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Sample records for amputated upper limb

  1. Major upper limb amputation after Snake Bite Gangrene | Ajibade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major lower limb amputations following snake bite gangrene have been reported from the savannah belt of Nigeria. In bites delivered to the upper limb, amputations are often of the digits (minor amputations). We report the case of a male farmer who had an above elbow amputation after a snake bite to the hand. Explanation ...

  2. Prevalence and Characteristics of Phantom Limb Pain and Residual Limb Pain in the Long Term after Upper Limb Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Deirdre M.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe the prevalence and characteristics of phantom limb pain and residual limb pain after upper limb amputation. One-hundred and forty-one participants (139 males; mean age 74.8 years; mean time since amputation 50.1 years) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing residual and phantom limb pain experience. Prevalence…

  3. [Tests of hand functionality in upper limb amputation with prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzini, G; Orlandini, D; Moscato, T A; Nicita, D; Panigazzi, M

    2007-01-01

    The need for standardized instruments for clinical measurements has become pressing in the fields of occupational rehabilitation and ergonomics. This is particularly the case for instruments that allow a quantitative evaluation of upper limb function, and especially hand function in patients who have undergone an amputation and then application of an upper limb prosthesis. This study presents a review of the main tests used to evaluate hand function, with a critical analysis of their use in subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. The tests are divided into: tests to evaluate strength, tests to evaluate co-ordination and dexterity, tests of global or overall function, and tests proposed specifically for subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. Of the various tests presented, the authors give their preference to the Bimanual Functional Assessment, Abilhand and/or the ADL Questionnaire, because of the practical usefulness, clinimetric features, simplicity and ease of administration of these tests.

  4. [Cross-hand replantation in bilateral upper limb amputation: An anatomical emergency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, A; Rongieres, M; Laffosse, J-M; Pailhe, R; Lauwers, F; Grolleau, J-L

    2015-08-01

    Bilateral amputations of upper limbs are excessively rare clinical situations. We report an exceptional clinical case of bilateral amputation of upper limbs at different levels: destruction of the right hand and left transhumeral amputation in a patient after an attempted suicide on train lines. This special situation led us to perform a cross-hand replantation of the left hand to the right forearm. Only 4 other similar cases have been published in the literature. Once the surgical indication had been formulated collectively, and taking into account all the ethical issues surrounding such a decision, we had to solve the issue of inverting anatomical structures in emergency. We have provided a detailed description of our surgical technique. The aim was to save at least one organ used for grasping. The result obtained is presented and reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Yao; Albert Chen; Todd Kuiken; Carolina Carmona; Julius Dewald

    2015-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR). As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via th...

  6. Reliability, Validity, and Responsiveness of the QuickDASH in Patients With Upper Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    To examine the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the shortened version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) questionnaire in persons with upper limb amputation. Cross-sectional and longitudinal. Three sites participating in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Home Study of the DEKA Arm. A convenience sample of upper limb amputees (N=44). Training with a multifunction upper limb prosthesis. Multiple outcome measures including the QuickDASH were administered twice within 1 week, and for a subset of 20 persons, after completion of in-laboratory training with the DEKA Arm. Scale alphas and intraclass correlation coefficient type 3,1 (ICC3,1) were used to examine reliability. Minimum detectable change (MDC) scores were calculated. Analyses of variance, comparing QuickDASH scores by the amount of prosthetic use and amputation level, were used for known-group validity analyses with alpha set at .05. Pairwise correlations between QuickDASH and other measures were used to examine concurrent validity. Responsiveness was measured by effect size (ES) and standardized response mean (SRM). QuickDASH alpha was .83, and ICC was .87 (95% confidence interval, .77-.93). MDC at the 95% confidence level (MDC95%) was 17.4. Full- or part-time prosthesis users had better QuickDASH scores compared with nonprosthesis users (P=.021), as did those with more distal amputations at both baseline (P=.042) and with the DEKA Arm (P=.024). The QuickDASH was correlated with concurrent measures of activity limitation as expected. The ES and SRM after training with the DEKA Arm were 0.6. This study provides evidence of reliability and validity of the QuickDASH in persons with upper limb amputation. Results provide preliminary evidence of responsiveness to prosthetic device type/training. Further research with a larger sample is needed to confirm results. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by

  7. Epidural electrocorticography of phantom hand movement following long-term upper-limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza eGharabaghi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostheses for upper-limb amputees are currently controlled by either myoelectric or peripheral neural signals. Performance and dexterity of these devices is still limited, particularly when it comes to controlling hand function. Movement-related brain activity might serve as a complementary bio-signal for motor control of hand prosthesis. Methods: We introduced a methodology to implant a cortical interface without direct exposure of the brain surface in an upper-limb amputee. This bi-directional interface enabled us to explore the cortical physiology following long-term transhumeral amputation. In addition, we investigated neurofeedback of electrocorticographic brain activity related to the patient’s motor imagery to open his missing hand, i.e. phantom hand movement, for real-time control of a virtual hand prosthesis.Results: Both event-related brain potentials and cortical stimulation revealed mutually overlapping cortical representations of the phantom hand. Phantom hand movements could be robustly classified and the patient required only three training sessions to gain reliable control of the virtual hand prosthesis in an online closed-loop paradigm that discriminated between hand opening and rest. Conclusion: Epidural implants may constitute a powerful and safe alternative communication pathway between the brain and external devices for upper-limb amputees, thereby facilitating the integrated use of different signal sources for more intuitive and specific control of multi-functional devices in clinical use.

  8. Systematic Review of Measures of Impairment and Activity Limitation for Persons With Upper Limb Trauma and Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matt; Silver, Ben; Cancio, Jill

    2017-09-01

    (1) To identify outcome measures used in studies of persons with traumatic upper limb injury and/or amputation; and (2) to evaluate focus, content, and psychometric properties of each measure. Searches of PubMed and CINAHL for terms including upper extremity, function, activities of daily living, outcome assessment, amputation, and traumatic injuries. Included articles had a sample of ≥10 adults with limb trauma or amputation and were in English. Measures containing most items assessing impairment of body function or activity limitation were eligible. There were 260 articles containing 55 measures that were included. Data on internal consistency; test-retest, interrater, and intrarater reliability; content, structural, construct, concurrent, and predictive validity; responsiveness; and floor/ceiling effects were extracted and confirmed by a second investigator. The mostly highly rated performance measures included 2 amputation-specific measures (Activities Measure for Upper Limb Amputees and University of New Brunswick Test of Prosthetic Function skill and spontaneity subscales) and 2 non-amputation-specific measures (Box and Block Test and modified Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test light and heavy cans tests). Most highly rated self-report measures were Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand; Patient Rated Wrist Evaluation; QuickDASH; Hand Assessment Tool; International Osteoporosis Foundation Quality of Life Questionnaire; and Patient Rated Wrist Evaluation functional recovery subscale. None were amputation specific. Few performance measures were recommended for patients with limb trauma and amputation. All top-rated self-report measures were suitable for use in both groups. These results will inform choice of outcome measures for these patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Elective amputation of the upper limb is an option in the treatment of traumatic injuries of the brachial plexus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Mário Gilberto; Martins, Roberto Sérgio; Heise, Carlos Otto; Foroni, Luciano

    2017-09-01

    The treatment of complete post-traumatic brachial plexus palsy resulting in a flail shoulder and upper extremity remains a challenge to peripheral nerve surgeons. The option of upper limb amputation is controversial and scarcely discussed in the literature. We believe that elective amputation still has a role in the treatment of select cases. The pros and cons of the procedure should be intensely discussed with the patient by a multidisciplinary team. Better outcomes are usually achieved in active patients who strongly advocate for the procedure.

  10. Strength and endurance training of an individual with left upper and lower limb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donachy, J E; Brannon, K D; Hughes, L S; Seahorn, J; Crutcher, T T; Christian, E L

    2004-04-22

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a strength and endurance training programme designed to prepare an individual with a left glenohumeral disarticulation and transtibial amputation for a bike trip across the USA. The subject was scheduled for training three times per week over a two-month period followed by two times per week for an additional two months. Training consisted of a resistance training circuit using variable resistance machines, cycling using a recumbent stationary bike, and core stability training using stability ball exercises. Changes in strength were assessed using 10 RM tests on the resistance machines and changes in peak VO(2) were monitored utilizing the Cosmed K4b pulmonary function tester. The subject demonstrated a 30.3% gain in peak VO(2). The subject's 10 RM for left single limb leg press increased 36.8% and gains of at least 7.7% were seen for all other muscle groups tested. The strength and endurance training programme adapted to compensate for this subject's limb losses was effective in increasing both strength and peak VO(2). Adapting exercise programmes to compensate for limb loss may allow individuals with amputations to participate in physically challenging activities that otherwise may not be available to them.

  11. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR. As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via the newly re-innervated muscles. Correspondingly, recent study results have shown that motor representations for the missing limb move closer to their original locations following TR. Besides regaining motor control signals, TR also restores the sensation in the re-innervated skin areas. We therefore hypothesize that TR causes analogous cortical sensory remapping that may return closer to their original locations. In order to test this hypothesis, cortical activity in response to sensory-level electrical stimulation in different parts of the arm was studied longitudinally in one amputated individual before and up to 2 years after TR. Our results showed that 1 before TR, the cortical response to sensory electrical stimulation in the residual limb showed a diffuse bilateral pattern without a clear focus in either the time or spatial domain; and 2 2 years after TR, the sensory map of the reinnervated median nerve reorganized, showing predominant activity over the contralateral S1 hand area as well as moderate activity over the ipsilateral S1. Therefore, this work provides new evidence for long-term sensory cortical plasticity in the human brain after TR.

  12. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Chen, Albert; Kuiken, Todd; Carmona, Carolina; Dewald, Julius

    2015-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR). As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via the newly re-innervated muscles. Correspondingly, recent study results have shown that motor representations for the missing limb move closer to their original locations following TR. Besides regaining motor control signals, TR also restores the sensation in the re-innervated skin areas. We therefore hypothesize that TR causes analogous cortical sensory remapping that may return closer to their original locations. In order to test this hypothesis, cortical activity in response to sensory-level electrical stimulation in different parts of the arm was studied longitudinally in one amputated individual before and up to 2 years after TR. Our results showed that 1) before TR, the cortical response to sensory electrical stimulation in the residual limb showed a diffuse bilateral pattern without a clear focus in either the time or spatial domain; and 2) 2 years after TR, the sensory map of the reinnervated median nerve reorganized, showing predominant activity over the contralateral S1 hand area as well as moderate activity over the ipsilateral S1. Therefore, this work provides new evidence for long-term sensory cortical plasticity in the human brain after TR.

  13. Three-dimensional-printed upper limb prosthesis for a child with traumatic amputation of right wrist: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guisheng; Gao, Liang; Tao, Ke; Wan, Shengxiang; Lin, Yuning; Xiong, Ao; Kang, Bin; Zeng, Hui

    2017-12-01

    For traumatic upper limb amputees, the prohibitive cost of a custom-made prosthesis brings an insufferable financial burden for their families in developing countries. Three-dimensional (3D) printing allows for creating affordable, lightweight, customized, and well-fitting prosthesis, especially for the growing children. We presented a case of an 8-year-old boy, who suffered a traumatic right wrist amputation as result of a mincing machine accident. The patient was immediately sent to the emergency orthopedics department after the accident. He was diagnosed as severed mangled limb crash injury at the level of the right wrist with a Mangled Extremity Severity Score of 8. A wrist disarticulation was performed and a 3D-printed prosthetic hand was designed and manufactured for this child. A personalized prosthetic rehabilitation training was applied after the prosthesis installation at 6 months postoperatively. The function of the prosthesis was evaluated at 1-month and 3-month follow-up using the Children Amputee Prosthetics Projects (CAPP) score and the University Of New Brunswick Test Of Prosthetic Function for Unilateral Amputees (UNB test). The materials cost traumatic wrist amputation might serve as a practical and affordable alternative for children in developing countries and those lacking access to health care providers. A personalized prosthetic rehabilitation needs to be undertaken and more clinical studies are warranted to validate the potential superiority of similar 3D-printed prostheses. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A cross-sectional study of post-amputation pain in upper and lower limb amputees, experience of a tertiary referral amputee clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Judith H; Khor, Kok E; Jones, Lorraine E

    2010-01-01

    To determine the pain characteristics and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) of upper and lower limb amputees. Amputees attending the Prince of Wales Prosthetic Clinics in 2006 were administered a questionnaire survey of their pain experiences, Short form McGill pain questionnaire, Short Form 36 (SF 36) and Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ). Of the 17 who were upper limb amputees (including the two multiple limb amputees), only 1 was pain free and of the 39 who were lower limb amputees 14 were pain free. Upper limb amputees experienced significantly greater proportion, frequency and severity of post-amputation pain than lower limb amputees. The presence of significant pre-operative pain did not correlate with the development of persistent post-amputation pain. In quality of life measures, the amputees experienced a better physical function, role physical and confidence in performance of activities than chronic pain patients attending the pain clinic. Lower limb amputees fared better than upper limb amputees in terms of bodily pain, social function and mental health. However, the amputee groups have a reduced health status in almost all domains compared to the aged matched Australian population norm. The study suggests that upper limb amputees are significantly more likely to suffer post-amputation pain which is more frequent, longer lasting and more severe in intensity when compared to lower limb amputees. This is accompanied by reduced HR-QOL especially that related to bodily pain, social function and mental health. The overall health status of amputees are also significantly lower compared to the Australian population norm.

  15. Crossover replantation as a salvage procedure following bilateral transhumeral upper limb amputation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, Ismail Bülent; Mersa, Berkan; Kabakaş, Fatih; Saçak, Bülent; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi

    2011-04-01

    Cross-over replantation is a salvage option for cases with bilateral extremity amputations where the wound conditions do not enable an orthotopic replantation. Here, we present a 24-year-old patient who applied to our center with bilateral transhumeral amputations. Due to the wound conditions, a cross-over replantation was performed. 24 months after the initial operation, the patient exhibits good protective sensation at the distal levels and function to some degree, whereas the active range of motion is not as promising as previously expected. In this article, we present this case together with its immediate and long-term outcomes and the consequences of the cross-over replantation.

  16. A young female patient with reflex sympathetic dystrophy of the upper limb in whom amputation became inevitable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, JHB; Rietman, JS; Smit, AJ; Zimmerman, KW

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is characterized mostly by: (burning) pain, restricted range of motion, oedema and autonomic disturbances. Amputations in case of RSD patients should only be performed in cases of a dysfunctional limb, life threatening conditions such as untreatable infections or

  17. Acute Limb Shortening for Major Near and Complete Upper Extremity Amputations with Associated Neurovascular Injury: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnezov, Nicholas; Dunn, John C; Stewart, Jeremy; Mitchell, Justin S; Pirela-Cruz, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    In the setting a near or complete upper extremity amputations with significant soft tissue loss and neurovascular compromise, upper extremity surgeons are faced with the challenge of limb salvage. There are a multitude of treatment options for managing skeletal and soft tissue injuries including provisional fixation, staged reconstruction, and an acute shortening osteotomy with primary rigid internal fixation. However, many complications are associated with these techniques. Complications of provisional fixation include pin tract infection and loosening, tethering of musculotendinous units, nonunion, and additional surgeries. Staged reconstruction includes a variety of techniques: distraction osteogenesis, bone transport, or vascularized and non-vascularized structural autograft or allograft, but the risks often outweigh the benefits. Risks include nonunion, postoperative vascular complications necessitating reoperation, and the inability to return to the previous level of function at an average of 24 months. Acute shortening osteotomy with internal fixation offers the advantage of a single-stage procedure that provides for decreasing the soft tissue loss, provides a rigid platform to protect the delicate neurovascular repair, and alleviates unwanted tension at the repair sites. This review discusses the literature on the surgical treatment of severe upper extremity trauma with associated neurovascular injury over the past 75 years, and aims to evaluate the indications, surgical techniques, clinical and functional outcomes, and complications associated with acute shortening osteotomy with rigid internal fixation. Although this technique is not without risks, it is well-tolerated in the acute setting with a complication profile comparable to other techniques of fixation while remaining a single procedure. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Metastatic Invasive Sweat Gland Adenocarcinoma of the Hand with Upper Limb Amputation/Shoulder Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capildeo, Kavi

    2015-01-01

    Summary: A rare case of metastatic invasive sweat gland adenocarcinoma of hand in a 78-year-old woman is presented. From this analysis of the available literature, it seems that these rare primary tumors of the hand are aggressive tumors with little known about their biological behavior. Fluoropyrimidines, taxanes, and cisplatin have been reported to be active agents for metastatic sweat gland carcinomas. Further, these tumors have historically been considered radioresistant, but responses to radiation have been documented in the setting of recurrent disease, and the use of adjuvant radiotherapy has been advocated for tumors at high risk of local recurrence. We advocate an aggressive approach of high amputation and axillary lymph node dissection with adjuvant treatment using chemotherapy as the mainstay with close follow-up for metastases. PMID:26495225

  19. Musculoskeletal Complaints in Transverse Upper Limb Reduction Deficiency and Amputation in The Netherlands : Prevalence, Predictors, and Effect on Health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Sietke G.; Bongers, Raoul M.; Brouwers, Michael A.; Burger, Helena; Norling-Hermansson, Liselotte M.; Reneman, Michiel F.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    Objective: (1) To determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints (MSCs) in individuals with upper limb absence in The Netherlands, (2) to assess the health status of individuals with upper limb absence in general and in relation to the presence of MSCs, and (3) to explore the predictors of

  20. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs) were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p prosthetic prescription. Being married was positively associated. After adjusting for patient characteristics, people with ankle amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why.

  1. Motor cortex changes after amputation are modulated by phantom limb motor control rather than pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffin, Estelle E.; Pascal, Giraux,; Karen, Reilly,

    Amputation of a limb induces reorganization within the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1-c) (1-3). In the case of hand amputation, M1-c areas evoking movements in the face and the remaining part of the upper-limb expand toward the hand area. Despite this expansion, the amputated hand still...

  2. Pattern Of Lower Limb Amputations In Eku | Akhator | Ebonyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Below knee amputation constituted 57.4% of the cases and above knee amputation constituted 35.2%, with diabetic foot gangrene being the most common indication for amputation. The pattern of lower limb amputation in Eku is ... facilities for lower limb prosthesis is recommended. Keywords: Lower limb; amputation; ...

  3. Return to work after lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Helena; Marincek, Crt

    2007-09-15

    To review the literature on return to work after lower limb amputation. A comprehensive review of literature on return to work after lower limb amputation was carried out, searching MEDLINE and PubMED. Most authors found return-to-work rate to be about 66%. Between 22 and 67% of the subjects retained the same occupation, while the remainder had to change occupation. Post-amputation jobs were generally more complex with a requirement for a higher level of general educational development and were physically less demanding. The return to work depends on: general factors, such as age, gender and educational level; factors related to impairments and disabilities due to amputation (amputation level, multiple amputations, comorbidity, reason for amputation, persistent stump problems, the time from the injury to obtaining a permanent prosthesis, wearing comfort of the prosthesis, walking distance and restrictions in mobility); and factors related to work and policies (salary, higher job involvement, good support from the implementing body and the employer and social support network). Subjects have problems returning to work after lower limb amputation. Many have to change their work and/or work only part-time. Vocational rehabilitation and counselling should become a part of rehabilitation programme for all subjects who are of working age after lower limb amputation. Better cooperation between professionals, such as rehabilitation team members, implementing bodies, company doctors and the employers, is necessary.

  4. [WHICH IN SURGERY OF LOWER LIMB AMPUTATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzetti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Lower limb amputation is in effect decisive surgery in the treatment of ischemic gangrene whether nature of post-traumatic or secondary to arterial disease of the lower limbs. The amputation is not however to be considered debulking surgery. The demolition regards the limb behind which we do not have the presence scotomize amputee who requires to be accompanied in dealing with a new life that has as its main objective the autonomy scope family and society. The search for a good level of amputation surgery then makes reconstructive surgery. The level of amputation will allow in fact the use ofprincipals able to guarantee the total autonomy. After an analysis of surgical techniques the author will then analyze the latest devices available in the permit to pursue the best possible level of amputation even in cases where the disease is starting to discourage the doctor.

  5. [May physicians amputate a healthy limb?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    A recent article in the Dutch Journal of Medicine describes two cases of patients with body integrity identity disorder (BIID), a disorder in which patients might resort to self-amputation in order to create the body they wish for. The authors wonder if medical professionals should provide elective amputations in BIID patients in order to prevent them from harm and death. The amputation of a healthy limb in BIID in a medical context is currently under discussion. Doctors struggle to proceed to elective amputation of a healthy body part in BIID. An analogy with gender dysphoria or euthanasia might shed a different light on this dilemma.

  6. Major limb amputations: A tertiary hospital experience in northwestern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalya Phillipo L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major limb amputation is reported to be a major but preventable public health problem that is associated with profound economic, social and psychological effects on the patient and family especially in developing countries where the prosthetic services are poor. The purpose of this study was to outline the patterns, indications and short term complications of major limb amputations and to compare our experience with that of other published data. Methods This was a descriptive cross-sectional study that was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre between March 2008 and February 2010. All patients who underwent major limb amputation were, after informed consent for the study, enrolled into the study. Data were collected using a pre-tested, coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 11.5 computer software. Results A total of 162 patients were entered into the study. Their ages ranged between 2–78 years (mean 28.30 ± 13.72 days. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 2:1. The majority of patients (76.5% had primary or no formal education. One hundred and twelve (69.1% patients were unemployed. The most common indication for major limb amputation was diabetic foot complications in 41.9%, followed by trauma in 38.4% and vascular disease in 8.6% respectively. Lower limbs were involved in 86.4% of cases and upper limbs in 13.6% of cases giving a lower limb to upper limb ratio of 6.4:1 Below knee amputation was the most common procedure performed in 46.3%. There was no bilateral limb amputation. The most common additional procedures performed were wound debridement, secondary suture and skin grafting in 42.3%, 34.5% and 23.2% respectively. Two-stage operation was required in 45.4% of patients. Revision amputation rate was 29.6%. Post-operative complication rate was 33.3% and surgical site infection was the most common complication accounting for 21.0%. The mean length of hospital stay was 22.4 days and mortality

  7. The mangled limb: salvage versus amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinsky, Philip R; Webb, Lawrence X; Harvey, Edward J; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2011-01-01

    A mangled extremity is defined as a limb with injury to three of four systems in the extremity. The decision to salvage or amputate the injured limb has generated much controversy in the literature, with studies to support advantages of each approach. Various scoring systems have proved unreliable in predicting the need for amputation or salvage; however, a recurring theme in the literature is that the key to limb viability seems to be the severity of the soft-tissue injury. Factors such as associated injuries, patient age, and comorbidities (such as diabetes) also should be considered. Attempted limb salvage should be considered only if a patient is hemodynamically stable enough to tolerate the necessary surgical procedures and blood loss associated with limb salvage. For persistently hemodynamically unstable patients and those in extremis, life comes before limb. Recently, the Lower Extremity Assessment Project study attempted to answer the question of whether amputation or limb salvage achieves a better outcome. The study also evaluated other factors, including return-to-work status, impact of the level of and bilaterality of the amputation, and economic cost. There appears to be no significant difference in return to work, functional outcomes, or the cost of treatment (including the prosthesis) between the two groups. A team approach with different specialties, including orthopaedics, plastic surgery, vascular surgery and trauma general surgery, is recommended for treating patients with a mangled extremity.

  8. Incidence of Overuse Musculoskeletal Injuries in Military Service Members With Traumatic Lower Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Mazzone, Brittney; Eskridge, Susan; Shannon, Kaeley; Hill, Owen T

    2018-02-01

    To describe the incidence of overuse musculoskeletal injuries in service members with combat-related lower limb amputation. Retrospective cohort study. Military treatment facilities. Service members with deployment-related lower limb injury (N=791): 496 with a major lower limb amputation and 295 with a mild lower limb injury. Not applicable. The outcomes of interest were clinical diagnosis codes (International Classification of Diseases-9th Revision) associated with musculoskeletal overuse injuries of the lumbar spine, upper limb, and lower limb regions 1 year before and 1 year after injury. The overall incidence of developing at least 1 musculoskeletal overuse injury within the first year after lower limb amputation was between 59% and 68%. Service members with unilateral lower limb amputation were almost twice as likely to develop an overuse lower or upper limb injury than those with mild combat-related injury. Additionally, service members with bilateral lower limb amputation were more than twice as likely to develop a lumbar spine injury and 4 times more likely to develop an upper limb overuse injury within the first year after amputation than those with mild combat-related injury. Incidence of secondary overuse musculoskeletal injury is elevated in service members with lower limb amputation and warrants focused research efforts toward developing preventive interventions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Features of surgical tactics in traumatic amputations of limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Ponomarenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of traumatic amputations is constantly growing, which is associated with the development of transport and modern technology, military conflicts. Aim: To improve the results of treatment of patients with wound and functional defects after injury by developing a comprehensive program of surgical treatment to restore the shape and function of the trunk and limbs. Materials and methods. From 2010 to 2016 52 patients were observed in the clinic. Traumatic amputations at the hip level were observed in 14 patients, at the level of the upper third of the tibia – in 7 patients, at the level of the lower third of the tibia – 3, foot – 6. Simultaneous amputation of two lower limbs was observed in 2 patients. Amputation of upper limbs at shoulder level was observed in 3 patients, hand – 2, fingers – 15 patients. Among the reasons of limb amputations road traffic injuries occupied the leading position – 77.8 %. Combined injury (mechanical and thermal was observed in 1 case – there was a burn of amputated limb. In 31 cases (59.6 % there was complete amputation of a limb, incomplete – in 21 cases (40.4 %. Results. As a result of these tactics, only in 3 cases we had to do limb reamputation due to the inconsistency of the stump. In 22 patients for the conservation of sufficient length and the optimum shape of the stump the imposition of primary sutures was not made. At the stage of recovery of tissue covering the stump in 16 cases the closure of wound defects with simple split skin graft was fulfilled, 3 – with plastic by local tissues, 4 – islet flap on the peripheral stalk, 1 – plastic flat bridging flap, 20 operations were performed with tubular migratory classic flap. There were no complications in the postoperative period. Conclusions. The main principles in establishing the indications for reconstruction of large limb segments should be both critical attitude to the operation and strict individual approach to each

  10. Possibilities of prosthetic upper limb fitting in cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Doležalová, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Bachelor thesis give an overview of possible solutions in upper limbs prosthetic fitting which is suitable for cycling. And provide enough information on modifications that should be performed on a bicycle so that it can be used by humans with upper extremity prostheses. It can be an essential guide for anyone looking for a solution that would allow a person with an amputated upper limb again sit on the bike. Keywords: amputation, upper limb prosthesis, prosthetic fitting, cycling

  11. Epidemiology of post-traumatic limb amputation: a National Trauma Databank analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmparas, Galinos; Inaba, Kenji; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Dubose, Joseph J; Criscuoli, Michele; Talving, Peep; Plurad, David; Green, Donald; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the epidemiology and outcomes of posttraumatic upper (UEA) and lower extremity amputations (LEA). The National Trauma Databank version 5 was used to identify all posttraumatic amputations. From 2000 to 2004 there were 8910 amputated patients (1.0% of all trauma patients). Of these, 6855 (76.9%) had digit and 2055 (23.1%) had limb amputation. Of those with limb amputation, 92.7 per cent (1904/2055) had a single limb amputation. LEA were more frequent than UEA among patients in the single limb amputation group (58.9% vs 41.1%). The mechanism of injury was blunt in 83 per cent; most commonly after motor vehicle collisions (51.0%), followed by machinery accidents (19.4%). Motor vehicle collision occupants had more UEA (54.5% vs 45.5%, P Traumatic limb amputation is not uncommon after trauma in the civilian population and is associated with significant morbidity. Although single limb amputation did not impact mortality, the need for multiple limb amputation was an independent risk factor for death.

  12. Upper Limb Exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusak, Z.; Luijten, J.; Kooijman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates a wearable exoskeleton for a user having a torso with an upper limb to support motion of the said upper limb. The wearable exoskeleton comprises a first fixed frame mountable to the torso, an upper arm brace and a first group of actuators for moving the upper arm brace

  13. Upper extremity amputations after motor vehicle rollovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Chad G; Rozycki, Grace S; Feliciano, David V

    2009-08-01

    The upper extremity is vulnerable to injury during a rollover motor vehicle crash (MVC). There is some concern that positioning one's arm on a vehicle door/window eliminates the benefit of maintaining containment within a protective structure. Mangled extremities with associated vascular injuries have an amputation rate exceeding 40%. The primary goal was to describe the care process and outcome of patients requiring an emergent upper extremity amputation after a rollover MVC. All patients requiring an upper extremity amputation after a rollover MVC (2000-2008) were included. Patient demographics, injuries, and outcomes were analyzed. Seventeen patients required an upper extremity amputation after a rollover MVC (mean injury severity score = 23; hemodynamic instability at presentation = 29%). Injuries occurred on the side ipsilateral to the occupant vehicle position in 88% of cases. Most (76%) amputations occurred between May 1 and August 1 of their respective years, with 11 (65%) in the past 24 months. All amputations except one (replantation attempt) were completed within 24 hours. Concurrent operative procedures were performed in six (35%) patients, including three diagnostic peritoneal lavages, two laparotomies (splenectomies), one craniotomy, and one thoracotomy (atrial rupture). Mortality (12%) was a direct result of traumatic brain injuries. Temporary intravascular shunts were used before amputation in four (24%) patients. The majority (65%) of amputations were above the elbow joint. Blunt mangled upper extremities requiring completion amputations are most often caused by MVC rollovers. The risk of this injury is strongly associated with summer days and seems to be increasing in frequency.

  14. Epidemiology and pattern of limb amputations at a private hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Amputation of either the upper or lower extremities in man presents a special public health challenge due to the problems associated with patients' rehabilitation. Objective: To determine the epidemiology and pattern of limb amputations in a private medical setting in Owerri, Imo State. Methodology: This was a ...

  15. Motor cortex changes after amputation are modulated by phantom limb motor control rather than pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffin, Estelle E.; Pascal, Giraux,; Karen, Reilly,

    Amputation of a limb induces reorganization within the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1-c) (1-3). In the case of hand amputation, M1-c areas evoking movements in the face and the remaining part of the upper-limb expand toward the hand area. Despite this expansion, the amputated hand still...... retains a residual M1-c activity when amputees perform phantom limb movements (4-5). Except a correlation between phantom limb pain and M1-c expansion of the face (2-3), the relationship between the ability to voluntary move the phantom hand, the level of phantom limb pain, the degree of M1-c...... reorganization and the residual M1-c activity of the amputated hand is unknown. This fMRI study aimed to determine this relationship...

  16. Prevalence, Indications, Levels and Outcome Limb amputations at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence, Indications, Levels and Outcome Limb amputations at University Teaching Hospital-Butare in Rwanda. ... Results: Out of 3466 operated cases in Surgery Department, there were 107 limb amputations accounting for 3.08% of all operations performed during the study period. Females accounted for 29.9% cases.

  17. Surgical Limb Amputation: A Five-Year Experience At Hilltop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Limb amputation is one of the oldest and commonest surgical procedures known to man. It is performed by the orthopedic, general, vascular and trauma surgeons. At Hilltop Orthopedic Hospital, Enugu, limb amputation is found prevalent, yet most times it is objectionable to the patient. METHOD: A ...

  18. Major limb amputations in El Obeid Hospital, Western Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To study the causes and pattern of major limb amputations in El Obeid Hospital, Western Sudan. Patients and methods: The records of 50 major limb amputations performed in patients admitted to the University Surgical Unit at El Obeid Teaching Hospital, Western Sudan in two years were retrospectively studied.

  19. Characterisation and outcomes of upper extremity amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennent, David J; Wenke, Joseph C; Rivera, Jessica C; Krueger, Chad A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterise the injuries, outcomes, and disabling conditions of the isolated, combat-related upper extremity amputees in comparison to the isolated lower extremity amputees and the general amputee population. A retrospective study of all major extremity amputations sustained by the US military service members from 1 October 2001 to 30 July 2011 was conducted. Data from the Department of Defense Trauma Registry, the Armed Forces Health Longitudinal Technology Application, and the Physical Evaluation Board Liaison Offices were queried in order to obtain injury characteristics, demographic information, treatment characteristics, and disability outcome data. A total of 1315 service members who sustained 1631 amputations were identified; of these, 173 service members were identified as sustaining an isolated upper extremity amputation. Isolated upper extremity and isolated lower extremity amputees had similar Injury Severity Scores (21 vs. 20). There were significantly more non-battle-related upper extremity amputees than the analysed general amputation population (39% vs. 14%). Isolated upper extremity amputees had significantly greater combined disability rating (82.9% vs. 62.3%) and were more likely to receive a disability rating >80% (69% vs. 53%). No upper extremity amputees were found fit for duty; only 12 (8.3%) were allowed continuation on active duty; and significantly more upper extremity amputees were permanently retired than lower extremity amputees (82% vs. 74%). The most common non-upper extremity amputation-related disabling condition was post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (17%). Upper extremity amputees were significantly more likely to have disability from PTSD, 13% vs. 8%, and loss of nerve function, 11% vs. 6%, than the general amputee population. Upper extremity amputees account for 14% of all amputees during the Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom conflicts. These amputees have significant

  20. Elective amputation of a "healthy limb".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Rianne M; Guglielmi, Valeria; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-10-01

    Patients with body integrity identity disorder (BIID) experience a strong desire for amputation from very early on. BIID patients are often dismissed when they share their wish for amputation with surgeons. Consequently, patients resort to self-amputation, including complications and sometimes death. BIID patients are not psychotic and are mentally competent to oversee the consequences of an elective amputation. The authors offer arguments in favor of elective amputation.

  1. Causal conditions for major limb amputation at a specialist hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The causes of major limb amputation included trauma (n=122, 61.6%), diabetic foot disease (n=36, 18.2%), musculoskeletal tumours (n=26, 13.1%) and peripheral vascular disease (unrelated to diabetes) (n=10, 5.1%). Traditional bone setters' gangrene was the predominant cause (n=65, 53.3%) of traumatic amputation.

  2. Lower limb amputation for ischaemia with special reference to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mars M, Elson KI, Salisbury RT, Robbs JV. Do pre-operative antibiotics reach the operative field in amputation surgery for peripheral vascular disease? A pilot study. S Afr J Surg. 1990; 28: 58-61. 7. Huizinga WKJ, Robbs JV, Bhamjee A. Wound infection after major lower limb amputation – the role of antibiotic prophylaxis.

  3. Coping and posttraumatic growth in women with limb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutts, Lauren A; Bills, Sarah E; Erwin, Savannah R; Good, Jessica J

    2015-01-01

    While ample research has examined the psychological experiences of men with limb amputations, minimal research has examined the psychological experiences of women with limb amputations. The present study utilizes a qualitative design to examine coping and posttraumatic growth in women with limb amputations. Thirty women completed the posttraumatic growth inventory (PTGI) and provided open-ended responses about coping, social support, discrimination, support groups, and acceptance. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to discern emergent and superordinate themes in qualitative responses. Superordinate themes included social support (friendships/family and community), self-beliefs, resources, physical complications, spirituality, specific strategies, and acceptance. Concerns related specifically to participants' gender identity included appearance and motherhood. Overall, women reported moderate-to-high PTGI scores. The current findings address a void in the literature by illuminating the unique perspective of women with amputations. Future research should use quantitative methodology to expand on our research findings, as well as assess interventions to assist women adjusting to limb loss.

  4. Lower Limb Amputation at the 34 Military Hospital in Freetown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lower Limb Amputation at the 34 Military Hospital in Freetown, Sierra Leone: Causes and Indications. Paul F. Nabieu, Thomas A. Massaquoi, S. D. Massaquoi, G Luseni, B. Idris, T. B. Kamara, M. L. Baryoh ...

  5. Standardized Approach to Quantitatively Measure Residual Limb Skin Health in Individuals with Lower Limb Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Cameron L.; Wernke, Matthew M.; Powell, Heather M.; Tornero, Mark; Gnyawali, Surya C.; Schroeder, Ryan M.; Kim, Jayne Y.; Denune, Jeffrey A.; Albury, Alexander W.; Gordillo, Gayle M.; Colvin, James M.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: (1) Develop a standardized approach to quantitatively measure residual limb skin health. (2) Report reference residual limb skin health values in people with transtibial and transfemoral amputation. Approach: Residual limb health outcomes in individuals with transtibial (n = 5) and transfemoral (n = 5) amputation were compared to able-limb controls (n = 4) using noninvasive imaging (hyperspectral imaging and laser speckle flowmetry) and probe-based approaches (laser doppler flowmetry, transcutaneous oxygen, transepidermal water loss, surface electrical capacitance). Results: A standardized methodology that employs noninvasive imaging and probe-based approaches to measure residual limb skin health are described. Compared to able-limb controls, individuals with transtibial and transfemoral amputation have significantly lower transcutaneous oxygen tension, higher transepidermal water loss, and higher surface electrical capacitance in the residual limb. Innovation: Residual limb health as a critical component of prosthesis rehabilitation for individuals with lower limb amputation is understudied in part due to a lack of clinical measures. Here, we present a standardized approach to measure residual limb health in people with transtibial and transfemoral amputation. Conclusion: Technology advances in noninvasive imaging and probe-based measures are leveraged to develop a standardized approach to quantitatively measure residual limb health in individuals with lower limb loss. Compared to able-limb controls, resting residual limb physiology in people that have had transfemoral or transtibial amputation is characterized by lower transcutaneous oxygen tension and poorer skin barrier function. PMID:28736682

  6. Standardized Approach to Quantitatively Measure Residual Limb Skin Health in Individuals with Lower Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Cameron L; Wernke, Matthew M; Powell, Heather M; Tornero, Mark; Gnyawali, Surya C; Schroeder, Ryan M; Kim, Jayne Y; Denune, Jeffrey A; Albury, Alexander W; Gordillo, Gayle M; Colvin, James M; Sen, Chandan K

    2017-07-01

    Objective: (1) Develop a standardized approach to quantitatively measure residual limb skin health. (2) Report reference residual limb skin health values in people with transtibial and transfemoral amputation. Approach: Residual limb health outcomes in individuals with transtibial ( n  = 5) and transfemoral ( n  = 5) amputation were compared to able-limb controls ( n  = 4) using noninvasive imaging (hyperspectral imaging and laser speckle flowmetry) and probe-based approaches (laser doppler flowmetry, transcutaneous oxygen, transepidermal water loss, surface electrical capacitance). Results: A standardized methodology that employs noninvasive imaging and probe-based approaches to measure residual limb skin health are described. Compared to able-limb controls, individuals with transtibial and transfemoral amputation have significantly lower transcutaneous oxygen tension, higher transepidermal water loss, and higher surface electrical capacitance in the residual limb. Innovation: Residual limb health as a critical component of prosthesis rehabilitation for individuals with lower limb amputation is understudied in part due to a lack of clinical measures. Here, we present a standardized approach to measure residual limb health in people with transtibial and transfemoral amputation. Conclusion: Technology advances in noninvasive imaging and probe-based measures are leveraged to develop a standardized approach to quantitatively measure residual limb health in individuals with lower limb loss. Compared to able-limb controls, resting residual limb physiology in people that have had transfemoral or transtibial amputation is characterized by lower transcutaneous oxygen tension and poorer skin barrier function.

  7. Biomechanics of the upper limb

    OpenAIRE

    Łukasz Jaworski; Robert Karpiński; Angelika Dobrowolska

    2016-01-01

    The article presents basics of the human upper limb’s anatomy, including skeletal system, joints and basic division of muscles in the limb. The biomechanics of the upper limb is introduced. The range of performed motions is depicted. The possible applications of anatomy and biomechanics of the upper limb are shown.

  8. The eventual outcome of patients who had lower limb amputations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C De Klerk

    Background: Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) presenting with irreversible lower limb pathology has a high morbidity and mortality rate. This study aimed to determine the outcome of patients who underwent lower limb amputations (LLAs) because of PVD at Pelonomi Hospital, Bloemfontein, 2008–2011. Methods: ...

  9. The effect of limb amputation on standing weight distribution in the remaining three limbs in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Grayson Lee; Millis, Darryl

    2017-01-16

    Despite the fact that limb amputation is a commonly performed procedure in veterinary medicine, quantitative data regarding outcomes are lacking. The intention of this study was to evaluate the effect of limb amputation on weight distribution to the remaining three limbs at a stance in dogs. Ten dogs with a prior forelimb amputation and ten dogs with a prior hindlimb amputation; all of which had no history of orthopaedic or neural disease in the remaining three limbs were included in the study. Standing weight bearing was evaluated with a commercial stance analyzer in all dogs. Five valid trials were obtained and a mean percentage of weight bearing was calculated for each remaining limb. The dogs with a previous forelimb amputation, and also those with a previous hindlimb amputation, had the largest mean increase in weight bearing in the contralateral forelimb. In conclusion, proactive monitoring of orthopaedic disease in the contralateral forelimb may be advisable in dogs with a previous limb amputation. In addition, when determining candidacy for a limb amputation, disease of the contralateral forelimb should be thoroughly evaluated.

  10. Factors affecting outcome after traumatic limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Z B; De'Ath, H D; Sharp, G; Tai, N R M

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic leg amputation commonly affects young, active people and leads to poor long-term outcomes. The aim of this review was to describe common causes of disability and highlight therapeutic interventions that may optimize outcome after traumatic leg amputation. A comprehensive search of MEDLINE, Embase and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases was performed, using the terms 'leg injury', 'amputation' and 'outcome'. Articles reporting outcomes following traumatic leg amputation were included. Studies demonstrated that pain, psychological illness, decreased physical and vocational function, and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were common causes of disability after traumatic leg amputation. The evidence highlights that appropriate preoperative management and operative techniques, in conjunction with suitable rehabilitation and postoperative follow-up, can lead to improved treatment outcome and patient satisfaction. Patients who undergo leg amputation after trauma are at risk of poor long-term physical and mental health. Clinicians involved in their care have many opportunities to improve their outcome using a variety of therapeutic variables. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Lower Limb Amputation in Patients with Vascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Johannesson, Anton

    2009-01-01

    The current prevalence of persons amputated at transmetatarsal level or higher in Sweden can be estimated to be between 5000 and 5500 persons (approx. 0.06 % of the population). The majority of these are patients with vascular disease (≈ 80%). In Sweden between 1000 and1100 new amputees can be expect every year. Less than 5% of all amputations will be related to causes other than vascular disease. Lower limb amputation (LEA) in patients with vascular disease may not only be highly disablin...

  12. Limb amputations from the ancient times to the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryła, Wanda; Pogorzała, Adam M; Kasior, Iwona; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2013-07-26

    Amputations, or the removal of limbs at different levels, have been performed since the ancient times. The first reports of amputations originate from the ancient ruins in Egypt, where primitive prosthetic toes were found in the tombs of the Pharaohs. In Europe, during the period of ancient Greece and Rome, various examples of amputations were described on amphoras and mosaics. During the middle ages, the body was marginalized and replaced by the worship of human spirituality. As a result reports of amputations from that time period are scarce. True development of amputation and prosthetic techniques took place during the Renaissance and centuries that followed. Present-day indications for amputation are similar to those utilized in the ancient times. The greatest development of limb amputation techniques and prosthetic methods began in the 20th century and continues to this day. Despite the development of new techniques in prosthetics, many solutions have their roots in designs originating in the ancient times and differ only in their structural design.

  13. Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain with Ambulatory Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0009 TITLE: Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain with Ambulatory Continuous...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 26 Dec 2014- 25 Dec 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain with Ambulatory...effective treatment for intractable phantom limb pain following a traumatic limb amputation. There is currently no reliable treatment for phantom limb pain

  14. Adjustments to amputation and an artificial limb in lower limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Richa; van den Heuvel, Wim J A; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam

    2014-04-01

    Positive adjustments to amputation and an artificial limb play important roles in the rehabilitation process. To study the different facets of adjustments to amputation and an artificial limb in lower limb amputees and to assess the possible role of different background and amputation-related factors that could potentially influence these adjustments. Cross-sectional. Adult unilateral and non-congenital lower limb amputees (n = 368) met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using structured questionnaires including patient's background, amputation and the Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales. Amputees were on average satisfied with the functioning of the prosthesis, moderately psychosocially adjusted and not restricted in performing functional and social activities, except for athletic activities. Age, employment, daily use of prosthesis and assistive device use were the most important factors associated with adjustments to amputation and prosthesis, followed by gender, co-morbidity and amputation level. Evaluation of employment status and measures to curb unemployment through vocational rehabilitation and providing assistance for placement should be intrinsic to the rehabilitation programme. Future studies are envisaged to understand the underlying factors determining the extent of daily use of prosthesis and the reasons for the use of assistive devices by the amputees. Clinical relevance Proper appraisal and measures to alleviate employment and co-morbidity, related issues, routine evaluation of daily use of prosthesis and providing appropriate gait training might facilitate immediate and long-term adjustment.

  15. Effects of prosthetic limb prescription on 3-year mortality among Veterans with lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurichi, Jibby E; Kwong, Pui; Vogel, W Bruce; Xie, Dawei; Cowper Ripley, Diane; Bates, Barbara E

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the relationship between receipt of a prescription for a prosthetic limb and 3 yr mortality postsurgery among Veterans with lower-limb amputation (LLA). We conducted a retrospective observational study that included 4,578 Veterans hospitalized for LLA and discharged in fiscal years 2003 and 2004. The outcome was time to all-cause mortality from the amputation surgical date up to the 3 yr anniversary of the surgical date. Of the Veterans with LLA, 1,300 (28.4%) received a prescription for a prosthetic limb within 1 yr after the surgical amputation. About 46% (n = 2,086) died within 3 yr of the surgical anniversary. Among those who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb, only 25.2% died within 3 yr of the surgical anniversary. After adjustment, Veterans who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb were less likely to die after the surgery than Veterans without a prescription, with a hazard ratio of 0.68 (95% confidence interval: 0.60-0.77). Findings demonstrated that Veterans with LLA who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb within 1 yr after the surgical amputation were less likely to die within 3 yr of the surgical amputation after controlling for patient-, treatment-, and facility-level characteristics.

  16. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of patient-reported outcomes after traumatic upper extremity amputation: Replantation versus prosthetic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pet, Mitchell A; Morrison, Shane D; Mack, Jacob S; Sears, Erika D; Wright, Thomas; Lussiez, Alisha D; Means, Kenneth R; Higgins, James P; Ko, Jason H; Cederna, Paul S; Kung, Theodore A

    2016-12-01

    After major upper extremity traumatic amputation, replantation is attempted based upon the assumption that outcomes for a replanted limb exceed those for revision amputation with prosthetic rehabilitation. While some reports have examined functional differences between these patients, it is increasingly apparent that patient perceptions are also critical determinants of success. Currently, little patient-reported outcomes data exists to support surgical decision-making in the setting of major upper extremity traumatic amputation. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to directly compare patient-reported outcomes after replantation versus prosthetic rehabilitation. At three tertiary care centers, patients with a history of traumatic unilateral upper extremity amputation at or between the radiocarpal and elbow joints were identified. Patients who underwent either successful replantation or revision amputation with prosthetic rehabilitation were contacted. Patient-reported health status was evaluated with both DASH and MHQ instruments. Intergroup comparisons were performed for aggregate DASH score, aggregate MHQ score on the injured side, and each MHQ domain. Nine patients with successful replantation and 22 amputees who underwent prosthetic rehabilitation were enrolled. Aggregate MHQ score for the affected extremity was significantly higher for the Replantation group compared to the Prosthetic Rehabilitation group (47.2 vs. 35.1, ptraumatic amputation reported more favorable patient-reported outcomes after successful replantation compared to revision amputation with prosthetic rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Physical and social factors determining quality of life for veterans with lower-limb amputation(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan; Ipsen, Thomas; Doherty, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    of the literature to summarize any evidence on the physical and social determinants for HRQoL in veterans with uni- or bilateral lower-limb amputation(s). Method MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, CINAHL, Scopus and Cochrane databases were searched systematically for eligible studies. Inclusion criteria were: traumatic lower......-limb amputation(s), HRQoL outcome and veterans. Physical and social factors that influence HRQoL were extracted. Results The literature search identified 2073 citations, leading to the inclusion of 10 studies in the systematic review. Physical activity level, sport participation, level of amputation, back pain......, years of education, as well as duration and severity of phantom pain were found to be determining factors for HRQoL among veterans with lower-limb amputation. Conclusions The identified physical and social determinants were similar to those found in civilian traumatic amputees. More high quality...

  19. Midfoot amputations expand limb salvage rates for diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Patrick A; Back, Martin R; Armstrong, Paul A; Flaherty, Sarah K; Keeling, W Brent; Johnson, Brad L; Shames, Murray L; Bandyk, Dennis F

    2005-11-01

    The persistent high incidence of limb loss resulting from advanced forefoot tissue loss and infection in diabetic patients prompted an evaluation of transmetatarsal (TMA) and transtarsal/midfoot amputations in achieving foot salvage at our tertiary vascular practice. Over the last 8 years, 74 diabetic patients required 77 TMAs for tissue loss and/or infection. Twelve (16%) of the patients had a contralateral below-knee amputation (BKA) and 26% (n = 20) had dialysis-dependent renal failure. Thirty-five (45%) limbs had concomitant revascularization (bypass grafting or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty), 32 (42%) had arterial occlusive disease by noninvasive testing and/or arteriography but were not or could not be revascularized, and seven (13%) had normal hemodynamics. Patient factors, arterial testing, operative complications, operative mortality (foot salvage was possible in 61% (25/41) of nonhealing TMAs. Overall limb salvage for TMA/midfoot procedures was estimated from Kaplain-Meier life tables to be 73%, 68%, and 62% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively, with only 50% of dialysis patients avoiding major amputation. Ankle pressure >100 mm Hg and a biphasic pedal waveform had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 79%, and toe pressure >50 mm Hg had a PPV of 91% for determining healing of TMA/midfoot amputations. One- and 3-year survival rates were only 72% and 69% for the entire cohort from life table estimates. Aggressive attempts at foot salvage are justified in diabetic patients with advanced forefoot tissue loss/infection after assuring adequate arterial perfusion. Transtarsal amputations salvaged over half of nonhealing TMAs with excellent functional results.

  20. Always Contact a Vascular Interventional Specialist Before Amputating a Patient with Critical Limb Ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Met, Rosemarie; Koelemay, Mark J. W.; Bipat, Shandra; Legemate, Dink A.; Lienden, Krijn P. van; Reekers, Jim A.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with severe critical limb ischemia (CLI) due to long tibial artery occlusions are often poor candidates for surgical revascularization and frequently end up with a lower limb amputation. Subintimal angioplasty (SA) offers a minimally invasive alternative for limb salvage in this severely compromised patient population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of SA in patients with CLI caused by long tibial occlusions who have no surgical options for revascularization and are facing amputation. We retrospectively reviewed all consecutive patients with CLI due to long tibial occlusions who were scheduled for amputation because they had no surgical options for revascularization and who were treated by SA. A total of 26 procedures in 25 patients (14 males; mean age, 70 ± 15 [SD] years) were evaluated. Technical success rate was 88% (23/26). There were four complications, which were treated conservatively. Finally, in 10 of 26 limbs, no amputation was needed. A major amputation was needed in 10 limbs (7 below-knee amputations and 3 above-knee amputations). Half of the major amputations took place within 3 months after the procedure. Cumulative freedom of major amputation after 12 months was 59% (SE = 11%). In six limbs, amputation was limited to a minor amputation. Seven patients (28%) died during follow-up. In conclusion, SA of the tibial arteries seem to be a valuable treatment option to prevent major amputation in patients with CLI who are facing amputation due to lack of surgical options.

  1. Factors related to successful job reintegration of people with a lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoppen, Tanneke; Boonstra, Antje; Groothoff, JW; van Sonderen, E; Goeken, LN; Eisma, Willem

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study demographically, amputation-, and employment-related factors that show a relationship to successful job reintegration of patients after lower limb amputation. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University hospital. Patients: Subjects had an acquired unilateral major

  2. Outcomes of dogs undergoing limb amputation, owner satisfaction with limb amputation procedures, and owner perceptions regarding postsurgical adaptation: 64 cases (2005-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Vanna M; Coleman, Kevin D; Ogawa, Morika; Saba, Corey F; Cornell, Karen K; Radlinsky, MaryAnn G; Schmiedt, Chad W

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate outcomes of dogs and owner satisfaction and perception of their dogs' adaptation following amputation of a thoracic or pelvic limb. Retrospective case series. 64 client-owned dogs. Procedures-Medical records of dogs that underwent limb amputation at a veterinary teaching hospital between 2005 and 2012 were reviewed. Signalment, body weight, and body condition scores at the time of amputation, dates of amputation and discharge from the hospital, whether a thoracic or pelvic limb was amputated, and reason for amputation were recorded. Histologic diagnosis and date of death were recorded if applicable. Owners were interviewed by telephone about their experience and interpretation of the dog's adaptation after surgery. Associations between perioperative variables and postoperative quality of life scores were investigated. 58 of 64 (91%) owners perceived no change in their dog's attitude after amputation; 56 (88%) reported complete or nearly complete return to preamputation quality of life, 50 (78%) indicated the dog's recovery and adaptation were better than expected, and 47 (73%) reported no change in the dog's recreational activities. Body condition scores and body weight at the time of amputation were negatively correlated with quality of life scores after surgery. Taking all factors into account, most (55/64 [86%]) respondents reported they would make the same decision regarding amputation again, and 4 (6%) indicated they would not; 5 (8%) were unsure. This information may aid veterinarians in educating clients about adaptation potential of dogs following limb amputation and the need for postoperative weight control in such patients.

  3. Anxiety and depression following traumatic limb amputation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckechnie, P S; John, A

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic amputation can result in multiple physical, psychological and socio-economic sequalae. While there has been a significant increase in investment and public profile of the rehabilitation of patients who have experienced traumatic limb amputation, little is known about the prevalence of anxiety and depression, especially in the long term. To determine the association between traumatic limb amputation and anxiety and depression. A literature search of available databases including Cochrane, Medline, Embase, and PsycINFO was performed for relevant studies since 2002. Secondary outcomes included the effect on employment, substance misuse, relationships and quality of life. Randomised control trials, observational studies or reviews which met the inclusion, exclusion and quality criteria. Levels of anxiety and depression are significantly higher than in the general population. Significant heterogeneity exists between studies making meta-analyses inappropriate. Improved rehabilitation is having a positive effect on employment rates. There appears to be no significant effect on substance abuse and relationships. All studies demonstrated high prevalence of anxiety and depression in post-traumatic amputees. No good prospective data exists for levels of anxiety and depression beyond two years of follow up and this should be an area of future study. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Provision of Prosthetic Services Following Lower Limb Amputation in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Nooranida; Hasbollah, Hasif Rafidee; Hanafi, Muhammad Hafiz; Ibrahim, Al Hafiz; Rahman, Wan Afezah Wan Abdul; Aziz, Roslizawati Che

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of lower limb amputation is high across the globe and continues to be a major threat to morbidity and mortality. Consequently, the provision of high quality and effective prosthetics services have been known as an essential component for a successful rehabilitation outcome. In Malaysia, amputation prevalence has been increasing in which several main components of service delivering aspects (such as service intervention, prosthetic personnel) should be anticipated to accommodate for the increasing demand. This article highlights the hurdles experienced in providing prosthetic services in Malaysia from multiple aspects such as financial burden to acquire the prosthesis and lack of expertise to produce quality prosthesis. This paramount issues consequently justify for the urgency to carry out national level survey on the current statistics of lower limb amputation and to ascertain the available workforce to provide a quality prosthetics services. Only with accurate and current information from the national survey, strategies and policies aimed at enhancing the outcome from prosthetics services can be achieved. PMID:29386978

  5. Provision of Prosthetic Services Following Lower Limb Amputation in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Nooranida; Hasbollah, Hasif Rafidee; Hanafi, Muhammad Hafiz; Ibrahim, Al Hafiz; Rahman, Wan Afezah Wan Abdul; Aziz, Roslizawati Che

    2017-10-01

    The incidence of lower limb amputation is high across the globe and continues to be a major threat to morbidity and mortality. Consequently, the provision of high quality and effective prosthetics services have been known as an essential component for a successful rehabilitation outcome. In Malaysia, amputation prevalence has been increasing in which several main components of service delivering aspects (such as service intervention, prosthetic personnel) should be anticipated to accommodate for the increasing demand. This article highlights the hurdles experienced in providing prosthetic services in Malaysia from multiple aspects such as financial burden to acquire the prosthesis and lack of expertise to produce quality prosthesis. This paramount issues consequently justify for the urgency to carry out national level survey on the current statistics of lower limb amputation and to ascertain the available workforce to provide a quality prosthetics services. Only with accurate and current information from the national survey, strategies and policies aimed at enhancing the outcome from prosthetics services can be achieved.

  6. Spina bifida and lower limb amputation in Northern Ireland: A retrospective study of demographics and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Lorraine

    2017-10-01

    Spina bifida is an uncommon cause for lower limb amputation. The causes and level of amputation and mobility outcome for these patients have not been reported previously. To identify the causes and level of amputation and the mobility outcome for amputee patients with spina bifida. Retrospective case series. Chart review of patients identified by computer as having an amputation secondary to neurological or congenital cause. Additional patients identified from the Regional Spina Bifida Medical Clinic. Demographics, cause and level of mobility pre- and post-amputation recorded from the prosthetic notes. In total, 16 patients were identified who had a diagnosis of spina bifida and a lower limb amputation. Mean age at the time of amputation was 28.5 years. In total, 15 patients had a transtibial amputation. In total, 14 patients post-amputation were able to maintain their mobility, wheelchair or walking, without any change in type of aid needed. Patients with spina bifida appear to require lower limb amputation at a younger age than patients with peripheral vascular disease. Almost all patients had prior chronic skin infection/osteomyelitis as precursors for amputation. The most common level for amputation was transtibial. Mobility was maintained for all patients, albeit for two in a more supported way. Clinical relevance Spina bifida is an uncommon reason for amputation. Patients, are often younger and medically complicated. Chronic skin ulceration, was the most common indication for amputation. Wheelchair or walking ambulance was maintained at the same level for most patients.

  7. Sensory feedback in upper limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antfolk, Christian; D'Alonzo, Marco; Rosén, Birgitta; Lundborg, Göran; Sebelius, Fredrik; Cipriani, Christian

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges facing prosthetic designers and engineers is to restore the missing sensory function inherit to hand amputation. Several different techniques can be employed to provide amputees with sensory feedback: sensory substitution methods where the recorded stimulus is not only transferred to the amputee, but also translated to a different modality (modality-matched feedback), which transfers the stimulus without translation and direct neural stimulation, which interacts directly with peripheral afferent nerves. This paper presents an overview of the principal works and devices employed to provide upper limb amputees with sensory feedback. The focus is on sensory substitution and modality matched feedback; the principal features, advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are presented.

  8. Remodeling of cortical activity for motor control following upper limb loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Laura; Pirouz, Nikta; Mizelle, J.C.; Cusack, William; Kistenberg, Rob; Wheaton, Lewis A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Upper extremity loss presents immediate and lasting challenges for motor control. While sensory and motor representations of the amputated limb undergo plasticity to adjacent areas of the sensorimotor homunculus, it remains unclear whether laterality of motor-related activity is affected by neural reorganization following amputation. Methods Using electroencephalography, we evaluated neural activation patterns of formerly right hand dominant persons with upper limb loss (amputees) performing a motor task with their residual right limb, then their sound left limb. We compared activation patterns with left- and right-handed persons performing the same task. Results Amputees have involvement of contralateral motor areas when using their sound limb and atypically increased activation of posterior parietal regions when using the affected limb. When using the non-amputated left arm, patterns of activation remains similar to right handed persons using their left arm. Conclusions A remodeling of activations from traditionally motor areas into posterior parietal areas occurs for motor planning and execution when using the amputated limb. This may reflect an amputation-specific adaptation of heightened visuospatial feedback for motor control involving the amputated limb. Significance These results identify a neuroplastic mechanism for motor control in amputees, which may have great relevance to development of motor rehabilitation paradigms and prosthesis adaptation. PMID:27472549

  9. Rehabilitation and multiple limb amputations: A clinical report of patients injured in combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcer, Ted; Pyo, Jay; Walker, Jay; Quinn, Kimberly; Lebedda, Martin; Neises, Kamaran; Nguyen, Christina; Galarneau, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This clinical report describes the outpatient rehabilitation program for patients with multiple limb amputations enrolled in the Comprehensive Combat and Complex Casualty Care facility at the Naval Medical Center San Diego. Injury-specific data for 29 of these patients wounded by blast weaponry in Afghanistan in 2010 or 2011 were captured by the Expeditionary Medical Encounter Database at the Naval Health Research Center and were reviewed for this report. Their median Injury Severity Score was 27 (N = 29; range, 11-54). Patients averaged seven moderate to serious injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale scores ≥2), including multiple injuries to lower limbs and injuries to the torso and/or upper limbs. All patients received care from numerous clinics, particularly physical therapy during the first 6 mo postinjury. Clinic use generally declined after the first 6 mo with the exception of prosthetic devices and repairs. The clinical team implemented the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory, 4th Revision (MPAI-4) to assess functioning at outpatient program initiation and discharge (n = 23). At program discharge, most patients had improved scores for the MPAI-4 items assessing mobility, pain, and transportation, but not employment. Case reports described rehabilitation for two patients with triple amputations and illustrated multispecialty care and contrasting solutions for limb prostheses.

  10. Predicting prosthetic use in elderly patients after major lower limb amputation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, M.S. van; Linde, H. van der; Buijck, B.I.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main determinants of prosthetic use known from literature apply to the younger patient with lower limb amputation. Studies aimed at identifying determinants of outcome of lower limb amputation in elderly patients with multimorbidity that rehabilitate in skilled nursing facilities

  11. Major limb amputations in a tertiary hospital in North Western Nigeria.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is usually due to the high rate of road traffic accidents and consequent mismanagement by traditional bone setters. Keywords: Limb amputations, tertiary hospital, North Western Nigeria. ... mors, diabetic gangrene, peripheral artery disease, limb infections and burns.4. While the indications for amputation in Europe and.

  12. Reorganization of the primary motor cortex following lower-limb amputation for vascular disease: a pre-post-amputation comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordacre, Brenton; Bradnam, Lynley V; Crotty, Maria

    2017-08-01

    This study compared bilateral corticomotor and intracortical excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1), pre- and post-unilateral transtibial amputation. Three males aged 45, 55, and 48 years respectively who were scheduled for elective amputation and thirteen (10 male, 3 female) healthy control participants aged 58.9 (SD 9.8) were recruited. Transcranial magnetic stimulation assessed corticomotor and intracortical excitability of M1 bilaterally. Neurophysiological assessments were performed 10 (SD 7) days prior to surgery and again at 10 (SD 3) days following surgery. Data were analyzed descriptively and objectively compared to 95% confidence intervals from control data. Prior to amputation, all three patients demonstrated stronger short-latency intracortical inhibition evoked from M1 ipsilateral to the affected limb and reduced long-latency intracortical inhibition evoked from M1 contralateral to the affected limb compared to control subjects. Following amputation, short-latency intracortical inhibition was reduced in both M1s and long-latency intracortical inhibition was reduced for the ipsilateral M1. Single-pulse motor evoked potential amplitude and motor thresholds were similar pre-to-post amputation. Modulation of intracortical excitability shortly following amputation indicates that the cortical environment may be optimized for reorganization in the acute post-amputation period which might be significant for learning to support prosthetic mobility. Implications for Rehabilitation Amputation of a lower-limb is associated with extensive reorganization at the level of the cortex. Reorganization occurs in the acute post-amputation period implying a favorable cortical environment for recovery. Rehabilitation or brain interventions may target the acute pre-prosthetic post-amputation period to optimize recovery.

  13. Job adjustments, job satisfaction and health experience in upper and lower limb amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Corry K.; Hartman, Paul P.; Schoppen, Tanneke; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To explore job adjustments, job satisfaction, and health experience among employees with an upper limb amputation and to compare the results with those of lower limb amputees and control subjects. Methods: Amputees were recruited from data files of a large European University Medical

  14. Limb Amputations in Fixed Dystonia: A Form of Body Integrity Identity Disorder?

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Mark J; Alonso-Canovas, Araceli; Schrag, Arnette; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Thompson, Philip D; Bhatia, Kailash

    2011-01-01

    Fixed dystonia is a disabling disorder mainly affecting young women who develop fixed abnormal limb postures and pain after apparently minor peripheral injury. There is continued debate regarding its pathophysiology and management. We report 5 cases of fixed dystonia in patients who sought amputation of the affected limb. We place these cases in the context of previous reports of patients with healthy limbs and patients with chronic regional pain syndrome who have sought amputation. Our cases...

  15. Treating Intractable Post Amputation Phantom Limb Pain with Ambulatory Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0009 TITLE: Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain with Ambulatory Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks...26 Dec 2016 – 25 Dec 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain with Ambulatory Continuous Peripheral Nerve...trial to determine if ambulatory continuous peripheral nerve block (CPNB) is an effective treatment for intractable phantom limb pain following a

  16. Responsiveness of outcome measures for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    There is limited research on responsiveness of prosthetic rehabilitation outcome measures. To examine responsiveness of the Box and Block test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function tests, Upper Extremity Functional Scale, University of New Brunswick skill and spontaneity tests, Activity Measure for Upper Limb Amputation, and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. This was a quasi-experimental study with repeated measurements in a convenience sample of upper limb amputees. Measures were collected before, during, and after training with the DEKA Arm. Largest effect sizes were observed for Patient-Specific Functional Scale (effect size: 1.59, confidence interval: 1.00, 2.14), Activity Measure for Upper Limb Amputation (effect size: 1.33, confidence interval: 0.73, 1.90), and University of New Brunswick skill test (effect size: 1.18, confidence interval: 0.61, 1.73). Other measures that were responsive to change were Box and Block test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function light and heavy can tests, and University of New Brunswick spontaneity test. Responsiveness and pattern of responsiveness varied by prosthetic level. The Box and Block test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function light and heavy can tests, University of New Brunswick skill and spontaneity tests, Activities Measure for Upper Limb Amputation, and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale were responsive to change during prosthetic training. These findings have implications for choice of measures for research and practice and inform clinicians about the amount of training necessary to maximize outcomes with the DEKA Arm. Findings on responsiveness of outcome measures have implications for the choice of measures for clinical trials and practice. Findings regarding the responsiveness to change over the course of training can inform clinicians about the amount of training that may be necessary to maximize specific outcomes with the DEKA Arm. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  17. Osseointegrated Prosthetic Limb for the treatment of lower limb amputations : Experience and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Muderis, Munjed; Lu, William; Li, Jiao Jiao

    2017-04-01

    Osseointegration has emerged over the past two decades as a dramatically different approach for the treatment of lower limb amputations, which involves direct attachment of the prosthesis to the skeletal residuum. This approach can address many of the socket-interface issues associated with socket prostheses which represent the current standard of care for amputees. The Osseointegrated Prosthetic Limb (OPL) is an osseointegration implant with a new design and improved features compared to other available implant systems. To report on the experience and outcomes of using the OPL for osseointegrated reconstruction of lower limb amputations. This is a retrospective study of 22 patients who received the OPL implant between December 2013 and November 2014. Clinical outcomes were obtained pre- and post-operatively, with results reported at the 1‑year follow-up. Outcome measures included the Questionnaire for persons with a Trans-Femoral Amputation (Q-TFA), Short Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36), Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), and Timed Up and Go (TUG). Adverse events were also recorded. Compared to the mean pre-operative values obtained while patients were using socket prostheses or were wheelchair-bound, the mean post-operative values for all four validated outcome measures were significantly improved. There were 15 episodes of minor infections in 12 patients, all of which responded to antibiotics. Soft tissue refashioning was performed electively on 6 patients. No other adverse events were recorded. The results demonstrate that osseointegration surgery using the OPL is a relatively safe and effective procedure for the reconstruction and rehabilitation of lower limb amputees.

  18. Limb amputations in fixed dystonia: a form of body integrity identity disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark J; Alonso-Canovas, Araceli; Schrag, Arnette; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Thompson, Philip D; Bhatia, Kailash

    2011-07-01

    Fixed dystonia is a disabling disorder mainly affecting young women who develop fixed abnormal limb postures and pain after apparently minor peripheral injury. There is continued debate regarding its pathophysiology and management. We report 5 cases of fixed dystonia in patients who sought amputation of the affected limb. We place these cases in the context of previous reports of patients with healthy limbs and patients with chronic regional pain syndrome who have sought amputation. Our cases, combined with recent data regarding disorders of mental rotation in patients with fixed dystonia, as well as previous data regarding body integrity identity disorder and amputations sought by patients with chronic regional pain syndrome, raise the possibility that patients with fixed dystonia might have a deficit in body schema that predisposes them to developing fixed dystonia and drives some to seek amputation. The outcome of amputation in fixed dystonia is invariably unfavorable. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Peak oxygen consumption in older adults with a lower limb amputation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, D.; de Haan, A.; Faber, W.X; Slootman, H.J.; van der Woude, L.H.V.; Houdijk, J.H.P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether the aerobic capacity of older adults who underwent a lower limb amputation is associated with the presence, cause (traumatic or vascular), and level of amputation (transtibial or transfemoral). Design: Cross-sectional descriptive. Setting: Human motion laboratory at

  20. Peak Oxygen Consumption in Older Adults With a Lower Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, Daphne; de Haan, Arnold; Faber, Willemijn X.; Slootman, Hans J.; van der Woude, Lucas H.; Houdijk, Han

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether the aerobic capacity of older adults who underwent a lower limb amputation is associated with the presence, cause (traumatic or vascular), and level of amputation (transtibial or transfemoral). Design: Cross-sectional descriptive. Setting: Human motion laboratory at

  1. Pattern of limb amputations in male patients in a sub-urban teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Extremity amputations represent a major disability and it is compounded by the difficulty in obtaining prosthesis in developing nations. The consequences of loss of ... The most frequent level of amputation was below knee level in 53.1% of cases, followed by above knee in 31.2% of cases. The lower limb was ...

  2. Sexuality in people with a lower limb amputation : a topic too hot to handle?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, J. E. A.; Enzlin, P.; Geertzen, J. H. B.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Dekker, R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze whether, and by whom sexuality is discussed in amputation departments. The focus was on whether professionals received questions about sexuality from their patients with a lower limb amputation and whether they addressed sexuality themselves, as well

  3. Lower limb amputation for ischaemia with special reference to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient must be left with an amputation stump that can bear weight and, when necessary, to which a prosthesis can be fitted. The scope of what follows is not intended to be a detailed text on amputation, but to provide some insight for the clinician, based on general experience with amputation over a number of years.

  4. Limb- and Person-Level Risk Factors for Lower-Limb Amputation in the Prospective Seattle Diabetic Foot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Edward J; Seelig, Amber D; Ahroni, Jessie H

    2018-04-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of nontraumatic lower-limb amputations in the U.S., but no research has prospectively examined associations between limb-specific measurements and amputation risk among patients without foot ulcer. We investigated amputation risk by limb in relation to the same limb- and person-level factors. We conducted a 22-year prospective study among 1,461 male patients with diabetes without foot ulcer (mean age 62.4 years), with 2,893 lower limbs among subjects recruited between 1990 and 2002 from one Department of Veterans Affairs general internal medicine clinic. The following information was collected: demographic, lifestyle, and diabetes characteristics; visual acuity; kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR]); and lower-limb measurements including presence of Charcot deformity, sensory neuropathy by 10-g monofilament, dorsal foot transcutaneous oximetry (TcPO 2 ) at 44°C, and ankle-brachial index (ABI). Over 25,735 limb-years, 136 amputations occurred. A multivariable Cox model identified multiple independent risk factors: sensory neuropathy (hazard ratio 3.09 [95% CI 2.02-4.74]), ABI ≤0.5 vs. >0.9 to 0.9 to 70 years vs. <57 years (0.13 [0.04-0.38]). Although TcPO 2 was not significantly associated with amputation overall, TcPO 2 <26 mmHg significantly predicted a higher risk in the ABI ≥1.3 category. Arterial disease and neuropathy emerged as the only limb-specific risk factors for amputation, but these and several person-level factors may be amenable to prevention or treatment interventions to potentially reduce diabetic amputation risk. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of upper limb apraxia

    OpenAIRE

    Dovern, A.; Fink, G. R.; Weiss, P. H.

    2012-01-01

    Upper limb apraxia, a disorder of higher motor cognition, is a common consequence of left-hemispheric stroke. Contrary to common assumption, apraxic deficits not only manifest themselves during clinical testing but also have delirious effects on the patients’ everyday life and rehabilitation. Thus, a reliable diagnosis and efficient treatment of upper limb apraxia is important to improve the patients’ prognosis after stroke. Nevertheless, to date, upper limb apraxia is still an underdiagnosed...

  6. Trends in traumatic limb amputation in Allied Forces in Iraq and Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Background: Limb amputation has been a common injury occurring in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Compared to other injuries, less attention has been given to this serious, disabling wound. Purpose: The article describes the Allied military experience of traumatic limb amputation in Iraq and Afghanistan. It intends to inform health care personnel involved in the care of serving military personnel and veterans about the scale of these casualties. Methods: A literature se...

  7. Acute bone changes after lower limb amputation resulting from traumatic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemben, D A; Sherk, V D; Ertl, W J J; Bemben, M G

    2017-07-01

    Bone health is critical for lower limb amputees, affecting their ability to use a prosthesis and their risk of osteoporosis. We found large losses in hip bone mineral density (BMD) and in amputated bone strength in the first year of prosthesis use, suggesting a need for load bearing interventions early post-amputation. Large deficits in hip areal BMD (aBMD) and residual limb volumetric BMD (vBMD) occur after lower limb amputation; however, the time course of these bone quality changes is unknown. The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in the amputated bone that occur during the early stages post-amputation. Eight traumatic unilateral amputees (23-53 years) were enrolled prior to surgery. Changes in total body, hip, and spine aBMD (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry); in vBMD, stress-strain index (SSI), and muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) (peripheral QCT); and in bone turnover markers were assessed after amputation prior to prosthesis fitting (pre-ambulatory) and at 6 and 12 months walking with prosthesis. Hip aBMD of the amputated limb decreased 11-15%, which persisted through 12 months. The amputated bone had decreases (p 650 mg/cm 3 (58 to 43% of total area) or >480 mg/cm 3 (65% to 53%), suggesting an increase in cortical porosity after amputation. Bone alkaline phosphatase and sclerostin were elevated (p amputation and are not regained by 12 months of becoming ambulatory. Early post-amputation may be the most critical window for preventing bone loss.

  8. Quality of Life Following Amputation or Limb Preservation in Patients with Lower Extremity Bone Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Mason

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Although functional differences have been described between patients with lower extremity bone sarcoma with amputation and limb preservation surgery, differences have not clearly been shown between the two groups related to quality of life. The aim of the study was to determine if there is a difference in overall quality of life in lower extremity bone sarcoma survivors related to whether they had an amputation or a limb preservation procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-two long-term survivors of lower extremity bone sarcoma were studied to make a comparison of the overall quality of life, pain assessment and psychological evaluations in limb preservation and amputation patients. Forty-eight patients with limb preservation and thirty-four patients with amputations were enrolled in the study. Validated psychometric measures including the Quality of Life Questionnaire, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and visual analog scales were utilized.RESULTS: The overall quality of life of patients with limb preservation was significantly higher than patients with amputation (p-value < 0.01. Significant differences were noted in the categories of material well being, job satisfiers and occupational relations. CONCLUSION: The overall quality of life of patients with limb preservation appears to be better than for those patients with amputation based on the quality of life questionnaire in patients surviving lower extremity bone sarcoma. Further analysis needs to verify the results and focus on the categories that significantly affect the overall quality of life.

  9. [The endo-exo prosthesis treatment concept : Improvement in quality of life after limb amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, T; Schwarze, F; Aschoff, H H

    2017-05-01

    Osseointegrated, percutaneous implants as the force bearer for exoprosthetics after limb amputation have been used in individual cases for clinical rehabilitation of amputees during the past years. Most experience in this field in Germany has been accumulated at the Sana Klinik in Lübeck with the so-called endo-exo prosthesis (EEP) system. The two-step implantation procedure can now be considered as reliable. Following a well-documented learning curve initial soft tissue problems concerning the cutaneous stoma can now be regarded as exceptions. The retrospective examination of the results concerning by now more than 100 patients provided with an endo-exo femoral prosthesis (EEFP) showed a very satisfying outcome concerning objective as well as subjective values, such as duration of daily use and wearing comfort of the exoprosthesis. Regaining the ability of osseoperception due to the intraosseous fixation is described by the patients as a great advantage. The step from a socket prosthesis to an EEP is felt to be a big increase in quality of life by nearly all patients included into the follow-up. Nearly all of the patients questioned would choose an endo-exo prosthesis again. Meanwhile, the success of the EEP resulted in the broadening of indications from above-knee amputations to transtibial as well as transhumeral amputations. The results are likewise encouraging. The use of EEP for the upper limbs leads to substantial improvement in the range of motion of the shoulder joint with the intramedullary anchored percutaneous implant. Furthermore, new pathbreaking possibilities in the fixation of myoelectrically controlled arm prostheses may arise from the EEP technique.

  10. Amputations for extremity soft tissue sarcoma in an era of limb salvage treatment : Local control and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, Marc G; Musters, Annelie H; Geertzen, Jan H B; van Leeuwen, Barbara L; Hoekstra, Harald J; Been, Lukas B

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite multimodality limb salvage treatment (LST) for locally advanced extremity soft tissue sarcoma (ESTS), some patients still need an amputation. Indications for amputation and oncological outcome for these patients are described. METHODS: Between 1996 and 2016, all patients who

  11. Peak oxygen consumption in older adults with a lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wezenberg, Daphne; de Haan, Arnold; Faber, Willemijn X; Slootman, Hans J; van der Woude, Lucas H; Houdijk, Han

    2012-11-01

    To investigate whether the aerobic capacity of older adults who underwent a lower limb amputation is associated with the presence, cause (traumatic or vascular), and level of amputation (transtibial or transfemoral). Cross-sectional descriptive. Human motion laboratory at a rehabilitation center. Older subjects (n=36) who underwent lower limb amputation and age-matched, able-bodied controls (n=21). All subjects were able to walk for a minimum of 4 minutes. Not applicable. Peak oxygen consumption (Vo(2)(peak)) was measured using open-circuit respirometry while performing a discontinuous, graded, 1-legged, peak cycle exercise test. After correcting for age, body mass index, and sex, the multiple linear regression analysis revealed that subjects who underwent amputation had a 13.1% lower aerobic capacity compared with able-bodied controls (P=.021). Differentiation among etiologies revealed that subjects with a vascular amputation had a lower Vo(2)(peak) of 29.1% compared with able-bodied controls (Ptraumatic amputees did not differ from able-bodied controls (P=.127). After correcting for etiology, no association between level of amputation and Vo(2)(peak) was found (P=.534). Older adults who underwent an amputation because of vascular deficiency had a lower aerobic capacity compared with able-bodied controls and people with a traumatic amputation. The level of amputation was not associated with Vo(2)(peak). Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyao Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA of white matter (WM were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC. Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections.

  13. Sex after amputation: the relationships between sexual functioning, body image, mood and anxiety in persons with a lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Lorraine; Hevey, David; Ryall, Nicola; O'Keeffe, Fiadhnait

    2018-07-01

    The study examined the relationships between psychological variables and sexual functioning in persons with lower limb amputations. Sixty-five participants (n = 49 males, n = 16 females) with lower limb amputations completed a battery of self-report questionnaires regarding their current psychological well-being and their current sexual activity. Measures included the anxiety items on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory - Second Edition, Body Image Quality of Life Inventory, Body Exposure Self-Consciousness during Intimate Situations and the Golombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction. Half of all participants with lower limb amputations were not currently sexually active. Approximately 60% of those who were sexually active scored within the clinical range for overall sexual dysfunction. Overall levels of sexual dysfunction were associated with significantly higher levels of anxiety (r = 0.40, p < 0.005), depression (r = 0.41, p < 0.015) and body exposure self-consciousness during sexual activities (r = 0.56, p < 0.005). Body image self-consciousness during sexual activities was the strongest predictor of sexual dysfunction. Psychological challenges following limb loss are strongly associated with levels of sexual dysfunction. The study highlights the need for psychological and psychosexual assessment and intervention following limb loss to enhance sexual functioning and overall quality of life. Implications for Rehabilitation Only half of the participants with a lower limb amputation were sexually active. Over 60% of those who were sexually active reported clinical levels of sexual dysfunction. One third of the entire sample scored within the clinical range for depression and for anxiety. Depression, anxiety and body image issues were significantly associated with sexual dysfunction in the current sample of individuals with lower limb amputation. There is a need for psychosexual assessment

  14. Replantation of traumatic limb amputation above the elbow: a report of 4 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Karimian

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: Transplantation of the amputated limb can be done in spite of limited resources. Any delay in repairing damaged nerves will result great reduction of final organs’ performance. A limb, made from the own body, always take precedence to prosthesis, even when the efficiency is low.

  15. Lower-Limb Amputation and Effect of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder on Department of Veterans Affairs Outpatient Cost Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    SD = standard deviation, TBI = traumatic brain injury. 831 BHATNAGAR et al. Lower-limb amputation , PTSD, and VA costsFigure 1. Among Veterans with...PTSD = posttraumatic stress disorder, TBI = traumatic brain injury. 835 BHATNAGAR et al. Lower-limb amputation , PTSD, and VA costsModel Covariates...JRRD Volume 52, Number 7, 2015Pages 827–838Lower-limb amputation and effect of posttraumatic stress disorder on Department of Veterans Affairs

  16. Smartphone supported upper limb prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hepp D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available State of the art upper limb prostheses offer up to six active DoFs (degrees of freedom and are controlled using different grip patterns. This low number of DoFs combined with a machine-human-interface which does not provide control over all DoFs separately result in a lack of usability for the patient. The aim of this novel upper limb prosthesis is both offering simplified control possibilities for changing grip patterns depending on the patients’ priorities and the improvement of grasp capability. Design development followed the design process requirements given by the European Medical Device Directive 93/42 ECC and was structured into the topics mechanics, software and drive technology. First user needs were identified by literature research and by patient feedback. Consequently, concepts were evaluated against technical and usability requirements. A first evaluation prototype with one active DoF per finger was manufactured. In a second step a test setup with two active DoF per finger was designed. The prototype is connected to an Android based smartphone application. Two main grip patterns can be preselected in the software application and afterwards changed and used by the EMG signal. Three different control algorithms can be selected: “all-day”, “fine” and “tired muscle”. Further parameters can be adjusted to customize the prosthesis to the patients’ needs. First patient feedback certified the prosthesis an improved level of handling compared to the existing devices. Using the two DoF test setup, the possibilities of finger control with a neural network are evaluated at the moment. In a first user feedback test, the smartphone based software application increased the device usability, e.g. the change within preselected grip patterns and the “tired muscle” algorithm. Although the overall software application was positively rated, the handling of the prosthesis itself needs to be proven within a patient study to be

  17. Predicting prosthetic use in elderly patients after major lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijk, Monica Spruit-; van der Linde, Harmen; Buijck, Bianca; Geurts, Alexander; Zuidema, Sytse; Koopmans, Raymond

    2012-03-01

    The main determinants of prosthetic use known from literature apply to the younger patient with lower limb amputation. Studies aimed at identifying determinants of outcome of lower limb amputation in elderly patients with multimorbidity that rehabilitate in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) are scarce. To predict prosthetic use and physical mobility in geriatric patients admitted to SNFs for rehabilitation after lower limb amputation and the impact of multimorbidity. Prospective design. Univariate and multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses were used to identify determinants that were independently related to prosthetic use and the timed-up-and-go test (TUG test). Of 55 eligible patients, 38 had complete assessments on admission and at discharge. Fifty per cent was provided with a prosthesis. Multimorbidity was present in 53% of the patients. Being able to ambulate independently, and having a transtibial amputation (rather than a higher level of amputation), without phantom pain determined prosthetic use (R(2)=56%), while cognitive abilities, low amputation level, and pre-operative functional abilities were independently associated with the TUG test (R(2)=82%). Elderly patients referred to an SNF for prosthetic training have a high probability of using a prosthesis when having an independent ambulation after transtibial amputation, without phantom pain. These patients should be considered for prosthetic training.

  18. Peripheral muscle dysfunction in COPD: lower limbs versus upper limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Eduardo Foschini; Malaguti, Carla; Corso, Simone Dal

    2011-01-01

    In patients with COPD, the degree of functional impairment appears to differ between the upper and lower limbs. Significant dyspnea and fatigue have been reported by these patients when performing tasks with unsupported upper limbs and two mechanisms have been proposed to explain this fact: neuromechanical dysfunction of respiratory muscles; and changes in lung volume during such activities. The neuromechanical dysfunction seen in COPD patients during this type of exercise is related to changes in the breathing pattern, as well as to the simultaneity of afferent and efferent muscle stimuli, resulting in respiratory muscle asynchrony. In addition, the increased ventilation during upper limb exercise in patients with COPD leads to dynamic hyperinflation at different workloads. During lower limb exercises, the strength and endurance of the quadriceps muscle is lower in COPD patients than in healthy subjects. This could by explained by abnormal muscle metabolism (decreased aerobic capacity), dependence on glycolytic metabolism, and rapid accumulation of lactate during exercise. In comparison with lower limb exercises, upper limb exercises result in higher metabolic and ventilatory demands, as well as in a more intense sensation of dyspnea and greater fatigue. Because there are differences between the upper and lower limb muscles in terms of the morphological and functional adaptations in COPD patients, specific protocols for strength training and endurance should be developed and tested for the corresponding muscle groups.

  19. Prosthetic fitting, use, and satisfaction following lower-limb amputation: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joseph B; Hakimi, Kevin N; Williams, Rhonda M; Turner, Aaron P; Norvell, Daniel C; Czerniecki, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    Providing a satisfactory, functional prosthesis following lower-limb amputation is a primary goal of rehabilitation. The objectives of this study were to describe the rate of successful prosthetic fitting over a 12 mo period; describe prosthetic use after amputation; and determine factors associated with greater prosthetic fitting, function, and satisfaction. The study design was a multicenter prospective cohort study of individuals undergoing their first major lower-limb amputation because of vascular disease and/or diabetes. At 4 mo, unsuccessful prosthetic fitting was significantly associated with depression, prior arterial reconstruction, diabetes, and pain in the residual limb. At 12 mo, 92% of all subjects were fit with a prosthetic limb and individuals with transfemoral amputation were significantly less likely to have a prosthesis fit. Age older than 55 yr, diagnosis of a major depressive episode, and history of renal dialysis were associated with fewer hours of prosthetic walking. Subjects who were older, had experienced a major depressive episode, and/or were diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had greater functional restriction. Thus, while most individuals achieve successful prosthetic fitting by 1 yr following a first major nontraumatic lower-limb amputation, a number of medical variables and psychosocial factors are associated with prosthetic fitting, utilization, and function.

  20. Psychological adjustment to amputation: variations on the bases of sex, age and cause of limb loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.; Haider, S.K.F.

    2017-01-01

    Amputation is the removal of a limb or part of a limb by a surgical procedure in order to save the life of a person. The underlying reasons behind the occurrence of this tragic incidence may be varied. However, irrespective of its cause limb loss is associated with wide range of life challenges. The study was done to investigate the psychological sequel of an individual after losing a limb and to know the level of strain and pressure they experience after this traumatic event. It also attempts to examine the moderating role of some demographic traits such as age, sex and cause of limb loss in psychosocial adjustment to amputation. Methods: The study includes 100 adult amputees of both genders and the data was collected from major government and private hospitals of Peshawar district. Demographic data sheet was constructed in order to know the demographics traits of amputees and a standardize Psychological Adjustment Scale developed by Sabir (1999) was used to find out the level of psychological adjustment after limb loss. Results: Nearly all the amputees' exhibit signs of psychological maladjustment at varying degrees. Males showed much greater signs of maladjustment than women and young adults were much psychologically shattered and disturbed as a result of limb loss. Amputation caused by planned medical reasons leads to less adjustment issues as compared to unplanned accidental amputation in which patient were not mentally prepare to accept this loss. Conclusion: Psychological aspect of amputation is an important aspect of limb loss which needs to be addressed properly in order to rehabilitate these patients and helps them to adjust successfully to their limb loss. (author)

  1. Free fillet flap application to cover forequarter or traumatic amputation of an upper extremity: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglioni, Mario F; Lindenblatt, Nicole; Barth, André A; Fuchs, Bruno; Weder, Walter; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2016-11-01

    Reusing tissue of amputated or unsalvageable limbs to reconstruct soft tissue defects is one aspect of the "spare parts concept." Using a free fillet flap in such situations enables the successful formation of a proximal stump with the length needed to cover a large defect from forequarter amputation without risking additional donor-site morbidity. The use of free fillet flaps for reconstruction after forequarter and traumatic upper extremity amputations is illustrated here in a case report. A 41-year old patient required a forequarter amputation to resect a desmoid tumor, resulting in an extensive soft-tissue defect of the upper extremity. A free fillet flap of the amputated arm and an additional local epaulette flap were used to reconstruct the defect. At 9 months after the procedure, a satisfactory result with a very well healed flap was attained. Free fillet flaps can be used successfully for reconstruction of large upper extremity defects, without risking additional donor-site morbidity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 36:700-704, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The importance of orthoses on activities of daily living in patients with unilateral lower limb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onat, Sule Sahin; Ünsal-Delialioğlu, Sibel; Özel, Sumru

    2017-01-01

    The role of the selected prothesis on activities of daily living (ADL). To evaluate the impact of prothesis on ADL in patients with lower-limb amputations. The data of 500 patients with unilateral lower limb amputation were recorded. The activity level was defined based on the Medicare Functional Classification Level. Old and new prescribed prosthesis were recorded. Nottingham Extended Activities of daily living activities Daily Living Scale was used to evaluate ADL. Amputation levels were transfemoral (TF) in 268 (53.6%), transtibial (TT) in 178 (35.6%), knee disarticulation (KD) in 54 (10.8%). In patients with TF and KD amputation active vacuum system, pin modular system, hydraulic system and mechanical modular prosthesis were replaced with the swing stance phase microprocessor-controlled prostheses. In patients with TT amputation pin modular system, hydraulic system and mechanical modular prosthesis were converted to active vacuum system prostheses. Prescribed new prosthesis has caused a statistically significant increase in all amputation levels in ADL of patients (p≤ 0.05). We observed that there was significant improvement in ADL when conventional prostheses replaced with advanced technology prostheses in unilateral lower extremity amputation patients.

  3. Update on embryology of the upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Kozin, Scott H

    2013-09-01

    Current concepts in the steps of upper limb development and the way the limb is patterned along its 3 spatial axes are reviewed. Finally, the embryogenesis of various congenital hand anomalies is delineated with an emphasis on the pathogenetic basis for each anomaly. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tactile, thermal, and electrical thresholds in patients with and without phantom limb pain after traumatic lower limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Shengai Li,1,2 Danielle H Melton,1,2 Sheng Li1,2 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 2Neurorehabilitation Research Laboratory, TIRR Memorial Hermann Research Center, Houston, TX, USA Purpose: To examine whether there is central sensitization in patients with phantom limb pain (PLP after traumatic limb amputation. Methods: Seventeen patients after unilateral lower limb amputation secondary to trauma were enrolled. Ten patients had chronic PLP, while the other seven patients had no PLP. Tactile-sensation threshold, cold- and warm-sensation thresholds, cold- and heat-pain thresholds, electrical-sensation threshold (EST, and electrical-pain threshold on the distal residual limb and the symmetrical site on the sound limb were measured in all tested patients. Their thresholds were compared within the PLP and non-PLP group, and between the groups. Results: The novel findings included: 1 electrical-pain threshold was only decreased in the sound limb in the PLP group and there was no difference between two limbs in the non-PLP group, suggesting central sensitization in patients with PLP; and 2 EST was increased on the affected limb as compared to the sound limb within the PLP group, but there were no significant differences in EST between the PLP and non-PLP group. There were in general no significant differences in other tested thresholds within the groups and between groups. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate central sensitization in the patients with PLP after traumatic limb amputation. Keywords: central sensitization, pain threshold, human

  5. Four limb amputations due to peripheral gangrene from inotrope use – Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Chuan Han

    2015-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Microvascular spasm is a rare complication of inotrope use which may lead to extensive peripheral gangrene. Anecdotal reports of reversal agents have been discussed. Four limb amputations are a reasonable option especially if done in an elective setting after the gangrene has demarcated itself. Rehabilitation with prosthesis after 4 limb amputations can result in good functional outcome.

  6. Upper Limb Absence: Predictors of Work Participation and Work Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, Sietke G; Bongers, Raoul M; Brouwers, Michael A; Burger, Helena; Norling-Hermansson, Liselotte M; Reneman, Michiel F; Dijkstra, Pieter U; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2016-06-01

    To analyze work participation, work productivity, contributing factors, and physical work demands of individuals with upper limb absence (ULA). Cross-sectional study: postal survey (response rate, 45%). Twelve rehabilitation centers and orthopedic workshops. Individuals (n=207) with unilateral transverse upper limb reduction deficiency (RD) or acquired amputation (AA), at or proximal to the carpal level, between the ages of 18 and 65 years, and a convenience sample of control subjects (n=90) matched on age and sex. Not applicable. Employment status, self-reported work productivity measured with the Quality-Quantity method, and self-reported upper extremity work demands measured with the Upper Extremity Work Demands scale. Seventy-four percent of the individuals with RD and 57% of the individuals with AA were employed (vs 82% of the control group and 66% of the general population). Male sex, younger age, a medium or higher level of education, prosthesis use, and good general health were predictors of work participation. Work productivity was similar to that of the control group. Higher work productivity was inversely related to musculoskeletal complaint-related pain. When having predominantly mentally demanding work, individuals with ULA perceived higher upper extremity work demands compared with controls. Work participation of individuals with RD was slightly higher compared with that of the general population, whereas employment rates of individuals with AA were slightly lower. Furthermore, work productivity did not differ between individuals with RD, AA, and controls. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of anxiety and depression after lower limb amputation in Jordanian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad M Hawamdeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Ziad M Hawamdeh1, Yasmin S Othman2, Alaa I Ibrahim31Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; 2Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; 3Lecturer, Department of Physical Therapy for Pediatrics and Pediatric surgery, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, EgyptObjective: This study aimed to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depression among Jordanian lower limb amputees with different clinical characteristics and sociodemographic data (gender, marital status, social support, income, type and level of amputation, and occupation.Methods: Participants were 56 patients with unilateral lower limb amputation with mean duration (8.4 ± 5.75 years. They were recruited from inpatient and outpatient clinics of Jordan University hospital, Royal Farah Rehabilitation Center, and Al-basheer hospital in Amman, Jordan. Participants responded to a questionnaire that included a battery of questions requesting brief information about sociodemographic variables and characteristics of amputation. The level of depression and anxiety in each participating patient was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS.Results: The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms were 37% and 20%, respectively. Factors associated with high prevalence of psychological symptoms included female gender, lack of social support, unemployment, traumatic amputation, shorter time since amputation, and amputation below the knee. These findings were confirmed by a significant reduction of anxiety and depression scores in patients who received social support, patients with amputation due to disease, and patients with amputation above the knee. Presence of pain and use of prosthesis had no effect on the prevalence.Conclusions: The findings of the present study highlight the high incidence of psychiatric disability and

  8. Sequential compression biomechanical device versus primary amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tawfick, Wael A

    2013-10-01

    Introduction: Patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI), who are unsuitable for intervention, face the consequence of primary amputation. Sequential compression biomechanical device (SCBD) therapy provides a limb salvage option for these patients. Objectives: To assess the outcome of SCBD in patients with severe CLI who are unsuitable for revascularization. Primary end points were limb salvage and 30-day mortality. Methods: From 2005 to 2012, 189 patients with severe CLI were not suitable for revascularization. In all, 171 joined the SCBD program. We match controlled 75 primary amputations. Results: All patients were Rutherford category 4 or higher. Sustained clinical improvement was 68% at 1 year. Mean toe pressure increased from 19.9 to 35.42 mm Hg, P < .0001. Mean popliteal flow increased from 35.44 to 55.91 cm\\/sec, P < .0001. The 30-day mortality was 0.6%. Limb salvage was 94% at 5 years. Freedom from major adverse clinical events was 62.5%. All-cause survival was 69%. Median cost of managing a primary amputation patient is €29 815 compared to €3985 for SCBD. We treated 171 patients with artassist at a cost of €681 965. However, primary amputation for 75 patients cost €2 236 125. Conclusion: The SCBD therapy is a cost-effective and clinically effective solution in patients with CLI having no option of revascularization. It provides adequate limb salvage while providing relief of rest pain without any intervention.

  9. Elevated vacuum suspension preserves residual-limb skin health in people with lower-limb amputation: Randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Cameron; Wernke, Matthew M; Powell, Heather M; Gynawali, Surya; Schroeder, Ryan M; Kim, Jayne Y; Denune, Jeffrey A; Gordillo, Gayle M; Colvin, James M; Sen, Chandan K

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of clinical trials and case reports support qualitative claims that use of an elevated vacuum suspension (EVS) prosthesis improves residual-limb health on the basis of self-reported questionnaires, clinical outcomes scales, and wound closure studies. Here, we report first efforts to quantitatively assess residual-limb circulation in response to EVS. Residual-limb skin health and perfusion of people with lower-limb amputation (N = 10) were assessed during a randomized crossover study comparing EVS with nonelevated vacuum suspension (control) over a 32 wk period using noninvasive probes (transepidermal water loss, laser speckle imaging, transcutaneous oxygen measurement) and functional hyperspectral imaging approaches. Regardless of the suspension system, prosthesis donning decreased perfusion in the residual limb under resting conditions. After 16 wk of use, EVS improved residual-limb oxygenation during treadmill walking. Likewise, prosthesis-induced reactive hyperemia was attenuated with EVS following 16 wk of use. Skin barrier function was preserved with EVS but disrupted after control socket use. Taken together, outcomes suggest chronic EVS use improves perfusion and preserves skin barrier function in people with lower-limb amputation. ClinicalTrials.gov; "Evaluation of limb health associated with a prosthetic vacuum socket system": NCT01839123; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01839123?term=NCT01839123&rank=1.

  10. Restoration of motor control and proprioceptive and cutaneous sensation in humans with prior upper-limb amputation via multiple Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) implanted in residual peripheral arm nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelken, Suzanne; Page, David M; Davis, Tyler; Wark, Heather A C; Kluger, David T; Duncan, Christopher; Warren, David J; Hutchinson, Douglas T; Clark, Gregory A

    2017-11-25

    Despite advances in sophisticated robotic hands, intuitive control of and sensory feedback from these prostheses has been limited to only 3-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) with 2 sensory percepts in closed-loop control. A Utah Slanted Electrode Array (USEA) has been used in the past to provide up to 81 sensory percepts for human amputees. Here, we report on the advanced capabilities of multiple USEAs implanted in the residual peripheral arm nerves of human amputees for restoring control of 5 DOF and sensation of up to 131 proprioceptive and cutaneous hand sensory percepts. We also demonstrate that USEA-restored sensory percepts provide a useful source of feedback during closed-loop virtual prosthetic hand control. Two 100-channel USEAs were implanted for 4-5 weeks, one each in the median and ulnar arm nerves of two human subjects with prior long-duration upper-arm amputations. Intended finger and wrist positions were decoded from neuronal firing patterns via a modified Kalman filter, allowing subjects to control many movements of a virtual prosthetic hand. Additionally, USEA microstimulation was used to evoke numerous sensory percepts spanning the phantom hand. Closed-loop control was achieved by stimulating via an electrode of the ulnar-nerve USEA while recording and decoding movement via the median-nerve USEA. Subjects controlled up to 12 degrees-of-freedom during informal, 'freeform' online movement decode sessions, and experienced up to 131 USEA-evoked proprioceptive and cutaneous sensations spanning the phantom hand. Independent control was achieved for a 5-DOF real-time decode that included flexion/extension of the thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers, and the wrist. Proportional control was achieved for a 4-DOF real-time decode. One subject used a USEA-evoked hand sensation as feedback to complete a 1-DOF closed-loop virtual-hand movement task. There were no observed long-term functional deficits due to the USEA implants. Implantation of high-channel-count USEAs

  11. Kinetic, kinematic, magnetic resonance and owner evaluation of dogs before and after the amputation of a hind limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Zamora, Vladimir; von Babo, Verena; Eberle, Nina; Betz, Daniela; Nolte, Ingo; Wefstaedt, Patrick

    2016-01-25

    The amputation of a limb is a surgical procedure that is regularly performed in small animal practice. In spite of several clinical reports indicating high owner satisfaction after limb amputation in dogs, an amputation is still very critically seen by the owners, and even by some veterinarians, due to the lack of accurate information about the recovery of amputee patients. Thus, the objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate, both objectively and subjectively, the recovery outcome of dogs undergoing a hind limb amputation. Twelve patients in which a hind limb amputation was scheduled were studied. Kinetic and kinematic gait analyses were performed before the amputation, and 10, 30, 90 and 120 days after surgery. Magnetic resonance (MR) examination of the contralateral stifle joint was performed before and 120 days after amputation. The subjective impressions of the owners were gathered at the same examination times of the gait analyses. Kinetic data showed a redistribution of the load to all remaining limbs after the amputation; ten days after the procedure patients had already established their new locomotory pattern. Kinematic data showed significant differences between sessions in the mean angle progression curves of almost all analyzed joints; however, the ranges of motion were very similar before and after the amputation, and remained constant in the subsequent sessions after the amputation. No changes in the signal intensity of the soft tissues evaluated, and no evidence of cartilage damage or osteoarthritis was seen on the MR examination of the contralateral stifle. Owners evaluated the results of the amputation very positively, both during and at the end of the study. Dogs had a quick adaptation after a hind limb amputation, and the adaptation process began before the amputation was performed. This happened without evidence of morphologic changes in the contralateral stifle joint, and with a very positive evaluation from the owner.

  12. Amputation of the limbs: 10 years' experience at Enugu State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Male to female ratio was 1.2 to 1; age range was 5 to 88years with mean age 45.4years. Peak age incidence was in the 6th decade. Below knee amputation was the most common operation, and delayed wound healing, the commonest postoperative complication. Thirty amputees procured prosthesis within three months of ...

  13. Early outcome of vascular lower limb amputations at a National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OUTCOME MEASURES: These included the wound healing time, number of stump revisions, number of conversions to a higher amputation level, the ... CONCLUSION: While the findings of this study compare with other series, the prolonged hospital stay is of concern considering the younger average age of the patients.

  14. Body integrity identity disorder (BIID)--is the amputation of healthy limbs ethically justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    The term body integrity identity disorder (BIID) describes the extremely rare phenomenon of persons who desire the amputation of one or more healthy limbs or who desire a paralysis. Some of these persons mutilate themselves; others ask surgeons for an amputation or for the transection of their spinal cord. Psychologists and physicians explain this phenomenon in quite different ways; but a successful psychotherapeutic or pharmaceutical therapy is not known. Lobbies of persons suffering from BIID explain the desire for amputation in analogy to the desire of transsexuals for surgical sex reassignment. Medical ethicists discuss the controversy about elective amputations of healthy limbs: on the one hand the principle of autonomy is used to deduce the right for body modifications; on the other hand the autonomy of BIID patients is doubted. Neurological results suggest that BIID is a brain disorder producing a disruption of the body image, for which parallels for stroke patients are known. If BIID were a neuropsychological disturbance, which includes missing insight into the illness and a specific lack of autonomy, then amputations would be contraindicated and must be evaluated as bodily injuries of mentally disordered patients. Instead of only curing the symptom, a causal therapy should be developed to integrate the alien limb into the body image.

  15. Prosthesis evaluation questionnaire for persons with lower limb amputations: assessing prosthesis-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legro, M W; Reiber, G D; Smith, D G; del Aguila, M; Larsen, J; Boone, D

    1998-08-01

    To develop a self-report questionnaire for persons with lower limb amputations who use a prosthesis. The resulting scales were intended to be suitable to evaluate the prosthesis and life with the prosthesis. The conceptual framework was health-related quality of life. Multiple steps of scale development, terminating with test-retest of the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ) by mail. SOURCE OF SAMPLE: Records from two Seattle hospitals. Ninety-two patients with lower limb amputations who varied by age, reason for amputation, years since amputation, and amputation level. The 10 scales used were 4 prosthesis function scales (Usefulness, Residual Limb Health, Appearance, and Sounds), 2 mobility scales (Ambulation and Transfers), 3 psychosocial scales (Perceived Responses, Frustration, and Social Burden), and 1 Well-being scale. Validation measures were the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, the Social Interaction subscale from the Sickness Impact Profile, and the Profile of Mood States-short form. Nine PEQ scales demonstrated high internal consistency. All met test-retest criteria for comparing group results. Validity was described based on methods used to gather original items, distribution of scores, and comparison of scores with criterion variables. The PEQ scales displayed good psychometric properties. Future work will assess responsiveness of PEQ scales to changes in prosthetic components. We conclude that they will be useful in evaluation of prosthetic care.

  16. Primary motor cortex changes after amputation correlate with phantom limb pain and the ability to move the phantom limb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffin, Estelle; Richard, Nathalie; Giraux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence documents massive reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices following hand amputation, the extent of which is correlated with phantom limb pain. Many therapies for phantom limb pain are based upon the idea that plastic changes after amputation...... are maladaptive and attempt to normalize representations of cortical areas adjacent to the hand area. Recent data suggest, however, that higher levels of phantom pain are associated with stronger local activity and more structural integrity in the missing hand area rather than with reorganization of neighbouring...... of reorganization, but the lip and elbow representations reorganized and shifted towards the hand area. We also found that poorer voluntary control and higher levels of pain in the phantom limb were powerful drivers of the lip and elbow topological changes. In addition to providing further support...

  17. Residual-limb quality and functional mobility 1 year after transtibial amputation caused by vascular insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Arwert (Henk); M.H. van Doorn-Loogman (Mirjam); J. Koning (Jan); M. Terburg (Martinus); M. Rol (Mathilde); M.E. Roebroeck (Marij)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis study identified which residual-limb quality factors are related to functional mobility 1 year after transtibial (TT) amputation. A group of 28 TT amputees were evaluated with respect to their functional mobility (Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire [PEQ], Locomotor Index, Timed Up

  18. Gait adjustments in obstacle crossing, gait initiation and gait termination after a recent lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, Aline H.; van Keeken, Helco G.; Schoppen, Tanneke; Hof, At L.; Otten, Bert; Halbertsma, Jan P. K.; Postema, Klaas

    Objective: To describe the adjustments in gait characteristics of obstacle crossing, gait initiation and gait termination that occur in subjects with a recent lower limb amputation during the rehabilitation process. Design: Prospective and descriptive study. Subjects: Fourteen subjects with a recent

  19. Mobility in Elderly People With a Lower Limb Amputation : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortington, Lauren V.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Postema, Klaas; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    Elderly people with a lower limb amputation impose a heavy burden on health resources, requiring extensive rehabilitation and long term care. Mobility is key to regaining independence; however, the impact of multiple comorbidities in this patient group can make regaining mobility a particularly

  20. Effects of lower limb amputation on the mental rotation of feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtze, Carolin; Otten, Bert; Postema, Klaas

    What happens to the mental representation of our body when the actual anatomy of our body changes? We asked 18 able-bodied controls, 18 patients with a lower limb amputation and a patient with rotationplasty to perform a laterality judgment task. They were shown illustrations of feet in different

  1. A Robot Hand Testbed Designed for Enhancing Embodiment and Functional Neurorehabilitation of Body Schema in Subjects with Upper Limb Impairment or Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Hellman, Randall B.; Chang, Eric; Tanner, Justin; Helms Tillery, Stephen I.; Santos, Veronica J.

    2015-01-01

    Many upper limb amputees experience an incessant, post-amputation “phantom limb pain” and report that their missing limbs feel paralyzed in an uncomfortable posture. One hypothesis is that efferent commands no longer generate expected afferent signals, such as proprioceptive feedback from changes in limb configuration, and that the mismatch of motor commands and visual feedback is interpreted as pain. Non-invasive therapeutic techniques for treating phantom limb pain, such as mirror visual fe...

  2. A robot hand testbed designed for enhancing embodiment and functional neurorehabilitation of body schema in subjects with upper limb impairment or loss

    OpenAIRE

    Randall B. Hellman; Randall B. Hellman; Eric eChang; Justin eTanner; Stephen I. Helms Tillery; Veronica J. Santos

    2015-01-01

    Many upper limb amputees experience an incessant, post-amputation phantom limb pain and report that their missing limbs feel paralyzed in an uncomfortable posture. One hypothesis is that efferent commands no longer generate expected afferent signals, such as proprioceptive feedback from changes in limb configuration, and that the mismatch of motor commands and visual feedback is interpreted as pain. Non-invasive therapeutic techniques for treating phantom limb pain, such as mirror visual feed...

  3. Incidence, severity, and impact of hyperhidrosis in people with lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Colby; Godfrey, Bradeigh; Wixom, Jody; McFadden, Molly

    2015-01-01

    To assess the incidence and severity of self-reported hyperhidrosis in patients with amputation and understand its effects on prosthetic fit or function, a cross-sectional survey of patients at two amputee clinics was performed. Responses from 121 subjects with lower-limb amputation were analyzed. Of these subjects, 66% reported sweating to a degree that it interfered with daily activities, as measured by the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale. There was a significant association between sweating and interference with prosthetic fit and function. Sweating was more severe in cases of transtibial amputations, patients under the age of 60, warm weather, and vigorous activity. There was no relationship between severity of sweating and time since amputation, etiology of amputation, duration of daily prosthetic use, or reported ability to perform functional tasks. Subjects reported trying multiple interventions, but the self-reported effectiveness of these treatments was low. Hyperhidrosis, a common problem associated with prosthetic usage, varies in severity and often interferes with daily activities. Sweating severity is associated with poor prosthetic fit and function. Risk factors include younger age and transtibial amputation status. Treatment strategies generally lack efficacy. The results of this study may provide guidance for future interventions and treatment options.

  4. Effects of practice, visual loss, limb amputation, and disuse on motor imagery vividness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouin, Francine; Richards, Carol L; Durand, Anne; Descent, Micheline; Poiré, Diane; Frémont, Pierre; Pelet, Stéphane; Gresset, Jacques; Doyon, Julien

    2009-06-01

    The ability to generate vivid images of movements is variable across individuals and likely influenced by sensorimotor inputs. The authors examined (1) the vividness of motor imagery in dancers and in persons with late blindness, with amputation or an immobilization of one lower limb; (2) the effects of prosthesis use on motor imagery; and (3) the temporal characteristics of motor imagery. Eleven dancers, 10 persons with late blindness, 14 with amputation, 6 with immobilization, and 2 groups of age-matched healthy individuals (27 in control group A; 35 in control group B) participated. The Kinesthetic and Visual Imagery Questionnaire served to assess motor imagery vividness. Temporal characteristics were assessed with mental chronometry. The late blindness group and dance group displayed higher imagery scores than respective control groups. In the amputation and immobilization groups, imagery scores were lower on the affected side than the intact side and specifically for imagined foot movements. Imagery scores of the affected limb positively correlated with the time since walking with prosthesis. Movement times during imagination and execution (amputation and immobilization) were longer on the affected side than the intact side, but the temporal congruence between real and imagined movement times was similar to that in the control group. The mental representation of actions is highly modulated by imagery practice and motor activities. The ability to generate vivid images of movements can be specifically weakened by limb loss or disuse, but lack of movement does not affect the temporal characteristics of motor imagery.

  5. Psychosocial and functional outcomes in long-term survivors of osteosarcoma: a comparison of limb-salvage surgery and amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Rhonda S; Ottaviani, Giulia; Huh, Winston W; Palla, Shana; Jaffe, Norman

    2010-07-01

    Traditionally, physicians have believed that limb-salvage surgery has functional and cosmetic advantages over amputation, yet the literature is equivocal. Therefore, we sought to compare the psychosocial and functional outcomes in osteosarcoma survivors after limb-salvage surgery and amputation. We hypothesized there to be neither psychosocial nor functional outcome differences between groups. Participants received treatment of extremity osteosarcoma, had received their cancer diagnosis at least 2 years prior, and were at least 16 years old. A comprehensive set of validated psychosocial and functional measures was used to assess outcome. Fifty-seven patients participated in this study (33 who underwent limb-salvage surgery and 24 who underwent amputation). Participants had gone 12-24 years since diagnosis and were 16-52 years old at study participation. We used multiple linear regression models to examine differences in quality of life, body image, self-esteem, and social support between the two groups and found no differences. Lower limb function was a significant predictor of quality of life (P surgery type did not impact this relationship. Body image was rated significantly worse by those who underwent late amputation, amputation after failed limb salvage, than by those who did not. Participants with more functional lower limbs had better quality of life than did those with less functional lower limbs regardless of whether they underwent amputation or limb-salvage surgery. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Predictors of secondary amputation in patients with grade IIIC lower limb injuries: A retrospective analysis of 35 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenhao; Zhou, DongSheng; Dong, Jinlei

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for failure of limb salvage surgery in grade IIIC lower extremity injuries.A single-institution, retrospective review was performed of all patients with grade IIIC lower limb injuries presenting from January 2009 to April 2014. We gathered the data on each patient who underwent limb salvage and analyzed the final outcome for these patients (limb salvage vs secondary amputation).Grade IIIC lower limb injuries were identified in 41 patients. Primary amputation was performed in 6 patients (15%) as the initial procedure. Thirty-five patients (85%) underwent vascular reconstruction and other surgical procedures to salvage the limb. Limb salvage was successful in 23 patients (66%); 12 patients (34%) ultimately underwent secondary amputation. The median time from injury to secondary amputation was 22.5 days (range 4-380 days). The mean Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) was 7.2 ± 1.5 (range 5-10). The MESS was significantly higher in the secondary amputation group compared with the limb salvage group. Additionally, statistical testing revealed that the limb ischemia time, complex fractures, rate of fasciotomy, and number of vascular reconstruction were significantly higher in the secondary amputation group. Muscle necrosis and extensive soft tissue defect were the main reasons for secondary amputation.The findings indicate that MESS of 7 or greater, complex fractures, limb ischemia time equal to or greater than 6 hours, and osteofascial compartment syndrome were associated with an increased risk of delayed amputation. The MESS is highly prognostic but not perfect; decision-making in patients with an MESS of 7 or greater should be re-evaluated for clinical use.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of upper limb apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovern, A; Fink, G R; Weiss, P H

    2012-07-01

    Upper limb apraxia, a disorder of higher motor cognition, is a common consequence of left-hemispheric stroke. Contrary to common assumption, apraxic deficits not only manifest themselves during clinical testing but also have delirious effects on the patients' everyday life and rehabilitation. Thus, a reliable diagnosis and efficient treatment of upper limb apraxia is important to improve the patients' prognosis after stroke. Nevertheless, to date, upper limb apraxia is still an underdiagnosed and ill-treated entity. Based on a systematic literature search, this review summarizes the current tools of diagnosis and treatment strategies for upper limb apraxia. It furthermore provides clinicians with graded recommendations. In particular, a short screening test for apraxia, and a more comprehensive diagnostic apraxia test for clinical use are recommended. Although currently only a few randomized controlled studies investigate the efficacy of different apraxia treatments, the gesture training suggested by Smania and colleagues can be recommended for the therapy of apraxia, the effects of which were shown to extend to activities of daily living and to persist for at least 2 months after completion of the training. This review aims at directing the reader's attention to the ecological relevance of apraxia. Moreover, it provides clinicians with appropriate tools for the reliable diagnosis and effective treatment of apraxia. Nevertheless, this review also highlights the need for further research into how to improve diagnosis of apraxia based on neuropsychological models and to develop new therapeutic strategies.

  8. A training programme to improve hip strength in persons with lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Lee

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the effect of a 10-week training programme on persons with a lower limb amputation and to determine if this training is sufficient to enable running. Seven transtibial, 8 transfemoral and 1 bilateral amputee (all resulting from trauma, tumour or congenital) were randomly assigned to a training (n  =8) or control group (n = 8). Isokinetic hip flexor and extensor strength at 60 and 120º/s and oxygen consumption while walking at 1.0 m/s were tested pre- and post- a 10-week period. The training group followed a twice weekly hip strengthening programme, while the control group continued with their usual activities. Running ability was determined pre-testing, and attempted after post-testing for the training group only. The training group increased hip strength and decreased oxygen consumption. Six amputees who were previously unable to run were able to after training. The control group decreased intact limb hip extensor strength. The training programme is sufficient to improve hip strength and enable running in persons with a lower limb amputation. As hip strength was reduced in those not following the training programme, it is recommended that strength training be undertaken regularly in order to avoid losing limb strength following amputation.

  9. Perceptions of low back pain in people with lower limb amputation: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devan, Hemakumar; Carman, Allan B; Hendrick, Paul A; Ribeiro, Daniel Cury; Hale, Leigh A

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of people with a lower limb amputation as to important factors contributing to their low back pain (LBP). Semi-structured interviews were conducted (three focus groups and two individual interviews), with 11 participants with lower limb amputation and on-going LBP. The discussions were analysed using the General Inductive Approach. Five major categories were identified with "uneven posture and compensatory movements" of the back perceived to be the main contributor to LBP. "Fatigue" during functional activities and "prosthesis-related factors" may affect the "uneven movements" of the back further leading to LBP. "Multiple pain conditions" (i.e. phantom limb pain, non-amputated limb pain) could influence the pain perceptions contributing to LBP. "Self-management strategies" in the form of maintaining optimal physical fitness and support from health care professionals helped to manage LBP symptoms, thereby assisted in preventing chronicity. The results suggest "uneven movements" of the back affected by "fatigue" and "prosthesis-related factors" may alter the mechanical loading of the spine during functional activities and contribute to LBP. While being physically active helped participants cope with their LBP, identifying and addressing "uneven movements" in the back during the performance of functional activities may be important to devise prevention strategies for LBP.

  10. COMPARISON OF A SIMPLE AND CHEAP IMMEDIATE POSTOPERATIVE PROSTHESIS WITH SOFT DRESSING IN LOWER LIMB AMPUTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Yeshwant Kothari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Removal of a part of a limb through one or more bones termed amputation is done for various causes. Properly performed amputation is a reconstructive procedure. Effective postoperative rehabilitation reduces disability and helps in proper shaping of the residual limb leading to final prosthetic fitment. The aim of the study is to compare effect of rigid dressing and Immediate Postoperative Prosthesis (IPOP using a simple and cheap pylon developed by the first author with soft dressing in respect of stump maturation and function in lower limb amputees. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty one patients with lower limb amputations were included in the study and randomised into two groups. Twenty four patients completed follow-up in the study group of rigid dressing with early postoperative prosthetic fitting while twenty patients completed with soft dressing. Stump maturation as measured by girth and volumetric assessment and complications of residual pain and phantom pain were compared at six weeks and twelve weeks with baseline data. Statistical Analysis- Done with SPSS for Windows version 17. Independent-T test was used for comparison of continuous variables and Chi-square and Fischer exact test was used for comparison of dichotomous responses. Settings and Design- The study was done in a multispecialty teaching hospital of a metro city. It was a well-structured comparative study done after addressing all safety and ethical issues. RESULTS Stump maturation was significantly better and the stump complications reduced in the study group. CONCLUSION Rigid dressing with IPOP has proven to be significantly superior to soft dressing in terms of maturation of stump and residual complications in lower limb amputations.

  11. Design and Development of a Novel Upper-Limb Cycling Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Tiele

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The rise in popularity of the Paralympics in recent years has created a need for effective, low-cost sports-prosthetic devices for upper-limb amputees. There are various opportunities for lower-limb amputees to participate in cycling; however, there are only few options for those with upper-limb amputations. If the individual previously participated in cycling, a cycling-specific prosthesis could allow these activities to be integrated into rehabilitation methods. This article describes the processes involved with designing, developing and manufacturing such a prosthesis. The fundamental needs of people with upper-limb amputation were assessed and realised in the prototype of a transradial terminal device with two release mechanisms, including a sliding mechanism (for falls and minor collisions and clamping mechanism (for head-on collisions. The sliding mechanism requires the rider to exert approximately 200 N, while the clamping mechanism requires about 700 N. The force ranges can be customised to match rider requirements. Experiments were conducted in a controlled environment to demonstrate stability of the device during normal cycling. Moreover, a volunteer test-rider was able to successfully activate the release mechanism during a simulated emergency scenario. The development of this prosthesis has the potential to enable traumatic upper-limb amputees to participate in cycling for rehabilitation or recreation.

  12. Design and Development of a Novel Upper-Limb Cycling Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiele, Akira; Soni-Sadar, Shivam; Rowbottom, Jack; Patel, Shilen; Mathewson, Edward; Pearson, Samuel; Hutchins, David; Head, John; Hutchins, Stephen

    2017-11-16

    The rise in popularity of the Paralympics in recent years has created a need for effective, low-cost sports-prosthetic devices for upper-limb amputees. There are various opportunities for lower-limb amputees to participate in cycling; however, there are only few options for those with upper-limb amputations. If the individual previously participated in cycling, a cycling-specific prosthesis could allow these activities to be integrated into rehabilitation methods. This article describes the processes involved with designing, developing and manufacturing such a prosthesis. The fundamental needs of people with upper-limb amputation were assessed and realised in the prototype of a transradial terminal device with two release mechanisms, including a sliding mechanism (for falls and minor collisions) and clamping mechanism (for head-on collisions). The sliding mechanism requires the rider to exert approximately 200 N, while the clamping mechanism requires about 700 N. The force ranges can be customised to match rider requirements. Experiments were conducted in a controlled environment to demonstrate stability of the device during normal cycling. Moreover, a volunteer test-rider was able to successfully activate the release mechanism during a simulated emergency scenario. The development of this prosthesis has the potential to enable traumatic upper-limb amputees to participate in cycling for rehabilitation or recreation.

  13. Lower limb amputation in Jos, Nigeria | Kidmas | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Others were peripheral vascular gangrene (PVG) in eight (9.2%) patients; chronic osteomyelitis, three (3.5%); chronic leg ulcers, three (3.5%); Ainhum, three (3.5%) and snake bite in one patient (1.1%). ... A case is made for community health education on the need for early presentation to hospital for limb lesions.

  14. Reclaiming Autologous Amputated Tissue for Limb Salvage of a Diabetic Foot Burn with Underlying Critical Limb Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Wishy, Andrew M; West, Kaitlyn I M; Dawson, David L; Dahle, Sara E; Carson, John G

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a worldwide pandemic that impacts more than 387 million people, with 29 million individuals affected in the United States alone. Diabetic patients have a 25% lifetime risk of developing a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). Having a DFU is associated with a risk of recurrence approaching 70%. In addition, 1 in 6 patients with DFU will have a lower-limb amputation, with an associated increase in mortality ranging from 47% to 70%. Therefore, limb salvage is critical in patients with DFU. This article describes the case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus, end-stage renal disease, and peripheral arterial occlusive disease who presented with a 1.5% total-body-surface-area, third-degree burn to the left hallux with dry gangrene extending to the midfoot. Ankle brachial indexes were 0.66 on the left and 0.64 on the right. Toe pressures on the left were absent because of extensive dry gangrene. His right foot had a prior transmetatarsal amputation. Using a retrograde pedal approach, a chronic total occlusion of the left posterior tibial artery was recanalized with balloon angioplasty. He then underwent a transmetatarsal amputation with closure, except that the plantar medial side could not be closed without tension. Therefore, an autologous full-thickness skin graft, from the amputation specimen, was used to bridge the defect. At 32-week follow-up, the wound was healed, the graft had fully incorporated, and the patient was ambulating well using custom orthotic footwear. The creative use of amputated tissue to assist with wound coverage has not been well described in the literature.

  15. Effect of Upper Limb Deformities on Gross Motor and Upper Limb Functions in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Sook; Sim, Eun Geol; Rha, Dong-wook

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the nature and extent of upper limb deformities via the use of various classifications, and to analyze the relationship between upper limb deformities and gross motor or upper limb functionality levels. Upper extremity data were collected from 234 children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) who were…

  16. Proximal major limb amputations – a retrospective analysis of 45 oncological cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goertz Ole

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proximal major limb amputations due to malignant tumors have become rare but are still a valuable treatment option in palliation and in some cases can even cure. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse outcome in those patients, including the postoperative course, survival, pain, quality of life, and prosthesis usage. Methods Data of 45 consecutive patients was acquired from patient's charts and contact to patients, and general practitioners. Patients with interscapulothoracic amputation (n = 14, shoulder disarticulation (n = 13, hemipelvectomy (n = 3 or hip disarticulation (n = 15 were included. Results The rate of proximal major limb amputations in patients treated for sarcoma was 2.3% (37 out of 1597. Survival for all patients was 42.9% after one year and 12.7% after five years. Survival was significantly better in patients with complete tumor resections. Postoperative chemotherapy and radiation did not prolong survival. Eighteen percent of the patients with malignant disease developed local recurrence. In 44%, postoperative complications were observed. Different modalities of postoperative pain management and the site of the amputation had no significant influence on long-term pain assessment and quality of life. Eighty-seven percent suffered from phantom pain, 15.6% considered their quality of life worse than before the operation. Thirty-two percent of the patients who received a prosthesis used it regularly. Conclusion Proximal major limb amputations severely interfere with patients' body function and are the last, albeit valuable, option within the treatment concept of extremity malignancies or severe infections. Besides short survival, high complication rates, and postoperative pain, patients' quality of life can be improved for the time they have remaining.

  17. Psychosocial reactions to upper extremity limb salvage: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposato, Lindsay; Yancosek, Kathleen; Cancio, Jill

    2017-11-30

    Case series. A salvaged limb is one that has undergone a major traumatic injury, followed by repeated surgical attempts in order to avoid amputation. Psychological recovery for individuals with lower extremity limb salvage has been examined in a number of studies. However, psychosocial reactions for individuals with upper extremity (UE) limb salvage are understudied in the literature. The purpose of this study was to explore the process of psychosocial adaptation for 3 trauma cases after UE limb salvage. The Reactions to Impairment and Disability Inventory was used to assess psychosocial adaptation. Physical function outcomes (pain, range of motion, edema, sensation, and dexterity) are presented. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand measure was used to assess perceived disability. Medical and rehabilitation history are discussed for each case, in order to provide in-depth understanding of the impact of these injuries. Reactions to injury varied across the cases; however, outcomes suggest that psychosocial adaptation may be influenced by the experience of pain, the ability to participate in valued roles and activities, and having a supportive social network. For this population, therapists may consider emphasizing pain management, focusing on client-centered goals and interventions, and facilitating peer support. Providers should closely monitor patients for signs of poor adaptation, such as hand-hiding behaviors. This study is among the first to examine psychological outcomes for the UE limb salvage population. Future research would be beneficial to provide deeper understanding of the psychosocial challenges for these individuals. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Goal pursuit, goal adjustment, and affective well-being following lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Laura; Gallagher, Pamela; Desmond, Deirdre; Ryall, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the relationships between tenacious goal pursuit (TGP), flexible goal adjustment (FGA), and affective well-being in a sample of individuals with lower limb amputations. Cross-sectional, quantitative. Ninety-eight patients recently admitted to a primary prosthetic rehabilitation programme completed measures of TGP, FGA, positive affect, and negative affect. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that TGP and FGA accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in both positive and negative affect, controlling for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. TGP was significantly positively associated with positive affect, while FGA was significantly negatively associated with negative affect. Moderated regression analyses indicated that the beneficial effect of FGA on negative affect was strongest at high levels of amputation-related pain intensity and low levels of TGP. TGP and FGA appear to influence subjective well-being in different ways, with TGP promoting the experience of positive affect and FGA buffering against negative affect. TGP and FGA may prove useful in identifying individuals at risk of poor affective outcomes following lower limb amputation and represent important targets for intervention in this patient group. What is already known on this subject? The loss of a limb has a significant impact on several important life domains. Although some individuals experience emotional distress following amputation, the majority adjust well to their limb loss, with some achieving positive change or growth as a result of their experiences. Theories of self-regulation propose that disruptions in goal attainment have negative affective consequences. The physical, social, and psychological upheaval caused by limb loss is likely to threaten the attainment of valued goals, which may leave individuals vulnerable to negative psychosocial outcomes if they do not regulate their goals in response to these challenges. According to the dual

  19. Motor and sensory rehabilitation after lower limb amputation: state of art and perspective of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Roberto; Maini, Maurizio; Bettinardi, Ornella; Labeeb, Alaa; Rosati, Vanessa; Damiani, Carlo; Mallik, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    The rehabilitation of the amputated patient is based on a coordinated sequence of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic procedures carried out by an interdisciplinary rehabilitation team, that works globally on all patient problems. The objectives of the different phases of the rehabilitation treatment were reviewed. Due to their relevance in conditioning the final outcome of the treatment, aspects requiring further studies and remarks, were also reviewed. Among these the psychological aspects, the alterations of all sensory inputs, the secondary alterations at the bone, articular and muscular level, pain of the residual limb and the phantom limb. Finally, the basic criteria to be used to choose the kind of prosthesis in relation to the characteristics and expectations of the amputated person, and the results of the recovery of the autonomy and walking ability, will be schematically described.

  20. Very low survival rates after non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a consecutive series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Holm, Gitte; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate factors potentially influencing short- and long-term mortality in patients who had a non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a university hospital. A consecutive series of 93 amputations (16% toe/foot, 33% trans-tibial, 9% through knee and 42......% trans-femoral) were studied. Their mean age was 75.8 years; 21 (23%) were admitted from a nursing home and 87 (92%) were amputated due to a vascular disease and/or diabetes. Thirty days and 1-year mortality were 30 and 54%, respectively. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that the 30-day mortality...... was associated with older age (P = 0.01), and the number of co-morbidities (P = 0.04), when adjusted for gender, previous amputations, cause of and amputation level, and residential status. Thus, a patient with 4 or 5 co-morbidities (n = 20) was seven times more likely to die within 30 days, compared...

  1. [Amputation and equipment of the lower limb during the Revolution and the Empire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesselle, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    During the French Revolution and Napoleon's campaigns, above-knee or below-knee amputations were performed either immediately or with a delay, which favoured septic problems. A rapidly operated amputation by a well-trained surgeon was the best way to save the life of a soldier who suffered from an open comminuted fracture of a limb. The conditions on military campaigns were indeed hard ones: doctors and surgeons had practically no resources and the transportation of severely injured persons was difficult. Such conditions favoured the pain and the danger caused by an injury, and it was rather impossible for the medical corps to lavish repeated treatments on the wounds. The amputated soldiers were then given prostheses: either a traditional peg-leg, with a flexed knee joint for trans-tibial amputations, or an "imitative" prosthesis, which tended to look like a real leg with eventually an articulated knee or foot. The author mentions famous or unrecognized amputated men, describing significant events.

  2. Goal pursuit, goal adjustment, and affective well-being following lower limb amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Coffey, Laura; Gallagher, Pamela; Desmond, Deirdre; Ryall, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study examined the relationships between tenacious goal pursuit (TGP), flexible goal adjustment (FGA), and affective well-being in a sample of individuals with lower limb amputations. Design. Cross-sectional, quantitative. Methods. Ninety-eight patients recently admitted to a primary prosthetic rehabilitation programme completed measures of TGP, FGA, positive affect, and negative affect. Results. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that TGP and FGA accounted fo...

  3. Femoral head and neck excision in a dog that had previously undergone contralateral hind limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, L G; Oulton, S A; Piermattei, D L

    1996-03-01

    A German Shepherd Dog that underwent left hind limb amputation at 6 weeks of age because of quadriceps contracture developed arthritis of the remaining coxofemoral joint when it was 6 months old. The dog subsequently underwent femoral head and neck excision, and following rehabilitation that included intensive physical therapy, the dog was able to walk and run without signs of pain or disability. Strength and agility were maintained during a 4.5-year follow-up period. This case demonstrates the importance of postoperative management in the successful outcome of femoral head and neck excision in a large dog with only 1 hind limb.

  4. Combined mirror visual and auditory feedback therapy for upper limb phantom pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Kun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Phantom limb sensation and phantom limb pain is a very common issue after amputations. In recent years there has been accumulating data implicating 'mirror visual feedback' or 'mirror therapy' as helpful in the treatment of phantom limb sensation and phantom limb pain. Case presentation We present the case of a 24-year-old Caucasian man, a left upper limb amputee, treated with mirror visual feedback combined with auditory feedback with improved pain relief. Conclusion This case may suggest that auditory feedback might enhance the effectiveness of mirror visual feedback and serve as a valuable addition to the complex multi-sensory processing of body perception in patients who are amputees.

  5. Intermanual Transfer in Training With an Upper-Limb Myoelectric Prosthesis Simulator : A Mechanistic, Randomized, Pretest-Posttest Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romkema, Sietske; Bongers, Raoul M.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    Background. Intermanual transfer may improve prosthetic handling and acceptance if used in training soon after an amputation. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine whether intermanual transfer effects can be detected after training with a myoelectric upper-limb prosthesis simulator.

  6. Emulating Upper Limb Disorder for Therapy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Ayuni binti Che Zakaria

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Robotics not only contributes to the invention of rehabilitation devices, it can also enhance the quality of medical education. In recent years, the use of patient simulators and part-task trainers in the medical education field has brought meaningful improvements in the training of medical practitioners. Nevertheless, in the context of therapy training for upper limb disorders, trainee therapists still have to engage directly with the patients to gain experience of the rehabilitation of physical diseases. In this work, a high-fidelity part-task trainer that is able to reproduce the stiffness of spasticity and rigidity symptoms of the upper limb, such as those observed in post-stroke patients and Parkinson's disease patients, has been developed. Based on the evaluation carried out by two experienced therapists, the developed part-task trainer is able to simulate different patient cases and help trainee therapists gain pre-clinical experience in a safe and intuitive learning environment.

  7. Rehabilitation protocol in upper limb lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, O; Leduc, A

    2002-01-01

    Edema of the upper limb is, frequently, very invalidating. The physical treatment for edema of the upper limb consists on a combination of different therapies: manual lymphatic drainage (MLD), intermittent sequential pressotherapy (IPP) with a very low intensity, multilayer bandages (MLB), and compression sleeves. Patients are not hospitalized. In the first step of physical treatment, the patients are treated daily during 2 or 3 weeks with different therapies (MLD, IPP and MLB). During the second step, bandages are no more used. The compression garments are applied after this 2 or 3 weeks period. The physical treatment consist now in: manual lynphatic drainage and intermittent sequential pressotherapy (with low intensity). The frequency of the physical treatment is progressively decreased.

  8. Management of the multiple limb amputee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, J H; Jones, L E; Cornet, J; Cittarelli, T

    2002-09-10

    Multiple limb amputations involving at least one upper extremity are very uncommon. The amputation of both an upper and lower limb is even more uncommon. Due to the rarity of these amputations therapists are uncertain regarding the most appropriate treatment methods. While the majority of the protocols used for single limb amputations are appropriate for these multiple limb amputees, there are differences. Loss of multiple limbs creates a problem of overheating for the individual. Loss of an arm and leg results in difficulty donning the prostheses and difficulty using crutches and parallel bars during mobilization. A review is given of 16 multiple limb amputees seen in our rehabilitation centre in the last 15 years. Return to work was seen in one third and was not related to the number of the amputations. A higher proportion of these multiple limb amputations occur through alcoholism or attempted suicide behaviour than occurs with either single upper limb amputations or lower limb amputations. This existing behaviour can create a management problem for the rehabilitation team during rehabilitation. Guidelines as to appropriate prosthetic and preprosthetic care are provided to assist the practitioner who has the acute and long term care of these patients. All multiple limb amputees should be referred to a specialized rehabilitation centre to discuss prosthetic options and long term rehabilitation requirements. This paper does not discuss bilateral lower limb amputations when not combined with an upper limb amputation.

  9. Sound limb loading in individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputation across a range of walking velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell Esposito, Elizabeth; Aldridge Whitehead, Jennifer M; Wilken, Jason M

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputation demonstrate significantly increased rates of osteoarthritis in their sound knee. This increased risk is likely the result of altered knee mechanical loading and gait compensations resulting from limited function in the prosthetic limb. Altered knee loading as calculated using loading rates and peak external knee adduction moments and impulses have been associated with both the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in other populations. The purpose of this study was to determine if young individuals with transfemoral amputation demonstrate biomechanical indicators of increased knee osteoarthritis risk. Fourteen young male Service Members with unilateral transfemoral amputation and 14 able-bodied service members underwent biomechanical gait analysis at three standardized walking velocities. A two-way ANOVA (group × speed) with unpaired comparisons with Bonferroni-Holm post-hoc corrections assessed statistical significance and effect sizes (d) were calculated. Normalized peak external knee adduction moments and impulses were 25.7% (P 0.994) and 27.1% (P 1.019) lower, respectively, in individuals with trans-femoral amputation than controls when averaged across speeds, and effect sizes were large. External knee flexor moments were not, however, different between groups and effect sizes were generally small (P > 0.380, d amputation and effect sizes were large (P 1.644). Individuals with transfemoral amputation did not demonstrate biomechanical risk factors for high medial compartment knee joint loads, but the increased loading rates could place the sound knee at greater risk for cartilage or other tissue damage, even if not localized to the medial compartment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Development and evaluation of the activities measure for upper limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Adams, Laurel; Borgia, Matthew; Delikat, Jemy; Disla, Roxanne; Ebner, Christopher; Walters, Lisa Smurr

    2013-03-01

    (1) To develop a measure of activities for adults with upper limb amputation: the Activities Measure for Upper Limb Amputees (AM-ULA); and (2) to conduct initial psychometric evaluation of the measure. This was a cohort study where the prototype measure was administered twice within 1 week. Tests were videotaped and graded by 2 independent raters. Interrater reliability, test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and minimal detectable change were estimated. Known group validity was examined using analyses of variance comparing scores of transradial, transhumeral, and shoulder level amputees. Convergent validity was examined by correlating AM-ULA scores with dexterity tests and self-reported function. Hospital outpatient. Subjects (N=52) with upper limb amputation. Not applicable. Not applicable. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for test-retest reliability were .88 to .91. ICCs for interrater reliability were .84 to .89. Cronbach alphas were .89 to .91. The minimal detectable change at the 90% confidence interval was 3.7 points. Subjects with more distal levels of limb loss had better scores than those with more proximal levels (P<.01). The AM-ULA was moderately correlated with most dexterity tests and self-reported function. The AM-ULA is a new measure of activity performance for adults with upper limb amputation that considers task completion, speed, movement quality, skillfulness of prosthetic use, and independence in its rating system. It has good interrater reliability, test-retest reliability, and demonstrated known group validity. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The incidence of pelvic fractures with traumatic lower limb amputation in modern warfare due to improvised explosive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, A M; Davis, C; Penn-Barwell, J; Taylor, D M; De Mello, W F; Matthews, J J

    2014-01-01

    A frequently-seen injury pattern in current military experience is traumatic lower limb amputation as a result of improvised explosive devices (IEDs). This injury can coexist with fractures involving the pelvic ring. This study aims to assess the frequency of concomitant pelvic fracture in IED-related lower limb amputation. A retrospective analysis of the trauma charts, medical notes, and digital imaging was undertaken for all patients arriving at the Emergency Department at the UK military field hospital in Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, with a traumatic lower limb amputation in the six months between September 2009 and April 2010, in order to determine the incidence of associated pelvic ring fractures. Of 77 consecutive patients with traumatic lower limb amputations, 17 (22%) had an associated pelvic fracture (eleven with displaced pelvic ring fractures, five undisplaced fractures and one acetabular fracture). Unilateral amputees (n = 31) had a 10% incidence of associated pelvic fracture, whilst 30 % of bilateral amputees (n = 46) had a concurrent pelvic fracture. However, in bilateral, trans-femoral amputations (n = 28) the incidence of pelvic fracture was 39%. The study demonstrates a high incidence of pelvic fractures in patients with traumatic lower limb amputations, supporting the routine pre-hospital application of pelvic binders in this patient group.

  12. The importance of aerodynamics for prosthetic limb design used by competitive cyclists with an amputation: An introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Bryce

    2015-06-01

    This study introduces the importance of the aerodynamics to prosthetic limb design for athletes with either a lower-limb or upper-limb amputation. The study comprises two elements: 1) An initial experiment investigating the stability of outdoor velodrome-based field tests, and 2) An experiment evaluating the application of outdoor velodrome aerodynamic field tests to detect small-scale changes in aerodynamic drag respective of prosthetic limb componentry changes. An outdoor field-testing method is used to detect small and repeatable changes in the aerodynamic drag of an able-bodied cyclist. These changes were made at levels typical of alterations in prosthetic componentry. The field-based test method of assessment is used at a smaller level of resolution than previously reported. With a carefully applied protocol, the field test method proved to be statistically stable. The results of the field test experiments demonstrate a noticeable change in overall athlete performance. Aerodynamic refinement of artificial limbs is worthwhile for athletes looking to maximise their competitive performance. A field-testing method illustrates the importance of the aerodynamic optimisation of prosthetic limb components. The field-testing protocol undertaken in this study gives an accessible and affordable means of doing so by prosthetists and sports engineers. Using simple and accessible field-testing methods, this exploratory experiment demonstrates how small changes to riders' equipment, consummate of the scale of a small change in prosthetics componentry, can affect the performance of an athlete. Prosthetists should consider such opportunities for performance enhancement when possible. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  13. Stump infections after major lower-limb amputation: a 10-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutronc, H; Gobet, A; Dauchy, F-A; Klotz, R; Cazanave, C; Garcia, G; Lafarie-Castet, S; Fabre, T; Dupon, M

    2013-12-01

    There is little published data on the diagnostic and therapeutic management of lower-limb stump infections (excluding toe and forefoot amputations). We made a retrospective observational study of 72 patients having undergone a major lower-limb amputation for a vascular or traumatic reason, complicated by post-surgical stump infection, between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2009. Stump infection was diagnosed more than 6weeks after amputation in half of the patients. Staphylococcus was the most frequently isolated bacterium. Ultrasonography and CT scan combined with fistulography were useful to confirm the diagnosis and to determine the extension of infection. Thirty-two patients (44%) needed surgical revision in addition to antibiotic treatment. Patients diagnosed with bone infection more frequently required complementary surgery than those with soft tissue infection (P<0.001). The optimal management of this type of infection requires obtaining reliable bacteriological documentation (abscess aspiration in case of soft tissue infection or bone biopsy in case of osteomyelitis) to adapt to the antibiotic treatment. The management should be multidisciplinary (orthopedic or vascular surgeons, rehabilitation specialists, and infectious diseases physicians). Most patients may use prosthesis once the infection is treated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Global trends in incidence of lower limb amputation: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Godlwana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to compile a literature report on the global epidemiology of lower limb amputations. Specifically it aimed at capturing information on the incidence of traumatic and non-traumatic lowerlimb amputations throughout the world, to identify the etiology including diseases and lifestyle habits associated with lower limb amputees (LLA in boththe developed and the developing countries, to identify the demographiccharacteristics, age, sex, race, geographical location of the people undergoing LLA including the levels of amputation as pointed out by the literature. Aliterature search was conducted. Different keyword combinations were used togather as much literature on the subject as possible. The authors systemicallyreviewed literature from some parts of Europe, Asia, North and South America and South Africa. The data was analyzed and presented under various themes. The existing literature shows that diabetes is the leading cause of LLA and trauma accounts for the minority of these cases. The incidence of LLA can be predicted by gender, age, maritalstatus, level of education and socio-economic status. Information on LLA in South Africa is almost absent.

  15. Impact of a diabetic foot care education program on lower limb amputation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Wahbi

    2010-10-01

    stage, has increased the awareness of both patients and health care staff about the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, and decreased the rate of lower extremity amputation. We believe that the statistical proof of its impact will be evident in the final evaluation.Keywords: diabetic foot, prevention, complications, lower limb amputation

  16. Severe form of streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis of the upper limb - diagnostic and therapeutic challenge: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Since delay in recognition and effective treatment of necrotizing fasciitis (NF caused by invasive group A streptococcus increases the mortality and disability, the early diagnosis and management of this disease are essential for a better outcome. We presented a patient with a severe form of streptococcal NF of the left upper limb in whom amputation was performed as a life saving procedure. Case report. A 65-year-old man, previously healthy, suffered an injury to his left hand by sting on a fish bone. Two days after that the patient got fever, redness, swelling and pain in his left hand. Clinical examination of the patient after admission indicated NF that spread quickly to the entire left upper limb, left armpit, and the left side of the chest and abdomen. Despite the use of aggressive antibiotic and surgical therapy severe destruction of the skin and subcutaneous tissues developed with the development of gangrene of the left upper limb. In this situation, the team of specialists decided that the patient must be operated on submited to amputation of the left arm, at the shoulder. After amputation and aggressive debridement of soft tissue on the left side of the trunk, the patient completely recovered. β-hemolytic streptococcus group A was isolated from the skin and tissue obtained during the surgery. Conclusion. In the most severe forms of streptococcal NF of the extremities, adequate multidisciplinary treatment, including limb amputation, can save the life of a patient.

  17. Soccer Practice and Functional and Social Performance of Men With Lower Limb Amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Rogeria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Practicing sports together with rehabilitative treatment improves the development of motor, social and emotional abilities of lower limb amputees. The aim of this study was to compare the functional and social performance of individuals with lower limb amputations between those who played soccer and those who did not engage in any sports activities. A total of 138 individuals participated in the study and were divided into two groups: soccer players (n = 69, 34 ± 8.1 years and non-athletes (n = 69, 38 ± 8.9 years. A checklist, based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, was used. Data were analyzed using the Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. The soccer players group showed significantly better performance than the non-athletes group in most items of body function, body structure, occupational performance components and daily activities (p < 0.001 for all, and also in some important items of social and environment factors (p < 0.001 for all. The results strongly suggest that amputee soccer significantly improves the functional and social performance in individuals with lower limb amputations.

  18. Lower amputation rate after fasciotomy by straight midline incision technique for a 22,900-V electrical injury to the upper extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Young-Soo; Lee, Byung Hoon; Park, Hyun-Soo

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the major amputation rate following two different fasciotomy techniques, conventional versus straight midline, in patients with high-voltage arc burn injury by electric currents of 22,900V to the upper extremities. A retrospective analysis of 230 patients (270 burned upper limbs) who underwent fasciotomy after high-voltage electrical injuries between 1996 and 2007 was performed. The patients were divided into two groups according to the fasciotomy method used. From 1996 to 2002, 158 patients (184 limbs) underwent conventional fasciotomy by Green's volar-ulnar incision (conventional fasciotomy group). From 2003 to 2007, 72 patients (86 limbs) underwent fasciotomy using a straight midline curved incision (midline fasciotomy group). The patients were also divided into two groups based on whether the fasciotomy procedure was performed early or late. Patients who underwent fasciotomies injury were classified as early, while those who underwent it >8h after injury were classified as late. Major amputation rates were compared between two fasciotomy methods and analyzed following fasciotomy timing. The midline fasciotomy group had a significantly lower major amputation rate (33.7%) than the conventional fasciotomy group (59.2%) (pinjury; in the setting of minimized vascular exposure after fasciotomy, a midline straight incision could ensure that various types of reconstructive microsurgical procedures and primary skin closures can be used to save limbs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Change in health-related quality of life in the first 18 months after lower limb amputation : A prospective, longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortington, L.V.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Bosmans, J.C.; Post, W.J.; Geertzen, J.H.B.

    Objective: To describe changes in health-related quality of life in people with lower limb amputation, from time of amputation to 18 months, taking into consideration the influence of age and walking distance. In addition, quality of life for people with amputation is compared with the Dutch

  20. Upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Jbali, B.; Daoud, J.; Guermazi, M.; Frikha, M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - To study the frequency and risk factors for upper limb lymphedema through a series of patients treated for breast cancer. Patients and methods. - It is a retrospective study about 222 patients treated for breast cancer during the period between February 1993 and December 2003 in Sfax hospitals. Average age was 51 years (27-92 years). Tumour was T2 in 59% of cases. All patients had surgery with lymph node dissection. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the most frequent histological type (80% of cases), with predominant SBR II grade (62%). The mean number of removed lymph nodes was 12 (2-33). Axillary lymph node metastasis was detected in 124 patients. Radiotherapy was delivered in 200 patients, including axillary irradiation in 30 cases. The mean follow-up was 68 months (12-120). Results. - Lymphedema appeared in 23% of cases (51 patients), 14 months after surgery (mean period). Lymphedema affected the brachium in 17% of cases, the forearm in 12% of cases and all upper limb in 71% of cases. Fifty percent of patients had rehabilitation. However, improvement of lymphedema was obtained in 18 cases. Parameters predicting lymphedema were studied. Significant risk factors were obesity, infection and a number of removed lymph node above 10. The type of surgery, axillary irradiation and shoulder abduction deficit did not predict lymphedema. Conclusion. - Lymphedema of the arm is a frequent consequence of breast cancer treatment. The risk of lymphedema is correlated with obesity, infection and a number of removed lymph node above 10. (authors)

  1. Consumer design priorities for upper limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddiss, Elaine; Beaton, Dorcas; Chau, Tom

    2007-11-01

    To measure consumer satisfaction with upper limb prosthetics and provide an enumerated list of design priorities for future developments. A self-administered, anonymous survey collected information on participant demographics, history of and goals for prosthesis use, satisfaction, and design priorities. The questionnaire was available online and in paper format and was distributed through healthcare providers, community support groups, and one prosthesis manufacturer; 242 participants of all ages and levels of upper limb absence completed the survey. Rates of rejection for myoelectric hands, passive hands, and body-powered hooks were 39%, 53%, and 50%, respectively. Prosthesis wearers were generally satisfied with their devices while prosthesis rejecters were dissatisfied. Reduced prosthesis weight emerged as the highest priority design concern of consumers. Lower cost ranked within the top five design priorities for adult wearers of all device types. Life-like appearance is a priority for passive/cosmetic prostheses, while improved harness comfort, wrist movement, grip control and strength are required for body-powered devices. Glove durability, lack of sensory feedback, and poor dexterity were also identified as design priorities for electric devices. Design priorities reflect consumer goals for prosthesis use and vary depending on the type of prosthesis used and age. Future design efforts should focus on the development of more light-weight, comfortable prostheses.

  2. Quality of life and functionality after lower limb amputations: comparison between uni- vs. bilateral amputee patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Selim; Tekin, Levent; Safaz, Ismail; Göktepe, Ahmet Salim; Yazicioğlu, Kamil

    2013-02-01

    It is difficult for the lower limb amputee patients to adapt to their new lifestyles. To compare the life quality and functionality of patients with bilateral vs. unilateral lower extremity amputations. Cross-sectional study. Fifteen bilateral and 15 unilateral lower extremity amputee patients were enrolled. Demographics, cause and level of amputations, frequency and duration of prosthesis use were evaluated. SF-36, Satisfaction with Prosthesis Questionnaire (SAT-PRO), Amputee Body Image Scale. (ABIS), Houghton Scale (HS), six-minute walk test (6MWT), and 10-metre walk test (10 MWT) were performed. Physical function, physical and emotional role scores of SF-36 were significantly lower in the bilateral amputee group in comparison with the unilateral group. SAT-PRO and ABIS total scores were similar between the groups. There was a positive correlation between the frequency of prosthetic use and SF-36 subgroups (except pain). The unilateral amputee group had significantly better scores than the bilateral amputee group in terms of HS, 6MWT and 10 MWT. Physical capacity of bilateral lower extremity amputee patients is lower than the unilateral amputee patients; satisfaction with prosthesis and body image are not related with the amputation level; and the life quality and satisfaction with prostheses are increased in parallel with the use of the prostheses. Clinical relevance Although differences exist between the groups, in terms of quality of life and functionality, patients can reach an acceptable life standard with good rehabilitation and a suitable prosthesis.

  3. Increased peripheral vascular resistance in male patients with traumatic lower limb amputation: one piece of the cardiovascular risk puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula-Ribeiro, Marcelle; Garcia, Marília M N; Martinez, Daniel G; Lima, Jorge R P; Laterza, Mateus C

    2015-12-01

    The increased morbidity and mortality in traumatic lower limb amputees can be explained by the development of risk factors, among which high blood pressure plays an important role. However, the possible mechanisms underlying increased blood pressure levels observed in this population remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to test the hypothesis that peripheral vascular resistance is increased at rest in patients with traumatic lower limb amputation. In a cross-sectional study, eight patients with traumatic unilateral lower limb amputation (amputee group) and eight healthy individuals without amputation (control group) were included. Resting blood pressure, heart rate, and forearm blood flow were recorded simultaneously and thus, forearm vascular resistance was calculated. The amputee group showed higher systolic (126±2 vs. 118±5 mmHg, Ptraumatic lower limb amputation presented increased peripheral vascular resistance at rest compared with the control group (31.3±3.8 vs. 25.7±6.5 U, P=0.05). Patients with traumatic amputation present increased peripheral vascular resistance. Our findings clarify one possible mechanism underlying the higher blood pressure levels observed in this population.

  4. Can We Achieve Intuitive Prosthetic Elbow Control Based on Healthy Upper Limb Motor Strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merad, Manelle; de Montalivet, Étienne; Touillet, Amélie; Martinet, Noël; Roby-Brami, Agnès; Jarrassé, Nathanaël

    2018-01-01

    Most transhumeral amputees report that their prosthetic device lacks functionality, citing the control strategy as a major limitation. Indeed, they are required to control several degrees of freedom with muscle groups primarily used for elbow actuation. As a result, most of them choose to have a one-degree-of-freedom myoelectric hand for grasping objects, a myoelectric wrist for pronation/supination, and a body-powered elbow. Unlike healthy upper limb movements, the prosthetic elbow joint angle, adjusted prior to the motion, is not involved in the overall upper limb movements, causing the rest of the body to compensate for the lack of mobility of the prosthesis. A promising solution to improve upper limb prosthesis control exploits the residual limb mobility: like in healthy movements, shoulder and prosthetic elbow motions are coupled using inter-joint coordination models. The present study aims to test this approach. A transhumeral amputated individual used a prosthesis with a residual limb motion-driven elbow to point at targets. The prosthetic elbow motion was derived from IMU-based shoulder measurements and a generic model of inter-joint coordinations built from healthy individuals data. For comparison, the participant also performed the task while the prosthetic elbow was implemented with his own myoelectric control strategy. The results show that although the transhumeral amputated participant achieved the pointing task with a better precision when the elbow was myoelectrically-controlled, he had to develop large compensatory trunk movements. Automatic elbow control reduced trunk displacements, and enabled a more natural body behavior with synchronous shoulder and elbow motions. However, due to socket impairments, the residual limb amplitudes were not as large as those of healthy shoulder movements. Therefore, this work also investigates if a control strategy whereby prosthetic joints are automatized according to healthy individuals' coordination models can

  5. Can We Achieve Intuitive Prosthetic Elbow Control Based on Healthy Upper Limb Motor Strategies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manelle Merad

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Most transhumeral amputees report that their prosthetic device lacks functionality, citing the control strategy as a major limitation. Indeed, they are required to control several degrees of freedom with muscle groups primarily used for elbow actuation. As a result, most of them choose to have a one-degree-of-freedom myoelectric hand for grasping objects, a myoelectric wrist for pronation/supination, and a body-powered elbow. Unlike healthy upper limb movements, the prosthetic elbow joint angle, adjusted prior to the motion, is not involved in the overall upper limb movements, causing the rest of the body to compensate for the lack of mobility of the prosthesis. A promising solution to improve upper limb prosthesis control exploits the residual limb mobility: like in healthy movements, shoulder and prosthetic elbow motions are coupled using inter-joint coordination models. The present study aims to test this approach. A transhumeral amputated individual used a prosthesis with a residual limb motion-driven elbow to point at targets. The prosthetic elbow motion was derived from IMU-based shoulder measurements and a generic model of inter-joint coordinations built from healthy individuals data. For comparison, the participant also performed the task while the prosthetic elbow was implemented with his own myoelectric control strategy. The results show that although the transhumeral amputated participant achieved the pointing task with a better precision when the elbow was myoelectrically-controlled, he had to develop large compensatory trunk movements. Automatic elbow control reduced trunk displacements, and enabled a more natural body behavior with synchronous shoulder and elbow motions. However, due to socket impairments, the residual limb amplitudes were not as large as those of healthy shoulder movements. Therefore, this work also investigates if a control strategy whereby prosthetic joints are automatized according to healthy individuals

  6. Motor cortex representation of the upper-limb in individuals born without a hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen T Reilly

    Full Text Available The body schema is an action-related representation of the body that arises from activity in a network of multiple brain areas. While it was initially thought that the body schema developed with experience, the existence of phantom limbs in individuals born without a limb (amelics led to the suggestion that it was innate. The problem with this idea, however, is that the vast majority of amelics do not report the presence of a phantom limb. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS applied over the primary motor cortex (M1 of traumatic amputees can evoke movement sensations in the phantom, suggesting that traumatic amputation does not delete movement representations of the missing hand. Given this, we asked whether the absence of a phantom limb in the majority of amelics means that the motor cortex does not contain a cortical representation of the missing limb, or whether it is present but has been deactivated by the lack of sensorimotor experience. In four upper-limb amelic subjects we directly stimulated the arm/hand region of M1 to see 1 whether we could evoke phantom sensations, and 2 whether muscle representations in the two cortices were organised asymmetrically. TMS applied over the motor cortex contralateral to the missing limb evoked contractions in stump muscles but did not evoke phantom movement sensations. The location and extent of muscle maps varied between hemispheres but did not reveal any systematic asymmetries. In contrast, forearm muscle thresholds were always higher for the missing limb side. We suggest that phantom movement sensations reported by some upper limb amelics are mostly driven by vision and not by the persistence of motor commands to the missing limb within the sensorimotor cortex. We propose that prewired movement representations of a limb need the experience of movement to be expressed within the primary motor cortex.

  7. Construct Validity of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility (PLUS-M) in Adults With Lower Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Brian J; Gaunaurd, Ignacio A; Morgan, Sara J; Amtmann, Dagmar; Salem, Rana; Gailey, Robert S

    2017-02-01

    To assess construct validity of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility (PLUS-M), a self-report mobility measure for people with lower limb amputation (LLA). Cross-sectional study. Private prosthetic clinics (n=37). Current lower limb prosthesis users (N=199; mean age ± SD, 55.4±14.3y; 71.4% men) were assessed before receiving a replacement prosthesis, prosthetic socket, and/or prosthetic knee. Not applicable. Convergent construct validity was examined using correlations between participants' PLUS-M T-scores and measures of physical function, mobility, and balance, including the Amputee Mobility Predictor (AMP), timed Up and Go (TUG), Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Physical Function (PROMIS-PF), Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire-Mobility Subscale (PEQ-MS), and Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale. Known-groups construct validity was evaluated by comparing differences in PLUS-M T-scores among participants grouped by Medicare Functional Classification Level (MFCL). PLUS-M T-scores demonstrated a moderate positive relationship with AMP scores (ρ=.54, Pprosthetic mobility. Correlations between PLUS-M and measures of physical function, mobility, and balance indicate convergent construct validity. Similarly, significant differences in PLUS-M T-scores across MFCL groups provide evidence of known-groups construct validity. In summary, evidence indicates that PLUS-M has good construct validity among people with LLA. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiogrammetric analysis of upper limb long bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zlatan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiogrammetry is radiological method of bone mineral density quantification. Besides giving an insight in diagnostics and evolution of metabolic bone disorders (osteoporosis, osteomalacia, osteitis deformans- Paget's disease, it can also explain some specific biomechanical characteristics of bone structures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the significance and perspectives of radiogrammetry as a scientific model for further inquiry of skeletal system. The work demonstrates mathematical parameters (Ca-Cortical area, CI- Cortical index, GI- Garn's index, ESI- Exton Smith's index of upper limb long bones (humerus, radius, ulna. Two standard radiological projections of bones were taken: antero-posterior (AP and latero-lateral (LL. Correlation with metacarpal and lower limb bones was also performed. The value of the cortical area of humerus is significantly higher comparing with the two other examined bones (Xmean 2,2443 cm2, p < 0.01. Radial bone has the highest values of the relational mathematical parameters, which implicates its higher strength by volumetric unit concerning humerus and ulna. Despite the development of contemporary osteometric procedures (ultrasound densitometry, dual X-ray absorptiometry, digital X-ray radiogrammetry, the classical radiogrammetry sustains its important role in diagnostics of metabolic bone disorders and it can be successfully used for biomechanical inquiry of skeletal system.

  9. A Different Presentation of Mal De Meleda: New Skin Lesions in a Residual Limb after Traumatic Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adıgüzel, Emre; Yüksel, Emine; Safaz, İsmail; Kenan Tan, Arif

    2016-06-01

    Mal de Meleda is a rare autosomal recessive skin disease which is known as keratoderma palmoplantaris transgradiens. Here we report a case of Mal de Meleda who had skin lesions in the residual limb and pseudoainhum in the thigh after traumatic lower leg amputation. A 71-year-old female was admitted to our tertiary hospital for prosthetic rehabilitation. On the physical examination, thickening of the skin on palms, left sole and residual limb was present. The patient reported that she had these skin lesions since infancy and she realized new skin lesions after amputation in the residual limb. We requested dermatology consultation and she was diagnosed as Mal de Meleda. To our knowledge, this is the first Mal de Meleda case in the literature with new lesions at the residual limb. Although exact pathophysiological mechanisms are not well known in Mal de Meleda, prosthesis use might have accelerated disease process in our patient.

  10. Unilateral versus bilateral upper limb training after stroke: The upper limb training after stroke clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Delden, AL; Peper, CE; Nienhuys, KN; Zijp, NI; Beek, PJ; Kwakkel, G

    2013-01-01

    This article is available open access through the publisher’s website at the link below. Copyright © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc. Background and Purpose — Unilateral and bilateral training protocols for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke represent conceptually contrasting approaches with the same ultimate goal. In a randomized controlled trial, we compared the merits of modified constraint-induced movement therapy, modified bilateral arm training with rhythmic auditory cueing,...

  11. Outcomes of Critical Limb Ischemia in an Urban, Safety Net Hospital Population with High WIfI Amputation Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Robert; Dunn, Joie; Clavijo, Leonardo; Shavelle, David; Rowe, Vincent; Woo, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Patients presenting to a public hospital with critical limb ischemia (CLI) typically have advanced disease with significant comorbidities. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of revascularization on 1-year amputation rate of CLI patients presenting to Los Angeles County USC Medical Center, classified according to the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia and foot Infection (WIfI). A retrospective review of patients who presented to a public hospital with CLI from February 2010 to July 2014 was performed. Patients were classified according to the WIfI system. Only patients with complete data who survived at least 12 months after presentation were included. Ninety-three patients with 98 affected limbs were included. The mean age was 62.8 years. Eighty-two patients (84%) had hypertension and 71 (72%) had diabetes. Fifty (57.5%) limbs had Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) C or D femoral-popliteal lesions and 82 (98%) had significant infrapopliteal disease. The majority had moderate or high WIfI amputation and revascularization scores. Eighty-four (86%) limbs underwent open, endovascular, or hybrid revascularization. Overall, one year major amputation (OYMA) rate was 26.5%. In limbs with high WIfI amputation score, the OYMA was 34.5%: 21.4% in those who were revascularized and 57% in those who were not. On univariable analysis, factors associated with increased risk of OYMA were nonrevascularization (P = 0.005), hyperlipidemia (P = 0.06), hemodialysis (P = 0.005), gangrene (P = 0.02), ulcer classification (P = 0.05), WIfI amputation score (P = 0.026), and WIfI wound grade (P = 0.04). On multivariable analysis, increasing WIfI amputation score (odds ratio [OR] 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-3.39) was associated with increased risk of OYMA while revascularization (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.07-0.80) was associated with decreased risk of OYMA. The OYMA rates in this population were consistent with those predicted by the

  12. Sensibility of the Stump in Adults With an Acquired Major Upper Extremity Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gils, Willemijn; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.; Smit-Klaij, Frida; Bongers, Raoul M.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the sensibility of the stump in adults with an acquired major upper extremity amputation with the sensibility of the unaffected side and with the corresponding body parts of healthy controls, as well as to relate the sensibility of the stump to daily functioning. Design: A

  13. Upper limb risk assessment according to ISO/CEN standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delleman, N.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the current status, general content, and application of the standards EN 1005, ISO 11226, and ISO 11228-3 concerning upper limb risk assessment. The upper limb risk assessment according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/CEN standards is discussed. Risk

  14. Psychosocial reactions to upper extremity limb salvage: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposato, Lindsay; Yancosek, Kathleen; Lospinoso, Josh; Cancio, Jill

    2017-08-09

    Descriptive cross-sectional survey study. Limb salvage spares an extremity at risk for amputation after a major traumatic injury. Psychosocial recovery for individuals with lower extremity limb salvage has been discussed in the literature. However, to date, psychosocial reactions for individuals with upper extremity (UE) limb salvage have not been examined. To determine which factors may influence psychosocial adaptation to UE limb salvage. Participants (n = 30; 28 males) were adults (mean, 30.13; range, 18-61) who sustained an UE limb salvage from a traumatic event. Adaptation was measured using a modified version of the Reactions to Impairment and Disability Inventory. A linear mixed-effects regression found that worse psychosocial adaptation was associated with having less than a college degree, being less than 6 months post-injury, being older than 23 years, and having more pain. Dominant hand injuries were found to influence poor adaptation on the denial Reactions to Impairment and Disability Inventory subscale only. The results of this study indicate that there is potential for nonadaptive reactions and psychological distress with certain variables in UE limb salvage. Therapists may use these results to anticipate which clients may be at risk for poor psychosocial outcomes. This study indicates the need for early consideration to factors that affect psychological prognosis for the UE limb salvage population. However, future research is indicated to better understand the unique psychosocial challenges and needs of these individuals. 4. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased slow transport in axons of regenerating newt limbs after a nerve conditioning lesion made prior to amputation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    The first part of this study shows that axonal density is constant in the limb stump of the next proximal to the area of traumatic nerve degeneration caused by limb amputation. The results of the second part of this work reveal that a nerve conditioning lesion made two weeks prior to amputation is associated with accelerated limb regeneration and that this accelerated limb regeneration is accompanied by an earlier arrival of axons. This is the first demonstration of naturally occurring limb regeneration being enhanced. In this study SCb cytoskeletal proteins were identified and measured using SDS-PAGE and liquid scintillation counting. Proteins were measured at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after {sup 35}S-methionine injection and the normal rate of SCb transport determined to be 0.19 mm/day. A single axotomy does not enhance the rate of SCb transport but does increase the amount of labeled SCb proteins that are transported. When a conditioning lesion is employed prior to limb amputation and SCb proteins are measured at 7, 14, and 21 days after injection, there is a twofold acceleration in the rate of SCb transport and an increase in the amount of SCb proteins transported in conditioned axons.

  16. Third degree open fractures and traumatic sub-/total amputations of the upper extremity: Outcome and relevance of the Mangled Extremity Severity Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fochtmann, A; Binder, H; Rettl, G; Starlinger, J; Aszmann, O; Sarahrudi, K; Hajdu, S

    2016-10-01

    Third degree open fractures and traumatic sub-/total amputations of the upper extremity represent severe injuries and are associated with a high rate of functional impairment of the affected extremity. More than 20 years ago, the Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) was introduced to predict amputation following severe lower extremity trauma. However, there have been few studies evaluating MESS in connection with the mangled upper limb. A retrospective medical chart review was performed of all patients diagnosed with the aforementioned fractures of the upper extremity treated at the Department of trauma surgery (level I trauma center) and the Clinical division of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the general hospital of Vienna between 1994 and 2014. Fifty-four out of 606 patients (9%) suffered from a total of 61 third degree open fractures or traumatic sub-/total amputations of the upper extremity (Gustilo-Anderson, type IIIA, n=30; Gustilo-Anderson, type IIIB, n=15; Gustilo-Anderson, type IIIC, n=9; traumatic sub-/total amputations, n=7). Thirty-seven out of 54 patients (69%) suffered fractures of the forearm, 10/54 (19%) patients of the humerus and 7/54 (13%) patients of the forearm and the humerus. The median MESS and Injury Severity Score (ISS) for all patients was 5 (range: 3-10) and 9 (range: 4-50), respectively. Seventeen out of 54 patients (31%) were diagnosed with a MESS≥7. Twenty-one out of 54 patients (39%) suffered severe vascular injuries and 22/54 (41%) patients suffered injuries of neural structures. Throughout the therapy process, 6/54 (11%) patients died. Definite limb salvage was achieved in 45 (94%) of the 48 survivors, of whom 9/45 (20%) subjects had a MESS≥7. It became apparent that definite limb salvage could be achieved in the mangled upper extremity regardless of MESS. It should be noted that in the current study, limb functionality was not assessed. However, without a standardized scoring system, there might be

  17. QUALITY-OF-LIFE IN BONE-TUMOR PATIENTS COMPARING LIMB SALVAGE AND AMPUTATION OF THE LOWER-EXTREMITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POSTMA, A; KINGMA, A; DERUITER, JH; KOOPS, HS; VETH, RPH; GOEKEN, LNH; KAMPS, WA

    In 33 long-term survivors of lower extremity bone cancer quality-of-life data were studied following limb salvage compared to amputation. Self-report questionnaires, semistructured interviews and visual analog scales were used to measure psychoneurotic and somatical distress, activities of daily

  18. REHABILITATION IN SKILLED NURSING CENTRES FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE WITH LOWER LIMB AMPUTATIONS : A MIXED-METHODS, DESCRIPTIVE STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortington, Lauren V.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Wind-Kral, Anne; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the current set-up, barriers and potential for providing rehabilitation to people with lower limb amputation in skilled nursing centres. Design: Survey and interviews. Subjects/participants: Elderly care physicians, physiotherapists. Methods: In 2011, clinicians from 34

  19. Can external lateral stabilization reduce the energy cost of walking in persons with a lower limb amputation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJmker, T.; Noten, S.; Lamoth, C. J.; Beek, P. J.; van der Woude, L. H. V.; Houdijk, H.

    The aim of this study was to examine whether impaired balance control is partly responsible for the increased energy cost of walking in persons with a lower limb amputation (LLA). Previous studies used external lateral stabilization to evaluate the energy cost for balance control; this caused a

  20. Construct Validity and Test-Retest Reliability of the Walking Questionnaire in People With a Lower Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Fred A.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Roorda, Leo D.

    Objective: To investigate the construct validity and test-retest reliability of the Walking Questionnaire, a patient-reported measure of activity limitations in walking in people with a lower limb amputation. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Outpatient department of a rehabilitation center.

  1. Autobiographical memory and psychological distress in a sample of upper-limb amputees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Luchetti

    Full Text Available Amputation is a traumatic and life-changing event that can take years to adjust to. The present study (a examines psychological adjustment in a specific trauma-exposed sample, (b compares the phenomenology (e.g., vividness of amputation-related memories to more recent memories, and (c tests whether memory phenomenology is associated with psychological distress. A total of 24 upper-limb amputees recalled two autobiographical memories--an amputation-related memory and a recent memory--and rated the phenomenological qualities of each memory, including Vividness, Coherence, Emotional Intensity, Visual Perspective, and Distancing. Participants also completed self-rated measures of psychological distress and personality. The sample was generally well adjusted; participants showed no relevant symptoms of anxiety and depression, and personality scores were similar to the general population. There were no significant differences in phenomenology between the two types of memories recalled. Even though amputation-related memories were, on average, almost 20 years older than the recent memories, they retained their intense phenomenology. Despite the intensity of the memory, none of the phenomenological dimensions were associated with psychological distress. It is worth to further define which dimensions of phenomenology characterize memories of traumatic events, and their association with individuals' psychological reactions.

  2. Clinical factors associated with replantation after traumatic major upper extremity amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, John V; Kung, Theodore A; Cederna, Paul S; Sears, Erika D; Urbanchek, Melanie G; Langhals, Nicholas B

    2013-10-01

    Little knowledge exists concerning replantation following traumatic major upper extremity amputation. This study characterizes the injury patterns and outcomes of patients suffering major upper extremity amputation and ascertains clinical factors associated with the decision to attempt replantation. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients treated at a Level I trauma center between June of 2000 and August of 2011. Patients who experienced traumatic upper extremity amputation at or proximal to the radiocarpal joint were included in the study. The subset of patients subsequently undergoing replantation was identified. Medical records were reviewed and bivariate analysis was performed to identify factors associated with attempted replantation and replant survival. Sixty-two patients were treated for traumatic upper extremity amputation and 20 patients underwent replantation. Injury factors associated with attempted replantation included a sharp/penetrating injury (p = 0.004), distal level of amputation (p = 0.017), Injury Severity Score less than 16 (p = 0.020), absence of avulsion (p = 0.002), absence of significant contamination (p ≤ 0.001), and lack of multilevel involvement (p = 0.007). Replantation exhibited a complete replant survival rate of 70 percent. An Injury Severity Score of 16 or more was associated with replant failure (p = 0.004). Patients who underwent replantation demonstrated increased rates of secondary surgical revisions (p ≤ 0.001) and complications (p = 0.023) and had a greater length of hospital stay (p = 0.024). Several injury characteristics are associated with the decision to attempt replantation of the major upper extremity. A high global injury severity (Injury Severity Score ≥ 16) is associated with replantation failure when attempted. Patients who undergo replantation demonstrate higher resource use, warranting further cost-analysis and outcomes investigation. Risk, III.

  3. Adjustment to finger amputation and silicone finger prosthesis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuret, Zala; Burger, Helena; Vidmar, Gaj; Maver, Tomaz

    2018-01-11

    Finger amputations are the most common amputations of upper limbs. They influence hand function, general functioning and quality of life. One of the possibilities for rehabilitation after finger amputation is fitting a silicone finger prosthesis. We wanted to evaluate the adjustment to amputation and prosthesis use in patients after finger amputation. We included 42 patients with partial or complete single or multiple finger amputation of one hand who visited the outpatient clinic for prosthetics and orthotics at our institute and received a silicone prosthesis. We assessed their adjustment to amputation and prosthesis with the Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales (TAPES). Most of the patients (28, 67%) had a single finger amputated. The average scores on all TAPES subscales (except adjustment to limitation) were above 50% of the maximum possible score. On average, the scores were the highest on the general adjustment and satisfaction with the prosthesis subscales. Silicone prostheses for finger amputation of upper limb play an important role in the process of adaptation to amputation. They offer aesthetically satisfying results and alleviate social interactions, which influences overall quality of life. Implications for Rehabilitation Silicone prostheses for finger amputation of upper limb offer an aesthetically satisfying result and alleviate problems with social interactions. Their influence on hand function is not optimal, but the prosthesis improves the amputee's quality of life.

  4. Financial analysis of diabetic patients hospitalizations submitted to lower limb amputation in a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Santos Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is a documental descriptive analysis which aimed to verify the cost established in 2006, in relation to the hospitalization of 21 diabetic patients submitted to the lower limb amputation in a public hospital and the value transferred by the Unified Health System (SUS regarding this procedure. Among the studied patients, 57.14% were female and 42.86% male, aged 40 to 90 years. The time of diagnosis varied from 5 to 25 years. The average of hospitalization was 14 days per patient. The cost to the hospital was R$ 99,455.74, average cost per patient was R$ 4,735.98. The total amount transferred by SUS to the hospital was R$ 27,740.15, a cost 3.6 times lower than the hospital costs. The SUS transferring is in accordance with the predetermined values for its table of procedure. Prevention is the only alternative to reduce the rate of amputation and improve survival of diabetes patients. It is necessary an early diagnosis and better control of diabetes mellitus with appropriate government and institutional policies.

  5. The Progression of Male 100 m Sprinting with a Lower-Limb Amputation 1976–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce Dyer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sprinting with a lower-limb amputation over 100 m has taken place in the Paralympic Games for over three decades. The aim of this paper is to statistically evaluate the performances and participation levels of such athletes during this period. The level of performance improvement over a 36-year period was proposed to be significantly greater than the able-bodied equivalent. Coupled with this, a major spike in amputee running performance improvement was shown to occur from 1984–1988. This supports previously recorded accounts of a major technological change being made at this time. Finally, whilst the average performance of the medallists has increased consistently over the 36-year history, the overall participation in the event fell significantly after 1988 and did not recover until 2012.

  6. Amputation history and rehabilitation of black men living in the greater Durban area who have had traumatic amputations of the lower limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kubheka

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available A survey was undertaken amongst twenty five black men living in the greater Durban area who had had amputations of the lower limbs. The type of amputation care and the rehabilitation programme they underwent post-operatively is described. The sample included men from 24 to 50 years of age, of whom the majority were from rural areas. The amputation care intra and post-operatively was marked by the lack of emotional preparation pre-operatively, and lack of rehabilitation information and teaching afterwards. Most respondents had to find information for themselves. This lack of information and teaching seemed to impede physical rehabilitation, with stump sores and limited use of prostheses being the main problems. Vocational rehabilitation was almost totally absent. In contrast to the twenty two respondents who worked before their amputations, only four worked afterwards. The majority had to support their families alone; sixteen of them were totally reliant on a Disability Grant. These problems lead to social isolation, depression, loneliness and other psycho-social problems.

  7. Amputation history and rehabilitation of black men living in the greater Durban area who have had traumatic amputations of the lower limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kubheka

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available A survey was undertaken amongst twenty five black men living in the greater Durban area who had had amputations of the lower limbs. The type of amputation care and the rehabilitation programme they underwent post-operatively is described. The sample included men from 24 to 50 years of age, of whom the majority were from rural areas. The amputation care intra and post-operatively was marked by the lack of emotional preparation pre-operatively, and lack of rehabilitation information and teaching afterwards. Most respondents had to find information for themselves. This lack of information and teaching seemed to impede physical rehabilitation, with stump sores and limited use of prostheses being the main problems. Vocational rehabilitation was almost totally absent. In contrast to the twenty two respondents who worked before their amputations, only four worked afterwards. The majority had to support their families alone; sixteen of them were totally reliant on a Disability Grant. These problems lead to social isolation, depression, loneliness and other psycho-social problems.

  8. Ectopic major transplantation for salvage of upper and lower extremity amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazerani Shahram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Ectopic tissue transplanta- tion is not a new idea. Godina and his colleagues pioneered this method in the 1980s. This method is a last resort method of preserving an amputated body part, which consists of banking the amputated segment in an ectopic area and re- turning it to its native place at a later date. In this article we present our experience with this demanding procedure. Methods: Debridement was the mainstay of this procedure. The stump and amputated part are carefully de- brided and the stump was either closed primarily or covered by a flap. The amputated part was transplanted to one of several banking sites in the body and at a later date it will be transferred to its native site in an elective setting. Results: Seven patients meeting the set criteria for ectopic transplantation were enrolled in this study. The over- all success rate was about 70%, lower than expected but these are cases of severe crush injury. Although the func- tional recovery of these patients are very low, all of the successful cases except one could find a job as a janitor or light manual worker. No patient could return to his previous job. Conclusion: Ectopic transplantation of body parts is an accepted method of treatment of severely crushed ex- tremity or finger injuries. In our country an amputee has very little chance of finding a job instead a disabled person can. In addition in Iran cultures amputation is seen as pu- nishment of either the God or the society, so it is not well accepted and many patients persist on saving the limb even with no functional recovery. None of our successful cases could return to his previous occupation but almost all of them could find a job as janitors or light manual workers. Key words: Replantation; Transplantation; Extremities; Amputation, traumatic

  9. Psoas compartment and sacral plexus block via electrostimulation for pelvic limb amputation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Jonathon M; Boscan, Pedro; Goh, Clara S S; Rezende, Marlis

    2017-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of psoas compartment and sacral plexus block for pelvic limb amputation in dogs. Prospective clinical study. A total of 16 dogs aged 8±3 years and weighing 35±14 kg (mean±standard deviation). Dogs were administered morphine (0.5 mg kg -1 ) and atropine (0.02 mg kg -1 ); anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. Regional blocks were performed before surgery in eight dogs with bupivacaine (2.2 mg kg -1 ) and eight dogs were administered an equivalent volume of saline. The lumbar plexus within the psoas compartment was identified using electrolocation lateral to the lumbar vertebrae at the fourth-fifth, fifth-sixth and sixth-seventh vertebral interspaces. The sacral plexus, ventrolateral to the sacrum, was identified using electrolocation. Anesthesia was monitored using heart rate (HR), invasive blood pressure, electrocardiography, expired gases, respiratory frequency and esophageal temperature by an investigator unaware of the group allocation. Pelvic limb amputation by coxofemoral disarticulation was performed. Dogs that responded to surgical stimulation (>10% increase in HR or arterial pressure) were administered fentanyl (2 μg kg -1 ) intravenously for rescue analgesia. Postoperative pain was assessed at extubation; 30, 60 and 120 minutes; and the morning after surgery using a visual analog scale (VAS). The number of intraoperative fentanyl doses was fewer in the bupivacaine group (2.7±1.1 versus 6.0±2.2; pdogs at extubation (0.8±1.9 versus 3.8±2.5) and at 30 minutes (1.0±1.4 versus 4.3±2.1; pdogs. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pathophysiology of Post Amputation Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    in regions of the somatosensory cortex in the vicinity of the somatotopic mapping of upper or lower limb regions (yellow and blue circles, resp...human somatosensory cortex following amputation. Neuroreport 1998;9:1013-7. 38. Karl A, Birbaumer N, Lutzenberger W, Cohen LG, Flor H. Reorganization...of motor and somatosensory cortex in upper extremity amputees with phantom limb pain. J Neurosci 2001;21:3609-18. 39. Sica RE, Sanz OP, Cohen LG

  11. Chronic Low Back Pain in Individuals with Lower-limb Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Kušljugić

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is a common condition in individuals which experienced psychology and physical trauma. LBP is usually found in persons with lower-limb amputation (LLA, as the most common sign of somatisation or inappropriately made prostheses. Our goal was to investigate cases of chronic pain syndrome in persons with LLA and to determine factors, which influence their functional inability due to LBP. Pain after LLA has been studied. 37 persons, including 26 war veterans (70.2 % and 11 (29.8 % civilians with LLA due to an illness, were examined. All participants gave their informed consent and filled Oswestry index of disability due to chronic LBP, divided into 10 sections with 6 questions each, with marks in the range 0-5. The average age of 37 analyzed participants with LLA was 46.2+-10.92 years. 30 participants (81.1 % were married, 4 (10.8 % were single and 3 (8.1 % were widows. 27 (73.0 % participants had below the knee amputation, 5 (13.5 % had above the knee amputation and 5 (13.5 % had foot amputation. 33 (89.6 % participants experienced chronic LBP in the last 2-10 years and 4 (10.8 % did not have pains. According to Oswestry index for chronic pain higher level of social functionality was found in civilian amputees than in war veterans (p<0.05. Married civilian amputees have higher level of disability during seating (p<0.01, sleeping (p<0.01 and traveling (p<0.05. Higher level of social disorder among civilian amputees is due to the fact that they belong to older group of participants which usually have social integration at the lower degree. More serious problems during seating, traveling and sleeping among this group are probably due to co morbidity. Chronic LBP was found among 89.6 % of the participants. Higher level of social disorder, problems during seating, traveling and sleeping were identified in the civilian amputees and the married participants.

  12. Origin of directionally tuned responses in lower limb muscles to unpredictable upper limb disturbances

    OpenAIRE

    Forghani, Ali; Milner, Theodore E.

    2017-01-01

    Unpredictable forces which perturb balance are frequently applied to the body through interaction between the upper limb and the environment. Lower limb muscles respond rapidly to these postural disturbances in a highly specific manner. We have shown that the muscle activation patterns of lower limb muscles are organized in a direction specific manner which changes with lower limb stability. Ankle muscles change their activity within 80 ms of the onset of a force perturbation applied to the h...

  13. Appropriateness of advanced upper limb prosthesis prescription for a patient with cognitive impairment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barredo, Jennifer; Acluche, Frantzy; Disla, Roxanne; Fantini, Christopher; Fishelis, Leah; Sasson, Nicole; Resnik, Linda

    2017-08-01

    To describe a participant with scapulo-thoracic amputation and cognitive impairment trained to use the DEKA Arm and discuss factors relevant to the determination that he was not an appropriate candidate for independent home use of the device. The participant underwent 40 h of in-laboratory training with the DEKA Arm Advanced Upper Limb Prosthesis. Pre-training neuropsychological measures of cognition were collected. Qualitative and quantitative data related to functional performance, quality of life and pain were collected after 10 h of training, and at the conclusion of training. Using a constant comparative approach, data were binned into major themes; elements within each theme were identified. Six themes were relevant to the determination that the participant was inappropriate for home use of the DEKA Arm: physical and mental health; learning, memory and cognition; adult role function; functional performance; user safety and judgement and capacity for independent device use. Issues contraindicating unsupervised device use included: uncontrolled health symptoms, poor knowledge application, safety concerns, absenteeism and performance degradation under stress. The findings have implications for training with and prescription of the DEKA Arm and other complex upper limb prostheses. Further research is needed to develop a model to guide prescription of technologically complex upper limb prostheses. Implications for Rehabilitation Advanced upper limb prostheses, like the DEKA Arm, promise greater functionality, but also may be cognitively demanding, raising questions of when, and if, prescription is appropriate for patients with cognitive impairment. At this time, no formal criteria exist to guide prescription of advanced upper limb prostheses. Each clinical team applies their own informal standards in decision-making. In this case report, we described six factors that were considered in determining whether or not a research participant, with scapulo

  14. Explaining modified 2-min walk test outcomes in male Veterans with traumatic or nontraumatic lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Brian J; Fields, Thomas T; Stephenson, Ryan O; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer; Christiansen, Cory L

    2016-01-01

    Little evidence exists to support the presence of differences in spatiotemporal gait parameters and ambulation ability between those individuals with traumatic and nontraumatic lower-limb amputation (LLA). We conducted an exploratory study of 81 male Veterans with unilateral amputation to quantify differences in spatiotemporal gait parameters and ambulatory mobility between Veterans with traumatic and nontraumatic LLA. Furthermore, we identified variables that significantly contributed to the explanation of variability in modified 2-min walk test distance. All participants completed the modified 2-min walk test and a spatiotemporal gait analysis using an instrumented walkway during a routine physical therapy visit. Veterans with nontraumatic LLA walked significantly shorter mean distances during a modified 2-min walk test than Veterans with traumatic LLA. Variables identified as significant contributors to modified 2-min walk test variability were amputated limb stance time, amputated limb step length, and percentage of the gait cycle spent in double support. These findings demonstrate that differences in spatiotemporal gait parameters and ambulatory mobility exist between Veterans with traumatic and nontraumatic LLA and identify important spatiotemporal parameters of gait contributing to this decline. These parameters should be considered as targets for intervention and future investigation.

  15. Capsaicin 8% patch treatment for amputation stump and phantom limb pain: a clinical and functional MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Privitera R

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rosario Privitera,1 Rolfe Birch,1 Marco Sinisi,2 Iordan R Mihaylov,3 Robert Leech,4 Praveen Anand1 1Peripheral Neuropathy Unit, Centre for Clinical Translation, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK; 2Peripheral Nerve Injury Unit, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex, UK; 3Department of Pain Medicine, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, UK; 4Computational, Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, Division of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, UK Purpose: The aim of this study was to measure the efficacy of a single 60 min application of capsaicin 8% patch in reducing chronic amputation stump and phantom limb pain, associated hypersensitivity with quantitative sensory testing, and changes in brain cortical maps using functional MRI (fMRI scans. Methods: A capsaicin 8% patch (Qutenza treatment study was conducted on 14 patients with single limb amputation, who reported pain intensity on the Numerical Pain Rating Scale ≥4/10 for chronic stump or phantom limb pain. Pain assessments, quantitative sensory testing, and fMRI (for the lip pursing task were performed at baseline and 4 weeks after application of capsaicin 8% patch to the amputation stump. The shift into the hand representation area of the cerebral cortex with the lip pursing task has been correlated with phantom limb pain intensity in previous studies, and was the fMRI clinical model for cortical plasticity used in this study. Results: The mean reduction in spontaneous amputation stump pain, phantom limb pain, and evoked stump pain were −1.007 (p=0.028, −1.414 (p=0.018, and −2.029 (p=0.007, respectively. The areas of brush allodynia and pinprick hypersensitivity in the amputation stump showed marked decreases: −165 cm2, −80% (p=0.001 and −132 cm2, −72% (p=0.001, respectively. fMRI analyses provided objective evidence of the restoration of the brain map, that is

  16. Sensory feedback for upper limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Steven S; Fettiplace, Michael; Darbandi, Bejan

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the neurophysiological basis of how to provide sensory feedback to users with an upper limb prosthesis and discuss some of the theoretical issues that need to be considered when directly stimulating neurons in the somatosensory system. We focus on technologies that are currently available and discuss approaches that are most likely to succeed in providing natural perception from the artificial hand to the user. First, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of providing feedback by stimulating directly the remaining afferents that originally innervated the arm and hand. In particular, we pay close attention to the normal functional roles that the peripheral afferents play in perception. What are the consequences and implications of stimulating these afferents? We then discuss whether it is reasonable to stimulate neurons in the ascending pathways that carry the information from the afferents to the cortex or directly in neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex. We show that for some modalities there are advantages for stimulating in the spinal cord, while for others it is advantageous to stimulate directly in the somatosensory cortex. Finally, we discuss results from a current experiment in which we used electrical stimuli in primary somatosensory cortex to restore the percept of the intensity of a mechanical probe indented into the hand. The results suggest that the simple percept of stimulus intensity can be provided to the animal from a single finger using four electrodes. We propose that significantly more electrodes will be needed to reproduce more complex aspects of tactile perception. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Upper and lower limb muscle activation is bidirectionally and ipsilaterally coupled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Helen J; Ferris, Daniel P

    2009-09-01

    There are neural connections between the upper and lower limbs of humans that enable muscle activation in one limb pair (upper or lower) to modulate muscle activation in the other limb pair (lower or upper, respectively). The aims of this study were to extend previous findings regarding submaximal exercise to maximal effort exercise and determine whether there is an ipsilateral or contralateral bias to the neural coupling during a rhythmic locomotor-like task. We measured upper and lower limb muscle activity, joint kinematics, and limb forces in neurologically intact subjects (n = 16) as they performed recumbent stepping using different combinations of upper and lower limb efforts. We found increased muscle activation in passive lower limbs during active upper limb effort compared with passive upper limb effort. Likewise, increased muscle activation in passive upper limbs occurred during active lower limb effort compared with passive lower limb effort, suggesting a bidirectional effect. Maximal muscle activation in the active lower limbs was not different between conditions with active upper limb effort and conditions with passive upper limb movement. Similarly, maximal muscle activation in the active upper limbs was not different between conditions with active lower limb effort and conditions with passive lower limb movement. Further comparisons revealed that neural coupling was primarily from active upper limb muscles to passive ipsilateral lower limb muscles. These findings indicate that interlimb neural coupling affects muscle recruitment during maximal effort upper and lower limb rhythmic exercise and provides insight into the architecture of the neural coupling.

  18. Development of an Upper Limb Motorized Assistive-Rehabilitative Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Masoud; Casolo, Federico

    While the number of people requiring help for the activities of daily living are increasing, several studies have been shown the effectiveness of robot training for upper limb functionality recovery. The robotic system described in this paper is an active end-effector based robot which can be used for assisting and rehabilitating of human upper limb. The robot is able to take into account desire of the patient for the support that patient needs to complete the task.

  19. Surveillance case definitions for work related upper limb pain syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Harrington, J. M.; Carter, J. T.; Birrell, L.; Gompertz, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish consensus case definitions for several common work related upper limb pain syndromes for use in surveillance or studies of the aetiology of these conditions. METHODS: A group of healthcare professionals from the disciplines interested in the prevention and management of upper limb disorders were recruited for a Delphi exercise. A questionnaire was used to establish case definitions from the participants, followed by a consensus conference involving the core grou...

  20. Very low survival rates after non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a consecutive series: what to do?†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Holm, Gitte; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus; Krasheninnikoff, Michael; Gebuhr, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate factors potentially influencing short- and long-term mortality in patients who had a non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a university hospital. A consecutive series of 93 amputations (16% toe/foot, 33% trans-tibial, 9% through knee and 42% trans-femoral) were studied. Their mean age was 75.8 years; 21 (23%) were admitted from a nursing home and 87 (92%) were amputated due to a vascular disease and/or diabetes. Thirty days and 1-year mortality were 30 and 54%, respectively. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that the 30-day mortality was associated with older age (P = 0.01), and the number of co-morbidities (P = 0.04), when adjusted for gender, previous amputations, cause of and amputation level, and residential status. Thus, a patient with 4 or 5 co-morbidities (n = 20) was seven times more likely to die within 30 days, compared with a patient with 1 co-morbidity (n = 16). Further, the risk of not surviving increased with 7% per each additional year the patient got older. Of concern, almost one-third of patients died within 1 month. This may be unavoidable, but a multidisciplinary, optimized, multimodal pre- and postoperative programme should be instituted, trying to improve the outcome. PMID:22298857

  1. To lump or to split? Comparing individuals with traumatic and nontraumatic limb loss in the first year after amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Anna L; Williams, Rhonda M; Turner, Aaron P; Raichle, Katherine A; Smith, Doug G; Ehde, Dawn

    2010-05-01

    To compare individuals with traumatic (TE) vs. nontraumatic (NTE) amputation etiology on pain, psychological, and social variables over the first 12 months postamputation, and to explore changes in mean levels of and correlations between these variables over time. There were 111 adults with newly acquired limb loss. A VA medical center and a Level I trauma hospital in a large metropolitan area. Characteristic Pain Severity, Pain Interference, Patient Health Questionnaire depression module, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist, Social Constraints Scale, Aversive Emotional Support Scale, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention single item Social Support measure, single item loneliness measure. The NTE group was significantly older, had lower income, and had greater medical comorbidity, preamputation pain, and physical disability. The etiology groups did not differ significantly in mean levels of outcome variables except that the TE group reported greater aversive emotional support at 6 and 12 months. The TE group demonstrated a quadratic change in pain interference, with highest levels at 6 months and a linear increase in social constraints. Both etiology groups showed a linear increase in PTSD symptoms over time. Correlations between physical, psychological, and social distress were observed earlier in the year for the NTE group. Despite significant demographic and preamputation experience differences, few differences in outcomes emerged by etiology group in the first year after amputation. Findings suggest that the year after amputation may be a time of greater change for those with traumatic amputation compared to those with nontraumatic amputation.

  2. Very low survival rates after non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a consecutive series: what to do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Holm, Gitte; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus; Krasheninnikoff, Michael; Gebuhr, Peter

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate factors potentially influencing short- and long-term mortality in patients who had a non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a university hospital. A consecutive series of 93 amputations (16% toe/foot, 33% trans-tibial, 9% through knee and 42% trans-femoral) were studied. Their mean age was 75.8 years; 21 (23%) were admitted from a nursing home and 87 (92%) were amputated due to a vascular disease and/or diabetes. Thirty days and 1-year mortality were 30 and 54%, respectively. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that the 30-day mortality was associated with older age (P = 0.01), and the number of co-morbidities (P = 0.04), when adjusted for gender, previous amputations, cause of and amputation level, and residential status. Thus, a patient with 4 or 5 co-morbidities (n = 20) was seven times more likely to die within 30 days, compared with a patient with 1 co-morbidity (n = 16). Further, the risk of not surviving increased with 7% per each additional year the patient got older. Of concern, almost one-third of patients died within 1 month. This may be unavoidable, but a multidisciplinary, optimized, multimodal pre- and postoperative programme should be instituted, trying to improve the outcome.

  3. Number of test trials needed for performance stability and interrater reliability of the one leg stand test in patients with a major non-traumatic lower limb amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Nielsen, Anni Østergaard; Madsen Topp, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Balance is beneficial for daily functioning of patients with a lower limb amputation and sometimes assessed by the one-leg stand test (OLST). The aims of the study were to examine (1) the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability, (2) the interrater reliability of the OLST...... in patients with a major non-traumatic lower limb amputation, and (3) to provide a test procedure....

  4. Sensibility of the stump in adults with an acquired major upper extremity amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gils, Willemijn; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A; Smit-Klaij, Frida; Bongers, Raoul M; Dijkstra, Pieter U; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2013-11-01

    To compare the sensibility of the stump in adults with an acquired major upper extremity amputation with the sensibility of the unaffected side and with the corresponding body parts of healthy controls, as well as to relate the sensibility of the stump to daily functioning. A survey with matched controls. A tertiary referral center. A referred sample of patients (n=30) with an acquired upper extremity amputation, at least 1 year after amputation, and control subjects (n=30) matched for age, sex, and hand dominance were evaluated. Not applicable. Three different modalities of sensibility were measured: (1) touch-pressure sensibility, tested using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments; (2) stereognosis, detected using the Shape and Texture Identification test; and (3) kinesthesia. Daily functioning was assessed using the Upper Extremity Functional Status Module of the Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey. The mean time ± SD since amputation was 20±17.8 years. Twenty patients used a prosthesis. The stump sensibility was similar to that of unaffected hands and tended to be less than that of unaffected arms (P=.08). The patients using a prosthesis had significantly poorer touch-pressure sensibility in the stump compared with the nonusers (P=.04). However, touch-pressure sensibility and stereognosis were worse in the patients than in controls (Psensibility. The touch-pressure sensibility in the stumps of patients using prostheses was poorer than the sensibility in nonusers, and remarkably, the unaffected extremities of the amputees were less sensitive than the extremities of the controls. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Validity and reliability of the Berg Balance Scale for community-dwelling persons with lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Matthew J; Fatone, Stefania; Roth, Elliot J

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the validity and reliability of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) for use in people with lower-limb amputation. Cross-sectional study. Research laboratory. Individuals (N=30; age, 54±12y; 20 men) with unilateral transtibial (n=13), unilateral transfemoral (n=14), or bilateral (n=3) lower-limb amputation of dysvascular (n=7), traumatic (n=14), infectious (n=6), or congenital (n=3) origin. Not applicable. BBS, 2-minute walk test, L test, Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire-Mobility Subscale, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, and Frenchay Activities Index; self-reported descriptors were also collected, including frequency of prosthesis use, number of falls in 12 months before the visit, fear of falling, and daily mobility aid use. The BBS had high interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient =.945) and internal consistency (α=.827). Relations between the BBS scores and those of other outcome measures were all statistically significant (P≤.001). Significant group differences in BBS scores were observed for fear of falling (P=.008) and mobility aid use (Pmultiple (≥2) falls in the previous 12 months (P=.381). BBS items involving reaching forward, turning 360°, tandem standing, and standing on 1 leg had relatively greater frequencies of lower scores across participants. The BBS appears to be a valid and reliable clinical instrument for assessing balance in individuals with lower-limb amputation, but it may not be able to discriminate between individuals with greater or lesser fall risk. Limitations in prosthetic motion and control may be responsible for the challenges experienced on items of lower performance. Future studies would be useful to assess the responsiveness of the BBS to interventions aimed at improving balance in individuals with lower-limb amputation. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Three-body segment musculoskeletal model of the upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdmanová L.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim is to create a computational three-body segment model of an upper limb of a human body for determination of muscle forces generated to keep a given loaded upper limb position. The model consists of three segments representing arm, forearm, hand and of all major muscles connected to the segments. Muscle origins and insertions determination corresponds to a real anatomy. Muscle behaviour is defined according to the Hill-type muscle model consisting of contractile and viscoelastic element. The upper limb is presented by a system of three rigid bars connected by rotational joints. The whole limb is fixed to the frame in the shoulder joint. A static balance problem is solved by principle of virtual work. The system of equation describing the musculoskeletal system is overdetermined because more muscles than necessary contribute to get the concrete upper limb position. Hence the mathematical problem is solved by an optimization method searching the least energetically-consuming solution. The upper limb computational model is verified by electromyography of the biceps brachii muscle.

  7. Rasch validation of the Prosthetic Mobility Questionnaire: A new outcome measure for assessing mobility in people with lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchignoni, Franco; Monticone, Marco; Giordano, Andrea; Rocca, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    To create a new outcome measure of mobility in people with lower limb amputation, based on a pool of 14 items assessing prosthetic mobility, comprising the 12-item Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire (Mobility Section) plus 2 new items. Cross-sectional study. A total of 100 subjects (median age 58 years; 46 males; median body mass index 23.8) who had recently undergone lower limb amputation. Each patient completed the 14-item questionnaire twice: (i) at admission to the rehabilitation unit for prosthetic rehabilitation training; (ii) at 6-month follow-up after discharge. After Rasch analysis, 2 items were deleted (one due to misfit, the other because showing large (>  0.30) positive correlation of residuals with two other items (local dependence). The remaining items fitted the Rasch model (internal construct validity), giving a new 12-item scale with a 5-level response format, the Prosthetic Mobility Questionnaire (PMQ), which demonstrated unidimensionality, lack of differential item functioning, and good reliability indices (person-separation reliability = 0.87; Cronbach's alpha 0.88). Although further studies are needed to increase confidence in clinical use of the PMQ, this new questionnaire appears to be a promising, psychometrically-sound patient-reported outcome measure for assessment of mobility in subjects with lower limb amputation who use a prosthesis.

  8. Acute Parotitis after Lower Limb Amputation: A Case Report of a Rare Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Ioannis Avgerinos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postoperative parotitis is a rare complication that occurs usually after abdominal surgery. Parotitis has never been described as a complication of vascular operations, in literature. In the present article, we describe a case of a postamputation parotitis along with its management and its possible pathogenesis. Case Report. An 83-year-old diabetic man was emergently admitted to hospital because of gangrene below the right ankle and sepsis. The patient underwent a lower limb amputation above the knee. On the 5th postoperative day, he was diagnosed with right parotitis probably because of dehydration, general anesthesia, and immunocompromisation. A CT scan confirmed the diagnosis. He received treatment with antibiotics and fluids. His condition gradually improved, and he was finally discharged on 15th postoperative day. Conclusions. Postoperative parotitis can possibly occur after any type of surgery including vascular. Clinicians should be aware of this complication although it is rare. Several risk factors such as dehydration, general anesthesia, drugs, immunocompromisation, head tilt during surgery, and stones in Stensen’s duct may predispose to postoperative parotitis. Treatment consists of antibiotics and hydration.

  9. Phantom pain and phantom sensations in upper limb amputees : an epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, CM; Dijkstra, PU; Geertzen, JHB; Elzinga, A; van der Schans, CP

    Phantom pain in subjects with an amputated limb is a well-known problem. However, estimates of the prevalence of phantom pain differ considerably in the literature. Various factors associated with phantom pain have been described including pain before the amputation, gender, dominance, and time

  10. Prevalence of upper limb disorders among female librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandy, R

    2013-09-01

    Work as a librarian involves exposure to potential risk factors for developing upper limb disorders. The prevalence of upper limb symptoms has, however, not previously been assessed in this occupational group. To estimate the 7-day and annual prevalence of self-reported neck and upper limb symptoms in librarians and to examine associations with specific tasks and ergonomic risk factors. A cross-sectional study using components of the standardized Nordic questionnaire. The study population consisted of librarians employed by a large local authority, and data collection was by means of a self-administered questionnaire. from studies on keyboard workers and on the general population were used as comparators. The 7-day prevalence of self-reported neck and upper limb pain in female librarians was 42% (95% confidence interval (CI) 33.7-50.5) and the annual prevalence was 65% (95% CI 56.6-72.8). The prevalence of reported wrist and hand pain increased with increased working involving a wide thumb-index span (P < 0.05) with a significant linear trend in prevalence with increasing exposure (P < 0.01). There was a strong association between reporting hand and/or wrist pain and awareness of work-related upper limb disorder (P < 0.05). The annual prevalence of self-reported upper limb symptoms among female librarians was high, but there was insufficient evidence to confirm whether the prevalence was higher than in the general population or among keyboard workers. Working with a wide thumb-index span was associated with reporting upper limb symptoms.

  11. Factors associated with interest in novel interfaces for upper limb prosthesis control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah M Engdahl

    Full Text Available Surgically invasive interfaces for upper limb prosthesis control may allow users to operate advanced, multi-articulated devices. Given the potential medical risks of these invasive interfaces, it is important to understand what factors influence an individual's decision to try one.We conducted an anonymous online survey of individuals with upper limb loss. A total of 232 participants provided personal information (such as age, amputation level, etc. and rated how likely they would be to try noninvasive (myoelectric and invasive (targeted muscle reinnervation, peripheral nerve interfaces, cortical interfaces interfaces for prosthesis control. Bivariate relationships between interest in each interface and 16 personal descriptors were examined. Significant variables from the bivariate analyses were then entered into multiple logistic regression models to predict interest in each interface.While many of the bivariate relationships were significant, only a few variables remained significant in the regression models. The regression models showed that participants were more likely to be interested in all interfaces if they had unilateral limb loss (p ≤ 0.001, odds ratio ≥ 2.799. Participants were more likely to be interested in the three invasive interfaces if they were younger (p < 0.001, odds ratio ≤ 0.959 and had acquired limb loss (p ≤ 0.012, odds ratio ≥ 3.287. Participants who used a myoelectric device were more likely to be interested in myoelectric control than those who did not (p = 0.003, odds ratio = 24.958.Novel prosthesis control interfaces may be accepted most readily by individuals who are young, have unilateral limb loss, and/or have acquired limb loss However, this analysis did not include all possible factors that may have influenced participant's opinions on the interfaces, so additional exploration is warranted.

  12. What are the key conditions associated with lower limb amputations in a major Australian teaching hospital?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzarini Peter A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lower extremity amputation results in significant global morbidity and mortality. Australia appears to have a paucity of studies investigating lower extremity amputation. The primary aim of this retrospective study was to investigate key conditions associated with lower extremity amputations in an Australian population. Secondary objectives were to determine the influence of age and sex on lower extremity amputations, and the reliability of hospital coded amputations. Methods Lower extremity amputation cases performed at the Princess Alexandra Hospital (Brisbane, Australia between July 2006 and June 2007 were identified through the relevant hospital discharge dataset (n = 197. All eligible clinical records were interrogated for age, sex, key condition associated with amputation, amputation site, first ever amputation status and the accuracy of the original hospital coding. Exclusion criteria included records unavailable for audit and cases where the key condition was unable to be determined. Chi-squared, t-tests, ANOVA and post hoc tests were used to determine differences between groups. Kappa statistics were used to measure reliability between coded and audited amputations. A minimum significance level of p  Results One hundred and eighty-six cases were eligible and audited. Overall 69% were male, 56% were first amputations, 54% were major amputations, and mean age was 62 ± 16 years. Key conditions associated included type 2 diabetes (53%, peripheral arterial disease (non-diabetes (18%, trauma (8%, type 1 diabetes (7% and malignant tumours (5%. Differences in ages at amputation were associated with trauma 36 ± 10 years, type 1 diabetes 52 ± 12 years and type 2 diabetes 67 ± 10 years (p  Conclusions This study, the first in over 20 years to report on all levels of lower extremity amputations in Australia, found that people undergoing amputation are more likely to be older, male and have

  13. An event-related potential study on the time course of mental rotation in upper-limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xiaoli; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Flor, Herta; Tong, Shanbao

    2017-05-01

    Mental rotation of body parts involves sequential cognitive processes, including visual processing, categorization and the mental rotation process itself. However, how these processes are affected by the amputation of a limb is still unclear. Twenty-five right upper-limb amputees and the same number of matched healthy controls participated in a hand mental rotation task. Thirty-two-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded and the event-related potentials (ERPs) were analyzed. In the early visual processing phase, amputees and controls showed a similar P100. During the categorization phase, the amputees exhibited a decreased N200 compared with controls, and the decline was positively correlated with the time since amputation. In the mental rotation phase, controls had a larger ERP for the right upright hand than for the left upright hand, while amputees had a larger ERP for the left (intact) upright hand than for the right (affected) upright hand. Early visual processing was not affected by limb amputation. However, the perceptual salience of hand pictures decreased and the intact hand gained more significance in the amputees. Event-related potentials had the capability of showing the differences in categorization and mental rotation phases between amputees and controls. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Using vacuum-assisted suspension to manage residual limb wounds in persons with transtibial amputation: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Robert D; Sutton, Erin E; Kinor, Deborah; Schaeffer, Julia M; Fatone, Stefania

    2014-02-01

    Persons with amputation and residual limb wounds would benefit from the ability to continue wearing a prosthesis while healing. Sockets with vacuum-assisted suspension may reduce intra-socket motion and be less disruptive to wound healing. The purpose of this case series was to measure residual limb wound size over time in persons with transtibial amputation while using prostheses with vacuum-assisted suspension. Six subjects with residual limb wounds were fit with vacuum-assisted suspension sockets. Wound surface area was calculated using ImageJ software at the time of fit and each subsequent visit until closure. FINDINGS AND OUTCOME: Average wound surface area at initial measurement was 2.17 ± 0.65 cm(2). All subjects were instructed to continue their normal activity level while wounds healed, with a mean of 177.6 ± 113 days to wound closure. Results suggest that well-fitting sockets with vacuum-assisted suspension in compliant individuals did not preclude wound healing. Further research is required to substantiate these case-based observations. Residual limb wounds are typically treated by suspension of prosthetic use until healing occurs, increasing the risk of long-term prosthesis nonuse. Our results suggest that vacuum-assisted suspension sockets may be used while healing occurs.

  15. The role of amputation as an outcome measure in cellular therapy for critical limb ischemia: implications for clinical trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl Gregory J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells have been ascribed an important therapeutic role in No-Option Critical limb Ischemia (NO-CLI. One primary endpoint for evaluating NO-CLI therapy is major amputation (AMP, which is usually combined with mortality for AMP-free survival (AFS. Only a trial which is double blinded can eliminate physician and patient bias as to the timing and reason for AMP. We examined factors influencing AMP in a prospective double-blinded pilot RCT (2:1 therapy to control of 48 patients treated with site of service obtained bone marrow cells (BMAC as well as a systematic review of the literature. Methods Cells were injected intramuscularly in the CLI limbs as either BMAC or placebo (peripheral blood. Six month AMP rates were compared between the two arms. Both patient and treating team were blinded of the assignment in follow-up examinations. A search of the literature identified 9 NO-CLI trials, the control arms of which were used to determine 6 month AMP rates and the influence of tissue loss. Results Fifteen amputations occurred during the 6 month period, 86.7% of these during the first 4 months. One amputation occurred in a Rutherford 4 patient. The difference in amputation rate between patients with rest pain (5.6% and those with tissue loss (46.7%, irrespective of treatment group, was significant (p = 0.0029. In patients with tissue loss, treatment with BMAC demonstrated a lower amputation rate than placebo (39.1% vs. 71.4%, p = 0.1337. The Kaplan-Meier time to amputation was longer in the BMAC group than in the placebo group (p = 0.067. Projecting these results to a pivotal trial, a bootstrap simulation model showed significant difference in AFS between BMAC and placebo with a power of 95% for a sample size of 210 patients. Meta-analysis of the literature confirmed a difference in amputation rate between patients with tissue loss and rest pain. Conclusions BMAC shows promise in improving AMP

  16. Post-amputation pain is associated with the recall of an impaired body representation in dreams-results from a nation-wide survey on limb amputees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Bekrater-Bodmann

    Full Text Available The experience of post-amputation pain such as phantom limb pain (PLP and residual limb pain (RLP, is a common consequence of limb amputation, and its presence has negative effects on a person's well-being. The continuity hypothesis of dreams suggests that the presence of such aversive experiences in the waking state should be reflected in dream content, with the recalled body representation reflecting a cognitive proxy of negative impact. In the present study, we epidemiologically assessed the presence of post-amputation pain and other amputation-related information as well as recalled body representation in dreams in a sample of 3,234 unilateral limb amputees. Data on the site and time of amputation, residual limb length, prosthesis use, lifetime prevalence of mental disorders, presence of post-amputation pain, and presence of non-painful phantom phenomena were included in logistic regression analyses using recalled body representation in dreams (impaired, intact, no memory as dependent variable. The effects of age, sex, and frequency of dream recall were controlled for. About 22% of the subjects indicated that they were not able to remember their body representation in dreams, another 24% of the amputees recalled themselves as always intact, and only a minority of less than 3% recalled themselves as always impaired. Almost 35% of the amputees dreamed of themselves in a mixed fashion. We found that lower-limb amputation as well as the presence of PLP and RLP was positively associated with the recall of an impaired body representation in dreams. The presence of non-painful phantom phenomena, however, had no influence. These results complement previous findings and indicate complex interactions of physical body appearance and mental body representation, probably modulated by distress in the waking state. The findings are discussed against the background of alterations in cognitive processes after amputation and hypotheses suggesting an innate

  17. Post-amputation pain is associated with the recall of an impaired body representation in dreams-results from a nation-wide survey on limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Schredl, Michael; Diers, Martin; Reinhard, Iris; Foell, Jens; Trojan, Jörg; Fuchs, Xaver; Flor, Herta

    2015-01-01

    The experience of post-amputation pain such as phantom limb pain (PLP) and residual limb pain (RLP), is a common consequence of limb amputation, and its presence has negative effects on a person's well-being. The continuity hypothesis of dreams suggests that the presence of such aversive experiences in the waking state should be reflected in dream content, with the recalled body representation reflecting a cognitive proxy of negative impact. In the present study, we epidemiologically assessed the presence of post-amputation pain and other amputation-related information as well as recalled body representation in dreams in a sample of 3,234 unilateral limb amputees. Data on the site and time of amputation, residual limb length, prosthesis use, lifetime prevalence of mental disorders, presence of post-amputation pain, and presence of non-painful phantom phenomena were included in logistic regression analyses using recalled body representation in dreams (impaired, intact, no memory) as dependent variable. The effects of age, sex, and frequency of dream recall were controlled for. About 22% of the subjects indicated that they were not able to remember their body representation in dreams, another 24% of the amputees recalled themselves as always intact, and only a minority of less than 3% recalled themselves as always impaired. Almost 35% of the amputees dreamed of themselves in a mixed fashion. We found that lower-limb amputation as well as the presence of PLP and RLP was positively associated with the recall of an impaired body representation in dreams. The presence of non-painful phantom phenomena, however, had no influence. These results complement previous findings and indicate complex interactions of physical body appearance and mental body representation, probably modulated by distress in the waking state. The findings are discussed against the background of alterations in cognitive processes after amputation and hypotheses suggesting an innate body model.

  18. Post-Amputation Pain Is Associated with the Recall of an Impaired Body Representation in Dreams—Results from a Nation-Wide Survey on Limb Amputees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Schredl, Michael; Diers, Martin; Reinhard, Iris; Foell, Jens; Trojan, Jörg; Fuchs, Xaver; Flor, Herta

    2015-01-01

    The experience of post-amputation pain such as phantom limb pain (PLP) and residual limb pain (RLP), is a common consequence of limb amputation, and its presence has negative effects on a person’s well-being. The continuity hypothesis of dreams suggests that the presence of such aversive experiences in the waking state should be reflected in dream content, with the recalled body representation reflecting a cognitive proxy of negative impact. In the present study, we epidemiologically assessed the presence of post-amputation pain and other amputation-related information as well as recalled body representation in dreams in a sample of 3,234 unilateral limb amputees. Data on the site and time of amputation, residual limb length, prosthesis use, lifetime prevalence of mental disorders, presence of post-amputation pain, and presence of non-painful phantom phenomena were included in logistic regression analyses using recalled body representation in dreams (impaired, intact, no memory) as dependent variable. The effects of age, sex, and frequency of dream recall were controlled for. About 22% of the subjects indicated that they were not able to remember their body representation in dreams, another 24% of the amputees recalled themselves as always intact, and only a minority of less than 3% recalled themselves as always impaired. Almost 35% of the amputees dreamed of themselves in a mixed fashion. We found that lower-limb amputation as well as the presence of PLP and RLP was positively associated with the recall of an impaired body representation in dreams. The presence of non-painful phantom phenomena, however, had no influence. These results complement previous findings and indicate complex interactions of physical body appearance and mental body representation, probably modulated by distress in the waking state. The findings are discussed against the background of alterations in cognitive processes after amputation and hypotheses suggesting an innate body model. PMID

  19. Intermanual transfer in training with an upper-limb myoelectric prosthesis simulator: a mechanistic, randomized, pretest-posttest study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romkema, Sietske; Bongers, Raoul M; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2013-01-01

    Intermanual transfer may improve prosthetic handling and acceptance if used in training soon after an amputation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether intermanual transfer effects can be detected after training with a myoelectric upper-limb prosthesis simulator. A mechanistic, randomized, pretest-posttest design was used. A total of 48 right-handed participants (25 women, 23 men) who were able-bodied were randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group performed a training program of 5 days' duration using the prosthesis simulator. To determine the improvement in skill, a test was administered before, immediately after, and 6 days after training. The control group only performed the tests. Training was performed with the unaffected arm, and tests were performed with the affected arm (the affected arm simulating an amputated limb). Half of the participants were tested with the dominant arm and half with the nondominant arm. Initiation time was defined as the time from starting signal until start of the movement, movement time was defined as the time from the beginning of the movement until completion of the task, and force control was defined as the maximal applied force on a deformable object. The movement time decreased significantly more in the experimental group (F₂,₉₂=7.42, P=.001, η²(G)=.028) when compared with the control group. This finding is indicative of faster handling of the prosthesis. No statistically significant differences were found between groups with regard to initiation time and force control. We did not find a difference in intermanual transfer between the dominant and nondominant arms. The training utilized participants who were able-bodied in a laboratory setting and focused only on transradial amputations. Intermanual transfer was present in the affected arm after training the unaffected arm with a myoelectric prosthesis simulator, and this effect did not depend on laterality. This

  20. Prevalence of phantom limb pain, stump pain, and phantom limb sensation among the amputated cancer patients in India: A prospective, observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The phantom limb pain (PLP and phantom limb sensation (PLS are very common among amputated cancer patients, and they lead to considerable morbidity. In spite of this, there is a lack of epidemiological data of this phenomenon among the Asian population. This study was done to provide the data from Indian population. Methods: The prevalence of PLP, stump pain (SP, and PLS was prospectively analyzed from the amputated cancer patients over a period of 2 years in Dr. B.R.A. Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. The risk factors and the impact of phantom phenomenon on patients were also noted. Results: The prevalence of PLP was 41% at 3 and 12 months and 45.3% at 6 months, whereas that of SP and PLS was 14.4% and 71.2% at 3 months, 18.75% and 37.1% at 6 months, 15.8% and 32.4% at 12 months, respectively. There was higher prevalence of PLP and PLS among the patients with history of preamputation pain, smoking with proximal level of amputation, receiving general anesthesia, receiving intravenous (IV opioid postoperative analgesia, and developing neuroma or infection. Conclusion: The prevalence of PLP and PLS was higher among the cancer amputees as compared to SP, and a few risk factors responsible for their higher prevalence were found in our study. The PLP and PLS lead to considerable morbidity in terms of sleep disturbance and depression.

  1. Is occupational therapy practice for older adults with lower limb amputations evidence-based? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotopoulou, Georgia; Atwal, Anita

    2012-03-01

    Although occupational therapists are integral to the rehabilitation process of people with amputations, the effectiveness of the occupational therapy intervention for older adults with lower limb amputations has not been investigated. To identify the effectiveness of the occupational therapy interventions with older adults aged 65 years and older with lower limb amputations. Systematic review. A systematic search was conducted in CINAHL, PUBMED, OTSEEKER and OTDBASE from January 1985 to January 2011. The eligible papers were critiqued using a typology, which involved designation of levels of evidence and quality markers. The databases yielded 2,664 potential publications. Of these, only two were included in the final review. These studies suggested that the frequency of the occupational therapy sessions was found to be statistically significantly related to prosthesis use and that service users perceived positive benefits about the provision of stump boards. Both studies had limitations resulting in a need for further investigation in these areas. Research evidence on the occupational therapy interventions with this population is limited and scarce. Occupational therapists need to take urgent action to address the identified evidence-based gaps in order to devise informed targeted rehabilitation programmes for this client group.

  2. The impact of lower limb amputation on community reintegration of a population in Johannesburg: A Qualitative perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Godlwana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To explore the experiences and perceptions of people with lower limb amputations from the Johannesburg metropolitan area on the impact that their amputations had on their lives and their return to their communities. Methods: Semi-structured audio-taped in-depth interviews were used to collect data on 12 purposively selected participants. Ethical clearance was obtained. A General Inductive Approach was used to generate or discover themes within the data using a process of systematic coding. Results: Emerging from the qualitative data were psychological, social and religious themes. Suicidal thoughts, dependence, poor acceptance, public perception about body image, phantom limb related falls and hopes of obtaining prostheses were reported. Some reported poor social involvement due to mobility problems and employment concerns, while families and friends were found to be supportive. Participants had faith in God. Conclusion: Generally, most participants had come to terms with the amputation and were managing well while some expressed that they were struggling with reintegration to their communities of origin three months postoperatively with both functional and psychosocial challenges.

  3. Long-term outcome following upper extremity replantation after major traumatic amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiassich, G; Rittenschober, F; Dorninger, L; Rois, J; Mittermayr, R; Ortmaier, R; Ponschab, M; Katzensteiner, K; Larcher, L

    2017-02-10

    Amputations in general and amputations of upper extremities, in particular, have a major impact on patients' lives. There are only a few long-term follow-up reports of patients after macro-replantation. We present our findings in contrast with the existing literature. Sixteen patients with traumatic macro-amputation of an upper extremity were eligible for inclusion in this study. Altogether, the patients underwent replantation in 3 institutions between 1983 and 2011. Twelve male and four female patients with an average age at injury of 40.6 years (range, 14-61 years) were included in this study. The mean follow-up period was 13.5 years (range, 4.4-32.6 years; SD, 5.7 years). The mean disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) outcome measure was 41 (range, 5.2-94.8; SD, 18.2), functional independence measurement (FIM) was 125 (range, 120-126; SD, 1.8). Chen I representing very good function was accounted in six, Chen II representing good function in eight, Chen III (fair) in one and Chen IV (bad function) in one patient. We found that while the majority of the included patients exhibited good or very good function of the extremity, none of the replanted appendages regained normal levels of functionality. In addition, all participants were very satisfied with their outcomes. Positive long-term results with high rates of subjective satisfaction are possible after replantation of upper extremities.

  4. Balneotherapy in treatment of spastic upper limb after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erceg-Rukavina, Tatjana; Stefanovski, Mihajlo

    2015-02-01

    After stroke, spasticity is often the main problem that prevents functional recovery. Pain occurs in up to 70% of patients during the first year post-stroke. A total of 70 patients (30 female and 45 male) mean age (65.67) participated in prospective, controlled study. ischaemic stroke, developed spasticity of upper limb, post-stroke interval cryotherapy. The outcome was evaluated using Modified Ashworth scale for spasticity and VAS scale for pain. The significance value was sat at pspasticity and pain in affected upper limb. Reduction in tone of affected upper limb muscles was significant in Ex group (pspasticity and pain significantly and can help in treatment of post-stroke patients.

  5. Lymphophlebographic studies in edema of the upper limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhamedzhanov, I.Kh.; Drozdovskij, B.Ya.; Dergachev, A.I.

    1984-01-01

    64 female patients with a secondary edema of the upper limb due to radical m mastoectomy with the removal of lymphatic nodes of the armpit region and radiation therapy were examined. Pathological changes in the vessels of the pos sterolateral and anteromedial collectors with the domination of a complete lymph flow blocking are noted. It is shown that, in patients with postmastoectomic sy yndrome, the upper limb edema is determined by combined violations of the lympha tic and venous outflow in 55% of cases; lent in 45% soley by the violation of th he passability of lymphatic collectors

  6. Stellate ganglion blockade for analgesia following upper limb surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, J G

    2012-01-31

    We report the successful use of a stellate ganglion block as part of a multi-modal postoperative analgesic regimen. Four patients scheduled for orthopaedic surgery following upper limb trauma underwent blockade of the stellate ganglion pre-operatively under ultrasound guidance. Patients reported excellent postoperative analgesia, with postoperative VAS pain scores between 0 and 2, and consumption of morphine in the first 24 h ranging from 0 to 14 mg. While these are preliminary findings, and must be confirmed in a clinical trial, they highlight the potential for stellate ganglion blockade to provide analgesia following major upper limb surgery.

  7. Work-related upper limb “overuse” syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    A previous review of historical descriptions and theories about the character and pathogenesis of writer’s cramp and other comparable chronic upper limb “overuse” work-related pain syndromes has indicated that somatic dysfunctions explain symptoms and findings. The first case studies and case...... disorders remain diagnostically challenging to clinicians and there is still a tendency to see many patients’ pain as a psychiatric problem when a standard physical examination does not explain the condition. This article describes reports of writer’s cramp and comparable occupational upper limb “overuse...

  8. Is Limb Salvage With Microwave-induced Hyperthermia Better Than Amputation for Osteosarcoma of the Distal Tibia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kang; Dang, Peiye; Bian, Na; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Tongtao; Fan, QingYu; Zhou, Yong; Zhao, Tingbao; Wang, Pingshan

    2017-06-01

    Amputation has been the standard surgical treatment for distal tibia osteosarcoma owing to its unique anatomic features. Preliminary research suggested that microwave-induced hyperthermia may have a role in treating osteosarcoma in some locations of the body (such as the pelvis), but to our knowledge, no comparative study has evaluated its efficacy in a difficult-to-treat location like the distal tibia. Does microwave-induced hyperthermia result in (1) improved survival, (2) decreased local recurrence, (3) improved Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) scores, or (4) fewer complications than amputation in patients with a distal tibial osteosarcoma? Between 2000 and 2015, we treated 79 patients for a distal tibia osteosarcoma without metastases. Of those, 52 were treated with microwave-induced hyperthermia, and 27 with amputation. Patients were considered eligible for microwave-induced hyperthermia if they had an at least 20-mm available distance from the tumor edge to the articular surface, good clinical and imaging response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and no pathologic fracture. Patients not meeting these indications were treated with amputation. In addition, if neither the posterior tibial artery nor the dorsalis pedis artery was salvageable, the patients were treated with amputation and were not included in any group in this study. A total of 13 other patients were treated with conventional limb-salvage resections and reconstructions (at the request of the patient, based on patient preference) and were not included in this study. All 79 patients in this retrospective study were available for followup at a minimum of 12 months (mean followup in the hyperthermia group, 79 months, range 12-158 months; mean followup in the amputation group, 95 months, range, 15-142 months). With the numbers available, the groups were no different in terms of sex, age, tumor grade, tumor stage, or tumor size. All statistical tests were two-sided, and a probability less than 0.05 was

  9. Work-Related Upper Limb Disorders: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatka Borisova Stoyneva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the complex interrelationship between physical factors, job stress, lifestyle and genetic factors on symptoms of work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper limbs is demonstrated by a case report and discussion of the literature. A 58 year old woman with long lasting complaints of the upper limbs with increasing intensity and duration, generalisation, combined with skin thickness, Raynaud’s phenomenon, joint disorders, arterial and pulmonary hypertension, metabolic lipid dysfunctions is presented. Occupational history proves continuous duration of service at a job with occupational physical static load with numerous repetitive monotonous systematic motions of fingers and hands as a weaver of Persian rugs followed by work at an automated loom and variable labour activities. Though the complaints dated since the time she was a manual weaver, the manifestations of generalized joint degenerative changes, system sclerosis with Raynaud’s phenomenon with similar upper extremities signs and symptoms discount upper limbs musculoskeletal disorder as caused only or mainly by occupational risk factors. The main principles and criteria for occupational diagnosis of musculoskeletal upper limb disorders and legislative requirements for their reglamentation are discussed.

  10. Predicting successful prosthetic rehabilitation in major lower-limb amputation patients: a 15-year retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Martos, Inés; Roda, Olga; Zambudio-Periago, Ramón; Bueno-Cavanillas, Aurora; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Sánchez-Montesinos, Indalecio

    2017-11-07

    To determine and compare specific factors that could be associated and predictive with successful prosthetic rehabilitation in major lower-limb amputations. A 15-year long (2000-2014) retrospective observational cohort study was conducted. Two different criteria were used to define successful prosthetic rehabilitation: (1) the ability to walk at least 45m, regardless of assistive devices; and (2) walking >45m without other ambulatory aids than one cane (if required). Age, gender, comorbidities, cause and level of amputation, stump characteristics, ulcers in the preserved limb, and time between surgery and physical therapy were examined as predictors of successful prosthetic rehabilitation. A total of 169 patients (61.60±15.9 years) were included. Regarding walking ability with or without walking aids, the presence of ulcers in the preserved limb was individually associated with failed prosthetic rehabilitation (pprosthetic rehabilitation when assistive walking devices are considered. Future prospective cohort studies are needed to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. A developing world experience with distal foot amputations for diabetic limb salvage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Salahuddin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the functional outcome, morbidity, and viability of foot salvage in diabetic patients. Materials and methods: This prospective case series was conducted from March 2007 to December 2012 at the department of surgery Pakistan Ordnance Factories Hospital, Wah Cantt, Pakistan. 123 males and 26 female patients were included in the study. All the patients were treated after getting admitted in the hospital and wounds were managed with daily dressings, nursing care and debridement of necrotic tissue with adequate antibiotic coverage. Results: In total, 149 patients (mean age: 56±7.52 years with 171 amputations were included in the study. The mean duration of diabetes mellitus (DM was 9±4.43 years. Ninety-seven percent of the patients were diagnosed with type 2 DM. Wound debridement was performed under general anesthesia in 48 (33.2% patients, whereas local anesthesia was used for the rest of the patients after having good glycemic control and improvement in general health. The most common pathogen isolated from the infected wounds was Staphylococcus aureus in approximately 46% cases. Regarding the types of amputation, partial toe amputation was performed in 21 (12.2% cases, second-toe amputation in 60 (35% cases, hallux amputation in 41 (24% cases, multiple toe amputations in 29 (17% cases, bilateral feet involvement was observed in 16 (9.3% cases, and transmetatarsal amputation was performed in 4 (2.3% cases. The wounds healed well except in 19 cases where amputation had to be revised to a more proximal level. Thirty-nine patients died during the study period: 3 died of wound-related complications and 36 died of systemic complications. Conclusion: With the ever-increasing epidemic of DM, the number of patients with diabetic foot ulcers has also significantly risen. Early surgical management with good glycemic control and foot care with close monitoring can decrease amputations and thus foot salvage can be successfully

  12. Core muscle activation during dynamic upper limb exercises in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnanen, Sami P; Siekkinen, Kirsti M; Häkkinen, Arja H; Mälkiä, Esko A; Kautiainen, Hannu J; Ylinen, Jari J

    2012-12-01

    Although several everyday functions and sporting activities demand controlled use of the abdominal and back muscles while working with the upper limbs, the activity of core muscles during dynamic upper limb exercises in the standing position has not been studied extensively. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine abdominal and back muscle activity during dynamic upper limb exercises while standing and to evaluate whether dynamic exercises are appropriate for strengthening muscles. The activation of the rectus abdominis, obliquus externus abdominis, longissimus, and multifidus muscles during dynamic bilateral or unilateral shoulder exercises with or without fixation of the pelvis was measured in 20 healthy women using surface electromyography. Trunk muscle activation during isometric maximum contraction was used as a comparative reference. With bilateral shoulder extension and unilateral shoulder horizontal adduction, abdominal muscle activity was >60% of activity during reference exercises. With unilateral shoulder horizontal abduction and shoulder extension exercises, back muscle activity was >60% of the activity level reference exercise. Muscle activation levels were 35-64% lower during shoulder horizontal adduction and abduction without fixation compared with exercises with fixation. The results indicate that upper limb exercises performed in the standing position are effective for activating core muscles. Bilateral and unilateral shoulder extension and unilateral shoulder horizontal abduction and adduction with the pelvis fixed elicited the greatest activity of the core muscles.

  13. The artery blood supply variant of the upper limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    MASLARSKI, IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Variations of arterial patterns in the upper limb have represented the most common subject of vascular anatomy. Different types of artery branching pattern of the upper limb are very important for orthopedists in angiographic and microvascular surgical practice. The brachial artery (BA) is the most important vessel in the normal vascular anatomy of the upper limb. The classical pattern of the palmar hand region distribution shows the superficial palmar arch. Normally this arch is formed by the superficial branch of the ulnar artery and completed on the lateral side by one of these arteries: the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery, the princeps pollicis artery, the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery or the median artery. After the routine dissection of the right upper limb of an adult male cadaver, we found a very rare variant of the superficial arch artery – a division in a higher level brachial artery. We found this division at 10.4 cm from the beginning of the brachial artery. This superficial brachial artery became a radial artery and was not involved in the formation of the palm arch. In the forearm region, the artery variant was present with the median artery and the ulnar artery, which form the superficial palm arch. PMID:26733754

  14. A short overview of upper limb rehabilitation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macovei, S.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    As some studies show, the number of people over 65 years old increases constantly, leading to the need of solution to provide services regarding patient mobility. Diseases, accidents and neurologic problems affect hundreds of people every day, causing pain and lost of motor functions. The ability of using the upper limb is indispensable for a human being in everyday activities, making easy tasks like drinking a glass of water a real challenge. We can agree that physiotherapy promotes recovery, but not at an optimal level, due to limited financial and human resources. Hence, the need of robot-assisted rehabilitation emerges. A robot for upper-limb exercises should have a design that can accurately control interaction forces and progressively adapt assistance to the patients’ abilities and also to record the patient's motion and evolution. In this paper a short overview of upper limb rehabilitation devices is presented. Our goal is to find the shortcomings of the current developed devices in terms of utility, ease of use and costs, for future development of a mechatronic system for upper limb rehabilitation.

  15. Balneotherapy in Treatment of Spastic Upper Limb after Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Erceg-Rukavina, Tatjana; Stefanovski, Mihajlo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: After stroke, spasticity is often the main problem that prevents functional recovery. Pain occurs in up to 70% of patients during the first year post-stroke. Materials and methods: A total of 70 patients (30 female and 45 male) mean age (65.67) participated in prospective, controlled study. Inclusion criteria: ischaemic stroke, developed spasticity of upper limb, post-stroke interval

  16. Upper limb movement analysis during gait in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsworth-Edelsten, Charlotte; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice; Laidet, Magali; Armand, Stephane; Assal, Frederic; Lalive, Patrice; Allali, Gilles

    2017-08-01

    Gait disorders in multiple sclerosis (MS) are well studied; however, no previous study has described upper limb movements during gait. However, upper limb movements have an important role during locomotion and can be altered in MS patients due to direct MS lesions or mechanisms of compensation. The aim of this study was to describe the arm movements during gait in a population of MS patients with low disability compared with a healthy control group. In this observational study we analyzed the arm movements during gait in 52 outpatients (mean age: 39.7±9.6years, female: 40%) with relapsing-remitting MS with low disability (mean EDSS: 2±1) and 25 healthy age-matched controls using a 3-dimension gait analysis. MS patients walked slower, with increased mean elbow flexion and decreased amplitude of elbow flexion (ROM) compared to the control group, whereas shoulder and hand movements were similar to controls. These differences were not explained by age or disability. Upper limb alterations in movement during gait in MS patients with low disability can be characterized by an increase in mean elbow flexion and a decrease in amplitude (ROM) for elbow flexion/extension. This upper limb movement pattern should be considered as a new component of gait disorders in MS and may reflect subtle motor deficits or the use of compensatory mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sports participation of individuals with major upper limb deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragaru, Mihai; Dekker, Rienk; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to analyse sports participation of individuals with upper limb deficiency (ULD) and associated factors. METHODS: Individuals with ULD originating from the Netherlands were invited, via their attending physiatrist or prosthetist, to answer a digital or paper

  18. Long-term outcomes after upper limb arterial injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderSluis, CK; Kucey, DS; Brenneman, FD; Hunter, GA; Maggisano, R; tenDuis, HJ

    OBJECTIVE: To assess long-term outcomes in multisystem trauma victims who have arterial injuries to upper limbs. DESIGN: A retrospective case series. SETTING: Tertiary care regional trauma centre in a university hospital. PATIENTS: All consecutive severely injured patients (Injury Severity Score

  19. Diagnostic distribution of non-traumatic upper limb disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lise H; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Hagert, C G

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Upper limb disorders (ULDs) are common, and so are the difficulties in specific diagnoses of these disorders. Prior studies have shed light on the nerves in the diagnostic approach beside disorders related to muscles, tendons and joints (MCDs). OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to compare th...

  20. Stump sensibility in children with upper limb reduction deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinkingh, Marianne; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Maathuis, Karel G. B.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    Objectives: To compare stump sensibility in children with upper limb reduction deficiency with sensibility of the unaffected arm and hand. In addition, to evaluate the associations between stump sensibility, stump length and activity level. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Children and young

  1. Vertex epidural haematoma manifesting with bilateral upper limb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vertex epidural haematomas (VEDH) are rare and difficulties are encountered in diagnosis and management. This is a case report of a patient with a vertex epidural haematoma who presented with signs of severe head injury with upper limb decerebrate posture. We discuss the challenges of radiological investigation and ...

  2. Management of essential hyperhidrosis of upper limbs by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Essential hyperhidrosis is an idiopathic condition characterized by markedly excessive sweating especially in the hands. Objective: This study was done to evaluate the functional results of radiofrequency thermocoagulation of T2 ganglion in 10 patients suffered from essential hyperhidrosis of both upper limbs.

  3. Electromyogram pattern recognition for control of powered upper-limb prostheses: state of the art and challenges for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheme, Erik; Englehart, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Using electromyogram (EMG) signals to control upper-limb prostheses is an important clinical option, offering a person with amputation autonomy of control by contracting residual muscles. The dexterity with which one may control a prosthesis has progressed very little, especially when controlling multiple degrees of freedom. Using pattern recognition to discriminate multiple degrees of freedom has shown great promise in the research literature, but it has yet to transition to a clinically viable option. This article describes the pertinent issues and best practices in EMG pattern recognition, identifies the major challenges in deploying robust control, and advocates research directions that may have an effect in the near future.

  4. Prosthetic rehabilitation of the upper limb amputee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard O′Keeffe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of all or part of the arm is a catastrophic event for a patient and a significant challenge to rehabilitation professionals and prosthetic engineers. The large, upper extremity amputee population in India has, historically, been poorly served, with most having no access to support or being provided with ineffective prostheses. In recent years, the arrival of organisations like Otto Bock has made high quality service standards and devices accessible to more amputees. This review attempts to provide surgeons and other medical professionals with an overview of the multidisciplinary, multistage rehabilitation process and the solution options available. With worldwide upper extremity prosthesis rejection rates at significant levels, the review also describes some of the factors which influence the outcome. This is particularly relevant in the Indian context where the service can involve high cost investments. It is the responsibility of all contributing professionals to guide vulnerable patients through the process and try to maximise the benefit that can be obtained within the resources available.

  5. Vascular anomalies of the upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Balakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular anomalies of the upper extremity are a surgical challenge to the hand surgeons. The treatment modality varies with respect to the presentation, extent of the lesion, progression and their complications. Based on our experience in treating patients with vascular malformations, a protocol has been formulated for their management, which we have found to be very useful and successful. With the use of the tumescent technique and good planning, haemangiomas are best excised in infancy or early childhood. Investigations like contrast computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have been found to be a useful tool in the diagnosis and planning of surgery for venous malformations. Embolisation seems to be a safe option in arteriovenous malformations.

  6. Prosthesis rejection in acquired major upper-limb amputees: a population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østlie, Kristin; Lesjø, Ingrid Marie; Franklin, Rosemary Joy; Garfelt, Beate; Skjeldal, Ola Hunsbeth; Magnus, Per

    2012-07-01

    To estimate the rates of primary and secondary prosthesis rejection in acquired major upper-limb amputees (ULAs), to describe the most frequently reported reasons for rejection and to estimate the influence of background factors on the risk of rejection. Cross-sectional study analysing population-based questionnaire data (n = 224). Effects were analysed by logistic regression analyses and Cox regression analyses. Primary prosthesis rejection was found in 4.5% whereas 13.4% had discontinued prosthesis use. The main reasons reported for primary non-wear were a perceived lack of need and discrepancies between perceived need and the prostheses available. The main reasons reported for secondary prosthesis rejection were dissatisfaction with prosthetic comfort, function and control. Primary prosthesis rejection was more likely in ULAs amputated at high age and in ULAs with proximal amputations. Secondary prosthesis rejection was more likely in proximal ULAs and in women. Clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of rejection in proximal ULAs, elderly ULAs and in women. Emphasising individual needs will probably facilitate successful prosthetic fitting. Improved prosthesis quality and individualised prosthetic training may increase long-term prosthesis use. Further studies of the effect of prosthetic training and of the reasons for rejection of different prosthetic types are suggested.

  7. Cognitive predictors of skilled performance with an advanced upper limb multifunction prosthesis: a preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Laura; Correia, Stephen; Ahern, David; Barredo, Jennifer; Resnik, Linda

    2017-07-01

    Purpose The objectives were to 1) identify major cognitive domains involved in learning to use the DEKA Arm; 2) specify cognitive domain-specific skills associated with basic versus advanced users; and 3) examine whether baseline memory and executive function predicted learning. Method Sample included 35 persons with upper limb amputation. Subjects were administered a brief neuropsychological test battery prior to start of DEKA Arm training, as well as physical performance measures at the onset of, and following training. Multiple regression models controlling for age and including neuropsychological tests were developed to predict physical performance scores. Prosthetic performance scores were divided into quartiles and independent samples t-tests compared neuropsychological test scores of advanced scorers and basic scorers. Baseline neuropsychological test scores were used to predict change in scores on physical performance measures across time. Results Cognitive domains of attention and processing speed were statistically significantly related to proficiency of DEKA Arm use and predicted level of proficiency. Conclusions Results support use of neuropsychological tests to predict learning and use of a multifunctional prosthesis. Assessment of cognitive status at the outset of training may help set expectations for the duration and outcomes of treatment. Implications for Rehabilitation Cognitive domains of attention and processing speed were significantly related to level of proficiencyof an advanced multifunctional prosthesis (the DEKA Arm) after training. Results provide initial support for the use of neuropsychological tests to predict advanced learningand use of a multifunctional prosthesis in upper-limb amputees. Results suggest that assessment of patients' cognitive status at the outset of upper limb prosthetictraining may, in the future, help patients, their families and therapists set expectations for theduration and intensity of training and may help set

  8. A Narrative Review of the Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated With Development of Knee Osteoarthritis After Traumatic Unilateral Lower Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Mazzone, Brittney; Yoder, Adam; Grant, Kristina; Wyatt, Marilynn

    2016-11-01

    Young military Service Members with traumatic unilateral lower limb amputations may be at a high risk for developing knee osteoarthritis (OA). There is growing evidence for potential influence and predictive value of nonsystemic risk factors on development and progression of primary knee OA in older adults. Proposed factors include chronic knee pain, obesity, abnormal knee joint mechanics, muscle weakness, previous knee trauma, and altered physical activity level. However, there is limited information available regarding whether such nonsystemic risk factors could also be responsible for the increased risk of knee OA after traumatic, unilateral lower limb amputation in young military Service Members. The purpose of this narrative review is to compile and present evidence regarding prevalence of nonsystemic and potentially modifiable knee OA risk factors in Service Members with traumatic, unilateral lower limb amputation, and to identify potential strategies for intervention. A comprehensive literature search was performed in July 2015 using structured search terms related to nonsystemic risk factors for knee OA. Current collective evidence does suggest an elevated prevalence of the nonsystemic knee OA risk factors in young military Service Members with unilateral lower limb amputation. In conclusion, the present state of the literature supports that young military Service Members with traumatic unilateral lower limb amputations may be at increased risk for developing knee OA compared to nonamputees. Military Service Members injured at a young age have a long life expectancy, and thus require comprehensive rehabilitation programs to prevent or delay progression of knee OA. Given the lack of strong evidence, further clinical research is needed to determine whether early identification and modification of nonsystemic risk factors for knee OA could optimize long-term function and quality of life in young Service Members after traumatic, unilateral, limb amputations

  9. Disorders of Upper Limb Movements in Ataxia-Telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasef G Shaikh

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia is known for cerebellar degeneration, but clinical descriptions of abnormal tone, posture, and movements suggest involvement of the network between cerebellum and basal ganglia. We quantitatively assessed the nature of upper-limb movement disorders in ataxia-telangiectasia. We used a three-axis accelerometer to assess the natural history and severity of abnormal upper-limb movements in 80 ataxia-telangiectasia and 19 healthy subjects. Recordings were made during goal-directed movements of upper limb (kinetic task, while arms were outstretched (postural task, and at rest. Almost all ataxia-telangiectasia subjects (79/80 had abnormal involuntary movements, such as rhythmic oscillations (tremor, slow drifts (dystonia or athetosis, and isolated rapid movements (dystonic jerks or myoclonus. All patients with involuntary movements had both kinetic and postural tremor, while 48 (61% also had resting tremor. The tremor was present in transient episodes lasting several seconds during two-minute recording sessions of all three conditions. Percent time during which episodic tremor was present was greater for postural and kinetic tasks compared to rest. Resting tremor had higher frequency but smaller amplitude than postural and kinetic tremor. Rapid non-rhythmic movements were minimal during rest, but were triggered during sustained arm postures and goal directed arm movements suggesting they are best considered a form of dystonic jerks or action myoclonus. Advancing age did not correlate with the severity of involuntary limb movements. Abnormal upper-limb movements in ataxia-telangiectasia feature classic cerebellar impairment, but also suggest involvement of the network between the cerebellum and basal ganglia.

  10. Functional Recovery of the Paretic Upper Limb After Stroke: Who Regains Hand Capacity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Nijland, R.H.; Geurts, A.C.; Kwakkel, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe recovery of upper limb capacity after stroke during inpatient rehabilitation based on the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale (SULCS). Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Inpatient department of a rehabilitation center. Participants: Patients with stroke (N=299)

  11. Functional recovery of the paretic upper limb after stroke: who regains hand capacity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Nijland, R.H.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Kwakkel, G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe recovery of upper limb capacity after stroke during inpatient rehabilitation based on the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale (SULCS). DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Inpatient department of a rehabilitation center. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with stroke (N=299)

  12. Preliminary development of a diabetic foot ulcer database from a wound electronic medical record: a tool to decrease limb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golinko, Michael S; Margolis, David J; Tal, Adit; Hoffstad, Ole; Boulton, Andrew J M; Brem, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to create a practical standardized database of clinically relevant variables in the care of patients with diabetes and foot ulcers. Numerical clinical variables such as age, baseline laboratory values, and wound area were extracted from the wound electronic medical record (WEMR). A coding system was developed to translate narrative data, culture, and pathology reports into discrete, quantifiable variables. Using data extracted from the WEMR, a diabetic foot ulcer-specific database incorporated the following tables: (1) demographics, medical history, and baseline laboratory values; (2) vascular testing data; (3) radiology data; (4) wound characteristics; and (5) wound debridement data including pathology, culture results, and amputation data. The database contains variables that can be easily exported for analysis. Amputation was studied in 146 patients who had at least two visits (e.g., two entries in the database). Analysis revealed that 19 (13%) patients underwent 32 amputations (nine major and 23 minor) in 23 limbs. There was a decreased risk of amputation, 0.87 (0.78, 1.00), using a proportional hazards model, associated with an increased number of visits and entries in the WEMR. Further analysis revealed no significant difference in age, gender, HbA1c%, cholesterol, white blood cell count, or prealbumin at baseline, whereas hemoglobin and albumin were significantly lower in the amputee group (psafety and quality of care, allowing clinicians to more easily identify a nonhealing wound and intervene. This report describes a method of capturing data relevant to clinical care of a patient with a diabetic foot ulcer, and may enable clinicians to adapt such a system to their own patient population.

  13. [Preventing lower limb amputations in patients suffering from diabetic foot syndrome and peripheral vascular disease - opportunities and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, S; Ritter, R G; Rice, A; Frerichs, O; Wehage, I C; Fansa, H

    2011-12-01

    The number of patients suffering from a diabetic foot syndrome is increasing. In many cases large plantar or heel defects can only be reconstructed by using a free flap. The free parascapular flap is an alternative to free muscle flaps in the reconstruction of plantar or heel defects. Donor site morbidity is low. Autologous bypass reconstruction or an angioplasty can increase extremity perfusion. PATIENTS AND OPERATIONS: 52 patients with a diabetic foot syndrome have been reconstructed since 2007. 23 of them required a free tissue transfer. On average these patients were 68.7 years of age. A parascapular flap was used in 15 cases, a latissimus dorsi flap with a skin graft in 4 cases, a gracilis muscle flap with a skin graft in 3 cases. In one case a free instep flap of the contralateral foot, which had to be amputated, was used. In 13 cases the flap was anastomosed to the autologous bypass, in one case an AV loop was used. 22 flaps healed primarily. Only 1 patient was not able to walk at discharge. There was one flap loss. 4 patients required an amputation later on due to bypass failure or infection. 2 patients died due to cardiac arrest at the rehabilitation clinic. If the correct indication is met, free flaps can prevent diabetes-derived amputations of the lower limb. The parascapular flap can be used for plantar and heel defects. Flap harvesting is quick due to the constant vascular anatomy. The donor site morbidity is low. Reconstruction requires revascularisation in an interdisciplinary setting including vascular surgeons and radiologists. Limb salvage reduces mortality and improves quality of life. Revascularisation and reconstruction should best be done in a single surgical procedure. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Stump sensibility in children with upper limb reduction deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinkingh, Marianne; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Maathuis, Karel G B; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2014-01-01

    To compare stump sensibility in children with upper limb reduction deficiency with sensibility of the unaffected arm and hand. In addition, to evaluate the associations between stump sensibility, stump length and activity level. Cross-sectional study. Children and young adults aged 6-25 years with upper limb reduction deficiency. Threshold of touch was measured with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, stereognosis was measured with the Shape-Texture Identification test and kinaesthesia and activity level was measured with the Child Amputee Prosthetics Project - Functional Status Inventory and the Prosthetic Upper Extremity Functional Index. A total of 31 children with upper limb reduction deficiency (mean age 15 years, 3 prosthesis wearers) were investigated. The threshold of touch of the stump circumference was lower (indicating higher sensibility) than of the unaffected arm (p = 0.006), hand (p = 0.004) and stump end-point (p = sensibility) than short stumps (p = 0.046). Twenty-nine children recognized 1 or more shapes or textures with the stump. Kinaesthesia in the affected and unaffected sides was comparable. Sensibility was not correlated with activity level. Threshold of touch, stereognosis and kinaesthesia of the affected sides were excellent. Threshold of touch of the stump circumference was lower (indicating higher sensibility) than of the unaffected arm and hand. High stump sensibility may clarify good functioning in the children without prostheses and contribute to prosthesis rejection.

  15. Analyzing at-home prosthesis use in unilateral upper-limb amputees to inform treatment & device design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Adam J; Resnik, Linda; Dollar, Aaron M

    2017-07-01

    New upper limb prosthetic devices are continuously being developed by a variety of industrial, academic, and hobbyist groups. Yet, little research has evaluated the long term use of currently available prostheses in daily life activities, beyond laboratory or survey studies. We seek to objectively measure how experienced unilateral upper limb prosthesis-users employ their prosthetic devices and unaffected limb for manipulation during everyday activities. In particular, our goal is to create a method for evaluating all types of amputee manipulation, including non-prehensile actions beyond conventional grasp functions, as well as to examine the relative use of both limbs in unilateral and bilateral cases. This study employs a head-mounted video camera to record participant's hands and arms as they complete unstructured domestic tasks within their own homes. A new 'Unilateral Prosthesis-User Manipulation Taxonomy' is presented based observations from 10 hours of recorded videos. The taxonomy addresses manipulation actions of the intact hand, prostheses, bilateral activities, and environmental feature-use (aiïordances). Our preliminary results involved tagging 23 minute segments of the full videos from 3 amputee participants using the taxonomy. This resulted in over 2,300 tag instances. Observations included that non-prehensile interactions outnumbered prehensile interactions in the affected limb for users with more distal amputation that allowed arm mobility.

  16. Lymphedema after upper limb transplantation: scintigraphic study in 3 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadas, Pedro C; Thione, Alessandro; Carballeira, Alexo; Dominguez, Pablo Caro

    2013-07-01

    Lymphatic vasculature is known to spontaneously reconnect after hand replantation. Nonetheless, lymphatic outflow has not been specifically studied in hand transplantation.Lymphedema was studied clinically and scintigraphically in 3 bilateral upper limb transplants performed in Valencia, Spain, since 2006. Case 1 was a radiocarpal level, case 2 midforearm and proximal forearm, and case 3 was a transhumeral transplantation. Follow-up was 5, 4, and 3 years, respectively. Clinically, in case 1, there was a left-sided moderate lymphedema, case 2 was normal, and a right-sided moderate lymphedema was present in case 3. Lymphoscintigraphy results were consistent with the clinical findings. It was normal in the 4 nonedematous limbs. In the 2 affected limbs, there were scintigraphic findings of lymphatic block and lymphangiectasia.The study demonstrates objectively that lymphatic circulation can reconnect spontaneously in hand transplantations, although not in a homogeneously efficient way.

  17. Computer assisted surgery for malunited fractures in upper limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Masahiro; Kazuki, Kenichi; Uemura, Takuya; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Takaoka, Kunio

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of computer-assisted preoperative simulation of malunited fractures in the upper limb. Ten patients with malunited fractures underwent multislice computed tomography of both upper limbs with reconstruction of three-dimensional bone models using three-dimensional (3D) software. Preoperative simulation was comprised of four main procedures: performance of virtual corrective osteotomy, matching of reposition with a mirror-image model of the unaffected side, creating new data for the bone defect, and machining of an hydroxyapatite block as bone graft. In addition, we used full-sized three-dimensional virtual reality modeling with a rapid prototyping molding device, and performed preoperative rehearsals of osteotomies using plaster models. All patients tolerated the surgical procedure well. This technique permits the surgeon to recognize and correct three-dimensional deformities of malunited fracture with both accuracy and precision. (author)

  18. Effectiveness of mirror therapy, motor imagery, and virtual feedback on phantom limb pain following amputation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrador Colmenero, Laura; Perez Marmol, Jose Manuel; Martí-García, Celia; Querol Zaldivar, María de Los Ángeles; Tapia Haro, Rosa María; Castro Sánchez, Adelaida María; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María Encarnación

    2017-11-01

    Phantom limb pain is reported in 50%-85% of people with amputation. Clinical interventions in treating central pain, such as mirror therapy, motor imagery, or virtual visual feedback, could redound in benefits to amputee patients with phantom limb pain. To provide an overview of the effectiveness of different techniques for treating phantom limb pain in amputee patients. Systematic review. A computerized literature search up to April 2017 was performed using the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, MEDLINE, ProQuest, PEDro, EBSCOhost, and Cochrane Plus. Methodological quality and internal validity score of each study were assessed using PEDro scale. For data synthesis, qualitative methods from the Cochrane Back Review Group were applied. In all, 12 studies met our inclusion criteria, where 9 were rated as low methodological quality and 3 rated moderate quality. All studies showed a significant reduction in pain, but there was heterogeneity among subjects and methodologies and any high-quality clinical trial (PEDro score ≤8; internal validity score ≤5) was not found. Mirror therapy, motor imaginary, and virtual visual feedback reduce phantom limb pain; however, there is limited scientific evidence supporting their effectiveness. Future studies should include designs with more solid research methods, exploring short- and long-term benefits of these therapies. Clinical relevance This systematic review investigates the effectiveness of mirror therapy, motor imagery, and virtual visual feedback on phantom limb pain, summarizing the currently published trials and evaluating the research quality. Although these interventions have positive benefits in phantom limb pain, there is still a lack of evidence for supporting their effectiveness.

  19. Quantification of upper limb kinetic asymmetries in front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morouço, Pedro G; Marinho, Daniel A; Fernandes, Ricardo J; Marques, Mário C

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed at quantifying upper limb kinetic asymmetries in maximal front crawl swimming and to examine if these asymmetries would affect the contribution of force exertion to swimming performance. Eighteen high level male swimmers with unilateral breathing patterns and sprint or middle distance specialists, volunteered as participants. A load-cell was used to quantify the forces exerted in water by completing a 30s maximal front crawl tethered swimming test and a maximal 50 m free swimming was considered as a performance criterion. Individual force-time curves were obtained to calculate the mean and maximum forces per cycle, for each upper limb. Following, symmetry index was estimated and breathing laterality identified by questionnaire. Lastly, the pattern of asymmetries along the test was estimated for each upper limb using linear regression of peak forces per cycle. Asymmetrical force exertion was observed in the majority of the swimmers (66.7%), with a total correspondence of breathing laterality opposite to the side of the force asymmetry. Forces exerted by the dominant upper limb presented a higher decrease than from the non-dominant. Very strong associations were found between exerted forces and swimming performance, when controlling the isolated effect of symmetry index. Results point that force asymmetries occur in the majority of the swimmers, and that these asymmetries are most evident in the first cycles of a maximum bout. Symmetry index stood up as an influencing factor on the contribution of tethered forces over swimming performance. Thus, to some extent, a certain degree of asymmetry is not critical for short swimming performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Staging of upper limb lymphedema from routine lymphoscintigraphic examinations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gebouský, Petr; Kárný, Miroslav; Křížová, H.; Wald, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2009), s. 1-7 ISSN 0010-4825 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA MŠk 2C06001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Quantitative lymphoscintigraphy * Secondary lymphedema of upper limbs * Staging * Bayesian evaluation * Probabilistic mixtures Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.269, year: 2009 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/AS/karny-0320214.pdf

  1. Pneumatic Muscle Actuated Rehabilitation Equipment of the Upper Limb Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaconescu dr. eng. habil., Andrea, Prof.

    2017-06-01

    Rehabilitation equipment of the upper limb joints holds a key role in passive physical therapy. Within this framework, the paper presents two such pieces of equipment developed for the rehabilitation of elbow and of wrist and knuckles, respectively. The presented and discussed equipment is actuated by pneumatic muscles, its benefits being a low cost, simple and robust construction, as well as short response time to commands.

  2. Technologically-advanced assessment of upper-limb spasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posteraro, Federico; Crea, Simona; Mazzoleni, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spasticity is a muscle disorder associated with upper motor neuron syndrome occurring in neurological disorders, such as stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury and others. It influences the patient's rehabilitation, interfering with function, limiting independence, causing pain...... post stroke patients. METHODS: A new robotic device able to automatically assess upper-limb spasticity during passive and active mobilization has been developed. The elbow spasticity of five post stroke patients has been assessed by using the new device and by means of the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS...

  3. Limb salvage after subtotal supramalleolar amputation by initial shortening followed by tibial lengthening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marti, R. K.; de Vries, J. S.; Kloen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Background. We present a patient with a subtotal traumatic supramalleolar amputation of the leg, which was initially treated by a vascular reconstruction with deliberate bone and soft-tissue shortening. Methods. To correct the ensuing complex deformity, which consisted of a varus hindfoot, leg

  4. The timed "up and go" test : Reliability and validity in persons with unilateral lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoppen, Tanneke; Boonstra, Antje; Groothoff, JW; de Vries, J; Goeken, LNH; Eisma, Willem

    Objective: To determine the interrater and interrater reliability and the validity of the Timed "up and go" test as a measure for physical mobility in elderly patients with an amputation of the lower extremity. Design: To test interrater reliability, the test was performed for two observers at

  5. Major limb amputations in a tertiary hospital in North Western Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the pattern and indications for amputation in Federal Medical Centre, Birnin Kebbi, Kebbi State, Nigeria; between January 2008 and December 2014, in a bid to proffer preventive measures. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective study of consecutive ...

  6. Estimation of Upper Limb Joint Angle Using Surface EMG Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Mon Aung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the development of robot-assisted rehabilitation systems for upper limb rehabilitation therapy, human electromyogram (EMG is widely used due to its ability to detect the user intended motion. EMG is one kind of biological signal that can be recorded to evaluate the performance of skeletal muscles by means of a sensor electrode. Based on recorded EMG signals, user intended motion could be extracted via estimation of joint torque, force or angle. Therefore, this estimation becomes one of the most important factors to achieve accurate user intended motion. In this paper, an upper limb joint angle estimation methodology is proposed. A back propagation neural network (BPNN is developed to estimate the shoulder and elbow joint angles from the recorded EMG signals. A Virtual Human Model (VHM is also developed and integrated with BPNN to perform the simulation of the estimated angle. The relationships between sEMG signals and upper limb movements are observed in this paper. The effectiveness of our developments is evaluated with four healthy subjects and a VHM simulation. The results show that the methodology can be used in the estimation of joint angles based on EMG.

  7. Upper limb joint forces and moments during underwater cyclical movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Jessy; Rouard, Annie Hélène; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2016-10-03

    Sound inverse dynamics modeling is lacking in aquatic locomotion research because of the difficulty in measuring hydrodynamic forces in dynamic conditions. Here we report the successful implementation and validation of an innovative methodology crossing new computational fluid dynamics and inverse dynamics techniques to quantify upper limb joint forces and moments while moving in water. Upper limb kinematics of seven male swimmers sculling while ballasted with 4kg was recorded through underwater motion capture. Together with body scans, segment inertial properties, and hydrodynamic resistances computed from a unique dynamic mesh algorithm capable to handle large body deformations, these data were fed into an inverse dynamics model to solve for joint kinetics. Simulation validity was assessed by comparing the impulse produced by the arms, calculated by integrating vertical forces over a stroke period, to the net theoretical impulse of buoyancy and ballast forces. A resulting gap of 1.2±3.5% provided confidence in the results. Upper limb joint load was within 5% of swimmer׳s body weight, which tends to supports the use of low-load aquatic exercises to reduce joint stress. We expect this significant methodological improvement to pave the way towards deeper insights into the mechanics of aquatic movement and the establishment of practice guidelines in rehabilitation, fitness or swimming performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. When is a technically successful peripheral angioplasty effective in preventing above-the-ankle amputation in diabetic patients with critical limb ischaemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faglia, E; Clerici, G; Clerissi, J; Mantero, M; Caminiti, M; Quarantiello, A; Curci, V; Lupattelli, T; Morabito, A

    2007-08-01

    To determine parameters predictive of avoidance of major (above-the-ankle) amputation after a technically successful peripheral angioplasty (PTA) in patients with diabetes with critical limb ischaemia. From January 1999 to December 2003, 420 consecutive patients with diabetes admitted to hospital because of critical limb ischaemia underwent peripheral angiography and concomitant technically successful PTA. Transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO(2)) was measured before and after PTA. Major amputation at 30 days was recorded. After PTA, the iliac-femoral-popliteal axis was patent in all patients. In 67 patients, all three crural arteries were patent, in 143 patients 2 crural arteries were patent, and in 186 patients one crural artery was patent (104 peroneal, 62 anterior tibial, 20 posterior tibial). In 24 patients, all three crural arteries were occluded. Twenty-two major amputations were performed. Of these, 15 were performed in the 24 patients with occlusion of all the infrapopliteal arteries. Seven of the 186 patients in whom only the peroneal artery was patent required amputation. In patients not requiring amputation, TcPO(2) increased from 15.5 +/- 11.9 to 45.0 +/- 12.0 mmHg (P = 0.000), while in those requiring amputation, TcPO(2) increased from 9.6 +/- 7.7 to 18.6 +/- 8.1 mmHg (P diabetes, PTA is effective in avoiding major amputation, provided recanalization occurs in at least one tibial artery down to the foot. In a few patients, re-canalization of the peroneal artery alone is not sufficient to avoid major amputation.

  9. Development of a patient-reported outcome measure for upper limb function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: DMD Upper Limb PROM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingels, K; Mayhew, A G; Mazzone, E S; Duong, T; Decostre, V; Werlauff, U; Vroom, E; Mercuri, E; Goemans, N M

    2017-02-01

    To develop a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) assessing upper limb function related to activities of daily living (ADL) that cannot be observed in a clinical setting, specifically for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) across a wide age range, applicable in the different stages of the disease. The developmental process was based on US Food and Drug Administration guidelines. This included item generation from a systematic review of existing tools and expert opinion on task difficulty and relevance, involving individuals with DMD. Cultural aspects affecting ADL were taken into consideration to make this tool applicable to the broad DMD community. Items were selected in relation to a conceptual framework reflecting disease progression covering the full range of upper limb function across different ADL domains. After pilot testing and iterative Rasch analyses, redundant or clinically irrelevant items were removed. The final questionnaire consists of 32 items covering four domains of ADL (food, self-care, household and environment, leisure and communication). Test-retest reliability was excellent. A DMD-specific upper limb PROM was developed on the basis of clinical relevance and psychometric robustness. Its main purpose is to document the patient self-reported natural history of DMD and assess the efficacy of interventions. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  10. Feasibility and Validity of a Graded One-Legged Cycle Exercise Test to Determine Peak Aerobic Capacity in Older People With a Lower-Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, Daphne; de Haan, Arnold; van der Woude, Lucas H.; Houdijk, Han

    Background. Information concerning exercise tolerance and aerobic capacity is imperative for generating effective and safe exercise programs. However, for older people with a lower-limb amputation, a standard exercise test is not available. Objective. The primary aim of the present study was to

  11. Sexual functioning and sexual well-being in people with a limb amputation : a cross-sectional study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Jesse E. A.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Enzlin, Paul; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Dekker, Rienk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to: (a) investigate whether, and if so which, sexual problems are present in people with a limb amputation; (b) analyze how they experience their sexuality; and (c) investigate whether sexuality was discussed with them during their rehabilitation process. Method: In total,

  12. Tracking upper limbs fatigue by means of electronic dynamometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Max Lima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify useful electronic grip dynamometry parameters to track differences between trained (TR and untrained (UT participants, and between dominant (DO and non-dominant (ND limbs as a consequence of upper limbs muscle fatigue following 10 RM tests of the brachial biceps. This experimental study with transversal design involved 18 young adult males, of whom 9 were untrained and 9 were experienced in resistance training.Isometric grip force was evaluated (30 seconds long previous and after 10RM tests by means of a G200 Model grip dynamometer with precision load cell (Biometrics(r. Significant differences between initial and final measurements were found only for trained participants: Peak force for TR-DO (67.1 vs 55.5 kgf, p = .0277; Raw average for TR-DO (46.96 vs 42.22 kgf, p = .0464, and for TR-ND (40.34 vs 36.13 kgf, p = .0277. Electronic grip dynamometry efficiently identified upper limbs fatigue in trained participants, being raw average measurements the best parameter.

  13. Upper and Lower Limbs Disability and Personality Traits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabeen, T.; Kazmi, S. F.; Rehman, A. U.; Ahmed, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is believed that the study of personality has the potentials to enhance our prognostic abilities and can better to expose the etiology of mental illness through the relationship of revealed mechanisms. The focus of this study was to investigate and compare the habitual patterns of behavior, thought and emotions of upper and lower limb physically disabled students in terms of personality traits. Methods: This cross sectional study consisted of 100 upper limbs and lower limbs disabled students taken from Kingston school Inclusive Education System Abottabad, Mashal special education system Haripur, Syed Ahmed Shaheed special education center Abottabad, Al-Munir Foundation Mansehra and Hera Special Education System Haripur and 100 normal students taken from Islamic International School Abottabad, Falcon Public School Haripur, Iqra Academy Mansehra and Alhamd International School Haripur of Hazara Division by purposive sampling technique. This study was conducted during the month of June 2013 to May 2014. Goldberg five big personality scale was used for measuring personality traits of physically disabled and normal students. Results: The significant difference of personality traits scores between physically disabled students (M = 139.2, SD=12.0) and normal students (M=184.5, SD=13.2), t (198) =25.3, p<.05 was observed. Conclusion: Normal students have high scores as compared to physically disabled students on big five traits, i.e., Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Emotional Stability and Openness to Experience. (author)

  14. Altered flexion-relaxation responses exist during asymmetric trunk flexion movements among persons with unilateral lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Brad D; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2014-02-01

    Repetitive exposures to altered gait and movement following lower-limb amputation (LLA) have been suggested to contribute to observed alterations in passive tissue properties and neuromuscular control in/surrounding the lumbar spine. These alterations, in turn, may affect the synergy between passive and active tissues during trunk movements. Eight males with unilateral LLA and eight non-amputation controls completed quasi-static trunk flexion-extension movements in seven distinct conditions of rotation in the transverse plane: 0° (sagittally-symmetric), ±15°, ±30°, and ±45° (sagittally-asymmetric). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the bilateral lumbar erector spinae and lumbar kinematics were simultaneously recorded. Peak lumbar flexion and EMG-off angles were determined, along with the difference ("DIFF") between these two angles and the magnitude of peak normalized EMG activities. Persons with unilateral LLA exhibited altered and asymmetric synergies between active and passive trunk tissues during both sagittally-symmetric and -asymmetric trunk flexion movements. Specifically, decreased and asymmetric passive contributions to trunk movements were compensated with increases in the magnitude and duration of active trunk muscle responses. Such alterations in trunk passive and active neuromuscular responses may result from repetitive exposures to abnormal gait and movement subsequent to LLA, and may increase the risk for LBP in this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Severe pain as a possible cause of dropped head syndrome that was attenuated after amputation of an ischemic lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Satoshi; Koda, Masao; Furuya, Takeo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-03-02

    Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is defined as weakness of the neck extensor muscles causing a correctable chin-on-the-chest deformity. Here we report the case of a patient with severe pain from lower leg ischemia showing DHS whose symptoms were attenuated by pain relief after amputation of the severely ischemic lower leg. To our knowledge this is the first report indicating that severe pain can cause DHS. A 64-year-old Asian woman was referred to our department with a 1-month history of DHS. She also suffered from severe right foot pain because of limb ischemia. She began to complain of DHS as her gangrenous foot pain worsened. She had neck pain and difficulty with forward gaze. We found no clinical or laboratory findings of neuromuscular disorder or isolated neck extensor myopathy. We amputated her leg below the knee because of progressive foot gangrene. Her severe foot pain resolved after the surgery and her DHS was attenuated. Severe pain can cause DHS. If a patient with DHS has severe pain in another part of the body, we recommend considering aggressive pain relief as a treatment option.

  16. Effect of Hemipelvectomy Amputation on Kinematics and Muscle Force Generation of Lower Limb While Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Sharifmoradi

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion The kinematics pattern of the patient’s lower limb during gait is different. Kinematic changes are associated with a significant increase in lower limb muscle generation that can have a degenerative effect on the knee joint. So the importance of this subject should be considered by rehabilitation experts.

  17. Locomotor Performance During Rehabilitation of People With Lower Limb Amputation and Prosthetic Nonuse 12 Months After Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffman, Caroline E; Buchanan, John; Allison, Garry T

    2016-07-01

    It is recognized that multifactorial assessments are needed to evaluate balance and locomotor function in people with lower limb amputation. There is no consensus on whether a single screening tool could be used to identify future issues with locomotion or prosthetic use. The purpose of this study was to determine whether different tests of locomotor performance during rehabilitation were associated with significantly greater risk of prosthetic abandonment at 12 months postdischarge. This was a retrospective cohort study. Data for descriptive variables and locomotor tests (ie, 10-Meter Walk Test [10MWT], Timed "Up & Go" Test [TUGT], Six-Minute Walk Test [6MWT], and Four Square Step Test [FSST]) were abstracted from the medical records of 201 consecutive participants with lower limb amputation. Participants were interviewed and classified as prosthetic users or nonusers at 12 months postdischarge. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze whether there were differences in locomotor performance. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to determine performance thresholds, and relative risk (RR) was calculated for nonuse. At 12 months postdischarge, 18% (n=36) of the participants had become prosthetic nonusers. Performance thresholds, area under the curve (AUC), and RR of nonuse (95% confidence intervals [CI]) were: for the 10MWT, if walking speed was ≤0.44 ms(-1) (AUC=0.743), RR of nonuse=2.76 (95% CI=1.83, 3.79; Pprosthetic nonuse. It may be implied that the 10MWT has the greatest clinical utility as a single screening tool for prosthetic nonuse, given the highest proportion of participants were able to perform this test early in rehabilitation. However, as locomotor skills improve, other tests (in particular, the 6MWT) have specific clinical utility. To fully enable implementation of these locomotor criteria for prosthetic nonuse into clinical practice, validation is warranted. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  18. Pattern of Nerve Blocks for Upper Limb Surgery at the University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Central and peripheral neural blockade techniques are popular for lower and upper limb surgeries respectively. Lower limb surgery is amenable to central neural blockade techniques, anatomical and physiological imperatives makes peripheral neural blockade more suited for upper limb surgeries. We looked ...

  19. Upper limb and eye movement coordination during reaching tasks in people with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadmore, Katie L; Exell, Timothy A; Burridge, Jane H; Hughes, Ann-Marie; Freeman, Christopher T; Benson, Valerie

    2017-06-09

    To enhance understanding of the relationship between upper limb and eye movements during reaching tasks in people with stroke. Eye movements were recorded from 10 control participants and 8 chronic stroke participants during a visual orienting task (Experiment 1) and a series of reaching tasks (Experiment 2). Stroke participants completed the reaching tasks using (i) their less impaired upper limb, (ii) their more impaired upper limb without support, and (iii) their more impaired upper limb, with support (SaeboMAS gravitational support and/or electrical stimulation). Participants were tested individually and completed both experiments in the same session. Oculomotor control and the coordination between the upper limb and the oculomotor system were found to be intact in stroke participants when no limb movements were required, or when the less impaired upper limb was used. However, when the more impaired upper limb was used, success and accuracy in reaching decreased and patterns of eye movements changed, with an observed increase in eye movements to the limb itself. With upper limb support, patterns of hand-eye coordination were found to more closely resemble those of the control group. Deficits in upper limb motor systems result in changes in patterns of eye movement behavior during reaching tasks. These changes in eye movement behavior can be modulated by providing upper limb support. Implications for Rehabilitation Deficits in upper limb motor systems can result in changes in patterns of eye movement behavior during reaching tasks. Upper limb support can reduce deficits in hand-eye coordination. Stroke rehabilitation outcomes should consider motor and oculomotor performance.

  20. Amputation and prosthesis implantation shape body and peripersonal space representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canzoneri, Elisa; Marzolla, Marilena; Amoresano, Amedeo; Verni, Gennaro; Serino, Andrea

    2013-10-03

    Little is known about whether and how multimodal representations of the body (BRs) and of the space around the body (Peripersonal Space, PPS) adapt to amputation and prosthesis implantation. In order to investigate this issue, we tested BR in a group of upper limb amputees by means of a tactile distance perception task and PPS by means of an audio-tactile interaction task. Subjects performed the tasks with stimulation either on the healthy limb or the stump of the amputated limb, while wearing or not wearing their prosthesis. When patients performed the tasks on the amputated limb, without the prosthesis, the perception of arm length shrank, with a concurrent shift of PPS boundaries towards the stump. Conversely, wearing the prosthesis increased the perceived length of the stump and extended the PPS boundaries so as to include the prosthetic hand, such that the prosthesis partially replaced the missing limb.

  1. Work-related upper limb “overuse” syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    The historical descriptions of chronic upper limb “overuse” pain syndromes reflect contemporary work-related conditions. Therefore, the former theories about the character and pathogenesis of these conditions are still of interest. The first case studies and case series related these conditions...... to abnormalities in the nervous system or muscles. The general opinion gradually changed and a dysfunction of the central nervous system, a “neurosis” was assumed, because no underlying lesion of the nervous system could be identified and many patients appeared to be mentally ill. This narrative review discusses...

  2. Review on Upper Limb Continuous Passive Motion Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragazzo Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to a survey on the state of the art of elements and parts for the upper limb rehabilitation. As a matter of fact, the use of technological, and specifically of robotic, devices is entering in the habits of clinical approaches, due to their ability to work efficiently and to be able to obtain, at least, the same rehabilitation results of manual therapy. At the same time, the therapists can change his/her role in rehabilitation activity from a physical contribution to an intellectual/motivational one.

  3. Work-related posttraumatic upper limb disorder. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodaglio, P; Nigrelli, M P; Malaguti, S; Panigazzi, M; Pierobon, A

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we describe a patient with mor-sensory loss in the right forearm and hand, which persisted more than 2 years after work-related crush trauma of the left hand. Radiographic and electromyographic investigations, somatosensory evoked potentials, CT scans of the encephalus as well as the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and the Roarschach test have been performed. On the basis of these investigations, we think this represents a case of conversion disorder with somatic features. Included is a brief overview of other psychological illness with physical findings involving the upper limb.

  4. Change in health-related quality of life in the first 18 months after lower limb amputation: a prospective, longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortington, Lauren V; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Bosmans, Joline C; Post, Wendy J; Geertzen, Jan H B

    2013-06-01

    To describe changes in health-related quality of life in people with lower limb amputation, from time of amputation to 18 months, taking into consideration the influence of age and walking distance. In addition, quality of life for people with amputation is compared with the Dutch population norm values. Multicentre, longitudinal study. All people undergoing first amputation: 106 were referred, of whom 82 were included, mean age 67.8 years (standard deviation; SD 13.0), 67% men. A total of 35 remained in the study at 18 months. Dutch language RAND-36 questionnaire (Research and Development Corporation measure of Quality of Life) was completed at time of amputation, 6 and 18 months after amputation. Over time, a significant improvement was seen in physical function, social function, pain, vitality, and perceived change in health (all p Quality of life improved significantly in 5 of 7 domains investigated; most change occurred in the first 6 months. Physical function remained well below population norm values. Different domains may be affected in different ways for older and younger age groups, but this requires further research.

  5. Upper limb injury in rugby union football: results of a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Juliana; McIntosh, Andrew Stuart

    2013-04-01

    There have been few in-depth studies of upper limb injury epidemiology in rugby union football, despite reports that they accounted for between 14% and 28% of all rugby injuries. To report on upper limb injury incidence, injury severity and to identify the risk factors associated with upper limb injuries, for example, level of play, season (years) and playing position. Prospective cohort study across five rugby seasons from 2004 to 2008. Formal rugby competitions-suburban, provincial and international. 1475 adult male rugby players in Colts, Grade and Elite competitions. An upper limb injury resulting in a missed game and its characteristics. A total of 61 598 athletic exposures (AE) and 606 upper limb injuries were recorded. About 66% of the injuries were to the shoulder. The overall upper limb injury incidence rate (IIR) was 9.84 injuries/1000 AE (95% CI 9.06 to 10.62). Statistically significant associations were found between upper limb injuries and level of play; and between shoulder injuries and playing position (p<0.05). No association was found between upper limb and shoulder injuries and study year. The overall upper limb IIR decreased as the level of play increased; 10.74 upper limb injuries/1000 AE (95% CI 9.93 to 11.56) in Colts to 6.07 upper limb injuries/1000 AE (95% CI 5.46 to 6.69) in Elite. The upper limb IIR decreased as the level of play increased indicating that age, level of skill and playing experience may be risk factors for upper limb injury.

  6. Evaluation of upper extremity traumatic amputations by means of etiology, demographics and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daghan Dagdelen

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Distal finger amputations (Tamai zones I and II form the most controversial amputation level. The decision of stump, local flap or replantation at this level will not only affect the patients' functional and body integrity but also the daily activity and dexterity of manual labor. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(3.000: 95-98

  7. Origin of directionally tuned responses in lower limb muscles to unpredictable upper limb disturbances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Forghani

    Full Text Available Unpredictable forces which perturb balance are frequently applied to the body through interaction between the upper limb and the environment. Lower limb muscles respond rapidly to these postural disturbances in a highly specific manner. We have shown that the muscle activation patterns of lower limb muscles are organized in a direction specific manner which changes with lower limb stability. Ankle muscles change their activity within 80 ms of the onset of a force perturbation applied to the hand which is earlier than the onset of changes in ground reaction force, ankle angle or head motion. The latency of the response is sensitive to the perturbation direction. However, neither the latency nor the magnitude of the response is affected by stiffening the arm even though this alters the magnitude and timing of motion of the body segments. Based on the short latency, insensitivity of the change in ankle muscle activation to motion of the body segments but sensitivity to perturbation direction we reason that changes in ankle muscle activation are most likely triggered by sensory signals originating from cutaneous receptors in the hand. Furthermore, evidence that the latency of changes in ankle muscle activation depends on the number of perturbation directions suggests that the neural pathway is not confined to the spinal cord.

  8. Origin of directionally tuned responses in lower limb muscles to unpredictable upper limb disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani, Ali; Milner, Theodore E

    2017-01-01

    Unpredictable forces which perturb balance are frequently applied to the body through interaction between the upper limb and the environment. Lower limb muscles respond rapidly to these postural disturbances in a highly specific manner. We have shown that the muscle activation patterns of lower limb muscles are organized in a direction specific manner which changes with lower limb stability. Ankle muscles change their activity within 80 ms of the onset of a force perturbation applied to the hand which is earlier than the onset of changes in ground reaction force, ankle angle or head motion. The latency of the response is sensitive to the perturbation direction. However, neither the latency nor the magnitude of the response is affected by stiffening the arm even though this alters the magnitude and timing of motion of the body segments. Based on the short latency, insensitivity of the change in ankle muscle activation to motion of the body segments but sensitivity to perturbation direction we reason that changes in ankle muscle activation are most likely triggered by sensory signals originating from cutaneous receptors in the hand. Furthermore, evidence that the latency of changes in ankle muscle activation depends on the number of perturbation directions suggests that the neural pathway is not confined to the spinal cord.

  9. Origin of directionally tuned responses in lower limb muscles to unpredictable upper limb disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani, Ali; Milner, Theodore E.

    2017-01-01

    Unpredictable forces which perturb balance are frequently applied to the body through interaction between the upper limb and the environment. Lower limb muscles respond rapidly to these postural disturbances in a highly specific manner. We have shown that the muscle activation patterns of lower limb muscles are organized in a direction specific manner which changes with lower limb stability. Ankle muscles change their activity within 80 ms of the onset of a force perturbation applied to the hand which is earlier than the onset of changes in ground reaction force, ankle angle or head motion. The latency of the response is sensitive to the perturbation direction. However, neither the latency nor the magnitude of the response is affected by stiffening the arm even though this alters the magnitude and timing of motion of the body segments. Based on the short latency, insensitivity of the change in ankle muscle activation to motion of the body segments but sensitivity to perturbation direction we reason that changes in ankle muscle activation are most likely triggered by sensory signals originating from cutaneous receptors in the hand. Furthermore, evidence that the latency of changes in ankle muscle activation depends on the number of perturbation directions suggests that the neural pathway is not confined to the spinal cord. PMID:29095888

  10. Indigo carmine extravasation to upper limb after pelvic reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindo, Fiona M; Chung, Christopher P; Yandell, Paul M

    2013-02-01

    The use of dyes during cystoscopy to visualize the ureters adequately is prevalent in gynecologic surgery. Observing ureteral patency after procedures such as a hysterectomy or pelvic reconstruction is important for identifying injury to the upper urinary tract. Indigo carmine is commonly used. Knowing the possible adverse effects and being aware of unusual presentations with the use of indigo carmine are important in managing and counseling patients. We present a case in which a patient developed indigo carmine extravasation to her upper limb after pelvic reconstructive surgery. The blue discoloration disappeared after 1 day. Indigo carmine extravasation to other parts of the body can occur without long-term complications. It takes 24-48 hours for the dye to clear subcutaneously.

  11. The Component Timed-Up-and-Go test: the utility and psychometric properties of using a mobile application to determine prosthetic mobility in people with lower limb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Sheila M; Gailey, Robert S; Bennett, Christopher L; Pasquina, Paul F; Kirk-Sanchez, Neva J; Gaunaurd, Ignacio A

    2018-03-01

    Using a custom mobile application to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Component Timed-Up-and-Go test to assess prosthetic mobility in people with lower limb amputation. Cross-sectional design. National conference for people with limb loss. A total of 118 people with non-vascular cause of lower limb amputation participated. Subjects had a mean age of 48 (±13.7) years and were an average of 10 years post amputation. Of them, 54% ( n = 64) of subjects were male. None. The Component Timed-Up-and-Go was administered using a mobile iPad application, generating a total time to complete the test and five component times capturing each subtask (sit to stand transitions, linear gait, turning) of the standard timed-up-and-go test. The outcome underwent test-retest reliability using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and convergent validity analyses through correlation with self-report measures of balance and mobility. The Component Timed-Up-and-Go exhibited excellent test-retest reliability with ICCs ranging from .98 to .86 for total and component times. Evidence of discriminative validity resulted from significant differences in mean total times between people with transtibial (10.1 (SD: ±2.3)) and transfemoral (12.76 (SD: ±5.1) amputation, as well as significant differences in all five component times ( P prosthetic mobility in people with non-vascular lower limb amputation. The iPad application provided a means to easily record data, contributing to clinical utility.

  12. Furniture dimensions and postural overload for schoolchildren's head, upper back and upper limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistão, Mariana Vieira; Sentanin, Anna Cláudia; Moriguchi, Cristiane Shinohara; Hansson, Gert-Åke; Coury, Helenice Jane Cote Gil; de Oliveira Sato, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how the fixed furniture dimensions match with students' anthropometry and to describe head, upper back and upper limbs postures and movements. Evaluation was performed in 48 students from a Brazilian state school. Furniture dimensions were measured with metric tape, movements and postures by inclinometers (Logger Tecknologi, Åkarp, Sweden). Seat height was high for 21% and low for 36% of the students; seat length was short for 45% and long for 9% and table height was high for 53% and low for 28%. Regression analysis showed that seat/popliteal height quotient is explained by 90th percentile of upper back inclination (β=0.410) and 90th percentile of right upper arm elevation (β=-0.293). For seat/thigh length quotient the significant variables were 90th percentile of upper back velocity (β=-0.282) and 90th percentile of right upper arm elevation (β=0.410). This study showed a relationship between furniture mismatch and postural overload. When the seat height is low students increase upper back left inclination and right upper arm elevation; when the seat is short students decrease the upper back flexion velocity and increase right upper arm elevation.

  13. Considerations for designing robotic upper limb rehabilitation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadas, I.; Vaida, C.; Gherman, B.; Pisla, D.; Carbone, G.

    2017-12-01

    The present study highlights the advantages of robotic systems for post-stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb. The latest demographic studies illustrate a continuous increase of the average life span, which leads to a continuous increase of stroke incidents and patients requiring rehabilitation. Some studies estimate that by 2030 the number of physical therapists will be insufficient for the patients requiring physical rehabilitation, imposing a shift in the current methodologies. A viable option is the implementation of robotic systems that assist the patient in performing rehabilitation exercises, the physical therapist role being to establish the therapeutic program for each patient and monitor their individual progress. Using a set of clinical measurements for the upper limb motions, the analysis of rehabilitation robotic systems provides a comparative study between the motions required by clinicians and the ones that robotic systems perform for different therapeutic exercises. A critical analysis of existing robots is performed using several classifications: mechanical design, assistance type, actuation and power transmission, control systems and human robot interaction (HRI) strategies. This classification will determine a set of pre-requirements for the definition of new concepts and efficient solutions for robotic assisted rehabilitation therapy.

  14. Evaluation of upper limb muscle fatigue based on surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qianxiang; Chen, Yuhong; Ma, Chao; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2011-10-01

    Fatigue is believed to be a major contributory factor to occupational injuries in machine operators. The development of accurate and usable techniques to measure operator fatigue is therefore important. In this study, we used a novel method based on surface electromyography (sEMG) of the biceps brachii and the Borg scale to evaluate local muscle fatigue in the upper limb after isometric muscle action. Thirteen young males performed isometric actions with the upper limb at different force levels. sEMG activities of the biceps brachii were recorded during the actions. Borg scales were used to evaluate the subjective sensation of local fatigue of the biceps brachii after the actions. sEMG activities were analyzed using the one-third band octave method, and an equation to determine the degree of fatigue was derived based on the relationship between the variable and the Borg scale. The results showed that the relationship could be expressed by a conic curve, and could be used to evaluate muscle fatigue during machine operation.

  15. Literature Review on Needs of Upper Limb Prosthesis Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordella, Francesca; Ciancio, Anna Lisa; Sacchetti, Rinaldo; Davalli, Angelo; Cutti, Andrea Giovanni; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Zollo, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    The loss of one hand can significantly affect the level of autonomy and the capability of performing daily living, working and social activities. The current prosthetic solutions contribute in a poor way to overcome these problems due to limitations in the interfaces adopted for controlling the prosthesis and to the lack of force or tactile feedback, thus limiting hand grasp capabilities. This paper presents a literature review on needs analysis of upper limb prosthesis users, and points out the main critical aspects of the current prosthetic solutions, in terms of users satisfaction and activities of daily living they would like to perform with the prosthetic device. The ultimate goal is to provide design inputs in the prosthetic field and, contemporary, increase user satisfaction rates and reduce device abandonment. A list of requirements for upper limb prostheses is proposed, grounded on the performed analysis on user needs. It wants to (i) provide guidelines for improving the level of acceptability and usefulness of the prosthesis, by accounting for hand functional and technical aspects; (ii) propose a control architecture of PNS-based prosthetic systems able to satisfy the analyzed user wishes; (iii) provide hints for improving the quality of the methods (e.g., questionnaires) adopted for understanding the user satisfaction with their prostheses.

  16. Serious games for upper limb rehabilitation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, João Pedro; Quaresma, Cláudia; Vieira, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this research is to carry out a systematic review of the use of technological gaming platforms with serious games in the upper limb rehabilitation of patients with neuromotor disorders. Through a systematic review, the first two authors defined the inclusion criteria and extracted the data, resulting in 38 studies collected from B-On, PubMed and Medline. Ninety-two per cent of the selected articles were published since 2010. This review documents 35 different gaming platforms types. Twenty-one of the 38 articles included in this review conducted a clinical trial and of those only eight report improvements in the target population following the use of the games and platforms. This review concludes that a new paradigm is emerging in the rehabilitation field, characterized by the systematic use of technological gaming platforms with serious games in/for rehabilitation. The use of this approach seems to be beneficial. However, to facilitate the full integration of these platforms, it is necessary to conduct more research in this area, explore new approaches and carry out in-depth clinical studies into the benefits of these platforms. Implications for rehabilitation This review states that the use serious games and gaming platforms for upper limb rehabilitation are starting a new paradigm in the rehabilitation. For a full integration of this technologies in the rehabilitation field more studies are needed.

  17. Amputation and prosthesis implantation shape body and peripersonal space representations

    OpenAIRE

    Canzoneri, Elisa; Marzolla, Marilena; Amoresano, Amedeo; Verni, Gennaro; Serino, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about whether and how multimodal representations of the body (BRs) and of the space around the body (Peripersonal Space, PPS) adapt to amputation and prosthesis implantation. In order to investigate this issue, we tested BR in a group of upper limb amputees by means of a tactile distance perception task and PPS by means of an audio-tactile interaction task. Subjects performed the tasks with stimulation either on the healthy limb or the stump of the amputated limb, while wearin...

  18. Trends in the incidence of lower limb amputation after implementation of a Multidisciplinary Diabetic Foot Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Sara; Rubio, José Antonio; Álvarez, Julia; Ruiz-Grande, Fernando; Medina, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Incidence of lower extremity amputations (LEA) in the population with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) was assessed after implementation of a Multidisciplinary Diabetic Foot Unit (MDFU) during 2008. Non-traumatic LEA were analyzed, and those performed before (2001-2007) and after (2008-2014) introduction of the MDFU were compared. LEA were grouped by age and sex. Their incidence was expressed as a rate per 100,000 population per year, adjusted to the standard European population. A total of 664 LEA were performed during the 2001-2014 period, 486 (73%) of them in patients with DM. Total LEA incidence was 11.2/10 5 population in DM versus 3.9/10 5 in the population without DM. Incidence of major LEA in patients with DM significantly decreased from 6.1/10 5 population in the 2001-2007 period to 4.5/10 5 in the 2008-2014 period (p=.03). Joinpoint regression analysis also showed a reduction in the trend of incidence of major LEA in patients with DM, with an annual percentage change of -3.3% [95% CI, -6.2-0.3] (p=.025). No significant differences were found for all other incidences and trends in the diabetic and non-diabetic populations. Implementation of a MDFU has been shown to be associated with a significant reduction in major amputation rate in the diabetic population, although the results are not optimal yet. Both results and work at the MDFU should be improved. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Limb amputations in fixed dystonia: A form of body integrity identity disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, M.J.; Alonso-Canovas, A.; Schrag, A.; Bloem, B.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Bhatia, K.

    2011-01-01

    Fixed dystonia is a disabling disorder mainly affecting young women who develop fixed abnormal limb postures and pain after apparently minor peripheral injury. There is continued debate regarding its pathophysiology and management. We report 5 cases of fixed dystonia in patients who sought

  20. Relation between aerobic capacity and walking ability in older adults with a lower-limb amputation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, D.; van der Woude, L.H.V.; Faber, W.X; de Haan, A.; Houdijk, J.H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the relative aerobic load, walking speed, and walking economy of older adults with a lower-limb prosthesis, and to predict the effect of an increased aerobic capacity on their walking ability. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Human motion laboratory at a rehabilitation

  1. Mobility of people with lower limb amputations : scales and questionnaires: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommers, G.M.; Groothoff, J.W.; Eisma, W.H.

    Objective and design: A systematic literature review to compare mobility scales used for lower limb amputees. A literature search was carried out by computerized search of biomedical literature including Medline and Embase. The studies included were published between 1978 and 1998 and including the

  2. Relation Between Aerobic Capacity and Walking Ability in Older Adults With a Lower-Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, Daphne; van der Woude, Lucas H.; Faber, Willemijn X.; de Haan, Arnold; Houdijk, Han

    Objectives: To determine the relative aerobic load, walking speed, and walking economy of older adults with a lower-limb prosthesis, and to predict the effect of an increased aerobic capacity on their walking ability. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Human motion laboratory at a rehabilitation

  3. Fall Detection in Individuals With Lower Limb Amputations Using Mobile Phones: Machine Learning Enhances Robustness for Real-World Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawen, Nicholas; Lonini, Luca; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya Krishna; Shparii, Ilona; Albert, Mark V; Kording, Konrad; Jayaraman, Arun

    2017-10-11

    Automatically detecting falls with mobile phones provides an opportunity for rapid response to injuries and better knowledge of what precipitated the fall and its consequences. This is beneficial for populations that are prone to falling, such as people with lower limb amputations. Prior studies have focused on fall detection in able-bodied individuals using data from a laboratory setting. Such approaches may provide a limited ability to detect falls in amputees and in real-world scenarios. The aim was to develop a classifier that uses data from able-bodied individuals to detect falls in individuals with a lower limb amputation, while they freely carry the mobile phone in different locations and during free-living. We obtained 861 simulated indoor and outdoor falls from 10 young control (non-amputee) individuals and 6 individuals with a lower limb amputation. In addition, we recorded a broad database of activities of daily living, including data from three participants' free-living routines. Sensor readings (accelerometer and gyroscope) from a mobile phone were recorded as participants freely carried it in three common locations-on the waist, in a pocket, and in the hand. A set of 40 features were computed from the sensors data and four classifiers were trained and combined through stacking to detect falls. We compared the performance of two population-specific models, trained and tested on either able-bodied or amputee participants, with that of a model trained on able-bodied participants and tested on amputees. A simple threshold-based classifier was used to benchmark our machine-learning classifier. The accuracy of fall detection in amputees for a model trained on control individuals (sensitivity: mean 0.989, 1.96*standard error of the mean [SEM] 0.017; specificity: mean 0.968, SEM 0.025) was not statistically different (P=.69) from that of a model trained on the amputee population (sensitivity: mean 0.984, SEM 0.016; specificity: mean 0.965, SEM 0

  4. Occurrence and temporal evolution of upper limb spasticity in stroke patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Keng H; Lee, Jeanette; Chua, Karen S

    2012-01-01

    To document the temporal development and evolution of upper limb spasticity, and to establish clinical correlates and predictors of upper limb spasticity in a cohort of stroke patients. Prospective cohort study. A rehabilitation unit. Patients (N=163) with a first-ever ischemic stroke. Not applicable. Ashworth Scale for measuring upper limb spasticity, Motor Assessment Scale for upper limb activity, Motricity Index for upper limb strength, and Modified Barthel Index for self-care. Upper limb spasticity was defined as an Ashworth Scale score of 1 or greater. Upper limb spasticity occurred in 54 patients (33%) at 3 months after stroke. Development of spasticity at later stages of the stroke was infrequent, occurring in only 28 patients (17%). In patients with mild spasticity (Ashworth Scale score 1) at 3 months after stroke, worsening of spasticity occurred in only 1 patient. On the other hand, almost half of the patients with moderate spasticity (Ashworth Scale score 2) at 3 months progressed to severe spasticity (Ashworth Scale score 3). Poor upper limb activity was the most important correlate of "moderate to severe spasticity" (Ashworth Scale score ≥2) (PAshworth Scale score of 2 or greater at 3 months after stroke, and in patients with severe upper limb weakness on admission to rehabilitation. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Servelle-Martorell syndrome with extensive upper limb involvement: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuppal Raju

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Angio-osteohypotrophic syndrome is also known as Servelle-Martorell angiodysplasia. It is characterized by venous or, rarely, arterial malformations, which may result in limb hypertrophy and bony hypoplasia. Extensive involvement of the upper limb is a rare feature of Servelle-Martorell syndrome. Cases with minimal upper limb involvement have been described in the literature. Case presentation A young man presented with multiple separate swollen areas over the right upper limb and functional difficulty since birth. The arm muscles and muscles of the limb girdle were atrophic. The forearm and hand bones were hypoplastic and tender. Conclusion We report a case of Servelle-Martorell syndrome with extensive involvement of the entire upper limb and periscapular region. Servelle-Martorell syndrome is highlighted as one of the causes of angiodysplastic limb hypertrophy.

  6. Incidence and causes of lower-limb amputations in the city of Ribeirão Preto from 1985 to 2008: evaluation of the medical records from 3,274 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Maria Bueno Barbosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Objective: It was to identify trends of traumatic and non-traumatic causes of lower limb amputations, as well as the role played by population aging, traffic violence increase, public health policy of diabetes control program and drivers anti-alcohol laws on these amputations. Method: Hospitalization data recorded in the discharge forms of 32 hospitals located in the region of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, from 1985 to 2008 were analyzed. Result: A total of 3,274 lower-limb amputations were analyzed, of which 95.2% were related to non-traumatic causes, mainly infectious and ischemic complications of diabetes mellitus. Cancer (2.8% and congenital (1.3% causes were included in this group. Only 4.8% were related to traumatic causes. Traumatic amputation average rate was 1.5 amputations in 100,000 habitants with a slight tendency of increase in the last 5 years. Non-traumatic causes showed an average rate of 30.0 amputations for 100,000 habitants and remained relatively constant during the whole period. Non-traumatic were much more predominant in patients older than 60 years and traumatic amputations occurred more frequently in patients younger than 39 years. Conclusion: The overall rates of amputation and the rates of traumatic and non-traumatic amputations remained nearly constant during the study period. The impact of diabetes control policies and the introduction of traffic safety laws could not be identified on the amputation rates.

  7. Constructs of health belief and disabling distal upper limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whibley, Daniel; MacDonald, Ross; Macfarlane, Gary J; Jones, Gareth T

    2016-10-01

    Musculoskeletal pain in the distal upper limb is common and is a cause of disability and healthcare consultation. At the time of presentation individuals reporting similar pain severities may report different levels of related disability. The biopsychosocial model proposes that health beliefs may help explain this difference. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to identify underlying constructs of health belief in those referred to physiotherapy with pain in the distal upper limb and investigate whether these constructs moderated the relationship between pain severity and extent of disability. Health beliefs were assessed using an instrument included in a questionnaire completed before randomisation to the Arm Pain Trial (ISRCTN79085082). Ordinal responses to statements about health beliefs were used to generate a polychoric correlation matrix. The output from this matrix was then used for Exploratory Factor Analysis to determine underlying constructs. The moderating influence of the identified health belief constructs was then tested using interaction terms in linear regression models. 476 trial participants contributed data, age range 18-85 (mean 48.8, SD 13.7), 54% female. Five health belief constructs were identified: beliefs about hereditary factors, beliefs about movement and pain, beliefs about locus of control, beliefs about the role of lifecourse/lifestyle factors, and beliefs about prognosis. The only health belief construct found to moderate the pain-disability relationship was beliefs about prognosis, with greater pessimism resulting in higher levels of disability at mild-to-moderate levels of pain severity (B -0.17, 95% CI -0.30, -0.036). This exploratory cross-sectional study identified five constructs of health belief from responses to a previously used set of statements investigating fear avoidance and illness beliefs in a clinical population with pain in the distal upper limb. Of these constructs, beliefs about prognosis were found to

  8. Contribution to the anatomical nomenclature concerning upper limb anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachlik, David; Musil, Vladimir; Baca, Vaclav

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this article is to revise and extend the existing sections of Terminologia Anatomica dealing with the upper limb structures, which nomenclature belongs to its most neglected and not developing parts, and to justify the use of the proposed anatomical terms in the clinical practice, research, and education. A sample collected from own educational and research experience was matched in the main anatomical textbooks as well as old and recent anatomical journals and compared with four versions of the official Latin anatomical nomenclatures. The authors summarize here 145 terms, completed with their definitions or explanations, concerning both constant and variable (inconstant) morphological structures (bones, joints, muscles, vessels, and nerves) of the pectoral girdle, arm, cubital region, forearm, wrist, and hand, completed with some grammar remarks and several general terms. After a broad discussion on this topic, the Terminologia Anatomica should be revised and extend with the listed terms (or their equivalents).

  9. Monomelic amyotrophy with proximal upper limb involvement: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghawi, Eman; Al-Harbi, Talal; Al-Sarawi, Adnan; Binfalah, Mohamed

    2016-03-17

    Monomelic amyotrophy is an uncommon, benign, unilateral disorder of the lower motor neurons, affecting predominantly the hand and forearm muscles. Proximal involvement of the arm and shoulder muscles is an unusual presentation that has been rarely reported in the literature. A 28-year-old white man presented with insidious-onset, slowly progressive, unilateral weakness and atrophy of his left shoulder girdle and deltoid muscles. A neurological examination revealed weakness and atrophy in his left deltoid, infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles. Electromyography demonstrated an active and chronic neurogenic pattern affecting his left C5 and C6 myotomes; magnetic resonance imaging of his cervical spine was normal. He did well with conservative treatment. Upper limb proximal form of monomelic amyotrophy is a rare clinical entity with a wide differential diagnosis. Physicians, especially neurologists, should be familiar with this benign condition to avoid inappropriately labeling patients as having amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other disorders with less favorable outcomes.

  10. Influence of disability type on upper-limb motor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarski, Tomasz; Roman-Liu, Danuta

    2016-12-01

    This study was carried out in order to determine the effect of physical disability (paraplegia) and sensory disability (deafness) on motor skills of the upper limbs. Studies were distinguished by two parameters: the nature of the control curve (sine or random) and the magnitude of the isometric force exerted on the lever (10 N, 20 N, 40 N, 80 N). A comparison of the quality of manual force control in a visual detection task among groups of people with sensory disability (deaf), people with physical disability (paraplegic) and people without disability showed differences among those groups. Values of force above 20 N create conditions of lower quality of control and of direction of force exertion outside the body. At the same time, the study proved that people with some types of disability can perform certain work tasks as effectively as people without disability.

  11. Expert opinions on success factors for upper-limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Aimee E; Baade, Susan P; Kuiken, Todd A

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to gather the opinions of prosthetics experts on the most important factors for the successful use of upper-limb (UL) prostheses, compare them with those of prosthesis users, and ultimately direct research efforts in this field. UL prosthetics experts were asked to compare the importance of the comfort, function, and cosmesis of a prosthetic device for a transhumeral amputee. Categories were subdivided into weight, socket-interface comfort, power, agility, color, and shape. The majority of those who responded viewed comfort as the most important factor for a unilateral amputee and considered socket-interface comfort to be more important than weight. Function was considered to be the most important factor for a bilateral amputee, with agility considered more important than power. Cosmesis was consistently reported as being less important than comfort and function, and shape was considered more important than color.

  12. Rehabilitation After Spasticity-Correcting Upper Limb Surgery in Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangdell, Johanna; Fridén, Jan

    2016-06-01

    To describe the early active rehabilitation concept developed for spasticity-correcting surgery in tetraplegia and to report the outcomes in grip ability and change of performance and satisfaction in patients' prioritized activities 1 year postoperatively. Retrospective case-control study. Nonprofit rehabilitation unit. All patients who underwent surgeries for correction of spasticity in tetraplegic hands between 2009 and 2013 in the studied unit (N=37). Spasticity-correcting upper limb surgery with early active rehabilitation to restore grip ability in tetraplegia. Grasp and release test (GRT) and modified Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). All patients could accomplish the early active rehabilitation concept. The complication rate related to the treatment was low. Compared with preoperatively, all evaluated individuals experienced improvements in grasp ability and activity performance and satisfaction at 1-year follow-up. The performance in prioritized activities, as measured by the COPM, improved by 2.6 scale steps. Satisfaction with performance improved 3.0 scale steps postoperatively (n=21). The grasp ability, measured by the GRT, improved significantly, from 80 preoperatively to 111 (n=10). The surgery, combined with the early active rehabilitation protocol, is a reliable and safe procedure. The ability to use the hand improved, and gains were maintained at least 1 year after surgery in all patients with respect to both the objective grasp ability and patients' subjective rating of their performance and satisfaction in their prioritized activities. The procedure should therefore be considered as an adjunct to other treatments of upper limb spasticity in spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Upper Limb-Hand 3D Display System for Biomimetic Myoelectric Hand Simulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jimenez, Gonzalo

    2001-01-01

    A graphics system displaying both upper limb posture and opening-closing of a prosthetic hand was developed for realtime operation of our biomimetic myoelectric hand simulator, Posture of the upper...

  14. Revised upper limb module for spinal muscular atrophy: Development of a new module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Elena S; Mayhew, Anna; Montes, Jacqueline; Ramsey, Danielle; Fanelli, Lavinia; Young, Sally Dunaway; Salazar, Rachel; De Sanctis, Roberto; Pasternak, Amy; Glanzman, Allan; Coratti, Giorgia; Civitello, Matthew; Forcina, Nicola; Gee, Richard; Duong, Tina; Pane, Marika; Scoto, Mariacristina; Pera, Maria Carmela; Messina, Sonia; Tennekoon, Gihan; Day, John W; Darras, Basil T; De Vivo, Darryl C; Finkel, Richard; Muntoni, Francesco; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2017-06-01

    There is a growing need for a robust clinical measure to assess upper limb motor function in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), as the available scales lack sensitivity at the extremes of the clinical spectrum. We report the development of the Revised Upper Limb Module (RULM), an assessment specifically designed for upper limb function in SMA patients. An international panel with specific neuromuscular expertise performed a thorough review of scales currently available to assess upper limb function in SMA. This review facilitated a revision of the existing upper limb function scales to make a more robust clinical scale. Multiple revisions of the scale included statistical analysis and captured clinically relevant changes to fulfill requirements by regulators and advocacy groups. The resulting RULM scale shows good reliability and validity, making it a suitable tool to assess upper extremity function in the SMA population for multi-center clinical research. Muscle Nerve 55: 869-874, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Diabetes effect on Quality of Life in the long-term after Limb salvage with Infrageniculate Bypasses accompanied with minor amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Kivanc Derya; Aksoy, Murat

    2014-09-01

    Objective : To evaluate the quality of life in patients, who had their limbs salvaged with an infrageniculate bypass and minor amputation in the long term and to see if diabetics are prone to worse results. The patients with limb salvage following an infrageniculate bypass and minor amputation were asked to complete Short Form 36 at the last follow-up visit. The mean scores in diabetic and non-diabetic population were compared to each other .The mean follow-up period was 58±8 months. Results : Of 142 patients, 40 patients were eligible to be included in the study. 33 (82.5%) patients were male and 7 (17.5%) patients were female. The mean age at the time of intervention was 57±14 (33-83) years. The mean scores for eight domains of SF-36 evaluation ranged from 44 to 67 out of 100. There were no significant differences concerning the mean scores of any dimension between the diabetic and non-diabetic group. Conclusion : Despite a minor amputation, the functional outcome of limb salvage with an infrageniculate bypass is favorable and diabetes does not seem to have negative effect on the functional outcome and Quality of Life.

  16. Socio-Occupational and Physical Outcomes More than 20 Years after Diagnosis for Osteosarcoma in Children and Adolescents: Limb Salvage versus Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Giulia; Robert, Rhonda S.; Huh, Winston W.; Palla, Shana; Jaffe, Norman

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND To date, there has been relatively little research on very-long-term survivors of childhood and adolescent osteosarcoma. We sought to compare the very-long-term outcomes of osteosarcoma patients treated with either limb salvage procedures or amputation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-eight long-term osteosarcoma patients surviving 20 or more years from diagnosis were divided into two groups according to whether they underwent amputation or limb salvage. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire about education, employment, annual income, marital status, health insurance, lifestyle, siblings, and all current and past health issues. RESULTS Education, employment, marital status, and health insurance did not differ significantly between the two groups of survivors, and they described themselves as similar to their siblings. Eight percent of survivors underwent secondary amputation due to complications with an endoprosthesis. The cumulative incidence of second primary neoplasms was 13%, and this was significantly higher in females and in survivors who underwent radiotherapy and had genetic predisposition. The second primary malignancies were breast cancer (ductal invasive carcinoma, ductal in situ carcinoma, leiomyosarcoma), mediastinal leiomyosarcoma, squamocellular carcinoma of the oral cavity and of the uterine cervix. Amputees required more assistive walking support than survivors who received limb salvage treatments (χ2 test, p <0.05). CONCLUSIONS Despite the many challenges that osteosarcoma survivors face, patients who survived over 20 years after their initial diagnosis reported having overall adjusted well to their physical limitations and were productive individuals. PMID:23907996

  17. Unilateral versus bilateral upper limb exercise therapy after stroke: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delden, A.E.Q.; Peper, C.E.; Beek, P.J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of unilateral and bilateral training on upper limb function after stroke with regard to two key factors: severity of upper limb paresis and time of intervention post-stroke. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods: Two

  18. Characteristic MRI Findings of upper Limb Muscle Involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Sugie

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to evaluate the relation between muscle MRI findings and upper limb weakness with grip myotonia in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1. Seventeen patients with DM1 were evaluated by manual muscle strength testing and muscle MRI of the upper limbs. Many DM1 patients presenting with decreased grasping power frequently showed high intensity signals in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP muscles on T1-weighted imaging. Patients presenting with upper limb weakness frequently also showed high intensity signals in the flexor pollicis longus, abductor pollicis longus, and extensor pollicis muscles. Disturbances of the distal muscles of the upper limbs were predominant in all DM1 patients. Some DM1 patients with a prolonged disease duration showed involvement of not only distal muscles but also proximal muscles in the upper limbs. Muscle involvement of the upper limbs on MRI strongly correlated positively with the disease duration or the numbers of CTG repeats. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide a detailed description of the distribution and severity of affected muscles of the upper limbs on MRI in patients with DM1. We conclude that muscle MRI findings are very useful for identifying affected muscles and predicting the risk of muscle weakness in the upper limbs of DM1 patients.

  19. A Systematic Review of Bilateral Upper Limb Training Devices for Poststroke Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delden, A.E.Q.; Peper, C.E.; Kwakkel, G.; Beek, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In stroke rehabilitation, bilateral upper limb training is gaining ground. As a result, a growing number of mechanical and robotic bilateral upper limb training devices have been proposed. Objective. To provide an overview and qualitative evaluation of the clinical applicability of

  20. Assessment of upper limb spasticity in stroke patients using the robotic device REAplan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Dehem

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the capacity of the robotic device REAplan to measure overall upper limb peak resistance force, as a reflection of upper limb spasticity. Methods: Twelve patients with chronic stroke presenting upper limb spasticity were recruited to the study. Patients underwent musculocutaneous motor nerve block to reduce the spasticity of elbow flexor muscles. Each patient was assessed before and after the motor nerve block. Overall the REAplan measured upper limb resistance force. The robot passively mobilized the patient’s upper limb at various velocities (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 cm/s in a back-and-forth trajectory (30 cm. The peak resistance force was analysed for each forward movement. Ten movements were performed and averaged at each velocity condition. Results: The overall upper limb resistance force increased proportionally to the mobilization velocity (p 0.6. Conclusion: This study proposes a new, valid, reliable and sensitive protocol to quantify upper limb resistance force using the REAplan, as a reflection of upper limb spasticity.

  1. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Mirror Therapy for Upper Extremity Phantom Limb Pain in Male Amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacha B. Finn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePhantom limb pain (PLP is prevalent in patients post-amputation and is difficult to treat. We assessed the efficacy of mirror therapy in relieving PLP in unilateral, upper extremity male amputees.MethodsFifteen participants from Walter Reed and Brooke Army Medical Centers were randomly assigned to one of two groups: mirror therapy (n = 9 or control (n = 6, covered mirror or mental visualization therapy. Participants were asked to perform 15 min of their assigned therapy daily for 5 days/week for 4 weeks. The primary outcome was pain as measured using a 100-mm Visual Analog Scale.ResultsSubjects in the mirror therapy group had a significant decrease in pain scores, from a mean of 44.1 (SD = 17.0 to 27.5 (SD = 17.2 mm (p = 0.002. In addition, there was a significant decrease in daily time experiencing pain, from a mean of 1,022 (SD = 673 to 448 (SD = 565 minutes (p = 0.003. By contrast, the control group had neither diminished pain (p = 0.65 nor decreased overall time experiencing pain (p = 0.49. A pain decrement response seen by the 10th treatment session was predictive of final efficacy.ConclusionThese results confirm that mirror therapy is an effective therapy for PLP in unilateral, upper extremity male amputees, reducing both severity and duration of daily episodes.RegistrationNCT0030144 ClinicalTrials.gov.

  2. The effect of a supervised community-based exercise program on balance, balance confidence, and gait in individuals with lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carol A; Williams, Jennifer E; Durham, Katey L; Hom, Selena C; Smith, Julie L

    2017-10-01

    Many individuals with lower limb loss report concern with walking ability after completing structured traditional rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of a supervised community-based exercise program on balance, balance confidence, and gait in individuals with lower limb amputation. Repeated measures. The supervised exercise program was offered biweekly for 6 weeks. The GAITRite System by CIR Systems, Inc., the Figure-of-8 Walk Test, and Activity-specific Balance Confidence Scale were used to measure clinical outcomes pre- and post-intervention. In total, 16 participants with lower limb amputation (mean age: 50.8 years) completed the study. A multivariate, repeated measures analysis of variance indicated a statistically significant effect of training across six clinical outcome measures ( F(6, 10) = 4.514, p = .018). Moderate effect sizes were found for the Figure-of-8 Walk Test ( η 2 = .586), Activity-specific Balance Confidence Scale ( η 2 = .504), and gait velocity at comfortable walking speed ( η 2 = .574). The average increase in gait speed was clinically meaningful at .14 m/s. The supervised community-based exercise program implemented in this study was designed to address specific functional needs for individuals with lower limb loss. Each participant experienced clinically meaningful improvements in balance, balance confidence, and walking ability. Clinical relevance The provision of a supervised community-based exercise program, after traditional rehabilitation, provides opportunity to offer a continuum of care that may enhance prosthetic functional ability and active participation in the community for individuals with lower limb amputation.

  3. Interventions for improving upper limb function after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Alex; Farmer, Sybil E; Brady, Marian C; Langhorne, Peter; Mead, Gillian E; Mehrholz, Jan; van Wijck, Frederike

    2014-11-12

    Improving upper limb function is a core element of stroke rehabilitation needed to maximise patient outcomes and reduce disability. Evidence about effects of individual treatment techniques and modalities is synthesised within many reviews. For selection of effective rehabilitation treatment, the relative effectiveness of interventions must be known. However, a comprehensive overview of systematic reviews in this area is currently lacking. To carry out a Cochrane overview by synthesising systematic reviews of interventions provided to improve upper limb function after stroke. We comprehensively searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; the Database of Reviews of Effects; and PROSPERO (an international prospective register of systematic reviews) (June 2013). We also contacted review authors in an effort to identify further relevant reviews. We included Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of patients with stroke comparing upper limb interventions with no treatment, usual care or alternative treatments. Our primary outcome of interest was upper limb function; secondary outcomes included motor impairment and performance of activities of daily living. When we identified overlapping reviews, we systematically identified the most up-to-date and comprehensive review and excluded reviews that overlapped with this. Two overview authors independently applied the selection criteria, excluding reviews that were superseded by more up-to-date reviews including the same (or similar) studies. Two overview authors independently assessed the methodological quality of reviews (using a modified version of the AMSTAR tool) and extracted data. Quality of evidence within each comparison in each review was determined using objective criteria (based on numbers of participants, risk of bias, heterogeneity and review quality) to apply GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) levels of evidence. We resolved

  4. Differential impairments of upper and lower limb movements influence action verb processing in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Angela; Nguyen, Peter; Orange, Joseph B; Jog, Mandar; Nisbet, Kelly A; McRae, Ken

    2017-12-01

    Theories of grounded cognition emphasize the role of the motor system in the processing of action concepts. The present study investigated whether persons with Parkinson disease (PD) who have greater upper versus greater lower limb motor impairments show different patterns of performance when processing action verbs. PD patients and controls made action decisions on upper-limb (reach), lower-limb (kick), and psych verbs (think). The primary result was an interaction between PD motor dominance (PD upper vs lower limb motor impairments) and verb type (upper- vs lower-limb verbs). PD patients with greater upper limb impairments took longer to respond to upper-limb than to lower-limb verbs, whereas those with greater lower limb impairments performed similarly on the two verb types. Our results add to recent studies and theories that highlight the complexity of verb impairments in PD, semantic task effects, effector-specific sensorimotor cortex engagement, and fine-grained semantic features and their possible interactions with effector-specific impairments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fall incidence and associated risk factors among people with a lower limb amputation during various stages of recovery - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Noam; Gottlieb, Amihai; Siev-Ner, Itzhak; Plotnik, Meir

    2018-03-14

    The objective of this study was to estimate fall incidence and describe associated risk factors among people with a lower limb amputation (LLA) during various stages of recovery: the surgical ward, in-patient rehabilitation and return to community life. A systematic search of relevant English language articles was performed using PubMed and EMBASE. Out of 310 initial "hits," six retrospective cohort studies, one prospective cohort study and eleven cross-sectional studies from which fall incidence and risk factors could be extracted, were selected for critical review. Fall incidence and associated risk factors were extracted and analyzed in the context of various clinical stages of recovery after amputation. The studies were evaluated for quality using the "Quality Assessment Tool for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies." Results showed that during all stages of recovery, people with a LLA are at increased risk of falling compared with able-bodied individuals, as well as other clinical populations. Each stage of recovery is associated with different fall risk factors. The current review is limited mainly by the paucity of studies on the topic. Specialised care focusing on the most relevant risk factors for each stage of recovery may enhance fall prevention during post-fall recovery. Implications for rehabilitation •  People with a lower limb amputation are at a high risk of falling in all stages of their clinical course.      •  Health professionals should be aware that people with a lower limb amputation in the first 4 years ofamputation or with four or more health-related problems are at an increased risk.      •  Health professionals should also be aware that increased gait variability, excess confidence in balance andwalking abilities and less cautious stair walking, impose an elevated risk of falling and should focus theirefforts in reducing these factors.

  6. Activities of daily living in people with lower limb amputation: outcomes of an intervention to reduce dependence in pre-prosthetic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Rosende Celeiro, Iván; Simón Sanjuán, Luisa; Santos-Del-Riego, Sergio

    2017-09-01

    The main objective was to assess the change in the functional independence in basic activities of daily living (ADL) following a pre-prosthetic intervention in people with lower-limb amputation (LLA). Secondary objectives were to identify the factors contributing to the success of this intervention, and to analyze the effects on the presence of unmet needs for home adaptation. The ADL intervention was early and pre-prosthetic; it was focused on six self-care activities. Fifty-two adults with LLA, who required assistance in self-care, were included. Functional independence (Barthel) was assessed at baseline and after intervention (T2). Successful intervention was defined as independent performance of all self-care activities. There was a significant improvement in Barthel scores between baseline and T2 in toileting (p prosthetic ADL intervention improves functional independence and reduces the need for home adaptation. ADL programs should be included in rehabilitation strategies. Implications for Rehabilitation Because basic activities of daily living (ADL) can be seriously compromised after a lower-limb amputation, it is important for this population to improve or maintain their level of independence. A short and pre-prosthetic ADL intervention is an effective method for an early recovery of functional independence in self-care activities and promotes home adaptation. Age is an important determinant of functional recovery, and most subjects can achieve independence in basic ADL regardless of the level of amputation. A pre-prosthetic ADL program should be included in rehabilitation strategies for adults with lower-limb amputation.

  7. Improvement in upper limb function in children with dystonia following deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Hortensia; Lumsden, Daniel; Gordon, Anne; Tustin, Kylee; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Childhood dystonia can severely impact upper limb function. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to be effective in reducing dystonic symptoms in childhood. Functional recovery following DBS is however not well understood. To explore changes in upper limb function following DBS in paediatric dystonia. Upper limb outcomes, using the Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function, are reported in 20 cases of childhood dystonia (unilateral n = 1, four limb n = 19) at 6 and 12 months following DBS. Improvement in at least in one upper limb was seen in the majority of cases (n = 17, 85%) at 12 months following DBS. Deterioration of scores in both upper limbs was seen in 3 children with progressive disorders. Grouping the children aetiologically, a significant improvement in the dominant hand was obtained for the primary dystonia/dystonia-plus group at both six (p = 0.018) and twelve months (p = 0.012). In secondary dystonia due to a static disorder, improvement was also seen at 6 (p = 0.043) and 12 months (p = 0.046) in the non-dominant hand. No significant change was found in the group of children with progressive disorders. DBS has the potential to alter upper limb function in children with primary and secondary dystonia. The dominant hand improved most in children with primary dystonias, with greater improvement in the non-dominant hand in secondary-static cases. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fused Filament Fabrication of Prosthetic Components for Trans-Humeral Upper Limb Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, Steven M.

    Presented below is the design and fabrication of prosthetic components consisting of an attachment, tactile sensing, and actuator systems with Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) technique. The attachment system is a thermoplastic osseointegrated upper limb prosthesis for average adult trans-humeral amputation with mechanical properties greater than upper limb skeletal bone. The prosthetic designed has: a one-step surgical process, large cavities for bone tissue ingrowth, uses a material that has an elastic modulus less than skeletal bone, and can be fabricated on one system. FFF osseointegration screw is an improvement upon the current two-part osseointegrated prosthetics that are composed of a fixture and abutment. The current prosthetic design requires two invasive surgeries for implantation and are made of titanium, which has an elastic modulus greater than bone. An elastic modulus greater than bone causes stress shielding and overtime can cause loosening of the prosthetic. The tactile sensor is a thermoplastic piezo-resistive sensor for daily activities for a prosthetic's feedback system. The tactile sensor is manufactured from a low elastic modulus composite comprising of a compressible thermoplastic elastomer and conductive carbon. Carbon is in graphite form and added in high filler ratios. The printed sensors were compared to sensors that were fabricated in a gravity mold to highlight the difference in FFF sensors to molded sensors. The 3D printed tactile sensor has a thickness and feel similar to human skin, has a simple fabrication technique, can detect forces needed for daily activities, and can be manufactured in to user specific geometries. Lastly, a biomimicking skeletal muscle actuator for prosthetics was developed. The actuator developed is manufactured with Fuse Filament Fabrication using a shape memory polymer composite that has non-linear contractile and passive forces, contractile forces and strains comparable to mammalian skeletal muscle, reaction

  9. Upper limb joint dynamics during manual wheelchair propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches, Guillaume; Dumas, Raphaël; Pradon, Didier; Vaslin, Philippe; Lepoutre, François-Xavier; Chèze, Laurence

    2010-05-01

    Inverse dynamic methods have been widely used to estimate joint loads during manual wheelchair propulsion. However, the interpretation of 3D net joint moments and powers is not always straightforward. It has been suggested to use joint coordinate systems (expression of joint moment on anatomical axes) and the 3D angle between joint moment and angular velocity vectors (propulsion, resistance or stabilization joint configuration) for a better understanding of joint dynamics. Nine spinal cord injured subjects equipped with reflective markers propelled in a wheelchair with an instrumented wheel. Inverse dynamic results were interpreted using joint coordinate systems, 3D joint power and the 3D angle between the joint moment and joint angular velocity vectors at the three upper limb joints. The 3D angle was used to determine if the joints were predominantly driven (angle close to 0 or 180 degrees) or stabilized (angle close to 90 degrees ). The wrist and elbow joints are mainly in a stabilization configuration (angle close to 90 degrees ) with a combination of extension and ulnar deviation moments and an adduction moment respectively. The shoulder is in a propulsion configuration, but close to stabilization (angle hardly below 60 degrees ) with a combination of flexion and internal rotation moments. Stabilization configuration at the joints could partly explain the low mechanical efficiency of manual wheelchair propulsion and could give insight about injury risk at the wrist, elbow and shoulder joints. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Upper limb malformations in chromosome 22q11 deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalev, S.A.; Dar, H.; Barel, H.; Borochowitz, Z. [Bnai Zion Medical Center, Haifa (Israel)

    1996-03-29

    We read with interest the report of Cormier-Daire et al. in a recent issue of the journal, describing upper limb malformations in DiGeorge syndrome. We observed a family with this group of rare clinical expression of chromosome 22q11 deletions. The proposita was examined in our clinic when she was 4 years old. She was mildly mentally retarded. Clinical evaluation showed normal growth, long thin nose with squared tip, nasal speech, and abundant scalp hair and no cardiac anomalies. The girl was accompanied by her mother. Facial similarities were noted between the two. The mother reported to be treated with oral calcium due to hypoparathyroidism, diagnosed several years ago. Clinical evaluation showed wide flat face, short stature, mild mental retardation, slight hypertelorism, peculiar nose similar to her daughter`s, and nasal speech. No cardiac anomalies were found. Recently, a brother was born. Clinical examination documented large ventriculo-septal defect, retrognathia, narrow palpebral fissures, and long thin nose with squared tip. 1 ref.

  11. Sensory feedback add-on for upper-limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahian, Nader; Saeedi, Hassan; Mokhtarinia, Hamidreza; Tabatabai Ghomshe, Farhad

    2017-06-01

    Sensory feedback systems have been of great interest in upper-limb prosthetics. Despite tremendous research, there are no commercial modality-matched feedback systems. This article aims to introduce the first detachable and feedback add-on option that can be attached to in-use prostheses. A sensory feedback system was tested on a below-elbow myoelectric prosthesis. The aim was to have the amputee grasp fragile objects without crushing while other accidental feedback sources were blocked. A total of 8 successful trials (out of 10) showed that sensory feedback system decreased the amputee's visual dependency by improving awareness of his prosthesis. Sensory feedback system can be used either as post-fabrication (prosthetic add-on option) or para-fabrication (incorporated into prosthetic design). The use of these direct feedback systems can be explored with a current prosthesis before ordering new high-tech prosthesis. Clinical relevance This technical note introduces the first attach/detach-able sensory feedback system that can simply be added to in-use (myo)electric prosthesis, with no obligation to change prosthesis design or components.

  12. Temporal alignment of electrocorticographic recordings for upper limb movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talakoub, Omid; Popovic, Milos R; Navaro, Jessie; Hamani, Clement; Fonoff, Erich T; Wong, Willy

    2014-01-01

    The detection of movement-related components of the brain activity is useful in the design of brain-machine interfaces. A common approach is to classify the brain activity into a number of templates or states. To find these templates, the neural responses are averaged over each movement task. For averaging to be effective, one must assume that the neural components occur at identical times over repeated trials. However, complex arm movements such as reaching and grasping are prone to cross-trial variability due to the way movements are performed. Typically initiation time, duration of movement and movement speed are variable even as a subject tries to reproduce the same task identically across trials. Therefore, movement-related neural activity will tend to occur at different times across the trials. Due to this mismatch, the averaging of neural activity will not bring into salience movement-related components. To address this problem, we present a method of alignment that accounts for the variabilities in the way the movements are conducted. In this study, arm speed was used to align neural activity. Four subjects had electrocorticographic (ECoG) electrodes implanted over their primary motor cortex and were asked to perform reaching and retrieving tasks using the upper limb contralateral to the site of electrode implantation. The arm speeds were aligned using a non-linear transformation of the temporal axes resulting in average spectrograms with superior visualization of movement-related neural activity when compared to averaging without alignment.

  13. Temporal alignment of electrocorticographic recordings for upper limb movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid eTalakoub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of movement-related components of the brain activity is useful in the design of brain machine interfaces. A common approach is to classify the brain activity into a number of templates or states. To find these templates, the neural responses are averaged over each movement task. For averaging to be effective, one must assume that the neural components occur at identical times over repeated trials. However, complex arm movements such as reaching and grasping are prone to cross-trial variability due to the way movements are performed. Typically initiation time, duration of movement and movement speed are variable even as a subject tries to reproduce the same task identically across trials. Therefore, movement-related neural activity will tend to occur at different times across each trial. Due to this mismatch, the averaging of neural activity will not bring into salience movement-related components. To address this problem, we present a method of alignment that accounts for the variabilities in the way the movements are conducted. In this study, arm speed was used to align neural activity. Four subjects had electrocorticographic (ECoG electrodes implanted over their primary motor cortex and were asked to perform reaching and retrieving tasks using the upper limb contralateral to the site of electrode implantation. The arm speeds were aligned using a nonlinear transformation of the temporal axes resulting in averaged spectrograms with superior visualization of movement-related neural activity when compared to averaging without alignment.

  14. Work related upper limb disorders in telecommunication workers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premalatha, G D; Noor Hassim, I

    1999-06-01

    A total of 323 workers from 5 different occupational groups in the telecommunication industry were studied in this cross sectional study, which sought to determine the prevalence of Work Related Upper Limb Disorders (WRULD) in 5 occupational groups; operators using the Video Display Terminals, switchboard operators, clerks, data entry processors and the supervisors. WRULD was also studied with regard to factors such as sex, race, height, age, stress and the discomfort perceived due to the work station design. The possibility of WRULD was determined from a self-administered questionnaire and confirmed by history and physical examination. Psychological stress and the discomfort due to the workstation were measured from the questionnaire. The overall prevalence was found to be 31.2% and the prevalence among the various occupations differed with it being the highest in the switchboard operators and data processors and the lowest in the supervisors. The older workers and the female workers were found to have higher prevalences of WRULD. It was also found that a higher stress score and a higher score of discomfort perceived at the work station were associated with higher prevalences of WRULD.

  15. [The use of occupational therapy in upper limb amputees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscato, T A; Orlandini, D

    2010-01-01

    Since pre-history until modern times, the ever more refined use of the hand has been fundamental to the progress of mankind. The list of functions of this incredible part of the body would fill several pages and show its fundamental importance in all our actions; in fact, there is very little that humans do that does not involve the use of the hands. The hand offers points for unlimited dissertation and is the executive organ par excellence, carrying out directly or participating in almost all our actions; it is an organ for communication and an instrument of well-being as well as being the main site of one of the five senses: touch. On this background, attention will be focused on the importance that the hand plays in daily life and, particularly, on the difficulties inevitably faced by people who are forced to live without a hand, even if replaced by an orthopaedic prosthesis. This is the sense of occupational therapy in the context of upper limb amputees.

  16. Adapting Tai Chi for Upper Limb Rehabilitation Post Stroke: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shujuan; Kairy, Dahlia; Corriveau, Hélène; Tousignant, Michel

    2017-09-30

    Background: Tai chi (TC) has been reported as being beneficial for improving balance post stroke, yet its utility in upper limb rehabilitation remains unknown. Methods: Twelve chronic stroke survivors with persistent paresis of an upper limb underwent 60 minutes of adapted TC twice a week for eight weeks, with a 4-week follow up. A 10-min TC home program was recommended for the days without sessions. TC level of performance, attendance to the sessions, duration of self-practice at home, and adapted TC movements used were recorded. Results: Eleven participants completed the study. A clinical reasoning algorithm underlying the adaptation of TC was elaborated throughout the trial. Participants with varying profiles including a severely impaired upper limb, poor balance, shoulder pain, and severe spasticity were not only capable of practicing the adapted TC, but attended all 16 sessions and practiced TC at home for a total of 16.51 ± 9.21 h. The degree of self-practice for subgroups with low upper limb function, shoulder pain, or moderate-to-severe spasticity was similar to that of subgroups with greater upper limb function, no shoulder pain, and minimal-to-no spasticity. Conclusion: Adapted TC seems feasible for upper limb rehabilitation post stroke. Although the study was based on a small sample size and requires confirmation, low upper limb function, insufficient balance, spasticity, and shoulder pain do not appear to hinder the practice of TC.

  17. Digitized Hand Skateboard Based on IR-Camera for Upper Limb Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chen; Liu, Chun-Yen; Ciou, Shih-Hsiang; Chen, Shih-Ching; Chen, Yu-Luen

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal upper limb function seriously impacts a patient's daily life. After receiving emergency treatment patient should receive function-rebuilding and recovery training. The objective of this study is to integrate IR-camera, an infrared emitter, with a conventional passive hand skateboard training device for conventional upper limb training and the training process is comprehensively recorded and analyzed. Patients participating in the occupational therapy have a binding band attached to hand skateboard on the table to guide the patient in moving the hand skateboard along the designated path to train the patient's upper limbs. Six people with normal upper limb function participated in the stability test. The device repeatability and test results were verified acceptable. Eight patients with abnormal upper limb function (their upper limb function was damaged due to stroke, MMSE > =27) were trained for 4 weeks. The patient scores in finishing rate and finishing time showed significant improvement. The paired T test results (satisfy p hand skateboard for upper limb training. The experiments show that the hardware of the proposed device no longer delays in response and can result in obvious clinical advances. The proposed device is verified worthy of promotion.

  18. Robot-Aided Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Based on Motor Imagery EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoguo Xu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. In this paper, a novel robot‐assisted rehabilitation system based on motor imagery electroencephalography (EEG is developed for regular training of neurological rehabilitation for upper limb stroke patients. Firstly, three‐dimensional animation was used to guide the patient image the upper limb movement and EEG signals were acquired by EEG amplifier. Secondly, eigenvectors were extracted by harmonic wavelet transform (HWT and linear discriminant analysis (LDA classifier was utilized to classify the pattern of the left and right upper limb motor imagery EEG signals. Finally, PC triggered the upper limb rehabilitation robot to perform motor therapy and gave the virtual feedback. Using this robot‐assisted upper limb rehabilitation system, the patientʹs EEG of upper limb movement imagination is translated to control rehabilitation robot directly. Consequently, the proposed rehabilitation system can fully explore the patientʹs motivation and attention and directly facilitate upper limb post‐stroke rehabilitation therapy. Experimental results on unimpaired participants were presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the rehabilitation system. Combining robot‐assisted training with motor imagery‐ based BCI will make future rehabilitation therapy more effective. Clinical testing is still required for further proving this assumption.

  19. Robot-Aided Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Based on Motor Imagery EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoguo Xu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. In this paper, a novel robot-assisted rehabilitation system based on motor imagery electroencephalography (EEG is developed for regular training of neurological rehabilitation for upper limb stroke patients. Firstly, three-dimensional animation was used to guide the patient image the upper limb movement and EEG signals were acquired by EEG amplifier. Secondly, eigenvectors were extracted by harmonic wavelet transform (HWT and linear discriminant analysis (LDA classifier was utilized to classify the pattern of the left and right upper limb motor imagery EEG signals. Finally, PC triggered the upper limb rehabilitation robot to perform motor therapy and gave the virtual feedback. Using this robot-assisted upper limb rehabilitation system, the patient's EEG of upper limb movement imagination is translated to control rehabilitation robot directly. Consequently, the proposed rehabilitation system can fully explore the patient's motivation and attention and directly facilitate upper limb post-stroke rehabilitation therapy. Experimental results on unimpaired participants were presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the rehabilitation system. Combining robot-assisted training with motor imagery-based BCI will make future rehabilitation therapy more effective. Clinical testing is still required for further proving this assumption.

  20. Usability of the Upper Limb Risk Assessment (UPLIRA Method for Assessing the Risk Factors of Upper Limb Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Razak Noor Syafiqa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to design ergonomic methods or assessment with a high usability and good ergonomic features, so the method is easily adaptable to the task and the workplace environment. Usability is a measurement on how well the user can use that functionality. The study converged on testing the usability of the new tools for assessing ULDs namely as Upper Limb Risk Assessment (UPLIRA. The UPLIRA method was evaluated by 6 students (3 undergraduate students and 3 postgraduates students from University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM who are conducting research in ergonomic. From the feedback survey of UPLIRA method, the observers agree that the prototype of UPLIRA tool was applicable to workplace assessment for the wide range of jobs/task (mean 4.00, SD:0.632 with 83% percentage of agreement . They also indicate that UPLIRA method is quick to use (mean 3.67, SD:1.033 with percentage agreement of 67%. The scoring system and action level was rated as easy to understand (mean 3.67, SD:1.211 and (mean 4.17, SD:0.408. Conclusively, the UPLIRA method was rated as straightforward to use, applicable to wide range of tasks, and time saving as assessment can be completed within 10 minutes. In addition, the UPLIRA assessment covers an extensive range of physical, psychosocial, work organizational, and individual risk factors.

  1. Immediate and 24-h blood pressure-lowering effects of arm crank exercise in patients with traumatic lower-limb amputation: a randomized cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula-Ribeiro, Marcelle; Martinez, Daniel G; Lima, Jorge R P; Laterza, Mateus C

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinic and 24-h postexercise hypotension (PEH) after a moderate-intensity arm crank exercise session in individuals with traumatic lower-limb amputation. Nine men (46±17 years) with unilateral traumatic lower-limb amputation participated in two experimental sessions conducted randomly: an aerobic exercise (EXE: arm crank ergometer, 30 min) or a control session (CON: participants remained seated on the cycle ergometer, 30 min). Clinic and 24-h systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure (BP) response were measured after both sessions. The clinical measurements of blood flow and forearm vascular resistance (FVR) were also performed. Compared with the preintervention period, the BP levels did not change in the CON session. However, EXE resulted in a significant hypotensive effect in systolic (-10±0.9 mmHg, P≤0.05), diastolic (-11±1.5 mmHg, P≤0.05), and mean BP (-11±1.2 mmHg, P≤0.05) during the entire postexercise period. The PEH was accompanied by a decreased FVR over the entire postintervention period (P≤0.05). Significant reductions were found for 24-h average systolic, diastolic, and mean BP levels (P=0.03, 0.01, and 0.02, respectively) following EXE compared with the CON session. These results showed, for the first time, that individuals with traumatic lower-limb amputation presented immediate and 24-h PEH after a single bout of arm crank exercise testing. The PEH at the clinic condition was justified, at least in part, by the reduction in peripheral FVR.

  2. The Effect of Upper Limb Massage on Infants' Venipuncture Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chik, Yuen-Man; Ip, Wan-Yim; Choi, Kai-Chow

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of upper limb massage on relieving pain among infants undergoing venipuncture in Hong Kong. This study was a crossover, double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Eighty infants at the neonatal intensive care unit were randomly assigned to 2 groups in different order to receive interventions. The massage first group (N = 40) received 2-minute massage before venipuncture on the first occasion then received usual care (control) on the second occasion, and vice versa in the massage second group (N = 40). The infants' behavior and physiological responses were recorded on two occasions: (1) right after the intervention and (2) during the first 30 seconds of venipuncture procedure. The mean pain scores (Premature Infant Pain Profile) were significantly lower in infants who received massage (massage first: 6.0 [standard deviation = 3.3]; massage second: 7.30 [standard deviation = 4.4]) versus control (massage first: 12.0 [standard deviation = 4.3]; massage second: 12.7 [standard deviation = 3.1]). The crude and adjusted generalized estimating equations model showed that the infants had significantly lower pain score when receiving massage as compared to receiving the control treatment, and there were no significant time and carryover effects: -6.03 (95% confidence interval: -7.67 to -4.38), p pain perception. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Upper limb impairments associated with spasticity in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirbagheri Mehdi M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While upper-extremity movement in individuals with neurological disorders such as stroke and spinal cord injury (SCI has been studied for many years, the effects of spasticity on arm movement have been poorly quantified. The present study is designed to characterize the nature of impaired arm movements associated with spasticity in these two clinical populations. By comparing impaired voluntary movements between these two groups, we will gain a greater understanding of the effects of the type of spasticity on these movements and, potentially a better understanding of the underlying impairment mechanisms. Methods We characterized the kinematics and kinetics of rapid arm movement in SCI and neurologically intact subjects and in both the paretic and non-paretic limbs in stroke subjects. The kinematics of rapid elbow extension over the entire range of motion were quantified by measuring movement trajectory and its derivatives; i.e. movement velocity and acceleration. The kinetics were quantified by measuring maximum isometric voluntary contractions of elbow flexors and extensors. The movement smoothness was estimated using two different computational techniques. Results Most kinematic and kinetic and movement smoothness parameters changed significantly in paretic as compared to normal arms in stroke subjects (p Conclusion The findings suggest that although the cause and location of injury are different in spastic stroke and SCI subjects, the impairments in arm voluntary movement were similar in the two spastic groups. Our results also suggest that the non-paretic arm in stroke subjects was not distinguishable from the normal, and might therefore be used as an appropriate control for studying movement of the paretic arm.

  4. Effect of the inclination of support in cervical and upper limb development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailime Perito Feiber Heck

    Full Text Available Introduction It is expected that a child will acquire control of posture (CP of the head and upper limbs in a gradual, sequential and organized way. However, there is still no consensus regarding the best position to achieve this; the evidence suggests that it is prone. Objective To investigate whether age and inclination of the supporting surface in the prone position influence the alignment of the head and upper limbs of children with typical motor development (TMD and atypical motor development (AMD. Methods The study included 29 children aged between one and three months divided according to the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS into groups with TMD (n = 18 and AMD (n = 11. The children were placed in the prone position with three angles of the support surface (0°, 25° and 45°. Kinematic analysis was conducted to evaluate the alignment angles of the head and upper limbs. Results Children with TMD had higher head alignment. There was no difference in the upper limbs’ alignment between the group with TMD and the group with AMD. In the third month of age compared with the first, increased head alignment and decreased upper limb alignment were found in both groups. The inclination of the supporting surface did not influence the alignment of the head and upper limbs. Conclusions Among the positions evaluated, the prone position without inclination of the supporting surface was more appropriate for weight discharge in the upper limbs, favoring the development of postural control of the child.

  5. Lower-limb amputation following foot ulcers in patients with diabetes: classification systems, external validation and comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro-Soares, Matilde; Martins-Mendes, Daniela; Vaz-Carneiro, António; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to validate and compare the existing systems developed to stratify subjects with diabetic foot ulcers by risk of consequent lower extremity amputation. We conducted a prospective cohort study on a consecutive series of patients (mean age of 68 years; 64% male) with active ulcer who were attending our Hospital Diabetic Foot Clinic (n = 293) from January 2010 to March 2013. At baseline, we collected information on the participants' characteristics and the relevant variables. Afterwards, we assessed the predictive value of each variable and each system's prognostic accuracy for amputation occurrence. During a median follow-up of 91 days (interquartile range of 98), ulcers healed in 62% of the subjects. Major amputation occurred in 7% and minor occurred in 17%. Previous ulcer or amputation, ulcer area, and gangrene were associated with amputation occurrence. Nephropathy, pulses number, ulcer aetiology, depth, and number were associated with risk of amputation. Systems typically presented sensitivity values ≥80% and negative likelihood ratios ≤0.5 for the highest risk group; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve ranged from 0.56 to 0.83 and positive likelihood ratios from 1.0 to 5.9. If one chose only major amputation as an outcome, positive predictive values were lower, and negative predictive values tended to be higher. System stages, grades, scores, and/or prognostics were generally associated with amputation, presenting overall substantial accuracy values. Nevertheless, great improvement is possible. A multicentre study validating and refining the existing systems is needed to improve clinical decision-making in this area. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Computer-Based Clinical Instrumentation for Processing and Analysis of Electroneuromyographic Signals in the Upper Limb

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nazeran, Homer

    2001-01-01

    ...) activity in the upper limb in humans, This system was designed around AMLAB analog modules and software objects called ICAMs, The system consists of a nerve stimulator block, a time domain EMG block...

  7. Unilateral versus bilateral upper limb training after stroke: the ULTRA-Stroke clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delden, A.E.Q.; Peper, C.E.; Nienhuys, K.; Zijp, N.I.; Beek, P.J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Unilateral and bilateral training protocols for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke represent conceptually contrasting approaches with the same ultimate goal. In a randomized controlled trial, we compared the merits of modified constraint-induced movement therapy,

  8. A review of nerve conduction studies in cases of suspected compression neuropathies of the upper limb.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neligan, A

    2010-01-01

    Entrapment neuropathies, particularly those affecting upper limbs, are common reasons for referral for nerve conduction studies (NCS). However, concordance between clinical findings and NCS findings, especially in patients being considered for intervention including decompressive surgery, has not been assessed.

  9. Non-Union in Upper Limb Fractures - Clinical Evaluation and Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, M V; Zwingmann, J; Jaeger, M; Hammer, T O; Südkamp, N P

    2016-01-01

    Although non-unions in the upper limb are rare different treatment options of this challenging situation are still affected with up to 20% of failure rate due to current literature. Risk factors for delayed and non-union of fractures are mainly the size of the fracture gap and bone loss of open fractures or in primary surgery followed by other relevant internal and external factors. In the upper limb non-unions of long bones are described with up to 30% after operative intervention. Especially in the upper limb range of motion is limited in non-union cases and disables adjacent joints like the shoulder, elbow and wrist hence reducing the total activity level of affected patients. Beside careful investigation of the causes leading to the non-union a comprehensive treatment plan should be defined to achieve successful results. Treatment can be non-operative in several, selected cases, but in the majority of cases revision surgery is necessary to achieve osseous healing. Our own experience showed that non-union in the upper limb are rare and account for only 1.7% of all surgical managed upper limb fractures. Non-union of upper limb fractures occur most frequently in clavicle fractures followed by humeral fractures. Atrophic non-union is the most frequent reason for osseous non-union (57%) and osseous healing after revision surgery in non-unions is completed after a mean of 6.45 months. This article will give a brief overview of the genesis, clinical evaluation, treatment options and recommendations in upper limb non-unions according to the current literature. Key words: fracture, upper-limb, non-union, osteosynthesis, cancellous bone-graft.

  10. Development of a virtual reality system for the rehabilitation of the upper limb after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Jacqueline; McDonough, Suzanne; Lennon, Sheila; McNeill, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) provides a three-dimensional computer representation of a real world or imaginary space through which a person can navigate and interact with objects to carry out specific tasks. One novel application of VR technology is in rehabilitation following stroke, particularly of the upper limb. This paper describes the development of a VR system for use in this field. This system gives the user the ability to interact with objects by touching, grasping and moving their upper limb.

  11. Functional rehabilitation of upper limb apraxia in poststroke patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    P?rez-M?rmol, Jose Manuel; Garc?a-R?os, M? Carmen; Barrero-Hernandez, Francisco J.; Molina-Torres, Guadalupe; Brown, Ted; Aguilar-Ferr?ndiz, Mar?a Encarnaci?n

    2015-01-01

    Background Upper limb apraxia is a common disorder associated with stroke that can reduce patients? independence levels in activities of daily living and increase levels of disability. Traditional rehabilitation programs designed to promote the recovery of upper limb function have mainly focused on restorative or compensatory approaches. However, no previous studies have been completed that evaluate a combined intervention method approach, where patients concurrently receive cognitive trainin...

  12. Outcome of selective motor fasciculotomy in the treatment of upper limb spasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Puligopu, Aneel Kumar; Purohit, Anirudh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to assess the outcome of selective motor fasciculotomy in relieving upper limb harmful resistant spasticity and thereby to improve motor functions in persons with cerebral palsy. Materials and Methods: Twenty people having cerebral palsy (12 females and 8 males) with age ranging from 5 to 35 (mean 12.85) years with upper limb resistant spasticity due to spastic hemiplegia (n=7), triplegia (n=6), and quadriplegia (n=7) were assessed using Modified Ashworth Scale, S...

  13. Non-traumatic lower limb amputation in patients with end-stage renal failure on dialysis: an Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhotra, Rajit A; Rodrigues, Beverly T; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Kan, George; Porter, David; Sangla, Kunwarjit S; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-08-01

    End-stage renal failure (ESRF) and dialysis have been identified as a risk factor for lower limb amputations (LLAs). High rate of ESRF amongst the Australian population has been reported, however till date no study has been published identifying magnitude and risk factors of LLA in subjects on renal dialysis. The study aims to document trends in the prevalence and identify risk factors of non-traumatic LLA in Australian patients on dialysis. A retrospective review of all patients (218) who attended the regional dialysis center between 1st January 2009 and 31st December 2013 was conducted. Demographic, clinical and biochemical data were analyzed. We identified a high prevalence of 13.3% of LLAs amongst Australian patients with ESRF on dialysis at our center. The associated risk factors were the presence of diabetes (OR 1.67 [1.49-1.88] p < 0.001), history of foot ulceration (OR 81 [18.20-360.48] p < 0.001), peripheral arterial disease (OR 31.29 [9.02-108.56] p < 0.001), peripheral neuropathy (OR 31.29 [9.02-108.56] p < 0.001), foot deformity (OR 23.62 [5.82-95.93] p < 0.001), retinopathy (OR 6.08 [2.64-14.02] p < 0.001), dyslipidemia (OR 4.6 [1.05-20.05] p= 0.049) and indigenous background (OR 3.39 [1.38-8.33] p= 0.01). 75% of the amputees had aboriginal heritage. We also identified higher HbA1c and CRP levels as well as low serum albumin, hemoglobin and vitamin D levels to have a strong association with LLAs (p < 0.05). There is high prevalence of LLAs amongst Australian indigenous patients with diabetes on dialysis in North Queensland. Other strongly associated risk factors include history of foot ulceration, foot deformity and peripheral neuropathy as well as high HbA1c levels and low serum albumin levels.

  14. Differences in characteristics between people with lower limb amputations who died before 12 weeks and those who survived: Short Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Godlwana

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The baseline determinants of survival following a non-traumatic lower limb amputation (LLA in participants in the Johannesburg metropolitan area are unknown.The aim of the study was to establish the characteristics of participants who had died by three months after LLAA longitudinal pre- test- post test study utilized participant interviews (n=73.  Consecutive  sampling  was  used  to  select  participants  who  met  the  inclusion criteria. Ethical clearance was obtained. Permission was obtained from the hospitals. Participants gave consent before taking part in the study. A demographic questionnaire, the EQ-5D, the Modified Household Economic and Social Status Index (HESSI and the Barthel Index (BI were used, to collect data. Participants  were  interviewed  preoperatively  and  then  followed  up  three  months  post-operatively  to  establish survival/ existence. Twenty-four  participants  (33%  had  died.  The  preoperative  median  Visual  Analogue  Scale  (VAS  of  the  EQ-5D was 60 and 70 showing no significant difference in quality of life (QOL between those who survived and those who  died  respectively.  The  preoperative  median  total  BI  score  was  20  and  19  showing  significantly  inferior  function for the deceased (p=0.01. The deceased were significantly older (p=0.009 used alcohol (p=0.02 and smoked tobacco (p=0.03.Being older, having poorer function, being a smoker and drinking alcohol preoperatively seem to decrease the chance of survival following LLA in Johannesburg.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Use of a Prophylactic Antibiotic for Patients Undergoing Lower Limb Amputation due to Diabetes or Vascular Illness in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Mateo; Orozco, Luis Esteban; Valderrama, Carlos Oliver; Londoño, Diana Isabel; Lugo, Luz Helena

    2017-04-01

    The use of a prophylactic antibiotic in an amputation surgery is a key element for the successful recovery of the patient. We aim to determine, from the perspective of the Colombian health system, the cost-effectiveness of administering a prophylactic antibiotic among patients undergoing lower limb amputation due to diabetes or vascular illness in Colombia. A decision tree was constructed to compare the use and nonuse of a prophylactic antibiotic. The probabilities of transition were obtained from studies identified from a systematic review of the clinical literature. The chosen health outcome was reduction in mortality due to prevention of infection. The costs were measured by expert consensus using the standard case methodology, and the resource valuation was carried out using national-level pricing manuals. Deterministic sensitivity, scenarios, and probabilistic analyses were conducted. In the base case, the use of a prophylactic antibiotic compared with nonuse was a dominant strategy. This result was consistent when considering different types of medications and when modifying most of the variables in the model. The use of a prophylactic antibiotic ceases to be dominant when the probability of infection is greater than 48%. The administration of a prophylactic antibiotic was a dominant strategy, which is a conclusion that holds in most cases examined; therefore, it is unlikely that the uncertainty around the estimation of costs and benefits change the results. We recommend creating policies oriented toward promoting the use of a prophylactic antibiotic during amputation surgery in Colombia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A robot hand testbed designed for enhancing embodiment and functional neurorehabilitation of body schema in subjects with upper limb impairment or loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Randall B; Chang, Eric; Tanner, Justin; Helms Tillery, Stephen I; Santos, Veronica J

    2015-01-01

    Many upper limb amputees experience an incessant, post-amputation "phantom limb pain" and report that their missing limbs feel paralyzed in an uncomfortable posture. One hypothesis is that efferent commands no longer generate expected afferent signals, such as proprioceptive feedback from changes in limb configuration, and that the mismatch of motor commands and visual feedback is interpreted as pain. Non-invasive therapeutic techniques for treating phantom limb pain, such as mirror visual feedback (MVF), rely on visualizations of postural changes. Advances in neural interfaces for artificial sensory feedback now make it possible to combine MVF with a high-tech "rubber hand" illusion, in which subjects develop a sense of embodiment with a fake hand when subjected to congruent visual and somatosensory feedback. We discuss clinical benefits that could arise from the confluence of known concepts such as MVF and the rubber hand illusion, and new technologies such as neural interfaces for sensory feedback and highly sensorized robot hand testbeds, such as the "BairClaw" presented here. Our multi-articulating, anthropomorphic robot testbed can be used to study proprioceptive and tactile sensory stimuli during physical finger-object interactions. Conceived for artificial grasp, manipulation, and haptic exploration, the BairClaw could also be used for future studies on the neurorehabilitation of somatosensory disorders due to upper limb impairment or loss. A remote actuation system enables the modular control of tendon-driven hands. The artificial proprioception system enables direct measurement of joint angles and tendon tensions while temperature, vibration, and skin deformation are provided by a multimodal tactile sensor. The provision of multimodal sensory feedback that is spatiotemporally consistent with commanded actions could lead to benefits such as reduced phantom limb pain, and increased prosthesis use due to improved functionality and reduced cognitive burden.

  17. A robot hand testbed designed for enhancing embodiment and functional neurorehabilitation of body schema in subjects with upper limb impairment or loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall B. Hellman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many upper limb amputees experience an incessant, post-amputation phantom limb pain and report that their missing limbs feel paralyzed in an uncomfortable posture. One hypothesis is that efferent commands no longer generate expected afferent signals, such as proprioceptive feedback from changes in limb configuration, and that the mismatch of motor commands and visual feedback is interpreted as pain. Non-invasive therapeutic techniques for treating phantom limb pain, such as mirror visual feedback (MVF, rely on visualizations of postural changes. Advances in neural interfaces for artificial sensory feedback now make it possible to combine MVF with a high-tech rubber hand illusion, in which subjects develop a sense of embodiment with a fake hand when subjected to congruent visual and somatosensory feedback. We discuss clinical benefits that could arise from the confluence of known concepts such as MVF and the rubber hand illusion, and new technologies such as neural interfaces for sensory feedback and highly sensorized robot hand testbeds, such as the BairClaw presented here. Our multi-articulating, anthropomorphic robot testbed can be used to study proprioceptive and tactile sensory stimuli during physical finger-object interactions. Conceived for artificial grasp, manipulation, and haptic exploration, the BairClaw could also be used for future studies on the neurorehabilitation of somatosensory disorders due to upper limb impairment or loss. A remote actuation system enables the modular control of tendon-driven hands. The artificial proprioception system enables direct measurement of joint angles and tendon tensions while temperature, vibration, and skin deformation are provided by a multimodal tactile sensor. The provision of multimodal sensory feedback that is spatiotemporally consistent with commanded actions could lead to benefits such as reduced phantom limb pain, and increased prosthesis use due to improved functionality and reduced

  18. Differences in muscle power between the dominant and nondominant upper limbs of baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Takanori; Demura, Shinichi; Takahashi, Kenji; Demura, Gou; Mori, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    We examined the differences in muscle power between the dominant and nondominant upper limbs of 33 healthy, right-handed, university baseball players (mean age, 20.4 ± 1.1 years) with an average baseball experience >11 years. After measuring maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of hand grip, elbow flexion, and shoulder internal rotation in both upper limbs, the muscle power of each joint was measured at 40%, 50%, and 60% MVC. No significant differences were observed in the main factors affecting MVC and elbow flexion power loads between dominant and nondominant upper limbs. For handgrip power, load factors at 40% MVC in the dominant hand were lower than those at 60% MVC in the same hand and those at 50% and 60% MVC in the nondominant hand. Significant differences were observed in shoulder internal rotation power between dominant and nondominant upper limbs, with the dominant limb having greater power at all loads. Correlations between muscle power of both upper limbs for handgrip and elbow flexion were significant and moderately high at all loads. For shoulder internal rotation power, the degree of correlation was significant and moderately high at 40% MVC but low to moderate at 50% and 60% MVC. Therefore, baseball players have marked lateral dominance in shoulder internal rotation power unlike handgrip and elbow flexion power, although the relationship between shoulder internal rotation muscle powers of both upper limbs becomes lower with increasing load. The dominance of muscle power of each joint varied even in the same upper limb. It is thus beneficial for baseball players to train with even loads on both arms or adopt simultaneous workout of both arms after adjusting for strength differences.

  19. Entrapment neuropathies in the upper and lower limbs: anatomy and MRI features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Jacobson, Jon A; Jamadar, David A; Gandikota, Girish; Brandon, Catherine; Morag, Yoav; Fessell, David P; Kim, Sung-Moon

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral nerve entrapment occurs at specific anatomic locations. Familiarity with the anatomy and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of nerve entrapment syndromes is important for accurate diagnosis and early treatment of entrapment neuropathies. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the normal anatomy of peripheral nerves in the upper and lower limbs and to review the MRI features of common disorders affecting the peripheral nerves, both compressive/entrapment and noncompressive, involving the suprascapular nerve, the axillary nerve, the radial nerve, the ulnar nerve, and the median verve in the upper limb and the sciatic nerve, the common peroneal nerve, the tibial nerve, and the interdigital nerves in the lower limb.

  20. The prevalence of symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among soldiers with amputation of a limb or spinal injury: a report from a rehabilitation centre in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyasinghe, N L; de Zoysa, P; Bandara, K M K C; Bartholameuz, N A; Bandara, J M U J

    2012-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder has been identified as one of the most commonly occurring mental illnesses in combatants. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among soldiers who had undergone amputation of a lower or an upper limb or sustained a spinal cord injury in the battlefield, and to compare the prevalence among these categories. The research presented seeks to increase the awareness of this condition among those treating war casualties so that appropriate treatment choices could be made to address them. The study was carried out in 2009 at a rehabilitation centre for combatants of war. Data were collected from 96 male army veterans between the ages of 18-49 years using a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the Impact of Event Scale and the PTSD symptom scale. Soldiers with injuries sustained at least four weeks prior to the study were selected by a convenience sampling technique. Soldiers with multiple injuries, head injuries or those diagnosed with psychiatric disorders were excluded. The results revealed that 41.7% of the study population was compatible with the diagnosis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Within the three groups, 42.5% of the lower limb amputees, 33.3% of the upper limb amputees and 45.7% of the participants with spinal cord injury had symptoms compatible with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. There was no difference between the prevalence among the different injury categories considered. This study highlights the need to pay more attention in providing psychological care as a part of the overall health management of injured combatants. Early preparation of soldiers for stressors of war and screening for and proper management of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder will improve the overall outcome of rehabilitation.

  1. Needs, Preferences, and Functional Abilities of Veterans and Service Members with Upper-Limb Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    sensory feedback in patient perception of voluntary movement and assessment of the performance of sound-handed individuals and amputees with real and...Project’s Goals: To develop treatment strategies for improving executive function and memory following TBI. List of The Specific Aims: 1. Develop...acceptability of the DEKA Arm in a home environment. Data from this study will help inform future VA Prosthetics and Sensory Aids clinical guidelines for

  2. Cardiac autonomic recovery after strength exercise in lower and upper limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidoro, Naerton JoséXavier; Santana, Milana Drumond Ramos; Valenti, Vitor E; Garner, David M; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Strength exercises influence the cardiovascular system by promoting autonomic adjustments induced by the increased metabolic demand and consequent increase in local blood flow. However, it is unclear whether there are differences between upper and lower limbs. We aimedto evaluate recovery of cardiac autonomic modulation afterstrengthexercise in upper and lower limbs. Methods We analysed 29 healthy male subjects physically active but not professional athletes aged between 20 and 35 years old. We analysed heart rate variability (HRV) in the time and frequency domain 0-10 minutes before exercise (T1), 0-10 minutes after exercise (T2), 10-20 minutes after exercise (T3) and 20-30 minutes after exercise (T4). Results Regarding the time domain we observed that the SDNN, pNN50 and RMSSD were reduced (P lower limbs. In the frequency domain analysis, we observed stronger significancefor the increased values of LF (nu) (P = 0.0008) and LF/HF ratio (P = 0.0008) and for reduction in HF (nu) (P = 0.0008) in the lower limbs compared to upper limbs (LF (nu) - P = 0.0015, LF/HF ratio - P = 0.0028 and HF (nu) - P = 0.0028). Conclusion Strength exercise acutely induced more pronounced cardiac autonomic responses in lower limbs compared to upper limbs.

  3. Determining 1-Yr Prosthetic Use for Mobility Prognoses for Community-Dwelling Adults with Lower-Limb Amputation: Development of a Clinical Prediction Rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christopher Kevin; Young, Rebecca S; Ow-Wing, Carlyn; Karimi, Parisa

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a prognostic clinical prediction rule to identify people not achieving community walking level prosthetic use after 1 yr. This is a prospective longitudinal cohort study of community-dwelling adults with lower-limb amputations recruited from support groups and prosthetic clinics. Participants completed Activities-specific Balance Confidence and Houghton prosthetic use for mobility self-report scales and the Berg Balance Scale. The clinical prediction rule was developed using multivariate logistic regression, receiver operating curves, and probability statistics to identify people not achieving community walking level prosthetic use (Houghton scores prosthetic walking level with excellent accuracy (area under the curve >0.96) using four criteria: initial Houghton, Activities-specific Balance Confidence, and Berg Balance Scale tasks 9 (retrieve object from floor) and 10 (look behind over shoulders). Failure to exceed cutoff scores in two or more criteria yielded posttest probability of not reaching community walking prosthetic use 1 yr later for 90% of participants or higher. Accurate 1-yr prosthetic use for mobility prognoses can be obtained by screening prosthetic use, balance confidence, and balance ability to identify community-dwelling people with lower-limb amputations unlikely to achieve community walking prosthetic use.

  4. Number of test trials needed for performance stability and interrater reliability of the one leg stand test in patients with a major non-traumatic lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Nielsen, Anni Østergaard; Topp, Ulla Madsen; Jakobsen, Berit; Nielsen, Kirsten Juel; Juul-Larsen, Helle Gybel; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2014-01-01

    Balance is beneficial for daily functioning of patients with a lower limb amputation and sometimes assessed by the one-leg stand test (OLST). The aims of the study were to examine (1) the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability, (2) the interrater reliability of the OLST in patients with a major non-traumatic lower limb amputation, and (3) to provide a test procedure. Thirteen women and 23 men with a mean age (SD) of 67.4 (10.6) years; 19 below-knee and 17 above-knee amputees who performed the OLST at a mean of 14.5 (4.5) days post-amputation. All patients performed five timed OLST-trials with 1-min rest intervals between trials, supervised by a physical therapist, of which 28 included in the reliability-part conducted this twice, separated with a mean of 3.4 (0.78)h. Repeated measures Friedman determined the number of trials needed to ensure stable OLST-scores while the ICC1.1, the standard error of measurement (SEM) and the smallest real difference (SRD) determined reproducibility. No learning curve was found for the five OLST-trials (p=0.241), with the best of the five trials reaching a median (25-75% quartile) of 2.9 (1.7-8.2)s, and with only six patients able to stand for more than 10s. The ICC (95% CI), SEM and SRD were respectively 0.87 (0.61-0.96), 0.99 s and 2.74 s. Findings suggest that the best of five trials be used for the OLST in unilateral non-traumatic amputee patients as we found excellent interrater reliability and acceptable agreement when using this score. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Diabetes-related major lower limb amputation incidence is strongly related to diabetic foot service provision and improves with enhancement of services: peer review of the South-West of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisey, R B; Abbott, A; Levenson, R; Harrington, A; Browne, D; Moore, J; Bamford, M; Roe, M

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between high diabetes-related lower limb amputation incidence and foot care services in the South-West region of England. The introduction of 10 key elements of foot care service provision in one area of the South-West resulted in stabilization of foot ulcer incidence and sustained reduction in amputation incidence from 2007. Services introduced included administrative support, standardized general practice foot screening, improved community podiatry staffing, hospital multidisciplinary foot clinics, effective care pathways, availability of an orthotist and audit. Peer reviews of the region's diabetes foot care services were undertaken to assess delivery of these service provisions and compare this with major amputation incidence in other regions with data provided by Yorkshire and Humber Public Health Observatory Hospital Episode Statistics. Recommendations were made to improve service provision. In 2015 changes in service provision and amputation incidence were reviewed. Initial reviews in 2013 showed that the 3-year diabetes-related major amputation incidence correlated inversely with adequate delivery of diabetes foot care services (P=0.0024, adjusted R 2 =0.51). Repeat reviews in 2015 found that two or more foot care service improvements were reported by six diabetes foot care providers, with improvement in outcomes. The negative relationship between major amputation incidence and service provision remained strong both in the period 2012-2015 and in the year 2015 only (P ≤0.0012, adjusted R 2 =0.56, and P= 0.0005, R 2 =0.62, respectively). Major diabetes-related lower limb amputation incidence is significantly inversely correlated with foot care services provision. Introduction of more effective service provision resulted in significant reductions in major amputation incidence within 2 years. Failure to improve unsatisfactory service provision resulted in continued high amputation incidence. © 2017 The Authors. Diabetic

  6. Peripheral Stent Thrombosis Leading to Acute Limb Ischemia and Major Amputation: Incidence and Risk Factors in the Aortoiliac and Femoropopliteal Arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr [King’s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Imaging Sciences Division, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Al-Lamki, Said A. M. [The Royal Hospital, Department of Radiology (Oman); Parthipun, Aneeta [King’s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Imaging Sciences Division, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Spiliopoulos, Stavros [ATTIKO Athens University Hospital, 2nd Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Unit (Greece); Patel, Sanjay Dhanji [King’s Health Partners, Academic Department of Surgery, Cardiovascular Division, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Paraskevopoulos, Ioannis [King’s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Imaging Sciences Division, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Zayed, Hany [King’s Health Partners, Academic Department of Surgery, Cardiovascular Division, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Diamantopoulos, Athanasios [King’s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Imaging Sciences Division, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    PurposeTo report the real-world incidence and risk factors of stent thrombosis in the aortoiliac and femoropopliteal arteries in case of bare nitinol stent (BNS) or covered nitinol stent (CNS) placement from a single-centre retrospective audit.Materials and MethodsMedical records of consecutive patients treated with peripheral stent placement for claudication or critical limb ischemia were audited for definite stent thrombosis defined as imaging confirmed stent thrombosis that presented as acute limb-threatening ischemia. Cases were stratified between aortoiliac and femoropopliteal anatomy. Cox regression analysis was employed to adjust for baseline clinical and procedural confounders and identify predictors of stent thrombosis and major limb loss.Results256 patients (n = 277 limbs) were analysed over a 5-year period (2009–2014) including 117 aortoiliac stents (34 CNS; 12.8 ± 5.0 cm and 83 BNS; 7.8 ± 4.0 cm) and 160 femoropopliteal ones (60 CNS; 21.1 ± 11.0 cm and 100 BNS; 17.5 ± 11.9 cm). Median follow-up was 1 year. Overall stent thrombosis rate was 6.1% (17/277) after a median of 43 days (range 2–192 days) and affected almost exclusively the femoropopliteal segment (12/60 in the CNS cohort vs. 4/100 in the BNS; p = 0.001). Annualized stent thrombosis rates (per 100 person-years) were 12.5% in case of CNS and 1.4% in case of BNS (HR 6.3, 95% CI 2.4–17.9; p = 0.0002). Corresponding major amputations rates were 8.7 and 2.5%, respectively (HR 4.5, 95% CI 2.7–27.9; p = 0.0006). On multivariable analysis, critical leg ischemia and CNS placement were the only predictors of stent thrombosis. Diabetes, critical leg ischemia, femoropopliteal anatomy, long stents and CNS were independent predictors of major amputations.ConclusionsPlacement of long femoropopliteal covered nitinol stents is associated with an increased incidence of acute stent thrombosis and ensuing major amputation. Risks are significantly lower in the aortoiliac vessels

  7. Using commercial video games for upper limb stroke rehabilitation: is this the way of the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Eva; Cotea, Cristina; Pullman, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of people living with poststroke sequelae has stimulated the search for novel ways of providing poststroke rehabilitation without putting additional stress on overburdened health care systems. One of them is the use of commercially available technology and off-the-shelf video games for hemiparetic upper limb rehabilitation. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched using key word synonyms for stroke, upper limb, and video games. Included studies investigated upper limb stroke rehabilitation using commercially available consoles and video games, reported outcomes that included measures of upper limb functionality, and were published in a peer-reviewed journal written in English. Thirteen studies were identified - 6 published as full articles and 7 as abstracts. Studies were generally small and only 3 were randomized. The gaming systems investigated were the Nintendo Wii (n = 10), EyeToy PlayStation (n = 2), and CyWee Z (n = 1). The Nintendo Wii appears to provide the greatest benefits to patients, with improvements seen in upper extremity function measures such as joint range of motion, hand motor function, grip strength, and dexterity. Three studies indicate that video therapy appears to be safe and that long-term improvements continue at follow-up. At present, the evidence that the use of commercial video games in rehabilitation improves upper limb functionality after stroke is very limited. However, this approach has the potential to provide easily available and affordable stroke rehabilitation therapy in settings where access to therapy is limited by geographical or financial constraints.

  8. Primary suture of amputation wound: pro et contra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muminagic, Sahib N

    2011-01-01

    During the First World War and the Second World War more than 80 % of wounded persons had injuries of upper or lower limbs. In the recent war in the Former Yugoslavia the percentage of persons with these injuries was above 80%. Each war is also characterized by the high percentage of wounded persons with amputations of upper or lower extremities. These amputations occurred mostly in the cases of polytrauma. In other cases we faced with severely wounded extremities with an extensive destruction of soft tissues, bones, blood vessels and joints, where the amputation is the only possible intervention to save the patient. In the previous World Wars, the surgeons have tried to shorten the time of treatment and to accept the surgical technique, by the application of primary suture of the wound. During the aggression on Bosnia and Herzegovina we were faced with a large number of wounded persons with amputations i.e. cases where we applied the primary suture. The results were still surprising and in many cases the wounds had primarily healed. The results were better when they were using primary suture on the upper extremities, measured at 61.9 % while the percentage of using the same suture on the lower limbs was of 48.8 %. The results of the war year 1995 were improved in comparison to the percentages listed above. The statistical analysis indicated that early application of the primary suture to the amputation wound was possible and largely successful, but, only when performed under certain conditions.

  9. Congenital constriction ring syndrome of the limbs: A prospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the upper limb malformations involved 42 digits; in the lower limb malformations involved 33 toes, one foot and fi ve legs. Four main types of lesions were found: constriction rings, intrauterine amputations, acrosyndactyly, and simple syndactyly. Conclusion: Congenital constriction ring syndrome is of uncertain aetiology ...

  10. Overlapping of Sturge-Weber Syndrome and Klippel-Trenaunay Weber Syndrome With Upper Limb Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ali Ebrahimi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The phakomatoses are a group of clinical disorders that are linked. Overlap between Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS and Klippel-Trenaunay Weber syndrome (KTWS is very rarely. We presented a case of SWS with KTWS that involved upper limb. Case Presentation A 24- year-old male with extensive port-wine staining over left side of his face, extending to lower eyelids, cheeks, neck and left upper extremity. The size of mid arm circle in left side was 34 cm and in right side was 27 cm. Conclusions This is a case of overlap SWS and KTWS that involved upper limb.

  11. Upper Limb Portable Motion Analysis System Based on Inertial Technology for Neurorehabilitation Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique J. Gómez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Here an inertial sensor-based monitoring system for measuring and analyzing upper limb movements is presented. The final goal is the integration of this motion-tracking device within a portable rehabilitation system for brain injury patients. A set of four inertial sensors mounted on a special garment worn by the patient provides the quaternions representing the patient upper limb’s orientation in space. A kinematic model is built to estimate 3D upper limb motion for accurate therapeutic evaluation. The human upper limb is represented as a kinematic chain of rigid bodies with three joints and six degrees of freedom. Validation of the system has been performed by co-registration of movements with a commercial optoelectronic tracking system. Successful results are shown that exhibit a high correlation among signals provided by both devices and obtained at the Institut Guttmann Neurorehabilitation Hospital.

  12. Research, design and development project Myoelectric Prosthesis of Upper Limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiano, L; Montaner, E; Flecha, A

    2007-01-01

    A Research Design and Development Project was developed of a myoelectric prosthesis for a pediatric patient presenting congenital amputation of the left forearm below the elbow. A multidisciplinary work-team was formed for this goal, in order to solve the several (/various) aspects regarding this project (mechanical, ergonomics, electronics, physical). The prosthesis as an electromechanical device was divided in several blocks, trying to achieve a focused development for each stage, acording to requisites. A mechanical prototype of the prothesis was designed and built along with the circuitry needed for EMG aquisition, control logic and drivers. Having acomplished the previuos stages, the project is now dealing with the definitions of the interface between the prosthesis and the patient, with promising perspectives

  13. Research, design and development project Myoelectric Prosthesis of Upper Limb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galiano, L; Montaner, E; Flecha, A [Bioparx, J Hernandez 1101, Parana, ERios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    A Research Design and Development Project was developed of a myoelectric prosthesis for a pediatric patient presenting congenital amputation of the left forearm below the elbow. A multidisciplinary work-team was formed for this goal, in order to solve the several (/various) aspects regarding this project (mechanical, ergonomics, electronics, physical). The prosthesis as an electromechanical device was divided in several blocks, trying to achieve a focused development for each stage, acording to requisites. A mechanical prototype of the prothesis was designed and built along with the circuitry needed for EMG aquisition, control logic and drivers. Having acomplished the previuos stages, the project is now dealing with the definitions of the interface between the prosthesis and the patient, with promising perspectives.

  14. An upper limb mathematical model of an oil palm harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumit, N. P.; Rambely, A. S.; BMT, Shamsul; Shahriman A., B.; Ng Y., G.; Deros, B. M.; Zailina, H.; Goh, Y. M.; Arumugam, Manohar; Ismail, I. A.; Abdul Hafiz A., R.

    2014-09-01

    The main purpose of this article is to develop a mathematical model of human body during harvesting via Kane's method. In this paper, a 2-D closed-kinematic biomechanical model that represents a harvesting movement is developed. The model of six segments consisted of upper right arm, right forearm, harvesting equipment, left forearm, upper left arm, and upper part of trunk. Finally, the inverse dynamic equations are represented in matrix form.

  15. Upper-limb sensory impairments after stroke: Self-reported experiences of daily life and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Carlsson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe stroke survivors’ experiences of sensory impairment in the upper limb, the influence of such impairment on daily life, coping strategies used, and sensory training for the affected hand. Design: A qualitative study with a content analysis approach. Subjects: Fifteen post-stroke patients interviewed individually. Results: Five categories emerged from the data: “Changed and varied perception of the sensation”; “Affected movement control”; “Problems using the hand in daily life”; “Various strategies to cope with upper limb disability”; and “Lack of sensory training”. Numbness and tingling, changes in temperature sensitivity, and increased sensitivity to touch and pain were reported. Many subjects had difficulty adjusting their grip force and performing movements with precision. It was problematic and mentally fatiguing managing personal care and carrying out household and leisure activities. Practical adaptations, compensation with vision, increased concentration, and use of the less affected hand were strategies used to overcome difficulties. Despite their problems very few subjects had received any specific sensory training for the hand. Conclusion: Stroke survivors perceive that sensory impairment of the upper limb has a highly negative impact on daily life, but specific rehabilitation for the upper limb is lacking. These findings imply that the clinical management of upper limb sensory impairment after stroke requires more attention.

  16. CLINICAL REABILITATION OF UPPER LIMB IN CHRONIC STROKE IN PORTUGAL A CROSS SECTIONAL SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Vieira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: More than 77% of stroke survivors have upper limb dysfunction. The scientific evidence for interventions in upper limb rehabilitation in stroke has shown variable results. To improve health care treatments in this domain it is needed to know what modalities are actually being used by physiotherapists. Methods: A national web-based survey focused in characterizing the profile of Portuguese physiotherapists working in post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation was conducted in 237 health institutions (n= 462 physiotherapists. The recruitment was conducted from August to December 2014. Analytic and descriptive analysis were used. Results: A total of 179 physiotherapists from 64 different locations from Portugal answered the survey, with a rate of response of 38.7%. The average age of respondents was 29.25±6.4 years old and predominantly finished the graduation or bachelor degree between 2001 and 2010. More than half hadn´t carried out any specialization in neurologic rehabilitation area. The top 5 modalities most used in the rehabilitation of upper limb in acute stroke are Goal Oriented Tasks (93.4% n=141, Motor Learning (89.4% n=135, Passive Mobilization (88.7% n=134, Task Repetition (87.4% n=132 and Bobath/Neurodevelopmental Therapy (86.9% n=131. Conclusions: The main modalities used for physiotherapists in upper limb rehabilitation in acute stroke have sparse levels of evidence. It is important to alert teachers, formers, physiotherapists and students for interventions with supported scientific results.

  17. Design and preliminary evaluation of an exoskeleton for upper limb resistance training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzong-Ming; Chen, Dar-Zen

    2012-06-01

    Resistance training is a popular form of exercise recommended by national health organizations, such as the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Heart Association (AHA). This form of training is available for most populations. A compact design of upper limb exoskeleton mechanism for homebased resistance training using a spring-loaded upper limb exoskeleton with a three degree-of-freedom shoulder joint and a one degree-of-freedom elbow joint allows a patient or a healthy individual to move the upper limb with multiple joints in different planes. It can continuously increase the resistance by adjusting the spring length to train additional muscle groups and reduce the number of potential injuries to upper limb joints caused by the mass moment of inertia of the training equipment. The aim of this research is to perform a preliminary evaluation of the designed function by adopting an appropriate motion analysis system and experimental design to verify our prototype of the exoskeleton and determine the optimal configuration of the spring-loaded upper limb exoskeleton.

  18. A Systematic Review of Bilateral Upper Limb Training Devices for Poststroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. (Lex E. Q. van Delden

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In stroke rehabilitation, bilateral upper limb training is gaining ground. As a result, a growing number of mechanical and robotic bilateral upper limb training devices have been proposed. Objective. To provide an overview and qualitative evaluation of the clinical applicability of bilateral upper limb training devices. Methods. Potentially relevant literature was searched in the PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases from 1990 onwards. Devices were categorized as mechanical or robotic (according to the PubMed MeSH term of robotics. Results. In total, 6 mechanical and 14 robotic bilateral upper limb training devices were evaluated in terms of mechanical and electromechanical characteristics, supported movement patterns, targeted part and active involvement of the upper limb, training protocols, outcomes of clinical trials, and commercial availability. Conclusion. Initial clinical results are not yet of such caliber that the devices in question and the concepts on which they are based are firmly established. However, the clinical outcomes do not rule out the possibility that the concept of bilateral training and the accompanied devices may provide a useful extension of currently available forms of therapy. To actually demonstrate their (surplus value, more research with adequate experimental, dose-matched designs, and sufficient statistical power are required.

  19. Individuals' perception about upper limb influence on participation after stroke: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjai, Renata Morales; Freitas, Sandra Maria Sbeghen Ferreira de; Silva, Flavia Paiva da; Alouche, Sandra Regina

    2017-12-10

    Background Stroke can compromise upper limb performance and influence the individual's participation in real life situations. Objective To investigate how components of body function and activity affect the individuals' self-perception of their participation after stroke. Methods In this observational study, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health was used as model. Body function was assessed by palmar grip and pinch strength; Ashworth modified scale; Fugl-Meyer scale; and Motor-Free Visual Perception Test. The Purdue Pegboard Test and the aiming movement performance measured the activity. Upper limb participation was analyzed by the Hand Function domain of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). Thirty-four individuals after chronic stroke were divided into two groups, according to their Hand function SIS scores (severe and non-severe). Differences between groups were analyzed. Relationships between individual variables and the SIS score were verified. A regression model was proposed. Results Strength and the Fugl-Meyer scale score were greater for the non-severe group. Muscle tone was greater for the severe group only in the wrist flexors. None of the activity variables differed between groups. The upper limb Fugl-Meyer score was able to predict 79% of the individuals in SIS Hand Function groups. Conclusion Sensory-motor impairment, as measured by the upper limb Fugl-Meyer scale, can explain the influence of the upper limbs on participation in the individuals' perception.

  20. Electrical stimulation and iterative learning control for functional recovery in the upper limb post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadmore, Katie; Exell, Timothy; Freeman, Christopher; Kutlu, Mustafa; Rogers, Eric; Hughes, Ann-Marie; Hallewell, Emma; Burridge, Jane

    2013-06-01

    Therapies using functional electrical stimulation (FES) in conjunction with practice of everyday tasks have proven effective in facilitating recovery of upper limb function following stroke. The aim of the current study is to develop a multi-channel electrical stimulation system that precisely controls the assistance provided in goal-orientated tasks through use of advanced model-based 'iterative learning control' (ILC) algorithms to facilitate functional motor recovery of the upper limb post-stroke. FES was applied to three muscle groups in the upper limb (the anterior deltoid, triceps and wrist extensors) to assist hemiparetic, chronic stroke participants to perform a series of functional tasks with real objects, including closing a drawer, turning on a light switch and repositioning an object. Position data from the participants' impaired upper limb was collected using a Microsoft Kinect® and was compared to an ideal reference. ILC used data from previous attempts at the task to moderate the FES signals applied to each muscle group on a trial by trial basis to reduce performance error whilst supporting voluntary effort by the participant. The clinical trial is on-going. Preliminary results show improvements in performance accuracy for each muscle group, as well as improvements in clinical outcome measures pre and post 18 training sessions. Thus, the feasibility of applying precisely controlled FES to three muscle groups in the upper limb to facilitate functional reach and grasp movements post stroke has been demonstrated.

  1. Multisession, noninvasive closed-loop neuroprosthetic control of grasping by upper limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agashe, H A; Paek, A Y; Contreras-Vidal, J L

    2016-01-01

    Upper limb amputation results in a severe reduction in the quality of life of affected individuals due to their inability to easily perform activities of daily living. Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that translate grasping intent from the brain's neural activity into prosthetic control may increase the level of natural control currently available in myoelectric prostheses. Current BMI techniques demonstrate accurate arm position and single degree-of-freedom grasp control but are invasive and require daily recalibration. In this study we tested if transradial amputees (A1 and A2) could control grasp preshaping in a prosthetic device using a noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG)-based closed-loop BMI system. Participants attempted to grasp presented objects by controlling two grasping synergies, in 12 sessions performed over 5 weeks. Prior to closed-loop control, the first six sessions included a decoder calibration phase using action observation by the participants; thereafter, the decoder was fixed to examine neuroprosthetic performance in the absence of decoder recalibration. Ability of participants to control the prosthetic was measured by the success rate of grasping; ie, the percentage of trials within a session in which presented objects were successfully grasped. Participant A1 maintained a steady success rate (63±3%) across sessions (significantly above chance [41±5%] for 11 sessions). Participant A2, who was under the influence of pharmacological treatment for depression, hormone imbalance, pain management (for phantom pain as well as shoulder joint inflammation), and drug dependence, achieved a success rate of 32±2% across sessions (significantly above chance [27±5%] in only two sessions). EEG signal quality was stable across sessions, but the decoders created during the first six sessions showed variation, indicating EEG features relevant to decoding at a smaller timescale (100ms) may not be stable. Overall, our results show that (a) an EEG

  2. Upper limb posture estimation in robotic and virtual reality-based rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Camilo; Ardanza, Aitor; Molina-Rueda, F; Cuesta-Gómez, A; Unzueta, Luis; Epelde, Gorka; Ruiz, Oscar E; De Mauro, Alessandro; Florez, Julian

    2014-01-01

    New motor rehabilitation therapies include virtual reality (VR) and robotic technologies. In limb rehabilitation, limb posture is required to (1) provide a limb realistic representation in VR games and (2) assess the patient improvement. When exoskeleton devices are used in the therapy, the measurements of their joint angles cannot be directly used to represent the posture of the patient limb, since the human and exoskeleton kinematic models differ. In response to this shortcoming, we propose a method to estimate the posture of the human limb attached to the exoskeleton. We use the exoskeleton joint angles measurements and the constraints of the exoskeleton on the limb to estimate the human limb joints angles. This paper presents (a) the mathematical formulation and solution to the problem, (b) the implementation of the proposed solution on a commercial exoskeleton system for the upper limb rehabilitation, (c) its integration into a rehabilitation VR game platform, and (d) the quantitative assessment of the method during elbow and wrist analytic training. Results show that this method properly estimates the limb posture to (i) animate avatars that represent the patient in VR games and (ii) obtain kinematic data for the patient assessment during elbow and wrist analytic rehabilitation.

  3. Upper Limb Posture Estimation in Robotic and Virtual Reality-Based Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Cortés

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New motor rehabilitation therapies include virtual reality (VR and robotic technologies. In limb rehabilitation, limb posture is required to (1 provide a limb realistic representation in VR games and (2 assess the patient improvement. When exoskeleton devices are used in the therapy, the measurements of their joint angles cannot be directly used to represent the posture of the patient limb, since the human and exoskeleton kinematic models differ. In response to this shortcoming, we propose a method to estimate the posture of the human limb attached to the exoskeleton. We use the exoskeleton joint angles measurements and the constraints of the exoskeleton on the limb to estimate the human limb joints angles. This paper presents (a the mathematical formulation and solution to the problem, (b the implementation of the proposed solution on a commercial exoskeleton system for the upper limb rehabilitation, (c its integration into a rehabilitation VR game platform, and (d the quantitative assessment of the method during elbow and wrist analytic training. Results show that this method properly estimates the limb posture to (i animate avatars that represent the patient in VR games and (ii obtain kinematic data for the patient assessment during elbow and wrist analytic rehabilitation.

  4. Upper Limb Posture Estimation in Robotic and Virtual Reality-Based Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Camilo; Ardanza, Aitor; Molina-Rueda, F.; Cuesta-Gómez, A.; Ruiz, Oscar E.

    2014-01-01

    New motor rehabilitation therapies include virtual reality (VR) and robotic technologies. In limb rehabilitation, limb posture is required to (1) provide a limb realistic representation in VR games and (2) assess the patient improvement. When exoskeleton devices are used in the therapy, the measurements of their joint angles cannot be directly used to represent the posture of the patient limb, since the human and exoskeleton kinematic models differ. In response to this shortcoming, we propose a method to estimate the posture of the human limb attached to the exoskeleton. We use the exoskeleton joint angles measurements and the constraints of the exoskeleton on the limb to estimate the human limb joints angles. This paper presents (a) the mathematical formulation and solution to the problem, (b) the implementation of the proposed solution on a commercial exoskeleton system for the upper limb rehabilitation, (c) its integration into a rehabilitation VR game platform, and (d) the quantitative assessment of the method during elbow and wrist analytic training. Results show that this method properly estimates the limb posture to (i) animate avatars that represent the patient in VR games and (ii) obtain kinematic data for the patient assessment during elbow and wrist analytic rehabilitation. PMID:25110698

  5. Visualisation of upper limb activity using spirals - a new approach to the 1 assessment of daily prosthesis usage

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwell, AE; Kenney, LPJ; Granat, MH; Thies, SBA; Head, JS; Galpin, AJ

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current outcome measures used in upper limb myoelectric prosthesis studies include clinical tests of function and self-report questionnaires on real world prosthesis use. Research in other cohorts has questioned both the validity of self-report as an activity assessment tool and the relationship between clinical functionality and real-world upper limb activity. Previously1 we reported the first results of monitoring upper-limb prosthesis use. \\ud However, the data visualisation te...

  6. The Armeo Spring as training tool to improve upper limb functionality in multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Gijbels, Domien; Lamers, Ilse; Kerkhofs, Lore; Alders, Geert; Knippenberg, Els; Feys, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Few research in multiple sclerosis (MS) has focused on physical rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction, though the latter strongly influences independent performance of activities of daily living. Upper limb rehabilitation technology could hold promise for complementing traditional MS therapy. Consequently, this pilot study aimed to examine the feasibility of an 8-week mechanical-assisted training program for improving upper limb muscle strength and functional capacity i...

  7. Mirror therapy for upper limb rehabilitation in chronic patients after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Mota,Dreyzialle Vila Nova; Meireles,André Luís Ferreira de; Viana,Marcelo Tavares; Almeida,Rita de Cássia de Albuquerque

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Individuals with stroke sequelae present changes in the postural alignment and muscle strength associated with hemiplegia or hemiparesis. Mirror therapy is a technique that aims to improve the motor function of the paretic limb. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mirror therapy, associated with conventional physiotherapy, for range of motion (ROM), degree of spasticity of the affected upper limb, and the level of independence in the activ...

  8. Modulation of upper limb joint work and power during sculling while ballasted with varying loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Jessy; Rouard, Annie Hélène; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2017-05-01

    The human musculoskeletal system must modulate work and power output in response to substantial alterations in mechanical demands associated with different tasks. In particular, in water, upper limb muscles must perform net positive work to replace the energy lost against the dissipative fluid load. Where in the upper limb are work and power developed? Is mechanical output modulated similarly at all joints, or are certain muscle groups favored? This study examined, for the first time, how work and power per stroke are distributed at the upper limb joints in seven male participants sculling while ballasted with 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 kg. Upper limb kinematics was captured and used to animate body virtual geometry. Net wrist, elbow and shoulder joint work and power were subsequently computed through a novel approach integrating unsteady numerical fluid flow simulations and inverse dynamics modeling. Across a threefold increase in load, total work and power significantly increased from 0.38±0.09 to 0.67±0.13 J kg -1 , and 0.47±0.06 to 1.14±0.16 W kg -1 , respectively. Shoulder and elbow equally supplied >97% of the upper limb total work and power, coherent with the proximo-distal gradient of work performance in the limbs of terrestrial animals. Individual joint relative contributions remained constant, as observed on land during tasks necessitating no net work. The apportionment of higher work and power simultaneously at all joints in water suggests a general motor strategy of power modulation consistent across physical environments, limbs and tasks, regardless of whether or not they demand positive net work. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Upper limb vein anatomy before hemodialysis fistula creation: cross-sectional anatomy using MR venography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laissy, Jean-Pierre; Fernandez, Pedro; Karila-Cohen, Pascale; Chillon, Sylvie; Schouman-Claeys, Elisabeth [Department of Radiology, Hopital Bichat, 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75877 Paris Cedex 18 (France); Delmas, Vincent [Department of Urology, Hopital Bichat, 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75877 Paris Cedex 18 (France); Dupuy, Emmanuel; Mignon, Francoise [Department of Nephrology, Hopital Bichat, 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75877 Paris Cedex 18 (France)

    2003-02-01

    Preoperative imaging is indicated to discriminate patent, adequate superficial veins of the upper limbs undetectable by clinical inspection that could be anastomosed for the creation of a durable and functional hemodialysis fistula. The aim of this pictorial review is to provide a venous anatomic map of the upper limbs using MR venography (MRV) which could help surgeons before creation of hemodialysis access fistulas (AVF). At the level of the forearm, the antebrachial cephalic vein is the most commonly identified as patent. At the level of the elbow and distal arm, the cephalic vein is patent in 80% of normal subjects, and less often patent (23-26%) than basilic vein (33-38%) in patients. Overall, reading transaxial MR views can help for assessing upper limb vein anatomy before creation of a hemodialysis access fistula. (orig.)

  10. Upper limb vein anatomy before hemodialysis fistula creation: cross-sectional anatomy using MR venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laissy, Jean-Pierre; Fernandez, Pedro; Karila-Cohen, Pascale; Chillon, Sylvie; Schouman-Claeys, Elisabeth; Delmas, Vincent; Dupuy, Emmanuel; Mignon, Francoise

    2003-01-01

    Preoperative imaging is indicated to discriminate patent, adequate superficial veins of the upper limbs undetectable by clinical inspection that could be anastomosed for the creation of a durable and functional hemodialysis fistula. The aim of this pictorial review is to provide a venous anatomic map of the upper limbs using MR venography (MRV) which could help surgeons before creation of hemodialysis access fistulas (AVF). At the level of the forearm, the antebrachial cephalic vein is the most commonly identified as patent. At the level of the elbow and distal arm, the cephalic vein is patent in 80% of normal subjects, and less often patent (23-26%) than basilic vein (33-38%) in patients. Overall, reading transaxial MR views can help for assessing upper limb vein anatomy before creation of a hemodialysis access fistula. (orig.)

  11. Acupotomy and venesection in Upper Limb Lymphedema and Peripheral neuropathy following Breast Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Eun-ha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to estimate clinical effects of acupotomy and venesection in a patient with peripheral neuropathy and upper limb lymphedema following breast cancer surgery. Methods: From 17th August, 2009 to 29th August 2009, 1 female patient with peripheral neuropathy and upper limb lymphedema following breast cancer surgery was treated with general oriental medicine therapy(acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy with venesection. Results: The patient's chief complaints- Lt hand numbness, Lt arm edema, Lt. wrist flexion limitation - were notably improved. Conclusions : This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acupotomy and venesection therapy has significant effect in improving symptoms of peripheral neuropathy and upper limb lymphedema following breast cancer surgery, as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  12. Ethical considerations in providing an upper limb exoskeleton device for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulboacă, Adriana E; Bolboacă, Sorana D; Bulboacă, Angelo C

    2017-04-01

    The health care system needs to face new and advanced medical technologies that can improve the patients' quality of life by replacing lost or decreased functions. In stroke patients, the disabilities that follow cerebral lesions may impair the mandatory daily activities of an independent life. These activities are dependent mostly on the patient's upper limb function so that they can carry out most of the common activities associated with a normal life. Therefore, an upper limb exoskeleton device for stroke patients can contribute a real improvement of quality of their life. The ethical problems that need to be considered are linked to the correct adjustment of the upper limb skills in order to satisfy the patient's expectations, but within physiological limits. The debate regarding the medical devices dedicated to neurorehabilitation is focused on their ability to be beneficial to the patient's life, keeping away damages, injustice, and risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Kinematics and Dynamics Analysis of a 3-DOF Upper-Limb Exoskeleton with an Internally Rotated Elbow Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The contradiction between self-weight and load capacity of a power-assisted upper-limb exoskeleton for material hanging is unresolved. In this paper, a non-anthropomorphic 3-degree of freedom (DOF upper-limb exoskeleton with an internally rotated elbow joint is proposed based on an anthropomorphic 5-DOF upper-limb exoskeleton for power-assisted activity. The proposed 3-DOF upper-limb exoskeleton contains a 2-DOF shoulder joint and a 1-DOF internally rotated elbow joint. The structural parameters of the 3-DOF upper-limb exoskeleton were determined, and the differences and singularities of the two exoskeletons were analyzed. The workspace, the joint torques and the power consumption of two exoskeletons were analyzed by kinematics and dynamics, and an exoskeleton prototype experiment was performed. The results showed that, compared with a typical anthropomorphic upper-limb exoskeleton, the non-anthropomorphic 3-DOF upper-limb exoskeleton had the same actual workspace; eliminated singularities within the workspace; improved the elbow joint force situation; and the maximum elbow joint torque, elbow external-flexion/internal-extension and shoulder flexion/extension power consumption were significantly reduced. The proposed non-anthropomorphic 3-DOF upper-limb exoskeleton can be applied to a power-assisted upper-limb exoskeleton in industrial settings.

  14. The Effect of an Upper Limb Rehabilitation Robot on Hemispatial Neglect in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Sik; Lee, Kyeong Woo; Lee, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sang Beom; Park, Gyu Tae; Lee, Sook Joung

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of an upper limb rehabilitation robot therapy on hemispatial neglect in stroke patients. Patients were randomly divided into an upper limb rehabilitation robot treatment group (robot group) and a control group. The patients in the robot group received left upper limb training using an upper limb rehabilitation robot. The patients sat on the right side of the robot, so that the monitor of the robot was located on the patients' left side. In this position, patients could focus continuously on the left side. The control group received conventional neglect treatment, such as visual scanning training and range of motion exercises, administered by occupational therapists. Both groups received their respective therapies for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week for 3 weeks. Several tests were used to evaluate treatment effects before and after the 3-week treatment. In total, 38 patients (20 in the robot group and 18 in the control group) completed the study. After completion of the treatment sessions, both groups showed significant improvements in the Motor-Free Visual Perception Test 3rd edition (MVPT-3), the line bisection test, the star cancellation test, the Albert's test, the Catherine Bergego scale, the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index. The changes in all measurements showed no significant differences between the two groups. This present study showed that the upper limb robot treatment had benefits for hemispatial neglect in stroke patients that were similar to conventional neglect treatment. The upper limb robot treatment could be a therapeutic option in the treatment of hemispatial neglect after stroke.

  15. Modulation of shoulder muscle and joint function using a powered upper-limb exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Fong, Justin; Crocher, Vincent; Lee, Peter V S; Oetomo, Denny; Tan, Ying; Ackland, David C

    2018-02-21

    Robotic-assistive exoskeletons can enable frequent repetitive movements without the presence of a full-time therapist; however, human-machine interaction and the capacity of powered exoskeletons to attenuate shoulder muscle and joint loading is poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify shoulder muscle and joint force during assisted activities of daily living using a powered robotic upper limb exoskeleton (ArmeoPower, Hocoma). Six healthy male subjects performed abduction, flexion, horizontal flexion, reaching and nose touching activities. These tasks were repeated under two conditions: (i) the exoskeleton compensating only for its own weight, and (ii) the exoskeleton providing full upper limb gravity compensation (i.e., weightlessness). Muscle EMG, joint kinematics and joint torques were simultaneously recorded, and shoulder muscle and joint forces calculated using personalized musculoskeletal models of each subject's upper limb. The exoskeleton reduced peak joint torques, muscle forces and joint loading by up to 74.8% (0.113 Nm/kg), 88.8% (5.8%BW) and 68.4% (75.6%BW), respectively, with the degree of load attenuation strongly task dependent. The peak compressive, anterior and superior glenohumeral joint force during assisted nose touching was 36.4% (24.6%BW), 72.4% (13.1%BW) and 85.0% (17.2%BW) lower than that during unassisted nose touching, respectively. The present study showed that upper limb weight compensation using an assistive exoskeleton may increase glenohumeral joint stability, since deltoid muscle force, which is the primary contributor to superior glenohumeral joint shear, is attenuated; however, prominent exoskeleton interaction moments are required to position and control the upper limb in space, even under full gravity compensation conditions. The modeling framework and results may be useful in planning targeted upper limb robotic rehabilitation tasks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Outcomes of the Bobath concept on upper limb recovery following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Carolyn; Dodd, Karen J; Brock, Kim

    2004-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the Bobath concept at reducing upper limb impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions after stroke. Electronic databases were searched to identify relevant trials published between 1966 and 2003. Two reviewers independently assessed articles for the following inclusion criteria: population of adults with upper limb disability after stroke; stated use of the Bobath concept aimed at improving upper limb disability in isolation from other approaches; outcomes reflecting changes in upper limb impairment, activity limitation or participation restriction. Of the 688 articles initially identified, eight met the inclusion criteria. Five were randomized controlled trials, one used a single-group crossover design and two were single-case design studies. Five studies measured impairments including shoulder pain, tone, muscle strength and motor control. The Bobath concept was found to reduce shoulder pain better than cryotherapy, and to reduce tone compared to no intervention and compared to proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF). However, no difference was detected for changes in tone between the Bobath concept and a functional approach. Differences did not reach significance for measures of muscle strength and motor control. Six studies measured activity limitations, none of these found the Bobath concept was superior to other therapy approaches. Two studies measured changes in participation restriction and both found equivocal results. Comparisons of the Bobath concept with other approaches do not demonstrate superiority of one approach over the other at improving upper limb impairment, activity or participation. However, study limitations relating to methodological quality, the outcome measures used and contextual factors investigated limit the ability to draw conclusions. Future research should use sensitive upper limb measures, trained Bobath therapists and homogeneous samples to identify the influence of

  17. Comparison of three tools to measure improvements in upper-limb function with poststroke therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson-Butel, Angelica G; Lin, Gaven; Shiner, Christine T; McNulty, Penelope A

    2015-05-01

    Functional ability is regularly monitored poststroke to assess improvement and the efficacy of clinical trials. The balance between implementation times and sensitivity has led to multidomain tools that aim to assess upper-limb function comprehensively. This study implemented 3 common multidomain tools to investigate their suitability across a broad spectrum of movement ability after stroke. Forty-nine hemiparetic patients (18 females), aged 22 to 83 years and 24.7 ± 39.2 months poststroke, were assessed before and after a 14-day upper-limb rehabilitation program of Wii-based Movement Therapy. Assessments included the upper-limb motor subscale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (F-M), the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), and the Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) upper-limb sections 6 to 8. The MAS was analyzed both with and without the hierarchical system. Patients were stratified with low, moderate, or high motor-function. Upper-limb function improved significantly for the pooled cohort for all assessments (P < .001), although ceiling effects were evident for the F-M, floor effects for the WMFT, and both floor and ceiling effects for MAS. When analyzed by stratified subgroup these improvements were significant for all groups with the F-M, for the moderate and high motor-function groups with both the WMFT and the MAS scored without hierarchical system, but only for the high motor-function group with the hierarchically scored MAS. These results suggest that no single test is suitable for measuring function and improvement across the spectrum of poststroke upper-limb dysfunction and that assessment tool selection should be based on the level of residual motor-function of individual patients. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Technology that Touches Lives: Teleconsultation to Benefit Persons with Upper Limb Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsay R. Whelan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available While over 1.5 million individuals are living with limb loss in the United States (Ziegler-Graham et al., 2008, only 10% of these individuals have a loss that affects an upper limb. Coincident with the relatively low incidence of upper limb loss, is a shortage of the community-based prosthetic rehabilitation experts that can help prosthetic users to more fully integrate their devices into their daily routines. This article describes how expert prosthetists and occupational therapists at Touch Bionics, a manufacturer of advanced upper limb prosthetic devices, employ Voice over the Internet Protocol (VoIP videoconferencing software telehealth technologies to engage in remote consultation with users of prosthetic devices and/or their local practitioners. The Touch Bionics staff provide follow-up expertise to local prosthetists, occupational therapists, and other health professionals. Contrasted with prior telephone-based consultations, the video-enabled approach provides enhanced capabilities to benefit persons with upper limb loss.  Currently, the opportunities for Touch Bionics occupational therapists to fully engage in patient-based services delivered through telehealth technologies are significantly reduced by their need to obtain and maintain professional licenses in multiple states.

  19. Efficacy of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing on the phantom limb pain of patients with amputations within a 24-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostaminejad, Akbar; Behnammoghadam, Mohammad; Rostaminejad, Marzieh; Behnammoghadam, Zargham; Bashti, Somaye

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) on the phantom limb pain (PLP) of patients with amputations within a 24-month follow-up. This study was a randomized-controlled trial. A total of 60 patients with amputations were selected by a purposive sampling and patients were divided randomly into two experimental and control groups. Samples were assigned through randomized allocation. EMDR therapy was administered individually to the experimental group participants in 12 one-hour sessions over a 1-month period In each session, the patient completed the Subjective Units of Distress Scale and a pain-rating scale before and after the intervention. Follow-up measures were obtained 24 months later for the experimental group. The participants in the control group were measured on the two scales at an initial session and again after 1- and 24-month follow-up. The mean PLP decreased in the experimental group between the first and last sessions and remained so at a 24-month follow-up. No decrease occurred for the control group over the 1- and 24-month period. The differences were statistically significant (PEMDR therapy proved to be a successful treatment for PLP. Because of its efficacy and the fact that the positive effects were maintained at the 24-month follow-up, this therapy is recommended for the treatment of PLP.

  20. A motion-classification strategy based on sEMG-EEG signal combination for upper-limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangxin; Samuel, Oluwarotimi Williams; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Hui; Fang, Peng; Li, Guanglin

    2017-01-07

    Most of the modern motorized prostheses are controlled with the surface electromyography (sEMG) recorded on the residual muscles of amputated limbs. However, the residual muscles are usually limited, especially after above-elbow amputations, which would not provide enough sEMG for the control of prostheses with multiple degrees of freedom. Signal fusion is a possible approach to solve the problem of insufficient control commands, where some non-EMG signals are combined with sEMG signals to provide sufficient information for motion intension decoding. In this study, a motion-classification method that combines sEMG and electroencephalography (EEG) signals were proposed and investigated, in order to improve the control performance of upper-limb prostheses. Four transhumeral amputees without any form of neurological disease were recruited in the experiments. Five motion classes including hand-open, hand-close, wrist-pronation, wrist-supination, and no-movement were specified. During the motion performances, sEMG and EEG signals were simultaneously acquired from the skin surface and scalp of the amputees, respectively. The two types of signals were independently preprocessed and then combined as a parallel control input. Four time-domain features were extracted and fed into a classifier trained by the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) algorithm for motion recognition. In addition, channel selections were performed by using the Sequential Forward Selection (SFS) algorithm to optimize the performance of the proposed method. The classification performance achieved by the fusion of sEMG and EEG signals was significantly better than that obtained by single signal source of either sEMG or EEG. An increment of more than 14% in classification accuracy was achieved when using a combination of 32-channel sEMG and 64-channel EEG. Furthermore, based on the SFS algorithm, two optimized electrode arrangements (10-channel sEMG + 10-channel EEG, 10-channel sEMG + 20-channel

  1. Upper limb rehabilitation robotics after stroke: a perspective from the University of Padua, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiero, Stefano; Carraro, Elena; Ferraro, Claudio; Gallina, Paolo; Rossi, Aldo; Rosati, Giulio

    2009-11-01

    Rehabilitation robotics is an emerging research field that aims to employ leading-edge robotic technology and virtual reality systems in the rehabilitation treatment of neuro-logical patients. In post-stroke patients with upper limb impairment, clinical trials have so far shown positive results in terms of motor recovery, but poor efficacy in terms of functional outcome. Much work is needed to develop a new generation of rehabilitation robots and clinical protocols that will be more effective in helping patients to regain their abilities in activities of daily living. This paper presents some key issues in the future perspective of upper limb robotic rehabilitation after stroke.

  2. INCIDENCE OF AMPUTATION IN EMERGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rojaramani Kumbha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Advanced Technology and early detection of disease by recent improvements in investigation modalities lead to decreased incidents of amputations while Road Traffic Accidents (RTA increase. Furthermore, it leads to variation and decreased morbidity, mortality and accidents (crush injuries, and better equipped and trained staff, specialist services, diabetic food, rehabilitation centres, and giving good support physically and psychologically for Amputated patients. OBJECTIVE To know incidence rates of Emergency Amputation who attended causality with advanced disease and severe Trauma. METHODOLOGY The study is done over a period of one year i.e. between June 2015 to June 2016 who attended causality with advanced and severe disease affecting the limbs either due to diabetes, trauma or vascular diseases. RESULTS During one-year period, total 6,371 patients attended for general surgery OP. In those, 187 patients needed emergency surgery which included both major and minor operations. Among those, 81 patients were amputated. CONCLUSION As per our available records and observation, even though there is increased literacy and access to advanced technology, there is still increased incidence of patients undergoing amputations due to diseases. Therefore, there is a need to improve awareness and importance of early detection of diabetes, hazards of smoking, and regular general health checkups for patients at root level. With that we can treat diabetes and/or any disease in time. So there must be awareness in peripheral health staff i.e. PHC, subcentres, and community health centres about early detection of disease which in turn improves the quality of life of the patient. Due to diabetes slight injury to the glucose laden tissue may cause chronic infection and ulcer formation.(1 The tumours are seen commonly in the age group of 20-40 years after bone fusion, bones affected commonly are those around the knee (lower end of knee, upper end of tibia. A lytic

  3. Goal pursuit and goal adjustment as predictors of disability and quality of life among individuals with a lower limb amputation: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Laura; Gallagher, Pamela; Desmond, Deirdre

    2014-02-01

    (1) To identify significant changes in disability and quality of life (QOL) across 3 time points (t1: admission to rehabilitation; t2: 6wk postdischarge; t3: 6mo postdischarge) in individuals with lower limb amputation, and (2) to examine whether goal pursuit and goal adjustment at t1 were predictive of these outcomes at t3. Prospective cohort study. Inpatient rehabilitation. Consecutive sample of persons (N=64) aged ≥18 years with major lower limb amputation. Not applicable. World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) and World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF). Mean WHODAS 2.0 scores were in the 95th percentile at each time point. Scores on the WHODAS 2.0 and the physical, psychological, and social relations domains of the WHOQOL-BREF remained stable across the study period. Environmental QOL scores decreased from t1 to t2 but returned to near-baseline levels between t2 and t3. Having a greater tendency toward goal pursuit at t1 was predictive of higher physical and psychological QOL at t3, whereas having a stronger disposition toward goal adjustment at t1 predicted lower disability and higher environmental QOL at t3. High levels of disability were experienced from admission to rehabilitation up to 6 months postdischarge. QOL in the physical, psychological, and social relations domains remained stable over the study period. Stronger goal pursuit and goal adjustment tendencies on admission predicted lower disability and higher QOL 6 months postdischarge. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of the rubber hand illusion paradigm: comparison between upper and lower limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flögel, Mareike; Kalveram, Karl Theodor; Christ, Oliver; Vogt, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    The "rubber hand illusion (RHI)" is a perceptual illusion, which allows the integration of artificial limbs into the body representation of a person by means of combined visual and tactile stimulation. The illusion has been frequently replicated but always concerning the upper limbs. The present study verified an analog illusion that can be called the "rubber foot illusion" (RFI). In a conjoint experiment using both a rubber hand and a rubber foot, brushstrokes were applied to the respective real and rubber limb placed alongside the real one. However, only the artificial limb's handling was visible. The brushstrokes were given either synchronously, with a delay of ±0.5 s, or without tactile stimulation of the real limb. Questionnaire data and the proprioceptive drift towards the rubber limb (determined by calling on the subjects to show where they locate their unseen limb) defined the illusion strength. Results revealed that the illusion was induced in both limbs with comparable strength, but only in the synchronous condition.

  5. Use of an innovative model to evaluate mobility in seniors with lower-limb amputations of vascular origin: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corriveau Hélène

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mobility of older individuals has often been only partially assessed, without considering all important aspects such as potential (available versus effective (used mobilities and the physical and psychosocial factors that modulate them. This study proposes a new model for evaluating mobility that considers all important aspects, applied here to lower-limb amputees with vascular origin. This model integrates the concepts of potential mobility (e.g. balance, speed of movement, effective mobility (e.g. life habits, movements in living areas and factors that modulate these two types of mobility (e.g. strength, sensitivity, social support, depression. The main objective was to characterize potential and effective mobility as well as mobility modulators in a small sample of people with lower-limb amputations of vascular origin with different characteristics. The second objective of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of measuring all variables in the model in a residential context. Methods An observational and transversal design was used with a heterogeneous sample of 10 participants with a lower-limb amputation of vascular origin, aged 51 to 83, assessed between eight and 18 months after discharge from an acute care hospital. A questionnaire of participant characteristics and 16 reliable and valid measurements were used. Results The results show that the potential mobility indicators do not accurately predict effective mobility, i.e., participants who perform well on traditional measures done in the laboratory or clinic are not always those who perform well in the real world. The model generated 4 different profiles (categories of participants ranging from reduced to excellent potential mobility and low to excellent effective mobility, and characterized the modulating factors. The evaluations were acceptable in terms of the time taken (three hours and the overall measurements, with a few exceptions, which were

  6. Use of an innovative model to evaluate mobility in seniors with lower-limb amputations of vascular origin: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Claude; Demers, Emilie; Moffet, Hélène; Corriveau, Hélène; Nadeau, Sylvie; Mercier, Catherine

    2010-09-20

    The mobility of older individuals has often been only partially assessed, without considering all important aspects such as potential (available) versus effective (used) mobilities and the physical and psychosocial factors that modulate them. This study proposes a new model for evaluating mobility that considers all important aspects, applied here to lower-limb amputees with vascular origin. This model integrates the concepts of potential mobility (e.g. balance, speed of movement), effective mobility (e.g. life habits, movements in living areas) and factors that modulate these two types of mobility (e.g. strength, sensitivity, social support, depression). The main objective was to characterize potential and effective mobility as well as mobility modulators in a small sample of people with lower-limb amputations of vascular origin with different characteristics. The second objective of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of measuring all variables in the model in a residential context. An observational and transversal design was used with a heterogeneous sample of 10 participants with a lower-limb amputation of vascular origin, aged 51 to 83, assessed between eight and 18 months after discharge from an acute care hospital. A questionnaire of participant characteristics and 16 reliable and valid measurements were used. The results show that the potential mobility indicators do not accurately predict effective mobility, i.e., participants who perform well on traditional measures done in the laboratory or clinic are not always those who perform well in the real world. The model generated 4 different profiles (categories) of participants ranging from reduced to excellent potential mobility and low to excellent effective mobility, and characterized the modulating factors. The evaluations were acceptable in terms of the time taken (three hours) and the overall measurements, with a few exceptions, which were modified to optimize the data collected and the

  7. Posture interacts with arm weight support to modulate corticomotor excitability to the upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnalls, Keith D; Anson, Greg; Byblow, Winston D

    2017-01-01

    The use of arm weight support (WS) to optimize movement quality may be an avenue for improved upper limb stroke rehabilitation; however, the underlying neurophysiological effects of WS are not well understood. Rehabilitation exercises may be performed when sitting or standing, but the interaction of posture with WS has not been examined until now. We explored the effect of posture with WS on corticomotor excitability (CME) in healthy adults. Thirteen participants performed static shoulder abduction in two postures (sitting and standing) at three levels of WS (0, 45, and 90 % of full support). Transcranial magnetic stimulation of primary motor cortex was used to elicit motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in eight upper limb muscles. Stimulus-response (SR) curves were fitted to the MEP data using nonlinear regression. Whole-body posture interacted with WS to influence tonic activity and CME in all muscles examined. SR curve parameters revealed greater CME when standing compared to sitting for upper arm muscles, but lower CME to the shoulder, forearm, and hand. Distal to the shoulder, tonic activity and CME were modulated independent of any explicit differences in task requirements. Overall, these results support a model of integrated upper limb control influenced by whole-body posture and WS. These findings have implications for the application of WS in settings such as upper limb rehabilitation after stroke.

  8. The application of accelerometers to measure movements of upper limbs: Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Kutilek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Even though inertial measurement units (IMU are already being used experimentally for evaluating movements of segment of the axial skeleton, no studies have been found which have used IMUs to measure the behavior of the segments of upper limbs during quiet stance. Objective: The objective is to design a suitable application of IMUs to measure movements of the upper extremities in Romberg's test and analyze spontaneous arm movements. Second aim is to identify possible discrepancies between the dominant and non-dominant arm movements. Methods: The dominant and non-dominant upper limb of each participant was identified. Then, the movements of both upper limbs were measured by the Xsens system equipped with MTx motion trackers during the quiet stance on a firm surface with eyes open (EO and eyes closed (EC. The measured data was used to calculate the medians and maximums of the superior-inferior, medio-lateral and anterior-posterior acceleration. Also, tremor intensity was calculated to quantitatively evaluate the measured data. Results: The comparison of values of maximal accelerations of the dominant and non-dominant arms showed significant difference between the arms during EC conditions. The comparison of values of median accelerations of the dominant and non-dominant arms showed significant differences between the acceleration of arms in medio-lateral direction during EO and EC conditions. In all cases, values of maximal and median accelerations and values of tremor intensity of the dominant limb strongly correlated with values on the non-dominant limb. Conclusions: Findings suggest possible usefulness of the designed application of IMUs and evaluation methods for their use in Romberg's test in clinical practice for evaluation of upper limb movements.

  9. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  10. The Impact of Upper Tropospheric Humidity from Microwave Limb Sounder on the Midlatitude Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hua; Liu, W. Timothy

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of upper tropospheric humidity, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder, and the impact of the humidity on the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes. Enhanced upper tropospheric humidity and an enhanced greenhouse effect occur over the storm tracks in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. In these areas, strong baroclinic activity and the large number of deep convective clouds transport more water vapor to the upper troposphere, and hence increase greenhouse trapping. The greenhouse effect increases with upper tropospheric humidity in areas with a moist upper troposphere (such as areas over storm tracks), but it is not sensitive to changes in upper tropospheric humidity in regions with a dry upper troposphere, clearly demonstrating that there are different mechanisms controlling the geographical distribution of the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes.

  11. Defining the role of sensation, strength, and prehension for upper limb function in cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi-Ryan, Sukhvinder; Beaton, Dorcas; Curt, Armin; Duff, Susan; Jiang, Depeng; Popovic, Milos R; Rudhe, Claudia; Fehlings, Michael G; Verrier, Mary C

    2014-01-01

    Upper limb function plays a significant role in enhancing independence for individuals with tetraplegia. However, there is limited knowledge about the specific input of sensorimotor deficits on upper limb function. Thus the theoretical framework designed to develop the Graded Redefined Assessment of Strength Sensibility and Prehension (GRASSP) was used as a hypothetical model to analyze the impact of impairment on function. To define the association of impairment (sensation, strength, and prehension measured by the GRASSP) to upper limb function as defined by functional measures (Capabilities of Upper Extremity Questionnaire, Spinal Cord Independence Measure). A hypothetical model representing relationships by applying structural equation modeling was used to estimate the effect of the impairment domains in GRASSP on upper limb function. Data collected on 72 chronic individuals with tetraplegia was used to test the hypothetical model. Structural equation modeling confirmed strong associations between sensation, strength, and prehension with upper limb function, and determined 72% of the variance in "sensorimotor upper limb function" was explained by the model. Statistics of fit showed the data did fit the hypothesized model. Sensation and strength influence upper limb function directly and indirectly with prehension as the mediator. The GRASSP is a sensitive diagnostic tool in distinguishing the relative contribution of strength, sensation and prehension to function. Thus, the impact of interventions on specific domains of impairment and related contribution on clinical recovery of the upper limb can be detailed to optimize rehabilitation programs.

  12. Predictive Value of Upper Limb Muscles and Grasp Patterns on Functional Outcome in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velstra, Inge-Marie; Bolliger, Marc; Krebs, Jörg; Rietman, Johan S; Curt, Armin

    2016-05-01

    To determine which single or combined upper limb muscles as defined by the International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI); upper extremity motor score (UEMS) and the Graded Redefined Assessment of Strength, Sensibility, and Prehension (GRASSP), best predict upper limb function and independence in activities of daily living (ADLs) and to assess the predictive value of qualitative grasp movements (QlG) on upper limb function in individuals with acute tetraplegia. As part of a Europe-wide, prospective, longitudinal, multicenter study ISNCSCI, GRASSP, and Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM III) scores were recorded at 1 and 6 months after SCI. For prediction of upper limb function and ADLs, a logistic regression model and unbiased recursive partitioning conditional inference tree (URP-CTREE) were used. Results: Logistic regression and URP-CTREE revealed that a combination of ISNCSCI and GRASSP muscles (to a maximum of 4) demonstrated the best prediction (specificity and sensitivity ranged from 81.8% to 96.0%) of upper limb function and identified homogenous outcome cohorts at 6 months. The URP-CTREE model with the QlG predictors for upper limb function showed similar results. Prediction of upper limb function can be achieved through a combination of defined, specific upper limb muscles assessed in the ISNCSCI and GRASSP. A combination of a limited number of proximal and distal muscles along with an assessment of grasping movements can be applied for clinical decision making for rehabilitation interventions and clinical trials. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Upper limb kinesthetic asymmetries: gender and handedness effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Diane E; Scotland, Samantha; Martin, Bernard J

    2012-05-16

    Proprioceptive and motor information contribute to movement representation; however, the equivalence of homologous contralateral sensorimotor processes as a function of gender and handedness has received little attention. The present work investigated asymmetry in contralateral reproductions of movements elicited by tendon vibration in right and left handed young adults of both genders. With eyes closed, illusions of elbow flexion movement elicited by a 100 Hz vibration applied to the distal tendon of the right or left triceps muscle were matched concurrently with the opposite limb. Overall, movement velocity was larger for females than males, asymmetric and handedness dependent in males. Conversely, consistent symmetry was found between left and right-handed females. These findings lead us to suggest that hand preference and gender contribute to differences in movement representation that may result from the combination of cortical structural differences and information processing specific to each hemisphere and gender. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Common goal areas in the treatment of upper limb spasticity: a multicentre analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashford, Stephen; Fheodoroff, Klemens; Jacinto, Jorge; Turner-Stokes, Lynne

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to develop a goal classification of individualised goals for spasticity treatment incorporating botulinum toxin intervention for upper limb spasticity to under-pin a more structured approach to future goal setting. Individualised goals for spasticity treatment incorporating botulinum toxin intervention for upper limb spasticity (n=696) were analysed initially from four studies published in 2008-2012, spanning a total of 18 centres (12 in the UK and 6 in Australia). Goals were categorised and mapped onto the closest matching domains of the WHO International Classification of Functioning. Confirmatory analysis included a further 927 goals from a large international cohort study spanning 22 countries published in 2013. Goal categories could be assigned into two domains, each subdivided into three key goal areas: Domain 1: symptoms/impairment n=322 (46%): a. pain/discomfort n=78 (11%), b. involuntary movements n=75 (11%), c. range of movement/contracture prevention n=162 (23%). Domain 2: Activities/function n=374 (54%): a. passive function (ease of caring for the affected limb) n=242 (35%), b active function (using the affected limb in active tasks) n=84 (12%), c. mobility n=11 (2%).Over 99% of the goals from the large international cohort fell into the same six areas, confirming the international applicability of the classification. Goals for management of upper limb spasticity, in worldwide clinical practice, fall into six main goal areas. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Perceived self-efficacy and specific self-reported outcomes in persons with lower-limb amputation using a non-microprocessor-controlled versus a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Saffran; Hagberg, Kerstin; Samulesson, Kersti; Ramstrand, Nerrolyn

    2018-04-01

    To measure self-efficacy in a group of individuals who have undergone a lower-limb amputation and investigate the relationship between self-efficacy and prosthetic-specific outcomes including prosthetic use, mobility, amputation-related problems and global health. A second purpose was to examine if differences exist in outcomes based upon the type of prosthetic knee unit being used. Cross-sectional study using the General Self-Efficacy (GSE) Scale and the Questionnaire for Persons with a Transfemoral Amputation (Q-TFA). Forty-two individuals participated in the study. Twenty-three used a non-microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint (non-MPK) and 19 used a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint (MPK). The study sample had quite high GSE scores (32/40). GSE scores were significantly correlated to the Q-TFA prosthetic use, mobility and problem scores. High GSE scores were related to higher levels of prosthetic use, mobility, global scores and negatively related to problem score. No significant difference was observed between individuals using a non-MPK versus MPK joints. Individuals with high self-efficacy used their prosthesis to a higher degree and high self-efficacy was related to higher level of mobility, global scores and fewer problems related to the amputation in individuals who have undergone a lower-limb amputation and were using a non-MPK or MPK knee. Implications for rehabilitation Perceived self-efficacy has has been shown to be related to quality of life, prosthetic mobility and capability as well as social activities in daily life. Prosthetic rehabilitation is primary focusing on physical improvement rather than psychological interventions. More attention should be directed towards the relationship between self-efficacy and prosthetic related outcomes during prosthetic rehabilitation after a lower-limb amputation.

  16. The association between self-reported low back pain and lower limb disability as well as the association between neck pain and upper limb disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Turhan; Göz, Evrim; Genç, Arzu

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the association between self-reported low back pain (LBP) and lower limb disability as well as the association between neck pain and upper limb disability. A hundred twenty-six participants registered as a healthcare staff member were included in this cross-sectional study. The presence of neck and LBP were determined using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire. Neck and LBP/disability were measured with the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPDS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), respectively. Upper and lower limb disability were measured with the Quick Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (Quick-DASH) and Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), respectively. Participants reporting LBP had more musculoskeletal complaints in the lower limbs (pupper limbs (pupper limb disability.

  17. Manufacturing, testing, and numerical modeling a lower limb orthosis for a patient that has a partial foot amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Ayad Murad Takhakh, Hassanein Salih Hussain

    2017-01-01

    This study includes two main parts: The first part includes the process of manufacturing and testing partial foot orthosis for a patient suffering from partial foot amputation. The orthosis was manufactured from lamination Perlon-Carbon-Perlon(4-2-4) and then tested with Force plate and F-Socket. The patientwas tested in two cases: the first without wearing the orthosis and the second after wearing the orthosis. The results of gait cycle testshow that the gait cycle of the patient was improve...

  18. Entrapment Neuropathies in the Upper and Lower Limbs: Anatomy and MRI Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Dong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve entrapment occurs at specific anatomic locations. Familiarity with the anatomy and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features of nerve entrapment syndromes is important for accurate diagnosis and early treatment of entrapment neuropathies. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the normal anatomy of peripheral nerves in the upper and lower limbs and to review the MRI features of common disorders affecting the peripheral nerves, both compressive/entrapment and noncompressive, involving the suprascapular nerve, the axillary nerve, the radial nerve, the ulnar nerve, and the median verve in the upper limb and the sciatic nerve, the common peroneal nerve, the tibial nerve, and the interdigital nerves in the lower limb.

  19. Effects of Robot-Assisted Therapy for the Upper Limb after Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerbeek, Janne M.; Langbroek-Amersfoort, Anneli C.; Van Wegen, Erwin E.H.; Meskers, Carel G.M.; Kwakkel, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Background. Robot technology for poststroke rehabilitation is developing rapidly. A number of new randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have investigated the effects of robot-assisted therapy for the paretic upper limb (RT-UL). Objective. To systematically review the effects of poststroke RT-UL on

  20. Upper Limb Immobilisation: A Neural Plasticity Model with Relevance to Poststroke Motor Rehabilitation

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    Leonardo Furlan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in our understanding of the neural plasticity that occurs after hemiparetic stroke have contributed to the formulation of theories of poststroke motor recovery. These theories, in turn, have underpinned contemporary motor rehabilitation strategies for treating motor deficits after stroke, such as upper limb hemiparesis. However, a relative drawback has been that, in general, these strategies are most compatible with the recovery profiles of relatively high-functioning stroke survivors and therefore do not easily translate into benefit to those individuals sustaining low-functioning upper limb hemiparesis, who otherwise have poorer residual function. For these individuals, alternative motor rehabilitation strategies are currently needed. In this paper, we will review upper limb immobilisation studies that have been conducted with healthy adult humans and animals. Then, we will discuss how the findings from these studies could inspire the creation of a neural plasticity model that is likely to be of particular relevance to the context of motor rehabilitation after stroke. For instance, as will be elaborated, such model could contribute to the development of alternative motor rehabilitation strategies for treating poststroke upper limb hemiparesis. The implications of the findings from those immobilisation studies for contemporary motor rehabilitation strategies will also be discussed and perspectives for future research in this arena will be provided as well.

  1. Elite athlete motor and loading actions on the upper limb in baseball pitching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasparutto, X.; van der Graaff, E; van der Helm, F.C.T.; Veeger, H.E.J.; van der Helm, FCT; Jansen, AJ

    2016-01-01

    In baseball, pitchers are the players that are most prone to injury. Most injuries occur at the elbow and shoulder of the throwing upper limb. It is widely accepted that understanding the loading in the joints during pitching is a key factor to prevent injuries. To deepen the understanding of the

  2. Late morbidity in upper limb function and quality of life in women after breast cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia R. Assis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Brazilian women. In recent years, there has been great progress in and an increasing number of breast-conserving surgical techniques; however, immediate or late morbidity after surgery, in the form of functional impairment and pain, remains a significant clinical problem. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between late upper limb functional impairment and the quality of life in women subjected to breast cancer surgery. METHOD: A total of 81 women participated in the study, with the length of time since surgery ranging from one to five years. A survey of upper limb complaints reported by patients was conducted, and the questionnaires Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQC-30 and BR23 were applied. RESULTS: The correlation between the DASH score and the length of time since surgery determined that the longer the time since surgery, the greater the difficulties in functionality of the upper limb (r=0.459; p<0.0001. A statistically significant correlation was observed between the DASH score and health-related quality of life. CONCLUSION: Late functional impairment had a significant impact on upper limb function in everyday life and health-related quality of life for women who underwent breast cancer surgery.

  3. The corticospinal tract: a biomarker to categorize upper limb functional potential in unilateral cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen eJaspers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP typically present with largely divergent upper limb sensorimotor deficits and individual differences in response to upper limb rehabilitation. This review summarizes how early brain damage can cause dramatic deviations from the normal anatomy of sensory and motor tracts, resulting in unique wiring patterns of the sensorimotor system in CP. Based on the existing literature we suggest that corticospinal tract (CST anatomy and integrity constrains sensorimotor function of the upper limb and potentially also the response to treatment. However, it is not possible to infer CST (reorganization from clinical presentation alone and conventional biomarkers like time of the insult, location and extent of the lesion seem to have limited clinical utility. Here we propose a theoretical framework based on a detailed examination of the motor system using behavioral, neurophysiological and magnetic resonance imaging measures, akin to those used to predict potential for upper limb recovery of adults after stroke. This theoretical framework might prove useful because it provides testable hypotheses for future research with the goal to develop and validate a clinical assessment flowchart to categorize children with unilateral CP.

  4. The role of order of practice in learning to handle an upper-limb prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwsema, Hanneke; van der Sluis, Corry K.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    Objective: To determine which Order of presentation of practice tasks had the highest effect oil using an upper-limb prosthetic simulator. Design: A cohort analytic Study. Setting: University laboratory. Participants: Healthy, able-bodied participants (N=72) randomly assigned to I Of 8 groups, each

  5. Exoskeleton-Based Robotic Platform Applied in Biomechanical Modelling of the Human Upper Limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres F. Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the approaches to study the human motor system, and specifically the motor strategies implied during postural tasks of the upper limbs, is to manipulate the mechanical conditions of each joint of the upper limbs independently. At the same time, it is essential to pick up biomechanical signals and bio-potentials generated while the human motor system adapts to the new condition. The aim of this paper is two-fold: first, to describe the design, development and validation of an experimental platform designed to modify or perturb the mechanics of human movement, and simultaneously acquire, process, display and quantify bioelectric and biomechanical signals; second, to characterise the dynamics of the elbow joint during postural control. A main goal of the study was to determine the feasibility of estimating human elbow joint dynamics using EMG-data during maintained posture. In particular, the experimental robotic platform provides data to correlate electromyographic (EMG activity, kinetics and kinematics information from the upper limb motion. The platform aims consists of an upper limb powered exoskeleton, an EMG acquisition module, a control unit and a software system. Important concerns of the platform such as dependability and safety were addressed in the development. The platform was evaluated with 4 subjects to identify, using system identification methods, the human joint dynamics, i.e. visco-elasticity. Results obtained in simulations and experimental phase are introduced.

  6. The effect of physical activity in leisure time on neck and upper limb symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, S.G. van den; Heinrich, J.; Jans, M.P.; Beek, A.J. van der; Bongers, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Little is known of the preventive effects of physical activity in leisure time on neck and upper limb symptoms. Methods. A cohort of 1742 employees was selected from a prospective cohort study with a follow-up period of 3 years. Independent variables were sporting activities and

  7. [Characteristics of pain syndrome in patients with upper limbs occupational polyneuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetova, O A; Mal'kova, N Yu

    2015-01-01

    Pain syndrome accompanies various diseases of central and peripheral nervous system--that is one of the most important problems in contemporary neurology. Many scientists are in search for effective diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The article covers characteristics of the pain syndrome and its mechanisms in patients with upper limbs occupational polyneuropathies.

  8. Golf and upper limb injuries: a summary and review of the literature

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    Pollard Henry P

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Golf is a popular past time that provides exercise with social interaction. However, as with all sports and activities, injury may occur. Many golf-related injuries occur in the upper limb, yet little research on the potential mechanisms of these injuries has been conducted. Objective To review the current literature on golf-related upper limb injuries and report on potential causes of injury as it relates to the golf swing. Discussion An overview of the golf swing is described in terms of its potential to cause the frequently noted injuries. Most injuries occur at impact when the golf club hits the ball. This paper concludes that more research into golf-related upper limb injuries is required to develop a thorough understanding of how injuries occur. Types of research include epidemiology studies, kinematic swing analysis and electromyographic studies of the upper limb during golf. By conducting such research, preventative measures maybe developed to reduce golf related injury.

  9. Psychosocial work characteristics in relation to neck and upper limb symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, S.G. van den; Beek, A.J. van der; Blatter, B.M.; Hoogendoorn, W.E.; Bongers, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between psychosocial work characteristics and neck and upper limb symptoms and to examine to what extent this relationship could be explained by other risk factors. Data were used from a prospective cohort study in a working population, with

  10. Frequency upper limbs injuries in the emergency health service in Paranaiba, MS, Brazil

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    Eliane Cristina Coelho de Oliveira Correia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To assess the frequency of upper limb injuries in the only emergency medical service inParanaiba, State of Mato Grosso do Sul. Methods: Retrospective study with data collection from medical recordsof patients assisted with upper limb injuries in “Santa Casa de Misericordia” Hospital, the only hospital in the cityto provide emergency care, in 2008. Variables of interest such as gender and type of injury were collected basedon the International Code of Diseases (ICD 10. Results: There were 314 cases of upper limb injury in 2008and men were the most affected with 211 cases (67.2%. The wrist was the most affected segment with 64 cases(20.4%, followed by the shoulder with 55 cases (17.5% and the hand with 50 cases (15.9%. Interventions andsurgeries involving bone portion were the most frequent - 225 (71.7%, followed by tendon - 19 (6.1% and neural - 16 (5.1%; 35 patients (11.1% underwent multiple operations. Osteosyntheses - 94 (29.9%, fractures- 48 (15.3%, and reduction - 46 (14.6% were the most frequent interventions, followed by 26 dislocations(8.3% and 14 tenorrhaphies (4.5%. Conclusion: The involvement of the upper limbs, especially bone lesions,is frequent. The segments most affected by injuries are men’s wrists and shoulders.

  11. Association between Severe Upper Limb Spasticity and Brain Lesion Location in Stroke Patients

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    Alessandro Picelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Association between the site of brain injury and poststroke spasticity is poorly understood. The present study investigated whether lesion analysis could document brain regions associated with the development of severe upper limb poststroke spasticity. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 39 chronic stroke patients. Spasticity was assessed at the affected upper limb with the modified Ashworth scale (shoulder, elbow, wrist, and fingers. Brain lesions were traced from magnetic resonance imaging performed within the first 7 days after stroke and region of interest images were generated. The association between severe upper limb spasticity (modified Ashworth scale ≥2 and lesion location was determined with the voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping method implemented in MRIcro software. Colored maps representing the z statistics were generated and overlaid onto the automated anatomical labeling and the Johns Hopkins University white matter templates provided with MRIcron. Thalamic nuclei were identified with the Talairach Daemon software. Injuries to the insula, the thalamus, the basal ganglia, and white matter tracts (internal capsule, corona radiata, external capsule, and superior longitudinal fasciculus were significantly associated with severe upper limb poststroke spasticity. Further advances in our understanding of the neural correlates of spasticity may lead to early targeted rehabilitation when key regions are damaged.

  12. Short-Term Upper Limb Immobilization Affects Action-Word Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidet-Ildei, Christel; Meugnot, Aurore; Beauprez, Sophie-Anne; Gimenes, Manuel; Toussaint, Lucette

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether well-established associations between action and language can be altered by short-term upper limb immobilization. The dominant arm of right-handed participants was immobilized for 24 hours with a rigid splint fixed on the hand and an immobilization vest restraining the shoulder, arm, and forearm. The…

  13. Upper Limb Immobilisation: A Neural Plasticity Model with Relevance to Poststroke Motor Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Leonardo; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Cohen, Leonardo G.; Sterr, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the neural plasticity that occurs after hemiparetic stroke have contributed to the formulation of theories of poststroke motor recovery. These theories, in turn, have underpinned contemporary motor rehabilitation strategies for treating motor deficits after stroke, such as upper limb hemiparesis. However, a relative drawback has been that, in general, these strategies are most compatible with the recovery profiles of relatively high-functioning stroke survivors and therefore do not easily translate into benefit to those individuals sustaining low-functioning upper limb hemiparesis, who otherwise have poorer residual function. For these individuals, alternative motor rehabilitation strategies are currently needed. In this paper, we will review upper limb immobilisation studies that have been conducted with healthy adult humans and animals. Then, we will discuss how the findings from these studies could inspire the creation of a neural plasticity model that is likely to be of particular relevance to the context of motor rehabilitation after stroke. For instance, as will be elaborated, such model could contribute to the development of alternative motor rehabilitation strategies for treating poststroke upper limb hemiparesis. The implications of the findings from those immobilisation studies for contemporary motor rehabilitation strategies will also be discussed and perspectives for future research in this arena will be provided as well. PMID:26843992

  14. Sensory re-education after nerve injury of the upper limb: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, Tanja; Beelen, Anita; Eijffinger, Elianne; Nollet, Frans

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the available evidence for the effectiveness of sensory re-education to improve the sensibility of the hand in patients with a peripheral nerve injury of the upper limb. DATA SOURCES: Studies were identified by an electronic search in the databases MEDLINE,

  15. Advanced insights in upper limb function of individuals with cervical spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velstra, Inge-Marie

    2015-01-01

    An important criterion for a clinical outcome measure, such as the Graded and Redefined Assessment of Strength, Sensibility and Prehension (GRASSP), is its sensitivity to detect changes in upper limb function over time. This facilitates the evaluation of recovery patterns and treatment efficacy of

  16. Vibrotactile sense in patients with different upper limb disorders compared with a control group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lise Hedegaard; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Upper limb disorders (ULDs) are common, and so are the difficulties with regard to their specific diagnoses. According to diagnostic consensus criteria, specific diagnoses include neuropathy and muscular- and connective-tissue disorders (MCDs). There is a need for valid objective diag...

  17. Improving work style behavior in computer workers with neck and upper limb symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernaards, C.M.; Ariëns, G.A.M.; Simons, M.; Knol, D.L.; Hildebrandt, V.H.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a group-based interactive work style intervention in improving work style behavior. Methods: Computer workers with neck and upper limb symptoms were randomised into the work style group (WS, N = 152), the work style and physical

  18. Addressing Sexuality as Standard Care in People with an Upper Limb Deficiency : Taboo or Necessary Topic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, J.E.A.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Enzlin, P.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Dekker, R.; Van Der Sluis, C.K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether professionals who work with people with an upper limb deficiency (ULD) received questions about sexuality from their patients and whether they addressed sexuality themselves, and to analyze their knowledge and comfort level, approach and attitudes

  19. Physiological consequences of using an upper limb exoskeleton during manual handling tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurel, Jean; Desbrosses, Kevin; Roux, Terence; Savescu, Adriana

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the physiological consequences of using an upper limb exoskeleton during manual handling task, as muscle activity, upper limb kinematics, postural balance and cardiac cost. Participants performed three tasks (load lifting (LIFT), carrying (WALK) and stacking-unstacking (STACK)) with (EXOS) and without (FREE) an exoskeleton. During LIFT and STACK, the activity of the deltoid anterior muscle was significantly lower for EXOS than for FREE. During LIFT, the activity of the triceps brachii (TB) and tibialis anterior muscles significantly increased for EXO. The TB muscle activity significantly decreased for EXOS during WALK. The cardiac cost tended to increase with the use of the exoskeleton during LIFT, compared to FREE. The upper limb kinematics significantly differed between the EXOS and FREE conditions for all tasks. The benefits of the upper limb exoskeleton to reduce shoulder flexor muscle activity has been demonstrated, while broader physiological consequences have also been evidenced as increased antagonist muscle activity, postural strains, cardiovascular demand, and modified kinematics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Improving Work Style Behavior in Computer Workers with Neck and Upper Limb Symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernaards, C.M.; Ariens, G.A.; Simons, M.; Knol, D.L.; Hildebrandt, V.H.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a group-based interactive work style intervention in improving work style behavior. Methods: Computer workers with neck and upper limb symptoms were randomised into the work style group (WS, N = 152), the work style and physical

  1. Do work-related physical factors predict neck and upper limb symptoms in office workers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, S.G. van den; Beek, A.J. van der; Blatter, B.M.; Bonger, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Examination of the influence of physical exposure at work on neck and upper limb symptoms in office workers. Data were used from a prospective cohort study with a follow-up period of 3 years. Independent variables were physical exposure at work, observed and self-reported. Outcome measures were

  2. Prescribing upper limb exercises after stroke: a survey of current UK therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Louise A; McMahon, Naoimh E; Eng, Janice J; Watkins, Caroline L

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the current practice of physiotherapists and occupational therapists in prescribing upper limb exercises to people after stroke and to explore differences between professions and work settings. A cross-sectional survey design. Occupational therapists and physiotherapists working in UK stroke rehabilitation. The survey's response rate was 21.0% (n = 322); with 295 valid responses. Almost two thirds of therapists (64.7%, n = 191) agreed that they always prescribe upper limb exercises to a person with stroke if they can actively elevate their scapula and have grade 1 finger/wrist extension. Most therapists (98.6%, n = 278) prescribed exercises to be completed outside of therapy time, with exercises verbally communicated to family. Standardised upper limb specific outcome measures were used to evaluate the prescribed exercises by 21.9% (n = 62) OF THERAPISTS. DIFFERENCES WERE FOUND BETWEEN PROFESSIONS AND ACROSS WORK SETTINGS. The majority of prescribed upper limb exercises were of low intensity (range of motion or stretching exercises) rather than repetitive practice or strengthening exercises. The use of standardised outcome measures was low. Progression of exercises and the provision of written instructions on discharge occur less frequently in inpatient settings than outpatient and community settings.

  3. Robot-Mediated Upper Limb Physiotherapy: Review and Recommendations for Future Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Orsolya; Fazekas, Gabor; Zsiga, Katalin; Denes, Zoltan

    2011-01-01

    Robot-mediated physiotherapy provides a new possibility for improving the outcome of rehabilitation of patients who are recovering from stroke. This study is a review of robot-supported upper limb physiotherapy focusing on the shoulder, elbow, and wrist. A literature search was carried out in PubMed, OVID, and EBSCO for clinical trials with robots…

  4. Biomimetics in the design of a robotic exoskeleton for upper limb therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniqued, Paul Dominick E.; Dungao, Jade R.; Manguerra, Michael V.; Baldovino, Renann G.; Abad, Alexander C.; Bugtai, Nilo T.

    2018-02-01

    Current methodologies in designing robotic exoskeletons for upper limb therapy simplify the complex requirements of the human anatomy. As a result, such devices tend to compromise safety and biocompatibility with the intended user. However, a new design methodology uses biological analogues as inspiration to address these technical issues. This approach follows that of biomimetics, a design principle that uses the extraction and transfer of useful information from natural morphologies and processes to solve technical design issues. In this study, a biomimetic approach in the design of a 5-degree-of-freedom robotic exoskeleton for upper limb therapy was performed. A review of biomimetics was first discussed along with its current contribution to the design of rehabilitation robots. With a proposed methodological framework, the design for an upper limb robotic exoskeleton was generated using CATIA software. The design was inspired by the morphology of the bones and the muscle force transmission of the upper limbs. Finally, a full design assembly presented had integrated features extracted from the biological analogue. The successful execution of a biomimetic design methodology made a case in providing safer and more biocompatible robots for rehabilitation.

  5. The Society for Vascular Surgery lower extremity threatened limb classification system based on Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) correlates with risk of major amputation and time to wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Luke X; Branco, Bernardino C; Armstrong, David G; Mills, Joseph L

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the new Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system correlates with important clinical outcomes for limb salvage and wound healing. A total of 201 consecutive patients with threatened limbs treated from 2010 to 2011 in an academic medical center were analyzed. These patients were stratified into clinical stages 1 to 4 on the basis of the SVS WIfI classification. The SVS objective performance goals of major amputation, 1-year amputation-free survival (AFS) rate, and wound healing time (WHT) according to WIfI clinical stages were compared. The mean age was 58 years (79% male, 93% with diabetes). Forty-two patients required major amputation (21%); 159 (78%) had limb salvage. The amputation group had a significantly higher prevalence of advanced stage 4 patients (P wound and ischemia grades, revascularization resulted in accelerated WHT (P = .008). These data support the underlying concept of the SVS WIfI, that an appropriate classification system correlates with important clinical outcomes for limb salvage and wound healing. As the clinical stage progresses, the risk of major amputation increases, 1-year AFS declines, and WHT is prolonged. We further demonstrated benefit of revascularization to improve WHT in selected patients, especially those in stage 3. Future efforts are warranted to incorporate the SVS WIfI classification into clinical decision-making algorithms in conjunction with a comorbidity index and anatomic classification. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reliability and construct validity of the Turkish version of the Trinity Amputation and Prosthetic Experience Scales (TAPES) in lower limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topuz, Semra; Ülger, Özlem; Yakut, Yavuz; Gül Şener, Fatma

    2011-06-01

    In Turkey there is no amputee-specific instrument to measure health-related quality of life in lower limb amputees. To evaluate the validity and reliability of a Turkish version of the Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales (TAPES). Outcome study to determine test-retest reliability and construct validity of the adapted Turkish version of the TAPES. After translation/retranslation of the TAPES, the Turkish version of the TAPES was applied to 47 amputees. A quality of life evaluation (Nottingham Health Profile), a satisfaction evaluation (Satisfaction with Prosthesis), and a functional assessment tool (Amputee Mobility Predictor) were also performed and analysed. On the basis of retesting, the Turkish version of the TAPES was observed to be reliable. The first domain of the Turkish version, which includes psychosocial adjustment, activity restriction and satisfaction with the prosthesis, was found to be valid. However, the validity of the second domain could not be analysed. The Turkish version of the multidimensional TAPES survey is valid and reliable in Turkish unilateral lower limb amputees and may be used in clinical situations to assess the needs of amputees. The Turkish version of the TAPES quality-of-life measurement tool for amputees is a valid instrument for assessing the effectiveness of rehabilitation and clinical applications.

  7. Intra-arterial Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Upper-extremity Critical Limb Ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madaric, Juraj, E-mail: jurmad@hotmail.com [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NUSCH) and Slovak Medical University, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Slovakia); Klepanec, Andrej [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia); Mistrik, Martin [Clinic of Hematology and Transfusiology, Faculty Hospital (Slovakia); Altaner, Cestmir [Slovak Academy of Science, Institute of Experimental Oncology (Slovakia); Vulev, Ivan [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia)

    2013-04-15

    Induction of therapeutic angiogenesis by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation has been identified as a potential new option in patients with advanced lower-limb ischemia. There is little evidence of the benefit of intra-arterial cell application in upper-limb critical ischemia. We describe a patient with upper-extremity critical limb ischemia with digital gangrene resulting from hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by intra-arterial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation.

  8. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the upper limb. Apropos of 4 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, R; el Yazidi, A; Ameziane, L; Berrada, M S; el Bardouni, A; el Yaacoubi, M; el Manouar, M

    1999-01-01

    This article is based on the retrospective study of 4 cases of necrotic fasciitis of the upper extremity, in adult patients with a mean age of 57 years (range: 36 to 78 years) and with a male predominance (3 M/1 F). Presenting signs were variable: pain, febrile and inflammatory oedema, ecchymoses with inflammatory masses containing clear or haemorrhagic fluid. Treatment with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs did not prevent progression to painless, necrotic ulcers. Rapid medical and surgical treatment constitutes an element essential of the prognosis and must include wide large debridement, antibiotics and intensive care.

  9. Effect of Pilates Exercise on Range of Motion and Edema of Upper Limb in Mastectomy Side

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghorbani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives : The surgery of breast cancer like any other surgeries may bring about some problems and complications, which the knowledge of these problems may be an effective way for prevention or dealing with the complications. The motor and sensory impairments in the upper limb of the surgery side necessitate the utilization of the rehabilitation methods. The main purpose of this research was to show the effect of Pilates exercise on range of motion and edema of upper limb in females suffering from breast cancer after going through surgery.   Methods: This quasi- experimental study was conducted on 25 patients randomly chosen among the patients referring to Cancer Institute. The designed exercise included five "Mat Pilates" moves which were done for 15 sessions until the patient reached fatigue borderlines. Meantime, the control group was doing routine active exercises in physiotherapy center. The range of motion and edema of upper limb was measured before and after applying the designed exercise. For describing the data, the mean and standard deviation, and for inferential analysis, the correlated T-tests and one way analysis of variance were used in level of significance of 5%, to compare the variants before and after applying the designed exercise.   Results: The results showed a significant difference between the flexion, extension, and internal, external rotation of shoulder, flexion and extension of elbow, flexion, extension, supination deviation and pronation deviation of the wrist and forearm before and after experiment in Pilates group. While in the control group, flexion, extension, internal and external rotation of shoulder, flexion and extension of elbow, and flexion of wrist showed a significant difference before and after the experiment.   Conclusion: The use of Pilates exercise after mastectomy surgery can increase the range of motion of the upper limb in the involved side of the patients, and decrease the edema

  10. Nature and incidence of upper limb injuries in professional cricket players a prospective observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhillon Mandeep S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cricket is the most popular sport in India, and is gaining in importance in all south-east Asian countries. The purpose of this study was to prospectively investigate the incidence, nature, and site of acute upper limb injuries sustained by professional cricketers of north India over a period of one year. Material & methods 95 cricket players (mean age 18.9 years were prospectively evaluated for nature and incidence of upper limb injuries from 1st November 2008 to 31st October 2009. For the purpose of comparison the calculated injury incidence included injuries sustained during match as well as practice. Injuries were also grouped according to the type of cricket activities such as batting or fielding. Results Out of 95 players evaluated, 24 were bowlers, 19 were batsmen, 8 were wicket keepers and the other 44 cricketers declared themselves as all rounders. There were a total of 16 upper limb injuries in 16 (16.8% players. The majority of injuries (10/16 occurred while fielding. Out of 16 injuries, 11 were seen in hand, 3 were observed in elbow, while 2 patients suffered from shoulder problem. Twelve were acute injuries while 4 were classified as repetitive stress injuries (RSI. Conclusion The incidence of upper limb injuries in cricketers at the professional and semi-professional level is significant, causing them to miss matches or practice for a significant number of days. This is the first study of Indian cricketers which documents the high incidence of upper limb injuries. The study highlights the importance of injury surveillance for Indian cricket. It is a concern which needs to be addressed by the players, coaches, teachers, administrators and medical personnel involved with cricket.

  11. Controlling a multi-degree of freedom upper limb prosthesis using foot controls: user experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Klinger, Shana Lieberman; Etter, Katherine; Fantini, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    The DEKA Arm, a pre-commercial upper limb prosthesis, funded by the DARPA Revolutionizing Prosthetics Program, offers increased degrees of freedom while requiring a large number of user control inputs to operate. To address this challenge, DEKA developed prototype foot controls. Although the concept of utilizing foot controls to operate an upper limb prosthesis has been discussed for decades, only small-sized studies have been performed and no commercial product exists. The purpose of this paper is to report amputee user perspectives on using three different iterations of foot controls to operate the DEKA Arm. Qualitative data was collected from 36 subjects as part of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Study to Optimize the DEKA Arm through surveys, interviews, audio memos, and videotaped sessions. Three major, interrelated themes were identified using the constant comparative method: attitudes towards foot controls, psychomotor learning and physical experience of using foot controls. Feedback about foot controls was generally positive for all iterations. The final version of foot controls was viewed most favorably. Our findings indicate that foot controls are a viable control option that can enable control of a multifunction upper limb prosthesis (the DEKA Arm). Multifunction upper limb prostheses require many user control inputs to operate. Foot controls offer additional control input options for such advanced devices, yet have had minimal study. This study found that foot controls were a viable option for controlling multifunction upper limb prostheses. Most of the 36 subjects in this study were willing to adopt foot controls to control the multiple degrees of freedom of the DEKA Arm. With training and practice, all users were able to develop the psychomotor skills needed to successfully operate food controls. Some had initial difficulty, but acclimated over time.

  12. Rehabilitation of Upper Limb in Children with Acquired Brain Injury: A Preliminary Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Beretta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired brain injuries (ABIs can lead to a wide range of impairments, including weakness or paralysis on one side of the body known as hemiplegia. In hemiplegic patients, the rehabilitation of the upper limb skills is crucial, because the recovery has an immediate impact on patient quality of life. For this reason, several treatments were developed to flank physical therapy (PT and improve functional recovery of the upper limbs. Among them, Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT and robot-aided therapy have shown interesting potentialities in the rehabilitation of the hemiplegic upper limb. Nevertheless, there is a lack of quantitative evaluations of effectiveness in a standard clinical setting, especially in children, as well as a lack of direct comparative studies between these therapeutic techniques. In this study, a group of 18 children and adolescents with hemiplegia was enrolled and underwent intensive rehabilitation treatment including PT and CIMT or Armeo®Spring therapy. The effects of the treatments were assessed using clinical functional scales and upper limb kinematic analysis during horizontal and vertical motor tasks. Results showed CIMT to be the most effective in terms of improved functional scales, while PT seemed to be the most significant in terms of kinematic variations. Specifically, PT resulted to have positive influence on distal movements while CIMT conveyed more changes in the proximal kinematics. Armeo treatment delivered improvements mainly in the vertical motor task, showing trends of progresses of the movement efficiency and reduction of compensatory movements of the shoulder with respect to other treatments. Therefore, every treatment gave advantages in a specific and different upper limb district. Therefore, results of this preliminary study may be of help to define the best rehabilitation treatment for each patient, depending on the goal, and may thus support clinical decision.

  13. Upper limb therapy in children with cerebral palsy (CP – The Pirate Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlak Marta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children with cerebral palsy (CP in the form of spastic hemiplegia experience numerous difficulties concerning an affected upper limb such as reaching for objects, gripping or manipulating them. These limitations affect their everyday activity. Conducting an effective and simultaneously an interesting therapy aimed at meeting the child’s individual needs and improving upper limb function is a challenge for a physiotherapist. The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of upper limb therapy carried out within the project titled “The Pirate Group” based on Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT and Bimanual Training (BIT conducted in a specially arranged environment. Material and methods: The research included 16 children with CP in the form of spastic hemiplegia. Mean age of the study participants was 4.23 years. The children underwent a two-week Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT combined with Bimanual Training (BIT. In order to evaluate the effects of the therapy, each child underwent the Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA prior to the therapy and after its completion. Results: Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference (p<0.05 between the results of AHA prior to and after the therapy (t(14=9.12, p<0.0001. An improvement in the affected upper limb function was noted in all the children participating in the research. Conclusions: The project titled “The Pirate Group”, based on CIMT and BIT is an effective therapeutic intervention which improves spontaneous activity of the affected upper limb in children with hemiplegia.

  14. Somatosensory Impairments in the Upper Limb Poststroke: Distribution and Association With Motor Function and Visuospatial Neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sarah; De Bruyn, Nele; Lafosse, Christophe; Van Dijk, Margaretha; Michielsen, Marc; Thijs, Liselot; Truyens, Veronik; Oostra, Kristine; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena; Peeters, Andre; Thijs, Vincent; Feys, Hilde; Verheyden, Geert

    2016-09-01

    A thorough understanding of the presence of different upper-limb somatosensory deficits poststroke and the relation with motor performance remains unclear. Additionally, knowledge about the relation between somatosensory deficits and visuospatial neglect is limited. To investigate the distribution of upper-limb somatosensory impairments and the association with unimanual and bimanual motor outcomes and visuospatial neglect. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted, including 122 patients within 6 months after stroke (median = 82 days; interquartile range = 57-133 days). Somatosensory measurement included the Erasmus MC modification of the (revised) Nottingham Sensory Assessment (Em-NSA), Perceptual Threshold of Touch (PTT), thumb finding test, 2-point discrimination, and stereognosis subscale of the NSA. Upper-limb motor assessment comprised the Fugl-Meyer assessment, motricity index, Action Research Arm Test, and Adult-Assisting Hand Assessment Stroke. Screening for visuospatial neglect was performed using the Star Cancellation Test. Upper-limb somatosensory impairments were common, with prevalence rates ranging from 21% to 54%. Low to moderate Spearman ρ correlations were found between somatosensory and motor deficits (r = 0.22-0.61), with the strongest associations for PTT (r = 0.56-0.61) and stereognosis (r = 0.51-0.60). Visuospatial neglect was present in 27 patients (22%). Between-group analysis revealed somatosensory deficits that occurred significantly more often and more severely in patients with visuospatial neglect (P visuospatial neglect (r = 0.44-0.78) compared with patients without neglect (r = 0.08-0.59). Somatosensory impairments are common in subacute patients poststroke and are related to motor outcome. Visuospatial neglect was associated with more severe upper-limb somatosensory impairments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Return to sport following amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, D; Sukeik, M; Haddad, F

    2014-08-01

    Amputation in athletes has a substantial impact on lifestyle and sporting activity, as well as self-perception and quality of life. The impact of limb loss on athletic ability will vary depending on the cause of amputation and the anatomical location of the amputation. The use of sporting activity for rehabilitation of amputees was first introduced in 1944 at Stoke Mandeville Hospital. The first international paralympic games were founded in 1960. Following these events the opportunity to participate in sport following limb loss has increased significantly. Sport participation has been aided by the development of sporting prostheses, however multiple factors will determine the exact prosthesis used. These include the nature of the sporting activity as well as the level of the amputation. The biomechanics involved in walking and running are altered following the loss of a limb or part thereof. This can cause subsequent degenerative changes within the remaining joints on the amputated limb as well as the contralateral limb. Factors affecting return to sporting activity are multivariate and inter-related, including patient factors, surgical factors, nature and level of the sporting activity and prosthetic factors. The authors review current literature, detail predictive factors of return to sport and the physical and psychosocial impact on patients following limb amputation.

  16. Upper Limb Muscle and Brain Activity in Light Assembly Task on Different Load Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadry, Hilma Raimona; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md.; Taha, Zahari

    2010-10-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of load on upper limb muscles and brain activities in light assembly task. The task was conducted at two levels of load (Low and high). Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to measure upper limb muscle activities of twenty subjects. Electroencephalography (EEG) was simultaneously recorded with EMG to record brain activities from Fz, Pz, O1 and O2 channels. The EMG Mean Power Frequency (MPF) of the right brachioradialis and the left upper trapezius activities were higher on the high-load task compared to low-load task. The EMG MPF values also decrease as time increases, that reflects muscle fatigue. Mean power of the EEG alpha bands for the Fz-Pz channels were found to be higher on the high-load task compared to low-load task, while for the O1-O2 channels, they were higher on the low-load task than on the high-load task. These results indicated that the load levels effect the upper limb muscle and brain activities. The high-load task will increase muscle activities on the right brachioradialis and the left upper tapezius muscles, and will increase the awareness and motivation of the subjects. Whilst the low-load task can generate drowsiness earlier. It signified that the longer the time and the more heavy of the task, the subjects will be more fatigue physically and mentally.

  17. Constraint-induced movement therapy improves upper limb activity and participation in hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Ching Chiu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Questions: Does constraint-induced movement therapy improve activity and participation in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy? Does it improve activity and participation more than the same dose of upper limb therapy without restraint? Is the effect of constraint-induced movement therapy related to the duration of intervention or the age of the children? Design: Systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis. Participants: Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy with any level of motor disability. Intervention: The experimental group received constraint-induced movement therapy (defined as restraint of the less affected upper limb during supervised activity practice of the more affected upper limb. The control group received no intervention, sham intervention, or the same dose of upper limb therapy. Outcome measures: Measures of upper limb activity and participation were used in the analysis. Results: Constraint-induced movement therapy was more effective than no/sham intervention in terms of upper limb activity (SMD 0.63, 95% CI 0.20 to 1.06 and participation (SMD 1.21, 95% CI 0.41 to 2.02. However, constraint-induced movement therapy was no better than the same dose of upper limb therapy without restraint either in terms of upper limb activity (SMD 0.05, 95% CI –0.21 to 0.32 or participation (SMD –0.02, 95% CI –0.34 to 0.31. The effect of constraint-induced movement therapy was not related to the duration of intervention or the age of the children. Conclusions: This review suggests that constraint-induced movement therapy is more effective than no intervention, but no more effective than the same dose of upper limb practice without restraint. Registration: PROSPERO CRD42015024665. [Chiu H-C, Ada L (2016 Constraint-induced movement therapy improves upper limb activity and participation in hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 62: 130–137

  18. A novel upper limb rehabilitation system with self-driven virtual arm illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Yee Mon; Al-Jumaily, Adel; Anam, Khairul

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel upper extremity rehabilitation system with virtual arm illusion. It aims for fast recovery from lost functions of the upper limb as a result of stroke to provide a novel rehabilitation system for paralyzed patients. The system is integrated with a number of technologies that include Augmented Reality (AR) technology to develop game like exercise, computer vision technology to create the illusion scene, 3D modeling and model simulation, and signal processing to detect user intention via EMG signal. The effectiveness of the developed system has evaluated via usability study and questionnaires which is represented by graphical and analytical methods. The evaluation provides with positive results and this indicates the developed system has potential as an effective rehabilitation system for upper limb impairment.

  19. INTERVENTIONS TO MANAGE RESIDUAL LIMB ULCERATION DUE TO PROSTHETIC USE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH LOWER EXTREMITY AMPUTATION:A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highsmith, M Jason; Kahle, Jason T; Klenow, Tyler D; Andrews, Casey R; Lewis, Katherine L; Bradley, Rachel C; Ward, Jessica M; Orriola, John J; Highsmith, James T

    2016-09-01

    Patients with lower extremity amputation (LEA) experience 65% more dermatologic issues than non-amputees, and skin problems are experienced by ≈75% of LEA patients who use prostheses. Continuously referring LEA patients to a dermatologist for every stump related skin condition may be impractical. Thus, physical rehabilitation professionals should be prepared to recognize and manage common non-emergent skin conditions in this population. The purpose of this study was to determine the quantity, quality, and strength of available evidence supporting treatment methods for prosthesis-related residual limb (RL) ulcers. Systematic literature review with evidence grading and synthesis of empirical evidence statements (EES) was employed. Three EESs were formulated describing ulcer etiology, conditions in which prosthetic continuance is practical, circumstances likely requiring prosthetic discontinuance, and the consideration of additional medical or surgical interventions. Continued prosthetic use is a viable option to manage minor or early-stage ulcerated residual limbs in compliant patients lacking multiple comorbidities. Prosthetic discontinuance is also a viable method of residual limb ulcer healing and may be favored in the presence of severe acute ulcerations, chronic heavy smoking, intractable pain, rapid volume and weight change, history of chronic ulceration, systemic infections, or advanced dysvascular etiology. Surgery or other interventions may also be necessary in such cases to achieve restored prosthetic ambulation. A short bout of prosthetic discontinuance with a staged re-introduction plan is another viable option that may be warranted in patients with ulceration due to poor RL volume management. High-quality prospective research with larger samples is needed to determine the most appropriate course of treatment when a person with LEA develops an RL ulcer that is associated with prosthetic use.

  20. Upper limb biomechanics during the volleyball serve and spike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeser, Jonathan C; Fleisig, Glenn S; Bolt, Becky; Ruan, Mianfang

    2010-09-01

    The shoulder is the third-most commonly injured body part in volleyball, with the majority of shoulder problems resulting from chronic overuse. Significant kinetic differences exist among specific types of volleyball serves and spikes. Controlled laboratory study. Fourteen healthy female collegiate volleyball players performed 5 successful trials of 4 skills: 2 directional spikes, an off-speed roll shot, and the float serve. Volunteers who were competent in jump serves (n, 5) performed 5 trials of that skill. A 240-Hz 3-dimensional automatic digitizing system captured each trial. Multivariate analysis of variance and post hoc paired t tests were used to compare kinetic parameters for the shoulder and elbow across all the skills (except the jump serve). A similar statistical analysis was performed for upper extremity kinematics. Forces, torques, and angular velocities at the shoulder and elbow were lowest for the roll shot and second-lowest for the float serve. No differences were detected between the cross-body and straight-ahead spikes. Although there was an insufficient number of participants to statistically analyze the jump serve, the data for it appear similar to those of the cross-body and straight-ahead spikes. Shoulder abduction at the instant of ball contact was approximately 130° for all skills, which is substantially greater than that previously reported for female athletes performing tennis serves or baseball pitches. Because shoulder kinetics were greatest during spiking, the volleyball player with symptoms of shoulder overuse may wish to reduce the number of repetitions performed during practice. Limiting the number of jump serves may also reduce the athlete's risk of overuse-related shoulder dysfunction. Volleyball-specific overhead skills, such as the spike and serve, produce considerable upper extremity force and torque, which may contribute to the risk of shoulder injury.

  1. Preventable amputations in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sew. Mi. 6. Discussion. Gas gangre. Total. This study thus confirms that at the present time about a half of the limbs being amputated at our. Hospital (and probably throughout Ethiopia) could have been saved, or prevented by relatively simple means. These include reducing the number of road traffic accident casualties by ...

  2. Disinhibition of upper limb motor area by voluntary contraction of the lower limb muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazoe, Toshiki; Endoh, Takashi; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Masanori; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2007-03-01

    It is well known that monosynaptic spinal reflexes and motor evoked potentials following transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are reinforced during phasic and intensive voluntary contraction in the remote segment (remote effect). However, the remote effect on the cortical silent period (CSP) is less known. The purpose of the present study is to determine to what extent the CSP in the intrinsic hand muscle following TMS is modified by voluntary ankle dorsiflexion and to elucidate the origin of the modulation of CSP by the remote effect. CSP was recorded in the right first dorsal interosseous while subjects performed phasic dorsiflexion in the ipsilateral side under self-paced and reaction-time conditions. Modulation of the peripherally-induced silent period (PSP) induced by electrical stimulation of the ulnar nerve was also investigated under the same conditions. In addition, modulation of the CSP was investigated during ischemic nerve block of the lower limb and during application of vibration to the tibialis anterior tendon. The duration of CSP was significantly shortened by phasic dorsiflexion, and the extent of shortening was proportional to dorsiflexion force. Shortening of the CSP duration was also observed during tonic dorsiflexion. In contrast, the PSP duration following ulnar nerve stimulation was not altered during phasic dorsiflexion. Furthermore, the remote effect on the CSP duration was seen during ischemic nerve block of the lower limb and the pre-movement period in the reaction-time paradigm, but shortening of the CSP was not observed during tendon vibration. These findings suggest that phasic muscle contraction in the remote segment results in a decrease in intracortical inhibitory pathways to the corticospinal tract innervating the muscle involved in reflex testing and that the remote effect on the CSP is predominantly cortical in origin.

  3. Comparative analysis of speech impairment and upper limb motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusz, Jan; Tykalová, Tereza; Krupička, Radim; Zárubová, Kateřina; Novotný, Michal; Jech, Robert; Szabó, Zoltán; Růžička, Evžen

    2017-04-01

    It is currently unknown whether speech and limb motor effectors in Parkinson's disease (PD) are controlled by similar underlying brain processes. Based on computerized objective analysis, the aim of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between speech and mechanical tests of upper limb motor function. Speech and upper limb motor tests were performed in 22 PD patients and 22 healthy controls. Quantitative acoustic analyses of eight key speech dimensions of hypokinetic dysarthria, including quality of voice, sequential motion rates, consonant articulation, vowel articulation, average loudness, loudness variability, pitch variability, and number of pauses, were performed. Upper limb movements were assessed using the motor part of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, contactless three-dimensional motion capture system, blinded expert evaluation, and the Purdue Pegboard Test. Significant relationships were observed between the quality of voice assessed by jitter and amplitude decrement of finger tapping (r = 0.61, p = 0.003), consonant articulation evaluated using voice onset time and expert rating of finger tapping (r = 0.60, p = 0.003), and number of pauses and Purdue Pegboard Test score (r = 0.60, p = 0.004). The current study supports the hypothesis that speech impairment in PD shares, at least partially, similar pathophysiological processes with limb motor dysfunction. Vocal fold vibration irregularities appeared to be influenced by mechanisms similar to amplitude decrement during repetitive limb movements. Consonant articulation deficits were associated with decreased manual dexterity and movement speed, likely reflecting fine motor control involvement in PD.

  4. Cervical Spinal Cord and Dorsal Nerve Root Stimulation for Neuropathic Upper Limb Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Adrian B; Parrent, Andrew G; MacDougall, Keith W

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a well-established treatment for chronic neuropathic pain in the lower limbs. Upper limb pain comprises a significant proportion of neuropathic pain patients, but is often difficult to target specifically and consistently with paresthesias. We hypothesized that the use of dorsal nerve root stimulation (DNRS), as an option along with SCS, would help us better relieve pain in these patients. All 35 patients trialed with spinal stimulation for upper limb pain between July 1, 2011, and October 31, 2013, were included. We performed permanent implantation in 23/35 patients based on a visual analogue scale pain score decrease of ≥50% during trial stimulation. Both the SCS and DNRS groups had significant improvements in average visual analogue scale pain scores at 12 months compared with baseline, and the majority of patients in both groups obtained ≥50% pain relief. The majority of patients in both groups were able to reduce their opioid use, and on average had improvements in Short Form-36 quality of life scores. Complication rates did not differ significantly between the two groups. Treatment with SCS or DNRS provides meaningful long-term relief of chronic neuropathic pain in the upper limbs.

  5. Measuring upper limb function in children with hemiparesis with 3D inertial sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Christopher J; Bruchez, Roselyn; Roches, Sylvie; Jequier Gygax, Marine; Duc, Cyntia; Dadashi, Farzin; Massé, Fabien; Aminian, Kamiar

    2017-12-01

    Upper limb assessments in children with hemiparesis rely on clinical measurements, which despite standardization are prone to error. Recently, 3D movement analysis using optoelectronic setups has been used to measure upper limb movement, but generalization is hindered by time and cost. Body worn inertial sensors may provide a simple, cost-effective alternative. We instrumented a subset of 30 participants in a mirror therapy clinical trial at baseline, post-treatment, and follow-up clinical assessments, with wireless inertial sensors positioned on the arms and trunk to monitor motion during reaching tasks. Inertial sensor measurements distinguished paretic and non-paretic limbs with significant differences (P < 0.01) in movement duration, power, range of angular velocity, elevation, and smoothness (normalized jerk index and spectral arc length). Inertial sensor measurements correlated with functional clinical tests (Melbourne Assessment 2); movement duration and complexity (Higuchi fractal dimension) showed moderate to strong negative correlations with clinical measures of amplitude, accuracy, and fluency. Inertial sensor measurements reliably identify paresis and correlate with clinical measurements; they can therefore provide a complementary dimension of assessment in clinical practice and during clinical trials aimed at improving upper limb function.

  6. Mirror therapy for upper limb rehabilitation in chronic patients after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreyzialle Vila Nova Mota

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Individuals with stroke sequelae present changes in the postural alignment and muscle strength associated with hemiplegia or hemiparesis. Mirror therapy is a technique that aims to improve the motor function of the paretic limb. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mirror therapy, associated with conventional physiotherapy, for range of motion (ROM, degree of spasticity of the affected upper limb, and the level of independence in the activities of daily living (ADL of chronic patients after stroke. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental (before and after study. The study included ten stroke survivors undertaking physiotherapy and presenting with upper limb paresis. The following gauges were used for the present study: goniometry, the Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer and Barthel Index. Fifteen sessions were performed, each lasting 30 minutes, consisting of stretching of the flexor and extensor muscles of the wrist and elbow, pronators and supinators, followed by mirror therapy with gradual functional exercises. Results: Improvement was observed in all aspects studied, however with significant differences for ROM wrist extension (p = 0.04 and forearm supination (p = 0.03 Conclusion: It can be concluded that mirror therapy contributed to the participants' good performance in the aspects studied, mainly in relation to ROM of the affected upper limb.

  7. Co-ordination of the upper and lower limbs for vestibular control of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig P; Allsop, Jonathan E; Mistry, Michael; Reynolds, Raymond F

    2017-11-01

    When standing and holding an earth-fixed object, galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) can evoke upper limb responses to maintain balance. In the present study, we determined how these responses are affected by grip context (no contact, light grip and firm grip), as well as how they are co-ordinated with the lower limbs to maintain balance. When GVS was applied during firm grip, hand and ground reaction forces were generated. The directions of these force vectors were co-ordinated such that the overall body sway response was always aligned with the inter-aural axis (i.e. craniocentric). When GVS was applied during light grip (balance control and also that the upper and lower limbs co-ordinate for an appropriate whole-body sway response. Vestibular stimulation can evoke responses in the arm when it is used for balance. In the present study, we determined how these responses are affected by grip context, as well as how they are co-ordinated with the rest of the body. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was used to evoke balance responses under three conditions of manual contact with an earth-fixed object: no contact, light grip (vestibular-evoked balance responses. Furthermore, they demonstrate that upper and lower-limb forces are co-ordinated to produce an appropriate whole-body sway response. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  8. Adaptive control based on an on-line parameter estimation of an upper limb exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riani, Akram; Madani, Tarek; Hadri, Abdelhafid El; Benallegue, Abdelaziz

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents an adaptive control strategy for an upper-limb exoskeleton based on an on-line dynamic parameter estimator. The objective is to improve the control performance of this system that plays a critical role in assisting patients for shoulder, elbow and wrist joint movements. In general, the dynamic parameters of the human limb are unknown and differ from a person to another, which degrade the performances of the exoskeleton-human control system. For this reason, the proposed control scheme contains a supplementary loop based on a new efficient on-line estimator of the dynamic parameters. Indeed, the latter is acting upon the parameter adaptation of the controller to ensure the performances of the system in the presence of parameter uncertainties and perturbations. The exoskeleton used in this work is presented and a physical model of the exoskeleton interacting with a 7 Degree of Freedom (DoF) upper limb model is generated using the SimMechanics library of MatLab/Simulink. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, an example of passive rehabilitation movements is performed using multi-body dynamic simulation. The aims is to maneuver the exoskeleton that drive the upper limb to track desired trajectories in the case of the passive arm movements.

  9. Development of an exercise testing protocol for patients with a lower limb amputation : results of a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vestering, MM; Schoppen, T; Dekker, R; Wempe, J; Geertzen, JHB

    Due to a decrease in physical activity, lower limb amputees experience a decline in physical fitness. This causes problems in walking with a prosthesis because energy expenditure in walking with a prosthesis is much higher than in walking with two sound legs. Exercise training may therefore increase

  10. Congenital terminal transverse deformity of upper limb: clinical and radiological findings in a sporadic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sajid; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-03-01

    Congenital transverse limb anomalies are rare, which affect upper and/or lower limbs and may accompany several syndromic malformations. We present a sporadic male subject with congenital, unilateral transverse arrest of the left hand. The affected arm was observed to be short with reduced zeugopod and truncated palm. Fingers were represented by five bead-like nubbins. Roentgenographic examination revealed short radius and ulna with hypoplastic distal heads, absent carpals/metacarpals, and a hypoplastic bony island in each nubbin. Consanguinity was denied, and the subject had no symptoms in the orofacial, neurological and skeletal systems. Detailed clinical data with literature survey is presented.

  11. A Method for Quantifying Upper Limb Performance in Daily Life Using Accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Catherine E.; Waddell, Kimberly J.; Klaesner, Joseph W.; Bland, Marghuretta D.

    2017-01-01

    A key reason for referral to rehabilitation services after stroke and other neurological conditions is to improve one's ability to function in daily life. It has become important to measure a person's activities in daily life, and not just measure their capacity for activity in the structured environment of a clinic or laboratory. A wearable sensor that is now enabling measurement of daily movement is the accelerometer. Accelerometers are commercially-available devices resembling large wrist watches that can be worn throughout the day. Data from accelerometers can quantify how the limbs are engaged to perform activities in peoples' homes and communities. This report describes a methodology to collect accelerometry data and turn it into clinically-relevant information. First, data are collected by having the participant wear two accelerometers (one on each wrist) for 24 h or longer. The accelerometry data are then downloaded and processed to produce four different variables that describe key aspects of upper limb activity in daily life: hours of use, use ratio, magnitude ratio, and the bilateral magnitude. Density plots can be constructed that visually represent the data from the 24 h wearing period. The variables and their resultant density plots are highly consistent in neurologically-intact, community-dwelling adults. This striking consistency makes them a useful tool for determining if upper limb daily performance is different from normal. This methodology is appropriate for research studies investigating upper limb dysfunction and interventions designed to improve upper limb performance in daily life in people with stroke and other patient populations. Because of its relative simplicity, it may not be long before it is also incorporated in clinical neurorehabilitation practice. PMID:28518079

  12. Effect of Load Carriage on Upper Limb Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, Amir; Katz, Inbar; Haker, Tal; Zeilig, Gabi; Defrin, Ruth; Epstein, Yoram; Gefen, Amit

    2017-05-01

    Carrying heavy backpacks are often associated with shoulder discomfort or pain, loss of sensorimotor functions, and brachial plexus injuries that might hamper performance. On the basis of previous research, the cause of these symptoms could be tissue deformations of the brachial plexus and the subclavian artery caused by the shoulder straps. This study aimed to evaluate the changes in the upper extremity hemodynamic and neural function and to assess how they are associated with brachial plexus tissue deformation during heavy load carriage. Ten young healthy adults carried for 45 min a backpack load (40% of their body weight) while standing freely, followed by 15 min of recovery (unloaded). Index-finger microvascular flow and sensorimotor function were measured before and after carrying the load, and after recovery. The following sensorimotor functions were measured: light touch thresholds by the index finger and little finger, forearm thermal sensation thresholds, and gross motor function. In addition, marksmanship accuracy, as an indication for fine motor function, was tested. Load carriage resulted in an average decrease of ~40% in microvascular flow and a significant decrement in light touch sensation (P load carriage resulted in impaired light touch sensitivity and fine motor function, which were associated with reduced finger microvascular blood flow.

  13. Computer simulations of neural mechanisms explaining upper and lower limb excitatory neural coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferris Daniel P

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When humans perform rhythmic upper and lower limb locomotor-like movements, there is an excitatory effect of upper limb exertion on lower limb muscle recruitment. To investigate potential neural mechanisms for this behavioral observation, we developed computer simulations modeling interlimb neural pathways among central pattern generators. We hypothesized that enhancement of muscle recruitment from interlimb spinal mechanisms was not sufficient to explain muscle enhancement levels observed in experimental data. Methods We used Matsuoka oscillators for the central pattern generators (CPG and determined parameters that enhanced amplitudes of rhythmic steady state bursts. Potential mechanisms for output enhancement were excitatory and inhibitory sensory feedback gains, excitatory and inhibitory interlimb coupling gains, and coupling geometry. We first simulated the simplest case, a single CPG, and then expanded the model to have two CPGs and lastly four CPGs. In the two and four CPG models, the lower limb CPGs did not receive supraspinal input such that the only mechanisms available for enhancing output were interlimb coupling gains and sensory feedback gains. Results In a two-CPG model with inhibitory sensory feedback gains, only excitatory gains of ipsilateral flexor-extensor/extensor-flexor coupling produced reciprocal upper-lower limb bursts and enhanced output up to 26%. In a two-CPG model with excitatory sensory feedback gains, excitatory gains of contralateral flexor-flexor/extensor-extensor coupling produced reciprocal upper-lower limb bursts and enhanced output up to 100%. However, within a given excitatory sensory feedback gain, enhancement due to excitatory interlimb gains could only reach levels up to 20%. Interconnecting four CPGs to have ipsilateral flexor-extensor/extensor-flexor coupling, contralateral flexor-flexor/extensor-extensor coupling, and bilateral flexor-extensor/extensor-flexor coupling could enhance

  14. Cyborg beast: a low-cost 3d-printed prosthetic hand for children with upper-limb differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Jorge; Katsavelis, Dimitrios; Peck, Jean; Stollberg, John; Petrykowski, Marc; Carson, Adam; Fernandez, Cristina

    2015-01-20

    There is an increasing number of children with traumatic and congenital hand amputations or reductions. Children's prosthetic needs are complex due to their small size, constant growth, and psychosocial development. Families' financial resources play a crucial role in the prescription of prostheses for their children, especially when private insurance and public funding are insufficient. Electric-powered (i.e., myoelectric) and body-powered (i.e., mechanical) devices have been developed to accommodate children's needs, but the cost of maintenance and replacement represents an obstacle for many families. Due to the complexity and high cost of these prosthetic hands, they are not accessible to children from low-income, uninsured families or to children from developing countries. Advancements in computer-aided design (CAD) programs, additive manufacturing, and image editing software offer the possibility of designing, printing, and fitting prosthetic hands devices at a distance and at very low cost. The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to describe a low-cost three-dimensional (3D)-printed prosthetic hand for children with upper-limb reductions and to propose a prosthesis fitting methodology that can be performed at a distance. No significant mean differences were found between the anthropometric and range of motion measurements taken directly from the upper limbs of subjects versus those extracted from photographs. The Bland and Altman plots show no major bias and narrow limits of agreements for lengths and widths and small bias and wider limits of agreements for the range of motion measurements. The main finding of the survey was that our prosthetic device may have a significant potential to positively impact quality of life and daily usage, and can be incorporated in several activities at home and in school. This investigation describes a low-cost 3D-printed prosthetic hand for children and proposes a distance fitting procedure. The Cyborg Beast

  15. Amputation - traumatic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Traumatic amputation is the loss of a body part, usually ... fitting and functional prosthesis can speed rehabilitation. Causes Traumatic amputations usually result from factory, farm, power tool accidents, ...

  16. The effect of arm weight support on upper limb muscle synergies during reaching movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Compensating for the effect of gravity by providing arm-weight support (WS) is a technique often utilized in the rehabilitation of patients with neurological conditions such as stroke to facilitate the performance of arm movements during therapy. Although it has been shown that, in healthy subjects as well as in stroke survivors, the use of arm WS during the performance of reaching movements leads to a general reduction, as expected, in the level of activation of upper limb muscles, the effects of different levels of WS on the characteristics of the kinematics of motion and of the activity of upper limb muscles have not been thoroughly investigated before. Methods In this study, we systematically assessed the characteristics of the kinematics of motion and of the activity of 14 upper limb muscles in a group of 9 healthy subjects who performed 3-D arm reaching movements while provided with different levels of arm WS. We studied the hand trajectory and the trunk, shoulder, and elbow joint angular displacement trajectories for different levels of arm WS. Besides, we analyzed the amplitude of the surface electromyographic (EMG) data collected from upper limb muscles and investigated patterns of coordination via the analysis of muscle synergies. Results The characteristics of the kinematics of motion varied across WS conditions but did not show distinct trends with the level of arm WS. The level of activation of upper limb muscles generally decreased, as expected, with the increase in arm WS. The same eight muscle synergies were identified in all WS conditions. Their level of activation depended on the provided level of arm WS. Conclusions The analysis of muscle synergies allowed us to identify a modular organization underlying the generation of arm reaching movements that appears to be invariant to the level of arm WS. The results of this study provide a normative dataset for the assessment of the effects of the level of arm WS on muscle synergies in stroke

  17. Functional rehabilitation of upper limb apraxia in poststroke patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mármol, Jose Manuel; García-Ríos, M Carmen; Barrero-Hernandez, Francisco J; Molina-Torres, Guadalupe; Brown, Ted; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María Encarnación

    2015-11-05

    Upper limb apraxia is a common disorder associated with stroke that can reduce patients' independence levels in activities of daily living and increase levels of disability. Traditional rehabilitation programs designed to promote the recovery of upper limb function have mainly focused on restorative or compensatory approaches. However, no previous studies have been completed that evaluate a combined intervention method approach, where patients concurrently receive cognitive training and learn compensatory strategies for enhancing daily living activities. This study will use a two-arm, assessor-blinded, parallel, randomized controlled trial design, involving 40 patients who present a left- or right-sided unilateral vascular lesion poststroke and a clinical diagnosis of upper limb apraxia. Participants will be randomized to either a combined functional rehabilitation or a traditional health education group. The experimental group will receive an 8-week combined functional program at home, including physical and occupational therapy focused on restorative and compensatory techniques for upper limb apraxia, 3 days per week in 30-min intervention periods. The control group will receive a conventional health education program once a month over 8 weeks, based on improving awareness of physical and functional limitations and facilitating the adaptation of patients to the home. Study outcomes will be assessed immediately postintervention and at the 2-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure will be basic activities of daily living skills as assessed with the Barthel Index. Secondary outcome measures will include the following: 1) the Lawton and Brody Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale, 2) the Observation and Scoring of ADL-Activities, 3) the De Renzi Test for Ideational Apraxia, 4) the De Renzi Test for Ideomotor Apraxia, 5) Recognition of Gestures, 6) the Test of Upper Limb Apraxia (TULIA), and 7) the Quality of Life Scale For Stroke (ECVI-38). This trial is

  18. Upper limb muscle activation during sports video gaming of persons with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Jeffrey P; Johanson, M Elise; Kiratli, B Jenny

    2018-04-04

    Video gaming as a therapeutic tool has largely been studied within the stroke population with some benefits reported in upper limb motor performance, balance, coordination, and cardiovascular status. To date, muscle activation of upper limb muscles in persons with spinal cord injuries (SCI) has not been studied during video game play. In this paper, we provide descriptive and comparative data for muscle activation and strength during gaming for players with tetraplegia and paraplegia, as well as, compare these results with data from traditional arm exercises (ie, biceps curl and shoulder press) with light weights which are commonly prescribed for a home program. Fourteen individuals with chronic SCI (9 tetraplegia, 5 paraplegia). We measured upper limb muscle activation with surface electromyography (EMG) during Wii Sports video game play. Muscle activation was recorded from the playing arm during 4 selected games and normalized to a maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Heart rate and upper limb motion were recorded simultaneously with EMG. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to analyze differences in muscle activation between participants with paraplegia versus tetraplegia and compare gaming with traditional arm exercises with light weights. A Friedman 2-way analysis of variance identified key muscle groups active during game play. Overall muscle activation across the games was not different between those with paraplegia and tetraplegia. Heart rate during video game play for tennis and boxing were on average 10 to 20 beats/minute above resting heart rate. The magnitude of EMG was relatively greater for traditional arm exercises with light weights compared with game play. The selected Wii games were able to elicit upper extremity muscle activation and elevated heart rates for individuals with SCI that may be used to target therapeutic outcomes.

  19. Neck and Upper Limb Dysfunction in Patients following Neck Dissection: Looking beyond the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gane, Elise M; O'Leary, Shaun P; Hatton, Anna L; Panizza, Benedict J; McPhail, Steven M

    2017-10-01

    Objective To measure patient-perceived upper limb and neck function following neck dissection and to investigate potential associations between clinical factors, symptoms, and function. Study Design Cross-sectional. Setting Two tertiary hospitals in Brisbane, Australia. Subjects and Methods Inclusion criteria: patients treated with neck dissection (2009-2014). aged Index). Secondary outcomes included demographics, oncological management, self-efficacy, and pain. Generalized linear models were prepared to examine relationships between explanatory variables and self-reported function. Results Eighty-nine participants (male n = 63, 71%; median age, 62 years; median 3 years since surgery) reported mild upper limb and neck dysfunction (median [quartile 1, quartile 3] scores of 11 [3, 32] and 12 [4, 28], respectively). Significant associations were found between worse upper limb function and longer time since surgery (coefficient, 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01-3.51), having disease within the thyroid (17.40; 2.37-32.44), postoperative radiation therapy (vs surgery only) (13.90; 6.67-21.14), and shoulder pain (0.65; 0.44-0.85). Worse neck function was associated with metastatic cervical lymph nodes (coefficient, 6.61; 95% CI, 1.14-12.08), shoulder pain (0.19; 0.04-0.34), neck pain (0.34; 0.21-0.47), and symptoms of neuropathic pain (0.61; 0.25-0.98). Conclusion Patients can experience upper limb and neck dysfunction following nerve-preserving neck dissection. The upper quadrant as a whole should be considered when assessing rehabilitation priorities after neck dissection.

  20. Development of a core outcome set for studies involving patients undergoing major lower limb amputation for peripheral arterial disease: study protocol for a systematic review and identification of a core outcome set using a Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Graeme K; Bosanquet, David C; Brookes-Howell, Lucy; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Waldron, Cherry-Ann; Edwards, Adrian G K; Twine, Christopher P

    2017-12-28

    The development of a standardised reporting set is important to ensure that research is directed towards the most important outcomes and that data is comparable. To ensure validity, the set must be agreed by a consensus of stakeholders including patients, healthcare professionals and lay representatives. There is currently no agreed core outcome set for patients undergoing major lower limb amputation for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) for either short- or medium-term research outcomes. By developing these sets we aim to rationalise future trial outcomes, facilitate meta-analysis and improve the quality and applicability of amputation research. We will undertake a comprehensive systematic review of studies of patients undergoing major lower limb amputation for PAD. Data regarding all primary and secondary outcomes reported in relevant studies will be extracted and summarised as outcome domains. We will then undertake focus groups with key stakeholders (patients, carers, health and social care workers) to collect qualitative data to identify the main short- and medium-term research outcomes for patients undergoing major lower limb amputation. Results of the systematic review and focus groups will be combined to create a comprehensive list of potential key outcomes. Stakeholders (patients, researchers and health and social care workers) will then be polled to determine which of the outcomes are considered to be important in a general context using a three-phase Delphi process. After preliminary analysis, results will be presented at a face-to-face meeting of key stakeholders for discussion and voting on the final set of core outcomes. This project is being run in parallel with a feasibility trial assessing perineural catheters in patients undergoing lower limb amputation (the PLACEMENT trial). Full ethical approval has been granted for the study (Wales REC 3 reference number 16/WA/0353). Core outcome sets will be developed for short- and medium-term outcomes of

  1. Congenital Amputation Involving the Hands and Feet: A Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were forefoot amputations on both lower limbs. Scars were noticed over the amputation stumps with no associated congenital anomaly. Conclusion: Congenital amputation involving all limbs as an isolated entity is a rare condition; the cause of which is probably as a result of congenital amniotic bands. Keywords: ...

  2. Music Upper Limb Therapy – Integrated: an Enriched Collaborative Approach for Stroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Raghavan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. It leads to a sudden and overwhelming disruption in one’s physical body, and alters the stroke survivors’ sense of self. Long-term recovery requires that bodily perception, social participation and sense of self are restored; this is challenging to achieve, particularly with a single intervention. However, rhythmic synchronization of movement to external stimuli facilitates sensorimotor coupling for movement recovery, enhances emotional engagement, and has positive effects on interpersonal relationships. In this proof-of-concept study, we designed a group music-making intervention, Music Upper Limb Therapy-Integrated (MULT-I, to address the physical, psychological and social domains of rehabilitation simultaneously, and investigated its effects on long-term post-stroke upper limb recovery. The study used a mixed-method pre-post design with one-year follow up. Thirteen subjects completed the 45-minute intervention twice a week for six weeks. The primary outcome was reduced upper limb motor impairment on the Fugl-Meyer Scale. Secondary outcomes included sensory impairment (two-point discrimination test, activity limitation (Modified Rankin scale, well-being (WHO well-being index, and participation (Stroke Impact Scale. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to test for differences between pre- and post-intervention, and one-year follow up scores. Significant improvement was found in upper limb motor impairment, sensory impairment, activity limitation, and well-being immediately post-intervention that persisted at 1 year. Activities of daily living and social participation improved only from post-intervention to one-year follow up. The improvement in upper limb motor impairment was more pronounced in a subset of lower functioning individuals as determined by their pre-intervention wrist range of motion. Qualitatively, subjects reported new feelings of ownership of their impaired limb, more

  3. Music Upper Limb Therapy-Integrated: An Enriched Collaborative Approach for Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Preeti; Geller, Daniel; Guerrero, Nina; Aluru, Viswanath; Eimicke, Joseph P; Teresi, Jeanne A; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Palumbo, Anna; Turry, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. It leads to a sudden and overwhelming disruption in one's physical body, and alters the stroke survivors' sense of self. Long-term recovery requires that bodily perception, social participation and sense of self are restored; this is challenging to achieve, particularly with a single intervention. However, rhythmic synchronization of movement to external stimuli facilitates sensorimotor coupling for movement recovery, enhances emotional engagement and has positive effects on interpersonal relationships. In this proof-of-concept study, we designed a group music-making intervention, Music Upper Limb Therapy-Integrated (MULT-I), to address the physical, psychological and social domains of rehabilitation simultaneously, and investigated its effects on long-term post-stroke upper limb recovery. The study used a mixed-method pre-post design with 1-year follow up. Thirteen subjects completed the 45-min intervention twice a week for 6 weeks. The primary outcome was reduced upper limb motor impairment on the Fugl-Meyer Scale (FMS). Secondary outcomes included sensory impairment (two-point discrimination test), activity limitation (Modified Rankin Scale, MRS), well-being (WHO well-being index), and participation (Stroke Impact Scale, SIS). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test for differences between pre- and post-intervention, and 1-year follow up scores. Significant improvement was found in upper limb motor impairment, sensory impairment, activity limitation and well-being immediately post-intervention that persisted at 1 year. Activities of daily living and social participation improved only from post-intervention to 1-year follow up. The improvement in upper limb motor impairment was more pronounced in a subset of lower functioning individuals as determined by their pre-intervention wrist range of motion. Qualitatively, subjects reported new feelings of ownership of their impaired limb, more

  4. Music Upper Limb Therapy—Integrated: An Enriched Collaborative Approach for Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Preeti; Geller, Daniel; Guerrero, Nina; Aluru, Viswanath; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Palumbo, Anna; Turry, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. It leads to a sudden and overwhelming disruption in one’s physical body, and alters the stroke survivors’ sense of self. Long-term recovery requires that bodily perception, social participation and sense of self are restored; this is challenging to achieve, particularly with a single intervention. However, rhythmic synchronization of movement to external stimuli facilitates sensorimotor coupling for movement recovery, enhances emotional engagement and has positive effects on interpersonal relationships. In this proof-of-concept study, we designed a group music-making intervention, Music Upper Limb Therapy-Integrated (MULT-I), to address the physical, psychological and social domains of rehabilitation simultaneously, and investigated its effects on long-term post-stroke upper limb recovery. The study used a mixed-method pre-post design with 1-year follow up. Thirteen subjects completed the 45-min intervention twice a week for 6 weeks. The primary outcome was reduced upper limb motor impairment on the Fugl-Meyer Scale (FMS). Secondary outcomes included sensory impairment (two-point discrimination test), activity limitation (Modified Rankin Scale, MRS), well-being (WHO well-being index), and participation (Stroke Impact Scale, SIS). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test for differences between pre- and post-intervention, and 1-year follow up scores. Significant improvement was found in upper limb motor impairment, sensor