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Sample records for amputated upper limb

  1. Classification of the pattern of intrauterine amputations of the upper limb in constriction ring syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qattan, M M

    2000-06-01

    Twenty patients with congenital upper limb amputations caused by constriction rings were reviewed to classify the pattern of these amputations. In the 20 patients studied, 31 upper limbs had congenital amputations. The pattern of amputation was classified into three types. Proximal upper limb amputation was considered type I and was only seen in one limb. The most common pattern of amputation was digital amputation associated with "coning" or "superimposition" of the digits (type II) and was seen in 20 hands. Type II amputations were subclassified according to the involvement of all, ulnar, radial, or central digits by the constriction ring. In type III amputations (N = 10 limbs), there was no associated coning or superimposition of the digits. This type of amputation was subclassified into type IIIA (multiple-digit amputations within the same hand) and type III B (single-digit amputation). Associated anomalies are reviewed and the pathogenesis of constriction rings is discussed.

  2. Bilateral upper limb amputations in victims of high tension electrical injuries: Three case studies

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    Cajetan Nwadinigwe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral upper limb amputations result in severe disability. High voltage electrical injury is a rare cause of such an outcome and injuries often occur as occupational hazards. We present three case reports of accidental high voltage injuries that occurred in a non-occupational setting. Victims were all initially managed at other centres before referral to our hospital and all subsequently had bilateral upper limb amputations. The high cost of treatment, importance of prevention, and need for rehabilitation are highlighted.

  3. Phantom limb perception interferes with motor imagery after unilateral upper-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xiaoli; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Flor, Herta; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-01-01

    A potential contributor to impaired motor imagery in amputees is an alteration of the body schema as a result of the presence of a phantom limb. However, the nature of the relationship between motor imagery and phantom experiences remains unknown. In this study, the influence of phantom limb perception on motor imagery was investigated using a hand mental rotation task by means of behavioral and electrophysiological measures. Compared with healthy controls, significantly prolonged response time for both the intact and missing hand were observed specifically in amputees who perceived a phantom limb during the task but not in amputees without phantom limb perception. Event-related desynchronization of EEG in the beta band (beta-ERD) in central and parietal areas showed an angular disparity specifically in amputees with phantom limb perception, with its source localized in the right inferior parietal lobule. The response time as well as the beta-ERD values were significantly positively correlated with phantom vividness. Our results suggest that phantom limb perception during the task is an important interferential factor for motor imagery after amputation and the interference might be related to a change of the body representation resulting from an unnatural posture of the phantom limb. PMID:26879749

  4. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Yao; Albert Chen; Todd Kuiken; Carolina Carmona; Julius Dewald

    2015-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR). As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via th...

  5. Epidural electrocorticography of phantom hand movement following long-term upper-limb amputation

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    Alireza eGharabaghi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostheses for upper-limb amputees are currently controlled by either myoelectric or peripheral neural signals. Performance and dexterity of these devices is still limited, particularly when it comes to controlling hand function. Movement-related brain activity might serve as a complementary bio-signal for motor control of hand prosthesis. Methods: We introduced a methodology to implant a cortical interface without direct exposure of the brain surface in an upper-limb amputee. This bi-directional interface enabled us to explore the cortical physiology following long-term transhumeral amputation. In addition, we investigated neurofeedback of electrocorticographic brain activity related to the patient’s motor imagery to open his missing hand, i.e. phantom hand movement, for real-time control of a virtual hand prosthesis.Results: Both event-related brain potentials and cortical stimulation revealed mutually overlapping cortical representations of the phantom hand. Phantom hand movements could be robustly classified and the patient required only three training sessions to gain reliable control of the virtual hand prosthesis in an online closed-loop paradigm that discriminated between hand opening and rest. Conclusion: Epidural implants may constitute a powerful and safe alternative communication pathway between the brain and external devices for upper-limb amputees, thereby facilitating the integrated use of different signal sources for more intuitive and specific control of multi-functional devices in clinical use.

  6. Quality of Life among Egyptian Patients with Upper and Lower Limb Amputation: Sex Differences

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    Salwa A. Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Limb amputation is a life-changing event that can cause significant disruptions in many important areas of existence. Aim of this study. To evaluate the quality of life (QOL of patients with limb amputation and identify the factors affecting the quality of life of patients with limb amputation among Egyptian patients. Research Design. It was a descriptive exploratory design. Setting. The study was conducted in Orthopedics and Surgical Department in Emergency Hospital at Mansoura University Hospitals. Sample. A sample of convenience of 100 adult male and female patients who met the inclusion criteria was included. Tools. (a Structured interview questionnaire (SIQ was used to collect personal data, (b short form (36 health status questionnaires: this part was utilized to assess the quality of life among Egyptian patients with amputation. Results. The result of this study indicates that most participants experienced a change in the quality of life. There is a statistically significant difference between total QOL aspects and each of the following: age, gender, educational level, and type of work. Conclusion. Limb amputation tends to cause increased disability for those amputated patients. The age, gender, place of amputation, and marital status are found as statistically significant factors with physical component and psychological component.

  7. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR. As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via the newly re-innervated muscles. Correspondingly, recent study results have shown that motor representations for the missing limb move closer to their original locations following TR. Besides regaining motor control signals, TR also restores the sensation in the re-innervated skin areas. We therefore hypothesize that TR causes analogous cortical sensory remapping that may return closer to their original locations. In order to test this hypothesis, cortical activity in response to sensory-level electrical stimulation in different parts of the arm was studied longitudinally in one amputated individual before and up to 2 years after TR. Our results showed that 1 before TR, the cortical response to sensory electrical stimulation in the residual limb showed a diffuse bilateral pattern without a clear focus in either the time or spatial domain; and 2 2 years after TR, the sensory map of the reinnervated median nerve reorganized, showing predominant activity over the contralateral S1 hand area as well as moderate activity over the ipsilateral S1. Therefore, this work provides new evidence for long-term sensory cortical plasticity in the human brain after TR.

  8. [Upper leg amputation. Transfemoral amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, R

    2011-10-01

    Objective. Amputation through the diaphysis of the femur at the most peripheral level possible. The stump, covered with soft tissue flaps, is free from pain. It can be fitted with a total contact prosthetic socket. The hip joint is preserved with its full range of motion.Indications. When no possibility to amputate at a more distal level through the tibia or the knee joint exists.Contraindications. When it is possible to amputate at a more distal level.Surgical technique. Symmetrical flaps in the frontal plane are recommended. Asymmetrical flaps and flaps in the sagittal plane can also be made. Their muscles are fixed to each other (myodesis) or the bone end by means of transosseous sutures (myopexy). The ischial nerve has to be shortened about 2 inches proximal to the end of the femur.In peripheral vascular diseases, this procedure is not suitable. An alternative technique is suggested.In chronic osteomyelitis (e.g., after intramedullary nailing), the ventral half of the femur can be removed and the medullary cavity cleansed and filled with a muscular flap in order to maintain length. Lengthening procedures of the femur are discussed.Postoperative management. Avoid active or passive movement of the stump for the first 2 weeks in order not to disturb healing of the muscle sutures. Physical therapy, prosthetic fitting after 4–6 weeks, according to the expected functional level 0–4. Aids: crutches, wheel chair, adjustable bed, modified hand-controlled automobile.The walking ability of a patient with a double amputation above the knee is severely limited and in patients with peripheral artery disease remains the exception.

  9. [Upper leg amputation. Transfemoral amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, R

    2011-10-01

    Objective. Amputation through the diaphysis of the femur at the most peripheral level possible. The stump, covered with soft tissue flaps, is free from pain. It can be fitted with a total contact prosthetic socket. The hip joint is preserved with its full range of motion.Indications. When no possibility to amputate at a more distal level through the tibia or the knee joint exists.Contraindications. When it is possible to amputate at a more distal level.Surgical technique. Symmetrical flaps in the frontal plane are recommended. Asymmetrical flaps and flaps in the sagittal plane can also be made. Their muscles are fixed to each other (myodesis) or the bone end by means of transosseous sutures (myopexy). The ischial nerve has to be shortened about 2 inches proximal to the end of the femur.In peripheral vascular diseases, this procedure is not suitable. An alternative technique is suggested.In chronic osteomyelitis (e.g., after intramedullary nailing), the ventral half of the femur can be removed and the medullary cavity cleansed and filled with a muscular flap in order to maintain length. Lengthening procedures of the femur are discussed.Postoperative management. Avoid active or passive movement of the stump for the first 2 weeks in order not to disturb healing of the muscle sutures. Physical therapy, prosthetic fitting after 4–6 weeks, according to the expected functional level 0–4. Aids: crutches, wheel chair, adjustable bed, modified hand-controlled automobile.The walking ability of a patient with a double amputation above the knee is severely limited and in patients with peripheral artery disease remains the exception. PMID:21975907

  10. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation

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    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, OCS

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p < 0.001. African American race, longer length of hospital stay, older age, congestive heart failure, paralysis, other neurological disease, renal failure, and admission from a nursing facility were negatively associated with prosthetic prescription. Being married was positively associated. After adjusting for patient characteristics, people with ankle amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why.

  11. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs) were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why.

  12. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs) were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p length of hospital stay, older age, congestive heart failure, paralysis, other neurological disease, renal failure, and admission from a nursing facility were negatively associated with prosthetic prescription. Being married was positively associated. After adjusting for patient characteristics, people with ankle amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why. PMID:26562228

  13. Major limb amputations: A tertiary hospital experience in northwestern Tanzania

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    Chalya Phillipo L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major limb amputation is reported to be a major but preventable public health problem that is associated with profound economic, social and psychological effects on the patient and family especially in developing countries where the prosthetic services are poor. The purpose of this study was to outline the patterns, indications and short term complications of major limb amputations and to compare our experience with that of other published data. Methods This was a descriptive cross-sectional study that was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre between March 2008 and February 2010. All patients who underwent major limb amputation were, after informed consent for the study, enrolled into the study. Data were collected using a pre-tested, coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 11.5 computer software. Results A total of 162 patients were entered into the study. Their ages ranged between 2–78 years (mean 28.30 ± 13.72 days. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 2:1. The majority of patients (76.5% had primary or no formal education. One hundred and twelve (69.1% patients were unemployed. The most common indication for major limb amputation was diabetic foot complications in 41.9%, followed by trauma in 38.4% and vascular disease in 8.6% respectively. Lower limbs were involved in 86.4% of cases and upper limbs in 13.6% of cases giving a lower limb to upper limb ratio of 6.4:1 Below knee amputation was the most common procedure performed in 46.3%. There was no bilateral limb amputation. The most common additional procedures performed were wound debridement, secondary suture and skin grafting in 42.3%, 34.5% and 23.2% respectively. Two-stage operation was required in 45.4% of patients. Revision amputation rate was 29.6%. Post-operative complication rate was 33.3% and surgical site infection was the most common complication accounting for 21.0%. The mean length of hospital stay was 22.4 days and mortality

  14. [Psychological adjustment following lower limb amputation].

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    Panyi, Lilla Krisztina; Lábadi, Beatrix

    2015-09-27

    Rehabilitation of lower limb amputees and the fitting of their prosthesis depend highly on the psychological adjustment process and motivational state of the patient. The loss of a limb is extremely challenging and can cause various physical and psychological problems. Depression, anxiety, decreased well-being and quality of life, body image dissatisfaction and changes in self-concept and identity are frequent after lower limb amputation. In the interest of adjustment patients have to cope with the emerging changes and difficulties in their lifes as well as the problems in psychological functioning. It is important for them to accept the alterations in their body and identity, and integrate them in a new self-concept in which process motivation is a fundamental issue. The aim of this article is to review the literature on psychological consequences of lower limb amputation, and to propose an integrative way of rehabilitation for lower limb amputees. PMID:26550913

  15. Epidemiology of post-traumatic limb amputation: a National Trauma Databank analysis.

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    Barmparas, Galinos; Inaba, Kenji; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Dubose, Joseph J; Criscuoli, Michele; Talving, Peep; Plurad, David; Green, Donald; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the epidemiology and outcomes of posttraumatic upper (UEA) and lower extremity amputations (LEA). The National Trauma Databank version 5 was used to identify all posttraumatic amputations. From 2000 to 2004 there were 8910 amputated patients (1.0% of all trauma patients). Of these, 6855 (76.9%) had digit and 2055 (23.1%) had limb amputation. Of those with limb amputation, 92.7 per cent (1904/2055) had a single limb amputation. LEA were more frequent than UEA among patients in the single limb amputation group (58.9% vs 41.1%). The mechanism of injury was blunt in 83 per cent; most commonly after motor vehicle collisions (51.0%), followed by machinery accidents (19.4%). Motor vehicle collision occupants had more UEA (54.5% vs 45.5%, P < 0.001), whereas motorcyclists (86.2% vs 13.8%, P < 0.001) and pedestrians (91.9% vs 8.1%, P < 0.001) had more LEA. Patients with LEA were more likely to require discharge to a skilled nursing facility; whereas those with UEA were more likely to be discharged home. Traumatic limb amputation is not uncommon after trauma in the civilian population and is associated with significant morbidity. Although single limb amputation did not impact mortality, the need for multiple limb amputation was an independent risk factor for death.

  16. Primary motor cortex changes after amputation correlate with phantom limb pain and the ability to move the phantom limb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffin, Estelle; Richard, Nathalie; Giraux, Pascal;

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence documents massive reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices following hand amputation, the extent of which is correlated with phantom limb pain. Many therapies for phantom limb pain are based upon the idea that plastic changes after amputation...... for the maladaptative plasticity model, we demonstrate for the first time that motor capacities of the phantom limb correlate with post-amputation reorganization, and that this reorganization is not limited to the face and hand representations but also includes the proximal upper-limb....

  17. Upper limb prosthetic use in Slovenia.

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    Burger, H; Marincek, C

    1994-04-01

    The article deals with the use of different types of upper limb prostheses in Slovenia. Four hundred and fourteen upper limb amputees were sent a questionnaire on the type of their prosthesis, its use and reasons for non-use, respectively. The replies were subject to statistical analysis. Most of the questioned upper limb amputees (70%) wear a prosthesis only for cosmesis. The use of a prosthesis depends on the level of upper limb amputation, loss of the dominant hand, and time from amputation. Prosthetic success appears to be unrelated to age at the time of amputation and the rehabilitation programme. The most frequent reason for not wearing a prosthesis is heat and consequent sweating of the stump. More than a third of amputees are dissatisfied with their prostheses.

  18. Traction avulsion amputation of the major upper limb: a proposed new classification, guidelines for acute management, and strategies for secondary reconstruction.

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    Chuang, D C; Lai, J B; Cheng, S L; Jain, V; Lin, C H; Chen, H C

    2001-11-01

    Major replantation of a traction avulsion amputation is undertaken with the goal of not only the reestablishment of circulation, but also functional outcome. This type of amputation is characterized by different levels of soft-tissue divisions involving crushing, traction, and avulsion injuries to various structures. Between 1985 and 1998, 27 cases were referred for secondary reconstruction following amputation of the upper extremity involving both arm and forearm. Replantation was performed by at least 12 qualified plastic surgeons using different approaches and management, resulting in different outcomes. Initial replantation management significantly affects the later reconstruction. For comparing studies and prognostic implications, the authors propose a new classification according to the level of injury to muscles and innervated nerves: type I, amputation at or close to the musculotendinous aponeurosis with muscles remaining essentially intact; type II, amputation within the muscle bellies but with the proximal muscles still innervated; type III, amputation involving the motor nerve or neuromuscular junction, thereby causing total loss of muscle function; and type IV, amputation through the joint; i.e., disarticulation of the elbow or shoulder joint. Some patients required further reconstruction for functional restoration after replantation, but some did not. Through this retrospective study based on the proposed classification system, prospective guidelines for the management of different types of traction avulsion amputation are provided, including the value of replantation, length of bone shortening, primary or delayed muscle or nerve repair, necessity of fasciotomy, timing for using free tissue transfer for wound coverage, and the role of functioning free muscle transplantation for late reconstruction. The final functional outcome can also be anticipated prospectively through this classification system.

  19. Upper Limb Exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusak, Z.; Luijten, J.; Kooijman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates a wearable exoskeleton for a user having a torso with an upper limb to support motion of the said upper limb. The wearable exoskeleton comprises a first fixed frame mountable to the torso, an upper arm brace and a first group of actuators for moving the upper arm brace

  20. Association between Functional Severity and Amputation Type with Rehabilitation Outcomes in Patients with Lower Limb Amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Karmarkar, Amol M.; Graham, James E.; Reistetter, Timothy A.; Amit Kumar; Jacqueline M. Mix; Paulette Niewczyk; Granger, Carl V.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine independent influences of functional level and lower limb amputation type on inpatient rehabilitation outcomes. We conducted a secondary data analysis for patients with lower limb amputation who received inpatient medical rehabilitation (N = 26,501). The study outcomes included length of stay, discharge functional status, and community discharge. Predictors included the 3-level case mix group variable and a 4-category amputation variable. Age of the ...

  1. Assessment of gait stability, harmony, and symmetry in subjects with lower-limb amputation evaluated by trunk accelerations.

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    Iosa, Marco; Paradisi, Francesco; Brunelli, Stefano; Delussu, Anna Sofia; Pellegrini, Roberto; Zenardi, Daniele; Paolucci, Stefano; Traballesi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of upper-body accelerations is a promising and simple technique for quantitatively assessing some general features of gait such as stability, harmony, and symmetry. Despite the growing literature on elderly healthy populations and neurological patients, few studies have used accelerometry to investigate these features in subjects with lower-limb amputation. We enrolled four groups of subjects: subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with a locked knee prosthesis, subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with an unlocked knee prosthesis, subjects with transtibial amputation, and age-matched nondisabled subjects. We found statistically significant differences for stability (p amputation. This study is the first to investigate upper-body acceleration of subjects with unilateral lower-limb amputation during walking who were evaluated upon dismissal from a rehabilitation hospital; it is also the first study to differentiate the sample in terms of level of amputation and type of prosthesis used.

  2. Assessment of gait stability, harmony, and symmetry in subjects with lower-limb amputation evaluated by trunk accelerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosa, Marco; Paradisi, Francesco; Brunelli, Stefano; Delussu, Anna Sofia; Pellegrini, Roberto; Zenardi, Daniele; Paolucci, Stefano; Traballesi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of upper-body accelerations is a promising and simple technique for quantitatively assessing some general features of gait such as stability, harmony, and symmetry. Despite the growing literature on elderly healthy populations and neurological patients, few studies have used accelerometry to investigate these features in subjects with lower-limb amputation. We enrolled four groups of subjects: subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with a locked knee prosthesis, subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with an unlocked knee prosthesis, subjects with transtibial amputation, and age-matched nondisabled subjects. We found statistically significant differences for stability (p amputation. This study is the first to investigate upper-body acceleration of subjects with unilateral lower-limb amputation during walking who were evaluated upon dismissal from a rehabilitation hospital; it is also the first study to differentiate the sample in terms of level of amputation and type of prosthesis used. PMID:25144175

  3. Reduction of residual limb volume in people with transtibial amputation

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    Audrey T. Tantua, MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The early postoperative phase after transtibial amputation is characterized by rapid residual limb volume reduction. Accurate measurement of residual limb volume is important for the timing of fitting a prosthesis. The aim of this study was to analyze the reduction of residual limb volume in people with transtibial amputation and to correlate residual limb volume with residual limb circumference. In a longitudinal cohort study of 21 people who had a transtibial amputation, residual limb volume was measured using a laser scanner and circumference was measured using a tape measure 1 wk postamputation and every 3 wk thereafter until 24 wk postamputation. A linear mixed model analysis was performed with weeks postamputation transformed according to the natural logarithm as predictor. Residual limb volume decreased significantly over time, with a large variation between patients. Residual limb volume did not correlate well with circumference. On average, residual limb volume decreased 200.5 mL (9.7% of the initial volume per natural logarithm of the weeks postamputation. The decrease in residual limb volume following a transtibial amputation was substantial in the early postamputation phase, followed by a leveling off. It was not possible to determine the specific moment at which the residual limb volume stabilized.

  4. Association between Functional Severity and Amputation Type with Rehabilitation Outcomes in Patients with Lower Limb Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol M. Karmarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine independent influences of functional level and lower limb amputation type on inpatient rehabilitation outcomes. We conducted a secondary data analysis for patients with lower limb amputation who received inpatient medical rehabilitation (N = 26,501. The study outcomes included length of stay, discharge functional status, and community discharge. Predictors included the 3-level case mix group variable and a 4-category amputation variable. Age of the sample was 64.5 years (13.4 and 64% were male. More than 75% of patients had a dysvascular-related amputation. Patients with bilateral transfemoral amputations and higher functional severity experienced longest lengths of stay (average 13.7 days and lowest functional rating at discharge (average 79.4. Likelihood of community discharge was significantly lower for those in more functionally severe patients but did not differ between amputation categories. Functional levels and amputation type are associated with rehabilitation outcomes in inpatient rehabilitation settings. Patients with transfemoral amputations and those in case mix group 1003 (admission motor score less than 36.25 generally experience poorer outcomes than those in other case mix groups. These relationships may be associated with other demographic and/or health factors, which should be explored in future research.

  5. Association between Functional Severity and Amputation Type with Rehabilitation Outcomes in Patients with Lower Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmarkar, Amol M; Graham, James E; Reistetter, Timothy A; Kumar, Amit; Mix, Jacqueline M; Niewczyk, Paulette; Granger, Carl V; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine independent influences of functional level and lower limb amputation type on inpatient rehabilitation outcomes. We conducted a secondary data analysis for patients with lower limb amputation who received inpatient medical rehabilitation (N = 26,501). The study outcomes included length of stay, discharge functional status, and community discharge. Predictors included the 3-level case mix group variable and a 4-category amputation variable. Age of the sample was 64.5 years (13.4) and 64% were male. More than 75% of patients had a dysvascular-related amputation. Patients with bilateral transfemoral amputations and higher functional severity experienced longest lengths of stay (average 13.7 days) and lowest functional rating at discharge (average 79.4). Likelihood of community discharge was significantly lower for those in more functionally severe patients but did not differ between amputation categories. Functional levels and amputation type are associated with rehabilitation outcomes in inpatient rehabilitation settings. Patients with transfemoral amputations and those in case mix group 1003 (admission motor score less than 36.25) generally experience poorer outcomes than those in other case mix groups. These relationships may be associated with other demographic and/or health factors, which should be explored in future research. PMID:25400948

  6. Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of illnesses and disabilities Your health Everyday living Parenting Your rights Women veterans with disabilities Caregiver support ... partially cut off due to an accident or violence. With surgical amputation, a limb or part of ...

  7. Lower-limb amputation and body weight changes in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson J. Littman, PhD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the relationship between lower-limb amputation (LLA and subsequent changes in body weight. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using clinical and administrative databases to identify and follow weight changes in 759 males with amputation (partial foot amputation [PFA], n = 396; transtibial amputation [TTA], n = 267; and transfemoral amputation [TFA], n = 96 and 3,790 men without amputation frequency-matched (5:1 on age, body mass index, diabetes, and calendar year from eight Department of Veterans Affairs medical care facilities in the Pacific Northwest. We estimated and compared longitudinal percent weight change from baseline up to 39 mo of follow-up in men with and without amputation. Weight gain in the 2 yr after amputation was significantly more in men with an amputation than without, and in men with a TTA or TFA (8%–9% increase than in men with a PFA (3%–6% increase. Generally, percent weight gain peaked at 2 yr and was followed by some weight loss in the third year. These findings indicate that LLA is often followed by clinically important weight gain. Future studies are needed to better understand the reasons for weight gain and to identify intervention strategies to prevent excess weight gain and the deleterious consequences that may ensue.

  8. Simultaneous toe-to-hand transfer and lower extremity amputations for severe upper and lower limb defects: the use of spare parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J; Jones, N F

    2002-06-01

    From 1995 to 2000, five microvascular toe-to-hand transfers were performed in three children who were simultaneously undergoing lower extremity amputations. Their ages at time of transfer ranged from 4 to 10 years and the types of lower extremity amputation included toe amputation, foot amputation and through-knee amputation. The resulting toe-to-hand transfers included three great toe-to-thumb transfers and one combined great and second toe-to-hand transfer. The toe-to-hand transfers were all successful and all the lower extremity amputations healed without complications. In all cases, improved hand function and lower extremity function was noted by the families. These unique cases represent the ultimate use of spare parts in congenital hand surgery.

  9. Obesity and metabolic disorders in adults with lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdibaylo, S F

    1996-10-01

    Anthropometric and biochemical research was conducted on 94 subjects with various levels of lower limb amputation. The purpose of the work was to investigate the features of obesity progression and disorders of cholesterin metabolism, as well as to develop adequate training exercises. Anthropometric research was conducted by calipermetry; the biochemical research was done by various methods to determine exempt and total cholesterin and triglycerides in the blood serum. The research establishes the frequency of obesity progression relative to the level of amputation, as well as the features of the excessive body mass. Type 11A hyperlipoproteidemia was evident. It is characterized by rapid progress of atherosclerotic vascular disease and coronary disease (CD). Cyclic and acyclic exercises were developed for prophylaxis and therapy. Anthropometric research on the determination of body fat mass was conducted on 68 subjects with various levels of lower limb amputation. The nondirect method of measuring skin folds of several parts of the body was used to determine the extent of lipogenesis. Biochemical research of cholesterin metabolism was conducted on 26 subjects with lower limb amputation (a different group). Anthropometric research revealed an increase of body fat mass directly related to the level of amputation. The largest amount of fat in the body mass was noted for the subjects with bilateral transfemoral (above-knee) amputation or transfemoral plus transtibial (below-knee) amputation. Both groups averaged 25.9%. The body fat mass increased chiefly in the subcutaneous fat. Increase of the internal fat mass was less noticeable. The frequency of obesity progression in subjects with unilateral transtibial amputation equaled 37.9%; in subjects with transfemoral amputation, 48.0%; and in subjects with bilateral transfemoral or transfemoral plus transtibial amputation, 64.2%. Young subjects demonstrated obesity progression during the first year after amputation

  10. Lower-limb amputation and body weight changes in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Alyson J; Thompson, Mary Lou; Arterburn, David E; Bouldin, Erin; Haselkorn, Jodie K; Sangeorzan, Bruce J; Boyko, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between lower-limb amputation (LLA) and subsequent changes in body weight. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using clinical and administrative databases to identify and follow weight changes in 759 males with amputation (partial foot amputation [PFA], n = 396; transtibial amputation [TTA], n = 267; and transfemoral amputation [TFA], n = 96) and 3,790 nondisabled persons frequency-matched (5:1) on age, body mass index, diabetes, and calendar year from eight Department of Veterans Affairs medical care facilities in the Pacific Northwest. We estimated and compared longitudinal percent weight change from baseline during up to 39 mo of follow-up in participants with and without amputation. Weight gain in the 2 yr after amputation was significantly more in men with an amputation than without, and in men with a TTA or TFA (8%-9% increase) than in men with a PFA (3%-6% increase). Generally, percent weight gain peaked at 2 yr and was followed by some weight loss in the third year. These findings indicate that LLA is often followed by clinically important weight gain. Future studies are needed to better understand the reasons for weight gain and to identify intervention strategies to prevent excess weight gain and the deleterious consequences that may ensue.

  11. Lower-limb amputation and body weight changes in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Alyson J; Thompson, Mary Lou; Arterburn, David E; Bouldin, Erin; Haselkorn, Jodie K; Sangeorzan, Bruce J; Boyko, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between lower-limb amputation (LLA) and subsequent changes in body weight. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using clinical and administrative databases to identify and follow weight changes in 759 males with amputation (partial foot amputation [PFA], n = 396; transtibial amputation [TTA], n = 267; and transfemoral amputation [TFA], n = 96) and 3,790 nondisabled persons frequency-matched (5:1) on age, body mass index, diabetes, and calendar year from eight Department of Veterans Affairs medical care facilities in the Pacific Northwest. We estimated and compared longitudinal percent weight change from baseline during up to 39 mo of follow-up in participants with and without amputation. Weight gain in the 2 yr after amputation was significantly more in men with an amputation than without, and in men with a TTA or TFA (8%-9% increase) than in men with a PFA (3%-6% increase). Generally, percent weight gain peaked at 2 yr and was followed by some weight loss in the third year. These findings indicate that LLA is often followed by clinically important weight gain. Future studies are needed to better understand the reasons for weight gain and to identify intervention strategies to prevent excess weight gain and the deleterious consequences that may ensue. PMID:26244755

  12. Amputated Lower Limb Fixation to the Fracture Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamulin, Axel; Farshad, Mazda

    2015-11-01

    Fractures of the proximal and diaphyseal femur are frequently internally fixed using a fracture table with fracture reduction obtained by traction and adequate rotation exerted on the slightly abducted extremity. Although rare, these fractures may occur on an amputated limb. If so, standard use of a fracture table is not possible. To address this situation, the authors describe a simple novel technique allowing rigid fixation of the amputated limb to the traction device of the fracture table that provides accurate control of reduction in all planes. PMID:26558660

  13. Vascular surgery reduces the frequency of lower limb major amputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Bøvling, Søren; Fasting, H;

    1994-01-01

    In June 1988 a Department of Vascular Surgery was established in the county of Viborg, Denmark. In this retrospective study of the periods 1986-87 and 1989-90, we have observed a significant rise in the number of patients evaluated by a vascular surgeon before amputation, from 19 to 49...... surgical activity. The frequency of major amputations in the county in 1986-87 of 40.9 per 100,000 per year declined by 25% to 30.9 per 100,000 per year in 1989-90. We conclude that vascular surgery reduces the number of major lower limb amputations and consequently all patients threatened with amputation......%. At the same time the number of major lower limb amputations significantly decreased. This reduction was most marked in 1990 probably due to a rise of 43% in the number of distal reconstructions. The distribution between below knee, through knee and mid-thigh amputation was unaffected by the increased vascular...

  14. Upper-limb thrombo-embolectomy: national cohort study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L V; Mortensen, L S; Lindholt, Jes S.;

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the incidence of thrombo-embolectomy in upper-limb and prognosis with respect to arm amputation, stroke and death.......We investigated the incidence of thrombo-embolectomy in upper-limb and prognosis with respect to arm amputation, stroke and death....

  15. Primary motor cortex changes after amputation correlate with phantom limb pain and the ability to move the phantom limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffin, Estelle; Richard, Nathalie; Giraux, Pascal; Reilly, Karen T

    2016-04-15

    A substantial body of evidence documents massive reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices following hand amputation, the extent of which is correlated with phantom limb pain. Many therapies for phantom limb pain are based upon the idea that plastic changes after amputation are maladaptive and attempt to normalize representations of cortical areas adjacent to the hand area. Recent data suggest, however, that higher levels of phantom pain are associated with stronger local activity and more structural integrity in the missing hand area rather than with reorganization of neighbouring body parts. While these models appear to be mutually exclusive they could co-exist, and one reason for the apparent discrepancy between them might be that no single study has examined the organisation of lip, elbow, and hand movements in the same participants. In this study we thoroughly examined the 3D anatomy of the central sulcus and BOLD responses during movements of the hand, elbow, and lips using MRI techniques in 11 upper-limb amputees and 17 healthy control subjects. We observed different reorganizational patterns for all three body parts as the former hand area showed few signs of reorganization, but the lip and elbow representations reorganized and shifted towards the hand area. We also found that poorer voluntary control and higher levels of pain in the phantom limb were powerful drivers of the lip and elbow topological changes. In addition to providing further support for the maladaptative plasticity model, we demonstrate for the first time that motor capacities of the phantom limb correlate with post-amputation reorganization, and that this reorganization is not limited to the face and hand representations but also includes the proximal upper-limb.

  16. Primary motor cortex changes after amputation correlate with phantom limb pain and the ability to move the phantom limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffin, Estelle; Richard, Nathalie; Giraux, Pascal; Reilly, Karen T

    2016-04-15

    A substantial body of evidence documents massive reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices following hand amputation, the extent of which is correlated with phantom limb pain. Many therapies for phantom limb pain are based upon the idea that plastic changes after amputation are maladaptive and attempt to normalize representations of cortical areas adjacent to the hand area. Recent data suggest, however, that higher levels of phantom pain are associated with stronger local activity and more structural integrity in the missing hand area rather than with reorganization of neighbouring body parts. While these models appear to be mutually exclusive they could co-exist, and one reason for the apparent discrepancy between them might be that no single study has examined the organisation of lip, elbow, and hand movements in the same participants. In this study we thoroughly examined the 3D anatomy of the central sulcus and BOLD responses during movements of the hand, elbow, and lips using MRI techniques in 11 upper-limb amputees and 17 healthy control subjects. We observed different reorganizational patterns for all three body parts as the former hand area showed few signs of reorganization, but the lip and elbow representations reorganized and shifted towards the hand area. We also found that poorer voluntary control and higher levels of pain in the phantom limb were powerful drivers of the lip and elbow topological changes. In addition to providing further support for the maladaptative plasticity model, we demonstrate for the first time that motor capacities of the phantom limb correlate with post-amputation reorganization, and that this reorganization is not limited to the face and hand representations but also includes the proximal upper-limb. PMID:26854561

  17. Factors related to successful job reintegration of people with a lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoppen, Tanneke; Boonstra, Antje; Groothoff, JW; van Sonderen, E; Goeken, LN; Eisma, Willem

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study demographically, amputation-, and employment-related factors that show a relationship to successful job reintegration of patients after lower limb amputation. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University hospital. Patients: Subjects had an acquired unilateral major amputati

  18. Physical and social factors determining quality of life for veterans with lower-limb amputation(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan; Ipsen, Thomas; Doherty, Patrick;

    2016-01-01

    of the literature to summarize any evidence on the physical and social determinants for HRQoL in veterans with uni- or bilateral lower-limb amputation(s). Method MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, CINAHL, Scopus and Cochrane databases were searched systematically for eligible studies. Inclusion criteria were: traumatic lower...

  19. Assessment of gait stability, harmony, and symmetry in subjects with lower-limb amputation evaluated by trunk accelerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Iosa, PhD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of upper-body accelerations is a promising and simple technique for quantitatively assessing some general features of gait such as stability, harmony, and symmetry. Despite the growing literature on elderly healthy populations and neurological patients, few studies have used accelerometry to investigate these features in subjects with lower-limb amputation. We enrolled four groups of subjects: subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with a locked knee prosthesis, subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with an unlocked knee prosthesis, subjects with transtibial amputation, and age-matched nondisabled subjects. We found statistically significant differences for stability (p < 0.001, harmony (p < 0.001, and symmetry (p < 0.001 of walking, with general trends following the noted order of subjects, but with the lowest laterolateral harmony in subjects with transtibial amputation. This study is the first to investigate upper-body acceleration of subjects with unilateral lower-limb amputation during walking who were evaluated upon dismissal from a rehabilitation hospital; it is also the first study to differentiate the sample in terms of level of amputation and type of prosthesis used.

  20. Reducing treatment by means of physical rehabilitation after lower limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Dugina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the main approaches to the assignment of physical rehabilitation restorative treatment after lower limb amputations. Material and Methods: theoretical analysis and synthesis of modern scientific and methodological literature data on methods of comprehensive rehabilitation after lower limb amputations. Results: the features of the application of physical rehabilitation after lower limb amputations, tasks and presents the main approaches to the appointment of medical physical training, therapeutic massage and physical therapy in preparation for prosthetics. Conclusions: demonstrated that therapeutic physical training, therapeutic massage and physical therapy are effective means of physical rehabilitation of patients after lower limb amputations.

  1. Painful neuroma requiring surgical excision after lower limb amputation caused by landmine explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Sehirlioglu, Ali; Ozturk, Cagatay; Yazicioglu, Kamil; Tugcu, Ilknur; Yilmaz, Bilge; Goktepe, Ahmet Salim

    2007-01-01

    This article reports an analysis of 75 consecutive lower limb amputees who developed painful neuroma requiring surgical excision after lower limb amputation following landmine explosions. This retrospective study analyses the results of 75 patients who were treated for painful neuroma after lower limb amputation following landmine explosions between the years 2000 and 2006. The average time period from use of prosthesis to start of symptoms suggesting neuroma was 9.6 months. The average time ...

  2. Pediatric Traumatic Limb Amputation: The Principles of Management and Optimal Residual Limb Lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Adil Abbas; Javed, Ammar Asrar; Rao, Dominic Jordan; Corner, J Antony; Rosenfield, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric traumatic limb amputations are rare and their acute and long term management can be challenging in this subgroup of patients. The lengthy and costly hospital stays, and resulting physical and psychological implications leads to significant morbidity. We present a summary of treatment principles and the evidence base supporting the management options for this entity. The initial management focuses on resuscitating and stabilization of the patients, administration of appropriate and adequate analgesics, and broad spectrum antibiotics. The patient should ideally be managed by an orthopedic or a plastic surgeon and when an amputation is warranted, the surgical team should aim to conserve as much of the viable physis as possible aimed at allowing bone development in a growing child. A subsequent wound inspection should be performed to assess for signs of ischemia or non-viability of tissue. Depending on the child's age, approximations of the ideal residual limb length can be calculated using our guidelines, allowing an ideal stump length at skeletal maturity for a well-fitting and appropriate prosthesis. Myodesis and myoplasties can be performed according to the nature of the amputation. Removable rigid dressings are safe and cost effective offering better protection of the stump. Complications such as necrosis and exostosis, on subsequent examination, warrant further revisions. Other complications such as neuromas can be prevented by proximal division of the nerves. Successful rehabilitation can be accomplished with a multidisciplinary approach, involving physiotherapist, play therapist and a child psychiatrist, in addition to the surgeon and primary care providers. PMID:27308235

  3. [Arterial surgery of the upper limb].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, L; Lassonde, J; Laurendeau, F

    1991-01-01

    Arterial surgery of the upper limb represents 2.5% of peripheral vascular procedures in our center. From 1976 to 1989, 58 procedures were performed in 45 patients. There were 26 men and 19 women with average age of 52 years, ranging from 6 to 92 years. These patients were grouped in three categories according to etiology: 1) trauma; 2) acute non traumatic ischemia and 3) chronic ischemia. Sixteen patients (35.5%) were operated on for arterial trauma including three false aneurysms. Blunt trauma was the cause in 9 patients, penetrating in 6 and iatrogenic in one. Angioplasty and primary end to end anastomosis were used in 6, bypass in 4, simple ligation in 3, thrombectomy in 3. The outcome was excellent in 15/16 (93%). Non traumatic acute ischemia occurred in 16 patients (35.5%) and was due to emboli of cardiac origin in 92%. All patients were treated by thromboembolectomy. This group had a high mortality (5/16, 31%) because of associated medical conditions. The third group of 13 patients (29%) underwent surgery for chronic ischemia of the upper limb localized to the subclavian artery in 92%. They were treated with carotid subclavian bypasses in 9, other types of bypass in 3 and endarterectomy in 1. Excellent results were obtained in 10/13 (78%). Overall, satisfactory results were obtained in 90% of surviving patients. Operative mortality was 11.1% and the amputation rate was 13%.

  4. Sexuality in people with a lower limb amputation : a topic too hot to handle?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, J. E. A.; Enzlin, P.; Geertzen, J. H. B.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Dekker, R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze whether, and by whom sexuality is discussed in amputation departments. The focus was on whether professionals received questions about sexuality from their patients with a lower limb amputation and whether they addressed sexuality themselves, as well

  5. Peak Oxygen Consumption in Older Adults With a Lower Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, Daphne; de Haan, Arnold; Faber, Willemijn X.; Slootman, Hans J.; van der Woude, Lucas H.; Houdijk, Han

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether the aerobic capacity of older adults who underwent a lower limb amputation is associated with the presence, cause (traumatic or vascular), and level of amputation (transtibial or transfemoral). Design: Cross-sectional descriptive. Setting: Human motion laboratory at

  6. Spinal, pelvic, and hip movement asymmetries in people with lower-limb amputation: Systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemakumar Devan, MPhty

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Following amputation, people with transfemoral amputation (TFA and transtibial amputation (TTA adapt with asymmetrical movements in the spinal and lower-limb joints. The aim of this review is to describe the trunk, lumbopelvic, and hip joint movement asymmetries of the amputated limb of people with TFA and TTA during functional tasks as compared with the intact leg and/or referent leg of nondisabled controls. Electronic databases were searched from inception to February 2014. Studies with kinematic data comparing (1 amputated and intact leg and (2 amputated and referent leg of nondisabled controls were included (26 articles. Considerable heterogeneity in the studies precluded data pooling. During stance phase of walking in participants with TFA, there is moderate evidence for increased trunk lateral flexion toward the amputated limb as compared with the intact leg and increased anterior pelvic tilt as compared with nondisabled controls. None of the studies investigated spinal kinematics during other functional tasks such as running, ramp walking, stair climbing, or obstacle crossing in participants with TFA or TTA. Overall, persons with TFA adapt with trunk and pelvic movement asymmetries at the amputated limb to facilitate weight transfer during walking. Among participants with TTA, there is limited evidence of spinal and pelvic asymmetries during walking.

  7. Spinal, pelvic, and hip movement asymmetries in people with lower-limb amputation: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devan, Hemakumar; Carman, Allan; Hendrick, Paul; Hale, Leigh; Ribeiro, Daniel Cury

    2015-01-01

    Following amputation, people with transfemoral amputation (TFA) and transtibial amputation (TTA) adapt with asymmetrical movements in the spinal and lower-limb joints. The aim of this review is to describe the trunk, lumbopelvic, and hip joint movement asymmetries of the amputated limb of people with TFA and TTA during functional tasks as compared with the intact leg and/or referent leg of nondisabled controls. Electronic databases were searched from inception to February 2014. Studies with kinematic data comparing (1) amputated and intact leg and (2) amputated and referent leg of nondisabled controls were included (26 articles). Considerable heterogeneity in the studies precluded data pooling. During stance phase of walking in participants with TFA, there is moderate evidence for increased trunk lateral flexion toward the amputated limb as compared with the intact leg and increased anterior pelvic tilt as compared with nondisabled controls. None of the studies investigated spinal kinematics during other functional tasks such as running, ramp walking, stair climbing, or obstacle crossing in participants with TFA or TTA. Overall, persons with TFA adapt with trunk and pelvic movement asymmetries at the amputated limb to facilitate weight transfer during walking. Among participants with TTA, there is limited evidence of spinal and pelvic asymmetries during walking.

  8. Spinal, pelvic, and hip movement asymmetries in people with lower-limb amputation: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devan, Hemakumar; Carman, Allan; Hendrick, Paul; Hale, Leigh; Ribeiro, Daniel Cury

    2015-01-01

    Following amputation, people with transfemoral amputation (TFA) and transtibial amputation (TTA) adapt with asymmetrical movements in the spinal and lower-limb joints. The aim of this review is to describe the trunk, lumbopelvic, and hip joint movement asymmetries of the amputated limb of people with TFA and TTA during functional tasks as compared with the intact leg and/or referent leg of nondisabled controls. Electronic databases were searched from inception to February 2014. Studies with kinematic data comparing (1) amputated and intact leg and (2) amputated and referent leg of nondisabled controls were included (26 articles). Considerable heterogeneity in the studies precluded data pooling. During stance phase of walking in participants with TFA, there is moderate evidence for increased trunk lateral flexion toward the amputated limb as compared with the intact leg and increased anterior pelvic tilt as compared with nondisabled controls. None of the studies investigated spinal kinematics during other functional tasks such as running, ramp walking, stair climbing, or obstacle crossing in participants with TFA or TTA. Overall, persons with TFA adapt with trunk and pelvic movement asymmetries at the amputated limb to facilitate weight transfer during walking. Among participants with TTA, there is limited evidence of spinal and pelvic asymmetries during walking. PMID:26186283

  9. Quality of Life Following Amputation or Limb Preservation in Patients with Lower Extremity Bone Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gary E Mason; Lele eAung; Sarah eGall; Meyers, Paul A; Robert eButler; Sarah eKrug; Mimi eKim; Healey, John H.; Richard eGorlick

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although functional differences have been described between patients with lower extremity bone sarcoma with amputation and limb preservation surgery, differences have not clearly been shown between the two groups related to quality of life. The aim of the study was to determine if there is a difference in overall quality of life in lower extremity bone sarcoma survivors related to whether they had an amputation or a limb preservation procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-two lon...

  10. Quality of Life Following Amputation or Limb Preservation in Patients with Lower Extremity Bone Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Mason

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Although functional differences have been described between patients with lower extremity bone sarcoma with amputation and limb preservation surgery, differences have not clearly been shown between the two groups related to quality of life. The aim of the study was to determine if there is a difference in overall quality of life in lower extremity bone sarcoma survivors related to whether they had an amputation or a limb preservation procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-two long-term survivors of lower extremity bone sarcoma were studied to make a comparison of the overall quality of life, pain assessment and psychological evaluations in limb preservation and amputation patients. Forty-eight patients with limb preservation and thirty-four patients with amputations were enrolled in the study. Validated psychometric measures including the Quality of Life Questionnaire, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and visual analog scales were utilized.RESULTS: The overall quality of life of patients with limb preservation was significantly higher than patients with amputation (p-value < 0.01. Significant differences were noted in the categories of material well being, job satisfiers and occupational relations. CONCLUSION: The overall quality of life of patients with limb preservation appears to be better than for those patients with amputation based on the quality of life questionnaire in patients surviving lower extremity bone sarcoma. Further analysis needs to verify the results and focus on the categories that significantly affect the overall quality of life.

  11. Job adjustments, job satisfaction and health experience in upper and lower limb amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Corry K.; Hartman, Paul P.; Schoppen, Tanneke; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To explore job adjustments, job satisfaction, and health experience among employees with an upper limb amputation and to compare the results with those of lower limb amputees and control subjects. Methods: Amputees were recruited from data files of a large European University Medical Cen

  12. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangyao; Yin, Xuntao; Li, Chuanming; Li, Lei; Zhao, Lu; Evans, Alan C.; Jiang, Tianzi; Wu, Jixiang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter (WM) were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC). Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections. PMID:26587289

  13. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyao Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA of white matter (WM were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC. Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections.

  14. Prosthetic fitting, use, and satisfaction following lower-limb amputation: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph B. Webster, MD

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing a satisfactory, functional prosthesis following lower-limb amputation is a primary goal of rehabilitation. The objectives of this study were to describe the rate of successful prosthetic fitting over a 12 mo period; describe prosthetic use after amputation; and determine factors associated with greater prosthetic fitting, function, and satisfaction. The study design was a multicenter prospective cohort study of individuals undergoing their first major lower-limb amputation because of vascular disease and/or diabetes. At 4 mo, unsuccessful prosthetic fitting was significantly associated with depression, prior arterial reconstruction, diabetes, and pain in the residual limb. At 12 mo, 92% of all subjects were fit with a prosthetic limb and individuals with transfemoral amputation were significantly less likely to have a prosthesis fit. Age older than 55 yr, diagnosis of a major depressive episode, and history of renal dialysis were associated with fewer hours of prosthetic walking. Subjects who were older, had experienced a major depressive episode, and/or were diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had greater functional restriction. Thus, while most individuals achieve successful prosthetic fitting by 1 yr following a first major nontraumatic lower-limb amputation, a number of medical variables and psychosocial factors are associated with prosthetic fitting, utilization, and function.

  15. Phantom hand and wrist movements in upper limb amputees are slow but naturally controlled movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graaf, J B; Jarrassé, N; Nicol, C; Touillet, A; Coyle, T; Maynard, L; Martinet, N; Paysant, J

    2016-01-15

    After limb amputation, patients often wake up with a vivid perception of the presence of the missing limb, called "phantom limb". Phantom limbs have mostly been studied with respect to pain sensation. But patients can experience many other phantom sensations, including voluntary movements. The goal of the present study was to quantify phantom movement kinematics and relate these to intact limb kinematics and to the time elapsed since amputation. Six upper arm and two forearm amputees with various delays since amputation (6months to 32years) performed phantom finger, hand and wrist movements at self-chosen comfortable velocities. The kinematics of the phantom movements was indirectly obtained via the intact limb that synchronously mimicked the phantom limb movements, using a Cyberglove® for measuring finger movements and an inertial measurement unit for wrist movements. Results show that the execution of phantom movements is perceived as "natural" but effortful. The types of phantom movements that can be performed are variable between the patients but they could all perform thumb flexion/extension and global hand opening/closure. Finger extension movements appeared to be 24% faster than finger flexion movements. Neither the number of types of phantom movements that can be executed nor the kinematic characteristics were related to the elapsed time since amputation, highlighting the persistence of post-amputation neural adaptation. We hypothesize that the perceived slowness of phantom movements is related to altered proprioceptive feedback that cannot be recalibrated by lack of visual feedback during phantom movement execution.

  16. Predictors of major lower limb amputation among type II diabetic patients admitted for diabetic foot problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Nazri Mohd; Rahman, Jamalludin Ab; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Che-Ahmad, Aminudin; Khalid, Kamarul Ariffin; Sulong, Ahmad Fadzli; Vijayasingham, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of amputations in Malaysia. This study aimed to identify the predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with type 2 DM (T2DM) who were admitted to a hospital, in order to reduce its likelihood. METHODS This cross-sectional study involved 218 patients with T2DM who were admitted to Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan, Kuantan, Malaysia, for diabetic foot problems from June 2011 to July 2012. A form was developed to document the patients’ profiles, comorbidities, complications, investigations, treatment and clinical outcomes. The predictors for major lower limb amputations were determined using univariate and stepwise logistic regression analysis. RESULTS A total of 31 patients underwent major lower limb amputations (25 transtibial, 6 transfemoral). The following factors were found to be associated with the incidence of major lower limb amputations: T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, presentation with gangrene, diabetic foot conditions of Wagner grade 4 or 5, and necrotising fasciitis. Patients who underwent major amputations had significantly lower haemoglobin and albumin levels, and higher total white blood cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and C-reactive protein, urea and creatinine levels. However, only T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and albumin levels were significant on stepwise logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and low albumin levels were found to be significant predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with T2DM admitted for diabetic foot problems. PMID:26668408

  17. Crossover replantation after bilateral traumatic lower limb amputations: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Jun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Replantation of a limb to the contralateral stump after bilateral traumatic amputations is rare. To the best of our knowledge, there are only a few reports of crossover lower limb replantation in the literature. Case presentation We treated a 37-year-old Chinese woman with bilateral lower limb crush injuries sustained in a traffic accident. Her lower limb injuries were at different anatomic levels. We performed emergency bilateral amputations followed by crossover replantation. Five years later, the woman had recovered well, and had perfect movement and stability in her replanted leg. After reviewing the literature, we thought that presentation of our patient’s case might provide useful information for clinicians. Conclusions Crossover replantation should be considered when evaluating a patient with bilateral lower limb injuries, thus allowing the patient to touch the ground and stand using their own foot.

  18. Assessment of anxiety and depression after lower limb amputation in Jordanian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad M Hawamdeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Ziad M Hawamdeh1, Yasmin S Othman2, Alaa I Ibrahim31Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; 2Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; 3Lecturer, Department of Physical Therapy for Pediatrics and Pediatric surgery, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, EgyptObjective: This study aimed to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depression among Jordanian lower limb amputees with different clinical characteristics and sociodemographic data (gender, marital status, social support, income, type and level of amputation, and occupation.Methods: Participants were 56 patients with unilateral lower limb amputation with mean duration (8.4 ± 5.75 years. They were recruited from inpatient and outpatient clinics of Jordan University hospital, Royal Farah Rehabilitation Center, and Al-basheer hospital in Amman, Jordan. Participants responded to a questionnaire that included a battery of questions requesting brief information about sociodemographic variables and characteristics of amputation. The level of depression and anxiety in each participating patient was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS.Results: The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms were 37% and 20%, respectively. Factors associated with high prevalence of psychological symptoms included female gender, lack of social support, unemployment, traumatic amputation, shorter time since amputation, and amputation below the knee. These findings were confirmed by a significant reduction of anxiety and depression scores in patients who received social support, patients with amputation due to disease, and patients with amputation above the knee. Presence of pain and use of prosthesis had no effect on the prevalence.Conclusions: The findings of the present study highlight the high incidence of psychiatric disability and

  19. Barriers and Facilitators of Participation in Sports : A Qualitative Study on Dutch Individuals with Lower Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragaru, Mihai; van Wilgen, C. P.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Ruijs, Suzette G. J. B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Dekker, Rienk

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Although individuals with lower limb amputation may benefit from participation in sports, less than 40% do so. Aim: To identify the barriers and facilitators that influence participation in sports for individuals with lower limb amputation. Design: Qualitative study. Participants: Twen

  20. Four limb amputations due to peripheral gangrene from inotrope use – Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Chuan Han

    2015-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Microvascular spasm is a rare complication of inotrope use which may lead to extensive peripheral gangrene. Anecdotal reports of reversal agents have been discussed. Four limb amputations are a reasonable option especially if done in an elective setting after the gangrene has demarcated itself. Rehabilitation with prosthesis after 4 limb amputations can result in good functional outcome.

  1. Sequential compression biomechanical device versus primary amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tawfick, Wael A

    2013-10-01

    Introduction: Patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI), who are unsuitable for intervention, face the consequence of primary amputation. Sequential compression biomechanical device (SCBD) therapy provides a limb salvage option for these patients. Objectives: To assess the outcome of SCBD in patients with severe CLI who are unsuitable for revascularization. Primary end points were limb salvage and 30-day mortality. Methods: From 2005 to 2012, 189 patients with severe CLI were not suitable for revascularization. In all, 171 joined the SCBD program. We match controlled 75 primary amputations. Results: All patients were Rutherford category 4 or higher. Sustained clinical improvement was 68% at 1 year. Mean toe pressure increased from 19.9 to 35.42 mm Hg, P < .0001. Mean popliteal flow increased from 35.44 to 55.91 cm\\/sec, P < .0001. The 30-day mortality was 0.6%. Limb salvage was 94% at 5 years. Freedom from major adverse clinical events was 62.5%. All-cause survival was 69%. Median cost of managing a primary amputation patient is €29 815 compared to €3985 for SCBD. We treated 171 patients with artassist at a cost of €681 965. However, primary amputation for 75 patients cost €2 236 125. Conclusion: The SCBD therapy is a cost-effective and clinically effective solution in patients with CLI having no option of revascularization. It provides adequate limb salvage while providing relief of rest pain without any intervention.

  2. Impact of rehabilitation programs on dependency and functional performance of patients with major lower limb amputations

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSofyani, Mohammad A.; AlHarthi, Abdulaziz S.; Farahat, Fayssal M.; Abuznadah, Wesam T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine pattern and impact of physical rehabilitation on dependency and functional performance of patients. Methods: This retrospective chart review was carried out between July and August 2012 at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Data were collected using demographic, clinical, and dependency assessment checklists. Results: Patients who underwent major lower limb amputations between January 2007 and April 2012 (n=121) were included in the study. There were 84 (69.4%) male and 37 (30.6%) female patients with a mean ± standard deviation of 63.3±17.4 years old. Diabetes mellitus was the most frequent cause in 63.6% of patients. Only one-third of the amputees (32.2%) have records of completion of their rehabilitation programs, although 20.7% of them completed the <50% of the scheduled rehabilitation sessions, 17.2% attended between 50% and 80%, and the remaining 62.1% attended more than 80% of the scheduled sessions. Muscle power scores in each side of the upper and lower limbs were significantly better following rehabilitation (p<0.0001). Basic functions of mobility and transfer have also significantly improved (p<0.05). Conclusions: Overall dependency and functional performance were significantly better following implementation of the physical rehabilitation programs. A multidisciplinary team approach is mandatory to improve compliance of patients toward the rehabilitation programs. PMID:27652362

  3. [Problems and techniques of functional rehabilitation of upper limb stump].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, G; Vitangeli, L; Assennato, P; Drommi, M

    1990-07-15

    The authors discuss problems and techniques of rehabilitation in subjects who have undergone upper limb amputation, as well as the requirements for good application of a prosthesis. Various types of prostheses are described: passive ones, those moved by the body and externally operated ones. The amputee undergoes three stages of rehabilitation: a general preparatory phase for maintenance of good joint function and muscle efficiency; a phase of specific rehabilitation with the help of electromyometry and an electronic training device for the use of the prosthesis, and finally individual and group exercises in laboratories with special facilities.

  4. Gait adjustments in obstacle crossing, gait initiation and gait termination after a recent lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, Aline H.; van Keeken, Helco G.; Schoppen, Tanneke; Hof, At L.; Otten, Bert; Halbertsma, Jan P. K.; Postema, Klaas

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the adjustments in gait characteristics of obstacle crossing, gait initiation and gait termination that occur in subjects with a recent lower limb amputation during the rehabilitation process. Design: Prospective and descriptive study. Subjects: Fourteen subjects with a recent

  5. Mobility in Elderly People With a Lower Limb Amputation : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortington, Lauren V.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Postema, Klaas; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2012-01-01

    Elderly people with a lower limb amputation impose a heavy burden on health resources, requiring extensive rehabilitation and long term care. Mobility is key to regaining independence; however, the impact of multiple comorbidities in this patient group can make regaining mobility a particularly chal

  6. Instrumented Measurement of Balance and Postural Control in Individuals with Lower Limb Amputation: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakaran, Prasath; Johnson, Gillian M.; Sullivan, S. John; Nitz, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of balance and postural performance that underpins activities of daily living is important in the rehabilitation of individuals with a lower limb amputation (LLA), and there are a number of methods and strategies available for this purpose. To provide an evidence-based choice of approach, this review aims to critically review the tasks…

  7. Amputation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnur, David; Meier, Robert H

    2014-02-01

    The best level of amputation must take into consideration the newest socket designs, methods of prosthetic suspension, and technologically advanced components. In some instances stump revision should be considered, to provide a better prosthetic fitting and function. Targeted reinnervation is a new neural-machine interface that has been developed to help improve the function of electrically powered upper prosthetic limbs. Osseointegrated implants for prosthetic suspension offer amputees an alternative to the traditional socket suspension, and are especially useful for transfemoral and transhumeral levels of amputation. Cadaver bone can be used to lengthen an extremely short residual bony lever arm.

  8. Incidence, severity, and impact of hyperhidrosis in people with lower-limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colby Hansen, MD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the incidence and severity of self-reported hyperhidrosis in patients with amputation and understand its effects on prosthetic fit or function, a cross-sectional survey of patients at two amputee clinics was performed. Responses from 121 subjects with lower-limb amputation were analyzed. Of these subjects, 66% reported sweating to a degree that it interfered with daily activities, as measured by the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale. There was a significant association between sweating and interference with prosthetic fit and function. Sweating was more severe in cases of transtibial amputations, patients under the age of 60 yr, warm weather, and vigorous activity. There was no relationship between severity of sweating and time since amputation, etiology of amputation, duration of daily prosthetic use, or reported ability to perform functional tasks. Subjects reported trying multiple interventions, but the self-reported effectiveness of these treatments was low. Hyperhidrosis, a common problem associated with prosthetic usage, varies in severity and often interferes with daily activities. Sweating severity is associated with poor prosthetic fit and function. Risk factors include younger age and transtibial amputation status. Treatment strategies generally lack efficacy. The results of this study may provide guidance for future interventions and treatment options.

  9. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Diabetic Lower Limb Amputation: A Clinic-Based Case Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Beverly T.; Vangaveti, Venkat N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for lower limb amputation in a specialist foot clinic-based setting. Methods. A retrospective quantitative study was conducted, using clinical and biochemical profiles of diabetic foot patients attending the High Risk Foot Clinic at The Townsville Hospital, Australia, between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013. Results. The total study sample included 129 subjects, comprising 81 males and 48 females with M : F ratio of 1.7 : 1. Twenty-three subjects were Indigenous Australians, representing 17.8% of the study population. The average age of the cohort was 63.4 years ± 14.1 years [CI 90.98–65.89]. Lower limb amputation was identified as a common and significant outcome (n = 44), occurring in 34.1%, more commonly amongst the Indigenous Australians (56.5% versus 29.2%; p = 0.94, OR 0.94). Risk factors most closely associated with amputation included diabetic retinopathy (p = 0.00, OR 4.4), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (p = 0.01, OR 4.1), Charcot's arthropathy (p = 0.01, OR 2.9), and Indigenous ethnicity (p = 0.01, OR 3.4). Although average serum creatinine, corrected calcium, and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (Hba1c) levels were higher amongst amputees they were statistically insignificant. Conclusions. Lower limb amputation is a common outcome and linked to ethnicity and neurovascular diabetic complications amongst subjects with diabetic foot ulcer. Further research is needed to identify why risk of lower limb amputation seems to differ according to ethnicity.

  10. Physical activity, functional capacity, and step variability during walking in people with lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Suh-Jen; Winston, Katie D; Mitchell, Jill; Girlinghouse, Jacob; Crochet, Karleigh

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity is important for general health. For an individual with amputation to sustain physical activity, certain functional capacity might be needed. Gait variability is related to the incidence of falls. This study explored the relationship between physical activity and a few common performance measures (six-minute walk test, step length variability, step width variability, and comfortable walking speed) in individuals with unilateral lower-limb amputation. Twenty individuals completed the study (age: 50±11yrs). Twelve of them had transtibial amputation, seven had transfemoral amputation, and one had through-knee amputation. Gait data was collected by the GaitRite instrumented walkway while participants performed a 3-min comfortable walking trial followed by a six-minute walk test. Physical activity was indicated by the mean of 7-day step counts via a pedometer. Gait variability was calculated by the coefficient of variation. Pearson correlation analysis was conducted between physical activity level and the 4 performance measures. Significance level was set at 0.05. Physical activity correlates strongly to comfortable walking speed (r=0.76), six-minute walk distance (r=0.67), and correlates fairly to step width variability (r=0.44). On the contrary, physical activity is inversely related to step length variability of the prosthetic leg (r=-0.46) and of the sound leg (r=-0.47). Having better functional capacity and lateral stability might enable an individual with lower-limb amputation to engage in a higher physical activity level, or vise versa. However, our conclusions are only preliminary as limited by the small sample size.

  11. Physical activity, functional capacity, and step variability during walking in people with lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Suh-Jen; Winston, Katie D; Mitchell, Jill; Girlinghouse, Jacob; Crochet, Karleigh

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity is important for general health. For an individual with amputation to sustain physical activity, certain functional capacity might be needed. Gait variability is related to the incidence of falls. This study explored the relationship between physical activity and a few common performance measures (six-minute walk test, step length variability, step width variability, and comfortable walking speed) in individuals with unilateral lower-limb amputation. Twenty individuals completed the study (age: 50±11yrs). Twelve of them had transtibial amputation, seven had transfemoral amputation, and one had through-knee amputation. Gait data was collected by the GaitRite instrumented walkway while participants performed a 3-min comfortable walking trial followed by a six-minute walk test. Physical activity was indicated by the mean of 7-day step counts via a pedometer. Gait variability was calculated by the coefficient of variation. Pearson correlation analysis was conducted between physical activity level and the 4 performance measures. Significance level was set at 0.05. Physical activity correlates strongly to comfortable walking speed (r=0.76), six-minute walk distance (r=0.67), and correlates fairly to step width variability (r=0.44). On the contrary, physical activity is inversely related to step length variability of the prosthetic leg (r=-0.46) and of the sound leg (r=-0.47). Having better functional capacity and lateral stability might enable an individual with lower-limb amputation to engage in a higher physical activity level, or vise versa. However, our conclusions are only preliminary as limited by the small sample size. PMID:24731451

  12. Very low survival rates after non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a consecutive series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Holm, Gitte; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate factors potentially influencing short- and long-term mortality in patients who had a non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a university hospital. A consecutive series of 93 amputations (16% toe/foot, 33% trans-tibial, 9% through knee and 42......% trans-femoral) were studied. Their mean age was 75.8 years; 21 (23%) were admitted from a nursing home and 87 (92%) were amputated due to a vascular disease and/or diabetes. Thirty days and 1-year mortality were 30 and 54%, respectively. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that the 30-day mortality...... was associated with older age (P = 0.01), and the number of co-morbidities (P = 0.04), when adjusted for gender, previous amputations, cause of and amputation level, and residential status. Thus, a patient with 4 or 5 co-morbidities (n = 20) was seven times more likely to die within 30 days, compared...

  13. PERCEIVED INDEPENDENCE AND LIMITATIONS IN RISING AND SITTING DOWN AFTER REHABILITATION FOR A LOWER-LIMB AMPUTATION

    OpenAIRE

    de Laat, Fred A.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Roorda, Leo D

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study perceived independence in rising and perceived limitations in rising and sitting down in persons after a lower-limb amputation and the relationship of these perceptions with personal and clinical characteristics. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects/patients: Persons with a lower-limb amputation wearing a prosthesis (n=172). Methods: Perceived independence in rising was assessed with the Locomotor Capabilities Index. Limitations in rising and sitting down were assessed ...

  14. Interhemispheric sensorimotor integration; an upper limb phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Kathy L; Jaspers, Ellen; Keller, Martin; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    Somatosensory information from the limbs reaches the contralateral Primary Sensory Cortex (S1) with a delay of 23ms for finger, and 40ms for leg (somatosensory N20/N40). Upon arrival of this input in the cortex, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) are momentarily inhibited. This phenomenon is called 'short latency afferent inhibition (SAI)' and can be used as a tool for investigating sensorimotor interactions in the brain. We used SAI to investigate the process of sensorimotor integration in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the stimulated limb. We hypothesized that ipsilateral SAI would occur with a delay following the onset of contralateral SAI, to allow for transcallosal conduction of the signal. We electrically stimulated the limb either contralateral or ipsilateral to the hemisphere receiving TMS, using a range of different interstimulus intervals (ISI). We tested the First Dorsal Interosseous (FDI) muscle in the hand, and Tibialis Anterior (TA) in the lower leg, in three separate experiments. Ipsilateral SAI was elicited in the upper limb (FDI) at all ISIs that were greater than N20+18ms (all p<.05) but never at any earlier timepoint. No ipsilateral SAI was detected in the lower limb (TA) at any of the tested ISIs. The delayed onset timing of ipsilateral SAI suggests that transcallosal communication mediates this inhibitory process for the upper limb. The complete absence of ipsilateral SAI in the lower limb warrants consideration of the potential limb-specific differences in demands for bilateral sensorimotor integration.

  15. Global trends in incidence of lower limb amputation: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Godlwana

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to compile a literature report on the global epidemiology of lower limb amputations. Specifically it aimed at capturing information on the incidence of traumatic and non-traumatic lowerlimb amputations throughout the world, to identify the etiology including diseases and lifestyle habits associated with lower limb amputees (LLA in boththe developed and the developing countries, to identify the demographiccharacteristics, age, sex, race, geographical location of the people undergoing LLA including the levels of amputation as pointed out by the literature. Aliterature search was conducted. Different keyword combinations were used togather as much literature on the subject as possible. The authors systemicallyreviewed literature from some parts of Europe, Asia, North and South America and South Africa. The data was analyzed and presented under various themes. The existing literature shows that diabetes is the leading cause of LLA and trauma accounts for the minority of these cases. The incidence of LLA can be predicted by gender, age, maritalstatus, level of education and socio-economic status. Information on LLA in South Africa is almost absent.

  16. Impact of a diabetic foot care education program on lower limb amputation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Wahbi

    2010-10-01

    stage, has increased the awareness of both patients and health care staff about the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, and decreased the rate of lower extremity amputation. We believe that the statistical proof of its impact will be evident in the final evaluation.Keywords: diabetic foot, prevention, complications, lower limb amputation

  17. Amputation-Free Survival after Crural Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Critical Limb Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, M; Konge, L; Lönn, L;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: To evaluate the amputation-free survival after below the knee percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in a consecutive group of patients with critical ischemia of the lower extremity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 70 consecutive patients with critical ischemia were treated...... with below the knee percutaneous transluminal angioplasty at the vascular center at Rigshospitalet with the purpose of limb salvage. All patients were deemed unfit for major surgery due to anatomical limitations or severe co-morbidity, and no prior attempts of revascularization were performed. Follow...... within the first year. Complications after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty were rare. Cumulative mortality after 1 and 2 years was 22% and 34%, respectively. Amputation-free survival at 1 and 2 years of follow-up was 68% and 58%, respectively. There were no association between known risk factors...

  18. Soccer Practice and Functional and Social Performance of Men With Lower Limb Amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Rogeria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Practicing sports together with rehabilitative treatment improves the development of motor, social and emotional abilities of lower limb amputees. The aim of this study was to compare the functional and social performance of individuals with lower limb amputations between those who played soccer and those who did not engage in any sports activities. A total of 138 individuals participated in the study and were divided into two groups: soccer players (n = 69, 34 ± 8.1 years and non-athletes (n = 69, 38 ± 8.9 years. A checklist, based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, was used. Data were analyzed using the Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. The soccer players group showed significantly better performance than the non-athletes group in most items of body function, body structure, occupational performance components and daily activities (p < 0.001 for all, and also in some important items of social and environment factors (p < 0.001 for all. The results strongly suggest that amputee soccer significantly improves the functional and social performance in individuals with lower limb amputations.

  19. Registering a methodology for imaging and analysis of residual-limb shape after transtibial amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Dickinson, PhD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful prosthetic rehabilitation following lower-limb amputation depends upon a safe and comfortable socket-residual limb interface. Current practice predominantly uses a subjective, iterative process to establish socket shape, often requiring several visits to a prosthetist. This study proposes an objective methodology for residual-limb shape scanning and analysis by high-resolution, automated measurements. A 3-D printed "analog" residuum was scanned with three surface digitizers on 10 occasions. Accuracy was measured by the scan-height error between repeat analog scans and the computer-aided design (CAD geometry and the scan versus CAD volume. Subsequently, 20 male residuum casts from ambulatory individuals with transtibial amputation were scanned by two observers, and 10 were repeat-scanned by one observer. The shape files were aligned spatially, and geometric measurements were extracted. Repeatability was evaluated by intraclass correlation, Bland-Altman analysis of scan volumes, and pairwise root-mean-square error ranges of scan area and width profiles. Submillimeter accuracy was achieved when scanning the analog shape using white light and laser scanning technologies. Scanning male residuum casts was highly repeatable within and between observers. The analysis methodology technique provides clinical researchers and prosthetists the capability to establish their own quantitative, objective, multipatient datasets. This could provide an evidence base for training, long-term follow-up, and interpatient outcome comparison, for decision support in socket design.

  20. 针刺复合星状神经节阻滞治疗外伤性上肢截肢术后幻肢痛效果观察%The effect of combination therapy of nerve block and acupuncture for phantom limb pain by amputation of upper extremity after surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚琴; 刘莱莉; 罗富荣; 廖荣宗; 高俊青; 陈浩宇

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of combination therapy of nerve block and acupuncture to phantom limb pain of upper extremity after amputation.Methods Eighty patients with phantom limb pain of upper limb were randomly divided into four groups (n=20):20 patients received basic treatment (A group),which included Medications and Psychotherapy,20 patients recieved acupuncture and basic treatment (B group),20 patients recieved nerve block and basic treatment (C group),20 patients recieved nerve block,acupuncture and basic treatment (D group).Scores of VAS,SR-36 and comprehensive comparison of efficacy were used to assess before and after treatment among the four groups.Results visual analogue scales (VAS) scores and SF-36 scores of four groups of patients were significant differences after treatment compared with before treatment (P<0.05).VAS scores decreased after treatment,while SF-36 scores were significantly increased.When compared with A group (52±6),VAS scores of B group (42±8),C group (42±8) and D group (32±6) after treatment decreased significantly,and the differences were statistically significant(P<0.05).Compared with A group(Mental:58±9,Physical:36±5),SF-36 scores of B group(Mental:67±9,Physical:43± 4),C group(Mental:66±6,Physical:43±5) and D group(Mental:77±10,Physical:50±6) after treatment increased significantly,and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05).When compared with B group and C group,VAS scores of D group decreased significantly after treatment,and SF-36 scores were significantly increased(P<0.05).Comprehensive comparison of efficacy of four groups of patients:After treatment for 5 weeks,compared with A group (70%),there was significant difference in comprehensive comparison of efficacy of B group(85%),C group(85%) and D group(100%) (P<0.05).The results suggest that the treatment effect of B group,C group and D group is better than A group,the treatment effect of D group is best among four groups

  1. Demographics of Lower Limb Amputations in the Pakistan Military: A Single Center, Three-Year Prospective Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Saeed B; Mansoor, Sahibzada N; Qureshi, Ali R; Fahim, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  The Pakistan military has been actively engaged in the war against terror for more than a decade. Many officers and soldiers have lost their limbs in this war. But the data on traumatic lower limb amputations in Pakistan is sparse. The aim of this study is to prospectively document the epidemiological profile of lower limb military amputees presenting at the largest rehabilitation centre of Pakistan over a three-year period. Materials & methods  A prospective three-year survey was conducted at the Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Pakistan. One hundred twenty-three consecutive patients with lower limb amputations were enrolled in the survey. The demographic data, etiology, associated injuries, complications profile, and type of prosthesis provided were documented. The data analysis was done using the statistical analysis tool SPSS V 20 (IBM®,NY, USA).  Results  All patients were male. Most had traumatic amputation (119), were between 20–40 years (106), with unilateral amputation (115). Mine blast injury was the leading cause in 73 (59.3%) and most (58.5%) were fitted with modular prosthesis. Transtibial amputation was the commonest level (65), followed by transfemoral (30). The time of surgical amputation was not documented in 87% of the patients. Half of the patients (54%) had associated injuries. Seventy-nine patients had at least one complication with phantom pain being the commonest in 25% cases. Conclusions  This is the largest prospective demographic survey of lower limb amputees in Pakistan military to date. Scores of soldiers and civilians in Pakistan have suffered lower limb amputation. The availability of demographic data can improve the trauma and rehabilitation services for better understanding and management of such cases. There is a need to conduct large scale community-based epidemiological surveys to direct future policies and develop amputee rehabilitation services in the public sector. PMID:27186448

  2. Demographics of Lower Limb Amputations in the Pakistan Military: A Single Center, Three-Year Prospective Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Farooq A; Ayaz, Saeed B; Mansoor, Sahibzada N; Qureshi, Ali R; Fahim, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : The Pakistan military has been actively engaged in the war against terror for more than a decade. Many officers and soldiers have lost their limbs in this war. But the data on traumatic lower limb amputations in Pakistan is sparse. The aim of this study is to prospectively document the epidemiological profile of lower limb military amputees presenting at the largest rehabilitation centre of Pakistan over a three-year period. MATERIALS & METHODS : A prospective three-year survey was conducted at the Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Pakistan. One hundred twenty-three consecutive patients with lower limb amputations were enrolled in the survey. The demographic data, etiology, associated injuries, complications profile, and type of prosthesis provided were documented. The data analysis was done using the statistical analysis tool SPSS V 20 (IBM®,NY, USA). RESULTS : All patients were male. Most had traumatic amputation (119), were between 20-40 years (106), with unilateral amputation (115). Mine blast injury was the leading cause in 73 (59.3%) and most (58.5%) were fitted with modular prosthesis. Transtibial amputation was the commonest level (65), followed by transfemoral (30). The time of surgical amputation was not documented in 87% of the patients. Half of the patients (54%) had associated injuries. Seventy-nine patients had at least one complication with phantom pain being the commonest in 25% cases. CONCLUSIONS : This is the largest prospective demographic survey of lower limb amputees in Pakistan military to date. Scores of soldiers and civilians in Pakistan have suffered lower limb amputation. The availability of demographic data can improve the trauma and rehabilitation services for better understanding and management of such cases. There is a need to conduct large scale community-based epidemiological surveys to direct future policies and develop amputee rehabilitation services in the public sector. PMID:27186448

  3. Cardiovascular risk factors among males with war-related bilateral lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriar, S H; Masumi, M; Edjtehadi, F; Soroush, M R; Soveid, M; Mousavi, B

    2009-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the cardiovascular risk factors among 327 Iranian males with bilateral lower limb amputation.The average age at the time of amputation and at the time of the study was 20.6 (SD = 5.4) and 42 years (SD = 6.3), respectively. Below both knees was the most common level of amputation (37.6%). About 95.4% had at least one modifiable risk factor. Prevalence of risk factors included: hyperglycemia 13.1%, systolic hypertension 18.9%, diastolic hypertension 25.6%, abdominal obesity 82.5%, high total cholesterol 36.7%, low HDL 25.9%, high LDL 24.7%, high triglycerides 32.1%, and smoking 31.8%. The most common risk factor was abdominal obesity. Prevalence of coronary artery disease was similar to the general Iranian population but prevalence of risk factors was higher significantly. The majority of the cases seem to be susceptible to cardiovascular disease in near future. Some strategies are needed as a primary prevention to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  4. Intermanual Transfer in Training With an Upper-Limb Myoelectric Prosthesis Simulator : A Mechanistic, Randomized, Pretest-Posttest Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romkema, Sietske; Bongers, Raoul M.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Intermanual transfer may improve prosthetic handling and acceptance if used in training soon after an amputation. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine whether intermanual transfer effects can be detected after training with a myoelectric upper-limb prosthesis simulator.

  5. Combined mirror visual and auditory feedback therapy for upper limb phantom pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Kun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Phantom limb sensation and phantom limb pain is a very common issue after amputations. In recent years there has been accumulating data implicating 'mirror visual feedback' or 'mirror therapy' as helpful in the treatment of phantom limb sensation and phantom limb pain. Case presentation We present the case of a 24-year-old Caucasian man, a left upper limb amputee, treated with mirror visual feedback combined with auditory feedback with improved pain relief. Conclusion This case may suggest that auditory feedback might enhance the effectiveness of mirror visual feedback and serve as a valuable addition to the complex multi-sensory processing of body perception in patients who are amputees.

  6. Pain and pain-related interference in adults with lower-limb amputation: Comparison of knee-disarticulation, transtibial, and transfemoral surgical sites

    OpenAIRE

    Behr, James; Friedly, Janna; Molton, Ivan; Morgenroth, David; Jensen, Mark P.; Smith, Douglas G.

    2009-01-01

    Pain and pain-related interference with physical function have not been thoroughly studied in individuals who have undergone knee-disarticulation amputations. The principal aim of this study was to determine whether individuals with knee-disarticulation amputations have worse pain and pain-related interference with physical function than do individuals with transtibial or transfemoral amputations. We analyzed cross-sectional survey data provided by 42 adults with lower-limb amputations. These...

  7. Emulating Upper Limb Disorder for Therapy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Ayuni binti Che Zakaria

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Robotics not only contributes to the invention of rehabilitation devices, it can also enhance the quality of medical education. In recent years, the use of patient simulators and part-task trainers in the medical education field has brought meaningful improvements in the training of medical practitioners. Nevertheless, in the context of therapy training for upper limb disorders, trainee therapists still have to engage directly with the patients to gain experience of the rehabilitation of physical diseases. In this work, a high-fidelity part-task trainer that is able to reproduce the stiffness of spasticity and rigidity symptoms of the upper limb, such as those observed in post-stroke patients and Parkinson’s disease patients, has been developed. Based on the evaluation carried out by two experienced therapists, the developed part-task trainer is able to simulate different patient cases and help trainee therapists gain pre- clinical experience in a safe and intuitive learning environment.

  8. The upper limb of Australopithecus sediba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Steven E; Holliday, Trenton W; Carlson, Kristian J; Jashashvili, Tea; Macias, Marisa E; Mathews, Sandra; Sparling, Tawnee L; Schmid, Peter; de Ruiter, Darryl J; Berger, Lee R

    2013-04-12

    The evolution of the human upper limb involved a change in function from its use for both locomotion and prehension (as in apes) to a predominantly prehensile and manipulative role. Well-preserved forelimb remains of 1.98-million-year-old Australopithecus sediba from Malapa, South Africa, contribute to our understanding of this evolutionary transition. Whereas other aspects of their postcranial anatomy evince mosaic combinations of primitive (australopith-like) and derived (Homo-like) features, the upper limbs (excluding the hand and wrist) of the Malapa hominins are predominantly primitive and suggest the retention of substantial climbing and suspensory ability. The use of the forelimb primarily for prehension and manipulation appears to arise later, likely with the emergence of Homo erectus. PMID:23580536

  9. Interhemispheric sensorimotor integration; an upper limb phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Kathy L; Jaspers, Ellen; Keller, Martin; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    Somatosensory information from the limbs reaches the contralateral Primary Sensory Cortex (S1) with a delay of 23ms for finger, and 40ms for leg (somatosensory N20/N40). Upon arrival of this input in the cortex, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) are momentarily inhibited. This phenomenon is called 'short latency afferent inhibition (SAI)' and can be used as a tool for investigating sensorimotor interactions in the brain. We used SAI to investigate the process of sensorimotor integration in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the stimulated limb. We hypothesized that ipsilateral SAI would occur with a delay following the onset of contralateral SAI, to allow for transcallosal conduction of the signal. We electrically stimulated the limb either contralateral or ipsilateral to the hemisphere receiving TMS, using a range of different interstimulus intervals (ISI). We tested the First Dorsal Interosseous (FDI) muscle in the hand, and Tibialis Anterior (TA) in the lower leg, in three separate experiments. Ipsilateral SAI was elicited in the upper limb (FDI) at all ISIs that were greater than N20+18ms (all pintegration. PMID:27425210

  10. Can external lateral stabilization reduce the energy cost of walking in persons with a lower limb amputation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJmker, T.; Noten, S.; Lamoth, C. J.; Beek, P. J.; van der Woude, L. H. V.; Houdijk, H.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether impaired balance control is partly responsible for the increased energy cost of walking in persons with a lower limb amputation (LLA). Previous studies used external lateral stabilization to evaluate the energy cost for balance control; this caused a decr

  11. Ectopic major transplantation for salvage of upper and lower extremity amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazerani Shahram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Ectopic tissue transplanta- tion is not a new idea. Godina and his colleagues pioneered this method in the 1980s. This method is a last resort method of preserving an amputated body part, which consists of banking the amputated segment in an ectopic area and re- turning it to its native place at a later date. In this article we present our experience with this demanding procedure. Methods: Debridement was the mainstay of this procedure. The stump and amputated part are carefully de- brided and the stump was either closed primarily or covered by a flap. The amputated part was transplanted to one of several banking sites in the body and at a later date it will be transferred to its native site in an elective setting. Results: Seven patients meeting the set criteria for ectopic transplantation were enrolled in this study. The over- all success rate was about 70%, lower than expected but these are cases of severe crush injury. Although the func- tional recovery of these patients are very low, all of the successful cases except one could find a job as a janitor or light manual worker. No patient could return to his previous job. Conclusion: Ectopic transplantation of body parts is an accepted method of treatment of severely crushed ex- tremity or finger injuries. In our country an amputee has very little chance of finding a job instead a disabled person can. In addition in Iran cultures amputation is seen as pu- nishment of either the God or the society, so it is not well accepted and many patients persist on saving the limb even with no functional recovery. None of our successful cases could return to his previous occupation but almost all of them could find a job as janitors or light manual workers. Key words: Replantation; Transplantation; Extremities; Amputation, traumatic

  12. Upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - To study the frequency and risk factors for upper limb lymphedema through a series of patients treated for breast cancer. Patients and methods. - It is a retrospective study about 222 patients treated for breast cancer during the period between February 1993 and December 2003 in Sfax hospitals. Average age was 51 years (27-92 years). Tumour was T2 in 59% of cases. All patients had surgery with lymph node dissection. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the most frequent histological type (80% of cases), with predominant SBR II grade (62%). The mean number of removed lymph nodes was 12 (2-33). Axillary lymph node metastasis was detected in 124 patients. Radiotherapy was delivered in 200 patients, including axillary irradiation in 30 cases. The mean follow-up was 68 months (12-120). Results. - Lymphedema appeared in 23% of cases (51 patients), 14 months after surgery (mean period). Lymphedema affected the brachium in 17% of cases, the forearm in 12% of cases and all upper limb in 71% of cases. Fifty percent of patients had rehabilitation. However, improvement of lymphedema was obtained in 18 cases. Parameters predicting lymphedema were studied. Significant risk factors were obesity, infection and a number of removed lymph node above 10. The type of surgery, axillary irradiation and shoulder abduction deficit did not predict lymphedema. Conclusion. - Lymphedema of the arm is a frequent consequence of breast cancer treatment. The risk of lymphedema is correlated with obesity, infection and a number of removed lymph node above 10. (authors)

  13. Motor cortex representation of the upper-limb in individuals born without a hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen T Reilly

    Full Text Available The body schema is an action-related representation of the body that arises from activity in a network of multiple brain areas. While it was initially thought that the body schema developed with experience, the existence of phantom limbs in individuals born without a limb (amelics led to the suggestion that it was innate. The problem with this idea, however, is that the vast majority of amelics do not report the presence of a phantom limb. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS applied over the primary motor cortex (M1 of traumatic amputees can evoke movement sensations in the phantom, suggesting that traumatic amputation does not delete movement representations of the missing hand. Given this, we asked whether the absence of a phantom limb in the majority of amelics means that the motor cortex does not contain a cortical representation of the missing limb, or whether it is present but has been deactivated by the lack of sensorimotor experience. In four upper-limb amelic subjects we directly stimulated the arm/hand region of M1 to see 1 whether we could evoke phantom sensations, and 2 whether muscle representations in the two cortices were organised asymmetrically. TMS applied over the motor cortex contralateral to the missing limb evoked contractions in stump muscles but did not evoke phantom movement sensations. The location and extent of muscle maps varied between hemispheres but did not reveal any systematic asymmetries. In contrast, forearm muscle thresholds were always higher for the missing limb side. We suggest that phantom movement sensations reported by some upper limb amelics are mostly driven by vision and not by the persistence of motor commands to the missing limb within the sensorimotor cortex. We propose that prewired movement representations of a limb need the experience of movement to be expressed within the primary motor cortex.

  14. The Use of the 6-Min Walk Test as a Proxy for the Assessment of Energy Expenditure during Gait in Individuals with Lower-Limb Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kark, Laurena; McIntosh, Andrew S.B; Simmons, Annea

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine, and compare, the utility of the 6-min walk test (6 MWT) and self-selected walking speed over 15 m as proxies for the assessment of energy expenditure during gait in individuals with lower-limb amputation. Patients with unilateral, transfemoral amputation (n = 6) and patients with unilateral,…

  15. Radiogrammetric analysis of upper limb long bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zlatan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiogrammetry is radiological method of bone mineral density quantification. Besides giving an insight in diagnostics and evolution of metabolic bone disorders (osteoporosis, osteomalacia, osteitis deformans- Paget's disease, it can also explain some specific biomechanical characteristics of bone structures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the significance and perspectives of radiogrammetry as a scientific model for further inquiry of skeletal system. The work demonstrates mathematical parameters (Ca-Cortical area, CI- Cortical index, GI- Garn's index, ESI- Exton Smith's index of upper limb long bones (humerus, radius, ulna. Two standard radiological projections of bones were taken: antero-posterior (AP and latero-lateral (LL. Correlation with metacarpal and lower limb bones was also performed. The value of the cortical area of humerus is significantly higher comparing with the two other examined bones (Xmean 2,2443 cm2, p < 0.01. Radial bone has the highest values of the relational mathematical parameters, which implicates its higher strength by volumetric unit concerning humerus and ulna. Despite the development of contemporary osteometric procedures (ultrasound densitometry, dual X-ray absorptiometry, digital X-ray radiogrammetry, the classical radiogrammetry sustains its important role in diagnostics of metabolic bone disorders and it can be successfully used for biomechanical inquiry of skeletal system.

  16. Autobiographical memory and psychological distress in a sample of upper-limb amputees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Luchetti

    Full Text Available Amputation is a traumatic and life-changing event that can take years to adjust to. The present study (a examines psychological adjustment in a specific trauma-exposed sample, (b compares the phenomenology (e.g., vividness of amputation-related memories to more recent memories, and (c tests whether memory phenomenology is associated with psychological distress. A total of 24 upper-limb amputees recalled two autobiographical memories--an amputation-related memory and a recent memory--and rated the phenomenological qualities of each memory, including Vividness, Coherence, Emotional Intensity, Visual Perspective, and Distancing. Participants also completed self-rated measures of psychological distress and personality. The sample was generally well adjusted; participants showed no relevant symptoms of anxiety and depression, and personality scores were similar to the general population. There were no significant differences in phenomenology between the two types of memories recalled. Even though amputation-related memories were, on average, almost 20 years older than the recent memories, they retained their intense phenomenology. Despite the intensity of the memory, none of the phenomenological dimensions were associated with psychological distress. It is worth to further define which dimensions of phenomenology characterize memories of traumatic events, and their association with individuals' psychological reactions.

  17. Autobiographical memory and psychological distress in a sample of upper-limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Martina; Montebarocci, Ornella; Rossi, Nicolino; Cutti, Andrea G; Sutin, Angelina R

    2014-01-01

    Amputation is a traumatic and life-changing event that can take years to adjust to. The present study (a) examines psychological adjustment in a specific trauma-exposed sample, (b) compares the phenomenology (e.g., vividness) of amputation-related memories to more recent memories, and (c) tests whether memory phenomenology is associated with psychological distress. A total of 24 upper-limb amputees recalled two autobiographical memories--an amputation-related memory and a recent memory--and rated the phenomenological qualities of each memory, including Vividness, Coherence, Emotional Intensity, Visual Perspective, and Distancing. Participants also completed self-rated measures of psychological distress and personality. The sample was generally well adjusted; participants showed no relevant symptoms of anxiety and depression, and personality scores were similar to the general population. There were no significant differences in phenomenology between the two types of memories recalled. Even though amputation-related memories were, on average, almost 20 years older than the recent memories, they retained their intense phenomenology. Despite the intensity of the memory, none of the phenomenological dimensions were associated with psychological distress. It is worth to further define which dimensions of phenomenology characterize memories of traumatic events, and their association with individuals' psychological reactions. PMID:24924483

  18. Autobiographical memory and psychological distress in a sample of upper-limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Martina; Montebarocci, Ornella; Rossi, Nicolino; Cutti, Andrea G; Sutin, Angelina R

    2014-01-01

    Amputation is a traumatic and life-changing event that can take years to adjust to. The present study (a) examines psychological adjustment in a specific trauma-exposed sample, (b) compares the phenomenology (e.g., vividness) of amputation-related memories to more recent memories, and (c) tests whether memory phenomenology is associated with psychological distress. A total of 24 upper-limb amputees recalled two autobiographical memories--an amputation-related memory and a recent memory--and rated the phenomenological qualities of each memory, including Vividness, Coherence, Emotional Intensity, Visual Perspective, and Distancing. Participants also completed self-rated measures of psychological distress and personality. The sample was generally well adjusted; participants showed no relevant symptoms of anxiety and depression, and personality scores were similar to the general population. There were no significant differences in phenomenology between the two types of memories recalled. Even though amputation-related memories were, on average, almost 20 years older than the recent memories, they retained their intense phenomenology. Despite the intensity of the memory, none of the phenomenological dimensions were associated with psychological distress. It is worth to further define which dimensions of phenomenology characterize memories of traumatic events, and their association with individuals' psychological reactions.

  19. Ectopic major transplantation for salvage of upper and lower extremity amputations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahram Nazerani; Hamed Vaseghi; Saied Hesami; Tina Nazerani

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Ectopic tissue transplantation is not a new idea.Godina and his colleagues pioneered this method in the 1980s.This method is a last resort method of preserving an amputated body part,which consists of banking the amputated segment in an ectopic area and returning it to its native place at a later date.In this article we present our experience with this demanding procedure.Methods:Debridement was the mainstay of this procedure.The stump and amputated part are carefully debrided and the stump was either closed primarily or covered by a flap.The amputated part was transplanted to one of several banking sites in the body and at a later date it will be transferred to its native site in an elective setting.Results:Seven patients meeting the set criteria for ectopic transplantation were enrolled in this study.The overall success rate was about 70%,lower than expected but these are cases of severe crush injury.Although the functional recovery of these patients are very low,all of the successful cases except one could find a job as a janitor or light manual worker.No patient could return to his previous job.Conclusion:Ectopic transplantation of body parts is an accepted method of treatment of severely crushed extremity or finger injuries.In our country an amputee has very little chance of finding a job instead a disabled person can.In addition in Iran cultures amputation is seen as punishment of either the God or the society,so it is not well accepted and many patients persist on saving the limb even with no functional recovery.None of our successful cases could return to his previous occupation but almost all of them could find a job as janitors or light manual workers.

  20. Assessment of quality of life in patients after lower limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Lower extremity amputation is a surgical procedure resulting in important anatomical, functional, psychological, and social consequences that can influence the quality of life of these patients. The aim of this research was to compare the quality of life of patients with lower extremity amputation and people without amputation taking into account gender differences as well as the amputation level. Material and Methods. The study was designed as a cross-sectional study which included 56 subjects. The patients from the experimental group underwent prosthetic rehabilitation treatment at the Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Clinical Centre of Vojvodina. The experimental group included 28 patients (21 male, 7 female with lower extremity amputation, their average age being 65.36±13.64. The control group consisted of 28 age and gender matching subjects without amputation. Research ANd Development (RAND 36 - Item Health Survey 1.0 (SF - 36 was used to measure the quality of life. Results. The results showed that patients with lower extremity amputation scored lower than the control group on all SF- 36 variables (p0.05. Seventeen (61% patients were with transfemoral, and 11 (39% with transtibial level of amputation. The patients with transtibial amputations scored higher on physical functioning and general health status variables (p<0.05. Conclusion. The patients with lower extremity amputations have numerous limitations compared to the control group, regardless of gender, while the patients with lower level of amputation have a higher level of physical functioning.

  1. Lower limb amputations: differences between the genders and long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, M; Saarinen, J; Suominen, V P; Virkkunen, J; Salenius, J

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate possible differences between genders in amputation incidence, revascularization activity before and survival after amputation. This population-based study was carried out in a well-defined geographical area, where all vascular surgical consultations and reconstructions are performed in one university hospital. All amputations performed in the region during 1990 - 1999 were identified from the hospital central registers. According to patient's identity codes, the Cause of Death Registry of Statistics Finland provided death data. Amputation data were cross-linked with the local vascular registry using identity codes. Women were found to be 8 years older than men (p < 0.0001). Major amputations comprised 73.4% in males and 77.7% in females. The age-standardized amputation incidence among males was 338 and among females 226 (per 10(6) inhabitants/year) (p < 0.001). The most prominent difference was seen in amputations due to trauma, where the age-adjusted major amputation incidence was over three-fold among males compared to females. The proportion of patients who had undergone vascular procedure before amputation was 23% in both genders. Median survival after amputation was 943 days in men and 716 in women (p = 0.01). When the higher age of women was considered, there was no significant difference between the genders. Survival was poorer among diabetics in both genders and the difference was significant in males. The amputation incidence was found to be higher in men compared to women in all etiologic subgroups except malignant tumour. Almost one in 4 patients had undergone vascular surgical reconstruction before amputation in both genders. There was no significant difference between the genders in survival after amputation. Subjects with diabetes had a poorer survival after major amputation than those without diabetes. PMID:17979013

  2. A prospective study of the importance of life goal characteristics and goal adjustment capacities in longer term psychosocial adjustment to lower limb amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Coffey, Laura; Gallagher, Pamela; Desmond, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the life goal characteristics and goal adjustment capacities of persons with lower limb amputation on admission to rehabilitation, and to examine their efficacy as predictors of psychosocial outcomes 6 months post-discharge. Design: Prospective, descriptive. Setting: Two specialist inpatient rehabilitation facilities in Ireland. Subjects: A consecutive sample of 64 patients with lower limb amputation. Main measures: On admission to rehabilitation, life goal c...

  3. Estimation of sex from the upper limb measurements of Sudanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Altayeb Abdalla

    2013-11-01

    Sex estimation is the first biological attribute needed for personal identification from mutilated and amputated limbs or body parts in medical-legal autopsies. Populations have different sizes and proportions that affect the anthropometric assessment of sex. Relatively few published works assess the accuracy of sex estimation from soft tissue measurements of upper limb parts, except for the hand and its components, but these studies involve a limited range of global populations. The current study aimed to assess the degree of sexual dimorphism in upper limb measurements and the accuracy of using these measurements for sex estimation in a contemporary adult Sudanese population. The upper arm length, ulnar length, wrist breadth, hand length, and hand breadth of 240 right-handed Sudanese subjects (120 males and 120 females) aged between 25 and 30 years were measured by international anthropometric standards. Demarking points, sexual dimorphism indices and discriminant functions were developed from 200 subjects (100 males and 100 females) who composed the study group. All variables were sexually dimorphic. The ulnar length, wrist breadth and hand breadth significantly contributed to sex estimation. Forearm dimensions showed a higher accuracy for sex estimation than hand dimensions. Cross-validated sex classification accuracy ranged between 78.5% and 89.5%. The reliability of these standards was assessed in a test sample of 20 males and 20 females, and the results showed accuracy between 77.5% and 90%. This study provides new forensic standards for sex estimation from upper limb measurements of Sudanese adults. PMID:24237816

  4. Stump problems in traumatic amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, M; Tokuhiro, A; Takechi, H

    1993-12-01

    Stump problems in amputations resulting from employment related injuries were investigated in 397 cases in the Chugoku and Shikoku districts of Japan between 1987 and 1991. Ninety-seven patients (24%) had stump problems which interfered the prosthetic fitting. Stump problems of the upper extremity were seen in about 9% (17 amputees), two thirds of which were skin troubles. Stump problems of the lower extremity were seen in about 37% (80 amputees). Certain complaints were associated with specific methods of amputation; abnormal keratosis in Syme's amputation, equinus deformity in Chopart's amputation, reduced muscle power in above the knee (A/K) amputation and joint dysfunction in below the knee (B/K) amputation. Adequate prosthetic fitting was achieved by the modification of the socket and alignment in almost all amputees with stump problems. In only two cases, Chopart's amputation required subsequent Syme's amputation due to equinus deformity with abnormal keratosis. In almost every case, stump problems are avoidable by means of surgeons' deliberate evaluation of the affected limb and adequate choice of the amputation level.

  5. Upper limb function in adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Bartels (Bart); R.F. Pangalila; M.P. Bergen (Michael); N.A.M. Cobben (Nicolle); H.J. Stam (Henk); M.E. Roebroeck (Marij)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTo determine upper limb function and associated factors in adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: A sample of 70 men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (age range 20-43 years). Methods: General motor function and, in particular, upper limb distal

  6. What are the key conditions associated with lower limb amputations in a major Australian teaching hospital?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzarini Peter A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lower extremity amputation results in significant global morbidity and mortality. Australia appears to have a paucity of studies investigating lower extremity amputation. The primary aim of this retrospective study was to investigate key conditions associated with lower extremity amputations in an Australian population. Secondary objectives were to determine the influence of age and sex on lower extremity amputations, and the reliability of hospital coded amputations. Methods Lower extremity amputation cases performed at the Princess Alexandra Hospital (Brisbane, Australia between July 2006 and June 2007 were identified through the relevant hospital discharge dataset (n = 197. All eligible clinical records were interrogated for age, sex, key condition associated with amputation, amputation site, first ever amputation status and the accuracy of the original hospital coding. Exclusion criteria included records unavailable for audit and cases where the key condition was unable to be determined. Chi-squared, t-tests, ANOVA and post hoc tests were used to determine differences between groups. Kappa statistics were used to measure reliability between coded and audited amputations. A minimum significance level of p  Results One hundred and eighty-six cases were eligible and audited. Overall 69% were male, 56% were first amputations, 54% were major amputations, and mean age was 62 ± 16 years. Key conditions associated included type 2 diabetes (53%, peripheral arterial disease (non-diabetes (18%, trauma (8%, type 1 diabetes (7% and malignant tumours (5%. Differences in ages at amputation were associated with trauma 36 ± 10 years, type 1 diabetes 52 ± 12 years and type 2 diabetes 67 ± 10 years (p  Conclusions This study, the first in over 20 years to report on all levels of lower extremity amputations in Australia, found that people undergoing amputation are more likely to be older, male and have

  7. Feasibility of the Nintendo WiiFit™ for improving walking in individuals with a lower limb amputation

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    Bita Imam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of the Nintendo WiiFit™ as an adjunct to usual therapy in individuals with a lower limb amputation. Methods: The study was a Multiple Baseline (AB Single Subject Research Design. Subjects were ≥19 years old, had their first unilateral transtibial or transfemoral amputation  ≤12 months ago, and were participating in prosthetic training. WiiFit training was provided for 30 min, 5 times a week, for a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 6 weeks in addition to usual therapy. Feasibility indicators were safety, post-intervention fatigue and pain levels, adherence, and subject’s acceptability of the program as measured by the Short Feedback Questionnaire–modified (SFQ-M. The primary clinical outcome was walking capacity assessed by the 2 Minute Walk Test (2MWT. The secondary clinical outcomes were the Short Physical Performance Battery, L-test, and Activities-Specific Balance Confidence. Results: Subjects (4 transtibial; 2 transfemoral had a median age of 48.5 years (range = 45–59 years. No adverse events associated with the intervention occurred. Median pain and fatigue levels were 1.3 (range = 0.5–3.5 and 3.1 (range = 1.4–4.1, respectively. Median adherence was 80%. Subjects found the WiiFit enjoyable and acceptable (median SFQ-M = 35. Five subjects showed statistical improvement on the 2MWT and four on the secondary outcomes (p < 0.05. Conclusion: The WiiFit intervention was found to be feasible in individuals with unilateral lower limb amputation. This research provides the foundation for future clinical research investigating the use of the WiiFit as a viable adjunctive therapy to improve outcomes in individuals with unilateral lower limb amputation who are participating in prosthetic training.

  8. The role of amputation as an outcome measure in cellular therapy for critical limb ischemia: implications for clinical trial design

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    Pearl Gregory J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells have been ascribed an important therapeutic role in No-Option Critical limb Ischemia (NO-CLI. One primary endpoint for evaluating NO-CLI therapy is major amputation (AMP, which is usually combined with mortality for AMP-free survival (AFS. Only a trial which is double blinded can eliminate physician and patient bias as to the timing and reason for AMP. We examined factors influencing AMP in a prospective double-blinded pilot RCT (2:1 therapy to control of 48 patients treated with site of service obtained bone marrow cells (BMAC as well as a systematic review of the literature. Methods Cells were injected intramuscularly in the CLI limbs as either BMAC or placebo (peripheral blood. Six month AMP rates were compared between the two arms. Both patient and treating team were blinded of the assignment in follow-up examinations. A search of the literature identified 9 NO-CLI trials, the control arms of which were used to determine 6 month AMP rates and the influence of tissue loss. Results Fifteen amputations occurred during the 6 month period, 86.7% of these during the first 4 months. One amputation occurred in a Rutherford 4 patient. The difference in amputation rate between patients with rest pain (5.6% and those with tissue loss (46.7%, irrespective of treatment group, was significant (p = 0.0029. In patients with tissue loss, treatment with BMAC demonstrated a lower amputation rate than placebo (39.1% vs. 71.4%, p = 0.1337. The Kaplan-Meier time to amputation was longer in the BMAC group than in the placebo group (p = 0.067. Projecting these results to a pivotal trial, a bootstrap simulation model showed significant difference in AFS between BMAC and placebo with a power of 95% for a sample size of 210 patients. Meta-analysis of the literature confirmed a difference in amputation rate between patients with tissue loss and rest pain. Conclusions BMAC shows promise in improving AMP

  9. Post-amputation pain is associated with the recall of an impaired body representation in dreams-results from a nation-wide survey on limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Schredl, Michael; Diers, Martin; Reinhard, Iris; Foell, Jens; Trojan, Jörg; Fuchs, Xaver; Flor, Herta

    2015-01-01

    The experience of post-amputation pain such as phantom limb pain (PLP) and residual limb pain (RLP), is a common consequence of limb amputation, and its presence has negative effects on a person's well-being. The continuity hypothesis of dreams suggests that the presence of such aversive experiences in the waking state should be reflected in dream content, with the recalled body representation reflecting a cognitive proxy of negative impact. In the present study, we epidemiologically assessed the presence of post-amputation pain and other amputation-related information as well as recalled body representation in dreams in a sample of 3,234 unilateral limb amputees. Data on the site and time of amputation, residual limb length, prosthesis use, lifetime prevalence of mental disorders, presence of post-amputation pain, and presence of non-painful phantom phenomena were included in logistic regression analyses using recalled body representation in dreams (impaired, intact, no memory) as dependent variable. The effects of age, sex, and frequency of dream recall were controlled for. About 22% of the subjects indicated that they were not able to remember their body representation in dreams, another 24% of the amputees recalled themselves as always intact, and only a minority of less than 3% recalled themselves as always impaired. Almost 35% of the amputees dreamed of themselves in a mixed fashion. We found that lower-limb amputation as well as the presence of PLP and RLP was positively associated with the recall of an impaired body representation in dreams. The presence of non-painful phantom phenomena, however, had no influence. These results complement previous findings and indicate complex interactions of physical body appearance and mental body representation, probably modulated by distress in the waking state. The findings are discussed against the background of alterations in cognitive processes after amputation and hypotheses suggesting an innate body model.

  10. The Floating Upper Limb: Multiple Injuries Involving Ipsilateral, Proximal, Humeral, Supracondylar, and Distal Radial Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaan, Qazi; Bashir, Adil; Zahoor, Adnan; Mokhdomi, Taseem A.

    2016-01-01

    Floating arm injury represents a common yet complicated injury of the childhood severely associated with limb deformation and even morbidity, if not precisely addressed and credibly operated. Here, we report a rare floating upper limb case of a 9-year-old boy with multiple injuries of ipsilateral proximal humeral, supracondylar and distal radial limb. This is the first report to document such a combined floating elbow and floating arm injury in the same limb. In this report, we discuss the surgical procedures used and recovery of the patient monitored to ascertain the effectiveness of the method in limb reorganisation. PMID:27583121

  11. Phantom pain and phantom sensations in upper limb amputees : an epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, CM; Dijkstra, PU; Geertzen, JHB; Elzinga, A; van der Schans, CP

    2000-01-01

    Phantom pain in subjects with an amputated limb is a well-known problem. However, estimates of the prevalence of phantom pain differ considerably in the literature. Various factors associated with phantom pain have been described including pain before the amputation, gender, dominance, and time elap

  12. Abnormal access of axial vibrotactile input to deafferented somatosensory cortex in human upper limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kew, J J; Halligan, P W; Marshall, J C; Passingham, R E; Rothwell, J C; Ridding, M C; Marsden, C D; Brooks, D J

    1997-05-01

    We studied two human subjects with total deafferentation of one upper limb secondary to traumatic multiple cervical root avulsions. Both subjects developed a phantom limb and underwent elective amputation of the paralyzed, deafferentated limb. Psychophysical study revealed in each subject an area of skin in the pectoral region ipsilateral to the amputation where vibrotactile stimulation (VS) elicited referred sensations (RS) in the phantom limb. Positron emission tomography was then used to measure regional cerebral blood flow changes during VS of the pectoral region ipsilateral to the amputation with RS and during VS of a homologous part of the pectoral region adjacent to the intact arm without RS. A voxel-based correlation analysis was subsequently used to study functional connectivity. VS of the pectoral region adjacent to the intact arm was associated with activation of the dorsal part of the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in a position consistent with the S1 trunk area. In contrast, VS of the pectoral region ipsilateral to the amputation with RS was associated with activation of the contralateral S1 that extended from the level of the trunk representation ventrally over distances of 20 and 12 mm, respectively, in the two subjects. The area of S1 activated during VS of the digits in a normal control subject was coextensive with the ventral S1 region abnormally activated during VS of the ectopic phantom representation in the two amputees, suggesting that the deafferented digit or hand/arm area had been activated by sensory input from the pectoral region. Correlation analysis showed an abnormal pattern of intrinsic connectivity within the deafferented S1 hand/arm area of both amputees. In one subject, the deafferented S1 was functionally connected with 3 times as many S1 voxels as the normally afferented S1. This abnormal functional connectivity extended in both the rostrocaudal and ventrodorsal dimensions. The results demonstrate that sensory

  13. Number of test trials needed for performance stability and interrater reliability of the one leg stand test in patients with a major non-traumatic lower limb amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Nielsen, Anni Østergaard; Madsen Topp, Ulla;

    2014-01-01

    Balance is beneficial for daily functioning of patients with a lower limb amputation and sometimes assessed by the one-leg stand test (OLST). The aims of the study were to examine (1) the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability, (2) the interrater reliability of the OLST in patie......Balance is beneficial for daily functioning of patients with a lower limb amputation and sometimes assessed by the one-leg stand test (OLST). The aims of the study were to examine (1) the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability, (2) the interrater reliability of the OLST...... in patients with a major non-traumatic lower limb amputation, and (3) to provide a test procedure....

  14. Three-body segment musculoskeletal model of the upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdmanová L.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim is to create a computational three-body segment model of an upper limb of a human body for determination of muscle forces generated to keep a given loaded upper limb position. The model consists of three segments representing arm, forearm, hand and of all major muscles connected to the segments. Muscle origins and insertions determination corresponds to a real anatomy. Muscle behaviour is defined according to the Hill-type muscle model consisting of contractile and viscoelastic element. The upper limb is presented by a system of three rigid bars connected by rotational joints. The whole limb is fixed to the frame in the shoulder joint. A static balance problem is solved by principle of virtual work. The system of equation describing the musculoskeletal system is overdetermined because more muscles than necessary contribute to get the concrete upper limb position. Hence the mathematical problem is solved by an optimization method searching the least energetically-consuming solution. The upper limb computational model is verified by electromyography of the biceps brachii muscle.

  15. Ubiquitous human upper-limb motion estimation using wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Wong, Wai-Choong; Wu, Jian-Kang

    2011-07-01

    Human motion capture technologies have been widely used in a wide spectrum of applications, including interactive game and learning, animation, film special effects, health care, navigation, and so on. The existing human motion capture techniques, which use structured multiple high-resolution cameras in a dedicated studio, are complicated and expensive. With the rapid development of microsensors-on-chip, human motion capture using wearable microsensors has become an active research topic. Because of the agility in movement, upper-limb motion estimation has been regarded as the most difficult problem in human motion capture. In this paper, we take the upper limb as our research subject and propose a novel ubiquitous upper-limb motion estimation algorithm, which concentrates on modeling the relationship between upper-arm movement and forearm movement. A link structure with 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) is proposed to model the human upper-limb skeleton structure. Parameters are defined according to Denavit-Hartenberg convention, forward kinematics equations are derived, and an unscented Kalman filter is deployed to estimate the defined parameters. The experimental results have shown that the proposed upper-limb motion capture and analysis algorithm outperforms other fusion methods and provides accurate results in comparison to the BTS optical motion tracker.

  16. Pattern of injury in those dying from traumatic amputation caused by bomb blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J B; Bowyer, G W; Cooper, G J; Crane, J

    1994-08-01

    Traumatic amputation of limbs caused by bomb blast carries a high risk of mortality. This paper describes 73 amputations in 34 deaths from bomb blast in Northern Ireland. The principal aim was to determine the sites of traumatic amputation to provide a biophysical basis for the development of protective measures. Few amputations were through joints; nearly all were through the bone shafts. The most common site in the tibia was the upper third. The distribution of femoral sites resulting from car bombs differed from that characterizing other types of explosion. For car bombs the principal site of amputation was the upper third; for other types of device it was the lower third. It is concluded that flailing is not a notable contributor to limb avulsion. The pattern of amputation is consistent with direct local pressure loads leading to bone fracture; the amputation itself is a secondary event arising from the flow of combustion products. PMID:7953338

  17. Pattern of injury in those dying from traumatic amputation caused by bomb blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J B; Bowyer, G W; Cooper, G J; Crane, J

    1994-08-01

    Traumatic amputation of limbs caused by bomb blast carries a high risk of mortality. This paper describes 73 amputations in 34 deaths from bomb blast in Northern Ireland. The principal aim was to determine the sites of traumatic amputation to provide a biophysical basis for the development of protective measures. Few amputations were through joints; nearly all were through the bone shafts. The most common site in the tibia was the upper third. The distribution of femoral sites resulting from car bombs differed from that characterizing other types of explosion. For car bombs the principal site of amputation was the upper third; for other types of device it was the lower third. It is concluded that flailing is not a notable contributor to limb avulsion. The pattern of amputation is consistent with direct local pressure loads leading to bone fracture; the amputation itself is a secondary event arising from the flow of combustion products.

  18. Motor cortex changes after amputation are modulated by phantom limb motor control rather than pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffin, Estelle E.; Pascal, Giraux,; Karen, Reilly,;

    retains a residual M1-c activity when amputees perform phantom limb movements (4-5). Except a correlation between phantom limb pain and M1-c expansion of the face (2-3), the relationship between the ability to voluntary move the phantom hand, the level of phantom limb pain, the degree of M1-c...

  19. Lower limb amputation in Northern Netherlands : Unchanged incidence from 1991-1992 to 2003-2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortington, Lauren V.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Postema, Klaas; van Netten, Jaap J.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Investigating population changes gives insight into effectiveness and need for prevention and rehabilitation services. Incidence rates of amputation are highly varied, making it difficult to meaningfully compare rates between studies and regions or to compare changes over time. Study Des

  20. Stellate ganglion blockade for analgesia following upper limb surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, J G

    2012-01-31

    We report the successful use of a stellate ganglion block as part of a multi-modal postoperative analgesic regimen. Four patients scheduled for orthopaedic surgery following upper limb trauma underwent blockade of the stellate ganglion pre-operatively under ultrasound guidance. Patients reported excellent postoperative analgesia, with postoperative VAS pain scores between 0 and 2, and consumption of morphine in the first 24 h ranging from 0 to 14 mg. While these are preliminary findings, and must be confirmed in a clinical trial, they highlight the potential for stellate ganglion blockade to provide analgesia following major upper limb surgery.

  1. Work-related upper limb “overuse” syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    A previous review of historical descriptions and theories about the character and pathogenesis of writer’s cramp and other comparable chronic upper limb “overuse” work-related pain syndromes has indicated that somatic dysfunctions explain symptoms and findings. The first case studies and case...... series suggested that these conditions were caused by pathology affecting the peripheral nerves. The general perception gradually changed, however, with symptoms becoming attributed to central nervous system dysfunction and ultimately to represent a psychiatric condition. Work-related upper limb......” conditions that have occurred sporadically and epidemically, and reviews interpretations from the nineteenth century that relate symptoms to psychogenic conditions....

  2. An assessment of skin preparation in upper limb surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, P J; Healy, C E; Hirpara, K M; Hussey, A J; Potter, S M; Kelly, J L

    2008-08-01

    Postoperative wound infections remain a major source of upper limb morbidity. The effectiveness of peri-operative human upper limb preparation was determined using a clear fluid antiseptic and an iodine-based solution over 60 and 90 seconds. Less area was missed using iodine over both times and increasing clear solution preparation time from 60 to 90 seconds improved coverage. Surgical experience had little outcome relevance and a 90-second preparation time with either solution was insufficient, with fingers being the sites most commonly missed.

  3. Sexual functioning and sexual well-being in people with a limb amputation : a cross-sectional study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Jesse E A; Geertzen, Jan H.; Enzlin, Paul; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Dekker, Rienk

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to: (a) investigate whether, and if so which, sexual problems are present in people with a limb amputation; (b) analyze how they experience their sexuality; and (c) investigate whether sexuality was discussed with them during their rehabilitation process. METHOD: In total,

  4. Sexual functioning and sexual well-being in people with a limb amputation : a cross-sectional study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Jesse E. A.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Enzlin, Paul; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Dekker, Rienk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to: (a) investigate whether, and if so which, sexual problems are present in people with a limb amputation; (b) analyze how they experience their sexuality; and (c) investigate whether sexuality was discussed with them during their rehabilitation process. Method: In total,

  5. How Depressive Levels Are Related to the Adults' Experiences of Lower-Limb Amputation: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senra, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    The current pilot study aims to explore whether different adults' experiences of lower-limb amputation could be associated with different levels of depression. To achieve these study objectives, a convergent parallel mixed methods design was used in a convenience sample of 42 adult amputees (mean age of 61 years; SD = 13.5). All of them had…

  6. Work-Related Upper Limb Disorders: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatka Borisova Stoyneva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the complex interrelationship between physical factors, job stress, lifestyle and genetic factors on symptoms of work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper limbs is demonstrated by a case report and discussion of the literature. A 58 year old woman with long lasting complaints of the upper limbs with increasing intensity and duration, generalisation, combined with skin thickness, Raynaud’s phenomenon, joint disorders, arterial and pulmonary hypertension, metabolic lipid dysfunctions is presented. Occupational history proves continuous duration of service at a job with occupational physical static load with numerous repetitive monotonous systematic motions of fingers and hands as a weaver of Persian rugs followed by work at an automated loom and variable labour activities. Though the complaints dated since the time she was a manual weaver, the manifestations of generalized joint degenerative changes, system sclerosis with Raynaud’s phenomenon with similar upper extremities signs and symptoms discount upper limbs musculoskeletal disorder as caused only or mainly by occupational risk factors. The main principles and criteria for occupational diagnosis of musculoskeletal upper limb disorders and legislative requirements for their reglamentation are discussed.

  7. Effect of amputation level on the stress transferred to the femur by an artificial limb directly attached to the bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, L; Dewar, M; Blunn, G W; Fromme, P

    2013-12-01

    Attachment of an artificial limb directly to the skeleton has a number of potential benefits and the technique has been implemented for several amputation sites. In this paper the transfer of stress from an external, transfemoral prosthesis to the femur during normal walking activity is investigated. The stress distribution in the femur and at the implant-bone interface is calculated using finite element analysis for the 3D geometry and inhomogeneous, anisotropic material properties obtained from a CT scan of a healthy femur. Attachment of the prosthetic leg at three different levels of amputation is considered. Stress concentrations are found at the distal end of the bone and adjacent to the implant tip and stress shielding is observed adjacent to the implant. It is found that the stress distribution in the femur distal to the epiphysis, where the femur geometry is close to cylindrical, can be predicted from a cylindrical finite element model, using the correct choice of bone diameter as measured from a radiograph. Proximal to the lesser trochanter the stress decreases as the femur geometry diverges significantly from a cylinder. The stress concentration at the distal, resected end of the bone is removed when a collared implant is employed. These findings form the basis for appropriate settings of an external fail-safe device to protect the bone from excessive stress in the event of an undue load. PMID:23953406

  8. Effect of amputation level on the stress transferred to the femur by an artificial limb directly attached to the bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, L; Dewar, M; Blunn, G W; Fromme, P

    2013-12-01

    Attachment of an artificial limb directly to the skeleton has a number of potential benefits and the technique has been implemented for several amputation sites. In this paper the transfer of stress from an external, transfemoral prosthesis to the femur during normal walking activity is investigated. The stress distribution in the femur and at the implant-bone interface is calculated using finite element analysis for the 3D geometry and inhomogeneous, anisotropic material properties obtained from a CT scan of a healthy femur. Attachment of the prosthetic leg at three different levels of amputation is considered. Stress concentrations are found at the distal end of the bone and adjacent to the implant tip and stress shielding is observed adjacent to the implant. It is found that the stress distribution in the femur distal to the epiphysis, where the femur geometry is close to cylindrical, can be predicted from a cylindrical finite element model, using the correct choice of bone diameter as measured from a radiograph. Proximal to the lesser trochanter the stress decreases as the femur geometry diverges significantly from a cylinder. The stress concentration at the distal, resected end of the bone is removed when a collared implant is employed. These findings form the basis for appropriate settings of an external fail-safe device to protect the bone from excessive stress in the event of an undue load.

  9. Electromyogram pattern recognition for control of powered upper-limb prostheses: State of the art and challenges for clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Scheme, MSc, PEng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Using electromyogram (EMG signals to control upper-limb prostheses is an important clinical option, offering a person with amputation autonomy of control by contracting residual muscles. The dexterity with which one may control a prosthesis has progressed very little, especially when controlling multiple degrees of freedom. Using pattern recognition to discriminate multiple degrees of freedom has shown great promise in the research literature, but it has yet to transition to a clinically viable option. This article describes the pertinent issues and best practices in EMG pattern recognition, identifies the major challenges in deploying robust control, and advocates research directions that may have an effect in the near future.

  10. A short overview of upper limb rehabilitation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macovei, S.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    As some studies show, the number of people over 65 years old increases constantly, leading to the need of solution to provide services regarding patient mobility. Diseases, accidents and neurologic problems affect hundreds of people every day, causing pain and lost of motor functions. The ability of using the upper limb is indispensable for a human being in everyday activities, making easy tasks like drinking a glass of water a real challenge. We can agree that physiotherapy promotes recovery, but not at an optimal level, due to limited financial and human resources. Hence, the need of robot-assisted rehabilitation emerges. A robot for upper-limb exercises should have a design that can accurately control interaction forces and progressively adapt assistance to the patients’ abilities and also to record the patient's motion and evolution. In this paper a short overview of upper limb rehabilitation devices is presented. Our goal is to find the shortcomings of the current developed devices in terms of utility, ease of use and costs, for future development of a mechatronic system for upper limb rehabilitation.

  11. Diagnostic distribution of non-traumatic upper limb disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lise H; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Hagert, C G;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Upper limb disorders (ULDs) are common, and so are the difficulties in specific diagnoses of these disorders. Prior studies have shed light on the nerves in the diagnostic approach beside disorders related to muscles, tendons and joints (MCDs). OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to compare th...

  12. Stump sensibility in children with upper limb reduction deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinkingh, Marianne; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Maathuis, Karel G. B.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare stump sensibility in children with upper limb reduction deficiency with sensibility of the unaffected arm and hand. In addition, to evaluate the associations between stump sensibility, stump length and activity level. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Children and young

  13. Using virtual reality environment to facilitate training with advanced upper-limb prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, OCS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in upper-limb prosthetic design offer dramatically increased possibilities for powered movement. The DEKA Arm system allows users 10 powered degrees of movement. Learning to control these movements by utilizing a set of motions that, in most instances, differ from those used to obtain the desired action prior to amputation is a challenge for users. In the Department of Veterans Affairs "Study to Optimize the DEKA Arm," we attempted to facilitate motor learning by using a virtual reality environment (VRE program. This VRE program allows users to practice controlling an avatar using the controls designed to operate the DEKA Arm in the real world. In this article, we provide highlights from our experiences implementing VRE in training amputees to use the full DEKA Arm. This article discusses the use of VRE in amputee rehabilitation, describes the VRE system used with the DEKA Arm, describes VRE training, provides qualitative data from a case study of a subject, and provides recommendations for future research and implementation of VRE in amputee rehabilitation. Our experience has led us to believe that training with VRE is particularly valuable for upper-limb amputees who must master a large number of controls and for those amputees who need a structured learning environment because of cognitive deficits.

  14. Prosthetic rehabilitation of the upper limb amputee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard O′Keeffe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of all or part of the arm is a catastrophic event for a patient and a significant challenge to rehabilitation professionals and prosthetic engineers. The large, upper extremity amputee population in India has, historically, been poorly served, with most having no access to support or being provided with ineffective prostheses. In recent years, the arrival of organisations like Otto Bock has made high quality service standards and devices accessible to more amputees. This review attempts to provide surgeons and other medical professionals with an overview of the multidisciplinary, multistage rehabilitation process and the solution options available. With worldwide upper extremity prosthesis rejection rates at significant levels, the review also describes some of the factors which influence the outcome. This is particularly relevant in the Indian context where the service can involve high cost investments. It is the responsibility of all contributing professionals to guide vulnerable patients through the process and try to maximise the benefit that can be obtained within the resources available.

  15. How do sock ply changes affect residual-limb fluid volume in people with transtibial amputation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan E. Sanders, PhD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of sock addition and removal on residual-limb fluid volume in people using prosthetic limbs. We used bioimpedance analysis to measure residual-limb extracellular fluid volume on 28 transtibial amputee subjects during 30 min test sessions. Upon addition of a one-ply polyester sock, residual-limb fluid volume changes ranged from −4.0% to 0.8% (mean −0.9 +/− 1.3% of the initial limb fluid volume. Changes for sock removal ranged from −1.2% to 2.8% (mean 0.5 +/− 0.8%. Subjects who reduced in fluid volume with both addition and removal of a sock and subjects with high positive ratios between the fluid-volume loss upon sock addition and gain upon sock removal (high add/remove [AR] ratios tended to have arterial disease, were obese, and were smokers. Subjects with low positive AR ratios, subjects who increased in fluid volume both with sock addition and removal, and a single subject who increased in fluid volume with sock addition and decreased with sock removal tended to be nonsmokers and either individuals in good health without complications or individuals without arterial problems. Results are relevant for the anticipation of limb volume changes during prosthetic fitting and toward the design of adjustable-socket technologies.

  16. Disorders of Upper Limb Movements in Ataxia-Telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasef G Shaikh

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia is known for cerebellar degeneration, but clinical descriptions of abnormal tone, posture, and movements suggest involvement of the network between cerebellum and basal ganglia. We quantitatively assessed the nature of upper-limb movement disorders in ataxia-telangiectasia. We used a three-axis accelerometer to assess the natural history and severity of abnormal upper-limb movements in 80 ataxia-telangiectasia and 19 healthy subjects. Recordings were made during goal-directed movements of upper limb (kinetic task, while arms were outstretched (postural task, and at rest. Almost all ataxia-telangiectasia subjects (79/80 had abnormal involuntary movements, such as rhythmic oscillations (tremor, slow drifts (dystonia or athetosis, and isolated rapid movements (dystonic jerks or myoclonus. All patients with involuntary movements had both kinetic and postural tremor, while 48 (61% also had resting tremor. The tremor was present in transient episodes lasting several seconds during two-minute recording sessions of all three conditions. Percent time during which episodic tremor was present was greater for postural and kinetic tasks compared to rest. Resting tremor had higher frequency but smaller amplitude than postural and kinetic tremor. Rapid non-rhythmic movements were minimal during rest, but were triggered during sustained arm postures and goal directed arm movements suggesting they are best considered a form of dystonic jerks or action myoclonus. Advancing age did not correlate with the severity of involuntary limb movements. Abnormal upper-limb movements in ataxia-telangiectasia feature classic cerebellar impairment, but also suggest involvement of the network between the cerebellum and basal ganglia.

  17. P300-amplitudes in upper limb amputees with and without phantom limb pain in a visual oddball paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Anke; Diers, Martin; Flor, Herta

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate to what extent cortical hyper-reactivity to visual stimuli is present in upper limb amputees. Five amputees with phantom limb pain (PLP), five amputees without PLP (Non-PLP) and 10 healthy controls (HC) were investigated using a visual oddball paradigm. Two hundred visual stimuli were presented with target stimuli occurring at a probability of 25% and standard stimuli at a probability of 75%. Event-related potentials were recorded from nine scalp positions (F3, F4, Fz, C3, C4, Cz, P3, P4, Pz). The PLP-patients had significantly higher P300-amplitudes to both types of stimuli compared to the non-PLP-patients. The HC were not significantly different from both amputee groups. P300-amplitude to targets at frontal sites in the hemisphere contralateral to the amputation was higher in the PLP patients. P300-latencies to target stimuli differed only at frontal sites with PLP-patients showing significantly longer latencies than non-PLP-patients. To standard stimuli, however, they showed significantly shorter latencies at central and parietal scalp positions. The HC had significantly shorter latencies than both amputee groups. The size of the P300-amplitude was positively correlated with the intensity of PLP. These findings suggest a higher magnitude of non-specific cortical excitability in amputees with PLP and a reduced excitability in amputees without PLP. This extends previous findings of differences in cortical excitability in PLP and non-PLP patients in the sensorimotor domain.

  18. Functional recovery of the paretic upper limb after stroke: who regains hand capacity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Nijland, R.H.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Kwakkel, G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe recovery of upper limb capacity after stroke during inpatient rehabilitation based on the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale (SULCS). DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Inpatient department of a rehabilitation center. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with stroke (N=299) adm

  19. Mobility of people with lower limb amputations : scales and questionnaires: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommers, G.M.; Groothoff, J.W.; Eisma, W.H.

    2001-01-01

    Objective and design: A systematic literature review to compare mobility scales used for lower limb amputees. A literature search was carried out by computerized search of biomedical literature including Medline and Embase. The studies included were published between 1978 and 1998 and including the

  20. Amputation and prosthesis implantation shape body and peripersonal space representations

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Canzoneri; Marilena Marzolla; Amedeo Amoresano; Gennaro Verni; Andrea Serino

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about whether and how multimodal representations of the body (BRs) and of the space around the body (Peripersonal Space, PPS) adapt to amputation and prosthesis implantation. In order to investigate this issue, we tested BR in a group of upper limb amputees by means of a tactile distance perception task and PPS by means of an audio-tactile interaction task. Subjects performed the tasks with stimulation either on the healthy limb or the stump of the amputated limb, while wearin...

  1. Literature Review on Needs of Upper Limb Prosthesis Users

    OpenAIRE

    Cordella, Francesca; Ciancio, Anna Lisa; Sacchetti, Rinaldo; Davalli, Angelo; Cutti, Andrea Giovanni; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Zollo, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    The loss of one hand can significantly affect the level of autonomy and the capability of performing daily living, working and social activities. The current prosthetic solutions contribute in a poor way to overcome these problems due to limitations in the interfaces adopted for controlling the prosthesis and to the lack of force or tactile feedback, thus limiting hand grasp capabilities. This paper presents a literature review on needs analysis of upper limb prosthesis users, and points out ...

  2. Upper-limb activity in adults: Referent values using accelerometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan R. Bailey, MSOT, OTR/L; Catherine E. Lang, PT, PhD

    2013-01-01

    The goal of physical rehabilitation following upper-limb (UL) impairment is functional restoration of the UL for use in daily activities. Because capacity for UL function may not translate into real-world activity, it is important that assessment of real-world UL activity be used in conjunction with clinical measures of capacity. Accelerometry can be used to quantify duration of UL activity outside of the clinic. The purpose of this study was to characterize hours of UL activity and potential...

  3. Unusual Cause of Swelling in the Upper Limb: Kimura Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabilan Chokkappan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kimura disease is a rare chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. The disease typically presents in young Asian males with single or multiple slowly progressing painless subcutaneous lumps in the head and neck region; regional lymphadenopathy is commonly accompanied. The disease is associated with peripheral blood eosinophilia and elevated serum immunoglobulin E levels. This gives an important clinical clue to the diagnosis and implies a possible immune-mediated pathophysiology. Although the disease commonly affects the head and neck region, it may also affect the extremities, axilla, groin, and abdomen. Upper limb involvement in Kimura’s disease is rare and few cases have been reported in the literature. We describe the case of a man who presented with a history of progressive upper limb swelling. He was diagnosed with Kimura’s disease based on concordant clinical, laboratory, radiological, and histopathological grounds. Although rare in the upper limb, the possibility of Kimura’s disease has to be considered in young males presenting with painless swelling in the medial epitrochlear region with compatible imaging appearance, particularly if associated with lymph node enlargement and increased blood eosinophils. Characteristic imaging findings of Kimura’s disease of the upper limb include specific location along the neuro-lymphovascular structures, the absence of necrosis or calcification, mutliple flow voids representing vascular structures, a varying amount of edema of subcutaneous fat plane overlying the lesion; displacement of adjacent muscles; and neurovascular structures without signs of direct invasion. Clinicians should be aware of this distinct entity in order to avoid misdiagnosis and to tailor appropriate management.

  4. The association of gegenhalten in the upper limbs with dyspraxia.

    OpenAIRE

    Tyrrell, P.; Rossor, M

    1988-01-01

    Ten patients with gegenhalten of the upper limb of mixed aetiology were studied, in nine of whom an association with dyspraxia was found. In four of the patients, the rigidity became more pronounced after the instruction to relax, and only one patient showed improvement after this instruction. In these patients, the resistance to movement, evident as gegenhalten, may be a direct consequence of the dyspraxia.

  5. The association of gegenhalten in the upper limbs with dyspraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, P; Rossor, M

    1988-01-01

    Ten patients with gegenhalten of the upper limb of mixed aetiology were studied, in nine of whom an association with dyspraxia was found. In four of the patients, the rigidity became more pronounced after the instruction to relax, and only one patient showed improvement after this instruction. In these patients, the resistance to movement, evident as gegenhalten, may be a direct consequence of the dyspraxia. PMID:3204407

  6. Acupuncture in the Treatment of Upper-Limb Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Cassileth, Barrie R.; Van Zee, Kimberly J.; Yeung, K. Simon; Coleton, Marci I.; Cohen, Sara; Chan, Yi H; Andrew J Vickers; Sjoberg, Daniel D.; Hudis, Clifford A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Current treatments for lymphedema after breast cancer treatment are expensive and require ongoing intervention. Clinical experience and our preliminary published results suggest that acupuncture is safe and potentially useful. This study evaluates the safety and potential efficacy of acupuncture on upper-limb circumference in women with lymphedema. METHODS Women with a clinical diagnosis of breast cancer−related lymphedema (BCRL) for 0.5-5 years and with affected arm circumference ...

  7. ERYSIPELAS OF UPPER LIMB: A COMPLICATION OF BREAST CANCER SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Cireap

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Erysipelas of upper limb is a well-known complication following breast cancer therapy, but few cases are reported in the literature. We undertook a 5-year retrospective study at the Department I of Infectious Diseases. For each patient we recorded the age, past medical history, clinical findings, laboratory parameters, treatment, outcome and recommended prophylaxis. From 145 erysipelas identified, 12 cases were erysipelas of upper limb. All patients had a breast surgery and lymphadectomy. The erysipelas appeared with an average of 5.5 years after cancer treatment. Associated pathology: obesity (5 cases, diabetes (6 cases and thrombophlebitis (1 case. Lymphedema was noticed in 9 patients and the site of involvement was the homolateral upper limb of the treated breast. The diagnosis of erysipelas was essentially clinical. The clinical aspect was an inflammatory plaque with raised edges in 7 cases, blisters, cellulitis and purpura in one case, respectively. The portal of entry was not found in 6 cases. Laboratory parameters: increased leucocytes with predominance of neutrophils (4; normal white count (5 and leucopenia (3; the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fibrinogen elevated in 5 cases; CRP levels elevated in 8 cases. The most commonly used antibiotic was penicillin G intravenous route of administration. The outcome was favorable for all the patients. At discharge, prophylactic treatment was recommended for all the patients. In three of our patient, despite the prophylaxis, recurrences occurred with a frequency of 3-6 episodes in 5 years. All these patients displayed an immune suppressive status with decreased CD4+.

  8. Thoracodorsal artery perforator flap for upper limb reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoracodorsal artery perforator flap (TAP) is a feasible option to reconstruct defects in upper limb where only skin and subcutaneous tissue is required. Methods: This case series was carried out at department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi. A total of 5 patients with upper limb defects were reconstructed with thoracodorsal artery musculocutaneous perforator flaps. Among them, 3 were pedicled and two free TAP flaps. All flaps except one pedicled flap were raised on a single perforator pedicle. Recipient sites were one axilla, two shoulder regions and two hands. The soft tissue defects in the patients had resulted from burns, trauma, wide local excision of synovial sarcoma and surgery for hidradenitis suppurativa. Preoperative hand held Doppler ultrasound was used to locate and mark the perforator. Results: All flaps survived without significant complications. All flaps were hyperemic in the immediate postoperative period. We designed and raised all the five flaps on eccentrically placed perforators. All the raised perforators originated from the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery. The donor sites were closed primarily with linear scars in all cases except one, in which partial closure was accomplished with split thickness skin grafting (STSG). Conclusion: The thoracodorsal artery perforator flap has great potential for reconstructing large, relatively shallow, defects of upper limb because of its suitable skin quality, texture and appropriate thickness, as well as hidden donor site, a reliable pedicle and sparing of muscle unit. (author)

  9. Repetitive training for ameliorating upper limbs spasm of hemiplegic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Zhu; Lin Liu; Weiqun Song

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The main aim of rehabilitation is to ameliorate motor function and use the damaged limbs in the activities of daily living.Several factors are needed in the self-recovery of the patients,and the most important one is to reduce spasm.Some mechanical repetitive movements can affect and change the excitability of motor neurons.OBJECTIVE:To observe the effect of repetitive training on ameliorating spasm of upper limbs of hemiplegic patients.DESIGN:A self-controlled observation before and after training.SETTING:Department of Rehabilitation,Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University.PARTICI PANTS: Seven hemiplegic patients induced by brain injury were selected from the Department of Rehabilitation,Xuanwu Hospital,Capital Medical University from March to June in 2005.Inclusive criteria:①Agreed and able to participate in the 30-minute training of hand function; ②Without disturbance of understanding.The patients with aphasia or apraxia,manifestation of shoulder pain,and severe neurological or mental defects.For the 7 patients,the Rivermead motor assessment(RMA)scores ranged 0-10 points,the Rivermead mobility index(RMI)ranged 1-3,and modified Ashworth scale(MAS)was grade 2-4.Their horizontal extension of shoulder joint was 0°-30°,anteflextion was 0°-50°,internal rotation was 50°-90°,external rotation was 0°-10°:and the elbow joint could extend for 15°-135°.METHODS:The viva 2 serial MOTOmed exerciser(Reck Company,Germany)was used.There were three phases of A-B-A.①The phase A lasted for 1 week.The patient sat on a chair facting to the MOTOmed screen.and did the circumduction of upper limbs forwardly,30 minutes a day and 5 days a week.②The phase B lasted for 3 weeks.The training consisted of forward circumduction of upper limbs for 15 minutes.followed by backward ones for 15 minutes and 5-minute rest.③The training in the phase A was performed again for 2 weeks.The extensions of upper limbs were recorded at phase A,the extension and flexion of

  10. Determinants of Quality of Life in the Caregivers of Iranian War Survivors with Bilateral Lower-Limb Amputation after More than Two Decades

    OpenAIRE

    Zohreh Ganjparvar; Batool Mousavi; Mehdi Masumi; Mohammadreza Soroush; Ali Montazeri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Providing care to a disable relative at home exposes the caregiver to a potentially higher risk of physical and mental problems. We measured health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its determinants among the caregivers of the Iranian survivors of the Iran-Iraq war (1980–1988) with bilateral lower-limb amputation. Methods: Data were collected from 464 individuals comprising war-related bilateral lower-limb amputees (n=232) and their caregivers (n=232) in January 2015 in Shira...

  11. Management of neglected femoral neck fracture in above knee amputated limb: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Umesh Meena; Ramesh Meena; Balaji S; Sahil Gaba

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of an above knee amputee who has sustained a fracture of the femoral neck is a challenging situation for both the orthopedic surgeon and the rehabilitation team.These fractures may be managed acutely either by reduction and internal fixation or by endoprosthetic replacement based on the same criteria as in any other patient with otherwise intact limbs.We present a neglected case treated successfully with valgus osteotomy.We conclude that these fractures should be treated with the same urgency and expertise as similar fractures in non-amputees as long-term survival and good quality of life can be expected.

  12. Management of neglected femoral neck fracture in above knee amputated limb: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Umesh; Meena, Ramesh; S, Balaji; Gaba, Sahil

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of an above knee amputee who has sustained a fracture of the femoral neck is a chal- lenging situation for both the orthopedic surgeon and the rehabilitation team. These fractures may be managed acutely either by reduction and internal fixation or by endoprosthetic replacement based on the same criteria as in any other patient with otherwise intact limbs.We present a neglected case treated successfully with valgus osteotomy. We conclude that these fractures should be treated with the same urgency and expertise as similar fractures in non-amputees as long-term survival and good quality of life can be expected. PMID:26917032

  13. Advances in upper limb stroke rehabilitation: a technology push.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Rui C V; Harwin, William S; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Johnson, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    Strokes affect thousands of people worldwide leaving sufferers with severe disabilities affecting their daily activities. In recent years, new rehabilitation techniques have emerged such as constraint-induced therapy, biofeedback therapy and robot-aided therapy. In particular, robotic techniques allow precise recording of movements and application of forces to the affected limb, making it a valuable tool for motor rehabilitation. In addition, robot-aided therapy can utilise visual cues conveyed on a computer screen to convert repetitive movement practice into an engaging task such as a game. Visual cues can also be used to control the information sent to the patient about exercise performance and to potentially address psychosomatic variables influencing therapy. This paper overviews the current state-of-the-art on upper limb robot-mediated therapy with a focal point on the technical requirements of robotic therapy devices leading to the development of upper limb rehabilitation techniques that facilitate reach-to-touch, fine motor control, whole-arm movements and promote rehabilitation beyond hospital stay. The reviewed literature suggest that while there is evidence supporting the use of this technology to reduce functional impairment, besides the technological push, the challenge ahead lies on provision of effective assessment of outcome and modalities that have a stronger impact transferring functional gains into functional independence.

  14. Tracking upper limbs fatigue by means of electronic dynamometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Max Lima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify useful electronic grip dynamometry parameters to track differences between trained (TR and untrained (UT participants, and between dominant (DO and non-dominant (ND limbs as a consequence of upper limbs muscle fatigue following 10 RM tests of the brachial biceps. This experimental study with transversal design involved 18 young adult males, of whom 9 were untrained and 9 were experienced in resistance training.Isometric grip force was evaluated (30 seconds long previous and after 10RM tests by means of a G200 Model grip dynamometer with precision load cell (Biometrics(r. Significant differences between initial and final measurements were found only for trained participants: Peak force for TR-DO (67.1 vs 55.5 kgf, p = .0277; Raw average for TR-DO (46.96 vs 42.22 kgf, p = .0464, and for TR-ND (40.34 vs 36.13 kgf, p = .0277. Electronic grip dynamometry efficiently identified upper limbs fatigue in trained participants, being raw average measurements the best parameter.

  15. Vascular malformations of the upper limb: a review of 270 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, J; Coombs, C J; Mulliken, J B; Burrows, P E; Pap, S

    1999-09-01

    Vascular malformations of the upper limb were once thought to be impossible to properly diagnose and treat. We reviewed our experience with these malformations of the upper limb in 270 patients seen over a 28-year period. These anomalies were slightly more common in females than males (ratio, 1.5:1.0). The malformations were categorized as either slow flow (venous, n = 125; lymphatic, n = 47; capillary, n = 32; combined, n = 33) or fast flow (arterial, n = 33). Three categories of fast-flow malformations were identified and designated as types A, B, and C. Over 90% of these lesions could be properly diagnosed by their appearance and growth pattern within the first 2 years of life. Additional radiographic studies were used to confirm this diagnosis and to define specific characteristics. Magnetic resonance imaging with and without contrast best demonstrated site, size, flow characteristics, and involvement of contiguous structures for all types of malformations. Algorithms for treatment of both slow-flow and fast-flow anomalies are presented. Two hundred sixty surgical resections were performed in 141 patients, including 24 of 33 fast-flow anomalies. Preoperative angiographic assessment, with magnified views, was an important preoperative adjunct before any well-planned resection of fast-flow arteriovenous malformations. The surgical strategy in all groups was to thoroughly extirpate the malformation, with preservation of nerves, tendons, joints, and uninvolved muscle, and microvascular revascularization and skin replacement as required. Resections were always restricted to well-defined regions and often completed in stages. Symptomatic slow-flow malformations and types A and B fast-flow anomalies were resected without major sequelae. Type C arterial anomalies, diffuse, pulsating lesions with distal vascular steal, and involvement of all tissues, including bone, progressed clinically and resulted in amputation in 10 of 14 patients. The complication rate was 22% for

  16. Review on Upper Limb Continuous Passive Motion Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragazzo Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to a survey on the state of the art of elements and parts for the upper limb rehabilitation. As a matter of fact, the use of technological, and specifically of robotic, devices is entering in the habits of clinical approaches, due to their ability to work efficiently and to be able to obtain, at least, the same rehabilitation results of manual therapy. At the same time, the therapists can change his/her role in rehabilitation activity from a physical contribution to an intellectual/motivational one.

  17. Can external lateral stabilization reduce the energy cost of walking in persons with a lower limb amputation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJmker, T; Noten, S; Lamoth, C J; Beek, P J; van der Woude, L H V; Houdijk, H

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether impaired balance control is partly responsible for the increased energy cost of walking in persons with a lower limb amputation (LLA). Previous studies used external lateral stabilization to evaluate the energy cost for balance control; this caused a decrease in energy cost, with concomitant decreases in mean and variability of step width. Using a similar set-up, we expected larger decreases for LLA than able-bodied controls. Fifteen transtibial amputees (TT), 12 transfemoral amputees (TF), and 15 able-bodied controls (CO) walked with and without external lateral stabilization provided via spring like cords attached to the waist. Effects of this manipulation on energy cost, step parameters, and pelvic motion were evaluated between groups. TT (-5%) and CO (-3%) showed on average a small reduction in energy cost when walking with stabilization, whereas TF exhibited an increase in energy cost (+6.5%) The difference in the effect of stabilization was only significant between TT and TF. Step width, step width variability, and medio-lateral pelvic displacement decreased significantly with stabilization in all groups, especially in TT. Contrary to expectations, external lateral stabilization did not result in a larger decrease in the energy cost of walking for LLA compared to able-bodied controls, suggesting that balance control is not a major factor in the increased cost of walking in LLA. Alternatively, the increased energy cost with stabilization for TF suggests that restraining (medio-lateral) pelvic motion impeded necessary movement adaptations in LLA, and thus negated the postulated beneficial effects of stabilization on the energy cost of walking. PMID:25108643

  18. Study on upper limb rehabilitation system based on surface EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Li, Hailong; Wang, Zhengyu; Meng, Fandong

    2015-01-01

    During the rehabilitation process, it is essential to accurately judge a patient's recovery in a timely manner. A reasonable and matched training program is significant in the development of rehabilitation system. This paper presents a new upper limb rehabilitation training system, which consists of an upper limb rehabilitation training device, a current detection circuit, a motor speed test circuit, a surface EMG (sEMG) sensor, and a dSPACE HIL simulation platform. The real-time output torque of the servo motor is calculated by using the motor's real-time current and speed, in order to monitor the patient's training situation. The signal of sEMG is collected in real time and is processed with root mean square (RMS) to characterize the degree of muscle activation. Based on this rehabilitation system, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) experiments, passive training experiments under different speeds, and active training experiments under different damping are studied. The results show that this new system performs real-time and accurate monitoring of a patient's training situation. It can also assess a patient's recovery through muscle activation. To a certain extent, this system provides a platform for research and development of rehabilitation medical engineering.

  19. Literature Review on Needs of Upper Limb Prosthesis Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordella, Francesca; Ciancio, Anna Lisa; Sacchetti, Rinaldo; Davalli, Angelo; Cutti, Andrea Giovanni; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Zollo, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    The loss of one hand can significantly affect the level of autonomy and the capability of performing daily living, working and social activities. The current prosthetic solutions contribute in a poor way to overcome these problems due to limitations in the interfaces adopted for controlling the prosthesis and to the lack of force or tactile feedback, thus limiting hand grasp capabilities. This paper presents a literature review on needs analysis of upper limb prosthesis users, and points out the main critical aspects of the current prosthetic solutions, in terms of users satisfaction and activities of daily living they would like to perform with the prosthetic device. The ultimate goal is to provide design inputs in the prosthetic field and, contemporary, increase user satisfaction rates and reduce device abandonment. A list of requirements for upper limb prostheses is proposed, grounded on the performed analysis on user needs. It wants to (i) provide guidelines for improving the level of acceptability and usefulness of the prosthesis, by accounting for hand functional and technical aspects; (ii) propose a control architecture of PNS-based prosthetic systems able to satisfy the analyzed user wishes; (iii) provide hints for improving the quality of the methods (e.g., questionnaires) adopted for understanding the user satisfaction with their prostheses. PMID:27242413

  20. A novel myoelectric training device for upper limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingman, Ryan; Pidcoe, Peter

    2014-07-01

    A training system intended for myoelectric prosthetic hands for upper limb amputees was developed to assist in learning myoelectric control schemes and training muscle isolation. The trainer allowed a user to operate a remote controlled car by use of a control scheme commonly used in myoelectric prosthetic hands. The trainer was designed to be easy for therapists to use and more engaging for the user than current methods of signal training. Preliminary testing of the trainer was conducted with eight nonamputee adult volunteers. The results indicated that the trainer could be a useful tool for myoelectric training in upper limb amputees. All subjects' skill with the myoelectric control scheme improved over the course of testing, with the improvements being greater at the beginning of the training period than at the end. Whereas the individual subjects' performance varied greatly at the beginning of the training, the subjects had achieved a more uniform level of performance by the end of the training, approaching the minimum possible values for the assessments.

  1. Impact of deteriorated calcium-phosphate homeostasis on amputation-free survival after endovascular revascularization in patients with critical limb ischemia on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hioki, Hirofumi; Miyashita, Yusuke; Shiraki, Tatsuya; Iida, Osamu; Uematsu, Masaaki; Miura, Takashi; Ebisawa, Souichirou; Ikeda, Uichi

    2016-04-01

    Patients on hemodialysis (HD) have abnormalities of calcium-phosphate (CaP) homeostasis and high CaP product contributes to atherosclerosis pathogenesis and adverse events. Patients on HD with critical limb ischemia (CLI) are at risk for major amputation and death because of advanced systemic atherosclerotic disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CaP product and amputation-free survival (AFS) in CLI after endovascular treatment (EVT). We retrospectively analyzed 221 CLI patients on HD. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, AFS was significantly lower in patients with CaP product ⩾ 55 mg(2)/dL(2) compared to those with CaP product EVT in CLI patients on HD, and can serve for their risk stratification. PMID:26681436

  2. The effects of prism glasses and intensive upper limb exercise on hemineglect, upper limb function, and activities of daily living in stroke patients: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se-Il; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, So-Yeon

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of visual field with prism glasses, and intensive upper limb functional training on reduction of hemineglect and improvement in upper limb function and activities of daily living in three stroke patients with hemineglect. [Subjects] This study included three stroke patients hospitalized in a sanatorium. [Methods] Intervention treatment involving prism glass use for 12 hours and 30 minutes and paretic side upper limb training was conducted 5 days a week for 15 weeks. Three upper limb training tasks (hitting a balloon, passing through a ring, and reading a newspaper) were performed for 10 minutes each session, for a total of 30 minutes. Line by Section, Motor-Free Visual Perception Test-3 (MVPT-3), Manual Function Test (MFT), Box & Block Test (BBT), and Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) were conducted before and after intervention. [Results] Subjects' hemineglect decreased and upper limb function on the paretic side improved after intervention, which enhanced activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Prism glass use and paretic upper limb functional training effectively ameliorated stroke patients' hemineglect and improved upper limb function. Future research should focus on prism glasses that provide a wide visual field for use in patients with different conditions. PMID:26834386

  3. Rhesus monkey is a new model of secondary lymphedema in the upper limb

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Guojun; Xu, Hao; Zhou, Wenhong; Yuan, Xianshun; Yang, Zhe; Yang, Qing; Ding, Feng; Meng, Zhigang; Liang, Weili; Geng, Chong; Gao, Ling; Tian, Xingsong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study is to establish the rhesus monkey model of lymphedema in the upper limbs, and assess the suitability of this model. Methods: An animal model of lymphedema was established by the combined irradiation and surgical techniques in the upper limbs of these rhesus monkeys. Physical examination, high-resolution MR lymphangiography, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and immunohistochemical staining were performed to determine the severity of the edema in the upper limbs of ...

  4. Disuse osteoporosis of the upper limb: assessment of thirty patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell'osso, Giacomo; De Paola, Gaia; Bugelli, Giulia; Pini, Erica; Guido, Giulio

    2013-05-01

    Osteoporosis is a multifactorial skeletal disorder characterized by the decrease of bone mass and the alteration of bone microarchitecture that leads to the increase of fracture risks. Traditionally, osteoporosis has been classified into primary and secondary osteoporosis. Primary osteoporosis refers to osteoporotic conditions which are not related to other chronic illnesses and is usually associated with aging and decreased gonadal function, such as decreased level of estrogen, whereas secondary osteoporosis is the type of osteoporosis caused by other health problems. Disuse is one of the many reasons inducing bone loss and resulting in secondary osteoporosis. The disuse osteoporosis appeared for the first time in the literature in 1974 when Minaire reported some histomorphometric analysis of iliac crest bone biopsies performed after a spinal cord injury. The most common skeleton sites in which disuse osteoporosis can be observed are knees and ankles. THERE ARE THREE CLINICAL SITUATION IN WHICH THIS DISEASE CAN BE OBSERVED: neurological or muscular disease that causes a pathological and prolonged immobilization. The most frequent is caused by a spinal cord injury, long term bed rest or space flight that causes the immobilization linked to changes in mechanical environment and experimental immobilizations in healthy subjects. Physical exercise is essential for increasing or maintaining bone mass and strength. In our study we wondered if the disuse of the upper limbs of a certain entity, lasting for a long time, can cause a decrease in BMD quantifiable with a densitometric evaluation of the distal radius and with an evaluation of the humeral cortical index such as to define a real osteoporosis from disuse. We analyzed 30 female patients without secondary osteoporosis older than 60 years: everyone underwent to vit D evaluation, densitometric exams of spine, hip and distal radius, Constant score and femoral and humeral cortical index evaluation. We observed that the

  5. Transcutaneous oximetry measurement: normal values for the upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Consistent with the Committee on Publication Ethics guidelines, we the above authors are initiating the retraction of our paper: Young DA, Blake DF, Brown LH: Transcutaneous oximetry measurement: normal values for the upper limb. Diving Hyperb Med. 2012;42(4):208-213. We wish to make the following statement: "The authors voluntarily retract this article after discovering a critical error associated with the instrumentation used in the study, namely the fitting of incorrect sensor membranes on the electrodes of the transcutaneous oximetry device used in the study. This resulted in transcutaneous oxygen tension (PtcO₂) measurements that were consistently lower than those that would have been recorded with the correct electrode membranes in place. We recently confirmed this by comparing the two membrane types once we discovered the error. We are in the process of replicating our work using the correct PtcO₂ specific membranes." PMID:27044465

  6. ADAPTIVE DEVICES IN YOUNG PEOPLE WITH UPPER LIMB REDUCTION DEFICIENCIES : USE AND SATISFACTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golea-Vasluian, Ecaterina; van Wijk, Iris; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Reinders - Messelink, Heelen; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate use of, satisfaction with, and social adjustment with adaptive devices compared with prostheses in young people with upper limb reduction deficiencies. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 218 young people with upper limb reduction deficiencies (age range 2-20 years) and their pa

  7. Restlessness in right upper limb as sole presentation of restless legs syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Gupta; Vivekananda Lahan; Deepak Goel

    2013-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) rarely affects the upper limb during the initial course of disease. We present a patient who complained of symptoms suggesting RLS in the right upper limb as the sole manifestation of illness. Bilateral cervical ribs and depression were co-incidental findings. Patient responded well to dopaminergic therapy.

  8. An upper limb robot model of children limb for cerebral palsy neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Yagna; Johnson, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Robot therapy has emerged in the last few decades as a tool to help patients with neurological injuries relearn motor tasks and improve their quality of life. The main goal of this study was to develop a simple model of the human arm for children affected with cerebral palsy (CP). The Simulink based model presented here shows a comparison for children with and without disabilities (ages 6-15) with normal and reduced range of motion in the upper limb. The model incorporates kinematic and dynamic considerations required for activities of daily living. The simulation was conducted using Matlab/Simulink and will eventually be integrated with a robotic counterpart to develop a physical robot that will provide assistance in activities of daily life (ADLs) to children with CP while also aiming to improve motor recovery. PMID:23366294

  9. Temporal adaptations in generic and population-specific quality of life and falls efficacy in men with recent lower-limb amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleveland T. Barnett, PhD

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the longitudinal changes in generic health-related quality of life (QOL, prosthesis-related QOL, falls efficacy, and walking speed in men with lower-limb amputations up to 6 months following discharge from rehabilitation. Seven male unilateral transtibial amputees completed the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire, and the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale at 1, 3, and 6 months postdischarge from rehabilitation. Walking speed was also recorded to objectively assess participants’ mobility. Health-related QOL measures displayed increases, resulting in large effect sizes though not reaching statistical significance. Prosthesis-related QOL measures indicated that scales relating to the participants’ prostheses improved and the support of significant others was the most positively scored variable. Walking speed increased by 0.12 m/s, although it was not significantly related to indices of QOL or falls efficacy. Falls efficacy did not improve significantly during the study period, although it was strongly related to QOL (p < 0.05. These results provide a novel insight into how QOL and falls efficacy develop in people with lower-limb amputations, alongside changes in mobility, after discharge from rehabilitation. Further improvements in physical health following discharge may be required to elicit subsequent increases in overall QOL and concurrent improvements in falls efficacy.

  10. [Upper extremity arterial diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, F

    2007-02-01

    Compared to lower limb arterial diseases, upper limb arterial diseases look rare, heterogeneous with various etiologies and a rather vague clinical picture, but with a negligible risk of amputation. Almost all types of arterial diseases can be present in the upper limb, but the anatomical and hemodynamic conditions particular to the upper limb often confuse the issue. Thus, atherosclerosis affects mainly the subclavian artery in its proximal segment where the potential of collateral pathway is high making the symptomatic forms not very frequent whereas the prevalence of subclavian artery stenosis or occlusion is relatively high. The clinical examination and the etiologies are discussed according to the clinical, anatomical and hemodynamic context.

  11. The scope of amputations in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solagberu, B A

    2001-09-01

    In developing countries, amputations have been performed due to trauma and infections; whereas in developed counties, trauma, diabetes and peripheral vascular diseases are the usual indications. Current practice in Nigeria suggests a change of relative indications, hence, this study. A five-year (July 1994 to June 1999) review of amputation records from the medical records, operating theatre, wards and physiotherapy department was carried out retrospectively. Amputation types, age, sex and indications were analysed. Fifty-eight amputations were performed in 56 patients (47 males, nine females, M: F = 5.2 : 1, age range 7-70 years, mean 33.3 +/- S.D 18.2). There were 42 lower and 16 upper limbs. Trauma accounted for 48.3%; followed by diabetes (29.3%), tumours (12.1%), infections (8.6%) and one indeterminate cause (1.7%). There was bias for sex, age and type of extremity as trauma was the commonest indication in male patients aged 30 years and below (and in the upper limb) whereas diabetes predominated in female patients above 30 years (and in the lower limb). Infection, as an indication for amputation, has now become a rear guard indication. Diabetes, previously uncommon, now appears in the forefront. These findings call for early detection and aggressive management of diabetic foot lesions.

  12. Limb Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the Residual Limb A prosthesis is an artificial device that replaces a missing body part. A limb may be amputated or missing because of a blood vessel disorder (such as atherosclerosis or damage due to ...

  13. [The use of occupational therapy in upper limb amputees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscato, T A; Orlandini, D

    2010-01-01

    Since pre-history until modern times, the ever more refined use of the hand has been fundamental to the progress of mankind. The list of functions of this incredible part of the body would fill several pages and show its fundamental importance in all our actions; in fact, there is very little that humans do that does not involve the use of the hands. The hand offers points for unlimited dissertation and is the executive organ par excellence, carrying out directly or participating in almost all our actions; it is an organ for communication and an instrument of well-being as well as being the main site of one of the five senses: touch. On this background, attention will be focused on the importance that the hand plays in daily life and, particularly, on the difficulties inevitably faced by people who are forced to live without a hand, even if replaced by an orthopaedic prosthesis. This is the sense of occupational therapy in the context of upper limb amputees. PMID:21438258

  14. Upper-limb activity in adults: Referent values using accelerometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan R. Bailey, MSOT, OTR/L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of physical rehabilitation following upper-limb (UL impairment is functional restoration of the UL for use in daily activities. Because capacity for UL function may not translate into real-world activity, it is important that assessment of real-world UL activity be used in conjunction with clinical measures of capacity. Accelerometry can be used to quantify duration of UL activity outside of the clinic. The purpose of this study was to characterize hours of UL activity and potential modifying factors of UL activity (sedentary activity, cognitive impairment, depressive symptomatology, additive effects of comorbidities, cohabitation status, and age. Seventy-four community-dwelling adults wore accelerometers on bilateral wrists for 25 h and provided information on modifying factors. Mean time of dominant UL activity was 9.1 +/– 1.9 h, and the ratio of activity between the nondominant and dominant ULs was 0.95 +/– 0.06 h. Decreased hours of dominant UL activity was associated with increased time spent in sedentary activity. No other factors were associated with hours of dominant UL activity. These data can be used to help clinicians establish outcome goals for patients given preimpairment level of sedentary activity and to track progress during rehabilitation of the ULs.

  15. Robot-Aided Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Based on Motor Imagery EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoguo Xu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. In this paper, a novel robot‐assisted rehabilitation system based on motor imagery electroencephalography (EEG is developed for regular training of neurological rehabilitation for upper limb stroke patients. Firstly, three‐dimensional animation was used to guide the patient image the upper limb movement and EEG signals were acquired by EEG amplifier. Secondly, eigenvectors were extracted by harmonic wavelet transform (HWT and linear discriminant analysis (LDA classifier was utilized to classify the pattern of the left and right upper limb motor imagery EEG signals. Finally, PC triggered the upper limb rehabilitation robot to perform motor therapy and gave the virtual feedback. Using this robot‐assisted upper limb rehabilitation system, the patientʹs EEG of upper limb movement imagination is translated to control rehabilitation robot directly. Consequently, the proposed rehabilitation system can fully explore the patientʹs motivation and attention and directly facilitate upper limb post‐stroke rehabilitation therapy. Experimental results on unimpaired participants were presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the rehabilitation system. Combining robot‐assisted training with motor imagery‐ based BCI will make future rehabilitation therapy more effective. Clinical testing is still required for further proving this assumption.

  16. Asymmetry in volume between dominant and nondominant upper limbs in young tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Ducher, Gaële; Brosseau, Olivier; Hautier, Christophe

    2008-08-01

    This study aimed at demonstrating the asymmetry in volume between the dominant and nondominant upper limbs in tennis players, controlled for maturity status. Upper limb volumes on both sides were calculated in 72 tennis players and 84 control subjects, using the truncated cone method. The participants' maturity status was determined using the predicted age at peak height velocity (PHV). The results showed significant larger side-to-side asymmetry in volume in tennis groups than in control groups. These findings suggested that, even before PHV, specific-sport adaptations occurred in the dominant upper limb in tennis players.

  17. Impairment of complex upper limb motor function in de novo Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsen, Mirthe M; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Wolters, Erik Ch; Beek, Peter J; Berendse, Henk W

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate complex upper limb motor function in newly diagnosed, untreated Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Four different unimanual upper limb motor tasks were applied to 13 newly diagnosed, untreated PD patients and 13 age- and sex-matched controls. In a handwriting task, PD patients had significantly reduced sentence length and writing velocity, and decreasing letter height in the course of writing. Furthermore, PD patients performed an aiming task slower with than without target, and showed increased transposition in a pointing task. The results of this study extend previous observations of impaired complex upper limb movements to newly diagnosed, untreated PD patients. PMID:17913560

  18. FLAP TRANSFERS IN UPPER LIMB RECONSTRUCTION AFTER SEVERE TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pieptu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Hand and upper limb traumatic injuries are common presenting pathology in the emergency department. Extensive trauma patients approach is standardized and internationally accepted guidelines are followed. The care for the traumatic injury is secondary to the patient’s general status stabilization. After debridement, lesions inventory is made and priority is established according to their gravity. Flap surgery is a ubiquitous strategy in soft tissue reconstruction. Extensive soft tissue defects, especially over exposed bones, joints, vessels and nerves, need immediate coverage with well-vascularized tissues. Besides the obvious reason for saving critical anatomical structure, is the only way to maximize the chances for functional recovery. One-stage reconstruction, even for complex defects, is possible due to flaps versatility. Composite tissue transfer, including two three or more types of tissues, can successfully address combined bone, muscle, vessels, nerves or skin loss. The best example is the subscapular system, which offers no less than 5 different tissues and wide combinations of flaps. Even if the procedure per se involves large human, technical and financial resources, on a long term it was proved to be cost-effective, in reducing number of operations, hospital stay and rehabilitation time. Muscle flaps share first place in soft tissue reconstruction with the fasciocutaneous flaps. Yet, in functional reconstruction or in combined defects in need for composite flaps, nothing can beat the muscle flaps. In our hands, muscles flaps and the omentum are the workhorse for soft tissue and/or combined defects reconstruction. Pedicled latissimus dorsi can cover tissue defects from shoulder down to the elbow, but also reconstruct the function of shoulder muscles or totally or partially biceps or triceps loss, with minimal or no donor-site functional deficit. Whenever defects are more distal, free flap transfers are needed for optimal

  19. Upper limb impairments associated with spasticity in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirbagheri Mehdi M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While upper-extremity movement in individuals with neurological disorders such as stroke and spinal cord injury (SCI has been studied for many years, the effects of spasticity on arm movement have been poorly quantified. The present study is designed to characterize the nature of impaired arm movements associated with spasticity in these two clinical populations. By comparing impaired voluntary movements between these two groups, we will gain a greater understanding of the effects of the type of spasticity on these movements and, potentially a better understanding of the underlying impairment mechanisms. Methods We characterized the kinematics and kinetics of rapid arm movement in SCI and neurologically intact subjects and in both the paretic and non-paretic limbs in stroke subjects. The kinematics of rapid elbow extension over the entire range of motion were quantified by measuring movement trajectory and its derivatives; i.e. movement velocity and acceleration. The kinetics were quantified by measuring maximum isometric voluntary contractions of elbow flexors and extensors. The movement smoothness was estimated using two different computational techniques. Results Most kinematic and kinetic and movement smoothness parameters changed significantly in paretic as compared to normal arms in stroke subjects (p Conclusion The findings suggest that although the cause and location of injury are different in spastic stroke and SCI subjects, the impairments in arm voluntary movement were similar in the two spastic groups. Our results also suggest that the non-paretic arm in stroke subjects was not distinguishable from the normal, and might therefore be used as an appropriate control for studying movement of the paretic arm.

  20. Feedforward control strategies of subjects with transradial amputation in planar reaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Metzger, MBE

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The rate of upper-limb amputations is increasing, and the rejection rate of prosthetic devices remains high. People with upper-limb amputation do not fully incorporate prosthetic devices into their activities of daily living. By understanding the reaching behaviors of prosthesis users, researchers can alter prosthetic devices and develop training protocols to improve the acceptance of prosthetic limbs. By observing the reaching characteristics of the nondisabled arms of people with amputation, we can begin to understand how the brain alters its motor commands after amputation. We asked subjects to perform rapid reaching movements to two targets with and without visual feedback. Subjects performed the tasks with both their prosthetic and nondisabled arms. We calculated endpoint error, trajectory error, and variability and compared them with those of nondisabled control subjects. We found no significant abnormalities in the prosthetic limb. However, we found an abnormal leftward trajectory error (in right arms in the nondisabled arm of prosthetic users in the vision condition. In the no-vision condition, the nondisabled arm displayed abnormal leftward endpoint errors and abnormally higher endpoint variability. In the vision condition, peak velocity was lower and movement duration was longer in both arms of subjects with amputation. These abnormalities may reflect the cortical reorganization associated with limb loss.

  1. A robot hand testbed designed for enhancing embodiment and functional neurorehabilitation of body schema in subjects with upper limb impairment or loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall B. Hellman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many upper limb amputees experience an incessant, post-amputation phantom limb pain and report that their missing limbs feel paralyzed in an uncomfortable posture. One hypothesis is that efferent commands no longer generate expected afferent signals, such as proprioceptive feedback from changes in limb configuration, and that the mismatch of motor commands and visual feedback is interpreted as pain. Non-invasive therapeutic techniques for treating phantom limb pain, such as mirror visual feedback (MVF, rely on visualizations of postural changes. Advances in neural interfaces for artificial sensory feedback now make it possible to combine MVF with a high-tech rubber hand illusion, in which subjects develop a sense of embodiment with a fake hand when subjected to congruent visual and somatosensory feedback. We discuss clinical benefits that could arise from the confluence of known concepts such as MVF and the rubber hand illusion, and new technologies such as neural interfaces for sensory feedback and highly sensorized robot hand testbeds, such as the BairClaw presented here. Our multi-articulating, anthropomorphic robot testbed can be used to study proprioceptive and tactile sensory stimuli during physical finger-object interactions. Conceived for artificial grasp, manipulation, and haptic exploration, the BairClaw could also be used for future studies on the neurorehabilitation of somatosensory disorders due to upper limb impairment or loss. A remote actuation system enables the modular control of tendon-driven hands. The artificial proprioception system enables direct measurement of joint angles and tendon tensions while temperature, vibration, and skin deformation are provided by a multimodal tactile sensor. The provision of multimodal sensory feedback that is spatiotemporally consistent with commanded actions could lead to benefits such as reduced phantom limb pain, and increased prosthesis use due to improved functionality and reduced

  2. A robot hand testbed designed for enhancing embodiment and functional neurorehabilitation of body schema in subjects with upper limb impairment or loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Randall B; Chang, Eric; Tanner, Justin; Helms Tillery, Stephen I; Santos, Veronica J

    2015-01-01

    Many upper limb amputees experience an incessant, post-amputation "phantom limb pain" and report that their missing limbs feel paralyzed in an uncomfortable posture. One hypothesis is that efferent commands no longer generate expected afferent signals, such as proprioceptive feedback from changes in limb configuration, and that the mismatch of motor commands and visual feedback is interpreted as pain. Non-invasive therapeutic techniques for treating phantom limb pain, such as mirror visual feedback (MVF), rely on visualizations of postural changes. Advances in neural interfaces for artificial sensory feedback now make it possible to combine MVF with a high-tech "rubber hand" illusion, in which subjects develop a sense of embodiment with a fake hand when subjected to congruent visual and somatosensory feedback. We discuss clinical benefits that could arise from the confluence of known concepts such as MVF and the rubber hand illusion, and new technologies such as neural interfaces for sensory feedback and highly sensorized robot hand testbeds, such as the "BairClaw" presented here. Our multi-articulating, anthropomorphic robot testbed can be used to study proprioceptive and tactile sensory stimuli during physical finger-object interactions. Conceived for artificial grasp, manipulation, and haptic exploration, the BairClaw could also be used for future studies on the neurorehabilitation of somatosensory disorders due to upper limb impairment or loss. A remote actuation system enables the modular control of tendon-driven hands. The artificial proprioception system enables direct measurement of joint angles and tendon tensions while temperature, vibration, and skin deformation are provided by a multimodal tactile sensor. The provision of multimodal sensory feedback that is spatiotemporally consistent with commanded actions could lead to benefits such as reduced phantom limb pain, and increased prosthesis use due to improved functionality and reduced cognitive burden

  3. A robot hand testbed designed for enhancing embodiment and functional neurorehabilitation of body schema in subjects with upper limb impairment or loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Randall B; Chang, Eric; Tanner, Justin; Helms Tillery, Stephen I; Santos, Veronica J

    2015-01-01

    Many upper limb amputees experience an incessant, post-amputation "phantom limb pain" and report that their missing limbs feel paralyzed in an uncomfortable posture. One hypothesis is that efferent commands no longer generate expected afferent signals, such as proprioceptive feedback from changes in limb configuration, and that the mismatch of motor commands and visual feedback is interpreted as pain. Non-invasive therapeutic techniques for treating phantom limb pain, such as mirror visual feedback (MVF), rely on visualizations of postural changes. Advances in neural interfaces for artificial sensory feedback now make it possible to combine MVF with a high-tech "rubber hand" illusion, in which subjects develop a sense of embodiment with a fake hand when subjected to congruent visual and somatosensory feedback. We discuss clinical benefits that could arise from the confluence of known concepts such as MVF and the rubber hand illusion, and new technologies such as neural interfaces for sensory feedback and highly sensorized robot hand testbeds, such as the "BairClaw" presented here. Our multi-articulating, anthropomorphic robot testbed can be used to study proprioceptive and tactile sensory stimuli during physical finger-object interactions. Conceived for artificial grasp, manipulation, and haptic exploration, the BairClaw could also be used for future studies on the neurorehabilitation of somatosensory disorders due to upper limb impairment or loss. A remote actuation system enables the modular control of tendon-driven hands. The artificial proprioception system enables direct measurement of joint angles and tendon tensions while temperature, vibration, and skin deformation are provided by a multimodal tactile sensor. The provision of multimodal sensory feedback that is spatiotemporally consistent with commanded actions could lead to benefits such as reduced phantom limb pain, and increased prosthesis use due to improved functionality and reduced cognitive burden.

  4. A review of nerve conduction studies in cases of suspected compression neuropathies of the upper limb.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neligan, A

    2010-01-01

    Entrapment neuropathies, particularly those affecting upper limbs, are common reasons for referral for nerve conduction studies (NCS). However, concordance between clinical findings and NCS findings, especially in patients being considered for intervention including decompressive surgery, has not been assessed.

  5. Associations between biopsychosocial factors and chronic upper limb pain among slaughterhouse workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Brandt, Mikkel;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of factors associated with chronic pain is necessary for preventive strategies. The present study investigates biopsychosocial differences, with specific focus on rate of force development (RFD) and work ability, between workers with and without chronic upper limb pain...

  6. Assessing upper limb function in nonambulant SMA patients: development of a new module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Elena; Bianco, Flaviana; Martinelli, Diego; Glanzman, Allan M; Messina, Sonia; De Sanctis, Roberto; Main, Marion; Eagle, Michelle; Florence, Julaine; Krosschell, Kristin; Vasco, Gessica; Pelliccioni, Marco; Lombardo, Marilena; Pane, Marika; Finkel, Richard; Muntoni, Francesco; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2011-06-01

    We report the development of a module specifically designed for assessing upper limb function in nonambulant SMA patients, including young children and those with severe contractures. The application of the module to a preschool cohort of 40 children (age 30-48 months) showed that all the items could be completed by 30 months. The module was also used in 45 nonambulant SMA patients (age 30 months to 27 years). Their scores were more variable than in the preschool cohort, ranging from 0 to 18. The magnitude of scores was not related to age (r=-0.19). The upper limb scores had a good correlation with the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale, r=0.75, but the upper limb function did not always strictly follow the overall gross motor function. These findings suggest that even some of the very weak nonambulant children possess upper limb skills that can be measured.

  7. Distal amputations for the diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Minor amputations in diabetic patients with foot complications have been well studied in the literature but controversy still remains as to what constitutes successful or non-successful limb salvage. In addition, there is a lack of consensus on the definition of a minor or distal amputation and a major or proximal amputation for the diabetic population. In this article, the authors review the existing literature to evaluate the efficacy of minor amputations in this selected group of patients in terms of diabetic limb salvage and also propose several definitions regarding diabetic foot amputations.

  8. Research, design and development project Myoelectric Prosthesis of Upper Limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Research Design and Development Project was developed of a myoelectric prosthesis for a pediatric patient presenting congenital amputation of the left forearm below the elbow. A multidisciplinary work-team was formed for this goal, in order to solve the several (/various) aspects regarding this project (mechanical, ergonomics, electronics, physical). The prosthesis as an electromechanical device was divided in several blocks, trying to achieve a focused development for each stage, acording to requisites. A mechanical prototype of the prothesis was designed and built along with the circuitry needed for EMG aquisition, control logic and drivers. Having acomplished the previuos stages, the project is now dealing with the definitions of the interface between the prosthesis and the patient, with promising perspectives

  9. The effects of rotation and positional change of stump tissues upon morphogenesis of the regenerating axolotl limb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlson, Bruce M.

    1972-01-01

    Rotation of a skin cuff 180° around the proximodistal axis of the upper arm in the axolotl results in the formation of multiple regenerates in about 80° of cases after amputation of the limb through the rotated skin. Rotation of the dermis or the flexor and extensor muscles folowed by amputation pro

  10. Perioperative nursing of imb salvage of patients with near limb amputation%濒临截肢损毁伤保肢围术期护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙琳琳; 于吉文

    2015-01-01

    目的:探究濒临截肢损毁伤保肢手术患者术前、术后护理方法。方法选取近几年于本院就诊的保肢手术患者,对其采取心理护理、疼痛护理等各项护理措施,并观察最终护理效果。结果对濒临截肢损毁伤保肢手术患者采取护理措施后,患者的心理状态明显改善,术后恢复较快,未出现任何护理事故。结论濒临截肢损毁伤保肢手术患者不仅应重视身体方面的护理,也应注重精神上的护理,同时注重提升护理技巧、总结护理经验。%Objective To explore nursing methods before and after operation in limb sal-vage patients who were closed to amputation.Methods The patients with limb salvage operation in our hospital in recent years were chosen.And nursing measures such as psychological nursing and pain nursing were taken and nursing results were observed.Results After nursing,the mental sta-tus of patients had improved.Besides,the patients had a good recovery and no nursing accident oc-curred.Conclusion The patients with limb salvage should focus on both body nursing and the mental nursing.It is very important for the nurses to improve nursing skills and summarize nursing experience.

  11. Thermographic Patterns of the Upper and Lower Limbs: Baseline Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Gatt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To collect normative baseline data and identify any significant differences between hand and foot thermographic distribution patterns in a healthy adult population. Design. A single-centre, randomized, prospective study. Methods. Thermographic data was acquired using a FLIR camera for the data acquisition of both plantar and dorsal aspects of the feet, volar aspects of the hands, and anterior aspects of the lower limbs under controlled climate conditions. Results. There is general symmetry in skin temperature between the same regions in contralateral limbs, in terms of both magnitude and pattern. There was also minimal intersubject temperature variation with a consistent temperature pattern in toes and fingers. The thumb is the warmest digit with the temperature falling gradually between the 2nd and the 5th fingers. The big toe and the 5th toe are the warmest digits with the 2nd to the 4th toes being cooler. Conclusion. Measurement of skin temperature of the limbs using a thermal camera is feasible and reproducible. Temperature patterns in fingers and toes are consistent with similar temperatures in contralateral limbs in healthy subjects. This study provides the basis for further research to assess the clinical usefulness of thermography in the diagnosis of vascular insufficiency.

  12. Thermographic Patterns of the Upper and Lower Limbs: Baseline Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, Kevin; Camilleri, Kenneth P.; De Raffaele, Clifford; Mizzi, Stephen; Cristina, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To collect normative baseline data and identify any significant differences between hand and foot thermographic distribution patterns in a healthy adult population. Design. A single-centre, randomized, prospective study. Methods. Thermographic data was acquired using a FLIR camera for the data acquisition of both plantar and dorsal aspects of the feet, volar aspects of the hands, and anterior aspects of the lower limbs under controlled climate conditions. Results. There is general symmetry in skin temperature between the same regions in contralateral limbs, in terms of both magnitude and pattern. There was also minimal intersubject temperature variation with a consistent temperature pattern in toes and fingers. The thumb is the warmest digit with the temperature falling gradually between the 2nd and the 5th fingers. The big toe and the 5th toe are the warmest digits with the 2nd to the 4th toes being cooler. Conclusion. Measurement of skin temperature of the limbs using a thermal camera is feasible and reproducible. Temperature patterns in fingers and toes are consistent with similar temperatures in contralateral limbs in healthy subjects. This study provides the basis for further research to assess the clinical usefulness of thermography in the diagnosis of vascular insufficiency. PMID:25648145

  13. Multisession, noninvasive closed-loop neuroprosthetic control of grasping by upper limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agashe, H A; Paek, A Y; Contreras-Vidal, J L

    2016-01-01

    Upper limb amputation results in a severe reduction in the quality of life of affected individuals due to their inability to easily perform activities of daily living. Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that translate grasping intent from the brain's neural activity into prosthetic control may increase the level of natural control currently available in myoelectric prostheses. Current BMI techniques demonstrate accurate arm position and single degree-of-freedom grasp control but are invasive and require daily recalibration. In this study we tested if transradial amputees (A1 and A2) could control grasp preshaping in a prosthetic device using a noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG)-based closed-loop BMI system. Participants attempted to grasp presented objects by controlling two grasping synergies, in 12 sessions performed over 5 weeks. Prior to closed-loop control, the first six sessions included a decoder calibration phase using action observation by the participants; thereafter, the decoder was fixed to examine neuroprosthetic performance in the absence of decoder recalibration. Ability of participants to control the prosthetic was measured by the success rate of grasping; ie, the percentage of trials within a session in which presented objects were successfully grasped. Participant A1 maintained a steady success rate (63±3%) across sessions (significantly above chance [41±5%] for 11 sessions). Participant A2, who was under the influence of pharmacological treatment for depression, hormone imbalance, pain management (for phantom pain as well as shoulder joint inflammation), and drug dependence, achieved a success rate of 32±2% across sessions (significantly above chance [27±5%] in only two sessions). EEG signal quality was stable across sessions, but the decoders created during the first six sessions showed variation, indicating EEG features relevant to decoding at a smaller timescale (100ms) may not be stable. Overall, our results show that (a) an EEG

  14. Dynamic Stability of Superior vs. Inferior Body Segments in Individuals with Transtibial Amputation Walking in Destabilizing Environments✰

    OpenAIRE

    Beurskens, Rainer; Wilken, Jason M.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Interestingly, young and highly active people with lower limb amputation appear to maintain a similar trunk and upper body stability during walking as able bodied individuals. Understanding the mechanisms underlying how this stability is achieved after lower leg amputation is important to improve training regimens for improving walking function in these patients. This study quantified how superior (i.e., head, trunk, and pelvis) and inferior (i.e., thigh, shank, and feet) segments of the body...

  15. Upper limb posture estimation in robotic and virtual reality-based rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Camilo; Ardanza, Aitor; Molina-Rueda, F; Cuesta-Gómez, A; Unzueta, Luis; Epelde, Gorka; Ruiz, Oscar E; De Mauro, Alessandro; Florez, Julian

    2014-01-01

    New motor rehabilitation therapies include virtual reality (VR) and robotic technologies. In limb rehabilitation, limb posture is required to (1) provide a limb realistic representation in VR games and (2) assess the patient improvement. When exoskeleton devices are used in the therapy, the measurements of their joint angles cannot be directly used to represent the posture of the patient limb, since the human and exoskeleton kinematic models differ. In response to this shortcoming, we propose a method to estimate the posture of the human limb attached to the exoskeleton. We use the exoskeleton joint angles measurements and the constraints of the exoskeleton on the limb to estimate the human limb joints angles. This paper presents (a) the mathematical formulation and solution to the problem, (b) the implementation of the proposed solution on a commercial exoskeleton system for the upper limb rehabilitation, (c) its integration into a rehabilitation VR game platform, and (d) the quantitative assessment of the method during elbow and wrist analytic training. Results show that this method properly estimates the limb posture to (i) animate avatars that represent the patient in VR games and (ii) obtain kinematic data for the patient assessment during elbow and wrist analytic rehabilitation.

  16. Upper Limb Posture Estimation in Robotic and Virtual Reality-Based Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Cortés

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New motor rehabilitation therapies include virtual reality (VR and robotic technologies. In limb rehabilitation, limb posture is required to (1 provide a limb realistic representation in VR games and (2 assess the patient improvement. When exoskeleton devices are used in the therapy, the measurements of their joint angles cannot be directly used to represent the posture of the patient limb, since the human and exoskeleton kinematic models differ. In response to this shortcoming, we propose a method to estimate the posture of the human limb attached to the exoskeleton. We use the exoskeleton joint angles measurements and the constraints of the exoskeleton on the limb to estimate the human limb joints angles. This paper presents (a the mathematical formulation and solution to the problem, (b the implementation of the proposed solution on a commercial exoskeleton system for the upper limb rehabilitation, (c its integration into a rehabilitation VR game platform, and (d the quantitative assessment of the method during elbow and wrist analytic training. Results show that this method properly estimates the limb posture to (i animate avatars that represent the patient in VR games and (ii obtain kinematic data for the patient assessment during elbow and wrist analytic rehabilitation.

  17. Wearable sensors for 3D upper limb motion modeling and ubiquitous estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Human motion capture technologies are widely used in interactive game and learning, animation, film special effects, health care, and navigation. Because of the agility, upper limb motion estimation is the most difficult problem in human motion capture. Traditional methods always assume that the movements of upper arm and forearm are independent and then estimate their movements separately; therefore, the estimated motion are always with serious distortion. In this paper, we propose a novel ubiquitous upper...

  18. Design and preliminary evaluation of an exoskeleton for upper limb resistance training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzong-Ming; Chen, Dar-Zen

    2012-06-01

    Resistance training is a popular form of exercise recommended by national health organizations, such as the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Heart Association (AHA). This form of training is available for most populations. A compact design of upper limb exoskeleton mechanism for homebased resistance training using a spring-loaded upper limb exoskeleton with a three degree-of-freedom shoulder joint and a one degree-of-freedom elbow joint allows a patient or a healthy individual to move the upper limb with multiple joints in different planes. It can continuously increase the resistance by adjusting the spring length to train additional muscle groups and reduce the number of potential injuries to upper limb joints caused by the mass moment of inertia of the training equipment. The aim of this research is to perform a preliminary evaluation of the designed function by adopting an appropriate motion analysis system and experimental design to verify our prototype of the exoskeleton and determine the optimal configuration of the spring-loaded upper limb exoskeleton.

  19. A Systematic Review of Bilateral Upper Limb Training Devices for Poststroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. (Lex E. Q. van Delden

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In stroke rehabilitation, bilateral upper limb training is gaining ground. As a result, a growing number of mechanical and robotic bilateral upper limb training devices have been proposed. Objective. To provide an overview and qualitative evaluation of the clinical applicability of bilateral upper limb training devices. Methods. Potentially relevant literature was searched in the PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases from 1990 onwards. Devices were categorized as mechanical or robotic (according to the PubMed MeSH term of robotics. Results. In total, 6 mechanical and 14 robotic bilateral upper limb training devices were evaluated in terms of mechanical and electromechanical characteristics, supported movement patterns, targeted part and active involvement of the upper limb, training protocols, outcomes of clinical trials, and commercial availability. Conclusion. Initial clinical results are not yet of such caliber that the devices in question and the concepts on which they are based are firmly established. However, the clinical outcomes do not rule out the possibility that the concept of bilateral training and the accompanied devices may provide a useful extension of currently available forms of therapy. To actually demonstrate their (surplus value, more research with adequate experimental, dose-matched designs, and sufficient statistical power are required.

  20. A systematic review of bilateral upper limb training devices for poststroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Delden, A Lex E Q; Peper, C Lieke E; Kwakkel, Gert; Beek, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In stroke rehabilitation, bilateral upper limb training is gaining ground. As a result, a growing number of mechanical and robotic bilateral upper limb training devices have been proposed. Objective. To provide an overview and qualitative evaluation of the clinical applicability of bilateral upper limb training devices. Methods. Potentially relevant literature was searched in the PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases from 1990 onwards. Devices were categorized as mechanical or robotic (according to the PubMed MeSH term of robotics). Results. In total, 6 mechanical and 14 robotic bilateral upper limb training devices were evaluated in terms of mechanical and electromechanical characteristics, supported movement patterns, targeted part and active involvement of the upper limb, training protocols, outcomes of clinical trials, and commercial availability. Conclusion. Initial clinical results are not yet of such caliber that the devices in question and the concepts on which they are based are firmly established. However, the clinical outcomes do not rule out the possibility that the concept of bilateral training and the accompanied devices may provide a useful extension of currently available forms of therapy. To actually demonstrate their (surplus) value, more research with adequate experimental, dose-matched designs, and sufficient statistical power are required.

  1. Characterizing upper limb muscle volume and strength in older adults: a comparison with young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidt, Meghan E; Daly, Melissa; Miller, Michael E; Davis, Cralen C; Marsh, Anthony P; Saul, Katherine R

    2012-01-10

    Aging is associated with the loss of muscle volume (MV) and force leading to difficulties with activities of daily living. However, the relationship between upper limb MV and joint strength has not been characterized for older adults. Quantifying this relationship may help our understanding of the functional declines of the upper limb that older adults experience. Our objective was to assess the relationship between upper limb MV and maximal isometric joint moment-generating capacity (IJM) in a single cohort of healthy older adults (age ≥ 65 years) for 6 major functional groups (32 muscles). MV was determined from MRI for 18 participants (75.1±4.3 years). IJM at the shoulder (abduction/adduction), elbow (flexion/extension), and wrist (flexion/extension) was measured. MV and IJM measurements were compared to previous reports for young adults (28.6±4.5 years). On average older adults had 16.5% less total upper limb MV compared to young adults. Additionally, older adult wrist extensors composed a significantly increased percentage of upper limb MV. Older adult IJM was reduced across all joints, with significant differences for shoulder abductors (pIJM was accounted for by MV changes (p≤0.027), compared to 81.0% in young adults. We conclude that for older adults, MV and IJM are, on average, reduced but the significant linear relationship between MV and IJM is maintained. These results suggest that older adult MV and IJM cannot be simply scaled from young adults.

  2. ANALYSIS OF UPPER LIMB CONTRACTURES: A 5-YEAR STUDY OF 786 PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Post burn upper limb contractures is still a common complication, in spite of better treatment available (Debridement, skin substitute and early skin grafting and early initiation of physiotherapy procedures. In view of broad range of surgical procedures performed at our centre Gandhi Medical College, Plastic Surgery Department Bhopal, we considered it worthwhile to review post-burn contractures of the upper limb, which are amongst the most frequent sequelae we treat. This has been an object of observation also in the past, and we will demonstrate that there has been a consistent increasing trend in the number of patients presenting such burns sequelae, a finding that has a sound explanation. AIMS: The aim of this study is to demonstrate the continuing high incidence of upper limb contractures in the framework of burns sequelae in our country and to comment on the surgical techniques used to correct these contractures. There are various modalities of approach for contracture release & reconstruction (STG, FTG and Various flaps. Each modality has its own advantages & disadvantages. METHODS AND MATERIALS: This is a retrospective study of 786 patients of upper limb, post-burn contracture in our hospital between 2011 to 2015. CONCLUSION: We would point out that this disease can be prevented by better treatment of the burned upper limb, better timing of coverage of the granulated burn wound, and better rehabilitation during convalescence.

  3. A Patient-Controlled Analgesia Adaptor to Mitigate Postsurgical Pain for Combat Casualties With Multiple Limb Amputation: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquina, Paul F; Isaacson, Brad M; Johnson, Elizabeth; Rhoades, Daniel S; Lindholm, Mark P; Grindle, Garrett G; Cooper, Rory A

    2016-08-01

    The use of explosive armaments during Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn has resulted in a significant number of injured U.S. service members. These weapons often generate substantial extremity trauma requiring multiple surgical procedures to preserve life, limb, and restore function. For those individuals who require multiple surgeries, the use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) devices can be an effective way to achieve adequate pain management and promote successful rehabilitation and recovery during inpatient treatment. A subpopulation of patients are unable to independently control a PCA device because of severe multiple limb dysfunction and/or loss. In response to the needs of these patients, our team designed and developed a custom adaptor to assist service members who would otherwise not be able to use a PCA. Patient feedback of the device indicated a positive response, improved independence, and overall satisfaction during inpatient hospitalization. PMID:27483540

  4. Bilateral Lower Limb Amputations in a Nigerian Child Following High-Voltage Electrical Burns Injury: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Dim, EM; Amanari, OC; Nottidge, TE; Inyang, UC; Nwashindi, A

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The human body conducts electricity very well. Direct contact with electric current can be lethal. The passage of electric current through the body is capable of producing a wide spectrum of injuries, including serious damage to the heart, brain, skin and muscles. Naked high-voltage electric cables negligently abandoned in residential, commercial and industrial areas are a recipe for disaster. This is a case report of a 5-year girl child who had bilateral lower limb gangrene followin...

  5. Amplitude Manipulation Evokes Upper Limb Freezing during Handwriting in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease with Freezing of Gait

    OpenAIRE

    Elke Heremans; Evelien Nackaerts; Griet Vervoort; Sarah Vercruysse; Sanne Broeder; Carolien Strouwen; Stephan P Swinnen; Alice Nieuwboer

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies show that besides freezing of gait (FOG), many people with Parkinson's disease (PD) also suffer from freezing in the upper limbs (FOUL). Up to now, it is unclear which task constraints provoke and explain upper limb freezing. Objective To investigate whether upper limb freezing and other kinematic abnormalities during writing are provoked by (i) gradual changes in amplitude or by (ii) sustained amplitude generation in patients with and without freezing of gait. Metho...

  6. Patterns of extremity traumas leading to amputation in lran:results of Iranian National Trauma Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Majid Moini; Mohammad R Rasouli; Ali Khaji; Farshad Farshidfar; Pedram Heidari

    2009-01-01

    Obiective: To determine the patterns of traumatic extremity injuries leading to amputation in Iran.Methotis: Data of Iranian National Trauma Project was used to identify patients with upper and lower extremity traumas undergoing amputation.This project was conducted in 8 major cities during 2000-2004.Results: of 17 753 traumatic Patients,164 (0.92%) had injuries to the extremities that resulted in the limb amputation.Of these,143 (87.2%) were men.The patient's mean age was 29.0 years±15.4 years and the highest incidence was seen in the age group of 21 to 30 years (34.1%).One hundred and four cases were occupational accidents (63.4%).Blunt trauma was in 54.9% of the cases.The most common reasons for amputation were respectively stabbings (37.8%) and crush injuries (31.7%).Amputation of hand fingers was the most frequent type of amputation (125 cases,76.2%).One patient died from severe associated injuries.Conclusions: This study shows the patterns of traumatic limb amputation in Iran,a developing country.Resuits of this study may be used in preventive strategic planning.

  7. Sensación de miembro fantasma y dolor de miembro residual tras 50 años de la amputación Chronic phantom sensation and residual limb pain 50 years after amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Olarra

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción El dolor del miembro residual o dolor de muñón es aquel que aparece en la parte todavía existente de la extremidad amputada. Paciente: Presentamos el caso de un paciente varón de 74 años con antecedentes de amputación supracondílea postraumática del miembro inferior izquierdo, que desarrolló dolor de miembro residual y sensación de miembro fantasma 50 años después de la amputación sin una causa que Justificara su aparición. El tratamiento con antidepresivos tricíclicos (amitriptilina, anticonvulsivantes (gabapentina y tramadol permitió un buen control del dolor. Conclusiones: La existencia de una matriz neuronal determinada genéticamente pero modulada durante la vida por los impulsos nerviosos (nociceptivos, crearía una memoria somato-sensorial que sería responsable de la aparición del dolor de miembro fantasma.Background and objective: Residual limb pain or stump pain is defined as pain in the remaining part of an amputated limb. Patient: We present the case of a 74-year-old male patient with a history of posttraumatic transfemoral (above knee amputation of the left lower limb who developed residual limb pain and phantom limb sensation 50 years after amputation without a clear etiology. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline, anticonvulsivants (gabapentin and opioids (tramadol, provided a satisfactory control of pain. Conclusions: The existence of a neuromatrix initially determined genetically and later sculpted by sensory inputs (continuous nociceptive stimulation, could create what is known as the somatosensorial memory, responsible for the development of phantom limb pain.

  8. A novel 5-DOF exoskeletal rehabilitation robot system for upper limbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qingling; Kong Minxiu; Du Zhijiang; Sun Lining

    2009-01-01

    A novel 5-DOF exoskeletal rehabilitation robot for upper limbs of hemiplegic patients caused by stroke is proposed in this paper. Its hardware structure is introduced and the control methods are analyzed. To implement intelligent and interactive rehabilitation exercises, motion intention of patients' upper limb is introduced into control methods of rehabilitation exercises. In passive motions, according to the character of unilateral impaired, multi-channels surface electromyogram (sEMG) signals of patients' healthy arm muscles are acquired and analyzed to recognize the upper limb motions, then drive the robot and assist paralysis arm's rehabilitation exercises. In active-resistant motions, because patients are recovered with some muscle forces and active motion ability after a rehabilitation period, the terminal force loaded on the robot by an impaired arm are estimated with multi-channel joint torque sensors, according to which, the terminal velocity of the robot is controlled to drive the joint motions with a damp controller.

  9. Acupotomy and venesection in Upper Limb Lymphedema and Peripheral neuropathy following Breast Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Eun-ha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to estimate clinical effects of acupotomy and venesection in a patient with peripheral neuropathy and upper limb lymphedema following breast cancer surgery. Methods: From 17th August, 2009 to 29th August 2009, 1 female patient with peripheral neuropathy and upper limb lymphedema following breast cancer surgery was treated with general oriental medicine therapy(acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy with venesection. Results: The patient's chief complaints- Lt hand numbness, Lt arm edema, Lt. wrist flexion limitation - were notably improved. Conclusions : This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acupotomy and venesection therapy has significant effect in improving symptoms of peripheral neuropathy and upper limb lymphedema following breast cancer surgery, as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  10. Technology that Touches Lives: Teleconsultation to Benefit Persons with Upper Limb Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Lynsay R; Wagner, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    While over 1.5 million individuals are living with limb loss in the United States (Ziegler-Graham et al., 2008), only 10% of these individuals have a loss that affects an upper limb. Coincident with the relatively low incidence of upper limb loss, is a shortage of the community-based prosthetic rehabilitation experts that can help prosthetic users to more fully integrate their devices into their daily routines. This article describes how expert prosthetists and occupational therapists at Touch Bionics, a manufacturer of advanced upper limb prosthetic devices, employ Voice over the Internet Protocol (VoIP) videoconferencing software telehealth technologies to engage in remote consultation with users of prosthetic devices and/or their local practitioners. The Touch Bionics staff provide follow-up expertise to local prosthetists, occupational therapists, and other health professionals. Contrasted with prior telephone-based consultations, the video-enabled approach provides enhanced capabilities to benefit persons with upper limb loss. Currently, the opportunities for Touch Bionics occupational therapists to fully engage in patient-based services delivered through telehealth technologies are significantly reduced by their need to obtain and maintain professional licenses in multiple states. PMID:25945186

  11. Technology that Touches Lives: Teleconsultation to Benefit Persons with Upper Limb Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsay R. Whelan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available While over 1.5 million individuals are living with limb loss in the United States (Ziegler-Graham et al., 2008, only 10% of these individuals have a loss that affects an upper limb. Coincident with the relatively low incidence of upper limb loss, is a shortage of the community-based prosthetic rehabilitation experts that can help prosthetic users to more fully integrate their devices into their daily routines. This article describes how expert prosthetists and occupational therapists at Touch Bionics, a manufacturer of advanced upper limb prosthetic devices, employ Voice over the Internet Protocol (VoIP videoconferencing software telehealth technologies to engage in remote consultation with users of prosthetic devices and/or their local practitioners. The Touch Bionics staff provide follow-up expertise to local prosthetists, occupational therapists, and other health professionals. Contrasted with prior telephone-based consultations, the video-enabled approach provides enhanced capabilities to benefit persons with upper limb loss.  Currently, the opportunities for Touch Bionics occupational therapists to fully engage in patient-based services delivered through telehealth technologies are significantly reduced by their need to obtain and maintain professional licenses in multiple states.

  12. Lymphoedema of the upper limb: a rare complication of thyroid surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Christopher; Munnoch, David Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman underwent an elective thyroidectomy for a non-toxic, multinodular goitre. In the early postoperative period, the patient developed a significant unilateral swelling of the right upper limb, which was subsequently confirmed to be lymphoedema. This was eventually treated successfully using liposuction and compression garment therapies. We report the case due to its rarity and present a possible explanation for such an unexpected complication based on known anatomical variations of lymphatic drainage of the upper limb. PMID:27090542

  13. An Overview of the Running Performance of Athletes with Lower-Limb Amputation at the Paralympic Games 2004–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Hassani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the performances of lower-limb amputees in the 100, 200 and 400 m running events from the 2004, 2008 and 2012 Paralympic Games. In this paper, four hypotheses are pursued. In the first, it investigates whether the running performance of lower-limb amputees over three consecutive Paralympic Games has changed. In the second, it asks whether a bi-lateral amputee has a competitive advantage over a uni-lateral amputee. In the third, the effect of blade classification has been considered and we attempt to see whether amputees in various classifications have different level of performance. Finally, it is considered whether the final round of competition obtains different levels of performance in comparison to the qualification heats. Based on the outcomes of these investigations, it is proposed that future amputee-based running events should be undertaken with separate and not combined events for the T42, T43 and T44 classifications at the Paralympic Games.

  14. Restoring motor control and sensory feedback in people with upper extremity amputations using arrays of 96 microelectrodes implanted in the median and ulnar nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. S.; Wark, H. A. C.; Hutchinson, D. T.; Warren, D. J.; O'Neill, K.; Scheinblum, T.; Clark, G. A.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. An important goal of neuroprosthetic research is to establish bidirectional communication between the user and new prosthetic limbs that are capable of controlling >20 different movements. One strategy for achieving this goal is to interface the prosthetic limb directly with efferent and afferent fibres in the peripheral nervous system using an array of intrafascicular microelectrodes. This approach would provide access to a large number of independent neural pathways for controlling high degree-of-freedom prosthetic limbs, as well as evoking multiple-complex sensory percepts. Approach. Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs, 96 recording/stimulating electrodes) were implanted for 30 days into the median (Subject 1-M, 31 years post-amputation) or ulnar (Subject 2-U, 1.5 years post-amputation) nerves of two amputees. Neural activity was recorded during intended movements of the subject’s phantom fingers and a linear Kalman filter was used to decode the neural data. Microelectrode stimulation of varying amplitudes and frequencies was delivered via single or multiple electrodes to investigate the number, size and quality of sensory percepts that could be evoked. Device performance over time was assessed by measuring: electrode impedances, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), stimulation thresholds, number and stability of evoked percepts. Main results. The subjects were able to proportionally, control individual fingers of a virtual robotic hand, with 13 different movements decoded offline (r = 0.48) and two movements decoded online. Electrical stimulation across one USEA evoked >80 sensory percepts. Varying the stimulation parameters modulated percept quality. Devices remained intrafascicularly implanted for the duration of the study with no significant changes in the SNRs or percept thresholds. Significance. This study demonstrated that an array of 96 microelectrodes can be implanted into the human peripheral nervous system for up to 1 month durations. Such an

  15. Multiple regeneration from axolotl limb stumps bearing cross-transplanted minced muscle regenerates : brief note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlson, Bruce M.

    1975-01-01

    Flexor and extensor muscles in the upper arms of axolotls were minced and cross-transplanted. The limbs were amputated 5 and 30 days after mincing. In each experiment a high percentage of the regenerates consisted of multiple limbs. This demonstrates that the morphogenetic information which produces

  16. The Impact of Upper Tropospheric Humidity from Microwave Limb Sounder on the Midlatitude Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hua; Liu, W. Timothy

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of upper tropospheric humidity, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder, and the impact of the humidity on the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes. Enhanced upper tropospheric humidity and an enhanced greenhouse effect occur over the storm tracks in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. In these areas, strong baroclinic activity and the large number of deep convective clouds transport more water vapor to the upper troposphere, and hence increase greenhouse trapping. The greenhouse effect increases with upper tropospheric humidity in areas with a moist upper troposphere (such as areas over storm tracks), but it is not sensitive to changes in upper tropospheric humidity in regions with a dry upper troposphere, clearly demonstrating that there are different mechanisms controlling the geographical distribution of the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes.

  17. Cervical selective dorsal rhizotomy for treating spasticity in upper limb neurosurgical way to neurosurgical technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Duan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Selective dorsal rhizotomy is an effective method to reduce spasticity of the lower limbs. However, functional outcomes in the upper limb following selective dorsal rhizotomy at the cervical level have not been reported. Here we report the clinical course after selective dorsal rhizotomy at the cervical level in a patient with hemiplegic spasticity caused by brain injury. The selective dorsal rootlets at the cervical level were sectioned under electrophysiological monitoring. The patient was followed for 1 year to evaluate the outcome of surgery. The spasticity in the upper limb was reduced and the passive range of motion and function of movement improved. However, the effectiveness and the safety of operation should be studied further in clinical trials.

  18. Entrapment Neuropathies in the Upper and Lower Limbs: Anatomy and MRI Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peripheral nerve entrapment occurs at specific anatomic locations. Familiarity with the anatomy and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of nerve entrapment syndromes is important for accurate diagnosis and early treatment of entrapment neuropathies. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the normal anatomy of peripheral nerves in the upper and lower limbs and to review the MRI features of common disorders affecting the peripheral nerves, both compressive/entrapment and non compressive, involving the supra scapular nerve, the axillary nerve, the radial nerve, the ulnar nerve, and the median verve in the upper limb and the sciatic nerve, the common peroneal nerve, the tibial nerve, and the interdigital nerves in the lower limb

  19. Evaluation of suitability of a micro-processing unit of motion analysis for upper limb tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza Madrigal, José Antonio; Cardiel, Eladio; Rogeli, Pablo; Leija Salas, Lorenzo; Muñoz Guerrero, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the suitability of a micro-processing unit of motion analysis (MPUMA), for monitoring, reproducing, and tracking upper limb movements. The MPUMA is based on an inertial measurement unit, a 16-bit digital signal controller and a customized algorithm. To validate the performance of the system, simultaneous recordings of the angular trajectory were performed with a video-based motion analysis system. A test of the flexo-extension of the shoulder joint during the active elevation in a complete range of 120º of the upper limb was carried out in 10 healthy volunteers. Additional tests were carried out to assess MPUMA performance during upper limb tracking. The first, a 3D motion reconstruction of three movements of the shoulder joint (flexo-extension, abduction-adduction, horizontal internal-external rotation), and the second, an upper limb tracking online during the execution of three movements of the shoulder joint followed by a continuous random movement without any restrictions by using a virtual model and a mechatronic device of the shoulder joint. Experimental results demonstrated that the MPUMA measured joint angles that are close to those from a motion-capture system with orientation RMS errors less than 3º. PMID:27185034

  20. Improving work style behavior in computer workers with neck and upper limb symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernaards, C.M.; Ariëns, G.A.M.; Simons, M.; Knol, D.L.; Hildebrandt, V.H.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a group-based interactive work style intervention in improving work style behavior. Methods: Computer workers with neck and upper limb symptoms were randomised into the work style group (WS, N = 152), the work style and physical

  1. Vibrotactile sense in patients with different upper limb disorders compared with a control group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lise Hedegaard; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Upper limb disorders (ULDs) are common, and so are the difficulties with regard to their specific diagnoses. According to diagnostic consensus criteria, specific diagnoses include neuropathy and muscular- and connective-tissue disorders (MCDs). There is a need for valid objective diag...

  2. Advanced insights in upper limb function of individuals with cervical spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velstra, Inge-Marie

    2015-01-01

    An important criterion for a clinical outcome measure, such as the Graded and Redefined Assessment of Strength, Sensibility and Prehension (GRASSP), is its sensitivity to detect changes in upper limb function over time. This facilitates the evaluation of recovery patterns and treatment efficacy of e

  3. Association between Severe Upper Limb Spasticity and Brain Lesion Location in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Picelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Association between the site of brain injury and poststroke spasticity is poorly understood. The present study investigated whether lesion analysis could document brain regions associated with the development of severe upper limb poststroke spasticity. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 39 chronic stroke patients. Spasticity was assessed at the affected upper limb with the modified Ashworth scale (shoulder, elbow, wrist, and fingers. Brain lesions were traced from magnetic resonance imaging performed within the first 7 days after stroke and region of interest images were generated. The association between severe upper limb spasticity (modified Ashworth scale ≥2 and lesion location was determined with the voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping method implemented in MRIcro software. Colored maps representing the z statistics were generated and overlaid onto the automated anatomical labeling and the Johns Hopkins University white matter templates provided with MRIcron. Thalamic nuclei were identified with the Talairach Daemon software. Injuries to the insula, the thalamus, the basal ganglia, and white matter tracts (internal capsule, corona radiata, external capsule, and superior longitudinal fasciculus were significantly associated with severe upper limb poststroke spasticity. Further advances in our understanding of the neural correlates of spasticity may lead to early targeted rehabilitation when key regions are damaged.

  4. The Corticospinal Tract: A Biomarker to Categorize Upper Limb Functional Potential in Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Ellen; Byblow, Winston D.; Feys, Hilde; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) typically present with largely divergent upper limb sensorimotor deficits and individual differences in response to upper limb rehabilitation. This review summarizes how early brain damage can cause dramatic deviations from the normal anatomy of sensory and motor tracts, resulting in unique “wiring patterns” of the sensorimotor system in CP. Based on the existing literature, we suggest that corticospinal tract (CST) anatomy and integrity constrains sensorimotor function of the upper limb and potentially also the response to treatment. However, it is not possible to infer CST (re)organization from clinical presentation alone and conventional biomarkers, such as time of insult, location, and lesion extent seem to have limited clinical utility. Here, we propose a theoretical framework based on a detailed examination of the motor system using behavioral, neurophysiological, and magnetic resonance imaging measures, akin to those used to predict potential for upper limb recovery of adults after stroke. This theoretical framework might prove useful because it provides testable hypotheses for future research with the goal to develop and validate a clinical assessment flowchart to categorize children with unilateral CP. PMID:26779464

  5. Exoskeleton-Based Robotic Platform Applied in Biomechanical Modelling of the Human Upper Limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres F. Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the approaches to study the human motor system, and specifically the motor strategies implied during postural tasks of the upper limbs, is to manipulate the mechanical conditions of each joint of the upper limbs independently. At the same time, it is essential to pick up biomechanical signals and bio-potentials generated while the human motor system adapts to the new condition. The aim of this paper is two-fold: first, to describe the design, development and validation of an experimental platform designed to modify or perturb the mechanics of human movement, and simultaneously acquire, process, display and quantify bioelectric and biomechanical signals; second, to characterise the dynamics of the elbow joint during postural control. A main goal of the study was to determine the feasibility of estimating human elbow joint dynamics using EMG-data during maintained posture. In particular, the experimental robotic platform provides data to correlate electromyographic (EMG activity, kinetics and kinematics information from the upper limb motion. The platform aims consists of an upper limb powered exoskeleton, an EMG acquisition module, a control unit and a software system. Important concerns of the platform such as dependability and safety were addressed in the development. The platform was evaluated with 4 subjects to identify, using system identification methods, the human joint dynamics, i.e. visco-elasticity. Results obtained in simulations and experimental phase are introduced.

  6. Golf and upper limb injuries: a summary and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollard Henry P

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Golf is a popular past time that provides exercise with social interaction. However, as with all sports and activities, injury may occur. Many golf-related injuries occur in the upper limb, yet little research on the potential mechanisms of these injuries has been conducted. Objective To review the current literature on golf-related upper limb injuries and report on potential causes of injury as it relates to the golf swing. Discussion An overview of the golf swing is described in terms of its potential to cause the frequently noted injuries. Most injuries occur at impact when the golf club hits the ball. This paper concludes that more research into golf-related upper limb injuries is required to develop a thorough understanding of how injuries occur. Types of research include epidemiology studies, kinematic swing analysis and electromyographic studies of the upper limb during golf. By conducting such research, preventative measures maybe developed to reduce golf related injury.

  7. Do work-related physical factors predict neck and upper limb symptoms in office workers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, S.G. van den; Beek, A.J. van der; Blatter, B.M.; Bonger, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Examination of the influence of physical exposure at work on neck and upper limb symptoms in office workers. Data were used from a prospective cohort study with a follow-up period of 3 years. Independent variables were physical exposure at work, observed and self-reported. Outcome measures were neck

  8. The role of order of practice in learning to handle an upper-limb prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwsema, Hanneke; van der Sluis, Corry K.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine which Order of presentation of practice tasks had the highest effect oil using an upper-limb prosthetic simulator. Design: A cohort analytic Study. Setting: University laboratory. Participants: Healthy, able-bodied participants (N=72) randomly assigned to I Of 8 groups, each

  9. Addressing Sexuality as Standard Care in People with an Upper Limb Deficiency : Taboo or Necessary Topic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, J.E.A.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Enzlin, P.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Dekker, R.; Van Der Sluis, C.K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether professionals who work with people with an upper limb deficiency (ULD) received questions about sexuality from their patients and whether they addressed sexuality themselves, and to analyze their knowledge and comfort level, approach and attitudes towa

  10. A novel motion tracking system for evaluation of functional rehabilitation of the upper limbs*****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ángel Gil-Agudo; Ana de los Reyes-Guzmn; Iris Dimbwadyo-Terrer; Benito Peasco-Martn; Alberto Bernal-Sahn; Patricia Lpez-Monteagudo; Antonio del Ama-Espinosa; Jos Luis Pons

    2013-01-01

    Upper limb function impairment is one of the most common sequelae of central nervous system in-jury, especial y in stroke patients and when spinal cord injury produces tetraplegia. Conventional assessment methods cannot provide objective evaluation of patient performance and the effec-tiveness of therapies. The most common assessment tools are based on rating scales, which are inefficient when measuring smal changes and can yield subjective bias. In this study, we designed an inertial sensor-based monitoring system composed of five sensors to measure and analyze the complex movements of the upper limbs, which are common in activities of daily living. We devel-oped a kinematic model with nine degrees of freedom to analyze upper limb and head movements in three dimensions. This system was then validated using a commercial optoelectronic system. These findings suggest that an inertial sensor-based motion tracking system can be used in patients who have upper limb impairment through data integration with a virtual reality-based neurorehabilitation system.

  11. Normative data for modified Box and Blocks test measuring upper-limb function via motion capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline S. Hebert, MD, FRCPC

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Motion analysis is an important tool for examining upper-limb function. Based on previous work demonstrating a modified Box and Blocks (BB test with motion capture to assess prosthetic performance, we collected data in 16 nondisabled participants to establish normative kinematics for this test. Four motions of the modified BB test were analyzed to establish kinematic data for upper-limb and trunk motion. The test was repeated for right and left arms in standing and seated positions. Data were compared using a nonparametric Friedman test. No differences were found between right- and left-hand performance other than for task completion time. Small but significant differences were found for standing and seated performance, with slightly greater ranges in standing for axial trunk rotation, medial-lateral sternum displacement, and anterior-posterior hand displacement. The kinematic trajectories, however, were very consistent. The consistency in our nondisabled data suggests that normative kinematic trajectories can be defined for this task. This motion capture procedure may add to the understanding of movement in upper-limb impairment and may be useful for measuring the effect of interventions to improve upper-limb function.

  12. Impact of early applied upper limb stimulation: The EXPLICIT-stroke programme design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkel, G.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Van Wegen, E.E.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Van Kuijk, A.A.; Lindeman, E.; Visser-Meily, A.; Vlugt, E.; Arendzen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Main claims of the literature are that functional recovery of the paretic upper limb is mainly defined within the first month post stroke and that rehabilitation services should preferably be applied intensively and in a task-oriented way within this particular time window. EXplaining PLastICITy aft

  13. Impact of early applied upper limb stimulation : The EXPLICIT-stroke programme design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkel, Gert; Meskers, Carel G. M.; van Wegen, Erwin E.; Lankhorst, Guus J.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; van Kuijk, Annet A.; Lindeman, Eline; Visser-Meily, Anne; de Vlugt, Erwin; Arendzen, J. Hans

    2008-01-01

    Background: Main claims of the literature are that functional recovery of the paretic upper limb is mainly defined within the first month post stroke and that rehabilitation services should preferably be applied intensively and in a task-oriented way within this particular time window. EXplaining PL

  14. Frequency upper limbs injuries in the emergency health service in Paranaiba, MS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Cristina Coelho de Oliveira Correia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To assess the frequency of upper limb injuries in the only emergency medical service inParanaiba, State of Mato Grosso do Sul. Methods: Retrospective study with data collection from medical recordsof patients assisted with upper limb injuries in “Santa Casa de Misericordia” Hospital, the only hospital in the cityto provide emergency care, in 2008. Variables of interest such as gender and type of injury were collected basedon the International Code of Diseases (ICD 10. Results: There were 314 cases of upper limb injury in 2008and men were the most affected with 211 cases (67.2%. The wrist was the most affected segment with 64 cases(20.4%, followed by the shoulder with 55 cases (17.5% and the hand with 50 cases (15.9%. Interventions andsurgeries involving bone portion were the most frequent - 225 (71.7%, followed by tendon - 19 (6.1% and neural - 16 (5.1%; 35 patients (11.1% underwent multiple operations. Osteosyntheses - 94 (29.9%, fractures- 48 (15.3%, and reduction - 46 (14.6% were the most frequent interventions, followed by 26 dislocations(8.3% and 14 tenorrhaphies (4.5%. Conclusion: The involvement of the upper limbs, especially bone lesions,is frequent. The segments most affected by injuries are men’s wrists and shoulders.

  15. Activity reconstruction of post-medieval Dutch rural villagers from upper limb osteoarthritis and entheseal changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogland, Menno; Palmer, Jessica; Waters, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The first objective of this study is to reconstruct levels and types of physical activity and associated sexual and social differences using human skeletal remains from the predominately 19th century Dutch cemetery of Middenbeemster. Two skeletal markers of activity are examined in the upper limb of

  16. Robot-Mediated Upper Limb Physiotherapy: Review and Recommendations for Future Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Orsolya; Fazekas, Gabor; Zsiga, Katalin; Denes, Zoltan

    2011-01-01

    Robot-mediated physiotherapy provides a new possibility for improving the outcome of rehabilitation of patients who are recovering from stroke. This study is a review of robot-supported upper limb physiotherapy focusing on the shoulder, elbow, and wrist. A literature search was carried out in PubMed, OVID, and EBSCO for clinical trials with robots…

  17. Gait and upper limb variability in Parkinson's disease patients with and without freezing of gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbe, M.T.; Amarell, M.; Snijders, A.H.; Florin, E.; Quatuor, E.L.; Schonau, E.; Fink, G.R.; Bloem, B.R.; Timmermann, L.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and freezing of gait (FOG) (freezers) demonstrate high gait variability. The objective of this study was to determine whether freezers display a higher variability of upper limb movements and elucidate if these changes correlate with gait. We were the first gro

  18. Deviations in upper limb function of the less-affected side in congenital hemiparesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, B.; Meulenbroek, R.G.J.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study we examined upper-limb function of the less-affected side in young adolescents with congenital hemiparesis (cerebral palsy: CP). Five participants with hemiparetic CP and five control participants performed a cyclical reach-and-grasp task with the less-affected hand towards targ

  19. Upper Limb Immobilisation: A Neural Plasticity Model with Relevance to Poststroke Motor Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Furlan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in our understanding of the neural plasticity that occurs after hemiparetic stroke have contributed to the formulation of theories of poststroke motor recovery. These theories, in turn, have underpinned contemporary motor rehabilitation strategies for treating motor deficits after stroke, such as upper limb hemiparesis. However, a relative drawback has been that, in general, these strategies are most compatible with the recovery profiles of relatively high-functioning stroke survivors and therefore do not easily translate into benefit to those individuals sustaining low-functioning upper limb hemiparesis, who otherwise have poorer residual function. For these individuals, alternative motor rehabilitation strategies are currently needed. In this paper, we will review upper limb immobilisation studies that have been conducted with healthy adult humans and animals. Then, we will discuss how the findings from these studies could inspire the creation of a neural plasticity model that is likely to be of particular relevance to the context of motor rehabilitation after stroke. For instance, as will be elaborated, such model could contribute to the development of alternative motor rehabilitation strategies for treating poststroke upper limb hemiparesis. The implications of the findings from those immobilisation studies for contemporary motor rehabilitation strategies will also be discussed and perspectives for future research in this arena will be provided as well.

  20. Casting for upper limb hypertonia: A retrospective study to determine the factors associated with intervention decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, K.; Burger, L.; Copley, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To determine if a Clinical Reasoning Protocol assisted occupational therapists to consistently choose casting as an intervention in the context of moderate/severe upper limb hypertonia and possible contracture.Methods: Sixty-four intervention decisions (including strength/movement training, spl

  1. A case report of neck, chest and upper limb cutaneous metastasis from synchronous colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; SHI Yu-qian; WU Zhi-yong

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis from colorectal carcinoma is uncommon, occurring in less than 4% of the whole patients.' The most frequently involved are incision scar or abdominal skin,24 while cutaneous metastasis to neck and chest is very rare. We hereby report a case of synchronous, postoperative cutaneous metastasis from colorectal carcinoma to neck, upper limb and chest skin, which were confirmed by biopsy.

  2. Work related neck and upper limb symptoms (RSI) : high risk occupations and risk factors in the Belgian working population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blatter, B.M.; Bongers, P.M.; Witte, H. de

    1999-01-01

    In this study on prevalence and risk factors for work related neck or upper limb symptoms in the Belgian working population, the researchers have found an overall prevalence of work and upper limb symptoms occurring in the past 12 months of 39%. High risk occupations for neck and shoulder symptoms w

  3. Intra-arterial Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Upper-extremity Critical Limb Ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induction of therapeutic angiogenesis by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation has been identified as a potential new option in patients with advanced lower-limb ischemia. There is little evidence of the benefit of intra-arterial cell application in upper-limb critical ischemia. We describe a patient with upper-extremity critical limb ischemia with digital gangrene resulting from hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by intra-arterial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation.

  4. Intra-arterial Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Upper-extremity Critical Limb Ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madaric, Juraj, E-mail: jurmad@hotmail.com [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NUSCH) and Slovak Medical University, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Slovakia); Klepanec, Andrej [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia); Mistrik, Martin [Clinic of Hematology and Transfusiology, Faculty Hospital (Slovakia); Altaner, Cestmir [Slovak Academy of Science, Institute of Experimental Oncology (Slovakia); Vulev, Ivan [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia)

    2013-04-15

    Induction of therapeutic angiogenesis by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation has been identified as a potential new option in patients with advanced lower-limb ischemia. There is little evidence of the benefit of intra-arterial cell application in upper-limb critical ischemia. We describe a patient with upper-extremity critical limb ischemia with digital gangrene resulting from hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by intra-arterial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation.

  5. Age Effects on Upper Limb Kinematics Assessed by the REAplan Robot in Healthy School-Aged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliaux, Maxime; Dierckx, Floriane; Vanden Berghe, Lola; Lejeune, Thierry M; Sapin, Julien; Dehez, Bruno; Stoquart, Gaëtan; Detrembleur, Christine

    2015-05-01

    The use of kinematics is recommended to quantitatively evaluate upper limb movements. The aims of this study were to determine the age effects on upper limb kinematics and establish norms in healthy children. Ninety-three healthy children, aged 3-12 years, participated in this study. Twenty-eight kinematic indices were computed from four tasks. Each task was performed with the REAplan, a distal effector robotic device that allows upper limb displacements in the horizontal plane. Twenty-four of the 28 indices showed an improvement during childhood. Indeed, older children showed better upper limb movements. This study was the first to use a robotic device to show the age effects on upper limb kinematics and establish norms in healthy children. PMID:25413362

  6. EFFECTS OF BURN ON THE MOBILITY OF UPPER LIMB/S, FUNCTIONS OF HAND /S & ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perera M M N

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burn is an injury cause destruction of skin and underling tissue. Post burns complications are severe. Objective of this study is to identify the effects on the Active Range of Motion (AROM of upper limb/s, hand functions and Activities of Daily Living (ADL who attend the physical therapy department of burns unit. Methodology: It was a descriptive cross sectional study carried out at out-patient physical therapy department of burns unit of National Hospital of SriLanka (NHSL. Fifty subjects recruited into the study. Interviewer assisted self administered questionnaire Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder,Hand Questionnaire (DASH, AROM of nine movements of shoulder and elbow joints and hand function assessment Signals of Functional, Impairements of hand (SOFI was used to collect data. Results: Study results showed that Flame burns were the most common burn type and majority of the victims were females. Study population had affected AROM in almost all the movements at the joint, which had affected to the ADL significantly. “Keeping an object shelf above head” and “engaging in heavy work”, showed significant correlation with movements of shoulder. SOFI score for the right hand showed significant correlation with selected Activities of Daily Living (ADL (“writing”,” using knife to cut food” opening a jar” etc ;. Conclusion: patient with burn injury including upper limb joints may encounter disabilities. Even though it is mild AROM restrictions at a joint, This restriction affects to persons’ independency in ADL s. This emphasizes the need of intensive medical care as well as long term physical therapy rehabilitation programme for burns patients. Limitations: Each subject’s AROM was not measured at their discharge which was already stated to be a limitation.

  7. Regenerative Engineering and Bionic Limbs

    OpenAIRE

    James, Roshan; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2015-01-01

    Amputations of the upper extremity are severely debilitating, current treatments support very basic limb movement, and patients undergo extensive physiotherapy and psychological counselling. There is no prosthesis that allows the amputees near-normal function. With increasing number of amputees due to injuries sustained in accidents, natural calamities and international conflicts, there is a growing requirement for novel strategies and new discoveries. Advances have been mad...

  8. Micro movements of the upper limb in fibromyalgia: The relation to proprioceptive accuracy and visual feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardal, Ellen Marie; Roeleveld, Karin; Ihlen, Espen; Mork, Paul Jarle

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of visual and proprioceptive feedback in upper limb posture control in fibromyalgia (FM) and to assess the coherence between acceleration measurements of upper limb micro movements and surface electromyography (sEMG) of shoulder muscle activity (upper trapezius and deltoid). Twenty-five female FM patients and 25 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) performed three precision motor tasks: (1) maintain a steady shoulder abduction angle of 45° while receiving visual feedback about upper arm position and supporting external loads (0.5, 1, or 2kg), (2) maintain the same shoulder abduction angle without visual feedback (eyes closed) and no external loading, and (3) a joint position sense test (i.e., assessment of proprioceptive accuracy). Patients had more extensive increase in movement variance than HCs when visual feedback was removed (PProprioceptive accuracy was related to movement variance in HCs (R⩾0.59, P⩽0.002), but not in patients (R⩽0.25, P⩾0.24). There was no difference between patients and HCs in coherence between sEMG and acceleration data. These results may indicate that FM patients are more dependent on visual feedback and less reliant on proprioceptive information for upper limb posture control compared to HCs.

  9. Constraint-induced movement therapy improves upper limb activity and participation in hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Ching Chiu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Questions: Does constraint-induced movement therapy improve activity and participation in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy? Does it improve activity and participation more than the same dose of upper limb therapy without restraint? Is the effect of constraint-induced movement therapy related to the duration of intervention or the age of the children? Design: Systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis. Participants: Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy with any level of motor disability. Intervention: The experimental group received constraint-induced movement therapy (defined as restraint of the less affected upper limb during supervised activity practice of the more affected upper limb. The control group received no intervention, sham intervention, or the same dose of upper limb therapy. Outcome measures: Measures of upper limb activity and participation were used in the analysis. Results: Constraint-induced movement therapy was more effective than no/sham intervention in terms of upper limb activity (SMD 0.63, 95% CI 0.20 to 1.06 and participation (SMD 1.21, 95% CI 0.41 to 2.02. However, constraint-induced movement therapy was no better than the same dose of upper limb therapy without restraint either in terms of upper limb activity (SMD 0.05, 95% CI –0.21 to 0.32 or participation (SMD –0.02, 95% CI –0.34 to 0.31. The effect of constraint-induced movement therapy was not related to the duration of intervention or the age of the children. Conclusions: This review suggests that constraint-induced movement therapy is more effective than no intervention, but no more effective than the same dose of upper limb practice without restraint. Registration: PROSPERO CRD42015024665. [Chiu H-C, Ada L (2016 Constraint-induced movement therapy improves upper limb activity and participation in hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 62: 130–137

  10. Upper limb artery segmental occlusions due to chronic use of ergotamine combined with itraconazole, treated by thrombolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nodari Franco

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ergotamine tartrate associated with certain categories of drugs can lead to critical ischemia of the extremities. Discontinuation of taking ergotamine is usually sufficient for the total regression of ischemia, but in some cases it could be necessary thrombolytic and anticoagulant therapy to avoid amputation. Case report A woman of 62 years presented with a severe pain left forearm appeared 10 days ago, with a worsening trend. The same symptoms appeared after 5 days also in the right forearm. Physical examination showed the right arm slightly hypothermic, with radial reduced pulse in presence of reduced sensitivity. The left arm was frankly hypothermic, pulse less on radial and with an ulnar humeral reduced pulse, associated to a decreased sensitivity and motility. Clinical history shows a chronic headache for which the patient took a daily basis for years Cafergot suppository (equivalent to 3.2 mg of ergotamine. From about ten days had begun therapy with itraconazole for vaginal candidiasis. The Color-Doppler ultrasound shown arterial thrombosis of the upper limbs (humeral and radial bilateral, with minimal residual flow to the right and no signal on the humeral and radial left artery. Results Angiography revealed progressive reduction in size of the axillary artery and right humeral artery stenosis with right segmental occlusions and multiple hypertrophic collateral circulations at the elbow joint. At the level of the right forearm was recognizable only the radial artery, decreased in size. Does not recognize the ulnar, interosseous artery was thin. To the left showed progressive reduction in size of the distal subclavian and humeral artery, determined by multiple segmental steno-occlusion with collateral vessels serving only a thin hypotrophic interosseous artery. Arteriographic findings were compatible with systemic drug-induced disease. The immediate implementation of thrombolysis, continued for 26 hours, with

  11. High intensity physical exercise and pain in the neck and upper limb among slaughterhouse workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Andersen, Kenneth Jay;

    2014-01-01

    Slaughterhouse work involves a high degree of repetitive and forceful upper limb movements and thus implies an elevated risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. High intensity strength training effectively rehabilitates musculoskeletal disorders among sedentary employees, but less is known....../wrist was 48%, 60%, 40%, and 52%, respectively. The odds for experiencing neck pain were significantly lower among slaughterhouse workers performing physical exercise (OR = 0.70, CI: 0.49-0.997), whereas the odds for pain in the shoulders, elbow, or hand/wrist were not associated with exercise. The present...... study can be used as general reference of pain in the neck and upper extremity among slaughterhouse workers. Future studies should investigate the effect of high intensity physical exercise on neck and upper limb pain in slaughterhouse workers....

  12. Epistemologia sobre amputações e desbridamentos de membros inferiores realizados no Hospital Universitário de Maringá Epistemology of lower limb amputations and debridements at Hospital Universitário de Maringá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélia Cristina Seidel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Não há estatísticas precisas sobre o número de amputações realizadas anualmente, mas é conhecido o comprometimento da qualidade de vida desses indivíduos e a necessidade de uma equipe multiprofissional para sua reabilitação. OBJETIVO: Analisar todas as amputações de membros inferiores realizadas pelo Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular do Hospital Universitário Regional de Maringá entre 2000 e 2006. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo e retrospectivo a partir dos prontuários de pacientes submetidos a amputação ou desbridamento cirúrgico de membros inferiores por trauma ou doença vascular. RESULTADOS: Ocorreram 116 procedimentos, sendo 84,5% amputações e 15% desbridamentos cirúrgicos, em 111 pacientes, sendo 78 homens e 33 mulheres, cuja média das idades foi de 63,4 anos (4 a 100 anos, sendo os principais fatores etiológicos: doenças vasculares (92,8% e trauma (7,2%. As comorbidades e fatores de risco mais prevalentes foram: hipertensão arterial sistêmica (66%, diabetes melito (60%, tabaco (28% e arritmia cardíaca (0,9%. Quanto à escolaridade, se observou que 52,2% dos pacientes cursaram apenas o ensino fundamental, 6,5% fizeram o ensino médio, completo ou incompleto, e 41,3% eram analfabetos. A percentagem de pacientes submetidos à amputação primária foi de 94,9%, e secundárias, 5,1%. No entanto, houve diminuição progressiva do coeficiente desses procedimentos a cada ano. CONCLUSÕES: Este trabalho permite inferir que a incidência de amputação de membros inferiores foi maior no sexo masculino e teve como principal causa a doença aterosclerótica, mas apresentou uma redução progressiva.BACKGROUND: There are no precise data on the number of amputations performed every year. However, the decrease in quality of life of patients submitted to amputation is well-known, as is the need to involve a multidisciplinary team in the rehabilitation of these individuals. OBJECTIVE: To analyze all lower limb

  13. Computer simulations of neural mechanisms explaining upper and lower limb excitatory neural coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferris Daniel P

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When humans perform rhythmic upper and lower limb locomotor-like movements, there is an excitatory effect of upper limb exertion on lower limb muscle recruitment. To investigate potential neural mechanisms for this behavioral observation, we developed computer simulations modeling interlimb neural pathways among central pattern generators. We hypothesized that enhancement of muscle recruitment from interlimb spinal mechanisms was not sufficient to explain muscle enhancement levels observed in experimental data. Methods We used Matsuoka oscillators for the central pattern generators (CPG and determined parameters that enhanced amplitudes of rhythmic steady state bursts. Potential mechanisms for output enhancement were excitatory and inhibitory sensory feedback gains, excitatory and inhibitory interlimb coupling gains, and coupling geometry. We first simulated the simplest case, a single CPG, and then expanded the model to have two CPGs and lastly four CPGs. In the two and four CPG models, the lower limb CPGs did not receive supraspinal input such that the only mechanisms available for enhancing output were interlimb coupling gains and sensory feedback gains. Results In a two-CPG model with inhibitory sensory feedback gains, only excitatory gains of ipsilateral flexor-extensor/extensor-flexor coupling produced reciprocal upper-lower limb bursts and enhanced output up to 26%. In a two-CPG model with excitatory sensory feedback gains, excitatory gains of contralateral flexor-flexor/extensor-extensor coupling produced reciprocal upper-lower limb bursts and enhanced output up to 100%. However, within a given excitatory sensory feedback gain, enhancement due to excitatory interlimb gains could only reach levels up to 20%. Interconnecting four CPGs to have ipsilateral flexor-extensor/extensor-flexor coupling, contralateral flexor-flexor/extensor-extensor coupling, and bilateral flexor-extensor/extensor-flexor coupling could enhance

  14. Upper limb joint muscle/tendon injury and anthropometric adaptations in French competitive tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Genevois, Cyril; Klouche, Shahnaz; Rahme, Michel; Hardy, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the upper limb anthropometric dimensions and a history of dominant upper limb injury in tennis players. Dominant and non-dominant wrist, forearm, elbow and arm circumferences, along with a history of dominant upper limb injuries, were assessed in 147 male and female players, assigned to four groups based on location of injury: wrist (n = 9), elbow (n = 25), shoulder (n = 14) and healthy players (n = 99). From anthropometric dimensions, bilateral differences in circumferences and in proportions were calculated. The wrist group presented a significant bilateral difference in arm circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between wrist and forearm, as well as between elbow and arm, compared to the healthy group (6.6 ± 3.1% vs. 4.9 ± 4.0%, P < 0.01; -3.6 ± 3.0% vs. -0.9 ± 2.9%, P < 0.05; and -2.2 ± 2.2% vs. 0.1 ± 3.4%, P < 0.05, respectively). The elbow group displayed asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and arm compared to the healthy group (-0.4 ± 4.3% vs. 1.5 ± 4.0%, P < 0.01). The shoulder group showed significant bilateral difference in elbow circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and elbow when compared to the healthy group (5.8 ± 4.7% vs. 3.1 ± 4.8%, P < 0.05 and -1.7 ± 4.5% vs. 1.4 ± 4.3%, P < 0.01, respectively). These findings suggest that players with a history of injury at the upper limb joint present altered dominant upper limb proportions in comparison with the non-dominant side, and such asymmetrical proportions would appear to be specific to the location of injury. Further studies are needed to confirm the link between location of tennis injury and asymmetry in upper limb proportions using high-tech measurements in symptomatic tennis players.

  15. Upper limb joint muscle/tendon injury and anthropometric adaptations in French competitive tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Genevois, Cyril; Klouche, Shahnaz; Rahme, Michel; Hardy, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the upper limb anthropometric dimensions and a history of dominant upper limb injury in tennis players. Dominant and non-dominant wrist, forearm, elbow and arm circumferences, along with a history of dominant upper limb injuries, were assessed in 147 male and female players, assigned to four groups based on location of injury: wrist (n = 9), elbow (n = 25), shoulder (n = 14) and healthy players (n = 99). From anthropometric dimensions, bilateral differences in circumferences and in proportions were calculated. The wrist group presented a significant bilateral difference in arm circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between wrist and forearm, as well as between elbow and arm, compared to the healthy group (6.6 ± 3.1% vs. 4.9 ± 4.0%, P < 0.01; -3.6 ± 3.0% vs. -0.9 ± 2.9%, P < 0.05; and -2.2 ± 2.2% vs. 0.1 ± 3.4%, P < 0.05, respectively). The elbow group displayed asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and arm compared to the healthy group (-0.4 ± 4.3% vs. 1.5 ± 4.0%, P < 0.01). The shoulder group showed significant bilateral difference in elbow circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and elbow when compared to the healthy group (5.8 ± 4.7% vs. 3.1 ± 4.8%, P < 0.05 and -1.7 ± 4.5% vs. 1.4 ± 4.3%, P < 0.01, respectively). These findings suggest that players with a history of injury at the upper limb joint present altered dominant upper limb proportions in comparison with the non-dominant side, and such asymmetrical proportions would appear to be specific to the location of injury. Further studies are needed to confirm the link between location of tennis injury and asymmetry in upper limb proportions using high-tech measurements in symptomatic tennis players. PMID:25881663

  16. Ultrasound guided distal peripheral nerve block of the upper limb: A technical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Sehmbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Upper extremity surgery is commonly performed under regional anesthesia. The advent of ultrasonography has made performing upper extremity nerve blocks relatively easy with a high degree of reliability. The proximal approaches to brachial plexus block such as supraclavicular plexus block, infraclavicular plexus block, or the axillary block are favored for the most surgical procedures of distal upper extremity. Ultrasound guidance has however made distal nerve blocks of the upper limb a technically feasible, safe and efficacious option. In recent years, there has thus been a resurgence of distal peripheral nerve blocks to facilitate hand and wrist surgery. In this article, we review the technical aspects of performing the distal blocks of the upper extremity and highlight some of the clinical aspects of their usage.

  17. Limb salvage surgery in a patient with macrodystrophia lipomatosa involving an entire upper extremity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Bo; ZHENG Long-po; CAI Zheng-dong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Macrodystrophia lipomatosa is a rare form of congenital localized gigantism, which is characterized by slowly progressive overgrowth of the mesenchymal elements, especially the fibroadipose tissue,in a limb. Frequently, multiple contiguous digits are involved on the lateral side of the hand or the medial side of the foot. Overabundance of the fibroadipose tissue and osseous overgrowth are most remarkable at the distal ends of the extremity. Macrodystrophia lipomatosa involving an entire limb has been previously reported for only one case in a 45-year-old adult male;1 however, no details of treatment were described. Here, we present the first report of successful limb salvage surgery of macrodystrophia lipomatosa in an adolescent involving an entire upper extremity.

  18. Haptic Neurorehabilitation and Virtual Reality for Upper Limb Paralysis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piggott, Leah; Wagner, Samantha; Ziat, Mounia

    2016-01-01

    Motor and sensory loss or dysfunction affects the quality of life for thousands of individuals daily. The upper limb, and especially the hand, are important for a person's ability to complete activities of daily living. Traditional therapy methods focus on motor recovery, but future methods should include sensory recovery and should promote the use of the affected limb(s) at home. In this review, we highlight the current state-of-art robotic devices for the upper limb, and we discuss benefits of including haptic feedback and virtual reality environments during neurorehabilitation. Robotic devices, such as end-effector devices, grounded and ungrounded exoskeletons, have been developed to assist with various functions including individual finger, whole hand, and shoulder movements. Many robots highlighted in this paper are inexpensive and are small enough to be in a patient's home, or allow for telerehabilitation. Virtual reality creates safe environments for patients to practice motor movements and interactive games improve enjoyment of therapy. Haptic feedback creates more immersive virtual reality, and contributes to the recovery of sensory function. Physiological studies conducted after brain trauma and with robotic devices contribute to the understanding of brain plasticity, and illustrate the efficacy of these technologies. We conclude by addressing the future direction of neurorehabilitation research.

  19. Music Upper Limb Therapy—Integrated: An Enriched Collaborative Approach for Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Preeti; Geller, Daniel; Guerrero, Nina; Aluru, Viswanath; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Palumbo, Anna; Turry, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. It leads to a sudden and overwhelming disruption in one’s physical body, and alters the stroke survivors’ sense of self. Long-term recovery requires that bodily perception, social participation and sense of self are restored; this is challenging to achieve, particularly with a single intervention. However, rhythmic synchronization of movement to external stimuli facilitates sensorimotor coupling for movement recovery, enhances emotional engagement and has positive effects on interpersonal relationships. In this proof-of-concept study, we designed a group music-making intervention, Music Upper Limb Therapy-Integrated (MULT-I), to address the physical, psychological and social domains of rehabilitation simultaneously, and investigated its effects on long-term post-stroke upper limb recovery. The study used a mixed-method pre-post design with 1-year follow up. Thirteen subjects completed the 45-min intervention twice a week for 6 weeks. The primary outcome was reduced upper limb motor impairment on the Fugl-Meyer Scale (FMS). Secondary outcomes included sensory impairment (two-point discrimination test), activity limitation (Modified Rankin Scale, MRS), well-being (WHO well-being index), and participation (Stroke Impact Scale, SIS). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test for differences between pre- and post-intervention, and 1-year follow up scores. Significant improvement was found in upper limb motor impairment, sensory impairment, activity limitation and well-being immediately post-intervention that persisted at 1 year. Activities of daily living and social participation improved only from post-intervention to 1-year follow up. The improvement in upper limb motor impairment was more pronounced in a subset of lower functioning individuals as determined by their pre-intervention wrist range of motion. Qualitatively, subjects reported new feelings of ownership of their impaired limb, more

  20. Proprioceptive rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction in movement disorders: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eAbbruzzese

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are frequently associated with sensory abnormalities. In particular, proprioceptive deficits have been largely documented in both hypokinetic (Parkinson’s disease and hyperkinetic conditions (dystonia suggesting a possible role in their pathophysiology. Proprioceptive feedback is a fundamental component of sensorimotor integration allowing effective planning and execution of voluntary movements. Rehabilitation has become an essential element in the management of patients with movement disorders and there is a strong rationale to include proprioceptive training in rehabilitation protocols focused on mobility problems of the upper limbs. Proprioceptive training is aimed at improving the integration of proprioceptive signals using task intrinsic or augmented feedback. This perspective article reviews the available evidences on the effects of proprioceptive stimulation in improving upper limb mobility in patients with movement disorders and highlights the emerging innovative approaches targeted to maximizing the benefits of exercise by means of enhanced proprioception.

  1. Proprioceptive rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction in movement disorders: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Trompetto, Carlo; Mori, Laura; Pelosin, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Movement disorders (MDs) are frequently associated with sensory abnormalities. In particular, proprioceptive deficits have been largely documented in both hypokinetic (Parkinson's disease) and hyperkinetic conditions (dystonia), suggesting a possible role in their pathophysiology. Proprioceptive feedback is a fundamental component of sensorimotor integration allowing effective planning and execution of voluntary movements. Rehabilitation has become an essential element in the management of patients with MDs, and there is a strong rationale to include proprioceptive training in rehabilitation protocols focused on mobility problems of the upper limbs. Proprioceptive training is aimed at improving the integration of proprioceptive signals using "task-intrinsic" or "augmented feedback." This perspective article reviews the available evidence on the effects of proprioceptive stimulation in improving upper limb mobility in patients with MDs and highlights the emerging innovative approaches targeted to maximizing the benefits of exercise by means of enhanced proprioception.

  2. Risk of upper limb complaints due to computer use in older persons: a randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolles Jelle

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied whether the twelve-month use of a standard computer would induce complaints of upper limb pain or functional limitations in older novice computer users. Methods Participants between 64 and 76 of age were randomly assigned to an Intervention group (n = 62, whose members received a personal computer and fast Internet access at their homes, or a No Intervention control group (n = 61, whose members refrained from computer use during the twelve month study period. Results Difference scores between baseline and twelve months assessments on both complaint (SFS and functional health scales (SF-36 did not differ between groups (all p > .05. Conclusion Prolonged, self-paced use of a standard computer interface does not put older persons at a risk of upper limb complaints or reduce functional health in older adults.

  3. Development of rehabilitation training support system for occupational therapy of upper limb motor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yoshifumi; Hirose, Akinori; Uno, Takashi; Uchid, Masaki; Ukai, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Nobuyuki

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we propose a new rehabilitation training support system for upper limbs. The proposed system enables therapists to quantitatively evaluate the therapeutic effect of upper limb motor function during training, to easily change the load of resistance of training and to easily develop a new training program suitable for the subjects. For this purpose we develop control algorithms of training programs in the 3D force display robot. The 3D force display robot has parallel link mechanism with three motors. The control algorithm simulating sanding training is developed for the 3D force display robot. Moreover the teaching/training function algorithm is developed. It enables the therapists to easily make training trajectory suitable for subject's condition. The effectiveness of the developed control algorithms is verified by experiments.

  4. Studying upper-limb kinematic using inertial sensors embedded in smartphones

    OpenAIRE

    Cuesta Vargas, Antonio; Roldan Jimenez, Cristina; Bennett, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background: In recent years, there have been investigations concerning upper-limbs kinematics by various devices. The latest generation of smartphones often includes inertial sensors with subunits which can detect inertial kinematics. The use of smartphones is presented as a convenient and portable analysis method for studying kinematics in terms of angular mobility and linear acceleration Objective: The aim of this study was to study humerus kinematics through six physical properties that...

  5. Effect of two contrasting interventions on upper limb chronic pain and disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Andersen, Christoffer H;

    2014-01-01

    questionnaire) as well as isometric shoulder and wrist muscle strength were secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Pain intensity, disability, and muscle strength improved more following resistance training than usual care (P respectively [corrected]). Pain intensity decreased by 1.5 points...... similar. CONCLUSION: Resistance training at the workplace results in clinical relevant improvements in pain, disability, and muscle strength in adults with upper limb chronic pain exposed to highly repetitive and forceful manual work. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01671267....

  6. Effect of two contrasting interventions on upper limb chronic pain and disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Andersen, Christoffer H;

    2014-01-01

    questionnaire) as well as isometric shoulder and wrist muscle strength were secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Pain intensity, disability, and muscle strength improved more following resistance training than usual care (P respectively). Pain intensity decreased by 1.5 points (95% confidence......: Resistance training at the workplace results in clinical relevant improvements in pain, disability, and muscle strength in adults with upper limb chronic pain exposed to highly repetitive and forceful manual work. Trial registration: NCT01671267....

  7. Electromyography-Based Quantitative Representation Method for Upper-Limb Elbow Joint Angle in Sagittal Plane

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Muye; Guo, Shuxiang; Huang, Qiang; Ishihara, Hidenori; Hirata, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a quantitative representation method for the upper-limb elbow joint angle using only electromyography (EMG) signals for continuous elbow joint voluntary flexion and extension in the sagittal plane. The dynamics relation between the musculotendon force exerted by the biceps brachii muscle and the elbow joint angle is developed for a modified musculoskeletal model. Based on the dynamics model, a quadratic-like quantitative relationship between EMG signals and the elbow joint...

  8. Proposed equation between flexor carpi radialis H-reflex latency and upper limb length

    OpenAIRE

    Saeid Khosrawi; Parisa Taheri; Seyed Hasan Hashemi

    2015-01-01

    Background: H-reflex is a valuable electrophysiological technique for assessing nerve conduction through entire length of afferent and efferent pathways, especially nerve roots and proximal segments of peripheral nerves. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between normal values of flexor carpi radialis (FCR) H-reflex latency, upper limb length and age in normal subjects, and to determine whether there is any regression equation between them. Methods: By considering the crite...

  9. Strategy for respiratory exercise pattern associated with upper limb movements in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirceu Costa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Upper limb exercises are frequently used in respiratory physiotherapy, with UL elevation and controlled inspiratory timing. However, the use of expiration during upper limb elevation appears to be a strategy that could minimize the action of accessory muscles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this context, little is known about the synchrony of upper limb (UL movements associated with breathing. The aim of this study was to investigate the respiratory pattern of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients during different UL exercises associated with respiratory exercises. METHODS: Fifteen chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients participated in this study. Respiratory pattern analysis by inductance plethysmography was performed during four types of upper limb exercises, two shoulder flexion-extension (one associated with inspiratory time during the concentric phase and the other associated with expiratory time and two shoulder abduction-adduction (same timing as above. Statistical analysis was performed by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and ANOVA with Tukey tests (p< 0.05. RESULTS: The thoracoabdominal coordination measurements increased in the two exercises using both inspiration during shoulder flexion (PhRIB: 172%; PhREB: 131%; PhRTB: 142% and PhAng: 238% as well as in shoulder horizontal abduction (PhRIB: 145%; PhREB: 109%; PhRTB: 130% and PhAng: 229%, differing from the exercises with expiration at the time of shoulder flexion and horizontal abduction. CONCLUSION: The exercises performed with inverted respiratory time produced less asynchrony and can be used as important strategies during physical exercise programs in these patients.

  10. Upper Limb Outcome Measures Used in Stroke Rehabilitation Studies: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santisteban, Leire; Térémetz, Maxime; Bleton, Jean-Pierre; Baron, Jean-Claude; Maier, Marc A.; Lindberg, Påvel G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Establishing which upper limb outcome measures are most commonly used in stroke studies may help in improving consensus among scientists and clinicians. Objective In this study we aimed to identify the most commonly used upper limb outcome measures in intervention studies after stroke and to describe domains covered according to ICF, how measures are combined, and how their use varies geographically and over time. Methods Pubmed, CinHAL, and PeDRO databases were searched for upper limb intervention studies in stroke according to PRISMA guidelines and477 studies were included. Results In studies 48different outcome measures were found. Only 15 of these outcome measures were used in more than 5% of the studies. The Fugl-Meyer Test (FMT)was the most commonly used measure (in 36% of studies). Commonly used measures covered ICF domains of body function and activity to varying extents. Most studies (72%) combined multiple outcome measures: the FMT was often combined with the Motor Activity Log (MAL), the Wolf Motor Function Test and the Action Research Arm Test, but infrequently combined with the Motor Assessment Scale or the Nine Hole Peg Test. Key components of manual dexterity such as selective finger movements were rarely measured. Frequency of use increased over a twelve-year period for the FMT and for assessments of kinematics, whereas other measures, such as the MAL and the Jebsen Taylor Hand Test showed decreased use over time. Use varied largely between countries showing low international consensus. Conclusions The results showed a large diversity of outcome measures used across studies. However, a growing number of studies used the FMT, a neurological test with good psychometric properties. For thorough assessment the FMT needs to be combined with functional measures. These findings illustrate the need for strategies to build international consensus on appropriate outcome measures for upper limb function after stroke. PMID:27152853

  11. Variable structure pantograph mechanism with spring suspension system for comprehensive upper-limb haptic movement training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C. Perry, PhD

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous haptic devices have been developed for upper-limb neurorehabilitation, but their widespread use has been largely impeded because of complexity and cost. Here, we describe a variable structure pantograph mechanism combined with a spring suspension system that produces a versatile rehabilitation robot, called Universal Haptic Pantograph, for movement training of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist. The variable structure is a 5-degree-of-freedom (DOF mechanism composed of 7 joints, 11 joint axes, and 3 configurable joint locks that reduce the number of system DOFs to between 0 and 3. The resulting device has eight operational modes: Arm, Wrist, ISO (isometric 1, ISO 2, Reach, Lift 1, Lift 2, and Steer. The combination of available work spaces (reachable areas shows a high suitability for movement training of most upper-limb activities of daily living. The mechanism, driven by series elastic actuators, performs similarly in all operational modes, with a single control scheme and set of gains. Thus, a single device with minimal setup changes can be used to treat a variety of upper-limb impairments that commonly afflict veterans with stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other direct trauma to the arm. With appropriately selected design parameters, the developed multimode haptic device significantly reduces the costs of robotic hardware for full-arm rehabilitation while performing similarly to that of single-mode haptic devices. We conducted case studies with three patients with stroke who underwent clinical training using the developed mechanism in Arm, Wrist, and/or Reach operational modes. We assessed outcomes using Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment and Wolf Motor Function Test scores showing that upper-limb ability improved significantly following training sessions.

  12. Development and testing of new upper-limb prosthetic devices: Research designs for usability testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, OCS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this article are to describe usability testing and introduce designs and methods of usability testing research as it relates to upper-limb prosthetics. This article defines usability, describes usability research, discusses research approaches to and designs for usability testing, and highlights a variety of methodological considerations, including sampling, sample size requirements, and usability metrics. Usability testing is compared with other types of study designs used in prosthetic research.

  13. Development and testing of new upper-limb prosthetic devices: Research designs for usability testing

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this article are to describe usability testing and introduce designs and methods of usability testing research as it relates to upper-limb prosthetics. This article defines usability, describes usability research, discusses research approaches to and designs for usability testing, and highlights a variety of methodological considerations, including sampling, sample size requirements, and usability metrics. Usability testing is compared with other types of study designs used in...

  14. A Framework to Automate Assessment of Upper-Limb Motor Function Impairment: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Otten

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Standard upper-limb motor function impairment assessments, such as the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA, are a critical aspect of rehabilitation after neurological disorders. These assessments typically take a long time (about 30 min for the FMA for a clinician to perform on a patient, which is a severe burden in a clinical environment. In this paper, we propose a framework for automating upper-limb motor assessments that uses low-cost sensors to collect movement data. The sensor data is then processed through a machine learning algorithm to determine a score for a patient’s upper-limb functionality. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach, we implemented a system based on the proposed framework that can automate most of the FMA. Our experiment shows that the system provides similar FMA scores to clinician scores, and reduces the time spent evaluating each patient by 82%. Moreover, the proposed framework can be used to implement customized tests or tests specified in other existing standard assessment methods.

  15. Gesture recognition in upper-limb prosthetics: a viability study using dynamic time warping and gyroscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermitzakis, Konstantinos; Arieta, Alejandro Hernandez; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in the upper-limb-prosthetics research field is to identify appropriate interfaces that utilize the full potential of current state-of-the-art neuroprostheses. As the new generation of such prostheses paces towards approximating the human physiological performance in terms of movement dexterity and sensory feedback, it is clear that current non-invasive interfaces are still severely limited. Surface electromyography, the interface ubiquitously used in the field, is riddled with several shortcomings. Gesture recognition, an interface pervasively used in wearables and mobile devices, shows a strong potential as a non-invasive upper-limb prosthetic interface. This study aims at showcasing its potential in the field by using gyroscope sensors. To this end, we (1) explore the viability of Dynamic Time Warping as a classification method for upper-limb prosthetics and (2) look for appropriate sensor locations on the body. Results indicate an optimal classification rate of 97.53%, σ = 8.74 using a sensor located proximal to the endpoint performing a gesture.

  16. Reorganizing therapy: changing the clinical approach to upper limb recovery post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Isobel J; Carey, Leeanne M; Budd, Timothy W; Parsons, Mark W

    2015-03-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability, and as a consequence, most therapists will provide health care to patients with stroke during their professional careers. An increasing number of studies are investigating the association between upper limb recovery and changes in brain activation patterns following stroke. In this review, we explore the translational implications of this research for health professionals working in stroke recovery. We argue that in light of the most recent evidence, therapists should consider how best to take full advantage of the brain's natural ability to reorganize, when prescribing and applying interventions to those with a stroke-affected upper limb. The authors propose that stroke is a brain-based problem that needs a brain-based solution. This review addresses two topics, anticipating recovery and maximizing recovery. It proposes five practice-ready recommendations that are based on the evidence reviewed. The over-riding aim of this review and discussion is to challenge therapists to reconsider the health care they prescribe and apply to people with a stroke-affected upper limb.

  17. Bilateral upper-limb rehabilitation after stroke using a movement-based game controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha M. Hijmans, PhD

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a bilateral, self-supported, upper-limb rehabilitation intervention using a movement-based game controller for people with chronic stroke. Fourteen participants received a control treatment, followed by a washout period, and then the intervention. The intervention comprised playing computer games with the CyWee Z (CyWee Group Ltd; Taipei, Taiwan, a movement-based game controller similar to the Nintendo Wii remote. The CyWee Z was incorporated into a handlebar, making bilateral exercises possible by allowing the unaffected side to support and assist the affected side. The intervention lasted for 8 to 10 sessions of 45 to 60 minutes over a period of 2.5 weeks. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment upper-limb section (FMA-UL was used as the primary outcome. The Wolf Motor Function Test and the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand outcome measure were used as secondary outcomes. Postintervention, motor performance as measured by the FMA-UL was significantly improved compared with all preintervention assessments (p < 0.001, whereas no changes were found on both secondary outcomes. It can be concluded from this pilot study that upper-limb motor performance of adults with chronic stroke improves with repetitive, game-assisted, self-supported bilateral exercises.

  18. The pedicled thoraco-umbilical flap: A versatile technique for upper limb coverage

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    Mishra Sharad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to upper limb has been on the increase and is invariably associated with significant soft tissue loss requiring a flap cover. Local tissue may not be available for cover in a majority of situations, necessitating import of tissue from a distant source. We have utilized the thoraco-umbilical flap taken from the trunk for this purpose. This flap is based on the perforators of the deep inferior epigastric artery that are maximally centred on the periumbilical region.This flap was used in 83 patients. The patients were observed for at least 3 weeks and any flap or donor site complications were recorded. The patients were again followed up at 3 months interval and the donor site scar was assessed. The flaps survived in 81 patients; there was marginal flap necrosis in five patients and partial flap necrosis in two patients. None of these patients required any additional procedure for coverage. The flap is technically easy to plan, almost effortless to drape around upper limb defects, with no significant donor site morbidity and also the post operative immobilization was fairly comfortable. The thoraco-umbilical flap thus is a very useful technique for coverage of the upper limb and is recommended as a first line flap for this purpose.

  19. Impact of early applied upper limb stimulation: The EXPLICIT-stroke programme design

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    Lindeman Eline

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Main claims of the literature are that functional recovery of the paretic upper limb is mainly defined within the first month post stroke and that rehabilitation services should preferably be applied intensively and in a task-oriented way within this particular time window. EXplaining PLastICITy after stroke (acronym EXPLICIT-stroke aims to explore the underlying mechanisms of post stroke upper limb recovery. Two randomized single blinded trials form the core of the programme, investigating the effects of early modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (modified CIMT and EMG-triggered Neuro-Muscular Stimulation (EMG-NMS in patients with respectively a favourable or poor probability for recovery of dexterity. Methods/design 180 participants suffering from an acute, first-ever ischemic stroke will be recruited. Functional prognosis at the end of the first week post stroke is used to stratify patient into a poor prognosis group for upper limb recovery (N = 120, A2 project and a group with a favourable prognosis (N = 60, A1 project. Both groups will be randomized to an experimental arm receiving respectively modified CIMT (favourable prognosis or EMG-NMS (poor prognosis for 3 weeks or to a control arm receiving usual care. Primary outcome variable will be the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT, assessed at 1,2,3,4,5, 8, 12 and 26 weeks post stroke. To study the impact of modified CIMT or EMG-NMS on stroke recovery mechanisms i.e. neuroplasticity, compensatory movements and upper limb neuromechanics, 60 patients randomly selected from projects A1 and A2 will undergo TMS, kinematical and haptic robotic measurements within a repeated measurement design. Additionally, 30 patients from the A1 project will undergo fMRI at baseline, 5 and 26 weeks post stroke. Conclusion EXPLICIT stroke is a 5 year translational research programme which main aim is to investigate the effects of early applied intensive intervention for regaining dexterity

  20. Home-based neurologic music therapy for upper limb rehabilitation with stroke patients at community rehabilitation stage—a feasibility study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Alex J Street; Magee, Wendy L.; Helen eOdell-Miller; Andrew eBateman; Jörg Christfried Fachner

    2015-01-01

    Background: Impairment of upper limb function following stroke is more common than lower limb impairment and is also more resistant to treatment. Several lab-based studies with stroke patients have produced statistically significant gains in upper limb function when using musical instrument playing and techniques where rhythm acts as an external time-keeper for the priming and timing of upper limb movements. Methods: For this feasibility study a small sample size of 14 participants (3–60 m...

  1. Caracterização dos portadores de diabetes submetidos à amputação de membros inferiores em Londrina, Estado do Paraná = Characterization of diabetic patients submitted to lower limb amputation in Londrina, Paraná State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Sayuri Sakay Bortoletto

    2010-07-01

    patients had diabetic neuropathy, 93% had lower limb ulcers, 52% had gangrene. They remained hospitalized an average of 14 days, and the length of hospital stay varied from 3 to 50 days. Of the amputations performed, 30% involved the thigh, 30% toes, 27.50% upper third of the leg, 5% transmetatarsal region, 5% knee disarticulation and 2.5% calcaneus bone. The increase in amputations is cause for concern for the quality of life of these patients, considering the physical and psychological impact that amputation has on the individual. Furthermore, higher government and institutional costs will be required to assist the health needs of these patients. It was concluded that prevention is the best alternative to reduce this amputation rate and improve the quality of life of diabetics.

  2. Differential diagnosis of a rare case of upper limb pain: Paget-Schroetter syndrome in a doner kebab chef

    OpenAIRE

    Aytekin, Ebru; Dogan, Yasemin Pekin; Okur, Sibel Caglar; Burnaz, Ozer; Caglar, Nil Sayiner

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Paget-Schroetter syndrome (PSS) is an uncommon deep vein thrombosis of the axillary and subclavian veins which may occur spontaneously, but is usually caused by excessive upper limb activity. PSS is clinically similar to other upper limb musculoskeletal disorders and soft tissue infections, and this may lead to delay in correct diagnosis in its early stages. The aim of our case report is to discuss this rare condition with reference to the available literature. [Subjects and Methods...

  3. Comparison of TMS-induced arm activation and upper limb functional tests in hemiparetic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarkka Ina M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke has a major impact in the total cost of healthcare in the Western world as stroke is the most common cause of long-term disability [1]. In attempts to enhance motor recovery after stroke effective treatment strategies have been developed in recent years. Appropriate evaluation of the intervention programs requires comprehensive and accurate assessment of the residual abnormal function. In the present study we compare two well-known clinical functional scoring tests developed for the assessment of hemiparetic upper limb function due to stroke and navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS, which measures involuntary target muscle response to cortical stimulation. The aim is to investigate the equivalence of these methods and thus add objective evidence of the limb function to strengthen evidence-based practice. In addition to functional tests, four muscles of both arms were studied in twenty chronic stroke patients. Those patients without motor evoked potentials (MEP to nTMS in the affected upper limb had significantly lower total score in Action Research Arm Test and Wolf Motor Function Test and longer performance time than those patients with MEP. Patients, in whom MEP in each of the four target muscles was elicitable, had better than average scores in clinical functional tests while patients, in whom no MEP was elicitable in any target muscle, had worse than average scores. Transcranial magnetic stimulation adds crucial information when clinical assessment based on voluntary activation by command is challenging, e.g. in patients suffering from cognitive deficits.

  4. Anatomical Network Comparison of Human Upper and Lower, Newborn and Adult, and Normal and Abnormal Limbs, with Notes on Development, Pathology and Limb Serial Homology vs. Homoplasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Rui; Esteve-Altava, Borja; Smith, Christopher; Boughner, Julia C; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2015-01-01

    How do the various anatomical parts (modules) of the animal body evolve into very different integrated forms (integration) yet still function properly without decreasing the individual's survival? This long-standing question remains unanswered for multiple reasons, including lack of consensus about conceptual definitions and approaches, as well as a reasonable bias toward the study of hard tissues over soft tissues. A major difficulty concerns the non-trivial technical hurdles of addressing this problem, specifically the lack of quantitative tools to quantify and compare variation across multiple disparate anatomical parts and tissue types. In this paper we apply for the first time a powerful new quantitative tool, Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), to examine and compare in detail the musculoskeletal modularity and integration of normal and abnormal human upper and lower limbs. In contrast to other morphological methods, the strength of AnNA is that it allows efficient and direct empirical comparisons among body parts with even vastly different architectures (e.g. upper and lower limbs) and diverse or complex tissue composition (e.g. bones, cartilages and muscles), by quantifying the spatial organization of these parts-their topological patterns relative to each other-using tools borrowed from network theory. Our results reveal similarities between the skeletal networks of the normal newborn/adult upper limb vs. lower limb, with exception to the shoulder vs. pelvis. However, when muscles are included, the overall musculoskeletal network organization of the upper limb is strikingly different from that of the lower limb, particularly that of the more proximal structures of each limb. Importantly, the obtained data provide further evidence to be added to the vast amount of paleontological, gross anatomical, developmental, molecular and embryological data recently obtained that contradicts the long-standing dogma that the upper and lower limbs are serial homologues

  5. Characterization of multi-joint upper limb movements in a single task to assess bradykinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrobaei, Mehdi; Tran, Stephanie; Gilmore, Greydon; McIsaac, Kenneth; Jog, Mandar

    2016-09-15

    Bradykinesia is a disabling symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) which presents with slowness of movement. Visual assessment using clinical rating scales is currently the gold standard to assess bradykinesia. Such assessments require multiple separate movements, are subjective, and rely on the ability of the rater to determine frequency and amplitude features of excursion of multiple joints simultaneously. The current study introduces the use of wearable inertial measurement units (IMUs) to characterize full-arm repetitive movements and provide a new index score for bradykinesia severity (BKI) in the upper limbs. The BKI provides an approach to measuring bradykinesia reliably and objectively. Importantly, this index is needed to demonstrate separability between healthy individuals and PD participants, and also between bradykinetic and non-bradykinetic PD participants. Thirteen PD participants and ten age-matched healthy control participants were studied. Using a single upper limb task that activated multiple joints and recordings from angular displacements from all joints, features relevant to demonstrating bradykinesia were extracted and systematically combined to create the total BKI. A strong correlation coefficient was obtained comparing BKI to upper limb UPDRS bradykinesia scores (rs=-0.626, p=0.001). The BKI successfully identified differences between control and PD participants (p=0.018). The BKI was also sensitive enough to identify differences within the PD population, separating PD participants with and without bradykinesia (pIMU-based motion capture systems and employing the new BKI for quantitative assessment of bradykinesia. This approach when generalized to lower extremity and truncal movements would be able to provide an objective and reproducible whole body bradykinesia index. PMID:27538660

  6. Diffuse venous malformations of the upper limb: morphologic characterization by MRI and venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives. To define the morphologic abnormalities in patients presenting with diffuse pure venous malformations (VM) of the upper extremity. Subjects and methods. A retrospective review of MRI and venography was performed on five patients, aged 6 months to 20 years, with extensive VM of the upper limbs. Abnormalities of major conducting veins were categorized as varicosities, stenoses, and asymmetrical pouches; anomalous venous spaces were classified into confluent lakes, interconnecting channels and spongelike plexiform networks. MRI and venographic data were reviewed separately and then simultaneously in order to establish correlation between types, location, and extent of lesions. Results. In all patients, the percentage of replacement of normal tissues by VM was shown by MRI to be significantly higher in the distal limb than in the proximal limb. Involvement of multiple tissue layers was seen in all cases, including, with a decreasing rate, muscles, tendons, interosseous membrane of the forearm, and bone. Venography showed superficial varicosities, frequently associated with stenoses and assymetric pouches in all patients. Interconnecting channels and venous lakes were noted in half of the segments, typically in muscle and other deep locations, and subcutaneous spongelike lesions were seen in two patients. MRI provided a more accurate evaluation of tissue extent. Venograms better demonstrated morphological details and provided more information about the venous drainage. Direct comparison of MR images with venograms helped to identify and characterize venous lesions on cross-sectional MR data. Conclusion. Diffuse VM of the upper extremity are most extensive distally, and all tissues layers can be involved, each with a characteristic morphologic appearance. The morphology of different components of the VM is related to the nature of the surrounding tissue. (orig.)

  7. EFFECT OF KAYAK ERGOMETER ELASTIC TENSION ON UPPER LIMB EMG ACTIVITY AND 3D KINEMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Fleming

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the prevalence of shoulder injury in kayakers, limited published research examining associated upper limb kinematics and recruitment patterns exists. Altered muscle recruitment patterns on-ergometer vs. on-water kayaking were recently reported, however, mechanisms underlying changes remain to be elucidated. The current study assessed the effect of ergometer recoil tension on upper limb recruitment and kinematics during the kayak stroke. Male kayakers (n = 10 performed 4 by 1 min on-ergometer exercise bouts at 85%VO2max at varying elastic recoil tension; EMG, stroke force and three-dimensional 3D kinematic data were recorded. While stationary recoil forces significantly increased across investigated tensions (125% increase, p < 0.001, no significant differences were detected in assessed force variables during the stroke cycle. In contrast, increasing tension induced significantly higher Anterior Deltoid (AD activity in the latter stages (70 to 90% of the cycle (p < 0.05. No significant differences were observed across tension levels for Triceps Brachii or Latissimus Dorsi. Kinematic analysis revealed that overhead arm movements accounted for 39 ± 16% of the cycle. Elbow angle at stroke cycle onset was 144 ± 10°; maximal elbow angle (151 ± 7° occurred at 78 ± 10% into the cycle. All kinematic markers moved to a more anterior position as tension increased. No significant change in wrist marker elevation was observed, while elbow and shoulder marker elevations significantly increased across tension levels (p < 0.05. In conclusion, data suggested that kayakers maintained normal upper limb kinematics via additional AD recruitment despite ergometer induced recoil forces

  8. Relationships between power and strength of the upper and lower limb muscles and throwing velocity in male handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel; Hermassi, Souhail; Shephard, Roy J

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate relationships between peak power (PP) as measured by upper limb (PPUL) and lower limb (PPLL) force-velocity tests, maximal upper limb force assessed by 1 repetition maximum bench press (1RMBP), and pullover (1RMPO) exercises, estimates of local muscle volume and 3-step running handball throwing velocity (T3-Steps). Fourteen male handball players volunteered for the investigation (age: 19.6+/-0.6 years; body mass: 86.7+/-12.9 kg; and height 1.87+/-0.07 m). Lower and upper limb force-velocity tests were performed on appropriately modified forms of a Monark cycle ergometer, with measurement of PPUL and PPLL, and the corresponding respective maximal forces (F0UL and F0LL) and velocities (V0UL and V0LL). T3-Steps was assessed using a radar Stalker ATS system. Muscle volumes of the upper and lower limbs were estimated with a standard anthropometric kit. T3-Steps was closely related to absolute PPUL and to F0UL (r=0.69, punit of limb muscle volume, the relationship with T3-Steps disappeared. This suggests the importance of muscle volume to performance in throwing events. Force-velocity data may prove useful in regulating conditioning and rehabilitation programs for handball players. Our results also highlight the contribution of both the lower and the upper limbs to handball throwing velocity, suggesting the need for coaches to include upper and lower limb strength and power programs when improving the throwing velocity of handball players. PMID:20508448

  9. Stewart-Treves syndrome: MR imaging of a postmastectomy upper-limb chronic lymphedema with angiosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindera, S.T.; Anderson, S.E. [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Streit, M.; Kaelin, U. [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Stauffer, E. [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Pathology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Steinbach, L. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The rare occurrence of angiosarcoma in postmastectomy upper-limb lymphedema with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is discussed. Unfamiliarity with this aggressive vascular tumor and its harmless appearance often leads to delayed diagnosis. Angiosarcoma complicating chronic lymphedema may be low in signal intensity on T2-weighting and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging reflecting the densely cellular, fibrous stroma, and sparsely vascularized tumor histology. Additional administration of intravenous contrast medium revealed significant enhancement of the tumorous lesions. Awareness of angiosarcoma and its MR imaging appearance in patients with chronic lymphedema may be a key to early diagnosis or allow at least inclusion in the differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. A Pre-Clinical Framework for Neural Control of a Therapeutic Upper-Limb Exoskeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Blank, Amy; O’Malley, Marcia K.; Francisco, Gerard E; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize a novel approach to robotic rehabilitation that capitalizes on the benefits of patient intent and real-time assessment of impairment. Specifically, an upper-limb, physical human-robot interface (the MAHI EXO-II robotic exoskeleton) is augmented with a non-invasive brain-machine interface (BMI) to include the patient in the control loop, thereby making the therapy ‘active’ and engaging patients across a broad spectrum of impairment severity in the rehabilitation tas...

  11. Severe upper limb injuries in four passengers of a 'People Carrier'; the contribution of design faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanby, D N; Perks, A G; Watson, S B; Thorlby, A

    1995-05-01

    Four passengers of a 'People Carrier' in a single vehicle motor accident sustained severe left upper limb trauma, when the vehicle rolled onto the near side. These injuries were directly attributable to the large glass interface between patient and road. The glass windows shattered on contact, providing no protection and in effect created a secondary injury mechanism. We advocate both the use of laminated side windows and mandatory testing of 'roll-over' characteristics for these 'People Carriers' to reduce the incidence of such injuries.

  12. Salvage of extensively burned upper limbs by a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, E; Foyatier, J L; el Kollali, R; Comparin, J P; Weil, E; Latarjet, J

    1995-09-01

    Very deep burns of the arm and elbow lead to soft tissue necrosis and infection with exposure of important structures. Aggressive debridement should be performed as early as possible to cut the vicious circle, and the defect, which may be extensive, should be covered by well-vascularized tissues. The reliability and versatility of the pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle or musculocutaneous flap make it our first choice in the management of this problem. A retrospective study of three patients for whom salvage of the upper limb has been achieved by the use of a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap is presented, illustrating the advantages of this technique.

  13. Dynamic stability of superior vs. inferior body segments in individuals with transtibial amputation walking in destabilizing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurskens, Rainer; Wilken, Jason M; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2014-09-22

    Interestingly, young and highly active people with lower limb amputation appear to maintain a similar trunk and upper body stability during walking as able-bodied individuals. Understanding the mechanisms underlying how this stability is achieved after lower-leg amputation is important to improve training regimens for improving walking function in these patients. This study quantified how superior (i.e., head, trunk, and pelvis) and inferior (i.e., thigh, shank, and feet) segments of the body respond to continuous visual or mechanical perturbations during walking. Nine persons with transtibial amputation (TTA) and 12 able-bodied controls (AB) walked on a 2 m × 3 m treadmill in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN). Subjects were perturbed by continuous pseudo-random mediolateral movements of either the treadmill platform or the visual scene. TTA maintained a similar local and orbital stability in their superior body segments as AB throughout both perturbation types. However, for their inferior body segments, TTA subjects exhibited greater dynamic instability during perturbed walking. In TTA subjects, these increases in instability were even more pronounced in their prosthetic limb compared to their intact leg. These findings demonstrate that persons with unilateral lower leg amputation maintain upper body stability in spite of increased dynamic instability in their impaired lower leg. Thus, transtibial amputation does significantly impair sensorimotor function, leading to substantially altered dynamic movements of their lower limb segments. However, otherwise relatively healthy patients with unilateral transtibial amputation appear to retain sufficient remaining sensorimotor function in their proximal and contralateral limbs to adequately compensate for their impairment.

  14. Predictive value of upper limb muscles and grasp patterns on functional outcome in cervical spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velstra, I.; Bolliger, M.; Krebs, J.; Rietman, J.S.; Curt, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine which single or combined upper limb muscles as defined by the International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI); upper extremity motor score (UEMS) and the Graded Redefined Assessment of Strength, Sensibility, and Prehension (GRASSP),

  15. Evaluation of inter-rater reliability of subjective and objective criteria for diagnosis of lymphedema in upper and lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Louise Campanholi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of lymphedema can be obtained objectively by measurement methods, and also by subjective methods, based on the patient's complaint. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate inter-rater reliability of objective and subjective criteria used for diagnosis of lymphedema and to propose a lymphedema cut-off for differences in volume between affected and control limbs. METHODS: We studied 84 patients who had undergone lymphadenectomy for treatment of cutaneous melanoma. Physical measures were obtained by manual perimetry (MP. The subjective criteria analyzed were clinical diagnosis of lymphedema in patients' medical records and self-report of feelings of heaviness and/or increase in volume in the affected limb. RESULTS: For upper limbs, the subjective criteria clinical observation (k 0.754, P<0.001 and heaviness and swelling (k 0.689, P<0.001 both exhibited strong agreement with MP results and there was moderate agreement between MP results and swelling (k 0.483 P<0.001, heaviness (k 0.576, P<0.001 and heaviness or swelling (k 0.412, P=0.001. For lower limbs there was moderate agreement between MP results and clinical observation (k 0.423, P=0.003 and regular agreement between MP and self-report of swelling (k 0.383, P=0.003. Cut-off values for diagnosing lymphedema were defined as a 9.7% difference between an affected upper limb and control upper limb and a 5.7% difference between lower limbs. CONCLUSION: Manual perimetry, medical criteria, and self-report of heaviness and/or swelling exhibited better agreement for upper limbs than for lower limbs for diagnosis of lymphedema.

  16. Rehabilitation After Surgical Reconstruction to Restore Function to the Upper Limb in Tetraplegia: A Changing Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, M. Elise

    2016-01-01

    Upper limb reconstructive surgical procedures for individuals with tetraplegia are performed in many centers internationally. Most recipients of surgery return to local communities and nonsurgical centers for postoperative rehabilitation and long-term follow-up. This supplement focuses on the clinical significance of upper extremity reconstruction, addressing issues related to the availability and choice for surgery, preoperative assessments, postoperative training paradigms, and appropriate outcome measures. Comprehensive intervention protocols are described in terms of dose, timing, specific activities, modalities, and related outcomes. Shared knowledge of current rehabilitation practice, as it relates to reconstructive surgery, can expand treatment options communicated to patients, increase the availability of postoperative muscle reeducation programs, and motivate long-term follow-up assessments. PMID:27233593

  17. Electromyography-based analysis of human upper limbs during 45-day head-down bed-rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Anshuang; Wang, Chunhui; Qi, Hongzhi; Li, Fan; Wang, Zheng; He, Feng; Zhou, Peng; Chen, Shanguang; Ming, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Muscle deconditioning occurs in response to simulated or actual microgravity. In spaceflight, astronauts become monkey-like for mainly using their upper limbs to control the operating system and to complete corresponding tasks. The changes of upper limbs' athletic ability will directly affect astronauts' working performance. This study investigated the variation trend of surface electromyography (sEMG) during prolonged simulated microgravity. Eight healthy males participating in this study performed strict 45-day head-down bed-rest (HDBR). On the 5th day of pre-HDBR, and the 15th, the 30th and the 45th days of HDBR, the subjects performed maximum pushing task and maximum pulling task, and sEMG was collected from upper limbs synchronously. Each subject's maximum volunteer contractions of both the tasks during these days were compared, showing no significant change. However, changes were detected by sEMG-based analysis. It was found that integrated EMG, root mean square, mean frequency, fuzzy entropy of deltoid, and fuzzy entropy of triceps brachii changed significantly when comparing pre-HDBR with HDBR. The variation trend showed a recovery tendency after significant decline, which is inconsistent with the monotonic variation of lower limbs that was proved by previous research. These findings suggest that EMG changes in upper limbs during prolonged simulated microgravity, but has different variation trend from lower limbs.

  18. Amputations in Sickle Cell Disease: Case Series and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximo, Claudia; Olalla Saad, Sara T; Thome, Eleonora; Queiroz, Ana Maria Mach; Lobo, Clarisse; Ballas, Samir K

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we describe four new patients with sickle cell disease who had limb amputations. Two of the patients had sickle cell anemia [Hb S (HBB: c.20A > T) (β(S)/β(S))] with refractory leg ulcers that required amputations. The third patient had sickle cell trait with an extensive leg ulcer that was associated with epidermoid carcinoma. The fourth patient had amputations of both forearms and feet due to a misdiagnosis of dactylitis. Review of the literature showed that the indications for amputations in sickle cell disease included three distinct categories: mythical beliefs, therapeutic and malpractice. All therapeutic amputations were for severely painful, large, recalcitrant leg ulcers that failed non-interventional therapies. Amputation resulted in pain relief and better quality of life. Phantom neuropathic pain was not a major issue post-operatively. It was absent, transient or well controlled with antidepressants. Limb function was restored post-amputation with prosthetic artificial limbs, wheelchairs or crutches. Malpractice amputations were due to misdiagnosis or to cryotherapy by exposing the painful limb to ice water resulting in thrombosis, gangrene and amputation. We strongly suggest that leg amputations should be considered in the management of certain patients with severe extensive refractory leg ulcers, and topical cryotherapy should never be used to manage sickle cell pain. PMID:27117565

  19. Power hand tool kinetics associated with upper limb injuries in an automobile assembly plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chia-Hua; Radwin, Robert G; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated the relationship between pneumatic nutrunner handle reactions, workstation characteristics, and prevalence of upper limb injuries in an automobile assembly plant. Tool properties (geometry, inertial properties, and motor characteristics), fastener properties, orientation relative to the fastener, and the position of the tool operator (horizontal and vertical distances) were measured for 69 workstations using 15 different pneumatic nutrunners. Handle reaction response was predicted using a deterministic mechanical model of the human operator and tool that was previously developed in our laboratory, specific to the measured tool, workstation, and job factors. Handle force was a function of target torque, tool geometry and inertial properties, motor speed, work orientation, and joint hardness. The study found that tool target torque was not well correlated with predicted handle reaction force (r=0.495) or displacement (r=0.285). The individual tool, tool shape, and threaded fastener joint hardness all affected predicted forces and displacements (paverage peak handle force and displacement for right-angle tools were twice as great as pistol grip tools. Soft-threaded fastener joints had the greatest average handle forces and displacements. Upper limb injury cases were identified using plant OSHA 200 log and personnel records. Predicted handle forces for jobs where injuries were reported were significantly greater than those jobs free of injuries (ppower hand tool operations and for controlling exposure to forces in manufacturing jobs involving power nutrunners. Therefore, a combination of tool, work station, and task requirements should be considered. PMID:17474028

  20. Bilateral robots for upper-limb stroke rehabilitation: State of the art and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Bo; Zhang, Yanxin; Meng, Wei; Deng, Chao; Xie, Shengquan

    2016-07-01

    Robot-assisted bilateral upper-limb training grows abundantly for stroke rehabilitation in recent years and an increasing number of devices and robots have been developed. This paper aims to provide a systematic overview and evaluation of existing bilateral upper-limb rehabilitation devices and robots based on their mechanisms and clinical-outcomes. Most of the articles studied here were searched from nine online databases and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) from year 1993 to 2015. Devices and robots were categorized as end-effectors, exoskeletons and industrial robots. Totally ten end-effectors, one exoskeleton and one industrial robot were evaluated in terms of their mechanical characteristics, degrees of freedom (DOF), supported control modes, clinical applicability and outcomes. Preliminary clinical results of these studies showed that all participants could gain certain improvements in terms of range of motion, strength or physical function after training. Only four studies supported that bilateral training was better than unilateral training. However, most of clinical results cannot definitely verify the effectiveness of mechanisms and clinical protocols used in robotic therapies. To explore the actual value of these robots and devices, further research on ingenious mechanisms, dose-matched clinical protocols and universal evaluation criteria should be conducted in the future.

  1. A Serious Game for Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation Using Biofeedback and Mirror-Neurons Based Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnin, Diego João; Cordeiro d'Ornellas, Marcos; Cervi Prado, Ana Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Upper limb stroke rehabilitation requires early, intensive and repetitive practice to be effective. Consequently, it is often difficult to keep patients committed to their rehabilitation regimen. In addition to direct measures of rehabilitation achievable through targeted assessments, other factors can indirectly lead to rehabilitation. Current levels of integration between commodity graphics software, hardware, and body-tracking devices have provided a reliable tool to build what are referred to as serious games, focusing on the rehabilitation paradigm. More specifically, serious games can captivate and engage players for a specific purpose such as developing new knowledge or skills. This paper discusses a serious game application with a focus on upper limb rehabilitation in patients with hemiplegia or hemiparesis. The game makes use of biofeedback and mirror-neurons to enhance the patient's engagement. Results from the application of a quantitative self-report instrument to assess in-game engagement suggest that the serious game is a viable instructional approach rather than an entertaining novelty and, furthermore, demonstrates the future potential for dual action therapy-focused games. PMID:26262069

  2. Inadvertent recovery in communication deficits following the upper limb mirror therapy in stroke: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Kamal Narayan; Pandian, Shanta

    2014-10-01

    Broca's aphasia is the most challenging communication deficit in stroke. Left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), a key region of the mirror-neuron system, gets lesioned in Broca's aphasia. Mirror therapy (MT), a form of action-observation, may trigger the mirror neurons. The aim of this study was to report a case of poststroke subject with Broca's aphasia, who exhibited an inadvertent and significant improvement in speech after MT for the paretic upper limb. The 20-month old stroke patient underwent MT through goal-directed tasks. He received a total absence of spontaneous speech, writing, and naming. After 45 sessions of task-based MT for the upper limb, he showed tremendous recovery in expressive communication. He had fluent and comprehensive communication; however, with a low pitch and minor pronunciation errors. He showed a substantial change (from 18/100 to 79/100) on the Communicative Effective Index, particularly, on items such as expressing emotions, one-to-one conversation, naming, and spontaneous conversation. PMID:25440208

  3. Bilateral robots for upper-limb stroke rehabilitation: State of the art and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Bo; Zhang, Yanxin; Meng, Wei; Deng, Chao; Xie, Shengquan

    2016-07-01

    Robot-assisted bilateral upper-limb training grows abundantly for stroke rehabilitation in recent years and an increasing number of devices and robots have been developed. This paper aims to provide a systematic overview and evaluation of existing bilateral upper-limb rehabilitation devices and robots based on their mechanisms and clinical-outcomes. Most of the articles studied here were searched from nine online databases and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) from year 1993 to 2015. Devices and robots were categorized as end-effectors, exoskeletons and industrial robots. Totally ten end-effectors, one exoskeleton and one industrial robot were evaluated in terms of their mechanical characteristics, degrees of freedom (DOF), supported control modes, clinical applicability and outcomes. Preliminary clinical results of these studies showed that all participants could gain certain improvements in terms of range of motion, strength or physical function after training. Only four studies supported that bilateral training was better than unilateral training. However, most of clinical results cannot definitely verify the effectiveness of mechanisms and clinical protocols used in robotic therapies. To explore the actual value of these robots and devices, further research on ingenious mechanisms, dose-matched clinical protocols and universal evaluation criteria should be conducted in the future. PMID:27117423

  4. A Pre-Clinical Framework for Neural Control of a Therapeutic Upper-Limb Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Amy; O'Malley, Marcia K; Francisco, Gerard E; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize a novel approach to robotic rehabilitation that capitalizes on the benefits of patient intent and real-time assessment of impairment. Specifically, an upper-limb, physical human-robot interface (the MAHI EXO-II robotic exoskeleton) is augmented with a non-invasive brain-machine interface (BMI) to include the patient in the control loop, thereby making the therapy 'active' and engaging patients across a broad spectrum of impairment severity in the rehabilitation tasks. Robotic measures of motor impairment are derived from real-time sensor data from the MAHI EXO-II and the BMI. These measures can be validated through correlation with widely used clinical measures and used to drive patient-specific therapy sessions adapted to the capabilities of the individual, with the MAHI EXO-II providing assistance or challenging the participant as appropriate to maximize rehabilitation outcomes. This approach to robotic rehabilitation takes a step towards the seamless integration of BMIs and intelligent exoskeletons to create systems that can monitor and interface with brain activity and movement. Such systems will enable more focused study of various issues in development of devices and rehabilitation strategies, including interpretation of measurement data from a variety of sources, exploration of hypotheses regarding large scale brain function during robotic rehabilitation, and optimization of device design and training programs for restoring upper limb function after stroke. PMID:24887296

  5. A Pre-Clinical Framework for Neural Control of a Therapeutic Upper-Limb Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Amy; O'Malley, Marcia K; Francisco, Gerard E; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize a novel approach to robotic rehabilitation that capitalizes on the benefits of patient intent and real-time assessment of impairment. Specifically, an upper-limb, physical human-robot interface (the MAHI EXO-II robotic exoskeleton) is augmented with a non-invasive brain-machine interface (BMI) to include the patient in the control loop, thereby making the therapy 'active' and engaging patients across a broad spectrum of impairment severity in the rehabilitation tasks. Robotic measures of motor impairment are derived from real-time sensor data from the MAHI EXO-II and the BMI. These measures can be validated through correlation with widely used clinical measures and used to drive patient-specific therapy sessions adapted to the capabilities of the individual, with the MAHI EXO-II providing assistance or challenging the participant as appropriate to maximize rehabilitation outcomes. This approach to robotic rehabilitation takes a step towards the seamless integration of BMIs and intelligent exoskeletons to create systems that can monitor and interface with brain activity and movement. Such systems will enable more focused study of various issues in development of devices and rehabilitation strategies, including interpretation of measurement data from a variety of sources, exploration of hypotheses regarding large scale brain function during robotic rehabilitation, and optimization of device design and training programs for restoring upper limb function after stroke.

  6. Therapeutic Efficacy Analysis of Balancing Yin-yang Manipulation for Post-stroke Upper Limb Spasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Hua-feng; Gao Guo-qiang; Wang Yan-li; Yu Xiao-hua; Guo Li; Ren Shuo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of balancing yin-yang needling manipulation on post-stroke upper limb spasticity and changes of electromyography (EMG) after treatment. Methods: A total of 60 eligible cases were randomly allocated into an observation group and a control group, 30 in each group. Based on routine medication, cases in the control group were treated with conventional needling manipulation, whereas cases in the observation group were treated with balancing yin-yang manipulation. After the courses of treatment were completed, the therapeutic efficacies were evaluated using modified Ashworth scale and clinical spasticity index (CSI), coupled with the integrated electromyography (IEMG) and root mean square (RMS) value of biceps in passive flexion of the elbow joint during isokinetic testing recorded with the surface EMG. Results: The total effective rate in the observation group was 86.7%, versus 53.3% in the control group, showing a statistical significance (P Conclusion:Balancing yin-yang and conventional needling manipulations can both improve upper limb spasm and reduce CSI as well as IEMG and RMS values in stroke patients;however, balancing yin-yang manipulation is better than conventional manipulation in clinical effect.

  7. COMPARISON OF MOTOR AND SENSORY NERVE CONDUCTION IN UPPER LIMB OF DIABETICS AND NON DIABETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological properties of nerve and muscle are usually modified due to patho physiological changes resulting from many diseases like diabetes. Impaired mobility and compromised dexterity leading to difficulties in daily life. Hand function in diabetes is affected mainly due to involvement of median nerve. Diabetic neuropathy the c ommon complication of diabetes can be assessed electro physiologically by nerve conduction studies. Therefore, we analyzed both motor and sensory nerve conduction on upper limb nerves. Distal latency, Amplitude and conduction velocity were measured in both upper limbs by using RMS EMG EP II machine with surface and ring electrodes. It was found that distal latencies of both nerves were higher in diabetics than non - diabetics. The difference was statistically significant. Motor responses are more reduced bel ow normal as compared with sensory responses in diabetics. Our study also revealed decreased amplitude and conduction velocity among cases. Our findings conclude that the nerve conduction studies are important in early detection of peripheral neuropathy so that prevention and management can be done in earliest possible way.

  8. E2Rebot: A robotic platform for upper limb rehabilitation in patients with neuromotor disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Fraile

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of robotic platforms for neuro-rehabilitation may boost the neural plasticity process and improve motor recovery in patients with upper limb mobility impairment as a consequence of an acquired brain injury. A robotic platform for this aim must provide ergonomic and friendly design, human safety, intensive task-oriented therapy, and assistive forces. Its implementation is a complex process that involves new developments in the mechanical, electronics, and control fields. This article presents the end-effector rehabilitation robot, a 2-degree-of-freedom planar robotic platform for upper limb rehabilitation in patients with neuromotor disability after a stroke. We describe the ergonomic mechanical design, the system control architecture, and the rehabilitation therapies that can be performed. The impedance-based haptic controller implemented in end-effector rehabilitation robot uses the information provided by a JR3 force sensor to achieve an efficient and friendly patient–robot interaction. Two task-oriented therapy modes have been implemented based on the “assist as needed” paradigm. As a result, the amount of support provided by the robot adapts to the patient’s requirements, maintaining the therapy as intensive as possible without compromising the patient’s health and safety and promoting engagement.

  9. Posture-movement responses to stance perturbations and upper limb fatigue during a repetitive pointing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jason R; Fung, Joyce; Côté, Julie N

    2013-08-01

    Localized muscle fatigue and postural perturbation have separately been shown to alter whole-body movement but little is known about how humans respond when subjected to both factors combined. Here we sought to quantify the kinematics of postural control and repetitive upper limb movement during standing surface perturbations and in the presence of fatigue. Subjects stood on a motion-based platform and repetitively reached between two shoulder-height targets until noticeably fatigued (rating of perceived exertion=8/10). Every minute, subjects experienced a posterior and an anterior platform translation while reaching to the distal target. Outcomes were compared prior to and with fatigue (first vs. final minute data). When fatigued, regardless of the perturbation condition, subjects decreased their shoulder abduction and increased contralateral trunk flexion, a strategy that may relieve the load on the fatiguing upper limb musculature. During perturbations, kinematic adaptations emerged across the trunk and arm to preserve task performance. In contrast to our expectation, the kinematic response to the perturbations did not alter in the presence of fatigue. Kinematic adaptations in response to the perturbation predominantly occurred in the direction of the reach whereas fatigue adaptations occurred orthogonal to the reach. These findings suggest that during repetitive reaching, fatigue and postural perturbation compensations organize so as to minimize interaction with each other and preserve the global task characteristics of endpoint motion. PMID:24054899

  10. Robotic unilateral and bilateral upper-limb movement training for stroke survivors afflicted by chronic hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkins, Matt; Kim, Hyuchul; Abrams, Gary; Byl, Nancy; Rosen, Jacob

    2013-06-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of long-term neurological disability and the principle reason for seeking rehabilitative services in the US. Learning based rehabilitation training enables independent mobility in the majority of patients post stroke, however, restoration of fine manipulation, motor function and task specific functions of the hemiplegic arm and hand is noted in fewer than 15% of the stroke patients. Brain plasticity is the innate mechanism enabling the recovery of motor skills through neurological reorganization of the brain as a response to limbs' manipulation. The objective of this research was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy for the upper limbs with a dual arm exoskeleton system (EXO-UL7) using three different modalities: bilateral mirror image with symmetric movements of both arms, unilateral movement of the affected arm and standard care. Five hemiparetic subjects were randomly assigned to each therapy modality. An upper limb exoskeleton was used to provide bilateral and unilateral treatments. Standard care was provided by a licensed physical therapist. Subjects were evaluated before and after the interventions using 13 different clinical measures. Following these treatments all of the subjects demonstrated significant improved of their fine motor control and gross control across all the treatment modalities. Subjects exhibited significant improvements in range of motion of the shoulder, and improved muscle strength for bilateral training and standard care, but not for unilateral training. In conclusion, a synergetic approach in which robotic treatments (unilateral and bilateral depending on the level of the motor control) are supplemented by the standard of care may maximize the outcome of the motor control recover following stroke. PMID:24187321

  11. Relationships between power and strength of the upper and lower limb muscles and throwing velocity in male handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel; Hermassi, Souhail; Shephard, Roy J

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate relationships between peak power (PP) as measured by upper limb (PPUL) and lower limb (PPLL) force-velocity tests, maximal upper limb force assessed by 1 repetition maximum bench press (1RMBP), and pullover (1RMPO) exercises, estimates of local muscle volume and 3-step running handball throwing velocity (T3-Steps). Fourteen male handball players volunteered for the investigation (age: 19.6+/-0.6 years; body mass: 86.7+/-12.9 kg; and height 1.87+/-0.07 m). Lower and upper limb force-velocity tests were performed on appropriately modified forms of a Monark cycle ergometer, with measurement of PPUL and PPLL, and the corresponding respective maximal forces (F0UL and F0LL) and velocities (V0UL and V0LL). T3-Steps was assessed using a radar Stalker ATS system. Muscle volumes of the upper and lower limbs were estimated with a standard anthropometric kit. T3-Steps was closely related to absolute PPUL and to F0UL (r=0.69, plimb muscle volume, the relationship with T3-Steps disappeared. This suggests the importance of muscle volume to performance in throwing events. Force-velocity data may prove useful in regulating conditioning and rehabilitation programs for handball players. Our results also highlight the contribution of both the lower and the upper limbs to handball throwing velocity, suggesting the need for coaches to include upper and lower limb strength and power programs when improving the throwing velocity of handball players.

  12. Detecting Elementary Arm Movements by Tracking Upper Limb Joint Angles With MARG Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazomenos, Evangelos B; Biswas, Dwaipayan; Cranny, Andy; Rajan, Amal; Maharatna, Koushik; Achner, Josy; Klemke, Jasmin; Jobges, Michael; Ortmann, Steffen; Langendorfer, Peter

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports an algorithm for the detection of three elementary upper limb movements, i.e., reach and retrieve, bend the arm at the elbow and rotation of the arm about the long axis. We employ two MARG sensors, attached at the elbow and wrist, from which the kinematic properties (joint angles, position) of the upper arm and forearm are calculated through data fusion using a quaternion-based gradient-descent method and a two-link model of the upper limb. By studying the kinematic patterns of the three movements on a small dataset, we derive discriminative features that are indicative of each movement; these are then used to formulate the proposed detection algorithm. Our novel approach of employing the joint angles and position to discriminate the three fundamental movements was evaluated in a series of experiments with 22 volunteers who participated in the study: 18 healthy subjects and four stroke survivors. In a controlled experiment, each volunteer was instructed to perform each movement a number of times. This was complimented by a seminaturalistic experiment where the volunteers performed the same movements as subtasks of an activity that emulated the preparation of a cup of tea. In the stroke survivors group, the overall detection accuracy for all three movements was 93.75% and 83.00%, for the controlled and seminaturalistic experiment, respectively. The performance was higher in the healthy group where 96.85% of the tasks in the controlled experiment and 89.69% in the seminaturalistic were detected correctly. Finally, the detection ratio remains close ( ±6%) to the average value, for different task durations further attesting to the algorithms robustness. PMID:25966489

  13. Upper limb joint motion of two different user groups during manual wheelchair propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seonhong; Kim, Seunghyeon; Son, Jongsang; Lee, Jinbok; Kim, Youngho

    2013-02-01

    Manual wheelchair users have a high risk of injury to the upper extremities. Recent studies have focused on kinematic and kinetic analyses of manual wheelchair propulsion in order to understand the physical demands on wheelchair users. The purpose of this study was to investigate upper limb joint motion by using a motion capture system and a dynamometer with two different groups of wheelchair users propelling their wheelchairs at different speeds under different load conditions. The variations in the contact time, release time, and linear velocity of the experienced group were all larger than they were in the novice group. The propulsion angles of the experienced users were larger than those of the novices under all conditions. The variances in the propulsion force (both radial and tangential) of the experienced users were larger than those of the novices. The shoulder joint moment had the largest variance with the conditions, followed by the wrist joint moment and the elbow joint moment. The variance of the maximum shoulder joint moment was over four times the variance of the maximum wrist joint moment and eight times the maximum elbow joint moment. The maximum joint moments increased significantly as the speed and load increased in both groups. Quick and significant manipulation ability based on environmental changes is considered an important factor in efficient propulsion. This efficiency was confirmed from the propulsion power results. Sophisticated strategies for efficient manual wheelchair propulsion could be understood by observation of the physical responses of each upper limb joint to changes in load and speed. We expect that the findings of this study will be utilized for designing a rehabilitation program to reduce injuries.

  14. A neural tracking and motor control approach to improve rehabilitation of upper limb movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Maurizio

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restoration of upper limb movements in subjects recovering from stroke is an essential keystone in rehabilitative practices. Rehabilitation of arm movements, in fact, is usually a far more difficult one as compared to that of lower extremities. For these reasons, researchers are developing new methods and technologies so that the rehabilitative process could be more accurate, rapid and easily accepted by the patient. This paper introduces the proof of concept for a new non-invasive FES-assisted rehabilitation system for the upper limb, called smartFES (sFES, where the electrical stimulation is controlled by a biologically inspired neural inverse dynamics model, fed by the kinematic information associated with the execution of a planar goal-oriented movement. More specifically, this work details two steps of the proposed system: an ad hoc markerless motion analysis algorithm for the estimation of kinematics, and a neural controller that drives a synthetic arm. The vision of the entire system is to acquire kinematics from the analysis of video sequences during planar arm movements and to use it together with a neural inverse dynamics model able to provide the patient with the electrical stimulation patterns needed to perform the movement with the assisted limb. Methods The markerless motion tracking system aims at localizing and monitoring the arm movement by tracking its silhouette. It uses a specifically designed motion estimation method, that we named Neural Snakes, which predicts the arm contour deformation as a first step for a silhouette extraction algorithm. The starting and ending points of the arm movement feed an Artificial Neural Controller, enclosing the muscular Hill's model, which solves the inverse dynamics to obtain the FES patterns needed to move a simulated arm from the starting point to the desired point. Both position error with respect to the requested arm trajectory and comparison between curvature factors

  15. Application of the vacuum sealing drainage in amputation of the patient with critical limb ischemia%负压封闭引流在重症肢端缺血患者截肢术中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚凯; 黄道景; 张亚明; 范跃祖

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical effectiveness of application of the vacuum sealing drainage( VSD) in amputation of the patient with critical limb ischemia. Methods: The data of 66 amputated patients with critical limb ischemia gangrene were reviewed retrospectively. Of 35 patients, VSD was applied to treat wound after the limb amputated, the wound was sutured secondarily after 7 days; of 31 patients, the wound closure was performed at the first stage. The wound healing conditions, the complication, the hospital time and cost were evaluated between two groups. Results: In the VSD group,the wound healing rate was 91% ;the wound infection rate was O;the mortality rate was 9% ;the median length of hospital stay was 23. 5 days;the median hospital cost was 14 485 yuan; in the first-stage suturing group, the wound healing rate was 52% ; the wound infection rate was 42% ; the mortality rate was 19% ;the median length of hospital stay was 58. 8 days;the median hospital cost was 32 213 yuan. There was a significant difference between two groups(P <0. 01). Conclusion: Application of the VSD in amputation of the patient with critical limb ischemia plays a positive role in the prevention of wound infection, promoting wound healing,reducing mortality,reducing hospital time and cost,etc,which is recommended to adopted widely.%目的:探讨负压封闭引流(VSD)技术在重症肢端缺血患者截肢术中应用的临床价值.方法:回顾性分析66例重症肢体缺血坏疽截肢术患者的临床资料.35例患者(VSD组)在离断肢体后先应用VSD技术治疗创面,7d后再二期缝合伤口;31例患者(对照组)离断肢体后一期缝合残端伤口.观察两组患者术后伤口愈合情况、并发症、住院时间和治疗费用.结果:VSD组患者伤口愈合率为91%,感染率为0,死亡率为9%,平均住院时间为23.5 d,平均费用为14 485元;对照组患者伤口愈合率52%,感染率42%,死亡率19%,平均住院时间58.8 d,平均费用32 213

  16. Lower limb deficient children in The Netherlands: epidemiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, L J; Boonstra, A M; Groothoff, J W; Cornel, M C; Eisma, W H

    2000-04-01

    Information on the characteristics of children with limb deficiencies and amputations in The Netherlands is largely lacking. The present study aimed to collect data about the prevalence of congenital deficiencies, the ratio of congenital to acquired limb deficiencies, types of lower leg deficiency or amputation and male/female ratios. Data were obtained from a regional birth defects registry for the northern part of The Netherlands (EUROCAT-NNL) and from a national survey. Inclusion criteria for the selection of the EUROCAT data were: children/foetuses with lower leg deficiencies born in 1981-1986. Inclusion criteria for the survey data were: children aged 1-18 years with congenital deficiencies or acquired amputations of the leg, excluding toe deficiencies/amputations. Both the regional birth defects registry and the national survey only yielded small numbers of children, which limits the validity of the authors' findings. The Eurocat data show a prevalence of lower leg deficiencies at birth of 2.07/10,000. Fifty-five (55) children/foetuses were included in the present study. The male/female ratio was 1:1. Of the live-born children, 30% also had defects of the upper limbs, while 38% had bilateral lower limb deficiencies. The national survey included 89 children, of whom 73% had congenital deficiencies, while the others had undergone amputations: of which 37% were due to malignancies, 29% to traumata, 13% to infections and 21% to other pathology. The male/female ratio was 7:3 for the children with congenital deficiencies versus 6:4 for the children with acquired amputations. In the group of congenital deficiencies, fibula deficiency was most frequently seen (36%), while in the group with acquired amputations trans-femoral amputation, knee disarticulation and trans-tibial amputation were seen with equal frequency (21%). In 40% of the children with congenital deficiency and in 8% of the children with acquired amputations the arm was also affected. Both legs were

  17. Foot amputation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation - foot - discharge; Trans-metatarsal amputation - discharge ... You have had a foot amputation. You may have had an accident, or your foot may have had an infection or disease and doctors could ...

  18. Development of risk filter and risk assessment worksheets for HSE guidance--'Upper Limb Disorders in the Workplace' 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Rod J; Way, Kïrsten; Riley, David; Lawton, Clare; Morris, Len

    2004-09-01

    Upper limb disorders (ULDs) in the workplace represent a significant cause of ill health in Great Britain. As part of the Health and Safety Commission's strategy for the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), the well known guidance document on ULDs--"Work-related Upper Limb Disorders: a Guide to Prevention" (HSG60), (HMSO, London.), has been extensively revised. This revision (Upper limb disorders in the workplace. HSG60 (rev), HSE Books, Sudbury.) includes the development of new risk assessment tools that can be used by employers to identify ULD risk factors in work activities and more importantly to take action to reduce or eliminate ULD risks. The risk assessment tools form part of a seven stage management approach that underpins the new guidance. This paper outlines the development of the risk assessment tools contained in the revised guidance.

  19. Comparing unilateral and bilateral upper limb training: The ULTRA-stroke program design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koppe Peter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 80% of all stroke survivors have an upper limb paresis immediately after stroke, only about a third of whom (30 to 40% regain some dexterity within six months following conventional treatment programs. Of late, however, two recently developed interventions - constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT and bilateral arm training with rhythmic auditory cueing (BATRAC - have shown promising results in the treatment of upper limb paresis in chronic stroke patients. The ULTRA-stroke (acronym for Upper Limb TRaining After stroke program was conceived to assess the effectiveness of these interventions in subacute stroke patients and to examine how the observed changes in sensori-motor functioning relate to changes in stroke recovery mechanisms associated with peripheral stiffness, interlimb interactions, and cortical inter- and intrahemispheric networks. The present paper describes the design of this single-blinded randomized clinical trial (RCT, which has recently started and will take several years to complete. Methods/Design Sixty patients with a first ever stroke will be recruited. Patients will be stratified in terms of their remaining motor ability at the distal part of the arm (i.e., wrist and finger movements and randomized over three intervention groups receiving modified CIMT, modified BATRAC, or an equally intensive (i.e., dose-matched conventional treatment program for 6 weeks. Primary outcome variable is the score on the Action Research Arm test (ARAT, which will be assessed before, directly after, and 6 weeks after the intervention. During those test sessions all patients will also undergo measurements aimed at investigating the associated recovery mechanisms using haptic robots and magneto-encephalography (MEG. Discussion ULTRA-stroke is a 3-year translational research program which aims (1 to assess the relative effectiveness of the three interventions, on a group level but also as a function of patient

  20. Robotic assessment of the influence of age on upper-limb sensorimotor function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LLinares A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ana LLinares, Francisco Javier Badesa, Ricardo Morales, Nicolas Garcia-Aracil, JM Sabater, Eduardo Fernandez Biomedical Neuroengineering, Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche, Elche, Spain Purpose: This paper examines the influence of age on several attributes of sensorimotor performance while performing a reaching task. Our hypothesis, based on previous studies, is that aged persons will show differences in one or more of the attributes of sensorimotor performance. Patients and methods: Fifty-one subjects (aged 20–80 years with no known neuromotor disorders of the upper limbs participated in the study. Subjects were asked to grasp the end-effector of a pneumatic robotic device with two degrees of freedom in order to reach peripheral targets (1.0 cm radius, "quickly and accurately", from a centrally located target (1.0 cm radius. Subjects began each trial by holding the hand within the central target for 2000 milliseconds. Afterwards, a peripheral target was illuminated. Then participants were given 3000 milliseconds to complete the movement. When a target was reached, the participant had to return to the central target in order to start a new trial. A total of 64 trials were completed and each peripheral target was illuminated in a random block design. Results: Subjects were divided into three groups according to age: group 1 (age 20–40 years, group 2 (age 41–60 years, and group 3 (age 61–80 years. The Kruskal–Wallis test showed significant differences (P < 0.05 between groups, except for the variables postural speed in the dominant arm, and postural speed and initial deviation in the non-dominant arm (P > 0.05. These results suggest that age introduces significant differences in upper-limb motor function. Conclusion: Our findings show that there are objective differences in sensorimotor function due to age, and that these differences are greater for the dominant arm. Therefore for the assessment of upper-limb function, we should

  1. Estimation of upper-limb orientation based on accelerometer and gyroscope measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Rick A; Ketteringham, Laurence P; Neild, Simon A; Jones, Rosie S

    2008-02-01

    A solution is proposed to the estimation of upper-limb orientation using miniature accelerometers and gyroscopes. This type of measurement device has many different possible applications, ranging from clinical use with patients presenting a number of conditions such as upper motor neuron syndrome and pathologies that give rise to loss of dexterity, to competitive sports training and virtual reality. Here we focus on a design that minimizes the number of sensors whilst delivering estimates of known accuracy over a defined frequency range. Minimizing the sensor count can make the measurement system less obtrusive, as well as minimising cost and reducing the required bandwidth if using a wireless solution. Accurate measurement of movement amplitude up to 15 Hz is required in our immediate application, namely to quantify tremor in multiple sclerosis patients. The drive for low numbers of sensors and good accuracy at higher frequencies leads to a novel design based on composite filters. The simple estimator structure also gives good insight into the fundamental accuracy limitations based on the sensors chosen. This paper defines the underlying mathematics, and quantifies performance for an estimator for shoulder, upper arm, lower arm and hand orientations. Good estimation accuracy up to 15 Hz is indicated, and this with a reduced total sensor count of 18 compared to 24 that would be required for more conventional estimator architectures. PMID:18270013

  2. Investigation of Risk Factors of Work-Related Upper-Limb Musculoskeletal Disorders in a Pharmaceutical Industry or Research Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmahabadian, Mohammad; Akhavan, Mehdi; Azam, Kamal

    This study was performed among workers of an Iranian pharmaceutical industry with the aiming to determine WRMDs prevalence and exposure assessment of WRMDs risks. In this cross-sectional study, 84 female and male workers randomly selected from five packing operations. Modified Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was applied to study the prevalence of WRMDs and Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) method was used for the evaluation of the exposure to risk factors associated with work-related upper limb disorders. Results showed a significant association exists between neck, lower arm and A scores group with those obtained by self-reported pain (pindustry.

  3. Upper-Limb Robotic Exoskeletons for Neurorehabilitation: A Review on Control Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Tommaso; Crocher, Vincent; Roby-Brami, Agnes; Jarrasse, Nathanael

    2016-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, there has been a burst of research on robotic devices for poststroke rehabilitation. Robot-mediated therapy produced improvements on recovery of motor capacity; however, so far, the use of robots has not shown qualitative benefit over classical therapist-led training sessions, performed on the same quantity of movements. Multidegree-of-freedom robots, like the modern upper-limb exoskeletons, enable a distributed interaction on the whole assisted limb and can exploit a large amount of sensory feedback data, potentially providing new capabilities within standard rehabilitation sessions. Surprisingly, most publications in the field of exoskeletons focused only on mechatronic design of the devices, while little details were given to the control aspects. On the contrary, we believe a paramount aspect for robots potentiality lies on the control side. Therefore, the aim of this review is to provide a taxonomy of currently available control strategies for exoskeletons for neurorehabilitation, in order to formulate appropriate questions toward the development of innovative and improved control strategies. PMID:27071194

  4. Detecting the Intention to Move Upper Limbs from Electroencephalographic Brain Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiño-Mendoza, Berenice; Sanchez-Ante, Gildardo; Antelis, Javier M.

    2016-01-01

    Early decoding of motor states directly from the brain activity is essential to develop brain-machine interfaces (BMI) for natural motor control of neuroprosthetic devices. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the detection of movement information before the actual movement occurs. This information piece could be useful to provide early control signals to drive BMI-based rehabilitation and motor assisted devices, thus providing a natural and active rehabilitation therapy. In this work, electroencephalographic (EEG) brain signals from six healthy right-handed participants were recorded during self-initiated reaching movements of the upper limbs. The analysis of these EEG traces showed that significant event-related desynchronization is present before and during the execution of the movements, predominantly in the motor-related α and β frequency bands and in electrodes placed above the motor cortex. This oscillatory brain activity was used to continuously detect the intention to move the limbs, that is, to identify the motor phase prior to the actual execution of the reaching movement. The results showed, first, significant classification between relax and movement intention and, second, significant detection of movement intention prior to the onset of the executed movement. On the basis of these results, detection of movement intention could be used in BMI settings to reduce the gap between mental motor processes and the actual movement performed by an assisted or rehabilitation robotic device. PMID:27217826

  5. Detecting the Intention to Move Upper Limbs from Electroencephalographic Brain Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice Gudiño-Mendoza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early decoding of motor states directly from the brain activity is essential to develop brain-machine interfaces (BMI for natural motor control of neuroprosthetic devices. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the detection of movement information before the actual movement occurs. This information piece could be useful to provide early control signals to drive BMI-based rehabilitation and motor assisted devices, thus providing a natural and active rehabilitation therapy. In this work, electroencephalographic (EEG brain signals from six healthy right-handed participants were recorded during self-initiated reaching movements of the upper limbs. The analysis of these EEG traces showed that significant event-related desynchronization is present before and during the execution of the movements, predominantly in the motor-related α and β frequency bands and in electrodes placed above the motor cortex. This oscillatory brain activity was used to continuously detect the intention to move the limbs, that is, to identify the motor phase prior to the actual execution of the reaching movement. The results showed, first, significant classification between relax and movement intention and, second, significant detection of movement intention prior to the onset of the executed movement. On the basis of these results, detection of movement intention could be used in BMI settings to reduce the gap between mental motor processes and the actual movement performed by an assisted or rehabilitation robotic device.

  6. High-density force myography: A possible alternative for upper-limb prosthetic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Radmand, PhD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Several multiple degree-of-freedom upper-limb prostheses that have the promise of highly dexterous control have recently been developed. Inadequate controllability, however, has limited adoption of these devices. Introducing more robust control methods will likely result in higher acceptance rates. This work investigates the suitability of using high-density force myography (HD-FMG for prosthetic control. HD-FMG uses a high-density array of pressure sensors to detect changes in the pressure patterns between the residual limb and socket caused by the contraction of the forearm muscles. In this work, HD-FMG outperforms the standard electromyography (EMG-based system in detecting different wrist and hand gestures. With the arm in a fixed, static position, eight hand and wrist motions were classified with 0.33% error using the HD-FMG technique. Comparatively, classification errors in the range of 2.2%–11.3% have been reported in the literature for multichannel EMG-based approaches. As with EMG, position variation in HD-FMG can introduce classification error, but incorporating position variation into the training protocol reduces this effect. Channel reduction was also applied to the HD-FMG technique to decrease the dimensionality of the problem as well as the size of the sensorized area. We found that with informed, symmetric channel reduction, classification error could be decreased to 0.02%.

  7. Effect of muscular fatigue on fractal upper limb coordination dynamics and muscle synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Diana R; Lizano, J M; Montano, L

    2015-08-01

    Rehabilitation exercises cause fatigue because tasks are repetitive. Therefore, inevitable human motion performance changes occur during the therapy. Although traditionally fatigue is considered an event that occurs in the musculoskeletal level, this paper studies whether fatigue can be regarded as context that influences lower-dimensional motor control organization and coordination at neural level. Non Negative Factorization Matrix (NNFM) and Detrended Fluctuations Analysis (DFA) are the tools used to analyze the changes in the coordination of motor function when someone is affected by fatigue. The study establishes that synergies remain fairly stable with the onset of fatigue, but the fatigue affects the dynamical coordination understood as a cognitive process. These results have been validated with 9 healthy subjects for three representative exercises for upper limb: biceps, triceps and deltoid. PMID:26737679

  8. Design of a Workstation for People with Upper-Limb Disabilities Using a Brain Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Muñoz-Cardona

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available  This paper shows the design of work-station for work-related inclusion people upper-limb disability. The system involves the use of novel brain computer interface used to bridge the user-computer interaction. Our hope objective is elucidating functional, technological, ergonomic and procedural aspects to runaway operation station; with propose to scratch barrier to impossibility access to TIC’s tools and work done for individual disability person. We found access facility ergonomics, adaptability and portable issue of workstation are most important design criteria. Prototype implementations in workplace environment have TIR estimate of 43% for retrieve. Finally we list a typology of services that could be the most appropriate for the process of labor including: telemarketing, telesales, telephone surveys, order taking, social assistance in disasters, general information and inquiries, reservations at tourist sites, technical support, emergency, online support and after-sales services.

  9. Control system design for electrical stimulation in upper limb rehabilitation modelling, identification and robust performance

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, Chris

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive framework for model-based electrical stimulation (ES) controller design, covering the whole process needed to develop a system for helping people with physical impairments perform functional upper limb tasks such as eating, grasping and manipulating objects. The book first demonstrates procedures for modelling and identifying biomechanical models of the response of ES, covering a wide variety of aspects including mechanical support structures, kinematics, electrode placement, tasks, and sensor locations. It then goes on to demonstrate how complex functional activities of daily living can be captured in the form of optimisation problems, and extends ES control design to address this case. It then lays out a design methodology, stability conditions, and robust performance criteria that enable control schemes to be developed systematically and transparently, ensuring that they can operate effectively in the presence of realistic modelling uncertainty, physiological variation an...

  10. Neuromuscular Activity of Upper and Lower Limbs during two Backstroke Swimming Start Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Karla; De Jesus, Kelly; Medeiros, Alexandre I. A.; Gonçalves, Pedro; Figueiredo, Pedro; Fernandes, Ricardo J.; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    A proficient start is decisive in sprint competitive swimming events and requires swimmers’ to exert maximal forces in a short period to complete the task successfully. The aim of this study was to compare the electromyographic (EMG) activity in-between the backstroke start with feet positioned parallel and partially emerged performed with the hands on the highest horizontal and on the vertical handgrip at hands-off, take-off, flight and entry start phases. EMG comparisons between starting variants were supported by upper and lower limb joint angles at starting position and 15 m start time data. Following a four-week start training to familiarize participants with each start variant, 10 male competitive backstroke swimmers performed randomly six 15 m maximal trials, being three of each start variant. Surface EMG of Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Rectus Femoris, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis and Tibialis Anterior was recorded and processed using the time integral EMG (iEMG). Eight video cameras (four surface and four underwater) were used to determine backstroke start phases and joint angles at starting position. EMG, joint angles and temporal parameters have not evidenced changes due to the different handgrips. Nevertheless, clear differences were observed in both variants for upper and lower limb muscles activity among starting phases (e.g. Biceps Brachii at take-off vs. flight phase, 15.17% ± 2.76% and 22.38% ± 4.25%; 14.24% ± 7.11% and 25.90% ± 8.65%, for variant with hands horizontal and vertically positioned, respectively). It was concluded that different handgrips did not affect EMG, kinematics and temporal profile in backstroke start. Despite coaches might plan similar strength training for both start variants, further attention should be given on the selection of proper exercises to maximize the contribution of relevant muscles at different starting phases. Key points An effective swim start component (from the starting signal until the

  11. Understanding and Overcoming Barriers to Upper Limb Surgical Reconstruction After Tetraplegia: The Need for Interdisciplinary Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punj, Vandana; Curtin, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    There are approximately 300,000 persons with spinal cord injury living in the United States, and nearly 60% of these persons have suffered tetraplegia with resultant alterations in body function, activity, and therefore participation. Restoring hand function can improve independence, and various studies have shown that persons with tetraplegia rate restoration of arm and hand function higher than bowel and bladder control, walking, or sexuality. There are conservative options to improve upper limb function in this population (eg, orthoses, neuroprostheses). Surgical interventions are also available, and 70% of surgical patients report satisfaction and improvement in various activities of daily living after surgery to restore arm and hand function. Despite these positive surgical outcomes, team building across disciplines these barriers can be overcome, ultimately leading to reduced disability and improved quality of life for persons with tetraplegia. PMID:27233595

  12. EEG controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the upper limb for stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hock Guan; Shee, Cheng Yap; Kong, Keng He; Guan, Cuntai; Ang, Wei Tech

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system and the experiments to allow post-acute (Aided by visual feedback, subjects then trained to regulate their mu-rhythm EEG to operate the BCI to trigger NMES of the wrist/finger. 6 post-acute stroke patients successfully completed the training, with 4 able to learn to control and use the BCI to initiate NMES. This result is consistent with the reported BCI literacy rate of healthy subjects. Thereafter, without the loss of generality, the controller of the NMES is developed and is based on a model of the upper limb muscle (biceps/triceps) groups to determine the intensity of NMES required to flex or extend the forearm by a specific angle. The muscle model is based on a phenomenological approach, with parameters that are easily measured and conveniently implemented.

  13. Development of Quasi-3DOF upper limb rehabilitation system using ER brake: PLEMO-P1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, many researchers have studied the potential of using robotics technology to assist and quantify the motor functions for neuron-rehabilitation. Some kinds of haptic devices have been developed and evaluated its efficiency with clinical tests, for example, upper limb training for patients with spasticity after stroke. However, almost all the devices are active-type (motor-driven) haptic devices and they basically require high-cost safety system compared to passive-type (brake-based) devices. In this study, we developed a new practical haptic device 'PLEMO-P1'; this system adopted ER brakes as its force generators. In this paper, the mechanism of PLEMO-P1 and its software for a reaching rehabilitation are described.

  14. Neuromuscular Activity of Upper and Lower Limbs during two Backstroke Swimming Start Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Karla; De Jesus, Kelly; Medeiros, Alexandre I A; Gonçalves, Pedro; Figueiredo, Pedro; Fernandes, Ricardo J; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2015-09-01

    A proficient start is decisive in sprint competitive swimming events and requires swimmers' to exert maximal forces in a short period to complete the task successfully. The aim of this study was to compare the electromyographic (EMG) activity in-between the backstroke start with feet positioned parallel and partially emerged performed with the hands on the highest horizontal and on the vertical handgrip at hands-off, take-off, flight and entry start phases. EMG comparisons between starting variants were supported by upper and lower limb joint angles at starting position and 15 m start time data. Following a four-week start training to familiarize participants with each start variant, 10 male competitive backstroke swimmers performed randomly six 15 m maximal trials, being three of each start variant. Surface EMG of Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Rectus Femoris, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis and Tibialis Anterior was recorded and processed using the time integral EMG (iEMG). Eight video cameras (four surface and four underwater) were used to determine backstroke start phases and joint angles at starting position. EMG, joint angles and temporal parameters have not evidenced changes due to the different handgrips. Nevertheless, clear differences were observed in both variants for upper and lower limb muscles activity among starting phases (e.g. Biceps Brachii at take-off vs. flight phase, 15.17% ± 2.76% and 22.38% ± 4.25%; 14.24% ± 7.11% and 25.90% ± 8.65%, for variant with hands horizontal and vertically positioned, respectively). It was concluded that different handgrips did not affect EMG, kinematics and temporal profile in backstroke start. Despite coaches might plan similar strength training for both start variants, further attention should be given on the selection of proper exercises to maximize the contribution of relevant muscles at different starting phases. Key pointsAn effective swim start component (from the starting signal until the

  15. Benchmarking of dynamic simulation predictions in two software platforms using an upper limb musculoskeletal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Katherine R; Hu, Xiao; Goehler, Craig M; Vidt, Meghan E; Daly, Melissa; Velisar, Anca; Murray, Wendy M

    2015-01-01

    Several opensource or commercially available software platforms are widely used to develop dynamic simulations of movement. While computational approaches are conceptually similar across platforms, technical differences in implementation may influence output. We present a new upper limb dynamic model as a tool to evaluate potential differences in predictive behavior between platforms. We evaluated to what extent differences in technical implementations in popular simulation software environments result in differences in kinematic predictions for single and multijoint movements using EMG- and optimization-based approaches for deriving control signals. We illustrate the benchmarking comparison using SIMM-Dynamics Pipeline-SD/Fast and OpenSim platforms. The most substantial divergence results from differences in muscle model and actuator paths. This model is a valuable resource and is available for download by other researchers. The model, data, and simulation results presented here can be used by future researchers to benchmark other software platforms and software upgrades for these two platforms. PMID:24995410

  16. Development of Quasi-3DOF upper limb rehabilitation system using ER brake: PLEMO-P1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, T; Fukushima, K; Furusho, J; Ozawa, T [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: kikuchi@mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, many researchers have studied the potential of using robotics technology to assist and quantify the motor functions for neuron-rehabilitation. Some kinds of haptic devices have been developed and evaluated its efficiency with clinical tests, for example, upper limb training for patients with spasticity after stroke. However, almost all the devices are active-type (motor-driven) haptic devices and they basically require high-cost safety system compared to passive-type (brake-based) devices. In this study, we developed a new practical haptic device 'PLEMO-P1'; this system adopted ER brakes as its force generators. In this paper, the mechanism of PLEMO-P1 and its software for a reaching rehabilitation are described.

  17. Prevention of upper limb symptoms and signs of nerve afflictions in computer operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis Jepsen, Jørgen; Thomsen, Gert

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In a previous study of computer operators we have demonstrated the relation of upper limb pain to individual and patterns of neurological findings (reduced function of muscles, sensory deviations from normal and mechanical allodynia of nerve trunks). The identified patterns....... Perceived changes of pain were recorded and individual and patterns of physical findings assessed for both groups at baseline and at follow-up. In subjects with no or minimal preceding pain we additionally studied the relation of incident pain to the summarized findings for parameters contained...... in the definition of nerve affliction at the three locations. RESULTS: Summarized pain was significantly reduced in the intervention group but unchanged in controls. After the intervention, fewer neurological abnormalities in accordance with nerve affliction were recorded for the whole material but no conclusion...

  18. Coordinated upper limb training assisted with an electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Wei, X J; Rong, W; Susanto, E A; Ho, S K

    2013-01-01

    An electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot had been developed for post-stroke rehabilitation training. The effectiveness of the hand robot assisted whole upper limb training on muscular coordination was investigated on persons with chronic stroke (n=10) in this work. All subjects attended a 20-session training (3-5 times/week) by using the hand robot to practice object grasp/release and arm transportation tasks. Improvements were found in the muscle co-ordination between the antagonist muscle pair (flexor digitorum and extensor digitorum) as measured by muscle co-contractions in EMG signals; and also in the reduction of excessive muscle activities in the biceps brachii. Reduced spasticity in the fingers was also observed as measured by the Modified Ashworth Score.

  19. Characteristics of upper limb muscular strength in male wheelchair tennis players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyo-Bin; Park, Seung-Jae; Kim, Al-Chan; Jang, Jee-Hun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics of muscular strength in upper limb and to present the preliminary information for development of sports injury prevention program and exercise rehabilitation program in wheelchair tennis players. Participants were 12 male wheelchair tennis players. Muscular strength was measured in shoulder and elbow joints with isokinetic dynamometer. Ipsilateral (IR) and bilateral (BR) balance ratio were calculated with isokinetic strength at 60°/sec. As a result, extension strength (ES) was significantly higher than flexion strength (FS) (Ptennis players. It is suggested that flexor strengthening program in nondominant shoulder joint, extensor strengthening program in both elbow joint, and flexor strengthening program in non-dominant elbow joint should be introduced for male wheelchair tennis players. PMID:24278887

  20. [Remote intelligent Brunnstrom assessment system for upper limb rehabilitation for post-stroke based on extreme learning machine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Yu, Lei; Fu, Jianming; Fang, Qiang

    2014-04-01

    In order to realize an individualized and specialized rehabilitation assessment of remoteness and intelligence, we set up a remote intelligent assessment system of upper limb movement function of post-stroke patients during rehabilitation. By using the remote rehabilitation training sensors and client data sampling software, we collected and uploaded the gesture data from a patient's forearm and upper arm during rehabilitation training to database of the server. Then a remote intelligent assessment system, which had been developed based on the extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm and Brunnstrom stage assessment standard, was used to evaluate the gesture data. To evaluate the reliability of the proposed method, a group of 23 stroke patients, whose upper limb movement functions were in different recovery stages, and 4 healthy people, whose upper limb movement functions were normal, were recruited to finish the same training task. The results showed that, compared to that of the experienced rehabilitation expert who used the Brunnstrom stage standard table, the accuracy of the proposed remote Brunnstrom intelligent assessment system can reach a higher level, as 92.1%. The practical effects of surgery have proved that the proposed system could realize the intelligent assessment of upper limb movement function of post-stroke patients remotely, and it could also make the rehabilitation of the post-stroke patients at home or in a community care center possible.

  1. NORMATIVE DATA OF UPPER LIMB NERVE CONDUCTION IN YOUNG POPULATION IN AND AROUND BARPETA TOWN, ASSAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Goal of our work was to establish the data of normal nerve conduction velocity (NCV for the median and the ulnar nerves in normal healthy adults in Barpeta town area, Assam, India. METHODS Nerve conduction studies were performed prospectively in the upper limbs of 100 carefully screened, healthy individuals of either sex, who were between the ages of 20 and 60 years, by using a standardized technique. RESULTS: MOTOR STUDIES The median distal latency (DL in men was 3.48 (0.26 ms, the amplitude (CMAPA was 9.86 (1.92 mV, the conduction velocity (MNCV was 55.94 (2.94 m/s and the F-wave (min latency was 26.86 (2.12 minute. In the ulnar nerve, the motor DL was 2.3 (0.26 ms, the amplitude (CMAPA was 9.97 (3.90 mV, MNCV was 62.97 (3.90 m/s and the F-Wave (min latency was 25.98±2.41. In the sensory studies, the median nerve DL was 1.89 (0.25 ms, SNCV was 53.14±3.80 m/s and the amplitude (SNAPA was 42.69 (20.48 μV for was. For the ulnar nerve the DL was 1.89 (0.36 ms, SNCV was 56.86 (6.23 m/s and the amplitude (SNAPA was 40.92 (168.4 μV. CONCLUSION The normative conduction parameters of the commonly tested nerves in the upper limb were established in research laboratory of physiology department of our institute. The mean motor nerve conduction parameters for the median and the ulnar nerves correlated favorably with the existing literature data. However, for the sensory nerves, a higher value for the nerve action potential amplitude was demonstrated in this study.

  2. Lesões do membro superior no esporte Sports injuries of the upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Teixeira da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As lesões esportivas do membro superior são muito comuns da prática de atividades físicas e, por isso, devem ser estudadas detalhadamente, levando-se em consideração aspectos específicos da modalidades esportiva praticada. Especial atenção deve ser dada à dinâmica da articulação do ombro e toda cintura escapular, pois somente assim poderemos tratar de forma mais adequada os atletas, atuando também na prevenção das recidivas, que podem ocorrer em alguns casos devido ao fato de o atleta procurar sempre o retorno ao mesmo nível esportivo anterior à lesão. Este artigo vai focar principalmente o manejo das lesões tendíneas do membro superior, da fisiopatologia até os novos métodos de tratamento das lesões de maior prevalência na prática esportiva em nosso país.Sports injuries of the upper limbs are very common in physical activities, and need to be studied in detail, taking into consideration specific aspects of the types of sports practiced. Special attention should be paid to the dynamics of the shoulder girdle and scapular belt, as this will enable us to treat athletes more adequately, also helping prevent recurrences that can occur in some cases, due to the fact that the athlete always attempts to return to their pre-injury level of sport. This review focuses primarily on the management of upper limb tendon sports injuries, from the physiopathology through to the more common new methods of treatment in sports practice in our country.

  3. Neuromuscular Activity of Upper and Lower Limbs during two Backstroke Swimming Start Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla De Jesus, Kelly De Jesus, Alexandre I. A. Medeiros, Pedro Gonçalves, Pedro Figueiredo, Ricardo J. Fernandes, João Paulo Vilas-Boas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A proficient start is decisive in sprint competitive swimming events and requires swimmers’ to exert maximal forces in a short period to complete the task successfully. The aim of this study was to compare the electromyographic (EMG activity in-between the backstroke start with feet positioned parallel and partially emerged performed with the hands on the highest horizontal and on the vertical handgrip at hands-off, take-off, flight and entry start phases. EMG comparisons between starting variants were supported by upper and lower limb joint angles at starting position and 15 m start time data. Following a four-week start training to familiarize participants with each start variant, 10 male competitive backstroke swimmers performed randomly six 15 m maximal trials, being three of each start variant. Surface EMG of Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Rectus Femoris, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis and Tibialis Anterior was recorded and processed using the time integral EMG (iEMG. Eight video cameras (four surface and four underwater were used to determine backstroke start phases and joint angles at starting position. EMG, joint angles and temporal parameters have not evidenced changes due to the different handgrips. Nevertheless, clear differences were observed in both variants for upper and lower limb muscles activity among starting phases (e.g. Biceps Brachii at take-off vs. flight phase, 15.17% ± 2.76% and 22.38% ± 4.25%; 14.24% ± 7.11% and 25.90% ± 8.65%, for variant with hands horizontal and vertically positioned, respectively. It was concluded that different handgrips did not affect EMG, kinematics and temporal profile in backstroke start. Despite coaches might plan similar strength training for both start variants, further attention should be given on the selection of proper exercises to maximize the contribution of relevant muscles at different starting phases.

  4. Study on 3D printer production of auxiliary device for upper limb for medical imaging test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeong Gyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumsung (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jae Ho [Jukwang Precision Co., Ltd., Gumi (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong Dae [Dept. of Mechanical system engineering, Kumoh Institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    There is a progressive development in the medical imaging technology, especially of descriptive capability for anatomical structure of human body thanks to advancement of information technology and medical devices. But however maintenance of correct posture is essential for the medical imaging checkup on the shoulder joint requiring rotation of the upper limb due to the complexity of human body. In the cases of MRI examination, long duration and fixed posture are critical, as failure to comply with them leads to minimal possibility of reproducibility only with the efforts of the examiner and will of the patient. Thus, this study aimed to develop an auxiliary device that enables rotation of the upper limb as well as fixing it at quantitative angles for medical imaging examination capable of providing diagnostic values. An auxiliary device has been developed based on the results of precedent studies, by designing a 3D model with the CATIA software, an engineering application, and producing it with the 3D printer. The printer is Objet350 Connex from Stratasys, and acrylonitrile- butadiene-styrene(ABS) is used as the material of the device. Dimensions are 120 X 150 X 190 mm, with the inner diameter of the handle being 125.9 mm. The auxiliary device has 4 components including the body (outside), handle (inside), fixture terminal and the connection part. The body and handle have the gap of 2.1 mm for smooth rotation, while the 360 degree of scales have been etched on the handle so that the angle required for observation may be recorded per patient for traceability and dual examination.

  5. Upper Limb Static-Stretching Protocol Decreases Maximal Concentric Jump Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo H. Marchetti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of an upper limb static-stretching (SS protocol on the maximal concentric jump performance. We recruited 25 young healthy, male, resistance trained individuals (stretched group, n = 15 and control group, n = 10 in this study. The randomized between group experimental protocol consisted of a three trials of maximal concentric jump task, before and after a SS of the upper limb. Vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF and surface electromyography (sEMG of both gastrocnemius lateralis (GL and vastus lateralis (VL were acquired. An extensive SS was employed consisting of ten stretches of 30 seconds, with 15 seconds of rest, and 70-90% of the point of discomfort (POD. ANOVA (2x2 (group x condition was used for shoulder joint range of motion (ROM, vGRF and sEMG. A significant interaction for passive ROM of the shoulder joint revealed significant increases between pre- and post-SS protocol (p < 0.001. A significant interaction demonstrated decreased peak force and an increased peak propulsion duration between pre- and post-stretching only for stretch group (p = 0.021, and p = 0.024, respectively. There was a significant main effect between groups (stretch and control for peak force for control group (p = 0.045. Regarding sEMG variables, there were no significant differences between groups (control versus stretched or condition (pre-stretching versus post-stretching for the peak amplitude of RMS and IEMG for both muscles (VL and GL. In conclusion, an acute extensive SS can increase the shoulder ROM, and negatively affect both the propulsion duration and peak force of the maximal concentric jump, without providing significant changes in muscle activation.

  6. Positive effects of robotic exoskeleton training of upper limb reaching movements after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frisoli Antonio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study, conducted in a group of nine chronic patients with right-side hemiparesis after stroke, investigated the effects of a robotic-assisted rehabilitation training with an upper limb robotic exoskeleton for the restoration of motor function in spatial reaching movements. The robotic assisted rehabilitation training was administered for a period of 6 weeks including reaching and spatial antigravity movements. To assess the carry-over of the observed improvements in movement during training into improved function, a kinesiologic assessment of the effects of the training was performed by means of motion and dynamic electromyographic analysis of reaching movements performed before and after training. The same kinesiologic measurements were performed in a healthy control group of seven volunteers, to determine a benchmark for the experimental observations in the patients’ group. Moreover degree of functional impairment at the enrolment and discharge was measured by clinical evaluation with upper limb Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FMA, 0–66 points, Modified Ashworth scale (MA, 0–60 pts and active ranges of motion. The robot aided training induced, independently by time of stroke, statistical significant improvements of kinesiologic (movement time, smoothness of motion and clinical (4.6 ± 4.2 increase in FMA, 3.2 ± 2.1 decrease in MA parameters, as a result of the increased active ranges of motion and improved co-contraction index for shoulder extension/flexion. Kinesiologic parameters correlated significantly with clinical assessment values, and their changes after the training were affected by the direction of motion (inward vs. outward movement and position of target to be reached (ipsilateral, central and contralateral peripersonal space. These changes can be explained as a result of the motor recovery induced by the robotic training, in terms of regained ability to execute single joint movements and of improved

  7. Early influence of auditory stimuli on upper-limb movements in young human infants: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Augusta Monteiro Ferronato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Given that the auditory system is rather well developed at the end of the third trimester of pregnancy, it is likely that couplings between acoustics and motor activity can be integrated as early as at the beginning of postnatal life. The aim of the present mini-review was to summarize and discuss studies on early auditory-motor integration, focusing particularly on upper-limb movements (one of the most crucial means to interact with the environment in association with auditory stimuli, to develop further understanding of their significance with regard to early infant development. Many studies have investigated the relationship between various infant behaviors (e.g., sucking, visual fixation, head turning and auditory stimuli, and established that human infants can be observed displaying couplings between action and environmental sensory stimulation already from just after birth, clearly indicating a propensity for intentional behavior. Surprisingly few studies, however, have investigated the associations between upper-limb movements and different auditory stimuli in newborns and young infants, infants born at risk for developmental disorders/delays in particular. Findings from studies of early auditory-motor interaction support that the developing integration of sensory and motor systems is a fundamental part of the process guiding the development of goal-directed action in infancy, of great importance for continued motor, perceptual and cognitive development. At-risk infants (e.g., those born preterm may display increasing central auditory processing disorders, negatively affecting early sensory-motor integration, and resulting in long-term consequences on gesturing, language development and social communication. Consequently, there is a need for more studies on such implications

  8. Measuring Upper Limb Capacity in Poststroke Patients : Development, Fit of the Monotone Homogeneity Model, Unidimensionality, Fit of the Double Monotonicity Model, Differential Item Functioning, Internal Consistency, and Feasibility of the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale, SULCS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Leo D.; Houwink, Annemieke; Smits, Wendy; Molenaar, Ivo W.; Geurts, Alexander C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To develop an easy-to-use scale that measures upper limb capacity, according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health definition, in patients after stroke, and to investigate certain psychometric properties of this scale. Design: Cohort study. Setting: In

  9. Remote Effect of Lower Limb Acupuncture on Latent Myofascial Trigger Point of Upper Trapezius Muscle: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Hua Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To demonstrate the use of acupuncture in the lower limbs to treat myofascial pain of the upper trapezius muscles via a remote effect. Methods. Five adults with latent myofascial trigger points (MTrPs of bilateral upper trapezius muscles received acupuncture at Weizhong (UB40 and Yanglingquan (GB34 points in the lower limbs. Modified acupuncture was applied at these points on a randomly selected ipsilateral lower limb (experimental side versus sham needling on the contralateral lower limb (control side in each subject. Each subject received two treatments within a one-week interval. To evaluate the remote effect of acupuncture, the range of motion (ROM upon bending the contralateral side of the cervical spine was assessed before and after each treatment. Results. There was significant improvement in cervical ROM after the second treatment (P=0.03 in the experimental group, and the increased ROM on the modified acupuncture side was greater compared to the sham needling side (P=0.036. Conclusions. A remote effect of acupuncture was demonstrated in this pilot study. Using modified acupuncture needling at remote acupuncture points in the ipsilateral lower limb, our treatments released tightness due to latent MTrPs of the upper trapezius muscle.

  10. Risk factors for upper limb deep vein thrombosis associated with the use of central vein catheter in cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verso, M.; Agnelli, G.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Ageno, W.; Bazzan, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Paoletti, F.; Paciaroni, M.; Mosca, S.; Bertoglio, S.

    2008-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis of upper limb is a common complication of CVC in patients with cancer. In these patients the risk factors for CVC-related thrombosis are not completely defined. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors for CVC-related thrombosis in patients included in a random

  11. The Use of an Upper-limb-artery Approach and Long Sheaths in Splanchnic Angiography and Interventional Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimohira, Masashi; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Mori, Yuji; Shibamoto, Yuta (Dept. of Radiology, Nagoya City Univ. Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan)); Omiya, Hiroko; Suzuki, Hirochika (Dept. of Radiology, Tsushima City Hospital, Tsushima (Japan))

    2009-08-15

    Background: The prolonged bed-rest required achieving hemostasis after splanchnic angiography and interventional procedures can be avoided if the upper limb arteries are used. In such procedures, the use of long sheaths capable of reaching the descending aorta may be advantageous. Purpose: To analyze the results of procedures that utilizes an upper-limb-artery approach and long sheaths. Material and Methods: Two hundred forty-two patients with a mean age of 64 years underwent splanchnic angiography and interventional procedures via an upper limb artery using a long sheath (85 cm, 4-French). Repeat examinations were performed on 48 patients and the total number of examinations was 296. The records of these 296 examinations were reviewed and the success rate and complications were evaluated. Results: Overall, 295 of 296 (99.7%) examinations were successful, and one (0.3%) failed. Complications and side effects occurred in six cases (2.0%), a painful sheath manipulation occurred in two examinations (0.7%), and arterial occlusion (including temporary occlusion), hematoma of the puncture site, and pseudoaneurysm occurred in two (0.7%), one (0.3%), and one (0.3%) patient, respectively. Conclusion: The use of a long sheath capable of reaching the descending aorta enables the performance of splanchnic angiography and interventional procedures via the upper limb arteries

  12. Sports Adaptations for Unilateral and Bilateral Upper-Limb Amputees: Archery/Badminton/Baseball/Softball/Bowling/Golf/Table Tennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowart, Jim

    1979-01-01

    The booklet discusses sports adaptations for unilateral and bilateral upper limb amputees. Designs for adapted equipment are illustrated and information on adaptations are described for archery (including an archery release aid and a stationary bow holder); badminton (serving tray); baseball/softball (adaptations for catching, throwing, and…

  13. Participant perceptions of use of CyWee Z as adjunct to rehabilitation of upper-limb function following stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hale, Leigh A.; Satherley, Jessica A.; McMillan, Nicole J.; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Hijmans, Juha M.; King, Marcus J.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the perceptions of 14 adults with chronic stroke who participated in a pilot study to determine the utility, acceptability, and potential efficacy of using an adapted CyWee Z handheld game controller to play a variety of computer games aimed at improving upper-limb function.

  14. Using thermal imaging to assess the effect of classical massage on selected physiological parameters of upper limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boguszewski Dariusz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: the aim of this study was to assess the relationship between classical sport massage of the hand and the forearm and the surface temperature of upper limb muscles, and between hand grip strength and the range of motion in the radiocarpal joint.

  15. The impact of recovery of visuo-spatial neglect on motor recovery of the upper paretic limb after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, T.C.W.; Kollen, B.J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the longitudinal relationship between improvements of synergism and strength of the upper paretic limb and severity of visuo-spatial neglect during the first 52 weeks post-stroke. The longitudinal association between severity of VSN and motor impairmen

  16. The Impact of Recovery of Visuo-Spatial Neglect on Motor Recovery of the Upper Paretic Limb after Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Tanja C. W.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Kwakkel, Gert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the longitudinal relationship between improvements of synergism and strength of the upper paretic limb and severity of visuo-spatial neglect during the first 52 weeks post-stroke. The longitudinal association between severity of VSN and motor impairmen

  17. Current status of robotic stroke rehabilitation and opportunities for a cyber-physically assisted upper limb stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, C.; Rusak, Z.; Horvath, I.; Ji, L.; Hou, Y.

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, robotics-assisted stroke reha-bilitation has been wide-spread, in particular for movement rehabilitation of upper limbs. Several studies have reported on the clinical effectiveness of this kind of therapy. The results of these studies show that robot assisted therapy can be

  18. Constraint-induced movement therapy for the upper paretic limb in acute or sub-acute stroke : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, Rinske; Kwakkel, Gert; Bakers, Japie; van Wegen, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy is a commonly used intervention to improve upper limb function after stroke. However, the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy and its optimal dosage during acute or sub-acute stroke is still under debate. To examine the literature on the effects o

  19. Bihemispheric repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with intensive occupational therapy for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Naoki; Kakuda, Wataru; Kondo, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masato; Mitani, Sugao; Abo, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of the combination of bihemispheric repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and intensive occupational therapy (OT) for upper limb hemiparesis in poststroke patients. The study participants were eight poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis (age at intervention: 62.8±4.9 years, time after stroke: 84.3±87.2 months, mean±SD). During 15 days of hospitalization, each patient received 10 sessions of 40-min bihemispheric rTMS and 240-min intensive OT (120-min one-to-one training and 120-min self-training). One session of bihemispheric rTMS comprised the application of both 1 and 10 Hz rTMS (2000 stimuli for each hemisphere). The Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Wolf Motor Function Test, and the Modified Ashworth Scale were administered on the day of admission and at discharge. All patients completed the treatment without any adverse effects. Motor function of the affected upper limb improved significantly, on the basis of changes in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function Test (Ptherapy for poststroke hemiparetic patients, and improved motor function of the hemiparetic upper limb in poststroke patients. The findings provide a new avenue for the treatment of patients with poststroke hemiparesis.

  20. Upper-limb motor control in patients after stroke: Attentional demands and the potential beneficial effects of arm support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Steenbergen, B.; Prange, G.B.; Buurke, J.H.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the attentional load of using the upper limb in moderately and mildly affected patients after stroke, with and without arm support. Ten patients with stroke (4 mild and 6 moderate paresis) and ten healthy, gender- and age-matched control subjects performed a

  1. Upper-limb motor control in patients after stroke: Attentional demands and the potential beneficial effects of arm support.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Steenbergen, B.; Prange, G.B.; Buurke, J.H.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the attentional load of using the upper limb in moderately and mildly affected patients after stroke, with and without arm support. Ten patients with stroke (4 mild and 6 moderate paresis) and ten healthy, gender- and age-matched control subjects performed a

  2. Amplitude Manipulation Evokes Upper Limb Freezing during Handwriting in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease with Freezing of Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heremans, Elke; Nackaerts, Evelien; Vervoort, Griet; Vercruysse, Sarah; Broeder, Sanne; Strouwen, Carolien; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies show that besides freezing of gait (FOG), many people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) also suffer from freezing in the upper limbs (FOUL). Up to now, it is unclear which task constraints provoke and explain upper limb freezing. Objective To investigate whether upper limb freezing and other kinematic abnormalities during writing are provoked by (i) gradual changes in amplitude or by (ii) sustained amplitude generation in patients with and without freezing of gait. Methods Thirty-four patients with PD, including 17 with and 17 without FOG, performed a writing task on a touch-sensitive writing tablet requiring writing at constant small and large size as well as writing at gradually increasing and decreasing size. Patients of both groups were matched for disease severity, tested while ‘on’ medication and compared to healthy age-matched controls. Results Fifty upper limb freezing episodes were detected in 10 patients, including 8 with and 2 without FOG. The majority of the episodes occurred when participants had to write at small or gradually decreasing size. The occurrence of FOUL and the number of FOUL episodes per patient significantly correlated with the occurrence and severity of FOG. Patients with FOUL also showed a significantly smaller amplitude in the writing parts outside the freezing episodes. Conclusions Corroborating findings of gait research, the current study supports a core problem in amplitude control underlying FOUL, both in maintaining as well as in flexibly adapting the cycle size. PMID:26580556

  3. Amputation and prostheses in Khartoum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, I A; Ahmed, A R; Ahmed, M E

    1997-08-01

    One hundred and seventy patients with major lower limb amputation (MLLA) presenting to The National Prosthetic-Orthotic Centre (NPOC) in Khartoum over a 1-year period were studied. There were 141 males and 29 females giving a M:F ratio of 4.9: 1.0, with mean age of 37 years (range 5-72 years). Forty-one patients (24%) underwent amputation of diabetic septic foot, 30 patients (17.6%) underwent amputation as a result of trauma from road traffic accidents and Madura foot, and war injuries accounted for 29 amputations (17%). One hundred and eleven patients had below knee amputation (BKA), 52 had above knee amputation (AKA) and seven patients had Syme's amputation. Diabetic amputees had higher rate of revisional surgery compared with others because of sepsis and/or flap necrosis. Stump pain was reported by amputees with excessive scarring of the stump and those with undue prominence of bony ends. There are two types of prostheses provided by the NPOC for both BKA and AKA: the peg leg and the conventional prostheses. The Syme's amputees were fitted with either simple hoof or articulated prostheses with solid ankle cushion heel (SACH). The peg leg consists of a leather lined side bearing metal socket connected to a rocker base by side steels. It is used by the country natives as it suits different weather and job conditions, particularly farming, and it can be repaired locally. The urban population use the conventional prostheses which is lighter in weight, can be put on and taken off easily and is cosmetically acceptable. However, these prostheses are more expensive and require frequent repair or replacement. The functional outcome of patient's rehabilitation with the prostheses was significantly affected by the level and indication of amputation. Those with BKA and those amputated because of trauma or Madura foot experienced better functional outcome compared with the diabetics, independent of age. 50% of patients with the AKA and 19% of those with BKA reported poor

  4. The effectiveness of a work style intervention and a lifestyle physical activity intervention on the recovery from neck and upper limb symptoms in computer workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernaards, C.M.; Ariëns, G.A.M.; Knol, D.L.; Hildebrandt, V.H.

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of a single intervention targeting work style and a combined intervention targeting work style and physical activity on the recovery from neck and upper limb symptoms. Computer workers with frequent or long-term neck and upper limb symptoms were randomised into

  5. Ideal functional outcomes for amputation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Robert H; Melton, Danielle

    2014-02-01

    This article provides a generalized overview of amputation classifications and the idealized outcomes for upper and lower amputations at their respective levels. The following levels are discussed: above knee/transfemoral, below knee/transtibial, above elbow/transhumeral, below elbow/transradial, and bilateral for upper and lower extremities. This classification defines a framework for clinicians to share with patients so that they understand the potential for their expected functional outcomes regarding mobility and activities of daily living, both with and without a prosthesis. Moreover, it addresses some of the vocational and avocational needs of the individual regarding amputation.

  6. The Armeo Spring as training tool to improve upper limb functionality in multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerkhofs Lore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few research in multiple sclerosis (MS has focused on physical rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction, though the latter strongly influences independent performance of activities of daily living. Upper limb rehabilitation technology could hold promise for complementing traditional MS therapy. Consequently, this pilot study aimed to examine the feasibility of an 8-week mechanical-assisted training program for improving upper limb muscle strength and functional capacity in MS patients with evident paresis. Methods A case series was applied, with provision of a training program (3×/week, 30 minutes/session, supplementary on the customary maintaining care, by employing a gravity-supporting exoskeleton apparatus (Armeo Spring. Ten high-level disability MS patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale 7.0-8.5 actively performed task-oriented movements in a virtual real-life-like learning environment with the affected upper limb. Tests were administered before and after training, and at 2-month follow-up. Muscle strength was determined through the Motricity Index and Jamar hand-held dynamometer. Functional capacity was assessed using the TEMPA, Action Research Arm Test (ARAT and 9-Hole Peg Test (9HPT. Results Muscle strength did not change significantly. Significant gains were particularly found in functional capacity tests. After training completion, TEMPA scores improved (p = 0.02, while a trend towards significance was found for the 9HPT (p = 0.05. At follow-up, the TEMPA as well as ARAT showed greater improvement relative to baseline than after the 8-week intervention period (p = 0.01, p = 0.02 respectively. Conclusions The results of present pilot study suggest that upper limb functionality of high-level disability MS patients can be positively influenced by means of a technology-enhanced physical rehabilitation program.

  7. Amputation of extremity in patients with atherosclerotic gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsareva Yu.O.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of investigation — to analyze the results of treatment of patients with atherosclerotic gangrene of a limb, to identify the causes of adverse outcomes amputation. Materials and methods: We analyzed the results of examination and treatment of 218 patients with atherosclerotic gangrene of the limb. Good outcome of amputation was considered the primary surgical wound healing of the stump. Suppuration, secondary healing, re-amputation and death we attributed to the adverse results of amputation. Results: The adverse outcomes of amputation due to technical errors in surgery, properly chosen level, inadequate drainage of the wound stump, an unsuccessful operation on the arteries of a limb, inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy, patient's age, functional capabilities of myocardium, the duration of critical ischemia, as well as the lack of psychological adaptation of patients before amputation. Conclusion: To decide the need for amputation in patients with atherosclerotic gangrene follows the assessment of possible vascular reconstructive surgery. In determining the level of amputation is necessary to objectively assess the degree of disruption of regional blood flow using multilevel manometry and laser Dopplerflowmetry. In preparation for amputation should be paid special attention to the correction of rheological and coagulation properties of blood, normalization of the functional state of the myocardium, as well as specialized psychotherapeutic training for timely and adequate psychological adaptation of the patient

  8. [The efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy in patients with upper limb spasticity due to traumatic brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akulov, M A; Khat'kova, S E; Mokienko, O A; Orlova, O R; Usachev, D Yu; Zakharov, V O; Orlova, A S; Tomsky, A A

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity is a type of muscle hyperactivity that occurs in patients after focal lesions of the Central nervous system due to various diseases: stroke, traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury, neurosurgical intervention, as well as multiple sclerosis and other diseases of the Central nervous system and is the most disability manifestation of the syndrome of upper motor neuron (UMNS). Focal spasticity of the upper limb requires a complex treatment. Botulinum toxin therapy is an effective treatment for focal/multifocal spasticity in reducing muscle tone and improving function with the highest level of evidence according to the latest American and European guidelines for treatment of spasticity. There are many publications devoted to BTA use in post-stroke patients. This article provides a review of the BTA use in patients with the upper limb spasticity due to severe traumatic brain injury. Some local data on the BTA efficacy in the cohort of patients with traumatic brain injury are also presented. PMID:27635608

  9. Connective tissue cells, but not muscle cells, are involved in establishing the proximo-distal outcome of limb regeneration in the axolotl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Eugen; Glausch, Mareen; Le, Huy Quang; Damanik, Febriyani Fiain Rochel; Schuez, Maritta; Knapp, Dunja; Khattak, Shahryar; Richter, Tobias; Tanaka, Elly M

    2013-02-01

    During salamander limb regeneration, only the structures distal to the amputation plane are regenerated, a property known as the rule of distal transformation. Multiple cell types are involved in limb regeneration; therefore, determining which cell types participate in distal transformation is important for understanding how the proximo-distal outcome of regeneration is achieved. We show that connective tissue-derived blastema cells obey the rule of distal transformation. They also have nuclear MEIS, which can act as an upper arm identity regulator, only upon upper arm amputation. By contrast, myogenic cells do not obey the rule of distal transformation and display nuclear MEIS upon amputation at any proximo-distal level. These results indicate that connective tissue cells, but not myogenic cells, are involved in establishing the proximo-distal outcome of regeneration and are likely to guide muscle patterning. Moreover, we show that, similarly to limb development, muscle patterning in regeneration is influenced by β-catenin signalling.

  10. Upper limb static-stretching protocol decreases maximal concentric jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Paulo H; Silva, Fernando H D de Oliveira; Soares, Enrico G; Serpa, Erica P; Nardi, Priscyla S M; Vilela, Guanis de B; Behm, David G

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of an upper limb static-stretching (SS) protocol on the maximal concentric jump performance. We recruited 25 young healthy, male, resistance trained individuals (stretched group, n = 15 and control group, n = 10) in this study. The randomized between group experimental protocol consisted of a three trials of maximal concentric jump task, before and after a SS of the upper limb. Vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) and surface electromyography (sEMG) of both gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and vastus lateralis (VL) were acquired. An extensive SS was employed consisting of ten stretches of 30 seconds, with 15 seconds of rest, and 70-90% of the point of discomfort (POD). ANOVA (2x2) (group x condition) was used for shoulder joint range of motion (ROM), vGRF and sEMG. A significant interaction for passive ROM of the shoulder joint revealed significant increases between pre- and post-SS protocol (p force and an increased peak propulsion duration between pre- and post-stretching only for stretch group (p = 0.021, and p = 0.024, respectively. There was a significant main effect between groups (stretch and control) for peak force for control group (p = 0.045). Regarding sEMG variables, there were no significant differences between groups (control versus stretched) or condition (pre-stretching versus post-stretching) for the peak amplitude of RMS and IEMG for both muscles (VL and GL). In conclusion, an acute extensive SS can increase the shoulder ROM, and negatively affect both the propulsion duration and peak force of the maximal concentric jump, without providing significant changes in muscle activation. Key pointsThe jump performance can be affected negatively by an intense extensive static-stretching protocol.An intense acute extensive SS protocol can affect positively the shoulder ROM.The intense acute extensive SS protocol does not change the level of muscle activation for vastus lateralis and

  11. Disfunção muscular periférica em DPOC: membros inferiores versus membros superiores Peripheral muscle dysfunction in COPD: lower limbs versus upper limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Foschini Miranda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O prejuízo funcional parece diferir entre membros superiores e membros inferiores de pacientes com DPOC. Dois possíveis mecanismos explicam os sintomas importantes de dispneia e fadiga relatados pelos pacientes ao executar tarefas com membros superiores não sustentados: a disfunção neuromecânica dos músculos respiratórios e a alteração dos volumes pulmonares durante as atividades realizadas com membros superiores. A disfunção neuromecânica está relacionada à alteração do padrão respiratório e à simultaneidade de estímulos aferentes e eferentes musculares, o que causaria a dissincronia na ação dos músculos respiratórios em pacientes com DPOC durante esse tipo de exercício. Adicionalmente, o aumento da ventilação durante os exercícios com membros superiores em pacientes com DPOC induz à hiperinsuflação dinâmica em diferentes cargas de trabalho. Nos membros inferiores, há redução da força e da endurance muscular do quadríceps femoral nos pacientes com DPOC comparados a indivíduos saudáveis. Uma explicação para essas reduções é a anormalidade no metabolismo muscular (diminuição da capacidade aeróbia, a dependência do metabolismo glicolítico e o acúmulo rápido de lactato durante o exercício. Quando contrastadas as atividades de membros superiores e membros inferiores, os exercícios com membros superiores resultam em maior demanda metabólica e ventilatória com mais intensa sensação de dispneia e fadiga. Devido às diferenças nas adaptações morfofuncionais dos músculos dos membros superiores e membros inferiores em pacientes com DPOC, protocolos específicos de treinamento de força e/ou endurance devem ser desenvolvidos e testados para os grupos musculares desses segmentos corporaisIn patients with COPD, the degree of functional impairment appears to differ between the upper and lower limbs. Significant dyspnea and fatigue have been reported by these patients when performing tasks with

  12. Upper-limb kinematic reconstruction during stroke robot-aided therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, E; Zollo, L; Garcia-Aracil, N; Badesa, F J; Morales, R; Mazzoleni, S; Sterzi, S; Guglielmelli, E

    2015-09-01

    The paper proposes a novel method for an accurate and unobtrusive reconstruction of the upper-limb kinematics of stroke patients during robot-aided rehabilitation tasks with end-effector machines. The method is based on a robust analytic procedure for inverse kinematics that simply uses, in addition to hand pose data provided by the robot, upper arm acceleration measurements for computing a constraint on elbow position; it is exploited for task space augmentation. The proposed method can enable in-depth comprehension of planning strategy of stroke patients in the joint space and, consequently, allow developing therapies tailored for their residual motor capabilities. The experimental validation has a twofold purpose: (1) a comparative analysis with an optoelectronic motion capturing system is used to assess the method capability to reconstruct joint motion; (2) the application of the method to healthy and stroke subjects during circle-drawing tasks with InMotion2 robot is used to evaluate its efficacy in discriminating stroke from healthy behavior. The experimental results have shown that arm angles are reconstructed with a RMSE of 8.3 × 10(-3) rad. Moreover, the comparison between healthy and stroke subjects has revealed different features in the joint space in terms of mean values and standard deviations, which also allow assessing inter- and intra-subject variability. The findings of this study contribute to the investigation of motor performance in the joint space and Cartesian space of stroke patients undergoing robot-aided therapy, thus allowing: (1) evaluating the outcomes of the therapeutic approach, (2) re-planning the robotic treatment based on patient needs, and (3) understanding pathology-related motor strategies.

  13. Upper Limb Strength and Muscle Volume in Healthy Middle-Aged Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Katherine R; Vidt, Meghan E; Gold, Garry E; Murray, Wendy M

    2015-12-01

    Our purpose was to characterize shoulder muscle volume and isometric moment, as well as their relationship, for healthy middle- aged adults. Muscle volume and maximum isometric joint moment were assessed for 6 functional muscle groups of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist in 10 middle-aged adults (46–60 y, 5M, 5F). Compared with young adults, shoulder abductors composed a smaller percentage of total muscle volume (P = .0009) and there was a reduction in shoulder adductor strength relative to elbow flexors (P = .012). We observed a consistent ordering of moment-generating capacity among functional groups across subjects. Although total muscle volume spanned a 2.3-fold range, muscle volume was distributed among functional groups in a consistent manner across subjects. On average, 72% of the variation in joint moment could be explained by the corresponding functional group muscle volume. These data are useful for improved modeling of upper limb musculoskeletal performance in middle-aged subjects, and may improve computational predictions of function for this group. PMID:26155870

  14. Non-target stimuli in the visual field influence movement preparation in upper-limb reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Kristina A; Morris, Laura J

    2015-09-14

    The present work provides an empirical test of the Dynamic Field Theory of visuospatial cognition. The Dynamic Field Theory is a bi-stable neural network model applied to explain how visual information is integrated during the preparation of reaching responses (Erlhagen and Schöner). The dynamic field theory posits that motor cortices develop peaks of activation for each possible target in the visual field. Targets that are close in space produce neural peaks with overlapping distributions, whereas targets that are far apart produce distinct peaks with non-overlapping distributions. As such, the Dynamic Field Theory predicts reaction times to potential targets that are close in space will be faster than those to targets that are far apart. The present work examined how proximal and distal distractors impact reaction time in an upper-limb reaching task. The results demonstrated that distal distractors result in prolonged reaction times compared to proximal distractors. We suggest that reaction time represents the time required to inhibit neural activity representing the location of the distractor. Thus, prolonged reaction times observed for distal distractors reflect the temporal demands associated with the competition of two non-overlapping distributions of activity in the brain. These findings support the tenets of the Dynamic Field Theory and demonstrate that non-target stimuli in the visual field can influence movement preparation.

  15. Usability testing of gaming and social media applications for stroke and cerebral palsy upper limb rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Bulmaro A; Hilderman, Courtney G E; Hung, Chai-Ting; Shirzad, Navid; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2014-01-01

    As part of the FEATHERS (Functional Engagement in Assisted Therapy Through Exercise Robotics) project, two motion tracking and one social networking applications were developed for upper limb rehabilitation of stroke survivors and teenagers with cerebral palsy. The project aims to improve the engagement of clients during therapy by using video games and a social media platform. The applications allow users to control a cursor on a personal computer through bimanual motions, and to interact with their peers and therapists through the social media. The tracking applications use either a Microsoft Kinect or a PlayStation Eye camera, and the social media application was developed on Facebook. This paper presents a usability testing of these applications that was conducted with therapists from two rehabilitation clinics. The "Cognitive Walkthrough" and "Think Aloud" methods were used. The objectives of the study were to investigate the ease of use and potential issues or improvements of the applications, as well as the factors that facilitate and impede the adoption of technology in current rehabilitation programs. PMID:25570770

  16. Energy Harvesting from Upper-Limb Pulling Motions for Miniaturized Human-Powered Generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jeongjin; Ryu, Mun-ho; Yang, Yoonseok

    2015-01-01

    The human-powered self-generator provides the best solution for individuals who need an instantaneous power supply for travel, outdoor, and emergency use, since it is less dependent on weather conditions and occupies less space than other renewable power supplies. However, many commercial portable self-generators that employ hand-cranking are not used as much as expected in daily lives although they have enough output capacity due to their intensive workload. This study proposes a portable human-powered generator which is designed to obtain mechanical energy from an upper limb pulling motion for improved human motion economy as well as efficient human-mechanical power transfer. A coreless axial-flux permanent magnet machine (APMM) and a flywheel magnet rotor were used in conjunction with a one-way clutched power transmission system in order to obtain effective power from the pulling motion. The developed prototype showed an average energy conversion efficiency of 30.98% and an average output power of 0.32 W with a maximum of 1.89 W. Its small form factor (50 mm × 32 mm × 43.5 mm, 0.05 kg) and the substantial electricity produced verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in the utilization of human power. It is expected that the developed generator could provide a mobile power supply. PMID:26151204

  17. Energy Harvesting from Upper-Limb Pulling Motions for Miniaturized Human-Powered Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongjin Yeo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The human-powered self-generator provides the best solution for individuals who need an instantaneous power supply for travel, outdoor, and emergency use, since it is less dependent on weather conditions and occupies less space than other renewable power supplies. However, many commercial portable self-generators that employ hand-cranking are not used as much as expected in daily lives although they have enough output capacity due to their intensive workload. This study proposes a portable human-powered generator which is designed to obtain mechanical energy from an upper limb pulling motion for improved human motion economy as well as efficient human-mechanical power transfer. A coreless axial-flux permanent magnet machine (APMM and a flywheel magnet rotor were used in conjunction with a one-way clutched power transmission system in order to obtain effective power from the pulling motion. The developed prototype showed an average energy conversion efficiency of 30.98% and an average output power of 0.32 W with a maximum of 1.89 W. Its small form factor (50 mm × 32 mm × 43.5 mm, 0.05 kg and the substantial electricity produced verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in the utilization of human power. It is expected that the developed generator could provide a mobile power supply.

  18. Study on development of active-passive rehabilitation system for upper limbs: Hybrid-PLEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, many researchers have studied the potential of using robotics technology to assist and quantify the motor functions for neuron-rehabilitation. Some kinds of haptic devices have been developed and evaluated its efficiency with clinical tests, for example, upper limb training for patients with spasticity after stroke. Active-type (motor-driven) haptic devices can realize a lot of varieties of haptics. But they basically require high-cost safety system. On the other hand, passive-type (brake-based) haptic devices have inherent safety. However, the passive robot system has strong limitation on varieties of haptics. There are not sufficient evidences to clarify how the passive/active haptics effect to the rehabilitation of motor skills. In this paper, we developed an active-passive-switchable rehabilitation system with ER clutch/brake device named 'Hybrid-PLEMO' in order to address these problems. In this paper, basic structures and haptic control methods of the Hybrid-PLEMO are described.

  19. Exoskeleton Technology in Rehabilitation: Towards an EMG-Based Orthosis System for Upper Limb Neuromotor Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Manuel Vaca Benitez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rehabilitation of patients should not only be limited to the first phases during intense hospital care but also support and therapy should be guaranteed in later stages, especially during daily life activities if the patient’s state requires this. However, aid should only be given to the patient if needed and as much as it is required. To allow this, automatic self-initiated movement support and patient-cooperative control strategies have to be developed and integrated into assistive systems. In this work, we first give an overview of different kinds of neuromuscular diseases, review different forms of therapy, and explain possible fields of rehabilitation and benefits of robotic aided rehabilitation. Next, the mechanical design and control scheme of an upper limb orthosis for rehabilitation are presented. Two control models for the orthosis are explained which compute the triggering function and the level of assistance provided by the device. As input to the model fused sensor data from the orthosis and physiology data in terms of electromyography (EMG signals are used.

  20. Study on development of active-passive rehabilitation system for upper limbs: Hybrid-PLEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, T; Jin, Y; Fukushima, K; Akai, H; Furusho, J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)], E-mail: kikuchi@mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, many researchers have studied the potential of using robotics technology to assist and quantify the motor functions for neuron-rehabilitation. Some kinds of haptic devices have been developed and evaluated its efficiency with clinical tests, for example, upper limb training for patients with spasticity after stroke. Active-type (motor-driven) haptic devices can realize a lot of varieties of haptics. But they basically require high-cost safety system. On the other hand, passive-type (brake-based) haptic devices have inherent safety. However, the passive robot system has strong limitation on varieties of haptics. There are not sufficient evidences to clarify how the passive/active haptics effect to the rehabilitation of motor skills. In this paper, we developed an active-passive-switchable rehabilitation system with ER clutch/brake device named 'Hybrid-PLEMO' in order to address these problems. In this paper, basic structures and haptic control methods of the Hybrid-PLEMO are described.

  1. Computationally Efficient Modelling of Proprioceptive Signals in the Upper Limb for Prostheses: a Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eWilliams

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate models of proprioceptive neural patterns could one day play an important role in the creation of an intuitive proprioceptive neural prosthesis for amputees. This paper looks at combining efficient implementations of biomechanical and proprioceptor models in order to generate signals that mimic human muscular proprioceptive patterns for future experimental work in prosthesis feedback. A neuro-musculoskeletal model of the upper limb with 7 degrees of freedom and 17 muscles is presented and generates real time estimates of muscle spindle and Golgi Tendon Organ neural firing patterns. Unlike previous neuro-musculoskeletal models, muscle activation and excitation levels are unknowns in this application and an inverse dynamics tool (static optimisation is integrated to estimate these variables. A proprioceptive prosthesis will need to be portable and this is incompatible with the computationally demanding nature of standard biomechanical and proprioceptor modelling. This paper uses and proposes a number of approximations and optimisations to make real time operation on portable hardware feasible. Finally technical obstacles to mimicking natural feedback for an intuitive proprioceptive prosthesis, as well as issues and limitations with existing models, are identified and discussed.

  2. Energy Harvesting from Upper-Limb Pulling Motions for Miniaturized Human-Powered Generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jeongjin; Ryu, Mun-ho; Yang, Yoonseok

    2015-07-03

    The human-powered self-generator provides the best solution for individuals who need an instantaneous power supply for travel, outdoor, and emergency use, since it is less dependent on weather conditions and occupies less space than other renewable power supplies. However, many commercial portable self-generators that employ hand-cranking are not used as much as expected in daily lives although they have enough output capacity due to their intensive workload. This study proposes a portable human-powered generator which is designed to obtain mechanical energy from an upper limb pulling motion for improved human motion economy as well as efficient human-mechanical power transfer. A coreless axial-flux permanent magnet machine (APMM) and a flywheel magnet rotor were used in conjunction with a one-way clutched power transmission system in order to obtain effective power from the pulling motion. The developed prototype showed an average energy conversion efficiency of 30.98% and an average output power of 0.32 W with a maximum of 1.89 W. Its small form factor (50 mm × 32 mm × 43.5 mm, 0.05 kg) and the substantial electricity produced verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in the utilization of human power. It is expected that the developed generator could provide a mobile power supply.

  3. Dynamic Characterization and Interaction Control of the CBM-Motus Robot for Upper-Limb Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Zollo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents dynamic characterization and control of an upper-limb rehabilitation machine aimed at improving robot performance in the interaction with the patient. An integrated approach between mechanics and control is the key issue of the paper for the development of a robotic machine with desirable dynamic properties. Robot inertial and acceleration properties are studied in the workspace via a graphical representation based on ellipses. Robot friction is experimentally retrieved by means of a parametric identification procedure. A current-based impedance control is developed in order to compensate for friction and enhance control performance in the interaction with the patient by means of force feedback, without increasing system inertia. To this end, servo-amplifier motor currents are monitored to provide force feedback in the interaction, thus avoiding the need for force sensors mounted at the robot end-effector. Current-based impedance control is implemented on the robot; experimental results in free space as well as in constrained space are provided.

  4. Upper limb kinematic differences between breathing and non-breathing conditions in front crawl sprint swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Carla B; Sanders, Ross H; Psycharakis, Stelios G

    2015-11-26

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the breathing action in front crawl (FC) sprint swimming affects the ipsilateral upper limb kinematics relative to a non-breathing stroke cycle (SC). Ten male competitive swimmers performed two 25m FC sprints: one breathing to their preferred side (Br) and one not breathing (NBr). Both swim trials were performed through a 6.75m(3) calibrated space and recorded by six gen-locked JVC KY32 CCD cameras. A paired t-test was used to assess statistical differences between the trials, with a confidence level of pswim performance is compromised by the inclusion of taking a breath in sprint FC swimming. It was proposed that swimmers aim to orient their ipsilateral shoulder into a stronger position by stretching and rolling the shoulders more in the entry phase whilst preparing to take a breath. Swimmers should focus on lengthening the push phase by extending the elbow more and not accelerating the hand too quickly upwards when preparing to inhale.

  5. Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa associated with congenital contractures of the upper and lower limbs: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Евгеньевна Агранович

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa (EB is a rare hereditary disease. Its main feature is vesication and weeping sores (erosions of the skin and mucous membranes, resulting from a minor injury. Clinical manifestations of the disease may vary from localized vesicles on the hands and feet to a generalized rash of the skin as well as lesions of the mucosa of the inner organs. At present, there are four main groups of EB: simple, intermediate, dystrophic, and Kindler syndrome. Mutations cause changes in the structure of the proteins responsible for the adhesion between layers of the dermis, leading to vesication. Treatment of EB is a challenge because of the lack of opportunities for the direct influence on the disease process, and its main purpose is to correct the existing cutaneous manifestations and prevent the occurrence of new elements. This article describes the main types of EB, methods of current diagnosis, and treatment of the disease as well as a clinical case of a rare combination of two severe disorders: 1 dystrophic EB and 2 arthrogryposis with upper and lower limb involvement.

  6. Primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the upper limb: A fascinating entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Madakshira Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous lymphomas are defined as lymphoid neoplasms that present themselves clinically on the skin and do not have extra-cutaneous disease, when the diagnosis is made or even after 6 months of the diagnosis. Primary cutaneous lymphomas of B-cells are less frequent than lymphomas of T-cells. Primary B-cell lymphomas have a better prognosis than secondary B-cell lymphomas. Primary B-cell cutaneous lymphomas are classified into five types according to the World Health Organization and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer classification. The primary diffuse large B-cell cutaneous lymphoma - leg type corresponds to approximately 5-10% of the B-cell cutaneous lymphomas. It is predominantly seen in elderly people and has a female preponderance. Skin lesions can be single, multiple, and even grouped. A 5-year survival rate ranges from 36 to 100% of the cases. The expression of Bcl-2, presence of multiple lesions, and involvement of both the upper limbs lead to a worse prognosis. Very few cases have been described in the literature.

  7. Robot training of upper limb in multiple sclerosis: comparing protocols with or without manipulative task components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinella, Ilaria; Cattaneo, Davide; Bertoni, Rita; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2012-05-01

    In this pilot study, we compared two protocols for robot-based rehabilitation of upper limb in multiple sclerosis (MS): a protocol involving reaching tasks (RT) requiring arm transport only and a protocol requiring both objects' reaching and manipulation (RMT). Twenty-two MS subjects were assigned to RT or RMT group. Both protocols consisted of eight sessions. During RT training, subjects moved the handle of a planar robotic manipulandum toward circular targets displayed on a screen. RMT protocol required patients to reach and manipulate real objects, by moving the robotic arm equipped with a handle which left the hand free for distal tasks. In both trainings, the robot generated resistive and perturbing forces. Subjects were evaluated with clinical and instrumental tests. The results confirmed that MS patients maintained the ability to adapt to the robot-generated forces and that the rate of motor learning increased across sessions. Robot-therapy significantly reduced arm tremor and improved arm kinematics and functional ability. Compared to RT, RMT protocol induced a significantly larger improvement in movements involving grasp (improvement in Grasp ARAT sub-score: RMT 77.4%, RT 29.5%, p=0.035) but not precision grip. Future studies are needed to evaluate if longer trainings and the use of robotic handles would significantly improve also fine manipulation.

  8. On the use of information theory for detecting upper limb motor dysfunction: An application to Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, M. Elias; Menegaldo, L. L.; Lucarelli, P.; Andrade, B. L. B.; Büchler, P.

    2011-11-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, decreased striatal dopamine levels, and consequent extrapyramidal motor dysfunctions. Several potential early diagnostic markers of PD have been proposed. Since they have not been validated in presymptomatic PD, the diagnosis and monitoring of the disease is based on subjective clinical assessment of cognitive and motor symptoms. In this study, we investigated interjoint coordination synergies in the upper limb of healthy and parkinsonian subjects during the performance of unconstrained linear-periodic movements in a horizontal plane using the mutual information (MI). We found that the MI is a sensitive metric in detecting upper limb motor dysfunction, thus suggesting that this method might be applicable to quantitatively evaluating the effects of the antiparkinsonian medication and to monitor the disease progression.

  9. The effects of post-stroke upper-limb training with an electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Wei, X J; Rong, W; Susanto, E A; Ho, S K

    2013-10-01

    Loss of hand function and finger dexterity are main disabilities in the upper limb after stroke. An electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot had been developed for post-stroke rehabilitation training. The effectiveness of the hand robot assisted whole upper limb training was investigated on persons with chronic stroke (n=10) in this work. All subjects attended a 20-session training (3-5times/week) by using the hand robot to practice object grasp/release and arm transportation tasks. Significant motor improvements were observed in the Fugl-Meyer hand/wrist and shoulder/elbow scores (pEMG level (p<0.05) and a significant decrease of ED and FD co-contraction during the training (p<0.05); the excessive muscle activities in the biceps brachii were also reduced significantly after the training (p<0.05).

  10. Combined transcranial direct current stimulation and homebased occupational therapy of upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jesper; Figlewski, Krystian; Andersen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the combined effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) andhome-based occupational therapy on activities of daily living (ADL) and grip strength, inpatients with upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods:A double......-blind randomized controlled trial with one-week follow-up. Patients received fiveconsecutive days of occupational therapy at home, combined with either anodal (n ¼ 8) orsham (n ¼ 7) tDCS. The primary outcome was ADL performance, which was assessed with theJebsen–Taylor test (JTT). Results: Both groups improved JTT...... group, from baseline to post-assessment (p ¼ 0.158). Conclusions: Fiveconsecutive days of tDCS combined with occupational therapy provided greater improvementsin grip strength compared with occupational therapy alone. tDCS is a promising add-onintervention regarding training of upper limb motor...

  11. Robot-assisted upper-limb therapy in acute rehabilitation setting following stroke: Department of Veterans Affairs multisite clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Charles G. Burgar, MD; Peter S. Lum, PhD; A. M. Erika Scremin, MD; Susan L. Garber, MA, OTR; H. F. Machiel Van der Loos, PhD; Deborah Kenney, MS, OTR; Peggy Shor, OTR

    2011-01-01

    This randomized, controlled, multisite Departmentof Veterans Affairs clinical trial assessed robot-assisted (RA)upper-limb therapy with the Mirror Image Movement Enabler(MIME) in the acute stroke rehabilitation setting. Hemipareticsubjects (n = 54) received RA therapy using MIME for either upto 15 hours (low-dose) or 30 hours (high-dose) or received up to15 hours of additional conventional therapy in addition to usualcare (control). The primary outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (F...

  12. Upper limb children action-observation training (UP-CAT): a randomised controlled trial in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Biagi Laura; Guzzetta Andrea; Cossu Giuseppe; Ferrari Adriano; Sgandurra Giuseppina; Tosetti Michela; Fogassi Leonardo; Cioni Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Rehabilitation for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HCP) aimed to improve function of the impaired upper limb (UL) uses a wide range of intervention programs. A new rehabilitative approach, called Action-Observation Therapy, based on the recent discovery of mirror neurons, has been used in adult stroke but not in children. The purpose of the present study is to design a randomised controlled trial (RCT) for evaluating the efficacy of Action-Observation Therapy in i...

  13. High Intensity Physical Exercise and Pain in the Neck and Upper Limb among Slaughterhouse Workers: Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Slaughterhouse work involves a high degree of repetitive and forceful upper limb movements and thus implies an elevated risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. High intensity strength training effectively rehabilitates musculoskeletal disorders among sedentary employees, but less is known about the effect among workers with repetitive and forceful work demands. Before performing randomized controlled trials it may be beneficial to assess the cross-sectional connection between exercise...

  14. Management of multijoint stiffness of bilateral upper limbs secondary to heterotopic ossification: Case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-wei Min, MD; Ke-min Liu, MD; Xin-zuo Han, MD; Rui Gu, MD

    2014-01-01

    The management of heterotopic ossification (HO) is controversial. Although some reports have investigated assessment and surgical resection techniques for HO affecting one or more joints, the cases of multijoint stiffness secondary to HO are rare. This article describes a rare case of HO affecting both upper limbs of a 32-year-old man that severely interfered with activities of daily living. We present the rehabilitation management of this case and the functional outcome 1 to 2 yr after excis...

  15. The impact of recovery of visuo-spatial neglect on motor recovery of the upper paretic limb after stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja C W Nijboer

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to investigate the longitudinal relationship between improvements of synergism and strength of the upper paretic limb and severity of visuo-spatial neglect during the first 52 weeks post-stroke. The longitudinal association between severity of VSN and motor impairment using Fugl Meyer motor score and Motricity Index of the arm was measured in an intensive repeated measurement design including 18 measurement sessions for each subject. Neglect was assessed using the letter cancellation test applied in a prospective cohort of 101 ischemic, first-ever, hemispheric stroke patients. All time-dependent measures were taken weekly, starting within 14 days post-stroke. From week 10 to 20 biweekly measurements are obtained. The longitudinal relationship of (biweekly time on improvement of motor functions and severity of neglect was investigated using random coefficient analysis and trend analyses. Fifty-one of the 101 stroke patients showed neglect at stroke onset. Less improvement of synergism and strength of the upper paretic limb was associated with more severe neglect. This association was most pronounced in the first 10 weeks post-stroke. The seemingly suppressive effect of neglect on upper-limb motor recovery appears to take place mainly during spontaneous neurological recovery of first 10 weeks post-stroke. This finding suggests that damage to large-scale white matter tracts of especially the perceptual-attention networks suppress recovery of other networks at distance in the brain suggesting a common underlying mechanism.

  16. Participant perceptions of use of CyWee Z as adjunct to rehabilitation of upper-limb function following stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh A. Hale, PhD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the perceptions of 14 adults with chronic stroke who participated in a pilot study to determine the utility, acceptability, and potential efficacy of using an adapted CyWee Z handheld game controller to play a variety of computer games aimed at improving upper-limb function. Four qualitative in-depth interviews and two focus groups explored participant perceptions. Data were thematically analyzed with the general inductive approach. Participants enjoyed playing the computer games with the technology. The perceived benefits included improved upper-limb function, concentration, and balance; however, six participants reported shoulder and/or arm pain or discomfort, which presented while they were engaged in play but appeared to ease during rest. Participants suggested changes to the games and provided opinions on the use of computer games in rehabilitation. Using an adapted CyWee Z controller and computer games in upper-limb rehabilitation for people with chronic stroke is an acceptable and potentially beneficial adjunct to rehabilitation. The development of shoulder pain was a negative side effect for some participants and requires further investigation.

  17. Continuous theta-burst stimulation combined with occupational therapy for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Naoki; Kakuda, Wataru; Kondo, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masato; Sageshima, Masashi; Mitani, Sugao; Abo, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) combined with intensive occupational therapy (OT) for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke. Ten patients with history of stroke and upper limb hemiparesis (age 62.0 ± 11.1 years, time since stroke 95.7 ± 70.2 months, mean ± SD) were studied. Each patient received 13 sessions, each comprising 160 s of cTBS applied to the skull on the area of the non-lesional hemisphere (using a 70-mm figure-8 coil, three pulse bursts at 50 Hz, repeated every 200 ms, i.e., 5 Hz, with total stimulation of 2,400 pulses), followed by intensive OT (comprising 120-min one-to-one training and 120-min self-training) during 15-day hospitalization. The motor function of the affected upper limb was evaluated by Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) on the days of admission and discharge. All patients completed the 15-day protocol without any adverse effects. Treatment significantly increased the FMA score (from 46.6 ± 8.7 to 51.6 ± 8.2 points, p stroke.

  18. Evaluation of Frequency and Risk Factors of Soft Tissue Rheumatism of Upper Limbs in Diabetic Patients in Kerman in 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Shakibi

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that affect different systems in human. Wide range of musculoskeletal syndromes have been described in association with diabetes. To determine the prevalence of upper limb soft tissue rheumatism in diabetes patients. In a cross sectional study 300 diabetic patients was examined by COPCORD questionnaire. The examination was performed by internist and rheumatologist . Data was analyzed by logistic regression. 73.3% of patients were female. Average age of cases was 51.2±13.7 years and mean of duration of disease was 7±6.4 years. 152 cases (50.7% had soft tissue rheumatism in upper limbs. 66 cases had carpal tannel syndrome, 23 cases with Dupuytren’s disease, 23 cases with Flexortenosynovitis, 91 cases with shoulder periarthritis, 4 cases had limited joint mobility and 12 had Elbow Epicandititis. Logestic regression analysis showed that type 2 diabetes, weak control of blood sugur and duration of disease>5years were risk factors for incidence of soft tissue rheumatism in upper limbs. Results have showed the high prevalence of soft tissue rheumatism in diabetic patients.

  19. Isotropy of an Upper Limb Exoskeleton and the Kinematics and Dynamics of the Human Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C. Perry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of human and robot into a single system offers remarkable opportunities for a new generation of assistive technology. Despite the recent prominence of upper limb exoskeletons in assistive applications, the human arm kinematics and dynamics are usually described in single or multiple arm movements that are not associated with any concrete activity of daily living (ADL. Moreover, the design of an exoskeleton, which is physically linked to the human body, must have a workspace that matches as close as possible with the workspace of the human body, while at the same time avoid singular configurations of the exoskeleton within the human workspace. The aims of the research reported in this manuscript are (1 to study the kinematics and the dynamics of the human arm during daily activities in a free and unconstrained environment, (2 to study the manipulability (isotropy of a 7-degree-of-freedom (DOF-powered exoskeleton arm given the kinematics and the dynamics of the human arm in ADLs. Kinematic data of the upper limb were acquired with a motion capture system while performing 24 daily activities from six subjects. Utilising a 7-DOF model of the human arm, the equations of motion were used to calculate joint torques from measured kinematics. In addition, the exoskeleton isotropy was calculated and mapped with respect to the spacial distribution of the human arm configurations during the 24 daily activities. The results indicate that the kinematic joint distributions representing all 24 actions appear normally distributed except for elbow flexion–extension with the emergence of three modal centres. Velocity and acceleration components of joint torque distributions were normally distributed about 0 Nm, whereas gravitational component distributions varied with joint. Additionally, velocity effects were found to contribute only 1/100th of the total joint torque, whereas acceleration components contribute 1/10th of the total torque at the

  20. When does action comprehension need motor involvement? Evidence from upper limb aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannuscorps, Gilles; Andres, Michael; Pillon, Agnesa

    2013-01-01

    Motor theories of action comprehension claim that comprehending the meaning of an action performed by a conspecific relies on the perceiver's own motor representation of the same action. According to this view, whether an action belongs to the motor repertoire of the perceiver should impact the ease by which this action is comprehended. We tested this prediction by assessing the ability of an individual (D.C.) born without upper limbs to comprehend actions involving hands (e.g., throwing) or other body parts (e.g., jumping). The tests used a range of different visual stimuli differing in the kind of information provided. The results showed that D.C. was as accurate and fast as control participants in comprehending natural video and photographic presentations of both manual and nonmanual actions, as well as pantomimes. However, he was selectively impaired at identifying point-light animations of manual actions. This impairment was not due to a difficulty in processing kinematic information per se. D.C. was indeed as accurate as control participants in two additional tests requiring a fine-grained analysis of an actor's arm or whole-body movements. These results challenge motor theories of action comprehension by showing that the visual analysis of body shape and motion provides sufficient input for comprehending observed actions. However, when body shape information is sparsely available, motor involvement becomes critical to interpret observed actions. We suggest that, with natural human movement stimuli, motor representations contribute to action comprehension each time visual information is incomplete or ambiguous. PMID:24215324

  1. An Upper-Limb Power-Assist Exoskeleton Using Proportional Myoelectric Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichuan Tang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We developed an upper-limb power-assist exoskeleton actuated by pneumatic muscles. The exoskeleton included two metal links: a nylon joint, four size-adjustable carbon fiber bracers, a potentiometer and two pneumatic muscles. The proportional myoelectric control method was proposed to control the exoskeleton according to the user’s motion intention in real time. With the feature extraction procedure and the classification (back-propagation neural network, an electromyogram (EMG-angle model was constructed to be used for pattern recognition. Six healthy subjects performed elbow flexion-extension movements under four experimental conditions: (1 holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton, but with no actuation and for different periods (2-s, 4-s and 8-s periods; (2 holding a 1-kg load, without wearing the exoskeleton, for a fixed period; (3 holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton, but with no actuation, for a fixed period; (4 holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton under proportional myoelectric control, for a fixed period. The EMG signals of the biceps brachii, the brachioradialis, the triceps brachii and the anconeus and the angle of the elbow were collected. The control scheme’s reliability and power-assist effectiveness were evaluated in the experiments. The results indicated that the exoskeleton could be controlled by the user’s motion intention in real time and that it was useful for augmenting arm performance with neurological signal control, which could be applied to assist in elbow rehabilitation after neurological injury.

  2. Functional Brain Correlates of Upper Limb Spasticity and Its Mitigation following Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Pundik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Arm spasticity is a challenge in the care of chronic stroke survivors with motor deficits. In order to advance spasticity treatments, a better understanding of the mechanism of spasticity-related neuroplasticity is needed. Objective. To investigate brain function correlates of spasticity in chronic stroke and to identify specific regional functional brain changes related to rehabilitation-induced mitigation of spasticity. Methods. 23 stroke survivors (>6 months were treated with an arm motor learning and spasticity therapy (5 d/wk for 12 weeks. Outcome measures included Modified Ashworth scale, sensory tests, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI for wrist and hand movement. Results. First, at baseline, greater spasticity correlated with poorer motor function (P=0.001 and greater sensory deficits (P=0.003. Second, rehabilitation produced improvement in upper limb spasticity and motor function (P<0.0001. Third, at baseline, greater spasticity correlated with higher fMRI activation in the ipsilesional thalamus (rho=0.49, P=0.03. Fourth, following rehabilitation, greater mitigation of spasticity correlated with enhanced fMRI activation in the contralesional primary motor (r=-0.755, P=0.003, premotor (r=−0.565, P=0.04, primary sensory (r=−0.614, P=0.03, and associative sensory (r=−0.597, P=0.03 regions while controlling for changes in motor function. Conclusions. Contralesional motor regions may contribute to restoring control of muscle tone in chronic stroke.

  3. A study of computer-related upper limb discomfort and computer vision syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A; Richardson, Stanley

    2007-12-01

    Personal computers are one of the commonest office tools in Malaysia today. Their usage, even for three hours per day, leads to a health risk of developing Occupational Overuse Syndrome (OOS), Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS), low back pain, tension headaches and psychosocial stress. The study was conducted to investigate how a multiethnic society in Malaysia is coping with these problems that are increasing at a phenomenal rate in the west. This study investigated computer usage, awareness of ergonomic modifications of computer furniture and peripherals, symptoms of CVS and risk of developing OOS. A cross-sectional questionnaire study of 136 computer users was conducted on a sample population of university students and office staff. A 'Modified Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) for office work' technique was used for evaluation of OOS. The prevalence of CVS was surveyed incorporating a 10-point scoring system for each of its various symptoms. It was found that many were using standard keyboard and mouse without any ergonomic modifications. Around 50% of those with some low back pain did not have an adjustable backrest. Many users had higher RULA scores of the wrist and neck suggesting increased risk of developing OOS, which needed further intervention. Many (64%) were using refractive corrections and still had high scores of CVS commonly including eye fatigue, headache and burning sensation. The increase of CVS scores (suggesting more subjective symptoms) correlated with increase in computer usage spells. It was concluded that further onsite studies are needed, to follow up this survey to decrease the risks of developing CVS and OOS amongst young computer users. PMID:18572794

  4. Bradykinesia-akinesia incoordination test: validating an online keyboard test of upper limb function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair J Noyce

    Full Text Available The Bradykinesia Akinesia Incoordination (BRAIN test is a computer keyboard-tapping task that was developed for use in assessing the effect of symptomatic treatment on motor function in Parkinson's disease (PD. An online version has now been designed for use in a wider clinical context and the research setting.Validation of the online BRAIN test was undertaken in 58 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD and 93 age-matched, non-neurological controls. Kinesia scores (KS30, number of key taps in 30 seconds, akinesia times (AT30, mean dwell time on each key in milliseconds, incoordination scores (IS30, variance of travelling time between key presses and dysmetria scores (DS30, accuracy of key presses were compared between groups. These parameters were correlated against total motor scores and sub-scores from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS.Mean KS30, AT30 and IS30 were significantly different between PD patients and controls (p≤0.0001. Sensitivity for 85% specificity was 50% for KS30, 40% for AT30 and 29% for IS30. KS30, AT30 and IS30 correlated significantly with UPDRS total motor scores (r = -0.53, r = 0.27 and r = 0.28 respectively and motor UPDRS sub-scores. The reliability of KS30, AT30 and DS30 was good on repeated testing.The BRAIN test is a reliable, convenient test of upper limb motor function that can be used routinely in the outpatient clinic, at home and in clinical trials. In addition, it can be used as an objective longitudinal measurement of emerging motor dysfunction for the prediction of PD in at-risk cohorts.

  5. Movement characteristics of upper extremity prostheses during basic goal-directed tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwsema, Hanneke; van der Sluis, Corry K.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: After an upper limb amputation a prosthesis is often used to restore the functionality. However, the frequency of prostheses use is generally low. Movement kinematics of prostheses use might suggest origins of this low use. The aim of this study was to reveal movement patterns of prosthe

  6. A Telehealth Intervention Using Nintendo Wii Fit Balance Boards and iPads to Improve Walking in Older Adults With Lower Limb Amputation (Wii.n.Walk): Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Bita; Finlayson, Heather C; Eng, Janice J; Payne, Michael WC; Jarus, Tal; Goldsmith, Charles H; Mitchell, Ian M

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of older adults living with lower limb amputation (LLA) who require rehabilitation for improving their walking capacity and mobility is growing. Existing rehabilitation practices frequently fail to meet this demand. Nintendo Wii Fit may be a valuable tool to enable rehabilitation interventions. Based on pilot studies, we have developed “Wii.n.Walk”, an in-home telehealth Wii Fit intervention targeted to improve walking capacity in older adults with LLA. Objective The objective of this study is to determine whether the Wii.n.Walk intervention enhances walking capacity compared to an attention control group. Methods This project is a multi-site (Vancouver BC, London ON), parallel, evaluator-blind randomized controlled trial. Participants include community-dwelling older adults over the age of 50 years with unilateral transtibial or transfemoral amputation. Participants will be stratified by site and block randomized in triplets to either the Wii.n.Walk intervention or an attention control group employing the Wii Big Brain cognitive software. This trial will include both supervised and unsupervised phases. During the supervised phase, both groups will receive 40-minute sessions of supervised group training three times per week for a duration of 4 weeks. Participants will complete the first week of the intervention in groups of three at their local rehabilitation center with a trainer. The remaining 3 weeks will take place at participants’ homes using remote supervision by the trainer using Apple iPad technology. At the end of 4 weeks, the supervised period will end and the unsupervised period will begin. Participants will retain the Wii console and be encouraged to continue using the program for an additional 4 weeks’ duration. The primary outcome measure will be the “Two-Minute Walk Test” to measure walking capacity. Outcome measures will be evaluated for all participants at baseline, after the end of both the supervised and

  7. Prevention of upper limb symptoms and signs of nerve afflictions in computer operators: The effect of intervention by stretching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Gert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study of computer operators we have demonstrated the relation of upper limb pain to individual and patterns of neurological findings (reduced function of muscles, sensory deviations from normal and mechanical allodynia of nerve trunks. The identified patterns were in accordance with neural afflictions at three specific locations (brachial plexus at chord level, posterior interosseous and median nerve on elbow level. We have introduced an intervention program aiming to mobilize nerves at these locations and tested its efficacy. Methods 125 and 59, respectively, computer operators in two divisions of an engineering consultancy company were invited to answer a questionnaire on upper limb symptoms and to undergo a blinded neurological examination. Participants in one division were subsequently instructed to participate in an upper limb stretching course at least three times during workdays in a six month period. Subjects from the other division served as controls. At the end of the intervention both groups were invited to a second identical evaluation by questionnaire and physical examination. Symptoms and findings were studied in the right upper limb. Perceived changes of pain were recorded and individual and patterns of physical findings assessed for both groups at baseline and at follow-up. In subjects with no or minimal preceding pain we additionally studied the relation of incident pain to the summarized findings for parameters contained in the definition of nerve affliction at the three locations. Results Summarized pain was significantly reduced in the intervention group but unchanged in controls. After the intervention, fewer neurological abnormalities in accordance with nerve affliction were recorded for the whole material but no conclusion could be drawn regarding the relation to the intervention of this reduction. Incident pain correlated to findings in accordance with the three locations of nerve

  8. Electroencephalographic markers of robot-aided therapy in stroke patients for the evaluation of upper limb rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Patrizio; Infarinato, Francesco; Del Percio, Claudio; Lizio, Roberta; Babiloni, Claudio; Foti, Calogero; Franceschini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in developed countries; its effects may include sensory, motor, and cognitive impairment as well as a reduced ability to perform self-care and participate in social and community activities. A number of studies have shown that the use of robotic systems in upper limb motor rehabilitation programs provides safe and intensive treatment to patients with motor impairments because of a neurological injury. Furthermore, robot-aided therapy was shown to be well accepted and tolerated by all patients; however, it is not known whether a specific robot-aided rehabilitation can induce beneficial cortical plasticity in stroke patients. Here, we present a procedure to study neural underpinning of robot-aided upper limb rehabilitation in stroke patients. Neurophysiological recordings use the following: (a) 10-20 system electroencephalographic (EEG) electrode montage; (b) bipolar vertical and horizontal electrooculographies; and (c) bipolar electromyography from the operating upper limb. Behavior monitoring includes the following: (a) clinical data and (b) kinematic and dynamic of the operant upper limb movements. Experimental conditions include the following: (a) resting state eyes closed and eyes open, and (b) robotic rehabilitation task (maximum 80 s each block to reach 4-min EEG data; interblock pause of 1 min). The data collection is performed before and after a program of 30 daily rehabilitation sessions. EEG markers include the following: (a) EEG power density in the eyes-closed condition; (b) reactivity of EEG power density to eyes opening; and (c) reactivity of EEG power density to robotic rehabilitation task. The above procedure was tested on a subacute patient (29 poststroke days) and on a chronic patient (21 poststroke months). After the rehabilitation program, we observed (a) improved clinical condition; (b) improved performance during the robotic task; (c) reduced delta rhythms (1-4 Hz) and increased alpha

  9. Electroencephalographic markers of robot-aided therapy in stroke patients for the evaluation of upper limb rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Patrizio; Infarinato, Francesco; Del Percio, Claudio; Lizio, Roberta; Babiloni, Claudio; Foti, Calogero; Franceschini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in developed countries; its effects may include sensory, motor, and cognitive impairment as well as a reduced ability to perform self-care and participate in social and community activities. A number of studies have shown that the use of robotic systems in upper limb motor rehabilitation programs provides safe and intensive treatment to patients with motor impairments because of a neurological injury. Furthermore, robot-aided therapy was shown to be well accepted and tolerated by all patients; however, it is not known whether a specific robot-aided rehabilitation can induce beneficial cortical plasticity in stroke patients. Here, we present a procedure to study neural underpinning of robot-aided upper limb rehabilitation in stroke patients. Neurophysiological recordings use the following: (a) 10-20 system electroencephalographic (EEG) electrode montage; (b) bipolar vertical and horizontal electrooculographies; and (c) bipolar electromyography from the operating upper limb. Behavior monitoring includes the following: (a) clinical data and (b) kinematic and dynamic of the operant upper limb movements. Experimental conditions include the following: (a) resting state eyes closed and eyes open, and (b) robotic rehabilitation task (maximum 80 s each block to reach 4-min EEG data; interblock pause of 1 min). The data collection is performed before and after a program of 30 daily rehabilitation sessions. EEG markers include the following: (a) EEG power density in the eyes-closed condition; (b) reactivity of EEG power density to eyes opening; and (c) reactivity of EEG power density to robotic rehabilitation task. The above procedure was tested on a subacute patient (29 poststroke days) and on a chronic patient (21 poststroke months). After the rehabilitation program, we observed (a) improved clinical condition; (b) improved performance during the robotic task; (c) reduced delta rhythms (1-4 Hz) and increased alpha

  10. Current management of the mangled upper extremity

    OpenAIRE

    Bumbasirevic, Marko; Stevanovic, Milan; Lesic, Aleksandar; Atkinson, Henry D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Mangled describes an injury caused by cutting, tearing, or crushing, which leads to the limb becoming unrecognizable; in essence, there are two treatment options for mangled upper extremities, amputation and salvage reconstruction. With advances in our understanding of human physiology and basic science, and with the development of new fixation devices, modern microsurgical techniques and the possibility of different types of bony and soft tissue reconstruction, the clinical and functional ou...

  11. Functional influence of botulinum neurotoxin type A treatment (Xeomin® of multifocal upper and lower limb spasticity on chronic hemiparetic gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Falso

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the modification of hemiplegic shoulder pain and walking velocity through injections of Xeomin®, a new botulinum neurotoxin type A formulation, in a 67-year-old woman with chronic residual left hemiparesis and hemiparetic gait attributable to stroke. Clinical evaluation included upper and lower limb spasticity, upper and lower limb pain, trunk control, upper and lower limb motricity index, visual gait analysis, and gait velocity. Assessments were performed before, 1 week after, and 1 month after treatment. Improvement was observed in all clinical parameters assessed. Amelioration of spasticity of the upper and lower limbs and shoulder pain was observed after 1 month. Trunk postural attitude and paraxial muscle recruitment recovered. No adverse events were observed and the patient shows significant improvement of functional impairment derived from chronic spasticity after treatment with Xeomin®. We also provide a simple and useful protocol for clinical evaluation of the treatment.

  12. Side-to-side comparisons of bone mineral density in upper and lower limbs of collegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, Barbara S; Harmon-Clayton, Karen; Ward, Kenneth D; Klesges, Robert C; Vukadinovich, Christopher M; Cantler, Edwin D

    2002-11-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the effects of participation in various sports on side-to-side (contralateral) differences in bone mineral density (BMD) of the upper and lower limbs. The BMD of the arms and legs was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The subjects were 184 collegiate athletes, both men and women, who participated in NCAA Division I-A baseball, basketball, football, golf, soccer, tennis, cross-country, indoor/outdoor track, and volleyball. Results revealed greater BMD of the right arms compared with the left arms for all teams, with the most pronounced differences observed in men's and women's tennis and men's baseball. Differences in the lower limbs were less common. No significant differences in lower limb BMD were found in the women. In men, differences in lower limb BMD were found in the football and tennis teams, with the nondominant leg having greater bone mass. Recognition of contralateral differences in bone density may be of particular interest to strength and conditioning professionals as they consider the need to include bilateral and unilateral training programs in an effort to maximize performance and minimize stress-related injuries. PMID:12423190

  13. Mechanism of Kinect-based virtual reality training for motor functional recovery of upper limbs after subacute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiao; Mao, Yurong; Lin, Qiang; Qiu, Yunhai; Chen, Shaozhen; Li, Le; Cates, Ryan S; Zhou, Shufeng; Huang, Dongfeng

    2013-11-01

    The Kinect-based virtual reality system for the Xbox 360 enables users to control and interact with the game console without the need to touch a game controller, and provides rehabilitation training for stroke patients with lower limb dysfunctions. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, 18 healthy subjects and five patients after subacute stroke were included. The five patients were scanned using functional MRI prior to training, 3 weeks after training and at a 12-week follow-up, and then compared with healthy subjects. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function Test scores of the hemiplegic upper limbs of stroke patients were significantly increased 3 weeks after training and at the 12-week follow-up. Functional MRI results showed that contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex was activated after Kinect-based virtual reality training in the stroke patients compared with the healthy subjects. Contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex, the bilateral supplementary motor area and the ipsilateral cerebellum were also activated during hand-clenching in all 18 healthy subjects. Our findings indicate that Kinect-based virtual reality training could promote the recovery of upper limb motor function in subacute stroke patients, and brain reorganization by Kinect-based virtual reality training may be linked to the contralateral sensorimotor cortex.

  14. Biomechanical study of upper-limb exoskeleton for resistance training with three-dimensional motion analysis system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzong-Ming Wu, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The world’s population is aging rapidly, particularly in developed countries. The trend toward prolonged life expectancy will increase the elderly population and thereby lead to an increase in occurrences of age-related health problems such as chronic disease. Healthcare services and home-based rehabilitation are in high demand, and the demand for professional physical therapy is imposing an increasing burden on the healthcare system. Rehabilitation training devices must keep pace with standards of care, be cost effective, and meet the home-based training requirements of today’s rehabilitation trends. This article presents an experimental study of a novel spring-loaded upper-limb exoskeleton meant to enable a patient or nondisabled individual to move a limb at multiple joints in different planes for resistance training in a free and unconstrained environment. To assess the functionality of the design, we have measured its kinematic data while performing designated movements and adopted a motion-capture system to verify the function of our mechanism. The collected data and analysis of the kinematic and dynamic joint torques may not only verify our mechanism but also provide a profound understanding of the design requirements for an appropriate spring-loaded exoskeleton for upper-limb resistance training.

  15. Mechanism of Kinect-based virtual reality training for motor functional recovery of upper limbs after subacute stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Bao; Yurong Mao; Qiang Lin; Yunhai Qiu; Shaozhen Chen; Le Li; Ryan S. Cates; Shufeng Zhou; Dongfeng Huang

    2013-01-01

    The Kinect-based virtual reality system for the Xbox 360 enables users to control and interact with the game console without the need to touch a game control er, and provides rehabilitation training for stroke patients with lower limb dysfunctions. However, the underlying mechanism remains un-clear. In this study, 18 healthy subjects and five patients after subacute stroke were included. The five patients were scanned using functional MRI prior to training, 3 weeks after training and at a 12-week fol ow-up, and then compared with healthy subjects. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function Test scores of the hemiplegic upper limbs of stroke patients were significantly increased 3 weeks after training and at the 12-week fol ow-up. Functional MRI results showed that contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex was activated after Kinect-based virtual reality training in the stroke patients compared with the healthy subjects. Contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex, the bilateral supplementary motor area and the ipsilateral cerebel um were also activated during hand-clenching in al 18 healthy subjects. Our findings indicate that Kinect-based virtual reality training could promote the recovery of upper limb motor function in subacute stroke patients, and brain reorganization by Kinect-based virtual reality training may be linked to the contralateral sen-sorimotor cortex.

  16. The development of an adaptive upper-limb stroke rehabilitation robotic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goetschalckx Robby

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is the primary cause of adult disability. To support this large population in recovery, robotic technologies are being developed to assist in the delivery of rehabilitation. This paper presents an automated system for a rehabilitation robotic device that guides stroke patients through an upper-limb reaching task. The system uses a decision theoretic model (a partially observable Markov decision process, or POMDP as its primary engine for decision making. The POMDP allows the system to automatically modify exercise parameters to account for the specific needs and abilities of different individuals, and to use these parameters to take appropriate decisions about stroke rehabilitation exercises. Methods The performance of the system was evaluated by comparing the decisions made by the system with those of a human therapist. A single patient participant was paired up with a therapist participant for the duration of the study, for a total of six sessions. Each session was an hour long and occurred three times a week for two weeks. During each session, three steps were followed: (A after the system made a decision, the therapist either agreed or disagreed with the decision made; (B the researcher had the device execute the decision made by the therapist; (C the patient then performed the reaching exercise. These parts were repeated in the order of A-B-C until the end of the session. Qualitative and quantitative question were asked at the end of each session and at the completion of the study for both participants. Results Overall, the therapist agreed with the system decisions approximately 65% of the time. In general, the therapist thought the system decisions were believable and could envision this system being used in both a clinical and home setting. The patient was satisfied with the system and would use this system as his/her primary method of rehabilitation. Conclusions The data collected in this study can only be

  17. Percutaneous isolated limb perfusion with thrombolytics for severe limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahsan T; Kalapatapu, Venkat R; Bledsoe, Shelly; Moursi, Mohammed M; Eidt, John F

    2005-01-01

    clinical improvement. The ABI changed from 0.15 to 0.5 in the lower extremity and near-normal digital pressures in upper extremity ischemia. Limb salvage and symptomatic relief at 6 months was 90%. All patients except one were kept on anticoagulation postoperatively. No bleeding complications were observed from the procedure. Percutaneous isolated limb perfusion brought symptomatic relief to patients presenting with acute on chronic limb ischemia. This can be an alternate option for patients facing amputation with no revascularization options.

  18. High Intensity Physical Exercise and Pain in the Neck and Upper Limb among Slaughterhouse Workers: Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Sundstrup

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Slaughterhouse work involves a high degree of repetitive and forceful upper limb movements and thus implies an elevated risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. High intensity strength training effectively rehabilitates musculoskeletal disorders among sedentary employees, but less is known about the effect among workers with repetitive and forceful work demands. Before performing randomized controlled trials it may be beneficial to assess the cross-sectional connection between exercise and musculoskeletal pain. We investigated the association between high intensity physical exercise and pain among 595 slaughterhouse workers in Denmark, Europe. Using logistic regression analyses, odds ratios for pain and work disability as a function of physical exercise, gender, age, BMI, smoking, and job position were estimated. The prevalence of pain in the neck, shoulder, elbow, and hand/wrist was 48%, 60%, 40%, and 52%, respectively. The odds for experiencing neck pain were significantly lower among slaughterhouse workers performing physical exercise (OR = 0.70, CI: 0.49–0.997, whereas the odds for pain in the shoulders, elbow, or hand/wrist were not associated with exercise. The present study can be used as general reference of pain in the neck and upper extremity among slaughterhouse workers. Future studies should investigate the effect of high intensity physical exercise on neck and upper limb pain in slaughterhouse workers.

  19. Effects of the Racket Polar Moment of Inertia on Dominant Upper Limb Joint Moments during Tennis Serve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Chèze, Laurence; Macé, Pierre; Dumas, Raphaël

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the polar moment of inertia of a tennis racket on upper limb loading in the serve. Eight amateur competition tennis players performed two sets of 10 serves using two rackets identical in mass, position of center of mass and moments of inertia other than the polar moment of inertia (0.00152 vs 0.00197 kg.m2). An eight-camera motion analysis system collected the 3D trajectories of 16 markers, located on the thorax, upper limbs and racket, from which shoulder, elbow and wrist net joint moments and powers were computed using inverse dynamics. During the cocking phase, increased racket polar moment of inertia was associated with significant increases in the peak shoulder extension and abduction moments, as well the peak elbow extension, valgus and supination moments. During the forward swing phase, peak wrist extension and radial deviation moments significantly increased with polar moment of inertia. During the follow-through phase, the peak shoulder adduction, elbow pronation and wrist external rotation moments displayed a significant inverse relationship with polar moment of inertia. During the forward swing, the magnitudes of negative joint power at the elbow and wrist were significantly larger when players served using the racket with a higher polar moment of inertia. Although a larger polar of inertia allows players to better tolerate off-center impacts, it also appears to place additional loads on the upper extremity when serving and may therefore increase injury risk in tennis players. PMID:25117871

  20. Effects of the racket polar moment of inertia on dominant upper limb joint moments during tennis serve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Rogowski

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of the polar moment of inertia of a tennis racket on upper limb loading in the serve. Eight amateur competition tennis players performed two sets of 10 serves using two rackets identical in mass, position of center of mass and moments of inertia other than the polar moment of inertia (0.00152 vs 0.00197 kg.m2. An eight-camera motion analysis system collected the 3D trajectories of 16 markers, located on the thorax, upper limbs and racket, from which shoulder, elbow and wrist net joint moments and powers were computed using inverse dynamics. During the cocking phase, increased racket polar moment of inertia was associated with significant increases in the peak shoulder extension and abduction moments, as well the peak elbow extension, valgus and supination moments. During the forward swing phase, peak wrist extension and radial deviation moments significantly increased with polar moment of inertia. During the follow-through phase, the peak shoulder adduction, elbow pronation and wrist external rotation moments displayed a significant inverse relationship with polar moment of inertia. During the forward swing, the magnitudes of negative joint power at the elbow and wrist were significantly larger when players served using the racket with a higher polar moment of inertia. Although a larger polar of inertia allows players to better tolerate off-center impacts, it also appears to place additional loads on the upper extremity when serving and may therefore increase injury risk in tennis players.

  1. High intensity physical exercise and pain in the neck and upper limb among slaughterhouse workers: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Jay, Kenneth; Brandt, Mikkel; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-01-01

    Slaughterhouse work involves a high degree of repetitive and forceful upper limb movements and thus implies an elevated risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. High intensity strength training effectively rehabilitates musculoskeletal disorders among sedentary employees, but less is known about the effect among workers with repetitive and forceful work demands. Before performing randomized controlled trials it may be beneficial to assess the cross-sectional connection between exercise and musculoskeletal pain. We investigated the association between high intensity physical exercise and pain among 595 slaughterhouse workers in Denmark, Europe. Using logistic regression analyses, odds ratios for pain and work disability as a function of physical exercise, gender, age, BMI, smoking, and job position were estimated. The prevalence of pain in the neck, shoulder, elbow, and hand/wrist was 48%, 60%, 40%, and 52%, respectively. The odds for experiencing neck pain were significantly lower among slaughterhouse workers performing physical exercise (OR = 0.70, CI: 0.49-0.997), whereas the odds for pain in the shoulders, elbow, or hand/wrist were not associated with exercise. The present study can be used as general reference of pain in the neck and upper extremity among slaughterhouse workers. Future studies should investigate the effect of high intensity physical exercise on neck and upper limb pain in slaughterhouse workers. PMID:24527440

  2. Optimum ratio of upper to lower limb lengths in hand-carrying of a load under the assumption of frequency coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W J; Crompton, R H; Li, Y; Gunther, M M

    2003-02-01

    The ratio of the upper to lower limb lengths [or the intermembral index (IMI)] in the earliest human ancestors is closer to that of the living chimpanzees than to our own, although the former show undoubted adaptations to bipedality. What biomechanical factors could then have led to the phenomenon of genus Homo? This paper proposes and evaluates a relationship between IMI and hand-carrying. Assuming that coordination of limb swing frequencies of the upper and lower limbs would be the subject of positive selection, a mathematical expression was derived and can in part explain the changes in IMI. We found that AL-288-1 [3.6 million years old (MY)], the most complete skeleton of the early hominid Australopithecus afarensis, could only have carried loads equivalent to 15-50% of the upper limb weight while maintaining swing symmetry, but KNM WT-15000, Homo ergaster (1.8MY) and modern humans could both carry loads 3 times heavier than the upper limb while maintaining swing symmetry. The carrying ability of chimpanzees would be inferior to that of AL-288-1. The IMI of modern humans, at 68-70, is the smallest, and is optimal for hand-carrying under our criteria. Under reduced selection pressure for hand-carrying, but unreduced selection for mechanical effectiveness, we might expect humans to evolve a longer upper limb, to improve swing symmetry when unloaded. PMID:12547362

  3. Topographic maps of human motor cortex in normal and pathological conditions: mirror movements, amputations and spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L G; Bandinelli, S; Topka, H R; Fuhr, P; Roth, B J; Hallett, M

    1991-01-01

    We studied motor evoked potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with unilateral upper limb amputations, complete T10-T12 spinal cord transection, and congenital mirror movements and in controls. Different muscles in the trunk and upper and lower extremities were evaluated at rest. In controls, muscles could be activated with stimulation of regions several centimeters wide. These areas overlapped extensively when muscles studied were from the same limb and shifted positions abruptly when muscles were from different limbs. Distal muscles were easier to activate than proximal muscles and normally evidenced exclusively a contralateral representation. Congenital defects in motor control in patients with mirror movements resulted in marked derangement of the map of outputs of distal hand muscles with enlarged and ipsilateral representations. Peripheral lesions, either acquired (amputations) or congenital (congenital absence of a limb), resulted in plastic reorganization of motor outputs targeting muscles immediately proximal to the stump. Central nervous system lesions (i.e., spinal cord injury producing paraplegia) also resulted in enlargement of the map of outputs targeting muscles proximal to the lesion. These results indicate that magnetic stimulation is a useful non-invasive tool for exploring plastic changes in human motor pathways following different types of injury.

  4. Management of multijoint stiffness of bilateral upper limbs secondary to heterotopic ossification: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-wei Min, MD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The management of heterotopic ossification (HO is controversial. Although some reports have investigated assessment and surgical resection techniques for HO affecting one or more joints, the cases of multijoint stiffness secondary to HO are rare. This article describes a rare case of HO affecting both upper limbs of a 32-year-old man that severely interfered with activities of daily living. We present the rehabilitation management of this case and the functional outcome 1 to 2 yr after excision of the ossific masses.

  5. Immunological indices of blood and interstitial fluid in estimation of a program of therapy of upper limb secondary edemas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of therapy of upper limb secondary edemas after 4 programs was compared among 83 patients. The methods were as follows: traditional method (TM) including routine conservative therapy, acupuncture (AP), He-Ne laser OKG-13 and semiconductor laser against a background of traditional therapy. A study was made of the time course of the extent of edema, total protein, IG, G, A and M and circulating immune complexes (CIC) during therapy of such patients. Blood serum and interstitial fluid indices were compared. It was shown that the application of both lasers led to increasing efficacy of TM and AP

  6. Brain network involved in visual processing of movement stimuli used in upper limb robotic training: an fMRI study

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    Nocchi Federico

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of robot-mediated therapy and virtual reality in neurorehabilitation is becoming of increasing importance. However, there is limited information, using neuroimaging, on the neural networks involved in training with these technologies. This study was intended to detect the brain network involved in the visual processing of movement during robotic training. The main aim was to investigate the existence of a common cerebral network able to assimilate biological (human upper limb and non-biological (abstract object movements, hence testing the suitability of the visual non-biological feedback provided by the InMotion2 Robot. Methods A visual functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI task was administered to 22 healthy subjects. The task required observation and retrieval of motor gestures and of the visual feedback used in robotic training. Functional activations of both biological and non-biological movements were examined to identify areas activated in both conditions, along with differential activity in upper limb vs. abstract object trials. Control of response was also tested by administering trials with congruent and incongruent reaching movements. Results The observation of upper limb and abstract object movements elicited similar patterns of activations according to a caudo-rostral pathway for the visual processing of movements (including specific areas of the occipital, temporal, parietal, and frontal lobes. Similarly, overlapping activations were found for the subsequent retrieval of the observed movement. Furthermore, activations of frontal cortical areas were associated with congruent trials more than with the incongruent ones. Conclusions This study identified the neural pathway associated with visual processing of movement stimuli used in upper limb robot-mediated training and investigated the brain’s ability to assimilate abstract object movements with human motor gestures. In both conditions

  7. Assessing the impact of upper limb disability following stroke: a qualitative enquiry using internet-based personal accounts of stroke survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltawski, Leon; Allison, Rhoda; Briscoe, Simon; Freeman, Jennifer; Kilbride, Cherry; Neal, Debbie; Turton, Ailie J.; Dean, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Upper limb disability following stroke may have multiple effects on the individual. Existing assessment instruments tend to focus on impairment and function and may miss other changes that are personally important. This study aimed to identify personally significant impacts of upper limb disability following stroke. Methods: Accounts by stroke survivors, in the form of web-based diaries (blogs) and stories, were sought using a blog search engine and in stroke-related web-sites. Thematic analysis using the World Health Organisation’s International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) was used to identify personal impacts of upper limb disability following stroke. Results: Ninety-nine sources from at least four countries were analysed. Many impacts were classifiable using the ICF, but a number of additional themes emerged, including emotional, cognitive and behavioural changes. Blogs and other web-based accounts were easily accessible and rich sources of data, although using them raised several methodological issues, including potential sample bias. Conclusions: A range of impacts was identified, some of which (such as use of information technology and alienation from the upper limb) are not addressed in current assessment instruments. They should be considered in post-stroke assessments. Blogs may help in the development of more comprehensive assessments.Implications for RehabilitationA comprehensive assessment of the upper limb following stroke should include the impact of upper limb problems on social participation, as well as associated emotional, cognitive and behavioural changes.Using personalised assessment instruments alongside standardised measures may help ensure that these broader domains are considered in discussions between clinicians and patients.Rehabilitation researchers should investigate whether and how these domains could be addressed and operationalised in standard upper limb assessment instruments. PMID

  8. Comparative study of the effect of taping on scapular stability and upper limb function in recovering hemiplegics with scapular weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhwanit Shah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemiplegia is the commonest form of paralysis, involving arm, leg and sometimes the face on one side of the body. Shoulder girdle in chronic hemiplegic suffers from two sorts of problems (a spasticity of elevators and retractors, which pull the scapula into a fixed elevated and retracted position. (b weakness of the opposite group of scapular muscles, i.e., depressors and protectors. This leads to instability of the scapulothoracic joint resulting in impaired functional use of the upper limb, taping is a method of maintaining orientation of the scapula by means of proprioceptive biofeedback to the patient. Aim of this study is to check the effect of taping on scapular stability and upper limb function in recovering hemiplegics. Objectives of the Study: (1 To study the effect of taping on functional performance of the hemiplegic upper extremity. (2 To compare the effect of taping combined with physiotherapeutic exercises v/s physiotherapeutic exercises alone on functional independence of the hemiplegic upper extremity. Subjects: All the 37 chronic hemiplegic patients with scapular weakness were taken and divided into two groups: Group A (Experimental group and Group B (Control group. Materials and Methods: All the 37 chronic hemiplegic patients were evaluated by Fugl Meyer Physical Performance Assessment Scale for hemiplegic upper extremity before starting the treatment. Group A patients received scapular taping combined with physiotherapeutic exercises and Group B patients received only physiotherapeutic exercises for the period of 2 weeks. After 2 weeks both Group A and B patients were re-evaluated on Fugl Meyer Physical Performance Assessment Scale for hemiplegic upper extremity. Results: There was a significant improvement between the pre- and post-treatment scores of Group A patients on the Fugl Meyer Physical Performance Assessment Scale of hemiplegic upper extremity, whereas Group B patients score on the same scale was

  9. Prosthetic options for below knee amputations after osteomyelitis and nonunion of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshirfar, A; Showers, D; Logan, P; Esterhai, J L

    1999-03-01

    Below the knee amputation after trauma is an appropriate option for many patients with recalcitrant infection and nonunion of the tibia. Patients who have had transtibial amputations have lower energy expenditure, heart rate, and oxygen cost when ambulating with their prostheses than when using a three-point gait with crutches without their artificial limb. Innovative prosthetists have improved each of the five essential components of the limb amputated below the knee: socket, insert, shaft and pylon, foot and ankle assembly, and suspension system. Prosthetists are integral members of the patient's healthcare team. Their recommendations and direct patient care are essential to optimizing the functional ability of patients who have had amputations.

  10. Effect of primary and secondary wartime below-knee amputation on length of hospitalization and rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Jandrić Slavica; Topić Brano

    2002-01-01

    The results of below-knee amputations in 36 war wounded (mean age 35,42) were reviewed. The majority of the patients was wounded by land mines (94.4%). Most of them were between 25 and 35 years old. Bilateral amputation was done in 2.8% of cases. The amputation was performed on the day of wounding (primary below-knee amputation) in 30 (83.3%) amputees. Secondary amputation after the attempt to save the severely injured lower-limb was performed in 6 patients (16,7%) average 4.61 ± 11.67 days a...

  11. Amputee Mobility Predictor-Bilateral: A performance-based measure of mobility for people with bilateral lower-limb loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele A. Raya, PhD, PT, SCS, ATC

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Amputee Mobility Predictor (AMP is an outcome measure designed to assess mobility and functional capabilities for people with unilateral lower-limb amputation. No comparable measure exists for those with bilateral lower-limb amputation (BLLA. The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of the AMP-Bilateral (AMP-B to measure the ability to perform functional tasks related to participation in advanced skill activities in those with BLLA and to determine whether AMP-B scores correlated with 6-minute walk test (6MWT performance. Twenty-six male servicemembers (SMs completed the study: 12 with bilateral transtibial amputation (BTTA, 7 with bilateral transfemoral amputation (BTFA, and 7 with combination transtibial and transfemoral amputation (TTA/TFA. Significant differences existed between the AMP-B scores (p < 0.001, AMP scores (p < 0.001, and 6MWT distance (p < 0.05 for SMs with BTTA and TTA/TFA and SMs with BTTA and BTFA but not between those with BTFA and TTA/TFA. Scoring of five AMP items was modified because they necessitate at least one intact knee joint to generate the necessary torque requirements to perform the activity without upper-limb assistance. Minor modifications in scoring of the AMP do not alter total score and allow clinicians to determine the mobility and functional capabilities of SMs with BTFA and TFA/TTA.

  12. Bone dosimetry and scintigraphy in post-traumatic reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) with upper limb involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 24 patients affected with post-traumatic reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) with upper limb involvement following humeral fractures, bone mineral density (BMD, mg/cm2) was measured by means of dual-photon absorptiometry in the distal radius of both the affected and the normal contralateral limbs. Subsequently, all patients underwent dynamic and static scintigraphic exams after i.v. injection of 99mTc-MDP (20 mCi), with gamma camera collimator centered in both limbs. BMD values were significantly lower in the affected sides than in the normal contralateral ones. Time-activity curves with MDP showed increased flow in the involved limbs. Significant increase in blood pool and in bone uptake was also oserved. After carbocalcin treatment (80 U/q.d.i.m. in 12 cases and 40 U/q.d.i.m. in the other 12 cases for month) all the patients presented improved clinical symptoms and significant increase in BMD, that was restored to normal values in 7 of the patients who had a longer treatment (40 U/q.d.i.m. for 2 months). Both local blood flow and bone up-take in the affected side significantly decreased after carbocalcitonin therapy while bone avidity index increased in those patients in whom this parameter had been measured. Results confirmed the usefulness of radioisotopic procedures in post-traumatic RSDS for both diagnosis (by demonstrating increased local blood flow and early bone demineralization) and monitoring response to treatment with carbocalcitonin, which seems to play an important role in this condition

  13. Effectiveness of the Virtual Reality System Toyra on Upper Limb Function in People with Tetraplegia: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dimbwadyo-Terrer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a virtual reality program combined with conventional therapy in upper limb function in people with tetraplegia and to provide data about patients’ satisfaction with the virtual reality system. Thirty-one people with subacute complete cervical tetraplegia participated in the study. Experimental group received 15 sessions with Toyra® virtual reality system for 5 weeks, 30 minutes/day, 3 days/week in addition to conventional therapy, while control group only received conventional therapy. All patients were assessed at baseline, after intervention, and at three-month follow-up with a battery of clinical, functional, and satisfaction scales. Control group showed significant improvements in the manual muscle test (p = 0,043, partial η2 = 0,22 in the follow-up evaluation. Both groups demonstrated clinical, but nonsignificant, changes to their arm function in 4 of the 5 scales used. All patients showed a high level of satisfaction with the virtual reality system. This study showed that virtual reality added to conventional therapy produces similar results in upper limb function compared to only conventional therapy. Moreover, the gaming aspects incorporated in conventional rehabilitation appear to produce high motivation during execution of the assigned tasks. This trial is registered with EudraCT number 2015-002157-35.

  14. Exploring the factor on sensory motor function of upper limb associated with executive function in communitydwelling older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Daiki; Matsuoka, Hiroka; Iwai, Midori; Nakamura, Shugo; Kubo, Ayumi; Tomiyama, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Exercise, such as cardiovascular fitness training, has been shown to have utility in improving executive function but is difficult for older adults with low mobility to perform. Accordingly, there is interest in the development of regimens other than high mobility exercises for older adults with low mobility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between sensory motor function of the upper limb and executive function in community-dwelling older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 57 right-handed, independent, community-dwelling older adults. Sensory motor function of upper limb, including range of motion, strength, sensation, finger dexterity, and comprehensive hand function was measured in both hands. Executive function was assessed using the Delta Trail Making Test. Multiple regression analysis indicated the finger dexterity of the non-dominant hand as independently associated with executive function (β = –0.414, P executive function that are more suitable for older adults with limited physical fitness levels. As this was a cross-sectional study, further studies are required to validate the efficacy of non-dominant finger dexterity training for improving executive function in older adults. PMID:27578912

  15. Robotic Assessment of Upper Limb Function after Proximal Humeral Fracture: Personal Experience as A Patient and Occupational Therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Atsuko; Otaka, Yohei; Kasuga, Shoko; Otaka, Eri; Yamazaki, Kotaro; Ushiba, Junichi; Liu, Meigen

    2016-01-01

    Robotics is an emerging field in rehabilitation medicine. Robots have the potential to complement traditional clinical assessments because they can measure functions more precisely and quantitatively than current clinical assessments. We present a patient with a proximal humeral fracture whose recovery process was evaluated with an exoskeleton robotic device. The patient, a 34-year-old woman, suffered a left proximal humeral fracture while snowboarding. She is an occupational therapist and is the first author of this study. With conservative therapy, fracture union was seen on X-ray at 6 weeks post-injury. At that time, the patient was permitted to move her left upper limb actively within the tolerance of pain. We assessed the function of the injured upper limb at 6, 7, and 12 weeks post-injury with the KINARM exoskeleton robotic device and with conventional clinical measures. The active range of motion and the muscle strength of the left shoulder improved over time. Using robotic assessment, the precise movement profiles, position sense, and functional ability of both arms were quantified and also showed progressive improvement over time. Assessment with a robotic device of the recovery process after proximal humeral fracture allowed quantification of functional impairments that could not be felt subjectively nor identified with conventional clinical assessments.

  16. Computational models of upper-limb motion during functional reaching tasks for application in FES-based stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Chris; Exell, Tim; Meadmore, Katie; Hallewell, Emma; Hughes, Ann-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has been shown to be an effective approach to upper-limb stroke rehabilitation, where it is used to assist arm and shoulder motion. Model-based FES controllers have recently confirmed significant potential to improve accuracy of functional reaching tasks, but they typically require a reference trajectory to track. Few upper-limb FES control schemes embed a computational model of the task; however, this is critical to ensure the controller reinforces the intended movement with high accuracy. This paper derives computational motor control models of functional tasks that can be directly embedded in real-time FES control schemes, removing the need for a predefined reference trajectory. Dynamic models of the electrically stimulated arm are first derived, and constrained optimisation problems are formulated to encapsulate common activities of daily living. These are solved using iterative algorithms, and results are compared with kinematic data from 12 subjects and found to fit closely (mean fitting between 63.2% and 84.0%). The optimisation is performed iteratively using kinematic variables and hence can be transformed into an iterative learning control algorithm by replacing simulation signals with experimental data. The approach is therefore capable of controlling FES in real time to assist tasks in a manner corresponding to unimpaired natural movement. By ensuring that assistance is aligned with voluntary intention, the controller hence maximises the potential effectiveness of future stroke rehabilitation trials.

  17. Effectiveness of the Virtual Reality System Toyra on Upper Limb Function in People with Tetraplegia: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimbwadyo-Terrer, I; Gil-Agudo, A; Segura-Fragoso, A; de los Reyes-Guzmán, A; Trincado-Alonso, F; Piazza, S; Polonio-López, B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a virtual reality program combined with conventional therapy in upper limb function in people with tetraplegia and to provide data about patients' satisfaction with the virtual reality system. Thirty-one people with subacute complete cervical tetraplegia participated in the study. Experimental group received 15 sessions with Toyra(®) virtual reality system for 5 weeks, 30 minutes/day, 3 days/week in addition to conventional therapy, while control group only received conventional therapy. All patients were assessed at baseline, after intervention, and at three-month follow-up with a battery of clinical, functional, and satisfaction scales. Control group showed significant improvements in the manual muscle test (p = 0,043, partial η (2) = 0,22) in the follow-up evaluation. Both groups demonstrated clinical, but nonsignificant, changes to their arm function in 4 of the 5 scales used. All patients showed a high level of satisfaction with the virtual reality system. This study showed that virtual reality added to conventional therapy produces similar results in upper limb function compared to only conventional therapy. Moreover, the gaming aspects incorporated in conventional rehabilitation appear to produce high motivation during execution of the assigned tasks. This trial is registered with EudraCT number 2015-002157-35.

  18. Biomedical research on the International Space Station postural and manipulation problems of the human upper limb in weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Gianluca; Zolesi, Valfredo

    2000-01-01

    Accumulated evidence, based on information gathered on space flight missions and ground based models involving both humans and animals, clearly suggests that exposure to states of microgravity conditions for varying duration induces certain physiological changes; they involve cardiovascular deconditioning, balance disorders, bone weakening, muscle hypertrophy, disturbed sleep patterns and depressed immune responses. The effects of the microgravity on the astronauts' movement and attitude have been studied during different space missions, increasing the knowledge of the human physiology in weightlessness. The purpose of the research addressed in the present paper is to understand and to assess the performances of the upper limb, especially during grasp. Objects of the research are the physiological changes related to the long-term duration spaceflight environment. Specifically, the changes concerning the upper limb are investigated, with particular regard to the performances of the hand in zero-g environments. This research presents also effects on the Earth, improving the studies on a number of pathological states, on the health care and the rehabilitation. In this perspective, a set of experiments are proposed, aimed at the evaluation of the effects of the zero-g environments on neurophysiology of grasping movements, fatigue assessment, precision grip. .

  19. Exploring the factor on sensory motor function of upper limb associated with executive function in communitydwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Daiki; Matsuoka, Hiroka; Iwai, Midori; Nakamura, Shugo; Kubo, Ayumi; Tomiyama, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    Exercise, such as cardiovascular fitness training, has been shown to have utility in improving executive function but is difficult for older adults with low mobility to perform. Accordingly, there is interest in the development of regimens other than high mobility exercises for older adults with low mobility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between sensory motor function of the upper limb and executive function in community-dwelling older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 57 right-handed, independent, community-dwelling older adults. Sensory motor function of upper limb, including range of motion, strength, sensation, finger dexterity, and comprehensive hand function was measured in both hands. Executive function was assessed using the Delta Trail Making Test. Multiple regression analysis indicated the finger dexterity of the non-dominant hand as independently associated with executive function (β = -0.414, P physical fitness levels. As this was a cross-sectional study, further studies are required to validate the efficacy of non-dominant finger dexterity training for improving executive function in older adults. PMID:27578912

  20. Effects of motor imagery combined with functional electrical stimulation on upper limb motor function of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-feng LIU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effects of motor imagery (MI combined with the third generation functional electrical stimulation (FES on upper limb motor function in acute ischemic stroke patients with hemiplegia.  Methods Forty acute ischemic stroke patients, within 48 h of onset, were randomly divided into FES group (N = 20 and combination group (FES combined with motor imagery, N = 20. All patients received basic routine rehabilitation training, for example, good limb positioning, accepting braces, balance training and training in the activities of daily living (ADL. FES group received the third generation FES therapy and the combination group also received motor imagery for 2 weeks. All of the patients were assessed with Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA, Action Research Arm Test (ARAT and active range of motion (AROM of wrist dorsiflexion before and after 2 weeks of treatment.  Results After 2 weeks of treatment, the 2 groups had significantly higher FMA score, ARAT score and AROM of wrist dorsiflexion than that in pre-treatment (P = 0.000, for all. Besides, the FMA score (t = - 2.528, P = 0.016, ARAT score (t = - 2.562, P = 0.014 and AROM of wrist dorsiflexion (t = - 2.469, P = 0.018 in the combination group were significantly higher than that in the FES group. There were interactions of treatment methods with observation time points (P < 0.05, for all.  Conclusions Motor imagery combined with the third generation FES can effectively promote the recovery of upper limb motor function and motion range of wrist dorsiflexion in patients with acute ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.008

  1. Agency over a phantom limb and electromyographic activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu eImaizumi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Most patients, post-amputation, report the experience of a phantom limb. Some even sense voluntary movements when viewing a mirror image of the intact limb superimposed onto the phantom limb. While delayed visual feedback of an action is known to reduce a sense of agency, the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation (i.e., sense of controlling a phantom limb has not been examined. Using a video-projection system, we examined the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation in an upper-limb amputee (male; left upper-limb amputation. He was instructed to view mirrored video images of his intact hand clasping and unclasping during a phantom limb movement. He then rated the intensity of the phantom motor sensation. Three types of hand movement images were presented as follows: synchronous, asynchronous with a 250-ms delay, and asynchronous with a 500-ms delay. Results showed that phantom motor sensation decreased when the image was delayed by 250 and 500 ms. However, when we instructed the patient to adjust the phase of phantom limb movement to that of the image with a 500-ms delay, phantom motor sensation increased. There was also a positive correlation between intensity of phantom motor sensation and electromyographic activity on deltoids at the patient’s stump. These results suggest that phantom motor sensation and electromyographic activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony and top-down effects.

  2. Agency over a phantom limb and electromyographic activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Shu; Asai, Tomohisa; Kanayama, Noriaki; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Most patients, post-amputation, report the experience of a phantom limb. Some even sense voluntary movements when viewing a mirror image of the intact limb superimposed onto the phantom limb. While delayed visual feedback of an action is known to reduce a sense of agency, the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation (i.e., sense of controlling a phantom limb) has not been examined. Using a video-projection system, we examined the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation in an upper-limb amputee (male; left upper-limb amputation). He was instructed to view mirrored video images of his intact hand clasping and unclasping during a phantom limb movement. He then rated the intensity of the phantom motor sensation. Three types of hand movement images were presented as follows: synchronous, asynchronous with a 250-ms delay, and asynchronous with a 500-ms delay. Results showed that phantom motor sensation decreased when the image was delayed by 250 and 500 ms. However, when we instructed the patient to adjust the phase of phantom limb movement to that of the image with a 500-ms delay, phantom motor sensation increased. There was also a positive correlation between intensity of phantom motor sensation and electromyographic (EMG) activity on deltoids at the patient's stump. These results suggest that phantom motor sensation and EMG activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony and top-down effects.

  3. Sciatic Neuroma Presenting Forty Years After Above-Knee Amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Kitcat, M; Hunter, J. E.; C.M. Malata

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a sciatic neuroma presenting forty years after above knee amputation. Patients developing neuroma following a limb amputation can present with stump pain which is commonly resistant to medical intervention. The length of interval from the initial injury to presentation is widely variable. Diagnosis relies on clinical suspicion and accurate assessment, radiological imaging and, if indicated, surgical exploration. MRI provides a better soft tissue definition than CT and is m...

  4. Inverse Kinematics for Upper Limb Compound Movement Estimation in Exoskeleton-Assisted Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Camilo; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Scorza, Davide; Bertelsen, Álvaro; Carrasco, Eduardo; Gil-Agudo, Ángel; Ruiz-Salguero, Oscar; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) is relevant for treating patients affected by nervous system injuries (e.g., stroke and spinal cord injury). The accurate estimation of the joint angles of the patient limbs in RAR is critical to assess the patient improvement. The economical prevalent method to estimate the patient posture in Exoskeleton-based RAR is to approximate the limb joint angles with the ones of the Exoskeleton. This approximation is rough since their kinematic structures differ. Motion capture systems (MOCAPs) can improve the estimations, at the expenses of a considerable overload of the therapy setup. Alternatively, the Extended Inverse Kinematics Posture Estimation (EIKPE) computational method models the limb and Exoskeleton as differing parallel kinematic chains. EIKPE has been tested with single DOF movements of the wrist and elbow joints. This paper presents the assessment of EIKPE with elbow-shoulder compound movements (i.e., object prehension). Ground-truth for estimation assessment is obtained from an optical MOCAP (not intended for the treatment stage). The assessment shows EIKPE rendering a good numerical approximation of the actual posture during the compound movement execution, especially for the shoulder joint angles. This work opens the horizon for clinical studies with patient groups, Exoskeleton models, and movements types. PMID:27403420

  5. Inverse Kinematics for Upper Limb Compound Movement Estimation in Exoskeleton-Assisted Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Cortés

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR is relevant for treating patients affected by nervous system injuries (e.g., stroke and spinal cord injury. The accurate estimation of the joint angles of the patient limbs in RAR is critical to assess the patient improvement. The economical prevalent method to estimate the patient posture in Exoskeleton-based RAR is to approximate the limb joint angles with the ones of the Exoskeleton. This approximation is rough since their kinematic structures differ. Motion capture systems (MOCAPs can improve the estimations, at the expenses of a considerable overload of the therapy setup. Alternatively, the Extended Inverse Kinematics Posture Estimation (EIKPE computational method models the limb and Exoskeleton as differing parallel kinematic chains. EIKPE has been tested with single DOF movements of the wrist and elbow joints. This paper presents the assessment of EIKPE with elbow-shoulder compound movements (i.e., object prehension. Ground-truth for estimation assessment is obtained from an optical MOCAP (not intended for the treatment stage. The assessment shows EIKPE rendering a good numerical approximation of the actual posture during the compound movement execution, especially for the shoulder joint angles. This work opens the horizon for clinical studies with patient groups, Exoskeleton models, and movements types.

  6. Sensorimotor impairments of paretic upper limb correlates with activities of daily living in subjects with chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng S.M. Shamay

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The  main objective  of  this  study  was  to  investigate  the correlations  between sensorimotor  impairments  of  paretic  upper  limb  and the  hand  functions of  activities of daily  living  (ADLs  scores  in  persons  with chronic stroke.This is a cross-sectional  study  with  19  chronic  stroke  survivors.  Hand function was measured by the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (JTHFT. Impairments in upper extremity motor function were measured by upper limb items  of  Fugl-Meyer  Assessment  (FMA-UE.  Forearm  muscles  strength, handgrip  and  pinch  grip  power  were  assessed  using  handheld  dynamo-meters. Tactile sensation threshold was measured by monofilaments.Significant differences were found between the affected and unaffected side in the total JTHFT scores, forearm muscle strength, handgrip and pinch grip (p≤0.017, but not the tactile sensa-tion threshold.  The total JTHFT scores were found to be correlated with total score of FMA-UE (rs = -0.789, hand-grip  power  (rs = -0.588 and pinch grip power (rs = -0.657 on the affected side, but not the tactile sensation. The total JTHFT scores were correlated with FMA-UE scores, handgrip and pinch grip of the affected side.  This is the first study in documenting the correlation between the sensorimotor impairments and JTHFT scores in persons with  chronic stroke. Our findings highlights the importance of including upper limb and grip strength training in stroke rehabilitation program in order to improve hand functions in activities of daily living in patients with chronic stroke.

  7. A haptic-robotic platform for upper-limb reaching stroke therapy: Preliminary design and evaluation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boger Jennifer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that intense training can significantly improve post-stroke upper-limb functionality. However, opportunities for stroke survivors to practice rehabilitation exercises can be limited because of the finite availability of therapists and equipment. This paper presents a haptic-enabled exercise platform intended to assist therapists and moderate-level stroke survivors perform upper-limb reaching motion therapy. This work extends on existing knowledge by presenting: 1 an anthropometrically-inspired design that maximizes elbow and shoulder range of motions during exercise; 2 an unobtrusive upper body postural sensing system; and 3 a vibratory elbow stimulation device to encourage muscle movement. Methods A multi-disciplinary team of professionals were involved in identifying the rehabilitation needs of stroke survivors incorporating these into a prototype device. The prototype system consisted of an exercise device, postural sensors, and a elbow stimulation to encourage the reaching movement. Eight experienced physical and occupational therapists participated in a pilot study exploring the usability of the prototype. Each therapist attended two sessions of one hour each to test and evaluate the proposed system. Feedback about the device was obtained through an administered questionnaire and combined with quantitative data. Results Seven of the nine questions regarding the haptic exercise device scored higher than 3.0 (somewhat good out of 4.0 (good. The postural sensors detected 93 of 96 (97% therapist-simulated abnormal postures and correctly ignored 90 of 96 (94% of normal postures. The elbow stimulation device had a score lower than 2.5 (neutral for all aspects that were surveyed, however the therapists felt the rehabilitation system was sufficient for use without the elbow stimulation device. Conclusion All eight therapists felt the exercise platform could be a good tool to use in upper-limb rehabilitation as

  8. Achievement report for fiscal 1999 on research and development of technologies for medical welfare equipment. Rehabilitation system for upper limbs and lower limbs; 1999 nendo iryo fukushi kiki gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Shintai kino rihabiri shien system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    This project aims to develop physical function measuring and training systems equipped with a variety of feedback utilities and widely applicable to the prevention of the elderly from physical function degradation, to the preservation of physical functions, and to their recovery from mild physical difficulties, thereby helping the elderly enjoy independence and participation in social activities. Possibilities will be studied of providing them with engineering support in the field of exercise therapy through the analysis of the characteristics of old people's movement, and the findings will be applied to the designing and assessment of welfare and nursing equipment and also fed back to their development environment. In the gait training system, the suspension force is adjusted according to data from the force plate and various position sensors, and the system produces an effect similar to that of walking in the water. The lower limb rehabilitation system facilitates the treatment of the aged or handicapped people, and patients suffering from cerebral disorders, at any of their physical positions from lying to standing. The upper limb training support system is to provide motivation for the aged or handicapped people suffering from mild difficulties in their upper limbs. In this fiscal year, basic designs have been prepared for the gait training system and the lower limb rehabilitation system, and a preparatory survey is conducted for the upper limb training support system. (NEDO)

  9. A functional and psychosocial assessment of patients with post-Sudeck atrophy amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeinberg-Arazi, D; Heim, M; Nadvorna, H; Ner, I Z; Szeinberg, A; Azaria, M

    1993-04-01

    Twelve patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy were referred to a comprehensive orthopaedic rehabilitation center after failure of conservative management. Ten underwent amputation of the affected limb and, although functional improvement occurred in the patients undergoing lower limb amputation, psychosocial dysfunction persisted. All the patients required psychological support. In cases of post-Sudeck amputation, early orthopaedic diagnosis and referral to a comprehensive treatment center are recommended. In the 12 cases described here, apart from the obvious limb pathology, severe psychological inadequacies were found to be present. PMID:7682058

  10. Minor amputations for diabetic foot salvage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Y. Habel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulceration in diabetic patients is a frequent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM, necessitating hospitalization for control of infection, wound care and glycemic control. These patients are at risk for potential loss of the involved limb as well as for future loss of the contralateral limb. Diabetic foot is the consequence of peripheral neuropathy complicated by infrapopliteal peripheral vascular disease. Most of the patients present with chronic plantar ulceration and with cellulitis or an abscess. In a significant number of patients, it is observed that the frequency of life or limb threatening infection is less with an intact skin cover. Limb salvage employs the use of culture specific antibiotics, sharp debridement or a minor amputation, wound care and/or skin cover as the situation demands.

  11. PHYSICAL WORKLOAD AS A RISK FACTOR FOR SYMPTOMS IN THE NECK AND UPPER LIMBS: EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT AND ERGONOMIC INTERVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Ketola

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to investigate work related and individual factors as predictors of insident neck pain among video display unit (VDU workers, to assess the effects of an ergonomic intervention and education on musculoskeletal symptoms, and to study the repeatability and validity of an expert assessment method of VDU workstation ergonomics. A method to assess the risk factors for upper limb disorders was developed, and its validity and repeatability were studied. The annual incidence of neck pain was 34.4%. A poor physical work environment and placement of the keyboard were work-related factors increasing the risk of neck pain. Among the individual factors, female sex was a strong predictor. The randomized intervention study included questionnaire survey, a diary of discomfort, and ergonomic rating of the workstations. The subjects (n=124 were allocated into three groups. The intensive and the education groups had less musculoskeletal discomfort than the control group at the 2-month follow-up. After the intervention, the level of ergonomics was distinctly higher in the intensive ergonomic group than in the education or control group. Two experts in ergonomics analyzed and rated the ergonomics of workstations before and after intervention. The validity of the assessment method was rated against the technical measurements, assessment of tidiness and space, and work chair ergonomics. The intraclass correlation coefficient between ratings of the two experts was 0.74. Changes in the location of the input devises and the screen, as well as the values of tidiness and space and work chair ergonomics showed a significant association with the ratings of both experts. The method to assess the loads imposed on the upper limbs was validated against the expert observations from the video, continuous recordings of myoelectric activity of forearm muscles, and wrist posture, measured with goniometers. Inter-observer repeatability and validity were

  12. Use of pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap to reconstruct the upper limb with large soft tissue defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Zhi-gang; LIU Yu-jie; HE Xu; DING Xiao-hen; FANG Guan-grong

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To report the technique of reconstruction of large skin and soft tissue defects in the upper extremity using pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps.Methods:Six patients with large skin and soft tissue defects were included in this report.There were 5 trauma patients and the rest one needed to receive plastic surgery for his extremity scar.All wounds were in the upper extremity.The sizes of defects ranged from 15 cm×6 cm to 30 cm× 18 cm.Pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps were designed according to the defect area and raised with part of latissimus dorsi.The thoracodorsal artery and its perforators were carefully protected during surgery.Results:All flaps healed primarily without flap congestion,margin necrosis or infection.The skin donor sites either received split-thickness skin graft (3 cases,mostly from the anterior thigh) or was closed primarily (3 cases)and had minimal morbidity.Follow-up of 6-12 months showed that the contour of flap was aesthetic and the function of limb was excellent.Conclusion:Our experience indicates that the pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap is favorable for reconstruction of large skin and soft tissue defects in the upper extremity.

  13. Recapitulating flesh with silicon and steel: advancements in upper extremity robotic prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian; Attenello, Frank J; Liu, Charles Y; McLoughlin, Michael P; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2014-01-01

    With the loss of function of an upper extremity because of stroke or spinal cord injury or a physical loss from amputation, an individual's life is forever changed, and activities that were once routine become a magnitude more difficult. Much research and effort have been put into developing advanced robotic prostheses to restore upper extremity function. For patients with upper extremity amputations, previously crude prostheses have evolved to become exceptionally functional. Because the upper extremities can perform a wide variety of activities, several types of upper extremity prostheses are available ranging from passive cosmetic limbs to externally powered robotic limbs. In addition, new developments in brain-machine interface are poised to revolutionize how patients can control these advanced prostheses using their thoughts alone. For patients with spinal cord injury or stroke, functional electrical stimulation promises to provide the most sophisticated prosthetic limbs possible by reanimating paralyzed arms of these patients. Advances in technology and robotics continue to help patients recover vital function. This article examines the latest neurorestorative technologies for patients who have either undergone amputation or lost the use of their upper extremities secondary to stroke or spinal cord injury.

  14. Development of Device to Evoke Stretch Reflexes by Use of Electromagnetic Force for the Rehabilitation of the Hemiplegic Upper Limb after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ryota; Ishimine, Tomoyasu; Kawahira, Kazumi; Yu, Yong; Tsujio, Showzow

    In this research, we focus on the method of rehabilitation with stretch reflexes for the hemiplegic upper limb in stroke patients. We propose a new device which utilizes electromagnetic force to evoke stretch reflexes. The device can exert an assisting force safely, because the electromagnetic force is non contact force. In this paper, we develop a support system applying the proposed device for the functional recovery training of the hemiplegic upper limb. The results obtained from several clinical tests with and without our support system are compared. Then we discuss the validity of our support system.

  15. Potential of robots as next-generation technology for clinical assessment of neurological disorders and upper-limb therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H. Scott, PhD

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Robotic technologies have profoundly affected the identification of fundamental properties of brain function. This success is attributable to robots being able to control the position of or forces applied to limbs, and their inherent ability to easily, objectively, and reliably quantify sensorimotor behavior. Our general hypothesis is that these same attributes make robotic technologies ideal for clinically assessing sensory, motor, and cognitive impairments in stroke and other neurologi-cal disorders. Further, they provide opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies. The present opinionated review describes how robotic technologies combined with virtual/augmented reality systems can support a broad range of behavioral tasks to objectively quantify brain function. This information could potentially be used to provide more accurate diagnostic and prognostic information than is available from current clinical assessment techniques. The review also highlights the potential benefits of robots to provide upper-limb therapy. Although the capital cost of these technologies is substantial, it pales in comparison with the potential cost reductions to the overall healthcare system that improved assessment and therapeutic interventions offer.

  16. Indocyanine green (ICG lymphography is superior to lymphoscintigraphy for diagnostic imaging of early lymphedema of the upper limbs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Mihara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Secondary lymphedema causes swelling in limbs due to lymph retention following lymph node dissection in cancer therapy. Initiation of treatment soon after appearance of edema is very important, but there is no method for early diagnosis of lymphedema. In this study, we compared the utility of four diagnostic imaging methods: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT, lymphoscintigraphy, and Indocyanine Green (ICG lymphography. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between April 2010 and November 2011, we examined 21 female patients (42 arms with unilateral mild upper limb lymphedema using the four methods. The mean age of the patients was 60.4 years old (35-81 years old. Biopsies of skin and collecting lymphatic vessels were performed in 7 patients who underwent lymphaticovenous anastomosis. RESULTS: The specificity was 1 for all four methods. The sensitivity was 1 in ICG lymphography and MRI, 0.62 in lymphoscintigraphy, and 0.33 in CT. These results show that MRI and ICG lymphography are superior to lymphoscintigraphy or CT for diagnosis of lymphedema. In some cases, biopsy findings suggested abnormalities in skin and lymphatic vessels for which lymphoscintigraphy showed no abnormal findings. ICG lymphography showed a dermal backflow pattern in these cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest the importance of dual diagnosis by examination of the lymphatic system using ICG lymphography and evaluation of edema in subcutaneous fat tissue using MRI.

  17. Retrieval of water vapor vertical distributions in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rozanov

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the retrieval of water vapor vertical distributions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS altitude range from space-borne observations of the scattered solar light made in limb viewing geometry and presents first results using measurements from SCIAMACHY. In the previous publications, the retrieval of water vapor vertical distributions has been achieved exploiting either the emitted radiance leaving the atmosphere or the transmitted solar radiation. In this study the scattered solar radiation is used as a new source of information on the water vapor content in the UTLS region. A recently developed retrieval algorithm utilizes the differential absorption structure of the water vapor in 1353–1410 nm spectral range and yields the water vapor content in 11–25 km altitude range. In this study the retrieval algorithm is successfully applied to SCIAMACHY limb measurements and the resulting water vapor profiles are compared to in situ balloon-borne observations. The results from both satellite and balloon-borne instruments are found to agree typically within 20%.

  18. Retrieval of water vapor vertical distributions in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rozanov

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the retrieval of water vapor vertical distributions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS altitude range from space-borne observations of the scattered solar light made in limb viewing geometry. First results using measurements from SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY aboard ENVISAT (Environmental Satellite are presented here. In previous publications, the retrieval of water vapor vertical distributions has been achieved exploiting either the emitted radiance leaving the atmosphere or the transmitted solar radiation. In this study, the scattered solar radiation is used as a new source of information on the water vapor content in the UTLS region. A recently developed retrieval algorithm utilizes the differential absorption structure of the water vapor in 1353–1410 nm spectral range and yields the water vapor content in the 11–25 km altitude range. In this study, the retrieval algorithm is successfully applied to SCIAMACHY limb measurements and the resulting water vapor profiles are compared to in situ balloon-borne observations. The results from both satellite and balloon-borne instruments are found to agree typically within 10 %.

  19. The Potency of Optical and Augmented Reality Mirror Boxes in Amputees and People with Intact Limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran O'Neill

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Phantom limb pain is the distressing problem experienced by many amputees, defined as a painful sensation perceived in the area of the missing body part. Phantom limb pain can be very severe and disabling. It continues to be experienced by two thirds of amputees, eight years post-amputation. Augmented reality has the ability to change a person’s sensory experience. More applications of this technology are gradually being utilised for therapeutic purposes as augmented environments can be used both to distract the attention of patients from excruciatingly painful experiences and to promote cortical re-mapping at the site from where the pain arises. Using Augmented Reality, an environment has been created where upper limb amputees can both view and control motion of their phantom limb to help alleviate phantom limb pain.

  20. Interrater reliability of the Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Spirtos, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: We examined the interrater reliability of the Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function. METHOD: Three occupational therapists independently scored 34 videotaped assessments of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy aged 6 yr, 1 mo, to 14 yr, 5 mo. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) at a 95% confidence interval were calculated for total scores, category scores, and item scores. RESULTS: The correlation between raters\\' total scores was high (ICC = .961). The highest correlation for test components between raters was found for fluency (ICC = .902), followed by range of movement (ICC = .866), and the lowest correlation was found for quality of movement (ICC = .683). The ICCs for individual test item scores varied and ranged from .368 to .899. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated high interrater reliability for total scores, with scoring of some individual components and items requiring further consideration from both a clinical and a research perspective.

  1. An experimental protocol for the definition of upper limb anatomical frames on children using magneto-inertial sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, L; Formica, D; Tamilia, E; Taffoni, F; Sparaci, L; Capirci, O; Guglielmelli, E

    2013-01-01

    Motion capture based on magneto-inertial sensors is a technology enabling data collection in unstructured environments, allowing "out of the lab" motion analysis. This technology is a good candidate for motion analysis of children thanks to the reduced weight and size as well as the use of wireless communication that has improved its wearability and reduced its obtrusivity. A key issue in the application of such technology for motion analysis is its calibration, i.e. a process that allows mapping orientation information from each sensor to a physiological reference frame. To date, even if there are several calibration procedures available for adults, no specific calibration procedures have been developed for children. This work addresses this specific issue presenting a calibration procedure for motion capture of thorax and upper limbs on healthy children. Reported results suggest comparable performance with similar studies on adults and emphasize some critical issues, opening the way to further improvements.

  2. Restoration of Upper Limb Function in an Individual with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy using Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Milos R; Zivanovic, Vera; Valiante, Taufik A

    2016-01-01

    Non-traumatic spinal cord pathology is responsible for 25-52% of all spinal cord lesions. Studies have revealed that spinal stenosis accounts for 16-21% of spinal cord injury (SCI) admissions. Impaired grips as well as slow unskilled hand and finger movements are the most common complaints in patients with spinal cord disorders, such as myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. In the past, our team carried out couple of successful clinical trials, including two randomized control trials, showing that functional electrical stimulation therapy (FEST) can restore voluntary reaching and/or grasping function, in people with stroke and traumatic SCI. Motivated by this success, we decided to examine changes in the upper limb function following FEST in a patient who suffered loss of hand function due to myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. The participant was a 61-year-old male who had C3-C7 posterior laminectomy and instrumented fusion for cervical myelopathy. The participant presented with progressive right hand weakness that resulted in his inability to voluntarily open and close the hand and to manipulate objects unilaterally with his right hand. The participant was enrolled in the study ~22 months following initial surgical intervention. Participant was assessed using Toronto Rehabilitation Institute's Hand Function Test (TRI-HFT), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). The pre-post differences in scores on all measures clearly demonstrated improvement in voluntary hand function following 15 1-h FEST sessions. The changes observed were meaningful and have resulted in substantial improvement in performance of activities of daily living. These results provide preliminary evidence that FEST has a potential to improve upper limb function in patients with non-traumatic SCI, such as myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. PMID:27375547

  3. An investigation of somatosensory profiles in work related upper limb disorders: a case-control observational study protocol.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, Niamh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work related upper limb disorders constitute 45% of all occupational diseases and are a significant public health problem. A subgroup, non specific arm pain (NSAP), remains elusive in terms of understanding its pathophysiological mechanisms with its diagnosis based on the absence of specific clinical findings. One commonly proposed theory is that a neural tissue disorder is the primary dysfunction in NSAP and findings from previous studies lend some support to this theory. However, it is not clear if changes identified are simply a consequence of ongoing pain rather than due to specific neural changes. The presence of neuropathic pain has been investigated in several other musculoskeletal conditions but currently, there is no specific diagnostic tool or gold standard which permits an unequivocal diagnosis of neuropathic pain. The purpose of this study is to further describe the somatosensory profiles in patients with NSAP and to compare these profiles to a group of patients with MRI confirmed cervical radiculopathy who have been previously classified as having neuropathic pain. METHODS\\/DESIGN: Three groups of participants will be investigated: Groups 1 and 2 will be office workers with either NSAP or cervical radiculopathy and Group 3 will be a control group of non office workers without upper limb pain. Participants will undergo a clinical assessment, pain questionnaires (LANSS, Short Form McGill, DASH and TSK) and quantitative sensory testing comprising thermal detection and pain thresholds, vibration thresholds and pressure pain thresholds. DISCUSSION: The spectrum of clinically suspected neuropathic pain ranges from more obvious conditions such as trigeminal neuralgia to those with vague signs of nerve disorder such as NSAP. A thorough description of the somatosensory profiles of NSAP patients and a comparison with a more defined group of patients with evidence of neuropathic pain will help in the understanding of underlying neurophysiology in

  4. Patterns of decline in upper limb function of boys and men with DMD: an international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.M.H.P.; Bergsma, A.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2014-01-01

    With increasing life expectancy, upper extremity (UE) function becomes more and more important in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Knowledge of UE function in these children is, however, limited. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the changing patterns of UE function during t

  5. Epidemiology of leg amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebskov, L B; Schroeder, T V; Holstein, P E

    1994-01-01

    The number of amputations performed for vascular disease in Denmark has decreased from 1777 (34.5 per 100,000 population) in 1983 to 1288 (25.0 per 100,000) in 1990, a reduction of 28 per cent. This decline coincided with an increase in vascular surgical activity of up to 100 per cent, including ...... studied. These findings suggest that vascular surgery may be responsible for the lower amputation rate.......The number of amputations performed for vascular disease in Denmark has decreased from 1777 (34.5 per 100,000 population) in 1983 to 1288 (25.0 per 100,000) in 1990, a reduction of 28 per cent. This decline coincided with an increase in vascular surgical activity of up to 100 per cent, including...... a marked rise in the rate of femorodistal reconstruction. Moreover, regional variation in vascular surgical activity correlated with percentage reduction in amputation rate (rS = 0.65, P

  6. Treatment of keloid in upper limb by combined surgical excision and immediate postoperative electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Kenichi; Yoshida, Jun; Heshiki, Takaya; Ishikura, Naotaka; Kawakami, Shigehiko [Kanazawa Medical Univ., Uchinada, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    A scar in the upper extremities sometimes leads to onset of keloid, whose treatment is difficult and many treatment methods have been tried. Recently our hospital has performed electron beam radiation for treatment of keloid. In this report, we describe our examination on patients with keloid in the upper extremities who visited our hospital and underwent electron beam irradiation in these past 7 years. The patients were 9 males and 15 females, age between 9 and 84 (average age 26.6 years). Treatments included the following: Total ablation of keloid plus electron beam radiation, electron beam radiation alone, localized administration of triamcinolone. Treatment evaluation and presence or absence of pigmentation was examined. Electron beam radiation was performed with a total of 25 Gy for consecutive 5 days by 5 Gy electron beam since 1 week after keloid ablation with sufficient informed consent. Onset site of 24 patients with keloid in the upper extremities was the shoulder in 12 patients, the upper arm in 11, and the elbow in one patient. Development cause was BCG inoculation in 8 patients, wound associated with surgery in 6, unknown cause in 6, and others in 4 patients. The number of patients who were followed-up after treatment was 16 for each examination respectively, and mean followed-up period was 2 years and 10 months. Postoperative evaluation for ablation plus electron beam was good in 1 patient and fair in 6, that for electron beam radiation alone was good in 1, fair in 2, and unknown in 2, and that for triamcinolone was fair in 2, poor in 4, and unknown in 1 patient. Postoperative pigmentation was observed in all the patients immediately after radiation, and at the time of final follow-up, in 6 (33%) out of 9 patients confirmed. Ablation plus electron beam irradiation for keloid in the upper extremities was effective. However, this treatment cannot avoid a possibility of cancerogenesis. Thus, sufficient explanation and consent may be essential after full

  7. Does kinematics add meaningful information to clinical assessment in post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation? A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigoni, Matteo; Baudo, Silvia; Cimolin, Veronica; Cau, Nicola; Galli, Manuela; Pianta, Lucia; Tacchini, Elena; Capodaglio, Paolo; Mauro, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this case study were to: (a) quantify the impairment and activity restriction of the upper limb in a hemiparetic patient; (b) quantitatively evaluate rehabilitation program effectiveness; and (c) discuss whether more clinically meaningful information can be gained with the use of kinematic analysis in addition to clinical assessment. The rehabilitation program consisted of the combined use of different traditional physiotherapy techniques, occupational therapy sessions, and the so-called task-oriented approach. [Subject and Methods] Subject was a one hemiplegic patient. The patient was assessed at the beginning and after 1 month of daily rehabilitation using the Medical Research Council scale, Nine Hole Peg Test, Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke Patients, and Hand Grip Dynamometer test as well as a kinematic analysis using an optoelectronic system. [Results] After treatment, significant improvements were evident in terms of total movement duration, movement completion velocity, and some smoothness parameters. [Conclusion] Our case report showed that the integration of clinical assessment with kinematic evaluation appears to be useful for quantitatively assessing performance changes. PMID:27630445

  8. The accuracy of conventional 2D video for quantifying upper limb kinematics in repetitive motion occupational tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hsiung; Azari, David P; Hu, Yu Hen; Lindstrom, Mary J; Thelen, Darryl; Yen, Thomas Y; Radwin, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Marker-less 2D video tracking was studied as a practical means to measure upper limb kinematics for ergonomics evaluations. Hand activity level (HAL) can be estimated from speed and duty cycle. Accuracy was measured using a cross-correlation template-matching algorithm for tracking a region of interest on the upper extremities. Ten participants performed a paced load transfer task while varying HAL (2, 4, and 5) and load (2.2 N, 8.9 N and 17.8 N). Speed and acceleration measured from 2D video were compared against ground truth measurements using 3D infrared motion capture. The median absolute difference between 2D video and 3D motion capture was 86.5 mm/s for speed, and 591 mm/s(2) for acceleration, and less than 93 mm/s for speed and 656 mm/s(2) for acceleration when camera pan and tilt were within ± 30 degrees. Single-camera 2D video had sufficient accuracy (tracking had sufficient accuracy to measure HAL for ascertaining the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Value(®) for repetitive motion when the camera is located within ± 30 degrees off the plane of motion when compared against 3D motion capture for a simulated repetitive motion task. PMID:25978764

  9. Does kinematics add meaningful information to clinical assessment in post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigoni, Matteo; Baudo, Silvia; Cimolin, Veronica; Cau, Nicola; Galli, Manuela; Pianta, Lucia; Tacchini, Elena; Capodaglio, Paolo; Mauro, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this case study were to: (a) quantify the impairment and activity restriction of the upper limb in a hemiparetic patient; (b) quantitatively evaluate rehabilitation program effectiveness; and (c) discuss whether more clinically meaningful information can be gained with the use of kinematic analysis in addition to clinical assessment. The rehabilitation program consisted of the combined use of different traditional physiotherapy techniques, occupational therapy sessions, and the so-called task-oriented approach. [Subject and Methods] Subject was a one hemiplegic patient. The patient was assessed at the beginning and after 1 month of daily rehabilitation using the Medical Research Council scale, Nine Hole Peg Test, Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke Patients, and Hand Grip Dynamometer test as well as a kinematic analysis using an optoelectronic system. [Results] After treatment, significant improvements were evident in terms of total movement duration, movement completion velocity, and some smoothness parameters. [Conclusion] Our case report showed that the integration of clinical assessment with kinematic evaluation appears to be useful for quantitatively assessing performance changes. PMID:27630445

  10. Pattern recognition control outperforms conventional myoelectric control in upper limb patients with targeted muscle reinnervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Levi J; Lock, Blair A; Simon, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Pattern recognition myoelectric control shows great promise as an alternative to conventional amplitude based control to control multiple degree of freedom prosthetic limbs. Many studies have reported pattern recognition classification error performances of less than 10% during offline tests; however, it remains unclear how this translates to real-time control performance. In this contribution, we compare the real-time control performances between pattern recognition and direct myoelectric control (a popular form of conventional amplitude control) for participants who had received targeted muscle reinnervation. The real-time performance was evaluated during three tasks; 1) a box and blocks task, 2) a clothespin relocation task, and 3) a block stacking task. Our results found that pattern recognition significantly outperformed direct control for all three performance tasks. Furthermore, it was found that pattern recognition was configured much quicker. The classification error of the pattern recognition systems used by the patients was found to be 16% ±(1.6%) suggesting that systems with this error rate may still provide excellent control. Finally, patients qualitatively preferred using pattern recognition control and reported the resulting control to be smoother and more consistent. PMID:24110008

  11. Modern surgical management of breast cancer therapy related upper limb and breast lymphoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Nelson; Furniss, Dominic; Giele, Henk

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest cancer in the UK. Advances in breast cancer treatment means that the sequelae of treatment are affecting more women and for a longer duration. Lymphoedema is one such sequela, with wide-ranging implications, from serious functional and psychological effects at the individual level to wider economic burdens to society. Breast cancer-related lymphoedema is principally managed by conservative therapy comprising compression garments and manual decongestive massage. This approach is effective for early stages of lymphoedema, but it is not curative and the effectiveness depends on patient compliance. Early surgical approaches were ablative, gave significant morbidity and hence, reserved for the most severe cases of refractory lymphoedema. However, recent non-ablative reconstructive surgical approaches have seen a revival of interest in the prevention or surgical management of breast cancer-related lymphoedema. This review examines the modern surgical techniques for the treatment of breast cancer-related lymphoedema. Liposuction reduces the volume and symptoms of lymphedema, but requires continual compressive therapy to avoid recurrence. Lymphatic reconstruction or bypass techniques including lymph node transfer (inguinal nodes are transferred to the affected limb), lymphatico-lymphatic bypass (lymphatics bypass the axilla using a lymph vessel graft reconstructing lymphatic flow from arm to neck) and lymphaticovenous anastomoses (lymphatics in the arm are joined to the venous system aiding lymph drainage) show promise in reducing lymphedema significantly. Further research is required, including into the role of primary lymphaticovenous anastomoses in the prevention of lymphedema at the time of axillary dissection.

  12. Pattern recognition control outperforms conventional myoelectric control in upper limb patients with targeted muscle reinnervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Levi J; Lock, Blair A; Simon, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Pattern recognition myoelectric control shows great promise as an alternative to conventional amplitude based control to control multiple degree of freedom prosthetic limbs. Many studies have reported pattern recognition classification error performances of less than 10% during offline tests; however, it remains unclear how this translates to real-time control performance. In this contribution, we compare the real-time control performances between pattern recognition and direct myoelectric control (a popular form of conventional amplitude control) for participants who had received targeted muscle reinnervation. The real-time performance was evaluated during three tasks; 1) a box and blocks task, 2) a clothespin relocation task, and 3) a block stacking task. Our results found that pattern recognition significantly outperformed direct control for all three performance tasks. Furthermore, it was found that pattern recognition was configured much quicker. The classification error of the pattern recognition systems used by the patients was found to be 16% ±(1.6%) suggesting that systems with this error rate may still provide excellent control. Finally, patients qualitatively preferred using pattern recognition control and reported the resulting control to be smoother and more consistent.

  13. Assessment of Body-Powered Upper Limb Prostheses by Able-Bodied Subjects, using the Box and Blocks Test and the Nine Hole Peg Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkate, L.; Smit, G.; Plettenburg, D.H.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design: Experimental trial. Background: The functional performance of currently available body-powered prostheses is unknown. Objective: The goal of this study was to objectively assess and compare the functional performance of three commonly used body-powered upper limb terminal devices. Meth

  14. Epidemiology of work related neck and upper limb problems: Psychosocial and personal risk factors (Part I) and effective interventions from a bio behavioural perspective (Part II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, P.M.; IJmker, S.; Heuvel, S. van den; Blatter, B.M.

    2006-01-01

    Work related neck and upper limb symptoms have a multi-factorial origin. Possible risk factors are of a physical, psychosocial or personal origin. These factors can reinforce each other and their influence can also be mediated by cultural or societal factors. Initially, most research on neck and upp

  15. The Profile of Patients and Current Practice of Treatment of Upper Limb Muscle Spasticity with Botulinum Toxin Type A: An International Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid

    2010-01-01

    To document the current practice in relation with the treatment of patients with upper limb spasticity with botulinum toxin type A to inform future research in this area. We designed an international, cross-sectional, noninterventional survey of current practice. Nine hundred and seventy-four patients from 122 investigational centres in 31…

  16. Intensive upper limb intervention with self-management training is feasible and promising for older children and adolescents with unilateral cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, Y.; Aarts, P.; Burg, J. van der; Steenbergen, B.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of a short (one week) intensive intervention combining Constraint Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) and bimanual training (BiT) to improve upper limb capacity and bimanual performance guided by individual goal setting in children and ad

  17. The course of nonspecific work-related upper limb disorders and the influence of demographic factors, psychologic factors, and physical fitness on clinical status and disability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsden-Besseling, M.D. van; Bergh, K.A. van den; Staal, J.B.; Bie, R.A. de; Heuvel, W.J.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the course of nonspecific work-related upper limb disorders (WRULD) and the influence of sociodemographic factors, psychologic factors, and physical fitness on clinical status and functional disability. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study with cross-sectional analysis among compu

  18. Effects of acute and chronic interval sprint exercise performed on a manually propelled treadmill on upper limb vascular mechanics in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, T Dylan; Reid, Steph M; Smith, Alan R; Zamir, Mair; Lemon, Peter W R; Laughlin, M Harold; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Interval sprint exercise performed on a manually propelled treadmill, where the hands grip the handle bars, engages lower and upper limb skeletal muscle, but little is known regarding the effects of this exercise modality on the upper limb vasculature. We tested the hypotheses that an acute bout of sprint exercise and 6 weeks of training induces brachial artery (BA) and forearm vascular remodeling, favoring a more compliant system. Before and following a single bout of exercise as well as 6 weeks of training three types of vascular properties/methodologies were examined in healthy men: (1) stiffness of the entire upper limb vascular system (pulse wave velocity (PWV); (2) local stiffness of the BA; and (3) properties of the entire forearm vascular bed (determined by a modified lumped parameter Windkessel model). Following sprint exercise, PWV declined (P Sprint exercise induced a more compliant forearm vascular bed, without altering indices of BA stiffness. These effects were transient, as following training the forearm vascular bed was not more compliant and indices of BA stiffness increased. On the basis of these data, we conclude that adaptations to acute and chronic sprint exercise on a manually propelled treadmill are not uniform along the arterial tree in upper limb.

  19. Timing training in three children with diplegic cerebral palsy: Short- and long-term effects on upper-limb movement organization and functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maria eJohansson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great need of interventions to maintain and improve motor functions in children with diplegic cerebral palsy (DCP, scientific evaluations of existing training methods are rare. This study aimed to explore individual effects of synchronized metronome training (SMT on motor timing, spatio-temporal movement organization, and subjective experiences of changes in upper-limb functions in three children with DCP. All children participated in an individualized 4-week/12 session SMT training regime. Measurements before training (Pre, after training (Post1 and at 6 months post completed training (Post2 were made by the applied SMT training equipment, optoelectronic registrations of goal-directed upper-limb movements, and a questionnaire assessing subjective experiences of changes in upper-limb functions and usability. In general, the training regime was shown to have little effect on motor timing. However, some positive changes in spatio-temporal movement organization were found. Two children also reported substantial long-lasting positive changes in subjective experiences of hand/arm functionality in terms of increased movement control and reduced muscle tone. For these children, parallel kinematic findings also indicated smoother and faster movement trajectories that remained at Post2. Although highly individualized, the shown improvements in upper-limb kinematics and subjective experiences of improved functionality of the hands/arms for two of the cases warrant further explorations of SMT outcomes in children with DCP.

  20. The Relationship between Independent Transfer Skills and Upper Limb Kinetics in Wheelchair Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ying Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfers are one of the most physically demanding wheelchair activities. The purpose of this study was to determine if using proper transfer skills as measured by the Transfer Assessment Instrument (TAI is associated with reduced loading on the upper extremities. Twenty-three wheelchair users performed transfers to a level-height bench while a series of forces plates, load cells, and a motion capture system recorded the biomechanics of their natural transferring techniques. Their transfer skills were simultaneously evaluated by two study clinicians using the TAI. Logistic regression and multiple linear regression models were used to determine the relationships between TAI scores and the kinetic variables on both arms across all joints. The results showed that the TAI measured transfer skills were closely associated with the magnitude and timing of joint moments (P<.02, model R2 values ranged from 0.27 to 0.79. Proper completion of the skills which targeted the trailing arm was associated with lower average resultant moments and rates of rise of resultant moments at the trailing shoulder and/or elbow. Some skills involving the leading side had the effect of increasing the magnitude or rate loading on the leading side. Knowledge of the kinetic outcomes associated with each skill may help users to achieve the best load-relieving effects for their upper extremities.

  1. The relationship between independent transfer skills and upper limb kinetics in wheelchair users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-Ying; Hogaboom, Nathan S; Boninger, Michael L; Koontz, Alicia M

    2014-01-01

    Transfers are one of the most physically demanding wheelchair activities. The purpose of this study was to determine if using proper transfer skills as measured by the Transfer Assessment Instrument (TAI) is associated with reduced loading on the upper extremities. Twenty-three wheelchair users performed transfers to a level-height bench while a series of forces plates, load cells, and a motion capture system recorded the biomechanics of their natural transferring techniques. Their transfer skills were simultaneously evaluated by two study clinicians using the TAI. Logistic regression and multiple linear regression models were used to determine the relationships between TAI scores and the kinetic variables on both arms across all joints. The results showed that the TAI measured transfer skills were closely associated with the magnitude and timing of joint moments (P shoulder and/or elbow. Some skills involving the leading side had the effect of increasing the magnitude or rate loading on the leading side. Knowledge of the kinetic outcomes associated with each skill may help users to achieve the best load-relieving effects for their upper extremities. PMID:25162039

  2. Experience of using vascularized bone grafts in reconstructive surgery of the upper limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamanov, E. A.; Keosyan, V. T.; Bryukhanov, A. V.; Tsaregorodtseva, E. M.; Danilov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The article describes the results of treatment patients with defects and diseases of bone tissue using bone grafting with vascularized bone grafts from different areas of the body. The results of treatment of 27 patients with bone tissue defects of the upper extremities are demonstrated. 16 of patients had scaphoid nonunion. 2 cases of nonunion were reported: one scaphoid nonunion due to unstable osteosynthesis and one lunate fragmentation nonunion in patient with late stage Kienbock`s disease. Vascularized bone graft from distal radius was used in both cases. We had two cases of delayed union at 18 months in surgical treatment of scaphoid. 2 patients had metacarpal bone defect, 1 patient with radius bone defect, 2 patients with SLAC (scapholunate advanced collapse), 2 patients with bone defect of the humerus, 1 patient with bone defect of the ulna. In all cases we used vascularized bone crafts from various anatomical areas. We achieved union in all other cases. The study shows high efficiency of upper extremity bone defect replacement methods.

  3. Prediction of Upper Limb Motor Recovery after Subacute Ischemic Stroke Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Kathuria, Prachi; Nair, Pallavi; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Early evaluation of the pyramidal tract using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is a prerequisite to decide the optimal treatment or to assess appropriate rehabilitation. The early predictive value of DTI for assessing motor and functional recovery in ischemic stroke (IS) has yielded contradictory results. The purpose is to systematically review and summarize the current available literature on the value of Fractional Anisotropy (FA) parameter of the DTI in predicting upper limb motor recovery after sub-acute IS. MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar and Cochrane CENTRAL searches were conducted from January 1, 1950, to July 31, 2015, which was supplemented with relevant articles identified in the references. Correlation between FA and upper limb motor recovery measure was done. Heterogeneity was examined using Higgins I-squared, Tau-squared. Summary of correlation coefficient was determined using Random Effects model. Out of 166 citations, only eleven studies met the criteria for inclusion in the systematic review and six studies were included in the meta-analysis. A random effects model revealed that DTI parameter FA is a significant predictor for upper limb motor recovery after sub-acute IS [Correlation Coefficient=0.82; 95% Confidence Interval-0.66 to 0.90, P value<0.001]. Moderate heterogeneity was observed (Tau-squared=0.12, I-squared=62.14). The studies reported so far on correlation between DTI and upper limb motor recovery are few with small sample sizes. This meta-analysis suggests strong correlation between DTI parameter FA and upper limb motor recovery. Well-designed prospective trials embedded with larger sample size are required to establish these findings. PMID:26846758

  4. A modified scintigrafic technique for amputation level selection in diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified 123I-antipyrine cutaneous washout technique for the selection of amputation levels is described. The modifications imply a reduction of time needed for the examination by simultaneous recordings on different levels, and a better patient acceptance by reducing inconvenience. Furthermore, both skin perfusion pressure (SPP) and skin blood flow (SBF) are determined from each clearance curve. In a prospective study among 26 diabetic patients presenting with ulcers or gangrene of the foot, both SPP and SBF were determined preoperatively on the selected level of surgery and on adjacent amputation sites. These 26 patients underwent 12 minor foot amputations and 17 major lower limb amputations. Two of these amputations failed to heal. SBF values appeared indicative for the degree of peripheral vascular disease, as low SBF values were found with low SPP values. SPP determinations revealed good predictive values: All surgical procedures healed when SPP>20 mmHg, but 2 out of 3 failed when SPP<2 mmHg. If SPP values would have been decisive, the amputation would have been converted to a lower level in 6 out of 17 cases. This modified scintigrafic technique provides accurate objective information for amputation level selection. (orig.)

  5. A palmar pressure sensor for measurement of upper limb weight bearing by the hands during transfers by paraplegics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunju, Nissan; Ojha, Rajdeep; Devasahayam, Suresh R

    2013-10-01

    Paraplegic patients have to effect transfer from one seat to another by using their upper limbs. In this process the hands bear almost the entire weight of the body in at least some phases of the transfer. It is desirable to train patients, especially those who are elderly and otherwise weak, to distribute their weight so as to avoid large forces being sustained on any one hand for an extended period. It is also desirable to evaluate the effectiveness of assistive devices like lower limb FES in sharing the load on the hand. This study presents a simple and versatile method of measuring palmar hand force during transfers by paraplegic patients. It is important that this force sensor should not interfere with the grasping and stabilizing properties of the hands and should permit normal transferring. The force sensor comprises an air-filled pouch or pillow that can be placed on any surface. This pneumatic sensor feels like upholstery padding on the surface on which it is placed. The sensor integrates the total pressure applied to the surface of the pouch, thereby obtaining the total force exerted by the palm/hand. The fabrication of the sensor is described, as well as the associated measurement circuit. The static calibration shows that the sensor is linear up to 350 N and the dynamic calibration shows that it has a bandwidth of 13 Hz. The sensor was fabricated using an inflated inelastic airbag attached to a pressure transducer. An automatic offset correction circuit in the preamplifier module ensures that any offset due to initial pressure or sensor drift is removed and the output is zero under no load condition. The key to this sensor arrangement is the ease of fitting it into the intended location without disturbing the existing arrangement for the subject's activities of daily living (ADL).

  6. Gait initiation in lower limb amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.H.; van Keeken, H.G.; Schoppen, T.; Otten, E.; Halbertsma, J.P.; Hof, A.L.; Postema, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study limitations in function and adjustment strategies in lower limb amputees during gait initiation. Design: Observational cohort study. Setting: University Medical Center. Participants: Amputees with a unilateral transfemoral or transtibial amputation, and able-bodied subjects. Main

  7. Epidemiological Study on Reasons for Leg Amputation in Japanese

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Yoshitaka; IMAKI, Masahide; Ogawa, Yukiko; FUCHOKA, Satoshi; OKUDA, Kuniharu

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted, with special reference to elucidating the causes for lower limb amputation, which would have the most significant effect on "locomotion", the basis of independence of the aged. The subjects were leg amputees for whom artificial limbs had been fitted financed by various insurance policies in Osaka prefecture. The survey was conducted on 3, 138 subjects, from whom acceptable responses were obtained from 1, 460 (recovery rate, 46.5%). Questionnaires were mailed to each ...

  8. Upper limb children action-observation training (UP-CAT: a randomised controlled trial in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagi Laura

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rehabilitation for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HCP aimed to improve function of the impaired upper limb (UL uses a wide range of intervention programs. A new rehabilitative approach, called Action-Observation Therapy, based on the recent discovery of mirror neurons, has been used in adult stroke but not in children. The purpose of the present study is to design a randomised controlled trial (RCT for evaluating the efficacy of Action-Observation Therapy in improving UL activity in children with HCP. Methods/Design The trial is designed according to CONSORT Statement. It is a randomised, evaluator-blinded, match-pair group trial. Children with HCP will be randomised within pairs to either experimental or control group. The experimental group will perform an Action-Observation Therapy, called UP-CAT (Upper Limb-Children Action-Observation Training in which they will watch video sequences showing goal-directed actions, chosen according to children UL functional level, combined with motor training with their hemiplegic UL. The control group will perform the same tailored actions after watching computer games. A careful revision of psychometric properties of UL outcome measures for children with hemiplegia was performed. Assisting Hand Assessment was chosen as primary measure and, based on its calculation power, a sample size of 12 matched pairs was established. Moreover, Melbourne and ABILHAND-Kids were included as secondary measures. The time line of assessments will be T0 (in the week preceding the onset of the treatment, T1 and T2 (in the week after the end of the treatment and 8 weeks later, respectively. A further assessment will be performed at T3 (24 weeks after T1, to evaluate the retention of effects. In a subgroup of children enrolled in both groups functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, exploring the mirror system and sensory-motor function, will be performed at T0, T1 and T2. Discussion The paper aims to

  9. Robot-aided therapy for upper limbs in patients with stroke-related lesions. Brief report of a clinical experience

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    Dall'Armi Valentina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was aimed at verifying the improvement on the motor impairment and functionality in 19 patients with chronic hemiparesis after stroke treated with a robot-aided rehabilitation protocol using the ReoGo™ system (Motorika Medical Ltd, Israel, and at evaluating the persistence of the effects after 1 month. The study also focused on the actual possibility of administering the robot-aided therapy with the ReoGo™ for the upper limbs and on the patients' degree of acceptance and compliance with the treatment. Subjects underwent an assessment prior to the start of the rehabilitation project (T-1, one at the start (T0, one at the end of the treatment (T1 and one after one month from the end of the treatment (T2. The following tests were administered: (i Fugl-Meyer (FM upper limb; Ashworth scale (AS; Functional Independence Measure (FIM™ (T-1 - T2; (ii strength evaluation; Visual Analogue Scale (VAS for pain; Frenchay Arm test (FAT; Box and Block test (BBT; Timed Up and Go (TUG test (T0 - T2. Additionally, the Euro-QoL questionnaire and a VAS for the treatment satisfaction were administered to the subjects. Non-statistical difference of scores at T-1 and T0 on almost the entire battery of tasks suggested a stable patients' performance prior to the start of the rehabilitation. With the exception of the Medical Research Council (MRC and the AS sub-scales measuring -as appropriate- strength and spasticity of the shoulder, triceps and wrist, all scores showed a significant increase between T0 and T1. The improvement on the pain could not be proved significant (p = 0.10. A significant increase between T0 and T2 was found for all assessment scores, with the exception of the MRC for external shoulder rotators (p = 0.05 and of the AS for shoulder (p = 0.32 and wrist (p = 0.08. Substantial stability was observed between T1 and T2. Patients were capable of completing the treatment and showed good participant satisfaction. This pilot study

  10. Characterization of age-related modifications of upper limb motor control strategies in a new dynamic environment

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    Dario Paolo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past, several research groups have shown that when a velocity dependent force field is applied during upper limb movements subjects are able to deal with this external perturbation after some training. This adaptation is achieved by creating a new internal model which is included in the normal unperturbed motor commands to achieve good performance. The efficiency of this motor control mechanism can be compromised by pathological disorders or by muscular-skeletal modifications such as the ones due to the natural aging process. In this respect, the present study aimed at identifying the age-related modifications of upper limb motor control strategies during adaptation and de-adaptation processes in velocity dependent force fields. Methods Eight young and eight elderly healthy subjects were included in the experiment. Subjects were instructed to perform pointing movements in the horizontal plane both in a null field and in a velocity dependent force field. The evolution of smoothness and hand path were used to characterize the performance of the subjects. Furthermore, the ability of modulating the interactive torque has been used as a paradigm to explain the observed discoordinated patterns during the adaptation process. Results The evolution of the kinematics during the experiments highlights important behavioural differences between the two groups during the adaptation and de-adaptation processes. In young subjects the improvement of movement smoothness was in accordance with the expected learning trend related to the consolidation of the internal model. On the contrary, elders did not show a coherent learning process. The kinetic analysis pointed out the presence of different strategies for the compensation of the external perturbation: older people required an increased involvement of the shoulder with a different modulation of joint torque components during the evolution of the experiments. Conclusion The results

  11. Modular externally-powered system for limb prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seamone, W.; Hoshall, C.H.; Schmeisser, G.

    Many upper limb amputees especially those who have sustained high level amputations of injury to remaining portions of the body, are unable to use conventional prosthetic devices effectively. In an effort to help the more severely handicapped amputees and those who may for other reasons require capabilities that standard prostheses cannot provide, the Applied Physics Laboratory, in conjunction with the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, has developed a prosthetic system which is powered by rechargeable batteries. The amputee need supply only a control signal. This article describes the concept which is now being evaluated with the aid of amputee subjects, and discusses results obtained to data in field tests.

  12. Reliability of the mangled extremity severity score in combat-related upper and lower extremity injuries

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    Tolga Ege

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decision of limb salvage or amputation is generally aided with several trauma scoring systems such as the mangled extremity severity score (MESS. However, the reliability of the injury scores in the settling of open fractures due to explosives and missiles is challenging. Mortality and morbidity of the extremity trauma due to firearms are generally associated with time delay in revascularization, injury mechanism, anatomy of the injured site, associated injuries, age and the environmental circumstance. The purpose of the retrospective study was to evaluate the extent of extremity injuries due to ballistic missiles and to detect the reliability of mangled extremity severity score (MESS in both upper and lower extremities. Materials and Methods: Between 2004 and 2014, 139 Gustillo Anderson Type III open fractures of both the upper and lower extremities were enrolled in the study. Data for patient age, fire arm type, transporting time from the field to the hospital (and the method, injury severity scores, MESS scores, fracture types, amputation levels, bone fixation methods and postoperative infections and complications retrieved from the two level-2 trauma center's data base. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the MESS were calculated to detect the ability in deciding amputation in the mangled limb. Results: Amputation was performed in 39 extremities and limb salvage attempted in 100 extremities. The mean followup time was 14.6 months (range 6–32 months. In the amputated group, the mean MESS scores for upper and lower extremity were 8.8 (range 6–11 and 9.24 (range 6–11, respectively. In the limb salvage group, the mean MESS scores for upper and lower extremities were 5.29 (range 4–7 and 5.19 (range 3–8, respectively. Sensitivity of MESS in upper and lower extremities were calculated as 80% and 79.4% and positive predictive values detected as 55.55% and 83.3%, respectively. Specificity of MESS

  13. Report of an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations in a cadaveric upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troupis, Theodore G; Michalinos, Adamantios; Manou, Vasiliki; Vlastos, Dimitrios; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Demesticha, Theano; Skandalakis, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    In this study an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations discovered during dissection of cervical, axillary and brachial area of a cadaver is described. Variations are thoroughly described and literature is briefly reviewed. Lateral cord of brachial plexus was not formed; Eight Cervical root divided into anterior and posterior division before uniting with First Thoracic root and Upper Trunk was unusually short. Axillary artery gave origin to a superficial brachial artery and then continued as deep brachial artery. Multiple variations in typical axillary artery branches were present including existence of inferior pectoral artery. Cephalic vein was absent. A variety of interventions, from relative simple as central venous catheter placement to most complicated as brachial plexus injury repair demand thorough knowledge of area's regional anatomy. Familiarity with anatomic variations allows more precise and careful interventions. Research on these variations is valuable for anatomists and embryologists but also for clinicians because it may provide useful information for non - typical cases but also helps in raising a high level of suspicion.

  14. Integrated vision-based robotic arm interface for operators with upper limb mobility impairments.

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    Jiang, Hairong; Wachs, Juan P; Duerstock, Bradley S

    2013-06-01

    An integrated, computer vision-based system was developed to operate a commercial wheelchair-mounted robotic manipulator (WMRM). In this paper, a gesture recognition interface system developed specifically for individuals with upper-level spinal cord injuries (SCIs) was combined with object tracking and face recognition systems to be an efficient, hands-free WMRM controller. In this test system, two Kinect cameras were used synergistically to perform a variety of simple object retrieval tasks. One camera was used to interpret the hand gestures to send as commands to control the WMRM and locate the operator's face for object positioning. The other sensor was used to automatically recognize different daily living objects for test subjects to select. The gesture recognition interface incorporated hand detection, tracking and recognition algorithms to obtain a high recognition accuracy of 97.5% for an eight-gesture lexicon. An object recognition module employing Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) algorithm was performed and recognition results were sent as a command for "coarse positioning" of the robotic arm near the selected daily living object. Automatic face detection was also provided as a shortcut for the subjects to position the objects to the face by using a WMRM. Completion time tasks were conducted to compare manual (gestures only) and semi-manual (gestures, automatic face detection and object recognition) WMRM control modes. The use of automatic face and object detection significantly increased the completion times for retrieving a variety of daily living objects. PMID:24187264

  15. Integrated vision-based robotic arm interface for operators with upper limb mobility impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hairong; Wachs, Juan P; Duerstock, Bradley S

    2013-06-01

    An integrated, computer vision-based system was developed to operate a commercial wheelchair-mounted robotic manipulator (WMRM). In this paper, a gesture recognition interface system developed specifically for individuals with upper-level spinal cord injuries (SCIs) was combined with object tracking and face recognition systems to be an efficient, hands-free WMRM controller. In this test system, two Kinect cameras were used synergistically to perform a variety of simple object retrieval tasks. One camera was used to interpret the hand gestures to send as commands to control the WMRM and locate the operator's face for object positioning. The other sensor was used to automatically recognize different daily living objects for test subjects to select. The gesture recognition interface incorporated hand detection, tracking and recognition algorithms to obtain a high recognition accuracy of 97.5% for an eight-gesture lexicon. An object recognition module employing Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) algorithm was performed and recognition results were sent as a command for "coarse positioning" of the robotic arm near the selected daily living object. Automatic face detection was also provided as a shortcut for the subjects to position the objects to the face by using a WMRM. Completion time tasks were conducted to compare manual (gestures only) and semi-manual (gestures, automatic face detection and object recognition) WMRM control modes. The use of automatic face and object detection significantly increased the completion times for retrieving a variety of daily living objects.

  16. Event-related Potentials During Target-response Tasks to Study Cognitive Processes of Upper Limb Use in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Ingar Marie; Steenbergen, Bert; Baas, C. Marjolein; Aarts, Pauline; Jongsma, Marijtje L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is a very common cause of disability in childhood. It is characterized by unilateral motor impairments that are frequently dominated in the upper limb. In addition to a reduced movement capacity of the affected upper limb, several children with unilateral CP show a reduced awareness of the remaining movement capacity of that limb. This phenomenon of disregarding the preserved capacity of the affected upper limb is regularly referred to as Developmental Disregard (DD). Different theories have been postulated to explain DD, each suggesting slightly different guidelines for therapy. Still, cognitive processes that might additionally contribute to DD in children with unilateral CP have never been directly studied. The current protocol was developed to study cognitive aspects involved in upper limb control in children with unilateral CP with and without DD. This was done by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) extracted from the ongoing EEG during target-response tasks asking for a hand-movement response. ERPs consist of several components, each of them associated with a well-defined cognitive process (e.g., the N1 with early attention processes, the N2 with cognitive control and the P3 with cognitive load and mental effort). Due to its excellent temporal resolution, the ERP technique enables to study several covert cognitive processes preceding overt motor responses and thus allows insight into the cognitive processes that might contribute to the phenomenon of DD. Using this protocol adds a new level of explanation to existing behavioral studies and opens new avenues to the broader implementation of research on cognitive aspects of developmental movement restrictions in children. PMID:26780483

  17. Home-based Neurologic Music Therapy for Upper Limb Rehabilitation with Stroke Patients at Community Rehabilitation Stage - a Feasibility Study Protocol.

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    Alex J Street

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Impairment of upper limb function following stroke is more common than lower limb impairment and is also more resistant to treatment. Several lab-based studies with stroke patients have produced statistically significant gains in upper limb function when using musical instrument playing and techniques where rhythm acts as an external time-keeper for the priming and timing of upper limb movements. Methods: For this feasibility study a small sample size of 14 participants (3 – 60 months post stroke has been determined through clinical discussion between the researcher and study host in order to test for management, feasibility and effects, before planning a larger trial determined through power analysis. A cross-over design with five repeated measures will be used, whereby participants will be randomized into either a treatment (n=7 or wait list control (n=7 group. Intervention will take place twice weekly over 6 weeks. The ARAT and 9HPT will be used to measure for quantitative gains in arm function and finger dexterity, pre/post treatment interviews will serve to investigate treatment compliance and tolerance. A lab based EEG case comparison study will be undertaken to explore audio-motor coupling, brain connectivity and neural reorganization with this intervention, as evidenced in similar studies. Discussion: Before evaluating the effectiveness of a home-based intervention in a larger scale study, it is important to assess whether implementation of the trial methodology is feasible. This study investigates the feasibility, efficacy and patient experience of a music therapy treatment protocol comprising a chart of 12 different instrumental exercises and variations, which aims at promoting measurable changes in upper limb function in hemiparetic stroke patients. The study proposes to examine several new aspects including home-based treatment and dosage, and will provide data on recruitment, adherence and variability of outcomes.

  18. Event-related Potentials During Target-response Tasks to Study Cognitive Processes of Upper Limb Use in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Ingar Marie; Steenbergen, Bert; Baas, C Marjolein; Aarts, Pauline; Jongsma, Marijtje L A

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is a very common cause of disability in childhood. It is characterized by unilateral motor impairments that are frequently dominated in the upper limb. In addition to a reduced movement capacity of the affected upper limb, several children with unilateral CP show a reduced awareness of the remaining movement capacity of that limb. This phenomenon of disregarding the preserved capacity of the affected upper limb is regularly referred to as Developmental Disregard (DD). Different theories have been postulated to explain DD, each suggesting slightly different guidelines for therapy. Still, cognitive processes that might additionally contribute to DD in children with unilateral CP have never been directly studied. The current protocol was developed to study cognitive aspects involved in upper limb control in children with unilateral CP with and without DD. This was done by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) extracted from the ongoing EEG during target-response tasks asking for a hand-movement response. ERPs consist of several components, each of them associated with a well-defined cognitive process (e.g., the N1 with early attention processes, the N2 with cognitive control and the P3 with cognitive load and mental effort). Due to its excellent temporal resolution, the ERP technique enables to study several covert cognitive processes preceding overt motor responses and thus allows insight into the cognitive processes that might contribute to the phenomenon of DD. Using this protocol adds a new level of explanation to existing behavioral studies and opens new avenues to the broader implementation of research on cognitive aspects of developmental movement restrictions in children. PMID:26780483

  19. Effect of primary and secondary wartime below-knee amputation on length of hospitalization and rehabilitation

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    Jandrić Slavica

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of below-knee amputations in 36 war wounded (mean age 35,42 were reviewed. The majority of the patients was wounded by land mines (94.4%. Most of them were between 25 and 35 years old. Bilateral amputation was done in 2.8% of cases. The amputation was performed on the day of wounding (primary below-knee amputation in 30 (83.3% amputees. Secondary amputation after the attempt to save the severely injured lower-limb was performed in 6 patients (16,7% average 4.61 ± 11.67 days after wounding. Reamputation was necessary in 6 cases (16.7%. Time period from the beginning of rehabilitation to the fitting of prosthesis, was 36.25 ± 14.97 days for primary amputations, 32 ± 17.8 days for secondary amputations and 68.66 ± 33.52 days for reamputations. There was no significant correlation between the duration of rehabilitation to prosthetic management and the period between wounding and amputation (r = -0.102. The attempt to save the limb after severe below-knee injuries and the secondary amputation afterwards, did not significantly influence the ensuing rehabilitation and prosthetic works.

  20. Role of ultrasound-guided continuous brachial plexus block in the management of neonatal ischemia in upper limb

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    Vrushali C Ponde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal upper limb ischemia due to accidental arterial damage remains a major concern, which can lead to devastating complications if untreated. The primary objective of this case report is to emphasize the role of continuous infraclavicular brachial plexus block, the issues related with block performance in an ischemic hand, and the importance of ultrasound guidance in this particular case scenario. A 1.1 kg infant suffered from distal forearm ischemia due to accidental arterial damage, which was treated with brachial plexus block. An ultrasound-guided single shot block with 0.5 mL/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine was followed by ultrasound-guided catheter placement in the target area. A continuous infusion of 0.03% of bupivacaine at the rate of 0.5 mL/kg/hr (approx. 0.15 mg/kg/h of bupivacaine was administered for 36 h. This treatment resulted in reversal of ischemia. Permanent ischemic damage was eventually confined to the tips of 4 fingers. We conclude that ultrasound-guided continuous infraclavicular block has a therapeutic role to play in the treatment of hand ischemia due to arterial damage and subsequent arterial spasm in neonates with added benefits.