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Sample records for amplitude rotational motion

  1. Water rotational jump driven large amplitude molecular motions of nitrate ions in aqueous potassium nitrate solution

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Puja; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous potassium nitrate solution reveal a highly complex rotational dynamics of nitrate ions where, superimposed on the expected continuous Brownian motion, are large amplitude angular jumps that are coupled to and at least partly driven by similar large amplitude jump motions in water molecules which are associated with change in the hydrogen bonded water molecule. These jumps contribute significantly to rotational and translational motions of these ions. We explore the detailed mechanism of these correlated (or, coupled) jumps and introduce a new time correlation function to decompose the coupled orientational- jump dynamics of solvent and solute in the aqueous electrolytic solution. Time correlation function provides for the unequivocal determination of the time constant involved in orientational dynamics originating from making and breaking of hydrogen bonds. We discover two distinct mechanisms-both are coupled to density fluctuation but are of different types.

  2. New vibration-rotation code for tetraatomic molecules exhibiting wide-amplitude motion: WAVR4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozin, Igor N.; Law, Mark M.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2004-11-01

    A general computational method for the accurate calculation of rotationally and vibrationally excited states of tetraatomic molecules is developed. The resulting program is particularly appropriate for molecules executing wide-amplitude motions and isomerizations. The program offers a choice of coordinate systems based on Radau, Jacobi, diatom-diatom and orthogonal satellite vectors. The method includes all six vibrational dimensions plus three rotational dimensions. Vibration-rotation calculations with reduced dimensionality in the radial degrees of freedom are easily tackled via constraints imposed on the radial coordinates via the input file. Program summaryTitle of program: WAVR4 Catalogue number: ADUN Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUN Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Persons requesting the program must sign the standard CPC nonprofit use license Computer: Developed under Tru64 UNIX, ported to Microsoft Windows and Sun Unix Operating systems under which the program has been tested: Tru64 Unix, Microsoft Windows, Sun Unix Programming language used: Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data: case dependent No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11 937 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 84 770 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: WAVR4 calculates the bound ro-vibrational levels and wavefunctions of a tetraatomic system using body-fixed coordinates based on generalised orthogonal vectors. Method of solution: The angular coordinates are treated using a finite basis representation (FBR) based on products of spherical harmonics. A discrete variable representation (DVR) [1] based on either Morse-oscillator-like or spherical-oscillator functions [2] is used for the radial coordinates. Matrix elements are computed using an efficient Gaussian quadrature in the angular coordinates and

  3. Conformational equilibria and large-amplitude motions in dimers of carboxylic acids: rotational spectrum of acetic acid-difluoroacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Qian; Feng, Gang; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther

    2014-10-01

    We report the rotational spectra of two conformers of the acetic acid-difluoroacetic acid adduct (CH3COOH-CHF2COOH) and supply information on its internal dynamics. The two conformers differ from each other, depending on the trans or gauche orientation of the terminal -CHF2 group. Both conformers display splittings of the rotational transitions, due to the internal rotation of the methyl group of acetic acid. The corresponding barriers are determined to be V3(trans)=99.8(3) and V3(gauche)=90.5(9) cm(-1) (where V3 is the methyl rotation barrier height). The gauche form displays a further doubling of the rotational transitions, due to the tunneling motion of the -CHF2 group between its two equivalent conformations. The corresponding B2 barrier is estimated to be 108(2) cm(-1). The increase in the distance between the two monomers upon OH→OD deuteration (the Ubbelohde effect) is determined.

  4. Rotational motion in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear structure theories are reviewed concerned with nuclei rotational motion. The development of the deformed nucleus model facilitated a discovery of rotational spectra of nuclei. Comprehensive verification of the rotational scheme and a successful classification of corresponding spectra stimulated investigations of the rotational movement dynamics. Values of nuclear moments of inertia proved to fall between two marginal values corresponding to rotation of a solid and hydrodynamic pattern of an unrotating flow, respectively. The discovery of governing role of the deformation and a degree of a symmetry violence for determining rotational degrees of freedon is pointed out to pave the way for generalization of the rotational spectra

  5. Rotational Motions in Seismology

    OpenAIRE

    Suryanto, Wiwit

    2006-01-01

    The seismic waves that spread out from the earthquake source to the entire Earth are usually measured at the ground surface by a seismometer which consists of three orthogonal components (Z (vertical), N (north-south), and E (east-west) or R (radial), T (transversal), and Z (vertical)). However, a complete representation of the ground motion induced by earthquakes consists not only of those three components of translational motion, but also three components of rotational motion plus six compo...

  6. Constraining Ceres' interior from its Rotational Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Rambaux, Nicolas; Dehant, Véronique; Kuchynka, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Context. Ceres is the most massive body of the asteroid belt and contains about 25 wt.% (weight percent) of water. Understanding its thermal evolution and assessing its current state are major goals of the Dawn Mission. Constraints on internal structure can be inferred from various observations. Especially, detailed knowledge of the rotational motion can help constrain the mass distribution inside the body, which in turn can lead to information on its geophysical history. Aims. We investigate the signature of the interior on the rotational motion of Ceres and discuss possible future measurements performed by the spacecraft Dawn that will help to constrain Ceres' internal structure. Methods. We compute the polar motion, precession-nutation, and length-of-day variations. We estimate the amplitudes of the rigid and non-rigid response for these various motions for models of Ceres interior constrained by recent shape data and surface properties. Results. As a general result, the amplitudes of oscillations in the r...

  7. Rotational Brownian Motion on Sphere Surface and Rotational Relaxation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ekrem Aydner

    2006-01-01

    The spatial components of the autocorrelation function of noninteracting dipoles are analytically obtained in terms of rotational Brownian motion on the surface of a unit sphere using multi-level jumping formalism based on Debye's rotational relaxation model, and the rotational relaxation functions are evaluated.

  8. Rotational motion control of a spacecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Kulczycki, P.

    2003-01-01

    The paper adopts the energy shaping method to control of rotational motion. A global representation of the rigid body motion is given in the canonical form by a quaternion and its conjugate momenta. A general method for motion control on a cotangent bundle to the 3-sphere is suggested. The design...

  9. Rotational Motion Control of a Spacecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Kulczycki, P.

    2001-01-01

    The paper adopts the energy shaping method to control of rotational motion. A global representation of the rigid body motion is given in the canonical form by a quaternion and its conjugate momenta. A general method for motion control on a cotangent bundle to the 3-sphere is suggested. The design...

  10. An Exercise in Rotational Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Brother James

    1980-01-01

    Describes an advanced high school physics experiment demonstrating rotational kinematics and dynamics, using simple equipment such as empty coffee cans, inclined planes, meter sticks, and a large 10-second demonstration timer. (CS)

  11. Rotational motion of Foton M-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrashkin, V. I.; Voronov, K. E.; Piyakov, I. V.; Puzin, Yu. Ya.; Sazonov, V. V.; Semkin, N. D.; Chebukov, S. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The actual controlled rotational motion of the Foton M-4 satellite is reconstructed for the mode of single-axis solar orientation. The reconstruction was carried out using data of onboard measurements of vectors of angular velocity and the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. The reconstruction method is based on the reconstruction of the kinematic equations of the rotational motion of a solid body. According to the method, measurement data of both types collected at a certain time interval are processed together. Measurements of the angular velocity are interpolated by piecewise-linear functions, which are substituted in kinematic differential equations for a quaternion that defines the transition from the satellite instrument coordinate system to the inertial coordinate system. The obtained equations represent the kinematic model of the satellite rotational motion. A solution of these equations that approximates the actual motion is derived from the condition of the best (in the sense of the least squares method) match between the measurement data of the strength vector of the Earth's magnetic field and its calculated values. The described method makes it possible to reconstruct the actual rotational satellite motion using one solution of kinematic equations over time intervals longer than 10 h. The found reconstructions have been used to calculate the residual microaccelerations.

  12. Large-amplitude motion in the Suzuki model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classical and quantum aspects for the analytically solvable one-dimensional pure monopole Suzuki model are studied to clarify the problem of quantization of classical collective motion. A set of nonlinear dynamic equations for a monopole moment of a nucleus are derived from the TDHF equation using the Wigner function moments model. It provides to describe large-amplitude monopole vibrations. The corresponding collective Hamiltonian is constructed and quantized. The anharmonicity of the collective spectra is analyzed in detal

  13. Examining Rotational Ground Motion Induced by Tornados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Elijah; Dunn, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Ring lasers are well known for their ability to detect rotation and to serve as replacements for mechanical gyroscopes. The sensitivity of large ring lasers to various forms of ground motion is less familiar. Since ring lasers preferentially measure rotational ground motion and a standard seismograph is designed to measure translational and vertical ground motion, each device responds to different aspects of ground movement. Therefore, the two instruments will be used to explore responses to microseisms, earthquake generated shear waves, and in particular tornado generated ground movement. On April 27, 2014 an EF4 tornado devastated Vilonia, AR a small town ~ 21 km from the Hendrix College ring laser. The proximity of the tornado's path to the ring laser interferometer and to a seismograph located in Vilonia provided the opportunity to examine the response of these instruments to tornadic generated ground motion. Our measurements suggest tornadic weather systems can produce both rotational and lateral ground motion. This contention is supported by an after the fact damage survey which found that the tornado flattened a forest in which trees were uprooted and laid down in a pair of converging arcs with the centerline pointed in the direction of the tornado's path.

  14. The Dynamics of Large-Amplitude Motion in Energized Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, David S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-05-27

    Chemical reactions involve large-amplitude nuclear motion along the reaction coordinate that serves to distinguish reactants from products. Some reactions, such as roaming reactions and reactions proceeding through a loose transition state, involve more than one large-amplitude degree of freedom. Because of the limitation of exact quantum nuclear dynamics to small systems, one must, in general, define the active degrees of freedom and separate them in some way from the other degrees of freedom. In this project, we use large-amplitude motion in bound model systems to investigate the coupling of large-amplitude degrees of freedom to other nuclear degrees of freedom. This approach allows us to use the precision and power of high-resolution molecular spectroscopy to probe the specific coupling mechanisms involved, and to apply the associated theoretical tools. In addition to slit-jet spectra at the University of Akron, the current project period has involved collaboration with Michel Herman and Nathalie Vaeck of the Université Libre de Bruxelles, and with Brant Billinghurst at the Canadian Light Source (CLS).

  15. Attenuation of ground-motion spectral amplitudes in southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, T.I.; Cummins, P.R.; Dhu, T.; Schneider, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    A dataset comprising some 1200 weak- and strong-motion records from 84 earthquakes is compiled to develop a regional ground-motion model for southeastern Australia (SEA). Events were recorded from 1993 to 2004 and range in size from moment magnitude 2.0 ??? M ??? 4.7. The decay of vertical-component Fourier spectral amplitudes is modeled by trilinear geometrical spreading. The decay of low-frequency spectral amplitudes can be approximated by the coefficient of R-1.3 (where R is hypocentral distance) within 90 km of the seismic source. From approximately 90 to 160 km, we observe a transition zone in which the seismic coda are affected by postcritical reflections from midcrustal and Moho discontinuities. In this hypocentral distance range, geometrical spreading is approximately R+0.1. Beyond 160 km, low-frequency seismic energy attenuates rapidly with source-receiver distance, having a geometrical spreading coefficient of R-1.6. The associated regional seismic-quality factor can be expressed by the polynomial: log Q(f) = 3.66 - 1.44 log f + 0.768 (log f)2 + 0.058 (log f)3 for frequencies 0.78 ??? f ??? 19.9 Hz. Fourier spectral amplitudes, corrected for geometrical spreading and anelastic attenuation, are regressed with M to obtain quadratic source scaling coefficients. Modeled vertical-component displacement spectra fit the observed data well. Amplitude residuals are, on average, relatively small and do not vary with hypocentral distance. Predicted source spectra (i.e., at R = 1 km) are consistent with eastern North American (ENA) Models at low frequencies (f less than approximately 2 Hz) indicating that moment magnitudes calculated for SEA earthquakes are consistent with moment magnitude scales used in ENA over the observed magnitude range. The models presented represent the first spectral ground-motion prediction equations develooed for the southeastern Australian region. This work provides a useful framework for the development of regional ground-motion relations

  16. Amplitude scaling for interchange motions of plasma filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Kube, R; Garcia, O E

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the interchange motion of seeded plasma blobs in a reduced two-field fluid model. If we neglect the compression of the electric drift in the model, the maximal radial center-of-mass velocity V of the filament follows the familiar square-root scaling V ~ (\\Delta n/N)^1/2, where \\Delta n is the blob amplitude and N is the background density. When including compression of the electric drift to account for an inhomogeneous magnetic field, the numerical simulations reveal that the maximal blob velocity depends linearly on its initial amplitude, V ~ \\Delta n/N. When the relative initial amplitude of the filament exceeds approximately unity we recover the square root velocity scaling. We explain the observed scaling laws in t erms of the conserved energy integrals of the model equations. The compression term leads to a constraint on the maximum kinetic energy of the blob, which is not present if the drift compression is ignored. If the compression term is included, only approximately half of the...

  17. Rotation Motion of Designed Nano-Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyuan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Xingfa; Zhao, Yuliang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-07-01

    Construction of nano-devices that can generate controllable unidirectional rotation is an important part of nanotechnology. Here, we design a nano-turbine composed of carbon nanotube and graphene nanoblades, which can be driven by fluid flow. Rotation motion of nano-turbine is quantitatively studied by molecular dynamics simulations on this model system. A robust linear relationship is achieved with this nano-turbine between its rotation rate and the fluid flow velocity spanning two orders of magnitude, and this linear relationship remains intact at various temperatures. More interestingly, a striking difference from its macroscopic counterpart is identified: the rotation rate is much smaller (by a factor of ~15) than that of the macroscopic turbine with the same driving flow. This discrepancy is shown to be related to the disruption of water flow at nanoscale, together with the water slippage at graphene surface and the so-called ``dragging effect''. Moreover, counterintuitively, the ratio of ``effective'' driving flow velocity increases as the flow velocity increases, suggesting that the linear dependence on the flow velocity can be more complicated in nature. These findings may serve as a foundation for the further development of rotary nano-devices and should also be helpful for a better understanding of the biological molecular motors.

  18. Remapping motion across modalities: tactile rotations influence visual motion judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Martin V; Thomaschke, Roland; Linhardt, Matthias J; Herbort, Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Multisensory interactions between haptics and vision remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that shapes, such as letters of the alphabet, when drawn on the skin, are differently perceived dependent upon which body part is stimulated and on how the stimulated body part, such as the hand, is positioned. Another line of research within this area has investigated multisensory interactions. Tactile perceptions, for example, have the potential to disambiguate visually perceived information. While the former studies focused on explicit reports about tactile perception, the latter studies relied on fully aligned multisensory stimulus dimensions. In this study, we investigated to what extent rotating tactile stimulations on the hand affect directional visual motion judgments implicitly and without any spatial stimulus alignment. We show that directional tactile cues and ambiguous visual motion cues are integrated, thus biasing the judgment of visually perceived motion. We further show that the direction of the tactile influence depends on the position and orientation of the stimulated part of the hand relative to a head-centered frame of reference. Finally, we also show that the time course of the cue integration is very versatile. Overall, the results imply immediate directional cue integration within a head-centered frame of reference. PMID:20878396

  19. Spectroscopy and dynamics of small molecules with large amplitude motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawadi, Mahesh B.

    This dissertation addresses the effect of large amplitude vibrations (LAV or LAVs) on the other small amplitude vibrations (SAVs) for investigating the vibrational dynamics on the molecular systems ranging from G6 to G12 symmetry, including methanol, methylamine, nitromethane, 2-methylmalonaldehyde (2-MMA) and 5-methyltropolone (5-MT). The study of the high-resolution infrared spectrum of methylamine (CH 3NH2) in the nu11 asymmetric CH stretch region (2965-3005 cm1) under sub-Doppler slit-jet conditions reveals that the torsion-inversion tunneling patterns are heavily impacted by perturbations and hence different both from the ground state and from the theoretical predictions. Two torsion-inversion tunneling models are reported for studying the high-barrier tunneling behavior in the methyl CH stretch vibrationally excited states of the molecules with G12 symmetry. These models predict the inverted tunneling pattern of the four tunneling states (A, B, E 1 and E2 symmetries) in the asymmetric CH stretch excited states relative to the ground state. The trends in the patterns relative to tunneling rates and coupling parameters are presented and comparisons are made to the available experimental data. Additionally, a remarkable result that follows from the approximate adiabatic separation of the fast and slow vibrations in methanol is the existence of vibrational conical intersections (CIs) where the surfaces representing the two asymmetric CH stretches meet like the points of two cones touching point-to-point. The CIs occur in the slow coordinates space consisting of the torsion and the COH bend. Finally, the analysis of the high-resolution synchrotron based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum for NO2 in-plane rock, nu 7, band of nitromethane reveals that the rotational energy pattern in the lowest torsional state (m' = 0) of the upper vibrational state is similar relative to the vibrational ground state.

  20. A multilayer neural network model for perception of rotational motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭爱克; 孙海坚; 杨先一

    1997-01-01

    A multilayer neural nerwork model for the perception of rotational motion has been developed usingReichardt’s motion detector array of correlation type, Kohonen’s self-organized feature map and Schuster-Wagner’s oscillating neural network. It is shown that the unsupervised learning could make the neurons on the second layer of the network tend to be self-organized in a form resembling columnar organization of selective directions in area MT of the primate’s visual cortex. The output layer can interpret rotation information and give the directions and velocities of rotational motion. The computer simulation results are in agreement with some psychophysical observations of rotation-al perception. It is demonstrated that the temporal correlation between the oscillating neurons would be powerful for solving the "binding problem" of shear components of rotational motion.

  1. MEMS Rotational Electret Energy Harvester for Human Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, J.; Komori, K.; Hattori, Y.; Suzuki, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the development of MEMS rotational electret energy harvester (EH) for capturing kinetic energy of human motion. Optimal design method of rotational electret EH is proposed by considering both the rate of overlapping-area-change and the parasitic capacitance. A rotational MEMS electret EH with embedded ball bearing has been successfully developed. Up to 3.6 μW has been obtained at 1 rps rotation with an early prototype.

  2. Fourier Amplitudes of the Foundation Motion connected with Soil-Structure Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Hayir, Abdul; Gicev, Vlado

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to understand the phenomena connected with the interaction and to give directions for improvement of the design of the earthquake resistant structures. Fourier amplitudes (amplitudes versus frequencies) of the foundation motion connected with the soil-structure interaction and differential motions of the foundation-structure contact due to the wave passage are considered. We expect that the motion of the flexible foundation will be larger tha...

  3. Action induction by visual perception of rotational motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, Claudia; Kibele, Armin

    2016-09-01

    A basic process in the planning of everyday actions involves the integration of visually perceived movement characteristics. Such processes of information integration often occur automatically. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the visual perception of spatial characteristics of a rotational motion (rotation direction) can induce a spatially compatible action. Four reaction time experiments were conducted to analyze the effect of perceiving task irrelevant rotational motions of simple geometric figures as well as of gymnasts on a horizontal bar while responding to color changes in these objects. The results show that the participants react faster when the directional information of a rotational motion is compatible with the spatial characteristics of an intended action. The degree of complexity of the perceived event does not play a role in this effect. The spatial features of the used biological motion were salient enough to elicit a motion based Simon effect. However, in the cognitive processing of the visual stimulus, the critical criterion is not the direction of rotation, but rather the relative direction of motion (direction of motion above or below the center of rotation). Nevertheless, this conclusion is tainted with reservations since it is only fully supported by the response behavior of female participants. PMID:26259847

  4. Phase lock and rotational motion of a parametric pendulum

    OpenAIRE

    Litak, Grzegorz; Borowiec,Marek; Wiercigroch , Marian

    2006-01-01

    The effect of noise on a rotational mode of a pendulum excited kinematically in vertical direction has been analyzed. We have shown that for a weak noise transitions from oscillations to rotations and vice versa are possible. For a moderate noise level dynamics of the system is governed by a combination of the excitation amplitude and stochastic component. Consequently for stronger noise the rotational solution as an independent sychonized mode has vanished.

  5. Quantal rotation and its coupling to intrinsic motion in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R

    2016-01-01

    Symmetry breaking is an importance concept in nuclear physics and other fields of physics. Self-consistent coupling between the mean-field potential and the single-particle motion is a key ingredient in the unified model of Bohr and Mottelson, which could lead to a deformed nucleus as a consequence of spontaneous breaking of the rotational symmetry. Some remarks on the finite-size quantum effects are given. In finite nuclei, the deformation inevitably introduces the rotation as a symmetry-restoring collective motion (Anderson-Nambu-Goldstone mode), and the rotation affects the intrinsic motion. In order to investigate the interplay between the rotational and intrinsic motions in a variety of collective phenomena, we use the cranking prescription together with the quasiparticle random phase approximation. At low spin, the coupling effect can be seen in the generalized intensity relation. A feasible quantization of the cranking model is presented, which provides a microscopic approach to the higher-order intens...

  6. Precise Measurement of Velocity Dependent Friction in Rotational Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Junaid; Hassan, Hafsa; Shamim, Sohaib; Mahmood, Waqas; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh

    2011-01-01

    Frictional losses are experimentally determined for a uniform circular disc exhibiting rotational motion. The clockwise and anticlockwise rotations of the disc, that result when a hanger tied to a thread is released from a certain height, give rise to vertical oscillations of the hanger as the thread winds and unwinds over a pulley attached to the…

  7. Chaotic motion and collective nuclear rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, T.H.; Verbaarschot, J.J.M.; Weidenmueller, H.A.

    1986-02-20

    The regular and chaotic motion in the classical and quantal versions of a model Hamiltonian with two degrees of freedom are investigated. This model contains a parameter which is identified with a conserved quantum number, the total spin. In particular, transition between states differing in spin by one unit are studied. The transition is strongly collective for regular motion, and collectivity is destroyed with increasing stochasticity of the model. (orig.).

  8. Manipulation of molecular vibrational motions via pure rotational excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2015-01-01

    via the rotation-vibration coupling. Our simulations show that a slow (compared to the vibrational period) rotational excitation leads to a smooth increase in the bond length whereas a fast rotational excitation leads to a non-stationary vibrational motion.......The coupling between different molecular degrees of freedom plays a decisive role in many quantum phenomena, including electron transfer and energy redistribution. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-mechanical time-dependent simulation to explore how a vibrational motion in a molecule can be affected...

  9. Change of amplitude of motion and force of hand for women after a radical mammectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Odinec T.E.

    2009-01-01

    The estimation of dynamometer of brush and amplitude of motion is rotined in a humeral joint for women. The features of remote postprocess period are considered after a radical mammectomy. Close correlation is rotined between amplitude of motion and index of function of the external breathing. The results of goniometer and dynamometer are presented. A hydrokinesitherapy is considered from position of perspective mean of rehabilitation of the functional state of women. The high degree of inter...

  10. Can walking motions improve visually induced rotational self-motion illusions in virtual reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecke, Bernhard E; Freiberg, Jacob B; Grechkin, Timofey Y

    2015-02-04

    Illusions of self-motion (vection) can provide compelling sensations of moving through virtual environments without the need for complex motion simulators or large tracked physical walking spaces. Here we explore the interaction between biomechanical cues (stepping along a rotating circular treadmill) and visual cues (viewing simulated self-rotation) for providing stationary users a compelling sensation of rotational self-motion (circular vection). When tested individually, biomechanical and visual cues were similarly effective in eliciting self-motion illusions. However, in combination they yielded significantly more intense self-motion illusions. These findings provide the first compelling evidence that walking motions can be used to significantly enhance visually induced rotational self-motion perception in virtual environments (and vice versa) without having to provide for physical self-motion or motion platforms. This is noteworthy, as linear treadmills have been found to actually impair visually induced translational self-motion perception (Ash, Palmisano, Apthorp, & Allison, 2013). Given the predominant focus on linear walking interfaces for virtual-reality locomotion, our findings suggest that investigating circular and curvilinear walking interfaces offers a promising direction for future research and development and can help to enhance self-motion illusions, presence and immersion in virtual-reality systems.

  11. Large amplitude motion with a stochastic mean-field approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz Bulent

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the stochastic mean-field approach, an ensemble of initial conditions is considered to incorporate correlations beyond the mean-field. Then each starting point is propagated separately using the Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock equation of motion. This approach provides a rather simple tool to better describe fluctuations compared to the standard TDHF. Several illustrations are presented showing that this theory can be rather effective to treat the dynamics close to a quantum phase transition. Applications to fusion and transfer reactions demonstrate the great improvement in the description of mass dispersion.

  12. Reconstruction of spacecraft rotational motion using a Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, V. A.; Sazonov, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    Quasi-static microaccelerations of four satellites of the Foton series (nos. 11, 12, M-2, M-3) were monitored as follows. First, according to measurements of onboard sensors obtained in a certain time interval, spacecraft rotational motion was reconstructed in this interval. Then, along the found motion, microacceleration at a given onboard point was calculated according to the known formula as a function of time. The motion was reconstructed by the least squares method using the solutions to the equations of satellite rotational motion. The time intervals in which these equations make reconstruction possible were from one to five orbital revolutions. This length is increased with the modulus of the satellite angular velocity. To get an idea on microaccelerations and satellite motion during an entire flight, the motion was reconstructed in several tens of such intervals. This paper proposes a method for motion reconstruction suitable for an interval of arbitrary length. The method is based on the Kalman filter. We preliminary describe a new version of the method for reconstructing uncontrolled satellite rotational motion from magnetic measurements using the least squares method, which is essentially used to construct the Kalman filter. The results of comparison of both methods are presented using the data obtained on a flight of the Foton M-3.

  13. Quantal rotation and its coupling to intrinsic motion in nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.

    2016-07-01

    Symmetry breaking is an important concept in nuclear physics and other fields of physics. Self-consistent coupling between the mean-field potential and the single-particle motion is a key ingredient in the unified model of Bohr and Mottelson, which could lead to a deformed nucleus as a consequence of spontaneous breaking of the rotational symmetry. Some remarks on the finite-size quantum effects are given. In finite nuclei, the deformation inevitably introduces the rotation as a symmetry-restoring collective motion (Anderson-Nambu-Goldstone mode), and the rotation affects the intrinsic motion. In order to investigate the interplay between the rotational and intrinsic motions in a variety of collective phenomena, we use the cranking prescription together with the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). At low spin, the coupling effect can be seen in the generalized intensity relation. A feasible quantization of the cranking model is presented, which provides a microscopic approach to the higher-order intensity relation. At high spin, the semiclassical cranking prescription works well. We discuss properties of collective vibrational motions under rapid rotation and/or large deformation. The superdeformed shell structure plays a key role in emergence of a new soft mode which could lead to instability toward the {K}π ={1}- octupole shape. A wobbling mode of excitation, which is a clear signature of the triaxiality, is discussed in terms of a microscopic point of view. A crucial role played by the quasiparticle alignment is presented.

  14. Precise measurement of velocity dependent friction in rotational motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frictional losses are experimentally determined for a uniform circular disc exhibiting rotational motion. The clockwise and anticlockwise rotations of the disc, that result when a hanger tied to a thread is released from a certain height, give rise to vertical oscillations of the hanger as the thread winds and unwinds over a pulley attached to the disc. It is thus observed how the maximum height is achieved by the hanger decrements in every bounce. From the decrements, the rotational frictional losses are measured. The precision is enhanced by correlating vertical motion with the angular motion. This method leads to a substantial improvement in precision. Furthermore, the frictional torque is shown to be proportional to the angular speed. The experiment has been successfully employed in the undergraduate lab setting.

  15. Photoinduced Ratchet-Like Rotational Motion of Branched Molecular Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingyan; Al-Kaysi, Rabih O; Bardeen, Christopher J

    2016-06-13

    Photomechanical molecular crystals can undergo a variety of light-induced motions, including expansion, bending, twisting, and jumping. The use of more complex crystal shapes may provide ways to turn these motions into useful work. To generate such shapes, pH-driven reprecipitation has been used to grow branched microcrystals of the anthracene derivative 4-fluoroanthracenecarboxylic acid. When these microcrystals are illuminated with light of λ=405 nm, an intermolecular [4+4] photodimerization reaction drives twisting and bending of the individual branches. These deformations drive a rotation of the overall crystal that can be repeated over multiple exposures to light. The magnitude and direction of this rotation vary because of differences in the crystal shape, but a typical branched crystal undergoes a 50° net rotation after 25 consecutive irradiations for 1 s. The ability of these crystals to undergo ratchet-like rotation is attributed to their chiral shape. PMID:27150819

  16. The Double Rotation as Invariant of Motion in Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Zeps, Dainis

    2010-01-01

    Quantum mechanics may loose its weirdness if systematically geometric algebra methods would be used more and more. Crucial aspect is to find laws of quantum mechanics be present in macroworld in form of description of motions rather than objects. To help to reach this goal we suggest to use double rotation as one of base invariants in quantum mechanics.

  17. Change of amplitude of motion and force of hand for women after a radical mammectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odinec T.E.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of dynamometer of brush and amplitude of motion is rotined in a humeral joint for women. The features of remote postprocess period are considered after a radical mammectomy. Close correlation is rotined between amplitude of motion and index of function of the external breathing. The results of goniometer and dynamometer are presented. A hydrokinesitherapy is considered from position of perspective mean of rehabilitation of the functional state of women. The high degree of intercommunication is rotined between taking and bending in a humeral joint the vital capacity of lights.

  18. New portable sensor system for rotational seismic motion measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new mechanical sensor system for recording the rotation of ground velocity has been constructed. It is based on measurements of differential motions between paired sensors mounted along the perimeter of a rigid (undeformable) disk. The elementary sensors creating the pairs are sensitive low-frequency geophones currently used in seismic exploration to record translational motions. The main features of the new rotational seismic sensor system are flat characteristics in the wide frequency range from 1 to 200 Hz and sensitivity limit of the order of 10-8 rad/s. Notable advantages are small dimensions, portability, easy installation and operation in the field, and the possibility of calibrating the geophones in situ simultaneously with the measurement. An important feature of the instrument is that it provides records of translational seismic motions together with rotations, which allows many important seismological applications. We have used the new sensor system to record the vertical rotation velocity due to a small earthquake of ML=2.2, which occurred within the earthquake swarm in Western Bohemia in autumn 2008. We found good agreement of the rotation record with the transverse acceleration as predicted by theory. This measurement demonstrates that this device has a much wider application than just to prospecting measurements, for which it was originally designed.

  19. Student understanding of rotational and rolling motion concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Rimoldini, L G; Rimoldini, Lorenzo G.; Singh, Chandralekha

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the common difficulties that students have with concepts related to rotational and rolling motion covered in the introductory physics courses. We compared the performance of calculus- and algebra-based introductory physics students with physics juniors who had learned rotational and rolling motion concepts in an intermediate level mechanics course. Interviews were conducted with six physics juniors and ten introductory students using demonstration-based tasks. We also administered free-response and multiple-choice questions to a large number of students enrolled in introductory physics courses, and interviewed six additional introductory students on the test questions (during the test design phase). All students showed similar difficulties regardless of their background, and higher mathematical sophistication did not seem to help acquire a deeper understanding. We found that some difficulties were due to related difficulties with linear motion, while others were tied specifically to the more i...

  20. Kinematics of Milky Way Satellites: Mass Estimates, Rotation Limits, and Proper Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis E. Strigari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past several years kinematic data sets from Milky Way satellite galaxies have greatly improved, furthering the evidence that these systems are the most dark matter dominated objects known. This paper discusses a maximum likelihood formalism that extracts important quantities from these kinematic data sets, including the amplitude of a rotational signal, proper motions, and the mass distributions. Using a simple model for galaxy rotation it is shown that the expected error on the amplitude of a rotational signal is ∼0.5 km s−1 with ∼103 stars from either classical or ultra-faint satellites. As an example Sculptor is analyzed for the presence of a rotational signal; no significant detection of rotation is found, with a 90% c.l. upper limit of ∼2 km s−1. A criterion for model selection is presented that determines the parameters required to describe the dark matter halo density profiles and the stellar velocity anisotropy. Applied to four data sets with a wide range of velocities, models with variable velocity anisotropy are preferred relative to those with constant velocity anisotropy, and that central dark matter profiles both less cuspy and more cuspy than Lambda-Cold Dark Matter-based fits are equally acceptable.

  1. Origin of inertia in large-amplitude collective motion in finite Fermi systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudhir R Jain

    2012-02-01

    We argue that mass parameters appearing in the treatment of large-amplitude collective motion, be it fission or heavy-ion reactions, originate as a consequence of their relation with Lyapunov exponents coming from the classical dynamics, and, fractal dimension associated with diffusive modes coming from hydrodynamic description.

  2. Retrograde diurnal motion of the instantaneous rotation axis observed by a large ring laser gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, W.

    2016-07-01

    Ring laser gyroscope technique directly senses the Earth's instantaneous rotation pole (IRP), whose polar motion contains strong retrograde diurnal components induced by external torques due to the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun. The first direct measurement of this retrograde diurnal motion with three large ring lasers was reported by Schreiber et al. (J Geophys Res 109(B18):B06405, 2004). Since then many technical improvements led to a significant increase in precision and stability of ring laser gyroscopes; however, precise determination of amplitude and phase at main partial waves has not been given in the literature. In this paper, I will report on determination of the retrograde diurnal motion of the IRP at main partial waves (Oo_1, J_1, K_1, M_1, O_1, Q_1 ) by the ring laser "G", located in Wettzell, Germany, which is the most stable one amongst the currently running large ring laser gyroscopes.

  3. Dynamic Interplay of Coherent Rotations and Domain Wall Motion in Faraday Rotators based on Ferromagnetic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzarella, Anthony; Wu, Dong; Shinn, Mannix

    Under small, externally-applied magnetic fields, the Faraday rotation in magneto-optic material containing ferromagnetic domains is driven primarily by two principal mechanisms: domain wall motion and coherent domain rotations. Domain wall motion yields a larger Faraday responsivity but is limited by magnetically induced optical incoherence and by damping effects. Coherent domain rotation yields smaller Faraday rotations, but exhibits a flatter and broader frequency response. The two mechanisms occur along orthogonal principal axes and may be probed independently. However, when probed along an oblique angle to the principal axes, the relationship between the Faraday rotation and the external field changes from linear to tensorial. Although this may lead to more complicated phenomena (e.g. a sensitivity axis that depends on RF frequency), the interplay of domain rotation and domain wall motion can be exploited to improve responsivity or bandwidth. The detailed experimental data can be understood in terms of a quantitative model for the magnitude and direction of the responsivity vector. Applications to magnetic field sensors based on arrayed bismuth doped iron garnet films will be emphasized in this presentation.

  4. Rigid rotators. [deriving the time-independent energy states associated with rotational motions of the molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The two-particle, steady-state Schroedinger equation is transformed to center of mass and internuclear distance vector coordinates, leading to the free particle wave equation for the kinetic energy motion of the molecule and a decoupled wave equation for a single particle of reduced mass moving in a spherical potential field. The latter describes the vibrational and rotational energy modes of the diatomic molecule. For fixed internuclear distance, this becomes the equation of rigid rotator motion. The classical partition function for the rotator is derived and compared with the quantum expression. Molecular symmetry effects are developed from the generalized Pauli principle that the steady-state wave function of any system of fundamental particles must be antisymmetric. Nuclear spin and spin quantum functions are introduced and ortho- and para-states of rotators, along with their degeneracies, are defined. Effects of nuclear spin on entropy are deduced. Next, rigid polyatomic rotators are considered and the partition function for this case is derived. The patterns of rotational energy levels for nonlinear molecules are discussed for the spherical symmetric top, for the prolate symmetric top, for the oblate symmetric top, and for the asymmetric top. Finally, the equilibrium energy and specific heat of rigid rotators are derived.

  5. Diffusion of hydrocarbons in confined media: Translational and rotational motion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Y Bhide; A V Anil Kumar; S Yashonath

    2001-10-01

    Diffusion of monatomic guest species within confined media has been understood to a good degree due to investigations carried out during the past decade and a half. Most guest species that are of industrial relevance are actually polyatomics such as, for example, hydrocarbons in zeolites. We attempt to investigate the influence of non-spherical nature of guest species on diffusion. Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of motion of methane in NaCaA and NaY, benzene in NaY and one-dimensional channels AlPO4-5, VPI-5 and carbon nanotube indicate interesting insights into the influence of the host on rotational degrees of freedom and rientational properties. It is shown that benzene in one-dimensional channels where the levitation parameter is near unity exhibits translational motion opposite to what is expected on the basis of molecular anisotropy. Rotational motion of benzene also possesses rotational diffusivities around 6 and 2 axes opposite to what is expected on the basis of molecular geometry. Methane shows orientational preference for 2 + 2 or 1 + 3 depending on the magnitude of the levitation parameter.

  6. Quantum theory of dynamical collective subspace for large-amplitude collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By placing emphasis on conceptual correspondence to the ''classical'' theory which has been developed within the framework of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory, a full quantum theory appropriate for describing large-amplitude collective motion is proposed. A central problem of the quantum theory is how to determine an optimal representation called a dynamical representation; the representation is specific for the collective subspace where the large-amplitude collective motion is replicated as satisfactorily as possible. As an extension of the classical theory where the concept of an approximate integral surface plays an important role, the dynamical representation is properly characterized by introducing a concept of an approximate invariant subspace of the Hamiltonian. (author)

  7. Effects of Rotational Motion in Robotic Needle Insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezanpour, H.; Yousefi, H.; Rezaei, M.; Rostami, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Robotic needle insertion in biological tissues has been known as one the most applicable procedures in sampling, robotic injection and different medical therapies and operations. Objective In this paper, we would like to investigate the effects of angular velocity in soft tissue insertion procedure by considering force-displacement diagram. Non-homogenous camel liver can be exploited as a tissue sample under standard compression test with Zwick/Roell device employing 1-D axial load-cell. Methods Effects of rotational motion were studied by running needle insertion experiments in 5, 50 and 200 mm/min in two types of with or without rotational velocity of 50, 150 and 300 rpm. On further steps with deeper penetrations, friction force of the insertion procedure in needle shaft was acquired by a definite thickness of the tissue. Results Designed mechanism of fixture for providing different frequencies of rotational motion is available in this work. Results for comparison of different force graphs were also provided. Conclusion Derived force-displacement graphs showed a significant difference between two procedures; however, tissue bleeding and disorganized micro-structure would be among unavoidable results. PMID:26688800

  8. Local computation of angular velocity in rotational visual motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza, José F; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2003-07-01

    Retinal images evolve continuously over time owing to self-motions and to movements in the world. Such an evolving image, also known as optic flow, if arising from natural scenes can be locally decomposed in a Bayesian manner into several elementary components, including translation, expansion, and rotation. To take advantage of this decomposition, the brain has neurons tuned to these types of motions. However, these neurons typically have large receptive fields, often spanning tens of degrees of visual angle. Can neurons such as these compute elementary optic-flow components sufficiently locally to achieve a reasonable decomposition? We show that human discrimination of angular velocity is local. Local discrimination of angular velocity requires an accurate estimation of the center of rotation within the optic-flow field. Inaccuracies in estimating the center of rotation result in a predictable systematic error when one is estimating local angular velocity. Our results show that humans make the predicted errors. We discuss how the brain might estimate the elementary components of the optic flow locally by using large receptive fields. PMID:12868642

  9. Stabilization of rotational motion with application to spacecraft attitude control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a control scheme for stabilization of a hamiltonian system. The method generalizes the results available in the literature on motion control in the Euclidean space to an arbitrary differrential manifol equipped with a metric. This modification is essencial...... for global stabilization of a rotary motion. Along with a model of the system formulated in the Hamilton's canonical from the algorithm uses information about a required potential energy and a dissipation term. The control action is the sum of the gradient of the potential energy and the dissipation force....... It is shown that this control law makes the system uniformly asymptotically stable to the desired reference point. The concepet is very straightforward in the Euclidean space however a global rotation control cannot be tackled.An additional modification is made to address a system which flow lies...

  10. Stabilization of rotational motion with application to spacecraft attitude control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a control scheme for stabilization of a hamiltonian system. The method generalizes the results available in the literature on motion control in the Euclidean space to an arbitrary differrential manifol equipped with a metric. This modification is essencial...... for global stabilization of a rotary motion. Along with a model of the system formulated in the Hamilton's canonical from the algorithm uses information about a required potential energy and a dissipation term. The control action is the sum of the gradient of the potential energy and the dissipation force....... It is shown that this control law makes the system uniformly asymptotically stable to the desired reference point. The concepet is very straightforward in the Euclidean space however a global rotation control cannot be tackled.An additional modification is made to address a system which flow lies...

  11. Brownian Motion and Harmonic Functions on Rotationally Symmetric Manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    March, Peter

    1986-01-01

    We consider Brownian motion $X$ on a rotationally symmetric manifold $M_g = (\\mathbb{R}^n, ds^2), ds^2 = dr^2 + g(r)^2 d\\theta^2$. An integral test is presented which gives a necessary and sufficient condition for the nontriviality of the invariant $\\sigma$-field of $X$, hence for the existence of nonconstant bounded harmonic functions on $M_g$. Conditions on the sectional curvatures are given which imply the convergence or the divergence of the test integral.

  12. Vibrational motions in rotating nuclei studied by Coulomb excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi R. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1998-03-01

    As is well-known Coulomb excitation is an excellent tool to study the nuclear collective motions. Especially the vibrational excitations in rotating nuclei, which are rather difficult to access by usual heavy-ion fusion reactions, can be investigated in detail. Combined with the famous 8{pi}-Spectrometer, which was one of the best {gamma}-ray detector and had discovered some of superdeformed bands, such Coulomb excitation experiments had been carried out at Chalk River laboratory just before it`s shutdown of physics division. In this meeting some of the experimental data are presented and compared with the results of theoretical investigations. (author)

  13. Experimental Motion Analysis of Radially Rotating Beams Using High-Speed Camera and Motion Analyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Low, K. H.; Michael W.S. Lau; Low, K.K.

    1996-01-01

    Although strain gauges can be attached to a system for vibration analysis, wires connected to the strain gauges may disturb the system and affect the accuracy of the strain measurement. As an alternative, this work presents the use of a high-speed camera combined with a motion analyzer to study the motion of rotating flexible beams. One end of the beam is rigidly connected to a motor, while the other end is free. White stickers placed on selected points on a given beam are the reference point...

  14. Experimental Motion Analysis of Radially Rotating Beams Using High-Speed Camera and Motion Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.H. Low

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Although strain gauges can be attached to a system for vibration analysis, wires connected to the strain gauges may disturb the system and affect the accuracy of the strain measurement. As an alternative, this work presents the use of a high-speed camera combined with a motion analyzer to study the motion of rotating flexible beams. One end of the beam is rigidly connected to a motor, while the other end is free. White stickers placed on selected points on a given beam are the reference points in a digitization process. The modes of the vibrating beams can be filmed and analyzed. The vibration parameters, such as deflection and frequency, can be obtained by using a film motion analyzer. The results show that the beam does not behave in a clamped-free or a pinned-free fashion, but instead occurs at an intermediate boundary between these two classical conditions.

  15. Thrombelastography and rotational thromboelastometry early amplitudes in 182 trauma patients with clinical suspicion of severe injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anna Sina P; Meyer, Martin A S; Sørensen, Anne Marie;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Viscoelastic hemostatic assays may provide means for earlier detection of trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC). METHODS: This is a prospective observational study of 182 trauma patients admitted to a Level 1 trauma center. Clinical data, thrombelastography (TEG), and rotational thromboel......BACKGROUND: Viscoelastic hemostatic assays may provide means for earlier detection of trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC). METHODS: This is a prospective observational study of 182 trauma patients admitted to a Level 1 trauma center. Clinical data, thrombelastography (TEG), and rotational...... ratio greater than 1.2 (TIC patients) as well as transfusion needs (no red blood cells [RBCs], 1-9 RBCs, and ≥10 RBC in 6 hours). Correlations were analyzed by Spearman's correlation. RESULTS: TIC patients had lower amplitudes than non-TIC patients in ROTEM/TEG as follows: EXTEM, INTEM, and FIBTEM: A5.......001) (CK, 16 [15-17] vs. 27 [25-30]; rTEG, 11 [11-11] vs. 18 [17-20]; EXTEM, 11 [11-11] vs. 29 [26-31]; and INTEM 13[12-13] vs. 25 [22-29]). CONCLUSION: Early amplitudes were lower in TIC patients, had significant correlations with MA/MCF, and differentiated between nontransfused and patients receiving one...

  16. Molecular quantum rotors in gyroscopic motion with a nonspreading rotational wavepacket

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Sang Jae

    2015-01-01

    We provide a way of generating and observing molecular quantum gyroscopic motion that resembles gyroscopic motion of classical rotors. After producing a nonspreading rotational wavepacket called a cogwheel state, one can generate a gyroscopic precession motion by applying an external magnetic field interacting through a rotational magnetic dipole moment. The quantum rotors, realized with linear nonparamagnetic ionic molecules trapped in an ion trap, can keep their gyroscopic motion for a long time in a collectively synchronized fashion. A Coulomb-explosion technique is suggested to observe the gyroscopic motion. Despite limited molecular species, the observation of the gyroscopic motion can be adopted as a method to measure rotational g factors of molecules.

  17. Towards a practical approach for self-consistent large amplitude collective motion

    CERN Document Server

    Almehed, D; Almehed, Daniel; Walet, Niels R.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the use of an operatorial basis in a self-consistent theory of large amplitude collective motion. For the example of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model, which has been studied previously at equilibrium, we show that a small set of carefully chosen state-dependent basis operators is sufficient to approximate the exact solution of the problem accuratly. This approximation is used to study the interplay of quadrupole and pairing degrees of freedom along the collective path for realistic examples of nuclei. We show how this leads to a viable calculational scheme for studying nuclear structure, and discuss the surprising role of pairing collapse.

  18. VIBRATION TECHNOLOGY WITH A LARGE AMPLITUDE OF PARTICLE MOTION OF FEED COMPONENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchenko A. Y.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article has revealed the contradiction between the way of technological impact and the means of implementation of technological transport in existing processes of feed preparation. There has been shown the possibility of eliminating this contradiction by menus of completely new technological equipment on the basis of relative screw drums and the opportunity to improve their productivity. There are no exciters in the offered design of vibrating machines. There is no need for them because the move mend of mass loading particles is provided by the original constructions of relative screw drums committing a rotary motion around its own axis. For implementing of feed preparation process the geometry of the relative screw drum and its dynamism must be individual: the shape, spatial orientation, the impact of forces providing feed components particles simultaneously with rotational-translational and vibrational motion. In the result, the continuously running through the inner cavity of the relative screw drum particles of feed components perform rotational-translational movements with super imposed vibrations inside this drum, due to this process the particles of feed components are mixed intensively

  19. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of large amplitude motions in molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bee, M. [Univ. J. Fourier - Grenoble 1, Lab. de Spectrometrie Physique, Saint-Martin d`Heres (France)

    1996-12-31

    This lecture aims at giving some illustrations of the use of Incoherent Quasielastic Neutron Scattering in the investigation of motions of atoms or molecules in phases with dynamical disorder. The general incoherent scattering function is first recalled. Then the Elastic Incoherent Structure Factor is introduced. It is shown how its determination permits to deduce a particular dynamical model. Long-range translational diffusion is illustrated by some experiments carried out with liquids or with different chemical species intercalated in porous media. Examples of rotational motions are provided by solid phases where an orientational disorder of the molecules exists. The jump model is the most commonly used and yields simple scattering laws which can be easily handled. Highly disordered crystals require a description in terms of the isotropic rotational diffusion model. Many of the present studies are concerned with rather complicated systems. Considerable help is obtained either by using selectively deuterated samples or by carrying out measurements with semi-oriented samples. (author) 5 figs., 14 refs.

  20. Rare transition event with self-consistent theory of large-amplitude collective motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsumura, Kyosuke, E-mail: kyosuke.tsumura@fujifilm.com; Maeda, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-15

    A numerical simulation method, based on Dang et al.’s self-consistent theory of large-amplitude collective motion, for rare transition events is presented. The method provides a one-dimensional pathway without knowledge of the final configuration, which includes a dynamical effect caused by not only a potential but also kinetic term. Although it is difficult to apply the molecular dynamics simulation to a narrow-gate potential, the method presented is applicable to the case. A toy model with a high-energy barrier and/or the narrow gate shows that while the Dang et al. treatment is unstable for a changing of model parameters, our method stable for it.

  1. Quadrupole shape dynamics in view from a theory of large amplitude collective motion

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuo, M; Sato, K; Matsuyanagi, K; Nakatsukasa, T; Yoshida, K

    2014-01-01

    Low-lying quadrupole shape dynamics is a typical manifestation of large amplitude collective motion in finite nuclei. To describe the dynamics on a microscopic foundation, we have formulated a consistent scheme in which the Bohr collective Hamiltonian for the five dimensional quadrupole shape variables is derived on the basis of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. It enables us to incorporates the Thouless-Valatin effect on the shape inertial functions, which has been neglected in previous microscopic Bohr Hamiltonian approaches. Quantitative successes are illustrated for the low-lying spectra in $^{68}$Se, $^{30-34}$Mg and $^{58-64}$Cr, which display shape-coexistence, -mixing and -transitional behaviors.

  2. Communication: Creation of molecular vibrational motions via the rotation-vibration coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark, Building 207, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); School of Engineering and Information Technology, University of New South Wales at the Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Henriksen, Niels E., E-mail: neh@kemi.dtu.dk [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark, Building 207, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-06-14

    Building on recent advances in the rotational excitation of molecules, we show how the effect of rotation-vibration coupling can be switched on in a controlled manner and how this coupling unfolds in real time after a pure rotational excitation. We present the first examination of the vibrational motions which can be induced via the rotation-vibration coupling after a pulsed rotational excitation. A time-dependent quantum wave packet calculation for the HF molecule shows how a slow (compared to the vibrational period) rotational excitation leads to a smooth increase in the average bond length whereas a fast rotational excitation leads to a non-stationary vibrational motion. As a result, under field-free postpulse conditions, either a stretched stationary bond or a vibrating bond can be created due to the coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom. The latter corresponds to a laser-induced breakdown of the adiabatic approximation for rotation-vibration coupling.

  3. Stability of steady rotational water-waves of finite amplitude on arbitrary shear currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seez, William; Abid, Malek; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A versatile solver for the two-dimensional Euler equations with an unknown free-surface has been developed. This code offers the possibility to calculate two-dimensional, steady rotational water-waves of finite amplitude on an arbitrary shear current. Written in PYTHON the code incorporates both pseudo-spectral and finite-difference methods in the discretisation of the equations and thus allows the user to capture waves with large steepnesses. As such it has been possible to establish that, in a counter-flowing situation, the existence of wave solutions is not guaranteed and depends on a pair of parameters representing mass flux and vorticity. This result was predicted, for linear solutions, by Constantin. Furthermore, experimental comparisons, both with and without vorticity, have proven the precision of this code. Finally, waves propagating on top of highly realistic shear currents (exponential profiles under the surface) have been calculated following current profiles such as those used by Nwogu. In addition, a stability analysis routine has been developed to study the stability regimes of base waves calculated with the two-dimensional code. This linear stability analysis is based on three dimensional perturbations of the steady situation which lead to a generalised eigenvalue problem. Common instabilities of the first and second class have been detected, while a third class of wave-instability appears due to the presence of strong vorticity. {1} Adrian Constantin and Walter Strauss. {Exact steady periodic water waves with vorticity}. Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics, 57(4):481-527, April 2004. Okey G. Nwogu. {Interaction of finite-amplitude waves with vertically sheared current fields}. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 627:179, May 2009.

  4. The Effect of Postoperative Passive Motion on Rotator Cuff Healing in a Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Peltz, Cathryn D.; Dourte, LeAnn M.; Kuntz, Andrew F.; Sarver, Joseph J.; Kim, Soung-Yon; Williams, Gerald R.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Surgical repairs of torn rotator cuff tendons frequently fail. Immobilization has been shown to improve tissue mechanical properties in an animal model of rotator cuff repair, and passive motion has been shown to improve joint mechanics in animal models of flexor tendon repair. Our objective was to determine if daily passive motion would improve joint mechanics in comparison with continuous immobilization in a rat rotator cuff repair model. We hypothesized that daily passive motio...

  5. Motion Controllers for Learners to Manipulate and Interact with 3D Objects for Mental Rotation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shih-Ching; Wang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Lin, Po-Han; Chen, Gwo-Dong; Rizzo, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Mental rotation is an important spatial processing ability and an important element in intelligence tests. However, the majority of past attempts at training mental rotation have used paper-and-pencil tests or digital images. This study proposes an innovative mental rotation training approach using magnetic motion controllers to allow learners to…

  6. Gender Differences in Modifying Lumbopelvic Motion during Hip Medial Rotation in People with Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon L. Hoffman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reducing increased or early lumbopelvic motion during trunk or limb movements may be an important component of low back pain treatment. The ability to reduce lumbopelvic motion may be influenced by gender. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of gender on the ability of people with low back pain to reduce lumbopelvic motion during hip medial rotation following physical therapy treatment. Lumbopelvic rotation and hip rotation before the start of lumbopelvic rotation were assessed pre- and posttreatment for 16 females and 15 males. Both men and women decreased lumbopelvic rotation and completed more hip rotation before the start of lumbopelvic rotation post-treatment compared to pre-treatment. Men demonstrated greater lumbopelvic rotation and completed less hip rotation before the start of lumbopelvic rotation than women both pre- and post-treatment. Both men and women reduced lumbopelvic motion relative to their starting values, but, overall, men still demonstrated greater and earlier lumbopelvic motion. These results may have important implications for understanding differences in the evaluation and treatment of men and women with low back pain.

  7. Communication: creation of molecular vibrational motions via the rotation-vibration coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2015-01-01

    motions which can be induced via the rotation-vibration coupling after a pulsed rotational excitation. A time-dependent quantum wave packet calculation for the HF molecule shows how a slow (compared to the vibrational period) rotational excitation leads to a smooth increase in the average bond length......Building on recent advances in the rotational excitation of molecules, we show how the effect of rotation-vibration coupling can be switched on in a controlled manner and how this coupling unfolds in real time after a pure rotational excitation. We present the first examination of the vibrational...... whereas a fast rotational excitation leads to a non-stationary vibrational motion. As a result, under field-free postpulse conditions, either a stretched stationary bond or a vibrating bond can be created due to the coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom. The latter corresponds...

  8. On the nonuniqueness of free motion of the fundamental relativistic rotator

    CERN Document Server

    Bratek, Łukasz

    2009-01-01

    Consider a class of relativistic rotators described by position and a single null direction. Such a rotator is called fundamental if both its Casimir invariants are intrinsic dimensional parameters independent of arbitrary constants of motion. As shown by Staruszkiewicz, only one rotator with this property exists (its partner with similar property can be excluded on physical grounds). We obtain a general solution to equations of free motion of the fundamental relativistic rotator in a covariant manner. Surprisingly, this motion is not entirely determined by initial conditions but depends on one arbitrary function of time, which specifies rotation of the null direction in the centre of momentum frame. This arbitrariness is in manifest contradiction with classical determinism. In this sense the isolated fundamental relativistic rotator is pathological as a dynamical system. To understand why this is so, we study the necessary condition for the uniqueness of the related Cauchy problem. It turns out that the fund...

  9. Reducing dynamic disorder in small-molecule organic semiconductors by suppressing large-amplitude thermal motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illig, Steffen; Eggeman, Alexander S.; Troisi, Alessandro; Jiang, Lang; Warwick, Chris; Nikolka, Mark; Schweicher, Guillaume; Yeates, Stephen G.; Henri Geerts, Yves; Anthony, John E.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-02-01

    Thermal vibrations and the dynamic disorder they create can detrimentally affect the transport properties of van der Waals bonded molecular semiconductors. The low-energy nature of these vibrations makes it difficult to access them experimentally, which is why we still lack clear molecular design rules to control and reduce dynamic disorder. In this study we discuss the promising organic semiconductors rubrene, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothio-phene and 2,9-di-decyl-dinaphtho-[2,3-b:20,30-f]-thieno-[3,2-b]-thiophene in terms of an exceptionally low degree of dynamic disorder. In particular, we analyse diffuse scattering in transmission electron microscopy, to show that small molecules that have their side chains attached along the long axis of their conjugated core are better encapsulated in their crystal structure, which helps reduce large-amplitude thermal motions. Our work provides a general strategy for the design of new classes of very high mobility organic semiconductors with a low degree of dynamic disorder.

  10. Governing equations and numerical solutions of tension leg platform with finite amplitude motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Xiao-hui; SHEN Xiao-peng; WU Ying-xiang

    2007-01-01

    It is demonstrated that when tension leg platform (TLP) moves with finite amplitude in waves, the inertia force, the drag force and the buoyancy acting on the platform are nonlinear functions of the response of TLP. The tensions of the tethers are also nonlinear functions of the displacement of TLP. Then the displacement, the velocity and the acceleration of TLP should be taken into account when loads are calculated. In addition, equations of motions should be set up on the instantaneous position. A theoretical model for analyzing the nonlinear behavior of a TLP with finite displacement is developed, in which multifold nonlinearities are taken into account, i.e., finite displacement, coupling of the six degrees of freedom, instantaneous position, instantaneous wet surface, free surface effects and viscous drag force. Based on the theoretical model, the comprehensive nonlinear differential equations are deduced. Then the nonlinear dynamic analysis of ISSC TLP in regular waves is performed in the time domain. The degenerative linear solution of the proposed nonlinear model is verified with existing published one.Furthermore, numerical results are presented, which illustrate that nonlinearities exert a significant influence on the dynamic responses of the TLP.

  11. Semiclassical vibration-rotation transition probabilities for motion in molecular state averaged potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Collision-induced vibration-rotation transition probabilities are calculated from a semiclassical three-dimensional model, in which the collision trajectory is determined by the classical motion in the interaction potential that is averaged over the molecular rotational state, and compared with those for which the motion is governed by a spherically averaged potential. For molecules that are in highly excited rotational states, thus dominating the vibrational relaxation rate at high temperature, it is found that the transition probability for rotational state averaging is smaller than that for spherical averaging. For typical collisions, the transition cross section is decreased by a factor of about 1.5 to 2.

  12. Forming rotated SAR images by real-time motion compensation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-12-01

    Proper waveform parameter selection allows collecting Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) phase history data on a rotated grid in the Fourier Space of the scene being imaged. Subsequent image formation preserves the rotated geometry to allow SAR images to be formed at arbitrary rotation angles without the use of computationally expensive interpolation or resampling operations. This should be useful where control of image orientation is desired such as generating squinted stripmaps and VideoSAR applications, among others.

  13. On the motion of rotating bodies in field gravity theory and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshev, Yu V

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of Lagrangian formalism of relativistic field theory post-Newtonian equations of motion for a rotating body are derived in the frame of Feynman's quantum field gravity theory (FGT) and compared with corresponding geodesic equations in general relativity (GR). It is shown that in FGT the trajectory of a rotating test body does not depend on a choice of a coordinate system. The equation of translational motion of a gyroscope is applied to description of laboratory experiments with free falling rotating bodies and rotating bodies on a balance scale. Post-Newtonian relativistic effect of periodical modulation of the orbital motion of a rotating body is discussed for the case of planets of the solar system and for binary pulsars PSR B1913+16 and PSR B1259-63. In the case of binary pulsars with known spin orientations this effect gives a possibility to measure radiuses of neutron stars.

  14. Low-amplitude rotational modulation rather than pulsations in the CoRoT B-type supergiant HD 46769

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, C.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Catala, C.; Neiner, C.; Briquet, M.; Castro, N.; Schmid, V. S.; Scardia, M.; Rainer, M.; Poretti, E.; Pápics, P. I.; Degroote, P.; Bloemen, S.; Østensen, R. H.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Baudin, F.; Michel, E.; Samadi, R.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We aim to detect and interpret photometric and spectroscopic variability of the bright CoRoT B-type supergiant target HD 46769 (V = 5.79). We also attempt to detect a magnetic field in the target. Methods: We analyse a 23-day oversampled CoRoT light curve after detrending and spectroscopic follow-up data using standard Fourier analysis and phase dispersion minimization methods. We determine the fundamental parameters of the star, as well as its abundances from the most prominent spectral lines. We perform a Monte Carlo analysis of spectropolarimetric data to obtain an upper limit of the polar magnetic field, assuming a dipole field. Results: In the CoRoT data, we detect a dominant period of 4.84 d with an amplitude of 87 ppm and some of its (sub-)multiples. Given the shape of the phase-folded light curve and the absence of binary motion, we interpret the dominant variability in terms of rotational modulation, with a rotation period of 9.69 d. Subtraction of the rotational modulation signal does not reveal any sign of pulsations. Our results are consistent with the absence of variability in the Hipparcos light curve. The spectroscopy leads to a projected rotational velocity of 72 ± 2 km s-1 and does not reveal periodic variability or the need to invoke macroturbulent line broadening. No signature of a magnetic field is detected in our data. A field stronger than ~500 G at the poles can be excluded, unless the possible non-detected field were more complex than dipolar. Conclusions: The absence of pulsations and macroturbulence of this evolved B-type supergiant is placed into the context of instability computations and of observed variability of evolved B-type stars. Based on CoRoT space-based photometric data; the CoRoT space mission was developed and operated by the French space agency CNES, with the participation of ESA's RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain. Based on observations collected at La Silla Observatory, ESO

  15. Solar Magnetized Tornadoes: Rotational Motion in a Tornado-like Prominence

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Yang; Gömöry, Peter; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Wang, Tongjiang; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Gan, Weiqun; Li, Youping

    2013-01-01

    Su et al. 2012 proposed a new explanation for filament formation and eruption, where filament barbs are rotating magnetic structures driven by underlying vortices on the surface. Such structures have been noticed as tornado-like prominences when they appear above the limb. They may play a key role as the source of plasma and twist in filaments. However, no observations have successfully distinguished rotational motion of the magnetic structures in tornado-like prominences from other motions s...

  16. MEASUREMENT OF ANGULAR VIBRATION AMPLITUDE BY ACTIVELY BLURRED IMAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Baiqing; WANG Shigang; LIU Chong; LI Qian

    2007-01-01

    A novel motion-blur-based method for measuring the angular amplitude of a high-frequency rotational vibration is schemed. The proposed approach combines the active vision concept and the mechanism of motion-from-blur, generates motion blur on the image plane actively by extending exposure time, and utilizes the motion blur information in polar images to estimate the angular amplitude of a high-frequency rotational vibration. This method obtains the analytical results of the angular vibration amplitude from the geometric moments of a motion blurred polar image and an unblurred image for reference. Experimental results are provided to validate the presented scheme.

  17. Simulation-based analysis of the micropropulsion with rotating corkscrew motion of the flagella

    OpenAIRE

    Koz, Mustafa; Yeşilyurt, Serhat; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms such as ecoli bacterium can propel themselves by means of a corkscrew motion in flow regimes where the Reynolds number is much smaller than one and inertial propulsion methods are ineffective. Micropropulsion with the rotating corkscrew motion of flagella can prove useful as a navigation mechanism for microswimming robots in medical applications. In this work, we present the motion of a microswimmer that consists of an ellipsoid of length two-microns and diameter one micron wit...

  18. Motion sickness severity and physiological correlates during repeated exposures to a rotating optokinetic drum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Senqi; Grant, Wanda F.; Stern, Robert M.; Koch, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fifty-two subjects were exposed to a rotating optokinetic drum. Ten of these subjects who became motion sick during the first session completed two additional sessions. Subjects' symptoms of motion sickness, perception of self-motion, electrogastrograms (EGGs), heart rate, mean successive differences of R-R intervals (RRI), and skin conductance were recorded for each session. The results from the first session indicated that the development of motion sickness was accompanied by increased EGG 4-9 cpm activity (gastric tachyarrhythmia), decreased mean succesive differences of RRI, increased skin conductance levels, and increased self-motion perception. The results from the subjects who had three repeated sessions showed that 4-9 cpm EGG activity, skin conductance levels, perception of self-motion, and symptoms of motion sickness all increased significantly during the drum rotation period of the first session, but increased significantly less during the following sessions. Mean successive differences of RRI decreased significantly during the drum rotation period for the first session, but decreased significantly less during the following sessions. Results show that the development of motion sickness is accompanied by an increase in gastric tachyarrhythmia, and an increase in sympathetic activity and a decrease in parasympathetic activity, and that adaptation to motion sickness is accompanied by the recovery of autonomic nervous system balance.

  19. Measuring the translational and rotational velocity of particles in helical motion using structured light

    CERN Document Server

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Belmonte, Aniceto; Torres, Juan P

    2014-01-01

    We measure the rotational and translational velocity components of particles moving in helical motion using the frequency shift they induced to the structured light beam illuminating them. Under Laguerre-Gaussian mode illumination, a particle with a helical motion reflects light that acquires an additional frequency shift proportional to the angular velocity of rotation in the transverse plane, on top of the usual frequency shift due to the longitudinal motion. We determined both the translational and rotational velocities of the particles by switching between two modes: by illuminating with a Gaussian beam, we can isolate the longitudinal frequency shift; and by using a Laguerre-Gaussian mode, the frequency shift due to the rotation can be determined. Our technique can be used to characterize the motility of microorganisms with a full three-dimensional movement.

  20. The rotational motion of an earth orbiting gyroscope according to the Einstein theory of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoots, F. R.; Fitzpatrick, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    The classical Poisson equations of rotational motion are used to study the attitude motions of an earth orbiting, rapidly spinning gyroscope perturbed by the effects of general relativity (Einstein theory). The center of mass of the gyroscope is assumed to move about a rotating oblate earth in an evolving elliptic orbit which includes all first-order oblateness effects produced by the earth. A method of averaging is used to obtain a transformation of variables, for the nonresonance case, which significantly simplifies the Poisson differential equations of motion of the gyroscope. Long-term solutions are obtained by an exact analytical integration of the simplified transformed equations. These solutions may be used to predict both the orientation of the gyroscope and the motion of its rotational angular momentum vector as viewed from its center of mass. The results are valid for all eccentricities and all inclinations not near the critical inclination.

  1. To development of analytical theory of rotational motion of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.; Navarro, J. F.

    2009-04-01

    Resume. In the work the analytical theory of forced librations of the Moon considered as a celestial body with a liquid core and rigid non-spherical mantle is developed. For the basic variables: Andoyer, Poincare and Eulerian angles, and also for various dynamic characteristics of the Moon the tables for amplitudes, periods and phases of perturbations of the first order have been constructed. Resonant periods of free librations have been estimated. The influence of a liquid core results in decreasing of the period of free librations in longitude approximately on 0.316 day, and in change of the period of free pole wobble of the Moon on 25.8 days. In the first approximation the liquid core does not render influence on the value of Cassini's inclination and on the period of precession of the angular momentum vector. However it causes an additional "quasi-diurnal" librations with period about 27.165 days. In comparison with model of rigid non-spherical of the Moon the presence of a liquid core should result in increase of amplitudes of the Moon librations in longitude on 0.06 %. 1 Development of analytical theory of rotational motion of the Moon with liquid core and rigid mantle. The work has been realized in following stages. 1. Canonical equations of rotation of the Moon with liquid core and elastic mantle in Andoyer and Poincare variables have been constructed. Developments of second harmonic of force function of the Moon in pointed variables have been obtained for accurate trigonometric presentation of perturbations of the Moon orbital motion. 2. Two approaches (two methods) of construction of analytical theory have been developed. These approaches use different principles for eliminating of singularities for axial rotation of the Moon. One is based on direct application of Andoyer variables by changing of notations of moments of inertia [1]. Second is based on application of Poincare elements. For comparison both approaches are developed. 3. The main equation for

  2. Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Take the mystery out of motion. Our resource gives you everything you need to teach young scientists about motion. Students will learn about linear, accelerating, rotating and oscillating motion, and how these relate to everyday life - and even the solar system. Measuring and graphing motion is easy, and the concepts of speed, velocity and acceleration are clearly explained. Reading passages, comprehension questions, color mini posters and lots of hands-on activities all help teach and reinforce key concepts. Vocabulary and language are simplified in our resource to make them accessible to str

  3. Spacecraft motion analysis about rapid rotating small body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史雪岩; 崔祜涛; 崔平远; 栾恩杰

    2003-01-01

    The orbital dynamics equation of a spacecraft around an irregular sphere small body is established based on the small body' s gravitational potential approximated with a tri-axial ellipsoid. According to the Jacobi integral constant, the spacecraft zero-velocity curves in the vicinity of the small body is described and feasible motion region is analyzed. The limited condition and the periapsis radius corresponding to different eccentricity against impact surface are presented. The stability of direct and retrograde equator orbits is analyzed based on the perturbation solutions of mean orbit elements.

  4. Accumulation of Microswimmers near a Surface Mediated by Collision and Rotational Brownian Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay X.

    2009-08-01

    In this Letter we propose a kinematic model to explain how collisions with a surface and rotational Brownian motion give rise to accumulation of microswimmers near a surface. In this model, an elongated microswimmer invariably travels parallel to the surface after hitting it from an oblique angle. It then swims away from the surface, facilitated by rotational Brownian motion. Simulations based on this model reproduce the density distributions measured for the small bacteria E. coli and Caulobacter crescentus, as well as for the much larger bull spermatozoa swimming between two walls.

  5. Rotating columns: relating structure-from-motion, accretion/deletion, and figure/ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, Vicky; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2013-08-14

    We present a novel phenomenon involving an interaction between accretion deletion, figure-ground interpretation, and structure-from-motion. Our displays contain alternating light and dark vertical regions in which random-dot textures moved horizontally at constant speed but in opposite directions in alternating regions. This motion is consistent with all the light regions in front, with the dark regions completing amodally into a single large surface moving in the background, or vice versa. Surprisingly, the regions that are perceived as figural are also perceived as 3-D volumes rotating in depth (like rotating columns)-despite the fact that dot motion is not consistent with 3-D rotation. In a series of experiments, we found we could manipulate which set of regions is perceived as rotating volumes simply by varying known geometric cues to figure ground, including convexity, parallelism, symmetry, and relative area. Subjects indicated which colored regions they perceived as rotating. For our displays we found convexity to be a stronger cue than either symmetry or parallelism. We furthermore found a smooth monotonic decay of the proportion by which subjects perceive symmetric regions as figural, as a function of their relative area. Our results reveal an intriguing new interaction between accretion-deletion, figure-ground, and 3-D motion that is not captured by existing models. They also provide an effective tool for measuring figure-ground perception.

  6. Effect of arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery in patients with preoperative restricted range of motion

    OpenAIRE

    Razmjou, Helen; Henry, Patrick; Costa, Giuseppe; Dwyer, Tim; Holtby, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of rotator cuff (RC) decompression and/or repair on post-operative ROM in patients with pre-operative restricted passive motion who had undergone arthroscopic subacromial debridement and/or rotator cuff repair. Potential predictors of ROM recovery such as age, sex, mechanism of injury, type of surgery, presence of an endocrine illness and having an active Worker Compensation claim related to the shoulder were explored. Methods A r...

  7. Solar Magnetized Tornadoes: Rotational Motion in a Tornado-like Prominence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yang; Gömöry, Peter; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Wang, Tongjiang; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Gan, Weiqun; Li, YouPing

    2014-04-01

    Su et al. proposed a new explanation for filament formation and eruption, where filament barbs are rotating magnetic structures driven by underlying vortices on the surface. Such structures have been noticed as tornado-like prominences when they appear above the limb. They may play a key role as the source of plasma and twist in filaments. However, no observations have successfully distinguished rotational motion of the magnetic structures in tornado-like prominences from other motions such as oscillation and counter-streaming plasma flows. Here we report evidence of rotational motions in a tornado-like prominence. The spectroscopic observations in two coronal lines were obtained from a specifically designed Hinode/EIS observing program. The data revealed the existence of both cold and million-degree-hot plasma in the prominence leg, supporting the so-called prominence-corona transition region. The opposite velocities at the two sides of the prominence and their persistent time evolution, together with the periodic motions evident in SDO/AIA dark structures, indicate a rotational motion of both cold and hot plasma with a speed of ~5 km s-1.

  8. Solar Magnetized "Tornadoes': Evidence for Rotational Motion in a Tornado-like Prominence

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Wang, Tongjiang; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Gan, Weiqun; Li, Youping

    2013-01-01

    Su et al. (2012) proposed a new explanation for filament formation and eruption, where filament barbs are rotating magnetic structures driven by underlying vortices on the surface. Such structures have been noticed as ``tornado-like prominences'' when they appear above the limb. They may play a key role as the source of plasma and twists in filament. However, no observations have successfully identified rotational motion of the magnetic structure itself from other motions such as oscillation and plasma flow. Here we report the first solid evidence of rotational motions in a tornado-like prominence obtained from spectroscopic observations in two coronal lines in the frame of a specifically designed Hinode/EIS observing program. The opposite velocities at the two sides of the prominence and their time evolution, together with the periodic motions evident in SDO/AIA images, indicate a rotational motion with a speed of $\\sim$5 km s$^{-1}$. The data also revealed the existence of both cold and million-degree-hot p...

  9. SOLAR MAGNETIZED TORNADOES: ROTATIONAL MOTION IN A TORNADO-LIKE PROMINENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Vanninathan, Kamalam [IGAM-Kanzelhöhe Observatory, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Gömöry, Peter [Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranská Lomnica (Slovakia); Wang, Tongjiang [Department of Physics, the Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Gan, Weiqun; Li, YouPing, E-mail: yang.su@uni-graz.at [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2014-04-10

    Su et al. proposed a new explanation for filament formation and eruption, where filament barbs are rotating magnetic structures driven by underlying vortices on the surface. Such structures have been noticed as tornado-like prominences when they appear above the limb. They may play a key role as the source of plasma and twist in filaments. However, no observations have successfully distinguished rotational motion of the magnetic structures in tornado-like prominences from other motions such as oscillation and counter-streaming plasma flows. Here we report evidence of rotational motions in a tornado-like prominence. The spectroscopic observations in two coronal lines were obtained from a specifically designed Hinode/EIS observing program. The data revealed the existence of both cold and million-degree-hot plasma in the prominence leg, supporting the so-called prominence-corona transition region. The opposite velocities at the two sides of the prominence and their persistent time evolution, together with the periodic motions evident in SDO/AIA dark structures, indicate a rotational motion of both cold and hot plasma with a speed of ∼5 km s{sup –1}.

  10. SOLAR MAGNETIZED TORNADOES: ROTATIONAL MOTION IN A TORNADO-LIKE PROMINENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su et al. proposed a new explanation for filament formation and eruption, where filament barbs are rotating magnetic structures driven by underlying vortices on the surface. Such structures have been noticed as tornado-like prominences when they appear above the limb. They may play a key role as the source of plasma and twist in filaments. However, no observations have successfully distinguished rotational motion of the magnetic structures in tornado-like prominences from other motions such as oscillation and counter-streaming plasma flows. Here we report evidence of rotational motions in a tornado-like prominence. The spectroscopic observations in two coronal lines were obtained from a specifically designed Hinode/EIS observing program. The data revealed the existence of both cold and million-degree-hot plasma in the prominence leg, supporting the so-called prominence-corona transition region. The opposite velocities at the two sides of the prominence and their persistent time evolution, together with the periodic motions evident in SDO/AIA dark structures, indicate a rotational motion of both cold and hot plasma with a speed of ∼5 km s–1

  11. The strong motion amplitudes from Himalayan earthquakes and a pilot study for the deterministic first order microzonation of Delhi City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interdependence among the strong-motion amplitude, earthquake magnitude and hypocentral distance has been established (Parvez et al. 2001) for the Himalayan region using the dataset of six earthquakes, two from Western and four from Eastern Himalayas (Mw=5.2-7.2) recorded by strong-motion networks in the Himalayas. The level of the peak strong motion amplitudes in the Eastern Himalayas is three fold larger than that in the Western Himalayas, in terms of both peak acceleration and peak velocities. In the present study, we include the strong motion data of Chamoli earthquake (Mw=6.5) of 1999 from the western sub-region to see whether this event supports the regional effects and we find that the new result fits well with our earlier prediction in the Western Himalayas. The minimum estimates of peak acceleration for the epicentral zone of Mw=7.5-8.5 events is Apeak=0.25-0.4 g for the Western Himalayas and as large as Apeak=1.0-1.6 g for the Eastern Himalayas. Similarly, the expected minimum epicentral values of Vpeak for Mw=8 are 35 cm/s for Western and 112 cm/s for Eastern Himalayas. The presence of unusually high levels of epicentral amplitudes for the eastern subregion also agrees well with the macroseismic evidence (Parvez et al. 2001). Therefore, these results represent systematic regional effects, and may be considered as a basis for future regionalized seismic hazard assessment in the Himalayan region. Many metropolitan and big cities of India are situated in the severe hazard zone just south of the Himalayas. A detailed microzonation study of these sprawling urban centres is therefore urgently required for gaining a better understanding of ground motion and site effects in these cities. An example of the study of site effects and microzonation of a part of metropolitan Delhi is presented based on a detailed modelling along a NS cross sections from the Inter State Bus Terminal (ISBT) to Sewanagar. Full synthetic strong motion waveforms have been computed

  12. Large amplitude motion of the acetylene molecule within acetylene-neon complexes hosted in helium droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, M; Mengesha, E; de Pujo, P; Gaveau, M-A; Soep, B; Mestdagh, J-M; Poisson, L

    2016-06-28

    Superfluid helium droplets provide an ideal environment for spectroscopic studies with rotational resolution. Nevertheless, the molecular rotation is hindered because the embedded molecules are surrounded by a non-superfluid component. The present work explores the dynamical role of this component in the hindered rotation of C2H2 within the C2H2-Ne complex. A HENDI experiment was built and near-infrared spectroscopy of C2H2-Ne and C2H2 was performed in the spectral region overlapping the ν3/ν2 + ν4 + ν5 Fermi-type resonance of C2H2. The comparison between measured and simulated spectra helped to address the above issue. PMID:27263427

  13. Numerical Simulation of Microcarrier Motion in a Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI-HAO JU; TIAN-QING LIU; XUE-HU MA; ZHAN-FENG CUI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To analyze the forces of rotational wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor on small tissue pieces or microcarrier particles and to determine the tracks of microcarrier particles in RWV bioreactor. Methods The motion of the microcarrier in the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor with both the inner and outer cylinders rotating was modeled by numerical simulation. Results The continuous trajectory of microcarrier particles, including the possible collision with the wall was obtained. An expression between the minimum rotational speed difference of the inner and outer cylinders and the microcarrier particle or aggregate radius could avoid collisions with either wall. The range of microcarrier radius or tissue size, which could be safely cultured in the RWV bioreactor, in terms of shear stress level, was determined. Conclusion The model works well in describing the trajectory of a heavier microcarrier particle in rotating wall vessel.

  14. Multi-polarization quantum control of rotational motion through dipole coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turinici, Gabriel [Ceremade, Universite Paris Dauphine, Place du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 75775 Paris Cedex 16 (France); Rabitz, Herschel [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1009 (United States)], E-mail: Gabriel.Turinici@dauphine.fr, E-mail: hrabitz@princeton.edu

    2010-03-12

    In this work we analyze the quantum controllability of rotational motion under the influence of an external laser field coupled through a permanent dipole moment. The analysis takes into consideration up to three polarization fields, but we also discuss the consequences for working with fewer polarized fields.

  15. Multi-polarization quantum control of rotational motion through dipole coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinici, Gabriel; Rabitz, Herschel

    2010-03-01

    In this work we analyze the quantum controllability of rotational motion under the influence of an external laser field coupled through a permanent dipole moment. The analysis takes into consideration up to three polarization fields, but we also discuss the consequences for working with fewer polarized fields.

  16. Tensor formalism for rotational and vibrational nuclear motions with discrete symmetries: rotational terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of construction of nuclear collective Hamiltonians with discrete symmetries has been considered. The method allows to construct the collective Hamiltonians using O(3) tensors as building blocks. The formula for general form of the rotational reduced matrix elements is derived. (author)

  17. Third-epoch Magellanic Cloud proper motions. II. The large Magellanic Cloud rotation field in three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first detailed assessment of the large-scale rotation of any galaxy based on full three-dimensional velocity measurements. We do this for the LMC by combining our Hubble Space Telescope average proper motion (PM) measurements for stars in 22 fields, with existing line-of-sight (LOS) velocity measurements for 6790 individual stars. We interpret these data with a model of circular rotation in a flat disk. The PM and LOS data paint a consistent picture of the LMC rotation, and their combination yields several new insights. The PM data imply a stellar dynamical center that coincides with the H I dynamical center, and a rotation curve amplitude consistent with that inferred from LOS velocity studies. The implied disk viewing angles agree with the range of values found in the literature, but continue to indicate variations with stellar population and/or radius. Young (red supergiant) stars rotate faster than old (red and asymptotic giant branch) stars due to asymmetric drift. Outside the central region, the circular velocity is approximately flat at V circ = 91.7 ± 18.8 km s–1. This is consistent with the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation and implies an enclosed mass M(8.7 kpc) = (1.7 ± 0.7) × 1010 M ☉. The virial mass is larger, depending on the full extent of the LMC's dark halo. The tidal radius is 22.3 ± 5.2 kpc (24.°0 ± 5.°6). Combination of the PM and LOS data yields kinematic distance estimates for the LMC, but these are not yet competitive with other methods.

  18. An exact variational method to calculate rovibrational spectra of polyatomic molecules with large amplitude motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2016-08-01

    We report a new full-dimensional variational algorithm to calculate rovibrational spectra of polyatomic molecules using an exact quantum mechanical Hamiltonian. The rovibrational Hamiltonian of system is derived in a set of orthogonal polyspherical coordinates in the body-fixed frame. It is expressed in an explicitly Hermitian form. The Hamiltonian has a universal formulation regardless of the choice of orthogonal polyspherical coordinates and the number of atoms in molecule, which is suitable for developing a general program to study the spectra of many polyatomic systems. An efficient coupled-state approach is also proposed to solve the eigenvalue problem of the Hamiltonian using a multi-layer Lanczos iterative diagonalization approach via a set of direct product basis set in three coordinate groups: radial coordinates, angular variables, and overall rotational angles. A simple set of symmetric top rotational functions is used for the overall rotation whereas a potential-optimized discrete variable representation method is employed in radial coordinates. A set of contracted vibrationally diabatic basis functions is adopted in internal angular variables. Those diabatic functions are first computed using a neural network iterative diagonalization method based on a reduced-dimension Hamiltonian but only once. The final rovibrational energies are computed using a modified Lanczos method for a given total angular momentum J, which is usually fast. Two numerical applications to CH4 and H2CO are given, together with a comparison with previous results.

  19. The Origin of Ekman Flow in a Cavity Subject to Impulsive Rotational Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jei Yang

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study is performed to disclose the origin of Ekman flow on the surfaces of a rotating drum resulting from fluid-structure interaction after an impulsive start of motion (referred to as the spin-up process or an impulsive stop (the spin-down process. Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV is employed to determine instantaneous distribution of both the radial and angular velocity components in the flow field inside the rotating drum. From these results, the secondary flow and the time history of the Ekman boundary layer thickness are determined. The tracer/light sheet method is also engaged to enable real-time visualization of flow patterns. Fluid viscosity, drum size and rotational speed are varied to determine their effects on fluid-structure interactions. Results may be applied to cavity flow in rotating machinery.

  20. Microscopic description of large amplitude collective motion in the nuclear astrophysics context

    CERN Document Server

    Lacroix, Denis; Scamps, Guillaume; Simenel, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    In the last 10 years, we have observed an important increase of interest in the application of time-dependent energy density functional theory (TD-EDF). This approach allows to treat nuclear structure and nuclear reaction from small to large amplitude dynamics in a unified framework. The possibility to perform unrestricted three-dimensional simulations using state of the art effective interactions has opened new perspectives. In the present article, an overview of applications where the predictive power of TD-EDF has been benchmarked is given. A special emphasize is made on processes that are of astrophysical interest. Illustrations discussed here include giant resonances, fission, binary and ternary collisions leading to fusion, transfer and deep inelastic processes.

  1. On the generation of ground motion accelerogram compatible with a specified response spectrum and a fourier amplitude spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design basis for earthquake ground motion is given by the peak ground acceleration, response spectrfal shapes for various damping values and the time history of ground motion in horizontal and vertical directions. The time history is required to be compatible with a specified design response spectrum. The course of having treated this problem in the past is outlined. Power spectral density functions (PSDF) require the explicit definition of the duration of motion, but fourier amplitude spectrum (FAS) treat the data as such. Whatever way the target PSDF or FAS was arrived at, its consistency with the specified response spectrum should be assured. Accordingly, it appears prudent to select a suitable data base and derive the target response spectrum and the FAS. In this paper, an algorithm for generating the accelerograms compatible with a specified response spectrum and a FAS is described. The compatibility criteria, the methods of generating algorithms based on response spectrum conpatibility, the inversion of FAS and the combination of response spectrum compatibility and the inversion of FAS, and the numerical results are reported. (K.I.)

  2. Effects of solar radiation pressure torque on the rotational motion of an artificial satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Maria Cecilia F. P. S.; Vilhenademoraes, Rodolpho

    1992-01-01

    The motion of an artificial satellite about its center of mass is studied considering torques due to the gravity gradient and direct solar radiation pressure. A model for direct solar radiation torque is derived for a circular cylindrical satellite. An analytical solution is obtained by the method of variation of the parameters. This solution shows that the angular variables have secular variation but that the modulus of the rotational angular momentum, the projection of rotational angular momentum on the z axis of the moment of inertia and inertial axis z, suffer only periodic variations. Considering a hypothetical artificial satellite, a numerical application is demonstrated.

  3. Earth rotation and polar motion from laser ranging to the moon and artificial satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aardoom, L.

    1978-01-01

    Earth-based laser ranging to artificial satellites and to the moon is considered as a technique for monitoring the Earth's polar motion and diurnal rotation. The kinematics of Earth rotation as related to laser ranging is outlined. The current status of laser ranging as regards its measuring capabilities is reviewed. The relative merits of artificial satellite and lunar laser ranging are pointed out. It appears that multistation combined artificial satellite and lunar laser ranging is likely to ultimately meet a 0.002 arcseconds in pole position and 0.1 msec in UT1 daily precision requirement.

  4. Motion sickness susceptibility during rotation at 30 rpm in free-fall parabolic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, A.

    1979-01-01

    To make comparisons with experimental motion sickness susceptibility in Skylab missions, subjects were tested during free fall in parabolic flight and in ground-based simulation tests. They were rotated at 30 rpm in a rotating litter chair (RLC) with head fixed, head swiveling left-to-right, or with 90 degree forward and return head and body movements. Stressful accelerations similar to those in the Skylab RLC were generated only in the tests aloft, where subjects who made 'forward and return' movements (generating cross-coupled angular accelerations) were substantially more prone to motion sickness than those with either head fixed or head swiveling left-to-right. However, with head swiveling, susceptibility was slightly higher in the laboratory than aloft.

  5. Quantification of mouse in vivo whole-body vibration amplitude from motion-blur using x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musculoskeletal effects of whole-body vibration on animals and humans have become an intensely studied topic recently, due to the potential of applying this method as a non-pharmacological therapy for strengthening bones. It is relatively easy to quantify the transmission of whole-body mechanical vibration through the human skeletal system using accelerometers. However, this is not the case for small-animal pre-clinical studies because currently available accelerometers have a large mass, relative to the mass of the animals, which causes the accelerometers themselves to affect the way vibration is transmitted. Additionally, live animals do not typically remain motionless for long periods, unless they are anesthetized, and they are required to maintain a static standing posture during these studies. These challenges provide the motivation for the development of a method to quantify vibrational transmission in small animals. We present a novel imaging technique to quantify whole-body vibration transmission in small animals using 280 μm diameter tungsten carbide beads implanted into the hind limbs of mice. Employing time-exposure digital x-ray imaging, vibrational amplitude is quantified based on the blurring of the implanted beads caused by the vibrational motion. Our in vivo results have shown this technique is capable of measuring vibration amplitudes as small as 0.1 mm, with precision as small as  ±10 μm, allowing us to distinguish differences in the transmitted vibration at different locations on the hindlimbs of mice. (paper)

  6. Quantification of mouse in vivo whole-body vibration amplitude from motion-blur using x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengyi; Welch, Ian; Yuan, Xunhua; Pollmann, Steven I.; Nikolov, Hristo N.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal effects of whole-body vibration on animals and humans have become an intensely studied topic recently, due to the potential of applying this method as a non-pharmacological therapy for strengthening bones. It is relatively easy to quantify the transmission of whole-body mechanical vibration through the human skeletal system using accelerometers. However, this is not the case for small-animal pre-clinical studies because currently available accelerometers have a large mass, relative to the mass of the animals, which causes the accelerometers themselves to affect the way vibration is transmitted. Additionally, live animals do not typically remain motionless for long periods, unless they are anesthetized, and they are required to maintain a static standing posture during these studies. These challenges provide the motivation for the development of a method to quantify vibrational transmission in small animals. We present a novel imaging technique to quantify whole-body vibration transmission in small animals using 280 μm diameter tungsten carbide beads implanted into the hind limbs of mice. Employing time-exposure digital x-ray imaging, vibrational amplitude is quantified based on the blurring of the implanted beads caused by the vibrational motion. Our in vivo results have shown this technique is capable of measuring vibration amplitudes as small as 0.1 mm, with precision as small as  ±10 μm, allowing us to distinguish differences in the transmitted vibration at different locations on the hindlimbs of mice.

  7. Cloud Atlas: Discovery of Patchy Clouds and High-amplitude Rotational Modulations in a Young, Extremely Red L-type Brown Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Ben W. P.; Apai, Daniel; Zhou, Yifan; Schneider, Glenn; Burgasser, Adam J.; Karalidi, Theodora; Yang, Hao; Marley, Mark S.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Bedin, Luigi R.; Metchev, Stanimir A.; Radigan, Jacqueline; Lowrance, Patrick J.

    2016-10-01

    Condensate clouds fundamentally impact the atmospheric structure and spectra of exoplanets and brown dwarfs, but the connections between surface gravity, cloud structure, dust in the upper atmosphere, and the red colors of some brown dwarfs remain poorly understood. Rotational modulations enable the study of different clouds in the same atmosphere, thereby providing a method to isolate the effects of clouds. Here, we present the discovery of high peak-to-peak amplitude (8%) rotational modulations in a low-gravity, extremely red (J-K s = 2.55) L6 dwarf WISEP J004701.06+680352.1 (W0047). Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) time-resolved grism spectroscopy, we find a best-fit rotational period (13.20 ± 0.14 hr) with a larger amplitude at 1.1 μm than at 1.7 μm. This is the third-largest near-infrared variability amplitude measured in a brown dwarf, demonstrating that large-amplitude variations are not limited to the L/T transition but are present in some extremely red L-type dwarfs. We report a tentative trend between the wavelength dependence of relative amplitude, possibly proxy for small dust grains lofted in the upper atmosphere, and the likelihood of large-amplitude variability. By assuming forsterite as a haze particle, we successfully explain the wavelength-dependent amplitude with submicron-sized haze particle sizes of around 0.4 μm. W0047 links the earlier spectral and later spectral type brown dwarfs in which rotational modulations have been observed; the large amplitude variations in this object make this a benchmark brown dwarf for the study of cloud properties close to the L/T transition.

  8. Three-dimensional organization of vestibular related eye movements to rotational motion in pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, J. D.; Beyer, M.; Hess, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    During rotational motions, compensatory eye movement adjustments must continually occur in order to maintain objects of visual interest as stable images on the retina. In the present study, the three-dimensional organization of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in pigeons was quantitatively examined. Rotations about different head axes produced horizontal, vertical, and torsional eye movements, whose component magnitude was dependent upon the cosine of the stimulus axis relative to the animal's visual axis. Thus, the three-dimensional organization of the VOR in pigeons appears to be compensatory for any direction of head rotation. Frequency responses of the horizontal, vertical, and torsional slow phase components exhibited high pass filter properties with dominant time constants of approximately 3 s.

  9. Optically driven translational and rotational motions of microrod particles in a nematic liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, Alexey; Hirankittiwong, Pemika; Chattham, Nattaporn; Nádasi, Hajnalka; Stannarius, Ralf; Limtrakul, Jumras; Haba, Osamu; Yonetake, Koichiro; Takezoe, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    A small amount of azo-dendrimer molecules dissolved in a liquid crystal enables translational and rotational motions of microrods in a liquid crystal matrix under unpolarized UV light irradiation. This motion is initiated by a light-induced trans-to-cis conformational change of the dendrimer adsorbed at the rod surface and the associated director reorientation. The bending direction of the cis conformers is not random but is selectively chosen due to the curved local director field in the vicinity of the dendrimer-coated surface. Different types of director distortions occur around the rods, depending on their orientations with respect to the nematic director field. This leads to different types of motions driven by the torques exerted on the particles by the director reorientations. PMID:25624507

  10. Optically driven translational and rotational motions of microrod particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, Alexey; Hirankittiwong, Pemika; Chattham, Nattaporn; Nádasi, Hajnalka; Stannarius, Ralf; Limtrakul, Jumras; Haba, Osamu; Yonetake, Koichiro; Takezoe, Hideo

    2015-02-10

    A small amount of azo-dendrimer molecules dissolved in a liquid crystal enables translational and rotational motions of microrods in a liquid crystal matrix under unpolarized UV light irradiation. This motion is initiated by a light-induced trans-to-cis conformational change of the dendrimer adsorbed at the rod surface and the associated director reorientation. The bending direction of the cis conformers is not random but is selectively chosen due to the curved local director field in the vicinity of the dendrimer-coated surface. Different types of director distortions occur around the rods, depending on their orientations with respect to the nematic director field. This leads to different types of motions driven by the torques exerted on the particles by the director reorientations. PMID:25624507

  11. Robotic real-time translational and rotational head motion correction during frameless stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xinmin; Belcher, Andrew H.; Grelewicz, Zachary; Wiersma, Rodney D., E-mail: rwiersma@uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a control system to correct both translational and rotational head motion deviations in real-time during frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: A novel feedback control with a feed-forward algorithm was utilized to correct for the coupling of translation and rotation present in serial kinematic robotic systems. Input parameters for the algorithm include the real-time 6DOF target position, the frame pitch pivot point to target distance constant, and the translational and angular Linac beam off (gating) tolerance constants for patient safety. Testing of the algorithm was done using a 4D (XY Z + pitch) robotic stage, an infrared head position sensing unit and a control computer. The measured head position signal was processed and a resulting command was sent to the interface of a four-axis motor controller, through which four stepper motors were driven to perform motion compensation. Results: The control of the translation of a brain target was decoupled with the control of the rotation. For a phantom study, the corrected position was within a translational displacement of 0.35 mm and a pitch displacement of 0.15° 100% of the time. For a volunteer study, the corrected position was within displacements of 0.4 mm and 0.2° over 98.5% of the time, while it was 10.7% without correction. Conclusions: The authors report a control design approach for both translational and rotational head motion correction. The experiments demonstrated that control performance of the 4D robotic stage meets the submillimeter and subdegree accuracy required by SRS.

  12. Electrohydrodynamic interactions in Quincke rotation: from pair dynamics to collective motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debasish; Saintillan, David

    2013-11-01

    Weakly conducting dielectric particles suspended in a dielectric liquid can undergo spontaneous sustained rotation when placed in a sufficiently strong dc electric field. This phenomenon of Quincke rotation has interesting implications for the rheology of these suspensions whose effective viscosity can be reduced by application of an external field. While previous models based on the rotation of isolated particles have provided accurate estimates for this viscosity reduction in dilute suspensions discrepancies have been reported in more concentrated systems where particle-particle interactions are likely significant. Motivated by this observation we extend the classic description of Quincke rotation based on the Taylor-Melcher leaky dielectric model to account for pair electrohydrodynamic interactions between identical spheres using method of reflections. We also consider the case of spherical particles undergoing Quincke rotation next to a planar electrode, where hydrodynamic interactions with the no-slip boundary lead to a self-propelled velocity. The interactions between such Quincke rollers are analyzed, and a transition to collective motion is predicted in sufficiently dense collections of many rollers, in agreement with recent experiments.

  13. Photometric Variability in Kepler Target Stars. II. An Overview of Amplitude, Periodicity, and Rotation in First Quarter Data

    CERN Document Server

    Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie; Gilliland, Ronald L; Jenkins, Jon; Borucki, William J; Koch, David; Caldwell, Doug; Dupree, Andrea K; Latham, David W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Meibom, Soeren; Howell, Steve; Brown, Tim

    2010-01-01

    We provide an overview of stellar variability in the first quarter of data from the Kepler mission. The intent of this paper is to examine the entire sample of over 150,000 target stars for periodic behavior in their lightcurves, and relate this to stellar characteristics. These data constitute an unprecedented study of stellar variability given its great precision and complete time coverage (with a half hour cadence). Because the full Kepler pipeline is not currently suitable for a study of stellar variability of this sort, we describe our procedures for treating the "raw" pipeline data. About half of the total sample exhibits convincing periodic variability up to two weeks, with amplitudes ranging from differential intensity changes less than 10^{-4} up to more than 10 percent. K and M dwarfs have a greater fraction of period behavior than G dwarfs. The giants in the sample have distinctive quasi-periodic behavior, but are not periodic in the way we define it. Not all periodicities are due to rotation, and ...

  14. Motion of ions specularly reflected off a quasi-parallel shock in the presence of large-amplitude, monochromatic MHD waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A test particle model is used to study the motion of ions specularly reflected off a shock in the presence of large-amplitude, monochromatic, transverse MHD waves. The characteristics of the motion depend on the frequency, wavelength, phase, and amplitude of the wave that is being convected into the shock. For low wave frequencies and long wavelengths (ω'> ion gyroradius), the ion motion depends only upon theta/sub B/n(phi0), the instantaneous angle between the total magnetic field at the shock (ambient+wave) and the shock normal. For high wave frequencies and short wavelengths (ω'>>ion gyrofrequency, lambda0, the angle between the ambient magnetic field and the shock normal. For intermediate frequencies and wavelengths, including those of interest in the region upstream from the earth's bow shock (ω'approx.ion gyrofrequency, lambdaapprox.ion gyroradius), no simple theta/sub B/n0 or theta/sub B/n(phi0) criterion for the ion motion is found. For example, at intermediate frequencies, the motion depends both on theta/sub B/n(phi0) and theta/sub B/n0 as well as upon b/B, the ratio of the wave amplitude to ambient magnetic field strength. In general, the presence of upstream waves inhibits the escape of specularly reflected ions from the shock, the effect being greatest when the wave amplitude is large

  15. Circular orbits and related quasiharmonic oscillatory motion of charged particles around weakly magnetized rotating black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursunov, Arman; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Kološ, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We study the motion of charged particles in the field of a rotating black hole immersed into an external asymptotically uniform magnetic field, focusing on the epicyclic quasicircular orbits near the equatorial plane. Separating the circular orbits into four qualitatively different classes according to the sign of the canonical angular momentum of the motion and the orientation of the Lorentz force, we analyze the circular orbits using the so-called force formalism. We find the analytical solutions for the radial profiles of velocity, specific angular momentum, and specific energy of the circular orbits in dependence on the black-hole dimensionless spin and the magnetic field strength. The innermost stable circular orbits are determined for all four classes of the circular orbits. The stable circular orbits with an outward-oriented Lorentz force can extend to radii lower than the radius of the corresponding photon circular geodesic. We calculate the frequencies of the harmonic oscillatory motion of the charged particles in the radial and vertical directions related to the equatorial circular orbits and study the radial profiles of the radial, ωr; vertical, ωθ; and orbital, ωϕ, frequencies, finding significant differences in comparison to the epicyclic geodesic circular motion. The most important new phenomenon is the existence of toroidal charged particle epicyclic motion with ωr˜ωθ≫ωϕ that could occur around retrograde circular orbits with an outward-oriented Lorentz force. We demonstrate that for the rapidly rotating black holes the role of the "Wald induced charge" can be relevant.

  16. Accumulation of microswimmers near surface due to steric confinement and rotational Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay

    2009-03-01

    Microscopic swimmers display some intriguing features dictated by Brownian motion, low Reynolds number fluid mechanics, and boundary confinement. We re-examine the reported accumulation of swimming bacteria or bull spermatozoa near the boundaries of a fluid chamber, and propose a kinematic model to explain how collision with surface, confinement and rotational Brownian motion give rise to the accumulation of micro-swimmers near a surface. In this model, an elongated microswimmer invariably travels parallel to the surface after hitting it from any incident angle. It then takes off and swims away from the surface after some time due to rotational Brownian motion. Based on this analysis, we obtain through computer simulation steady state density distributions that reproduce the ones measured for the small bacteria E coli and Caulobacter crescentus, as well as for the much larger bull spermatozoa swimming near surfaces. These results suggest strongly that Brownian dynamics and surface confinement are the dominant factors for the accumulation of microswimmers near a surface.

  17. Differential contribution of visual and auditory information to accurately predict the direction and rotational motion of a visual stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seoung Hoon; Kim, Seonjin; Kwon, MinHyuk; Christou, Evangelos A

    2016-03-01

    Vision and auditory information are critical for perception and to enhance the ability of an individual to respond accurately to a stimulus. However, it is unknown whether visual and auditory information contribute differentially to identify the direction and rotational motion of the stimulus. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of an individual to accurately predict the direction and rotational motion of the stimulus based on visual and auditory information. In this study, we recruited 9 expert table-tennis players and used table-tennis service as our experimental model. Participants watched recorded services with different levels of visual and auditory information. The goal was to anticipate the direction of the service (left or right) and the rotational motion of service (topspin, sidespin, or cut). We recorded their responses and quantified the following outcomes: (i) directional accuracy and (ii) rotational motion accuracy. The response accuracy was the accurate predictions relative to the total number of trials. The ability of the participants to predict the direction of the service accurately increased with additional visual information but not with auditory information. In contrast, the ability of the participants to predict the rotational motion of the service accurately increased with the addition of auditory information to visual information but not with additional visual information alone. In conclusion, this finding demonstrates that visual information enhances the ability of an individual to accurately predict the direction of the stimulus, whereas additional auditory information enhances the ability of an individual to accurately predict the rotational motion of stimulus.

  18. SIMULATION OF TRANSLATIONAL - ROTATIONAL MOTION OF WOOD PARTICLES DURING THE PROCESS OF PARTICLE ORIENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey PLOTNIKOV

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The simulation from the motion of flat particle revealed that the fall depends on the height of the drop, the thickness and density of the particles and does not depend on its length and width. The drop in air is about 20% longer than in vacuum. During orientation from angular particles the velocity of rotating particles with a length of 150mm is reduced by 18%, for particles with a length of 75mm by 12%. This reduction increases linearly with decreasing density of particles. A velocity field acting on the particle in the fall and rotation was presented. The results of the study prove the possibility to reduce the scatter of the particles during the mat's formation, that in turns can increase the board’s bending strength.

  19. On the relative rotational motion between rigid fibers and fluid in turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchioli, C. [Department of Electrical, Management and Mechanical Engineering, University of Udine, 33100 Udine (Italy); Zhao, L., E-mail: lihao.zhao@ntnu.no [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Andersson, H. I. [Department of Electrical, Management and Mechanical Engineering, University of Udine, 33100 Udine (Italy); Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the rotation of small rigid fibers relative to the surrounding fluid in wall-bounded turbulence is examined by means of direct numerical simulations coupled with Lagrangian tracking. Statistics of the relative (fiber-to-fluid) angular velocity, referred to as slip spin in the present study, are evaluated by modelling fibers as prolate spheroidal particles with Stokes number, St, ranging from 1 to 100 and aspect ratio, λ, ranging from 3 to 50. Results are compared one-to-one with those obtained for spherical particles (λ = 1) to highlight effects due to fiber length. The statistical moments of the slip spin show that differences in the rotation rate of fibers and fluid are influenced by inertia, but depend strongly also on fiber length: Departures from the spherical shape, even when small, are associated with an increase of rotational inertia and prevent fibers from passively following the surrounding fluid. An increase of fiber length, in addition, decouples the rotational dynamics of a fiber from its translational dynamics suggesting that the two motions can be modelled independently only for long enough fibers (e.g., for aspect ratios of order ten or higher in the present simulations)

  20. Both piston-like and rotational motions are present in bacterial chemoreceptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Daqi; Ma, Xiaomin; Tu, Yuhai; Lai, Luhua

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis signaling is triggered by binding of chemo-effectors to the membrane-bound chemoreceptor dimers. Though much is known about the structure of the chemoreceptors, details of the receptor dynamics and their effects on signaling are still unclear. Here, by using molecular dynamics simulations and principle component analysis, we study the dynamics of the periplasmic domain of aspartate chemoreceptor Tar dimer and its conformational changes when binding to different ligands (attractant, antagonist, and two attractant molecules). We found two dominant components (modes) in the receptor dynamics: a relative rotation of the two Tar monomers and a piston-like up-and-down sliding movement of the α4 helix. These two modes are highly correlated. Binding of one attractant molecule to the Tar dimer induced both significant piston-like downward movements of the α4 helix and strong relative rotations of the two Tar monomers, while binding of an antagonist or the symmetric binding of two attractant molecules to a Tar dimer suppresses both modes. The anti-symmetric effects of the relative rotation mode also explained the negative cooperativity between the two binding pockets. Our results suggest a mechanism of coupled rotation and piston-like motion for bacterial chemoreceptor signaling.

  1. Friction behavior of coupling motion for natural articular cartilage by reciprocating rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN ShanHua; GE ShiRong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the irregular surface of natural cartilage configurations, the tribological characteristics of coupling motion between natural cartilage pairs were investigated by the variation of rotated offset and velocity. Contact displacement, contact load, friction force and coefficient of friction from natural cartilage pairs were measured by a UMT-2 testing machine. In order to obtain the steady part and wavy part, the contact load and contact displacement were decompounded by the five-point sliding average method. These results showed that the contact load was composed of steady load and wavy load. And the contact displacement was composed of cartilage deformation and surface outline. The steady load was similar to exterior load while natural cartilage deformation increased nonlinearly with the sliding time. Wavy load had the correlative coefficient 0.235 with surface outline due to the irregular surface of fric-tion configurations. The coefficient of friction from cartilage friction configurations was less influenced by smaller magnitude in rotated parameters. A few strange summits were obtained in the area of coef-ficient of friction, and significantly related with local minimal values corresponding to the contact loads. The rotated offsets had clear impact on contact load and a slight impact on contact displacement. Larger offset produced higher wavy magnitude of the contact load. The rotated velocities played an evident role in cartilage deformation, but had a less influence on contact load. Lower velocity brought larger cartilage deformation.

  2. Ring-Puckering Motion in 1-Chloro-cyclopentene: Rotational Spectrum and ab InitioCalculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminati, Walther; Danieli, Roberto; Fantoni, Adolfo C.; Lopez, Juan C.

    1997-01-01

    The rotational spectra of 35Cl and 37Cl 1-chloro-cyclopentene have been investigated in the frequency range 26-40 GHz. The inversion splittings due to the ring-puckering motion have been determined to be 42320(10) and 42270(10) MHz for the two isotopomers, respectively. Four more vibrational states have been analyzed for the most abudant ( 35Cl) species. The barrier hindering the ring-puckering has been evaluated. According to the ab initiocalculations, it is lower than that in cyclopentene.

  3. Modeling direction discrimination thresholds for yaw rotations around an earth-vertical axis for arbitrary motion profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Soyka, Florian; Giordano, Paolo Robuffo; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Heinrich H Bülthoff

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of vestibular perception is important, for example, for improving the realism of motion simulation and virtual reality environments or for diagnosing patients suffering from vestibular problems. Previous research has found a dependence of direction discrimination thresholds for rotational motions on the period length (inverse frequency) of a transient (single cycle) sinusoidal acceleration stimulus. However, self-motion is seldom purely sinusoidal, and up to now, no...

  4. Mechanical motion conversion from reciprocating translation to one-directional rotation for effective energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Kabir; Lee, Soobum

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a new efficient motion conversion system which can be used in an energy harvesting system that converts wasted kinematic energy into electrical energy. In the proposed system, a reciprocating translational motion will be converted into one-directional rotational motion that spins a generator. The system will be devised with a two overlapping chambers (chamber 1 and 2) which move relatively through the sliding joint, and a pair of flexible strings (belt, steel wire, or chain) run around the rotor of the generator. Each end of the string fixed to chamber 1 is designed not to interfere with chamber 2 where the generator is mounted. When the two chambers move relatively, either top or bottom string is tensioned to spin the rotor while the other string is being rewound. One-directional clutch with a coil spring is engaged in a rewinding system - as found in a rowing machine, for example - so each string actuates the rotor only when it is in tension. This device can be applied to any mechanism where reciprocating translational motion exists, such as linear suspension system in a vehicle, a bicycle, and an energy generating marine buoy. The experimental study result will be reported as well as its battery-charging capacity will be demonstrated.

  5. Preliminary determination of the interdependence among strong-motion amplitude, earthquake magnitude and hypocentral distance for the Himalayan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Imtiyaz A.; Gusev, Alexander A.; Panza, Giuliano F.; Petukhin, Anatoly G.

    2001-03-01

    Since the installation of three limited-aperture strong-motion networks in the Himalayan region in 1986, six earthquakes with Mw=5.2-7.2 have been recorded up to 1991. The data set of horizontal peak accelerations and velocities consists of 182-component data for the hypocentral distance range 10-400km. This data set is limited in volume and coverage and, worst of all, it is highly inhomogeneous. Thus, we could not determine regional trends for amplitudes by means of the traditional approach of empirical multiple regression. Instead, we perform the reduction of the observations to a fixed distance and magnitude using independently defined distance and magnitude trends. To determine an appropriate magnitude-dependent distance attenuation law, we use the spectral energy propagation/random function approach of Gusev (1983) and adjust its parameters based on the residual variance. In doing so we confirm the known, rather gradual mode of decay of amplitudes with distance in the Himalayas; this seems to be caused by the combination of high Qs and crustal waveguide effects for high frequencies. The data are then reduced with respect to magnitude. The trend of peak acceleration versus magnitude cannot be determined from observations, and we assume that it coincides with that of abundant Japanese data. For the resulting set of reduced log10 (peak acceleration) data, the residual variance is 0.372, much above commonly found values. However, dividing the data into two geographical groups, western with two events and eastern with four events, reduces the residual variance to a more usual level of 0.272 (a station/site component of 0.222 and an event component of 0.162). This kind of data description is considered acceptable. A similar analysis is performed with velocity data, and again we have to split the data into two subregional groups. With our theoretically grounded attenuation laws we attempt a tentative extrapolation of our results to small distances and large

  6. Cloud Atlas: Discovery of Patchy Clouds and High-amplitude Rotational Modulations In a Young, Extremely Red L-type Brown Dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, Ben W P; Zhou, Yifan; Schneider, Glenn; Burgasser, Adam J; Karalidi, Theodora; Yang, Hao; Marley, Mark S; Cowan, N B; Bedin,; R., L; Metchev, Stanimir A; Radigan, Jacqueline; Lowrance, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Condensate clouds fundamentally impact the atmospheric structure and spectra of exoplanets and brown dwarfs but the connections between surface gravity, cloud structure, dust in the upper atmosphere, and the red colors of some brown dwarfs remain poorly understood. Rotational modulations enable the study of different clouds in the same atmosphere, thereby providing a method to isolate the effects of clouds. Here we present the discovery of high peak-to-peak amplitude (8%) rotational modulations in a low-gravity, extremely red (J-Ks=2.55) L6 dwarf WISEP J004701.06+680352.1 (W0047). Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) time-resolved grism spectroscopy we find a best-fit rotational period (13.20$\\pm$0.14 hours) with a larger amplitude at 1.1 micron than at 1.7 micron. This is the third largest near-infrared variability amplitude measured in a brown dwarf, demonstrating that large-amplitude variations are not limited to the L/T transition but are present in some extremely red L-type dwarfs. We report a tentativ...

  7. On the rotational motion of NEAs during close encounters with Earth and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães Boldrin, Luiz Augusto; Winter, Othon; Araujo, Rosana

    2016-10-01

    "NEAs" stands for Near-Earth Asteroids, and as the name suggests it refers to the asteroids that in its orbital evolution approach the Earth's orbit. During their lifetime, the NEAs suffer numerous close encounters (CE) with Earth, Mars and Venus. These close encounters cause variations in the orbital and rotational angular momentum, changing their dynamic behavior of them. The variation of the rotational angular momentum during the next encounters can increase or decrease the rotation rate depending on the initial condition. In addition to the rotation rate, close encounters cause variation in the movement of precession and nutation of the asteroid. Using a numerical model that takes into account the spin-orbit coupling of a body with ellipsoidal shape, the aim of this study is to analyze the variation and rotacioanal motion (rotation, precession and nutation) of asteroids during CE with earth and Venus for different initial conditions. We computed the variation of the obliquity, the variation of spin period and the spin mode (tumbling or non-tumbling and long-axis mode or short-axis mode) after the CE. We found significant changes in obliquity and spin period only in cases with strong encounters, i.e., those is in cases where the distance of the encounter (d) and the relative velocity (v) (we call encounter parameters) are small. On the other hand we did not find a relation between encounter parameters and the behavior of the spin mode since the body can tumbling in low as well as large values of (d) and (v). For future works we intent to do the same study for a binary asteroid system.

  8. EVIDENCE FOR ROTATIONAL MOTIONS IN THE FEET OF A QUIESCENT SOLAR PROMINENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present observational evidence of apparent plasma rotational motions in the feet of a solar prominence. Our study is based on spectroscopic observations taken in the He I 1083.0 nm multiplet with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter attached to the German Vacuum Tower Telescope. We recorded a time sequence of spectra with 34 s cadence placing the slit of the spectrograph almost parallel to the solar limb and crossing two feet of an intermediate size, quiescent hedgerow prominence. The data show opposite Doppler shifts, ±6 km s–1, at the edges of the prominence feet. We argue that these shifts may be interpreted as prominence plasma rotating counterclockwise around the vertical axis to the solar surface as viewed from above. The evolution of the prominence seen in EUV images taken with the Solar Dynamics Observatory provided us with clues to interpret the results as swirling motions. Moreover, time-distance images taken far from the central wavelength show plasma structures moving parallel to the solar limb with velocities of about 10-15 km s–1. Finally, the shapes of the observed intensity profiles suggest the presence of, at least, two components at some locations at the edges of the prominence feet. One of them is typically Doppler shifted (up to ∼20 km s–1) with respect to the other, thus suggesting the existence of supersonic counter-streaming flows along the line of sight.

  9. Evidence for rotational motions in the feet of a quiescent solar prominence

    CERN Document Server

    Suárez, D Orozco; Bueno, J Trujillo

    2012-01-01

    We present observational evidence of apparent plasma rotational motions in the feet of a solar prominence. Our study is based on spectroscopic observations taken in the He I 1083.0 nm multiplet with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter attached to the German Vacuum Tower Telescope. We recorded a time sequence of spectra with 34 s cadence placing the slit of the spectrograph almost parallel to the solar limb and crossing two feet of an intermediate size, quiescent hedgerow prominence. The data show opposite Doppler shifts, +/- 6 km/s, at the edges of the prominence feet. We argue that these shifts may be interpreted as prominence plasma rotating counterclockwise around the vertical axis to the solar surface as viewed from above. The evolution of the prominence seen in EUV images taken with the Solar Dynamic Observatory provided us clues to interpret the results as swirling motions. Moreover, time-distance images taken far from the central wavelength show plasma structures moving parallel to the solar limb with ve...

  10. Comparison of hip rotation range of motion in judo athletes with and without history of low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; de Souza, Vivian Lima; Sano, Saulo Sadao; Saccol, Michele Forgiarini; Cohen, Moisés

    2012-06-01

    This study compared hip rotation range of motion in judo athletes with and without a history of low back pain. Forty-two athletes (22 males) were divided into two groups: 21 with history of low back pain (HLBP) and 21 without history of low back pain (Control). Internal and external hip rotation range of motion in active and passive movement were measured using computed photogrammetry. The HLBP group exhibited a significant reduction in active internal rotation (27.5 ± 6.5°vs 38.2 ± 6.5°), active total rotation (80.1 ± 9.5°vs 87.4 ± 7.9°) of the non-dominant limb (P judo athletes with a history of low back pain exhibit deficits in hip rotation and greater asymmetry between limbs. PMID:22281524

  11. Rotating Motions and Modeling of the Erupting Solar Polar Crown Prominence on 2010 December 6

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yingna

    2012-01-01

    A large polar-crown prominence composed of different segments spanning nearly the entire solar disk erupted on 2010 December 6. Prior to the eruption, the filament in the active region part splits into two layers: a lower layer and an elevated layer. The eruption occurs in several episodes. Around 14:12 UT, the lower layer of the active region filament breaks apart, one part ejects towards the west, while the other part ejects towards the east, which leads to the explosive eruption of the eastern quiescent filament. During the early rise phase, part of the quiescent filament sheet displays strong rolling motion (observed by STEREO$\\_$B) in the clockwise direction (views from east to west) around the filament axis. This rolling motion appears to start from the border of the active region, then propagates towards the east. AIA observes another type of rotating motion: in some other parts of the erupting quiescent prominence the vertical threads turn horizontal, then turn upside down. The elevated active region ...

  12. Reconstructing plate-motion changes in the presence of finite-rotations noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaffaldano, Giampiero; Bodin, Thomas; Sambridge, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Understanding lithospheric plate motions is of paramount importance to geodynamicists. Much effort is going into kinematic reconstructions featuring progressively finer temporal resolution. However, the challenge of precisely identifying ocean-floor magnetic lineations, and uncertainties in geomagnetic reversal timescales result in substantial finite-rotations noise. Unless some type of temporal smoothing is applied, the scenario arising at the native temporal resolution is puzzling, as plate motions vary erratically and significantly over short periods (<1 Myr). This undermines our ability to make geodynamic inferences, as the rates at which forces need to be built upon plates to explain these kinematics far exceed the most optimistic estimates. Here we show that the largest kinematic changes reconstructed across the Atlantic, Indian and South Pacific ridges arise from data noise. We overcome this limitation using a trans-dimensional hierarchical Bayesian framework. We find that plate-motion changes occur on timescales no shorter than a few million years, yielding simpler kinematic patterns and more plausible dynamics. PMID:22948830

  13. Inversion of ground-motion data from a seismometer array for rotation using a modification of Jaeger's method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, W.-C.; Lee, W.H.K.; Aston, J.A.D.; Lin, C.J.; Liu, C.-C.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a new way to invert 2D translational waveforms using Jaeger's (1969) formula to derive rotational ground motions about one axis and estimate the errors in them using techniques from statistical multivariate analysis. This procedure can be used to derive rotational ground motions and strains using arrayed translational data, thus providing an efficient way to calibrate the performance of rotational sensors. This approach does not require a priori information about the noise level of the translational data and elastic properties of the media. This new procedure also provides estimates of the standard deviations of the derived rotations and strains. In this study, we validated this code using synthetic translational waveforms from a seismic array. The results after the inversion of the synthetics for rotations were almost identical with the results derived using a well-tested inversion procedure by Spudich and Fletcher (2009). This new 2D procedure can be applied three times to obtain the full, three-component rotations. Additional modifications can be implemented to the code in the future to study different features of the rotational ground motions and strains induced by the passage of seismic waves.

  14. Relegation of the proper rotation in the orbital-attitude motion of a spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, Mercedes; Elipe, Antonio

    An analytical approach is taken to study the attitude of a spacecraft on an orbit around a planet assimilated to a mass point. In the Hamiltonian representing this dynamical system, we identify the principal term (of order 0) as made of two parts: the part describing the motion of the center of mass of the satellite about the planet is expressed in terms of the Whittaker variables, and the part accounting for the rotation of the satellite about its center of mass in the absence of external forces which is expressed in terms of the Serret-Andoyer variables. We propose to build a Lie transformation to remove the angle g from the potential of the perturbation by applying the 'relegation of the node' technique.

  15. Modeling and adaptive motion/force tracking for ver tical wheel on rotating table

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongcai Zhang; Yuqiang Wu; Wei Sun

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of modeling and adaptive motion/force tracking for a class of nonholonomic dy-namic systems with affine constraints (NDSAC): a vertical wheel on a rotating table. Prior to the development of tracking control er, the dynamic model of the wheel in question is derived in a meticu-lous manner. A continuously differentiable friction model is also considered in the modeling. By exploiting the inherent cascade interconnected structure of the wheel dynamics, an adaptive mo-tion/force tracking control er is presented guaranteeing that the trajectory tracking errors asymptotical y converge to zero while the contact force tracking errors can be made smal enough by tuning design parameters. Simulation results are provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed tracking methodology.

  16. Study of Stability of Rotational Motion of Spacecraft with Canonical Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Reis Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to analyze the stability of the rotational motion of artificial satellites in circular orbit with the influence of gravity gradient torque, using the Andoyer variables. The used method in this paper to analyze stability is the Kovalev-Savchenko theorem. This method requires the reduction of the Hamiltonian in its normal form up to fourth order by means of canonical transformations around equilibrium points. The coefficients of the normal Hamiltonian are indispensable in the study of nonlinear stability of its equilibrium points according to the three established conditions in the theorem. Some physical and orbital data of real satellites were used in the numerical simulations. In comparison with previous work, the results show a greater number of equilibrium points and an optimization in the algorithm to determine the normal form and stability analysis. The results of this paper can directly contribute in maintaining the attitude of artificial satellites.

  17. Investigation of Pendulum Structures for Rotational Energy Harvesting from Human Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylli, K.; Hoffmann, D.; Willmann, A.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Energy Harvesting from human motion as a means of powering body-worn devices has been in the focus of research groups for several years now. This work presents a rotational inductive energy harvester that can generate a sufficient amount of energy during normal walking to power small electronic systems. Three pendulum structures and their geometrical parameters are investigated in detail through a system model and system simulations. Based on these results a prototype device is fabricated. The masses and angles between pendulum arms can be changed for the experiments. The device is tested under real-world conditions and generates an average power of up to 23.39 mW across a resistance equal to the coil resistance of the optimal pendulum configuration. A regulated power output of the total system including power management of 3.3 mW is achieved.

  18. Equations of motion for free-flight systems of rotating-translating bodies having variable mass and configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodapp, A.E. Jr.

    1978-03-01

    General vector differential equations of motion are developed for a system of rotating-translating, unbalanced, variable mass, variable configuration bodies. Complete flexibility is provided in placement of the reference coordinates within the system of bodies and in placement of body fixed axes within each body. Examples are presented to demonstrate the ease with which these equations can be reduced to the equations of motion for systems of interest.

  19. Real World Testing Of A Piezoelectric Rotational Energy Harvester For Human Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvesting energy from human motion is challenging because the frequencies are generally low and random compared to industrial machinery that vibrates at much higher frequencies. One of the most promising and popular strategies to overcome this is frequency up-conversion. The transducing element is actuated at its optimal frequency of operation, higher than the source excitation frequency, through some kind of catch and release mechanism. This is beneficial for efficient power generation. Such devices have now been investigated for a few years and this paper takes a previously introduced piezoelectric rotational harvester, relying on beam plucking for the energy conversion, to the next step by testing the device during a half marathon race. The prototype and data acquisition system are described in detail and the experimental results presented. A comparison of the input excitation, based on an accelerometer readout, and the output voltage of the piezoelectric beam, recorded at the same time, confirm the successful implementation of the system. For a device functional volume of 1.85 cm3, a maximum power output of 7 μW was achieved when the system was worn on the upper arm. However, degradation of the piezoelectric material meant that the performance dropped rapidly from this initial level; this requires further research. Furthermore, the need for intermediate energy storage solutions is discussed, as human motion harvesters only generate power as long as the wearer is actually moving

  20. Small amplitude, transverse vibrations of circular plates with an eccentric rectangular perforation elastically restrained against rotation and translation on both edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, P. A. A.; Avalos, D. R.

    2008-05-01

    The Rayleigh-Ritz variational method is applied to the determination of the first four frequency coefficients for small amplitude, transverse vibrations of circular plates with an eccentric, rectangular perforation that is elastically restrained against rotation and translation on both edges. Coordinate functions are used which identically satisfy the boundary conditions at the outer circular edge, while the restraining boundary conditions at the inner edge of the cutout are dealt with directly through the energetic terms in the functional expressions. The procedure seems to show very good numerical stability and convergence properties. As an added bonus, the method allows for increased flexibility in dealing with boundary conditions at the edge of the cutout.

  1. First Gaia Local Group Dynamics: Magellanic Clouds Proper Motion and Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    van der Marel, Roeland P

    2016-01-01

    We use the Gaia data release 1 (DR1) to study the proper motion (PM) fields of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC, SMC). This uses the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) PMs for 29 Hipparcos stars in the LMC and 8 in the SMC. The LMC PM in the West and North directions is inferred to be $(\\mu_W,\\mu_N) = (1.874 \\pm 0.039, 0.223 \\pm 0.049)$ mas/yr, and the SMC PM $(\\mu_W,\\mu_N) = (0.876 \\pm 0.060, 1.227 \\pm 0.042)$ mas/yr. These results have similar accuracy and agree to within the uncertainties with existing Hubble Space Telescope (HST) PM measurements. Since TGAS uses different methods with different systematics, this provides an external validation of both data sets and their underlying approaches. Residual DR1 systematics may affect the TGAS results, but the HST agreement implies this must be below the random errors. Also in agreement with prior HST studies, the TGAS LMC PM field clearly shows the clockwise rotation of the disk, even though it takes the LMC disk in excess of $10^8$ years to comp...

  2. Poisson equations of rotational motion for a rigid triaxial body with application to a tumbling artificial satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. J. F.; Fitzpatrick, P. M.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for studying the effects of gravity gradient torque on the attitude stability of a tumbling triaxial rigid satellite. Poisson equations are used to investigate the rotation of the satellite (which is in elliptical orbit about an attracting point mass) about its center of mass. An averaging method is employed to obtain an intermediate set of differential equations for the nonresonant, secular behavior of the osculating elements which describe the rotational motions of the satellite, and the averaged equations are then integrated to obtain long-term secular solutions for the osculating elements.

  3. Prosthesis alignment affects axial rotation motion after total knee replacement: a prospective in vivo study combining computed tomography and fluoroscopic evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harman Melinda K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical consequences of alignment errors in total knee replacement (TKR have led to the rigorous evaluation of surgical alignment techniques. Rotational alignment in the transverse plane has proven particularly problematic, with errors due to component malalignment relative to bone anatomic landmarks and an overall mismatch between the femoral and tibial components’ relative positions. Ranges of nominal rotational alignment are not well defined, especially for the tibial component and for relative rotational mismatch, and some studies advocate the use of mobile-bearing TKR to accommodate the resulting small rotation errors. However, the relationships between prosthesis rotational alignment and mobile-bearing polyethylene insert motion are poorly understood. This prospective, in vivo study evaluates whether component malalignment and mismatch affect axial rotation motions during passive knee flexion after TKR. Methods Eighty patients were implanted with mobile-bearing TKR. Rotational alignment of the femoral and tibial components was measured from postoperative CT scans. All TKR were categorized into nominal or outlier groups based on defined norms for surgical rotational alignment relative to bone anatomic landmarks and relative rotational mismatch between the femoral and tibial components. Axial rotation motion of the femoral, tibial and polyethylene bearing components was measured from fluoroscopic images acquired during passive knee flexion. Results Axial rotation motion was generally accomplished in two phases, dominated by polyethylene bearing rotation on the tibial component in early to mid-flexion and then femoral component rotation on the polyethylene articular surface in later flexion. Opposite rotations of the femur-bearing and bearing-baseplate articulations were evident at flexion greater than 80°. Knees with outlier alignment had lower magnitudes of axial rotation and distinct transitions from external to

  4. CHROMOSPHERIC MASS MOTIONS AND INTRINSIC SUNSPOT ROTATIONS FOR NOAA ACTIVE REGIONS 10484, 10486, AND 10488 USING ISOON DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work utilizes Improved Solar Observing Optical Network continuum (630.2 nm) and Hα (656.2 nm) data to: (1) detect and measure intrinsic sunspot rotations occurring in the photosphere and chromosphere, (2) identify and measure chromospheric filament mass motions, and (3) assess any large-scale photospheric and chromospheric mass couplings. Significant results from 2003 October 27-29, using the techniques of Brown et al., indicate significant counter-rotation between the two large sunspots in NOAA AR 10486 on October 29, as well as discrete filament mass motions in NOAA AR 10484 on October 27 that appear to be associated with at least one C-class solar flare

  5. Phase motion in the $Z^-(4430)$ amplitude in $B^0\\to\\psi^\\prime\\pi^-K^+$ decay

    OpenAIRE

    Bediaga, Ignacio; de Miranda, Jussara M.(Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 22290-180, Brazil); Nielsen, Marina; Rodrigues, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In view of the proliferation in the number of new charmonium states, it is really important to have a experimental way to prove that an observed bump is, indeed, a real resonance. To do that, in this paper we present an alternative method to demonstrate the resonant behavior of a state. With this method, the phase variation of a generic complex amplitude can be directly revealed through interference in the Dalitz-plot region where it crosses a well established resonant state, used as a probe....

  6. Chromospheric mass motions and intrinsic sunspot rotations for NOAA Active Regions 10484, 10486, and 10488 using ISOON data

    OpenAIRE

    Hardersen, Paul S.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Shkolyar, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    This work utilizes Improved Solar Observing Optical Network (ISOON: Neidig et al. 2003) continuum (630.2 nm) and H{\\alpha} (656.2 nm) data to: 1) detect and measure intrinsic sunspot rotations occurring in the photosphere and chromosphere, 2) identify and measure chromospheric filament mass motions, and 3) assess any large-scale photospheric and chromospheric mass couplings. Significant results from October 27-29, 2003, using the techniques of Brown et al. (2003), indicate significant counter...

  7. Discovery of a new motion mechanism of biomotors similar to the earth revolving around the sun without rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peixuan, E-mail: peixuan.guo@uky.edu; Schwartz, Chad; Haak, Jeannie; Zhao, Zhengyi

    2013-11-15

    Biomotors have been classified into linear and rotational motors. For 35 years, it has been popularly believed that viral dsDNA-packaging apparatuses are pentameric rotation motors. Recently, a third class of hexameric motor has been found in bacteriophage phi29 that utilizes a mechanism of revolution without rotation, friction, coiling, or torque. This review addresses how packaging motors control dsDNA one-way traffic; how four electropositive layers in the channel interact with the electronegative phosphate backbone to generate four steps in translocating one dsDNA helix; how motors resolve the mismatch between 10.5 bases and 12 connector subunits per cycle of revolution; and how ATP regulates sequential action of motor ATPase. Since motors with all number of subunits can utilize the revolution mechanism, this finding helps resolve puzzles and debates concerning the oligomeric nature of packaging motors in many phage systems. This revolution mechanism helps to solve the undesirable dsDNA supercoiling issue involved in rotation. - Highlights: • New motion mechanism of revolution without rotation found for phi29 DNA packaging. • Revolution motor finding expands classical linear and rotation biomotor classes. • Revolution motors transport dsDNA unidirectionally without supercoiling. • New mechanism solves many puzzles, mysteries, and debates in biomotor studies. • Motors with all numbers of subunits can utilize the revolution mechanism.

  8. Significance of rotating ground motions on nonlinear behavior of symmetric and asymmetric buildings in near fault sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; ,

    2012-01-01

    Building codes in the U.S. require at least two horizontal ground motion components for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of structures. For sites within 5 km of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal/fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHA analyses should be performed separately (when FN and then FP are aligned with transverse direction of the structural axes). It is assumed that this approach will lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all non-redundant rotation angles. This assumption is examined here using 3D computer models of a single-story structure having symmetric (that is, torsionally-stiff) and asymmetric (that is, torsionally flexible) layouts subjected to an ensemble of bi-directional near-fault strong ground motions with and without apparent velocity pulses. In this parametric study, the elastic vibration period of the structures is varied from 0.2 to 5 seconds, and yield strength reduction factors R is varied from a value that leads to linear-elastic design to 3 and 5. The influence that the rotation angle of the ground motion has on several engineering demand parameters (EDPs) is examined in linear-elastic and nonlinear-inelastic domains to form a benchmark for evaluating the use of the FN/FP directions as well as the maximum-direction (MD) ground motion, a new definition of horizontal ground motions for use in the seismic design of structures according to the 2009 NEHRP Provisions and Commentary.

  9. Mathematical Modelling of Response Amplitude Operator for Roll Motion of a Floating Body:Analysis in Frequency Domain with Numerical Validation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samir K.Das; Masoud Baghfalaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates mathematical modelling of response amplitude operator (RAO) or transfer function using the frequency-based analysis for uncoupled roll motion of a floating body under the influence of small amplitude regular waves. The hydrodynamic coefficients are computed using strip theory formulation by integrating over the length of the floating body. Considering sinusoidal wave with frequency (ω ) varying between 0.3 rad/s and 1.2 rad/s acts on beam to the floating body for zero forward speed, analytical expressions of RAO in frequency domain is obtained. Using the normalization procedure and frequency based analysis, group based classifications are obtained and accordingly governing equations are formulated for each case. After applying the fourth order Runge-Kutta method numerical solutions are obtained and relative importance of the hydrodynamic coefficients is analyzed. To illustrate the roll amplitude effects numerical experiments have been carried out for a Panamax container ship under the action of sinusoidal wave with a fixed wave height. The effect of viscous damping on RAO is evaluated and the model is validated using convergence, consistency and stability analysis. This modelling approach could be useful to model floating body dynamics for higher degrees of freedom and to validate the result.

  10. Characteristic dynamic modes and domain-wall motion in magnetic nanotubes excited by resonant rotating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaehak; Kim, Junhoe; Kim, Bosung; Cho, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2016-07-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical calculations to explore a cylindrical nanotube's magnetization dynamics and domain-wall (DW) motions driven by eigen-circular-rotating magnetic fields of different frequencies. We discovered the presence of two different localized DW oscillations as well as asymmetric ferromagnetic resonance precession and azimuthal spin-wave modes at the corresponding resonant frequencies of the circular-rotating fields. Associated with these intrinsic modes, there exist very contrasting DW motions of different speed and propagation direction for a given DW chirality. The direction and speed of the DW propagation were found to be controllable according to the rotation sense and frequency of noncontact circular-rotating fields. Furthermore, spin-wave emissions from the moving DW were observed at a specific field frequency along with their Doppler effect. This work furthers the fundamental understanding of soft magnetic nanotubes' intrinsic dynamic modes and spin-wave emissions and offers an efficient means of manipulating the speed and direction of their DW propagations.

  11. Circular orbits and related quasi-harmonic oscillatory motion of charged particles around weakly magnetized rotating black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Tursunov, Arman; Kološ, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We study motion of charged particles in the field of a rotating black hole immersed into an external asymptotically uniform magnetic field, focusing on the epicyclic quasi-circular orbits near the equatorial plane. Separating the circular orbits into four qualitatively different classes according to the sign of the canonical angular momentum of the motion and the orientation of the Lorentz force, we analyse the circular orbits using the so called force formalism. We find the analytical solutions for the radial profiles of velocity, specific angular momentum and specific energy of the circular orbits in dependence on the black hole dimensionless spin and the magnetic field strength. The innermost stable circular orbits are determined for all four classes of the circular orbits. The stable circular orbits with outward oriented Lorentz force can extend to radii lower than the radius of the corresponding photon circular geodesic. We calculate the frequencies of the harmonic oscillatory motion of the charged parti...

  12. Automatic 3D motion estimation of left ventricle from C-arm rotational angiocardiography using a prior motion model and learning based boundary detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingqing; Zheng, Yefeng; Wang, Yang; Mueller, Kerstin; Lauritsch, Guenter

    2013-01-01

    Compared to pre-operative imaging modalities, it is more convenient to estimate the current cardiac physiological status from C-arm angiocardiography since C-arm is a widely used intra-operative imaging modality to guide many cardiac interventions. The 3D shape and motion of the left ventricle (LV) estimated from rotational angiocardiography provide important cardiac function measurements, e.g., ejection fraction and myocardium motion dyssynchrony. However, automatic estimation of the 3D LV motion is difficult since all anatomical structures overlap on the 2D X-ray projections and the nearby confounding strong image boundaries (e.g., pericardium) often cause ambiguities to LV endocardium boundary detection. In this paper, a new framework is proposed to overcome the aforementioned difficulties: (1) A new learning-based boundary detector is developed by training a boosting boundary classifier combined with the principal component analysis of a local image patch; (2) The prior LV motion model is learned from a set of dynamic cardiac computed tomography (CT) sequences to provide a good initial estimate of the 3D LV shape of different cardiac phases; (3) The 3D motion trajectory is learned for each mesh point; (4) All these components are integrated into a multi-surface graph optimization method to extract the globally coherent motion. The method is tested on seven patient scans, showing significant improvement on the ambiguous boundary cases with a detection accuracy of 2.87 +/- 1.00 mm on LV endocardium boundary delineation in the 2D projections.

  13. Projectile motion of a once rotating object: physical quantities at the point of return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabasi, Sameer

    2016-09-01

    Vertical circular motion is a widely used example to explain non-uniform circular motion in most undergraduate general physics textbooks. However, most of these textbooks do not elaborate on the case when this motion turns into projectile motion under certain conditions. In this paper, we describe thoroughly when a mass attached to a cord, moving in a vertical circular motion, turns into a projectile and its location and velocity when it rejoins the circular orbit. This paper provides an intuitive understanding, supported by basic kinematic equations, to give an interesting elegant connection between circular motion and projectile motion—something lacking in most physics textbooks—and will be very useful to present to an undergraduate class to deepen their understanding of both models of motion.

  14. Simulation based analysis of the micro propulsion with rotating corkscrew motion of flagella

    OpenAIRE

    Koz, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    In this work, a simulation based parametric analysis of a micro swimmer with a rotating helical tail is presented. The numeric model consists of micro swimmer positioned in a cylindrical micro channel. The flow induced by the rotating helical tail has a Reynolds number much smaller than 1 and it is solved by three dimensional, time dependent Navier Stokes equations subject to continuity. As a requirement of the changing orientation of the swimmer and its rotating helical tail in the micro cha...

  15. The motion of an arbitrarily rotating spherical projectile and its application to ball games

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the differential equations which govern the motion of a spherical projectile rotating about an arbitrary axis in the presence of an arbitrary ‘wind’ are developed. Three forces are assumed to act on the projectile: (i) gravity, (ii) a drag force proportional to the square of the projectile's velocity and in the opposite direction to this velocity and (iii) a lift or ‘Magnus’ force also assumed to be proportional to the square of the projectile's velocity and in a direction perpendicular to both this velocity and the angular velocity vector of the projectile. The problem has been coded in Matlab and some illustrative model trajectories are presented for ‘ball-games’, specifically golf and cricket, although the equations could equally well be applied to other ball-games such as tennis, soccer or baseball. Spin about an arbitrary axis allows for the treatment of situations where, for example, the spin has a component about the direction of travel. In the case of a cricket ball the subtle behaviour of so-called ‘drift’, particularly ‘late drift’, and also ‘dip’, which may be produced by a slow bowler's off or leg-spin, are investigated. It is found that the trajectories obtained are broadly in accord with those observed in practice. We envisage that this paper may be useful in two ways: (i) for its inherent scientific value as, to the best of our knowledge, the fundamental equations derived here have not appeared in the literature and (ii) in cultivating student interest in the numerical solution of differential equations, since so many of them actively participate in ball-games, and they will be able to compare their own practical experience with the overall trends indicated by the numerical results. As the paper presents equations which can be further extended, it may be of interest to research workers. However, since only the most basic principles of fundamental mechanics are employed, it should be well within the grasp of first

  16. Modeling direction discrimination thresholds for yaw rotations around an earth-vertical axis for arbitrary motion profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyka, Florian; Giordano, Paolo Robuffo; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the dynamics of vestibular perception is important, for example, for improving the realism of motion simulation and virtual reality environments or for diagnosing patients suffering from vestibular problems. Previous research has found a dependence of direction discrimination thresholds for rotational motions on the period length (inverse frequency) of a transient (single cycle) sinusoidal acceleration stimulus. However, self-motion is seldom purely sinusoidal, and up to now, no models have been proposed that take into account non-sinusoidal stimuli for rotational motions. In this work, the influence of both the period length and the specific time course of an inertial stimulus is investigated. Thresholds for three acceleration profile shapes (triangular, sinusoidal, and trapezoidal) were measured for three period lengths (0.3, 1.4, and 6.7 s) in ten participants. A two-alternative forced-choice discrimination task was used where participants had to judge if a yaw rotation around an earth-vertical axis was leftward or rightward. The peak velocity of the stimulus was varied, and the threshold was defined as the stimulus yielding 75 % correct answers. In accordance with previous research, thresholds decreased with shortening period length (from ~2 deg/s for 6.7 s to ~0.8 deg/s for 0.3 s). The peak velocity was the determining factor for discrimination: Different profiles with the same period length have similar velocity thresholds. These measurements were used to fit a novel model based on a description of the firing rate of semi-circular canal neurons. In accordance with previous research, the estimates of the model parameters suggest that velocity storage does not influence perceptual thresholds. PMID:22623095

  17. PELVIC ROTATION AND LOWER EXTREMITY MOTION WITH TWO DIFFERENT FRONT FOOT DIRECTIONS IN THE TENNIS BACKHAND GROUNDSTROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayumi Iwamoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available When a tennis player steps forward to hit a backhand groundstroke in closed stance, modifying the direction of the front foot relative to the net may reduce the risk of ankle injury and increase performance. This study evaluated the relationship between pelvic rotation and lower extremity movement during the backhand groundstroke when players stepped with toes parallel to the net (Level or with toes pointed towards the net (Net. High school competitive tennis players (eleven males and seven females, 16.8 ± 0.8 years, all right- handed performed tennis court tests comprising five maximum speed directional runs to the court intersection line to hit an imaginary ball with forehand or backhand swings. The final backhand groundstroke for each player at the backcourt baseline was analyzed. Pelvic rotation and lower extremity motion were quantified using 3D video analysis from frontal and sagittal plane camera views reconstructed to 3D using DLT methods. Plantar flexion of ankle and supination of the front foot were displayed for both Net and Level groups during the late phase of the front foot step. The timings of the peak pelvis rotational velocity and peak pelvis rotational acceleration showed different pattern for Net and Level groups. The peak timing of the pelvis rotational velocity of the Level group occurred during the late phase of the step, suggesting an increase in the risk of inversion ankle sprain and a decrease in stroke power compared to the Net group

  18. On the propagation and stability of wave motions in rapidly rotating spherical shells - III: Hydromagnetic three-dimensional motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linear stability of a rotating Boussinesq fluid contained in a spherical shell to three-dimensional distrubances is studied in the presence of a general toroidal magnetic field. The local stability analysis used indicated that the stability of the system is not very different from that already known for the Malkus field (i.e. a field that varies directly as the distance from the rotation axis). The main influence of the general field is the introduction of a zonal flow which Doppler shifts the frequency of the waves. Consequently, the unstable waves in the geophysically relevant case of small q (=kappa/anti eta, where kappa, anti eta are, respectively, the thermal and magnetic diffusivities) drift eastward deep into the core and westward near the core-mantle boundary. For the astrophysically relevant situation q>>1 the presence of the zonal flow also blows the waves eastward in most of the core so that westward propagation is possible only in the top part of the core. (author)

  19. Phase motion in the $Z^-(4430)$ amplitude in $B^0\\to\\psi^\\prime\\pi^-K^+$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Bediaga, Ignacio; Nielsen, Marina; Rodrigues, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In view of the proliferation in the number of new charmonium states, it is really important to have a experimental way to prove that an observed bump is, indeed, a real resonance. To do that, in this paper we present an alternative method to demonstrate the resonant behavior of a state. With this method, the phase variation of a generic complex amplitude can be directly revealed through interference in the Dalitz-plot region where it crosses a well established resonant state, used as a probe. We have tested the method for the $Z^-(4430)$ state by generating Monte Carlo samples for the $B^0\\to \\psi^\\prime \\pi^-K^+$ decay channel. We have shown that the proposed method gives a clear oscillation behavior, related to the phase variation associated to a real resonant state, in the case where the $Z^-(4430)$ is considered as a regular resonance with a strong phase variation. We have also discussed the possibility of using the proposed method complementary to the Argand diagram to determine the internal structure of...

  20. A Comparative Study on Shoulder Rotational Strength, Range of Motion and Proprioception between the Throwing Athletes and Non-athletic Persons

    OpenAIRE

    Nodehi-Moghadam, Afsun; Nasrin, Nasrin; Kharazmi, Aleeyehsadat; Eskandari, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The repetitive micro traumatic stresses placed on the athletes shoulder joint complex during the throwing motion challenge the surrounding tissues. The purpose of this study was to compare shoulder rotational strength, range of motion and proprioception between the throwing athletes and non-athletic persons. Methods Fifteen throwing athletes and 15 non-athletes participated in a nonrandom case – control study. Strength of shoulder rotational movements was tested with a hand held dynam...

  1. Rotation periods and astrometric motions of the Luhman 16AB brown dwarfs by high-resolution lucky-imaging monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, L.; Giacobbe, P.; Littlefair, S. P.; Southworth, J.; Bozza, V.; Damasso, M.; Dominik, M.; Hundertmark, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Juncher, D.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Schmidt, R. W.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Sozzetti, A.; Alsubai, K.; Bramich, D. M.; Calchi Novati, S.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Galianni, P.; Gu, S.-H.; Harpsøe, K.; Haugbølle, T.; Henning, Th.; Hinse, T. C.; Kains, N.; Korhonen, H.; Scarpetta, G.; Starkey, D.; Surdej, J.; Wang, X.-B.; Wertz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Photometric monitoring of the variability of brown dwarfs can provide useful information about the structure of clouds in their cold atmospheres.The brown-dwarf binary system Luhman 16AB is an interesting target for such a study, because its components stand at the L/T transition and show high levels of variability. Luhman 16AB is also the third closest system to the solar system, which allows precise astrometric investigations with ground-based facilities. Aims: The aim of the work is to estimate the rotation period and study the astrometric motion of both components. Methods: We have monitored Luhman 16AB over a period of two years with the lucky-imaging camera mounted on the Danish 1.54 m telescope at La Silla, through a special i + z long-pass filter, which allowed us to clearly resolve the two brown dwarfs into single objects. An intense monitoring of the target was also performed over 16 nights, in which we observed a peak-to-peak variability of 0.20 ± 0.02 mag and 0.34 ± 0.02 mag for Luhman 16A and 16B, respectively. Results: We used the 16-night time-series data to estimate the rotation period of the two components. We found that Luhman 16B rotates with a period of 5.1 ± 0.1 h, in very good agreement with previous measurements. For Luhman 16A, we report that it rotates more slowly than its companion, and even though we were not able to get a robust determination, our data indicate a rotation period of roughly 8 h. This implies that the rotation axes of the two components are well aligned and suggests a scenario in which the two objects underwent the same accretion process. The 2-year complete data set was used to study the astrometric motion of Luhman 16AB. We predict a motion of the system that is not consistent with a previous estimate based on two months of monitoring, but cannot confirm or refute the presence of additional planetary-mass bodies in the system. Based on data collected by MiNDSTEp with the Danish 1.54 m telescope at the ESO La

  2. Exploiting Performance of Different Low-Cost Sensors for Small Amplitude Oscillatory Motion Monitoring: Preliminary Comparisons in View of Possible Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Benedetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of low amplitude oscillatory motion detection through different low-cost sensors: a LIS3LV02DQ MEMS accelerometer, a Microsoft Kinect v2 range camera, and a uBlox 6 GPS receiver. Several tests were performed using a one-direction vibrating table with different oscillation frequencies (in the range 1.5–3 Hz and small challenging amplitudes (0.02 m and 0.03 m. A Mikrotron EoSens high-resolution camera was used to give reference data. A dedicated software tool was developed to retrieve Kinect v2 results. The capabilities of the VADASE algorithm were employed to process uBlox 6 GPS receiver observations. In the investigated time interval (in the order of tens of seconds the results obtained indicate that displacements were detected with the resolution of fractions of millimeters with MEMS accelerometer and Kinect v2 and few millimeters with uBlox 6. MEMS accelerometer displays the lowest noise but a significant bias, whereas Kinect v2 and uBlox 6 appear more stable. The results suggest the possibility of sensor integration both for indoor (MEMS accelerometer + Kinect v2 and for outdoor (MEMS accelerometer + uBlox 6 applications and seem promising for structural monitoring applications.

  3. Adding flexibility to the “particles-on-a-sphere” model for large-amplitude motion: POSflex force field for protonated methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The so-called “particles-on-a-sphere” (POS) model has been introduced a while ago in order to describe in simple terms large-amplitude motion of polyatomic hydrides, XHn. The POS model of protonated methane, CH5+, has been shown to capture well the essence of the fluxional nature of this enigmatic floppy molecule. Here, we extend this model to the POSflex force field by adding flexibility to the C–H bonds, which are constrained to a common fixed bond length in the original model. This makes the present model extremely efficient for computer simulation, including path integral molecular dynamics in order to assess the crucial quantum effects on nuclear motion at low temperatures. Moreover, the POSflex force field can be conveniently used to study microsolvation effects upon combining it with intermolecular pair potentials to account for solute-solvent interactions. Upon computing static properties as well as thermal and quantum fluctuation effects at ambient and low temperatures, respectively, it is shown that the POSflex model is very well suited to describe the structural properties of bare CH5+, including hydrogen scrambling and thus fluxionality in the first place. The far- to mid-infrared spectrum up to the bending band is roughly described, whereas the model fails to account for the well-structured stretching band by construction

  4. Motion of a Point Mass in a Rotating Disc: A Quantitative Analysis of the Coriolis and Centrifugal Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddout, Soufiane

    2016-06-01

    In Newtonian mechanics, the non-inertial reference frames is a generalization of Newton's laws to any reference frames. While this approach simplifies some problems, there is often little physical insight into the motion, in particular into the effects of the Coriolis force. The fictitious Coriolis force can be used by anyone in that frame of reference to explain why objects follow curved paths. In this paper, a mathematical solution based on differential equations in non-inertial reference is used to study different types of motion in rotating system. In addition, the experimental data measured on a turntable device, using a video camera in a mechanics laboratory was conducted to compare with mathematical solution in case of parabolically curved, solving non-linear least-squares problems, based on Levenberg-Marquardt's and Gauss-Newton algorithms.

  5. Effect of octupole interaction on the rotational motion of rotors in a solid Kr-CD4 solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heat capacity of solid (CD4)nKr1-n solutions with CD4 concentrations n = 0.09, 0.17, 0.25, 0.35 and solutions with n = 0.25 doped with 0.0005, 0.0021 and 0.0123 of O2 impurity has been investigated at T 0.6-30 K. It is found that the molecular field responsible for a qualitative change in the rotational motion of the rotators increases sharply as the number of nearest neighbours increases from one to three. Below 1.6 K the temperature dependence of the heat capacities of the rotational subsystems of the solutions can be described by a sum of the contributions made by molecules finding themselves in effective weak, moderate and strong molecular fields. The average concentration and the effective energy differences between the ground and the first excited energy levels of the CD4 molecules in the above mentioned fields have been estimated. It is shown that the considerable changes in the experimental heat capacities of the rotational subsystem normalized to a mole of rotors are mostly due to the changes in the relative concentrations x(n) of the rotors in these molecular fields. Above T = 0.6 K the nuclear-spin A, T and E species of the molecules reach equilibrium distribution within one measurement of the heat capacity. The O2 impurity is found to produce great influence on the heat capacity of the rotational subsystem in the solution with n = 0.25 and the equilibrium composition of the nuclear-spin species of the molecules

  6. Mandibular range of motion in patients with idiopathic peripheral facial palsy Amplitude mandibular em pacientes com paralisia facial periférica idiopática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Chiarion Sassi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Regarding orofacial motor assessment in facial paralysis, quantitative measurements of the face are being used to establish diagnosis, prognosis and treatment planning. AIM: To assess the prevalence of changes in mandibular range of motion in individuals with peripheral facial paralysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective study. We had 56 volunteers, divided in two groups: G1 made up of 28 individuals with idiopathic facial paralysis (6 males and 22 females; 14 with manifestations on the right side of the face and 14 on the left side; time of onset varied between 6-12 months; G2 with 28 healthy individuals paired by age and gender to G1. In order to assess mandibular range of motion, a digital caliper was used. The following measurements were made: 1 middle line; 2 maximum oral opening; 3 lateralization to the right; 4 lateralization to the left; 5 protrusion; 6 horizontal overlap. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences between the groups were observed for maximum oral opening, lateralization to the left and protrusion. G1 presented smaller measurement values than G2. CONCLUSION: Patients with facial paralysis present significant reduction of mandibular range of motion. The results support the suggestion of incorporating functional evaluation of the temporomandibular joint to the existing facial paralysis clinical assessment protocols.Na atuação fonoaudiológica na paralisia facial, medidas quantitativas da face têm sido cada vez mais utilizadas para avaliação, diagnóstico, prognóstico e planejamento terapêutico. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência de alterações de amplitude mandibular na paralisia facial periférica de origem. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo. Cinquenta e seis indivíduos foram divididos em dois grupos: G1 com 28 pacientes com paralisia facial idiopática (6 homens e 22 mulheres, 14 com comprometimento à direita e 14 à esquerda e tempo de duração da paralisia entre 6 e 12 meses; G2 composto por 28 indiv

  7. Global rotational motion and displacement estimation of digital image stabilization based on the oblique vectors matching algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Hui, Mei; Zhao, Yue-jin

    2009-08-01

    The image block matching algorithm based on motion vectors of correlative pixels in oblique direction is presented for digital image stabilization. The digital image stabilization is a new generation of image stabilization technique which can obtains the information of relative motion among frames of dynamic image sequences by the method of digital image processing. In this method the matching parameters are calculated from the vectors projected in the oblique direction. The matching parameters based on the vectors contain the information of vectors in transverse and vertical direction in the image blocks at the same time. So the better matching information can be obtained after making correlative operation in the oblique direction. And an iterative weighted least square method is used to eliminate the error of block matching. The weights are related with the pixels' rotational angle. The center of rotation and the global emotion estimation of the shaking image can be obtained by the weighted least square from the estimation of each block chosen evenly from the image. Then, the shaking image can be stabilized with the center of rotation and the global emotion estimation. Also, the algorithm can run at real time by the method of simulated annealing in searching method of block matching. An image processing system based on DSP was used to exam this algorithm. The core processor in the DSP system is TMS320C6416 of TI, and the CCD camera with definition of 720×576 pixels was chosen as the input video signal. Experimental results show that the algorithm can be performed at the real time processing system and have an accurate matching precision.

  8. Reconstructing rotations and rigid body motions from exact point correspondences through reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Fontijne; L. Dorst

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new algorithm to reconstruct a rigid body motion from point correspondences. The algorithm works by constructing a series of reflections which align the points with their correspondences one by one. This is naturally and efficiently implemented in the conformal model of geometric algeb

  9. The seven sisters DANCe.II. Proper motions and the lithium-rotation-activity connection for G and K Pleiads

    CERN Document Server

    Barrado, D; Bouvier, J; Moraux, E; Sarro, L M; Bertin, E; Cuillandre, J C; Stauffer, J R; Lillo-Box, J; Pollock, A

    2016-01-01

    Stellar clusters are open windows to understand stellar evolution. Specifically, the change with time and the dependence on mass of different stellar properties. As such, they are our laboratories where different theories can be tested. We try to understand the origin of the connection between lithium depletion in F, G and K stars, rotation and activity, in particular in the Pleiades open cluster. We have collected all the relevant data in the literature, including information regarding rotation period, binarity and activity, and cross-matched with proper motions, multi-wavelength photometry and membership probability from the DANCe database. In order to avoid biases, only Pleiades single members with probabilities larger than p=0.75 have been included in the discussion. Results. The analysis confirms that there is a strong link between activity, rotation and the lithium equivalent width excess, specially for the range Lum(bol) = 0.5-0.2 Lsun (about K2-K7 spectral types or 0.75-0.95 Msun). It is not possible ...

  10. Carotid artery longitudinal wall motion is associated with local blood velocity and left ventricular rotational, but not longitudinal, mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Jason S; Ditor, David S; MacDonald, Maureen J; Stöhr, Eric J

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have identified a predictable movement pattern of the common carotid artery wall in the longitudinal direction. While there is evidence that the magnitude of this carotid artery longitudinal wall motion (CALM) is sensitive to cardiovascular health status, little is known about the determinants of CALM The purpose of this integrative study was to evaluate the contribution of left ventricular (LV) cardiac motion and local blood velocity to CALM Simultaneous ultrasound measurements of CALM, common carotid artery mean blood velocity (MBV), and left ventricular motion were performed in ten young, healthy individuals (6 males; 22 ± 1 years). Peak anterograde CALM occurred at a similar time as peak MBV (18.57 ± 3.98% vs. 18.53 ± 2.81% cardiac cycle; t-test: P = 0.94; ICC: 0.79, P longitudinal displacement was not associated with peak CALM (r = 0.11, P = 0.77). These results suggest that the rotational mechanical movement of the LV base may be closely associated with longitudinal mechanics in the carotid artery. This finding may have important implications for interpreting the complex relationship between ventricular and vascular function.

  11. A 1.82 m^2 ring laser gyroscope for nano-rotational motion sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Belfi, Jacopo; Bosi, Filippo; Carelli, Giorgio; Di Virgilio, Angela; Maccioni, Enrico; Ortolan, Antonello; Stefani, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    We present a fully active-controlled He-Ne ring laser gyroscope, operating in square cavity 1.35 m in side. The apparatus is designed to provide a very low mechanical and thermal drift of the ring cavity geometry and is conceived to be operative in two different orientations of the laser plane, in order to detect rotations around the vertical or the horizontal direction. Since June 2010 the system is active inside the Virgo interferometer central area with the aim of performing high sensitivity measurements of environmental rotational noise. So far, continuous not attempted operation of the gyroscope has been longer than 30 days. The main characteristics of the laser, the active remote-controlled stabilization systems and the data acquisition techniques are presented. An off-line data processing, supported by a simple model of the sensor, is shown to improve the effective long term stability. A rotational sensitivity at the level of ten nanoradiants per squareroot of Hz below 1 Hz, very close to the required ...

  12. ALMA Observations of the Transition from Infall Motion to Keplerian Rotation around the Late-phase Protostar TMC-1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yusuke; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Saigo, Kazuya; Koyamatsu, Shin; Aikawa, Yuri; Hayashi, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saito, Masao; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Yen, Hsi-Wei

    2015-10-01

    We have observed the Class I protostar TMC-1A with the Atacama Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the emissions of 12CO and C18O (J = 2–1) and 1.3 mm dust continuum. Continuum emission with a deconvolved size of 0.″50 × 0.″37, perpendicular to the 12CO outflow, is detected. It most likely traces a circumstellar disk around TMC-1A, as previously reported. In contrast, a more extended structure is detected in C18O, although it is still elongated with a deconvolved size of 3.″3 × 2.″2, indicating that C18O traces mainly a flattened envelope surrounding the disk and the central protostar. C18O shows a clear velocity gradient perpendicular to the outflow at higher velocities, indicative of rotation, while an additional velocity gradient along the outflow is found at lower velocities. The radial profile of the rotational velocity is analyzed in detail, finding that it is given as a power law ∝r‑a with an index of ∼0.5 at higher velocities. This indicates that the rotation at higher velocities can be explained as Keplerian rotation orbiting a protostar with a dynamical mass of 0.68 {M}ȯ (inclination corrected). The additional velocity gradient of C18O along the outflow is considered to be mainly infall motions in the envelope. Position–velocity diagrams made from models consisting of an infalling envelope and a Keplerian disk are compared with the observations, revealing that the observed infall velocity is ∼0.3 times smaller than the free-fall velocity yielded by the dynamical mass of the protostar. Magnetic fields could be responsible for the slow infall velocity. A possible scenario of Keplerian disk formation is discussed.

  13. Einstein, Schwarzschild, the Perihelion Motion of Mercury and the Rotating Disk Story

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstein, Galina

    2014-01-01

    On November 18, 1915 Einstein reported to the Prussian Academy that the perihelion motion of Mercury is explained by his new General Theory of Relativity: Einstein found approximate solutions to his November 11, 1915 field equations. Einstein's field equations cannot be solved in the general case, but can be solved in particular situations. The first to offer such an exact solution was Karl Schwarzschild. Schwarzschild found one line element, which satisfied the conditions imposed by Einstein...

  14. Numerical Study of Flow Motion and Patterns Driven by a Rotating Permanent Helical Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Xiaodong; Wang, Bo; Baltaretu, Florin; Etay, Jacqueline; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flow driven by a rotating permanent helical magnetic field in a cylindrical container is numerically studied. A three-dimensional numerical simulation provides insight into the visualization of the physical fields, including the magnetic field, the Lorentz force density, and the flow structures, especially the flow patterns in the meridional plane. Because the screen parameter is sufficiently small, the model is decoupled into electromagnetic and hydrodynamic components. Two flow patterns in the meridional plane, i.e., the global flow and the secondary flow, are discovered and the impact of several system parameters on their transition is investigated. Finally, a verifying model is used for comparison with the previous experiment.

  15. Partial reconstruction of the rotational motion of Philae spacecraft during its landing on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    CERN Document Server

    Baranyai, Tamás; Várkonyi, Péter L

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a partial reconstruction of the rotational dynamics of the Philae spacecraft upon landing on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as part of ESA's Rosetta mission. We analyze the motion and the events triggered by the failure to fix the spacecraft to the comet surface at the time of the first touchdown. Dynamic trajectories obtained by numerical simulation of a 7 degree-of-freedom mechanical model of the spacecraft are fitted to directions of incoming solar radiation inferred from in-situ measurements of the electric power provided by the solar panels. The results include a lower bound of the angular velocity of the lander immediately after its first touchdown. Our study also gives insight into the effect of the programmed turn-off of the stabilizing gyroscope after touchdown; the important dynamical consequences of a small collision during Philae's journey; and the probability that a similar landing scenario harms the operability of this type of spacecraft.

  16. A rotational and axial motion system load frame insert for in situ high energy x-ray studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shade, Paul A., E-mail: paul.shade.1@us.af.mil; Schuren, Jay C.; Turner, Todd J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Blank, Basil [PulseRay, Beaver Dams, New York 14812 (United States); Kenesei, Peter; Goetze, Kurt; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Suter, Robert M. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Bernier, Joel V.; Li, Shiu Fai [Engineering Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lind, Jonathan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Engineering Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    High energy x-ray characterization methods hold great potential for gaining insight into the behavior of materials and providing comparison datasets for the validation and development of mesoscale modeling tools. A suite of techniques have been developed by the x-ray community for characterizing the 3D structure and micromechanical state of polycrystalline materials; however, combining these techniques with in situ mechanical testing under well characterized and controlled boundary conditions has been challenging due to experimental design requirements, which demand new high-precision hardware as well as access to high-energy x-ray beamlines. We describe the design and performance of a load frame insert with a rotational and axial motion system that has been developed to meet these requirements. An example dataset from a deforming titanium alloy demonstrates the new capability.

  17. Apical Extrusion of Debris Produced during Continuous Rotating and Reciprocating Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevares, Giselle; Xavier, Felipe; Gominho, Luciana; Cavalcanti, Flávia; Cassimiro, Marcely; Romeiro, Kaline; Alvares, Pamella; Queiroz, Gabriela; Sobral, Ana Paula; Gerbi, Marleny; Silveira, Marcia; Albuquerque, Diana

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse and compare apical extrusion of debris in canals instrumented with systems used in reciprocating and continuous motion. Sixty mandibular premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20): the Reciproc (REC), WaveOne (WO), and HyFlex CM (HYF) groups. One Eppendorf tube per tooth was weighed in advance on an analytical balance. The root canals were instrumented according to the manufacturer's instructions, and standardised irrigation with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite was performed to a total volume of 9 mL. After instrumentation, the teeth were removed from the Eppendorf tubes and incubated at 37°C for 15 days to evaporate the liquid. The tubes were weighed again, and the difference between the initial and final weight was calculated to determine the weight of the debris. The data were statistically analysed using the Shapiro-Wilk, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests (α = 5%). All systems resulted in the apical extrusion of debris. Reciproc produced significantly more debris than WaveOne (p < 0.05), and both systems produced a greater apical extrusion of debris than HyFlex CM (p < 0.001). Cross section and motion influenced the results, despite tip standardization. PMID:26543896

  18. Range of motion and leg rotation affect electromyography activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen M; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-09-01

    Leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed 8 LE REP at their 8 repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP × ROM interaction was detected (p EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 (p ≤ 0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p EMG increased across REP (p EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO, the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM.

  19. Crystal Fluidity Reflected by Fast Rotational Motion at the Core, Branches, and Peripheral Aromatic Groups of a Dendrimeric Molecular Rotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xing; O'Brien, Zachary J; Yang, Song; Lai, Lan Huong; Buenaflor, Jeffrey; Tan, Colleen; Khan, Saeed; Houk, K N; Garcia-Garibay, Miguel A

    2016-04-01

    Low packing densities are key structural features of amphidynamic crystals built with static and mobile components. Here we report a loosely packed crystal of dendrimeric rotor 2 and the fast dynamics of all its aromatic groups, both resulting from the hyperbranched structure of the molecule. Compound 2 was synthesized with a convergent strategy to construct a central phenylene core with stators consisting of two layers of triarylmethyl groups. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed a low-density packing structure consisting of one molecule of 2 and approximately eight solvent molecules per unit cell. Three isotopologues of 2 were synthesized to study the motion of each segment of the molecule in the solid state using variable temperature quadrupolar echo (2)H NMR spectroscopy. Line shape analysis of the spectra reveals that the central phenylene, the six branch phenylenes, and the 18 periphery phenyls all display megahertz rotational dynamics in the crystals at ambient temperature. Arrhenius analysis of the data gives similar activation energies and pre-exponential factors for different parts of the structure. The observed pre-exponential factors are 4-6 orders of magnitude greater than those of elementary site-exchange processes, indicating that the dynamics are not dictated by static energetic potentials. Instead, the activation energies for rotations in the crystals of 2 are controlled by temperature dependent local structural fluctuations and crystal fluidity. PMID:26973017

  20. Shoulder 3D range of motion and humerus rotation in two volleyball spike techniques: injury prevention and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminati, Elena; Marzari, Alessandra; Vacondio, Oreste; Minetti, Alberto E

    2015-06-01

    Repetitive stresses and movements on the shoulder in the volleyball spike expose this joint to overuse injuries, bringing athletes to a career threatening injury. Assuming that specific spike techniques play an important role in injury risk, we compared the kinematic of the traditional (TT) and the alternative (AT) techniques in 21 elite athletes, evaluating their safety with respect to performance. Glenohumeral joint was set as the centre of an imaginary sphere, intersected by the distal end of the humerus at different angles. Shoulder range of motion and angular velocities were calculated and compared to the joint limits. Ball speed and jump height were also assessed. Results indicated the trajectory of the humerus to be different for the TT, with maximal flexion of the shoulder reduced by 10 degrees, and horizontal abduction 15 degrees higher. No difference was found for external rotation angles, while axial rotation velocities were significantly higher in AT, with a 5% higher ball speed. Results suggest AT as a potential preventive solution to shoulder chronic pathologies, reducing shoulder flexion during spiking. The proposed method allows visualisation of risks associated with different overhead manoeuvres, by depicting humerus angles and velocities with respect to joint limits in the same 3D space. PMID:26151344

  1. Assessment of range of motion and muscular shortening in female flamenco dancers. Valoración de las amplitudes articulares y acortamientos musculares en bailaoras de flamenco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Costa Sepúlveda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to assess flexibility and range of motion in flamenco dancers of Cádiz, Sevilla and Jaén (Spain through a tests battery. The study population comprised 37 healthy flamenco dancers (25 ± 7,2 years, 1,6 ± 0,5 m y 56 ± 7,6 Kg. They performed a range of flexibility and motion tests (i.e. Kendall test, Nachlas test. Results has shown that there is muscle shortening in most of the tests that flamenco dancers has passed. We conclude that there are not many articles on physiological and fitness aspects of dance and we think that it is necessary a specific physical dancer training, to prevent injuries and to extend dancers life.El objetivo de este estudio es la valoración de la flexibilidad muscular y la amplitud articular en bailaoras de flamenco de la provincia de Cádiz, Sevilla y Jaén, a través de una batería de tests. En el estudio participaron 37 bailaoras de danza flamenca de 25 ± 7,2 años, con una altura con valores de 1,6 ± 0,5 m y 56 ± 7,6 Kg de peso. La batería está compuesta de las siguientes pruebas que se realizarán a través del protocolo de actuación especificado: Prueba de rotadores internos y aductores del hombro, Prueba de Kendall, Prueba de Diagonal Posterior, Prueba de Nachlas, Prueba de Ridge, Prueba de Flexión de cadera con rodilla en extensión, Prueba de Thomas y Prueba de Elongación de los flexores plantares. Los resultados demuestran que existen acortamientos en diferente musculatura implicada como los rotadores internos y aductores del hombro, dorsal ancho, pectoral mayor, redondo mayor, cintura escapular, psoas-ilíaco, recto anterior del muslo y sóleo. Concluir con la escasa existencia de artículos relacionados con la valoración de la condición física de bailarines de cualquier modalidad de danza y con la necesaria aplicación de un entrenamiento planificado complementario con una propuesta de ejercicios de mejora de la musculatura implicada y, así, poder prevenir futuras

  2. Levitating Drop in a Tilted Rotating Tank - Gallery of Fluid Motion Entry V044

    CERN Document Server

    White, Andrew; Ward, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A cylindrical acrylic tank with inner diameter D = 4 in. is mounted such that its axis of symmetry is at some angle measured from the vertical plane. The mixing tank is identical to that described in [1] The tank is filled with 200 mL of 1000 cSt silicone oil and a 5 mL drop of de-ionized water is placed in the oil volume. The water drop is allowed to come to rest and then a motor rotates the tank about its axis of symmetry at a fixed frequency = 0.3 Hz. Therefore the Reynolds number is ?xed at about Re ~ 5 yielding laminar flow conditions. A CCD camera (PixeLink) is used to capture video of each experiment.

  3. Einstein, Schwarzschild, the Perihelion Motion of Mercury and the Rotating Disk Story

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Galina

    2014-01-01

    On November 18, 1915 Einstein reported to the Prussian Academy that the perihelion motion of Mercury is explained by his new General Theory of Relativity: Einstein found approximate solutions to his November 11, 1915 field equations. Einstein's field equations cannot be solved in the general case, but can be solved in particular situations. The first to offer such an exact solution was Karl Schwarzschild. Schwarzschild found one line element, which satisfied the conditions imposed by Einstein on the gravitational field of the sun, as well as Einstein's field equations from the November 18, 1915 paper. On December 22, 1915 Schwarzschild told Einstein that he reworked the calculation in his November 18 1915 paper of the Mercury perihelion. Subsequently Schwarzschild sent Einstein a manuscript, in which he derived his exact solution of Einstein's field equations. On January 13, 1916, Einstein delivered Schwarzschild's paper before the Prussian Academy, and a month later the paper was published. In March 1916 Ein...

  4. Relationship between static anterior laxity using the KT-1000 and dynamic tibial rotation during motion in patients with anatomical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Koji; Maeda, Akira; Takano, Yoshio; Matsuse, Hiroo; Ida, Hirofumi; Shiba, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) plays an important role in controlling knee joint stability, not only by limiting tibial anterior translation but also by controlling knee axial rotation. The aim of ACL reconstruction is to reduce excessive anterior joint laxity, hoping to restore normal tibiofemoral kinematics including knee axial rotation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between static anterior instability and tibial rotation during several activities in an anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee. Seven patients with unilateral ACL injury performed plain walking, running, landing and side step cutting tasks after ACL reconstruction with a mean follow-up of 14 months. The kinematic data for the 4 motions was measured using a motion analysis system and the point cluster technique. The evaluation period was defined to be from the first contact to removal of the tested leg from the ground. Maximum tibial internal rotation during tasks was calculated using the point cluster technique (PCT). Passive anterior tibial translation was measured using a KT-1000 arthrometer. Regression analysis was used to determine the correlation of the maximum internal rotation with the side-to-side difference of static anterior tibial translation measured using a KT-1000 arthrometer. During side step cutting maneuvers, maximum tibial internal rotation significantly showed negative correlation with static anterior tibial translation (pknee rotation kinematics. The normal anterior tibial translation obtained by ACL reconstruction is thought to be the key factor in successful restoration of normal knee kinematics. PMID:23925154

  5. Evaluation of the Rotational Throttle Interface for Converting Aircraft Utilizing the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozovski, David; Theodore, Colin R.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare a conventional helicopter Thrust Control Lever (TCL) to the Rotational Throttle Interface (RTI) for tiltrotor aircraft. The RTI is designed to adjust its orientation to match the angle of the tiltrotor s nacelles. The underlying principle behind the design is to increase pilot awareness of the vehicle s configuration state (i.e. nacelle angle). Four test pilots flew multiple runs on seven different experimental courses. Three predominant effects were discovered in the testing of the RTI: 1. Unintentional binding along the control axis resulted in difficulties with precision power setting, 2. Confusion in which way to move the throttle grip was present during RTI transition modes, and 3. Pilots were not able to distinguish small angle differences during RTI transition. In this experiment the pilots were able to successfully perform all of the required tasks with both inceptors although the handling qualities ratings were slightly worse for the RTI partly due to unforeseen deficiencies in the design. Pilots did however report improved understanding of nacelle movement during transitions with the RTI.

  6. Rotating Wavepackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  7. Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex during whole body yaw rotation in standing subjects: the role of head position and neck proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichi, Roberto; Botti, Fabio Massimo; Ferraresi, Aldo; Faralli, Mario; Kyriakareli, Artemis; Schieppati, Marco; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2011-04-01

    Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were studied during whole body yaw rotation in the dark at different static head positions. Rotations consisted of four cycles of symmetric sinusoidal and asymmetric oscillations. Self-motion perception was evaluated by measuring the ability of subjects to manually track a static remembered target. VOR was recorded separately and the slow phase eye position (SPEP) was computed. Three different head static yaw deviations (active and passive) relative to the trunk (0°, 45° to right and 45° to left) were examined. Active head deviations had a significant effect during asymmetric oscillation: the movement perception was enhanced when the head was kept turned toward the side of body rotation and decreased in the opposite direction. Conversely, passive head deviations had no effect on movement perception. Further, vibration (100 Hz) of the neck muscles splenius capitis and sternocleidomastoideus remarkably influenced perceived rotation during asymmetric oscillation. On the other hand, SPEP of VOR was modulated by active head deviation, but was not influenced by neck muscle vibration. Through its effects on motion perception and reflex gain, head position improved gaze stability and enhanced self-motion perception in the direction of the head deviation.

  8. A simplified technique for determining the rotational motion of a satellite based on the onboard measurements of the angular velocity and magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrashkin, V. I.; Voronov, K. E.; Piyakov, I. V.; Puzin, Yu. Ya.; Sazonov, V. V.; Syomkin, N. D.; Chebukov, S. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    The mathematical model, which allowed us to reconstruct the rotational motion of the Bion M-1 and Foton M-4 satellites by processing the measurements of onboard magnetometers and the angular velocity sensor, is sufficiently detailed and accurate. If we slightly lower the requirements for accuracy and transfer to a rougher model, i.e., we will not update the biases in measurements of the angular velocity component, then the measurement processing technique can be significantly simplified. The volume of calculations in minimizing the functional of the least-square technique is reduced; the most complicated part of calculations is performed using the standard procedure of computational linear algebra. This simplified technique is described below, and the examples of its application for reconstructing the rotational motion of the Foton M-4 satellite are presented. A noticeable distinction in the reconstructions of motion, constructed by simplified and more exact techniques, is revealed in processing the measurements over time intervals longer than 4 hours.

  9. Determining parameters of Moon's orbital and rotational motion from LLR observations using GRAIL and IERS-recommended models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Dmitry A.; Williams, James G.; Suvorkin, Vladimir V.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this work is to combine the model of orbital and rotational motion of the Moon developed for DE430 with up-to-date astronomical, geodynamical, and geo- and selenophysical models. The parameters of the orbit and physical libration are determined in this work from lunar laser ranging (LLR) observations made at different observatories in 1970-2013. Parameters of other models are taken from solutions that were obtained independently from LLR. A new implementation of the DE430 lunar model, including the liquid core equations, was done within the EPM ephemeris. The postfit residuals of LLR observations make evident that the terrestrial models and solutions recommended by the IERS Conventions are compatible with the lunar theory. That includes: EGM2008 gravitational potential with conventional corrections and variations from solid and ocean tides; displacement of stations due to solid and ocean loading tides; and precession-nutation model. Usage of these models in the solution for LLR observations has allowed us to reduce the number of parameters to be fit. The fixed model of tidal variations of the geopotential has resulted in a lesser value of Moon's extra eccentricity rate, as compared to the original DE430 model with two fit parameters. A mixed model of lunar gravitational potential was used, with some coefficients determined from LLR observations, and other taken from the GL660b solution obtained from the GRAIL spacecraft mission. Solutions obtain accurate positions for the ranging stations and the five retroreflectors. Station motion is derived for sites with long data spans. Dissipation is detected at the lunar fluid core-solid mantle boundary demonstrating that a fluid core is present. Tidal dissipation is strong at both Earth and Moon. Consequently, the lunar semimajor axis is expanding by 38.20 mm/yr, the tidal acceleration in mean longitude is -25.90 {{}^' ' }}/cy^2 , and the eccentricity is increasing by 1.48× 10^{-11} each year.

  10. Amplitudes and time scales of picosecond-to-microsecond motion in proteins studied by solid-state NMR: a critical evaluation of experimental approaches and application to crystalline ubiquitin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Jens D.; Schanda, Paul, E-mail: paul.schanda@ibs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France)

    2013-10-09

    Solid-state NMR provides insight into protein motion over time scales ranging from picoseconds to seconds. While in solution state the methodology to measure protein dynamics is well established, there is currently no such consensus protocol for measuring dynamics in solids. In this article, we perform a detailed investigation of measurement protocols for fast motions, i.e. motions ranging from picoseconds to a few microseconds, which is the range covered by dipolar coupling and relaxation experiments. We perform a detailed theoretical investigation how dipolar couplings and relaxation data can provide information about amplitudes and time scales of local motion. We show that the measurement of dipolar couplings is crucial for obtaining accurate motional parameters, while systematic errors are found when only relaxation data are used. Based on this realization, we investigate how the REDOR experiment can provide such data in a very accurate manner. We identify that with accurate rf calibration, and explicit consideration of rf field inhomogeneities, one can obtain highly accurate absolute order parameters. We then perform joint model-free analyses of 6 relaxation data sets and dipolar couplings, based on previously existing, as well as new data sets on microcrystalline ubiquitin. We show that nanosecond motion can be detected primarily in loop regions, and compare solid-state data to solution-state relaxation and RDC analyses. The protocols investigated here will serve as a useful basis towards the establishment of a routine protocol for the characterization of ps–μs motions in proteins by solid-state NMR.

  11. Determining parameters of Moon's orbital and rotational motion from LLR observations using GRAIL and IERS-recommended models

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlov, Dmitry A; Suvorkin, Vladimir V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to combine the model of orbital and rotational motion of the Moon developed for DE430 with up-to-date astronomical, geodynamical, and geo- and selenophysical models. The parameters of the orbit and physical libration are determined in this work from LLR observations made at different observatories in 1970-2013. Parameters of other models are taken from solutions that were obtained independently from LLR. A new implementation of the DE430 lunar model, including the liquid core equations, was done within the EPM ephemeris. The postfit residuals of LLR observations make evident that the terrestrial models and solutions recommended by the IERS Conventions are compatible with the lunar theory. That includes: EGM2008 with conventional corrections and variations from solid and ocean tides; displacement of stations due to solid and ocean loading tides; and precession-nutation model. Usage of these models in the solution for LLR observations has allowed us to reduce the number of parameters to ...

  12. Rotation periods and astrometric motions of the Luhman 16AB brown dwarfs by high-resolution lucky-imaging monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, L; Littlefair, S P; Southworth, J; Bozza, V; Damasso, M; Dominik, M; Hundertmark, M; Jorgensen, U G; Juncher, D; Popovas, A; Rabus, M; Rahvar, S; Schmidt, R W; Skottfelt, J; Snodgrass, C; Sozzetti, A; Alsubai, K; Bramich, D M; Novati, S Calchi; Ciceri, S; D'Ago, G; Jaimes, R Figuera; Galianni, P; Gu, S -H; Harpsoe, K; Haugbolle, T; Henning, Th; Hinse, T C; Kains, N; Korhonen, H; Scarpetta, G; Starkey, D; Surdej, J; Wang, X -B; Wertz, O

    2015-01-01

    Context. Photometric monitoring of the variability of brown dwarfs can provide useful information about the structure of clouds in their cold atmospheres. The brown-dwarf binary system Luhman 16AB is an interesting target for such a study, as its components stand at the L/T transition and show high levels of variability. Luhman 16AB is also the third closest system to the Solar system, allowing precise astrometric investigations with ground-based facilities. Aims. The aim of the work is to estimate the rotation period and study the astrometric motion of both components. Methods. We have monitored Luhman 16AB over a period of two years with the lucky-imaging camera mounted on the Danish 1.54m telescope at La Silla, through a special i+z long-pass filter, which allowed us to clearly resolve the two brown dwarfs into single objects. An intense monitoring of the target was also performed over 16 nights, in which we observed a peak-to-peak variability of 0.20 \\pm 0.02 mag and 0.34 \\pm 0.02 mag for Luhman 16A and 1...

  13. Evaluation of fault-normal/fault-parallel directions rotated ground motions for response history analysis of an instrumented six-story building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Kwong, Neal S.

    2012-01-01

    According to regulatory building codes in United States (for example, 2010 California Building Code), at least two horizontal ground-motion components are required for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of buildings. For sites within 5 km of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal/fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHA analyses should be performed separately (when FN and then FP are aligned with the transverse direction of the structural axes). It is assumed that this approach will lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. This assumption is examined here using a 3D computer model of a six-story reinforced-concrete instrumented building subjected to an ensemble of bidirectional near-fault ground motions. Peak responses of engineering demand parameters (EDPs) were obtained for rotation angles ranging from 0° through 180° for evaluating the FN/FP directions. It is demonstrated that rotating ground motions to FN/FP directions (1) does not always lead to the maximum responses over all angles, (2) does not always envelope the range of possible responses, and (3) does not provide maximum responses for all EDPs simultaneously even if it provides a maximum response for a specific EDP.

  14. Modeling Attitude Dynamics in Simulink: A Study of the Rotational and Translational Motion of a Spacecraft Given Torques and Impulses Generated by RMS Hand Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, Rebecca H.

    2010-01-01

    In order to study and control the attitude of a spacecraft, it is necessary to understand the natural motion of a body in orbit. Assuming a spacecraft to be a rigid body, dynamics describes the complete motion of the vehicle by the translational and rotational motion of the body. The Simulink Attitude Analysis Model applies the equations of rigid body motion to the study of a spacecraft?s attitude in orbit. Using a TCP/IP connection, Matlab reads the values of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) hand controllers and passes them to Simulink as specified torque and impulse profiles. Simulink then uses the governing kinematic and dynamic equations of a rigid body in low earth orbit (LE0) to plot the attitude response of a spacecraft for five seconds given known applied torques and impulses, and constant principal moments of inertia.

  15. Perception of the upright and susceptibility to motion sickness as functions of angle of tilt and angular velocity in off-vertical rotation. [human tolerance to angular accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. F., II; Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    Motion sickness susceptibility of four normal subjects was measured in terms of duration of exposure necessary to evoke moderate malaise (MIIA) as a function of velocity in a chair rotated about a central axis tilted 10 deg with respect to gravitational upright. The subjects had little or no susceptibility to this type of rotation at 2.5 and 5.0 rpm, but with further increases in rate, the MIIA endpoint was always reached and with ever shorter test durations. Minimal provocative periods for all subjects were found at 15 or 20 rpm. Higher rotational rates dramatically reversed the vestibular stressor effect, and the subjects as a group tended to reach a plateau of relatively low susceptibility at 40 and 45 rpm. At these higher velocities, furthermore, the subjects essentially lost their sensation of being tilted off vertical. In the second half of the study, the effect of tilt angle was varied while the rotation rate was maintained at a constant 17.5 rpm. Two subjects were completely resistant to symptoms of motion sickness when rotated at 2.5 deg off vertical; with greater off-vertical angles, the susceptibility of all subjects increased sharply at first, then tapered off in a manner reflecting a Fechnerian function.

  16. Confiabilidade da fleximetria e goniometria na avaliação da amplitude de movimento cervical em crianças Reliability of fleximetry and goniometry for assessing cervical range of motion among children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TC Chaves

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a confiabilidade intra e interexaminadores e correlacionar os valores de amplitudes de movimentos (ADM cervical obtidas por fleximetria e goniometria em crianças. MÉTODOS: Participaram deste estudo 106 crianças saudáveis, 49 meninos (8,91±2,09 anos e 57 meninas (9,14±1,46 anos, com idades entre seis e 14 anos, assintomáticas para disfunção cervical. Dois examinadores previamente treinados e dois auxiliares avaliaram a ADM cervical. Os examinadores coletaram as medidas por fleximetria e goniometria (confiabilidade interexaminadores e repetiram as avaliações, após uma semana (confiabilidade intra-examinador. Todas as medidas foram registradas três vezes por cada examinador e o valor médio foi considerado para análise estatística. O coeficiente de correlação intraclasse (ICC 2,1 e 2,2 foi utilizado para verificação das confiabilidades e o coeficiente de correlação de Pearson (pOBJECTIVE: To determine the intra and interrater reliability of fleximetry and goniometry in children and correlate the cervical spine range of motion (ROM values obtained from these methods. METHODS: One hundred six children participated in this study: 49 males (8.91±2.09 years and 57 females (9.14±1.46 years. Their ages ranged from six to 14 years and symptom-free to cervical dysfunction. Two previously trained raters and two assistants assessed neck ROM. The measurements were made using fleximetry and goniometry (interrater reliability and repeated them one week later (intrarater reliability. All measurements were made three times by each rater and the mean value was used for statistical analysis. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 2.1 and 2.2 were used to investigate reliability and Pearson's correlation coefficient (p<0.05 was used to investigate the correlation between measurements obtained from the two techniques. RESULTS: Moderate and excellent levels for intrarater reliability were observed for fleximetry and

  17. Rotating Casimir systems: magnetic-field-enhanced perpetual motion, possible realization in doped nanotubes, and laws of thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chernodub, M N

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that for a certain class of Casimir-type systems ("devices") the energy of zero-point vacuum fluctuations reaches its global minimum when the device rotates about certain axis rather than remains static. This rotational vacuum effect may lead to emergence of permanently rotating objects - philosophically similar to "time crystals" proposed recently by Shapere and Wilczek in classical and quantum mechanical systems - provided the negative rotational energy of zero-point fluctuations cancels the positive rotational energy of the device itself. In this paper we show that for massless electrically charged particles the rotational vacuum effect should be drastically (astronomically) enhanced in the presence of magnetic field. As an illustration, we show that in a background of experimentally available magnetic fields the zero-point energy of massless excitations in rotating torus-shaped doped carbon nanotubes may indeed overwhelm the classical energy of rotation for certain angular f...

  18. Bayesian noise-reduction in Arabia/Somalia and Nubia/Arabia finite rotations since ˜20 Ma: Implications for Nubia/Somalia relative motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaffaldano, Giampiero; Hawkins, Rhys; Sambridge, Malcolm

    2014-04-01

    of Nubia/Somalia relative motion since the Early Neogene is of particular importance in the Earth Sciences, because it (i) impacts on inferences on African dynamic topography; and (ii) allows us to link plate kinematics within the Indian realm with those within the Atlantic basin. The contemporary Nubia/Somalia motion is well known from geodetic observations. Precise estimates of the past-3.2-Myr average motion are also available from paleo-magnetic observations. However, little is known of the Nubia/Somalia motion prior to ˜3.2 Ma, chiefly because the Southwest Indian Ridge spread slowly, posing a challenge to precisely identify magnetic lineations. This also makes the few observations available particularly prone to noise. Here we reconstruct Nubia/Somalia relative motions since ˜20 Ma from the alternative plate-circuit Nubia-Arabia-Somalia. We resort to trans-dimensional hierarchical Bayesian Inference, which has proved effective in reducing finite-rotation noise, to unravel the Arabia/Somalia and Arabia/Nubia motions. We combine the resulting kinematics to reconstruct the Nubia/Somalia relative motion since ˜20 Ma. We verify the validity of the approach by comparing our reconstruction with the available record for the past ˜3.2 Myr, obtained through Antarctica. Results indicate that prior to ˜11 Ma the total motion between Nubia and Somalia was faster than today. Furthermore, it featured a significant strike-slip component along the Nubia/Somalia boundary. It is only since ˜11 Ma that Nubia diverges away from Somalia at slower rates, comparable to the present-day one. Kinematic changes of some 20% might have occurred in the period leading to the present-day, but plate-motion steadiness is also warranted within the uncertainties.

  19. Evaluation of hip internal and external rotation range of motion as an injury risk factor for hip, abdominal and groin injuries in professional baseball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinning Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal hip range of motion (ROM is essential in running and transfer of energy from lower to upper extremities during overhead throwing. Dysfunctional hip ROM may alter lower extremity kinematics and predispose athletes to hip and groin injuries. The purpose of this study is characterize hip internal/external ROM (Arc and its effect on the risk of hip, hamstring, and groin injuries in professional baseball players. Bilateral hip internal and external ROM was measured on all baseball players (N=201 in one professional organization (major and minor league during spring training. Players were organized according to their respective positions. All injuries were documented prospectively for an entire MLB season (2010 to 2011. Data was analyzed according to position and injuries during the season. Total number of players (N=201 with an average age of 24±3.6 (range=17-37. Both pitchers (N=93 and catchers (N=22 had significantly decreased mean hip internal rotation and overall hip arc of motion compared to the positional players (N=86. Players with hip, groin, and hamstring injury also had decreased hip rotation arc when compared to the normal group. Overall, there is a correlation between decreased hip internal rotation and total arc of motion with hip, hamstring, and groin injuries.

  20. Rotating Casimir systems: Magnetic-field-enhanced perpetual motion, possible realization in doped nanotubes, and laws of thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernodub, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that for a certain class of Casimir-type systems (“devices”) the energy of zero-point vacuum fluctuations reaches its global minimum when the device rotates about a certain axis rather than remains static. This rotational vacuum effect may lead to the emergence of permanently rotating objects provided the negative rotational energy of zero-point fluctuations cancels the positive rotational energy of the device itself. In this paper, we show that for massless electrically charged particles the rotational vacuum effect should be drastically (astronomically) enhanced in the presence of a magnetic field. As an illustration, we show that in a background of experimentally available magnetic fields the zero-point energy of massless excitations in rotating torus-shaped doped carbon nanotubes may indeed overwhelm the classical energy of rotation for certain angular frequencies so that the permanently rotating state is energetically favored. The suggested “zero-point-driven” devices—which have no internally moving parts—correspond to a perpetuum mobile of a new, fourth kind: They do not produce any work despite the fact that their equilibrium (ground) state corresponds to a permanent rotation even in the presence of an external environment. We show that our proposal is consistent with the laws of thermodynamics.

  1. Self-consistent theory of large amplitude collective motion: Applications to approximate quantization of non-separable systems and to nuclear physics

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, G. Do; De Klein, A.; Walet, N. R.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of the present account is to review our efforts to obtain and apply a ``collective'' Hamiltonian for a few, approximately decoupled, adiabatic degrees of freedom, starting from a Hamiltonian system with more or many more degrees of freedom. The approach is based on an analysis of the classical limit of quantum-mechanical problems. Initially, we study the classical problem within the framework of Hamiltonian dynamics and derive a fully self-consistent theory of large amplitude collect...

  2. Two large-amplitude motions in triatomic molecules. Force field of the 1B2 (1A') state of SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G.; Ramachandra Rao, Ch. V. S.

    1980-01-01

    A program has been developed to calculate the energy levels associated with the two large-amplitude stretching vibrations ν1 and ν3 of a bent triatomic molecule in which the ν3 oscillation occurs in a double minimum potential. Employing the two large-amplitude Hamiltonian H0s(ρ1,ρ3) obtained earlier by Brand and Rao. [J. Mol. Spectrosc., 61, 360 (1976)], the vibrational energy levels (v1,v3even/odd) of SO2 molecule in its 1B2 (1A') excited state are calculated. The nine parameters of the potential function V0(ρ1,ρ3) are then adjusted to give a least-square fit to the 12 observed vibrational term values corresponding to the levels (v1,v3even) of S16O2 and S18O2. A three-dimensional picture of the potential surface V0(ρ1,ρ3) using the final set of force constants is also presented. The saddle point of this surface is at (ρO1=1.5525 Å, ρO3=0.0 Å) and the absolute minima occur at (ρe1=1.5644 Å, ρe3=±0.0745 Å). Barrier height, i.e., the height of the saddle point above the absolute minima, is 140 cm-1.

  3. Pulsation-driven mean zonal and meridional flows in rotating massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Umin; Neiner, Coralie

    2015-01-01

    Zonal and meridional axisymmetric flows can deeply impact the rotational and chemical evolution of stars. Therefore, momentum exchanges between waves propagating in stars, differential rotation, and meridional circulation must be carefully evaluated. In this work, we study axisymmetric mean flows in rapidly and initially uniformly rotating massive stars driven by small amplitude non-axisymmetric $\\kappa$-driven oscillations. We treat them as perturbations of second-order of the oscillation amplitudes and derive their governing equations as a set of coupled linear ordinary differential equations. This allows us to compute 2-D zonal and meridional mean flows driven by low frequency $g$- and $r$-modes in slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars and $p$-modes in $\\beta$ Cephei stars. Oscillation-driven mean flows usually have large amplitudes only in the surface layers. In addition, the kinetic energy of the induced 2-D zonal rotational motions is much larger than that of the meridional motions. In some cases, meridional f...

  4. Analysis of Range of Motion and Isokinetic Strength of Internal and External Rotation According to Humeral Retroversion of the Dominant Shoulder in Youth Baseball Players: A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soung-Yob Rhi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to analyze the range of motion (ROM and internal rotation (IR and external rotation (ER isokinetic strength according to humeral retroversion of the dominant shoulder.We included 40 elite baseball players in Korea (OBP group: n=20 players with careers spanning >10 years, age: 19.37±2.21 years, height: 181.00±5.41 cm, weight: 84.58±7.85 kg; BBP group: n=20 players with careers spanning 10 years had significantly higher humeral retroversion, IROM, EROM, and IR and ER isokinetic strength of the dominant shoulder than youth players with careers spanning <10 years. Furthermore, humeral retroversion and ROM were not significantly related, but IR and ER isokinetic strength were significantly positively related with retroversion in both groups.

  5. Nuclear Jacobi and Poincar\\'e Transitions at High Spins and Temperatures: Account~of~Dynamic~Effects~and~Large-Amplitude Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Mazurek, K; Maj, A; Rouvel, D

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the competition between so-called nuclear Jacobi and Poincar\\'e shape transitions in function of spin - at high temperatures. The latter condition implies the method of choice - a realistic version of the nuclear Liquid Drop Model (LDM), here: the Lublin-Strasbourg Drop (LSD) model. We address specifically the fact that the Jacobi and Poincar\\'e shape transitions are accompanied by the flattening of total nuclear energy landscape as function of the relevant deformation parameters what enforces large amplitude oscillation modes that need to be taken into account. For that purpose we introduce an approximate form of the collective Schr\\"odinger equation whose solutions are used to calculate the most probable deformations associated with both types of transitions and discuss the physical consequences in terms of the associated critical-spin values and transitions themselves.

  6. Nuclear Jacobi and Poincaré transitions at high spins and temperatures: Account of dynamic effects and large-amplitude motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, K.; Dudek, J.; Maj, A.; Rouvel, D.

    2015-03-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the competition between the so-called nuclear Jacobi and Poincaré shape transitions as a function of spin at high temperatures. The latter condition implies the method of choice, a realistic version of the nuclear liquid drop model, here the Lublin-Strasbourg drop model. We address specifically the fact that the Jacobi and Poincaré shape transitions are accompanied by the flattening of the total nuclear energy landscape as a function of the relevant deformation parameters, which enforces large-amplitude oscillation modes that need to be taken into account. For that purpose we introduce an approximate form of the collective Schrödinger equation whose solutions are used to calculate the most probable deformations associated with the nuclear Jacobi and Poincaré transitions. We discuss selected aspects of the new description focusing on the critical-spin values for both types of these transitions.

  7. A DLVO model for catalyst motion in metal-assisted chemical etching based upon controlled out-of-plane rotational etching and force-displacement measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Owen J.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Fedorov, Andrei G.; Wong, Ching P.

    2013-01-01

    Metal-assisted Chemical Etching of silicon has recently emerged as a powerful technique to fabricate 1D, 2D, and 3D nanostructures in silicon with high feature fidelity. This work demonstrates that out-of-plane rotational catalysts utilizing polymer pinning structures can be designed with excellent control over rotation angle. A plastic deformation model was developed establishing that the catalyst is driven into the silicon substrate with a minimum pressure differential across the catalyst thickness of 0.4-0.6 MPa. Force-displacement curves were gathered between an Au tip and Si or SiO2 substrates under acidic conditions to show that Derjaguin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) based forces are capable of providing restorative forces on the order of 0.2-0.3 nN with a calculated 11-18 MPa pressure differential across the catalyst. This work illustrates that out-of-plane rotational structures can be designed with controllable rotation and also suggests a new model for the driving force for catalyst motion based on DLVO theory. This process enables the facile fabrication of vertically aligned thin-film metallic structures and scalloped nanostructures in silicon for applications in 3D micro/nano-electromechanical systems, photonic devices, nanofluidics, etc.Metal-assisted Chemical Etching of silicon has recently emerged as a powerful technique to fabricate 1D, 2D, and 3D nanostructures in silicon with high feature fidelity. This work demonstrates that out-of-plane rotational catalysts utilizing polymer pinning structures can be designed with excellent control over rotation angle. A plastic deformation model was developed establishing that the catalyst is driven into the silicon substrate with a minimum pressure differential across the catalyst thickness of 0.4-0.6 MPa. Force-displacement curves were gathered between an Au tip and Si or SiO2 substrates under acidic conditions to show that Derjaguin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) based forces are capable of

  8. Rotational testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, J M

    2016-01-01

    The natural stimulus for the semicircular canals is rotation of the head, which also might stimulate the otolith organs. Vestibular stimulation usually induces eye movements via the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). The orientation of the subject with respect to the axis of rotation and the orientation of the axis of rotation with respect to gravity together determine which labyrinthine receptors are stimulated for particular motion trajectories. Rotational testing usually includes the measurement of eye movements via a video system but might use a subject's perception of motion. The most common types of rotational testing are whole-body computer-controlled sinusoidal or trapezoidal stimuli during earth-vertical axis rotation (EVAR), which stimulates primarily the horizontal semicircular canals bilaterally. Recently, manual impulsive rotations, known as head impulse testing (HIT), have been developed to assess individual horizontal semicircular canals. Most types of rotational stimuli are not used routinely in the clinical setting but may be used in selected research environments. This chapter will discuss clinically relevant rotational stimuli and several types of rotational testing that are used primarily in research settings. PMID:27638070

  9. Spontaneous rotation in a driven mechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    We show that a mass free to circulate around a shaken pivot point exhibits resonance-like effects and large amplitude dynamics even though there is no natural frequency in the system, simply through driving under geometrical constraint. We find that synchronization between force and mass occurs over a wide range of forcing amplitudes and frequencies, even when the forcing axis is dynamically, and randomly, changed. Above a critical driving amplitude the mass will spontaneously rotate, with a fractal boundary dividing clockwise and anti-clockwise rotations. We show that this has significant implications for energy harvesting, with large output power over a wide frequency range. We examine also the effect of driving symmetry on the resultant dynamics, and show that if the shaking is circular the motion becomes constrained, whereas for anharmonic rectilinear shaking the dynamics may become chaotic, with the system mimicking that of the kicked rotor.

  10. Importance of body rotation during the flight of a butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Yueh-Han John; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2016-03-01

    In nature the body motion of a butterfly is clearly observed to involve periodic rotation and varied flight modes. The maneuvers of a butterfly in flight are unique. Based on the flight motion of butterflies (Kallima inachus) recorded in free flight, a numerical model of a butterfly is created to study how its flight relates to body pose; the body motion in a simulation is prescribed and tested with varied initial body angle and rotational amplitude. A butterfly rotates its body to control the direction of the vortex rings generated during flapping flight; the flight modes are found to be closely related to the body motion of a butterfly. When the initial body angle increases, the forward displacement decreases, but the upward displacement increases within a stroke. With increased rotational amplitudes, the jet flows generated by a butterfly eject more downward and further enhance the generation of upward force, according to which a butterfly executes a vertical jump at the end of the downstroke. During this jumping stage, the air relative to the butterfly is moving downward; the butterfly pitches up its body to be parallel to the flow and to decrease the projected area so as to avoid further downward force generated. Our results indicate the importance of the body motion of a butterfly in flight. The inspiration of flight controlled with body motion from the flight of a butterfly might yield an alternative way to control future flight vehicles.

  11. Importance of body rotation during the flight of a butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Yueh-Han John; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2016-03-01

    In nature the body motion of a butterfly is clearly observed to involve periodic rotation and varied flight modes. The maneuvers of a butterfly in flight are unique. Based on the flight motion of butterflies (Kallima inachus) recorded in free flight, a numerical model of a butterfly is created to study how its flight relates to body pose; the body motion in a simulation is prescribed and tested with varied initial body angle and rotational amplitude. A butterfly rotates its body to control the direction of the vortex rings generated during flapping flight; the flight modes are found to be closely related to the body motion of a butterfly. When the initial body angle increases, the forward displacement decreases, but the upward displacement increases within a stroke. With increased rotational amplitudes, the jet flows generated by a butterfly eject more downward and further enhance the generation of upward force, according to which a butterfly executes a vertical jump at the end of the downstroke. During this jumping stage, the air relative to the butterfly is moving downward; the butterfly pitches up its body to be parallel to the flow and to decrease the projected area so as to avoid further downward force generated. Our results indicate the importance of the body motion of a butterfly in flight. The inspiration of flight controlled with body motion from the flight of a butterfly might yield an alternative way to control future flight vehicles.

  12. Analysis of gravity-induced particle motion and fluid perfusion flow in the NASA-designed rotating zero-head-space tissue culture vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David A.; Schwarz, Ray P.

    1991-01-01

    The gravity induced motions, through the culture media, is calculated of living tissue segments cultured in the NASA rotating zero head space culture vessels. This is then compared with the media perfusion speed which is independent of gravity. The results may be interpreted as a change in the physical environment which will occur by operating the NASA tissue culture systems in actual microgravity (versus unit gravity). The equations governing particle motions which induce flows at the surface of tissues contain g terms. This allows calculation of the fluid flow speed, with respect to a cultured particle, as a function of the external gravitational field strength. The analysis is approached from a flow field perspective. Flow is proportional to the shear exerted on a structure which maintains position within the field. The equations are solved for the deviation of a particle from its original position in a circular streamline as a function of time. The radial deviation is important for defining the operating limits and dimensions of the vessel because of the finite radius at which particles necessarily intercept the wall. This analysis uses a rotating reference frame concept.

  13. Discovery of Infalling Motion with Rotation of the Cluster-Forming Clump S235AB and Its Implication to the Clump Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of infalling motion with rotation of S235AB the massive cluster-forming clump (~10^3 Mo) in the S235 region. Our C18O observations with the 45m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory have revealed the elliptical shape of the clump. Position-velocity (PV) diagram taken along its major axis exhibits two well-defined peaks symmetrically located with respect to the clump center, which is similar to that found for a dynamically infalling envelope with rotation around a single protostar modeled by N. Ohashi and his collaborators, indicating that the cluster-forming clump is also collapsing by the self-gravity toward the clump center. With analogue to Ohashi's model, we made a simple model of an infalling, rotating clump to fit the observed data. Based on the inferred model parameters as well as results of earlier observations and simulations in the literature, we discuss structures of the clump such as the relation among the global mass infall rate (~10^-3 Mo/yr), formation of a compact...

  14. Automatic generation of time resolved motion vector fields of coronary arteries and 4D surface extraction using rotational x-ray angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandt, Uwe; Schäfer, Dirk; Grass, Michael; Rasche, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Rotational coronary angiography provides a multitude of x-ray projections of the contrast agent enhanced coronary arteries along a given trajectory with parallel ECG recording. These data can be used to derive motion information of the coronary arteries including vessel displacement and pulsation. In this paper, a fully automated algorithm to generate 4D motion vector fields for coronary arteries from multi-phase 3D centerline data is presented. The algorithm computes similarity measures of centerline segments at different cardiac phases and defines corresponding centerline segments as those with highest similarity. In order to achieve an excellent matching accuracy, an increasing number of bifurcations is included as reference points in an iterative manner. Based on the motion data, time-dependent vessel surface extraction is performed on the projections without the need of prior reconstruction. The algorithm accuracy is evaluated quantitatively on phantom data. The magnitude of longitudinal errors (parallel to the centerline) reaches approx. 0.50 mm and is thus more than twice as large as the transversal 3D extraction errors of the underlying multi-phase 3D centerline data. It is shown that the algorithm can extract asymmetric stenoses accurately. The feasibility on clinical data is demonstrated on five different cases. The ability of the algorithm to extract time-dependent surface data, e.g. for quantification of pulsating stenosis is demonstrated.

  15. Automatic generation of time resolved motion vector fields of coronary arteries and 4D surface extraction using rotational x-ray angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandt, Uwe; Schaefer, Dirk; Grass, Michael [Philips Research Europe-Hamburg, Roentgenstr. 24, 22335 Hamburg (Germany); Rasche, Volker [University of Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Robert-Koch-Strasse 8, 89081 Ulm (Germany)], E-mail: ujandt@gmx.de

    2009-01-07

    Rotational coronary angiography provides a multitude of x-ray projections of the contrast agent enhanced coronary arteries along a given trajectory with parallel ECG recording. These data can be used to derive motion information of the coronary arteries including vessel displacement and pulsation. In this paper, a fully automated algorithm to generate 4D motion vector fields for coronary arteries from multi-phase 3D centerline data is presented. The algorithm computes similarity measures of centerline segments at different cardiac phases and defines corresponding centerline segments as those with highest similarity. In order to achieve an excellent matching accuracy, an increasing number of bifurcations is included as reference points in an iterative manner. Based on the motion data, time-dependent vessel surface extraction is performed on the projections without the need of prior reconstruction. The algorithm accuracy is evaluated quantitatively on phantom data. The magnitude of longitudinal errors (parallel to the centerline) reaches approx. 0.50 mm and is thus more than twice as large as the transversal 3D extraction errors of the underlying multi-phase 3D centerline data. It is shown that the algorithm can extract asymmetric stenoses accurately. The feasibility on clinical data is demonstrated on five different cases. The ability of the algorithm to extract time-dependent surface data, e.g. for quantification of pulsating stenosis is demonstrated.

  16. The puzzle of half-integral quanta in the application of the adiabatic hypothesis to rotational motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Anthony; Pérez, Enric

    2016-05-01

    We present and discuss an interesting and puzzling problem Ehrenfest found in his first application of the adiabatic hypothesis, in 1913. It arose when trying to extend Planck's quantization of the energy of harmonic oscillators to a rotating dipole within the frame of the old quantum theory. Such an extension seemed to lead unavoidably to half-integral values for the rotational angular momentum of a system (in units of ℏ). We present the problem in its original form along with the (few) responses we have found to Ehrenfest's treatment. After giving a brief account of the classical and quantum adiabatic theorem, we also describe how Quantum Mechanics provides an explanation for this difficulty.

  17. ALMA Observations of the Transition from Infall Motion to Keplerian Rotation around the Late-phase Protostar TMC-1A

    CERN Document Server

    Aso, Yusuke; Saigo, Kazuya; Koyamatsu, Shin; Aikawa, Yuri; Hayashi, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiro N; Saito, Masao; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Yen, Hsi-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the Class I protostar TMC-1A with Atacama Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in 12CO and C18O (J=2-1), and 1.3-mm dust continuum emission. Continuum emission with a deconvolved size of 0.50"x0.37", perpendicular to the 12CO outflow, is detected. It most likely traces a circumstellar disk around TMC-1A, as previously reported. In contrast, a more extended structure is detected in C18O although it is still elongated with a deconvolved size of 3.3"x2.2", indicating that C18O traces mainly a flattened envelope surrounding the disk and the central protostar. C18O shows a clear velocity gradient perpendicular to the outflow at higher velocities, indicative of rotation, while an additional velocity gradient along the outflow is found at lower velocities. The radial profile of the rotational velocity is analyzed in detail, finding that it is given as a power-law \\propto r^{-a} with an index of ~0.5 at higher velocities. This suggests that the rotation at higher velocities can be explained as Keple...

  18. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  19. Development of a novel index of shoulder's mobility based on the configuration space volume and its link to mono-axial amplitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crétual, Armel; Bonan, Isabelle; Ropars, Mickaël

    2015-06-01

    At first sight, shoulder mobility is frequently evaluated through mono-axial amplitude. Interestingly, for diagnosing shoulder hyperlaxity or frozen shoulder, external rotation of the arm whilst at the side (ER1) is commonly used. However, by definition, a mono-axial amplitude does not fully reflect shoulder global mobility. Our goal was to propose a novel index for measuring shoulder global mobility and secondly to evaluate the link between main mono-axial amplitudes and this new index. Twenty-eight female subjects (mean age 24.8 years) without upper limb pathology participated in the study. The movements of their right dominant arm were measured with an opto-electronic motion capture system. They performed 5 mono-axial maximal amplitude motions (axial rotations in three different postures, flexion/extension and abduction from rest) and a global range of motion exploring all the reachable space around the three axes of rotation. From this, we computed the correlation coefficient between the volume of the reachable space and each possible linear combination of the 5 mono-axial amplitudes. Even though ER1 is often chosen to assess global mobility, it demonstrated the lowest correlation with measured joint mobility. To assess shoulder global mobility, clinical routine examination should more take into account external/internal rotation with the shoulder abducted, then abduction and finally flexion/extension. However, further clinical testing in other populations has to be done to evaluate the potential generalization of this result.

  20. Effects of Periodic Forcing Amplitude on the Spiral Wave Resonance Drift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ning-Jie; LI Bing-Wei; YING He-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study dynamics of spiral waves under a uniform periodic temporal forcing in an excitable medium. With a specific combination of frequency and amplitude of the external periodic forcing, a resonance drift of a spiral wave occurs along a straight line, and it is accompanied by a complicated ‘flower-like’ motion on each side of this bifurcate boundary line. It is confirmed that the straight-line drift frequency of spiral waves is not locked to the nature rotation frequency as the forcing amplitude expends the range of the spiral wave frequency. These results are further verified numerically for a simplified kinematical model.

  1. Interaction of a rotational motion and an axial flow in small geometries for a Couette-Taylor problem

    CERN Document Server

    Bordag, L A; Froehner, M; Myrnyy, V

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the stability of a cylindrical Couette flow under the imposition of a weak axial flow in case of a very short cylinder with a narrow annulus gap. We consider an incompressible viscous fluid which is contained in the narrow gap between two concentric short cylinders, where the inner cylinder rotates with constant angular velocity. The caps of the cylinders have narrow tubes conically tapering to super narrow slits which allow for an axial flow along the surface of the inner cylinder. The approximated solution for the Couette flow for short cylinders was found and used for the stability analysis instead of the exact but bulky solution. The sensitivity of the Couette flow to general small perturbations and to the weak axial flow was studied. We demonstrate that perturbations coming from the axial flow cause the propagation of dispersive waves in the Taylor-Couette flow. The coexistence of a rotation and of an axial flow requires to study in addition to the energy and the angular momentum also the heli...

  2. Inertial modes of slowly rotating isentropic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, S; Yoshida, Shijun; Lee, Umin

    2000-01-01

    We investigate inertial mode oscillations of slowly and uniformly rotating, isentropic, Newtonian stars. Inertial mode oscillations are induced by the Coriolis force due to the star's rotation, and their characteristic frequencies are comparable with the rotation frequency $\\Omega$ of the star. So called r-mode oscillations form a sub-class of the inertial modes. In this paper, we use the term ``r-modes'' to denote the inertial modes for which the toroidal motion dominates the spheroidal motion, and the term ``inertial modes'' to denote the inertial modes for which the toroidal and spheroidal motions have comparable amplitude to each other. Using the slow rotation approximation consistent up to the order of $\\Omega^3$, we study the properties of the inertial modes and r-modes, by taking account of the effect of the rotational deformation of the equilibrium on the eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions. The eigenfrequencies of the r-modes and inertial modes calculated in this paper are in excellent agreement with...

  3. Outer Rotation Curve of the Galaxy with VERA II: Annual Parallax and Proper Motion of the Star-Forming Region IRAS21379+5106

    CERN Document Server

    Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Imai, Hiroshi; Burns, Ross A; Ozawa, Takeaki; Honma, Mareki; Shibata, Katsunori; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    We conducted astrometric VLBI observations of water-vapor maser emission in the massive star forming region IRAS 21379+5106 to measure the annual parallax and proper motion, using VERA. The annual parallax was measured to be $0.262 \\pm 0.031$ mas corresponding to a trigonometric distance of $3.82^{+0.51}_{-0.41}$ kpc. The proper motion was $(\\mu_\\alpha\\cos{\\delta}, \\mu_\\delta)=(-2.74 \\pm 0.08, -2.87 \\pm 0.18)$ mas yr$^{-1}$. Using this result, the Galactic rotational velocity was estimated to be $V_\\theta=218\\pm 19$ km s$^{-1}$ at the Galactocentric distance $R=9.22\\pm0.43$ kpc, when we adopted the Galactic constants $R_0=8.05\\pm 0.45$ kpc and $V_0=238\\pm 14$ km s$^{-1}$. With newly determined distance, {the bolometric luminosity of the central young stellar object was re-evaluated to $(2.15\\pm 0.54)\\times 10^3 L_\\odot$, which corresponds to spectral type of} B2--B3. Maser features were found to be distributed along a straight line from south-west to north-east. In addition, a vector map of the internal motio...

  4. Rotor instability due to loose rotating part

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Loosening of a rotating part from its fixed position on the shaft or a part of the stator which comes loose and begins to turn with the rotor very frequently represents machinery malfunction. The loose part becomes involved in rotative motion mostly due to dry or fluid friction, and thus its motion is very erratic. The loose part can also move axially along the shaft. Detachment of the rotating part causes changes in the rotor balance state. Most often this results in higher unbalance. During steady-state operation the effect of a loose rotating part can manifest itself through heat vibration. It can be diagnosed by observing periodic changes of amplitude and phase of the synchronous response. During start-up (or shutdown) a loose rotating part carrying some amount of unbalance may manifest its dynamic action in the form of subsynchronous vibrations, very similar to those of other instabilities. The objective of this demonstration is to observe the effect of a loose rotating part (fixed, however, in the axial direction) under both steady-state (rotor constant speed) and transient (rotor start-up or shutdown) operation. The dynamic response depends very much on the amount of damping in the system: lubrication of the loose part/shaft surfaces and addition/elimination of aerodynamic drag blades, mounted on the loose disk, significantly change the rotor response.

  5. Vibration characteristics analysis of rotating shrouded blades with impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui; Xie, Fangtao; Nai, Haiqiang; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-09-01

    A dynamic model of rotating shrouded blades with impacts among adjacent shrouded blades is established considering the effects of the centrifugal stiffening, spin softening and Coriolis force, and the model is validated using finite element method. In the proposed model, the shrouded blade is simplified as a cantilever Euler-Bernoulli beam with a mass point at the free end, and the flexural dynamic stiffness of shrouded blade is selected as contact stiffness during collision. Based on the developed model, the effects of symmetric and asymmetric shroud gaps, rotational speeds, and aerodynamic force amplitudes on the dynamic characteristics of shrouded blades are analyzed through Newmark-β numerical method. The results indicate that (1) the vibro-impact responses of shrouded blades under some asymmetric gaps are more complicated than that under symmetric gap. (2) With the increase of rotational speed from 6000 to 10,000 rev/min, the system vibration experiences from period-three motion, through chaotic motion, finally to period-one motion during collision process because the increasing rotational speed changes the flexural dynamic stiffness of rotating blade. (3) The vibration displacements of shrouded blades increase linearly, and impact force increases linearly with the increase of aerodynamic force amplitude.

  6. Passive motion reduces vestibular balance and perceptual responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard C; Watson, Shaun R D

    2015-05-15

    With the hypothesis that vestibular sensitivity is regulated to deal with a range of environmental motion conditions, we explored the effects of passive whole-body motion on vestibular perceptual and balance responses. In 10 subjects, vestibular responses were measured before and after a period of imposed passive motion. Vestibulospinal balance reflexes during standing evoked by galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) were measured as shear reaction forces. Perceptual tests measured thresholds for detecting angular motion, perceptions of suprathreshold rotation and perceptions of GVS-evoked illusory rotation. The imposed conditioning motion was 10 min of stochastic yaw rotation (0.5-2.5 Hz ≤ 300 deg s(-2) ) with subjects seated. This conditioning markedly reduced reflexive and perceptual responses. The medium latency galvanic reflex (300-350 ms) was halved in amplitude (48%; P = 0.011) but the short latency response was unaffected. Thresholds for detecting imposed rotation more than doubled (248%; P vestibular sensations of rotation evoked by GVS (mean 113 deg for 10 s at 1 mA) by 44% (P vestibular sensory autoregulation exists and that this probably involves central and peripheral mechanisms, possibly through vestibular efferent regulation. We propose that failure of these regulatory mechanisms at different levels could lead to disorders of movement perception and balance control during standing. PMID:25809702

  7. Relação entre altura da patela e amplitude de movimentos após a artroplastia total do joelho Relationship between patellar height and range of motion after total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Honório de Carvalho Júnior

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar se após a artroplastia total do joelho existe correlação entre a altura da patela e a amplitude de movimento (ADM alcançada pelo paciente após seis meses de pós-operatório. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 45 pacientes submetidos a artroplastia total do joelho, todos com, no mínimo, 12 meses de pós-operatório, totalizando 54 joelhos. Sob fluoroscopia, todos os joelhos tiveram suas amplitudes de movimentos (ADM máximas e mínimas registradas, bem como a altura da patela pelo índice de Blackburne e Peel. Foram avaliadas as duas correlações possíveis: relação entre altura da patela e ADM e altura da patela e a variação de ADM entre o pré e o pós-operatório. RESULTADOS: Foi observada correlação entre altura da patela e ADM no pós-operatório (p = 0,04. Não foi observada correlação entre altura da patela e variação de ADM (p = 0,182. CONCLUSÃO: No pós-operatório da artroplastia total do joelho, quanto mais baixa a patela, pior a ADM.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether, after total knee arthroplasty, there is any correlation between patellar height and range of motion (ROM achieved by patients six months after the operation. METHODS: Forty-five patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty were assessed at least 12 months after the operation (total of 54 knees. The maximum and minimum ROM of all the knees was recorded under fluoroscopy, along with patellar height according to the Blackburne and Peel ratio. Two possible correlations were evaluated: patellar height and ROM; and patellar height and ROM variation from before to after the operation. RESULTS: A correlation was found between patellar height and postoperative ROM (p = 0.04. There was no correlation between patellar height and ROM variation (p = 0.182. CONCLUSION: After total knee arthroplasty, the lower the patella is, the worse the ROM is.

  8. Signatures of the Martian rotation parameters in the Doppler and range observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yseboodt, Marie; Dehant, Véronique; Péters, Marie-Julie; Folkner, William M.

    2016-10-01

    Because of Mars rotation, the position of a lander on Mars' surface is affected by different motions: the nutations, the precession, the length-of-day variations and the polar motion.We derive first-order expressions of the signature of these different rotation parameters in a Doppler observable between a lander and the Earth. These expressions are function of the diurnal rotation of Mars, the lander position (its latitude and its longitude), the planet radius and the amplitude of the rotation parameter. The nutation signature is proportional to the Earth declination with respect to Mars.For an equatorial lander, the largest signatures in the Doppler observable are for the length-of-day variations, precession rate and rigid nutations. The polar motion and the liquid core signature have a much smaller amplitude.All the signatures, with the exception of the polar motion, decrease as the lander gets closer to the pole, while the polar motion signature decreases if the lander is closer to the equator.Similarly, we also derive expressions for the signatures of the rotation parameters in the lander-Earth range observable.These expressions are useful in order to find when these signatures are maximal during one day or on a longer timescale, therefore to identify the times during a geodesy mission where the signatures can be maximized.Numerical values for these signatures are given for the future InSight and ExoMars landers.

  9. OBSERVATIONS OF INFALLING AND ROTATIONAL MOTIONS ON A 1000 AU SCALE AROUND 17 CLASS 0 AND 0/I PROTOSTARS: HINTS OF DISK GROWTH AND MAGNETIC BRAKING?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We perform imaging and analyses of SMA 1.3 mm continuum, C18O (2-1) and 12CO (2-1) line data of 17 Class 0 and 0/I protostars to study their gas kinematics on a 1000 AU scale. Continuum and C18O (2-1) emission are detected toward all the sample sources and show central primary components with sizes of ∼600-1500 AU associated with protostars. The velocity gradients in C18O (2-1) have wide ranges of orientations from parallel to perpendicular to the outflows, with magnitudes from ∼1 to ∼530 km s–1 pc–1. We construct a simple kinematic model to reproduce the observed velocity gradients, estimate the infalling and rotational velocities, and infer the disk radii and the protostellar masses. The inferred disk radii range from <5 AU to >500 AU with estimated protostellar masses from <0.1 M ☉ to >1 M ☉. Our results hint that both large and small disks are possibly present around Class 0 protostars, which could be a sign of disk growth at the Class 0 stage. In addition, the directions of the overall velocity gradients in 7 out of the 17 sources are close to perpendicular to their outflow axes (Δθ > 65°), which is a signature of significant rotational motions. From our model fitting, the specific angular momenta in these sources are estimated to be >2 × 10–4 km s–1 pc, suggesting that magnetic braking is unlikely efficient on a 1000 AU scale in these Class 0 and 0/I sources. In a sub-sample with observed magnetic field orientations, we find no source with large specific angular momenta together with closely aligned magnetic field and outflow axes. This possibly hints that the magnetic field, if originally aligned with the rotational axis, can play a role in removing angular momentum from infalling material at the Class 0 stage. We discuss our results in comparison with theoretical models of collapsing dense cores with and without magnetic fields in the context of disk formation

  10. On rotational solutions for elliptically excited pendulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author considers the planar rotational motion of the mathematical pendulum with its pivot oscillating both vertically and horizontally, so the trajectory of the pivot is an ellipse close to a circle. The analysis is based on the exact rotational solutions in the case of circular pivot trajectory and zero gravity. The conditions for existence and stability of such solutions are derived. Assuming that the amplitudes of excitations are not small while the pivot trajectory has small ellipticity the approximate solutions are found both for high and small linear dampings. Comparison between approximate and numerical solutions is made for different values of the damping parameter. -- Highlights: → We study rotations of the mathematical pendulum when its pivot moves along an ellipse. → There are stable exact solutions for a circular pivot trajectory and zero gravity. → Asymptotic solutions are found for an elliptical pivot trajectory

  11. Characteristics of the orbital rotation in dual-beam fiber-optic trap with transverse offset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinlin; Xiao, Guangzong; Yang, Kaiyong; Xiong, Wei; Luo, Hui

    2016-07-25

    The orbital rotation is an important type of motion of trapped particles apart from translation and spin rotation. It could be realized by introducing a transverse offset to the dual-beam fiber-optic trap. The characteristics (e.g. rotation perimeter and frequency) of the orbital rotation have been analyzed in this article. We demonstrate the influences of offset distance, beam waist separation distance, light power, and radius of the microsphere by both experimental and numerical work. The experiment results, i.e. orbital rotation perimeter and frequency as functions of these parameters, are consistent with the theoretical model in the present work. The orbital rotation amplitude and frequency could be exactly controlled by varying these parameters. This controllable orbital rotation can be easily applied to the area where microfluidic mixing is required. PMID:27464147

  12. Mechanics of Coriolis stimulus and inducing factors of motion sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isu, N; Shimizu, T; Sugata, K

    2001-12-01

    To specify inducing factors of motion sickness comprised in Coriolis stimulus, or cross-coupled rotation, the sensation of rotation derived from the semicircular canal system during and after Coriolis stimulus under a variety of stimulus conditions, was estimated by an approach from mechanics with giving minimal hypotheses and simplifications on the semicircular canal system and the sensory nervous system. By solving an equation of motion of the endolymph during Coriolis stimulus, rotating angle of the endolymph was obtained, and the sensation of rotation derived from each semicircular canal was estimated. Then the sensation derived from the whole semicircular canal system was particularly considered in two cases of a single Coriolis stimulus and cyclic Coriolis stimuli. The magnitude and the direction of sensation of rotation were shown to depend on an angular velocity of body rotation and a rotating angle of head movement (amplitude of head oscillation when cyclic Coriolis stimuli) irrespective of initial angle (center angle) of the head relative to the vertical axis. The present mechanical analysis of Coriolis stimulus led a suggestion that the severity of nausea evoked by Coriolis stimulus is proportional to the effective value of the sensation of rotation caused by the Coriolis stimulus.

  13. Monitoring Vibration of A Model of Rotating Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arko Djajadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical movement or motion of a rotating machine normally causes additional vibration. A vibration sensing device must be added to constantly monitor vibration level of the system having a rotating machine, since the vibration frequency and amplitude cannot be measured quantitatively by only sight or touch. If the vibration signals from the machine have a lot of noise, there are possibilities that the rotating machine has defects that can lead to failure. In this experimental research project, a vibration structure is constructed in a scaled model to simulate vibration and to monitor system performance in term of vibration level in case of rotation with balanced and unbalanced condition. In this scaled model, the output signal of the vibration sensor is processed in a microcontroller and then transferred to a computer via a serial communication medium, and plotted on the screen with data plotter software developed using C language. The signal waveform of the vibration is displayed to allow further analysis of the vibration. Vibration level monitor can be set in the microcontroller to allow shutdown of the rotating machine in case of excessive vibration to protect the rotating machine from further damage. Experiment results show the agreement with theory that unbalance condition on a rotating machine can lead to larger vibration amplitude compared to balance condition. Adding and reducing the mass for balancing can be performed to obtain lower vibration level. 

  14. Floppy Molecules with Internal Rotation and Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreglewski, Marek

    2016-06-01

    There are different ways to analyze rovibrational structure of molecules having several large amplitude motions of different type, like internal rotation and inversion or ring-puckering. In my research group we have developed and used methods starting from potential surfaces for large amplitude motions but also applied purely effective Hamiltonians, where tunneling splittings were key parameters. Whatever is the method the following problems must be solved when addressing a rovibrational problem with large amplitude vibrations: 1) a definition of the permutation-inversion molecular symmetry group, 2) a choice of the internal coordinates and their transformation in the symmetry group, 3) derivation of the Hamiltonian in chosen coordinates, 4) calculation of the Hamiltonian matrix elements in a symmetrized basis set. These points will be discussed. The advantage of methods which start from the geometry and potential surface for large amplitude vibrations give much clearer picture of internal dynamics of molecules but generally the fit to experimental data is much poorer. The fitting procedure is strongly non-linear and the iteration procedure much longer. The effective Hamiltonians the fit is generally much better since almost all optimized parameters are linear but the parameters have no clear physical meaning. This method is very useful in the assignment of experimental spectra. Results of the application of both method to methylamine and hydrazine will be presented.

  15. Efeito da amplitude de movimento no número máximo de repetições no exercício supino livre Efectos de la amplitud de movimiento em el número máximo de repeticiones em el ejercicio de supino libre Effect of range of motion in the maximum number of repetitions in the bench press exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vitor Lima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pesquisas mostram resultados divergentes no aumento da força utilizando diferentes amplitudes de movimento (ADM. O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar o número máximo de repetições (NMR no exercício supino com duas ADM. Quatorze voluntários realizaram a familiarização e o teste de uma repetição máxima (1 RM nas sessões 1 e 2. Nas sessões 3 e 4 realizaram o NMR em quatro séries a 50% de 1 RM, com um minuto de pausa, com ADM parcial (ADMP e completa (ADMC. Na ADMP utilizou-se metade do deslocamento vertical da barra comparada a condição ADMC. Foi realizada ANOVA "two-way" com medidas repetidas, seguida pelo "Post hoc" Scheffé. Houve diminuição significante do NMR entre as séries, exceto da terceira para a quarta em ambas ADM. Um maior NMR foi verificado para ADMP. A redução da ADM permite a realização de um maior número de repetições para uma mesma intensidade relativa.Investigaciones cientificas muestran resultados divergentes en el aumento de la fuerza utilizando diferentes amplitudes de movimiento (ADM. El objetivo de este estudio fue comparar el número máximo de repeticiones (NMR en un ejercicio de supino con dos ADM. Catorce voluntarios realizaron la familiarización y el test de una repetición máxima (1 RM en las sesiones 1 y 2. En las sesiones 3 y 4 realizaron o NMR en cuatro series a 50% de 1 RM, un minuto de pausa con ADM parcial (ADMP y completa (ADMC. ADMP utilizó la mitad del desplazamiento vertical de la barra realizado durante la ADMC. Fue aplicada ANOVA "two-way" con medidas repetidas, seguido del "Post hoc" Scheffé. Se encontró disminución significante del NMR a lo largo de las series, excepto de la tercera para la cuarta en ambas ADM, con el mismo patrón de reducción en ambas ADM. El NMR de la ADMP fue mayor que la ADMC. La reducción de ADM interfirió en el volumen de entrenamiento con mayor número de repeticiones realizadas para una misma intensidad relativa.There are divergent results

  16. Effect of field size, head motion, and rotational velocity on roll vection and illusory self-tilt in a tumbling room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, R. S.; Howard, I. P.; Zacher, J. E.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The effect of field size, velocity, and visual fixation upon the perception of self-body rotation and tilt was examined in a rotating furnished room. Subjects sat in a stationary chair in the furnished room which could be rotated about the body roll axis. For full-field conditions, complete 360 degrees body rotation (tumbling) was the most common sensation (felt by 80% of subjects). Constant tilt or partial tumbling (less than 360 degrees rotation) occurred more frequently with a small field of view (20 deg). The number of subjects who experienced complete tumbling increased with increases in field of view and room velocity (for velocities between 15 and 30 degrees s-1). The speed of perceived self-rotation relative to room rotation also increased with increasing field of view.

  17. Progress in Research on Diurnal and Semidiurnal Earth Rotation Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xueqing

    2015-08-01

    We mainly focus on the progress of research on high frequency changes in the earth rotation. Firstly, we review the development course and main motivating factors of the diurnal and semidiurnal earth rotation change. In recent decades, earth orientation has been monitored with increasing accuracy by advanced space-geodetic techniques, including lunar and satellite laser ranging, very long baseline interferometry and the global positioning system. We are able to obtain the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP, polar motion and rotation rate changes) by even 1 to 2 hours observation data, form which obvious diurnal and semidiurnal signals can be detected, and compare them with the predicted results by the ocean model. Both the amplitude and phase are in good agreement in the main diurnal and semidiurnal wave frequency, especially for the UT1, whose compliance is 90%, and 60% for polar motion, there are 30% motivating factor of the diurnal and semidiurnal polar motion have not been identified. Then we comprehensively review the different types of global ocean tidal correction models since the last eighties century, as well as the application research on diurnal and semidiurnal polar motion and UT1, the current ocean tidal correction models have 10% to 20% uncertainty, and need for further refinement.

  18. Close-range airborne Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry for high-resolution beach morphometric surveys: Examples from an embayed rotating beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunier, Guillaume; Fleury, Jules; Anthony, Edward J.; Gardel, Antoine; Dussouillez, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    The field of photogrammetry has seen significant new developments essentially related to the emergence of new computer-based applications that have fostered the growth of the workflow technique called Structure-from-Motion (SfM). Low-cost, user-friendly SfM photogrammetry offers interesting new perspectives in coastal and other fields of geomorphology requiring high-resolution topographic data. The technique enables the construction of topographic products such as digital surface models (DSMs) and orthophotographs, and combines the advantages of the reproducibility of GPS surveys and the high density and accuracy of airborne LiDAR, but at very advantageous cost compared to the latter. Three SfM-based photogrammetric experiments were conducted on the embayed beach of Montjoly in Cayenne, French Guiana, between October 2013 and 2014, in order to map morphological changes and quantify sediment budgets. The beach is affected by a process of rotation induced by the alongshore migration of mud banks from the mouths of the Amazon River that generate spatial and temporal changes in wave refraction and incident wave angles, thus generating the reversals in longshore drift that characterise this process. Sub-vertical aerial photographs of the beach were acquired from a microlight aircraft that flew alongshore at low elevation (275 m). The flight plan included several parallel flight axes with an overlap of 85% between pictures in the lengthwise direction and 50% between paths. Targets of 40 × 40 cm, georeferenced by RTK-DGPS, were placed on the beach, spaced 100 m apart. These targets served in optimizing the model and in producing georeferenced 3D products. RTK-GPS measurements of random points and cross-shore profiles were used to validate the photogrammetry results and assess their accuracy. We produced dense point clouds with 150 to 200 points/m², from which we generated DSMs and orthophotos with respective resolutions of 10 cm and 5 cm. Compared to the GPS control

  19. Low-cost respiratory motion tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryawala, Mohammed; Del Valle, Misael; Wang, Jiali; Byrne, James; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony

    2008-03-01

    Lung cancer is the cause of more than 150,000 deaths annually in the United States. Early and accurate detection of lung tumors with Positron Emission Tomography has enhanced lung tumor diagnosis. However, respiratory motion during the imaging period of PET results in the reduction of accuracy of detection due to blurring of the images. Chest motion can serve as a surrogate for tracking the motion of the tumor. For tracking chest motion, an optical laser system was designed which tracks the motion of a patterned card placed on the chest by illuminating the pattern with two structured light sources, generating 8 positional markers. The position of markers is used to determine the vertical, translational, and rotational motion of the card. Information from the markers is used to decide whether the patient's breath is abnormal compared to their normal breathing pattern. The system is developed with an inexpensive web-camera and two low-cost laser pointers. The experiments were carried out using a dynamic phantom developed in-house, to simulate chest movement with different amplitudes and breathing periods. Motion of the phantom was tracked by the system developed and also by a pressure transducer for comparison. The studies showed a correlation of 96.6% between the respiratory tracking waveforms by the two systems, demonstrating the capability of the system. Unlike the pressure transducer method, the new system tracks motion in 3 dimensions. The developed system also demonstrates the ability to track a sliding motion of the patient in the direction parallel to the bed and provides the potential to stop the PET scan in case of such motion.

  20. Amplitude mediated chimera states

    OpenAIRE

    Sethia, Gautam C.; Sen, Abhijit; Johnston, George L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of obtaining chimera state solutions of the non-local Complex Ginzburg-Landau Equation (NLCGLE) in the strong coupling limit when it is important to retain amplitude variations. Our numerical studies reveal the existence of a variety of amplitude mediated chimera states (including stationary and non-stationary two cluster chimera states), that display intermittent emergence and decay of amplitude dips in their phase incoherent regions. The existence regions of t...

  1. Periods and Feynman amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Feynman amplitudes in perturbation theory form the basis for most predictions in particle collider experiments. The mathematical quantities which occur as amplitudes include values of the Riemann zeta function and relate to fundamental objects in number theory and algebraic geometry. This talk reviews some of the recent developments in this field, and explains how new ideas from algebraic geometry have led to much progress in our understanding of amplitudes. In particular, the idea that certain transcendental numbers, such as $\\pi$, can be viewed as a representation of a group, provides a powerful framework to study amplitudes which reveals many hidden structures.

  2. Influência da limitação da amplitude de movimento sobre a melhora da flexibilidade do ombro após um treino de seis semanas Influence of the range of motion (rom limitation on the shoulder flexibility improvement after a six-week training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Câmara Azevedo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Estudos anteriores têm mostrado que o nível aeróbico e de força pré-treinamento influenciam os ganhos obtidos após um período de treino. Nenhum estudo investigou esta relação em um programa de flexibilidade. O objetivo deste estudo foi observar a influência da limitação da amplitude de movimento (ADM sobre a melhora da ADM de rotação externa de ombro após um programa de alongamento de seis semanas. 30 voluntários, estudantes de fisioterapia, com limitação da ADM de rotação externa de ombro foram divididos de forma randomizadas em três grupos: grupo controle (GC, grupo experimental 1 (GE1, com maior limitação de ADM e grupo experimental 2 (GE2, com menor limitação de ADM. Os sujeitos do grupo experimental foram submetidos a um programa de seis semanas de alongamento ativo para melhora da ADM de rotação externa de ombro. Na análise dos resultados, o teste de ANOVA one-way mostrou uma diferença significativa entre a média do ganho de ADM de rotação externa de ombro entre os três grupos (p=0,001, sendo que o GE1 teve o maior ganho de ADM (30,1° ± 8,6° seguido pelos grupos GE2 (15,2° ± 7,5° e GC (1,1° ± 5,8°. O teste de correlação de Pearson mostrou uma correlação negativa significativa entre ADM prévia e ganho de ADM (r= -0,70, p=0,001. Os resultados deste estudo mostraram que a ADM prévia de rotação externa de ombro influencia o ganho de ADM deste movimento após um programa de alongamento de seis semanas em uma população jovem e saudável. Indivíduos com maior limitação de ADM respondem com um ganho de ADM mais pronunciado.Previous research has shown that pre-training aerobic and strength status can influence on the training results, with untrained individuals presenting a more pronounced improvement. No study has investigated this correlation in a flexibility program so far. The purpose of this study was to observe the influence of the range of motion (ROM limitation on ROM gain after a six

  3. A simplified motion model for estimating respiratory motion from orbiting views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rongping; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Balter, James M.

    2007-03-01

    We have shown previously that the internal motion caused by a patient's breathing can be estimated from a sequence of slowly rotating 2D cone-beam X-ray projection views and a static prior of of the patient's anatomy. 1, 2 The estimator iteratively updates a parametric 3D motion model so that the modeled projection views of the deformed reference volume best match the measured projection views. Complicated motion models with many degrees of freedom may better describe the real motion, but the optimizations assiciated with them may overfit noise and may be easily trapped by local minima due to a large number of parameters. For the latter problem, we believe it can be solved by offering the optimization algorithm a good starting point within the valley containing the global minimum point. Therefore, we propose to start the motion estimation with a simplified motion model, in which we assume the displacement of each voxel at any time is proportional to the full movement of that voxel from extreme exhale to extreme inhale. We first obtain the full motion by registering two breath-hold CT volumes at end-expiration and end-inspiration. We then estimate a sequence of scalar displacement proportionality parameters. Thus the goal simplifies to finding a motion amplitude signal. This estimation problem can be solved quickly using the exhale reference volume and projection views with coarse (downsampled) resolution, while still providing acceptable estimation accuracy. The estimated simple motion then can be used to initialize a more complicated motion estimator.

  4. Logarithmic torus amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flohr, Michael [Physikalisches Institut, University of Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Gaberdiel, Matthias R [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, ETH Zuerich, ETH-Hoenggerberg, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-02-24

    For the example of the logarithmic triplet theory at c = -2, the chiral vacuum torus amplitudes are analysed. It is found that the space of these torus amplitudes is spanned by the characters of the irreducible representations, as well as a function that can be associated with the logarithmic extension of the vacuum representation. A few implications and generalizations of this result are discussed.

  5. Amplitudes, acquisition and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloor, Robert

    1998-12-31

    Accurate seismic amplitude information is important for the successful evaluation of many prospects and the importance of such amplitude information is increasing with the advent of time lapse seismic techniques. It is now widely accepted that the proper treatment of amplitudes requires seismic imaging in the form of either time or depth migration. A key factor in seismic imaging is the spatial sampling of the data and its relationship to the imaging algorithms. This presentation demonstrates that acquisition caused spatial sampling irregularity can affect the seismic imaging and perturb amplitudes. Equalization helps to balance the amplitudes, and the dealing strategy improves the imaging further when there are azimuth variations. Equalization and dealiasing can also help with the acquisition irregularities caused by shot and receiver dislocation or missing traces. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Exact analytic solutions for the rotation of an axially symmetric rigid body subjected to a constant torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Marcello

    2008-08-01

    New exact analytic solutions are introduced for the rotational motion of a rigid body having two equal principal moments of inertia and subjected to an external torque which is constant in magnitude. In particular, the solutions are obtained for the following cases: (1) Torque parallel to the symmetry axis and arbitrary initial angular velocity; (2) Torque perpendicular to the symmetry axis and such that the torque is rotating at a constant rate about the symmetry axis, and arbitrary initial angular velocity; (3) Torque and initial angular velocity perpendicular to the symmetry axis, with the torque being fixed with the body. In addition to the solutions for these three forced cases, an original solution is introduced for the case of torque-free motion, which is simpler than the classical solution as regards its derivation and uses the rotation matrix in order to describe the body orientation. This paper builds upon the recently discovered exact solution for the motion of a rigid body with a spherical ellipsoid of inertia. In particular, by following Hestenes’ theory, the rotational motion of an axially symmetric rigid body is seen at any instant in time as the combination of the motion of a “virtual” spherical body with respect to the inertial frame and the motion of the axially symmetric body with respect to this “virtual” body. The kinematic solutions are presented in terms of the rotation matrix. The newly found exact analytic solutions are valid for any motion time length and rotation amplitude. The present paper adds further elements to the small set of special cases for which an exact solution of the rotational motion of a rigid body exists.

  7. Rotational instability in a linear theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The m=1 ''wobble'' instability of the plasma column in a 5-m linear theta pinch has been studied using an axial array of orthogonally viewing position detectors to resolve the wavelength and frequency of the column motion. The experimental results are compared with recent theoretical predictions that include finite Larmor orbit effects. The frequency and wavelength characteristics at saturation agree with the predicted dispersion relation for a plasma rotating faster than the diamagnetic drift speed. Measurements of the magnetic fields at the ends of the pinch establish the existence of currents flowing in such a way that they short out the radial electric fields in the plasma column. The magnitude of rotation, the observed delay in the onset of m=1 motion, and the magnitude of end-shorting currents can all be understood in terms of the torsional Alfven waves that communicate to the central plasma column the information that the ends have been shorted. The same waves are responsible for the torque which rotates the plasma and leads to the observed m=1 instability. Observations of the plasma in the presence of solid end plugs indicate a stabilization of high-m number modes and a reduction of the m=1 amplitude

  8. Cylindrical rotating triboelectric nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Peng; Zhu, Guang; Liu, Ying; Chen, Jun; Jing, Qingshen; Yang, Weiqing; Ma, Jusheng; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-07-23

    We demonstrate a cylindrical rotating triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on sliding electrification for harvesting mechanical energy from rotational motion. The rotating TENG is based on a core-shell structure that is made of distinctly different triboelectric materials with alternative strip structures on the surface. The charge transfer is strengthened with the formation of polymer nanoparticles on surfaces. During coaxial rotation, a contact-induced electrification and the relative sliding between the contact surfaces of the core and the shell result in an "in-plane" lateral polarization, which drives the flow of electrons in the external load. A power density of 36.9 W/m(2) (short-circuit current of 90 μA and open-circuit voltage of 410 V) has been achieved by a rotating TENG with 8 strip units at a linear rotational velocity of 1.33 m/s (a rotation rate of 1000 r/min). The output can be further enhanced by integrating more strip units and/or applying larger linear rotational velocity. This rotating TENG can be used as a direct power source to drive small electronics, such as LED bulbs. This study proves the possibility to harvest mechanical energy by TENGs from rotational motion, demonstrating its potential for harvesting the flow energy of air or water for applications such as self-powered environmental sensors and wildlife tracking devices. PMID:23799926

  9. A microscopic derivation of nuclear collective rotation-vibration model, axially symmetric case

    OpenAIRE

    Gulshani, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    We derive a microscopic version of the successful phenomenological hydrodynamic model of Bohr-Davydov-Faessler-Greiner for collective rotation-vibration motion of an axially symmetric deformed nucleus. The derivation is not limited to small oscillation amplitude. The nuclear Schrodinger equation is canonically transformed the to collective co-ordinates, which is then linearized using a constrained variational method. The associated constraints are imposed on the wavefunction rather than on th...

  10. Retrograde rotation of the large-scale flow in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection with high Rossby number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Li, Hui-Min; Wang, Xue-Ying

    2015-11-01

    We present measurements of the azimuthal orientation θ (t) of the large-scale circulation (LSC) for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in the presence of week rotations Ω . Linear retrograde rotations of the LSC circulating plane are observed over the entire Rossby-number range (1 / Ω remains nearly a constant 0.12 in the range of (1 80 . When Ro ~= 300 , γ approaches a value of 0.36 close to the prediction from previous theoretical models. In a background of linear rotations, erratic changes in θ (t) accompanied by decreasing in the LSC amplitude δ are observed. These small- δ events give rise to the increasing γ with very high Ro numbers (80 LSC azimuthal motion due to turbulent viscosity and provide theoretical interpretations of the experimental results. Work supported by NSFC Grant No. 11202151.

  11. Irregular rotation of the main sunspot in active region Hale 17 570 of 5-13 April 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irregular rotation of the main sunspot in the active region Hale 17 570 was investigated on 5 to 13 April 1981. The characteristics of this motion indicate that damped oscillations were involved. The maximum amplitude of the rotation of the sunspot was 111.4deg. The angular velocity of the rotational motion reached its maximum (ω=3.5deg h-1) on 9 April 1981 at 6.7 h UT. The largest angular acceleration (Δω/Δt=0.22deg h-2) was observed at 04.9 h UT on 8 April 1981. Coefficients A and b for the exponential damping function y=+-A exp(-bt) were estimated: A=123deg, b=0.02047, time t0 being 06.8 h UT on 8 April 1981 and the time t being given in hours. No correlation was found between the characteristics of the irregular rotation and flare activity. (author)

  12. Amplitude and frequency prediction in the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Rosalyn; Walker, Mark F

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the effect of amplitude and frequency predictability on the performance of the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR). Eye movements were recorded in 5 subjects during continuous vertical translation that consisted of a series of segments with: 1) 3 amplitudes at constant frequency (2 Hz) or 2) 3 different frequencies (1.6, 2, 2.5 Hz). Stimulus changes were presented in a pseudo-random order. We found that there was little change in the tVOR immediately after an unexpected stimulus change, as if eye velocity were being driven more by an expectation based on previous steady-state motion than by current head translation. For amplitude transitions, only about 30% of the eventual response change was seen in the first half cycle. Similarly, a sudden change in translation frequency did not appear in eye velocity for 70 ms, compared to a 8 ms lag during similar yaw rotation. Finally, after a sudden large decrease in frequency, the eyes continued to track at the original higher frequency, resulting initially in an anti-compensatory tVOR acceleration. Our results elucidate further the complexity of the tVOR and show that motion prediction based on prior experience plays an important role in its response.

  13. Infalling-Rotating Motion and Associated Chemical Change in the Envelope of IRAS 16293-2422 Source A Studied with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Oya, Yoko; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Lefloch, Bertrand; Favre, Cécile; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed rotational spectral line emission of OCS, CH3OH, HCOOCH3, and H2CS observed toward the low-mass Class 0 protostellar source IRAS 16293-2422 Source A at a sub-arcsecond resolution (~0".6 x 0".5) with ALMA. Significant chemical differentiation is found at a 50 AU scale. The OCS line is found to well trace the infalling-rotating envelope in this source. On the other hand, the CH3OH and HCOOCH3 distributions are found to be concentrated around the inner part of the infalling-rotating envelope. With a simple ballistic model of the infalling-rotating envelope, the radius of the centrifugal barrier (a half of the centrifugal radius) and the protostellar mass are evaluated from the OCS data to be from 40 to 60 AU and from 0.5 to 1.0 Msun, respectively, assuming the inclination angle of the envelope/disk structure to be 60 degrees (90 degrees for the edge-on configuration). Although the protostellar mass is correlated with the inclination angle, the radius of the centrifugal barrier is not. This is th...

  14. Spherical Pendulum Small Oscillations for Slewing Crane Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Perig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper focuses on the Lagrange mechanics-based description of small oscillations of a spherical pendulum with a uniformly rotating suspension center. The analytical solution of the natural frequencies’ problem has been derived for the case of uniform rotation of a crane boom. The payload paths have been found in the inertial reference frame fixed on earth and in the noninertial reference frame, which is connected with the rotating crane boom. The numerical amplitude-frequency characteristics of the relative payload motion have been found. The mechanical interpretation of the terms in Lagrange equations has been outlined. The analytical expression and numerical estimation for cable tension force have been proposed. The numerical computational results, which correlate very accurately with the experimental observations, have been shown.

  15. A microscopic derivation of nuclear collective rotation-vibration model and its application to nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulshani, P.

    2016-07-01

    We derive a microscopic version of the successful phenomenological hydrodynamic model of Bohr-Davydov-Faessler-Greiner for collective rotation-vibration motion of an axially symmetric deformed nucleus. The derivation is not limited to small oscillation amplitude. The nuclear Schrodinger equation is canonically transformed to collective co-ordinates, which is then linearized using a constrained variational method. The associated constraints are imposed on the wavefunction rather than on the particle co-ordinates. The approach yields three self-consistent, time-reversal invariant, cranking-type Schrodinger equations for the rotation-vibration and intrinsic motions, and a self-consistency equation. For harmonic oscillator mean-field potentials, these equations are solved in closed forms for excitation energy, cut-off angular momentum, and other nuclear properties for the ground-state rotational band in some deformed nuclei. The results are compared with measured data.

  16. Spectroscopic investigation of the vibrational quasi-continuum arising from internal rotation of a methyl group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hougen, J.T. [NIST, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this project is to use spectroscopic techniques to investigate in detail phenomena involving the vibrational quasi-continuum in a simple physical system. Acetaldehyde was chosen for the study because: (i) methyl groups have been suggested to be important promotors of intramolecular vibrational relaxation, (ii) the internal rotation of a methyl group is an easily describle large-amplitude motion, which should retain its simple character even at high levels of excitation, and (iii) the aldehyde carbonyl group offers the possibility of both vibrational and electronic probing. The present investigation of the ground electronic state has three parts: (1) understanding the {open_quotes}isolated{close_quotes} internal-rotation motion below, at, and above the top of the torsional barrier, (2) understanding in detail traditional (bond stretching and bending) vibrational fundamental and overtone states, and (3) understanding interactions involving states with multiquantum excitations of at least one of these two kinds of motion.

  17. Damage assessment of RC buildings subjected to the different strong motion duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezaei, Alireza; mohajer Tabrizi, Mohsen

    2015-07-01

    An earthquake has three important characteristics; namely, amplitude, frequency content and duration. Amplitude and frequency content have a direct impact but not necessarily the sole cause of structural damage. Regarding the duration, some researchers show a high correlation between strong motion duration and structural damage whereas some others find no relation. This paper focuses on the ground motion durations characterized by Arias Intensity (AI). High duration may increase the damage state of structure for the damage accumulation. This paper investigates the response time histories (acceleration, velocity and displacement) of RC buildings under the different strong motion durations. Generally, eight earthquake records were selected from different soil type, and these records were grouped according to their PGA and frequency ranges. Maximum plastic rotation and drift response was chosen as damage indicator. In general, there was a positive correlation between strong motion duration and damage; however, in some PGA and frequency ranges input motions with shorter durations might cause more damage than the input motions with longer durations. In soft soils, input motions with longer durations caused more damage than the input motions with shorter durations.

  18. Design and construction of a planar motion mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanasovici, Gilberto [Protemaq Engenharia e Projetos, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Fucatu, Carlos H. [Technomar Engenharia Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tannuri, Eduardo A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Mecatronica; Umeda, Carlos H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the design and construction of a PMM (Planar Motion Mechanism) towed by the IPT-SP main carriage. The IPT towing tank no. 2 is 220 m length and 6.6 m wide. The PMM provides a forced sway and/or yaw oscillation on a ship or other marine structure scaled model.. The maximum sway amplitude (transversal motion) is {+-}1 m, and the maximum sway velocity is 1.0 m/s, with a maximum carrying load of 1000 N. The maximum yaw velocity (rotation motion) is 36 deg/s. High-precision components were used in the construction, and the final estimated accuracy in the sway axis is 0.02 mm and approximately 0.1 deg for yaw motions. Finite Element Analysis and Structural Optimization techniques were used during the design stage. The PMM structure total mass is less than 1 ton, lighter than similar mechanisms in other institutions. A Man-Machine Interface was developed, and the operator is able to define the period and amplitude of sway and yaw motions, as well as the fade-in and fade-out time. An integral 3-component force load cell is installed in the end of the support axis, which measures the hydrodynamic loads on the captive model at low speed tests. This novel laboratorial facility allows the IPT to execute new kinds of experimental procedures, related to evaluation of hydrodynamic loads acting on ship hulls and offshore structures. (author)

  19. Population of rotational states in the ground-band of fission fragments

    CERN Document Server

    Misicu, Serban

    2013-01-01

    The population of rotational states in the ground-state band of neutron-rich fragments emitted in the spontaneous fission of $^{252}$Cf is described within a time-dependent quantum model similar to the one used for Coulomb excitation. The initial population probability of the states included in the selected basis is calculated according to the bending model at scission. Subsequently these initial amplitudes are feeding the coupled dynamical equations describing the population of rotational states in both fragments during the tunneling and post-barrier (pure Coulomb) motion. As application we consider the high yield Mo-Ba pair for different number of emitted neutrons.

  20. Avaliação da amplitude de movimento e força da cintura escapular em pacientes de pós-operatório tardio de mastectomia radical modificada Shoulder motion range and strength assessment in late post-operative patients having undergone modified radical mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Fernandes Gouveia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O câncer de mama é a neoplasia que mais afeta as mulheres e a cirurgia tem sido o tratamento de escolha, que pode assumir vários graus, até mastectomia radical modificada e alargada. Após a cirurgia, podem surgir seqüelas como alterações na amplitude articular do ombro homolateral, diminuição da força muscular, linfedema e aderências. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a amplitude de movimento e força muscular da cintura escapular em mulheres submetidas à mastectomia radical modificada em pós-operatório tardio. Foram avaliadas nove mulheres, em pós-operatório de 2 a 7 anos, com média de idade de 53,22±6,5 anos. A amplitude de movimento e força muscular do lado da cirurgia foram avaliadas em relação ao membro contralateral, tomado como parâmetro normal. Os dados foram tratados estatisticamente e o nível de signifcância fixado em pBreast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm among women; it is traditionally treated by surgery ranging from quadrantectomy to widened modified radical mastectomy, of which common sequels are changes in articular range of motion, muscle strength decrease, lymphedema, and adherences. The aim of this work is to evaluate shoulder motion range and muscle strength in late post-operative patients having undergone radical modified mastectomy. Nine women, mean aged 53.22±6,5 years, in 2-to-7 year post-operative span, were evaluated as to shoulder motion range and muscle strength of the surgery side, considering the contralateral shoulder and limb as the standard reference for comparison. Data were statistically analysed and significance level set at p=0.05. Results showed significant reduction in shoulder range of motion in all patients, mainly in active and passive flexion and abduction, as well as lesser muscle strength, especially in Middle Trapezius and Supraspinatus muscles, as compared to the healthy limb. Findings stress the need to physical therapy to be onset at immediate post-operative, in

  1. Amplitude recruitment of cochlear potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xingqi; SUN Wei; SUN Jianhe; YU Ning; JIANG Sichang

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from outer hair cells (OHC) and the cochlear microphonics (CM) were recorded from scala media (SM) in three turn of guinea pig cochlea,the compound action potential (CAP) were recorded at the round window (RW) before and after the animal were exposed to white noise. The results suggest that the nonlinear properties with “saduration” of Input/output (I/O) function of OHC AC recepter potential and CM were founded; the nonlinear properties with “Low”, “Platean” and “high” of CAP also were investigated. After explosion, the threshold shift of CAP has about 10 dB. The I/O of OHC responses and CM were changed in a linearizing (i.e., nonlinearity loss), the “platean” of I/O CAP disappeared and the growth rate of CAP amplitude were larger than before explosion. The response amplitude recruitment of OHC appears to result from reduction in gain (i.e., hearing loss); It was due to the nonlinear growth function of OHC receptor potentials was changed in linearzing that the basilar membrance motion was changed in linearizing. Since intensity coding in the inner ear depends on an interactions of nonlinear basilar membrance and nerve fibers. So that it must lead to a linearizing of CAP as input responses.

  2. Sunspots and Their Simple Harmonic Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, C. I.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an example of a simple harmonic motion, the apparent motion of sunspots due to the Sun's rotation, is described, which can be used to teach this subject to high-school students. Using real images of the Sun, students can calculate the star's rotation period with the simple harmonic motion mathematical expression.

  3. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Manolopoulou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exits, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte-Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z<~0.1 with member galaxies selected from the SDSS DR10 spectroscopic database. We find that ~35% of our clusters are rotating when using a set of strict criteria, while loosening the criteria we find this fraction increasing to ~48%. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation that the significance and strength of their...

  4. Protostring Scattering Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Thorn, Charles B

    2016-01-01

    We calculate some tree level scattering amplitudes for a generalization of the protostring, which is a novel string model implied by the simplest string bit models. These bit models produce a lightcone worldsheet which supports $s$ integer moded Grassmann fields. In the generalization we supplement this Grassmann worldsheet system with $d=24-s$ transverse coordinate worldsheet fields. The protostring corresponds to $s=24$ and the bosonic string to $s=0$. The interaction vertex is a simple overlap with no operator insertions at the break/join point. Assuming that $s$ is even we calculate the multi-string scattering amplitudes by bosonizing the Grassmann fields, each pair equivalent to one compactified bosonic field, and applying Mandelstam's interacting string formalism to a system of $s/2$ compactified and $d$ uncompactified bosonic worldsheet fields. We obtain all amplitudes for open strings with no oscillator excitations and for closed strings with no oscillator excitations and zero winding number. We then ...

  5. Study on rotating cutter motion analysis modeling and control simulation%滚切机运动参数分析建模及控制仿真研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵汝和; 柳润青; 李三雁

    2016-01-01

    针对滚切机工作过程中电机需要不断加减速满足切纸的要求并由此带来大量的功率消耗问题,通过对滚切机运动的分析,建立滚子运动参数及相关结构参数与功耗关系的数学模型,在模型的基础上采用ADAMS和Simulink仿真软件进行运动和控制的联合仿真,发现当滚子偏转角从2º变为1.5º时,整机功率增加一倍多,通过调整控制器中的PID参数,滚子角速度输出产生明显变化,而其他控制器参数的变化对输出的影响甚微。通过模型可以快速实现瓦楞生产线的节能降耗以及滚切机结构参数的优化设计。%As a large amount of power consumption occurs in the working process of rotating cutters due to constant acceleration or deceleration of motors, a mathematical model is designed according to the motion of rotating cutters. The model reflects the relation between roller motion parameters, structure parameters and power consumption. At the same time, simulation software ADAMS and Simulink are used to simulate motion and control. It shows that when the deflection angle of the roller varied from 2o to 1.5o,the total power is doubled. After the PID parameters in the controller are adjusted, the angular velocity output of the roller changed significantly but almost unaffected when other parameters are regulated. This method can be used to save energy and reduce consumption in corrugated production lines and optimize the structural parameters of rotating cutters.

  6. Motion-induced dose artifacts in helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bryan; Chen, Jeff; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry

    2009-10-01

    Tumor motion is a particular concern for a complex treatment modality such as helical tomotherapy, where couch position, gantry rotation and MLC leaf opening all change with time. In the present study, we have investigated the impact of tumor motion for helical tomotherapy, which could result in three distinct motion-induced dose artifacts, namely (1) dose rounding, (2) dose rippling and (3) IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect. Dose rounding and dose rippling effects have been previously described, while the IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect is a newly discovered motion-induced dose artifact. Dose rounding is the penumbral widening of a delivered dose distribution near the edges of a target volume along the direction of tumor motion. Dose rippling is a series of periodic dose peaks and valleys observed within the target region along the direction of couch motion, due to an asynchronous interplay between the couch motion and the longitudinal component of tumor motion. The IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect is caused by an asynchronous interplay between the temporal patterns of leaf openings and tumor motion. The characteristics of each dose artifact were investigated individually as functions of target motion amplitude and period for both non-IMRT and IMRT helical tomotherapy cases, through computer simulation modeling and experimental verification. The longitudinal dose profiles generated by the simulation program agreed with the experimental data within ±0.5% and ±1.5% inside the PTV region for the non-IMRT and IMRT cases, respectively. The dose rounding effect produced a penumbral increase up to 20.5 mm for peak-to-peak target motion amplitudes ranging from 1.0 cm to 5.0 cm. Maximum dose rippling magnitude of 25% was calculated, when the target motion period approached an unusually high value of 10 s. The IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect produced dose differences ranging from -29% to 7% inside the PTV region. This information on

  7. Oscillations of a Simple Pendulum with Extremely Large Amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butikov, Eugene I.

    2012-01-01

    Large oscillations of a simple rigid pendulum with amplitudes close to 180[degrees] are treated on the basis of a physically justified approach in which the cycle of oscillation is divided into several stages. The major part of the almost closed circular path of the pendulum is approximated by the limiting motion, while the motion in the vicinity…

  8. Nuclear rotation. Part 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quasiclassical treatment of the model 'rotator+particle' is suggested. The classical equations of motion for this model are obtained. General solution of these equations is given. The actual for nuclear physics stationary rotations are studied in detail. The applications of model to the phenomenon of alignment of the 'odd nucleons' angular momentum along the vector of angular velocity is discussed. The comparison with the experiment shows a good agreement with the theoretical results. 17 refs.; 4 figs

  9. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  10. A study on psychological factors and motion sickness symptoms induced by motorised rotating chair%心理因素与转椅诱发晕动反应的相关研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乐燕; 许恒; 杨扬; 许益飞; 包瀛春

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation between psychological factors and motion sickness symptoms induced by motorised rotating chair. Methods Three hundred and eight-six college undergraduate students received coriolis acceleration test. Their motion sickness responses were assessed by using Graybiels diagnostic criteria. They were filled in Self-Efficacy Scale, Self-Control Schedule and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire before test. Results It had significant correlation between Self-Efficacy and motion sickness Symptoms (r = -0.386,P<0.05). Single factor and logistic regression analysis showed that Self-Efficacy was important psychological factor for motion sickness induced by motorised rotating chair. Conclusion Self-Efficacy may provide important guidelines for psychological training about improving mition sickness tolerance in laboratory.%目的 探讨心理因素与科利奥力( Coriolis)转椅诱发晕动反应的相关性.方法 对某院校386名本科学员进行科利奥力加速度体能测试,采用格瑞比尔(Graybiel)评分标准对被试者进行晕动反应评估,并在测试前填写晕动病自我效能感量表、自我控制感量表及艾森克人格量表.结果 自我效能感得分与诱发晕动病Graybiel平均得分呈负相关(r=-0.386,P <0.05),有统计学意义;单因素和Logistic回归分析表明:个体的自我效能感为转椅诱发晕动反应的相关心理因素(P<0.05).结论 自我效能感为开展提高晕动耐受性的训练提供了重要依据.

  11. On Arbitrary Phases in Quantum Amplitude Amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, P

    2000-01-01

    We consider the use of arbitrary phases in quantum amplitude amplification which is a generalization of quantum searching. We prove that the phase condition in amplitude amplification is given by $\\tan(\\phi/2)=\\tan(\\phi/2)(1-2a)$, where $\\phi$ and $\\phi$ are the phases used and where $a$ is the success probability of the given algorithm. Thus the choice of phases depends nontrivially and nonlinearly on the success probability. Utilizing this condition, we give methods for constructing quantum algorithms that succeed with certainty and for implementing arbitrary rotations. We also conclude that phase errors of order up to $\\frac{1}{\\sqrt{a}}$ can be tolerated in amplitude amplification.

  12. Movement amplitude and tempo change in piano performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Caroline

    2001-05-01

    Music performance places stringent temporal and cognitive demands on individuals that should yield large speed/accuracy tradeoffs. Skilled piano performance, however, shows consistently high accuracy across a wide variety of rates. Movement amplitude may affect the speed/accuracy tradeoff, so that high accuracy can be obtained even at very fast tempi. The contribution of movement amplitude changes in rate (tempo) is investigated with motion capture. Cameras recorded pianists with passive markers on hands and fingers, who performed on an electronic (MIDI) keyboard. Pianists performed short melodies at faster and faster tempi until they made errors (altering the speed/accuracy function). Variability of finger movements in the three motion planes indicated most change in the plane perpendicular to the keyboard across tempi. Surprisingly, peak amplitudes of motion before striking the keys increased as tempo increased. Increased movement amplitudes at faster rates may reduce or compensate for speed/accuracy tradeoffs. [Work supported by Canada Research Chairs program, HIMH R01 45764.

  13. Visual Acuity Using Head-fixed Displays During Passive Self and Surround Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Black, F. Owen; Stallings, Valerie; Peters, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The ability to read head-fixed displays on various motion platforms requires the suppression of vestibulo-ocular reflexes. This study examined dynamic visual acuity while viewing a head-fixed display during different self and surround rotation conditions. Twelve healthy subjects were asked to report the orientation of Landolt C optotypes presented on a micro-display fixed to a rotating chair at 50 cm distance. Acuity thresholds were determined by the lowest size at which the subjects correctly identified 3 of 5 optotype orientations at peak velocity. Visual acuity was compared across four different conditions, each tested at 0.05 and 0.4 Hz (peak amplitude of 57 deg/s). The four conditions included: subject rotated in semi-darkness (i.e., limited to background illumination of the display), subject stationary while visual scene rotated, subject rotated around a stationary visual background, and both subject and visual scene rotated together. Visual acuity performance was greatest when the subject rotated around a stationary visual background; i.e., when both vestibular and visual inputs provided concordant information about the motion. Visual acuity performance was most reduced when the subject and visual scene rotated together; i.e., when the visual scene provided discordant information about the motion. Ranges of 4-5 logMAR step sizes across the conditions indicated the acuity task was sufficient to discriminate visual performance levels. The background visual scene can influence the ability to read head-fixed displays during passive motion disturbances. Dynamic visual acuity using head-fixed displays can provide an operationally relevant screening tool for visual performance during exposure to novel acceleration environments.

  14. Hyperventilation in a motion sickness desensitization program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mert, A.; Bles, W.; Nooij, S.A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: In motion sickness desensitization programs, the motion sickness provocative stimulus is often a forward bending of the trunk on a rotating chair, inducing Coriolis effects. Since respiratory relaxation techniques are applied successfully in these courses, we investigated whether these

  15. A Combined Softening and Hardening Mechanism for Low Frequency Human Motion Energy Harvesting Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalis Suhaimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the mechanism for harvesting energy from human body motion. The vibration signal from human body motion during walking and jogging was first measured using 3-axes vibration recorder placed at various places on the human body. The measured signal was then processed using Fourier series to investigate its frequency content. A mechanism was proposed to harvest the energy from the low frequency-low amplitude human motion. This mechanism consists of the combined nonlinear hardening and softening mechanism which was aimed at widening the bandwidth as well as amplifying the low human motion frequency. This was realized by using a translation-to-rotary mechanism which converts the translation motion of the human motion into the rotational motion. The nonlinearity in the system was realized by introducing a winding spring stiffness and the magnetic stiffness. Quasi-static and dynamic measurement were conducted to investigate the performance of the mechanism. The results show that, with the right degree of nonlinearity, the two modes can be combined together to produce a wide flat response. For the frequency amplification, the mechanism manages to increase the frequency by around 8 times in terms of rotational speed.

  16. Light Meson Distribution Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Arthur, R; Brommel, D; Donnellan, M A; Flynn, J M; Juttner, A; de Lima, H Pedroso; Rae, T D; Sachrajda, C T; Samways, B

    2010-01-01

    We calculated the first two moments of the light-cone distribution amplitudes for the pseudoscalar mesons ($\\pi$ and $K$) and the longitudinally polarised vector mesons ($\\rho$, $K^*$ and $\\phi$) as part of the UKQCD and RBC collaborations' $N_f=2+1$ domain-wall fermion phenomenology programme. These quantities were obtained with a good precision and, in particular, the expected effects of $SU(3)$-flavour symmetry breaking were observed. Operators were renormalised non-perturbatively and extrapolations to the physical point were made, guided by leading order chiral perturbation theory. The main results presented are for two volumes, $16^3\\times 32$ and $24^3\\times 64$, with a common lattice spacing. Preliminary results for a lattice with a finer lattice spacing, $32^3\\times64$, are discussed and a first look is taken at the use of twisted boundary conditions to extract distribution amplitudes.

  17. Periods and Superstring Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Stieberger, S

    2016-01-01

    Scattering amplitudes which describe the interaction of physical states play an important role in determining physical observables. In string theory the physical states are given by vibrations of open and closed strings and their interactions are described (at the leading order in perturbation theory) by a world-sheet given by the topology of a disk or sphere, respectively. Formally, for scattering of N strings this leads to N-3-dimensional iterated real integrals along the compactified real axis or N-3-dimensional complex sphere integrals, respectively. As a consequence the physical observables are described by periods on M_{0,N} - the moduli space of Riemann spheres of N ordered marked points. The mathematical structure of these string amplitudes share many recent advances in arithmetic algebraic geometry and number theory like multiple zeta values, single-valued multiple zeta values, Drinfeld, Deligne associators, Hopf algebra and Lie algebra structures related to Grothendiecks Galois theory. We review the...

  18. Translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex and Motion Perception During Interaural Linear Acceleration: Comparison of Different Motion Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, K. H.; Holly, J. E.; Clement, G. R.; Wood, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    The neural mechanisms to resolve ambiguous tilt-translation motion have been hypothesized to be different for motion perception and eye movements. Previous studies have demonstrated differences in ocular and perceptual responses using a variety of motion paradigms, including Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR), Variable Radius Centrifugation (VRC), translation along a linear track, and tilt about an Earth-horizontal axis. While the linear acceleration across these motion paradigms is presumably equivalent, there are important differences in semicircular canal cues. The purpose of this study was to compare translation motion perception and horizontal slow phase velocity to quantify consistencies, or lack thereof, across four different motion paradigms. Twelve healthy subjects were exposed to sinusoidal interaural linear acceleration between 0.01 and 0.6 Hz at 1.7 m/s/s (equivalent to 10 tilt) using OVAR, VRC, roll tilt, and lateral translation. During each trial, subjects verbally reported the amount of perceived peak-to-peak lateral translation and indicated the direction of motion with a joystick. Binocular eye movements were recorded using video-oculography. In general, the gain of translation perception (ratio of reported linear displacement to equivalent linear stimulus displacement) increased with stimulus frequency, while the phase did not significantly vary. However, translation perception was more pronounced during both VRC and lateral translation involving actual translation, whereas perceptions were less consistent and more variable during OVAR and roll tilt which did not involve actual translation. For each motion paradigm, horizontal eye movements were negligible at low frequencies and showed phase lead relative to the linear stimulus. At higher frequencies, the gain of the eye movements increased and became more inphase with the acceleration stimulus. While these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the neural computational strategies for

  19. Amplitude scaling of asymmetry-induced transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our initial experiments on asymmetry-induced transport in non-neutral plasmas found the radial particle flux at small radii to be proportional to φa2, where φa is the applied asymmetry amplitude. Other researchers, however, using the global expansion rate as a measure of the transport, have observed a φa1 scaling when the rigidity (the ratio of the axial bounce frequency to the azimuthal rotation frequency) is in the range one to ten. In an effort to resolve this discrepancy, we have extended our measurements to different radii and asymmetry frequencies. Although the results to date are generally in agreement with those previously reported (φa2 scaling at low asymmetry amplitudes falling off to a weaker scaling at higher amplitudes), we have observed some cases where the low amplitude scaling is closer to φa1. Both the φa2 and φa1 cases, however, have rigidities less than ten. Instead, we find that the φa1 cases are characterized by an induced flux that is comparable in magnitude but opposite in sign to the background flux. This suggests that the mixing of applied and background asymmetries plays an important role in determining the amplitude scaling of this transport

  20. Motion of a Pendulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Wynn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project is to derive and solve the equation of motion for a pendulum swinging at small angles in one dimension. The pendulum may be either a simple pendulum like a ball hanging from a string or a physical pendulum like a pendulum on a clock. For simplicity, we only considered small rotational angles so that the equation of motion becomes a harmonic oscillator.

  1. CISM Course on Rotating Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    The volume presents a comprehensive overview of rotation effects on fluid behavior, emphasizing non-linear processes. The subject is introduced by giving a range of examples of rotating fluids encountered in geophysics and engineering. This is then followed by a discussion of the relevant scales and parameters of rotating flow, and an introduction to geostrophic balance and vorticity concepts. There are few books on rotating fluids and this volume is, therefore, a welcome addition. It is the first volume which contains a unified view of turbulence in rotating fluids, instability and vortex dynamics. Some aspects of wave motions covered here are not found elsewhere.

  2. ON THE AMPLITUDE OF CONVECTIVE VELOCITIES IN THE DEEP SOLAR INTERIOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtain lower limits on the amplitude of convective velocities in the deep solar convection zone (CZ) based only on the observed properties of the differential rotation and meridional circulation together with simple and robust dynamical balances obtained from the fundamental magnetohydrodynamics equations. The linchpin of the approach is the concept of gyroscopic pumping whereby the meridional circulation across isosurfaces of specific angular momentum is linked to the angular momentum transport by the convective Reynolds stress. We find that the amplitude of the convective velocity must be at least 30 m s–1 in the upper CZ (r ∼ 0.95R) and at least 8 m s–1 in the lower CZ (r ∼ 0.75R) in order to be consistent with the observed mean flows. Using the base of the near-surface shear layer as a probe of the rotational influence, we are further able to show that the characteristic length scale of deep convective motions must be no smaller than 5.5-30 Mm. These results are compatible with convection models but suggest that the efficiency of the turbulent transport assumed in advection-dominated flux-transport dynamo models is generally not consistent with the mean flows they employ.

  3. Linearization of friction effects in vibration of two rotating blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modelling of friction effects in blade shrouding which are realized by means of friction elements placed between blades. In order to develop a methodology of modelling, two blades with one friction element in between are considered only. Flexible blades fixed to a rotating disc are discretized by FEM using 1D Rayleigh beam elements derived in rotating space as well as the friction element modelled as a rigid body. The blades and the friction element are connected through two concurrent friction planes, where the friction forces arise on the basis of centrifugal force acting on the friction element. The linearization of friction is performed using the harmonic balance method to determine equivalent damping coefficients in dependence on the amplitudes of relative slip motion between the blades and the friction element. The methodology is applied to a model of two real blades and will be extended for the whole bladed disc with shrouding.

  4. Observations of Infalling and Rotational Motions on a 1,000-AU Scale around 17 Class 0 and 0/I Protostars: Hints of Disk Growth and Magnetic Braking?

    CERN Document Server

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Ho, Paul T P; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2014-01-01

    We perform imaging and analyses of SMA 1.3 mm continuum, C18O (2-1) and 12CO (2-1) line data of 17 Class 0 and 0/I protostars to study their gas kinematics on a 1,000-AU scale. Continuum and C18O (2-1) emission are detected toward all the sample sources and show central primary components with sizes of ~600-1,500 AU associated with protostars. The velocity gradients in C18O (2-1) have wide ranges of orientations from parallel to perpendicular to the outflows, with magnitudes from ~1 to ~530 km/s/pc. We construct a simple kinematic model to reproduce the observed velocity gradients, estimate the infalling and rotational velocities, and infer the disk radii and the protostellar masses. The inferred disk radii range from 500 AU with estimated protostellar masses from 1 Msun. Our results hint that both large and small disks are possibly present around Class 0 protostars, which could be a sign of disk growth at the Class 0 stage. In addition, the directions of the overall velocity gradients in 7 out of the 17 sour...

  5. Drag and lift forces on a counter-rotating cylinder in rotating flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Chao; Mullin, Tom; Wijngaarden, van Leen; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Results are reported of an experimental investigation into the motion of a heavy cylinder free to move inside a water-filled drum rotating around its horizontal axis. The cylinder is observed to either co-rotate or, counter-intuitively, counter-rotate with respect to the rotating drum. The flow was

  6. Rotation of rigid Venus: a complete precession-nutation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottereau, L.; Souchay, J.

    2009-12-01

    Context: With the increasing knowledge of the terrestrial planets due to recent space probes it is possible to model their rotation with increasing accuracy. Despite that fact, an accurate determination of Venus precession and nutation is lacking Aims: Although Venus rotation has been studied in several aspects, a full and precise analytical model of its precession-nutation motion remains to be constructed. We propose to determine this motion with up-to-date physical parameters of the planet Methods: We adopt a theoritical framework already used for a precise precession-nutation model of the Earth, based on a Hamiltonian formulation, canonical equations and an accurate development of the perturbing function due to the Sun. Results: After integrating the disturbing function and applying the canonical equations, we can evaluate the precession constant dot{Psi} and the coefficients of nutation, both in longitude and in obliquity. We get dot{Psi} = 4474farcs35/Jcy ± 66.5 , corresponding to a precession period of 28 965.10±437 years. This result, based on recent estimations of the Venus moment of inertia is significantly different from previous estimations. The largest nutation coefficient in longitude with an argument 2 LS (where LS is the longitude of the Sun) has a 2''19 amplitude and a 112.35 d period. We show that the coefficients of nutation of Venus due to its triaxiality are of the same order of amplitude as these values due to its dynamical flattening, unlike of the Earth, for which they are negligible. Conclusions: We have constucted a complete theory of the rotation of a rigid body applied to Venus, with up-to-date determinations of its physical and rotational parameters. This allowed us to set up a new and better constrained value of the Venus precession constant and to calculate its nutation coefficients for the first time.

  7. Damping and non-linearity of a levitating magnet in rotation above a superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druge, J.; Jean, C.; Laurent, O.; Méasson, M.-A.; Favero, I.

    2014-07-01

    We study the dissipation of moving magnets in levitation above a superconductor. The rotation motion is analyzed using optical tracking techniques. It displays a remarkable regularity together with long damping time up to several hours. The magnetic contribution to the damping is investigated in detail by comparing 14 distinct magnetic configurations and points towards amplitude-dependent dissipation mechanisms. The non-linear dynamics of the mechanical rotation motion is also revealed and described with an effective Duffing model. The magnetic mechanical damping is consistent with measured hysteretic cycles M(H) that are discussed within a modified critical state model. The obtained picture of the coupling of levitating magnets to their environment sheds light on their potential as ultra-low dissipation mechanical oscillators for high precision physics.

  8. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high.

  9. Exact analytic solution for the rotation of a rigid body having spherical ellipsoid of inertia and subjected to a constant torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Marcello

    2008-03-01

    The exact analytic solution is introduced for the rotational motion of a rigid body having three equal principal moments of inertia and subjected to an external torque vector which is constant for an observer fixed with the body, and to arbitrary initial angular velocity. In the paper a parametrization of the rotation by three complex numbers is used. In particular, the rows of the rotation matrix are seen as elements of the unit sphere and projected, by stereographic projection, onto points on the complex plane. In this representation, the kinematic differential equation reduces to an equation of Riccati type, which is solved through appropriate choices of substitutions, thereby yielding an analytic solution in terms of confluent hypergeometric functions. The rotation matrix is recovered from the three complex rotation variables by inverse stereographic map. The results of a numerical experiment confirming the exactness of the analytic solution are reported. The newly found analytic solution is valid for any motion time length and rotation amplitude. The present paper adds a further element to the small set of special cases for which an exact solution of the rotational motion of a rigid body exists.

  10. Effect of rotation on the tachoclinic transport

    OpenAIRE

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2006-01-01

    We study the effect of rotation on sheared turbulence, due to differential rotation. By solving quasi-linear equations for the fluctuating fields, we derive turbulence amplitude and turbulent transport coefficients, taking into account the effects of shear and rotation on turbulence. We focus on the regions of the tachocline near the equator and the poles where the rotation and the shear are perpendicular and parallel, respectively. For parameter values typical of the tachocline, we show that...

  11. Integrable spin chains and scattering amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, J.; Prygarin, A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Lipatov, L.N. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Sankt-Peterburgskij Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15

    In this review we show that the multi-particle scattering amplitudes in N=4 SYM at large N{sub c} and in the multi-Regge kinematics for some physical regions have the high energy behavior appearing from the contribution of the Mandelstam cuts in the complex angular momentum plane of the corresponding t-channel partial waves. These Mandelstam cuts or Regge cuts are resulting from gluon composite states in the adjoint representation of the gauge group SU(N{sub c}). In the leading logarithmic approximation (LLA) their contribution to the six point amplitude is in full agreement with the known two-loop result. The Hamiltonian for the Mandelstam states constructed from n gluons in LLA coincides with the local Hamiltonian of an integrable open spin chain. We construct the corresponding wave functions using the integrals of motion and the Baxter-Sklyanin approach. (orig.)

  12. 转椅加速度试验诱发晕动病的相关心理因素研究%Study on psychological factors and motion sickness responses induced by coriolis rotating chair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乐燕; 许恒; 杨扬; 许益飞; 包瀛春

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation between psychological factors and motion sickness responses induced by coriolis rotating chair.Methods Three hundred and eight-six university undergraduates received coriolis acceleration test and motion sickness responses were assessed by using Graybiel's diagnostic criteria.Before tests,the subjects were told to fill in the Self-efficacy Scale,the Self-control Scale and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire.Results The average scores of the Self-efficacy Scale were (5.26 ± 1.98),which was negatively correlated with the scores obtained with Graybiel s diagnostic criteria (r =-0.386,P<0.05),with statistical significance.And statistically significant differences could be noted in self-efficacy between various Graybiel grades( F =7.614,P<0.05 ).Conclusions Study on related psychological factors could provide evidence for the importance of laboratory psychological training to increase the tolerance of motion sickness.%目的 探讨心理因素与转椅加速度试验诱发晕动反应的相关性.方法 对某院校386名学员进行转椅加速度体能测试,由专职人员采用格瑞比尔评分标准对被试者进行晕动反应评估,并要求被试者在测试前填写晕动病自我效能感量表、自我控制感量表及艾森克人格量表.结果 自我效能感平均得分[(5.62±1.98)]与转椅诱发晕动反应格瑞比尔得分呈一定负相关(r=-0.386,P<0.05),格瑞比尔各等级组间自我效能感得分差异有统计学意义(F=7.614,P<0.05).结论 本实验条件下,心理因素一定程度上影响晕动病的发生和发展,本结果为在实验室开展提高晕动耐受性的心理训练提供了重要依据.

  13. Effects of Frequency and Motion Paradigm on Perception of Tilt and Translation During Periodic Linear Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, K. H.; Holly, J. E.; Clement, G. R.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an effect of frequency on the gain of tilt and translation perception. Results from different motion paradigms are often combined to extend the stimulus frequency range. For example, Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) and Variable Radius Centrifugation (VRC) are useful to test low frequencies of linear acceleration at amplitudes that would require impractical sled lengths. The purpose of this study was to compare roll-tilt and lateral translation motion perception in 12 healthy subjects across four paradigms: OVAR, VRC, sled translation and rotation about an earth-horizontal axis. Subjects were oscillated in darkness at six frequencies from 0.01875 to 0.6 Hz (peak acceleration equivalent to 10 deg, less for sled motion below 0.15 Hz). Subjects verbally described the amplitude of perceived tilt and translation, and used a joystick to indicate the direction of motion. Consistent with previous reports, tilt perception gain decreased as a function of stimulus frequency in the motion paradigms without concordant canal tilt cues (OVAR, VRC and Sled). Translation perception gain was negligible at low stimulus frequencies and increased at higher frequencies. There were no significant differences between the phase of tilt and translation, nor did the phase significantly vary across stimulus frequency. There were differences in perception gain across the different paradigms. Paradigms that included actual tilt stimuli had the larger tilt gains, and paradigms that included actual translation stimuli had larger translation gains. In addition, the frequency at which there was a crossover of tilt and translation gains appeared to vary across motion paradigm between 0.15 and 0.3 Hz. Since the linear acceleration in the head lateral plane was equivalent across paradigms, differences in gain may be attributable to the presence of linear accelerations in orthogonal directions and/or cognitive aspects based on the expected motion paths.

  14. Is the anomalous magnetic moment the consequence of a non-classical transformation for rotating frames?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gisin, B V [Department of Electrical Engineering - Physical Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2002-08-01

    We consider the anomalous magnetic moment from an 'optical viewpoint' using an analogy between the motion of a particle with a magnetic moment in a magnetic field and the propagation of an optical pulse through an electro-optical crystal in an electric field. We show that an optical experiment similar to electron magnetic resonance is possible in some electro-optical crystals possessing the Faraday effect. This phenomenon is described by an analogue of the Pauli equation extracted from the Maxwell equation in the slowly varied amplitude approximation. In such an experiment the modulation by rotating fields plays a significant role. From the optical viewpoint the modulation assumes introducing the concept of a point rotation frame with the rotation axis at every point originated from the concept of the optical indicatrix (index ellipsoid). We discuss the connection between the non-classical transformation by transition from one such frame to another and an anomalous magnetic moment.

  15. Phase space spinor amplitudes for spin 1/2 systems

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, P

    2010-01-01

    The concept of phase space amplitudes for systems with continuous degrees of freedom is generalized to finite-dimensional spin systems. Complex amplitudes are obtained on both a sphere and a finite lattice, in each case enabling a more fundamental description of pure spin states than that previously given by Wigner functions on either the sphere or lattice. In each case the Wigner function can be expressed as the star product of the amplitude and its conjugate, so providing a generalized Born interpretation of amplitudes that emphasizes their more fundamental status. The case of spin-$\\half$ is treated in detail, and it is shown that the phase space amplitudes transform correctly as spinors under under rotations, on both the sphere and the lattice.

  16. Higher Twist Distribution Amplitudes of the Nucleon in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, V M; Mahnke, N; Stein, E

    2000-01-01

    We present the first systematic study of higher-twist light-cone distribution amplitudes of the nucleon in QCD. We find that the valence three-quark state is described at small transverse separations by eight independent distribution amplitudes. One of them is leading twist-3, three distributions are twist-4 and twist-5, respectively, and one is twist-6. A complete set of distribution amplitudes is constructed, which satisfies equations of motion and constraints that follow from conformal expansion. Nonperturbative input parameters are estimated from QCD sum rules.

  17. Vibrot, a simple device for the conversion of vibration into rotation mediated by friction: preliminary evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Altshuler

    Full Text Available While "vibrational noise" induced by rotating components of machinery is a common problem constantly faced by engineers, the controlled conversion of translational into rotational motion or vice-versa is a desirable goal in many scenarios ranging from internal combustion engines to ultrasonic motors. In this work, we describe the underlying physics after isolating a single degree of freedom, focusing on devices that convert a vibration along the vertical axis into a rotation around this axis. A typical Vibrot (as we label these devices consists of a rigid body with three or more cantilevered elastic legs attached to its bottom at an angle. We show that these legs are capable of transforming vibration into rotation by a "ratchet effect", which is caused by the anisotropic stick-slip-flight motion of the leg tips against the ground. Drawing an analogy with the Froude number used to classify the locomotion dynamics of legged animals, we discuss the walking regime of these robots. We are able to control the rotation frequency of the Vibrot by manipulating the shaking amplitude, frequency or waveform. Furthermore, we have been able to excite Vibrots with acoustic waves, which allows speculating about the possibility of reducing the size of the devices so they can perform tasks into the human body, excited by ultrasound waves from the outside.

  18. Rotational moulding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, R J; Kearns, M P

    2003-10-01

    Rotational moulding promises designers attractive economics and a low-pressure process. The benefits of rotational moulding are compared here with other manufacturing methods such as injection and blow moulding. PMID:14603714

  19. Large amplitude nuclear collective motion and the quantized ATDHF theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is the aim of the present work to present some numerical results obtained within the ATDHF formalism. Both approaches have been considered, the construction of the collective Hamiltonian as well as the solution of the Griffin-Hill-Wheeler equation, both using the ATDHF collective path. We show that a fully selfconsistent microscopic description of nuclear phemomena using general many-body techniques can be treated on the numerical level. We considered several different systems to indicate as much as possible the present possibilities and limits of the theory as well as of the numerical techniques. (orig./HSI)

  20. The rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Eva B. Vedel; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb

    1993-01-01

    The mean particle volume can be stereologically estimated using the nucleator principle. In the present paper, we discuss another principle for estimating mean particle volume, namely the rotator. The vertical rotator has already been previously described and is supplemented in the present paper by...... the isotropic rotator. For a collection of particle profiles, simulations show that the variance of the rotator is smaller than that of the nucleator....

  1. Motion Sickness Induced by Optokinetic Drums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Bles, W.

    2004-01-01

    Motion sickness is not only elicited by certain kinds of self-motion, but also by motion of a visual scene. In case of the latter, optokinetic drums are often used and a visual-vestibular conflict is assumed to cause the sickness. When the rotation axis is Earth vertical however, different studies s

  2. Simulation of transients of high amplitude in pipe systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, J.M.; Looijmans, K.N.H.

    1999-01-01

    Fast high-amplitude transients ask for a non-linear modelling approach in which large density variations and heat exchange can be considered. Operation of safety-valves, relief valves, the occurrence of valve failure and the start-up or shutdown of rotating equipment in industrial pipe systems can l

  3. CHY formula and MHV amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Yi-jian; Wu, Yong-shi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the relation between the Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula and the maximal-helicity-violating (MHV) amplitudes of Yang-Mills and gravity in four dimensions. We prove that only one special rational solution of the scattering equations found by Weinzierl support the MHV amplitudes. Namely, localized at this solution, the integrated CHY formula reproduces the Parke-Taylor formula for Yang-Mills amplitudes as well as the Hodges formula for gravitational amplitudes. This is achieved by developing techniques, in a manifestly M\\"obius covariant formalism, to explicitly compute relevant reduced Pfaffians/determinants. We observe and prove two interesting properties (or identities), which facilitate the computations. We also check that all the other $(n-3)!-1$ solutions to the scattering equations do not support the MHV amplitudes, and prove analytically that this is indeed true for the other special rational solution proposed by Weinzierl, that actually supports the anti-MHV amplitudes.

  4. Nonlinear resonant traveling waves in rotating disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AlbertC.J.LUO; ChinAnTAN

    2000-01-01

    The resonant conditions for traveling waves in rotating disks are derived. The nonlinear resonant spectrum of a rotating disk is computed from the resonant conditions.Such a resonant spectrum is useful for the disk drive industry to determine the range of operational rotation speed. The resonant wave motions for linear and nonlinear, rotating disks are simulated numerically for a 3.5-inch diameter computer memory disk.

  5. Mechanical coupling between transverse plane pelvis and thorax rotations during gait is higher in people with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoorn, W; Bruijn, S M; Meijer, O G; Hodges, P W; van Dieën, J H

    2012-01-10

    This study investigated whether people with low back pain (LBP) reduce variability of movement between the pelvis and thorax (trunk) in the transverse plane during gait at different speeds compared to healthy controls. Thirteen people with chronic LBP and twelve healthy controls walked on a treadmill at speeds from 0.5 to 1.72 m/s, with increments of 0.11 m/s. Step-to-step variability of the trunk, pelvis, and thorax rotations were calculated. Step-to-step deviations of pelvis and thorax rotations from the average pattern (residual rotations) were correlated to each other, and the linear regression coefficients between these deviations calculated. Spectral analysis was used to determine the frequencies of the residual rotations, to infer the relation of reduced trunk variability to trunk stiffness and/or damping. Variability of trunk motion (thorax relative to pelvis) was lower (P=0.02), covariance between the residual rotations of pelvis and thorax motions was higher (P=0.03), and the linear regression coefficients were closer to 1 (P=0.05) in the LBP group. Most power of segmental residual rotations was below stride frequency (~1 Hz). In this frequency range, trunk residual rotations had less power than pelvis or thorax residual rotations. These data show that people with LBP had lower variability of trunk rotations, as a result of the coupling of deviations of residual rotations in one segment to deviations of a similar shape (correlation) and amplitude (regression coefficient) in the other segment. These results support the argument that people with LBP adopt a protective movement strategy, possibly by increased trunk stiffness.

  6. Hidden Beauty in Multiloop Amplitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Cachazo, Freddy(Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada); Spradlin, Marcus; Volovich, Anastasia

    2006-01-01

    Planar L-loop maximally helicity violating amplitudes in N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory are believed to possess the remarkable property of satisfying iteration relations in L. We propose a simple new method for studying the iteration relations for four-particle amplitudes which involves the use of certain linear differential operators and eliminates the need to fully evaluate any loop integrals. We carry out this procedure in explicit detail for the two-loop amplitude and argue that t...

  7. Motivic amplitudes and cluster coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    J.K. Golden; Goncharov, A. B.; M. Spradlin; C. Vergu; Volovich, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study motivic amplitudes--objects which contain all of the essential mathematical content of scattering amplitudes in planar SYM theory in a completely canonical way, free from the ambiguities inherent in any attempt to choose particular functional representatives. We find that the cluster structure on the kinematic configuration space Conf_n(P^3) underlies the structure of motivic amplitudes. Specifically, we compute explicitly the coproduct of the two-loop seven-particle MH...

  8. Rotational Seismology: AGU Session, Working Group, and Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H.K.; Igel, Heiner; Todorovska, Maria I.; Evans, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Although effects of rotational motions due to earthquakes have long been observed (e. g., Mallet, 1862), nevertheless Richter (1958, p. 213) stated that: 'Perfectly general motion would also involve rotations about three perpendicular axes, and three more instruments for these. Theory indicates, and observation confirms, that such rotations are negligible.' However, Richter provided no references for this claim. Seismology is based primarily on the observation and modeling of three-component translational ground motions. Nevertheless, theoretical seismologists (e.g., Aki and Richards, 1980, 2002) have argued for decades that the rotational part of ground motions should also be recorded. It is well known that standard seismometers are quite sensitive to rotations and therefore subject to rotation-induced errors. The paucity of observations of rotational motions is mainly the result of a lack, until recently, of affordable rotational sensors of sufficient resolution. Nevertheless, in the past decade, a number of authors have reported direct observations of rotational motions and rotations inferred from rigid-body rotations in short baseline accelerometer arrays, creating a burgeoning library of rotational data. For example, ring laser gyros in Germany and New Zealand have led to the first significant and consistent observations of rotational motions from distant earthquakes (Igel et al., 2005, 2007). A monograph on Earthquake Source Asymmetry, Structural Media and Rotation Effects was published recently as well by Teisseyre et al. (2006). Measurement of rotational motions has implications for: (1) recovering the complete ground-displacement history from seismometer recordings; (2) further constraining earthquake rupture properties; (3) extracting information about subsurface properties; and (4) providing additional ground motion information to earthquake engineers for seismic design. A special session on Rotational Motions in Seismology was convened by H

  9. Amplitude dependent closest tune approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Franchi, Andrea; Maclean, Ewen Hamish; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations in the LHC point to the existence of an amplitude dependent closest tune approach. However this dynamical behavior and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This effect is highly relevant for the LHC as an unexpectedly closest tune approach varying with amplitude modifies the frequency content of the beam and, hence, the Landau damping. Furthermore the single particle stability would also be affected by this effect as it would modify how particles with varying amplitudes approach and cross resonances. We present analytic derivations that lead to a mechanism generating an amplitude dependent closest tune approach.

  10. On the saturation amplitude of the f-mode instability

    CERN Document Server

    Kastaun, Wolfgang; Kokkotas, Kostas D

    2010-01-01

    We investigate strong nonlinear damping effects which occur during high amplitude oscillations of neutron stars, and the gravitational waves they produce. For this, we use a general relativistic nonlinear hydrodynamics code in conjunction with a fixed spacetime (Cowling approximation) and a polytropic equation of state (EOS). Gravitational waves are estimated using the quadrupole formula. Our main interest are $l=m=2$ $f$-modes subject to the CFS (Chandrasekhar, Friedman, Schutz) instability, but we also investigate axisymmetric and quasi-radial modes. We study various models to determine the influence of rotation rate and EOS. We find that axisymmetric oscillations at high amplitudes are predominantly damped by shock formation, while the non-axisymmetric $f$-modes are mainly damped by wave breaking and, for rapidly rotating models, coupling to non-axisymmetric inertial modes. From the observed nonlinear damping, we derive upper limits for the saturation amplitude of CFS-unstable $f$-modes. Finally, we estima...

  11. Introducing Rotational Motion with EXIF Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, James

    2011-01-01

    In their article "Measuring the Flight Speed of Fire Bombers from Photos: An In-Class Exercise in Introductory Kinematics," Greg W. Lowe and Eric Ayars remind us that photographs have always had physics hidden in them if you look hard enough. Since digital photos are embedded with EXIF data, vastly more physics can be explored with them. EXIF…

  12. Towards motion insensitive EEG-fMRI: Correcting motion-induced voltages and gradient artefact instability in EEG using an fMRI prospective motion correction (PMC) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziero, Danilo; Velasco, Tonicarlo R; Hunt, Nigel; Payne, Edwin; Lemieux, Louis; Salmon, Carlos E G; Carmichael, David W

    2016-09-01

    The simultaneous acquisition of electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) is a multimodal technique extensively applied for mapping the human brain. However, the quality of EEG data obtained within the MRI environment is strongly affected by subject motion due to the induction of voltages in addition to artefacts caused by the scanning gradients and the heartbeat. This has limited its application in populations such as paediatric patients or to study epileptic seizure onset. Recent work has used a Moiré-phase grating and a MR-compatible camera to prospectively update image acquisition and improve fMRI quality (prospective motion correction: PMC). In this study, we use this technology to retrospectively reduce the spurious voltages induced by motion in the EEG data acquired inside the MRI scanner, with and without fMRI acquisitions. This was achieved by modelling induced voltages from the tracking system motion parameters; position and angles, their first derivative (velocities) and the velocity squared. This model was used to remove the voltages related to the detected motion via a linear regression. Since EEG quality during fMRI relies on a temporally stable gradient artefact (GA) template (calculated from averaging EEG epochs matched to scan volume or slice acquisition), this was evaluated in sessions both with and without motion contamination, and with and without PMC. We demonstrate that our approach is capable of significantly reducing motion-related artefact with a magnitude of up to 10mm of translation, 6° of rotation and velocities of 50mm/s, while preserving physiological information. We also demonstrate that the EEG-GA variance is not increased by the gradient direction changes associated with PMC. Provided a scan slice-based GA template is used (rather than a scan volume GA template) we demonstrate that EEG variance during motion can be supressed towards levels found when subjects are still. In summary, we show that

  13. Perception of complex motion in humans and pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankoo, Jean-François; Madan, Christopher R; Spetch, Marcia L; Wylie, Douglas R

    2014-06-01

    In the primate visual system, local motion signals are pooled to create a global motion percept. Like primates, many birds are highly dependent on vision for their survival, yet relatively little is known about motion perception in birds. We used random-dot stimuli to investigate pigeons' ability to detect complex motion (radial, rotation, and spiral) compared to humans. Our human participants had a significantly lower threshold for rotational and radial motion when compared to spiral motion. The data from the pigeons, however, showed that the pigeons were most sensitive to rotational motion and least sensitive to radial motion, while sensitivity for spiral motion was intermediate. We followed up the pigeon results with an investigation of the effect of display aperture shape for rotational motion and velocity gradient for radial motion. We found no effect of shape of the aperture on thresholds, but did observe that radial motion containing accelerating dots improved thresholds. However, this improvement did not reach the thresholds levels observed for rotational motion. In sum, our experiments demonstrate that the pooling mechanism in the pigeon motion system is most efficient for rotation.

  14. Effects of mechanical rotation on spin currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Mamoru; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2011-02-18

    We study the Pauli-Schrödinger equation in a uniformly rotating frame of reference to describe a coupling of spins and mechanical rotations. The explicit form of the spin-orbit interaction (SOI) with the inertial effects due to the mechanical rotation is presented. We derive equations of motion for a wave packet of electrons in two-dimensional planes subject to the SOI. The solution is a superposition of two cyclotron motions with different frequencies and a circular spin current is created by the mechanical rotation. The magnitude of the spin current is linearly proportional to the lower cyclotron frequency. PMID:21405528

  15. Rotation of the planet mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, W H

    1966-04-01

    The equations of motion for the rotation of Mercury are solved for the general case by an asymptotic expansion. The findings of Liu and O'Keefe, obtained by numerical integration of a special case, that it is possible for Mercury's rotation to be locked into a 2:3 resonance with its revolution, are confirmed in detail. The general solution has further applications. PMID:17741632

  16. Monitoring Mechanical Motion of Carbon Nanotube based Nanomotor by Optical Absorption Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Baomin; Wang, Zhan; Wang, Yong; Liu, Kaihui

    2016-01-01

    The optical absorption spectrums of nanomotors made from double-wall carbon nanotubes have been calculated with the time-dependent density functional based tight binding method. When the outer short tube of the nanomotor moves along or rotates around the inner long tube, the peaks in the spectrum will gradually evolve and may shift periodically, the amplitude of which can be as large as hundreds of meV. We show that the features and behaviors of the optical absorption spectrum could be used to monitor the mechanical motions of the double-wall carbon nanotube based nanomotor.

  17. The power spectra of non-circular motions in disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Kyle; Laws, Anna S. E.; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the first year of the SDSS-IV/MaNGA survey, we present a preliminary study of the amplitude of non-circular motions in a sample of disk galaxies. We select galaxies that have either a visual classification as a spiral galaxy by the Galaxy Zoo project (Lintott et al. 2011) and/or a measured Sersic index of less than 2.5 from the NASA-Sloan Atlas (nsatlas.org). We also remove high-inclination systems by selecting galaxies with isophotal ellipticity measurements of less than 0.6, implying an inclination of less than 65 degrees. For each galaxy, we fit a tilted-disk model to the observed line-of-sight velocities (Andersen & Bershady 2013). The geometric projection of the circularly rotating disk is simultaneously fit to both the ionized-gas (H-alpha) and stellar kinematics, whereas the rotation curves of the two dynamical tracers are allowed to be independent. We deproject the residuals of the velocity-field fit to the disk-plane polar coordinates and select a radial region that is fully covered in aziumuth, yet not undersampled by the on-sky spaxel. Similar to the approach taken by Bovy et al. (2015) for the Milky Way, we then compute the two-dimensional power spectrum of this velocity-residual map, which provides the amplitude of non-circular motions at all modes probed by the data. Our preliminary analysis reveals disk-plane non-circular motions in both the stars and ionized-gas with typical peak amplitudes of approximately 20 km/s. Additionally, our initial findings appear to demonstrate that non-circular motions in barred galaxies are stronger in the ionized gas than in the stars, a trend not seen in unbarred galaxies.

  18. Rotating flow

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, Peter R N

    2010-01-01

    Rotating flow is critically important across a wide range of scientific, engineering and product applications, providing design and modeling capability for diverse products such as jet engines, pumps and vacuum cleaners, as well as geophysical flows. Developed over the course of 20 years' research into rotating fluids and associated heat transfer at the University of Sussex Thermo-Fluid Mechanics Research Centre (TFMRC), Rotating Flow is an indispensable reference and resource for all those working within the gas turbine and rotating machinery industries. Traditional fluid and flow dynamics

  19. Destabilization mechanism of edge-localized MHD modes by a toroidal rotation in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Masaru; Hirota, Makoto; Tokuda, Shinji

    2009-11-01

    In JT-60U, some experimental results showed that the ELM frequency depends on the toroidal rotation, and the rapid rotation in the counter direction of the plasma current changes from Type-I ELM to Grassy ELM, whose frequency is high and the amplitude is small [1]. Since both Type-I and Grassy ELMs are considered as ideal MHD modes destabilizing near the plasma surface, theoretical and numerical analyses about the toroidal rotation effects on the edge localized MHD mode are important to understand this dependence of the ELM frequency on the toroidal rotation frequency. Our previous works have illustrated that the toroidal rotation with shear can destabilize low/intermediate-n (Rotenberg equation. Particularly, we pay attention to the destabilizing effects of the toroidal rotation shear and the centrifuged force on not only equilibrium but also change of equation of motion. [1] N. Oyama et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 49, 249 (2007). [2] N. Aiba et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 065015 (2009).

  20. Polychromatic and rotating beams of light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams of light with rotating polarization or mode patterns can be viewed as superpositions of components with a well-defined angular momentum ℎm per photon, each having a frequency shift m times the rotation frequency. Such beams can also be created after passing a monochromatic beam through rotating optical elements. We discuss the properties of the angular momentum of such beams, both for a rotating polarization and a rotating amplitude pattern. We also consider beams where the polarization is not uniform

  1. CHY formula and MHV amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yi-Jian; Teng, Fei; Wu, Yong-Shi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the relation between the Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula and the maximal-helicity-violating (MHV) amplitudes of Yang-Mills and gravity in four dimensions. We prove that only one special rational solution of the scattering equations found by Weinzierl supports the MHV amplitudes. Namely, localized at this solution, the integrated CHY formula produces the Parke-Taylor formula for MHV Yang-Mills amplitudes as well as the Hodges formula for MHV gravitational amplitudes, with an arbitrary number of external gluons/gravitons. This is achieved by developing techniques, in a manifestly Möbius covariant formalism, to explicitly compute relevant reduced Pfaffians/determinants. We observe and prove two interesting properties (or identities), which facilitate the computations. We also check that all the other ( n - 3)! - 1 solutions to the scattering equations do not support the MHV amplitudes, and prove analytically that this is indeed true for the other special rational solution proposed by Weinzierl, that actually supports the anti-MHV amplitudes. Our results reveal a mysterious feature of the CHY formalism that in Yang-Mills and gravity theory, solutions of scattering equations, involving only external momenta, somehow know about the configuration of external polarizations of the scattering amplitudes.

  2. Chaotic ion motion in magnetosonic plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvoglis, H.

    1984-01-01

    The motion of test ions in a magnetosonic plasma wave is considered, and the 'stochasticity threshold' of the wave's amplitude for the onset of chaotic motion is estimated. It is shown that for wave amplitudes above the stochasticity threshold, the evolution of an ion distribution can be described by a diffusion equation with a diffusion coefficient D approximately equal to 1/v. Possible applications of this process to ion acceleration in flares and ion beam thermalization are discussed.

  3. Analyzing Rotor Rotating Error by Using Fractal Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kai; LI Yan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the judgement of fractional Brownian motion, this paper analyzes the radial rotating error of a precision rotor. The results indicate that the rotating error motion of the precision rotor is characterized by basic fractional Brownian motions, i. e. randomicity, non-sequencity, and self-simulation insinuation to some extent. Also, this paper calculates the fractal box counting dimension of radial rotating error and judges that the rotor error motion is of stability, indicating that the motion range of the future track of the axes is relatively stable.

  4. The Rotation of Janus and Epimetheus

    OpenAIRE

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Thomas, Peter C.; Burns, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Epimetheus, a small moon of Saturn, has a rotational libration (an oscillation about synchronous rotation) of 5.9 +- 1.2 degrees, placing Epimetheus in the company of Earth's Moon and Mars' Phobos as the only natural satellites for which forced rotational libration has been detected. The forced libration is caused by the satellite's slightly eccentric orbit and non-spherical shape. Detection of a moon's forced libration allows us to probe its interior by comparing the measured amplitude to th...

  5. Multi-scale theory of rotating turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2007-01-01

    We consider turbulence induced by an arbitrary forcing and derive turbulence amplitude and turbulent transport coefficients, first by using a quasi-linear theory and then by using a multi-scale renormalisation analysis. With an isotropic forcing, the quasi-linear theory gives that the turbulent transport coefficients, both parallel and perpendicular to the rotation vector, have the asymptotic scaling $\\Omega^{-1}$ for rapid rotation (i.e. when the rotation rate $\\Omega$ is larger than the inv...

  6. Motion sickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bles, W.; Bos, J.E.; Kruit, H.

    2000-01-01

    The number of recently published papers on motion sickness may convey the impression that motion sickness is far from being understood. The current review focusses on a concept which tends to unify the different manifestations and theories of motion sickness. The paper highlights the relations betwe

  7. Teleporting Superpositions of Chiral Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Maierle, C S; Harris, R A; Maierle, Christopher S.; Lidar, Daniel A.; Harris, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Chiral molecules may exist in superpositions of left- and right-handed states. We show how the amplitudes of such superpositions may be teleported to the polarization degrees of freedom of a photon. Two experimental schemes are proposed, one leading to perfect, the other to state-dependent teleportation. Both methods yield complete information about the amplitudes. This is the first explicit example of "inter-species" teleportation, where the amplitudes of the quantum superposition of one species are transferred at the end of the process to a different species. The latter is then easily accessible for measurement.

  8. Stellar differential rotation from direct starspot tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, A C; Semel, M

    2002-01-01

    On the Sun, the rotation periods of individual sunspots not only trace the latitude dependence of the surface rotation rate, but also provide clues as to the amount of subsurface fluid shear. In this paper we present the first measurements of stellar differential rotation made by tracking the rotation of individual starspots with sizes comparable to the largest sunspots. To achieve this we re-analyse four sequences of densely-sampled, high signal-to-noise echelle spectra of AB Doradus spanning several stellar rotations in 1996 December. Using spectral subtraction, least-squares deconvolution and matched-filter analysis, we demonstrate that it is possible to measure directly the velocity amplitudes and rotation periods of large numbers of individual starspots at low to intermediate latitude. We derive values for the equatorial rotation rate and the magnitude of the surface differential rotation, both of which are in excellent agreement with those obtained by Donati & Collier Cameron (1997) from cross-corre...

  9. Vibrational shear flow of anisotropic viscoelastic fluid with small amplitudes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩式方

    2008-01-01

    Using the constitutive equation of co-rotational derivative type for anisotropic viscoelastic fluid-liquid crystalline(LC),polymer liquids was developed.Two relaxation times are introduced in the equation:λn represents relaxation of the normal-symmetric stress components;λs represents relaxation of the shear-unsymmetric stress components.A vibrational rotating flow in gap between cylinders with small amplitudes is studied for the anisotropic viscoelastic fluid-liquid crystalline polymer.The time-dependent constitutive equation are linearized with respect to parameter of small amplitude.For the normal-symmetric part of stress tensor analytical expression of the shear stress is obtained by the constitutive equation.The complex viscosity,complex shear modulus,dynamic and imaginary viscosities,storage modulus and loss modulus are obtained for the normal-symmetric stress case which are defined by the common shear rate.For the shear-unsymmetric stress part,two shear stresses are obtained thus two complex viscosities and two complex shear modulus(i.e.first and second one) are given by the constitutive equation which are defined by rotating shear rate introduced by author.The dynamic and imaginary viscosities,storage modulus and loss modulus are given for each complex viscosities and complex shear modulus.Using the constituive equation the rotating flow with small amplitudes in gap between two coaxial cylinders is studied.

  10. Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Henn, Johannes M

    2014-01-01

    At the fundamental level, the interactions of elementary particles are described by quantum gauge field theory. The quantitative implications of these interactions are captured by scattering amplitudes, traditionally computed using Feynman diagrams. In the past decade tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of and computational abilities with regard to scattering amplitudes in gauge theories, going beyond the traditional textbook approach. These advances build upon on-shell methods that focus on the analytic structure of the amplitudes, as well as on their recently discovered hidden symmetries. In fact, when expressed in suitable variables the amplitudes are much simpler than anticipated and hidden patterns emerge.   These modern methods are of increasing importance in phenomenological applications arising from the need for high-precision predictions for the experiments carried out at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in foundational mathematical physics studies on the S-matrix in quantum ...

  11. Variable-amplitude oscillatory shear response of amorphous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchikov, Nathan; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2014-06-01

    Variable-amplitude oscillatory shear tests are emerging as powerful tools to investigate and quantify the nonlinear rheology of amorphous solids, complex fluids, and biological materials. Quite a few recent experimental and atomistic simulation studies demonstrated that at low shear amplitudes, an amorphous solid settles into an amplitude- and initial-conditions-dependent dissipative limit cycle, in which back-and-forth localized particle rearrangements periodically bring the system to the same state. At sufficiently large shear amplitudes, the amorphous system loses memory of the initial conditions, exhibits chaotic particle motions accompanied by diffusive behavior, and settles into a stochastic steady state. The two regimes are separated by a transition amplitude, possibly characterized by some critical-like features. Here we argue that these observations support some of the physical assumptions embodied in the nonequilibrium thermodynamic, internal-variables based, shear-transformation-zone model of amorphous viscoplasticity; most notably that "flow defects" in amorphous solids are characterized by internal states between which they can make transitions, and that structural evolution is driven by dissipation associated with plastic deformation. We present a rather extensive theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic shear-transformation-zone model for a variable-amplitude oscillatory shear protocol, highlighting its success in accounting for various experimental and simulational observations, as well as its limitations. Our results offer a continuum-level theoretical framework for interpreting the variable-amplitude oscillatory shear response of amorphous solids and may promote additional developments.

  12. Kinematic principles of primate rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex. I. Spatial organization of fast phase velocity axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, B. J.; Angelaki, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    The spatial organization of fast phase velocity vectors of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was studied in rhesus monkeys during yaw rotations about an earth-horizontal axis that changed continuously the orientation of the head relative to gravity ("barbecue spit" rotation). In addition to a velocity component parallel to the rotation axis, fast phases also exhibited a velocity component that invariably was oriented along the momentary direction of gravity. As the head rotated through supine and prone positions, torsional components of fast phase velocity axes became prominent. Similarly, as the head rotated through left and right ear-down positions, fast phase velocity axes exhibited prominent vertical components. The larger the speed of head rotation the greater the magnitude of this fast phase component, which was collinear with gravity. The main sequence properties of VOR fast phases were independent of head position. However, peak amplitude as well as peak velocity of fast phases were both modulated as a function of head orientation, exhibiting a minimum in prone position. The results suggest that the fast phases of vestibulo-ocular reflexes not only redirect gaze and reposition the eye in the direction of head motion but also reorient the eye with respect to earth-vertical when the head moves relative to gravity. As further elaborated in the companion paper, the underlying mechanism could be described as a dynamic, gravity-dependent modulation of the coordinates of ocular rotations relative to the head.

  13. Projectile transverse motion and stability in electromagnetic induction launchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokair, I.R.

    1993-12-31

    The transverse motion of a projectile in an electromagnetic induction launcher is considered. The equations of motion for translation and rotation are derived assuming a rigid projectile and a flyway restoring force per unit length that is proportional to the local displacement. Linearized transverse forces and torques due to energized coils are derived for displaced or tilted armature elements based on a first order perturbation method. The resulting equations of motion for a rigid projectile composed of multiple elements in a multi-coil launcher are analyzed as a coupled oscillator system of equations and a simple linear stability condition is derived. The equations of motion are incorporated into the 2-D Slingshot circuit code and numerical solutions for the transverse motion are obtained. For a launcher with a 10 cm bore radius with a 40 cm long solid armature, we find that stability is achieved with a restoring force (per unit length) constant of k {approx} 1 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2}. For k = 1.5 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2} and sample coil misalignment modeled as a sine wave of 1 mm amplitude at wavelengths of one or two meters, the projectile displacement grows to a maximum of 4 mm. This growth is due to resonance between the natural frequency of the projectile transverse motion and the coil displacement wavelength. This resonance does not persist because of the changing axial velocity. Random coil displacement is also found to cause roughly the same projectile displacement. For the maximum displacement a rough estimate of the transverse pressure is 50 bars. Results for a wound armature with uniform current density throughout show very similar displacements.

  14. The reliability of humerothoracic angles during arm elevation depends on the representation of rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pascual, Juan; Cáceres, Magda Liliana; De Rosario, Helios; Page, Álvaro

    2016-02-01

    The reliability of joint rotation measurements is an issue of major interest, especially in clinical applications. The effect of instrumental errors and soft tissue artifacts on the variability of human motion measures is well known, but the influence of the representation of joint motion has not yet been studied. The aim of the study was to compare the within-subject reliability of three rotation formalisms for the calculation of the shoulder elevation joint angles. Five repetitions of humeral elevation in the scapular plane of 27 healthy subjects were recorded using a stereophotogrammetry system. The humerothoracic joint angles were calculated using the YX'Y" and XZ'Y" Euler angle sequences and the attitude vector. A within-subject repeatability study was performed for the three representations. ICC, SEM and CV were the indices used to estimate the error in the calculation of the angle amplitudes and the angular waveforms with each method. Excellent results were obtained in all representations for the main angle (elevation), but there were remarkable differences for axial rotation and plane of elevation. The YX'Y" sequence generally had the poorest reliability in the secondary angles. The XZ'Y' sequence proved to be the most reliable representation of axial rotation, whereas the attitude vector had the highest reliability in the plane of elevation. These results highlight the importance of selecting the method used to describe the joint motion when within-subjects reliability is an important issue of the experiment. This may be of particular importance when the secondary angles of motions are being studied. PMID:26787010

  15. Full Rotational Control of Levitated Silicon Nanorods

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhn, Stefan; Stickler, Benjamin A; Patolsky, Fernando; Hornberger, Klaus; Arndt, Markus; Millen, James

    2016-01-01

    We study a nanofabricated silicon rod levitated in an optical trap. By manipulating the polarization of the light we gain full control over the ro-translational dynamics of the rod. We are able to trap both its centre-of-mass and align it along the linear polarization of the laser field. The rod can be set into rotation at a tuned frequency by exploiting the radiation pressure exerted by elliptically polarized light. The rotational motion of the rod dynamically modifies the optical potential, which allows tuning of the rotational frequency over hundreds of Kilohertz. This ability to trap and control the motion and alignment of nanoparticles opens up the field of rotational optomechanics, rotational ground state cooling and the study of rotational thermodynamics in the underdamped regime.

  16. Tuned liquid column dampers for mitigation of edgewise vibrations in rotating wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zili; Basu, Biswajit; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Edgewise vibrations in wind turbine blades are lightly damped, and large amplitude vibrations induced by the turbulence may significantly shorten the fatigue life of the blade. This paper investigates the performance of tuned liquid column dampers (TLCDs) for mitigating edgewise vibrations...... in rotating wind turbine blades. Normally, the centrifugal acceleration at the outboard portion of a rotating blade can reach to a magnitude of 7–8 g, which makes it possible to use a TLCD with a very small mass for suppressing edgewise vibrations effectively. The parameters of the TLCD to be optimized......, with the consideration of both the space limitation inside the blade and the constraint of the liquid motion. The edgewise modal load for the 2-DOF model has been calculated from a more sophisticated 13-DOF aeroelastic wind turbine model, which includes the coupling of the blade-tower-drivetrain vibration...

  17. [Bionic model for coordinated head-eye motion control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaobo; Chen, Tiejun

    2011-10-01

    The relationships between eye movements and head movements of the primate during gaze shifts are analyzed in detail in the present paper. Applying the mechanisms of neurophysiology to engineering domain, we have improved the robot eye-head coordination. A bionic control strategy of coordinated head-eye motion was proposed. The processes of gaze shifts are composed of an initial fast phase followed by a slow phase. In the fast phase saccade eye movements and slow head movements were combined, which cooperate to bring gaze from an initial resting position toward the new target rapidly, while in the slow phase the gaze stability and target fixation were ensured by the action of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) where the eyes and head rotate by equal amplitudes in opposite directions. A bionic gaze control model was given. The simulation results confirmed the effectiveness of the model by comparing with the results of neurophysiology experiments.

  18. Scattering Amplitudes in Gauge Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Schubert, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the development of new mathematical methods for computing multi-loop scattering amplitudes in gauge theories. In this work we combine, for the first time, the unitarity-based construction for integrands, and the recently introduced integrand-reduction through multivariate polynomial division. After discussing the generic features of this novel reduction algorithm, we will apply it to the one- and two-loop five-point amplitudes in ${\\cal N}=4$ sYM. The integrands of the multiple-cuts are generated from products of tree-level amplitudes within the super-amplitudes formalism. The corresponding expressions will be used for the analytic reconstruction of the polynomial residues. Their parametric form is known a priori, as derived by means of successive polynomial divisions using the Gr\\"obner basis associated to the on-shell denominators. The integrand reduction method will be exploited to investigate the color-kinematic duality for multi-loop ${\\cal N}=4$ sYM scattering amplitudes. Our a...

  19. Earth rotation and geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz, Janusz; Brzezinski, Aleksander; Kosek, Wieslaw; Nastula, Jolanta

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the summary of research activities carried out in Poland in 2011-2014 in the field of Earth rotation and geodynamics by several Polish research institutions. It contains a summary of works on Earth rotation, including evaluation and prediction of its parameters and analysis of the related excitation data as well as research on associated geodynamic phenomena such as geocentre motion, global sea level change and hydrological processes. The second part of the paper deals with monitoring of geodynamic phenomena. It contains analysis of geodynamic networks of local, and regional scale using space (GNSS and SLR) techniques, Earth tides monitoring with gravimeters and water-tube hydrostatic clinometer, and the determination of secular variation of the Earth' magnetic field.

  20. Synthetic nanoscale motion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyshevski, M.A. [Microsystems and Nanotechnologies, Webster, NY (United States); Lyshevski, S.E. [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    This study examined biomolecular axial and radial topology rotational machines, as well as translational motion devices made from proteins. In particular, it documented the integrated topological, structural and analytic design of synthetic nanoscale motion devices in an effort to promote high performance and meet specifications. Control, analysis and design problems were solved for electromagnetic motion devices. A systematic synthesis resulted in a radial topology permanent-magnetic device with noncontact electrostatic bearings for use in microrobotics. Such nanoscale motion devices can be made from carbon nanotubes using molecular nanotechnology and surface chemistry. Structures, magnets and windings were formed by depositing polymers and organic/inorganic molecules on the noncontact electrostatic bearings. The electromagnetic torque was studied to analyze the electromagnetics and nonuniform field. The electromagnetic torque was varied in order to control the phase voltages applied to the windings. The closed-loop systems were designed for stability, controllability and optimal performance. The proposed machines can be used as nanoscale generators to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. The permanent-magnet synthetic motion devices may have practical use in nano- and micro robots, assemblers and propulsors. Practical control laws were derived from electromagnetic and electromechanical analyses. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Reeducação postural global e alongamento estático segmentar na melhora da flexibilidade, força muscular e amplitude de movimento: um estudo comparativo Global posture reeducation and static muscle stretching on improving flexibility, muscle strength, and range of motion: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luís Pimentel do Rosário

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercícios de alongamento são usados para aumentar a flexibilidade e amplitude de movimento (ADM. Entre os métodos existentes, destacam-se a reeducação postural global (RPG, que promove o alongamento global das cadeias musculares, e o alongamento segmentar, que alonga um músculo ou grupo muscular específico. Este estudo visou comparar o alongamento segmentar e o global pela técnica de RPG quanto ao ganho de flexibilidade, ADM e força muscular. Trinta mulheres foram distribuídas aleatoriamente em três grupos (n=10 em cada: o grupo global fez alongamento de cadeias musculares; o grupo segmentar realizou alongamento segmentar; e o grupo controle não fez alongamento. Antes e depois do tratamento, em todos os grupos, foram avaliadas a ADM de extensão da perna, flexibilidade pelo teste 3o dedo-solo e força isométrica de flexão da perna em 45° e 90°. Os dois grupos experimentais realizaram oito sessões de alongamento de 30 minutos cada, duas vezes por semana. Toda a análise estatística foi realizada com pStretching exercises are prescribed to increase flexibility and range of motion (ROM. Two current stretching methods are the global posture reeducation (GPR, where muscle chains are stretched, and segmentary exercises, where a single muscle or muscle group is stretched. The aim of this study was to compare these two techniques, assessing their effects on improving flexibility, ROM and muscle strength. Thirty women were randomly distributed into three groups (n=10 each: global group performed stretching following GPR method; segment group performed segment stretching exercises; and control group did no exercise. Before and after treatment, in all groups, knee extension ROM, flexibility by means of the fingertip-to-floor test, and isometric muscular strength at 45° and 90° knee flexion were measured. Each treated group performed eight stretching 30-minute sessions for four weeks, twice a week. Data were statistically analysed and

  2. Factorization of chiral string amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-tin; Siegel, Warren; Yuan, Ellis Ye

    2016-09-01

    We re-examine a closed-string model defined by altering the boundary conditions for one handedness of two-dimensional propagators in otherwise-standard string theory. We evaluate the amplitudes using Kawai-Lewellen-Tye factorization into open-string amplitudes. The only modification to standard string theory is effectively that the spacetime Minkowski metric changes overall sign in one open-string factor. This cancels all but a finite number of states: as found in earlier approaches, with enough supersymmetry (e.g., type II) the tree amplitudes reproduce those of the massless truncation of ordinary string theory. However, we now find for the other cases that additional fields, formerly thought to be auxiliary, describe new spin-2 states at the two adjacent mass levels (tachyonic and tardyonic). The tachyon is always a ghost, but can be avoided in the heterotic case.

  3. Factorization of Chiral String Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yu-tin; Yuan, Ellis Ye

    2016-01-01

    We re-examine a closed-string model defined by altering the boundary conditions for one handedness of two-dimensional propagators in otherwise-standard string theory. We evaluate the amplitudes using Kawai-Lewellen-Tye factorization into open-string amplitudes. The only modification to standard string theory is effectively that the spacetime Minkowski metric changes overall sign in one open-string factor. This cancels all but a finite number of states: As found in earlier approaches, with enough supersymmetry (e.g., type II) the tree amplitudes reproduce those of the massless truncation of ordinary string theory. However, we now find for the other cases that additional fields, formerly thought to be auxiliary, describe new spin-2 states at the two adjacent mass levels (tachyonic and tardyonic). The tachyon is always a ghost, but can be avoided in the heterotic case.

  4. Nonsinglet pentagons and NMHV amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belitsky, A.V., E-mail: andrei.belitsky@asu.edu

    2015-07-15

    Scattering amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric gauge theory receive a dual description in terms of the expectation value of the super Wilson loop stretched on a null polygonal contour. This makes the analysis amenable to nonperturbative techniques. Presently, we elaborate on a refined form of the operator product expansion in terms of pentagon transitions to compute twist-two contributions to NMHV amplitudes. To start with, we provide a novel derivation of scattering matrices starting from Baxter equations for flux-tube excitations propagating on magnon background. We propose bootstrap equations obeyed by pentagon form factors with nonsinglet quantum numbers with respect to the R-symmetry group and provide solutions to them to all orders in 't Hooft coupling. These are then successfully confronted against available perturbative calculations for NMHV amplitudes to four-loop order.

  5. Nonsinglet pentagons and NMHV amplitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Belitsky

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scattering amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric gauge theory receive a dual description in terms of the expectation value of the super Wilson loop stretched on a null polygonal contour. This makes the analysis amenable to nonperturbative techniques. Presently, we elaborate on a refined form of the operator product expansion in terms of pentagon transitions to compute twist-two contributions to NMHV amplitudes. To start with, we provide a novel derivation of scattering matrices starting from Baxter equations for flux-tube excitations propagating on magnon background. We propose bootstrap equations obeyed by pentagon form factors with nonsinglet quantum numbers with respect to the R-symmetry group and provide solutions to them to all orders in 't Hooft coupling. These are then successfully confronted against available perturbative calculations for NMHV amplitudes to four-loop order.

  6. Assigning the Vibration-Rotation Spectra Using the Lww Program Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodyga, Wieslaw; Kreglewski, Marek

    2016-06-01

    The LWW program package is based on traditional methods used in assigning rotationally resolved IR molecular spectra. The Loomis-Wood diagrams, which are used to visualize spectral branches and facilitate their identification, are combined with the power of interactive lower state combination difference (LSCD) checking, which provides immediate verification of correct assignments of quantum numbers to spectral lines. The traditional Giessen/Cologne type Loomis-Wood algorithm is also implemented. Predictions of vibration-rotation wavenumbers are calculated from a table of vibration-rotation energies, which can be imported from any external fitting program. Program includes many additional tools like simulation of a spectrum from a catalog file (list of transitions with intensities), build-up of a vibration-rotation band from individual branches and simultaneous displaying of two IR spectra - active one used for assignments and a reference one, both with full link to their peak-list files. Importing energies as well as exporting assigned data for fitting in an external program is made easy and flexible by a user-programmed import/export interface, which facilitates iterative refining of energy levels and gives a possibility of using directly exact vibration-rotation energies. Program is available in tree versions: for symmetric top, asymmetric top and molecules with large amplitude motions. The program is designed for the Windows operating systems and is available with full documentation on www.lww.amu.edu.pl .

  7. Complex demodulation in VLBI estimation of high frequency Earth rotation components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, S.; Brzeziński, A.; Schuh, H.

    2012-12-01

    The spectrum of high frequency Earth rotation variations contains strong harmonic signal components mainly excited by ocean tides along with much weaker non-harmonic fluctuations driven by irregular processes like the diurnal thermal tides in the atmosphere and oceans. In order to properly investigate non-harmonic phenomena a representation in time domain is inevitable. We present a method, operating in time domain, which is easily applicable within Earth rotation estimation from Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). It enables the determination of diurnal and subdiurnal variations, and is still effective with merely diurnal parameter sampling. The features of complex demodulation are used in an extended parameterization of polar motion and universal time which was implemented into a dedicated version of the Vienna VLBI Software VieVS. The functionality of the approach was evaluated by comparing amplitudes and phases of harmonic variations at tidal periods (diurnal/semidiurnal), derived from demodulated Earth rotation parameters (ERP), estimated from hourly resolved VLBI ERP time series and taken from a recently published VLBI ERP model to the terms of the conventional model for ocean tidal effects in Earth rotation recommended by the International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service (IERS). The three sets of tidal terms derived from VLBI observations extensively agree among each other within the three-sigma level of the demodulation approach, which is below 6 μas for polar motion and universal time. They also coincide in terms of differences to the IERS model, where significant deviations primarily for several major tidal terms are apparent. An additional spectral analysis of the as well estimated demodulated ERP series of the ter- and quarterdiurnal frequency bands did not reveal any significant signal structure. The complex demodulation applied in VLBI parameter estimation could be demonstrated a suitable procedure for the reliable reproduction of

  8. The Perception of Auditory Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlile, Simon; Leung, Johahn

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of efficient and relatively inexpensive virtual auditory display technology has provided new research platforms to explore the perception of auditory motion. At the same time, deployment of these technologies in command and control as well as in entertainment roles is generating an increasing need to better understand the complex processes underlying auditory motion perception. This is a particularly challenging processing feat because it involves the rapid deconvolution of the relative change in the locations of sound sources produced by rotational and translations of the head in space (self-motion) to enable the perception of actual source motion. The fact that we perceive our auditory world to be stable despite almost continual movement of the head demonstrates the efficiency and effectiveness of this process. This review examines the acoustical basis of auditory motion perception and a wide range of psychophysical, electrophysiological, and cortical imaging studies that have probed the limits and possible mechanisms underlying this perception. PMID:27094029

  9. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J; Weik, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity.

  10. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J.; Weik, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity.

  11. Vibration-rotation-tunneling dynamics in small water clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliano, N.

    1992-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize the intermolecular vibrations of small water clusters. Using tunable far infrared laser absorption spectroscopy, large amplitude vibration-rotation-tunneling (VRT) dynamics in vibrationally excited states of the water dimer and the water trimer are investigated. This study begins with the measurement of 12 VRT subbands, consisting of approximately 230 transitions, which are assigned to an 82.6 cm{sup {minus}1} intermolecular vibration of the water dimer-d{sub 4}. Each of the VRT subbands originate from K{sub a}{double_prime}=0 and terminate in either K{sub a}{prime}=0 or 1. These data provide a complete characterization of the tunneling dynamics in the vibrationally excited state as well as definitive symmetry labels for all VRT energy levels. Furthermore, an accurate value for the A{prime} rotational constant is found to agree well with its corresponding ground state value. All other excited state rotational constants are fitted, and discussed in terms of the corresponding ground state constants. In this vibration, the quantum tunneling motions are determined to exhibit large dependencies with both the K{sub a}{prime} quantum number and the vibrational coordinate, as is evidenced by the measured tunneling splittings. The generalized internal-axis-method treatment which has been developed to model the tunneling dynamics, is considered for the qualitative description of each tunneling pathway, however, the variation of tunneling splittings with vibrational excitation indicate that the high barrier approximation does not appear to be applicable for this vibrational coordinate. The data are consistent with a motion possessing a{prime} symmetry, and the vibration is assigned as the {nu}{sub 12} acceptor bending coordinate. This assignment is in agreement with the vibrational symmetry, the resultsof high level ab initio calculations, and preliminary data assigned to the analogous vibration in the D{sub 2}O-DOH isotopomer.

  12. Vibration-rotation-tunneling dynamics in small water clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliano, N.

    1992-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize the intermolecular vibrations of small water clusters. Using tunable far infrared laser absorption spectroscopy, large amplitude vibration-rotation-tunneling (VRT) dynamics in vibrationally excited states of the water dimer and the water trimer are investigated. This study begins with the measurement of 12 VRT subbands, consisting of approximately 230 transitions, which are assigned to an 82.6 cm[sup [minus]1] intermolecular vibration of the water dimer-d[sub 4]. Each of the VRT subbands originate from K[sub a][double prime]=0 and terminate in either K[sub a][prime]=0 or 1. These data provide a complete characterization of the tunneling dynamics in the vibrationally excited state as well as definitive symmetry labels for all VRT energy levels. Furthermore, an accurate value for the A[prime] rotational constant is found to agree well with its corresponding ground state value. All other excited state rotational constants are fitted, and discussed in terms of the corresponding ground state constants. In this vibration, the quantum tunneling motions are determined to exhibit large dependencies with both the K[sub a][prime] quantum number and the vibrational coordinate, as is evidenced by the measured tunneling splittings. The generalized internal-axis-method treatment which has been developed to model the tunneling dynamics, is considered for the qualitative description of each tunneling pathway, however, the variation of tunneling splittings with vibrational excitation indicate that the high barrier approximation does not appear to be applicable for this vibrational coordinate. The data are consistent with a motion possessing a[prime] symmetry, and the vibration is assigned as the [nu][sub 12] acceptor bending coordinate. This assignment is in agreement with the vibrational symmetry, the resultsof high level ab initio calculations, and preliminary data assigned to the analogous vibration in the D[sub 2]O-DOH isotopomer.

  13. Direct estimation of tidally induced Earth rotation variations observed by VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englich, S.; Heinkelmann, R.; BOHM, J.; Schuh, H.

    2009-09-01

    The subject of our study is the investigation of periodical variations induced by solid Earth tides and ocean tides in Earth rotation parameters (ERP: polar motion, UT1)observed by VLBI. There are two strategies to determine the amplitudes and phases of Earth rotation variations from observations of space geodetic techniques. The common way is to derive time series of Earth rotation parameters first and to estimate amplitudes and phases in a second step. Results obtained by this means were shown in previous studies for zonal tidal variations (Englich et al.; 2008a) and variations caused by ocean tides (Englich et al.; 2008b). The alternative method is to estimate the tidal parameters directly within the VLBI data analysis procedure together with other parameters such as station coordinates, tropospheric delays, clocks etc. The purpose of this work was the application of this direct method to a combined VLBI data analysis using the software packages OCCAM (Version 6.1, Gauss-Markov-Model) and DOGSCS (Gerstl et al.; 2001). The theoretical basis and the preparatory steps for the implementation of this approach are presented here.

  14. OBSERVATION OF MHD INSTABILITY AND DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF LOCAL PERTURBED MAGNETIC FIELD USING MOTIONAL STARK EFFECT DIAGNOSTIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JAYAKUMAR,RJ; MAKOWSKI,MA; ALLEN,SL; AUSTIN,ME; GAROFALO,AM; LA HAYE,RJ; REIMERDES,H; RHODES,TL

    2003-11-01

    OAK-B135 The local oscillating component of the poloidal magnetic field in plasma associated with MHD instabilities has been measured using the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak. The magnetic field perturbations associated with a resistive wall mode (RWM) rotated by internal coils at 20 Hz was measured using the conventional MSE operation mode. These first observations of perturbations due to a MHD mode were obtained on multiple MSE channels covering a significant portion of the plasma and the radial profile o the amplitude of the perturbed field oscillations was obtained. The measured profile is similar to the profile of the amplitude of the electron temperature oscillation measured by electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements. In a new mode of measurement, the amplitude of a tearing mode rotating at a high frequency ({approx} 7 kHz) was observed using the spectral analysis of high frequency MSE data on one channel. The spectrum consists of the harmonics of the light modulation employed in the MSE diagnostics, their mutual beat frequencies and their beat frequencies with the rotation frequency of the tearing mode. The value and time variation of the frequency of the observed perturbations is in good agreement with that measured by Mirnov probes and ECE. The paper demonstrates that the MSE diagnostic can be used for observing low and high frequency phenomena such as MHD instabilities and electromagnetic turbulence.

  15. Rotational dynamics of propylene inside Na-Y zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Sharma; Mala N Rao; Siddharth Gautam; A K Tripathi; V S Kamble; S L Chaplot; R Mukhopadhyay

    2008-11-01

    We report here the quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) studies on the dynamics of propylene inside Na-Y zeolite using triple axis spectrometer (TAS) at Dhruva reactor, Trombay. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed on the system had shown that the rotational motion involves energy larger than that involved in the translational motion. Therefore, rotational motion was not observed in our earlier QENS studies on propylene adsorbed Na-Y zeolite using a higher resolution spectrometer at Dhruva. Analysis of the TAS spectra revealed that the quasielastic broadening observed in propylene-loaded zeolite spectra is due to the rotational motion of the propylene molecules. This is consistent with our simulation result. Further, the rotational motion is found to be isotropic. The rotational diffusion coefficient has been obtained.

  16. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2016-05-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in 4- and d -dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for p p →H +0 , 1, 2 jets, p p →W /Z /γ +0 , 1, 2 jets, and p p →2 , 3 jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with e+e- and e-p collisions.

  17. Discontinuity formulas for multiparticle amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown how discontinuity formulas for multiparticle scattering amplitudes are derived from unitarity and analyticity. The assumed analyticity property is the normal analytic structure, which was shown to be equivalent to the space-time macrocausality condition. The discontinuity formulas to be derived are the basis of multi-particle fixed-t dispersion relations

  18. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in 4- and d-dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for pp → H+0,1,2 jets, pp → W/Z/γ+0,1,2 jets, and pp → 2,3 jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with e+e- and e-p collisions.

  19. Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henn, Johannes M. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States). School of Natural Sciences; Plefka, Jan C. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2014-03-01

    First monographical text on this fundamental topic. Course-tested, pedagogical and self-contained exposition. Includes exercises and solutions. At the fundamental level, the interactions of elementary particles are described by quantum gauge field theory. The quantitative implications of these interactions are captured by scattering amplitudes, traditionally computed using Feynman diagrams. In the past decade tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of and computational abilities with regard to scattering amplitudes in gauge theories, going beyond the traditional textbook approach. These advances build upon on-shell methods that focus on the analytic structure of the amplitudes, as well as on their recently discovered hidden symmetries. In fact, when expressed in suitable variables the amplitudes are much simpler than anticipated and hidden patterns emerge. These modern methods are of increasing importance in phenomenological applications arising from the need for high-precision predictions for the experiments carried out at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in foundational mathematical physics studies on the S-matrix in quantum field theory. Bridging the gap between introductory courses on quantum field theory and state-of-the-art research, these concise yet self-contained and course-tested lecture notes are well-suited for a one-semester graduate level course or as a self-study guide for anyone interested in fundamental aspects of quantum field theory and its applications. The numerous exercises and solutions included will help readers to embrace and apply the material presented in the main text.

  20. Large amplitude oscillatory elongation flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Laillé, Philippe; Yu, Kaijia

    2008-01-01

    + Lambda[1 - cos( 2 pi Omega(epsilon) over dot(0)t)] where epsilon is the Hencky strain, (epsilon) over dot(0) is a constant elongational rate for the base elongational flow, Lambda the strain amplitude ( Lambda >= 0), and Omega the strain frequency. A narrow molecular mass distribution linear polystyrene...

  1. Discontinuity formulas for multiparticle amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1976-03-01

    It is shown how discontinuity formulas for multiparticle scattering amplitudes are derived from unitarity and analyticity. The assumed analyticity property is the normal analytic structure, which was shown to be equivalent to the space-time macrocausality condition. The discontinuity formulas to be derived are the basis of multi-particle fixed-t dispersion relations.

  2. Positivity of spin foam amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amplitude for a spin foam in the Barrett-Crane model of Riemannian quantum gravity is given as a product over its vertices, edges and faces, with one factor of the Riemannian 10j symbols appearing for each vertex, and simpler factors for the edges and faces. We prove that these amplitudes are always nonnegative for closed spin foams. As a corollary, all open spin foams going between a fixed pair of spin networks have real amplitudes of the same sign. This means one can use the Metropolis algorithm to compute expectation values of observables in the Riemannian Barrett-Crane model, as in statistical mechanics, even though this theory is based on a real-time (eiS) rather than imaginary-time e-S path integral. Our proof uses the fact that when the Riemannian 10j symbols are nonzero, their sign is positive or negative depending on whether the sum of the ten spins is an integer or half-integer. For the product of 10j symbols appearing in the amplitude for a closed spin foam, these signs cancel. We conclude with some numerical evidence suggesting that the Lorentzian 10j symbols are always nonnegative, which would imply similar results for the Lorentzian Barrett-Crane model

  3. Extracting amplitudes from photoproduction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, R. L.

    2011-09-01

    We consider the problems associated with amplitude extraction, from meson photoproduction data, over the first resonance regions. The notion of a complete experiment has motivated the FROST program at Jefferson Lab. Exercises applied to pion photoproduction data illustrate the problems to be confronted in any attempt to extract underlying resonance signals from these data (without introducing a model for the resonant process).

  4. Visual perception of axes of head rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mattijs Arnoldussen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Registration of ego-motion is important to accurately navigate through space. Movements of the head and eye relative to space are registered through the vestibular system and optical flow, respectively. Here, we address three questions concerning the visual registration of self-rotation. 1. Eye-in-head movements provide a link between the motion signals received by sensors in the moving eye and sensors in the moving head. How are these signals combined into an ego-rotation percept? We combined optic flow of simulated forward and rotational motion of the eye with different levels of eye-in-head rotation for a stationary head. We dissociated simulated gaze rotation and head rotation by different levels of eye-in-head pursuit.We found that perceived rotation matches simulated head- not gaze-rotation. This rejects a model for perceived self-rotation that relies on the rotation of the gaze line. Rather, eye-in-head signals serve to transform the optic flow’s rotation information, that specifies rotation of the scene relative to the eye, into a rotation relative to the head. This suggests that transformed visual self-rotation signals may combine with vestibular signals.2. Do transformed visual self-rotation signals reflect the arrangement of the semicircular canals (SCC? Previously, we found sub-regions within MST and V6+ that respond to the speed of the simulated head rotation. Here, we re-analyzed those BOLD signals for the presence of a spatial dissociation related to the axes of visually simulated head rotation, such as have been found in sub-cortical regions of various animals. Contrary, we found a rather uniform BOLD response to simulated rotation along the three SCC axes.3. We investigated if subject’s sensitivity to the direction of the head rotation axis shows SCC axes specifcity. We found that sensitivity to head rotation is rather uniformly distributed, suggesting that in human cortex, visuo-vestibular integration is not arranged into

  5. Chaotic Rotation of Nereid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The shape and spin of Neptune's outermost satellite Nereid are still unknown. Ground-based photometry indicates large brightness variations, but different observers report very different lightcurve amplitudes and periods. On the contrary, Voyager 2 images spanning 12 days show no evidence of variations greater than 0.1 mag. The latter suggest either that Nereid is nearly spherical, or that it is rotating slowly. We propose that tides have already despun Nereid's rotation to a period of a few weeks, during the time before the capture of Triton when Nereid was closer to Neptune. Since Nereid reached its present orbit, tides have further despun Nereid to a period on the order of a month. For Nereid's orbital eccentricity of 0.75, tidal evolution ceases when the spin period is still approximately 1/8 of the orbital period. Furthermore, the synchronous resonance becomes quite weak for such high eccentricities, along with other low-order spin orbit commensurabilities. In contrast, high-order resonances become very strong particularly the 6:1, 6.5:1, 7:1, 7.5:1, and 8:1 spin states. If Nereid departs by more than approximately 1% from a sphere, however, these resonances overlap, generating chaos. Our simulations show that Nereid is likely to be in chaotic rotation for any spin period longer than about 2 weeks.

  6. Structural principles governing domain motions in proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayward, S

    1999-01-01

    With the use of a recently developed method, twenty-four proteins for which two or more X-ray conformers are known have been analyzed to reveal structural principles that govern domain motions in proteins. In all 24 cases, the domain motion is a rotation about a physical axis created through local i

  7. Relativistic Motion of Spinning Particles in a Gravitational Field

    OpenAIRE

    Chicone, C.; Mashhoon, B.; Punsly, B.

    2005-01-01

    The relative motion of a classical relativistic spinning test particle is studied with respect to a nearby free test particle in the gravitational field of a rotating source. The effects of the spin-curvature coupling force are elucidated and the implications of the results for the motion of rotating plasma clumps in astrophysical jets are discussed.

  8. Relativistic motion of spinning particles in a gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicone, C.; Mashhoon, B.; Punsly, B.

    2005-08-01

    The relative motion of a classical relativistic spinning test particle is studied with respect to a nearby free test particle in the gravitational field of a rotating source. The effects of the spin-curvature coupling force are elucidated and the implications of the results for the motion of rotating plasma clumps in astrophysical jets are discussed.

  9. On the rotational dynamics of Prometheus and Pandora

    OpenAIRE

    Melnikov, A.V.; Shevchenko, I. I.

    2013-01-01

    Possible rotation states of two satellites of Saturn, Prometheus (S16) and Pandora (S17), are studied by means of numerical experiments. The attitude stability of all possible modes of synchronous rotation and the motion close to these modes is analyzed by means of computation of the Lyapunov spectra of the motion. The stability analysis confirms that the rotation of Prometheus and Pandora might be chaotic, though the possibility of regular behaviour is not excluded. For the both satellites, ...

  10. Spectroscopic techniques and hindered molecular motion

    CERN Document Server

    Bashirov, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    Fundamentals of the Theory of Hindered Molecular MotionThe basis of the angular autocorrelation function techniqueThe autocorrelation functions adapted to the rotational diffusion model and the model of fixed angular jumps.The General Solution of the Hindered Molecular Motion ProblemThe extended angular jump modelSolution of the hindered molecular motion problemThe Autocorrelation Functions Adapted to the Extended Angular Jump ModelThe general formThe explicit form of autocorrelation function

  11. Theory of coorbital motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopliv, Alexander Stephen

    The gravitational interaction of two small coorbital satellites in nearly identical orbits about a large central mass is investigated. This involves the study of the general three-body problem as well as the restricted three-body problem. Since the eccentricity is small, dynamical models are developed by expanding the equations of motion in rotating polar coordinates about a circular orbit. For numerical investigation, a combination of Hill's variables and equinoctial variables is used to find series solutions expanded in time. From these series solutions, highly accurate averaged equations are determined. To study the stability of the motion, periodic orbits are generated and the linearized stability is found from the eigenvalues of the state transition matrix.

  12. Perception of rotation, path, and heading in circular trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Nooij, Suzanne A. E.; Nesti, Alessandro; Heinrich H Bülthoff; Pretto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    When in darkness, humans can perceive the direction and magnitude of rotations and of linear translations in the horizontal plane. The current paper addresses the integrated perception of combined translational and rotational motion, as it occurs when moving along a curved trajectory. We questioned whether the perceived motion through the environment follows the predictions of a self-motion perception model (e.g., Merfeld et al. in J Vestib Res 3:141–161, 1993; Newman in A multisensory observ...

  13. The angular velocity of the apsidal rotation in binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Vasilev, B V

    2004-01-01

    The shape of a rotating star consisting of equilibrium plasma is considered. The velocity of apsidal rotation of close binary stars (periastron rotation) which depends on the star shapes is calculated. The obtained estimations are in a good agreement with the observation data of the apsidal motion in binary systems.

  14. Angular momentum projection of tilted axis rotating states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oi, M.; Onishi, N.; Tajima, N. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Horibata, T.

    1998-03-01

    We applied an exact angular momentum projection to three dimensional cranked HFB (3d-CHFB) states. Tilted axis rotating states (TAR) and principal axis rotating states (PAR) are compared. It is shown that TAR is more adequate than PAR for description of the back bending phenomena driven by tilted rotation or wobbling motion. (author)

  15. Gauge and Gravity Amplitude Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco, John Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    In these lectures I talk about simplifications and universalities found in scattering amplitudes for gauge and gravity theories. In contrast to Ward identities, which are understood to arise from familiar symmetries of the classical action, these structures are currently only understood in terms of graphical organizational principles, such as the gauge-theoretic color-kinematics duality and the gravitational double-copy structure, for local representations of multi-loop S-matrix elements. These graphical principles make manifest new relationships in and between gauge and gravity scattering amplitudes. My lectures will focus on arriving at such graphical organizations for generic theories with examples presented from maximal supersymmetry, and their use in unitarity-based multi-loop integrand construction.

  16. Pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias; Wu, Jie

    2015-12-29

    Chlorophyll fluorometry may be used for detecting toxins in a sample because of changes in micro algae. A portable lab on a chip ("LOAC") based chlorophyll fluorometer may be used for toxin detection and environmental monitoring. In particular, the system may include a microfluidic pulse amplitude modulated ("PAM") chlorophyll fluorometer. The LOAC PAM chlorophyll fluorometer may analyze microalgae and cyanobacteria that grow naturally in source drinking water.

  17. Amplitude of Perturbations from Inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    The observed power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is consistent with inflationary cosmology, which predicts a nearly scale-invariant power spectrum of quantum fluctuations of the inflaton field as they exit the Hubble horizon during inflation. Here we report a very significant correction (of several orders of magnitude) to the predicted amplitude of the power spectrum. This correction does not alter the near scale-invariance of the spectrum, but is crucial for testing predi...

  18. Motion constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Raunhardt, Daniel; Boulic, Ronan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid postural control approach taking advantage of data-driven and goal-oriented methods while overcoming their limitations. In particular, we take advantage of the latent space characterizing a given motion database. We introduce a motion constraint operating in the latent space to benefit from its much smaller dimension compared to the joint space. This allows its transparent integration into a Prioritized Inverse Kinematics framework. If its priority is high t...

  19. A microscopic rotational cranking model and its connection to conventional cranking and other collective rotational models

    CERN Document Server

    Gulshani, P

    2016-01-01

    A simple derivation from first principles of the conventional cranking model for nuclear collective rotation about a single axis and its coupling to intrinsic motion is given. The microscopic cranking model is derived by transforming the nuclear Schrodinger equation to a rotating frame using a rotation-intrinsic product wavefunction and imposing no constraints on either the wavefunction or the nucleon coordinates. The no-constraint feature of the transformation makes it possible to share the angular momentum of the nucleus between the rotating frame and intrinsic system. The rotation of the frame is driven by a combination of rigid and irrotational flows generated by the motion of the nucleons. The resulting transformed, time-reversal invariant Schrodinger equation is readily reduced to the equations of the conventional cranking, particle-plus-rotor, phenomenological and microscopic collective rotation-vibration, and two-fluid semi-classical collective models. In particular, the reduction of the microscopic m...

  20. Confiabilidade intra-avaliador da medida de amplitude de movimento da flexão e extensão do joelho pelo método de fotogrametria Intra-rater reliability of knee flexion and extension range of motion measurement through the photogrammetry method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eurico Peixoto César

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Apesar de existirem diversos métodos para a determinação da amplitude de movimento (ADM, a baixa confiabilidade, a pouca sensibilidade, a subjetividade ou a ausência de valores do erro típico da medida (ETM de alguns desses métodos comprometem a interpretação adequada dos resultados. O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a confiabilidade intra-avaliador da medida e do método de fotogrametria para a ADM de extensão ativa e flexão passiva do joelho (FPJ, realizada no mesmo dia (consistência interna e em dias diferentes (estabilidade. Participaram 18 sujeitos do sexo masculino (24,5±3,7 anos, 79,3±10,1 kg e 174,8±4,2 cm. Após a marcação dos pontos anatômicos de referência, a angulação dos movimentos foi registrada em fotografia, por meio da ferramenta de dimensão angular no software CorelDRAW®. A confiabilidade da medida e do instrumento foi estabelecida pelo coeficiente de correlação intraclasse (CCI e pelo cálculo do ETM. A distribuição dos erros dos dados foi verificada pela representação gráfica de Bland e Altman. O método apresentou confiabilidade perfeita (ETM=0,01 e CCI=1,0 para ambos os movimentos. Para a confiabilidade da medida, foram encontrados os valores 0,97 e 0,93 para consistência interna e 0,96 e 0,83 para estabilidade (ETM=2,9 e 4,0%; pAlthough there are several methods for determining the range of motion (ROM, low reliability, low sensitivity, subjectivity or lack of information related to the typical error of measurement (TEM may compromise interpretation of testing results. The aim of this study was to test the intra-rater reliability of the ROM measurement and the photogrammetry method for same day (internal consistency and between days (stability for knee active extension and passive flexion. Eighteen active male volunteers (24.5±3.7 years, 79.3±10.1 kg and 174.8±4.2 cm were selected to participate in the study. After identification of anatomical landmarks used for reference, knee passive

  1. Serum levels of eleven steroid hormones following motion sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalla, G K; Doerr, H G; Bidlingmaier, F; Sippel, W G; von Restorff, W

    1985-10-01

    In order to grade motion sickness objectively, the following 11 adrenal hormones were investigated in subjects with different motion sickness susceptibility: Aldosterone, corticosterone, 11-deoxycorticosterone, progesterone, 17-OH-progesterone, 11-deoxycortisol, cortisol, cortisone, testosterone, androstendione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Motion sickness was induced by the coriolis effect on a rotary chair. Both severe kinetosis after short rotation time and mild motion sickness after 30 min of rotation occurred together with small hormonal changes. Androstendione and 11-deoxycortisol appear to be sensitive indicators of motion sickness if the rotation time is taken into consideration. A significant increase of all hormones except progesterone, cortisone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate was observed when pronounced malaise had come after a long rotation stress (24.6 min). The changes in plasma aldosterone concentration appeared to correlate with time only. The present study demonstrates that hormonal analysis can be helpful in estimating the degree of motion sickness.

  2. The rotation of P/Halley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nucleus of the comet Halley rotates as a slightly asymmetric top, the orientation of the rotation axis (the orientation of the angular momentum vector) is b=54 deg +-15 deg, l=219 deg +-15 deg in the ecliptic system. In the case of the rotation of an asymmetric top the rotation axis is not fixed rigidly to the body, which means that while the nucleus rotates around the axis with a period of 2.2+-0.05 d, its long axis 'nods' periodically with a period of 7.4+-0.05 d. The amplitude of the 'nodding' is about 15 deg +-3 deg in both directions relative to a plane perpendicular to the rotation axis. (author) 21 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. General-relativistic rotation laws in rotating fluid bodies: constant linear velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Knopik, Jerzy; Malec, Edward

    2015-01-01

    New rotation laws have been recently found for general-relativistic self-gravitating stationary fluids. It was not clear whether they apply to systems rotating with a constant linear velocity. In this paper we fill this gap. The answer is positive. That means, in particular, that these systems should exhibit the recently discovered general-relativistic weak-field effects within rotating tori: the dynamic anti-dragging and the deviation from the Keplerian motion induced by the fluid selfgravity.

  4. Time-resolved measurement of the three-dimensional motion of gold nanocrystals in water using diffracted electron tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Naoki, E-mail: n-ogawa@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Integrated Science in Physics and Biology, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-25-40 Sakurajosui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Graduate School for Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Hirohata, Yasuhisa [Department of Integrated Science in Physics and Biology, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-25-40 Sakurajosui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Sasaki, Yuji C. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Ishikawa, Akira, E-mail: ishikawa@phys.chs.nihon-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-25-40 Sakurajosui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    We introduce diffracted electron tracking (DET), which combines two electron microscopy techniques, electron backscatter diffraction and the use of an environmental cell in a scanning electron microscope to measure changes in nanocrystal-orientation. The accuracy of DET was verified by measuring the motion of a flat gold crystal caused by the rotation or tilting of the specimen stage. DET was applied to measure the motion of semi-fixed gold nanocrystals in various environments. In addition to large motions induced in water environment, DET could detect small differences in the three-dimensional (3D) motion amplitude between vacuum environment and an Ar gas environment. DET promises to be a useful method for measuring the motion of single nanocrystals in various environments. This measuring technique may be used in a wide range of scientific fields; for example, DET may be a prospective method to track the single molecule dynamics of molecules labeled with gold nanocrystals. - Highlights: • We developed DET for measuring single molecular dynamics. • DET can be run by a scanning electron microscope only attached with EBSD system. • DET was assured using a flat gold crystal corresponding to sample stage movements. • DET can measure the Brownian motion of gold nanocrystals in water environment.

  5. Vibration of low amplitude imaged in amplitude and phase by sideband versus carrier correlation digital holography

    CERN Document Server

    Verrier, N; Gross, M

    2015-01-01

    Sideband holography can be used to get fields images (E0 and E1) of a vibrating object for both the carrier (E0) and the sideband (E1) frequency with respect to vibration. We propose here to record E0 and E1 sequentially, and to image the correlation E1E * 0 . We show that this correlation is insensitive the phase related to the object roughness and directly reflect the phase of the mechanical motion. The signal to noise can be improved by averaging the correlation over neighbor pixel. Experimental validation is made with vibrating cube of wood and with a clarinet reed. At 2 kHz, vibrations of amplitude down to 0.01 nm are detected.

  6. Rotating Structure Modeling and Damping Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jia

    2011-01-01

    The structural damping is of importance to suppress the vibration amplitude of compressor blades rotating at high angular velocity under a high cycle impact. To avoid the appearance of the high cycle fatigue (HCF), damping materials may be applied to the compressor blades. To quantify the effect while using damping materials, a numerical tool needs to be developed for the damping prediction of a dynamic rotating blade. This thesis is divided into two parts: Paper A develops a dynamic model of...

  7. New Dynamic Spin Rig Capabilities Used to Determine Rotating Blade Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenza, Andrew J.

    2004-01-01

    The Dynamic Spin Rig Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center is used to determine the structural response of rotating engine components without the effects of aerodynamic loading. Recently, this rig's capabilities were enhanced through the replacement of grease-lubricated ball bearings with magnetic bearings. Magnetic bearings offer a number of advantages--the most important here being that they not only fully support the rotor system, but excite it as well. Three magnetic bearings support the rotor and provide five axes of controlled motion: an x- and y-axis translation at each of two radial bearings and a z-axis translation in the vertical or axial direction. Sinusoidal excitation (most commonly used) can be imparted on the rotor through the radial magnetic bearings in either a fixed or rotating frame of reference. This excitation is added directly to the magnetic bearing control output. Since the rotor is fully levitated, large translations and rotations of the rotor system can be achieved. Some of the capabilities of this excitation system were determined and reported. The accelerations obtained at the tip of a titanium flat plate test article versus the swept sine excitation sent to both radial bearings in phase and perpendicular to the plane containing the two blades are shown. Recent tests required the excitation of fundamental bending and torsional blade resonances at rotor speeds up to 10,000 rpm. Successful fixed synchronous rotation of the excitation signal provided the best detectable blade resonant vibrations at excitation frequencies up to 1100 Hz for the particular blades of interest. A noncontacting laser measurement system was used to collect blade-tip motions. From these data, the amplitude and frequency of the motion could be determined as well as the blade damping properties. Damping could be determined using two methods: (1) free decay and (2) curve fitting the vibration amplitude as a function of frequency in and around the resonance of

  8. Molecular motion in restricted geometries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siddharth Gautam; S Mitra; R Mukhopadhyay

    2008-10-01

    Molecular dynamics in restricted geometries is known to exhibit anomalous behaviour. Diffusion, translational or rotational, of molecules is altered significantly on confinement in restricted geometries. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) offers a unique possibility of studying molecular motion in such systems. Both time scales involved in the motion and the geometry of motion can be studied using QENS. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation not only provides insight into the details of the different types of motion possible but also does not suffer limitations of the experimental set-up. Here we report the effect of confinement on molecular dynamics in various restricted geometries as studied by QENS and MD simulations: An example where the QENS technique provided direct evidence of phase transition associated with change in the dynamical behaviour of the molecules is also discussed.

  9. Solar rotation measurements at Mount Wilson. II - Systematic instrumental effects and the absolute rotation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonte, B. J.; Howard, R.

    1981-01-01

    Possible sources of systematic error in solar Doppler rotational velocities are examined. Scattered light is shown to affect the Mount Wilson solar rotation results, but this effect is not enough to bring the spectroscopic results in coincidence with the sunspot rotation. Interference fringes at the spectrograph focus at Mount Wilson have in two intervals affected the rotation results. It has been possible to correlate this error with temperature and thus correct for it. A misalignment between the entrance and exit slits is a possible source of error, but for the Mount Wilson slit configuration, the amplitude of this effect is negligibly small. Rapid scanning of the solar image also produces no measurable effect.

  10. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  11. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth, E-mail: rrromero@salud.madrid.org; Castro-Tejero, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.castro@salud.madrid.org [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, 28222 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  12. Sensitivity to full-field visual movement compatible with head rotation: variations among axes of rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, L R; Lott, L A

    1995-01-01

    Movement detection thresholds for full-field visual motion about various axes were measured in three subjects using a two-alternative forced-choice staircase method. Thresholds for 1-s exposures to rotation about different rotation axes varied significantly over the range 0.139 +/- 0.05 deg/s to 0.463 +/- 0.166 deg/s. The highest thresholds were found in response to rotation about axes closely aligned to the line of sight. Variations among the thresholds for different axes could not be explained by different movement patterns in the fovea or variations in motion sensitivity with eccentricity. The variations can be well simulated by a three-channel model for coding the axis and velocity of full-field visual motion. A three-channel visual coding system would be well suited for extracting information about self-rotation from a complex pattern of retinal image motion containing components due to both rotation and translation. A three-channel visual motion system would also be readily compatible with vestibular information concerning self-rotation arising from the semicircular canals. PMID:8527373

  13. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

  14. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants

  15. Residual polar motion caused by coseismic and interseismic deformations from 1900 to present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambiotti, G.; Wang, X.; Sabadini, R.; Yuen, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We challenge the perspective that seismicity could contribute to polar motion by arguing quantitatively that, in first approximation and on the average, interseismic deformations can compensate for it. This point is important because what we must simulate and observe in Earth Orientation Parameter time-series over intermediate timescales of decades or centuries is the residual polar motion resulting from the two opposing processes of coseismic and interseismic deformations. In this framework, we first simulate the polar motion caused by only coseismic deformations during the longest period available of instrumental seismicity, from 1900 to present, using both the CMT and ISC-GEM catalogues. The instrumental seismicity covering a little longer than one century does not represent yet the average seismicity that we should expect on the long term. Indeed, although the simulation shows a tendency to move the Earth rotation pole towards 133°E at the average rate of 16.5 mm yr-1, this trend is still sensitive to individual megathrust earthquakes, particularly to the 1960 Chile and 1964 Alaska earthquakes. In order to further investigate this issue, we develop a global seismicity model (GSM) that is independent from any earthquake catalogue and that describes the average seismicity along plate boundaries on the long term by combining information about present-day plate kinematics with the Anderson theory of faulting, the seismic moment conservation principle and a few other assumptions. Within this framework, we obtain a secular polar motion of 8 mm yr-1 towards 112.5°E that is comparable with that estimated from 1900 to present using the earthquake catalogues, although smaller by a factor of 2 in amplitude and different by 20° in direction. Afterwards, in order to reconcile the idea of a secular polar motion caused by earthquakes with our simplest understanding of the seismic cycle, we adapt the GSM in order to account for interseismic deformations and we use it to

  16. Rotator Cuff Tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Rotator Cuff Tears Page ( 1 ) A rotator cuff tear is a common cause of pain and disability among adults. In ... went to their doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your ...

  17. HOW TO DETERMINE AN EXOMOON'S SENSE OF ORBITAL MOTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, René [Origins Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Albrecht, Simon, E-mail: rheller@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: albrecht@phys.au.dk [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2014-11-20

    We present two methods to determine an exomoon's sense of orbital motion (SOM), one with respect to the planet's circumstellar orbit and one with respect to the planetary rotation. Our simulations show that the required measurements will be possible with the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). The first method relies on mutual planet-moon events during stellar transits. Eclipses with the moon passing behind (in front of) the planet will be late (early) with regard to the moon's mean orbital period due to the finite speed of light. This ''transit timing dichotomy'' (TTD) determines an exomoon's SOM with respect to the circumstellar motion. For the 10 largest moons in the solar system, TTDs range between 2 and 12 s. The E-ELT will enable such measurements for Earth-sized moons around nearby Sun-like stars. The second method measures distortions in the IR spectrum of the rotating giant planet when it is transited by its moon. This Rossiter-McLaughlin effect (RME) in the planetary spectrum reveals the angle between the planetary equator and the moon's circumplanetary orbital plane, and therefore unveils the moon's SOM with respect to the planet's rotation. A reasonably large moon transiting a directly imaged planet like β Pic b causes an RME amplitude of almost 100 m s{sup –1}, about twice the stellar RME amplitude of the transiting exoplanet HD209458 b. Both new methods can be used to probe the origin of exomoons, that is, whether they are regular or irregular in nature.

  18. HOW TO DETERMINE AN EXOMOON'S SENSE OF ORBITAL MOTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present two methods to determine an exomoon's sense of orbital motion (SOM), one with respect to the planet's circumstellar orbit and one with respect to the planetary rotation. Our simulations show that the required measurements will be possible with the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). The first method relies on mutual planet-moon events during stellar transits. Eclipses with the moon passing behind (in front of) the planet will be late (early) with regard to the moon's mean orbital period due to the finite speed of light. This ''transit timing dichotomy'' (TTD) determines an exomoon's SOM with respect to the circumstellar motion. For the 10 largest moons in the solar system, TTDs range between 2 and 12 s. The E-ELT will enable such measurements for Earth-sized moons around nearby Sun-like stars. The second method measures distortions in the IR spectrum of the rotating giant planet when it is transited by its moon. This Rossiter-McLaughlin effect (RME) in the planetary spectrum reveals the angle between the planetary equator and the moon's circumplanetary orbital plane, and therefore unveils the moon's SOM with respect to the planet's rotation. A reasonably large moon transiting a directly imaged planet like β Pic b causes an RME amplitude of almost 100 m s–1, about twice the stellar RME amplitude of the transiting exoplanet HD209458 b. Both new methods can be used to probe the origin of exomoons, that is, whether they are regular or irregular in nature

  19. Enhancing Rotational Diffusion Using Oscillatory Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Brian D.; Cheng, Xiang; Ong, Desmond C.; Liddell-Watson, Chekesha; Cohen, Itai

    2013-05-01

    Taylor dispersion—shear-induced enhancement of translational diffusion—is an important phenomenon with applications ranging from pharmacology to geology. Through experiments and simulations, we show that rotational diffusion is also enhanced for anisotropic particles in oscillatory shear. This enhancement arises from variations in the particle’s rotation (Jeffery orbit) and depends on the strain amplitude, rate, and particle aspect ratio in a manner that is distinct from the translational diffusion. This separate tunability of translational and rotational diffusion opens the door to new techniques for controlling positions and orientations of suspended anisotropic colloids.

  20. Enhancing Rotational Diffusion Using Oscillatory Shear

    KAUST Repository

    Leahy, Brian D.

    2013-05-29

    Taylor dispersion - shear-induced enhancement of translational diffusion - is an important phenomenon with applications ranging from pharmacology to geology. Through experiments and simulations, we show that rotational diffusion is also enhanced for anisotropic particles in oscillatory shear. This enhancement arises from variations in the particle\\'s rotation (Jeffery orbit) and depends on the strain amplitude, rate, and particle aspect ratio in a manner that is distinct from the translational diffusion. This separate tunability of translational and rotational diffusion opens the door to new techniques for controlling positions and orientations of suspended anisotropic colloids. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  1. Electro-hydrodynamic propulsion of counter-rotating Pickering drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommersnes, P.; Mikkelsen, A.; Fossum, J. O.

    2016-07-01

    Insulating particles or drops suspended in carrier liquids may start to rotate with a constant frequency when subjected to a uniform DC electric field. This is known as the Quincke rotation electro-hydrodynamic instability. A single isolated rotating particle exhibit no translational motion at low Reynolds number, however interacting rotating particles may move relative to one another. Here we present a simple system consisting of two interacting and deformable Quincke rotating particle covered drops, i.e. deformable Pickering drops. The drops attract one another and spontaneously form a counter-rotating pair that exhibits electro-hydrodynamic driven propulsion at low Reynolds number flow.

  2. The Rapidly Rotating Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures at a continuum of scales, from large to small. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. In the present work, imaging techniques of time-distance helioseismology applied to observational data reveal no long-range order in the convective motion. We conservatively bound the associated velocity magnitudes, as a function of depth and the spherical-harmonic degree l to be 20-100 times weaker than prevailing estimates within the wavenumber band l Sun is seemingly a much faster rotator than previously thought, with advection dominated by Coriolis forces at scales l < 60.

  3. Ferrofluid drops in rotating magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, A V; Morozov, K I; Bauke, H

    2003-01-01

    Drops of a ferrofluid floating in a non-magnetic liquid of the same density and spun by a rotating magnetic field are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The parameters for the experiment are chosen such that different stationary drop shapes including non-axis-symmetric configurations could be observed. Within an approximate theoretical analysis the character of the occurring shape bifurcations, the different stationary drop forms, as well as the slow rotational motion of the drop is investigated. The results are in qualitative, and often quantitative agreement, with the experimental findings. It is also shown that a small eccentricity of the rotating field may have a substantial impact on the rotational motion of the drop.

  4. Gravitational radiation from a rotating magnetic dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational radiation emitted by a rotating magnetic dipole is calculated. Formulas for the polarization amplitudes and the radiated power are obtained in closed forms, considering both the near and radiation zones of the dipole. For a neutron star, a comparison is made with other sources of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation.

  5. Effect of physical therapy on joint range of motion and muscle collagen deposition in the golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD model Efeito da fisioterapia na amplitude de movimento articular e deposição de colágeno muscular no modelo golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TP Gaiad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the effect of physical therapy on joint range of motion (ROM and muscle fibrosis in GRMD animals. METHODS: This was a nonrandomized blinded study with a control group, with six months of intervention evaluated beforehand and afterwards. Six dystrophic male Golden Retrievers of mean age 10.16±3.46 months and weight 17.75±6.01 kg were divided into a treated group (n=3 and an untreated group. These groups of dogs were named: G1=treated group before treatment; G2=treated group after treatment; G3=untreated group before treatment; and G4=untreated group after treatment. G1 underwent a physical therapy program that consisted of a 300-meter circuit with obstacles. Stifle, tarsal, elbow and carpal ROM were assessed using a goniometer before and after treatment. The area of collagen in the vastus lateralis muscle was measured using histomorphometry. The locations of collagen types I, III and IV were studied using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The tarsal ROM values in G2 presented an increasing trend. The area of muscle collagen differed between the groups after treatment and an increasing trend in these values was observed in G4. Collagen types I and III were the ones most frequently observed, forming broad bands in the perimysium of both G2 and G4. Type I collagen was observed in the endomysium more than type III collagen. Type IV collagen was observed only in the basal layer. CONCLUSION: Physical Therapy seemed to improve tarsal ROM in the treated group without increasing muscular fibrosis.OBJETIVO: Elucidar o efeito da fisioterapia na Amplitude de Movimento Articular (ADM e na fibrose muscular em animais GRMD. MÉTODOS: Estudo não randomizado, com grupo controle, cego, seis meses de intervenção, avaliação antes e depois da intervenção. Seis animais da raça Golden Retriever, distróficos, machos, média de idade 10,16±3,46 meses e peso de 17,75±6,01 kg foram separados em grupo tratado (n=3 e não tratado. Esses

  6. Confiabilidade intra e interexaminadores de dois métodos de medida da amplitude ativa de dorsiflexão do tornozelo em indivíduos saudáveis Intrarater and interrater reliability of two methods for measuring the active range of motion for ankle dorsiflexion in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Venturini

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A medida da amplitude do movimento (ADM é um importante parâmetro utilizado na avaliação e no acompanhamento fisioterapêutico, conseqüentemente, a confiabilidade dessa medida e dos instrumentos utilizados devem ser avaliados. OBJETIVOS: O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a confiabilidade das medidas intra-examinador e interexaminador da ADM ativa de dorsiflexão do tornozelo, por meio da goniometria e de forma mais funcional em cadeia cinética fechada (CCF. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Dois examinadores realizaram, em dois dias de teste, as mensurações de ambos os membros de 22 sujeitos saudáveis. A ADM ativa de dorsiflexão foi medida primeiro com o sujeito em prono, utilizando o goniômetro universal e, posteriormente, com o sujeito em dorsiflexão, na posição ortostática com o pé testado sobre uma fita métrica. O coeficiente de correlação intraclasse (CCI foi utilizado para a análise da confiabilidade das medidas, e o teste t pareado e independente foi utilizado para verificar a diferença entre as médias de dois dias de teste e entre os dois examinadores, respectivamente. RESULTADOS: Os coeficientes de correlação intraclasse (CCI demonstraram de baixa a moderada confiabilidade intra-examinador, com CCI: 0,32 a 0,72, e moderada confiabilidade interexaminador, com CCI de 0,57 e 0,66 para a goniometria. Para a medida em CCF a confiabilidade foi alta tanto para a condição intra-examinador (CCI de 0,93 e 0,96 para os tornozelos direito e esquerdo, respectivamente quanto para interexaminador (CCI de 0,98 e 0,99 para os tornozelos direito e esquerdo, respectivamente. CONCLUSÃO: Esses resultados indicaram que a confiabilidade da avaliação em CCF é maior que a do goniômetro universal, e isso indica ser um método confiável para sua aplicação clínica ao envolver o mesmo ou diferentes avaliadores.BACKGROUND: Range of motion (ROM measurements are an important parameter for physiotherapeutic assessment and follow

  7. Grassmannian geometry of scattering amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cachazo, Freddy; Goncharov, Alexander; Postnikov, Alexander; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Outlining a revolutionary reformulation of the foundations of perturbative quantum field theory, this book is a self-contained and authoritative analysis of the application of this new formulation to the case of planar, maximally supersymmetric Yang–Mills theory. The book begins by deriving connections between scattering amplitudes and Grassmannian geometry from first principles before introducing novel physical and mathematical ideas in a systematic manner accessible to both physicists and mathematicians. The principle players in this process are on-shell functions which are closely related to certain sub-strata of Grassmannian manifolds called positroids - in terms of which the classification of on-shell functions and their relations becomes combinatorially manifest. This is an essential introduction to the geometry and combinatorics of the positroid stratification of the Grassmannian and an ideal text for advanced students and researchers working in the areas of field theory, high energy physics, and the...

  8. VIBRATING-UPLIFT ROCKING MOTION OF CAISSON BREAKWATERS UNDER VARIOUS BREAKING WAVE IMPACT FORCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuan-zhan; ZHOU Zhi-rong; YANG Hai-dong

    2005-01-01

    Overturning is one of principal failure types of caisson breakwaters and is an essential content of stability examination in caisson breakwater design. The mass-springdashpot model of caisson-foundation system is used to simulate the vibrating-uplift rocking motion of caisson under various types of breaking wave impact forces, i.e., single peak impact force, double peak impact force, and shock-damping oscillation impact force. The effects of various breaking wave types and the uplift rocking motion on dynamic response behaviors of caisson breakwaters are investigated. It is shown that the dynamic responses of a caisson are significantly different under different types of breaking wave impact forces even when the amplitudes of impact forces are equal. Though the rotation of a caisson is larger due to the uplift rocking motion, the displacement, the sliding force and the overturning moment of the caisson are significantly reduced. It provides the theoretical base for the design idea that the uplift rocking motion of caisson is allowed in design.

  9. Dynamical Centers and Non-Circular Motions in THINGS Galaxies: Implications for Dark Matter Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Trachternach, C; Walter, F; Brinks, E; Kennicutt, R C

    2008-01-01

    We present harmonic decompositions of the velocity fields of 19 galaxies from THINGS (The \\HI Nearby Galaxy Survey) which quantify the magnitude of the non-circular motions in these galaxies and yield observational estimates of the elongations of the dark matter halo potentials. Additionally, we present accurate dynamical center positions for these galaxies. We show that the positions of the kinematic and photometric centers of the large majority of the galaxies in our sample are in good agreement. The median absolute amplitude of the non-circular motions, averaged over our sample, is $6.7 \\kms$, with $\\sim 90$ percent of the galaxies having median non-circular motions of less than $\\sim 9\\kms$. As a fraction of the total rotation velocity this translates into 4.5 percent on average. The mean elongation of the gravitational potential, after a statistical correction for an unknown viewing angle, is $0.017\\pm 0.020$, i.e., consistent with a round potential. Our derived non-circular motions and elongations are s...

  10. Interaction between subdaily Earth rotation parameters and GPS orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panafidina, Natalia; Seitz, Manuela; Hugentobler, Urs

    2013-04-01

    In processing GPS observations the geodetic parameters like station coordinates and ERPs (Earth rotation parameters) are estimated w.r.t. the celestial reference system realized by the satellite orbits. The interactions/correlations between estimated GPS orbis and other parameters may lead to numerical problems with the solution and introduce systematic errors in the computed values: the well known correlations comprise 1) the correlation between the orbital parameters determining the orientation of the orbital plane in inertial space and the nutation and 2) in the case of estimating ERPs with subdaily resolution the correlation between retrograde diurnal polar motion and nutation (and so the respective orbital elements). In this contribution we study the interaction between the GPS orbits and subdaily model for the ERPs. Existing subdaily ERP model recommended by the IERS comprises ~100 terms in polar motion and ~70 terms in Universal Time at diurnal and semidiurnal tidal periods. We use a long time series of daily normal equation systems (NEQ) obtaine from GPS observations from 1994 till 2007 where the ERPs with 1-hour resolution are transformed into tidal terms and the influence of the tidal terms with different frequencies on the estimated orbital parameters is considered. We found that although there is no algebraic correlation in the NEQ between the individual orbital parameters and the tidal terms, the changes in the amplitudes of tidal terms with periods close to 24 hours can be better accmodated by systematic changes in the orbital parameters than for tidal terms with other periods. Since the variation in Earth rotation with the period of siderial day (23.93h, tide K1) in terrestrial frame has in inertial space the same period as the period of revolution of GPS satellites, the K1 tidal term in polar motion is seen by the satellites as a permanent shift. The tidal terms with close periods (from ~24.13h to ~23.80h) are seen as a slow rotation of the

  11. Perpetual Motion with Maxwell's Demon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lyndsay G. M.

    2002-11-01

    A method for producing a temperature gradient by Brownian motion in an equilibrated isolated system composed of two fluid compartments and a separating adiabatic membrane is discussed. This method requires globular protein molecules, partially embedded in the membrane, to alternate between two conformations which lie on opposite sides of the membrane. The greater part of each conformer is bathed by one of the fluids and rotates in Brownian motion around its axis, perpendicular to the membrane. Rotational energy is transferred through the membrane during conformational changes. Angular momentum is conserved during the transitions. The energy flow becomes asymmetrical when the conformational changes of the protein are sterically hindered by two of its side-chains, the positions of which are affected by the angular velocity of the rotor. The heat flow increases the temperature gradient in contravention of the Second Law. A second hypothetical model which illustrates solute transfer at variance with the Second Law is also discussed.

  12. Strongly driven spin rotations in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present in this talk theoretical background, numerical simulations and experimental evidences of strongly driven single spin rotations through the application of optimal control methods. The spin, an electron spin of the nitrogen-vacancy colour centre in diamond, is strongly driven by a numerically optimised microwave (MW) control. To obtain such control we employ a quantum optimal control method, namely chopped random basis (CRAB) algorithm. We show that arbitrary spin rotations are possible by demonstrating pi and half-pi spin rotations without resorting to the common rotating-wave-approximation (RWA). Furthermore, the rotations are performed faster than that of the RWA-Rabi oscillation at the same MW amplitude, and they are more robust to magnetic field noise than those based on bang-bang control. These results are promising to increase the number of operations in quantum computer before decoherence take place and can improve the performance of diamond-based quantum technologies. (author)

  13. Rotation of warm nuclei and superdeformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, S.; Lopez-Martens, A.

    2016-06-01

    The Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) has played a leading role in the development of nuclear spectroscopy at high spin and more particularly the study of rotational motion. Indeed, it laid the theoretical foundation stone and contributed to the birth of the workhorse of the field: the Compton-suppressed Ge array. In this article, we will focus, with special emphasis on the contribution of the NBI, on the properties of rotational motion at high excitation energy and on chaotic phenomena associated with nuclear superdeformation.

  14. A self-assembled microlensing rotational probe

    OpenAIRE

    Brody, James P; Quake, Stephen R.

    1999-01-01

    A technique to measure microscopic rotational motion is presented. When a small fluorescent polystyrene microsphere is attached to a larger polystyrene microsphere, the larger sphere acts as a lens for the smaller microsphere and provides an optical signal that is a strong function of the azimuthal angle. We demonstrate the technique by measuring the rotational diffusion constant of the microsphere in solutions of varying viscosity and discuss the feasibility of using this probe to measure ro...

  15. Rotation of cometary meteoroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čapek, D.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: The rotation of meteoroids caused by gas drag during the ejection from a cometary nucleus has not been studied yet. The aim of this study is to estimate the rotational characteristics of meteoroids after their release from a comet during normal activity. Methods: The basic dependence of spin rate on ejection velocity and meteoroid size is determined analytically. A sophisticated numerical model is then applied to meteoroids ejected from the 2P/Encke comet. The meteoroid shapes are approximated by polyhedrons, which have been determined by a 3D laser scanning method of 36 terrestrial rock samples. These samples come from three distinct sets with different origins and characteristics, such as surface roughness or angularity. Two types of gas-meteoroid interactions and three gas ejection models are assumed. The rotational characteristics of ejected meteoroid population are obtained by numerical integration of equations of motion with random initial conditions and random shape selection. Results: It is proved that the results do not depend on a specific set of shape models and that they are applicable to the (unknown) shapes of real meteoroids. A simple relationship between the median of meteoroid spin frequencies bar{f} (Hz), ejection velocities vej (m s-1), and sizes D (m) is determined. For diffuse reflection of gas molecules from meteoroid's surface it reads as bar{f≃ 2× 10-3 v_ej D-0.88}, and for specular reflection of gas molecules from meteoroid's surface it is bar{f≃ 5× 10-3 v_ej D-0.88}. The distribution of spin frequencies is roughly normal on log scale, and it is relatively wide: a 2σ-interval can be described as (0.1, 10)× bar{f}. Most of the meteoroids are non-principal axis rotators. The median angle between angular momentum vector and spin vector is 12°. About 60% of meteoroids rotate in long-axis mode. The distribution of angular momentum vectors is not random. They are concentrated in the perpendicular direction with respect to the gas

  16. Nth-powered amplitude squeezing in fan-states

    CERN Document Server

    Duc, T M

    2002-01-01

    Squeezing properties of the Hillery-type N-powered amplitude are investigated in the fan-state vertical bar xi; 2k, f> sub F which is linearly superposed by 2k 2k-quantum nonlinear coherent states in the phase-locked manner. The general expression of squeezing is derived analytically for arbitrary xi, k, N and f showing a multi-directional character of squeezing. For a given k, squeezing may appear to the even power N=2k if f ident to 1 and N>=2k if f not =1 and the number of directions along with the Nth-powered amplitude is squeezed is exactly equal to N, for both f ident to 1 (the light field) and f not =1 (the vibrational motion of the trapped ion). Discussions are also given elucidating the qualitative difference between the cases of f ident to 1 and f not =1.

  17. Collective Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Czirok, A

    1999-01-01

    With the aim of understanding the emergence of collective motion from local interactions of organisms in a "noisy" environment, we study biologically inspired, inherently non-equilibrium models consisting of self-propelled particles. In these models particles interact with their neighbors by turning towards the local average direction of motion. In the limit of vanishing velocities this behavior results in a dynamics analogous to some Monte Carlo realization of equilibrium ferromagnets. However, numerical simulations indicate the existence of new types of phase transitions which are not present in the corresponding ferromagnets. In particular, here we demonstrate both numerically and analytically that even in certain one dimensional self-propelled particle systems an ordered phase exists for finite noise levels.

  18. Intraplate rotational deformation induced by faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Neta; Hamiel, Yariv; Granot, Roi

    2015-11-01

    Vertical axis rotations provide important constraints on the tectonic history of plate boundaries. Geodetic measurements can be used to calculate interseismic rotations, whereas paleomagnetic remanence directions provide constraints on the long-term rotations accumulated over geological timescales. Here we present a new mechanical modeling approach that links between intraplate deformational patterns of these timescales. We construct mechanical models of active faults at their locked state to simulate the presumed to be elastic interseismic deformation rate observed by GPS measurements. We then apply a slip to the faults above the locking depth to simulate the long-term deformation of the crust from which we derive the accumulated rotations. We test this approach in northern Israel along the Dead Sea Fault and Carmel-Gilboa fault system. We use 12 years of interseismic GPS measurements to constrain a slip model of the major faults found in this region. Next, we compare the modeled rotations against long-term rotations determined based on new primary magnetic remanence directions from 29 sites with known age. The distributional pattern of site mean declinations is in general agreement with the vertical axis rotations predicted by the mechanical model, both showing anomalously high rotations near fault tips and bending points. Overall, the results from northern Israel validate the effectiveness of our approach and indicate that rotations induced by motion along faults may act in parallel (or alone) to rigid block rotations. Finally, the new suggested method unravels important insights on the evolution (timing, magnitude, and style) of deformation along major faults.

  19. Effects of experimentally increased trunk stiffness on thorax and pelvis rotations during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen Hua; Lin, Xiao Cong; Meijer, Onno G; Gao, Jin Tuan; Hu, Hai; Prins, Maarten R; Liang, Bo Wei; Zhang, Li Qun; Van Dieën, Jaap H; Bruijn, Sjoerd M

    2014-02-01

    Patients with non-specific low back pain, or a similar disorder, may stiffen their trunk, which probably alters their walking coordination. To study the direct effects of increasing trunk stiffness, we experimentally increased trunk stiffness during walking, and compared the results with what is known from the literature about gait coordination with, e.g., low back pain. Healthy subjects walked on a treadmill at 3 speeds (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5m/s), in three conditions (normal, while contracting their abdominal muscles, or wearing an orthopedic brace that limits trunk motions). Kinematics of the legs, thorax and pelvis were recorded, and relative Fourier phases and amplitudes of segment motions were calculated. Increasing trunk stiffness led to a lower thorax-pelvis relative phase, with both a decrease in thorax-leg relative phase, and an increase in pelvis-leg relative phase, as well as reduced rotational amplitude of thorax relative to pelvis. While lower thorax-pelvis relative phase was also found in patients with low back pain, higher pelvis-leg relative phase has never been reported in patients with low back pain or related disorders. These results suggest that increasing trunk stiffness in healthy subjects causes short-term gait coordination changes which are different from those seen in patients with back pain.

  20. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF A SPATIAL COUPLED TIMOSHENKO ROTATING SHAFT WITH LARGE DISPLACEMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱怀亮

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic simulation is presented for an axial moving flexible rotating shafts,which have large rigid motions and small elastic deformation. The effects of the axial inertia,shear deformation, rotating inertia, gyroscopic moment, and dynamic unbalance areconsidered based on the Timoshenko rotating shaft theory. The equations of motion andboundary conditions are derived by Hamilton principle, and the solution is obtained by usingthe perturbation approach and cssuming mode method. This study confirms that the influenceof the axial rigid motion, shear deformation, slenderness ratio and rotating speed on thedynamic behavior of Timoshenko rotating shaft is evident, especially to a high-angularvelocity rotor.

  1. Integrability of scattering amplitudes in N=4 SUSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatow, L.N. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)]|[Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2009-02-15

    We argue, that the multi-particle scattering amplitudes in N=4 SUSY at large N{sub c} and in the multi-Regge kinematics for some physical regions have the high energy behavior appearing from the contribution of the Mandelstam cuts in the corresponding t-channel partial waves. The Mandelstam cuts correspond to gluon composite states in the adjoint representation of the gauge group SU(N{sub c}). The hamiltonian for these states in the leading logarithmic approximation coincides with the local hamiltonian of an integrable open spin chain. We construct the corresponding wave functions using the integrals of motion and the Baxter-Sklyanin approach. (orig.)

  2. Integrability of scattering amplitudes in N=4 SUSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We argue, that the multi-particle scattering amplitudes in N=4 SUSY at large Nc and in the multi-Regge kinematics for some physical regions have the high energy behavior appearing from the contribution of the Mandelstam cuts in the corresponding t-channel partial waves. The Mandelstam cuts correspond to gluon composite states in the adjoint representation of the gauge group SU(Nc). The hamiltonian for these states in the leading logarithmic approximation coincides with the local hamiltonian of an integrable open spin chain. We construct the corresponding wave functions using the integrals of motion and the Baxter-Sklyanin approach. (orig.)

  3. Kepler observations of the high-amplitude δ Scuti star V2367 Cyg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balona, L. A.; Lenz, P.; Antoci, V.;

    2012-01-01

    We analyse Kepler observations of the high-amplitude δ Scuti (HADS) star V2367 Cyg (KIC 9408694). The variations are dominated by a mode with frequency f1= 5.6611 d−1. Two other independent modes with f2= 7.1490 d−1 and f3= 7.7756 d−1 have amplitudes an order of magnitude smaller than f1. Nearly...... all the light variation is due to these three modes and their combination frequencies, but several hundred other frequencies of very low amplitude are also present. The amplitudes of the principal modes may vary slightly with time. The star has twice the projected rotational velocity of any other HADS...... star, which makes it unusual. We find a correlation between the phases of the combination frequencies and their pulsation frequencies, which is not understood. Since modes of highest amplitude in HADS stars are normally radial modes, we assumed that this would also be true in this star. However...

  4. Quantum Amplitude Amplification and Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Brassard, G; Mosca, M; Tapp, A; Brassard, Gilles; Hoyer, Peter; Mosca, Michele; Tapp, Alain

    2000-01-01

    Consider a Boolean function $\\chi: X \\to \\{0,1\\}$ that partitions set $X$ between its good and bad elements, where $x$ is good if $\\chi(x)=1$ and bad otherwise. Consider also a quantum algorithm $\\mathcal A$ such that $A \\ket{0} = \\sum_{x\\in X} \\alpha_x \\ket{x}$ is a quantum superposition of the elements of $X$, and let $a$ denote the probability that a good element is produced if $A \\ket{0}$ is measured. If we repeat the process of running $A$, measuring the output, and using $\\chi$ to check the validity of the result, we shall expect to repeat $1/a$ times on the average before a solution is found. *Amplitude amplification* is a process that allows to find a good $x$ after an expected number of applications of $A$ and its inverse which is proportional to $1/\\sqrt{a}$, assuming algorithm $A$ makes no measurements. This is a generalization of Grover's searching algorithm in which $A$ was restricted to producing an equal superposition of all members of $X$ and we had a promise that a single $x$ existed such tha...

  5. Clinical evaluations of an amplitude-based binning algorithm for 4DCT reconstruction in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Low, Daniel; Bradley, Jeffrey; Robinson, Clifford; Mutic, Sasa; Parikh, Parag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Phase-binning algorithms are commonly utilized in 4DCT image reconstruction for characterization of tumor or organ shape and respiration motion, but breathing irregularities occurring during 4DCT acquisition can cause considerable image distortions. Recently, amplitude-binning algorithms have been evaluated as a potential improvement to phase-binning algorithms for 4DCT image reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the first commercially available on-line retrospective amplitude-binning algorithm for comparison to the traditional phase-binning algorithm. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for evaluation. A phantom of known geometry was mounted on a 4D motion platform programmed with seven respiratory waves (two computer generated and five patient trajectories) and scanned with a Philips Brilliance Big bore 16-slice CT simulator. 4DCT images were reconstructed using commercial amplitude- and phase-binning algorithms. Image quality of the amplitude- and phase-binned image sets was compared by evaluation of shape and volume distortions in reconstructed images. Clinical evaluations were performed on 64 4DCT patient image sets in a blinded review process. The amplitude- and phase-binned 4DCT maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were further evaluated for 28 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases of total 64 cases. A preliminary investigation of the effects of respiratory amplitude and pattern irregularities on motion artifact severity was conducted. Results: The phantom experiments illustrated that, as expected, maximum inhalation occurred at the 0% amplitude and maximum exhalation occurred at the 50% amplitude of the amplitude-binned 4DCT image sets. The phantom shape distortions were more severe in the images reconstructed from the phase-binning algorithm. In the clinical study, compared to the phase-binning algorithm, the amplitude-binning algorithm yielded fewer or less severe motion

  6. Deblurring for spatial and temporal varying motion with optical computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Xue, Dongfeng; Hui, Zhao

    2016-05-01

    A way to estimate and remove spatially and temporally varying motion blur is proposed, which is based on an optical computing system. The translation and rotation motion can be independently estimated from the joint transform correlator (JTC) system without iterative optimization. The inspiration comes from the fact that the JTC system is immune to rotation motion in a Cartesian coordinate system. The work scheme of the JTC system is designed to keep switching between the Cartesian coordinate system and polar coordinate system in different time intervals with the ping-pang handover. In the ping interval, the JTC system works in the Cartesian coordinate system to obtain a translation motion vector with optical computing speed. In the pang interval, the JTC system works in the polar coordinate system. The rotation motion is transformed to the translation motion through coordinate transformation. Then the rotation motion vector can also be obtained from JTC instantaneously. To deal with continuous spatially variant motion blur, submotion vectors based on the projective motion path blur model are proposed. The submotion vectors model is more effective and accurate at modeling spatially variant motion blur than conventional methods. The simulation and real experiment results demonstrate its overall effectiveness.

  7. 22-Year Periodicity in the Solar Differential Rotation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Javaraiah

    2000-09-01

    Using the data on sunspot groups compiled during 1879-1975, we determined variations in the differential rotation coefficients and during the solar cycle. The variation in the equatorial rotation rate is found to be significant only in the odd numbered cycles, with an amplitude ∼ 0.01 rads-1. There exists a good anticorrelation between the variations of the differential rotation rate derived from the odd and even numbered cycles, suggesting existence of a `22-year' periodicity in . The amplitude of the variation of is ∼ 0.05 rad s-1.

  8. Rotating saddle trap as Foucault's pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, Oleg N.; Levi, Mark

    2016-01-01

    One of the many surprising results found in the mechanics of rotating systems is the stabilization of a particle in a rapidly rotating planar saddle potential. Besides the counterintuitive stabilization, an unexpected precessional motion is observed. In this note, we show that this precession is due to a Coriolis-like force caused by the rotation of the potential. To our knowledge, this is the first example where such a force arises in an inertial reference frame. We also propose a simple mechanical demonstration of this effect.

  9. Magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087244; Arpaia, Pasquale

    This thesis presents a magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils. The requirements, the architecture, the conceptual design, and the prototype for straight magnets were shown. The proposed system is made up of a rotating coil transducer and a train-like system for longitudinal motion and positioning inside magnet bore. The mapper allows a localized measurement of magnetic fields and the variation of the harmonic multipole content in the magnet ends. The proof-of-principle demonstration and the experimental characterization of the rotating-coil transducer specifically conceived for mapping validated the main objective of satisfying the magnetic measurement needs of the next generation of compact accelerators.

  10. Rotational cooling of trapped polyatomic molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Glöckner, Rosa; Prehn, Alexander; Englert, Barbara G. U.; Rempe, Gerhard; Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the internal degrees of freedom is a key challenge for applications of cold and ultracold molecules. Here, we demonstrate rotational-state cooling of trapped methyl fluoride molecules (CH3F) by optically pumping the population of 16 M-sublevels in the rotational states J=3,4,5, and 6 into a single level. By combining rotational-state cooling with motional cooling, we increase the relative number of molecules in the state J=4, K=3, M=4 from a few percent to over 70%, thereby genera...

  11. Gravitational Wave Generation in Rotating Compact Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Endler, Ana Maria; Rodrigues, Hilário; Chiapparini, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    We present a simplified description of a rotating neutron star emitting gravitational waves. We describe the system by an uniformly rotating triaxial homogeneous ellipsoid to catch the main aspects of the evolution. We construct an effective Lagrangian model, in which the kinetic energy associated to the breath mode and rotation are explicitly determined. The rate of gravitational waves radiation is determined in the framework of the weak field limit approximation of Einstein equations. We then solve numerically the equations of motion for the nascent neutron star, incorporating the diffusion of neutrinos in the calculation.

  12. The Influence of Static and Rotating Magnetic Fields on Heat and Mass Transfer in Silicon Floating Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croell, Arne; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Szofran, Frank; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Hear and mass transfer in float-zone processing are strongly influenced by convective flows in the zone. They are caused by buoyancy convection, thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection, or artificial sources such as rotation and radio frequency heating. Flows in conducting melts can be controlled by the use of magnetic fields, either by damping fluid motion with static fields or by generating a def@ned flow with rotating fields. The possibilities of using static and rotating magnetic fields in silicon floating-zone growth have been investigated by experiments in axial static fields up to ST and in transverse rotating magnetic fields up to 7.S mT. Static fields of a few 100 MT already suppress most striations but are detrimental to the radial segregation by introducing a coring effect. A complete suppression of dopant striations caused by time-dependent thermocapillary convection and a reduction of the coring to insignificant values, combined with a shift of the axial segregation profile towards a more diffusion-limited case, is possible with static fields ? 1T. However, under certain conditions the use of high axial magnetic fields can lead to the appearance of a new type of pronounced dopant striations, caused by thermoelec:romagnetic convection. The use of a transverse rotating magnetic field influences the microscopic segregation at quite low inductions, of the order of a few mT. The field shifts time-dependent flows and the resulting striation patterns from a broad range of low frequencies at high amplitudes to a few high frequencies at low amplitudes

  13. Enhanced azimuthal rotation of the large-scale flow through stochastic cessations in turbulent rotating convection with large Rossby numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Wang, Xue-ying

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of the azimuthal orientation {\\theta}(t) and thermal amplitude {\\delta}(t) of the large-scale circulation (LSC) of turbulent rotating convection within an unprecedented large Rossby number range 170. We identify the mechanism through which the mean retrograde rotation speed can be enhanced by stochastic cessations in the presence of weak Coriolis force, and show that a low-dimensional, stochastic model provides predictions of the observed large-scale flow dynamics and interprets its retrograde rotation.

  14. Volumetric imaging with an amplitude-steered array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Catherine H; Hughes, W Jack; O'Brien, William D

    2002-12-01

    Volumetric acoustic imaging is desirable for the visualization of underwater objects and structures; however, the implementation of a volumetric imaging system is difficult due to the high channel count of a fully populated two-dimensional array. Recently, a linear amplitude-steered array with a reduced electronics requirement was presented, which is capable of collecting a two-dimensional set of data with a single transmit pulse. In this study, we demonstrate the use of the linear amplitude-steered array and associated image formation algorithms for collecting and displaying volumetric data; that is, proof of principle of the amplitude-steering concept and the associated image formation algorithms is demonstrated. Range and vertical position are obtained by taking advantage of the frequency separation of a vertical linear amplitude-steered array. The third dimension of data is obtained by rotating the array such that the mainlobe is mechanically steered in azimuth. Data are collected in a water tank at the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory for two targets: a ladder and three pipes. These data are the first experimental data collected with an amplitude-steered array for the purposes of imaging. The array is 10 cm in diameter and is operated in the frequency range of 80 to 304 kHz. Although the array is small for high-resolution imaging at these frequencies, the rungs of the ladder are recognizable in the images. The three pipes are difficult to discern in two of the projection images; however, the pipes separated in range are clear in the image showing vertical position versus range. The imaging concept is demonstrated on measured data, and the simulations agree well with the experimental results. PMID:12508995

  15. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio; Formica, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application. PMID:27612100

  16. Vibrating-Sliding Motion of Caisson Breakwaters Under Various Breaking Wave Impact Forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王元战; 于红霞

    2003-01-01

    Sliding is one of the principal failure types of caisson breakwaters and is an essential content of stability examination in caisson breakwater design. Herein, the mass-spring-dashpot model of caisson-base system is used to simulate the vibrating-sliding motion of the caisson under various types of breaking wave impact forces, i.e., single peak impact force, double peak impact force, and shock-damping oscillation impact force. The effects of various breaking wave impacts and the sliding motion on the dynamic response behaviors of caisson breakwaters are investigated and the calculation of relevant system parameters is discussed. It is shown that the dynamic responses of the caisson are significantly different under different types of breaking wave impact forces even when the amplitudes of impact forces are equal. The amplitude of dynamic response of the caisson is lower under single peak impact excitation than that under double peak impact or shock-damping oscillation impact excitation. Though the displacement of the caisson is large due to sliding, the rotation, the sliding force and the overturning moment of the caisson are significantly reduced.

  17. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application. PMID:27612100

  18. Rotating attractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We prove that, in a general higher derivative theory of gravity coupled to abelian gauge fields and neutral scalar fields, the entropy and the near horizon background of a rotating extremal black hole is obtained by extremizing an entropy function which depends only on the parameters labeling the near horizon background and the electric and magnetic charges and angular momentum carried by the black hole. If the entropy function has a unique extremum then this extremum must be independent of the asymptotic values of the moduli scalar fields and the solution exhibits attractor behaviour. If the entropy function has flat directions then the near horizon background is not uniquely determined by the extremization equations and could depend on the asymptotic data on the moduli fields, but the value of the entropy is still independent of this asymptotic data. We illustrate these results in the context of two derivative theories of gravity in several examples. These include Kerr black hole, Kerr-Newman black hole, black holes in Kaluza-Klein theory, and black holes in toroidally compactified heterotic string theory

  19. Shadow of rotating wormhole in plasma environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon; Juraev, Bakhtinur; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2016-07-01

    The massless particle motion around rotating wormhole in the presence of plasma environment has been studied. It has been shown that the presence of the plasma decreases the inner radius of the circular orbits of photons around rotating wormhole. The shadow cast by rotating wormhole surrounded by inhomogeneous plasma with the radial power-law density has been explored. It has been shown that the shape and size of the wormhole shadow is distorted and changed depending on i) plasma parameters, ii) wormhole rotation and iii) inclination angle between observer plane and axis of rotation of wormhole. As an example we have considered an inverse radial distribution of the plasma density and different types of the wormhole solution.

  20. Spectral Motion Synchronization in SE(3)

    OpenAIRE

    Arrigoni, Federica; Fusiello, Andrea; Rossi, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of motion synchronization (or averaging) and describes a simple, closed-form solution based on a spectral decomposition, which does not consider rotation and translation separately but works straight in SE(3), the manifold of rigid motions. Besides its theoretical interest, being the first closed form solution in SE(3), experimental results show that it compares favourably with the state of the art both in terms of precision and speed.

  1. Avaliação da amplitude articular do joelho: correlação entre as medidas realizadas com o goniômetro universal e no dinamômetro isocinético Knee joint range-of-motion evaluation: correlation between measurements achieved using a universal goniometer and an isokinetic dynamometer

    OpenAIRE

    LH Batista; PR Camargo; GV Aiello; J Oishi; TF Salvini

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: O instrumento mais utilizado pelos terapeutas para mensuração da amplitude de movimento (ADM) articular é o goniômetro universal. No entanto, há carência de estudos que analisem a confiabilidade das medidas da ADM do joelho realizadas no dinamômetro isocinético. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar a correlação entre as medidas de ADM na articulação do joelho, realizadas com o goniômetro universal e no dinamômetro isocinético. MÉTODO: Foram avaliados 38 voluntários...

  2. FOSREM - Fibre-Optic System for Rotational Events&Phenomena Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroszewicz, Leszek; Krajewski, Zbigniew; Kurzych, Anna; Kowalski, Jerzy; Teisseyre, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    We present the construction and tests of fiber-optic rotational seismometer named FOSREM (Fibre-Optic System for Rotational Events&Phenomena Monitoring). This presented device is designed for detection and monitoring the one-axis rotational motions, brought about to ground or human-made structures both by seismic events and the creep processes. The presented system works by measuring Sagnac effect and generally consists of two basic elements: optical sensor and electronic part. The optical sensor is based on so-called the minimum configuration of FOG (Fibre-Optic Gyroscope) where the Sagnac effect produces a phase shift between two counter-propagating light beams proportional to the measured rotation speed. The main advantage of the sensor of this type is its complete insensitivity to linear motions and a direct measurement of rotational speed. It may work even when tilted, moreover, used in continuous mode it may record the tilt. The electronic system, involving specific electronic solutions, calculates and records rotational events data by realizing synchronous in a digital form by using 32 bit DSP (Digital Signal Processing). Storage data and system control are realised over the internet by using connection between FOSREM and GSM/GPS. The most significant attribute of our system is possibility to measure rotation in wide range both amplitude up to 10 rad/s and frequency up to 328.12 Hz. Application of the wideband, low coherence and high power superluminescent diode with long fibre loop and suitable low losses optical elements assures the theoretical sensitivity of the system equal to 2·10-8 rad/s/Sqrt(Hz). Moreover, the FOSREM is fully remote controlled as well as is suited for continuous, autonomous work in very long period of time (weeks, months, even years), so it is useful for systematic seismological investigation at any place. Possible applications of this system include seismic monitoring in observatories, buildings, mines and even on glaciers and in

  3. METRIC OF ACCELERATING AND ROTATING REFERENCE SYSTEMS IN GENERAL RELATIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Trunev A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Metric describing the accelerated and rotating reference system in general relativity in the case of an arbitrary dependence of acceleration and angular velocity on time has been proposed. It is established that the curvature tensor in such metrics is zero, which corresponds to movement in the flat spaces. It is shown that the motion of test bodies in the metric accelerated and rotating reference system in general relativity is similarly to the classical motion in non-inertial reference frame...

  4. Incipient motion of surf zone sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Donya; Foster, Diane; Sou, In Mei; Calantoni, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Incipient motion experiments were conducted with natural gravel, acetate beads, and coarse-gravel-sized electronic grains called Smart Sediment Grains in a Small-Oscillatory Flow Tunnel. Measurements of fluid velocity were made using Particle Image Velocimetry. The strength of the fluid shear stresses and the pressure gradients were examined for a range of oscillatory flow conditions at the onset of motion of the sediment particles to determine which mechanism had induced particle motion. The three sediment types utilized in these experiments facilitated an assessment of the effects of sediment grain size diameter, shape, and density on incipient motion. Results suggested that the onset of sediment motion was dominated by the pressure gradients for flows with small orbital excursion amplitudes, by the shear stresses for flows with large orbital excursion amplitudes and by the combined effects for intermediate flows. The denser, angular gravel required greater free-stream accelerations to trigger sediment motion than the spherical, less dense acetate beads, and Smart Sediment Grains. A combined parameter for incipient motion that accounts for the simultaneous effects of both shear stresses and pressure gradients while depending on the static coefficient of friction and the packing concentration of the mobile bed layer was evaluated for accuracy using a range of sediment types. The results suggested that the combined parameter may be a better indicator of sediment mobilization under oscillatory flows than the typically assumed shear stress criterion.

  5. Cyclic pitch for the control of wind turbine noise amplitude modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    Using experimental data acquired during a wind turbine measurement campaign, it is shown that amplitude modulation of aerodynamic noise can be generated by the rotating blades in conjunction with the atmospheric wind shear. As an attempt to alleviate this phenomenon, a control strategy is designed...

  6. The "motion silencing" illusion results from global motion and crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turi, Marco; Burr, David

    2013-04-18

    Suchow and Alvarez (2011) recently devised a striking illusion, where objects changing in color, luminance, size, or shape appear to stop changing when they move. They refer to the illusion as "motion silencing of awareness to visual change." Here we present evidence that the illusion results from two perceptual processes: global motion and crowding. We adapted Suchow and Alvarez's stimulus to three concentric rings of dots, a central ring of "target dots" flanked on either side by similarly moving flanker dots. Subjects had to identify in which of two presentations the target dots were continuously changing (sinusoidally) in size, as distinct from the other interval in which size was constant. The results show: (a) Motion silencing depends on target speed, with a threshold around 0.2 rotations per second (corresponding to about 10°/s linear motion). (b) Silencing depends on both target-flanker spacing and eccentricity, with critical spacing about half eccentricity, consistent with Bouma's law. (c) The critical spacing was independent of stimulus size, again consistent with Bouma's law. (d) Critical spacing depended strongly on contrast polarity. All results imply that the "motion silencing" illusion may result from crowding.

  7. On the singularities of massive superstring amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O.

    1987-06-04

    Superstring one-loop amplitudes with massive external states are shown to be in general ill-defined due to internal on-shell propagators. However, we argue that since any massive string state (in the uncompactified theory) has a finite lifetime to decay into massless particles, such amplitudes are not terms in the perturbative expansion of physical S-matrix elements: These can be defined only with massless external states. Consistent massive amplitudes repuire an off-shell formalism.

  8. Covariant method for calculating helicity amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an alternative approach for calculating helicity amplitudes for processes involving both massless and massive fermions. With this method one can easily obtain covariant expressions for the helicity amplitudes. The final expressions involve only four-vector products and are independent of the basis for γ matrices or specific form of the spinors. We use the method to obtain the helicity amplitudes for several processes involving top quark production. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  9. The Trace Formula of the Spinoriel Amplitude

    OpenAIRE

    Mekhfi, M.

    2009-01-01

    We re express the fermion's probability amplitude as a trace over spinor indices, which formulation surprisingly does not exist in literature. This formulation puts the probabilty amplitude and the the probabilty(squared amplitude) of a given process on equal footing at the compuational level and this is our principal motivation to write the present paper. We test the power of the trace formula in three applications: Calculation of the charge-current of fermions by using symbolic programs, wh...

  10. On the singularities of massive superstring amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superstring one-loop amplitudes with massive external states are shown to be in general ill-defined due to internal on-shell propagators. However, we argue that since any massive string state (in the uncompactified theory) has a finite lifetime to decay into massless particles, such amplitudes are not terms in the perturbative expansion of physical S-matrix elements: These can be defined only with massless external states. Consistent massive amplitudes repuire an off-shell formalism. (orig.)

  11. On the singularities of massive superstring amplitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Foda, O.

    1987-01-01

    Superstring one-loop amplitudes with massive external states are shown to be in general ill-defined due to internal on-shell propagators. However, we argue that since any massive string state (in the uncompactified theory) has a finite lifetime to decay into massless particles, such amplitudes are not terms in the perturbative expansion of physical S-matrix elements: these can be defined only with massless external states. Consistent massive amplitudes require an off-shell formalism.

  12. Motion fading is driven by perceived, not actual angular velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, P J; Caplovitz, G P; Hsieh, P-J; Sun, J; Tse, P U

    2010-06-01

    After prolonged viewing of a slowly drifting or rotating pattern under strict fixation, the pattern appears to slow down and then momentarily stop. Here we examine the relationship between such 'motion fading' and perceived angular velocity. Using several different dot patterns that generate emergent virtual contours, we demonstrate that whenever there is a difference in the perceived angular velocity of two patterns of dots that are in fact rotating at the same angular velocity, there is also a difference in the time to undergo motion fading for those two patterns. Conversely, whenever two patterns show no difference in perceived angular velocity, even if in fact rotating at different angular velocities, we find no difference in the time to undergo motion fading. Thus, motion fading is driven by the perceived rather than actual angular velocity of a rotating stimulus. PMID:20371254

  13. Anatomical glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and symmetric rotational strength in male and female young beach volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccol, Michele Forgiarini; Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; de Souza, Vivian Lima

    2016-08-01

    Beach volleyball is a sport with a high demand of shoulder structures that may lead to adaptations in range of motion (ROM) and strength like in other overhead sports. Despite of these possible alterations, no study evaluated the shoulder adaptations in young beach volleyball athletes. The aim of this study was to compare the bilateral ROM and rotation strength in the shoulders of young beach volleyball players. Goniometric passive shoulder ROM of motion and isometric rotational strength were evaluated in 19 male and 14 female asymptomatic athletes. External and internal ROM, total rotation motion, glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD), external rotation and internal rotation strength, bilateral deficits and external rotation to internal rotation ratio were measured. The statistical analysis included paired Student's t-test and analysis of variance with repeated measures. Significantly lower dominant GIRD was found in both groups (pbeach volleyball athletes present symmetric rotational strength and shoulder ROM rotational adaptations that can be considered as anatomical. These results indicate that young practitioners of beach volleyball are subject to moderate adaptations compared to those reported for other overhead sports.

  14. Multiple-cylindrical Electrode System for Rotational Electric Field Generation in Particle Rotation Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateek Benhal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lab-on-a-chip micro-devices utilizing electric field-mediated particle movement provide advantages over current cell rotation techniques due to the flexibility in configuring micro-electrodes. Recent technological advances in micro-milling, three-dimensional (3D printing and photolithography have facilitated fabrication of complex micro-electrode shapes. Using the finite-element method to simulate and optimize electric field induced particle movement systems can save time and cost by simplifying the analysis of electric fields within complex 3D structures. Here we investigated different 3D electrode structures to obtain and analyse rotational electric field vectors. Finite-element analysis was conducted by an electric current stationary solver based on charge relaxation theory. High-resolution data were obtained for three-, four-, six- and eight-cylindrical electrode arrangements to characterize the rotational fields. The results show that increasing the number of electrodes within a fixed circular boundary provides larger regions of constant amplitude rotational electric field. This is a very important finding in practice, as larger rotational regions with constant electric field amplitude make placement of cells into these regions, where cell rotation occurs, a simple task – enhancing flexibility in cell manipulation. Rotation of biological particles over the extended region would be useful for biotechnology applications which require guiding cells to a desired location, such as automation of nuclear transfer cloning.

  15. Harmonic amplitude-phase adaptive control and its application in three-axis simulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan-sheng; YANG Yi-dong

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a compensation method for using the Harmonic Amplitude-Phase Adaptive Control(HAPAC) to increase the precision of sinusoidal motion simulators. It also expounds on the HAPAC principle and structural disposition, develops the HAPAC control laws and analyzes the system stability in the HAPAC. A nethod for further improving the precision using online identification of the system' s frequency-response models is presented. The tested data and tracking errors of the simulator demonstrate that the HAPAC makes the sinusoidal motions achieve higher precision than the common classical controls. The HAPAC can also be used in other tracking systems of precision sinusoidal motions.

  16. SU-C-210-01: Are Clinically Relevant Dosimetric Endpoints Significantly Better with Gating of Lung SBRT Vs. ITV-Based Treatment?: Results of a Large Cohort Investigation Analyzing Predictive Dosimetric Indicators as a Function of Tumor Volume and Motion Amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare patient internal target volume (ITV)-based plans with retrospectively generated gated plans to evaluate potential dosimetric improvements in lung toxicity from gated radiotherapy. Methods: Evaluation was conducted for 150 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment plans for 128 early-stage (T1–T3, <5cm) NSCLC patients. PTV margins were: ITV+5 mm (ITV-plan) and GTV+5 mm (Gated-plan). ITV-based and gated treatment plans were compared on the same free-breathing CT. ITV-based plan constraints were used to re-optimize and recalculate new gated plans. Plans were generated for 3 fractionation regimens: 3×18Gy, 4×12Gy (original), and 5×10Gy. Physical dose was converted to equivalent dose in 2Gy fractions (EQD2), which was used to determine mean lung dose (MLD) and percent volume of lung receiving ≥20Gy (V20). MLD and V20 differences between gating and ITV-based plans were analyzed as a function of both three-dimensional (3D) motion and tumor volume. The low dose region, V5, was also evaluated. Results: MLD and V20 differences between gated and ITV-based plans were larger for lower (1.48±1.32Gy and 1.44±1.29%) than for upper lobe tumors (0.89±0.74Gy and 0.92±0.71%) due to smaller tumor motion (2.9±3.4mm) compared to lower lobe tumors (8.1±6.1mm). Average differences of <1–2% were noted in V5 between ITV and gated plans. Dosimetric differences between gating and ITV-based methods increased with increasing tumor motion and decreasing tumor volume. Overall, average MLD (8.04±3.92Gy) and V20 (8.29±4.33%) values for ITV-based plans were already well below clinical guidelines, even for the 3×18Gy dose scheme, for which largest differences were noted relative to gated plans. Similar results were obtained for 5×10Gy and 4×12Gy regimens. Conclusion: Clinically relevant improvement in pulmonary toxicity, based on predictors of radiation pneumonitis (MLD and V20) was not generally observed, though improvement for tumors

  17. SU-C-210-01: Are Clinically Relevant Dosimetric Endpoints Significantly Better with Gating of Lung SBRT Vs. ITV-Based Treatment?: Results of a Large Cohort Investigation Analyzing Predictive Dosimetric Indicators as a Function of Tumor Volume and Motion Amplitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J; Zhao, B; Ajlouni, M; Movsas, B; Chetty, I.J. [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare patient internal target volume (ITV)-based plans with retrospectively generated gated plans to evaluate potential dosimetric improvements in lung toxicity from gated radiotherapy. Methods: Evaluation was conducted for 150 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment plans for 128 early-stage (T1–T3, <5cm) NSCLC patients. PTV margins were: ITV+5 mm (ITV-plan) and GTV+5 mm (Gated-plan). ITV-based and gated treatment plans were compared on the same free-breathing CT. ITV-based plan constraints were used to re-optimize and recalculate new gated plans. Plans were generated for 3 fractionation regimens: 3×18Gy, 4×12Gy (original), and 5×10Gy. Physical dose was converted to equivalent dose in 2Gy fractions (EQD2), which was used to determine mean lung dose (MLD) and percent volume of lung receiving ≥20Gy (V20). MLD and V20 differences between gating and ITV-based plans were analyzed as a function of both three-dimensional (3D) motion and tumor volume. The low dose region, V5, was also evaluated. Results: MLD and V20 differences between gated and ITV-based plans were larger for lower (1.48±1.32Gy and 1.44±1.29%) than for upper lobe tumors (0.89±0.74Gy and 0.92±0.71%) due to smaller tumor motion (2.9±3.4mm) compared to lower lobe tumors (8.1±6.1mm). Average differences of <1–2% were noted in V5 between ITV and gated plans. Dosimetric differences between gating and ITV-based methods increased with increasing tumor motion and decreasing tumor volume. Overall, average MLD (8.04±3.92Gy) and V20 (8.29±4.33%) values for ITV-based plans were already well below clinical guidelines, even for the 3×18Gy dose scheme, for which largest differences were noted relative to gated plans. Similar results were obtained for 5×10Gy and 4×12Gy regimens. Conclusion: Clinically relevant improvement in pulmonary toxicity, based on predictors of radiation pneumonitis (MLD and V20) was not generally observed, though improvement for tumors

  18. Translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clement, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    The translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) is an otolith-mediated response that stabilizes near vision during linear acceleration at higher frequencies where visually mediated reflexes are not adequate. The modulation of horizontal and vergence eye movements during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) are presumed to reflect the tVOR in response to the continuously varying linear acceleration in the interaural and nasooccipital axes, respectively. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of frequency and fixation distance on the modulation of slow phase eye velocity (SPV) as further evidence that the tVOR is elicited during OVAR. Eighteen subjects were rotated about their longitudinal axis tilted by 30 deg off-vertical. Rotational velocities varied between 18 and 288 deg/sec corresponding to a frequency range of 0.05 to 0.8 Hz. Fixation distance was altered by asking subjects to imagine stationary targets that were briefly presented at 0.5, 1 and 2 m during some rotation cycles. The target flash was 40 msec in the nose-up position at eye level. Oculomotor responses were recorded in the dark using infrared binocular videography. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple rotation cycles. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of both horizontal and vergence SPV increased with stimulus frequency. The effect of fixation distance was negligible at lower frequencies. The modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV was; however, proportional to fixation distance during OVAR at 0.8 Hz. This increasing sensitivity and dependence on fixation distance of horizontal and vergence SPV during OVAR is consistent with tVOR characteristics measured during other types of linear motion. We conclude that the modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV will be diagnostically more useful at higher stimulus frequencies where the tVOR is more robust.

  19. Internal rotation and equilibrium structure of 2-nitropropane from gas electron diffraction and quantum chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Yu. I.; Kochikov, I. V.; Kovtun, D. M.; Ivanov, A. A.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, the equilibrium structural parameters of the 2-nitropropane molecule and the barrier of internal rotation of the nitrogroup are determined from the gas electron diffraction data, with the use of quantum chemistry calculations and experimental vibrational frequencies, in the framework of the large-amplitude motion model for internal rotation. Quantum chemistry calculations at the MP2 and B3LYP levels of theory with various Pople and Dunning basis sets unambiguously predict the same minimum energy molecular conformation, with relatively close values of internal rotation barrier (375-525 cm -1). The results of present analysis show that the minimum of the potential function of the nitrogroup internal rotation is located in syn-H position when one of the oxygen atoms eclipses hydrogen atom that does not belong to any of CH 3 groups (dihedral angle H-C-N-O is zero). It has also been found that internal rotation is hindered, with the barrier height in the range of 220-560 cm -1 (0.6-1.6 kcal/mol) with the most probable value near 380 cm -1 (1.1 kcal/mol). The main equilibrium structure parameters in syn-H configuration are as follows (values in parentheses correspond to 3 times standard deviations): re(C-C) = 1.516(5) Å, re(C-N) = 1.501(5) Å, re (N dbnd O) = 1.225(4) Å, ∠C-C-N=108.7(1.0)°,∠O dbnd N dbnd O =124.8(0.4)°. We also provide thermally averaged parameters for comparison with the results of previous studies.

  20. Rotating Cavitation Supression Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a rotating cavitation (RC) suppressor for liquid rocket engine turbopump inducers. Cavitation instabilities, such as rotating...

  1. Motion Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  2. Amplitude and frequency modulation of the small scales in a turbulent jet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiscaletti, D.; Elsinga, G.E.; Ganapathisubramani, B.; Westerweel, J.

    2013-01-01

    This work involves the large-scale amplitude and frequency modulation of the small-scale motions in fullydeveloped turbulence of a high Reynolds number jet. The scales responsible for the production of turbulent kinetic energy (large scales), and those responsible for its viscous dissipation (small

  3. Roll dynamics of a ship sailing in large amplitude head waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daalen, E.F.G.; Gunsing, M.; Grasman, J.; Remmert, J.

    2014-01-01

    Some ship types may show significant rolling when sailing in large-amplitude (near) head waves. The dynamics of the ship are such that the roll motion is affected by the elevation of the encountering waves. If the natural roll period (without forcing) is about half the period of the forcing by the w

  4. Chiral symmetry in rotating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sham S.

    2015-08-01

    The triaxial rotating system at critical angular momentum I ≥Iband exhibits two enatiomeric (the left- and right-handed) forms. These enatiomers are related to each other through dynamical chiral symmetry. The chiral symmetry in rotating system is defined by an operator χ ˆ =Rˆy (π) T ˆ, which involves the product of two distinct symmetries, namely, continuous and discrete. Therefore, new guidelines are required for testing its commutation with the system Hamiltonian. One of the primary objectives of this study is to lay down these guidelines. Further, the possible impact of chiral symmetry on the geometrical arrangement of angular momentum vectors and investigation of observables unique to nuclear chiral-twins is carried out. In our model, the angular momentum components (J1, J2, J3) occupy three mutually perpendicular axes of triaxial shape and represent a non-planar configuration. At certain threshold energy, the equation of motion in angular momentum develops a second order phase transition and as a result two distinct frames (i.e., the left- and right-handed) are formed. These left- and right-handed states correspond to a double well system and are related to each other through chiral operator. At this critical angular momentum, the centrifugal and Coriolis interactions lower the barrier in the double well system. The tunneling through the double well starts, which subsequently lifts the degeneracy among the rotational states. A detailed analysis of the behavior of rotational energies, spin-staggering, and the electromagnetic transition probabilities of the resulting twin-rotational bands is presented. The ensuing model results exhibit similarities with many observed features of the chiral-twins. An advantage of our formalism is that it is quite simple and it allows us to pinpoint the understanding of physical phenomenon which lead to chiral-twins in rotating systems.

  5. Analysis of the Motion Control Methods for Stratospheric Balloon-Borne Gondola Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, gondola platform is one of the stratospheric balloon-borne platforms being in research focus at home and overseas. Comparing to other stratospheric balloon-borne platforms, such as airship platform, gondola platform has advantages of higher stability, rapid in motion regulation and lower energy cost but disadvantages of less supporting capacity and be incapable of fixation. While all platforms have the same goal of keeping them at accurate angle and right pose for the requirements of instruments and objects installed in the platforms, when platforms rotate round the ground level perpendicular. That is accomplishing motion control. But, platform control system has factors of low damper, excessive and uncertain disturbances by the reason of its being hung over balloon in the air, it is hard to achieve the desired control precision because platform is ease to deviate its benchmark motion. Thus, in the controlling procedure in order to get higher precision, it is crucial to perceive the platform's swing synchronously and rapidly, and restrain the influence of disturbances effectively, keep the platform's pose steadily. Furthermore, while the platform in the air regard control center in the ground as reference object, it is ultimate to select a appropriate reference frame and work out the coordinates and implement the adjustment by the PC104 controller. This paper introduces the methods of the motion control based on stratospheric balloon-borne gondola platform. Firstly, this paper compares the characteristic of the flywheel and CMG and specifies the key methods of obtaining two significant states which are 'orientation stability' state and 'orientation tracking' state for platform motion control procedure using CMG as the control actuator. These two states reduce the deviation amplitude of rotation and swing of gondola's motion relative to original motion due to stratospheric intense atmosphere disturbance. We define it as the first procedure. In next

  6. Analysis of the Motion Control Methods for Stratospheric Balloon-Borne Gondola Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H H [College of Automation, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an (China); Yuan, Z H [College of Automation, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an (China); Wu, J [College of Automation, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an (China)

    2006-10-15

    At present, gondola platform is one of the stratospheric balloon-borne platforms being in research focus at home and overseas. Comparing to other stratospheric balloon-borne platforms, such as airship platform, gondola platform has advantages of higher stability, rapid in motion regulation and lower energy cost but disadvantages of less supporting capacity and be incapable of fixation. While all platforms have the same goal of keeping them at accurate angle and right pose for the requirements of instruments and objects installed in the platforms, when platforms rotate round the ground level perpendicular. That is accomplishing motion control. But, platform control system has factors of low damper, excessive and uncertain disturbances by the reason of its being hung over balloon in the air, it is hard to achieve the desired control precision because platform is ease to deviate its benchmark motion. Thus, in the controlling procedure in order to get higher precision, it is crucial to perceive the platform's swing synchronously and rapidly, and restrain the influence of disturbances effectively, keep the platform's pose steadily. Furthermore, while the platform in the air regard control center in the ground as reference object, it is ultimate to select a appropriate reference frame and work out the coordinates and implement the adjustment by the PC104 controller. This paper introduces the methods of the motion control based on stratospheric balloon-borne gondola platform. Firstly, this paper compares the characteristic of the flywheel and CMG and specifies the key methods of obtaining two significant states which are 'orientation stability' state and 'orientation tracking' state for platform motion control procedure using CMG as the control actuator. These two states reduce the deviation amplitude of rotation and swing of gondola's motion relative to original motion due to stratospheric intense atmosphere disturbance. We define it as

  7. Tilt stability of rotating current rings with passive conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweibel, E.G.; Pomphrey, N.

    1984-12-01

    We study the combined effects of rotation and resistive passive conductors on the stability of a rigid current in an external magnetic field. We present numerical and approximate analytical solutions to the equations of motion, which show that the ring is always tilt unstable on the resistive decay timescale of the conductors, although rotation and eddy currents may stabilize it over short times. Possible applications of our model include spheromaks which rotate or which are encircled by energetic particle rings.

  8. Analysis on the rotatable stability of slipping prophase lumbar spondylolysis when motion of flexion and extension%滑脱前期腰椎峡部裂屈伸运动中旋转稳定性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜欢畅; 王吉兴; 尚平

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyse the lumbar static and dynamic sagittal rotatable stability of patients with bilateral slipping prophase lumbar spondylolysis. Methods The lumbar X-ray of 55 patients with bilateral slipping prophase lumbar spondylolysis was analyzed. On the lateral X-ray radiography of the lumbar spine under the conditions of static and hyperflexion-hyperextension, the intervertebral disc angles of L4/5 or L5/S1 with spondylolysis were measured. The differences between the hyperflexion and hyperextension intervertebral disc angles were calculated. A randomized controlled study was performed between persons underwent physical check-ups and patients. the statistical analysis was performed. Results Intervertebral disc angles were not statistically different between patients with bilateral slipping prophase lumbar spondylolysis and persons underwent physical check-upson static and hyperextension lumbar lateral X-ray(P>0.05). On lateral X-rayradiography under the condition of hyperflexion, the intervertebral disc angle was statistically different between them(P0.05);过屈侧位椎间盘角及过伸过屈动力侧位椎间盘角之差,和正常体检者比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论双侧滑脱前期腰椎峡部裂在屈伸运动中存在着矢状位上的旋转不稳,需尽早进行外科干预。

  9. Project CARDS technical information record: parametric and sensitivity analysis and determination of response spectra for horizontal, vertical and rotational motion of a radioactive material shipping package relative to the motion of its support (railcar). Part 2. Continuation of CARDS-TIR-80-3 (Preliminary)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, S.R.

    1980-11-26

    The generation of the response spectra was coupled to a parametric and sensitivity analysis. Support accelerations and tiedown forces are presented as functions of time. The parametric analysis found that the horizontal acceleration of the support and the MAR (max absolute relative) horizontal acceleration are relatively insensitive, while the corresponding vertical accelerations are highly sensitive to changes in 4 of the 13 parameters, and the corresponding rotational accelerations are highly sensitive to changes in 8 of the 13 parameters. The tiedown forces are moderately sensitive to changes in 3 of the parameters. (DLC)

  10. Optimal Tuning of Amplitude Proportional Coulomb Friction Damper for Maximum Cable Damping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Felix; Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Krenk, Steen

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates numerically the optimal tuning of Coulomb friction dampers on cables, where the optimality criterion is maximum additional damping in the first vibration mode. The expression for the optimal friction force level of Coulomb friction dampers follows from the linear viscous...... damper via harmonic averaging. It turns out that the friction force level has to be adjusted in proportion to cable amplitude at damper position which is realized by amplitude feedback in real time. The performance of this adaptive damper is assessed by simulated free decay curves from which the damping...... to higher modes evoked by the amplitude proportional Coulomb friction damper which clamps the cable at its upper and lower positions. The resulting nonsinusoidal cable motion clearly violates the assumption of pure harmonic motion and explains why such dampers have to be tuned differently from optimal...

  11. Models of soft rotators and the theory of a harmonic rotator

    CERN Document Server

    Zakir, Zahid

    2012-01-01

    The states of a planar oscillator are separated to a vibrational mode, containing a zero-point energy, and a rotational mode without the zero-point energy, but having a conserved angular momentum. On the basis of the analysis of properties of models of rigid and semirigid rotators, the theory of soft rotators is formulated where the harmonic attractive force is balanced only by the centrifugal force. As examples a Coulomb rotator (the Bohr model) and a magneto-harmonic rotator (the Fock-Landau levels) are considered. Disappearance of the radial speed in the model of a magneto-harmonic rotator is taken as a defining property of a pure rotational motion in the harmonic potential. After the exception of energies of the magnetic and spin decompositions, specific to magnetic fields, one turns to a simple and general model of a planar harmonic rotator (circular oscillator without radial speed) where kinetic energy is reduced to the purely rotational energy. Energy levels of the harmonic rotator have the same freque...

  12. Programmable motion of DNA origami mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Alexander E; Zhou, Lifeng; Su, Hai-Jun; Castro, Carlos E

    2015-01-20

    DNA origami enables the precise fabrication of nanoscale geometries. We demonstrate an approach to engineer complex and reversible motion of nanoscale DNA origami machine elements. We first design, fabricate, and characterize the mechanical behavior of flexible DNA origami rotational and linear joints that integrate stiff double-stranded DNA components and flexible single-stranded DNA components to constrain motion along a single degree of freedom and demonstrate the ability to tune the flexibility and range of motion. Multiple joints with simple 1D motion were then integrated into higher order mechanisms. One mechanism is a crank-slider that couples rotational and linear motion, and the other is a Bennett linkage that moves between a compacted bundle and an expanded frame configuration with a constrained 3D motion path. Finally, we demonstrate distributed actuation of the linkage using DNA input strands to achieve reversible conformational changes of the entire structure on ∼ minute timescales. Our results demonstrate programmable motion of 2D and 3D DNA origami mechanisms constructed following a macroscopic machine design approach.

  13. Programmable motion of DNA origami mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Alexander E; Zhou, Lifeng; Su, Hai-Jun; Castro, Carlos E

    2015-01-20

    DNA origami enables the precise fabrication of nanoscale geometries. We demonstrate an approach to engineer complex and reversible motion of nanoscale DNA origami machine elements. We first design, fabricate, and characterize the mechanical behavior of flexible DNA origami rotational and linear joints that integrate stiff double-stranded DNA components and flexible single-stranded DNA components to constrain motion along a single degree of freedom and demonstrate the ability to tune the flexibility and range of motion. Multiple joints with simple 1D motion were then integrated into higher order mechanisms. One mechanism is a crank-slider that couples rotational and linear motion, and the other is a Bennett linkage that moves between a compacted bundle and an expanded frame configuration with a constrained 3D motion path. Finally, we demonstrate distributed actuation of the linkage using DNA input strands to achieve reversible conformational changes of the entire structure on ∼ minute timescales. Our results demonstrate programmable motion of 2D and 3D DNA origami mechanisms constructed following a macroscopic machine design approach. PMID:25561550

  14. Motion Equation of Vorticity for Newton Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Jianhua, X

    2005-01-01

    The vorticity plays an important role in aerodynamics and rotational flow. Usually, they are studied with modified Navier-Stokes equation. This research will deduce the motion equation of vorticity from Navier-Stokes equation. To this propose, the velocity gradient field is decomposed as the stack of non-rotation field and pure-rotation field. By introducing the Chen S+R decomposition, the rotational flow is redefined. For elastic fluid, the research shows that for Newton fluid, the local average rotation always produces an additional pressure on the rotation plane. This item is deterministic rather than stochastic (as Reynolds stress) or adjustable. For non-elastic fluid, such as air, the research shows that the rotation will produce an additional stress along the rotation axis direction, that is on the normal direction of rotation plane. This result can be used to explain the lift force connected with vortex. The main purpose of this research is to supply a solvable mathematical model for the calculation of...

  15. Amplitude internal friction peaks associated with the interaction between dislocation kinks and solute atoms in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early in 1950, Ke observed in slightly cold-worked dilute aluminium-copper solid solutions a pronounced low-frequency internal friction peak around room temperature as a function of strain amplitude in which the high-amplitude side of the peak decreases rapidly to a very small value. This paper reviews the experimental results since the work of Ke, with emphasis on cold-worked aluminium containing Cu or Mg as substitutional solute atoms. A dislocation kink dragging and break away model is suggested. The latest results show that this internal friction peak around room temperature consists of two separate peaks. The amplitude peak accompanying the lower temperature peak shifts toward lower amplitudes and that accompanying the higher temperature peak shifts toward higher amplitudes with an increase of temperature of measurement. The former amplitude peak appears at an amplitude range lower than that of the former peak. A mechanism of the double amplitude peaks is suggested in terms of the simultaneous occurrence of longitudinal core diffusion (LCD) and transverse core diffusion (TCD) of the solute atoms during the to and fro sidewise motion of the dislocation kinks. Some conclusions concerning the mechanism of Hasiguti peaks are drawn from the comparison with studies on the internal friction peaks associated with the interaction between dislocation kinks and solute atoms. (orig.)

  16. Singularity Structure of Maximally Supersymmetric Scattering Amplitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Bourjaily, Jacob L.; Cachazo, Freddy;

    2014-01-01

    We present evidence that loop amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric (N=4) Yang-Mills theory (SYM) beyond the planar limit share some of the remarkable structures of the planar theory. In particular, we show that through two loops, the four-particle amplitude in full N=4 SYM has only logarithmic...

  17. Amplitude death in steadily forced chaotic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Guo-Lin; He Wen-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Steady forcing can induce the amplitude death in chaotic systems, which generally exists in coupled dynamic systems. Using the Lorenz system as a typical example, this paper investigates the dynamic behaviours of the chaotic system with steady forcing numerically, and finds that amplitude death can occur as the strength of the steady forcing goes beyond a critical constant.

  18. Interlimb coupling strength scales with movement amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, C Lieke E; de Boer, Betteco J; de Poel, Harjo J; Beek, Peter J

    2008-05-23

    The relation between movement amplitude and the strength of interlimb interactions was examined by comparing bimanual performance at different amplitude ratios (1:2, 1:1, and 2:1). For conditions with unequal amplitudes, the arm moving at the smaller amplitude was predicted to be more strongly affected by the contralateral arm than vice versa. This prediction was based on neurophysiological considerations and the HKB model of coupled oscillators. Participants performed rhythmic bimanual forearm movements at prescribed amplitude relations. After a brief mechanical perturbation of one arm, the relaxation process back to the initial coordination pattern was examined. This analysis focused on phase adaptations in the unperturbed arm, as these reflect the degree to which the movements of this arm were affected by the coupling influences stemming from the contralateral (perturbed) arm. The thus obtained index of coupling (IC) reflected the relative contribution of the unperturbed arm to the relaxation process. As predicted IC was larger when the perturbed arm moved at a larger amplitude than did the unperturbed arm, indicating that coupling strength scaled with movement amplitude. This result was discussed in relation to previous research regarding sources of asymmetry in coupling strength and the effects of amplitude disparity on interlimb coordination.

  19. On the singularities of massive superstring amplitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foda, O.

    1987-01-01

    Superstring one-loop amplitudes with massive external states are shown to be in general ill-defined due to internal on-shell propagators. However, we argue that since any massive string state (in the uncompactified theory) has a finite lifetime to decay into massless particles, such amplitudes are n

  20. Consistent Off-Shell Tree String Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Liccardo, A; Marotta, R

    1999-01-01

    We give a construction of off-shell tree bosonic string amplitudes, based on the operatorial formalism of the N-string Vertex, with three external massless states both for open and closed strings by requiring their being projective invariant. In particular our prescription leads, in the low-energy limit, to the three-gluon amplitude in the usual covariant gauge.

  1. Scattering Amplitudes via Algebraic Geometry Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Mads

    Feynman diagrams. The study of multiloop scattering amplitudes is crucial for the new era of precision phenomenology at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Loop-level scattering amplitudes can be reduced to a basis of linearly independent integrals whose coefficients are extracted from generalized...

  2. Cyclic fatigue of NiTi instruments used in complex curvatures with continuous or reciprocating rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Testarelli

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: In accordance with those findings, the results of the present study showed a significant increase of cyclic fatigue resistance of instruments used with the TFA motion. This can be explained by the alternance of engaging/disengaging movements, since the motion can be defined as a non-continuous rotation, while the traditional continuous rotation movement continuously engages and stresses the instruments.

  3. Earth rotation prevents exact solid body rotation of fluids in the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Boisson, J; Moisy, F; Cortet, P -P

    2012-01-01

    We report direct evidence of a secondary flow excited by the Earth rotation in a water-filled spherical container spinning at constant rotation rate. This so-called {\\it tilt-over flow} essentially consists in a rotation around an axis which is slightly tilted with respect to the rotation axis of the sphere. In the astrophysical context, it corresponds to the flow in the liquid cores of planets forced by precession of the planet rotation axis, and it has been proposed to contribute to the generation of planetary magnetic fields. We detect this weak secondary flow using a particle image velocimetry system mounted in the rotating frame. This secondary flow consists in a weak rotation, thousand times smaller than the sphere rotation, around a horizontal axis which is stationary in the laboratory frame. Its amplitude and orientation are in quantitative agreement with the theory of the tilt-over flow excited by precession. These results show that setting a fluid in a perfect solid body rotation in a laboratory exp...

  4. Perception of rotation, path, and heading in circular trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooij, Suzanne A E; Nesti, Alessandro; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Pretto, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    When in darkness, humans can perceive the direction and magnitude of rotations and of linear translations in the horizontal plane. The current paper addresses the integrated perception of combined translational and rotational motion, as it occurs when moving along a curved trajectory. We questioned whether the perceived motion through the environment follows the predictions of a self-motion perception model (e.g., Merfeld et al. in J Vestib Res 3:141-161, 1993; Newman in A multisensory observer model for human spatial orientation perception, 2009), which assume linear addition of rotational and translational components. For curved motion in darkness, such models predict a non-veridical motion percept, consisting of an underestimation of the perceived rotation, a distortion of the perceived travelled path, and a bias in the perceived heading (i.e., the perceived instantaneous direction of motion with respect to the body). These model predictions were evaluated in two experiments. In Experiment 1, seven participants were moved along a circular trajectory in darkness while facing the motion direction. They indicated perceived yaw rotation using an online tracking task, and perceived travelled path by drawings. In Experiment 2, the heading was systematically varied, and six participants indicated, in a 2-alternative forced-choice task, whether they perceived facing inward or outward of the circular path. Overall, we found no evidence for the heading bias predicted by the model. This suggests that the sum of the perceived rotational and translational components alone cannot adequately explain the overall perceived motion through the environment. Possibly, knowledge about motion dynamics and familiar stimuli combinations may play an important additional role in shaping the percept. PMID:27056085

  5. Spin- 1/2 amplitudes in black-hole evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent papers, we have studied the quantum-mechanical decay of a Schwarzschild-like black hole, formed by gravitational collapse, into almost-flat spacetime and weak radiation at a very late time. In this recent work, we have been concerned with evaluating quantum amplitudes (not just probabilities) for transitions from initial to final states. In a general asymptotically flat context, one may specify a quantum amplitude by posing boundary data on (say) an initial space-like hypersurface ΣI and a final space-like hypersurface ΣF. To complete the specification, one must also give the Lorentzian proper-time interval between the two boundary surfaces, as measured near spatial infinity. We have assumed that the Lagrangian contains Einstein gravity coupled to a massless scalar field φ, plus possible additional fields; there is taken to be a 'background' spherically symmetric solution (γμν, Φ) of the classical Einstein/scalar field equations. For bosonic fields, the gravitational and scalar boundary data can be taken to be gij and φ on the two hypersurfaces, where gij (i, j = 1, 2, 3) gives the intrinsic 3-metric on the boundary, and the 4-metric is gμν (μ, ν = 0, 1, 2, 3), the boundary being taken locally in the form {x0 = const}. The classical boundary value problem, corresponding to the calculation of this quantum amplitude, is badly posed, being a boundary value problem for a wave-like (hyperbolic) set of equations. Following Feynman's +iε prescription, one makes the problem well-posed by rotating the asymptotic time interval T into the complex: T → vertical barT vertical bar exp(-iθ), with 0 0, one then takes the 'Lorentzian limit' θ → 0+. Such quantum amplitudes have been calculated for weak s = 0 (scalar), s = 1 (photon) and s = 2 (graviton) anisotropic final data, propagating on the approximately Vaidya-like background geometry, in the region containing radially outgoing black-hole radiation. In this paper, we treat quantum amplitudes for

  6. A 3-DOF parallel robot with spherical motion for the rehabilitation and evaluation of balance performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Fabrizio; Cappa, Paolo

    2011-04-01

    In this paper a novel electrically actuated parallel robot with three degrees-of-freedom (3 DOF) for dynamic postural studies is presented. The design has been described, the solution to the inverse kinematics has been found, and a numerical solution for the direct kinematics has been proposed. The workspace of the implemented robot is characterized by an angular range of motion of about ±10° for roll and pitch when yaw is in the range ±15°. The robot was constructed and the orientation accuracy was tested by means of an optoelectronic system and by imposing a sinusoidal input, with a frequency of 1 Hz and amplitude of 10°, along the three axes, in sequence. The collected data indicated a phase delay of 1° and an amplitude error of 0.5%-1.5%; similar values were observed for cross-axis sensitivity errors. We also conducted a clinical application on a group of normal subjects, who were standing in equilibrium on the robot base with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC), which was rotated with a tri-axial sinusoidal trajectory with a frequency of 0.5 Hz and amplitude 5° for roll and pitch and 10° for the yaw. The postural configuration of the subjects was recorded with an optoelectronic system. However, due to the mainly technical nature of this paper, only initial validation outcomes are reported here. The clinical application showed that only the tilt and displacement on the sagittal pane of head, trunk, and pelvis in the trials conducted with eyes closed were affected by drift and that the reduction of the yaw rotation and of the mediolateral translation was not a controlled parameter, as happened, instead, for the other anatomical directions.

  7. A Comprehensive Motion Estimation Technique for the Improvement of EIS Methods Based on the SURF Algorithm and Kalman Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Hao, Qun; Xie, Mengdi

    2016-04-07

    Video stabilization is an important technology for removing undesired motion in videos. This paper presents a comprehensive motion estimation method for electronic image stabilization techniques, integrating the speeded up robust features (SURF) algorithm, modified random sample consensus (RANSAC), and the Kalman filter, and also taking camera scaling and conventional camera translation and rotation into full consideration. Using SURF in sub-pixel space, feature points were located and then matched. The false matched points were removed by modified RANSAC. Global motion was estimated by using the feature points and modified cascading parameters, which reduced the accumulated errors in a series of frames and improved the peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) by 8.2 dB. A specific Kalman filter model was established by considering the movement and scaling of scenes. Finally, video stabilization was achieved with filtered motion parameters using the modified adjacent frame compensation. The experimental results proved that the target images were stabilized even when the vibrating amplitudes of the video become increasingly large.

  8. A Comprehensive Motion Estimation Technique for the Improvement of EIS Methods Based on the SURF Algorithm and Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Hao, Qun; Xie, Mengdi

    2016-01-01

    Video stabilization is an important technology for removing undesired motion in videos. This paper presents a comprehensive motion estimation method for electronic image stabilization techniques, integrating the speeded up robust features (SURF) algorithm, modified random sample consensus (RANSAC), and the Kalman filter, and also taking camera scaling and conventional camera translation and rotation into full consideration. Using SURF in sub-pixel space, feature points were located and then matched. The false matched points were removed by modified RANSAC. Global motion was estimated by using the feature points and modified cascading parameters, which reduced the accumulated errors in a series of frames and improved the peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) by 8.2 dB. A specific Kalman filter model was established by considering the movement and scaling of scenes. Finally, video stabilization was achieved with filtered motion parameters using the modified adjacent frame compensation. The experimental results proved that the target images were stabilized even when the vibrating amplitudes of the video become increasingly large. PMID:27070603

  9. A Comprehensive Motion Estimation Technique for the Improvement of EIS Methods Based on the SURF Algorithm and Kalman Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Hao, Qun; Xie, Mengdi

    2016-01-01

    Video stabilization is an important technology for removing undesired motion in videos. This paper presents a comprehensive motion estimation method for electronic image stabilization techniques, integrating the speeded up robust features (SURF) algorithm, modified random sample consensus (RANSAC), and the Kalman filter, and also taking camera scaling and conventional camera translation and rotation into full consideration. Using SURF in sub-pixel space, feature points were located and then matched. The false matched points were removed by modified RANSAC. Global motion was estimated by using the feature points and modified cascading parameters, which reduced the accumulated errors in a series of frames and improved the peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) by 8.2 dB. A specific Kalman filter model was established by considering the movement and scaling of scenes. Finally, video stabilization was achieved with filtered motion parameters using the modified adjacent frame compensation. The experimental results proved that the target images were stabilized even when the vibrating amplitudes of the video become increasingly large. PMID:27070603

  10. Volumetric motion quantification by 3D tissue phase mapped CMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Anja

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was the quantification of myocardial motion from 3D tissue phase mapped (TPM CMR. Recent work on myocardial motion quantification by TPM has been focussed on multi-slice 2D acquisitions thus excluding motion information from large regions of the left ventricle. Volumetric motion assessment appears an important next step towards the understanding of the volumetric myocardial motion and hence may further improve diagnosis and treatments in patients with myocardial motion abnormalities. Methods Volumetric motion quantification of the complete left ventricle was performed in 12 healthy volunteers and two patients applying a black-blood 3D TPM sequence. The resulting motion field was analysed regarding motion pattern differences between apical and basal locations as well as for asynchronous motion pattern between different myocardial segments in one or more slices. Motion quantification included velocity, torsion, rotation angle and strain derived parameters. Results All investigated motion quantification parameters could be calculated from the 3D-TPM data. Parameters quantifying hypokinetic or asynchronous motion demonstrated differences between motion impaired and healthy myocardium. Conclusions 3D-TPM enables the gapless volumetric quantification of motion abnormalities of the left ventricle, which can be applied in future application as additional information to provide a more detailed analysis of the left ventricular function.

  11. Determination of the Static Friction Coefficient from Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Bolívar, J. A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a physics laboratory exercise for determining the coefficient of static friction between two surfaces. The circular motion of a coin placed on the surface of a rotating turntable has been studied. For this purpose, the motion is recorded with a high-speed digital video camera recording at 240 frames s[superscript-1], and the…

  12. Phase Diagram of Collective Motion of Bacterial Cells in a Shallow Circular Pool

    CERN Document Server

    Wakita, Jun-ichi; Yamamoto, Ken; Katori, Makoto; Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The collective motion of bacterial cells in a shallow circular pool is systematically studied using the bacterial species $Bacillus$ $subtilis$. The ratio of cell length to pool diameter (i.e., the reduced cell length) ranges from 0.06 to 0.43 in our experiments. Bacterial cells in a circular pool show various types of collective motion depending on the cell density in the pool and the reduced cell length. The motion is classified into six types, which we call random motion, turbulent motion, one-way rotational motion, two-way rotational motion, random oscillatory motion, and ordered oscillatory motion. Two critical values of reduced cell lengths are evaluated, at which drastic changes in collective motion are induced. A phase diagram is proposed in which the six phases are arranged.

  13. Motion control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a short discount publication. In today's manufacturing environment, Motion Control plays a major role in virtually every project.The Motion Control Report provides a comprehensive overview of the technology of Motion Control:* Design Considerations* Technologies* Methods to Control Motion* Examples of Motion Control in Systems* A Detailed Vendors List

  14. Secular motion around synchronously orbiting planetary satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Martin; San-Juan, Juan F; Ferrer, Sebastián

    2005-12-01

    We investigate the secular motion of a spacecraft around the natural satellite of a planet. The satellite rotates synchronously with its mean motion around the planet. Our model takes into account the gravitational potential of the satellite up to the second order, and the third-body perturbation in Hill's approximation. Close to the satellite, the ratio of rotation rate of the satellite to mean motion of the orbiter is small. When considering this ratio as a small parameter, the Coriolis effect is a first-order perturbation, while the third-body tidal attraction, the ellipticity effect, and the oblateness perturbation remain at higher orders. Then, we apply perturbation theory and find that a third-order approach is enough to show the influence of the satellite's ellipticity in the pericenter dynamics. Finally, we discuss the averaged system in the three-dimensional parametric space, and provide a global description of the flow.

  15. Rotating Optical Tubes: An Archimedes' Screw for Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rsheed, Anwar Al; Aldossary, Omar M; Lembessis, Vassilis E

    2016-01-01

    The classical dynamics of a cold atom trapped inside a vertical rotating helical optical tube (HOT) is investigated by taking also into account the gravitational field. The resulting equations of motion are solved numerically. The rotation induces a vertical motion for an atom initially at rest. The motion is a result of the action of two inertial forces, namely the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force. Both inertial forces force the atom to rotate in a direction opposite to that of the angular velocity of the HOT. The frequency and the turning points of the atom's global oscillation can be controlled by the value and the direction of the angular velocity of the HOT. However, at large values of the angular velocity of the HOT the atom can escape from the global oscillation and be transported along the axis of the HOT. In this case, the rotating HOT operates as an Optical Archimedes' Screw (OAS) for atoms.

  16. A microscopic cranking model for nuclear collective rotation I: rigid-plus-irrotational-flow rotating frame

    CERN Document Server

    Gulshani, Parviz

    2016-01-01

    We derive in a simple manner and from first principles the Inglis semi-classical phenomenological cranking model for nuclear collective rotation. The derivation transforms the nuclear Schrodinger equation (instead of the Hamiltonian) to a rotating frame using a product wavefunction and imposing no constraints on either the wavefunction or the nucleon motion. The difference from Inglis model is that the frame rotation is driven by the motions of the nucleons and not externally. Consequently, the transformed Schrodinger equation is time-reversal invariant, and the total angular momentum is the sum of those of the intrinsic system and rotating frame. In this article, we choose the rotation of the frame to be given by a combination of rigid and irrotational flows. The dynamic angular velocity of the rotating frame is determined by the angular momentum of the frame and by a moment of inertia that is determined by the nature of the flow combination. The intrinsic-system and rotating-frame angular momenta emerge to ...

  17. Effects of strength training on mechanomyographic amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to determine if the patterns of mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude across force would change with strength training. Twenty-two healthy men completed an 8-week strength training program. During three separate testing visits (pre-test, week 4, and week 8), the MMG signal was detected from the vastus lateralis as the subjects performed isometric step muscle actions of the leg extensors from 10–100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). During pre-testing, the MMG amplitude increased linearly with force to 66% MVC and then plateaued. Conversely, weeks 4 and 8 demonstrated an increase in MMG amplitude up to ∼85% of the subject's original MVC before plateauing. Furthermore, seven of the ten force levels (30–60% and 80–100%) showed a significant decrease in mean MMG amplitude values after training, which consequently led to a decrease in the slope of the MMG amplitude/force relationship. The decreases in MMG amplitude at lower force levels are indicative of hypertrophy, since fewer motor units would be required to produce the same absolute force if the motor units increased in size. However, despite the clear changes in the mean values, analyses of individual subjects revealed that only 55% of the subjects demonstrated a significant decrease in the slope of the MMG amplitude/force relationship. (paper)

  18. Relativistic Rotation: A Comparison of Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Klauber, R D

    2006-01-01

    Alternative theories of relativistic rotation considered viable as of 2004 are compared in the light of experiments reported in 2005. En route, the contentious issue of simultaneity choice in rotation is resolved by showing that only one simultaneity choice, the one possessing continuous time, gives rise, via the general relativistic equation of motion, to the correct Newtonian limit Coriolis acceleration. In addition, the widely dispersed argument purporting to justify an absolute Lorentz contraction in rotation is analyzed and found lacking for more than one reason. It is argued that only via experiment can we know whether such absolute contraction exists in rotation or not. The Coriolis/simultaneity correlation, and the results of the 2005 experiments, support the Selleri theory as being closest to the truth, though it is incomplete in a more general applicability sense, because it does not provide a global metric. Two alternatives, a modified Klauber approach and a Selleri-Klauber hybrid, are presented wh...

  19. Indications of stellar prominence oscillations on fast rotating stars: the cases of HK Aqr and PZ Tel

    CERN Document Server

    Leitzinger, M; Zaqarashvili, T V; Greimel, R; Hanslmeier, A; Lammer, H

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of six nights of spectroscopic monitoring of two young and fast rotating late-type stars, namely the dMe star HK Aqr and the dG/dK star PZ Tel. On both stars we detect absorption features reminiscent of signatures of co-rotating cool clouds or prominences visible in H$\\alpha$. Several prominences on HK Aqr show periodic variability in the prominence tracks which follow a sinusoidal motion (indication of prominence oscillations). On PZ Tel we could not find any periodic variability in the prominence tracks. By fitting sinusoidal functions to the prominence tracks we derive amplitudes and periods which are similar to those of large amplitude oscillations seen in solar prominences. In one specific event we also derive a periodic variation of the prominence track in the H$\\beta$ spectral line which shows an anti-phase variation with the one derived for the H$\\alpha$ spectral line. Using these parameters and estimated mass density of a prominence on HK Aqr we derive a minimum magnetic field...

  20. Indications of stellar prominence oscillations on fast rotating stars: the cases of HK Aqr and PZ Tel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitzinger, M.; Odert, P.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Greimel, R.; Hanslmeier, A.; Lammer, H.

    2016-08-01

    We present the analysis of six nights of spectroscopic monitoring of two young and fast rotating late-type stars, namely the dMe star HK Aqr and the dG/dK star PZ Tel. On both stars we detect absorption features reminiscent of signatures of co-rotating cool clouds or prominences visible in Hα. Several prominences on HK Aqr show periodic variability in the prominence tracks which follow a sinusoidal motion (indication of prominence oscillations). On PZ Tel we could not find any periodic variability in the prominence tracks. By fitting sinusoidal functions to the prominence tracks we derive amplitudes and periods which are similar to those of large amplitude oscillations seen in solar prominences. In one specific event we also derive a periodic variation of the prominence track in the Hβ spectral line which shows an anti-phase variation with the one derived for the Hα spectral line. Using these parameters and estimated mass density of a prominence on HK Aqr we derive a minimum magnetic field strength of ˜2 G. The relatively low strength of the magnetic field is explained by the large height of this stellar prominence (≥ 0.67 stellar radii above the surface).