Overlap of biologically interesting heavy elements and possible AMS tracers is discussed

  12. Radiocarbon measurements by liquid scintillation spectrometry at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiocarbon measurements by two QuantulusTM ultra low level liquid scintillation spectrometers were performed at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (National Institute for Nuclear Physics) and the Radiocarbon Laboratory of ENEA-Bologna to study the efficiency and background variations related to measurements sites. For the background, two sets of three Teflon vials with benzene volumes ranging form 1 ml to 5 ml filled with pure analytical benzene were used. For the modern standards two sets of three Teflon vials with the same benzene volumes filled with pure analytical benzene enriched with radiocarbon to give the same activity as the standard sucrose ANU (sucrose ANU/modern=1.0866) were used. The scintillation cocktail comprised 15 mg butyl-PBD/ml benzene [1]. For each of these standards, spectra were obtained for 40 one-hour periods [2]. Cylindrical Teflon-S vials designed by ISTA Ltd (Faenza, Italy) with Derlin cap sealed with epoxy resin have been used. The vials characteristics are: height of 50 mm, external diameter 27 mm, thickness of the bottom Teflon base 12 mm, capacity of 9 ml. Cosmic background and its variation have been removed in Gran Sasso National Laboratory by its 1400 m rock overburden. Stable high performance liquid scintillation counting conditions are obtained, when any remaining variable components of the environmental background, such as radon, are eliminated. Ultra low level liquid scintillation spectrometer QuantulusTM has an anti-Compton guard detector, which allows monitoring of gamma radiation in the background. Guard detector efficiency in 14C background reduction is 8% in Gran Sasso National Laboratory while 80% is observed on surface. The big difference in the guard detector efficiency between surface and Gran Sasso laboratories is related to the absence of cosmic and associated lower energy Compton radiation. Masked vials approach same zero volume background on surface as an unmasked vial in Gran Sasso National Laboratory

  13. AMS in Phytonutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueker, S R; Buchholz, B A

    2003-08-26

    As public interest in phytonutrition continues to increase, the result will be an augmented demand for extensive phytochemical research. The fact that foods are inherently phytochemically complex dictates a need to apply scientific techniques, which can detect synergistic interaction among the many active principles and adjuvant substances in the plant, and furthermore, modify the activities of these components. As illustrated by the experiments discussed in this presentation, the advantages of AMS are unique and extensive. These advantages are best summarized by Dr. John Vogel, an originator of biological AMS experimentation: ''AMS brings (at least) three advantages to biochemical tracing: high sensitivity for finding low probability events or for use of physiologic-sized doses; small sample sizes for painless biopsies or highly specific biochemical separations; and reduction of overall radioisotope exposures, inventories, and waste streams.'' AMS opens the door to increased phytochemical tracing in humans to obtain biochemical data concerning human health at dietary relevant levels of exposure. AMS, thus, obviates the need for uncertain extrapolations from animal models, which express marginal relevance to human metabolism. The unparalleled capabilities and benefits of AMS will undoubtedly establish this particular MS technique as an important analytical tool in phytochemical research.

  14. Isolation of individual fatty acids in sediments using preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) for radiocarbon analysis at NIES-TERRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) of individual fatty acids (140-1190 μg C) in an estuarine sediment sample collected from Tokyo Bay was carried out using a recently developed preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) system and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The results showed that the estimated 14C ages of four components greatly varied from modern age (combined iso and anteiso C15:0, C16:0) to 17 000 years BP (C22:0), while a bulk-phase 14C age of organic matter is 5000 years BP. The 14C ages of the fatty acids derived from phytoplankton and bacteria are much younger than that of the bulk phase. On the other hand, the fatty acid originated from terrestrial higher plants (C22:0) shows an older 14C age of 17 000 years BP

  15. 78 FR 61446 - Fourteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat AMS(R)S

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Fourteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat AMS(R)S AGENCY... RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat AMS(R)S. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of the fourteenth meeting of the RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat AMS(R)S DATES: The...

  16. 78 FR 8684 - Twelfth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat AMS(R)S

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Twelfth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat AMS(R)S AGENCY... RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat AMS(R)S. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of the twelfth meeting of the RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat AMS(R)S. DATES: The...

  17. AMS-02 in Space: Physics Results

    CERN Document Server

    Tomassetti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a particle physics experiment designed to study origin and nature of Galactic Cosmic Rays (CRs) up to TeV energies from space. With its high sensitivity, long exposure and excellent identification capabilities, AMS is conducting a unique mission of fundamental physics research in space. To date, more than 60 billion CR events have been collected by AMS. The new results on CR leptons and the analysis and light-nuclei are presented and discussed. The new leptonic data indicate the existence of new sources of high-energy CR leptons, that may arise either by dark-matter particles annihilation or by nearby astrophysical sources of $e^{\\pm}$ pairs. Future data at higher energies and forthcoming measurements on the antiproton spectrum and the boron-to-carbon ratio will be crucial in providing the discrimination among the different scenario.

  18. AMS 14C performance test of a new automated bone preparation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Bone is one of the most complex sample materials for radiocarbon dating. After burial, its physical state and chemical composition can be affected by many environmental processes. In case of our new AMS bone preparation technique, after ultrasonication in distilled water, drying, surface cleaning and grinding, the sample is sieved to get the appropriate sized sample fraction (0.5 - 1 mm) out of which 500 - 1000 mg is measured, depending on the state of the bone. We have developed our own continuous flow bone sample preparation equipment. In this unit OMNIFITTM columns are used as flow cells to construct our own automatic ABA (acid-base-acid) cleaning system. From 3 types of reagent, each one is injected via a 4 way valve and inert plastic tubing to an IsmatechTM IPC 12 channel peristaltic pump to ensure a constant flow rate. Reagents are selectively pumped to the reaction cells containing the powdered bone samples, with a sequence of 0.5 M HCl and 0.1 M NaOH solution, interspersed with flushing with distilled water. During the sixteen-hour-long process, reagents follow a well-defined sequence that is controlled by a computer program and a special electronic driver device. The cleaned sample is inserted into a test tube containing 5 ml, pH 3 aqueous solutions, and it is placed into a heating block at 75 deg C for 24 hours. Dissolved collagen is filtered via a 45 μm glass fibre filter (WhatmanTM AUTOVIAL 5) into a clean vial, and after freezing, it gets freeze-dried, a process which takes at least a day. To investigate the sample-preparation reproducibility and possible extra contamination effect by an optional ultra-filtration process a known-age bone sample, previously dated by an independent method (GPC at HEKAL), was prepared several times using the new AMS preparation line for 14C analyses. The results obtained (Figure 1.) showed very good reproducibility and excellent agreement with the classical GPC measured 14C age in

  19. Extension of the Southern Hemisphere Atmospheric Radiocarbon Curve, 2120-850 years BP: Results from Tasmanian Huon Pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, S R; P.Guilderson, T; Buckley, B M; Cook, E

    2010-02-12

    Decadal samples of dendrochronologically-dated pine (Lagorostrobos franklinii) from the Stanley River basin, Tasmania have been radiocarbon dated between 2120-850 yr BP. This data set overlaps and extends the current Southern Hemisphere record, which currently covers the period 110-995 yr BP. There is good agreement between the two records between 995-850 yr BP, between sample replicates and with consensus values for standards. As in the younger dataset, we find evidence for a distinct but variable offset between the southern hemisphere data and IntCal04; although this is likely due to real temporal variability in the interhemispheric offset, further work is planned to rule out possible laboratory or sample preparation differences.

  20. ARCHAEOMAGNETIC DATING OF THE ERUPTION OF XITLE VOLCANO, BASIN OF MEXICO: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MESOAMERICAN CENTERS OF CUICUILCO AND TEOTIHUACAN (Datación arqueomagnética de la erupción del volcán Xitle, cuenca de México: implicaciones para los centros mesoamericanos de Cuicuilco y Teotihuacan)

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime Urrutia-Fucugauchi; Avto Goguitchaichvili; Ligia Pérez-Cruz; Juan Morales

    2016-01-01

    The Cuicuilco archaeological site in southern Basin of Mexico is covered by lava flows from the Xitle volcano. Dating the Xitle eruption and Cuicuilco abandonment has long been attempted. Contrasting results with radiocarbon dates around 2000 and 1670 yr BP have been reported, with implications for the development of the Mesoamerican centers of Cuicuilco and Teotihuacan. Here, we analyze radiocarbon dates and paleomagnetic data for the Xitle lava flows. New age estimates for the eruption are ...

  1. Kimberley rock art dating project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The art's additional value, unequalled by traditionally recognised artefacts, is its permanent pictorial documentation presenting a 'window' into the otherwise intangible elements of perceptions, vision and mind of pre-historic cultures. Unfortunately it's potential in establishing Kimberley archaeological 'big picture' still remains largely unrecognised. Some of findings of the Kimberley Rock Art Dating Project, using AMS and optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating techniques, are outlined. It is estimated that these findings will encourage involvement by a greater diversity of specialist disciplines to tie findings into levels of this art sequence as a primary reference point. The sequence represents a sound basis for selecting specific defined images for targeting detailed studies by a range of dating technique. This effectively removes the undesirable ad hoc sampling of 'apparently old paintings'; a process which must unavoidably remain the case with researchers working on most global bodies of rock art

  2. Can UK fossil fuel emissions be determined by radiocarbon measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Angelina; O'Doherty, Simon; Rigby, Matthew; Manning, Alistair; Palmer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The GAUGE project evaluates different methods to estimate UK emissions. However, estimating carbon dioxide emissions as a result of fossil fuel burning is challenging as natural fluxes in and out of the atmosphere are very large. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements offer a way to specifically measure the amount of recently added carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning. This is possible as, due to their age, all the radiocarbon in fossil fuels has decayed. Hence the amount of recently added CO2 from fossil fuel burning can be measured as a depletion of the 14C content in air. While this method has been successfully applied by several groups on a city or a regional scale, this is the first attempt at using the technique for a national emission estimate. Geographically the UK, being an island, is a good location for such an experiment. But are 14CO2 measurements the ideal solution for estimating fossil fuel emissions as they are heralded to be? Previous studies have shown that 14CO2emissions from the nuclear industry mask the 14C depletion caused by fossil fuel burning and result in an underestimation of the fossil fuel CO2. While this might not be a problem in certain regions around the world, many countries like the UK have a substantial nuclear industry. A correction for this enhancement from the nuclear industry can be applied but are invariably difficult as 14CO2emissions from nuclear power plants have a high temporal variability. We will explain how our sampling strategy was chosen to minimize the influence form the nuclear industry and why this proved to be challenging. In addition we present the results from our ground based measurements to show why trying to estimate national emissions using radiocarbon measurements was overambitious, and how practical the technique is for the UK in general.

  3. IA, I AM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Timme Bisgaard; Mørk, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Hvad er informationsarkitektur? Mørk & Munk gennemgår de forskellige metaforiske konstruktioner af begrebet og kommer med deres helt egen selvstændige definition. Informationsarkitektur er en samtale, strukturation, en klassifikationskamp og et konceptuelt blend. Læs hvorfor i dette working paper...... om et af de meste centrale begreber videnssamfundet. For nu er vi alle informationsarkitekter: IA, I AM....

  4. Marine radiocarbon reservoir age simulations for the past 50000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzin, Martin; Köhler, Peter; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    We present simulations of marine radiocarbon reservoir ages using the ocean general circulation model LSG-HAMOCC2s, and evaluate the results with Marine13 raw data records. Our model considers various climatic background states. Radiocarbon cycle boundary conditions are atmospheric Δ14C values according to IntCal13, a recent atmospheric CO2 reconstruction, and spatially variable concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon derived from marine carbon cycle simulations. Our model reasonably agrees with glacial marine Δ14C records but indicates reservoir ages varying with time, different to the invariant reservoir age corrections applied to the observations and to Marine13. Modelled global-mean reservoir ages are in the range 400-800 years compared to the invariant Marine13 value of 405 years. Self-consistent simulations involving the Cariaco Basin record (which is the most continuous marine record contributing to IntCal13 for periods prior to about 30 kyears) amplify the temporal reservoir age variability with global-mean values of about 350-850 years, and improve the agreement with Δ14C observations in some areas.

  5. Measurements and modeling of contemporary radiocarbon in the stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanu, A. M.; Comfort, L. L.; Guilderson, T. P.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Bergmann, D. J.; Atlas, E. L.; Schauffler, S.; Boering, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of the 14C content of carbon dioxide in air collected by high-altitude balloon flights in 2003-2005 reveal the contemporary radiocarbon distribution in the northern midlatitude stratosphere, four decades after the Limited Test Ban Treaty restricted atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. Comparisons with results from a 3-D chemical-transport model show that the 14CO2 distribution is now largely governed by the altitude/latitude dependence of the natural cosmogenic production rate, stratospheric transport, and propagation into the stratosphere of the decreasing radiocarbon trend in tropospheric CO2 due to fossil fuel combustion. From the observed correlation of 14CO2 with N2O mixing ratios, an annual global mean net flux of 14CO2 to the troposphere of 1.6(±0.4) × 1017‰ mol CO2 yr-1 and a global production rate of 2.2(±0.6) × 1026 atoms 14C yr-1 are empirically derived. The results also indicate that contemporary 14CO2 observations provide highly sensitive diagnostics for stratospheric transport and residence times in models.

  6. An Alluvial Surface Chronology Based on Cosmogenic 36Cl Dating, Ajo Mountains (Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument), Southern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Beiling; Phillips, Fred M.; Pohl, Molly M.; Sharma, Pankaj

    1996-01-01

    A chronology of alluvial surfaces on piedmont slopes below the western Ajo Mountains, southern Arizona, has been obtained using cosmogenic 36Cl accumulation and AMS radiocarbon dating. The apparent 36Cl ages of individual boulders range from 520,000 to 13,000 yr, and the 14C ages of organic material in the two young terraces are 2750-2350 and 17,800 cal yr B.P. The sequence of 36Cl ages is consistent with the apparent stratigraphic order, but groupings of similar ages for different surfaces appear to result from repeated reworking of older surfaces associated with the deposition of younger ones. The youngest surface gave a distribution of 36Cl ages about 30,000 yr older than the 14C and soil ages; however, this distribution had 36Cl ages that overlapped with 36Cl ages from active channels and hillslopes. We attribute the older-than-expected exposure ages of sampled boulders to inheritance of 36Cl while residing near the surface during very slow erosion on the mountain front. Our results show that although cosmogenic nuclide accumulation can help establish chronologies for surfaces in piedmont settings, care must be used in evaluating the effects of complex exposure histories.

  7. Dating mortars: three medieval Spanish architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirós Castillo, Juan Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the major issues in building archaeology is finding the age of elements and structures discovered. Mortars represent a class of material basically constituted by a mixture of different phases (i.e. binder, aggregates, water and are widely used for constructive uses and artworks. Current scientific literature regarding the possibility of accurate radiocarbon dating for mortars reports different and still contradictory results. In this study, a new protocol for radiocarbon dating of mortar developed at the Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE is used to perform 14C measurements on archaeological mortars coming from three medieval architectures of northern Spain (two churches and the walls of a castle. Results observed will be discussed and compared with independent age estimations (i.e. radiocarbon dating performed on organic materials found in the same study site, archaeological analyses in order to frame experimental observations in the actual site knowledge by means of a multidisciplinary approach.Una de las principales problemáticas a las que se enfrenta la arqueología de la arquitectura es datar los elementos y las estructuras. Las argamasas son un tipo de material constituido por una mezcla de diferentes elementos (agregados, agua y empleadas en muchos tipos de construcciones. Los estudios realizados hasta la actualidad en torno a la posibilidad de realizar dataciones radiocarbónicas precisas han proporcionado resultados contradictorios. El objetivo de este artículo es el de presentar un nuevo protocolo para datar la arquitectura histórica desarrollado por el Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Enviromental Heritage (CIRCE, basado en la realización de dataciones radiocarbónicas de argamasas a partir del análisis de tres arquitecturas medievales del norte del España, dos iglesias y la muralla de un castillo. Los resultados obtenidos han sido confrontados y comparados con otros

  8. Synchronizing the Greenland ice core and radiocarbon timescales over the Holocene – Bayesian wiggle-matching of cosmogenic radionuclide records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Adolphi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of past climate dynamics rely on accurate and precise chronologies of the employed climate reconstructions. The radiocarbon dating calibration curve (IntCal13 and the Greenland ice core chronology (GICC05 represent two of the most widely used chronological frameworks in paleoclimatology of the past ∼ 50 000 years. However, comparisons of climate records anchored on these chronologies are hampered by the precision and accuracy of both timescales. Here we use common variations in the production rates of 14C and 10Be recorded in tree-rings and ice cores, respectively, to assess the differences between both timescales during the Holocene. We employ a novel statistical approach which leads to strongly reduced and yet, more robust, uncertainty estimates in comparison to earlier work. We demonstrate that the inferred timescale differences are robust independent of (i the applied ice core 10Be records, (ii assumptions of the mode of 10Be deposition, as well as (iii carbon cycle effects on 14C, and in agreement with independent estimates of the timescale differences. Our results imply that the GICC05 counting error is likely underestimated during the most recent 2000 years leading to a dating bias that propagates throughout large parts of the Holocene. Nevertheless, our analysis indicates that the GICC05 counting error is generally a robust uncertainty measurement but care has to be taken when treating it as a nearly Gaussian error distribution. The proposed IntCal13-GICC05 transfer function facilitates the comparison of ice core and radiocarbon dated paleoclimate records at high chronological precision.

  9. Microstructural evolution and Am migration behaviour in Am-containing fuels at the initial stage of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the effect of americium addition to MOX fuels on the irradiation behaviour, the 'Am-1' programme is being conducted in JAEA. The Am-1 programme consists of two short-term irradiation tests of 10-minute and 24-hour irradiations and a steady-state irradiation test. The short-term irradiation tests were successfully completed and the post-irradiation examinations (PIE) are in progress. The PIE for Am-containing MOX fuels focused on the microstructural evolution and redistribution behaviour of Am at the initial stage of irradiation and the results to date are reported. The successful development of fabrication technology with remote handling and the evaluation of thermo-chemical properties based on the out-of-pile experiments are described with an emphasis on the effects of Am addition on the MOX fuel properties. (authors)

  10. Villenarchitektur am Semmering

    OpenAIRE

    Buchinger, G. (Günther)

    2006-01-01

    Das vorgelegte Werk ist als zweiter - unabhängiger - Band einer zweiteiligen Publikation verfasst worden, die sich mit den kulturhistorischen und architekturgeschichtlichen Aspekten der Hotel- und Villenbauten am Semmering im südlichen Niederösterreich beschäftigt. Die Arbeit ist das Ergebnis eines einjährigen, vom FWF geförderten Forschungsprojektes (Nr. P 13959), das unter der verantwortlichen wissenschaftlichen Leitung des Antragstellers (Univ.-Prof. Dr. Mario Schwarz) gestanden ist. Der f...

  11. Carbon 14 dating method; Methode de datation par le carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, Ph

    2000-07-01

    This document gives a first introduction to {sup 14}C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the {sup 14}C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of {sup 14}C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  12. Forensic applications of 14C bomb-pulse dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a brief review of the basics of 14C bomb-pulse dating, this paper presents two unique forensic applications. Particular attention is dedicated to the use of the 14C bomb-pulse to establish the time of harvest of illicit drugs such as heroin and opium. Preliminary measurements of 14C concentrations in milligram samples taken from seized drugs are presented. 14C bomb-pulse dating can determine whether drug distribution originates from stockpiles or recent manufacture, and support the action of law enforcement authorities against criminal organisations involved in drug trafficking. In addition, we describe the dating of wine vintages for a number of authenticated single label vintage red wines from the Barossa Valley - South Australia. Our results show that radiocarbon dating can be used to accurately determine wine vintages and therefore reveal the addition of unrelated materials of natural and synthetic origin

  13. Forensic applications of {sup 14}C bomb-pulse dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoppi, U. E-mail: ugo@ansto.gov.au; Skopec, Z.; Skopec, J.; Jones, G.; Fink, D.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.; Tuniz, C.; Williams, A

    2004-08-01

    After a brief review of the basics of {sup 14}C bomb-pulse dating, this paper presents two unique forensic applications. Particular attention is dedicated to the use of the {sup 14}C bomb-pulse to establish the time of harvest of illicit drugs such as heroin and opium. Preliminary measurements of {sup 14}C concentrations in milligram samples taken from seized drugs are presented. {sup 14}C bomb-pulse dating can determine whether drug distribution originates from stockpiles or recent manufacture, and support the action of law enforcement authorities against criminal organisations involved in drug trafficking. In addition, we describe the dating of wine vintages for a number of authenticated single label vintage red wines from the Barossa Valley - South Australia. Our results show that radiocarbon dating can be used to accurately determine wine vintages and therefore reveal the addition of unrelated materials of natural and synthetic origin.

  14. BCal: an on-line Bayesian radiocarbon calibration tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin E. Buck

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe newly launched software for on-line Bayesian calibration of archaeological radiocarbon determinations. The software is known as BCal and we invite members of the world-wide archaeological research community to use it should they so wish. All that is required to gain access to the software is a computer connected to the Internet with a modern World-wide Web browser (of the sort you are probably using to read this. BCal does not require access to any additional 'Plug-ins' on your machine. Since the computations needed to obtain the calibrations are undertaken on the BCal server, if you have enough computer power to run your World-wide Web browser you have enough power to use BCal.

  15. Compound-specific radiocarbon analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments from an urban reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanke, Hirohide; Uchida, Masao E-mail: uchidama@jamstec.go.jp; Okuda, Tomoaki; Yoneda, Minoru; Takada, Hideshige; Shibata, Yasuyuki; Morita, Masatoshi

    2004-08-01

    A quantitative apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) derived from fossil fuel combustion ({sup 14}C-free) and biomass burning (contemporary {sup 14}C) was carried out using a recently developed compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) method for a sediment core from an urban reservoir located in the central Tokyo metropolitan area, Japan. The {sup 14}C abundance of PAHs in the sediments was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) after extraction and purification by three types of column chromatography, by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and, subsequently, by a preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) system. This method yielded a sufficient quantity of pure compounds and allowed a high degree of confidence in the determination of {sup 14}C. The fraction modern values (f{sub M}) of individual PAHs (phenanthrene, alkylphenanthrenes, fluoranthene, pyrene and benz[a]anthracene) in the sediments ranged from 0.06 to 0.21. These results suggest that sedimentary PAHs (those compounds mentioned above) were derived mostly from fossil fuel combustion. Three sectioned-downcore profiles ({approx}40 cm) of the {sup 14}C abundance in phenanthrene and alkylphenanthrenes showed a decreasing trend with depth, that was anti-correlated with the trend of {sigma}PAHs concentration. The f{sub M} values of phenanthrene were also larger than those of alkylphenanthrenes in each section of the core. This result indicates that phenanthrene received a greater contribution from biomass burning than alkylphenanthrenes throughout the core. This finding highlights the method used here as an useful approach to elucidate the source and origin of PAHs in the environment00.

  16. Radiocarbon mass balance for a Magnox nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • First comprehensive assessment of C-14 arisings in a Magnox nuclear power station. • C-14 production in graphite and coolant gas quantified by activation modelling. • Principal C-14 production pathway is via C-13 with a small contribution from N-14. • C-14 mass balance model provides a basis for analyses on other reactors. - Abstract: Nuclear power generation in the United Kingdom is based principally on graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors. The mass of irradiated graphite associated with these reactors, including material from associated experimental, prototype and plutonium production reactors, exceeds 96,000 tonnes. One of the principal long-lived radionuclides produced during graphite irradiation is radiocarbon (C-14). Its potential as a hazard must be taken into account in decommissioning and graphite waste management strategies. While C-14 production processes are well-understood, radionuclide distributions and concentrations need to be characterised. A common misconception is that generic statements can be made about C-14 precursors and their location. In fact, the composition of the original manufactured material, the chemical environment of the graphite during service and its irradiation history will all influence C-14 levels. The analysis presented here provides the first assessment of the principal C-14 activation pathways for a UK Magnox reactor. Activation modelling has been used to predict C-14 production rates in both the graphite core and the carbon dioxide coolant over a selected period of operation and the results compared with monitored site C-14 discharges. Principal activation routes have been identified, which should inform future graphite waste management strategies relating to radiocarbon

  17. Modeling radiocarbon dynamics in soils: SoilR version 1.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Sierra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon is an important tracer of the global carbon cycle that helps to understand carbon dynamics in soils. It is useful to estimate rates of organic matter cycling as well as the mean residence or transit time of carbon in soils. We included a set of functions to model the fate of radiocarbon in soil organic matter within the SoilR package for the R environment for computing. Here we present the main system equations and functions to calculate the transfer and release of radiocarbon from different soil organic matter pools. Similarly, we present functions to calculate the mean transit time for different pools and the entire soil system. This new version of SoilR also includes a group of datasets describing the amount of radiocarbon in the atmosphere over time, data necessary to estimate the incorporation of radiocarbon in soils. Also, we present examples on how to obtain parameters of pool-based models from radiocarbon data using inverse parameter estimation. This implementation is general enough so it can also be used to trace the incorporation of radiocarbon in other natural systems that can be represented as linear dynamical systems.

  18. Modeling radiocarbon dynamics in soils: SoilR version 1.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Sierra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon is an important tracer of the global carbon cycle that helps to understand carbon dynamics in soils. It is useful to estimate rates of organic matter cycling as well as the mean residence or transit time of carbon in soils. We included a set of functions to model the fate of radiocarbon in soil organic matter within the SoilR package for the R environment for computing. Here we present the main system equations and functions to calculate the transfer and release of radiocarbon from different soil organic matter pools. Similarly, we present functions to calculate the mean transit time for different pools and the entire soil system. This new version of SoilR also includes a group of data sets describing the amount of radiocarbon in the atmosphere over time, data necessary to estimate the incorporation of radiocarbon in soils. Also, we present examples on how to obtain parameters of pool-based models from radiocarbon data using inverse parameter estimation. This implementation is general enough so it can also be used to trace the incorporation of radiocarbon in other natural systems that can be represented as linear dynamical systems.

  19. Constraint on radiocarbon age correction in Lake Biwa environment from the middle to late Holocene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using data from previous studies and newly collected data, we compared the measured radiocarbon ages of molluscan shells, common reed (Phragmites australis) and pine needles (Pinus thunbergii) collected in 1966, 1970, 1990 and 2008 at Lake Biwa in Japan, and of archaeological samples, to examine radiocarbon reservoir effects at Lake Biwa. We also tested for differences in the radiocarbon reservoir effect between species and locations in the lake. The effects of nuclear bomb tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s are clear, the offset between atmospheric 14C and the Lake Biwa freshwater 14C is larger for this period because the atmospheric 14C is so high. The semiclosed Lake Biwa system is in dynamic equilibrium with the atmosphere, resulting in the 14C content of the water following the changes in atmospheric 14C caused by nuclear testing. The shells collected after 1990 had radiocarbon ages that were 330–450 14C years older than those of the coeval atmosphere. The apparent differences in radiocarbon age (about 300 14C years) between shell fossils and wood samples excavated from the same layer of the submerged Awazu shell midden at Lake Biwa suggest that the radiocarbon reservoir effect also existed in the middle Holocene (the Middle Jomon period, about 5000 years ago). Because the present-day average residence time of Lake Biwa water is 3–6 years, its direct influence on the radiocarbon reservoir effect is small, which suggests that old carbon has been supplied into Lake Biwa.

  20. Paleoclimate reconstruction based on tritium and radiocarbon measurements at Focul Viu Ice Cave, Bihor Mts., Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. For predicting the climate change in the near future we have to understand the climate change happened in the past. Several methods and tools have been developed or are under development for palaeoclimate reconstruction (palynology, dendrochronology, isotope analysis, etc.) but none of them can reveal perfectly the past changes in the climate. Little research has been devoted to the role of cave ice in paleoclimatology despite the fact that a significant number of ice caves in temperate climatic region contain ice and wood remnants from same site and probably same time span. In Romania numerous studies dealt with the relation between ice formation, external climate and cave climate, respectively [1-2] but there is still limited information on the process of ice formation, age of ice and growth rate of ice. Perennial ice block of about 14 meter vertical thickness and estimated volume of 12 000 m3, including subfossil wood, can be found in the Focul Viu Ice Cave, Bihor Mountains, Romania at 1120 m elevation a.s.l. on a karstic highland under temperate climate. The annual mean temperature of the highland area is about 7 deg C. The cave ice forms mainly from drip water in springtime, when the temperature of the ice and the rock wall is below freezing point in the cave and over freezing point on surface. Near-surface samples were taken from the upper surface and the side wall of the ice block for tritium, δ18O and δD measurements [3] and two wood samples were extracted from different depths (6.7 m and 11.1 m, respectively) for radiocarbon dating. The tritium activity-concentration indicates 1.9 cm/yr short-term growth rate for the ice, while the long-term growth rate based on radiocarbon ages gave 0.85 cm/yr. This big difference between the long and short term growth rates confirms the theory that on long time span (few hundred years) there were periods when the balance of ice growth was negative, more ice melt than formed. This

  1. On the Implementation of AM/AM AM/PM Behavioral Models in System Level Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Y.; Tauritz, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The use of nonlinear device behavioral models offers an economical way of simulating the performance of complex communication systems. A concrete method for implementing the AM/AM AM/PM behavioral model in system level simulation using ADS is developed. This method seamlessly tansfers the data from

  2. The Sea Peoples, from cuneiform tablets to carbon dating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kaniewski

    Full Text Available The 13(th century BC witnessed the zenith of the Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean civilizations which declined at the end of the Bronze Age, ∼3200 years ago. Weakening of this ancient flourishing Mediterranean world shifted the political and economic centres of gravity away from the Levant towards Classical Greece and Rome, and led, in the long term, to the emergence of the modern western civilizations. Textual evidence from cuneiform tablets and Egyptian reliefs from the New Kingdom relate that seafaring tribes, the Sea Peoples, were the final catalyst that put the fall of cities and states in motion. However, the lack of a stratified radiocarbon-based archaeology for the Sea People event has led to a floating historical chronology derived from a variety of sources spanning dispersed areas. Here, we report a stratified radiocarbon-based archaeology with anchor points in ancient epigraphic-literary sources, Hittite-Levantine-Egyptian kings and astronomical observations to precisely date the Sea People event. By confronting historical and science-based archaeology, we establish an absolute age range of 1192-1190 BC for terminal destructions and cultural collapse in the northern Levant. This radiocarbon-based archaeology has far-reaching implications for the wider Mediterranean, where an elaborate network of international relations and commercial activities are intertwined with the history of civilizations.

  3. The Sea Peoples, from cuneiform tablets to carbon dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniewski, David; Van Campo, Elise; Van Lerberghe, Karel; Boiy, Tom; Vansteenhuyse, Klaas; Jans, Greta; Nys, Karin; Weiss, Harvey; Morhange, Christophe; Otto, Thierry; Bretschneider, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The 13(th) century BC witnessed the zenith of the Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean civilizations which declined at the end of the Bronze Age, ∼3200 years ago. Weakening of this ancient flourishing Mediterranean world shifted the political and economic centres of gravity away from the Levant towards Classical Greece and Rome, and led, in the long term, to the emergence of the modern western civilizations. Textual evidence from cuneiform tablets and Egyptian reliefs from the New Kingdom relate that seafaring tribes, the Sea Peoples, were the final catalyst that put the fall of cities and states in motion. However, the lack of a stratified radiocarbon-based archaeology for the Sea People event has led to a floating historical chronology derived from a variety of sources spanning dispersed areas. Here, we report a stratified radiocarbon-based archaeology with anchor points in ancient epigraphic-literary sources, Hittite-Levantine-Egyptian kings and astronomical observations to precisely date the Sea People event. By confronting historical and science-based archaeology, we establish an absolute age range of 1192-1190 BC for terminal destructions and cultural collapse in the northern Levant. This radiocarbon-based archaeology has far-reaching implications for the wider Mediterranean, where an elaborate network of international relations and commercial activities are intertwined with the history of civilizations. PMID:21687714

  4. Applications of AMS to hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation and management of water as a resource requires an understanding of the chemical, and geological interactions that water effects or undergoes in the hydrologic cycle. Delivery of water to the land surface by precipitation, subsequent streamflow, circulation in surface waters and evapotranspiration, infiltration, recharge, movement of waters in the subsurface, and discharge are of interest. Also important are the quality of water, water's role in mineral dissolution, transport, and deposition, and the various water-related geotechnical problems of subsidence, tectonics, slope instability, and earth structures. Mathematical modeling techniques are available and are being improved which describe these phenomena and predict future system behavior. Typically, however, models suffer from substantial uncertainties due to insufficient data. Refinement, calibration,and verification of hydrologic models require expansion of the data base. Examination of chemical constituents of water which act as tracers can often supply the needed information. Unfortunately, few tracers are available which are both mobile and chemically stable. Several long-lived radioisotopic hydrologic tracers exist, however, which have received little attention in hydrologic studies to date because of low concentration, low specific activity, or sample size limitations. Recent development of ultra-sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry techniques (AMS) by Purser and others (1977), Nelson and others (1977), Bennett and others (1978), Muller and others (1978), Raisbeck and others (1978) is now expected to provide access to many of these tracers

  5. Otoliths as recorders of palaeoenvironments: comparison of radiocarbon age and isoleucine epimerization in Pleistocene golden perch 'Macquaria ambigua' otoliths from Willandra Lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish otoliths form by the accretion of layers of calcium carbonate and organic-rich material that often form distinctive layers over time scales ranging from days to years. These layers are not resorbed during the life of the fish and have potential to provide data relevant to both the biology of the fish and the environment to which the fish has been exposed. Environmental variability based on otoliths can be estimated through measures of stable oxygen isotopes, trace elements, and the widths of both daily and annual increments. Although otoliths can be dated based on measurement of radiocarbon by accelerator mass spectrometry this method is relatively expensive. An alternative method for dating golden perch otoliths is based on measurements of isoleucine D/L ratios. Miller and Rosewater (1995) demonstrated that golden perch otoliths are near a perfect closed system for racemization and that otoliths have potential of dating surrounding sediments older than 100 ka. Despite the suitability of these structures for racemization measurements, many of collections of Pleistocene otoliths from Willandra Lakes are not appropriate for determination of sample age. Most otoliths sampled in the region have been derived from surface collections, while it is recommended that samples should have been buried at least 1 m during most of their history. Therefore, the majority of existing otolith collections are not appropriate for geochronology or palaeothermometry. Nevertheless, when used in conjunction with radiocarbon dates, racemization data may be of value in assessing the relationship among otoliths in an assemblage. Radiocarbon ages and isoleucine D/L ratios were determined for 30 otoliths collected from Willandra Lakes. The rostrum of each otolith was analysed for D/L ratios and a portion of the posterior of the same otolith was analysed for radiocarbon by accelerator mass spectrometry. Sample weights for both analyses ranged from 14.0 to 25.6 mg. The central portion of the

  6. Age-dating of rockslides: Methods and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, M.; Sanders, D.; Prager, C.

    2009-04-01

    Age-dating of deposits of catastrophic rockslides is prerequisite to unravel the potential relation between the frequency of mass-wasting events with climatic change or earthquakes. In the Alps, about 250 rockslides exceeding 106 m3 in volume are known, but the age as yet is determined only for a comparatively small number of events. For age determination of rockslide events, different methods are available (e. g. Lang et al., 1999). Radiocarbon Dating In the past few decades, rockslide deposits commonly were proxy-dated by 14C age determination of organic remnants preserved (a) in glacial, fluvio-glacial sediments overridden by the rockslide, (b) within the rockslide mass, or (c) in rockslide-dammed backwater deposits or lakes situated atop the rockslide mass. In each case, the 14C age provides a different constraint on the age of the rockslide event: in case (a), the 14C age represents a maximum age of the event; in case (b), which is quite rare, the 14C age is generally considered as a good proxy of the event age; in case (c) the 14C age represents a minimum age for the rockslide event. Unfortunately, radiocarbon dating often cannot be applied because of absence of suited deposits or exposures thereof, lack of organic remnants or of remnants suited for age-dating, and/or because determined 14C ages are substantially biased. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) Proxy-dating of rockslide events by OSL can be applied to silt- to sand-sized quartzose sediments present (a) directly below, (b) within, or (c) above/laterally aside a rockslide mass. For each case (a) to (c), the determined ages are subject to the same constraints as outlined for radiocarbon dating. Unfortunately, situations allowing for application of OSL to rockslide event dating are comparatively rare, and the resulting ages tend to have a wide error range. Surface Exposure Dating with cosmogenic radionuclides Surface exposure ages can be determined for rock samples taken from the sliding planes at

  7. Age validation of quillback rockfish (Sebastes maliger) using bomb radiocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, L A; Andrews, A H; Munk, K; Coale, K H; Frantz, B R; Cailliet, G M; Brown, T A

    2005-01-05

    Rockfishes (Sebastes spp.) support one of the most economically important fisheries of the Pacific Northwest and it is essential for sustainable management that age estimation procedures be validated for these species. Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices during the 1950s and 1960s created a global radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) signal in the ocean environment that scientists have identified as a useful tracer and chronological marker in natural systems. In this study, we first demonstrated that fewer samples are necessary for age validation using the bomb-generated {sup 14}C signal by emphasizing the utility of the time-specific marker created by the initial rise of bomb-{sup 14}C. Second, the bomb-generated {sup 14}C signal retained in fish otoliths was used to validate the age and age estimation methodology of the quillback rockfish (Sebastes maliger) in the waters of southeast Alaska. Radiocarbon values from the first year's growth of quillback rockfish otoliths were plotted against estimated birth year producing a {sup 14}C time series spanning 1950 to 1985. The initial rise of bomb-{sup 14}C from pre-bomb levels ({approx} -90 {per_thousand}) occurred in 1959 {+-} 1 year and {sup 14}C levels rose relatively rapidly to peak {Delta}{sup 14}C values in 1967 (+105.4 {per_thousand}), with a subsequent declining trend through the end of the record in 1985 (+15.4 {per_thousand}). The agreement between the year of initial rise of {sup 14}C levels from the quillback rockfish record and the chronometer determined for the waters of southeast Alaska from yelloweye rockfish (S. ruberrimus) otoliths validated the ageing methodology for the quillback rockfish. The concordance of the entire quillback rockfish {sup 14}C record with the yelloweye rockfish time series demonstrated the effectiveness of this age validation technique, confirmed the longevity of the quillback rockfish up to a minimum of 43 years, and strongly supports higher age estimates of up to 90 years.

  8. Solar activity around AD 775 from aurorae and radiocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhäuser, R.; Neuhäuser, D. L.

    2015-04-01

    A large variation in 14C around AD 775 has been considered to be caused by one or more solar super-flares within one year. We critically review all known aurora reports from Europe as well as the Near, Middle, and Far East from AD 731 to 825 and find 39 likely true aurorae plus four more potential aurorae and 24 other reports about halos, meteors, thunderstorms etc., which were previously misinterpreted as aurorae or misdated; we assign probabilities for all events according to five aurora criteria. We find very likely true aurorae in AD 743, 745, 762, 765, 772, 773, 793, 796, 807, and 817. There were two aurorae in the early 770s observed near Amida (now Diyarbak\\i r in Turkey near the Turkish-Syrian border), which were not only red, but also green-yellow - being at a relatively low geomagnetic latitude, they indicate a relatively strong solar storm. However, it cannot be argued that those aurorae (geomagnetic latitude 43 to 50°, considering five different reconstructions of the geomagnetic pole) could be connected to one or more solar super-flares causing the 14C increase around AD 775: There are several reports about low- to mid-latitude aurorae at 32 to 44° geomagnetic latitude in China and Iraq; some of them were likely observed (quasi-)simultaneously in two of three areas (Europe, Byzantium/Arabia, East Asia), one lasted several nights, and some indicate a particularly strong geomagnetic storm (red colour and dynamics), namely in AD 745, 762, 793, 807, and 817 - always without 14C peaks. We use 39 likely true aurorae as well as historic reports about sunspots together with the radiocarbon content from tree rings to reconstruct the solar activity: From AD {˜ 733} to {˜ 823}, we see at least nine Schwabe cycles; instead of one of those cycles, there could be two short, weak cycles - reflecting the rapid increase to a high 14C level since AD 775, which lies at the end of a strong cycle. In order to show the end of the dearth of naked-eye sunspots, we

  9. Soil organic carbon dynamics in the Soils of Svalbard (by results of radiocarbon researches)

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The radiocarbon analysis can be applied in soil ecology. One of the problems of soil ecology is an estimation of rate of carbon exchange between soils and atmosphere. The model for evaluation of soils humus renovation has been created on the basis of radiocarbon measurements. It is a unique integrated method of direct measurements of humus activity. For evaluation of organic carbon renovation rate in soils there was offered the coefficient of renovation (Kr), which is the integral index of o...

  10. Age of soil organic matter and soil respiration: radiocarbon constraints on belowground C dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Trumbore, Susan

    2000-01-01

    Radiocarbon data from soil organic matter and soil respiration provide powerful constraints for determining carbon dynamics and thereby the magnitude and timing of soil carbon response to global change. In this paper, data from three sites representing well-drained soils in boreal, temperate, and tropical forests are used to illustrate the methods for using radiocarbon to determine the turnover times of soil organic matter and to partition soil respiration. For these sites, the average age of...

  11. Age validation of great hammerhead shark (Sphyrna mokarran), determined by bomb radiocarbon analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Passerotti, Michelle S.; John K. Carlson; Piercy, Andrew N.; Campana, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary validation of annual growth band deposition in vertebrae of great hammerhead shark (Sphyrna mokarran) was conducted by using bomb radiocarbon analysis. Adult specimens (n=2) were collected and thin sections of vertebral centra were removed for visual aging and use in radiocarbon assays. Vertebral band counts were used to estimate age, and year of formation was assigned to each growth band by subtracting estimated age from the year of capture. A total of 10 samples were extra...

  12. Very little in situ produced radiocarbon retained in accumulating Antarctic ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice samples from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, were analyzed for 14CO2 and 14CO by accelerator mass spectrometry. Only a small amount (∼2%) of in situ produced radiocarbon was detected. The calibrated radiocarbon ages, corrected for in situ produced 14C, are in fair agreement with age estimates obtained from stratigraphical methods added to a gas inclusion model. The ages of the entrapped air range from recent to ca. 1200 AD

  13. Teen Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dating violence prevention initiative seeks to reduce dating violence and increase healthy relationships in high-risk urban communities through comprehensive, multisector prevention. Division of Adolescent ...

  14. May 14C be used to date contemporary art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedi, M. E.; Caforio, L.; Mandò, P. A.; Petrucci, F.; Taccetti, F.

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiocarbon in forensics is by now widespread, thanks to the so-called bomb peak, which makes it possible to perform high-precision dating. Since 1955, 14C concentration in the atmosphere had strongly increased due to nuclear explosions, reaching its maximum value in 1963-1965. After the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 14C started to decrease as a consequence of the exchanges between atmosphere and the other natural carbon reservoirs. Nowadays, it is still slightly above the pre-bomb value. The work presented in this paper is based on the idea of exploiting the bomb peak to “precisely” date works of contemporary art, with the aim at identifying possible fakes. We analysed two kinds of materials from the 20th century: newspapers and painting canvases. Newspaper samples were taken because they might in principle be considered to represent dated samples (considering the date on the issues). Our data (28 samples) show a trend similar to atmospheric data in the literature, although with some differences; the paper peak is flatter and shifted towards more recent years (about five years) with respect to the atmospheric data. This can be explained by taking paper manufacturing processes into account. As to the canvas samples, the measured 14C concentrations were generally reasonably consistent with the expected concentrations (based on the year on the paintings). However, this does not indicate that the interpretation of the results is simpler and more straightforward. Obviously, we only measure the 14C concentration of the fibre used for the canvas, which does not necessarily measure the date the painting was manufactured. In this paper, sample preparation and experimental results will be discussed, in order to show the potential as well as the limitations of radiocarbon to date contemporary art.

  15. Isotopic analyses of food crusts on pottery: Implications for dating and palaeocuisine reconstructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    The concentrations of the stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, δ13C and δ15N, can be used to roughly reconstruct the former content of Stone Age cooking vessels. This was supported by measurements on experimental food crusts. The reconstruction of the ingredients used in the vessels is not only...... relevant for reconstructing the diet, but also important for 14C-dating. Resources from sea- or freshwater can cause substantial radiocarbon reservoir effects. For a reliable 14C-dating, they therefore have to be identified. This study presents 14C-datings of the earliest pottery of Schleswig-Holstein at...

  16. Dating burial practices and architecture at Lepenski Vir

    OpenAIRE

    Bonsall, Clive; Radovanović, Ivana; Roksandic, Mirjana; Cook, Gordon T.; Higham, Thomas; Pickard, Catriona

    2008-01-01

    Previous attempts to establish a chronology for Lepenski Vir using three different methods (stratigraphy, radiometric 14C dating of bulk charcoal samples, and AMS 14C dating of human bone collagen) produced inconsistent results. Discrepancies between the human bone and charcoal ages were found to result from a reservoir effect in the bones of people who ate significant quantities of Danube fish. When a reservoir ‘correction’ is applied, the human bone 14C dates are consistent with the charcoa...

  17. {sup 14}C chronology of the oldest Scandinavian church in use. An AMS/PIXE study of lime lump carbonate in the mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindroos, Alf, E-mail: alf.lindroos@abo.fi [Geology and Mineralogy, Department of Natural Sciences, Åbo Akademi University (Finland); Art History, Faculty of Art, Åbo Akademi University (Finland); Ranta, Heikki [Diocese of Lund, Church of Sweden (Sweden); Heinemeier, Jan [AMS " 1" 4C Dating Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus (Denmark); Lill, Jan-Olof [Accelerator Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Åbo Akademi University (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    Mortar dating was applied to newly revealed, original mortar in the church of Dalby in Scania, southern Sweden which is considered to be the oldest still standing church in Scandinavia. Small white lime lumps were sampled by chipping from the supporting pillars in the interior of the church. Special emphasis was in sampling lime lumps because the church is situated in the Scania limestone area and aggregate limestone contamination was anticipated in the bulk mortars. Earlier studies have, however, shown that lime lumps do not contain aggregate material but only possible limestone rests from incomplete calcination. The sampled material was prepared for radiocarbon AMS dating. The carbonate in the lime lumps was hydrolyzed according to the sequential leaching technique developed for the Århus {sup 14}C laboratory in Denmark. Prior to the hydrolysis the lime lumps were examined for dead-carbon contamination using a stereo microscope and cathodoluminescence. The lime lumps displayed heterogeneous carbonate luminescence. This is, however, common and it was not considered a problem because carbonate growth in changing pH/Eh conditions often leads to changing luminescence colors. Two lumps had little dead carbon contamination and an early second millennium {sup 14}C signature. One lump, however, seemed to be heavily contaminated with dead carbon. Since the sample passed the microscopic screening, the leftovers of the lump was subjected to PIXE analysis and compared with the other two lumps. The well-defined, early 2nd millennium {sup 14}C age of the lime lumps of this particular church is an important contribution to the discussion on stone church chronology in Scandinavia.

  18. C-14 Measurements of Ice Samples from the Juvfonne Ice Tunnel, Jotunheimen, Southern Norway-Validation of a C-14 Dating Technique for Glacier Ice

    OpenAIRE

    Zapf, Alexander; A. Nesje; Szidat, Sönke; L. Wacker; Schwikowski, Margit

    2013-01-01

    Establishing precise age-depth relationships of high-alpine ice cores is essential in order to deduce conclusive paleoclimatic information from these archives. Radiocarbon dating of carbonaceous aerosol particles incorporated in such glaciers is a promising tool to gain absolute ages, especially from the deepest parts where conventional methods are commonly inapplicable. In this study, we present a new validation for a published C-14 dating method for ice cores. Previously C-14-dated horizons...

  19. Implications of a Bayesian radiocarbon calibration of colonization ages for mammalian megafauna in glaciated New York State after the Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feranec, Robert S.; Kozlowski, Andrew L.

    2016-03-01

    To understand what factors control species colonization and extirpation within specific paleoecosystems, we analyzed radiocarbon dates of megafaunal mammal species from New York State after the Last Glacial Maximum. We hypothesized that the timing of colonization and extirpation were both driven by access to preferred habitat types. Bayesian calibration of a database of 39 radiocarbon dates shows that caribou (Rangifer tarandus) were the first colonizers, then mammoth (Mammuthus sp.), and finally American mastodon (Mammut americanum). The timing of colonization cannot reject the hypothesis that colonizing megafauna tracked preferred habitats, as caribou and mammoth arrived when tundra was present, while mastodon arrived after boreal forest was prominent in the state. The timing of caribou colonization implies that ecosystems were developed in the state prior to 16,000 cal yr BP. The contemporaneous arrival of American mastodon with Sporormiella spore decline suggests the dung fungus spore is not an adequate indicator of American mastodon population size. The pattern in the timing of extirpation is opposite to that of colonization. The lack of environmental changes suspected to be ecologically detrimental to American mastodon and mammoth coupled with the arrival of humans shortly before extirpation suggests an anthropogenic cause in the loss of the analyzed species.

  20. Towards a complete {sup 14}C AMS facility at the Universidade Federal Fluminense (Niteroi, Brazil): Sample preparation laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, R.M., E-mail: meigikos@if.uff.br [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/no, Gragoata, 24210-346 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Macario, K.D.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Linares, R.; Queiroz, E.; Carvalho, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/no, Gragoata, 24210-346 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report a new AMS facility at the Physics Institute of UFF in Brazil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A NEC 250 kV single stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first lab to perform the {sup 14}C-AMS technique not only in Brazil but in Latin America. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report preliminary results and plans for the future. - Abstract: The new radiocarbon sample preparation laboratory at the Physics Institute of the Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF) in Brazil is discussed and early trials with reference materials are presented, leading up to the installation of a single-stage AMS system in early 2012.

  1. Radiocarbon-based source apportionment of black carbon (BC) in PM 10 aerosols from residential area of suburban Tokyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masao; Kumata, Hidetoshi; Koike, Yasuyo; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Uchida, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Kitao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-04-01

    The AMS technique was applied to analyse black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), and previously reported polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 aerosols from a residential area, suburban Tokyo, to determine natural abundance of radiocarbon ( 14C), an ideal tracer to distinguish fossil fuel ( 14C-free) from modern biomass combustion sources of pyrolytic products. The 14C concentrations in BC, isolated using the CTO-375 method, were 42% and 30% pMC (in terms of percent Modern Carbon: pMC) in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C concentrations in BC were also compared with those of compound-class specific 14C content of PAHs previously reported for the same samples: they were 45% and 33% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C signals of BC were identical to those of high molecular weight (MW ⩾ 226, 5-6 rings) PAHs. The resemblance between 14C signals of BC and PAHs can be referred as a 'certificate' for the validity of the BC isolation method employed in this study. Also, it suggests that 14C-BC approach can be a surrogate for PAHs specific 14C analyses to monitor seasonal source variation of combustion-derived pyrolytic products. On the other hand, 14C contents of total organic carbon in 2004 were 61% and 42% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. This is likely attributed to higher contribution of plant activity in summer.

  2. Constraint on radiocarbon age correction in Lake Biwa environment from the middle to late Holocene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Y., E-mail: miyata@nendai.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); National Museum of Japanese History, Sakura 285-8502 (Japan); Minami, M. [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Onbe, S. [National Museum of Japanese History, Sakura 285-8502 (Japan); Archaeological Heritage Management Office, Tokushima University, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Sakamoto, M. [National Museum of Japanese History, Sakura 285-8502 (Japan); Nakamura, T. [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Imamura, M. [National Museum of Japanese History, Sakura 285-8502 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Using data from previous studies and newly collected data, we compared the measured radiocarbon ages of molluscan shells, common reed (Phragmites australis) and pine needles (Pinus thunbergii) collected in 1966, 1970, 1990 and 2008 at Lake Biwa in Japan, and of archaeological samples, to examine radiocarbon reservoir effects at Lake Biwa. We also tested for differences in the radiocarbon reservoir effect between species and locations in the lake. The effects of nuclear bomb tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s are clear, the offset between atmospheric {sup 14}C and the Lake Biwa freshwater {sup 14}C is larger for this period because the atmospheric {sup 14}C is so high. The semiclosed Lake Biwa system is in dynamic equilibrium with the atmosphere, resulting in the {sup 14}C content of the water following the changes in atmospheric {sup 14}C caused by nuclear testing. The shells collected after 1990 had radiocarbon ages that were 330-450 {sup 14}C years older than those of the coeval atmosphere. The apparent differences in radiocarbon age (about 300 {sup 14}C years) between shell fossils and wood samples excavated from the same layer of the submerged Awazu shell midden at Lake Biwa suggest that the radiocarbon reservoir effect also existed in the middle Holocene (the Middle Jomon period, about 5000 years ago). Because the present-day average residence time of Lake Biwa water is 3-6 years, its direct influence on the radiocarbon reservoir effect is small, which suggests that old carbon has been supplied into Lake Biwa.

  3. Intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy: Is there any evidence of a radiocarbon signal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Anders; Salehpour, Mehran

    2015-10-01

    In 2008, the first report of an ultrasensitive method for ro-vibrational spectrometry of radiocarbon dioxide was published. The method, called intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy (ICOGS), claimed a sensitivity and limit-of-detection comparable to accelerator mass spectroscopy. ICOGS was claimed to utilize the isotope-dependent ro-vibrational absorption lines of carbon dioxide in the infrared spectrum. In order to facilitate unambiguous detection of radiocarbon, the sample was placed inside the cavity of a radiocarbon dioxide laser. This intracavity approach was claimed to increase the sensitivity by seven orders of magnitude compared with traditional optogalvanic methods. However, despite the methodical and thorough efforts of several research groups worldwide, these claims have not been possible to reproduce. Instead, we have previously reported serious deviations from the original results, where we found that ICOGS suffers from considerable problems with the stability and reproducibility of the optogalvanic signal, and that misinterpretations of these uncertainties likely are the explanation for the claimed sensitivity in the first reports. Having identified the stability and reproducibility of the detection as major concerns, we decided to improve the setup by with state-of-the-art plasma source technology. Deploying a custom-made stripline split-ring resonator optogalvanic detector, we have now investigated the applicability of ICOGS to radiocarbon detection even further. Measurements have been made with a wide range of parameters including different gas mixtures at various pressures and wavelengths. We have also conducted measurements with gas flowing through the sample cell to investigate the effect of plasma induced decomposition of the sample. Still, we have seen no indications of a significant radiocarbon signal in a concentration range between 0.29 Modern and 9.7 Modern, i.e., the range of interest to the radiocarbon community. Hence, our conclusions

  4. Radiocarbon Based Ages and Growth Rates: Hawaiian Deep Sea Corals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Dunbar, R B; Ingram, B L

    2006-01-13

    The radial growth rates and ages of three different groups of Hawaiian deep-sea 'corals' were determined using radiocarbon measurements. Specimens of Corallium secundum, Gerardia sp., and Leiopathes glaberrima, were collected from 450 {+-} 40 m at the Makapuu deep-sea coral bed using a submersible (PISCES V). Specimens of Antipathes dichotoma were collected at 50 m off Lahaina, Maui. The primary source of carbon to the calcitic C. secundum skeleton is in situ dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Using bomb {sup 14}C time markers we calculate radial growth rates of {approx} 170 {micro}m y{sup -1} and ages of 68-75 years on specimens as tall as 28 cm of C. secundum. Gerardia sp., A. dichotoma, and L. glaberrima have proteinaceous skeletons and labile particulate organic carbon (POC) is their primary source of architectural carbon. Using {sup 14}C we calculate a radial growth rate of 15 {micro}m y{sup -1} and an age of 807 {+-} 30 years for a live collected Gerardia sp., showing that these organisms are extremely long lived. Inner and outer {sup 14}C measurements on four sub-fossil Gerardia spp. samples produce similar growth rate estimates (range 14-45 {micro}m y{sup -1}) and ages (range 450-2742 years) as observed for the live collected sample. Similarly, with a growth rate of < 10 {micro}m y{sup -1} and an age of {approx}2377 years, L. glaberrima at the Makapuu coral bed, is also extremely long lived. In contrast, the shallow-collected A. dichotoma samples yield growth rates ranging from 130 to 1,140 {micro}m y{sup -1}. These results show that Hawaiian deep-sea corals grow more slowly and are older than previously thought.

  5. Holocene glacier fluctuations and climate changes in the southeastern part of the Russian Altai (South Siberia) based on a radiocarbon chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatova, A. R.; Nazarov, A. N.; Nepop, R. K.; Rodnight, H.

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates glacier dynamic and climatic variations in the southeastern part of the Russian Altai (SE Altai) during the last 7000 years. Recent glacier retreats and ice melting in moraines has led to exhumation of organic material allowing the possibility of radiocarbon dating. We report here 57 new radiocarbon dates from wood remains buried by moraines and from proglacial forefields, from peat layers and lacustrine sediments that cover moraines, from dead trees at the upper tree limit, and from rock glaciers on trough slopes from six glacial valleys in the North Chuya Range, SE Altai. Such a numerous dataset for the vast but unified in neotectonic and climatic conditions area is presented for the first time the history of research in the Altai. Together with 62 previously published radiocarbon ages, mainly of fossil soils and peat layers in the foot of the ranges in SE Altai, they form the basis for understanding the relative magnitudes and timing of the most important glacial and climatic events of SE Altai. New data refute the traditional concept of the Russian Altai Holocene glaciations as a consecutive retreat of the late Würm glaciers and argue their complete degradation at the head of trough valleys at least 7000 cal. years BP. Moraine complexes of three Holocene glacial stages are morphologically expressed in trough valleys of the North Chuya range. They correlate with three identified periods of glacial advances: from 4900 to 4200 cal. years BP (Akkem stage), from 2300 to 1700 cal. years BP (Historical stage) and in the 13th-19th centuries (Little Ice Age (LIA) or Aktru stage). The coincident extremes of lowering temperature and increasing precipitation during the Akkem stage led to abrupt glacier advances and forming of the most remote moraine complexes downstream in the valleys. Following glacier advances had distinctly smaller magnitudes. In addition to the radiocarbon data, the time limits of the Historical stage were defined more

  6. Predicting decadal trends and transient responses of radiocarbon storage and fluxes in a temperate forest soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Sierra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Representing the response of soil carbon dynamics to global environmental change requires the incorporation of multiple tools in the development of predictive models. An important tool to construct and test models is the incorporation of bomb radiocarbon in soil organic matter during the past decades. In this manuscript, we combined radiocarbon data and a previously developed empirical model to explore decade-scale soil carbon dynamics in a temperate forest ecosystem at the Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, USA. We evaluated the contribution of different soil C fractions to both total soil CO2 efflux and microbially respired C. We tested the performance of the model based on measurable soil organic matter fractions against a decade of radiocarbon measurements. The model was then challenged with radiocarbon measurements from a warming and N addition experiment to test multiple hypotheses about the different response of soil C fractions to the experimental manipulations. Our results showed that the empirical model satisfactorily predicts the trends of radiocarbon in litter, density fractions, and respired CO2 observed over a decade in the soils not subjected to manipulation. However, the model, modified with prescribed relationships for temperature and decomposition rates, predicted most but not all the observations from the field experiment where soil temperatures and nitrogen levels were increased, suggesting that a larger degree of complexity and mechanistic relations need to be added to the model to predict short-term responses and transient dynamics.

  7. Long term measurements of tritium and radiocarbon in Romania environmental components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology started the tritium and radiocarbon measurements in 1969 and 1977, respectively. The paper deals with this type of measurements in environmental components (meteoric waters and atmospheric CO2). Tritium and radiocarbon activity determinations were performed by liquid scintillation technique. For tritium, preliminary electrolytic enrichment was applied to water samples, while for 14C, the Na2CO3 obtained from air sampling was converted into benzene. Tritium measurements in meteoric water started in 1970 at five stations and provide information about local concentration level and characteristics of territorial distribution. Useful conclusions about inter-correlation degree with other worldwide stations were obtained. The individual values of 500-600 T.U. recorded in 1970 decreased to the background values of present. This trend was interrupted by small accidental increases. The systematic radiocarbon measurements in atmospheric CO2 started in 1992 and continued at 1-2 stations. These measurements provided a better knowledge of the level, variability and radiocarbon evolution trend in the geographical and meteoclimatical conditions of the Carpathian area. Also, by anthropogenic CO2 identification and its quantitative estimation, these determinations could be very useful to greenhouse effect evaluation. This isotopic database allows the identification of any artificial incipient pollution even for background level concentrations. That was the reason of choosing Cernavoda station for tritium and radiocarbon determinations in water and air. The monitoring started before the nuclear power plant became operative and continues at present. (authors)

  8. Predicting decadal trends and transient responses of radiocarbon storage and fluxes in a temperate forest soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Sierra

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Representing the response of soil carbon dynamics to global environmental change requires the incorporation of multiple tools in the development of predictive models. An important tool to construct and test models is the incorporation of bomb radiocarbon in soil organic matter during the past decades. In this manuscript, we combined radiocarbon data and a previously developed empirical model to explore decade-scale soil carbon dynamics in a temperate forest ecosystem at the Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, USA. We evaluated the contribution of different soil C fractions to both total soil CO2 efflux and microbially-respired C. We tested the performance of the model based on measurable soil organic matter fractions against a decade of radiocarbon measurements. The model was then challenged with radiocarbon measurements from a warming and N addition experiment to test multiple hypotheses about the different response of soil C fractions to the experimental manipulations. Our results showed that the empirical model satisfactorily predicts the trends of radiocarbon in litter, density fractions, and respired CO2 observed over a decade in the soils not subjected to manipulation. However, the model, modified with prescribed relationships for temperature and decomposition rates, predicted most but not all the observations from the field experiment where soil temperatures and nitrogen levels were increased, suggesting that a larger degree of complexity and mechanistic relations need to be added to the model to predict short-term responses and transient dynamics.

  9. Can stable isotopes and radiocarbon dating provide a forensic solution for curbing illegal harvesting of threatened cycads?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retief, Kirsten; West, Adam G; Pfab, Michèle F

    2014-11-01

    Cycads in South Africa are facing an extinction crisis due to the illegal extraction of plants from the wild. Proving wild origin of suspect ex situ cycads to the satisfaction of a court of law is difficult, limiting law enforcement efforts. We investigated the feasibility of using multiple stable isotopes to identify specimens removed from the wild. Relocated and wild specimens from two species in the African genus Encephalartos (E. lebomboensis and E. arenarius) were sampled. (14) C analysis indicated that a ± 30-year chronology could be reliably obtained from the cycads. For E. arenarius, pre-relocation tissue was consistent with a wild origin, whereas tissue grown post-relocation was isotopically distinct from the wild for (87) Sr/(86) Sr and δ(15) N. For E. lebomboensis, δ(34) S, δ(18) O, and (87) Sr/(86) Sr were different between relocated and control plants, consistent with the >30 years since relocation. Our findings demonstrate the potential for a forensic isotope approach to identify illegal ex situ cycads. PMID:25331676

  10. The AD 1300-1700 eruptive periods at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, revealed by historical narratives, stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Pennec, J. -L.; Jaya, D.; Samaniego, P.; Ramon, P.; Yanez, S. Moreno; Egred, J.; van der Plicht, J.

    2008-01-01

    Tungurahua is a frequently active and hazardous volcano of the Ecuadorian Andes that has experienced pyroclastic flow-forming eruption in 1773, 1886, 1916-18 and 2006-08. Earlier eruptions in Late Pre-Hispanic and Early Colonial times have remained poorly known and are debated in the literature. To

  11. Expiration Dates Matter

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Expiration Dates Matter Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... video, FDA Pharmacist Ilisa Bernstein explains how expiration dates help determine if medicine is safe to use ...

  12. Expiration Dates Matter

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Expiration Dates Matter Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... Update video, FDA Pharmacist Ilisa Bernstein explains how expiration dates help determine if medicine is safe to ...

  13. Radiometric Dating Does Work!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, G. Brent

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the accuracy of dating methods and creationist arguments that radiometric dating does not work. Explains the Manson meteorite impact and the Pierre shale, the ages of meteorites, the K-T tektites, and dating the Mount Vesuvius eruption. (Author/YDS)

  14. Effects of Experimental Drought on Soil Respiration and Radiocarbon Efflux from a Temperate Forest Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borken, W.; Savage, K.; Davidson, E. A.; Trumbore, S. E.

    2002-12-01

    decomposition of older C substrates (>1 year) with higher Δ14C values contributed to the total CO2 efflux. Variation between treatments and among dates revealed higher Δ14C when CO2 concentrations were lower, which occurred when the soil dried due to natural summer drought in the control plots and more severe drought in the exclusion plots. When the soil was moist, high rates of root respiration and decomposition of young substrates resulted in high soil CO2 concentrations with relatively low Δ14C. Under dry conditions, root respiration produced less CO2, while gradual decomposition of old, radiocarbon-rich substrates continues at low rates, resulting in low CO2 concentrations with high Δ14C. Hence, drought responses differed between heterotrophic decomposition of old C substrates and root and microbial respiration of recently fixed C substrates.

  15. Dating and analysis of speleosediments from Aridaia at Macedonia, Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the cave system A at Aridaia, Greece brought to light sequences of sediment formations including archaeological deposits at their topmost layers, and thin- to fine-quartzed sediment for the rest underneath deposits. Within past studies, radiocarbon and ESR dating provided ages for charcoal samples from the near-surface archaeological units and travertine layers, respectively, recent OSL dating has been focused on the grounds and formation time of mainly the lower most sequences. The study aims at the analysis and chronological estimation of quartz-rich fine sediments using OSL and combined grain size distributions and chemical/mineralogical analysis to provide data about the evolution of the cave environment. The results indicate clastic sedimentation during Late Pleistocene caused by a river flow in the vicinity of the system; neotectonic episodes interrupted this activity which then allowed speleo-chemical processes generating calcitic cave formations

  16. Dating and analysis of speleosediments from Aridaia at Macedonia, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharias, N. [Institute of Materials Science, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, 15 310 Ag. Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece)], E-mail: zacharias@ims.demokritos.gr; Kabouroglou, E. [Ephorate of Palaeoanthropology and Speleology of Southern Greece, 34B Ardittou Street, 116 36 Athens (Greece); Bassiakos, Y.; Michael, C.T. [Institute of Materials Science, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, 15 310 Ag. Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece)

    2008-02-15

    The study of the cave system A at Aridaia, Greece brought to light sequences of sediment formations including archaeological deposits at their topmost layers, and thin- to fine-quartzed sediment for the rest underneath deposits. Within past studies, radiocarbon and ESR dating provided ages for charcoal samples from the near-surface archaeological units and travertine layers, respectively, recent OSL dating has been focused on the grounds and formation time of mainly the lower most sequences. The study aims at the analysis and chronological estimation of quartz-rich fine sediments using OSL and combined grain size distributions and chemical/mineralogical analysis to provide data about the evolution of the cave environment. The results indicate clastic sedimentation during Late Pleistocene caused by a river flow in the vicinity of the system; neotectonic episodes interrupted this activity which then allowed speleo-chemical processes generating calcitic cave formations.

  17. Characteristics study of a system for carbon 14 dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The developing of a radiocarbon dating laboratory, specially built to deal with carbonate samples from underground water, at the Institute de Energia Atomica, required the optimization of a benzene synthetizer, and also of the operative conditions of the liquid scintillator counter, used in sample measurements. An average yield of about 70% was obtained in our benzenic synthesis. If more refined conditions were used, better results could have been obtained, but the reported yield is good enough for our necessities. A comparison of the ages of several shell samples was done between the Geochronology Laboratory, belonging to the Instituto de Geociencias, at Sao Paulo University and our dating laboratory. The agreement between the results was fairly good, according to the precision required

  18. Tritium AMS for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.L.; Velsko, C.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-08-01

    We are developing {sup 3}H-AMS to measure {sup 3}H activity of mg-sized biological samples. LLNL has already successfully applied {sup 14}C AMS to a variety of problems in the area of biomedical research. Development of {sup 3}H AMS would greatly complement these studies. The ability to perform {sup 3}H AMS measurements at sensitivities equivalent to those obtained for {sup 14}C will allow us to perform experiments using compounds that are not readily available in {sup 14}C-tagged form. A {sup 3}H capability would also allow us to perform unique double-labeling experiments in which we learn the fate, distribution, and metabolism of separate fractions of biological compounds.

  19. Investigating the influence of regional climate and oceanography on marine radiocarbon reservoir ages in southwest New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Jessica L.; Moy, Christopher M.; Prior, Christine A.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Wilson, Gary S.

    2015-12-01

    The New Zealand fjords are located at a latitude where distinct oceanic and atmospheric fronts separate carbon reservoirs of varying residence time. The marine radiocarbon reservoir age in this region is likely to deviate from the global average reservoir age over space and time as frontal boundaries migrate north and south. Here we present new estimates of modern radiocarbon reservoir age using the radiocarbon content of bivalve shells collected live before 1950. Multiple measurements from hydrographically distinct sites support the use of a ΔR, defined as the regional offset between measured and modeled marine radiocarbon reservoir age, of 59 ± 35 years for the New Zealand fjords. We also assess the radiocarbon content of bulk surface sediments throughout the fjord region. Sediment with a higher proportion of marine organic carbon has relatively less radiocarbon than more terrestrial sediment, suggesting a short residence time of organic carbon on land before deposition in the fjords. Additionally, we constrain reservoir age variability throughout the Holocene using coeval terrestrial and marine macrofossils. Although our modern results suggest spatial consistency in ΔR throughout the fjords, large deviations from the global average marine radiocarbon reservoir age exist in the paleo record. We find four ancient ΔR values, extending back to ˜10.2 cal kyr BP, to be negative or near zero. A likely cause of younger radiocarbon reservoir ages at select intervals throughout the Holocene is the increased influence of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds, which cause extreme precipitation in the region that delivers terrestrial carbon, enriched in radiocarbon, to fjord basins. However, bivalve depth habitat may also influence radiocarbon content due to a stratified water column containing distinct carbon pools. This work highlights the need for thorough assessment of local radiocarbon cycling in similar regions of dynamic ocean/atmosphere frontal zones

  20. Radiometric dating of the United Kingdom SWAP sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of 210Pb by direct gamma assay have been used to date sediment cores from Surface Water Acidification Project (SWAP) study sites in the U.K. The results were checked against additional dating evidence from the artificial fallout isotopes 137Cs and 241Am. At one of the sites, Devoke Water in Cumbria, the 137Cs and 241Am data were crucial in identifying a recent sediment hiatus. At sites with recently afforested catchments the sediment record indicated substantial increases in accumulation rates. (author)

  1. Single-grain and multigrain luminescence dating of on-ice and lake-bottom deposits at Lake Hoare, Taylor Valley, Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, G.W.; Doran, P.T.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2010-01-01

    The large radiocarbon (14C) reservoir effect in Antarctica varies regionally and with settings. Luminescence sediment dating has potential as an alternate geochronometer. Extending our earlier tests of the effectiveness of resetting of photon-stimulated-luminescence (PSL) that employed only multi...

  2. Direct dating of hominids using ESR and U-series dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruen, R. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Earth Science

    1999-11-01

    Full text: Dating studies on palaeoanthropological sites is usually carried out on material associated with the human remains, such as the sediment, charcoal or other fauna rather than the human specimen itself. The reason lies in the fact that most dating techniques are destructive and because the hominid remains are too rare to be sacrificed for dating. This indirect dating approach is in many cases not satisfactory, because:(i) the human remains are often buried into the sediments and the association with other materials is uncertain (e.g. Skhul, Qafzeh, etc.);(ii) faunal remains or minerals from the sediment are re-worked from older deposits (see e.g. present discussion of the age of the Homo erectus remains in Indonesia);(iii) the hominid specimen was discovered at a time when no careful excavations were carried out and it is impossible to correlate the specimen with other datable material (nearly 90% of all palaeoanthropological specimen). For example, the hominid burial site of Qafzeh in Israel has been dated by several independent dating laboratories with a multitude of methods. However, the data are still not accepted by some because the dating has not been carried out on the hominid specimen. Until recently, hominid fossils could only be dated by radiocarbon. This method reaches back to about 40,000 years. As a consequence, all the older fossils could not be analysed and many important questions in our understanding of human evolution could not be addressed. Human remains are scarce and extremely valuable, therefore any sort of destruction has to be kept to an absolute minimum. This is of particular importance in Australia where any human fossils are sacred. Thus, for the analysis of hominid material it was necessary to develop a more or less non-destructive techniques. This has been accomplished in recent years by the application of ESR dating of tooth enamel and a combination of gamma spectrometric and TIMS U-series dating of bones. The examples of

  3. The new AMS control centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    Construction work for the future AMS control room began in November 2010 and should be finished this June. The new building, which will have been completed in record time thanks to the professionalism of the project team, will soon be ready to receive the initial data from the AMS experiment.     Luigi Scibile and Michael Poehler, from the GS department, at the AMS control centre construction site.   The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is due to wing its way towards the International Space Station (ISS) on board the shuttle Discovery in April. Mainly intended for research on antimatter and dark matter, the data collected by AMS will be sent to Houston in the United States and then directly to CERN’s new Building 946. Construction work for the AMS control centre building on the Route Gentner at CERN’s Prévessin site started in November 2010 and must be completed in time to receive the first data from the spectrometer in June. “It normall...

  4. Location of radiocarbon age dates sampled from vibracores collected by the U.S. Geological Survey within Apalachicola Bay, Florida, 2007 (APP-07_AgeDates, points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey collected 24 vibracores within Apalachicola Bay, Florida. The vibracores were collected using a Rossfelder electric percussive...

  5. 77 FR 5377 - National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... hundred and thirty- sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-2634 Filed 2-2-12; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8777 of January 31, 2012 National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and... violent dating relationship. The consequences of dating violence--spanning impaired development...

  6. Análisis radiocarbónico en una tafocenosis de la región pampeana (provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina: Su vinculación con la Gran Seca de 1827-1832 Radiocarbon Analysis Of A Taphocenosis From The Pampean Region (Buenos Aires Province, Argentina And Its Relationships With The "Great Drought" Of 1827-1832

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo P. Tonni

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió una tafocenosis compuesta por gran número de ejemplares de Equus caballus, Bos taurus y Ovis aries, sin selección etaria. Se realizó una datación radiocarbónica sobre el colágeno del hueso de un húmero de Bos taurus; la fecha obtenida resultó "moderna" (entre 1750 y 1950 AD. Sin embargo, la concentración ΔC14 en el espécimen y su comparación con la curva de concentración ΔC14 para América del Sur, permitió inferir una edad de muerte que corresponde al lapso 1817-1828 AD. La fecha inferida refiere el origen de la tafocenosis a la "Gran Seca", uno de los eventos de sequía más importantes de la región pampeana, sobre el que se tiene registro histórico. Es éste el primer registro paleontológico de un evento de mortandad masiva de ganado relacionado con las frecuentes sequías verificada en la región pampeana durante los siglos XVIII y XIX.A taphocenosis composed of a great number of specimens of Equus caballus, Bos taurus and Ovis aries, without age selection, was analyzed. A radiocarbon date from the bone collagen of a humerus of Bos taurus was obtained; the date is "modern" (between AD 1750 and 1950. However, the 14C concentration of the specimen and its comparison with the South America concentration curve enabled the date to be narrowed down. The inferred date corresponds to the period AD 1817-1828, and suggests that the origin of the taphocenosis is related to the "Gran Seca" ("Great Drought", one of the most important drought events in the Pampeana Region for which there are historical records. This is the first paleontological record of an event of mass death of livestock related to the frequent droughts that affected the Pampean Region during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

  7. PALEOEARTHQUAKES IN THE PRIBAIKALIE: METHODS AND RESULTS OF DATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg P. Smekalin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Pribaikalie and adjacent territories, seismogeological studies have been underway for almost a half of the century and resulted in discovery of more than 70 dislocations of seismic or presumably seismic origin. With commencement of paleoseismic studies, dating of paleo-earthquakes was focused on as an indicator useful for long-term prediction of strong earthquakes. V.P. Solonenko [Solonenko, 1977] distinguished five methods for dating paleoseismogenic deformations, i.e. geological, engineering geological, historico-archeological, dendrochronological and radiocarbon methods. However, ages of the majority of seismic deformations, which were subject to studies at the initial stage of development of seismogeology in Siberia, were defined by methods of relative or correlation age determination.Since the 1980s, studies of seismogenic deformation in the Pribaikalie have been widely conducted with trenching. Mass sampling, followed with radiocarbon analyses and definition of absolute ages of paleo-earthquakes, provided new data on seismic regimes of the territory and rates of and recent displacements along active faults, and enhanced validity of methods of relative dating, in particular morphometry. Capacities of the morphometry method has significantly increased with introduction of laser techniques in surveys and digital processing of 3D relief models.Comprehensive seismogeological studies conducted in the Pribaikalie revealed 43 paleo-events within 16 seismogenic structures. Absolute ages of 18 paleo-events were defined by the radiocarbon age determination method. Judging by their ages, a number of dislocations were related with historical earthquakes which occurred in the 18th and 19th centuries, yet any reliable data on epicenters of such events are not available. The absolute and relative dating methods allowed us to identify sections in some paleoseismogenic structures by differences in ages of activation and thus provided new data for

  8. Optical dating using feldspar from Quaternary alluvial and colluvial sediments from SE Brazilian Plateau, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatumi, Sonia H. E-mail: tatumi@fatecsp.br; Peixoto, Maria Naise O.; Moura, Josilda R.S.; Mello, Claudio L.; Carmo, Isabela O.; Kowata, Emilia A.; Yee, Marcio; Brito, Silvio Luiz M.; Gozzi, Giuiliano; Kassab, Luciana R.P

    2003-05-01

    Opticallly stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating has been applied to a wide variety of materials such as loess, sand dunes, colluvium, alluvium, volcanic products, etc., helping geologic geomorphologic studies. OSL dating results using feldspar crystals extracted from alluvial and colluvial deposits of SE Brazilian Plateau will be presented in this work. The methodology used is based on the regeneration method, with multiple aliquot protocol. A total of 23 sample ages were obtained spanning 6.5-97.2 kyr. Results of radioactive contents and comparison with radiocarbon ages will be discussed.

  9. An Overview of the Use of Absolute Dating Techniques in Ancient Construction Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Sanjurjo-Sánchez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of the chronology of historical buildings is a tricky issue, as usually there are not historical documents that allow the assessment of construction phases, and some materials are hardly reliable for the use of dating techniques (e.g., stone. However, in the last two decades, important advances on the use of absolute dating methods on building materials have increased the possibilities of reconstructing building chronologies, although some advances are still scarcely known among archaeologists and architects. Recent studies performed on several kinds of mortars, fired bricks, mud-bricks, and even stone surfaces have shown that it is possible to date them. Both radiocarbon and luminescence dating have been the most frequently used techniques but others such as archaeomagnetism can also be used in some cases. This paper intends to give an overview of the recent achievements on the use of absolute dating techniques for building materials.

  10. A simple Bragg detector design for AMS and IBA applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Arnold Milenko; Döbeli, Max; Seiler, Martin; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-08-01

    A new compact Bragg type gas ionization chamber (GIC) has been built for use as particle counter in AMS and IBA applications. The detector stands out due to its simple concept, which does not include a Frisch grid. Test experiments have been performed with ions in the mass range from He to Th and energies ranging from 30 keV to 2.5 MeV, in order to find optimal measurement conditions and to characterize the detector performance. For projectiles heavier than Al at energies below 2.5 MeV the obtained energy resolution is comparable with that of a state-of-the-art GIC with Frisch grid and clearly outperforms solid state detectors. Additionally the operation of this simplified Bragg GIC in the electron multiplication mode was investigated for the first time, which allows the detection of radiocarbon ions at energies below 50 keV with an energy resolution of the order of 10 keV.

  11. 10Be inventories in Alpine soils and their potentiality for dating land surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Markus; Brandová, Dagmar; Böhlert, Ralph; Favilli, Filippo; Kubik, Peter W.

    2010-05-01

    To exploit natural archives and geomorphic objects it is necessary to date them first. Landscape evolution of Alpine areas is often strongly related to the activities of glaciers in the Pleistocene and Holocene. At sites where no organic matter for radiocarbon dating exists and where suitable boulders for surface exposure dating (using in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides) are absent, dating of soils could give information about the timing of landscape evolution. We explored the applicability of soil dating using the inventory of meteoric Be-10 in Alpine soils. For this purpose, a set of 6 soil profiles in the Swiss and Italian Alps was investigated. The surface at these sites had already been dated (using the radiocarbon technique or surface exposure dating using in situ produced Be-10). Consequently, a direct comparison of the ages of the soils using meteoric Be-10 and other dating techniques was made possible. The estimation of Be-10 deposition rates is subject to severe limitations and strongly influences the obtained results. We tested three scenarios using a) the meteoric Be-10 deposition rates as a function of the annual precipitation rate, b) a constant Be-10 input for the Central Alps and c) as b) but assuming a pre-exposure of the parent material. The obtained ages that are based on the Be-10 inventory in soils and on scenario a) for the Be-10 input agreed reasonably well with the expected age (obtained from surface exposure or radiocarbon dating). The ages obtained from soils using scenario b) produced mostly ages that were too old whereas the approach using scenario c) seemed to yield better results than scenario b). Erosion calculations can, in theory, be performed using the Be-10 inventory and Be-10 deposition rates. An erosion estimation was possible using scenario a) and c), but not using b). The estimated erosion rates are in a reasonable range. The dating of soils using Be-10 has several potential error sources. Analytical errors as well as errors

  12. A non-destructive method for dating human remains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lail, Warren K.; Sammeth, David; Mahan, Shannon; Nevins, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The skeletal remains of several Native Americans were recovered in an eroded state from a creek bank in northeastern New Mexico. Subsequently stored in a nearby museum, the remains became lost for almost 36 years. In a recent effort to repatriate the remains, it was necessary to fit them into a cultural chronology in order to determine the appropriate tribe(s) for consultation pursuant to the Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). Because the remains were found in an eroded context with no artifacts or funerary objects, their age was unknown. Having been asked to avoid destructive dating methods such as radiocarbon dating, the authors used Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) to date the sediments embedded in the cranium. The OSL analyses yielded reliable dates between A.D. 1415 and A.D. 1495. Accordingly, we conclude that the remains were interred somewhat earlier than A.D. 1415, but no later than A.D. 1495. We believe the remains are from individuals ancestral to the Ute Mouache Band, which is now being contacted for repatriation efforts. Not only do our methods contribute to the immediate repatriation efforts, they provide archaeologists with a versatile, non-destructive, numerical dating method that can be used in many burial contexts.

  13. The First Radiocarbon-Constrained Full-Vector Holocene Paleomagnetic Secular Variation Reconstruction for Eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, F.; St-Onge, G.; Stoner, J.; Lajeunesse, P.

    2009-05-01

    Here we present the first high-resolution Holocene paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) master curve and relative paleointensity stack constrained by radiocarbon dates for Eastern Canada. This reconstruction is based on seven sedimentary sequences collected from the St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf from the head to the mouth of the Laurentian Channel. The natural remanent magnetization (NRM), the anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) and the isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) were measured on u-channel samples at the Paleomagnetism Laboratory of ISMER using a 2G Enterprises cryogenic magnetometer. Magnetic mineralogy was additionally assessed using a recently installed alternative gradient force magnetometer (AGM). The magnetic mineralogy of the Holocene postglacial sediments is mainly carried by low-coercivity ferrimagnetic minerals (most likely magnetite) in the pseudo-single domain size range. The characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM), assessed by principal component analysis, reveals the presence of a stable and well-defined magnetization characterized by maximum angular deviation (MAD) values generally lower than 5°. Furthermore, ChRM inclinations fluctuate around the expected geocentric axial dipole (GAD) magnetic inclination for the latitude of the coring sites (from 63° to 66°). The similarity of these records on their own independent timescales implies that all of the individual sedimentary sequences record a reliable Holocene PSV record for Eastern Canada. Relative paleointensity (RPI) was estimated by normalizing the NRM by the ARM which provided the best coercivity match. Lastly, the paleomagnetic directional and RPI records were stacked on a common time scale spanning the last ~10 000 cal BP. The smoothed PSV stack reveal centennial- to millennial-scale geomagnetic features concordant with the CALS7K.2 time-varying spherical harmonic model, as well as with the US eastern stack (King and Peck, 2001). Comparisons further a field with the

  14. 78 FR 44121 - FCC Extends Reply Comment Dates for Indecency Cases Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (1998). Electronic Filers: Reply comments may be filed... COMMISSION FCC Extends Reply Comment Dates for Indecency Cases Policy AGENCY: Federal Communications...:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday or from 8 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. on Friday at the FCC...

  15. Pollen-based biome reconstructions for Latin America at 0, 6000 and 18 000 radiocarbon years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchant, R.; Harrison, S.P.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Cleef, A.M.; Hammen, van der T.; Wille, M.

    2009-01-01

    The biomisation method is used to reconstruct Latin American vegetation at 6000±500 and 18 000±1000 radiocarbon years before present (14C yr BP) from pollen data. Tests using modern pollen data from 381 samples derived from 287 locations broadly reproduce potential natural vegetation. The strong tem

  16. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, J.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Ao, L.; Arefiev, A.; Azzarello, P.; Babucci, E.; Baldini, L.; Basile, M.; Barancourt, D.; Barao, F.; Barbier, G.; Barreira, G.; Battiston, R.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bene, P.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Biland, A.; Bizzaglia, S.; Blasko, S.; Boella, G.; Boschini, M.; Bourquin, M.; Brocco, L.; Bruni, G.; Buenerd, M.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Camps, C.; Cannarsa, P.; Capell, M.; Casadei, D.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cecchi, C.; Chang, Y.H.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chen, Z.G.; Chernoplekov, N.A.; Chiueh, T.H.; Chuang, Y.L.; Cindolo, F.; Commichau, V.; Contin, A. E-mail: contin@bo.infn.it; Crespo, P.; Cristinziani, M.; Cunha, J.P. da; Dai, T.S.; Deus, J.D.; Dinu, N.; Djambazov, L.; DAntone, I.; Dong, Z.R.; Emonet, P.; Engelberg, J.; Eppling, F.J.; Eronen, T.; Esposito, G.; Extermann, P.; Favier, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fisher, P.H.; Fluegge, G.; Fouque, N.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gervasi, M.; Giusti, P.; Grandi, D.; Grimm, O.; Gu, W.Q.; Hangarter, K.; Hasan, A.; Hermel, V.; Hofer, H.; Huang, M.A.; Hungerford, W.; Ionica, M.; Ionica, R.; Jongmanns, M.; Karlamaa, K.; Karpinski, W.; Kenney, G.; Kenny, J.; Kim, W.; Klimentov, A.; Kossakowski, R.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraeber, M.; Laborie, G.; Laitinen, T.; Lamanna, G.; Laurenti, G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, S.C.; Levi, G.; Levtchenko, P.; Liu, C.L.; Liu, H.T.; Lopes, I.; Lu, G.; Lu, Y.S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luckey, D.; Lustermann, W.; Mana, C.; Margotti, A.; Mayet, F.; McNeil, R.R.; Meillon, B.; Menichelli, M.; Mihul, A.; Mourao, A.; Mujunen, A.; Palmonari, F.; Papi, A.; Park, I.H.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, E.; Pesci, A.; Pevsner, A.; Pimenta, M.; Plyaskin, V.; Pojidaev, V.; Postolache, V.; Produit, N.; Rancoita, P.G.; Rapin, D.; Raupach, F.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Ribordy, M.; Richeux, J.P.; Riihonen, E.; Ritakari, J.; Roeser, U.; Roissin, C.; Sagdeev, R.; Sartorelli, G.; Schultz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E.S.; Shoutko, V.

    2002-02-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a large acceptance (0.65 sr m{sup 2}) detector designed to operate in the International Space Station (ISS) for three years. The purposes of the experiment are to search for cosmic antimatter and dark matter and to study the composition and energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays. A 'scaled-down' version has been flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery for 10 days in June 1998. The complete AMS is programmed for installation on the ISS in October 2003 for an operational period of 3 yr. This contribution reports on the experimental configuration that will be installed on the ISS.

  17. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz, J; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Babucci, E; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Bene, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Bizzaglia, S; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, Maurice; Brocco, L; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cecchi, C; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Chuang, Y L; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Crespo, P; Cristinziani, M; Cunha, J P D; Dai, T S; Deus, J D; Dinu, N; Djambazov, L; Dantone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, P; Favier, Jean; Fiandrini, E; Fisher, P H; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Grimm, O; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Huang, M A; Hungerford, W; Ionica, M; Ionica, R; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kenny, J; Kim, W; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Koutsenko, V F; Kraeber, M; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Levchenko, P M; Liu, C L; Liu, H T; Lopes, I; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mihul, A; Mourao, A; Mujunen, A; Palmonari, F; Papi, A; Park, I H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Postolache, V; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Röser, U; Roissin, C; Sagdeev, R; Sartorelli, G; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shoutko, V; Shoumilov, E; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torsti, J; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Usoskin, I; Valtonen, E; Vandenhirtz, J; Velcea, F; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, Gert M; Vitè, Davide F; Gunten, H V; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wang, Y H; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Yan, J L; Yan, L G; Yang, C G; Yang, M; Ye, S W; Yeh, P; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B

    2002-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a large acceptance (0.65 sr m sup 2) detector designed to operate in the International Space Station (ISS) for three years. The purposes of the experiment are to search for cosmic antimatter and dark matter and to study the composition and energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays. A 'scaled-down' version has been flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery for 10 days in June 1998. The complete AMS is programmed for installation on the ISS in October 2003 for an operational period of 3 yr. This contribution reports on the experimental configuration that will be installed on the ISS.

  18. América Latina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Olalla

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo analiza el sentido intelectualista de la producción literaria modernista de Latinoamérica. Dicho enfoque es revisado en la obra del escritor argentino Manuel Ugarte (1875-1951 El porvenir de América Latina (1910. Nuestra lectura ofrece algunas líneas para la discriminación de las diversas fuentes ideológicas del intelectualismo en el “americanismo literario”. Consideramos en tal sentido la perspectiva historicista con la que Ugarte describe la composición social de América Latina.

  19. Radiometric Dating in Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankhurst, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Described are several aspects and methods of quantitatively measuring geologic time using a constant-rate natural process of radioactive decay. Topics include half lives and decay constants, radiogenic growth, potassium-argon dating, rubidium-strontium dating, and the role of geochronology in support of geological exploration. (DS)

  20. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  1. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  2. Upper-ocean-to-atmosphere radiocarbon offsets imply fast deglacial carbon dioxide release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kathryn A; Sikes, Elisabeth L; Guilderson, Thomas P; Shane, Phil; Hill, Tessa M; Zahn, Rainer; Spero, Howard J

    2010-08-26

    Radiocarbon in the atmosphere is regulated largely by ocean circulation, which controls the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in the deep sea through atmosphere-ocean carbon exchange. During the last glaciation, lower atmospheric CO(2) levels were accompanied by increased atmospheric radiocarbon concentrations that have been attributed to greater storage of CO(2) in a poorly ventilated abyssal ocean. The end of the ice age was marked by a rapid increase in atmospheric CO(2) concentrations that coincided with reduced (14)C/(12)C ratios (Delta(14)C) in the atmosphere, suggesting the release of very 'old' ((14)C-depleted) CO(2) from the deep ocean to the atmosphere. Here we present radiocarbon records of surface and intermediate-depth waters from two sediment cores in the southwest Pacific and Southern oceans. We find a steady 170 per mil decrease in Delta(14)C that precedes and roughly equals in magnitude the decrease in the atmospheric radiocarbon signal during the early stages of the glacial-interglacial climatic transition. The atmospheric decrease in the radiocarbon signal coincides with regionally intensified upwelling and marine biological productivity, suggesting that CO(2) released by means of deep water upwelling in the Southern Ocean lost most of its original depleted-(14)C imprint as a result of exchange and isotopic equilibration with the atmosphere. Our data imply that the deglacial (14)C depletion previously identified in the eastern tropical North Pacific must have involved contributions from sources other than the previously suggested carbon release by way of a deep Southern Ocean pathway, and may reflect the expanded influence of the (14)C-depleted North Pacific carbon reservoir across this interval. Accordingly, shallow water masses advecting north across the South Pacific in the early deglaciation had little or no residual (14)C-depleted signals owing to degassing of CO(2) and biological uptake in the Southern Ocean.

  3. Biogenic contribution to PM-2.5 ambient aerosol from radiocarbon measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C.; Klouda, G.; Ellenson, W.

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide a means to quantify the biogenic fraction of any carbon-containing sample of ambient aerosol. In the absence of an impact from biomass burning (e.g., during summertime) such measurements can provide an estimate of the contribution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol, from biogenic volatile organic compound precursors. Radiocarbon results for 11.5-h PM-2.5 samples collected near Nashville, Tennessee, USA, during summer 1999 will be presented. On average the measured biogenic fraction was surprisingly large (more than half), with the average biogenic fraction for night samples being only slightly smaller than for day samples. Discussion will include (a) description of the radiocarbon methodology, (b) use of radiocarbon measurements on local vegetation and fuel samples as calibration data, (c) concurrent measurements of organic carbon and elemental carbon ambient concentrations, (d) assessment of organic aerosol sampling artifact through use of organic vapor denuders, variable face velocities, and filter extraction, and (e) comparison with published radiocarbon results obtained in Houston, Texas in a similar study. Disclaimer: This work has been funded wholly or in part by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under Interagency Agreement No. 13937923 to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Contract No. 68-D5-0049 to ManTech Environmental Tecnology, Inc. It has been subjected to Agency review and approved for publication.

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry {sup 14}C dating of lime mortars: Methodological aspects and field study applications at CIRCE (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzaioli, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.marzaioli@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy); Nonni, Sara, E-mail: sara.nonni@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, ' Sapienza' Universita di Roma (Italy); Passariello, Isabella, E-mail: isabella.passariello@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy); Capano, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.capano@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Dipartimento di Studio delle Componenti Culturali del Territorio, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Santa Maria Capua Vetere, Caserta (Italy); Ricci, Paola, E-mail: paola.ricci@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy); Lubritto, Carmine, E-mail: carmine.lubritto@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy); De Cesare, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.decesare@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Caserta (Italy); Eramo, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.eramo@uniba.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Geoambientali, Universita degli Studi di Bari ' Aldo Moro' , Bari (Italy); Quiros Castillo, Juan Antonio, E-mail: quiros.castillo@ehu.es [Universidad del Pais Vasco-Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Dipartimento di Geografia, Prehistoria y Arqueologia, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); and others

    2013-01-15

    Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) has, recently, obtained some promising results in testing the feasibility of mortar radiocarbon dating by means of an ad hoc developed purification procedure (CryoSoniC: Cryobraking, Sonication, Centrifugation) applied to a series of laboratory mortars. Observed results encouraged CryoSoniC accuracy evaluation on genuine mortars sampled from archeological sites of known or independently constrained age (i.e., other {sup 14}C dates on different materials). In this study, some {sup 14}C measurements performed on genuine mortars will be discussed and compared with independently estimated (i.e., radiocarbon/archaeometrical dating) absolute chronologies of two Spanish sites. Observed results confirm the agreement of the CryoSoniC mortar dates with the archaeological expectations for both examined cases. Several authors reported the possibility of obtaining accurate radiocarbon dates of mortar matrices by analyzing lime lumps: binder-related particles of different sizes exclusively composed of calcium carbonate. In this paper, preliminary data for the absolute chronology reconstruction of the Basilica of the cemetery complex of Ponte della Lama (Canosa di Puglia, Italy) based on lime lumps will also be discussed. Dating accuracy will be quantified by comparing {sup 14}C data on mortar lime lumps from a funerary inscription of known age found near the Basilica, in the same study site. For this site, a comparison between absolute chronologies performed by bulk and CryoSoniC purified lime lumps, and charcoal incased in mortars (when found) will also be discussed. Observed results for this site provide evidence of how bulk lime lump dating may introduce systematic overestimations of the analyzed sample while CryoSoniC purification allows accurate dating.

  5. 10Be inventories in Alpine soils and their potential for dating land surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Markus; Brandová, Dagmar; Böhlert, Ralph; Favilli, Filippo; Kubik, Peter W.

    2010-07-01

    To exploit natural sedimentary archives and geomorphic landforms it is necessary to date them first. Landscape evolution of Alpine areas is often strongly related to the activities of glaciers in the Pleistocene and Holocene. At sites where no organic matter for radiocarbon dating exists and where suitable boulders for surface exposure dating (using in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides) are absent, dating of soils could give information about the timing of landscape evolution. This paper explores the applicability of soil dating using the inventory of meteoric 10Be in Alpine soils. For this purpose, a set of 6 soil profiles in the Swiss and Italian Alps was investigated. The surface at these sites had already been dated (using the radiocarbon technique or the surface exposure determination using in situ produced 10Be). Consequently, a direct comparison of the ages of the soils using meteoric 10Be and other dating techniques was made possible. The estimation of 10Be deposition rates is subject to severe limitations and strongly influences the obtained results. We tested three scenarios using a) the meteoric 10Be deposition rates as a function of the annual precipitation rate, b) a constant 10Be input for the Central Alps, and c) as b) but assuming a pre-exposure of the parent material. The obtained ages that are based on the 10Be inventory in soils and on scenario a) for the 10Be input agreed reasonably well with the age using surface exposure or radiocarbon dating. The ages obtained from soils using scenario b) produced ages that were mostly too old whereas the approach using scenario c) seemed to yield better results than scenario b). Erosion calculations can, in theory, be performed using the 10Be inventory and 10Be deposition rates. An erosion estimation was possible using scenario a) and c), but not using b). The calculated erosion rates using these scenarios seemed to be plausible with values in the range of 0-57 mm/ky. The dating of soils using 10Be has

  6. Applications of 14C-AMS on archaeology, climate, environment, geology, oceanography and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , as at remote lakes of the Amazon region, the Hg accumulation rate archived in sediment cores may be a powerful tool for the interpretation of the paleoclimatology and paleoecology of the region. Mercury (and carbon) fluxes can be obtained from the product of the sedimentation rate, bulk density and mercury (carbon) concentration. The sedimentation rate can be obtained from the 14C-AMS dating of samples from the sediment cores. Three different sedimentation regimes, representing paleoclimatic processes that influenced the characteristics of the deposited material, are clearly observed. The first, from ∼41500 to ∼26000 yr. BP (Pleistocene), and the last, from 18000 yr. BP to the present (Tardiglacial and Holocene), correspond to steady sedimentation rates. There is a hiatus between ∼25000 and ∼18000 yr. BP. At ∼18000 yr. BP (Last Glacial Maximum-LGM), there is a sudden input of ∼20 cm of clastic material. The average flux since the LGM was much higher than prior to the LGM. This increase in the mercury deposition rate after the LGM may be linked to drier periods and a higher frequency of forest fires. The next experiment is part of a research on rapid climatic induced sea-level changes and paleotemperature of surface and bottom waters in South Atlantic. The understanding of sea-level fluctuations is fundamental for human occupation of littoral areas and hydrocarbon industry on offshore exploration. We performed radiocarbon dating of foraminifera shell samples, collected in upper slope of Campos Basin, offshore Cabo Frio, Rio de Janeiro State, in Southern Brazil. Samples are from a 34 cm sedimentary column of a box-core sample collected at 393 m water depth, Ages vary from 2560±80 y BP on the top to 7260±80 BP at the bottom of the sediment column, and show good correlation age X depth. The mean accumulation ratio for the whole column is 6.17 cm/1000 years. Fluctuations in this mean values indicate that the ocean bottom dynamics has some variation during

  7. Target preparation at the ANTARES AMS Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, G.E.; Hua, Q.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M.A.C.; Lawson, E.M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Antares Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy Centre at ANSTO has two chemistry labs dedicated to preparing targets for measurement. Target preparation encompasses a variety of activities ranging from the curation of incoming samples to the numerous steps involved in the purification and processing of dissimilar samples. One of the two laboratories is set up for the physical and chemical pretreatment of {sup 14}C samples. Treatments include cleaning by sonification, sorting, grinding and sieving, and chemical treatments such as the standard AAA treatment, and solvent extraction. Combustion and graphitization are also carried out in this laboratory. The second laboratory is a clean room and is dedicated to the combustion, hydrolysis and graphitization of {sup 14}C samples as well as the process of the targets for the other isotopes. Combustion is achieved by heating the sample to 900 deg C in the presence of CuO, the resulting gas is purified by passing over Ag and Cu wire at 600 deg C. Graphitization is carried out by reducing the CO{sub 2} with an iron catalyst (600 deg C) in the presence of zinc (400 deg C) and a small amount of hydrogen. Samples such as charcoal, shell bone, wood, sediment, seawater and groundwater, containing 0.3-1 mg or more of original carbon, are processed routinely for radiocarbon analysis. The current {sup 14}C chemistry background for 1 mg carbon is {approx} 0.3 percent of modern carbon (pMC) enabling us to date materials up to 45 000 BP. Samples of 0.5 - 3 mg carbon or more are routinely performed with a precision < 1% At present, procedures are being tested for the treatment of samples containing a minimum of 20 {mu}g original carbon. Such small samples sre more likely to be affected by contamination with modern carbon. These laboratories are also being expanded to cater for the processing of a variety of samples for the measurement of other isotopes, ie {sup 129}I, {sup 10}Be, {sup 36}CI and {sup 26}Al. Initial tests for the extraction of

  8. 14C AMS measurements of tree leaf samples to monitor air pollution induced by city traffic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, many radiocarbon measurement have been made for environmental studies such as source apportionment of air-borne particulates, and studies of the anthropogenic effects of nuclear power plants. In this presentation we report our accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of radiocarbon on tree leaf samples to investigate the impact of city traffic on our living-environment. The fossil-burning vehicles emit carbon dioxide (CO2) free of 14C content and, when mixed with the clean air CO2, lower 14C ratio compared to the normal reservoir value. This so-called Suess effect can be incorporated to monitor air quality in our living environments, since metabolic processes maintain the 14C content of living organism in equilibrium with atmospheric 14C. In other words, dead CO2 is admixed to the normal atmospheric CO2 and then photo-synthetically assimilated by the plants. Two kinds of tree leaf samples; pine tree needles and Ginkgo tree leaves were collected during a one-week period in the summer 1996 at five different locations with various traffic conditions in the region, within a 10-km diameter circle, south of the River Han, Seoul. The AMS targets were made by a simple sample-making procedure. The leaves have been pretreated by a standard acid-alkali treatment and then charred in a vacuum evaporator by applying ca. 800 deg C heat. The charred samples were mixed with Ag powder and pressed into the Al target holder for the AMS measurement.The AMS measurements were made using the accelerator mass spectrometry facilities of the Leibniz-Labor at the Christian-Albrecht University, Kiel,Germany. The observed Δ14C values, which ranged from 60TM to 158TM, have a good correlation with the traffic conditions in the places where the sampling took place and show a remarkable capability of 14C AMS measurements to monitor our fossil burning environment. The volume ratios of clean air to air from fossil-burn origin in the environmental CO2 reached to a level of 8

  9. High-temporal resolution radiocarbon analyses of dissolved organic matter in soils from a mountainous and temperate ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, Tessa Sophia; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; McIntyre, Cameron; Hagedorn, Frank; Eglinton, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    A better understanding of the stability and turnover of soil dissolved organic matter (DOM) is key in order to predict the behavior and response of this dynamic carbon pool to climate and land use change. Radiocarbon is increasingly used to determine carbon turnover in carbon cycle studies. However, due to the nature of radiocarbon measurement as well as complexity of in-situ DOM collection, little comprehensive radiocarbon and turnover data is currently available. This project combines a high-resolution temporal DOM sequence for a mountainous (podzol) and temperate (cambisol) forest ecosystem with additional bulk- and fraction-specific soil organic matter analyses. DOM was collected bi-weekly on two sites of the Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research (LWF) program of the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape research (WSL) at four depths, and measured for radiocarbon content. These initial results indicate bi-weekly variation in radiocarbon signatures over the summer season and a strong soil-type dependent pattern in DO14C trend. Overall, these initial radiocarbon results indicate that DOM dynamics are seasonally variable, and thus could potentially be sensitive to future climate change. Furthermore, the DO14C trend helps to better understand the trends as can be seen in the bulk 14C signature of the soil organic matter. Detailed radiocarbon investigations of soil DOM may yield key insights into the complex carbon transport dynamics in different soil systems and their potential behavior under climate change scenarios.

  10. Role of radiation dating technique - one example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The great majority of archaeological or geological dating technique is based on radiation effect. The so called radioactivity method uses radioactive decays of elements. This is the case of the well known radiocarbon or carbon-14 method. Also the method of relating daughter nucleus to decaying nucleus, as in K-40/Ar-40, Th- 230/U-234, etc. Here we will concentrate in the method based on energy deposition in a solid by radiation from the disintegration of U-series and Th-series. β-rays emitted by the decay of K-40 into Ca-40 (80%) and Ar-40 (11%) also contributes. The role of α, β and γ radiation emitted by radionuclides in the U-238 and Th-232 series and of β rays from the decay of K-40, all of them in the soil irradiate anything in their course. For dating, we can have sediments as well as potteries produced by ancient people and became buried. The important process consists in transferring a fraction of the energy of radiation to the solid, mainly liberating electrons from valence band to conduction band and from there to traps. In many case the energy of the radiation is used to create defects which in turn create energy levels (traps) in the forbidden gap (or energy gap). There are three ways to recover the energy stored in the solid: (1) by emission of light optically stimulated (OSL), (2) by emission of light thermally stimulated (TL), (3) by microwave absorption (EPR or ESR). Using these techniques among several applications, we will present one to find the first settlers in the northeaster region of Brazil. (author)

  11. Role of radiation dating technique - one example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Shigueo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Etchevarne, Carlos A. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Fac. de Filosofia e Ciencias Humanas. Dept. Antropologia e Etnologia; Cano, Nilo F.; Munita, C.S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The great majority of archaeological or geological dating technique is based on radiation effect. The so called radioactivity method uses radioactive decays of elements. This is the case of the well known radiocarbon or carbon-14 method. Also the method of relating daughter nucleus to decaying nucleus, as in K-40/Ar-40, Th- 230/U-234, etc. Here we will concentrate in the method based on energy deposition in a solid by radiation from the disintegration of U-series and Th-series. {beta}-rays emitted by the decay of K-40 into Ca-40 (80%) and Ar-40 (11%) also contributes. The role of {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} radiation emitted by radionuclides in the U-238 and Th-232 series and of {beta} rays from the decay of K-40, all of them in the soil irradiate anything in their course. For dating, we can have sediments as well as potteries produced by ancient people and became buried. The important process consists in transferring a fraction of the energy of radiation to the solid, mainly liberating electrons from valence band to conduction band and from there to traps. In many case the energy of the radiation is used to create defects which in turn create energy levels (traps) in the forbidden gap (or energy gap). There are three ways to recover the energy stored in the solid: (1) by emission of light optically stimulated (OSL), (2) by emission of light thermally stimulated (TL), (3) by microwave absorption (EPR or ESR). Using these techniques among several applications, we will present one to find the first settlers in the northeaster region of Brazil. (author)

  12. The emergence of mesolithic cemeteries in SW Europe: insights from the El Collado (Oliva, Valencia, Spain radiocarbon record.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Gibaja

    Full Text Available Located on the Iberian Mediterranean coast, El Collado is an open-air site where a rescue excavation was conducted over two seasons in 1987 and 1988. The archaeological work excavated a surface area of 143 m2 where 14 burials were discovered, providing skeletal remains from 15 individuals. We have obtained AMS dates for 10 of the 15 individuals by means of the direct dating of human bones. The ranges of the probability distribution of the calibrated dates suggest that the cemetery was used during a long period of time (781-1020 years at a probability of 95.4%. The new dates consequently set back the chrono-cultural attribution of the cemetery from the initial proposal of Late Mesolithic to an older date in the Early Mesolithic. Therefore, El Collado becomes the oldest known cemetery in the Iberian Peninsula, earlier than the numerous Mesolithic funerary contexts documented on the Atlantic façade such as the Portuguese shell-middens in the Muge and Sado Estuaries or the funerary sites on the northern Iberian coast.

  13. The emergence of mesolithic cemeteries in SW Europe: insights from the El Collado (Oliva, Valencia, Spain) radiocarbon record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibaja, Juan F; Subirà, M Eulàlia; Terradas, Xavier; Santos, F Javier; Agulló, Lidia; Gómez-Martínez, Isabel; Allièse, Florence; Fernández-López de Pablo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Located on the Iberian Mediterranean coast, El Collado is an open-air site where a rescue excavation was conducted over two seasons in 1987 and 1988. The archaeological work excavated a surface area of 143 m2 where 14 burials were discovered, providing skeletal remains from 15 individuals. We have obtained AMS dates for 10 of the 15 individuals by means of the direct dating of human bones. The ranges of the probability distribution of the calibrated dates suggest that the cemetery was used during a long period of time (781-1020 years at a probability of 95.4%). The new dates consequently set back the chrono-cultural attribution of the cemetery from the initial proposal of Late Mesolithic to an older date in the Early Mesolithic. Therefore, El Collado becomes the oldest known cemetery in the Iberian Peninsula, earlier than the numerous Mesolithic funerary contexts documented on the Atlantic façade such as the Portuguese shell-middens in the Muge and Sado Estuaries or the funerary sites on the northern Iberian coast.

  14. NAIP 2012 Image Dates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — This map is produced by the Aerial Phtography Field Office (APFO) to show the image acquisition dates for the 2012 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  15. Expiration Dates Matter

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Expiration Dates Matter ... recalls [ARCHIVED] CDER FOIA Electronic Reading Room Related Consumer Updates How to Dispose of Unused Medicines Identifying ...

  16. Radiometric dating methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general principle of isotope dating methods is based on the presence of radioactive isotopes in the geologic or archaeological object to be dated. The decay with time of these isotopes is used to determine the 'zero' time corresponding to the event to be dated. This paper recalls the general principle of isotope dating methods (bases, analytical methods, validation of results and uncertainties) and presents the methods based on natural radioactivity (Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, U-Pb, Re-Os, K-Ar (Ar-Ar), U-Th-Ra-210Pb, U-Pa, 14C, 36Cl, 10Be) and the methods based on artificial radioactivity with their applications. Finally, the methods based on irradiation damages (thermoluminescence, fission tracks, electron spin resonance) are briefly evoked. (J.S.)

  17. Expiration Dates Matter

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-mail | Consumer Updates RSS Feed If your medicine has expired, it may not provide the treatment ... Bernstein explains how expiration dates help determine if medicine is safe to use and will work as ...

  18. Dating and Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day National Gay Men's HIV/AIDS Awareness Day National Latino AIDS Awareness Day World AIDS Day Conferences 30 Years of ... Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Dating and Marriage ...

  19. NAIP 2014 Image Dates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — This map is produced by the Aerial Phtography Field Office (APFO) to show the image acquisition dates for the 2014 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  20. Food Product Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standard Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices ... Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Food Product Dating "Sell by Feb 14" is a ...

  1. Principles of radiometric dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major contributions that the study of meteorites has made to our understanding of the origin of the solar system is in defining when that event took place. In addition, several other important events in early solar-system history have been dated using radiochronological techniques applied to meteorites. The principles on which those applications of radiometric dating are based are outlined. 24 references

  2. A Blind Date

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周立

    2003-01-01

    英语对话:A: Talking about girls, I still remember my first time to meet my girlfriend. Iwas so clumsy and very nervous.B: That’s the same case with me. I had the jitters at my blind date, too.A: Did you also meet your girlfriend at a blind date?B: Yeah. I was actually very shy of speaking to girls, you know?

  3. Challenges faced when using radiocarbon measurements to estimate fossil fuel emissions in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, A.; O'Doherty, S.; Rigby, M. L.; Ganesan, A.; Manning, A.; Allen, G.

    2015-12-01

    Estimating the anthropogenic component of carbon dioxide emissions from direct atmospheric measurements is difficult, due to the large natural carbon dioxide fluxes. One way of determining the fossil fuel component of atmospheric carbon dioxide is the use of radiocarbon measurements. Whilst carbon reservoirs with a reasonably fast carbon exchange rate all have a similar radiocarbon content, fossil fuels are completely devoid of radiocarbon due to their age. Previous studies have 14CO2 (UK) this approach is compromised by the high density of 14CO2 emitting nuclear power plants. Of the 16 nuclear reactors in the UK, 14 are advanced gas cooled reactors, which have one of the highest 14CO2 emission rates of all reactor types. These radiocarbon emissions not only lead to a serious underestimation of the recently added fossil fuel CO2, by masking the depletion of 14C in CO2, but can in fact overshadow the depletion by a factor of 2 or more. While a correction for this enhancement can be applied, the emissions from the nuclear power plants are highly variable, and an accurate correction is therefore not straightforward. We present the first attempt to quantify UK fossil fuel CO2 emissions through the use of 14CO2. We employ a sampling strategy that makes use of a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, in combination with nuclear industry emission estimates, to forecast "good" sampling times, in an attempt to minimize the correction due to emissions from the nuclear industry. As part of the Greenhouse gAs Uk and Global Emissions (GAUGE) project, 14CO2measurements are performed at two measurement sites in the UK and Ireland, as well as during science flights around the UK. The measurement locations have been chosen with a focus on high emitting regions such as London and the Midlands. We discuss the unique challenges that face the determination of fossil fuel emissions through radiocarbon measurements in the UK and our sampling strategy to deal with them. In addition we

  4. A compact tritium AMS system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarappa, M L; Dingley, K H; Hamm, R W; Love, A H; Roberts, M L

    1999-09-23

    Tritium ({sup 3}H) is a radioisotope that is extensively utilized in biological and environmental research. For biological research, {sup 3}H is generally quantified by liquid scintillation counting requiring gram-sized samples and counting times of several hours. For environmental research, {sup 3}H is usually quantified by {sup 3}He in-growth which requires gram-sized samples and in-growth times of several months. In contrast, provisional studies at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry have demonstrated that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be used to quantify {sup 3}H in milligram-sized biological samples with a 100 to 1000-fold improvement in detection limits when compared to scintillation counting. This increased sensitivity is expected to have great impact in the biological and environmental research community. However in order to make the {sup 3}H AMS technique more broadly accessible, smaller, simpler, and less expensive AMS instrumentation must be developed. To meet this need, a compact, relatively low cost prototype {sup 3}H AMS system has been designed and built based on a LLNL ion source/sample changer and an AccSys Technology, Inc. Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac. With the prototype system, {sup 3}/{sup 1}H ratios ranging from 1 x 10{sup -10} to 1 x 10{sup -13} have to be measured from milligram sized samples. With improvements in system operation and sample preparation methodology, the sensitivity limit of the system is expected to increase to approximately 1 x 10{sup -15}.

  5. WILL I AM visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Noemi Caraban

    2013-01-01

    Will.i.am visited CERN in December 2013, fulfilling a wish he made in a video-link appearance at TEDxCERN earlier that year http://tedxcern.web.cern.ch/video/choral-performance-reach-stars-william. During his visit, he was shown the Antimatter Decelerator, the underground ATLAS experiment cavern and the CERN Control Centre. He also took the opportunity to promote CERN’s beam line for schools competition.

  6. AMS DAYS 2015 - Interview Roberto Battiston

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Roberto Battiston, president of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and deputy spokesperson of the AMS experiments, tells about AMS latest results and the complementarity with the second run of the LHC in the search for dark matter

  7. Luminescence dating of ancient Darhad basin, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheul Kim, Jin; Yi, Sangheon; Lim, Jaesoo; Kim, Ju-Yong

    2016-04-01

    . Thus, age control on existing 14C ages from this site is limited, chronological interpretation based on the 14C ages is still incomplete in Hodon outcrop sediments. OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence) is an alternative method for dating to overcome the problems associated with 14C methods. OSL has been extensively used for dating arctic sediments (Thomas et al., 2006; more). Previous optical ages on Darhad paleolake sediments obtained using IRSL (Infrared-stimulated luminescence) on feldspars (Gillespie et al., 2008; Batbaatar et al., 2009). Feldspar has much brighter luminescence than quartz, while the OSL signal of feldspars bleaches at least one order of magnitude slower than the OSL signal of quartz (Godfrey-Smith et al., 1988; Huntly and Lamothe, 2001; Mauz and Bungenstock, 2007; Kim et al., 2012). In glaciofluvial, glaciolacustrine environments, inadequate bleaching of the OSL signal is known to be a potential problem of burial ages (Thomas et al., 2006). OSL dating of permafrost deposits may also involve uncertainty about the inhomogeneous radiation field surrounding the dosimeter and the absorption of ionizing energy alternately by water and ice in a not-constant pore volume (Haeberli et al., 2003). In this study, we test the applicability of quartz OSL dating for the uppermost paleolake sediments in the Hodon outcrop of the Darhad basin. The OSL results were systematically compared with additional radiocarbon ages from wood fragments to conclude the reliability of the OSL dates and to construct intensive chronology for Late-Pleistocene Darhad paleolake. To evaluate the time of recent expansion of the paleolake, the northern piedmont (Talyn outcrop) of the basin was dated by OSL.

  8. Towards constraining the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon: strategies of stratospheric 14CO2 measurements using AirCore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huilin; Paul, Dipayan; Meijer, Harro; Miller, John; Kivi, Rigel; Krol, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) plays an important role in the carbon cycle studies to understand both natural and anthropogenic carbon fluxes, but also in atmospheric chemistry to constrain hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in the atmosphere. Apart from the enormous 14C emissions from nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s and 1960s, radiocarbon is primarily produced in the stratosphere due to the cosmogenic production. To this end, better understanding the stratospheric radiocarbon source is very useful to advance the use of radiocarbon for these applications. However, stratospheric 14C observations have been very limited so that there are large uncertainties on the magnitude and the location of the 14C production as well as the transport of radiocarbon from the stratosphere to the troposphere. Recently we have successfully made stratospheric 14C measurements using AirCore samples from Sodankylä, Northern Finland. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which passively collects atmospheric air samples into a long piece of coiled stainless steel tubing during the descent of a balloon flight. Due to the relatively low cost of the consumables, there is a potential to make such AirCore profiling in other parts of the world on a regular basis. In this study, we simulate the 14C in the atmosphere and assess the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon using the TM5 model. The Sodankylä radiocarbon measurements will be used to verify the performance of the model at high latitude. Besides this, we will also evaluate the influence of different cosmogenic 14C production scenarios and the uncertainties in the OH field on the seasonal cycles of radiocarbon and on the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, and based on the results design a strategy to set up a 14C measurement program using AirCore.

  9. IntCal13 and Marine13 Radiocarbon Age Calibration Curves 0–50,000 Years cal BP

    OpenAIRE

    Bard, Edouard; Bayliss, Alex; Beck, J. Warren; Blackwell, Paul G.; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Caitlin E. Buck; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Friedrich, Michael; Grootes, Pieter M; Guilderson, Thomas P; Haflidason, Haflidi; Hajdas, Irka; Hatté, Christine; Heaton, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The IntCal09 and Marine09 radiocarbon calibration curves have been revised utilizing newly available and updated data sets from C-14 measurements on tree rings, plant macrofossils, speleothems, corals, and foraminifera. The calibration curves were derived from the data using the random walk model (RWM) used to generate IntCal09 and Marine09, which has been revised to account for additional uncertainties and error structures. The new curves were ratified at the 21st International Radiocarbon c...

  10. 7 CFR 1230.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1230.602 Section 1230.602... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.602 Administrator, AMS. The term Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or...

  11. 7 CFR 1220.601 - Administrator, AMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1220.601 Section 1220.601... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.601 Administrator, AMS. Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or any officer or employee...

  12. 7 CFR 1280.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1280.602 Section 1280.602... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1280.602 Administrator, AMS. Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or any officer or employee of...

  13. 14C dating of bone using (gamma) Carboxyglutamic Acid and Carboxyglycine (Aminomalonate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southon, J R; Burky, R T; Kirner, D L; Taylor, R E; Hare, P E

    1999-04-27

    Radiocarbon determinations have been obtained on {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid [Gla] and {alpha}-carboxyglycine (aminomalonate) [Am] as well as acid- and base-hydrolyzed total amino acids isolated from a series of fossil bones. As far as they are aware, Am has not been reported previously in fossil bone and neither Gla nor Am {sup 14}C values have been measured previously. Interest in Gla, an amino acid found in the non-collagen proteins osteocalcin and matrix Gla-protein (MGP), proceeds from the suggestion that it may be preferentially retained and more resistant to diagenetic contamination affecting {sup 14}C values in bones exhibiting low and trace amounts of collagen. The data do not support these suggestions. The suite of bones examined showed a general tendency for total amino acid and Gla concentrations to decrease in concert. Even for bones retaining significant amounts of collagen, Gla (and Am extracts) can yield {sup 14}C values discordant with their expected age and with {sup 14}C values obtained on total amino-acid fractions isolated from the same bone sample.

  14. Examination of background contamination levels for gas counting and AMS target preparation in Trondheim

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulliksen, S.; Thomsen, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    of the double spar that is more insensitive to contaminating processes. The background for combusted samples is at the same level as for samples of double spar, indicating that additional C-14 contamination due to combustion is negligible. Dates obtained on interstadial samples (T >30 ka BP) by both GPC and AMS...... conventional gas proportional counting (GPC) system. We have also studied contamination levels of our target preparation for C-14 accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) dating in Uppsala. A significant lower background is obtained for Icelandic double spar than for marbles, probably due to a crystal structure...

  15. Significance of the distribution of bomb-produced radiocarbon in the ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pattern of global water column inventories of bomb-produced radiocarbon suggests that a sizable portion of the bomb radiocarbon that entered the Antarctic, the northern Pacific, and the tropical oceans has been transported to the adjacent temperate regions. Models of lateral transport of surface water in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans are designed on the basis of this distribution pattern. Upwelling of bomb-radiocarbon-free water from below takes place in the Antarctic, the northern Pacific, and the tropical regions; and downwelling of surface water occurs in the temperate oceans and in the northern Atlantic. Uptake of excess CO2 by these models is calculated using the observed Mauna Loa pCO2 record as an input function. Results indicate that 35 percent of fossil fuel CO2 is taken up by these model oceans during the period 1958-1980. Considering the observed airborne fraction of 0.55, it appears that about 10 percent of the global fossil fuel CO2 is still missing. 24 refs., 5 tabs

  16. Radiocarbon Dioxide detection based on Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy and a Quantum Cascade Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Genoud, Guillaume; Phillips, Hilary; Dean, Julian; Merimaa, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of radiocarbon ($^{14}$C) in carbon dioxide is demonstrated using mid-infrared spectroscopy and a quantum cascade laser. The measurement is based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and a high sensitivity is achieved with a simple setup. The instrument was tested using a standardised sample containing elevated levels of radiocarbon. Radiocarbon dioxide could be detected from samples with an isotopic ratio $^{14}$C/C as low as 50 parts-per-trillion, corresponding to an activity of 5 kBq/m$^3$ in pure CO$_2$, or 2 Bq/m$^3$ in air after extraction of the CO$_2$ from an air sample. The instrument is simple, compact and robust, making it the ideal tool for on-site measurements. It is aimed for monitoring of radioactive gaseous emissions in nuclear power environment, during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Its high sensitivity also makes it the ideal tool for the detection of leaks in radioactive waste repositories.

  17. Southwestern (U.S.A. Archaeological Tree-Ring Dating: 1930-1942

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Nash

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendrochronology, the science of assigning precise and accurate calendar dates to annual growth rings in trees (Stokes and Smiley 1968, was the first independent dating technique available to prehistorians. Ar­chaeological tree-ring dating came of age at a time when North American archaeologists concerned them­selves primarily with time/space systematics (Willey and Sabloff 1980 and yet had no absolute and inde­pendent dating techniques available to guide their analyses. Histories of archaeology typically have not considered the development of archaeological tree-ring dating in detail. Willey and Sabloff (1980:12 devote one paragraph to the development of Southwestern archaeological tree-ring dating, as does Steibing (1993:261. Trigger (1989:305 considers dendrochronology (in the sense of the Douglass method only in light of radiocarbon dating. Textbooks and regional histories of archaeology do a little better in their treat­ment of dendrochronology, though discussions typically focus on the interpretation of tree-ring dates and not on the developmental history of the technique itself (e.g. Cordell 1984:88-90; Fagan 1991:129-133; Lyon 1996:46; Michels 1973:116; Thomas 1979:190-194. Scott (1966:9 argues that 'the story of the discovery of archaeological tree-ring dating by A E. Douglass and others has been told and retold and is now familiar to scientists and laymen alike'. I beg to differ.

  18. The Realities of Date Rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Cara; Watson, Jennifer; Williams, Audrey R.

    This poster presentation addresses the issue of date rape, specifically in the college environment. Highlighted are date rape statistics, demographics, and date rape drugs. Also discussed are date rape warnings and prevention strategies. It is concluded that college and university administrators must place the issue of date rape and acquaintance…

  19. Quantum Dating Market

    OpenAIRE

    Arizmendi, C. M.; Zabaleta, O. G.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the dating market decision problem under the quantum mechanics point of view. Quantum states whose associated amplitudes are modified by men strategies are used to represent women. Grover quantum search algorithm is used as a playing strategy. Success is more frequently obtained by playing quantum than playing classic.

  20. Expiration Dates Matter

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... En Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Expiration Dates Matter Share ...