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Sample records for amplifying neuroblast lineages

  1. Long-term live cell imaging and automated 4D analysis of drosophila neuroblast lineages.

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    Catarina C F Homem

    Full Text Available The developing Drosophila brain is a well-studied model system for neurogenesis and stem cell biology. In the Drosophila central brain, around 200 neural stem cells called neuroblasts undergo repeated rounds of asymmetric cell division. These divisions typically generate a larger self-renewing neuroblast and a smaller ganglion mother cell that undergoes one terminal division to create two differentiating neurons. Although single mitotic divisions of neuroblasts can easily be imaged in real time, the lack of long term imaging procedures has limited the use of neuroblast live imaging for lineage analysis. Here we describe a method that allows live imaging of cultured Drosophila neuroblasts over multiple cell cycles for up to 24 hours. We describe a 4D image analysis protocol that can be used to extract cell cycle times and growth rates from the resulting movies in an automated manner. We use it to perform lineage analysis in type II neuroblasts where clonal analysis has indicated the presence of a transit-amplifying population that potentiates the number of neurons. Indeed, our experiments verify type II lineages and provide quantitative parameters for all cell types in those lineages. As defects in type II neuroblast lineages can result in brain tumor formation, our lineage analysis method will allow more detailed and quantitative analysis of tumorigenesis and asymmetric cell division in the Drosophila brain.

  2. Neuroblast lineage identification and lineage-specific Hox gene action during postembryonic development of the subesophageal ganglion in the Drosophila central brain.

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    Kuert, Philipp A; Hartenstein, Volker; Bello, Bruno C; Lovick, Jennifer K; Reichert, Heinrich

    2014-06-15

    The central brain of Drosophila consists of the supraesophageal ganglion (SPG) and the subesophageal ganglion (SEG), both of which are generated by neural stem cell-like neuroblasts during embryonic and postembryonic development. Considerable information has been obtained on postembryonic development of the neuroblasts and their lineages in the SPG. In contrast, very little is known about neuroblasts, neural lineages, or any other aspect of the postembryonic development in the SEG. Here we characterize the neuroanatomy of the larval SEG in terms of tracts, commissures, and other landmark features as compared to a thoracic ganglion. We then use clonal MARCM labeling to identify all adult-specific neuroblast lineages in the late larval SEG and find a surprisingly small number of neuroblast lineages, 13 paired and one unpaired. The Hox genes Dfd, Scr, and Antp are expressed in a lineage-specific manner in these lineages during postembryonic development. Hox gene loss-of-function causes lineage-specific defects in axonal targeting and reduction in neural cell numbers. Moreover, it results in the formation of novel ectopic neuroblast lineages. Apoptosis block also results in ectopic lineages suggesting that Hox genes are required for lineage-specific termination of proliferation through programmed cell death. Taken together, our findings show that postembryonic development in the SEG is mediated by a surprisingly small set of identified lineages and requires lineage-specific Hox gene action to ensure the correct formation of adult-specific neurons in the Drosophila brain. PMID:24713419

  3. Hydroxyurea-mediated neuroblast ablation establishes birthdates of secondary lineages and addresses neuronal interactions in the developing Drosophila brain

    OpenAIRE

    Lovick, Jennifer K.; Hartenstein, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila brain is comprised of neurons formed by approximately 100 lineages, each of which is derived from a stereotyped, asymmetrically dividing neuroblast. Lineages serve as structural and developmental units of Drosophila brain anatomy and reconstruction of lineage projection patterns represents a suitable map of Drosophila brain circuitry at the level of neuron populations (“macro-circuitry”). Two phases of neuroblast proliferation, the first in the embryo and the second during the ...

  4. Bridging the gap between postembryonic cell lineages and identified embryonic neuroblasts in the ventral nerve cord of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Birkholz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The clarification of complete cell lineages, which are produced by specific stem cells, is fundamental for understanding mechanisms, controlling the generation of cell diversity and patterning in an emerging tissue. In the developing Central Nervous System (CNS of Drosophila, neural stem cells (neuroblasts exhibit two periods of proliferation: During embryogenesis they produce primary lineages, which form the larval CNS. After a phase of mitotic quiescence, a subpopulation of them resumes proliferation in the larva to give rise to secondary lineages that build up the CNS of the adult fly. Within the ventral nerve cord (VNC detailed descriptions exist for both primary and secondary lineages. However, while primary lineages have been linked to identified neuroblasts, the assignment of secondary lineages has so far been hampered by technical limitations. Therefore, primary and secondary neural lineages co-existed as isolated model systems. Here we provide the missing link between the two systems for all lineages in the thoracic and abdominal neuromeres. Using the Flybow technique, embryonic neuroblasts were identified by their characteristic and unique lineages in the living embryo and their further development was traced into the late larval stage. This comprehensive analysis provides the first complete view of which embryonic neuroblasts are postembryonically reactivated along the anterior/posterior-axis of the VNC, and reveals the relationship between projection patterns of primary and secondary sublineages.

  5. Hydroxyurea-mediated neuroblast ablation establishes birth dates of secondary lineages and addresses neuronal interactions in the developing Drosophila brain.

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    Lovick, Jennifer K; Hartenstein, Volker

    2015-06-01

    The Drosophila brain is comprised of neurons formed by approximately 100 lineages, each of which is derived from a stereotyped, asymmetrically dividing neuroblast. Lineages serve as structural and developmental units of Drosophila brain anatomy and reconstruction of lineage projection patterns represents a suitable map of Drosophila brain circuitry at the level of neuron populations ("macro-circuitry"). Two phases of neuroblast proliferation, the first in the embryo and the second during the larval phase (following a period of mitotic quiescence), produce primary and secondary lineages, respectively. Using temporally controlled pulses of hydroxyurea (HU) to ablate neuroblasts and their corresponding secondary lineages during the larval phase, we analyzed the effect on development of primary and secondary lineages in the late larval and adult brain. Our findings indicate that timing of neuroblast re-activation is highly stereotyped, allowing us to establish "birth dates" for all secondary lineages. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that, whereas the trajectory and projection pattern of primary and secondary lineages is established in a largely independent manner, the final branching pattern of secondary neurons is dependent upon the presence of appropriate neuronal targets. Taken together, our data provide new insights into the degree of neuronal plasticity during Drosophila brain development. PMID:25773365

  6. Control of Drosophila Type I and Type II central brain neuroblast proliferation by bantam microRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weng, Ruifen; Cohen, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of stem cell self-renewal by microRNAs is emerging as an important mechanism controlling tissue homeostasis. Here, we provide evidence that bantam microRNA controls neuroblast number and proliferation in the Drosophila central brain. Bantam also supports...... proliferation of transit-amplifying intermediate neural progenitor cells in type II neuroblast lineages. The stem cell factors brat and prospero are identified as bantam targets acting on different aspects of these processes. Thus, bantam appears to act in multiple regulatory steps in the maintenance and...

  7. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila brain: II. Identification of lineage projection patterns based on MARCM clones

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Darren C.; Lovick, Jennifer K.; Ngo, Kathy T.; Borisuthirattana, Wichanee; Omoto, Jaison J.; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila central brain is largely composed of lineages, units of sibling neurons derived from a single progenitor cell or neuroblast. During the early embryonic period neuroblast generate the primary neurons that constitute the larval brain. Neuroblasts reactivate in the larva, adding to their lineages a large number of secondary neurons which, according to previous studies in which selected lineages were labeled by stably expressed markers, differentiate during metamorphosis, sending t...

  8. The mapping of neurons and lineage classification of the larvae and adult Drosophila brain in several Gal4 transmitter lines

    OpenAIRE

    Ahad, Sally

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, neurons within the central nervous system are grouped into units called lineages. Each lineage contains cells derived from a single neuroblast. A neuroblast is a stem cell divides and forms lineages of neurons. In flies, the lineage can be subdivided into different parts; the neurons that are born first are closest to the neuropile (Spindler and Hartenstein, 2010). There is a birth ordering of neurons. In the embryo, the neuroblasts divide 5 to 6 times and are called primary n...

  9. Genomic profiling identifies TITF1 as a lineage-specific oncogene amplified in lung cancer

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    Kwei, KA; Kim, YH; Girard, L; Kao, J; Pacyna-Gengelbach, M; Salari, K; Lee, J.; Choi, Y-L; Sato, M.; Wang, P.; Hernandez-Boussard, T; Gazdar, AF; Petersen, I. (Inga); Minna, JD; Pollack, JR

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death, where the amplification of oncogenes contributes to tumorigenesis. Genomic profiling of 128 lung cancer cell lines and tumors revealed frequent focal DNA amplification at cytoband 14q13.3, a locus not amplified in other tumor types. The smallest region of recurrent amplification spanned the homeobox transcription factor TITF1 (thyroid transcription factor 1; also called NKX2-1), previously linked to normal lung development and function. When amp...

  10. A young Alu subfamily amplified independently in human and African great apes lineages.

    OpenAIRE

    Zietkiewicz, E; Richer, C.; Makalowski, W; Jurka, J; Labuda, D

    1994-01-01

    A variety of Alu subfamilies amplified in primate genomes at different evolutionary time periods. Alu Sb2 belongs to a group of young subfamilies with a characteristic two-nucleotide deletion at positions 65/66. It consists of repeats having a 7-nucleotide duplication of a sequence segment involving positions 246 through 252. The presence of Sb2 inserts was examined in five genomic loci in 120 human DNA samples as well as in DNAs of higher primates. The lack of the insertional polymorphism se...

  11. Human fetal neuroblast and neuroblastoma transcriptome analysis confirms neuroblast origin and highlights neuroblastoma candidate genes

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    De Preter, Katleen; Vandesompele, Jo; Heimann, Pierre; Yigit, Nurten; Beckman, Siv; Schramm, Alexander; Eggert, Angelika; Stallings, Raymond L; Benoit, Yves; Renard, Marleen; Paepe, Anne De; Laureys, Geneviève; Påhlman, Sven; Speleman, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Background Neuroblastoma tumor cells are assumed to originate from primitive neuroblasts giving rise to the sympathetic nervous system. Because these precursor cells are not detectable in postnatal life, their transcription profile has remained inaccessible for comparative data mining strategies in neuroblastoma. This study provides the first genome-wide mRNA expression profile of these human fetal sympathetic neuroblasts. To this purpose, small islets of normal neuroblasts were isolated by laser microdissection from human fetal adrenal glands. Results Expression of catecholamine metabolism genes, and neuronal and neuroendocrine markers in the neuroblasts indicated that the proper cells were microdissected. The similarities in expression profile between normal neuroblasts and malignant neuroblastomas provided strong evidence for the neuroblast origin hypothesis of neuroblastoma. Next, supervised feature selection was used to identify the genes that are differentially expressed in normal neuroblasts versus neuroblastoma tumors. This approach efficiently sifted out genes previously reported in neuroblastoma expression profiling studies; most importantly, it also highlighted a series of genes and pathways previously not mentioned in neuroblastoma biology but that were assumed to be involved in neuroblastoma pathogenesis. Conclusion This unique dataset adds power to ongoing and future gene expression studies in neuroblastoma and will facilitate the identification of molecular targets for novel therapies. In addition, this neuroblast transcriptome resource could prove useful for the further study of human sympathoadrenal biogenesis. PMID:16989664

  12. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila brain: II. Identification of lineage projection patterns based on MARCM clones.

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    Wong, Darren C; Lovick, Jennifer K; Ngo, Kathy T; Borisuthirattana, Wichanee; Omoto, Jaison J; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-12-15

    The Drosophila central brain is largely composed of lineages, units of sibling neurons derived from a single progenitor cell or neuroblast. During the early embryonic period, neuroblasts generate the primary neurons that constitute the larval brain. Neuroblasts reactivate in the larva, adding to their lineages a large number of secondary neurons which, according to previous studies in which selected lineages were labeled by stably expressed markers, differentiate during metamorphosis, sending terminal axonal and dendritic branches into defined volumes of the brain neuropil. We call the overall projection pattern of neurons forming a given lineage the "projection envelope" of that lineage. By inducing MARCM clones at the early larval stage, we labeled the secondary progeny of each neuroblast. For the supraesophageal ganglion excluding mushroom body (the part of the brain investigated in the present work) we obtained 81 different types of clones. Based on the trajectory of their secondary axon tracts (described in the accompanying paper, Lovick et al., 2013), we assigned these clones to specific lineages defined in the larva. Since a labeled clone reveals all aspects (cell bodies, axon tracts, terminal arborization) of a lineage, we were able to describe projection envelopes for all secondary lineages of the supraesophageal ganglion. This work provides a framework by which the secondary neurons (forming the vast majority of adult brain neurons) can be assigned to genetically and developmentally defined groups. It also represents a step towards the goal to establish, for each lineage, the link between its mature anatomical and functional phenotype, and the genetic make-up of the neuroblast it descends from. PMID:23872236

  13. Existence of two geographically-linked clonal lineages in the bacterial fish pathogen Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida evidenced by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

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    Magariños, B; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L; Romalde, J L

    2000-08-01

    In this work, we applied the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique to evaluate the genetic diversity in Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida (formerly Pasteurella piscicida), an important pathogen for different marine fish. Regardless of the oligonucleotide primer employed, the 29 isolates of Ph. damselae subsp. piscicida tested were separated into two groups, the RAPD-PCR analysis differentiated the European strains from the Japanese strains. The similarity between both groups estimated on the basis of the Dice coefficient was 75-80%. These results show that European and Japanese isolates of Ph. damselae subsp. piscicida, regardless of their host fish species, belong to two different clonal lineages. Our findings also indicate that RAPD profiling constitutes a useful tool for epidemiological studies of this fish pathogen. PMID:11057980

  14. Drosophila neuroblasts retain the daughter centrosome

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    Januschke, Jens; Llamazares, Salud; Reina, Jose; Gonzalez, Cayetano

    2011-01-01

    During asymmetric mitosis, both in male Drosophila germline stem cells and in mouse embryo neural progenitors, the mother centrosome is retained by the self-renewed cell; hence suggesting that mother centrosome inheritance might contribute to stemness. We test this hypothesis in Drosophila neuroblasts (NBs) tracing photo converted centrioles and a daughter-centriole-specific marker generated by cloning the Drosophila homologue of human Centrobin. Here we show that upon asymmetric mitosis, the...

  15. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila brain: I. Development of the lineage-associated fiber tracts.

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    Lovick, Jennifer K; Ngo, Kathy T; Omoto, Jaison J; Wong, Darren C; Nguyen, Joseph D; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-12-15

    Neurons of the Drosophila central brain fall into approximately 100 paired groups, termed lineages. Each lineage is derived from a single asymmetrically-dividing neuroblast. Embryonic neuroblasts produce 1,500 primary neurons (per hemisphere) that make up the larval CNS followed by a second mitotic period in the larva that generates approximately 10,000 secondary, adult-specific neurons. Clonal analyses based on previous works using lineage-specific Gal4 drivers have established that such lineages form highly invariant morphological units. All neurons of a lineage project as one or a few axon tracts (secondary axon tracts, SATs) with characteristic trajectories, thereby representing unique hallmarks. In the neuropil, SATs assemble into larger fiber bundles (fascicles) which interconnect different neuropil compartments. We have analyzed the SATs and fascicles formed by lineages during larval, pupal, and adult stages using antibodies against membrane molecules (Neurotactin/Neuroglian) and synaptic proteins (Bruchpilot/N-Cadherin). The use of these markers allows one to identify fiber bundles of the adult brain and associate them with SATs and fascicles of the larval brain. This work lays the foundation for assigning the lineage identity of GFP-labeled MARCM clones on the basis of their close association with specific SATs and neuropil fascicles, as described in the accompanying paper (Wong et al., 2013. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila brain: II. Identification of lineage projection patterns based on MARCM clones. Submitted.). PMID:23880429

  16. Identifying neuronal lineages of Drosophila by sequence analysis of axon tracts

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    Cardona, A; Saalfeld, S; Arganda, I; Pereanu, W; Schindelin, J; Hartenstein, V.

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila brain is formed by an invariant set of lineages, each of which is derived from a unique neural stem cell (neuroblast) and forms a genetic and structural unit of the brain. The task of reconstructing brain circuitry at the level of individual neurons can be made significantly easier by assigning neurons to their respective lineages. In this paper we address the automatization of neuron and lineage identification. We focused on the Drosophila brain lineages at the larval stage wh...

  17. Klumpfuss controls FMRFamide expression by enabling BMP signaling within the NB5-6 lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Losada-Perez, Maria; Gabilondo, Hugo; Molina, Isabel; Turiegano, Enrique; Torroja, Laura; Thor, Stefan; Benito-Sipos, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A number of transcription factors that are expressed within most, if not all, embryonic neuroblast (NB) lineages participate in neural subtype specification. Some have been extensively studied in several NB lineages (e.g. components of the temporal gene cascade) whereas others only within specific NB lineages. To what extent they function in other lineages remains unknown. Klumpfuss (Klu), the Drosophila ortholog of the mammalian Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) protein, is one such transcription factor. ...

  18. Lineage mapping identifies molecular and architectural similarities between the larval and adult Drosophila central nervous system

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    Lacin, Haluk; Truman, James W

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis in Drosophila occurs in two phases, embryonic and post-embryonic, in which the same set of neuroblasts give rise to the distinct larval and adult nervous systems, respectively. Here, we identified the embryonic neuroblast origin of the adult neuronal lineages in the ventral nervous system via lineage-specific GAL4 lines and molecular markers. Our lineage mapping revealed that neurons born late in the embryonic phase show axonal morphology and transcription factor profiles that are similar to the neurons born post-embryonically from the same neuroblast. Moreover, we identified three thorax-specific neuroblasts not previously characterized and show that HOX genes confine them to the thoracic segments. Two of these, NB2-3 and NB3-4, generate leg motor neurons. The other neuroblast is novel and appears to have arisen recently during insect evolution. Our findings provide a comprehensive view of neurogenesis and show how proliferation of individual neuroblasts is dictated by temporal and spatial cues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13399.001 PMID:26975248

  19. Extremes of Lineage Plasticity in the Drosophila Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Suewei; Marin, Elizabeth C.; Yang, Ching-Po; Kao, Chih-Fei; Apenteng, Bettye A.; Huang, Yaling; O’Connor, Michael B.; Truman, James W.; Lee, Tzumin

    2013-01-01

    An often-overlooked aspect of neural plasticity is the plasticity of neuronal composition, in which the numbers of neurons of particular classes are altered in response to environment and experience. The Drosophila brain features several well-characterized lineages in which a single neuroblast gives rise to multiple neuronal classes in a stereotyped sequence during development [1]. We find that in the intrinsic mushroom body neuron lineage, the numbers for each class are highly plastic, depen...

  20. The Drosophila neural lineages: a model system to study brain development and circuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Spindler, Shana R; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila, neurons of the central nervous system are grouped into units called lineages. Each lineage contains cells derived from a single neuroblast. Due to its clonal nature, the Drosophila brain is a valuable model system to study neuron development and circuit formation. To better understand the mechanisms underlying brain development, genetic manipulation tools can be utilized within lineages to visualize, knock down, or over-express proteins. Here, we will introduce the formation an...

  1. Lineage-associated tracts defining the anatomy of the Drosophila first instar larval brain.

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    Hartenstein, Volker; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Lovick, Jennifer K; Kong, Angel; Omoto, Jaison J; Ngo, Kathy T; Viktorin, Gudrun

    2015-10-01

    Fixed lineages derived from unique, genetically specified neuroblasts form the anatomical building blocks of the Drosophila brain. Neurons belonging to the same lineage project their axons in a common tract, which is labeled by neuronal markers. In this paper, we present a detailed atlas of the lineage-associated tracts forming the brain of the early Drosophila larva, based on the use of global markers (anti-Neuroglian, anti-Neurotactin, inscuteable-Gal4>UAS-chRFP-Tub) and lineage-specific reporters. We describe 68 discrete fiber bundles that contain axons of one lineage or pairs/small sets of adjacent lineages. Bundles enter the neuropil at invariant locations, the lineage tract entry portals. Within the neuropil, these fiber bundles form larger fascicles that can be classified, by their main orientation, into longitudinal, transverse, and vertical (ascending/descending) fascicles. We present 3D digital models of lineage tract entry portals and neuropil fascicles, set into relationship to commonly used, easily recognizable reference structures such as the mushroom body, the antennal lobe, the optic lobe, and the Fasciclin II-positive fiber bundles that connect the brain and ventral nerve cord. Correspondences and differences between early larval tract anatomy and the previously described late larval and adult lineage patterns are highlighted. Our L1 neuro-anatomical atlas of lineages constitutes an essential step towards following morphologically defined lineages to the neuroblasts of the early embryo, which will ultimately make it possible to link the structure and connectivity of a lineage to the expression of genes in the particular neuroblast that gives rise to that lineage. Furthermore, the L1 atlas will be important for a host of ongoing work that attempts to reconstruct neuronal connectivity at the level of resolution of single neurons and their synapses. PMID:26141956

  2. The Hippo Pathway Regulates Neuroblasts and Brain Size in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Poon, Carole L C; Mitchell, Katrina A; Kondo, Shu; Cheng, Louise Y; Harvey, Kieran F

    2016-04-25

    A key question in developmental neurobiology is how neural stem cells regulate their proliferative potential and cellular diversity and thus specify the overall size of the brain. Drosophila melanogaster neural stem cells (neuroblasts) are known to regulate their ability to self-renew by asymmetric cell division and produce different types of neurons and glia through sequential expression of temporal transcription factors [1]. Here, we show that the conserved Hippo pathway, a key regulator of epithelial organ size [2-4], restricts neuroblast proliferative potential and neuronal cell number to regulate brain size. The inhibition of Hippo pathway activity via depletion of the core kinases Tao-1, Hippo, or Warts regulates several key characteristics of neuroblasts during postembryonic neurogenesis. The Hippo pathway is required to maintain timely entry and exit from neurogenesis by regulating both neuroblast reactivation from quiescence and the time at which neuroblasts undergo terminal differentiation. Further, it restricts neuroblast cell-cycle speed, specifies cell size, and alters the proportion of neuron types generated during postembryonic neurogenesis. Collectively, deregulation of Hippo signaling in neuroblasts causes a substantial increase in overall brain size. We show that these effects are mediated via the key downstream transcription co-activator Yorkie and that, indeed, Yorkie overexpression in neuroblasts is sufficient to cause brain overgrowth. These studies reveal a novel mechanism that controls stem cell proliferative potential during postembryonic neurogenesis to regulate brain size. PMID:26996505

  3. The AP-2 Transcription Factor APTF-2 Is Required for Neuroblast and Epidermal Morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans Embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budirahardja, Yemima; Tan, Pei Yi; Doan, Thang; Weisdepp, Peter; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionarily conserved family of AP-2 transcription factors (TF) regulates proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Mutations in human AP-2 TF have been linked with bronchio-occular-facial syndrome and Char Syndrome, congenital birth defects characterized by craniofacial deformities and patent ductus arteriosus, respectively. How mutations in AP-2 TF cause the disease phenotypes is not well understood. Here, we characterize the aptf-2(qm27) allele in Caenorhabditis elegans, which carries a point mutation in the conserved DNA binding region of AP-2 TF. We show that compromised APTF-2 activity leads to defects in dorsal intercalation, aberrant ventral enclosure and elongation defects, ultimately culminating in the formation of morphologically deformed larvae or complete arrest during epidermal morphogenesis. Using cell lineaging, we demonstrate that APTF-2 regulates the timing of cell division, primarily in ABarp, D and C cell lineages to control the number of neuroblasts, muscle and epidermal cells. Live imaging revealed nuclear enrichment of APTF-2 in lineages affected by the qm27 mutation preceding the relevant morphogenetic events. Finally, we found that another AP-2 TF, APTF-4, is also essential for epidermal morphogenesis, in a similar yet independent manner. Thus, our study provides novel insight on the cellular-level functions of an AP-2 transcription factor in development. PMID:27176626

  4. The AP-2 Transcription Factor APTF-2 Is Required for Neuroblast and Epidermal Morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans Embryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budirahardja, Yemima; Tan, Pei Yi; Weisdepp, Peter; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved family of AP-2 transcription factors (TF) regulates proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Mutations in human AP-2 TF have been linked with bronchio-occular-facial syndrome and Char Syndrome, congenital birth defects characterized by craniofacial deformities and patent ductus arteriosus, respectively. How mutations in AP-2 TF cause the disease phenotypes is not well understood. Here, we characterize the aptf-2(qm27) allele in Caenorhabditis elegans, which carries a point mutation in the conserved DNA binding region of AP-2 TF. We show that compromised APTF-2 activity leads to defects in dorsal intercalation, aberrant ventral enclosure and elongation defects, ultimately culminating in the formation of morphologically deformed larvae or complete arrest during epidermal morphogenesis. Using cell lineaging, we demonstrate that APTF-2 regulates the timing of cell division, primarily in ABarp, D and C cell lineages to control the number of neuroblasts, muscle and epidermal cells. Live imaging revealed nuclear enrichment of APTF-2 in lineages affected by the qm27 mutation preceding the relevant morphogenetic events. Finally, we found that another AP-2 TF, APTF-4, is also essential for epidermal morphogenesis, in a similar yet independent manner. Thus, our study provides novel insight on the cellular-level functions of an AP-2 transcription factor in development. PMID:27176626

  5. The Drosophila neural lineages: a model system to study brain development and circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Shana R; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-06-01

    In Drosophila, neurons of the central nervous system are grouped into units called lineages. Each lineage contains cells derived from a single neuroblast. Due to its clonal nature, the Drosophila brain is a valuable model system to study neuron development and circuit formation. To better understand the mechanisms underlying brain development, genetic manipulation tools can be utilized within lineages to visualize, knock down, or over-express proteins. Here, we will introduce the formation and development of lineages, discuss how one can utilize this model system, offer a comprehensive list of known lineages and their respective markers, and then briefly review studies that have utilized Drosophila neural lineages with a look at how this model system can benefit future endeavors. PMID:20306203

  6. HIF2A and IGF2 Expression Correlates in Human Neuroblastoma Cells and Normal Immature Sympathetic Neuroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Mohlin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During normal sympathetic nervous system (SNS development, cells of the ganglionic lineage can malignantly transform and develop into the childhood tumor neuroblastoma. Hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs mediate cellular responses during normal development and are central in the adaptation to oxygen shortage. HIFs are also implicated in the progression of several cancer forms, and high HIF-2α expression correlates with disseminated disease and poor outcome in neuroblastoma. During normal SNS development, HIF2A is transiently expressed in neuroblasts and chromaffin cells. SNS cells can, during development, be distinguished by distinct gene expression patterns, and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2 is a marker of sympathetic chromaffin cells, whereas sympathetic neuroblasts lack IGF2 expression. Despite the neuronal derivation of neuroblastomas, we show that neuroblastoma cell lines and specimens express IGF2 and that expression of HIF2A and IGF2 correlates, with the strongest correlation in high-stage tumors. In neuroblastoma, both IGF2 and HIF2A are hypoxia-driven and knocking down IGF2 at hypoxia resulted in downregulated HIF2A levels. HIF-2α and IGF2 were strongly expressed in subsets of immature neuroblastoma cells, suggesting that these two genes could be co-expressed also at early stages of SNS development. We show that IGF2 is indeed expressed in sympathetic chain ganglia at embryonic week 6.5, a developmental stage when HIF-2α is present. These findings provide a rationale for the unexpected IGF2 expression in neuroblastomas and might suggest that IGF2 and HIF2A positive neuroblastoma cells are arrested at an embryonic differentiation stage corresponding to the stage when sympathetic chain ganglia begins to coalesce.

  7. Hedgehog signaling acts with the temporal cascade to promote neuroblast cell cycle exit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phing Chian Chai

    Full Text Available In Drosophila postembryonic neuroblasts, transition in gene expression programs of a cascade of transcription factors (also known as the temporal series acts together with the asymmetric division machinery to generate diverse neurons with distinct identities and regulate the end of neuroblast proliferation. However, the underlying mechanism of how this "temporal series" acts during development remains unclear. Here, we show that Hh signaling in the postembryonic brain is temporally regulated; excess (earlier onset of Hh signaling causes premature neuroblast cell cycle exit and under-proliferation, whereas loss of Hh signaling causes delayed cell cycle exit and excess proliferation. Moreover, the Hh pathway functions downstream of Castor but upstream of Grainyhead, two components of the temporal series, to schedule neuroblast cell cycle exit. Interestingly, hh is likely a target of Castor. Hence, Hh signaling provides a link between the temporal series and the asymmetric division machinery in scheduling the end of neurogenesis.

  8. The Snail family member Worniu is continuously required in neuroblasts to prevent Elav-induced premature differentiation

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    Lai, Sen-Lin; Miller, Michael R.; Robinson, Kristin J.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2012-01-01

    Snail family transcription factors are best known for regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The Drosophila Snail family member Worniu is specifically transcribed in neural progenitors (neuroblasts) throughout their lifespan, and worniu mutants show defects in neuroblast delamination (a form of EMT). However, the role of Worniu in neuroblasts beyond their formation is unknown. We performed RNA-seq on worniu mutant larval neuroblasts and observed reduced cell cycle transcripts and increased neural differentiation transcripts. Consistent with these genomic data, worniu mutant neuroblasts showed a striking delay in prophase/metaphase transition by live imaging, and increased levels of the conserved neuronal differentiation splicing factor Elav. Reducing Elav levels significantly suppressed the worniu mutant phenotype. We conclude that Worniu is continuously required in neuroblasts to maintain self-renewal by promoting cell cycle progression and inhibiting premature differentiation. PMID:23079601

  9. Time-lapse imaging of neuroblast migration in acute slices of the adult mouse forebrain.

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    Khlghatyan, Jivan; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2012-01-01

    There is a substantial body of evidence indicating that new functional neurons are constitutively generated from an endogenous pool of neural stem cells in restricted areas of the adult mammalian brain. Newborn neuroblasts from the subventricular zone (SVZ) migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to their final destination in the olfactory bulb (OB). In the RMS, neuroblasts migrate tangentially in chains ensheathed by astrocytic processes using blood vessels as a structural support and a source of molecular factors required for migration. In the OB, neuroblasts detach from the chains and migrate radially into the different bulbar layers where they differentiate into interneurons and integrate into the existing network. In this manuscript we describe the procedure for monitoring cell migration in acute slices of the rodent brain. The use of acute slices allows the assessment of cell migration in the microenvironment that closely resembling to in vivo conditions and in brain regions that are difficult to access for in vivo imaging. In addition, it avoids long culturing condition as in the case of organotypic and cell cultures that may eventually alter the migration properties of the cells. Neuronal precursors in acute slices can be visualized using DIC optics or fluorescent proteins. Viral labeling of neuronal precursors in the SVZ, grafting neuroblasts from reporter mice into the SVZ of wild-type mice, and using transgenic mice that express fluorescent protein in neuroblasts are all suitable methods for visualizing neuroblasts and following their migration. The later method, however, does not allow individual cells to be tracked for long periods of time because of the high density of labeled cells. We used a wide-field fluorescent upright microscope equipped with a CCD camera to achieve a relatively rapid acquisition interval (one image every 15 or 30 sec) to reliably identify the stationary and migratory phases. A precise identification of the duration of

  10. Neurogenin2 directs granule neuroblast production and amplification while NeuroD1 specifies neuronal fate during hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Roybon

    Full Text Available The specification and differentiation of dentate gyrus granule neurons in the hippocampus require temporally and spatially coordinated actions of both intrinsic and extrinsic molecules. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Neurogenin2 (Ngn2 and NeuroD1 are key regulators in these processes. Based on existing classification, we analyzed the molecular events occurring during hippocampal neurogenesis, primarily focusing on juvenile animals. We found that Ngn2 is transiently expressed by late type-2a amplifying progenitors. The Ngn2 progenies mature into hippocampal granule neurons. Interestingly, the loss of Ngn2 at early stages of development leads to a robust reduction in neurogenesis, but does not disturb granule neuron maturation per se. We found that the role of Ngn2 is to maintain progenitors in an undifferentiated state, allowing them to amplify prior to their maturation into granule neurons upon NeuroD1 induction. When we overexpressed Ngn2 and NeuroD1 in vivo, we found NeuroD1 to exhibit a more pronounced neuron-inductive effect, leading to granule neuron commitment, than that displayed by Ngn2. Finally, we observed that all markers expressed during the transcriptional control of hippocampal neurogenesis in rodents are also present in the human hippocampus. Taken together, we demonstrate a critical role of for Ngn2 and NeuroD1 in controlling neuronal commitment and hippocampal granule neuroblast formation, both during embryonic development and in post-natal hippocampal granule neurogenesis.

  11. A model of ischemia-induced neuroblast activation in the adult subventricular zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Vergni

    Full Text Available We have developed a rat brain organotypic culture model, in which tissue slices contain cortex-subventricular zone-striatum regions, to model neuroblast activity in response to in vitro ischemia. Neuroblast activation has been described in terms of two main parameters, proliferation and migration from the subventricular zone into the injured cortex. We observed distinct phases of neuroblast activation as is known to occur after in vivo ischemia. Thus, immediately after oxygen/glucose deprivation (6-24 hours, neuroblasts reduce their proliferative and migratory activity, whereas, at longer time points after the insult (2 to 5 days, they start to proliferate and migrate into the damaged cortex. Antagonism of ionotropic receptors for extracellular ATP during and after the insult unmasks an early activation of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone, which responded with a rapid and intense migration of neuroblasts into the damaged cortex (within 24 hours. The process is further enhanced by elevating the production of the chemoattractant SDf-1alpha and may also be boosted by blocking the activation of microglia. This organotypic model which we have developed is an excellent in vitro system to study neurogenesis after ischemia and other neurodegenerative diseases. Its application has revealed a SOS response to oxygen/glucose deprivation, which is inhibited by unfavorable conditions due to the ischemic environment. Finally, experimental quantifications have allowed us to elaborate a mathematical model to describe neuroblast activation and to develop a computer simulation which should have promising applications for the screening of drug candidates for novel therapies of ischemia-related pathologies.

  12. NKCC1 controls GABAergic signaling and neuroblast migration in the postnatal forebrain

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    Murray Kerren

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract From an early postnatal period and throughout life there is a continuous production of olfactory bulb (OB interneurons originating from neuronal precursors in the subventricular zone. To reach the OB circuits, immature neuroblasts migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS. In the present study, we employed cultured postnatal mouse forebrain slices and used lentiviral vectors to label neuronal precursors with GFP and to manipulate the expression levels of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC1. We investigated the role of this Cl- transporter in different stages of postnatal neurogenesis, including neuroblast migration and integration in the OB networks once they have reached the granule cell layer (GCL. We report that NKCC1 activity is necessary for maintaining normal migratory speed. Both pharmacological and genetic manipulations revealed that NKCC1 maintains high [Cl-]i and regulates the resting membrane potential of migratory neuroblasts whilst its functional expression is strongly reduced at the time cells reach the GCL. As in other developing systems, NKCC1 shapes GABAA-dependent signaling in the RMS neuroblasts. Also, we show that NKCC1 controls the migration of neuroblasts in the RMS. The present study indeed indicates that the latter effect results from a novel action of NKCC1 on the resting membrane potential, which is independent of GABAA-dependent signaling. All in all, our findings show that early stages of the postnatal recruitment of OB interneurons rely on precise, orchestrated mechanisms that depend on multiple actions of NKCC1.

  13. The arborization pattern of engrailed-positive neural lineages reveal neuromere boundaries in the Drosophila brain neuropile

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Abhilasha; S Fung; Lichtneckert, Robert; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila brain is a highly complex structure composed of thousands of neurons that are interconnected in numerous exquisitely organized neuropile structures such as the mushroom bodies, central complex, antennal lobes, and other specialized neuropiles. While the neurons of the insect brain are known to derive in a lineage-specific fashion from a stereotyped set of segmentally organized neuroblasts, the developmental origin and neuromeric organization of the neuropile formed by these neu...

  14. Operational amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Dostal, Jiri

    1993-01-01

    This book provides the reader with the practical knowledge necessary to select and use operational amplifier devices. It presents an extensive treatment of applications and a practically oriented, unified theory of operational circuits.Provides the reader with practical knowledge necessary to select and use operational amplifier devices. Presents an extensive treatment of applications and a practically oriented, unified theory of operational circuits

  15. Two-dimensional differential adherence of neuroblasts in laser micromachined CAD/CAM agarose channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doraiswamy, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Material Science and Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Patz, T. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Material Science and Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Narayan, R.J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Material Science and Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG-16 Magurele, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Modi, R. [US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5345 (United States); Auyeung, R.C.Y. [US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5345 (United States); Chrisey, D.B. [US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5345 (United States)

    2006-04-30

    Laser micromachining of hydrophobic gels into CAD/CAM patterns was used to develop differentially adherent surfaces and induce the attachment of B35 rat neuroblasts that would later form engineered nerve bundles. Narrow channels, 60-400 {mu}m wide, were micromachined in a 2% agarose gel using an ArF laser, and subsequently filled with an extracellular matrix gel. Upon the addition of 1 ml of a 2 x 104 cells/ml neuroblast suspension, the cells selectively adhered to the ECM-lined channels in a non-confluent manner and we monitored their growth at various time points. The adherent neuroblasts were fluorescently imaged with a propidium iodide live/dead assay, which revealed that the cells were alive within the channels. After 72 h growth, the neuroblasts grew, proliferated, and differentiated into nerve bundles. The fully grown 1 cm long nerve bundle organoids maintained an aspect ratio on the order of 100. The results presented in this paper provide the foundation for laser micromachining technique to develop bioactive substrates for development of three-dimensional tissues. Laser micromachining offers rapid prototyping of substrates, excellent resolution, control of pattern depth and dimensions, and ease of fabrication.

  16. Two-dimensional differential adherence of neuroblasts in laser micromachined CAD/CAM agarose channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser micromachining of hydrophobic gels into CAD/CAM patterns was used to develop differentially adherent surfaces and induce the attachment of B35 rat neuroblasts that would later form engineered nerve bundles. Narrow channels, 60-400 μm wide, were micromachined in a 2% agarose gel using an ArF laser, and subsequently filled with an extracellular matrix gel. Upon the addition of 1 ml of a 2 x 104 cells/ml neuroblast suspension, the cells selectively adhered to the ECM-lined channels in a non-confluent manner and we monitored their growth at various time points. The adherent neuroblasts were fluorescently imaged with a propidium iodide live/dead assay, which revealed that the cells were alive within the channels. After 72 h growth, the neuroblasts grew, proliferated, and differentiated into nerve bundles. The fully grown 1 cm long nerve bundle organoids maintained an aspect ratio on the order of 100. The results presented in this paper provide the foundation for laser micromachining technique to develop bioactive substrates for development of three-dimensional tissues. Laser micromachining offers rapid prototyping of substrates, excellent resolution, control of pattern depth and dimensions, and ease of fabrication

  17. Identifying neuronal lineages of Drosophila by sequence analysis of axon tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Albert; Saalfeld, Stephan; Arganda, Ignacio; Pereanu, Wayne; Schindelin, Johannes; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-06-01

    The Drosophila brain is formed by an invariant set of lineages, each of which is derived from a unique neural stem cell (neuroblast) and forms a genetic and structural unit of the brain. The task of reconstructing brain circuitry at the level of individual neurons can be made significantly easier by assigning neurons to their respective lineages. In this article we address the automation of neuron and lineage identification. We focused on the Drosophila brain lineages at the larval stage when they form easily recognizable secondary axon tracts (SATs) that were previously partially characterized. We now generated an annotated digital database containing all lineage tracts reconstructed from five registered wild-type brains, at higher resolution and including some that were previously not characterized. We developed a method for SAT structural comparisons based on a dynamic programming approach akin to nucleotide sequence alignment and a machine learning classifier trained on the annotated database of reference SATs. We quantified the stereotypy of SATs by measuring the residual variability of aligned wild-type SATs. Next, we used our method for the identification of SATs within wild-type larval brains, and found it highly accurate (93-99%). The method proved highly robust for the identification of lineages in mutant brains and in brains that differed in developmental time or labeling. We describe for the first time an algorithm that quantifies neuronal projection stereotypy in the Drosophila brain and use the algorithm for automatic neuron and lineage recognition. PMID:20519528

  18. The high dosage of earthworm (Eisenia andrei) extract decreases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Bing Chun; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon; Won, Moo-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Earthworm extract has shown anticancer characteristics. In the present study, we examined the effect of chronic treatment with a high dose of earthworm (Eisenia andrei) extract (EE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of 3-week-old mice using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry for cell proliferation and doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry for neuroblast differentiation, respectively. BrdU-, Ki-67-, and DCX-i...

  19. Identification and characterization of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone and rostral migratory stream of the adult human brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Congmin Wang; Qiangqiang Zhang; Yue Zhang; Rui Chen; Hongjun Song; Zhengang Yang; Fang Liu; Ying-Ying Liu; Cai-Hong Zhao; Yan You; Lei Wang; Jingxiao Zhang; Bin Wei; Tong Ma

    2011-01-01

    It is of great interest to identify new neurons in the adult human brain,but the persistence of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the existence of the rostral migratory stream (RMS)-like pathway in the adult human forebrain remain highly controversial.In the present study,we have described the general configuration of the RMS in adult monkey,fetal human and adult human brains.We provide evidence that neuroblasts exist continuously in the anterior ventral SVZ and RMS of the adult human brain.The neuroblasts appear singly or in pairs without forming chains; they exhibit migratory morphologies and co-express the immature neuronal markers doublecortin,polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule and βI-tubulin.Few of these neuroblasts appear to be actively proliferating in the anterior ventral SVZ but none in the RMS,indicating that neuroblasts distributed along the RMS are most likely derived from the ventral SVZ.Interestingly,no neuroblasts are found in the adult human olfactory bulb.Taken together,our data suggest that the SVZ maintains the ability to produce neuroblasts in the adult human brain.

  20. Caenorhabditis elegans anillin (ani-1) regulates neuroblast cytokinesis and epidermal morphogenesis during embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulos, N; Wernike, D; Chen, Y; Makil, N; Marte, A; Piekny, A

    2013-11-01

    The formation of tissues is essential for metazoan development. During Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis, ventral epidermal cells migrate to encase the ventral surface of the embryo in a layer of epidermis by a process known as ventral enclosure. This process is regulated by guidance cues secreted by the underlying neuroblasts. However, since the cues and their receptors are differentially expressed in multiple cell types, the role of the neuroblasts in ventral enclosure is not fully understood. Furthermore, although F-actin is required for epidermal cell migration, it is not known if nonmuscle myosin is also required. Anillin (ANI-1) is an actin and myosin-binding protein that coordinates actin-myosin contractility in the early embryo. Here, we show that ANI-1 localizes to the cleavage furrows of dividing neuroblasts during mid-embryogenesis and is required for their division. Embryos depleted of ani-1 display a range of ventral enclosure phenotypes, where ventral epidermal cells migrate with similar speeds to control embryos, but contralateral neighbors often fail to meet and are misaligned. The ventral enclosure phenotypes in ani-1 RNAi embryos suggest that the position or shape of neuroblasts is important for directing ventral epidermal cell migration, although does not rule out an autonomous requirement for ani-1 in the epidermal cells. Furthermore, we show that rho-1 and other regulators of nonmuscle myosin activity are required for ventral epidermal cell migration. Interestingly, altering nonmuscle myosin contractility alleviates or strengthens ani-1's ventral enclosure phenotypes. Our findings suggest that ventral enclosure is a complex process that likely relies on inputs from multiple tissues. PMID:24016757

  1. Uncovering the link between malfunctions in Drosophila neuroblast asymmetric cell division and tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsom Corey

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asymmetric cell division is a developmental process utilized by several organisms. On the most basic level, an asymmetric division produces two daughter cells, each possessing a different identity or fate. Drosophila melanogaster progenitor cells, referred to as neuroblasts, undergo asymmetric division to produce a daughter neuroblast and another cell known as a ganglion mother cell (GMC. There are several features of asymmetric division in Drosophila that make it a very complex process, and these aspects will be discussed at length. The cell fate determinants that play a role in specifying daughter cell fate, as well as the mechanisms behind setting up cortical polarity within neuroblasts, have proved to be essential to ensuring that neurogenesis occurs properly. The role that mitotic spindle orientation plays in coordinating asymmetric division, as well as how cell cycle regulators influence asymmetric division machinery, will also be addressed. Most significantly, malfunctions during asymmetric cell division have shown to be causally linked with neoplastic growth and tumor formation. Therefore, it is imperative that the developmental repercussions as a result of asymmetric cell division gone awry be understood.

  2. Physicochemical properties of peptide-coated microelectrode arrays and their in vitro effects on neuroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane-Motlagh, Bahareh; Javanbakht, Taraneh; Shoghi, Fatemeh; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Martel, Richard; Sawan, Mohamad

    2016-11-01

    Silicon micromachined neural electrode arrays, which act as an interface between bioelectronic devices and neural tissues, play an important role in chronic implants, in vivo. The biological compatibility of chronic microelectrode arrays (MEA) is an essential factor that must be taken into account in their design and fabrication. In order to improve biocompatibility of the MEAs, the surface of the electrodes was coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and parylene-C, which are biocompatible polymers. An in vitro study was performed to test the capacity of poly-d-lysine (PDL) to improve neural-cell adhesion and proliferation. Increased proliferation of the neuroblast cells on the microelectrodes was observed in the presence of the PDL. The presence of the peptide on the electrode surface was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The impedance of the electrodes was not changed significantly before and after PDL deposition. Mouse neuroblast cells were seeded and cultured on the PDL coated and uncoated neural MEAs with different tip-coatings such as platinum, molybdenum, gold, sputtered iridium oxide, and carbon nanotubes. The neuroblast cells grew preferentially on and around peptide coated-microelectrode tips, as compared to the uncoated microelectrodes. PMID:27524064

  3. Arborization pattern of engrailed-positive neural lineages reveal neuromere boundaries in the Drosophila brain neuropil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhilasha; Fung, S; Lichtneckert, Robert; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-11-01

    The Drosophila brain is a highly complex structure composed of thousands of neurons that are interconnected in numerous exquisitely organized neuropil structures such as the mushroom bodies, central complex, antennal lobes, and other specialized neuropils. While the neurons of the insect brain are known to derive in a lineage-specific fashion from a stereotyped set of segmentally organized neuroblasts, the developmental origin and neuromeric organization of the neuropil formed by these neurons is still unclear. In this study we used genetic labeling techniques to characterize the neuropil innervation pattern of engrailed-expressing brain lineages of known neuromeric origin. We show that the neurons of these lineages project to and form most arborizations, in particular all of their proximal branches, in the same brain neuropil compartments in embryonic, larval and adult stages. Moreover, we show that engrailed-positive neurons of differing neuromeric origin respect boundaries between neuromere-specific compartments in the brain. This is confirmed by an analysis of the arborization pattern of empty spiracles-expressing lineages. These findings indicate that arborizations of lineages deriving from different brain neuromeres innervate a nonoverlapping set of neuropil compartments. This supports a model for neuromere-specific brain neuropil, in which a given lineage forms its proximal arborizations predominantly in the compartments that correspond to its neuromere of origin. PMID:19711412

  4. Adult mouse subventricular zone stem and progenitor cells are sessile and epidermal growth factor receptor negatively regulates neuroblast migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsoo Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The adult subventricular zone (SVZ contains stem and progenitor cells that generate neuroblasts throughout life. Although it is well accepted that SVZ neuroblasts are migratory, recent evidence suggests their progenitor cells may also exhibit motility. Since stem and progenitor cells are proliferative and multipotential, if they were also able to move would have important implications for SVZ neurogenesis and its potential for repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied whether SVZ stem and/or progenitor cells are motile in transgenic GFP+ slices with two photon time lapse microscopy and post hoc immunohistochemistry. We found that stem and progenitor cells; mGFAP-GFP+ cells, bright nestin-GFP+ cells and Mash1+ cells were stationary in the SVZ and rostral migratory stream (RMS. In our search for motile progenitor cells, we uncovered a population of motile betaIII-tubulin+ neuroblasts that expressed low levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr. This was intriguing since EGFr drives proliferation in the SVZ and affects migration in other systems. Thus we examined the potential role of EGFr in modulating SVZ migration. Interestingly, EGFr(low neuroblasts moved slower and in more tortuous patterns than EGFr-negative neuroblasts. We next questioned whether EGFr stimulation affects SVZ cell migration by imaging Gad65-GFP+ neuroblasts in the presence of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha, an EGFr-selective agonist. Indeed, acute exposure to TGF-alpha decreased the percentage of motile cells by approximately 40%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, the present study directly shows that SVZ stem and progenitor cells are static, that EGFr is retained on some neuroblasts, and that EGFr stimulation negatively regulates migration. This result suggests an additional role for EGFr signaling in the SVZ.

  5. The Snail protein family regulates neuroblast expression of inscuteable and string, genes involved in asymmetry and cell division in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, S I; Ip, Y T

    2001-12-01

    Delaminated neuroblasts in Drosophila function as stem cells during embryonic central nervous system development. They go through repeated asymmetric divisions to generate multiple ganglion mother cells, which divide only once more to produce postmitotic neurons. Snail, a zinc-finger transcriptional repressor, is a pan-neural protein, based on its extensive expression in neuroblasts. Previous results have demonstrated that Snail and related proteins, Worniu and Escargot, have redundant and essential functions in the nervous system. We show that the Snail family of proteins control central nervous system development by regulating genes involved in asymmetry and cell division of neuroblasts. In mutant embryos that have the three genes deleted, the expression of inscuteable is significantly lowered, while the expression of other genes that participate in asymmetric division, including miranda, staufen and prospero, appears normal. The deletion mutants also have much reduced expression of string, suggesting that a key component that drives neuroblast cell division is abnormal. Consistent with the gene expression defects, the mutant embryos lose the asymmetric localization of prospero RNA in neuroblasts and lose the staining of Prospero protein that is normally present in ganglion mother cells. Simultaneous expression of inscuteable and string in the snail family deletion mutant efficiently restores Prospero expression in ganglion mother cells, demonstrating that the two genes are key targets of Snail in neuroblasts. Mutation of the dCtBP co-repressor interaction motifs in the Snail protein leads to reduction of the Snail function in central nervous system. These results suggest that the Snail family of proteins control both asymmetry and cell division of neuroblasts by activating, probably indirectly, the expression of inscuteable and string. PMID:11731456

  6. Regional and Stage-Specific Effects of Prospectively Purified Vascular Cells on the Adult V-SVZ Neural Stem Cell Lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Crouch, Elizabeth E.; Liu, Chang; Silva-Vargas, Violeta; Doetsch, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Adult neural stem cells reside in specialized niches. In the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), quiescent neural stem cells (qNSCs) become activated (aNSCs), and generate transit amplifying cells (TACs), which give rise to neuroblasts that migrate to the olfactory bulb. The vasculature is an important component of the adult neural stem cell niche, but whether vascular cells in neurogenic areas are intrinsically different from those elsewhere in the brain is unknown. Moreover, the contri...

  7. Reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis is amplified by aluminum exposure in a model of type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoo, Dae Young; Jung, Hyo Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo; Seong, Je Kyung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic aluminum (Al) exposure for 10 weeks on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampus of type 2 diabetic rats. Six-week-old Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Zucker lean control (ZLC) rats were selected and randomly divided into Al- and non-Al-groups. Al was administered via drinking water for 10 weeks, after which the animals were sacrificed at 16 weeks of age. ZDF rats in both Al- and non-Al-groups showed increases in body weight and blood glucose levels compared to ZLC rats. Al exposure did not significantly affect body weight, blood glucose levels or pancreatic β-cells and morphology of the pancreas in either ZLC or ZDF rats. However, exposure to Al reduced cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in both ZLC and ZDF rats. Exposure to Al resulted in poor development of the dendritic processes of neuroblasts in both ZLC and ZDF rats. Furthermore, onset and continuation of diabetes reduced cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, and Al exposure amplified reduction of these parameters. These results suggest that Al exposure via drinking water aggravates the impairment in hippocampal neurogenesis that is typically observed in type 2 diabetic animals. PMID:27051335

  8. A subpopulation of mushroom body intrinsic neurons is generated by protocerebral neuroblasts in the tobacco hornworm moth, Manduca sexta (Sphingidae, Lepidoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Sarah M; Pettrey, Colleen; Daly, Kevin C

    2011-09-01

    Subpopulations of Kenyon cells, the intrinsic neurons of the insect mushroom bodies, are typically sequentially generated by dedicated neuroblasts that begin proliferating during embryogenesis. When present, Class III Kenyon cells are thought to be the first born population of neurons by virtue of the location of their cell somata, farthest from the position of the mushroom body neuroblasts. In the adult tobacco hornworm moth Manduca sexta, the axons of Class III Kenyon cells form a separate Y tract and dorsal and ventral lobelet; surprisingly, these distinctive structures are absent from the larval Manduca mushroom bodies. BrdU labeling and immunohistochemical staining reveal that Class III Kenyon cells are in fact born in the mid-larval through adult stages. The peripheral position of their cell bodies is due to their genesis from two previously undescribed protocerebral neuroblasts distinct from the mushroom body neuroblasts that generate the other Kenyon cell types. These findings challenge the notion that all Kenyon cells are produced solely by the mushroom body neuroblasts, and may explain why Class III Kenyon cells are found sporadically across the insects, suggesting that when present, they may arise through de novo recruitment of neuroblasts outside of the mushroom bodies. In addition, lifelong neurogenesis by both the Class III neuroblasts and the mushroom body neuroblasts was observed, raising the possibility that adult neurogenesis may play a role in mushroom body function in Manduca. PMID:21040804

  9. Lineage-specific effects of Notch/Numb signaling in post-embryonic development of the Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Suewei; Lai, Sen-Lin; Yu, Huang-Hsiang; Chihara, Takahiro; Luo, Liqun; Lee, Tzumin

    2010-01-01

    Numb can antagonize Notch signaling to diversify the fates of sister cells. We report here that paired sister cells acquire different fates in all three Drosophila neuronal lineages that make diverse types of antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs). Only one in each pair of postmitotic neurons survives into the adult stage in both anterodorsal (ad) and ventral (v) PN lineages. Notably, Notch signaling specifies the PN fate in the vPN lineage but promotes programmed cell death in the missing siblings in the adPN lineage. In addition, Notch/Numb-mediated binary sibling fates underlie the production of PNs and local interneurons from common precursors in the lAL lineage. Furthermore, Numb is needed in the lateral but not adPN or vPN lineages to prevent the appearance of ectopic neuroblasts and to ensure proper self-renewal of neural progenitors. These lineage-specific outputs of Notch/Numb signaling show that a universal mechanism of binary fate decision can be utilized to govern diverse neural sibling differentiations. PMID:20023159

  10. Insulin growth factors regulate the mitotic cycle in cultured rat sympathetic neuroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While neuronal mitosis is uniquely restricted to early development, the underlying regulation remains to be defined. The authors have now developed a dissociated, embryonic sympathetic neuron culture system that uses fully defined medium in which cells enter the mitotic cycle. The cultured cells expressed two neuronal traits, tyrosine hydroxylase and the neuron-specific 160-kDa neurofilament subunit protein, but were devoid of glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for non-myelin-forming Schwann cells in ganglia. Approximately one-third of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells synthesized DNA in culture, specifically incorporating [3H]thymidine into their nuclei. They used this system to define factors regulating the mitotic cycle in sympathetic neuroblasts. Members of the insulin family of growth factors, including insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II, regulated DNA synthesis in the presumptive neuroblasts. Insulin more than doubled the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells entering the mitotic cycle, as indicated by autoradiography of [3H]thymidine incorporation into nuclei. Scintillation spectrometry was an even more sensitive index of DNA synthesis. In contrast, the trophic protein nerve growth factor exhibited no mitogenic effect, suggesting that the mitogenic action of insulin growth factors is highly specific. The observations are discussed in the context of the detection of insulin growth factors and receptors in the developing brain

  11. Ethanol extract ofOenanthe javanica increases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the adolescent rat dentate gyrus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Hui Chen; Jae Chul Lee; Eun Joo Bae; Yun Lyul Lee; Jong Dai Kim; Moo-Ho Won; Il Jun Kang; Joon Ha Park; Jeong Hwi Cho; In Hye Kim; Bich Na Shin; Ji Hyeon Ahn; Seok Joon Hwang; Bing Chun Yan; Hyun Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Oenanthe javanica is an aquatic perennial herb that belongs to theOenanthe genus in Apiaceae family, and it displays well-known medicinal properties such as protective effects against glu-tamate-induced neurotoxicity. However, few studies regarding effects ofOenanthe javanica on neurogenesis in the brain have been reported. In this study, we examined the effects of a normal diet and a diet containing ethanol extract ofOenanthe javanica on cell proliferation and neu-roblast differentiation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adolescent rats using Ki-67 (an endogenous marker for cell proliferation) and doublecortin (a marker for neuroblast). Our results showed thatOenanthe javanica extract signiifcantly increased the number of Ki-67-immunoreactive cells and doublecortin-immunoreactive neuroblasts in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the adolescent rats. In addition, the immunoreactivity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor was signiifcantly increased in the dentate gyrus of theOe-nanthe javanica extract-treated group compared with the control group. However, we did not ifnd that vascular endothelial growth factor expression was increased in theOenanthe javanica extract-treated group compared with the control group. These results indicate thatOenanthe javanica extract improves cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation by increasing brain-de-rived neurotrophic factor immunoreactivity in the rat dentate gyrus.

  12. Ethanol extract of Oenanthe javanica increases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the adolescent rat dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Hui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oenanthe javanica is an aquatic perennial herb that belongs to the Oenanthe genus in Apiaceae family, and it displays well-known medicinal properties such as protective effects against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. However, few studies regarding effects of Oenanthe javanica on neurogenesis in the brain have been reported. In this study, we examined the effects of a normal diet and a diet containing ethanol extract of Oenanthe javanica on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adolescent rats using Ki-67 (an endogenous marker for cell proliferation and doublecortin (a marker for neuroblast. Our results showed that Oenanthe javanica extract significantly increased the number of Ki-67-immunoreactive cells and doublecortin-immunoreactive neuroblasts in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the adolescent rats. In addition, the immunoreactivity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor was significantly increased in the dentate gyrus of the Oenanthe javanica extract-treated group compared with the control group. However, we did not find that vascular endothelial growth factor expression was increased in the Oenanthe javanica extract-treated group compared with the control group. These results indicate that Oenanthe javanica extract improves cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor immunoreactivity in the rat dentate gyrus.

  13. Patterns of growth and tract formation during the early development of secondary lineages in the Drosophila larval brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovick, Jennifer K; Kong, Angel; Omoto, Jaison J; Ngo, Kathy T; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The Drosophila brain consists of a relatively small number of invariant, genetically determined lineages which provide a model to study the relationship between gene function and neuronal architecture. In following this long-term goal, we reconstruct the morphology (projection pattern and connectivity) and gene expression patterns of brain lineages throughout development. In this article, we focus on the secondary phase of lineage morphogenesis, from the reactivation of neuroblast proliferation in the first larval instar to the time when proliferation ends and secondary axon tracts have fully extended in the late third larval instar. We have reconstructed the location and projection of secondary lineages at close (4 h) intervals and produced a detailed map in the form of confocal z-projections and digital three-dimensional models of all lineages at successive larval stages. Based on these reconstructions, we could compare the spatio-temporal pattern of axon formation and morphogenetic movements of different lineages in normal brain development. In addition to wild type, we reconstructed lineage morphology in two mutant conditions. (1) Expressing the construct UAS-p35 which rescues programmed cell death we could systematically determine which lineages normally lose hemilineages to apoptosis. (2) so-Gal4-driven expression of dominant-negative EGFR ablated the optic lobe, which allowed us to conclude that the global centrifugal movement normally affecting the cell bodies of lateral lineages in the late larva is causally related to the expansion of the optic lobe, and that the central pattern of axonal projections of these lineages is independent of the presence or absence of the optic lobe. PMID:26178322

  14. The arborization pattern of engrailed-positive neural lineages reveal neuromere boundaries in the Drosophila brain neuropile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhilasha; Fung, S.; Lichtneckert, Robert; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila brain is a highly complex structure composed of thousands of neurons that are interconnected in numerous exquisitely organized neuropile structures such as the mushroom bodies, central complex, antennal lobes, and other specialized neuropiles. While the neurons of the insect brain are known to derive in a lineage-specific fashion from a stereotyped set of segmentally organized neuroblasts, the developmental origin and neuromeric organization of the neuropile formed by these neurons is still unclear. In this report, we use genetic labeling techniques to characterize the neuropile innervation pattern of engrailed-expressing brain lineages of known neuromeric origin. We show that the neurons of these lineages project to and form most arborizations, in particular all of their proximal branches, in the same brain neuropile compartments in embryonic, larval and adult stages. Moreover, we show that engrailed-positive neurons of differing neuromeric origin respect boundaries between neuromere-specific compartments in the brain. This is confirmed by an analysis of the arborization pattern of empty spiracles-expressing lineages. These findings indicate that arborizations of lineages deriving from different brain neuromeres innervate a non-overlapping set of neuropile compartments. This supports a model for neuromere-specific brain neuropile, in which a given lineage forms its proximal arborizations predominantly in the compartments that correspond to its neuromere of origin. PMID:19711412

  15. Low cost instrumentation amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Amplifier can be used for many applications requiring high input impedance and common mode rejection, low drift, and gain accuracy on order of one percent. Performance of inexpensive amplifier approaches that of some commercial instrumentation amplifiers in many specifications.

  16. Interactions with the young down-regulate adult olfactory neurogenesis and enhance the maturation of olfactory neuroblasts in sheep mothers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Levy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available New neurons are continuously added in the dentate gyrus and the olfactory bulb of mammalian brain. While numerous environmental factors controlling survival of newborn neurons have been extensively studied, regulation by social interactions is less documented. We addressed this question by investigating the influence of parturition and interactions with the young on neurogenesis in sheep mothers. Using Bromodeoxyuridine, a marker of cell division, in combination with markers of neuronal maturation, the percentage of neuroblasts and new mature neurons in the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus was compared between groups of parturient ewes which could interact or not with their lamb, and virgins. In addition, a morphological analysis was performed by measuring the dendritic arbor of neuroblasts in both structures. We showed that the post-partum period was associated with a decrease in olfactory and hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In the olfactory bulb, the suppressive effect on neuroblasts was dependent on interactions with the young whereas in the dentate gyrus the decrease in new mature neurons was associated with parturition. In addition, dendritic length and number of nodes of neuroblasts were significantly enhanced by interactions with the lamb in the olfactory bulb but not in the dentate gyrus. Because interactions with the young involved learning of the olfactory signature of the lamb, we hypothesize that this learning is associated with a down-regulation in olfactory neurogenesis and an enhancement of olfactory neuroblast maturation. Our assumption is that fewer new neurons decrease cell competition in the olfactory bulb and enhance maturation of those new neurons selected to participate in the learning of the young odor.

  17. Interactions with the young down-regulate adult olfactory neurogenesis and enhance the maturation of olfactory neuroblasts in sheep mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brus, Maïna; Meurisse, Maryse; Keller, Matthieu; Lévy, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    New neurons are continuously added in the dentate gyrus (DG) and the olfactory bulb of mammalian brain. While numerous environmental factors controlling survival of newborn neurons have been extensively studied, regulation by social interactions is less documented. We addressed this question by investigating the influence of parturition and interactions with the young on neurogenesis in sheep mothers. Using Bromodeoxyuridine, a marker of cell division, in combination with markers of neuronal maturation, the percentage of neuroblasts and new mature neurons in the olfactory bulb and the DG was compared between groups of parturient ewes which could interact or not with their lamb, and virgins. In addition, a morphological analysis was performed by measuring the dendritic arbor of neuroblasts in both structures. We showed that the postpartum period was associated with a decrease in olfactory and hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In the olfactory bulb, the suppressive effect on neuroblasts was dependent on interactions with the young whereas in the DG the decrease in new mature neurons was associated with parturition. In addition, dendritic length and number of nodes of neuroblasts were significantly enhanced by interactions with the lamb in the olfactory bulb but not in the DG. Because interactions with the young involved learning of the olfactory signature of the lamb, we hypothesize that this learning is associated with a down-regulation in olfactory neurogenesis and an enhancement of olfactory neuroblast maturation. Our assumption is that fewer new neurons decrease cell competition in the olfactory bulb and enhance maturation of those new neurons selected to participate in the learning of the young odor. PMID:24600367

  18. Gain ranging amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gain ranging amplifier system is provided for use in the acquisition of data. Voltage offset compensation is utilized to correct errors in the gain ranging amplifier system caused by thermal drift and temperature dependent voltage offsets, both of which are associated with amplifiers in the gain ranging amplifier system

  19. A subpopulation of mushroom body intrinsic neurons is generated by protocerebral neuroblasts in the tobacco hornworm moth, Manduca sexta (Sphingidae, Lepidoptera)

    OpenAIRE

    Farris, Sarah M.; Pettrey, Colleen; Daly, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    Subpopulations of Kenyon cells, the intrinsic neurons of the insect mushroom bodies, are typically sequentially generated by dedicated neuroblasts that begin proliferating during embryogenesis. When present, Class III Kenyon cells are thought to be the first born population of neurons by virtue of the location of their cell somata, farthest from the position of the mushroom body neuroblasts. In the adult tobacco hornworm moth Manduca sexta, the axons of Class III Kenyon cells form a separate ...

  20. Amplified Quantum Transforms

    OpenAIRE

    Cornwell, David

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate two new Amplified Quantum Transforms. In particular we create and analyze the Amplified Quantum Fourier Transform (Amplified-QFT) and the Amplified-Haar Wavelet Transform. First, we provide a brief history of quantum mechanics and quantum computing. Second, we examine the Amplified-QFT in detail and compare it against the Quantum Fourier Transform (QFT) and Quantum Hidden Subgroup (QHS) algorithms for solving the Local Period Problem. We calculate the probabiliti...

  1. Indomethacin treatment reduces microglia activation and increases numbers of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone and ischaemic striatum after focal ischaemia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ROSANA S LOPES; MARCELO M CARDOSO; ARTHUR O SAMPAIO; MARIO SANTOS BARBOSA Jr; CELICE C SOUZA; MICHELLE C DA SILVA; ELANE MAGNO N FERREIRA; MARCO AURELIOM FREIRE; RAFAEL RODRIGUES LIMA; WALACE GOMES-LEAL

    2016-09-01

    Neuroblasts from the subventricular zone (SVZ) migrate to striatum following stroke, but most of them die inthe ischaemic milieu and this can be related to exacerbated microglial activation. Here, we explored theeffects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory indomethacin on microglial activation, neuronal preservation andneuroblast migration following experimental striatal stroke in adult rats. Animals were submitted toendothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced focal striatal ischaemia and were treated with indomethacin or sterile saline(i.p.) for 7 days, being perfused after 8 or 14 days. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess neuronalloss (anti-NeuN), microglial activation (anti-Iba1, ED1) and migrating neuroblasts (anti-DCX) by countingNeuN, ED1 and DCX-positive cells in the ischaemic striatum or SVZ. Indomethacin treatment reducedmicroglia activation and the number of ED1^{+} cells in both 8 and 14 days post injury as compared withcontrols. There was an increase in the number of DCX^{+} cells in both SVZ and striatum at the same survivaltimes. Moreover, there was a decrease in the number of NeuN^{+} cells in indomethacin-treated animals ascompared with the control group at 8 days but not after 14 days post injury. Our results suggest thatindomethacin treatment modulates microglia activation, contributing to increased neuroblast proliferation inthe SVZ and migration to the ischaemic striatum following stroke.

  2. The high dosage of earthworm (Eisenia andrei) extract decreases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bing Chun; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Earthworm extract has shown anticancer characteristics. In the present study, we examined the effect of chronic treatment with a high dose of earthworm (Eisenia andrei) extract (EE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of 3-week-old mice using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry for cell proliferation and doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry for neuroblast differentiation, respectively. BrdU-, Ki-67-, and DCX-immunoreactive cells were easily detected in the subgranular zone of the DG in vehicle (saline)-treated mice. However, BrdU-, Ki-67-, and DCX-immunoreactive cells in the 500 mg/kg EE-treated mice decreased distinctively compared to those in the vehicle-treated mice. In addition, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) immunoreactivity and its protein level decreased markedly in the DG of the EE-treated group compared to those in the vehicle-treated group. These results indicate that chronic treatment with high dose EE decreased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, and that BDNF immunoreactivity decreased in the DG of EE-treated mice. PMID:22025974

  3. Portable musical instrument amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, David E. (Danbury, CT)

    1990-07-24

    The present invention relates to a musical instrument amplifier which is particularly useful for electric guitars. The amplifier has a rigid body for housing both the electronic system for amplifying and processing signals from the guitar and the system's power supply. An input plug connected to and projecting from the body is electrically coupled to the signal amplifying and processing system. When the plug is inserted into an output jack for an electric guitar, the body is rigidly carried by the guitar, and the guitar is operatively connected to the electrical amplifying and signal processing system without use of a loose interconnection cable. The amplifier is provided with an output jack, into which headphones are plugged to receive amplified signals from the guitar. By eliminating the conventional interconnection cable, the amplifier of the present invention can be used by musicians with increased flexibility and greater freedom of movement.

  4. Amplifier for nuclear spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopy amplifier model AE-020 is designed to adjust suitable the pulses coming from nuclear radiation detectors. Due to is capacity and specifications, the amplifier can be used together with high and medium resolution spectroscopy system

  5. Notch maintains Drosophila type II neuroblasts by suppressing expression of the Fez transcription factor Earmuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaosu; Xie, Yonggang; Zhu, Sijun

    2016-07-15

    Notch signaling is crucial for maintaining neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal and heterogeneity; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In Drosophila, loss of Notch prematurely terminates the self-renewal of larval type II neuroblasts (NBs, the Drosophila NSCs) and transforms type II NBs into type I NBs. Here, we demonstrate that Notch maintains type II NBs by suppressing the activation of earmuff (erm) by Pointed P1 (PntP1). We show that loss of Notch or components of its canonical pathway leads to PntP1-dependent ectopic Erm expression in type II NBs. Knockdown of Erm significantly rescues the loss-of-Notch phenotypes, and misexpression of Erm phenocopies the loss of Notch. Ectopically expressed Erm promotes the transformation of type II NBs into type I NBs by inhibiting PntP1 function and expression in type II NBs. Our work not only elucidates a key mechanism of Notch-mediated maintenance of type II NB self-renewal and identity, but also reveals a novel function of Erm. PMID:27151950

  6. Perinatal Exposure to Glufosinate Ammonium Herbicide Impairs Neurogenesis and Neuroblast Migration through Cytoskeleton Destabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzine, Ameziane; Laugeray, Anthony; Feat, Justyne; Menuet, Arnaud; Quesniaux, Valérie; Richard, Olivier; Pichon, Jacques; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline; Perche, Olivier; Mortaud, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis, a process of generating functional neurons from neural precursors, occurs throughout life in restricted brain regions such as the subventricular zone (SVZ). During this process, newly generated neurons migrate along the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb to replace granule cells and periglomerular neurons. This neuronal migration is pivotal not only for neuronal plasticity but also for adapted olfactory based behaviors. Perturbation of this highly controlled system by exogenous chemicals has been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. We reported recently that perinatal exposure to low dose herbicide glufosinate ammonium (GLA), leads to long lasting behavioral defects reminiscent of Autism Spectrum Disorder-like phenotype in the offspring (Laugeray et al., 2014). Herein, we demonstrate that perinatal exposure to low dose GLA induces alterations in neuroblast proliferation within the SVZ and abnormal migration from the SVZ to the olfactory bulbs. These disturbances are not only concomitant to changes in cell morphology, proliferation and apoptosis, but are also associated with transcriptomic changes. Therefore, we demonstrate for the first time that perinatal exposure to low dose GLA alters SVZ neurogenesis. Jointly with our previous work, the present results provide new evidence on the link between molecular and cellular consequences of early life exposure to the herbicide GLA and the onset of ASD-like phenotype later in life.

  7. High voltage distributed amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, D.; Bahl, I.; Wirsing, K.

    1991-12-01

    A high-voltage distributed amplifier implemented in GaAs MMIC technology has demonstrated good circuit performance over at least two octave bandwidth. This technique allows for very broadband amplifier operation with good efficiency in satellite, active-aperture radar, and battery-powered systems. Also, by increasing the number of FETs, the amplifier can be designed to match different voltage rails. The circuit does require a small amount of additional chip size over conventional distributed amplifiers but does not require power dividers or additional matching networks. This circuit configuration should find great use in broadband power amplifier design.

  8. A family of snail-related zinc finger proteins regulates two distinct and parallel mechanisms that mediate Drosophila neuroblast asymmetric divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y; Chia, W; Yang, X

    2001-04-01

    Three snail family genes snail, escargot and worniu, encode related zinc finger transcription factors that mediate Drosophila central nervous system (CNS) development. We show that simultaneous removal of all three genes causes defective neuroblast asymmetric divisions; inscuteable transcription/translation is delayed/suppressed in the segmented CNS. Further more, defects in localization of cell fate determinants and orientation of the mitotic spindle in dividing neuroblasts are much stronger than those associated with inscuteable loss of function. In inscuteable neuroblasts, cell fate determinants are mislocalized during prophase and metaphase, yet during anaphase and telophase the great majority of mutant neuroblasts localize these determinants as cortical crescents overlying one of the spindle poles. This phenomenon, known as 'telophase rescue', does not occur in the absence of the snail family genes; moreover, in contrast to inscuteable mutants, mitotic spindle orientation is completely randomized. Our data provide further evidence for the existence of two distinct asymmetry-controlling mechanisms in neuroblasts both of which require snail family gene function: an inscuteable-dependent mechanism that functions throughout mitosis and an inscuteable-independent mechanism that acts during anaphase/telophase. PMID:11285234

  9. Ancestral reconstruction of tick lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Ben J; de Castro, Minique H; Pienaar, Ronel; de Klerk, Daniel; Gaven, Philasande; Genu, Siyamcela; Latif, Abdalla A

    2016-06-01

    Ancestral reconstruction in its fullest sense aims to describe the complete evolutionary history of a lineage. This depends on accurate phylogenies and an understanding of the key characters of each parental lineage. An attempt is made to delineate our current knowledge with regard to the ancestral reconstruction of the tick (Ixodida) lineage. Tick characters may be assigned to Core of Life, Lineages of Life or Edges of Life phenomena depending on how far back these characters may be assigned in the evolutionary Tree of Life. These include housekeeping genes, sub-cellular systems, heme processing (Core of Life), development, moulting, appendages, nervous and organ systems, homeostasis, respiration (Lineages of Life), specific adaptations to a blood-feeding lifestyle, including the complexities of salivary gland secretions and tick-host interactions (Edges of Life). The phylogenetic relationships of lineages, their origins and importance in ancestral reconstruction are discussed. Uncertainties with respect to systematic relationships, ancestral reconstruction and the challenges faced in comparative transcriptomics (next-generation sequencing approaches) are highlighted. While almost 150 years of information regarding tick biology have been assembled, progress in recent years indicates that we are in the infancy of understanding tick evolution. Even so, broad reconstructions can be made with relation to biological features associated with various lineages. Conservation of characters shared with sister and parent lineages are evident, but appreciable differences are present in the tick lineage indicating modification with descent, as expected for Darwinian evolutionary theory. Many of these differences can be related to the hematophagous lifestyle of ticks. PMID:26868413

  10. RF Power Amplifier Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    M. Lokay; K. Pelikan

    1993-01-01

    The special program is presented for the demonstration of RF power transistor amplifiers for the purposes of the high-school education in courses of radio transmitters. The program is written in Turbo Pascal 6. 0 and enables to study the waveforms in selected points of the amplifier and to draw the trajectories of the working point in a plot of output transistor characteristics.

  11. Amplifier improvement circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, J.

    1968-01-01

    Stable input stage was designed for the use with a integrated circuit operational amplifier to provide improved performance as an instrumentation-type amplifier. The circuit provides high input impedance, stable gain, good common mode rejection, very low drift, and low output impedance.

  12. Anosmin-1 over-expression increases adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and neuroblast migration to the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Diego; Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Ortega, Felipe; Díaz, David; Sánchez-Vera, Irene; Lebrón-Galán, Rafael; Escobar-Castañondo, Laura; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Weruaga, Eduardo; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Berninger, Benedikt; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    New subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neuroblasts that migrate via the rostral migratory stream are continuously added to the olfactory bulb (OB) of the adult rodent brain. Anosmin-1 (A1) is an extracellular matrix protein that binds to FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) to exert its biological effects. When mutated as in Kallmann syndrome patients, A1 is associated with severe OB morphogenesis defects leading to anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here, we show that A1 over-expression in adult mice strongly increases proliferation in the SVZ, mainly with symmetrical divisions, and produces substantial morphological changes in the normal SVZ architecture, where we also report the presence of FGFR1 in almost all SVZ cells. Interestingly, for the first time we show FGFR1 expression in the basal body of primary cilia in neural progenitor cells. Additionally, we have found that A1 over-expression also enhances neuroblast motility, mainly through FGFR1 activity. Together, these changes lead to a selective increase in several GABAergic interneuron populations in different OB layers. These specific alterations in the OB would be sufficient to disrupt the normal processing of sensory information and consequently alter olfactory memory. In summary, this work shows that FGFR1-mediated A1 activity plays a crucial role in the continuous remodelling of the adult OB. PMID:25300351

  13. Semiconductor optical amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Niloy K

    2013-01-01

    This invaluable look provides a comprehensive treatment of design and applications of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA). SOA is an important component for optical communication systems. It has applications as in-line amplifiers and as functional devices in evolving optical networks. The functional applications of SOAs were first studied in the early 1990's, since then the diversity and scope of such applications have been steadily growing. This is the second edition of a book on Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers first published in 2006 by the same authors. Several chapters and sections rep

  14. RF Power Amplifier Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lokay

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available The special program is presented for the demonstration of RF power transistor amplifiers for the purposes of the high-school education in courses of radio transmitters. The program is written in Turbo Pascal 6. 0 and enables to study the waveforms in selected points of the amplifier and to draw the trajectories of the working point in a plot of output transistor characteristics.

  15. Noise in Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1997-01-01

    Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived.......Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived....

  16. Charge-sensitive amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Startsev V. I.; Yampolsky Ju. S.

    2008-01-01

    The authors consider design and circuit design techniques of reduction of the influence of the pyroelectric effect on operation of the charge sensitive amplifiers. The presented experimental results confirm the validity of the measures taken to reduce the impact of pyroelectric currents. Pyroelectric currents are caused by the influence of the temperature gradient on the piezoelectric sensor and on the output voltage of charge sensitive amplifiers.

  17. E-537 MWPC amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a fast MWPC amplifier for the beam chambers and the absorber chamber is completed and all parts are on order. A prototype 16 channel board has been built and satisfactorily tested. Artwork is completed for the board and out to be photographed. The board fabrication contract has been let. Listed below is a summary of the amplifier characteristics as well as test results obtained with the prototype

  18. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    A lot of research is focused on all-optical signal processing, aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for an efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods, involving high-temperature processes performed in highly pure environment, slow down the fabrication and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, ...

  19. Graphene Functionalized Scaffolds Reduce the Inflammatory Response and Supports Endogenous Neuroblast Migration when Implanted in the Adult Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kun; Motamed, Sepideh; Thouas, George A.; Bernard, Claude C.; Li, Dan; Parkington, Helena C.; Coleman, Harold A.; Finkelstein, David I.; Forsythe, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Electroactive materials have been investigated as next-generation neuronal tissue engineering scaffolds to enhance neuronal regeneration and functional recovery after brain injury. Graphene, an emerging neuronal scaffold material with charge transfer properties, has shown promising results for neuronal cell survival and differentiation in vitro. In this in vivo work, electrospun microfiber scaffolds coated with self-assembled colloidal graphene, were implanted into the striatum or into the subventricular zone of adult rats. Microglia and astrocyte activation levels were suppressed with graphene functionalization. In addition, self-assembled graphene implants prevented glial scarring in the brain 7 weeks following implantation. Astrocyte guidance within the scaffold and redirection of neuroblasts from the subventricular zone along the implants was also demonstrated. These findings provide new functional evidence for the potential use of graphene scaffolds as a therapeutic platform to support central nervous system regeneration. PMID:26978268

  20. A micropower electrocardiogram amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, L; Misra, V; Sarpeshkar, R

    2009-10-01

    We introduce an electrocardiogram (EKG) preamplifier with a power consumption of 2.8 muW, 8.1 muVrms input-referred noise, and a common-mode rejection ratio of 90 dB. Compared to previously reported work, this amplifier represents a significant reduction in power with little compromise in signal quality. The improvement in performance may be attributed to many optimizations throughout the design including the use of subthreshold transistor operation to improve noise efficiency, gain-setting capacitors versus resistors, half-rail operation wherever possible, optimal power allocations among amplifier blocks, and the sizing of devices to improve matching and reduce noise. We envision that the micropower amplifier can be used as part of a wireless EKG monitoring system powered by rectified radio-frequency energy or other forms of energy harvesting like body vibration and body heat. PMID:23853270

  1. A vircator amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cavity vircator has demonstrated that formation of a virtual cathode in a cavity can improve microwave production efficiency and narrow the radiation bandwidth. When the virtual cathode radiates the microwave fields grow from noise. For each cavity, there is only one or a limited number of allowable modes for a given frequency. In this paper, a novel device - a vircator amplifier is described. The device consists of a relativistic magnetron and a cavity vircator with both devices powered by a 1 MeV, 3 Ω, 65 ns FWHM pulser. The idea is to inject a signal from the magnetron before and during virtual cathode formation in a cavity. The injected signal should lock the frequency and enhance electron bunching and therefore improve efficiency further. Experiments underway to evaluate the amplifier operating characteristics are discussed. The applicability of vircator amplifiers to the next generation of high-power microwave devices are addressed

  2. An analysis of correspondence between unique rabies virus variants and divergent big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) mitochondrial DNA lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubaum, M.A.; Shankar, V.; Douglas, M.R.; Douglas, M.E.; O'Shea, T.J.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2008-01-01

    The literature supports that unique rabies virus (RABV) variants are often compartmentalized in different species of bats. In Colorado, two divergent mtDNA lineages of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) co-occur. RABV associated with this species also segregates into two clades. We hypothesized that unique RABV variants might be associated with mtDNA lineages of Colorado big brown bats. DNA was extracted from brain tissue of rabid big brown bats, the ND2 gene was amplified to determine mtDNA lineage, and the lineage was compared to a previously derived phylogenetic analysis of the RABV N gene. No correspondence was found between host bat lineage and RABV variant. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila ventral nervous system: Neuroglian expression reveals the adult hemilineage associated fiber tracts in the adult thoracic neuromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, David; Harris, Robin; Williams, Darren W; Truman, James W

    2016-09-01

    During larval life most of the thoracic neuroblasts (NBs) in Drosophila undergo a second phase of neurogenesis to generate adult-specific neurons that remain in an immature, developmentally stalled state until pupation. Using a combination of MARCM and immunostaining with a neurotactin antibody, Truman et al. (2004; Development 131:5167-5184) identified 24 adult-specific NB lineages within each thoracic hemineuromere of the larval ventral nervous system (VNS), but because of the neurotactin labeling of lineage tracts disappearing early in metamorphosis, they were unable extend the identification of these lineages into the adult. Here we show that immunostaining with an antibody against the cell adhesion molecule neuroglian reveals the same larval secondary lineage projections through metamorphosis and bfy identifying each neuroglian-positive tract at selected stages we have traced the larval hemilineage tracts for all three thoracic neuromeres through metamorphosis into the adult. To validate tract identifications we used the genetic toolkit developed by Harris et al. (2015; Elife 4) to preserve hemilineage-specific GAL4 expression patterns from larval into the adult stage. The immortalized expression proved a powerful confirmation of the analysis of the neuroglian scaffold. This work has enabled us to directly link the secondary, larval NB lineages to their adult counterparts. The data provide an anatomical framework that 1) makes it possible to assign most neurons to their parent lineage and 2) allows more precise definitions of the neuronal organization of the adult VNS based in developmental units/rules. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2677-2695, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26878258

  4. Effects of total saponins of Panax notoginseng on immature neuroblasts in the adult olfactory bulb following global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Xu He; Feng-jun Deng; Jin-wen Ge; Xiao-xin Yan; Ai-hua Pan; Zhi-yuan Li

    2015-01-01

    The main active components extracted from Panax notoginseng are total saponins. They have been shown to inhibit platelet aggregation, increase cerebral blood flow, improve neurological behavior, decrease infarct volume and promote proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the hippocampus and lateral ventricles. However, there is a lack of studies on whether total saponins of Panax notoginseng have potential benefits on immature neuroblasts in the olfactory bulb following ische...

  5. Hippophae rhamnoides L.leaves extract enhances cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation through upregulation of intrinsic factors in the dentate gyrus of the aged gerbil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Hyeon Ahn; Bai Hui Chen; Joon Ha Park; In Hye Kim; Jeong-Hwi Cho; Jae-Chul Lee; Bing Chun Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background Hippophae rhamnoides L.(HL) exerts antioxidant activities against various oxidative stress conditions.In this study,we investigated effects of extract from HL leaves (HLE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) of aged gerbils.Methods Aged gerbils (24 months) were divided into vehicle (saline)-treated-and HLE-treated-groups.The vehicle and HLE were orally administered with 200 mg/kg once a day for 20 days before sacrifice.Cell proliferation and neurobiast differentiation were examined in the DG using Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX),respectively.We also observed changes in immunoreactivities of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2),brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF),and phospho-glycogen synthase kinase-3-beta (p-GSK-3β) to examine their relation with neurogenesis using immunohistochemistry.Results The administration of HLE significantly increased the number of Ki67-positive cells and DCX-positive neuroblasts with well-developed processes in the SGZ of the DG of the HLE-treated-group.In addition,immunoreactivities of SOD1,SOD2,BDNF,and p-GSK-3β were significantly increased in granule and polymorphic cells of the DG in the HLE-treated-group compared with those in the vehicle-treated-group.Conclusions HLE treatment significantly increased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation,showing that immunoreactivities of SOD1,SOD2,BDNF,and p-GSK-3β were significantly increased in the DG.These indicate that increased neuroblast differentiation neurogenesis may be closely related to upregulation of SOD1,SOD2,BDNF,and p-GSK-3β in aged gerbils.

  6. Amplification of neural stem cell proliferation by intermediate progenitor cells in Drosophila brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello Bruno C

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mammalian brain, neural stem cells divide asymmetrically and often amplify the number of progeny they generate via symmetrically dividing intermediate progenitors. Here we investigate whether specific neural stem cell-like neuroblasts in the brain of Drosophila might also amplify neuronal proliferation by generating symmetrically dividing intermediate progenitors. Results Cell lineage-tracing and genetic marker analysis show that remarkably large neuroblast lineages exist in the dorsomedial larval brain of Drosophila. These lineages are generated by brain neuroblasts that divide asymmetrically to self renew but, unlike other brain neuroblasts, do not segregate the differentiating cell fate determinant Prospero to their smaller daughter cells. These daughter cells continue to express neuroblast-specific molecular markers and divide repeatedly to produce neural progeny, demonstrating that they are proliferating intermediate progenitors. The proliferative divisions of these intermediate progenitors have novel cellular and molecular features; they are morphologically symmetrical, but molecularly asymmetrical in that key differentiating cell fate determinants are segregated into only one of the two daughter cells. Conclusion Our findings provide cellular and molecular evidence for a new mode of neurogenesis in the larval brain of Drosophila that involves the amplification of neuroblast proliferation through intermediate progenitors. This type of neurogenesis bears remarkable similarities to neurogenesis in the mammalian brain, where neural stem cells as primary progenitors amplify the number of progeny they generate through generation of secondary progenitors. This suggests that key aspects of neural stem cell biology might be conserved in brain development of insects and mammals.

  7. STABILIZED TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, J.B.

    1963-05-01

    A temperature stabilized transistor amplifier having a pair of transistors coupled in cascade relation that are capable of providing amplification through a temperature range of - 100 un. Concent 85% F to 400 un. Concent 85% F described. The stabilization of the amplifier is attained by coupling a feedback signal taken from the emitter of second transistor at a junction between two serially arranged biasing resistances in the circuit of the emitter of the second transistor to the base of the first transistor. Thus, a change in the emitter current of the second transistor is automatically corrected by the feedback adjustment of the base-emitter potential of the first transistor and by a corresponding change in the base-emitter potential of the second transistor. (AEC)

  8. Principal modes in fiber amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Moti; Dubinskii, Mark; Friesem, Asher A; Davidson, Nir

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of the state of polarization in single mode and multimode fiber amplifiers are presented. The experimental results reveal that although the state of polarizations at the output can vary over a large range when changing the temperatures of the fiber amplifiers, the variations are significantly reduced when resorting to the principal states of polarization in single mode fiber amplifiers and principal modes in multimode fiber amplifiers.

  9. Helical Fiber Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Kliner, Dahy; Goldberg, Lew

    2002-12-17

    A multi-mode gain fiber is provided which affords substantial improvements in the maximum pulse energy, peak power handling capabilities, average output power, and/or pumping efficiency of fiber amplifier and laser sources while maintaining good beam quality (comparable to that of a conventional single-mode fiber source). These benefits are realized by coiling the multimode gain fiber to induce significant bend loss for all but the lowest-order mode(s).

  10. Radio Frequency Solid State Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, J

    2015-01-01

    Solid state amplifiers are being increasingly used instead of electronic vacuum tubes to feed accelerating cavities with radio frequency power in the 100 kW range. Power is obtained from the combination of hundreds of transistor amplifier modules. This paper summarizes a one hour lecture on solid state amplifiers for accelerator applications.

  11. The Microcephaly-Associated Protein Wdr62/CG7337 Is Required to Maintain Centrosome Asymmetry in Drosophila Neuroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Ramdas Nair

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Centrosome asymmetry has been implicated in stem cell fate maintenance in both flies and vertebrates, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we report that loss of CG7337, the fly ortholog of WDR62, compromises interphase centrosome asymmetry in fly neural stem cells (neuroblasts. Wdr62 maintains an active interphase microtubule-organizing center (MTOC by stabilizing microtubules (MTs, which are necessary for sustained recruitment of Polo/Plk1 to the pericentriolar matrix (PCM and downregulation of Pericentrin-like protein (Plp. The loss of an active MTOC in wdr62 mutants compromises centrosome positioning, spindle orientation, and biased centrosome segregation. wdr62 mutant flies also have an ∼40% reduction in brain size as a result of cell-cycle delays. We propose that CG7337/Wdr62, a microtubule-associated protein, is required for the maintenance of interphase microtubules, thereby regulating centrosomal Polo and Plp levels. Independent of this function, Wdr62 is also required for the timely mitotic entry of neural stem cells.

  12. Electronic amplifiers for automatic compensators

    CERN Document Server

    Polonnikov, D Ye

    1965-01-01

    Electronic Amplifiers for Automatic Compensators presents the design and operation of electronic amplifiers for use in automatic control and measuring systems. This book is composed of eight chapters that consider the problems of constructing input and output circuits of amplifiers, suppression of interference and ensuring high sensitivity.This work begins with a survey of the operating principles of electronic amplifiers in automatic compensator systems. The succeeding chapters deal with circuit selection and the calculation and determination of the principal characteristics of amplifiers, as

  13. Simplified design of IC amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Lenk, John

    1996-01-01

    Simplified Design of IC Amplifiers has something for everyone involved in electronics. No matter what skill level, this book shows how to design and experiment with IC amplifiers. For experimenters, students, and serious hobbyists, this book provides sufficient information to design and build IC amplifier circuits from 'scratch'. For working engineers who design amplifier circuits or select IC amplifiers, the book provides a variety of circuit configurations to make designing easier.Provides basics for all phases of practical design.Covers the most popular forms for amplif

  14. Building valve amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Building Valve Amplifiers is a unique hands-on guide for anyone working with tube audio equipment--as an electronics hobbyist, audiophile or audio engineer. This 2nd Edition builds on the success of the first with technology and technique revisions throughout and, significantly, a major new self-build project, worked through step-by-step, which puts into practice the principles and techniques introduced throughout the book. Particular attention has been paid to answering questions commonly asked by newcomers to the world of the valve, whether audio enthusiasts tackling their first build or

  15. Wideband amplifier design

    CERN Document Server

    Hollister, Allen L

    2007-01-01

    In this book, the theory needed to understand wideband amplifier design using the simplest models possible will be developed. This theory will be used to develop algebraic equations that describe particular circuits used in high frequency design so that the reader develops a ""gut level"" understanding of the process and circuit. SPICE and Genesys simulations will be performed to show the accuracy of the algebraic models. By looking at differences between the algebraic equations and the simulations, new algebraic models will be developed that include parameters originally left out of the model

  16. REGENERATIVE TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabell, L.J.

    1958-11-25

    Electrical circults for use in computers and the like are described. particularly a regenerative bistable transistor amplifler which is iurned on by a clock signal when an information signal permits and is turned off by the clock signal. The amplifier porforms the above function with reduced power requirements for the clock signal and circuit operation. The power requirements are reduced in one way by employing transformer coupling which increases the collector circuit efficiency by eliminating the loss of power in the collector load resistor.

  17. Quantum entanglement degrees amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Meng, Xiang-Dong; Li, Hong; Zhang, Si-Qi

    2015-01-01

    The quantum entangled degrees of entangled states become smaller with the transmission distance increasing, how to keep the purity of quantum entangled states is the puzzle in quantum communication. In the paper, we have designed a new type entanglement degrees amplifier by one-dimensional photonic crystal, which is similar as the relay station of classical electromagnetic communication. We find when the entangled states of two-photon and three-photon pass through photonic crystal, their entanglement degrees can be magnified, which make the entanglement states can be long range propagation and the quantum communication can be really realized.

  18. DIAMOND AMPLIFIED PHOTOCATHODES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY,J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BOHON, J.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; ISAKOVIC, A.; RAO, T.; WU, Q.

    2007-11-26

    High-average-current linear electron accelerators require photoinjectors capable of delivering tens to hundreds of mA average current, with peak currents of hundreds of amps. Standard photocathodes face significant challenges in meeting these requirements, and often have short operational lifetimes in an accelerator environment. We report on recent progress toward development of secondary emission amplifiers for photocathodes, which are intended to increase the achievable average current while protecting the cathode from the accelerator. The amplifier is a thin diamond wafer which converts energetic (few keV) primary electrons into hundreds of electron-hole pairs via secondary electron emission. The electrons drift through the diamond under an external bias and are emitted into vacuum via a hydrogen-terminated surface with negative electron affinity (NEA). Secondary emission gain of over 200 has been achieved. Two methods of patterning diamond, laser ablation and reactive-ion etching (RIE), are being developed to produce the required geometry. A variety of diagnostic techniques, including FTIR, SEM and AFM, have been used to characterize the diamonds.

  19. Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Frank

    1997-01-01

    The Technological Research and Development Authority (TRDA) and NASA-KSC entered into a cooperative agreement in March of 1994 to achieve the utilization and commercialization of a technology development for benefiting both the Space Program and U.S. industry on a "dual-use basis". The technology involved in this transfer is a new, unique Universal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) used in connection with various types of transducers. The project was initiated in partnership with I-Net Corporation, Lockheed Martin Telemetry & Instrumentation (formerly Loral Test and Information Systems) and Brevard Community College. The project consists of designing, miniaturizing, manufacturing, and testing an existing prototype of USCA that was developed for NASA-KSC by the I-Net Corporation. The USCA is a rugged and field-installable self (or remotely)- programmable amplifier that works in combination with a tag random access memory (RAM) attached to various types of transducers. This summary report comprises performance evaluations, TRDA partnership tasks, a project summary, project milestones and results.

  20. Characterisation Of Low Noise Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    MAULIK B.PATEL; ABHISEK CHOBEY; SUNIL B.PATEL

    2012-01-01

    Amplification is one of the most basic and prevalent microwave circuit functions inmodern RF and microwave systems. Early microwave amplifiers relied on tubes, such asklystrons and traveling-wave tubes, or solid-state reflection amplifiers based on thenegative resistance characteristics of tunnel or varactor diodes. But due to the dramaticimprovements and innovations in solid-state technology that have occurred since the1970s, most RF and microwave amplifiers today use transistor devices such...

  1. Modeling of semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Bischoff, Svend; Berg, Tommy Winther;

    We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed.......We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed....

  2. Amplified leak detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahony, James

    2011-12-15

    Leaks are one of the major concerns for oil and gas producers. But recently, a Calgary-based company developed a tool that can find natural gas leaks in wellbores. This has relieved the oil and gas producers because the optics of finding downhole leaks just got a little brighter. Since then, there have been continuous efforts to broaden and refine fiber optics based methods. This paper presents amplified leak detection using fiber optics to identify even the smallest liquid leaks downhole. At high volumes, detection of downhole leaks in liquids is not a problem but at lower flow rates, the leaks become harder to detect, and at very low flow rates, they might not be detected at all. Hifi Engineering Inc. has developed the LeakSonar fiber optic acoustic sensor array that is specifically designed to detect and locate fluid migration in wellbores, even through multiple strings of casing.

  3. Metatronic transistor amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettiar, Uday K.; Engheta, Nader

    2015-10-01

    Utilizing the notion of metamaterials, in recent years the concept of a circuit and lumped circuit elements have been extended to the optical domains, providing the paradigm of optical metatronics, i.e., metamaterial-inspired optical nanocircuitry, as a powerful tool for design and study of more complex systems at the nanoscale. In this paper we present a design for a new metatronic element, namely, a metatronic transistor that functions as an amplifier. As shown by our analytical and numerical paper here, this metatronic transistor provides gain as well as isolation between the input and output ports of such two-port device. The cascadability and fan-out aspects of this element are also explored.

  4. Semiconductor DC amplifier AEP 1487

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A semiconductor dc amplifier has been designed with the object of achieving low drift without component selection or special temperature-balancing adjustments. Modulator and ac-amplifier techniques have been adopted in order to avoid the drifts that occur when transistors are directly coupled. The diode-ring modulator described in CREL-902 has been used as the input chopper. (author)

  5. Identification of focally amplified lineage-specific super-enhancers in human epithelial cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyang; Choi, Peter S; Francis, Joshua M; Imielinski, Marcin; Watanabe, Hideo; Cherniack, Andrew D; Meyerson, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Whole-genome analysis approaches are identifying recurrent cancer-associated somatic alterations in noncoding DNA regions. We combined somatic copy number analysis of 12 tumor types with tissue-specific epigenetic profiling to identify significant regions of focal amplification harboring super-enhancers. Copy number gains of noncoding regions harboring super-enhancers near KLF5, USP12, PARD6B and MYC are associated with overexpression of these cancer-related genes. We show that two distinct focal amplifications of super-enhancers 3' to MYC in lung adenocarcinoma (MYC-LASE) and endometrial carcinoma (MYC-ECSE) are physically associated with the MYC promoter and correlate with MYC overexpression. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated repression or deletion of a constituent enhancer within the MYC-LASE region led to significant reductions in the expression of MYC and its target genes and to the impairment of anchorage-independent and clonogenic growth, consistent with an oncogenic function. Our results suggest that genomic amplification of super-enhancers represents a common mechanism to activate cancer driver genes in multiple cancer types. PMID:26656844

  6. Effects of total saponins of Panax notoginseng on immature neuroblasts in the adult olfactory bulb following global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu He; Feng-jun Deng; Jin-wen Ge; Xiao-xin Yan; Ai-hua Pan; Zhi-yuan Li

    2015-01-01

    The main active components extracted from Panax notoginseng are total saponins. They have been shown to inhibit platelet aggregation, increase cerebral blood lfow, improve neurological behavior, decrease infarct volume and promote proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the hippocampus and lateral ventricles. However, there is a lack of studies on whether total saponins of Panax notoginseng have potential benefits on immature neuroblasts in the olfactory bulb following ischemia and reperfusion. This study established a rat model of global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion using four-vessel occlusion. Rats were administered total sa-ponins of Panax notoginseng at 75 mg/kg intraperitoneally 30 minutes after ischemia then once a day, for either 7 or 14 days. Total saponins of Panax notoginseng enhanced the number of dou-blecortin (DCX)+ neural progenitor cells and increased co-localization of DCX with neuronal nuclei and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding/DCX+ neural progenitor cells in the olfactory bulb at 7 and 14 days post ischemia. These ifndings indicate that following global brain ischemia/reperfusion, total saponins of Panax notoginseng promote differentiation of DCX+ cells expressing immature neuroblasts in the olfactory bulb and the underlying mechanism is related to the activation of the signaling pathway of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein.

  7. Small signal microwave amplifier design

    CERN Document Server

    Grosch, Theodore

    2000-01-01

    This book explains techniques and examples for designing stable amplifiers for high-frequency applications in which the signal is small and the amplifier circuit is linear. An in-depth discussion of linear network theory provides the foundation needed to develop actual designs. Examples throughout the book will show you how to apply the knowledge gained in each chapter leading to the complex design of low noise amplifiers. Many exercises at the end of each chapter will help students to practice their skills. The solutions to these design problems are available in an accompanying solutions book

  8. International Standardization Activities for Optical Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haruo Okamura

    2003-01-01

    International standardization activities for Optical Amplifiers at IECTC86 and ITU-T SG15 are reviewed. Current discussions include Optical Amplifier safety guideline, Reliability standard, Rest methods of Noise and PMD, Definitions of Raman amplifier parameters and OA classification.

  9. Effects of aluminum on the reduction of neural stem cells, proliferating cells, and differentiating neuroblasts in the dentate gyrus of D-galactose-treated mice via increasing oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Jung, Hyo Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo; Seong, Je Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) accumulation increases with aging, and long-term exposure to Al is regarded as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of Al and/or D-galactose on neural stem cells, proliferating cells, differentiating neuroblasts, and mature neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. AlCl3 (40 mg/kg/day) was intraperitoneally administered to C57BL/6J mice for 4 weeks. In addition, vehicle (physiological saline) or D-galactose (100 mg/kg) was subcutaneously injected to these mice immediately after AlCl3 treatment. Neural stem cells, proliferating cells, differentiating neuroblasts, and mature neurons were detected using the relevant marker for each cell type, including nestin, Ki67, doublecortin, and NeuN, respectively, via immunohistochemistry. Subchronic (4 weeks) exposure to Al in mice reduced neural stem cells, proliferating cells, and differentiating neuroblasts without causing any changes to mature neurons. This Al-induced reduction effect was exacerbated in D-galactose-treated mice compared to vehicle-treated adult mice. Moreover, exposure to Al enhanced lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus and expression of antioxidants such as Cu, Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase in D-galactose-treated mice. These results suggest that Al accelerates the reduction of neural stem cells, proliferating cells, and differentiating neuroblasts in D-galactose-treated mice via oxidative stress, without inducing loss in mature neurons. PMID:26243606

  10. A Transformer Class E Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikolajewski Miroslaw

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In a high-efficiency Class E ZVS resonant amplifier a matching and isolation transformer can replace some or even all inductive components of the amplifier thus simplifying the circuit and reducing its cost. In the paper a theoretical analysis, a design example and its experimental verification for a transformer Class E amplifier are presented. In the experimental amplifier with a transformer as the only inductive component in the circuit high efficiency ηMAX = 0.95 was achieved for supply voltage VI = 36 V, maximum output power POMAX = 100 W and the switching frequency f = 300 kHz. Measured parameters and waveforms showed a good agreement with theoretical predictions. Moreover, the relative bandwidth of the switching frequency was only 19% to obtain output power control from 4.8 W to POMAX with efficiency not less than 0.9 in the regulation range.

  11. TARC: Carlo Rubbia's Energy Amplifier

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1997-01-01

    Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) is Carlo Rubbia's energy amplifier. This CERN experiment demonstrated that long-lived fission fragments, such as 99-TC, can be efficiently destroyed.

  12. New Packaging for Amplifier Slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thorsness, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Suratwala, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Steele, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rogowski, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-03-18

    The following memo provides a discussion and detailed procedure for a new finished amplifier slab shipping and storage container. The new package is designed to maintain an environment of <5% RH to minimize weathering.

  13. Transistor oscillator and amplifier grids

    OpenAIRE

    Weikle, Robert M., II; Kim, Moonil; Hacker, Jonathan B.; De Lisio, Michael P.; Popvić, Zoya B.; Rutledge, David B.

    1992-01-01

    Although quasi-optical techniques are applicable to a large variety of solid-state devices, special attention is given to transistors, which are attractive because they can be used as either amplifiers or oscillators. Experimental results for MESFET bar-grid and planar grid oscillators are presented. A MESFET grid amplifier that receives only vertically polarized waves at the input and radiates horizontally polarized waves at the output is discussed. These planar grids can be scaled for opera...

  14. A KIND OF NEW AMPLIFIER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN XUN-HE; FENG RU-PENG; REN YONG

    2000-01-01

    Chaotic characteristics in the iteration of logistic map (one-dimensional discrete dynamic system) are simulatedand analyzed. The circuit implementation of a kind of chaotic amplifier model is based on the chaotic characteristicsthat chaos is sensitively dependent on its initial conditions, and the circuit simulation result is given using simulationprogram with integrated circuit emphasis for personal computer (PSPICE), and is compared with linear amplifier.Advantages and disadvantages of such a model are indicated.

  15. Casimir force on amplifying bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Sambale, Agnes; Welsch, Dirk-Gunnar; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Dung, Ho Trung

    2009-01-01

    Based on a unified approach to macroscopic QED that allows for the inclusion of amplification in a limited space and frequency range, we study the Casimir force as a Lorentz force on an arbitrary partially amplifying system of linearly locally responding (isotropic) magnetoelectric bodies. We demonstrate that the force on a weakly polarisable/magnetisable amplifying object in the presence of a purely absorbing environment can be expressed as a sum over the Casimir--Polder forces on the excite...

  16. Determining Lineage Pathways from Cellular Barcoding Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leïla Perié

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular barcoding and other single-cell lineage-tracing strategies form experimental methodologies for analysis of in vivo cell fate that have been instrumental in several significant recent discoveries. Due to the highly nonlinear nature of proliferation and differentiation, interrogation of the resulting data for evaluation of potential lineage pathways requires a new quantitative framework complete with appropriate statistical tests. Here, we develop such a framework, illustrating its utility by analyzing data from barcoded multipotent cells of the blood system. This application demonstrates that the data require additional paths beyond those found in the classical model, which leads us to propose that hematopoietic differentiation follows a loss of potential mechanism and to suggest further experiments to test this deduction. Our quantitative framework can evaluate the compatibility of lineage trees with barcoded data from any proliferating and differentiating cell system.

  17. Two evolutionary lineages: Machiavellian and Bohrian intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Skopec, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Two evolutionary lineages: Machiavellian and Bohrian intelligence Mutation and natural selection are the two most basic processes of evolution, yet the study of their interplay remains a challenge for theoretical and empirical research. Darwinian evolution favors genotypes with high replication rates, a process called survival of the fittest representing lineage of the Machiavellian inteligence. According to quasi-species theory, selection favors the cloud of genotypes, interconnected by mutation, whose average replication rate is highest: mutation acts as a selective agent to shape the entire genome so that is robust with respect to mutation. Thus survival of the flattest and inventivest representing lineage of the Bohrian intelligence at high mutation rates. Quasi-species theory predicts that, under appropriate conditions (high mutation pressure), such a mutation can be fixed in an evolving population, despite its lower replication rate.

  18. Low-Noise Band-Pass Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    Circuit uses standard components to overcome common limitation of JFET amplifiers. Low-noise band-pass amplifier employs JFET and operational amplifier. High gain and band-pass characteristics are achieved with suitable choice of resistances and capacitances. Circuit should find use as low-noise amplifier, for example as first stage instrumentation systems.

  19. EMI-resilient amplifier circuits

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, Marcel J; Linnenbank, André C

    2014-01-01

    This book enables circuit designers to reduce the errors introduced by the fundamental limitations and electromagnetic interference (EMI) in negative-feedback amplifiers.  The authors describe a systematic design approach for application specific negative-feedback amplifiers, with specified signal-to-error ratio (SER).  This approach enables designers to calculate noise, bandwidth, EMI, and the required bias parameters of the transistors used in  application specific amplifiers in order to meet the SER requirements.   ·         Describes design methods that incorporate electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the design of application specific negative-feedback amplifiers; ·         Provides designers with a structured methodology to avoid the use of trial and error in meeting signal-to-error ratio (SER) requirements; ·         Equips designers to increase EMI immunity of the amplifier itself, thus avoiding filtering at the input, reducing the number of components and avoiding detr...

  20. Spectroscopic amplifier for pin diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photodiode remains the basic choice for the photo-detection and is widely used in optical communications, medical diagnostics and field of corpuscular radiation. In detecting radiation it has been used for monitoring radon and its progeny and inexpensive spectrometric systems. The development of a spectroscopic amplifier for Pin diode is presented which has the following characteristics: canceler Pole-Zero (P/Z) with a time constant of 8 μs; constant gain of 57, suitable for the acquisition system; 4th integrator Gaussian order to waveform change of exponential input to semi-Gaussian output and finally a stage of baseline restorer which prevents Dc signal contribution to the next stage. The operational amplifier used is the TLE2074 of BiFET technology of Texas Instruments with 10 MHz bandwidth, 25 V/μs of slew rate and a noise floor of 17 nv/(Hz)1/2. The integrated circuit has 4 operational amplifiers and in is contained the total of spectroscopic amplifier that is the goal of electronic design. The results show like the exponential input signal is converted to semi-Gaussian, modifying only the amplitude according to the specifications in the design. The total system is formed by the detector, which is the Pin diode, a sensitive preamplifier to the load, the spectroscopic amplifier that is what is presented and finally a pulse height analyzer (Mca) which is where the spectrum is shown. (Author)

  1. Towards One Generic Name for Monophyletic Lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the integration of asexually reproducing fungi into meaningful phylogenies, the need to use the same generic name for a monophyletic lineage has become urgent. At present Article 59 of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN) requires the use of a sexual state name for sexually r...

  2. Diversity rankings among bacterial lineages in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Noha H; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2009-03-01

    We used rarefaction curve analysis and diversity ordering-based approaches to rank the 11 most frequently encountered bacterial lineages in soil according to diversity in 5 previously reported 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from agricultural, undisturbed tall grass prairie and forest soils (n=26,140, 28 328, 31 818, 13 001 and 53 533). The Planctomycetes, Firmicutes and the delta-Proteobacteria were consistently ranked among the most diverse lineages in all data sets, whereas the Verrucomicrobia, Gemmatimonadetes and beta-Proteobacteria were consistently ranked among the least diverse. On the other hand, the rankings of alpha-Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi varied widely in different soil clone libraries. In general, lineages exhibiting largest differences in diversity rankings also exhibited the largest difference in relative abundance in the data sets examined. Within these lineages, a positive correlation between relative abundance and diversity was observed within the Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi, and a negative diversity-abundance correlation was observed within the Bacteroidetes. The ecological and evolutionary implications of these results are discussed. PMID:18987677

  3. Gaussian amplifier for nuclear spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major goals of nuclear spectrometry is the determination of the energy spectrum of a radioactive source. To measure this spectrum with electronic instrumentation one need to use a nuclear spectrometry chain of which the amplifier is part of, and whose filter shaping considerably influences the final energy resolution achieved. The amplifier released accomplishes a 7th order Gaussian filter shape with Taylor series approximation synthesized by the Shifted Companion Form and mounted using only electronic components availablein Brazil. The final version has been tested and the results showed a very good performance and the energy resolution achieved was equivalent to the imported models. (Author)

  4. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Zhuo

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100 currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13-25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon, yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian

  5. A wideband dc-coupled amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described whereby an ac-coupled high-frequency amplifier and a dc-coupled low-frequency amplifier are connected in parallel in order to obtain a dc-coupled wideband amplifier. By using an operational amplifier which compares the output voltage with the input voltage, the low-frequency amplifier contributes to the overall gain only when the gain of the ac-coupled amplifier droops at low frequencies. Thus, no frequency splitting networks are necessary and the excellent low-frequency features of an operational amplifier are added to those of the ac-coupled wideband amplifier. As an example, a low noise amplifier is described which exhibits a hundredfold gain, a bandwidth from dc to 550 MHz, an input bias current of less than 1 nA, and an output voltage range of ±1 V

  6. Characterisation Of Low Noise Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAULIK B.PATEL

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Amplification is one of the most basic and prevalent microwave circuit functions inmodern RF and microwave systems. Early microwave amplifiers relied on tubes, such asklystrons and traveling-wave tubes, or solid-state reflection amplifiers based on thenegative resistance characteristics of tunnel or varactor diodes. But due to the dramaticimprovements and innovations in solid-state technology that have occurred since the1970s, most RF and microwave amplifiers today use transistor devices such as Si or SiGeBJTs, GaAs HBTs, GaAs or InP FETs, or GaAs HEMTs. Microwave transistor amplifiersare rugged, low-cost, reliable, and can be easily integrated in both hybrid andmonolithic integrated circuitry. Transistor amplifiers can be used at frequencies inexcess of 100 GHz in a wide range of applications requiring small size, low-noise figure,broad bandwidth, and low to medium power capacity. Although microwave tubes are stillrequired for very high power and/or very high frequency applications, continuingimprovement in the performance of microwave transistors is steadily reducing the needfor microwave tubes

  7. Dielectric waveguide amplifiers and lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, M.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of semiconductor amplifiers and lasers has made them the preferred choice for optical gain on a micro-chip. In the past few years, we have demonstrated that also rare-earth-ion-doped dielectric waveguides show remarkable performance, ranging from a small-signal gain per unit length o

  8. Bazooka mediates secondary axon morphology in Drosophila brain lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Hartenstein Volker; Spindler Shana R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In the Drosophila brain, neural lineages project bundled axon tracts into a central neuropile. Each lineage exhibits a stereotypical branching pattern and trajectory, which distinguish it from other lineages. In this study, we used a multilineage approach to explore the neural function of the Par-complex member Par3/Bazooka in vivo. Drosophila bazooka is expressed in post-mitotic neurons of the larval brain and localizes within neurons in a lineage-dependent manner. The fact that mul...

  9. Low Cost RF Amplifier for Community TV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch, Syafaruddin; Sasongko, Sudi Mariyanto Al; Made Budi Suksmadana, I.; Mustiko Okta Muvianto, Cahyo; Ariessaputra, Suthami

    2016-01-01

    he capability of television to deliver audio video makes this media become the most effective method to spread information. This paper presents an experiment of RF amplifier design having low-cost design and providing sufficient RF power particularly for community television. The RF amplifier consists of two stages of amplifier. The first stage amplifier was used to leverage output of TV modulator from 11dBm to enable to drive next stage amplifier. CAD simulation and fabrication were run to reach optimum RF amplifier design circuit. The associated circuit was made by determining stability circle, stability gain, and matching impedance. Hence, the average power of first stage RF amplifier was 24.68dBm achieved. The second stage used RF modules which was ready match to 50 ohm for both input and output port. The experiment results show that the RF amplifier may operate at frequency ranging from 174 to 230MHz. The average output power of the 2nd stage amplifier was 33.38 Watt with the overall gain of 20.54dB. The proposed RF amplifier is a cheap way to have a stable RF amplifier for community TV. The total budget for the designed RF amplifier is only a 1/5 compared to local design of final TV amplifier.

  10. Hormonal regulation in green plant lineage families

    OpenAIRE

    Johri, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    The patterns of phytohormones distribution, their native function and possible origin of hormonal regulation across the green plant lineages (chlorophytes, charophytes, bryophytes and tracheophytes) are discussed. The five classical phytohormones — auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins (GA), abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene occur ubiquitously in green plants. They are produced as secondary metabolites by microorganisms. Some of the bacterial species use phytohormones to interact with the plant as ...

  11. Tracing lineages to uncover neuronal identity

    OpenAIRE

    Perlmann Thomas; Panman Lia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Many previous studies have focused on understanding how midbrain dopamine neurons, which are implicated in many neurological conditions, are generated during embryogenesis. One of the remaining questions concerns how different dopamine neuron subtypes are specified. A recent paper in Neural Development has revealed features of a spatial and temporal lineage map that, together with other studies, begins to elucidate the developmental origin of distinct neuronal subtypes within the dev...

  12. Lineages of varicella-zoster virus

    OpenAIRE

    McGeoch, Duncan J.

    2009-01-01

    Relationships among varicella-zoster virus (VZV; Human herpesvirus 3) genome sequences were examined to evaluate descent of strains, structures of lineages and incidence of recombination events. Eighteen complete, published genome sequences were aligned and 494 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) extracted, each as two alleles. At 281 SNPs, a single sequence differed from all the others. Distributions of the remaining 213 SNPs indicated that the sequences fell into five groups, which coinc...

  13. Phylogenomics of the Zygomycete lineages: Exploring phylogeny and genome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Zygomycete lineages mark the major transition from zoosporic life histories of the common ancestors of Fungi and the earliest diverging chytrid lineages (Chytridiomycota and Blastocladiomycota). Genome comparisons from these lineages may reveal gene content changes that reflect the transition to...

  14. Genetic Mosaics and the Germ Line Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Samuels

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic mosaics provide information about cellular lineages that is otherwise difficult to obtain, especially in humans. De novo mutations act as cell markers, allowing the tracing of developmental trajectories of all descendants of the cell in which the new mutation arises. De novo mutations may arise at any time during development but are relatively rare. They have usually been observed through medical ascertainment, when the mutation causes unusual clinical signs or symptoms. Mutational events can include aneuploidies, large chromosomal rearrangements, copy number variants, or point mutations. In this review we focus primarily on the analysis of point mutations and their utility in addressing questions of germ line versus somatic lineages. Genetic mosaics demonstrate that the germ line and soma diverge early in development, since there are many examples of combined somatic and germ line mosaicism for de novo mutations. The occurrence of simultaneous mosaicism in both the germ line and soma also shows that the germ line is not strictly clonal but arises from at least two, and possibly multiple, cells in the embryo with different ancestries. Whole genome or exome DNA sequencing technologies promise to expand the range of studies of genetic mosaics, as de novo mutations can now be identified through sequencing alone in the absence of a medical ascertainment. These technologies have been used to study mutation patterns in nuclear families and in monozygotic twins, and in animal model developmental studies, but not yet for extensive cell lineage studies in humans.

  15. Amplifying the evanescent field of free electrons

    OpenAIRE

    So, J.-K.; Ou, J.-Y.; Adamo, G.; García de Abajo, F. J.; MacDonald, K. F.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2013-01-01

    We provide the first experimental demonstration that the evanescent field of free electrons can be amplified by a plasmonic nanolayer in much that same way as optical evanescent fields are amplified in the ‘poor-man’s superlens’.

  16. Amplifying free-electron evanescent fields

    OpenAIRE

    So, J.-K.; Ou, J.-Y.; Adamo, G.; García de Abajo, F. J.; MacDonald, K. F.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2013-01-01

    We show experimentally for the first time that free-electron evanescent fields can be amplified by a plasmonic nanolayer in a manner analogous to the way in which optical fields are amplified in the poor-man's superlens.

  17. Analog circuit design designing high performance amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Feucht, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The third volume Designing High Performance Amplifiers applies the concepts from the first two volumes. It is an advanced treatment of amplifier design/analysis emphasizing both wideband and precision amplification.

  18. Compact dual channel spectroscopy amplifier cum discriminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single width NIM module having two channels of spectroscopy amplifier cum discriminator has been developed for Nuclear Physics experiments at IUAC. Each channel contains a shaping amplifier along with logic circuits to generate the energy and timing information respectively

  19. Single conversion stage amplifier - SICAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljusev, P.

    2005-12-15

    This Ph.D. thesis presents a thorough analysis of the so called SICAM - SIngle Converter stage AMplifier approach to building direct energy conversion audio power amplifiers. The mainstream approach for building isolated audio power amplifiers today consists of isolated DC power supply and Class D amplifier, which essentially represents a two stage solution, where each of the components can be viewed as separate and independent part. The proposed SICAM solution strives for direct energy conversion from the mains to the audio output, by dedicating the operation of the components one to another and integrating their functions, so that the final audio power amplifier represents a single-stage topology with higher efficiency, lower volume, less board space, lower component count and subsequently lower cost. The SICAM approach is both applicable to non-isolated and isolated audio power amplifiers, but the problems encountered in these two cases are different. Non-isolated SICAM solutions are intended for both AC mains-connected and battery-powered devices. In non-isolated mains-connected SICAMs the main idea is to simplify the power supply or even provide integrated power factor correction (PFC) functions, while still maintaining low component stress and good audio performance by generally decreasing the input voltage level to the Class D audio power amplifier. On the other hand, non-isolated battery-powered SICAMs have to cope with the ever changing battery voltage and provide output voltage levels which are both lower and higher than the battery voltage, while still being simple and single-stage energy conversion solutions. In isolated SICAMs the isolation transformer adjusts the voltage level on the secondary side to the desired level, so the main challenges here are decreasing the size of the magnetic core and reducing the number and size of bulky reactive components as much as possible. The main focus of this thesis is directed towards the isolated SICAMs and

  20. European Research on THz Vacuum Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, F.; Cojocarua, C.-S.; de Rossi, A.; Di Carlo, A.; Dispenza, M.; Dolfi, D.; Durand, A.; Fiorello, A.; Gohier, A.; Guiset, P.; Korantia, M.; Krozer, V.; Legagneux, P.; Marchesin, R.; Megtert, S.; Bouamrane, F.; Mineo, M.; Paoloni, C.; Pham, K.; Schnell, J.P.; Secchi, A.; Tamburri, E.; Terranova, M.L.; Ulisse, G.; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    The OPTHER (OPtically Driven TeraHertz AmplifiERs) project represents a considerable advancement in the field of high frequency amplification. The design and realization of a THz amplifier within this project is a consolidation of efforts at the international level from the main players of the Eu...... European research, academy and industry in vacuum electronics. This paper describes the status of the project and progress towards the THz amplifier realization....

  1. Improved charge amplifier using hybrid hysteresis compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin-Shahidi, Darya; Trumper, David L.

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel charge amplifier, with a robust feedback circuit and a method for compensating piezoelectric actuator's hysteresis at low frequencies. The amplifier uses a modified feedback circuit which improves robustness to the addition of series load impedance such as in cabling. We also describe a hybrid hysteresis compensation method for enabling the charge amplifier to reduce hysteresis at low frequencies. Experimental results demonstrate the utility of the new amplifier design.

  2. Quantum Theory of Laser Amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Gillian Linda

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. We calculate the input-output characteristics of a below threshold laser amplifier. Expressions are derived for the output second- and fourth-order spectral and temporal correlation functions in terms of the corresponding input quantities, and for the photocount first and second factorial moments for both homodyne and direct detection. The general results are applied to several cases of practical interest, including specific non-classical input states. We show that a maximum of twofold amplification is permitted if squeezing in the input is to survive at the output. Similarly, for preservation of photon antibunching in amplification we show that only very small gains are allowed. The model treated here provides a detailed example of the amplifier noise limitations imposed by quantum mechanics. In particular, we show that minimum noise occurs in a cavity that is asymmetric with respect to the mirror reflectivities. The latter part of this work treats the above threshold laser amplifier. The laser output is back-scattered from a moving target to provide a weak Doppler-shifted signal which re-enters the laser cavity and is amplified. We show that the three-level atomic lasing medium is equivalent to a two-level medium pumped by an inverted bath. We use the methods of quantum statistical analysis to obtain time -evolution equations for the c-number amplitudes of the laser and signal fields. We show that the results may be applied to the below threshold regime for appropriate values of the pump parameter. By considering the amplitude differential gain we show explicitly that the behaviour of the laser around threshold is characteristic of a second -order phase transition. We calculate the output intensity gain appropriate to a heterodyne detection process, and find good agreement between the predicted gain profiles and measured data for both carbon dioxide and argon-ion lasers.

  3. Compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, H.Z.; Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Levush, B.; Tate, J.; Chen, S.H. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Inst. for Plasma Research

    1995-12-31

    A compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling wave amplifier is being developed. The device is a three-stage tube with the output section running as a fourth harmonic gyro-TWT, the input section running as a fundamental gyro-TWT, and the middle operating at the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. Radiation is suppressed by servers between the sections. The operating beam of the tube is produced by a magnetron injection gun (MIG). A TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit consisting of mode converters and a filter waveguide is employed for both input and output sections to solve the mode competition problem, which is pervasive in gyro-TWT operation. The input section has an input coupler designed as a TE{sub 0n} mode launcher. It excites a signal at the fundamental cyclotron frequency (17.5 GHz), which is amplified in the first TWT interaction region. So far the device is similar to a two-stage harmonic gyro-TWT. The distinction is that in the three-stage device the second section will be optimized not for output power but for fourth harmonic bunching of the beam. A gyroklystron amplifier has also been designed. The configuration is similar to the gyro-TWT but with the traveling wave interaction structures replaced by mode selective special complex cavities. Cold test results of the wideband input coupler and the TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit have been obtained.

  4. SPS RF System Amplifier plant

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows a 2 MW, 200 MHz amplifier plant with feeder lines. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X.

  5. European Research on THz Vacuum Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, F.; Cojocarua, C.-S.; de Rossi, A.;

    2010-01-01

    The OPTHER (OPtically Driven TeraHertz AmplifiERs) project represents a considerable advancement in the field of high frequency amplification. The design and realization of a THz amplifier within this project is a consolidation of efforts at the international level from the main players of the Eu...

  6. NASA developments in solid state power amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Regis F.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last ten years, NASA has undertaken an extensive program aimed at development of solid state power amplifiers for space applications. Historically, the program may be divided into three phases. The first efforts were carried out in support of the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) program, which is developing an experimental version of a Ka-band commercial communications system. These first amplifiers attempted to use hybrid technology. The second phase was still targeted at ACTS frequencies, but concentrated on monolithic implementations, while the current, third phase, is a monolithic effort that focusses on frequencies appropriate for other NASA programs and stresses amplifier efficiency. The topics covered include: (1) 20 GHz hybrid amplifiers; (2) 20 GHz monolithic MESFET power amplifiers; (3) Texas Instruments' (TI) 20 GHz variable power amplifier; (4) TI 20 GHz high power amplifier; (5) high efficiency monolithic power amplifiers; (6) GHz high efficiency variable power amplifier; (7) TI 32 GHz monolithic power amplifier performance; (8) design goals for Hughes' 32 GHz variable power amplifier; and (9) performance goals for Hughes' pseudomorphic 60 GHz power amplifier.

  7. Solid state, S-band, power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digrindakis, M.

    1973-01-01

    The final design and specifications for a solid state, S-band, power amplifier is reported. Modifications from a previously proposed design were incorporated to improve efficiency and meet input overdrive and noise floor requirements. Reports on the system design, driver amplifier, power amplifier, and voltage and current limiter are included along with a discussion of the testing program.

  8. Solid state ku-band power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, H. C.; Lockyear, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of two types of IMPATT diode reflection amplifiers and a transmission amplifier are given. The Ku-band IMPATT diode development is discussed. Circuitry and electrical performance of the final version of the Ku-band amplifier is described. Construction details and an outline and mounting drawing are presented.

  9. low pump power photonic crystal fibre amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristian G.; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2003-01-01

    Designs of low pump power optical amplifiers, based on photonic crystal fibres are presented. The potential of these fibre amplifiers is investigated, and it is demonstrated that such amplifiers may deliver gains of more than 15 dB at 1550 nm with less than 1 mW of optical pump power....

  10. Influenza B vaccine lineage selection - An optimized trivalent vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Moster?n H?pping, Ana; Fonville, Judith M; Russell, Colin A.; James, Sarah; Derek J Smith

    2016-01-01

    Highlights • Although it is not known which one of two influenza B lineages will circulate in any one season, only a representative virus of one of the two lineages is part of the trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine. • We describe three lineage selection strategies to choose which lineage to include in the seasonal vaccine, including the common strategy of using the last lineage that has been observed to dominate, and a new strategy which takes into account population immunity. • We show why...

  11. Bazooka mediates secondary axon morphology in Drosophila brain lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartenstein Volker

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the Drosophila brain, neural lineages project bundled axon tracts into a central neuropile. Each lineage exhibits a stereotypical branching pattern and trajectory, which distinguish it from other lineages. In this study, we used a multilineage approach to explore the neural function of the Par-complex member Par3/Bazooka in vivo. Drosophila bazooka is expressed in post-mitotic neurons of the larval brain and localizes within neurons in a lineage-dependent manner. The fact that multiple GAL4 drivers have been mapped to several lineages of the Drosophila brain enables investigation of the role of Bazooka from larval to adult stages Bazooka loss-of-function (LOF clones had abnormal morphologies, including aberrant pathway choice of ventral projection neurons in the BAla1 lineage, ectopic branching in the DALv2 and BAmv1 lineages, and excess BLD5 lineage axon projections in the optic medulla. Exogenous expression of Bazooka protein in BAla1 neurons rescued defective guidance, supporting an intrinsic requirement for Bazooka in the post-mitotic neuron. Elimination of the Par-complex member Par6 recapitulated Bazooka phenotypes in some but not all lineages, suggesting that the Par complex functions in a lineage-dependent manner, and that Bazooka may act independently in some lineages. Importantly, this study highlights the potential of using a multilineage approach when studying gene function during neural development in Drosophila.

  12. Bazooka mediates secondary axon morphology in Drosophila brain lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Shana R; Hartenstein, Volker

    2011-01-01

    In the Drosophila brain, neural lineages project bundled axon tracts into a central neuropile. Each lineage exhibits a stereotypical branching pattern and trajectory, which distinguish it from other lineages. In this study, we used a multilineage approach to explore the neural function of the Par-complex member Par3/Bazooka in vivo. Drosophila bazooka is expressed in post-mitotic neurons of the larval brain and localizes within neurons in a lineage-dependent manner. The fact that multiple GAL4 drivers have been mapped to several lineages of the Drosophila brain enables investigation of the role of Bazooka from larval to adult stages Bazooka loss-of-function (LOF) clones had abnormal morphologies, including aberrant pathway choice of ventral projection neurons in the BAla1 lineage, ectopic branching in the DALv2 and BAmv1 lineages, and excess BLD5 lineage axon projections in the optic medulla. Exogenous expression of Bazooka protein in BAla1 neurons rescued defective guidance, supporting an intrinsic requirement for Bazooka in the post-mitotic neuron. Elimination of the Par-complex member Par6 recapitulated Bazooka phenotypes in some but not all lineages, suggesting that the Par complex functions in a lineage-dependent manner, and that Bazooka may act independently in some lineages. Importantly, this study highlights the potential of using a multilineage approach when studying gene function during neural development in Drosophila. PMID:21524279

  13. NIF/LMJ prototype amplifier mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amplifier prototypes for the National Ignition Facility and the Laser Megajoule will be tested at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The prototype amplifier, which is an ensemble of modules from LLNL and Centre d'Etudes de Limeil-Valenton, is cassette-based with bottom access for maintenance. A sealed maintenance transfer vehicle which moves optical cassettes between the amplifier and the assembly cleanroom, and a vacuum gripper which holds laser slabs during cassette assembly will also be tested. The prototype amplifier will be used to verify amplifier optical performance, thermal recovery time, and cleanliness of mechanical operations

  14. An Implantable CMOS Amplifier for Nerve Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Lehmann, Torsten

    In this paper, a low noise high gain CMOS amplifier for minute nerve signals is presented. The amplifier is constructed in a fully differential topology to maximize noise rejection. By using a mixture of weak- and strong inversion transistors, optimal noise suppression in the amplifier is achieved....... A continuous-time current-steering offset-compensation technique is utilized in order to minimize the noise contribution and to minimize dynamic impact on the amplifier input nodes. The method for signal recovery from noisy nerve signals is presented. A prototype amplifier is realized in a standard...

  15. HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department

  16. High temperature charge amplifier for geothermal applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, Scott C.; Maldonado, Frank J.; Henfling, Joseph A.

    2015-12-08

    An amplifier circuit in a multi-chip module includes a charge to voltage converter circuit, a voltage amplifier a low pass filter and a voltage to current converter. The charge to voltage converter receives a signal representing an electrical charge and generates a voltage signal proportional to the input signal. The voltage amplifier receives the voltage signal from the charge to voltage converter, then amplifies the voltage signal by the gain factor to output an amplified voltage signal. The lowpass filter passes low frequency components of the amplified voltage signal and attenuates frequency components greater than a cutoff frequency. The voltage to current converter receives the output signal of the lowpass filter and converts the output signal to a current output signal; wherein an amplifier circuit output is selectable between the output signal of the lowpass filter and the current output signal.

  17. Tracing lineages to uncover neuronal identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlmann Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many previous studies have focused on understanding how midbrain dopamine neurons, which are implicated in many neurological conditions, are generated during embryogenesis. One of the remaining questions concerns how different dopamine neuron subtypes are specified. A recent paper in Neural Development has revealed features of a spatial and temporal lineage map that, together with other studies, begins to elucidate the developmental origin of distinct neuronal subtypes within the developing midbrain. See research article http://www.neuraldevelopment.com/content/6/1/29

  18. Cometin is a novel neurotrophic factor that promotes neurite outgrowth and neuroblast migration in vitro and supports survival of spiral ganglion neurons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Roland; Fransson, Anette; Fjord-Larsen, Lone; Thompson, Lachlan H; Houchins, Jeffrey P; Andrade, Nuno; Torp, Malene; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Andersson, Elisabet; Lindvall, Olle; Ulfendahl, Mats; Brunak, Søren; Johansen, Teit E; Wahlberg, Lars U

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors are secreted proteins responsible for migration, growth and survival of neurons during development, and for maintenance and plasticity of adult neurons. Here we present a novel secreted protein named Cometin which together with Meteorin defines a new evolutionary conserved protein family. During early mouse development, Cometin is found exclusively in the floor plate and from E13.5 also in dorsal root ganglions and inner ear but apparently not in the adult nervous system. In vitro, Cometin promotes neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion cells which can be blocked by inhibition of the Janus or MEK kinases. In this assay, additive effects of Cometin and Meteorin are observed indicating separate receptors. Furthermore, Cometin supports migration of neuroblasts from subventricular zone explants to the same extend as stromal cell derived factor 1a. Given the neurotrophic properties in vitro, combined with the restricted inner ear expression during development, we further investigated Cometin in relation to deafness. In neomycin deafened guinea pigs, two weeks intracochlear infusion of recombinant Cometin supports spiral ganglion neuron survival and function. In contrast to the control group receiving artificial perilymph, Cometin treated animals retain normal electrically-evoked brainstem response which is maintained several weeks after treatment cessation. Neuroprotection is also evident from stereological analysis of the spiral ganglion. Altogether, these studies show that Cometin is a potent new neurotrophic factor with therapeutic potential. PMID:21985865

  19. Whole Genome Sequencing and Comparisons of Different Chinese Rabies Virus Lineages Including the First Complete Genome of an Arctic-like Strain in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hao; GUO ZhenYang; ZHANG Jian; TAO XiaoYan; ZHU WuYang; TANG Qing; LIU HongTu

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo learn the rabies genome molecular characteristics and compare the difference of China rabies lineages. MethodsThe complete genomes of 12 strains from different China rabies lineages were amplified and sequenced, and all the China street strain genomes (total 43), Arctic and Arctic-like genomes were aligned using ClustalX2, the genome homologies were analyzed using MegAlign software, and the phylogenetic trees were constructed by MEGA 5. ResultsFirst Arctic-like rabies genome in China (CQH1202D) was reported, and we supplemented the rabies genome data of China, ensuring at least one genome was available in each China lineage. The genome size of China V (11908nt) is obviously shorter than other lineages’ (11923-11925nt) for the difference of N-P non-coding regions. Among different lineages, the genome homologies are almost under 90%.CQH1202D (China IV lineage) has close relationship with strains from South Korea and they share about 95% genome similarities. ConclusionThe molecular characteristics of 6 different China rabies lineages werecompared and analyzed from genome level, which benefits for continued comprehensive rabies surveillance, rabies prevention and control in China.

  20. Variability in triactinomyxon production from Tubifex tubifex populations from the same mitochondrial DNA lineage infected with Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease in salmonids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Charlotte; Zickovich, Julie; Winton, James R; Kerans, Billie L

    2008-06-01

    Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease, infects both salmonid fish and an aquatic oligochaete, Tubifex tubifex. Although M. cerebralis has been detected in river drainages throughout the United States, disease severity among wild fish populations has been highly variable. Tubifex tubifex populations have been genetically characterized using sequences from the 16S mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene, the 18S ribosomal RNA gene, the internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1), and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Our earlier work indicated that large differences in compatibility between the parasite and populations of T. tubifex may play a substantial role in the distribution of whirling disease and resulting mortality in different watersheds. In the present study, we examined 4 laboratory populations of T. tubifex belonging to 16S mtDNA lineage III and 1 population belonging to 16S mtDNA lineage I for triactinomyxon (TAM) production after infection with M. cerebralis myxospores. All 4 16S mtDNA lineage III populations produced TAMs, but statistically significant differences in TAM production were observed. Most individuals in the 16S mtDNA lineage III-infected populations produced TAMs. The 16S mtDNA lineage I population produced few TAMs. Further genetic characterization of the 16S mtDNA lineage III populations with RAPD markers indicated that populations producing similar levels of TAMs had more genetic similarity. PMID:18605778

  1. Audio power amplifier design handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Self, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    This book is essential for audio power amplifier designers and engineers for one simple reason...it enables you as a professional to develop reliable, high-performance circuits. The Author Douglas Self covers the major issues of distortion and linearity, power supplies, overload, DC-protection and reactive loading. He also tackles unusual forms of compensation and distortion produced by capacitors and fuses. This completely updated fifth edition includes four NEW chapters including one on The XD Principle, invented by the author, and used by Cambridge Audio. Cro

  2. Cathode-follower power amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In circular accelerators and particularly in storage rings it is essential that the total impedance, as seen by the beam, be kept below some critical value. A model of the accelerating system was built using a single-ended cathode-follower amplifier driving a ferrite-loaded cavity. The system operated at 234.5 kHz with a peak output voltage of +-10 kV on the gap. The dynamic output impedance, as measured on the gap, was < 15 ohms

  3. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  4. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  5. YANG-MILLS FIELD AMPLIFIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a project of the Yang-Mills amplifier. Amplifier model is a multilayer spherical shell with increasing density towards the center. In the center of the amplifier is the core of high-density material. It is shown that in such a system, the amplitude of the Yang-Mills waves rises from the periphery to the center of several orders of magnitude. The role of the Yang-Mills field in the processes occurring in the nuclei of galaxies, stars and planets is discussed. The data modeling to strengthen the Yang-Mills field in the bowels of the planet, with an atomic explosion, and in some special devices such as the voltaic pile. To describe the mechanism of amplification chromodynamics field used as accurate results in Yang-Mills theory and numerical models developed based on an average and the exact equations as well. Among the exact solutions of the special role played by the centralsymmetric metric describing the contribution of the Yang-Mills field in the speed of recession of galaxies. Among the approximate numerical models can be noted the eight-scalar model we have developed for the simulation of non-linear color oscillations and chaos in the Yang-Mills theory. Earlier models were investigated spatio-temporal oscillations of the YangMills theory in the case of three and eight colors. The results of numerical simulation show that the nonlinear interaction does not lead to a spatial mixing of colors as it might be in the case of turbulent diffusion. Depending on the system parameters there is a suppression of the amplitude of the oscillations the first three by five colors or vice versa. The kinetic energy fluctuations or shared equally between the color components, or dominated by the kinetic energy of repressed groups of colors. In the present study, we found that amplification chromodynamic field leads to a sharp increase in the amplitude of the suppressed color, which can lead to an increase in entropy, excitation of nuclear

  6. Enhanced Gain in Photonic Crystal Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara; Semenova, Elizaveta; Hansen, Per Lunnemann;

    2012-01-01

    study of a 1 QW photonic crystal amplifier. Net gain is achieved which enables laser oscillation in photonic crystal micro cavities. The ability to freely tailor the dispersion in a semiconductor optical amplifier makes it possible to raise the optical gain considerably over a certain bandwidth. These...... results are promising for short and efficient semiconductor optical amplifiers. This effect will also benefit other devices, such as mode locked lasers....

  7. Feedback, Lineages and Self-Organizing Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameeran Kunche

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Feedback regulation of cell lineage progression plays an important role in tissue size homeostasis, but whether such feedback also plays an important role in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. Here we use mathematical modeling to show that a particular feedback architecture in which both positive and negative diffusible signals act on stem and/or progenitor cells leads to the appearance of bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors, ultrasensitivity to external growth cues, local growth-driven budding, self-sustaining elongation, and the triggering of self-organization in the form of lamellar fingers. Such behaviors arise not through regulation of cell cycle speeds, but through the control of stem or progenitor self-renewal. Even though the spatial patterns that arise in this setting are the result of interactions between diffusible factors with antagonistic effects, morphogenesis is not the consequence of Turing-type instabilities.

  8. New native South American Y chromosome lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jota, Marilza S; Lacerda, Daniela R; Sandoval, José R; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R; Ohasi, Dominique; Santos-Júnior, José E; Acosta, Oscar; Cuellar, Cinthia; Revollo, Susana; Paz-Y-Miño, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Schurr, Theodore G; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo M; Pena, Sergio Dj; Ayub, Qasim; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Santos, Fabrício R

    2016-07-01

    Many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the non-recombining region of the human Y chromosome have been described in the last decade. High-coverage sequencing has helped to characterize new SNPs, which has in turn increased the level of detail in paternal phylogenies. However, these paternal lineages still provide insufficient information on population history and demography, especially for Native Americans. The present study aimed to identify informative paternal sublineages derived from the main founder lineage of the Americas-haplogroup Q-L54-in a sample of 1841 native South Americans. For this purpose, we used a Y-chromosomal genotyping multiplex platform and conventional genotyping methods to validate 34 new SNPs that were identified in the present study by sequencing, together with many Y-SNPs previously described in the literature. We updated the haplogroup Q phylogeny and identified two new Q-M3 and three new Q-L54*(xM3) sublineages defined by five informative SNPs, designated SA04, SA05, SA02, SA03 and SA29. Within the Q-M3, sublineage Q-SA04 was mostly found in individuals from ethnic groups belonging to the Tukanoan linguistic family in the northwest Amazon, whereas sublineage Q-SA05 was found in Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon ethnic groups. Within Q-L54*, the derived sublineages Q-SA03 and Q-SA02 were exclusively found among Coyaima individuals (Cariban linguistic family) from Colombia, while Q-SA29 was found only in Maxacali individuals (Jean linguistic family) from southeast Brazil. Furthermore, we validated the usefulness of several published SNPs among indigenous South Americans. This new Y chromosome haplogroup Q phylogeny offers an informative paternal genealogy to investigate the pre-Columbian history of South America.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 31 March 2016; doi:10.1038/jhg.2016.26. PMID:27030145

  9. Reflection amplifiers in self-regulated learning

    OpenAIRE

    Verpoorten, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Verpoorten, D. (2012). Reflection amplifiers in self-regulated learning. Doctoral thesis. November, 9, 2012, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit (CELSTEC). Datawyse / Universitaire Pers Maastricht.

  10. Dynamics of Soliton Cascades in Fiber Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga-Sierra, F R; Agrawal, Govind P

    2016-01-01

    We study numerically the formation of cascading solitons when femtosecond optical pulses are launched into a fiber amplifier with less energy than required to form a soliton of equal duration. As the pulse is amplified, cascaded fundamental solitons are created at different distances, without soliton fission, as each fundamental soliton moves outside the gain bandwidth through the Raman-induced spectral shifts. As a result, each input pulse creates multiple, temporally separated, ultrashort pulses of different wavelengths at the amplifier output. The number of pulses depends not only on the total gain of the amplifier but also on the width of input pulses.

  11. Ping-pong auto-zero amplifier with glitch reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Mark R.

    2008-01-22

    A ping-pong amplifier with reduced glitching is described. The ping-pong amplifier includes a nulling amplifier coupled to a switching network. The switching network is used to auto-zero a ping amplifier within a ping-pong amplifier. The nulling amplifier drives the output of a ping amplifier to a proper output voltage level during auto-zeroing of the ping amplifier. By being at a proper output voltage level, glitches associated with transitioning between a ping amplifier and a pong amplifier are reduced or eliminated.

  12. Linearisation of RF Power Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Asbeck

    2001-01-01

    linearisation systems with focus on polar modulation feedback, and a chip oriented part focusing on integrating of separate building blocks of the system on a chip. The system oriented part of this thesis deals with analog feedback linearisation systems. The Polar modulation feedback system is compared with the...... more traditional Cartesian modulation feedback system in terms of loop settlement and dependencies between the feedback signals. A method to calculate the distortion functions of the linearisation system (AM/AM and AM/PM)based on the distortion functions of the power amplifier is presented. Also the...... polar loop architecture and it’s suitability to modern digital transmitters is discussed. A proposal of an architecture that is suitable for digital transmitters, which means that it has an interface to the digital back-end, defined by low-pass signals in polar form, is presented. Simulation guidelines...

  13. Transverse pumped laser amplifier architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Manes, Kenneth; Deri, Robert; Erlandson, Al; Caird, John; Spaeth, Mary

    2013-07-09

    An optical gain architecture includes a pump source and a pump aperture. The architecture also includes a gain region including a gain element operable to amplify light at a laser wavelength. The gain region is characterized by a first side intersecting an optical path, a second side opposing the first side, a third side adjacent the first and second sides, and a fourth side opposing the third side. The architecture further includes a dichroic section disposed between the pump aperture and the first side of the gain region. The dichroic section is characterized by low reflectance at a pump wavelength and high reflectance at the laser wavelength. The architecture additionally includes a first cladding section proximate to the third side of the gain region and a second cladding section proximate to the fourth side of the gain region.

  14. CXCL12/CXCR4 Axis Improves Migration of Neuroblasts Along Corpus Callosum by Stimulating MMP-2 Secretion After Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weifeng; Yi, Xin; Qin, Jianbing; Tian, Meiling; Jin, Guohua

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effect of CXCL12 on migration of neural precursor cells after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We randomly divided 48 rats into four groups: (1) the sham group, rats were performed craniotomy only, (2) the control group, saline were injected into the ipsilateral cortex after TBI, (3) the CXCL12 group, CXCL12 were injected into the ipsilateral cortex after TBI, and (4) the CXCL12 + AMD3100 group, CXCL12 and AMD3100 were mixed together and injected into the ipsilateral cortex after TBI. At 7 days after TBI, the brain tissues were subjected to immunofluorescent double-labeled staining with the antibodies of CXCR4/DCX, MMP-2/DCX, MMP-2/GFAP, MMP-2/NeuN. Western blot assay was used to measure the protein levels of MMP-2. Compared with the control group, the number of CXCR4/DCX and MMP-2 positive cells around the injured corpus callosum area were significantly increased in the CXCL12 treatment group. The area occupied by these cells expanded and the shape changed from chain distribution to radial. CXCL12 + AMD3100 treatment significantly decreased the number and distribution area of CXCR4/DCX and MMP-2 positive cells compared with the CXCL12 treatment and control group. The DCX positive cells could not form chain or radial distribution. The protein expressions of MMP-2 had the similar change trends as the results of immunofluorescent staining. MMP-2 could be secreted by DCX, GFAP and NeuN positive cells. CXCL12/CXCR4 axis can improve the migration of the neuroblasts along the corpus callosum by stimulating the MMP-2 secretion of different types of cells. PMID:26801174

  15. The neuroblast and angioblast chemotaxic factor SDF-1 (CXCL12 expression is briefly up regulated by reactive astrocytes in brain following neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Aisha L

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1 or CXCL12 is chemotaxic for CXCR4 expressing bone marrow-derived cells. It functions in brain embryonic development and in response to ischemic injury in helping guide neuroblast migration and vasculogenesis. In experimental adult stroke models SDF-1 is expressed perivascularly in the injured region up to 30 days after the injury, suggesting it could be a therapeutic target for tissue repair strategies. We hypothesized that SDF-1 would be expressed in similar temporal and spatial patterns following hypoxic-ischemic (HI injury in neonatal brain. Results Twenty-five 7-day-old C57BL/J mice underwent HI injury. SDF-1 expression was up regulated up to 7 days after the injury but not at the later time points. The chief sites of SDF-1 up regulation were astrocytes, their foot processes along blood vessels and endothelial cells. Conclusion The localization of SDF-1 along blood vessels in the HI injury zone suggests that these perivascular areas are where chemotaxic signaling for cellular recruitment originates and that reactive astrocytes are major mediators of this process. The associated endothelium is likely to be the site for vascular attachment and diapedesis of CXCR4 receptor expressing cells to enter the injured tissue. Here we show that, relative to adults, neonates have a significantly smaller window of opportunity for SDF-1 based vascular chemotaxic recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells. Therefore, without modification, following neonatal HI injury there is only a narrow period of time for endogenous SDF-1 mediated chemotaxis and recruitment of reparative cells, including exogenously administered stem/progenitor cells.

  16. Identification and Characterization of Mouse Otic Sensory Lineage Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron H. Hartman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate embryogenesis gives rise to all cell types of an organism through the development of many unique lineages derived from the three primordial germ layers. The otic sensory lineage arises from the otic vesicle, a structure formed through invagination of placodal non-neural ectoderm. This developmental lineage possesses unique differentiation potential, giving rise to otic sensory cell populations including hair cells, supporting cells, and ganglion neurons of the auditory and vestibular organs. Here we present a systematic approach to identify transcriptional features that distinguish the otic sensory lineage (from early otic progenitors to otic sensory populations from other major lineages of vertebrate development. We used a microarray approach to analyze otic sensory lineage populations including microdissected otic vesicles (embryonic day 10.5 as well as isolated neonatal cochlear hair cells and supporting cells at postnatal day 3. Non-otic tissue samples including periotic tissues and whole embryos with otic regions removed were used as reference populations to evaluate otic specificity. Otic populations shared transcriptome-wide correlations in expression profiles that distinguish members of this lineage from non-otic populations. We further analyzed the microarray data using comparative and dimension reduction methods to identify individual genes that are specifically expressed in the otic sensory lineage. This analysis identified and ranked top otic sensory lineage-specific transcripts including Fbxo2, Col9a2, and Oc90, and additional novel otic lineage markers. To validate these results we performed expression analysis on select genes using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Fbxo2 showed the most striking pattern of specificity to the otic sensory lineage, including robust expression in the early otic vesicle and sustained expression in prosensory progenitors and auditory and vestibular hair cells and supporting

  17. Amplified spontaneous emission and its restraint in a terawatt Ti:sapphire amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and its restraint in a femtosecond Ti: sapphire chirped_pulse amplifier were investigated. The noises arising from ASE were effectively filtered out in the spatial, temporal and spectral domain. Pulses as short as 38 fs were amplified to peak power of 1.4 TW. The power ratio between the amplified femtosecond pulse and the ASE was higher than 106:1.

  18. Distributed feedback laser amplifiers combining the functions of amplifiers and channel filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Z.; Durhuus, T.; Mikkelsen, Benny;

    1994-01-01

    A dynamic model for distributed feedback amplifiers, including the mode coupled equations and the carrier rate equation, is established. The presented mode coupled equations have taken into account the interaction between fast changing optical signal and the waveguide with corrugations. By showin...... the possibility of amplifying 100 ps pulses without pulse broadening, we anticipate that a distributed feedback amplifier can be used as a combined amplifier and channel filter in high bit rate transmission systems....

  19. A general-purpose pulse amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper proposals are made for using the technique, known from analogue computation, for transforming nuclear pulses to the shape and size desired by the means of ''operational amplifiers''. By using this technique it is possible, by means of one fundamental amplifier but with different feedback networks, to have pre-amplifiers and head-amplifiers with different pulse-handling performances and optimized with respect to the parameter of greatest interest, such as linearity, stability or overloading characteristics. As this technique involves the use of parallel-feedback it is specially suited for pre-amplifiers since most detectors are current-generators. An amplifier fulfilling the requirements necessary for use as an operational amplifier is described. The most important specifications are: 90 db gain from DC-10 kHz, then falling approximately 20 db/decade until 15 MHz (30 db gain). Four tubes are used in the amplifier. For most pulse-handling applications a stabilized power-supply is unnecessary and the stability will depend solely on the stability of the feedback network used. (author)

  20. Self-pulsation in Raman fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated.......Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated....

  1. High efficiency, low magnetic field gyroklystron amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of operating a gyroklystron amplifier at high efficiency and low magnetic field is considered. Two devices are discussed: A two cavity second harmonic TE02 gyroklystron amplifier operating at 19.7 GHz with subharmonic bunching, and a fundamental mode TE01 gyrotwistron at 16 GHz. The nonlinear efficiency is given for both devices

  2. BROADBAND TRAVELLING WAVE SEMICONDUCTOR OPTICAL AMPLIFIER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Broadband travelling wave semiconductor optical amplifier (100, 200, 300, 400, 800) for amplification of light, wherein the amplifier (100, 200, 300, 400, 800) comprises a waveguide region (101, 201, 301, 401, 801) for providing confinement of the light in transverse directions and adapted for...

  3. Waveguide optical amplifier for telecom applications

    OpenAIRE

    Taccheo, Stefano; Zannin, Marcelo; Ennser, Karin; Careglio, Davide; Solé Pareta, Josep; Aracil Rico, Javier

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review progress in optical gain clamped waveguide amplifiers for applications to optical communications. We demonstrate that compact waveguide devices may offer advantages compared to standard fiber amplifiers. In particular we focus on the application of gain clamping and optical burst switching networks where physical impairments may occur due to variation of the input power. Peer Reviewed

  4. Genetic admixture and lineage separation in a southern Andean plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Santiago; Sede, Silvana M.

    2016-01-01

    Mountain uplifts have generated new ecologic opportunities for plants, and triggered evolutionary processes, favouring an increase on the speciation rate in all continents. Moreover, mountain ranges may act as corridors or barriers for plant lineages and populations. In South America a high rate of diversification has been linked to Andean orogeny during Pliocene/Miocene. More recently, Pleistocene glacial cycles have also shaped species distribution and demography. The endemic genus Escallonia is known to have diversified in the Andes. Species with similar morphology obscure species delimitation and plants with intermediate characters occur naturally. The aim of this study is to characterize genetic variation and structure of two widespread species of Escallonia: E. alpina and E. rubra. We analyzed the genetic variation of populations of the entire distribution range of the species and we also included those with intermediate morphological characters; a total of 94 accessions from 14 populations were used for the Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Plastid DNA sequences (trnS-trnG, 3′trnV-ndhC intergenic spacers and the ndhF gene) from sixteen accessions of Escallonia species were used to construct a Statistical Parsimony network. Additionally, we performed a geometric morphometrics analysis on 88 leaves from 35 individuals of the two E. alpina varieties to further study their differences. Wright’s Fst and analysis of molecular variance tests performed on AFLP data showed a significant level of genetic structure at the species and population levels. Intermediate morphology populations showed a mixed genetic contribution from E. alpina var. alpina and E. rubra both in the Principal Coordinates Analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE. On the other hand, E. rubra and the two varieties of E. alpina are well differentiated and assigned to different genetic clusters. Moreover, the Statistical Parsimony network showed a high degree of divergence between the

  5. mm-wave solid state amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfert, P. H.; Crowley, J. D.; Fank, F. B.

    The development of mm-wave amplifiers using InP Gunn diodes is reviewed including a low-noise eight-stage amplifier for replacement of a Ka-band TWTA and a three-stage amplifier for the 42.5 to 44.5 range with an output power of 100 mW and 20 dB associated gain. A detailed description of a three-stage amplifier for the 54 to 58 GHz range is given with 100 mW output power and 15 dB associated gain, a small signal gain of 30 dB and an N.F. of 15.5 to 16.5 dB. The design of a broad band, low-loss V-band circulator, which was used in the amplifier, is described.

  6. Detection of Non-Amplified Genomic DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Corradini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    This book offers a state-of-the-art overview on non amplified DNA detection methods and provides chemists, biochemists, biotechnologists and material scientists with an introduction to these methods. In fact all these fields have dedicated resources to the problem of nucleic acid detection, each contributing with their own specific methods and concepts. This book will explain the basic principles of the different non amplified DNA detection methods available, highlighting their respective advantages and limitations. The importance of non-amplified DNA sequencing technologies will be also discussed. Non-amplified DNA detection can be achieved by adopting different techniques. Such techniques have allowed the commercialization of innovative platforms for DNA detection that are expected to break into the DNA diagnostics market. The enhanced sensitivity required for the detection of non amplified genomic DNA has prompted new strategies that can achieve ultrasensitivity by combining specific materials with specifi...

  7. Semiconductor quantum-dot lasers and amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Borri, Paola; Ledentsov, N. N.;

    2002-01-01

    We have produced GaAs-based quantum-dot edge-emitting lasers operating at 1.16 mu m with record-low transparency current, high output power, and high internal quantum efficiencies. We have also realized GaAs-based quantum-dot lasers emitting at 1.3 mu m, both high-power edge emitters and low-power...... biased to positive net gain. We have further measured gain recovery times in quantum dot amplifiers that are significantly lower than in bulk and quantum-well semiconductor optical amplifiers. This is promising for future demonstration of quantum dot devices with high modulation bandwidth...... surface emitting VCSELs. We investigated the ultrafast dynamics of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers. The dephasing time at room temperature of the ground-state transition in semiconductor quantum dots is around 250 fs in an unbiased amplifier, decreasing to below 50 fs when the amplifier is...

  8. Radiation tolerant isolation amplifiers for temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper concentrates on the selection of radiation tolerant isolation amplifiers, which are suitable for the signal conditioners for cryogenic system in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The evolution and the results of different commercial isolation amplifiers' parameters under neutron and gamma radiation are presented. In most cases, the tested isolation amplifiers' input offset voltage, bias currents and output offset voltage hardly changed during the radiation. The DC gain in input stage was only affected for some isolation amplifiers with a small open loop gain. Transmission coefficient showed decrease for all the tested isolation amplifiers. Also, the DC output voltage increased and the ripple voltage decreased for all the build-in isolated regulators. In addition, results on 1B41 signal conditioner showed that it was tolerant to 7-8x1012 n/cm2, which was 50% higher than the expected dose in the LHC

  9. An Implantable CMOS Amplifier for Nerve Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Lehmann, Torsten

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a low noise high gain CMOS amplifier for minute nerve signals is presented. By using a mixture of weak- and strong inversion transistors, optimal noise suppression in the amplifier is achieved. A continuous-time offset-compensation technique is utilized in order to minimize impact on...... the amplifier input nodes. The method for signal recovery from noisy nerve signals is presented. A prototype amplifier is realized in a standard digital 0.5 μm CMOS single poly, n-well process. The prototype amplifier features a gain of 80 dB over a 3.6 kHz bandwidth, a CMRR of more than 87 dB and a...

  10. Design and performance of the beamlet amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandson, A.C.; Rotter, M.D.; Frank, M.D.; McCracken, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    In future laser systems, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), multi-segment amplifiers (MSAs) will be used to amplify the laser beam to the required levels. As a prototype of such a laser architecture, the authors have designed, built, and tested flash-lamp-pumped, Nd:Glass, Brewster-angle slab MSAs for the Beamlet project. In this article, they review the fundamentals of Nd:Glass amplifiers, describe the MSA geometry, discuss parameters that are important in amplifier design, and present our results on the characterization of the Beamlet MSAs. In particular, gain and beam steering measurements show that the Beamlet amplifiers meet all optical performance specifications and perform close to model predictions.

  11. Qubit readout with a directional parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, K. M.; Abdo, B.; Narla, A.; Shankar, S.; Hatridge, M.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2014-03-01

    Josephson junction based quantum limited parametric amplifiers play an essential role in superconducting qubit measurements. These measurements necessitate circulators and isolators between the amplifier and qubit to add directionality and/or isolation. Unfortunately, this extra hardware limits both quantum measurement efficiency and experimental scalability. Here we present a quantum-limited Josephson-junction-based directional amplifier (JDA) based on a novel coupling between two nominally identical Josephson parametric converters (JPCs). The device achieves a forward gain of 11 dB with a 15 MHz dynamical bandwidth, but higher gains are possible at the expense of bandwidth. We also present measurements of a transmon qubit made with the JDA, and show minimal measurement back-action despite the absence of any isolator or circulator before the amplifier. These results provide a first step toward realizing on-chip integration of qubits and parametric amplifiers. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and NSF.

  12. Design of an 1800nm Raman amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a Raman amplifier that operates at 1810 nm and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser at 1680 nm. Both the pump laser and the Raman amplifier is polarization maintaining. A challenge when scaling Raman amplifiers to longer wavelengths is the increase in...... transmission loss, but also the reduction in the Raman gain coefficient as the amplifier wavelength is increased. Both polarization components of the Raman gain is characterized, initially for linearly co-polarized signal and pump, subsequently linearly polarized orthogonal signal and pump. The noise...... performance of the amplifier is also investigated for both configurations. Our results show an on/off gain exceeding 20 dB at 1810 nm for which the obtained effective noise figure is below 3 dB....

  13. Identification of genes to differentiate closely related Salmonella lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Hua Zou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salmonella are important human and animal pathogens. Though highly related, the Salmonella lineages may be strictly adapted to different hosts or cause different diseases, from mild local illness like gastroenteritis to fatal systemic infections like typhoid. Therefore, rapid and accurate identification of Salmonella is essential for timely and correct diagnosis of Salmonella infections. The current identification methods such as 16S rRNA sequencing and multilocus sequence typing are expensive and time consuming. Additionally, these methods often do not have sufficient distinguishing resolution among the Salmonella lineages. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared 27 completely sequenced Salmonella genomes to identify possible genomic features that could be used for differentiation of individual lineages. We concatenated 2372 core genes in each of the 27 genomes and constructed a neighbor-joining tree. On the tree, strains of each serotype were clustered tightly together and different serotypes were unambiguously separated with clear genetic distances, demonstrating systematic genomic divergence among the Salmonella lineages. We made detailed comparisons among the 27 genomes and identified distinct sets of genomic differences, including nucleotide variations and genomic islands (GIs, among the Salmonella lineages. Two core genes STM4261 and entF together could unambiguously distinguish all Salmonella lineages compared in this study. Additionally, strains of a lineage have a common set of GIs and closely related lineages have similar sets of GIs. CONCLUSIONS: Salmonella lineages have accumulated distinct sets of mutations and laterally acquired DNA (e.g., GIs in evolution. Two genes entF and STM4261 have diverged sufficiently among the Salmonella lineages to be used for their differentiation. Further investigation of the distinct sets of mutations and GIs will lead to novel insights into genomic evolution of Salmonella and

  14. The Strait of Gibraltar poses an effective barrier to host-specialised but not to host-generalised lineages of avian Haemosporidia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Vanessa A; da Silva, Luís P; Lopes, Ricardo J; Drovetski, Sergei V

    2015-09-01

    One of the major concerns with ongoing environmental global change is the ability of parasites to shift their distribution (both geographically and across hosts) and to increase in virulence. To understand the structure, diversity and connectivity of parasite communities across the Mediterranean Sea, we used avian haemosporidian communities associated with forest birds of northwestern Africa and northwestern Iberia as a model system. We characterised host specificity of lineages and tested whether host generalists are more likely to cross the biogeographic barrier imposed by the Strait of Gibraltar than host specialists. We sampled 321 birds of 43 species in northwestern Africa and 735 birds of 49 species in northwestern Iberia. Using a PCR-based approach to amplify Plasmodium, Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon parasites, we retrieved 969 sequences representing 200 unique cytochrome-b lineages. Haemosporidians infected a significantly higher proportion of birds in northwestern Africa (78.5%) than in northwestern Iberia (50.5%). Relative diversity of different haemosporidian genera did not differ between our study areas, but Plasmodium was overrepresented among individual infections in northwestern Iberia. Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon lineages were predominantly host-specialised and Plasmodium lineages were host-generalised. The number of regions occupied by lineages was significantly associated with their host specificity and abundance. These data are consistent with the positive abundance-occupancy relationship and patterns of host specificity among different haemosporidian genera observed in other studies. PMID:26056737

  15. Micromere lineages in the glossiphoniid leech Helobdella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Francoise Z.; Kang, Dongmin; Ramirez-Weber, Felipe-Andres; Bissen, Shirley T.; Weisblat, David A.

    2002-01-01

    In leech embryos, segmental mesoderm and ectoderm arise from teloblasts by lineages that are already relatively well characterized. Here, we present data concerning the early divisions and the definitive fate maps of the micromeres, a group of 25 small cells that arise during the modified spiral cleavage in leech (Helobdella robusta) and contribute to most of the nonsegmental tissues of the adult. Three noteworthy results of this work are as follows. (1) The c"' and dm' clones (3d and 3c in traditional nomenclature) give rise to a hitherto undescribed network of fibers that run from one end of the embryo to the other. (2) The clones of micromeres b" and b"' (2b and 3b in traditional nomenclature) die in normal development; the b" clone can be rescued to assume the normal c" fate if micromere c" or its clone are ablated in early development. (3) Two qualitative differences in micromere fates are seen between H. robusta (Sacramento) and another Helobdella sp. (Galt). First, in Helobdella sp. (Galt), the clone of micromere b" does not normally die, and contributes a subset of the cells arising exclusively from c" in H. robusta (Sacramento). Second, in Helobdella sp. (Galt), micromere c"' makes no definitive contribution, whereas micromere dm' gives rise to cells equivalent to those arising from c"' and dm' in H. robusta (Sacramento).

  16. Vanillin and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol promotes cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus of mice via the increase of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tropomyosin-related kinase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Chul; Hwang, In Koo; Park, Seung Min; Ahn, Ji Yun; Kim, Dong Won; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Jong-Dai; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Kang, Il-Jun

    2016-04-01

    4-Hydroxy‑3-methoxybenzaldehyde (vanillin) and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (4-HBA) are well‑known phenolic compounds, which possess various therapeutic properties and are widely found in a variety of plants. In the present study, the effects of vanillin and 4‑HBA were first investigated on cell proliferation, as well as neuronal differentiation and integration of granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of adolescent mice using Ki‑67, doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry and 5‑bromo‑2'‑deoxyuridine (BrdU)/feminizing Locus on X 3 (NeuN) double immunofluorescence. In both the vanillin and 4‑HBA groups, the number of Ki‑67+ cells, DCX+ neuroblasts and BrdU+/NeuN+ neurons were significantly increased in the subgranular zone of the DG, as compared with the vehicle group. In addition, the levels of brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin‑related kinase B (TrkB), a BDNF receptor, were significantly increased in the DG in the vanillin and 4‑HBA groups compared with the vehicle group. These results indicated that vanillin and 4‑HBA enhanced cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and integration of granule cells in the DG of adolescent mice . These neurogenic effects of vanillin and 4‑HBA may be closely associated with increases in BDNF and TrkB. PMID:26935641

  17. The 60 GHz solid state power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclymonds, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new amplifier architecture was developed during this contract that is superior to any other solid state approach. The amplifier produced 6 watts with 4 percent efficiency over a 2 GHz band at 61.5 GHz. The unit was 7 x 9 x 3 inches in size, 5.5 pounds in weight, and the conduction cooling through the baseplate is suitable for use in space. The amplifier used high efficiency GaAs IMPATT diodes which were mounted in 1-diode circuits, called modules. Eighteen modules were used in the design, and power combining was accomplished with a proprietary passive component called a combiner plate.

  18. Laser Cooled High-Power Fiber Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Nemova, Galina

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model for laser cooled continuous-wave fiber amplifier is presented. The amplification process takes place in the Tm3+-doped core of the fluoride ZBLAN (ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF) glass fiber. The cooling process takes place in the Yb3+:ZBLAN fiber cladding. It is shown that for each value of the pump power and the amplified signal there is a distribution of the concentration of the Tm3+ along the length of the fiber amplifier, which provides its athermal operation. The influence ...

  19. Effect of Soliton Propagation in Fiber Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of optical solitons in fiber amplifiers is discussed by considering a model that includes linear high order dispersion, two-photon absorption, nonlinear high-order dispersion, self-induced Ramam and five-order nonlinear effects. Based on travelling wave method, the solutions of the nonlinear Schrdinger equations, and the influence on soliton propagation as well as high-order effect in the fiber amplifier are discussed in detail. It is found that because of existing five-order nonlinear effect, the solution is not of secant hyperbola type, but shows high gain state of the fiber amplifier which is very favourable to the propagation of solitons.

  20. Noise reduction in AC-coupled amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano Finetti, Roberto Ernesto; Pallàs Areny, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    AC-coupled amplifiers are noisier than dc-coupled amplifiers because of the thermal noise of the resistor(s) in the ac-coupling network and the increased contribution of the amplifier input noise current i(n). Both contributions, however, diminish if the corner frequency f(c) of the high-pass filter observed by the signal is lowered, the cost being a longer transient response. At the same time, the presence of large resistors in the ac-coupling network suggests that the use of FET-input ampli...

  1. Fundamentals of RF and microwave transistor amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Bahl, Inder J

    2009-01-01

    A Comprehensive and Up-to-Date Treatment of RF and Microwave Transistor Amplifiers This book provides state-of-the-art coverage of RF and microwave transistor amplifiers, including low-noise, narrowband, broadband, linear, high-power, high-efficiency, and high-voltage. Topics covered include modeling, analysis, design, packaging, and thermal and fabrication considerations. Through a unique integration of theory and practice, readers will learn to solve amplifier-related design problems ranging from matching networks to biasing and stability. More than 240 problems are included to help read

  2. Fast and scalable inference of multi-sample cancer lineages.

    KAUST Repository

    Popic, Victoria

    2015-05-06

    Somatic variants can be used as lineage markers for the phylogenetic reconstruction of cancer evolution. Since somatic phylogenetics is complicated by sample heterogeneity, novel specialized tree-building methods are required for cancer phylogeny reconstruction. We present LICHeE (Lineage Inference for Cancer Heterogeneity and Evolution), a novel method that automates the phylogenetic inference of cancer progression from multiple somatic samples. LICHeE uses variant allele frequencies of somatic single nucleotide variants obtained by deep sequencing to reconstruct multi-sample cell lineage trees and infer the subclonal composition of the samples. LICHeE is open source and available at http://viq854.github.io/lichee .

  3. Stat3 inhibition in neural lineage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Tomohiro; Mack, Laura; Delis, Natalia; Brill, Boris; Groner, Bernd

    2012-06-01

    Abstract Deregulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is attracting attentions in neurological disorders of elderly populations, e.g., Stat3 is inactivated in hippocampal neurons of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, whereas it is often constitutively activated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), correlating with poor prognosis. Stat3-inhibiting drugs have been intensively developed for chemotherapy based on the fact that GBM, in many cases, are "addicted" to Stat3 activation. Stat3 inhibitors, however, potentially have unfavorable side effects on postmitotic neurons, normal permanent residents in the central nervous system. It is, therefore, of great importance to address detailed cellular responses of neural lineage cells including normal neurons, astrocytes, and neuronal/glial cancer cell lines to several classes of Stat3 inhibitors focusing on their effective concentrations. Here, we picked up five human and mouse cancer cell lines (Neuro-2a and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell lines and Tu-9648, U-87MG, and U-373MG glioblastoma cell lines) and treated with various Stat3 inhibitors. Among them, Stattic, FLLL31, and resveratrol potently suppressed P-Stat3 and cell viability in all the tested cell lines. Stat3 knockdown or expression of dominant-negative Stat3 further sensitized cells to the inhibitors. Expression of familial AD-related mutant amyloid precursor protein sensitized neuronal cells, not glial cells, to Stat3 inhibitors by reducing P-Stat3 levels. Primary neurons and astrocytes also responded to Stat3 inhibitors with similar sensitivities to those observed in cancer cell lines. Thus, Stat3 inhibitors should be carefully targeted to GBM cells to avoid potential neurotoxicity leading to AD-like neuropsychiatric dysfunctions. PMID:25436682

  4. High Energy Single Frequency Resonant Amplifier Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase I project proposes a single frequency high energy resonant amplifier for remote sensing. Current state-of-art technologies can not provide all...

  5. Noise in phase-preserving linear amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Shashank; Jiang, Zhang; Combes, Joshua [Center for Quantum Information and Control, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Caves, Carlton M. [Center for Quantum Information and Control, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA and Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2014-12-04

    The purpose of a phase-preserving linear amplifier is to make a small signal larger, so that it can be perceived by instruments incapable of resolving the original signal, while sacrificing as little as possible in signal-to-noise. Quantum mechanics limits how well this can be done: the noise added by the amplifier, referred to the input, must be at least half a quantum at the operating frequency. This well-known quantum limit only constrains the second moments of the added noise. Here we provide the quantum constraints on the entire distribution of added noise: any phasepreserving linear amplifier is equivalent to a parametric amplifier with a physical state σ for the ancillary mode; σ determines the properties of the added noise.

  6. Noise in phase-preserving linear amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shashank; Jiang, Zhang; Combes, Joshua; Caves, Carlton M.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of a phase-preserving linear amplifier is to make a small signal larger, so that it can be perceived by instruments incapable of resolving the original signal, while sacrificing as little as possible in signal-to-noise. Quantum mechanics limits how well this can be done: the noise added by the amplifier, referred to the input, must be at least half a quantum at the operating frequency. This well-known quantum limit only constrains the second moments of the added noise. Here we provide the quantum constraints on the entire distribution of added noise: any phasepreserving linear amplifier is equivalent to a parametric amplifier with a physical state σ for the ancillary mode; σ determines the properties of the added noise.

  7. Cryogenic Amplifier Based Receivers at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Reck, Theodore and; Schlecht, Erich; Lin, Robert; Deal, William

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based amplifiers has moved well in the submillimeter-wave frequencies over the last couple of years. Working amplifiers with usable gain in waveguide packages has been reported beyond 700 GHz. When cooled cryogenically, they have shown substantial improvement in their noise temperature. This has opened up the real possibility of cryogenic amplifier based heterodyne receivers at submillimeter wavelengths for ground-based, air-borne, and space-based instruments for astrophysics, planetary, and Earth science applications. This paper provides an overview of the science applications at submillimeter wavelengths that will benefit from this technology. It also describes the current state of the InP HEMT based cryogenic amplifier receivers at submillimeter wavelengths.

  8. Quantum cloning with an optical fiber amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Fasel, Sylvain; Gisin, Nicolas; Ribordy, Grégoire; Scarani, Valerio; Zbinden, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown theoretically that a light amplifier working on the physical principle of stimulated emission should achieve optimal quantum cloning of the polarization state of light. We demonstrate close-to-optimal universal quantum cloning of polarization in a standard fiber amplifier for telecom wavelengths. For cloning 1 --> 2 we find a fidelity of 0.82, the optimal value being 5/6 = 0.83.

  9. Data defining markers of human neural stem cell lineage potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikari, Lotta E; Okolicsanyi, Rachel K; Griffiths, Lyn R; Haupt, Larisa M

    2016-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) are self-renewing and multipotent cells, however, NPCs are considered to be more lineage-restricted with a reduced self-renewing capacity. We present data comparing the expression of 21 markers encompassing pluripotency, self-renewal (NSC) as well as neuronal and glial (astrocyte and oligodendrocyte) lineage specification and 28 extracellular proteoglycan (PG) genes and their regulatory enzymes between embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived human NSCs (hNSC H9 cells, Thermo Fisher) and human cortex-derived normal human NPCs (nhNPCs, Lonza). The data demonstrates expression differences of multiple lineage and proteoglycan-associated genes between hNSC H9 cells and nhNPCs. Data interpretation of markers and proteoglycans defining NSC and neural cell lineage characterisation can be found in "Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans as novel markers of human neural stem cell fate determination" (Oikari et al. 2015) [1]. PMID:26958640

  10. V-band IMPATT power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, S. W.

    1985-09-01

    This program is the result of the continuing demand and future requirement for a high data rate 60-GHz communications link. A reliable solid-state transmitter which delivers the necessary power over a wide bandwidth using the present IMPATT diode technology required the development of combining techniques. The development of a 60-GHz IMPATT power combiner amplifier is detailed. The results form a basis from which future wideband, high-power IMPATT amplifiers may be developed. As a result, several state-of-the-art advancements in millimeter-wave components technology were achieved. Specific achievements for the amplifier integration were: development of a nonresonant divider/combiner circuit; reproducible multiple junction circulator assemblies; and reliable high power 60-GHz IMPATT diodes. The various design approaches and tradeoffs which lead to the final amplifier configuration are discussed. A detailed circuit design is presented for the various amplifier components, and the conical line combiner, radial line combiner, and circulator development are discussed. The performance of the amplifier, the overall achievement of the program, the implications of the results, and an assessment of future development needs and recommendations are examined.

  11. Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation

  12. An improved AC-amplifier for electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgovanović Nikola

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the design, simulation and test results of a new AC amplifier for electrophysiological measurements based on a three op-amp instrumentation amplifier (IA. The design target was to increase the common mode rejection ratio (CMRR, thereby improving the quality of the recorded physiological signals in a noisy environment. The new amplifier actively suppresses the DC component of the differential signal and actively reduces the common mode signal in the first stage of the IA. These functions increase the dynamic range of the amplifier's first stage of the differential signal. The next step was the realization of the amplifier in a single chip technology. The design and tests of the new AC amplifier with a differential gain of 79.2 dB, a CMRR of 130 dB at 50 Hz, a high-pass cutoff frequency at 0.01 Hz and common mode reduction in the first stage of the 49.8 dB are presented in this paper.

  13. Identification of human erythroid lineage-committed progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yasuo; Akashi, Koichi; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-05-01

    Elucidating the developmental pathway leading to erythrocytes and being able to isolate their progenitors is crucial to understanding and treating disorders of red cell imbalance such as anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and polycythemia vera. Endoglin (CD105) is a key marker for purifying mouse erythroid lineage-committed progenitors (EPs) from bone marrow. Herein, we show that human EPs can also be isolated from adult bone marrow. We identified three subfractions that possessed different expression patterns of CD105 and CD71 within the previously defined human megakaryocyte/erythrocyte progenitor (hMEP; Lineage-CD34(+)CD38(+)IL-3Rα(-)CD45RA(-)) population. Both CD71(-)CD105(-) and CD71(+)CD105(-) MEPs, at least in vitro, retained bipotency for the megakaryocyte (MegK) and erythrocyte (E) lineages, although the latter sub-population had a differentiation potential skewed toward the E-lineage. Notably, the differentiation output of the CD71(+)CD105(+) subset of cells within the MEP population was completely restricted to the E-lineage with the loss of MegK potential; thus, we termed CD71(+)CD105(-) MEPs and CD71(+)CD105(+) cells as E-biased MEPs (E-MEPs) and EPs, respectively. These previously unclassified populations may facilitate understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing human erythroid development and serve as potential therapeutic targets in disorders of the erythroid lineage. PMID:27263782

  14. Single-cell analysis defines the divergence between the innate lymphoid cell lineage and lymphoid tissue-inducer cell lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Isabel E; Chea, Sylvestre; Gudjonson, Herman; Constantinides, Michael G; Dinner, Aaron R; Bendelac, Albert; Golub, Rachel

    2016-03-01

    The precise lineage relationship between innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells is poorly understood. Using single-cell multiplex transcriptional analysis of 100 lymphoid genes and single-cell cultures of fetal liver precursor cells, we identified the common proximal precursor to these lineages and found that its bifurcation was marked by differential induction of the transcription factors PLZF and TCF1. Acquisition of individual effector programs specific to the ILC subsets ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 was initiated later, at the common ILC precursor stage, by transient expression of mixed ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 transcriptional patterns, whereas, in contrast, the development of LTi cells did not go through multilineage priming. Our findings provide insight into the divergent mechanisms of the differentiation of the ILC lineage and LTi cell lineage and establish a high-resolution 'blueprint' of their development. PMID:26779601

  15. Co-circulation of Peste-des-Petits-Ruminants Virus Asian lineage IV with Lineage II in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woma, T Y; Adombi, C M; Yu, D; Qasim, A M M; Sabi, A A; Maurice, N A; Olaiya, O D; Loitsch, A; Bailey, D; Shamaki, D; Dundon, W G; Quan, M

    2016-06-01

    Peste-des-petits-ruminants (PPR), a major small ruminant transboundary animal disease, is endemic in Nigeria. Strains of the causal agent, peste-des-petits-ruminants virus (PPRV), have been differentiated into four genetically distinct lineages based on the partial sequence of the virus nucleoprotein (N) or fusion (F) genes. Peste-des-petits-ruminants virus strains that were identified initially in Africa were grouped into lineages I, II and III and viruses from Asia were classified as lineage IV and referred to as the Asian lineage. Many recent reports indicate that the Asian lineage is now also present in Africa. With this in mind, this study was conducted to reassess the epidemiology of PPRV in Nigeria. A total of 140 clinical samples from 16 sheep and 63 goats with symptoms suggestive of PPR were collected from different states of Nigeria during a four-year period (2010-2013). They were analysed by the amplification of fragments of the N gene. Results for 33 (42%) animals were positive. The phylogenetic analysis of the N gene sequences with those available in GenBank showed that viruses that were detected belong to both lineage II and IV. Based on an analysis of the N gene sequences, the lineage IV isolates grouped into two clades, one being predominant in the north-eastern part of the country and the other found primarily in the southern regions of the country. This study reports the presence of PPRV Asian lineage IV in Nigeria for the first time. PMID:26095085

  16. Modern lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exhibit lineage-specific patterns of growth and cytokine induction in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary in virulence. Strains that have caused outbreaks in the United States and United Kingdom have been shown to subvert the innate immune response as a potential immune evasion mechanism. There is, however, little information available as to whether these patterns of immune subversion are features of individual strains or characteristic of broad clonal lineages of M. tuberculosis. METHODS: Strains from two major modern lineages (lineage 2 [East-Asian] and lineage 4 [Euro-American] circulating in the Western Cape in South Africa as well as a comparator modern lineage (lineage 3 [CAS/Delhi] were identified. We assessed two virulence associated characteristics: mycobacterial growth (in liquid broth and monocyte derived macrophages and early pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. RESULTS: In liquid culture, Lineage 4 strains grew more rapidly and reached higher plateau levels than other strains (lineage 4 vs. lineage 2 p=0.0024; lineage 4 vs. lineage 3 p=0.0005. Lineage 3 strains were characterized by low and early plateau levels, while lineage 2 strains showed an intermediate growth phenotype. In monocyte-derived macrophages, lineage 2 strains grew faster than lineage 3 strains (p<0.01 with lineage 4 strains having an intermediate phenotype. Lineage 2 strains induced the lowest levels of pro-inflammatory TNF and IL-12p40 as compared to other lineages (lineage 2: median TNF 362 pg/ml, IL-12p40 91 pg/ml; lineage 3: median TNF 1818 pg/ml, IL-12p40 123 pg/ml; lineage 4: median TNF 1207 pg/ml, IL-12p40 205 pg/ml;. In contrast, lineage 4 strains induced high levels of IL-12p40 and intermediate level of TNF. Lineage 3 strains induced high levels of TNF and intermediate levels of IL-12p40. CONCLUSIONS: Strains of M. tuberculosis from the three major modern strain lineages possess distinct patterns of growth and cytokine induction. Rapid growth and immune subversion may be key characteristics to the success

  17. The OPTHER Project: Progress toward the THz Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paoloni, C; Brunetti, F; Di Carlo, A;

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the OPTHER (OPtically driven TeraHertz AmplifiERs) project and progress toward the THz amplifier realization. This project represents a considerable advancement in the field of high frequency amplification. The design and realization of a THz amplifier within th...

  18. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ying.chen@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Knott, Jason G. [Developmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University (United States); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  19. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro

  20. Pulsed ti: sapphire laser power amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated an all solid state Ti:Sapphire laser system consisting of a power oscillator and single pass amplifier. The electrical-to-optical efficiency far exceeds that of the current CW systems. The pump lasers have lower capital and operating costs than the Argon-ion laser. In the future, we plan to scale the output power to higher levels by adding a fourth pump laser and improving the output power of the current pump lasers. Modeling results suggest that a large increase in efficiency can be realized by improving the beam quality of the pump lasers, even at the cost of reduced output power. We will explore this option by adding apertures to the cavity and/or reducing the rod diameter along with optimizing the resonator design. Other improvements in efficiency which will be investigated include double passing the amplifier for better extraction. To complete this work, the laser system will be converted into a two-stage amplifier. A narrow band, lower power oscillator currently under development will be injected in to the amplifier to study the extraction and efficiency characteristics of the amplifier throughout the tuning range of Ti:Sapphire. Detailed beam quality measurements will also be made. Other work will include doubling the narrow band output for materials processing applications

  1. DLGP: A database for lineage-conserved and lineage-specific gene pairs in animal and plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dapeng

    2016-01-15

    The conservation of gene organization in the genome with lineage-specificity is an invaluable resource to decipher their potential functionality with diverse selective constraints, especially in higher animals and plants. Gene pairs appear to be the minimal structure for such kind of gene clusters that tend to reside in their preferred locations, representing the distinctive genomic characteristics in single species or a given lineage. Despite gene families having been investigated in a widespread manner, the definition of gene pair families in various taxa still lacks adequate attention. To address this issue, we report DLGP (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/DLGP/) that stores the pre-calculated lineage-based gene pairs in currently available 134 animal and plant genomes and inspect them under the same analytical framework, bringing out a set of innovational features. First, the taxonomy or lineage has been classified into four levels such as Kingdom, Phylum, Class and Order. It adopts all-to-all comparison strategy to identify the possible conserved gene pairs in all species for each gene pair in certain species and reckon those that are conserved in over a significant proportion of species in a given lineage (e.g. Primates, Diptera or Poales) as the lineage-conserved gene pairs. Furthermore, it predicts the lineage-specific gene pairs by retaining the above-mentioned lineage-conserved gene pairs that are not conserved in any other lineages. Second, it carries out pairwise comparison for the gene pairs between two compared species and creates the table including all the conserved gene pairs and the image elucidating the conservation degree of gene pairs in chromosomal level. Third, it supplies gene order browser to extend gene pairs to gene clusters, allowing users to view the evolution dynamics in the gene context in an intuitive manner. This database will be able to facilitate the particular comparison between animals and plants, between vertebrates and arthropods, and

  2. Partial characterization of a new adenovirus lineage discovered in testudinoid turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doszpoly, Andor; Wellehan, James F X; Childress, April L; Tarján, Zoltán L; Kovács, Endre R; Harrach, Balázs; Benkő, Mária

    2013-07-01

    In the USA and in Hungary, almost simultaneously, adenoviruses of a putative novel lineage were detected by PCR and sequencing in turtles belonging to four different species (including two subspecies) of the superfamily Testudinoidea. In the USA, partial sequence of the adenoviral DNA-dependent DNA polymerase was obtained from samples of a captive pancake tortoise (Malacochersus tornieri), four eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) and two red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans). In Hungary, several individuals of the latter subspecies as well as some yellow-bellied sliders (T. scripta scripta) were found to harbor identical, or closely related, putative new adenoviruses. From numerous attempts to amplify any other genomic fragment by PCR, only a nested method was successful, in which a 476-bp fragment of the hexon gene could be obtained from several samples. In phylogeny reconstructions, based on either DNA polymerase or hexon partial sequences, the putative new adenoviruses formed a clade distinct from the five accepted genera of the family Adenoviridae. Three viral sub-clades corresponding to the three host genera (Malacochersus, Terrapene, Trachemys) were observed. Attempts to isolate the new adenoviruses on turtle heart (TH-1) cells were unsuccessful. Targeted PCR screening of live and dead specimens revealed a prevalence of approximately 25% in small shelter colonies of red-eared and yellow-bellied sliders in Hungary. The potential pathology of these viruses needs further investigation; clinically healthy sliders were found to shed the viral DNA in detectable amounts. Based on the phylogenetic distance, the new adenovirus lineage seems to merit the rank of a novel genus. PMID:23567817

  3. Single mode terahertz quantum cascade amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y., E-mail: yr235@cam.ac.uk; Wallis, R.; Shah, Y. D.; Jessop, D. S.; Degl' Innocenti, R.; Klimont, A.; Kamboj, V.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, CB3 0HE Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    A terahertz (THz) optical amplifier based on a 2.9 THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) structure has been demonstrated. By depositing an antireflective coating on the QCL facet, the laser mirror losses are enhanced to fully suppress the lasing action, creating a THz quantum cascade (QC) amplifier. Terahertz radiation amplification has been obtained, by coupling a separate multi-mode THz QCL of the same active region design to the QC amplifier. A bare cavity gain is achieved and shows excellent agreement with the lasing spectrum from the original QCL without the antireflective coating. Furthermore, a maximum optical gain of ∼30 dB with single-mode radiation output is demonstrated.

  4. Ultrashort pulse amplification in cryogenically cooled amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, Sterling J.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret Mary

    2004-10-12

    A laser amplifier system amplifies pulses in a single "stage" from .about.10.sup.-9 joules to more than 10.sup.-3 joules, with average power of 1-10 watts, and beam quality M.sup.2 <2. The laser medium is cooled substantially below room temperature, as a means to improve the optical and thermal characteristics of the medium. This is done with the medium inside a sealed, evacuated or purged cell to avoid moisture or other materials condensing on the surface. A "seed" pulse from a separate laser is passed through the laser medium, one or more times, in any of a variety of configurations including single-pass, multiple-pass, and regenerative amplifier configurations.

  5. Transistorized pulse amplifiers (A.I.T.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two amplifiers whose design and operation are described in this report have been studied for neutron detection units used in piles. They are designed to allow an important reduction of the volume and of the weight of the detector and its amplifier, and to simplify the operation of the detection assembly. To these characteristics can be added the mechanical and electrical robustness and the very reduced micro-phony. The first transistorized amplifier (AIT.1) is simple, very robust, and can be used for radioprotection installations. The second (AIT.4) has a better performance and makes it possible to replace the APT.2 in most of its applications (it has even been used satisfactorily in an apparatus where the micro-phony and the sensitivity to interference of the APT.2 made this latter unusable). (author)

  6. An automated test facility for neutronic amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutronic amplifiers are used at the Chalk River Laboratory in applications such as neutron flux monitoring and reactor control systems. Routine preventive maintenance of control and safety systems included annual calibration and characterization of the neutronic amplifiers. An investigation into the traditional methods of annual routine maintenance of amplifiers concluded that frequency and phase response measurements in particular were labour intensive and subject to non-repeatable errors. A decision was made to upgrade testing methods and facilities by using programmable test equipment under the control of a computer. In order to verify the results of the routine measurements, expressions for the transfer functions were derived from the circuit diagrams. Frequency and phase responses were then calculated and plotted thus providing a bench-mark to which the test results can be compared. (author)

  7. Broad phylogenomic sampling and the sister lineage of land plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth E Timme

    Full Text Available The tremendous diversity of land plants all descended from a single charophyte green alga that colonized the land somewhere between 430 and 470 million years ago. Six orders of charophyte green algae, in addition to embryophytes, comprise the Streptophyta s.l. Previous studies have focused on reconstructing the phylogeny of organisms tied to this key colonization event, but wildly conflicting results have sparked a contentious debate over which lineage gave rise to land plants. The dominant view has been that 'stoneworts,' or Charales, are the sister lineage, but an alternative hypothesis supports the Zygnematales (often referred to as "pond scum" as the sister lineage. In this paper, we provide a well-supported, 160-nuclear-gene phylogenomic analysis supporting the Zygnematales as the closest living relative to land plants. Our study makes two key contributions to the field: 1 the use of an unbiased method to collect a large set of orthologs from deeply diverging species and 2 the use of these data in determining the sister lineage to land plants. We anticipate this updated phylogeny not only will hugely impact lesson plans in introductory biology courses, but also will provide a solid phylogenetic tree for future green-lineage research, whether it be related to plants or green algae.

  8. Highly variable rates of genome rearrangements between hemiascomycetous yeast lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemiascomycete yeasts cover an evolutionary span comparable to that of the entire phylum of chordates. Since this group currently contains the largest number of complete genome sequences it presents unique opportunities to understand the evolution of genome organization in eukaryotes. We inferred rates of genome instability on all branches of a phylogenetic tree for 11 species and calculated species-specific rates of genome rearrangements. We characterized all inversion events that occurred within synteny blocks between six representatives of the different lineages. We show that the rates of macro- and microrearrangements of gene order are correlated within individual lineages but are highly variable across different lineages. The most unstable genomes correspond to the pathogenic yeasts Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Chromosomal maps have been intensively shuffled by numerous interchromosomal rearrangements, even between species that have retained a very high physical fraction of their genomes within small synteny blocks. Despite this intensive reshuffling of gene positions, essential genes, which cluster in low recombination regions in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tend to remain syntenic during evolution. This work reveals that the high plasticity of eukaryotic genomes results from rearrangement rates that vary between lineages but also at different evolutionary times of a given lineage.

  9. Fetal male lineage determination by analysis of Y-chromosome STR haplotype in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Santa Rita, Ticiane Henriques; Chianca, Camilla Figueiredo; Velasco, Lara Francielle Ribeiro; de Sousa, Claudia Ferreira; Nery, Lídia Freire Abdalla; Costa, Sandra Santana Soares

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the fetus Y-STR haplotype in maternal plasma during pregnancy and estimate, non-invasively, if the alleged father and fetus belong to the same male lineage. The study enrolled couples with singleton pregnancies and known paternity. All participants signed informed consent and the local ethics committee approved the study. Peripheral blood was collected in EDTA tubes (mother) and in FTA paper (father). Maternal plasma DNA was extracted by using NucliSens EasyMAG. Fetal gender was determined by qPCR targeting DYS-14 in maternal plasma and it was also confirmed after the delivery. From all included volunteers, the first consecutive 20 mothers bearing male fetuses and 10 mothers bearing female fetuses were selected for the Y-STR analysis. The median gestational age was 12 weeks (range 12-36). All DNA samples were subjected to PCR amplification by PowerPlex Y23, ampFLSTR Yfiler, and two in-house multiplexes, which together accounts for 27 different Y-STR. The PCR products were detected with 3500 Genetic Analyzer and they were analyzed using GeneMapper-IDX. Fetuses' haplotypes (Yfiler format) were compared to other 5328 Brazilian haplotypes available on Y-chromosome haplotypes reference database (YHRD). As a result, between 22 and 27 loci were successfully amplified from maternal plasma in all 20 cases of male fetuses. None of the women bearing female fetuses had a falsely amplified Y-STR haplotype. The haplotype detected in maternal plasma completely matched the alleged father haplotype in 16 out of the 20 cases. Four cases showed single mismatches and they did not configure exclusions; 1 case showed a mutation in the DYS 458 locus due to the loss of one repeat unit and 3 cases showed one DYS 385I/II locus dropout. All mismatches were confirmed after the delivery. Seventeen fetuses' haplotypes were not found in YHRD and one of them had a mutation, which corresponded to the paternity probability of 99.9812% and 95.7028%, respectively

  10. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Perin J.P.; Millet F.; Divoky M.; Rus B.

    2013-01-01

    Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 1...

  11. Transportable setup for amplifier phase fidelity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröbs, M.; Bogan, C.; Barke, S.; Kühn, G.; Reiche, J.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2015-05-01

    One possible laser source for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) consists of an Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier originally developed for inter-satellite communication, seeded by the laser used for the technology demonstrator mission LISA Pathfinder. LISA needs to transmit clock information between its three spacecraft to correct for phase noise between the clocks on the individual spacecraft. For this purpose phase modulation sidebands at GHz frequencies will be imprinted on the laser beams between spacecraft. Differential phase noise between the carrier and a sideband introduced within the optical chain must be very low. We report on a transportable setup to measure the phase fidelity of optical amplifiers.

  12. Optimization of Pr3+:ZBLAN fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, B.; Miniscalco, J. W.; Quimby, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental parameters have been measured and used in a quantitative model of Pr3+-doped fluorozirconate fiber amplifiers. The optimum cutoff wavelength was determined to be 800 nm and the gain for 400 mW of pump was found to increase from 12 to 34 dB if the NA was increased from 0.15 to 0.......25. Lengthening the metastable state lifetime from 110 to 300 μs would significantly improve amplifier performance while concentration quenching can appreciably degrade it...

  13. Beyond nonlinear saturation of backward Raman amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Ido; Toroker, Zeev; Balakin, Alexey A.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-06-01

    Backward Raman amplification is limited by relativistic nonlinear dephasing resulting in saturation of the leading spike of the amplified pulse. Pump detuning is employed to mitigate the relativistic phase mismatch and to overcome the associated saturation. The amplified pulse can then be reshaped into a monospike pulse with little precursory power ahead of it, with the maximum intensity increasing by a factor of two. This detuning can be employed advantageously both in regimes where the group velocity dispersion is unimportant and where the dispersion is important but small.

  14. Operational amplifier circuits analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, J C C

    1995-01-01

    This book, a revised and updated version of the author's Basic Operational Amplifiers (Butterworths 1986), enables the non-specialist to make effective use of readily available integrated circuit operational amplifiers for a range of applications, including instrumentation, signal generation and processing.It is assumed the reader has a background in the basic techniques of circuit analysis, particularly the use of j notation for reactive circuits, with a corresponding level of mathematical ability. The underlying theory is explained with sufficient but not excessive, detail. A range of compu

  15. Independent Stem Cell Lineages Regulate Adipose Organogenesis and Adipose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Jiang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissues have striking plasticity, highlighted by childhood and adult obesity. Using adipose lineage analyses, smooth muscle actin (SMA-mural cell-fate mapping, and conditional PPARγ deletion to block adipocyte differentiation, we find two phases of adipocyte generation that emanate from two independent adipose progenitor compartments: developmental and adult. These two compartments are sequentially required for organ formation and maintenance. Although both developmental and adult progenitors are specified during the developmental period and express PPARγ, they have distinct microanatomical, functional, morphogenetic, and molecular profiles. Furthermore, the two compartments derive from different lineages; whereas adult adipose progenitors fate-map from an SMA+ mural lineage, developmental progenitors do not. Remarkably, the adult progenitor compartment appears to be specified earlier than the developmental cells and then enters the already developmentally formed adipose depots. Thus, two distinct cell compartments control adipose organ development and organ homeostasis, which may provide a discrete therapeutic target for childhood and adult obesity.

  16. Bacillus anthracis in China and its relationship to worldwide lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schupp James M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global pattern of distribution of 1033 B. anthracis isolates has previously been defined by a set of 12 conserved canonical single nucleotide polymorphisms (canSNP. These studies reinforced the presence of three major lineages and 12 sub-lineages and sub-groups of this anthrax-causing pathogen. Isolates that form the A lineage (unlike the B and C lineages have become widely dispersed throughout the world and form the basis for the geographical disposition of "modern" anthrax. An archival collection of 191 different B. anthracis isolates from China provides a glimpse into the possible role of Chinese trade and commerce in the spread of certain sub-lineages of this pathogen. Canonical single nucleotide polymorphism (canSNP and multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA typing has been used to examine this archival collection of isolates. Results The canSNP study indicates that there are 5 different sub-lineages/sub-groups in China out of 12 previously described world-wide canSNP genotypes. Three of these canSNP genotypes were only found in the western-most province of China, Xinjiang. These genotypes were A.Br.008/009, a sub-group that is spread across most of Europe and Asia; A.Br.Aust 94, a sub-lineage that is present in Europe and India, and A.Br.Vollum, a lineage that is also present in Europe. The remaining two canSNP genotypes are spread across the whole of China and belong to sub-group A.Br.001/002 and the A.Br.Ames sub-lineage, two closely related genotypes. MLVA typing adds resolution to the isolates in each canSNP genotype and diversity indices for the A.Br.008/009 and A.Br.001/002 sub-groups suggest that these represent older and established clades in China. Conclusion B. anthracis isolates were recovered from three canSNP sub-groups (A.Br.008/009, A.Br.Aust94, and A.Br.Vollum in the western most portion of the large Chinese province of Xinjiang. The city of Kashi in this province appears to have served as a crossroads

  17. Drosophila E-cadherin and its binding partner Armadillo/ β-catenin are required for axonal pathway choices in the developing larval brain

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Siaumin; Wang, Fay; Spindler, Shana R; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The fly brain is formed by approximately hundred paired lineages of neurons, each lineage derived from one neuroblast. Embryonic neuroblasts undergo a small number of divisions and produce the primary neurons that form the functioning larval brain. In the larva, neuroblasts produce the secondary lineages that make up the bulk of the adult brain. Axons of a given secondary lineage fasciculate with each other and form a discrete bundle, the secondary axon tract (SAT). Secondary axon tracts pref...

  18. Stochastic dynamics of interacting haematopoietic stem cell niche lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Székely

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since we still know very little about stem cells in their natural environment, it is useful to explore their dynamics through modelling and simulation, as well as experimentally. Most models of stem cell systems are based on deterministic differential equations that ignore the natural heterogeneity of stem cell populations. This is not appropriate at the level of individual cells and niches, when randomness is more likely to affect dynamics. In this paper, we introduce a fast stochastic method for simulating a metapopulation of stem cell niche lineages, that is, many sub-populations that together form a heterogeneous metapopulation, over time. By selecting the common limiting timestep, our method ensures that the entire metapopulation is simulated synchronously. This is important, as it allows us to introduce interactions between separate niche lineages, which would otherwise be impossible. We expand our method to enable the coupling of many lineages into niche groups, where differentiated cells are pooled within each niche group. Using this method, we explore the dynamics of the haematopoietic system from a demand control system perspective. We find that coupling together niche lineages allows the organism to regulate blood cell numbers as closely as possible to the homeostatic optimum. Furthermore, coupled lineages respond better than uncoupled ones to random perturbations, here the loss of some myeloid cells. This could imply that it is advantageous for an organism to connect together its niche lineages into groups. Our results suggest that a potential fruitful empirical direction will be to understand how stem cell descendants communicate with the niche and how cancer may arise as a result of a failure of such communication.

  19. Mitochondrial evolution across lineages of the vampire barnacle Notochthamalus scabrosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, John P

    2015-02-01

    Eight whole mitochondrial genomes from the barnacle Notochthamalus scabrosus, with one from the northern lineage and seven from the divergent southern lineage, are presented. The annotated and aligned data were analyzed for signals of non-neutral evolution. Overall, these data are consistent with purifying selection operating on the protein-coding regions of the mitochondrion. However, a notable region of nonsynonymous substitution at the 3' end of the ND2 gene region, along with unusual site frequency spectra in two other gene regions, was identified. PMID:24047186

  20. Ultra-low Voltage CMOS Cascode Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Torsten; Cassia, Marco

    In this paper, we design a folded cascode operational transconductance amplifier in a standard CMOS process, which has a measured 69 dB DC gain, a 2 MHz bandwidth and compatible input- and output voltage levels at a 1 V power supply. This is done by a novel Current Driven Bulk (CDB) technique...

  1. Compensation techniques for operational amplifier bias current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two techniques are proposed for the compensation of the input current on operational amplifiers that can be used on inverting and non-inverting configurations. A qualitative analysis of temperature drift problems is made, and as a practical application, the construction of a voltage follower for high impedance measurements is presented. (Author)

  2. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, Jussi; Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-12-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants' gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15-65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions. PMID:27551358

  3. Predistortion of a Bidirectional Cuk Audio Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Thomas Hagen; Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold;

    2014-01-01

    using predistortion. This paper suggests linearizing a nonlinear bidirectional Cuk audio amplifier using an analog predistortion approach. A prototype power stage was built and results show that a voltage gain of up to 9 dB and reduction in THD from 6% down to 3% was obtainable using this approach....

  4. Mast cell diversion of T-lineage precursor cells by the essential T-lineage transcription factor GATA-3

    OpenAIRE

    Taghon, Tom; Yui, Mary A.; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2007-01-01

    GATA-3 is essential for T cell development from the earliest stages. However, highly abundant GATA-3 can drive T-lineage precursors to a non-T fate, depending on Notch signaling and developmental stage. GATA-3 overexpression blocked pro-T cell survival when Notch-Delta signals were present, but enhanced viability in their absence. In double-negative (DN1) and DN2 but not DN3 fetal thymocytes, GATA-3 overexpression rapidly induced mast cell lineage respecification with high frequency by direct...

  5. Pax7 lineage contributions to the mammalian neural crest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Murdoch

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells are vertebrate-specific multipotent cells that contribute to a variety of tissues including the peripheral nervous system, melanocytes, and craniofacial bones and cartilage. Abnormal development of the neural crest is associated with several human maladies including cleft/lip palate, aggressive cancers such as melanoma and neuroblastoma, and rare syndromes, like Waardenburg syndrome, a complex disorder involving hearing loss and pigment defects. We previously identified the transcription factor Pax7 as an early marker, and required component for neural crest development in chick embryos. In mammals, Pax7 is also thought to play a role in neural crest development, yet the precise contribution of Pax7 progenitors to the neural crest lineage has not been determined.Here we use Cre/loxP technology in double transgenic mice to fate map the Pax7 lineage in neural crest derivates. We find that Pax7 descendants contribute to multiple tissues including the cranial, cardiac and trunk neural crest, which in the cranial cartilage form a distinct regional pattern. The Pax7 lineage, like the Pax3 lineage, is additionally detected in some non-neural crest tissues, including a subset of the epithelial cells in specific organs.These results demonstrate a previously unappreciated widespread distribution of Pax7 descendants within and beyond the neural crest. They shed light regarding the regionally distinct phenotypes observed in Pax3 and Pax7 mutants, and provide a unique perspective into the potential roles of Pax7 during disease and development.

  6. Epidemiological history and phylogeography of West Nile virus lineage 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccozzi, Massimo; Peletto, Simone; Cella, Eleonora; Giovanetti, Marta; Lai, Alessia; Gabanelli, Elena; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Modesto, Paola; Rezza, Giovanni; Platonov, Alexander E; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Zehender, Gianguglielmo

    2013-07-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was first isolated in Uganda. In Europe WNV was sporadically detected until 1996, since then the virus has been regularly isolated from birds and mosquitoes and caused several outbreaks in horses and humans. Phylogenetic analysis showed two main different WNV lineages. The lineage 1 is widespread and segregates into different subclades (1a-c). WNV-1a includes numerous strains from Africa, America, and Eurasia. The spatio-temporal history of WNV-1a in Europe was recently described, identifying two main routes of dispersion, one in Eastern and the second in Western Europe. The West Nile lineage 2 (WNV-2) is mainly present in sub-Saharan Africa but has been recently emerged in Eastern and Western European countries. In this study we reconstruct the phylogeny of WNV-2 on a spatio-temporal scale in order to estimate the time of origin and patterns of geographical dispersal of the different isolates, particularly in Europe. Phylogeography findings obtained from E and NS5 gene analyses suggest that there were at least two separate introductions of WNV-2 from the African continent dated back approximately to the year 1999 (Central Europe) and 2000 (Russia), respectively. The epidemiological implications and clinical consequences of lineage 1 and 2 cocirculation deserve further investigations. PMID:23542457

  7. Putative Lineage of Novel African Usutu Virus, Central Europe

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-10-15

    Sarah Gregory reads an abridged version of "Putative Lineage of Novel African Usutu Virus, Central Europe.".  Created: 10/15/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/15/2015.

  8. Even Cancers Want Commitment: Lineage Identity and Medulloblastoma Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Eberhart, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Yang et al. (2008) and Schüller et al. (2008) show that Hedgehog activation in either multipotent neural stem cells or developmentally restricted progenitors causes only medulloblastomas to form. These data suggest that some stem cell-derived tumors must commit to a specific lineage in order to grow.

  9. Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cell Lineages and Parenchymal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammary development proceeds from an aggregation of cells in the ventral ectoderm to the establishment of an elaborate tree of alveoli, ducts, and cisternae. However, despite abundant data on endocrine regulation of ruminant mammary growth, we know comparatively little about cell lineages, express...

  10. Study of the T16189C variant and mitochondrial lineages in Tunisian and overall Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsouna, Sana; Ben Halim, Nizar; Lasram, Khaled; Meiloud, Ghlana; Arfa, Imen; Kerkeni, Emna; Romdhane, Lilia; Jamoussi, Henda; Bahri, Sonia; Ben Ammar, Slim; Abid, Abdelmajid; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Houmeida, Ahmed; Abdelhak, Sonia; Kefi, Rym

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variant T16189C has been investigated in several metabolic diseases. In this study, we aimed to estimate the frequency of the T16189C variant in Tunisian and other Mediterranean populations and to evaluate the impact of this variant on the phylogeny of Mediterranean populations. Blood sample of 240 unrelated Tunisian subjects were recruited from several Tunisian localities. The hypervariable region 1 of the mtDNA were amplified and sequenced. Additional sequences (N = 4921) from Mediterranean populations were compiled from previous studies. The average frequency of T16189C variant in Tunisia (29%) is similar to that observed in North African and Near Eastern populations. Our findings showed positive correlation of the T16189C variant with Sub-Saharan and North African lineages, while a negative correlation was found with the Eurasian haplogroups, reaching its maximum with the Eurasian haplogroup H. The principal component analyses showed a high internal heterogeneity between Tunisian localities. At the Mediterranean scale, Tunisians are closer to North African (Algerian and Moroccan) and Near Eastern populations (Syrians and Palestinians) than to Europeans. PMID:25208176

  11. Metabolic traits of an uncultured archaeal lineage -MSBL1- from brine pools of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Mwirichia, Romano

    2016-01-13

    The candidate Division MSBL1 (Mediterranean Sea Brine Lakes 1) comprises a monophyletic group of uncultured archaea found in different hypersaline environments. Previous studies propose methanogenesis as the main metabolism. Here, we describe a metabolic reconstruction of MSBL1 based on 32 single-cell amplified genomes from Brine Pools of the Red Sea (Atlantis II, Discovery, Nereus, Erba and Kebrit). Phylogeny based on rRNA genes as well as conserved single copy genes delineates the group as a putative novel lineage of archaea. Our analysis shows that MSBL1 may ferment glucose via the Embden–Meyerhof–Parnas pathway. However, in the absence of organic carbon, carbon dioxide may be fixed via the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, Wood-Ljungdahl pathway or reductive TCA cycle. Therefore, based on the occurrence of genes for glycolysis, absence of the core genes found in genomes of all sequenced methanogens and the phylogenetic position, we hypothesize that the MSBL1 are not methanogens, but probably sugar-fermenting organisms capable of autotrophic growth. Such a mixotrophic lifestyle would confer survival advantage (or possibly provide a unique narrow niche) when glucose and other fermentable sugars are not available.

  12. Metabolic traits of an uncultured archaeal lineage -MSBL1- from brine pools of the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwirichia, Romano; Alam, Intikhab; Rashid, Mamoon; Vinu, Manikandan; Ba-Alawi, Wail; Anthony Kamau, Allan; Kamanda Ngugi, David; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Bajic, Vladimir; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The candidate Division MSBL1 (Mediterranean Sea Brine Lakes 1) comprises a monophyletic group of uncultured archaea found in different hypersaline environments. Previous studies propose methanogenesis as the main metabolism. Here, we describe a metabolic reconstruction of MSBL1 based on 32 single-cell amplified genomes from Brine Pools of the Red Sea (Atlantis II, Discovery, Nereus, Erba and Kebrit). Phylogeny based on rRNA genes as well as conserved single copy genes delineates the group as a putative novel lineage of archaea. Our analysis shows that MSBL1 may ferment glucose via the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. However, in the absence of organic carbon, carbon dioxide may be fixed via the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, Wood-Ljungdahl pathway or reductive TCA cycle. Therefore, based on the occurrence of genes for glycolysis, absence of the core genes found in genomes of all sequenced methanogens and the phylogenetic position, we hypothesize that the MSBL1 are not methanogens, but probably sugar-fermenting organisms capable of autotrophic growth. Such a mixotrophic lifestyle would confer survival advantage (or possibly provide a unique narrow niche) when glucose and other fermentable sugars are not available.

  13. Investigation of the amplified spontaneous emission in Nd: glass disk laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model program has been established to investigate the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in the Nd: glass disk amplifier with the Monte Carlo method and rays tracing. The distribution of ASE loading on the edge of a disk is firstly calculated. The effect of disk aspect radio on ASE gain reduction is also investigated. Allowance is made for the effect of different reflectivity under the condition of different incidence on two faces

  14. Arrested development of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis, in certain populations of mitochondrial 16S lineage III Tubifex tubifex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxa, D.V.; Kelley, G.O.; Mukkatira, K.S.; Beauchamp, K.A.; Rasmussen, C.; Hedrick, R.P.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory populations of Tubifex tubifex from mitochondrial (mt)16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) lineage III were generated from single cocoons of adult worms releasing the triactinomyxon stages (TAMs) of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis. Subsequent worm populations from these cocoons, referred to as clonal lines, were tested for susceptibility to infection with the myxospore stages of M. cerebralis. Development and release of TAMs occurred in five clonal lines, while four clonal lines showed immature parasitic forms that were not expelled from the worm (non-TAM producers). Oligochaetes from TAM- and non-TAM-producing clonal lines were confirmed as lineage III based on mt16S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) sequences, but these genes did not differentiate these phenotypes. In contrast, random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses of genomic DNA demonstrated unique banding patterns that distinguished the phenotypes. Cohabitation of parasite-exposed TAM- and non-TAM-producing phenotypes showed an overall decrease in expected TAM production compared to the same exposure dose of the TAM-producing phenotype without cohabitation. These studies suggest that differences in susceptibility to parasite infection can occur in genetically similar T. tubifex populations, and their coexistence may affect overall M. cerebralis production, a factor that may influence the severity of whirling disease in wild trout populations. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Arrested development of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis, in certain populations of mitochondrial 16S lineage III Tubifex tubifex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxa, D V; Kelley, G O; Mukkatira, K S; Beauchamp, K A; Rasmussen, C; Hedrick, R P

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory populations of Tubifex tubifex from mitochondrial (mt)16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) lineage III were generated from single cocoons of adult worms releasing the triactinomyxon stages (TAMs) of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis. Subsequent worm populations from these cocoons, referred to as clonal lines, were tested for susceptibility to infection with the myxospore stages of M. cerebralis. Development and release of TAMs occurred in five clonal lines, while four clonal lines showed immature parasitic forms that were not expelled from the worm (non-TAM producers). Oligochaetes from TAM- and non-TAM-producing clonal lines were confirmed as lineage III based on mt16S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) sequences, but these genes did not differentiate these phenotypes. In contrast, random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses of genomic DNA demonstrated unique banding patterns that distinguished the phenotypes. Cohabitation of parasite-exposed TAM- and non-TAM-producing phenotypes showed an overall decrease in expected TAM production compared to the same exposure dose of the TAM-producing phenotype without cohabitation. These studies suggest that differences in susceptibility to parasite infection can occur in genetically similar T. tubifex populations, and their coexistence may affect overall M. cerebralis production, a factor that may influence the severity of whirling disease in wild trout populations. PMID:17891544

  16. Origins, admixture and founder lineages in European Roma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Mendizabal, Isabel; Harmant, Christine; de Pablo, Rosario; Ioana, Mihai; Angelicheva, Dora; Kouvatsi, Anastasia; Makukh, Halyna; Netea, Mihai G; Pamjav, Horolma; Zalán, Andrea; Tournev, Ivailo; Marushiakova, Elena; Popov, Vesselin; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Comas, David

    2016-06-01

    The Roma, also known as 'Gypsies', represent the largest and the most widespread ethnic minority of Europe. There is increasing evidence, based on linguistic, anthropological and genetic data, to suggest that they originated from the Indian subcontinent, with subsequent bottlenecks and undetermined gene flow from/to hosting populations during their diaspora. Further support comes from the presence of Indian uniparentally inherited lineages, such as mitochondrial DNA M and Y-chromosome H haplogroups, in a significant number of Roma individuals. However, the limited resolution of most genetic studies so far, together with the restriction of the samples used, have prevented the detection of other non-Indian founder lineages that might have been present in the proto-Roma population. We performed a high-resolution study of the uniparental genomes of 753 Roma and 984 non-Roma hosting European individuals. Roma groups show lower genetic diversity and high heterogeneity compared with non-Roma samples as a result of lower effective population size and extensive drift, consistent with a series of bottlenecks during their diaspora. We found a set of founder lineages, present in the Roma and virtually absent in the non-Roma, for the maternal (H7, J1b3, J1c1, M18, M35b, M5a1, U3, and X2d) and paternal (I-P259, J-M92, and J-M67) genomes. This lineage classification allows us to identify extensive gene flow from non-Roma to Roma groups, whereas the opposite pattern, although not negligible, is substantially lower (up to 6.3%). Finally, the exact haplotype matching analysis of both uniparental lineages consistently points to a Northwestern origin of the proto-Roma population within the Indian subcontinent. PMID:26374132

  17. Metagenome Sequence Analysis of Filamentous Microbial Communities Obtained from Geochemically Distinct Geothermal Channels Reveals Specialization of Three Aquificales Lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eTakacs-vesbach

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Aquificales are thermophilic microorganisms that inhabit hydrothermal systems worldwide and are considered one of the earliest lineages of the domain Bacteria. We analyzed metagenome sequence obtained from six thermal ‘filamentous streamer’ communities (~40 Mbp per site, which targeted three different groups of Aquificales found in Yellowstone National Park (YNP. Unassembled metagenome sequence and PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed that acidic, sulfidic sites were dominated by Hydrogenobaculum (Aquificaceae populations, whereas the circumneutral pH (6.5 - 7.8 sites containing dissolved sulfide were dominated by Sulfurihydrogenibium spp. (Hydrogenothermaceae. Thermocrinis (Aquificaceae populations were found primarily in the circumneutral sites with undetectable sulfide, and to a lesser extent in one sulfidic system at pH 8. Phylogenetic analysis of assembled sequence containing 16S rRNA genes as well as conserved protein-encoding genes revealed that the composition and function of these communities varied across geochemical conditions. Each Aquificales lineage contained genes for CO2 fixation by the reverse TCA cycle, but only the Sulfurihydrogenibium populations perform citrate cleavage using ATP citrate lyase (Acl. The Aquificaceae populations use an alternative pathway catalyzed by two separate enzymes, citryl CoA synthetase (Ccs and citryl CoA lyase (Ccl. All three Aquificales lineages contained evidence of aerobic respiration, albeit due to completely different types of heme Cu oxidases (subunit I involved in oxygen reduction. The distribution of Aquificales populations and differences among functional genes involved in energy generation and electron transport is consistent with the hypothesis that geochemical parameters (e.g., pH, sulfide, H2, O2 have resulted in niche specialization among members of the Aquificales.

  18. A reaction–diffusion mechanism influences cell lineage progression as a basis for formation, regeneration, and stability of intestinal crypts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lei

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon crypts, a single sheet of epithelia cells, consist of a periodic pattern of stem cells, transit-amplifying cells, and terminally differentiated cells that constantly renew and turnover. Experimental evidence suggests that Wnt signaling promotes and regulates stem cell division, differentiation, and possible cell migrations while intestinal BMP signaling inhibits stem cell self-renewal and repression in crypt formation. As more molecular details on Wnt and BMP in crypts are being discovered, little is still known about how complex interactions among Wnt, BMP, and different types of cells, and surrounding environments may lead to de novo formation of multiple crypts or how such interactions affect regeneration and stability of crypts. Results We present a mathematical model that contains Wnt and BMP, a cell lineage, and their feedback regulations to study formation, regeneration, and stability of multiple crypts. The computational explorations and linear stability analysis of the model suggest a reaction–diffusion mechanism, which exhibits a short-range activation of Wnt plus a long-range inhibition with modulation of BMP signals in a growing tissue of cell lineage, can account for spontaneous formation of multiple crypts with the spatial and temporal pattern observed in experiments. Through this mechanism, the model can recapitulate some distinctive and important experimental findings such as crypt regeneration and crypt multiplication. BMP is important in maintaining stability of crypts and loss of BMP usually leads to crypt multiplication with a fingering pattern. Conclusions The study provides a mechanism for de novo formation of multiple intestinal crypts and demonstrates a synergetic role of Wnt and BMP in regeneration and stability of intestinal crypts. The proposed model presents a robust framework for studying spatial and temporal dynamics of cell lineages in growing tissues driven by multiple signaling

  19. Plasmonic amplifier of the evanescent field of free electrons

    OpenAIRE

    So, J.-K.; Ou, J.Y.; Adamo, G.; García de Abajo, F. J.; MacDonald, K. F.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2013-01-01

    We show experimentally for the first time that free electron evanescent fields can be amplified by a plasmonic nanolayer in much that same way as optical evanescent fields are amplified in the poor-man's super-lens.

  20. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K-170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser. (authors)

  1. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, J. P.; Millet, F.; Divoky, M.; Rus, B.

    2013-11-01

    Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K-170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  2. Fundamentals of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Ter-Mikirtychev, Valerii (Vartan)

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the fundamental aspects of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers, and includes a wide range of material from laser physics fundamentals to state-of-the-art topics in this rapidly growing field of quantum electronics. Emphasis is placed on the nonlinear processes taking place in fiber lasers and amplifiers, their similarities, differences to, and their advantages over other solid-state lasers. The reader will learn basic principles of solid-state physics and optical spectroscopy of laser active centers in fibers, main operational laser regimes, and practical recommendations and suggestions on fiber laser research, laser applications, and laser product development. The book will be useful for students, researchers, and professionals who work with lasers, in the optical communications, chemical and biological industries, etc.

  3. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perin J.P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz. The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K–170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m−2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  4. High power single-frequency Innoslab amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ke-Zhen; Ning, Jian; Zhang, Bai-Tao; Wang, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Hai-Kun; Nie, Hong-Kun; Sun, Xiao-Li; He, Jing-Liang

    2016-07-10

    A laser diode array (LDA) end-pumped continuous-wave single-frequency Innoslab amplifier has been demonstrated. The Gaussian ray bundle method was used to model the light propagation in the Innoslab amplifier for the first time to the best of our knowledge. With discrete reflectors, the maximum output of 60 W with a linewidth of 44 MHz was achieved under the pump power of 245 W, corresponding to the optical-optical efficiency of 24.5%. The beam quality factor M2 at the output power of 51 W in the horizontal and vertical direction was measured to be 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. The long-term power instability in 2 h was less than 0.25%. PMID:27409308

  5. First lasing of the regenerative amplifier FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regenerative amplifier free-electron laser (RAFEL) is a high-gain RF-linac FEL capable of producing high optical power from a compact design. The combination of a high-gain and small optical feedback enables the FEL to reach saturation and produce a high optical power and high extraction efficiency without the risk of optical damage to the mirrors. This paper summarizes the first lasing of the regenerative amplifier FEL and describes recent experimental results. The highest optical energy achieved thus far at 16.3 μm is 1.7 J over a train of 900 micropulses. We infer pulse energy of 1.9 mJ in each 16 ps micropulse, corresponding to a peak power of 120 MW

  6. Noise Gain Features of Fiber Raman Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgii S. Felinskyi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation dynamics of the optical noise in a silica single mode fiber (SMF as function of the pump power variation in the counter pumped fiber Raman amplifier (FRA is experimentally studied. The ratio between the power of amplified spontaneous emission and the power of incoherent optical noise is quantitatively determined by detailed analysis of experimental data in the pump powers range of 100–300 mW within the full band of Stokes frequencies, including FRA working wavelengths over the C + L transparency windows. It is found out the maximum of Raman gain coefficient for optical noise does not exceed ~60% of corresponding peak at the gain profile maximum of coherent signal. It is shown that the real FRA noise figure may be considerably less than 3 dB over a wide wavelength range (100 nm at a pump power of several hundreds of mW.

  7. SINGLE CONVERSION ISOLATED IMPEDANCE TRANSFORMATION AMPLIFIER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The invention relates to a switch mode power amplifier. A first and a second change-over switch are inserted between a DC voltage supply and a primary side of an isolation transformer. Two secondary windings are connected to a power output terminal. A first and a second secondary side power switch...... are adapted to connect the two secondary windings to the power connector of the power output terminal. The pulse width modulation means is adapted to generate control signals for the driver means of the first and the second change-over switch so as to cause every second pulse to be inverted. The pulse...... width modulation means is also adapted to generate a third and a fourth control signal for said driver means of the power switches of said first and said second secondary. The invention also relates to a method of controlling a switch mode power amplifier...

  8. Application module of universal amplifier in education process

    OpenAIRE

    CHALOUPEK, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the teaching and implementation module for teaching in secondary schools and their role in education. Following the theory being discussed in relation to a valid educational program. Learning amplifier module implemented by the assignment to DPS. The activity of the amplifier module to simulate in Multisim simulation program. Next is made circuitry design in discrete amplifier module. There evaluated the feasibility and simulation of realizations amplifier module in sec...

  9. Noise and saturation properties of semiconductor quantum dot optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of quantum dot optical amplifiers. Due to the presence of a reservoir of wetting layer states, the saturation and noise properties differ markedly from bulk or QW amplifiers and may be significantly improved.......We present a detailed theoretical analysis of quantum dot optical amplifiers. Due to the presence of a reservoir of wetting layer states, the saturation and noise properties differ markedly from bulk or QW amplifiers and may be significantly improved....

  10. Pump to signal noise transfer in parametric fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Hansen, Toke; Rottwitt, Karsten; Peucheret, Christophe; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard; Svane, Ask Sebastian; Andersen, Lasse Mejling; Cristofori, Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Fiber optic parametric amplifiers have been suggested due to their potential low spontaneous emission. However, by nature the parametric amplifier only work in a forward pumped configuration, which result in transfer of relative intensity noise in the pump to the signal.......Fiber optic parametric amplifiers have been suggested due to their potential low spontaneous emission. However, by nature the parametric amplifier only work in a forward pumped configuration, which result in transfer of relative intensity noise in the pump to the signal....

  11. Radiation and particle detector and amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A radiation or charged particle detector is described which incorporates a channel multiplier structure to amplify the detected rays or particles. The channel multiplier structure has a support multiplying element with a longitudinal slot along one side. The element supports a pair of plates positioned contiguous with the slot. The plates funnel the particles or rays to be detected into the slotted aperture and the element, thus creating an effectively wide aperture detector of the windowless type.

  12. Amplifying the Hawking Signal in BECs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Balbinot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider simple models of Bose-Einstein condensates to study analog pair-creation effects, namely, the Hawking effect from acoustic black holes and the dynamical Casimir effect in rapidly time-dependent backgrounds. We also focus on a proposal by Cornell to amplify the Hawking signal in density-density correlators by reducing the atoms’ interactions shortly before measurements are made.

  13. Design and simulation of a gyroklystron amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, M. S., E-mail: mschauhan.rs.ece@iitbhu.ac.in; Swati, M. V.; Jain, P. K. [Centre of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2015-03-15

    In the present paper, a design methodology of the gyroklystron amplifier has been described and subsequently used for the design of a typically selected 200 kW, Ka-band, four-cavity gyroklystron amplifier. This conceptual device design has been validated through the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and nonlinear analysis. Commercially available PIC simulation code “MAGIC” has been used for the electromagnetic study at the different location of the device RF interaction structure for the beam-absent case, i.e., eigenmode study as well as for the electron beam and RF wave interaction behaviour study in the beam present case of the gyroklystron. In addition, a practical problem of misalignment of the RF cavities with drift tubes within the tube has been also investigated and its effect on device performance studied. The analytical and simulation results confirmed the validity of the gyroklystron device design. The PIC simulation results of the present gyroklystron produced a stable RF output power of ∼218 kW for 0% velocity spread at 35 GHz, with ∼45 dB gain, 37% efficiency, and a bandwidth of 0.3% for a 70 kV, 8.2 A gyrating electron beam. The simulated values of RF output power have been found in agreement with the nonlinear analysis results within ∼5%. Further, the PIC simulation has been extended to study a practical problem of misalignment of the cavities axis and drift tube axis of the gyroklystron amplifier and found that the RF output power is more sensitive to misalignments in comparison to the device bandwidth. The present paper, gyroklystron device design, nonlinear analysis, and 3D PIC simulation using commercially available code had been systematically described would be of use to the high-power gyro-amplifier tube designers and research scientists.

  14. Design and simulation of a gyroklystron amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper, a design methodology of the gyroklystron amplifier has been described and subsequently used for the design of a typically selected 200 kW, Ka-band, four-cavity gyroklystron amplifier. This conceptual device design has been validated through the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and nonlinear analysis. Commercially available PIC simulation code “MAGIC” has been used for the electromagnetic study at the different location of the device RF interaction structure for the beam-absent case, i.e., eigenmode study as well as for the electron beam and RF wave interaction behaviour study in the beam present case of the gyroklystron. In addition, a practical problem of misalignment of the RF cavities with drift tubes within the tube has been also investigated and its effect on device performance studied. The analytical and simulation results confirmed the validity of the gyroklystron device design. The PIC simulation results of the present gyroklystron produced a stable RF output power of ∼218 kW for 0% velocity spread at 35 GHz, with ∼45 dB gain, 37% efficiency, and a bandwidth of 0.3% for a 70 kV, 8.2 A gyrating electron beam. The simulated values of RF output power have been found in agreement with the nonlinear analysis results within ∼5%. Further, the PIC simulation has been extended to study a practical problem of misalignment of the cavities axis and drift tube axis of the gyroklystron amplifier and found that the RF output power is more sensitive to misalignments in comparison to the device bandwidth. The present paper, gyroklystron device design, nonlinear analysis, and 3D PIC simulation using commercially available code had been systematically described would be of use to the high-power gyro-amplifier tube designers and research scientists

  15. Design and simulation of a gyroklystron amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, M. S.; Swati, M. V.; Jain, P. K.

    2015-03-01

    In the present paper, a design methodology of the gyroklystron amplifier has been described and subsequently used for the design of a typically selected 200 kW, Ka-band, four-cavity gyroklystron amplifier. This conceptual device design has been validated through the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and nonlinear analysis. Commercially available PIC simulation code "MAGIC" has been used for the electromagnetic study at the different location of the device RF interaction structure for the beam-absent case, i.e., eigenmode study as well as for the electron beam and RF wave interaction behaviour study in the beam present case of the gyroklystron. In addition, a practical problem of misalignment of the RF cavities with drift tubes within the tube has been also investigated and its effect on device performance studied. The analytical and simulation results confirmed the validity of the gyroklystron device design. The PIC simulation results of the present gyroklystron produced a stable RF output power of ˜218 kW for 0% velocity spread at 35 GHz, with ˜45 dB gain, 37% efficiency, and a bandwidth of 0.3% for a 70 kV, 8.2 A gyrating electron beam. The simulated values of RF output power have been found in agreement with the nonlinear analysis results within ˜5%. Further, the PIC simulation has been extended to study a practical problem of misalignment of the cavities axis and drift tube axis of the gyroklystron amplifier and found that the RF output power is more sensitive to misalignments in comparison to the device bandwidth. The present paper, gyroklystron device design, nonlinear analysis, and 3D PIC simulation using commercially available code had been systematically described would be of use to the high-power gyro-amplifier tube designers and research scientists.

  16. Electrically Pumped Vertical-Cavity Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Tine

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the design of electrically pumped vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (eVCAs) for use in a mode-locked external-cavity laser has been developed, investigated and analysed. Four different eVCAs, one top-emitting and three bottom emitting structures, have been designed and...... discussed. The thesis concludes with recommendations for further work towards the realisation of compact electrically pumped mode-locked vertical externalcavity surface emitting lasers....

  17. CMOS RF Power Amplifiers for Wireless Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzin, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    The wireless market has experienced a remarkable development and growth since the introduction of the first modern mobile phone systems, with a steady increase in the number of subscribers, new application areas, and higher data rates. As mobile phones and wireless connectivity have become consumer mass markets, the prime goal of the IC manufacturers is to provide low-cost solutions. The power amplifier (PA) is a key building block in all RF transmitters. To lower the costs and allow full int...

  18. Quantum noise in ideal operational amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Courty, Jean-Michel; Grassia, Francesca; Reynaud, Serge

    1998-01-01

    We consider a model of quantum measurement built on an ideal operational amplifier operating in the limit of infinite gain, infinite input impedance and null output impedance and with a feddback loop. We evaluate the intensity and voltage noises which have to be added to the classical amplification equations in order to fulfill the requirements of quantum mechanics. We give a description of this measurement device as a quantum network scattering quantum fluctuations from input to output ports.

  19. Amplifying youth voices in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotenos, Saori; Rohatgi, Deepti

    2007-01-01

    Low-literacy youth in the slums of Brazil have been historically unequipped to share their ideas on how to improve their lives, because outside of the spoken word, it is difficult for them to express their thoughts persuasively. The Amplifying Voices afterschool video program piloted at Projeto Uerê in Rio de Janeiro shows that youth can leverage technological tools to voice their perspectives on social issues relevant to themselves and their communities. PMID:18271053

  20. X-band magnicon amplifier experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnicon, a ''scanning beam'' microwave amplifier tube related to the gyrocon, is of interest as a possible replacement for klystron amplifiers in future linear accelerators. It consists of a multicavity deflection system, whose purpose is to spin up an electron beam to high transverse momentum (α ≡ υperpendicular / υz approx-gt 1), followed by an output cavity that employs a cyclotron resonant mechanism to extract principally the transverse beam momentum. The deflection cavities are designed to produce an electron beam whose entry point and guiding center rotate in space about the cavity axis at the drive frequency. The output cavity employs a synchronously rotating mode, making possible a highly efficient interaction. This paper presents an overview of magnicon theory and design considerations, and discusses the progress of an experimental program to develop a frequency-doubling magnicon amplifier at X-band. This magnicon will require a sequence of 3 or 4 deflection cavities, in order to generate the required transverse momentum, followed by an output cavity operating at twice the drive frequency. The initial experiment was designed to measure the gain between two such deflection cavities operating in the TM110 mode a 5.7 GHz. These cavities were powered by a 170A, 500 keV electron beam immersed in an 8.1 kG magnetic field. In low power amplifier experiments, a gain of ∼15 dB was observed in the preferred circular polarization, at a frequency shift of approximately -0.18%, and a gain of ∼3 dB in the opposite circular polarization, at a frequency shift of approximately +0.06%. These results are in good agreement with theory and numerical simulation. The complete magnicon experiment is presently under design, and will also be discussed

  1. Amplifier/compressor fiber Raman lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M N; Mollenauer, L F; Stolen, R H; Simpson, J R; Shang, H T

    1987-10-01

    We show that the chirp from cross-phase modulation (XPM) dominates the operation of fiber Raman lasers (FRL's). Thus a FRL in the anomalous group-velocity regime is best described as a XPM-chirped Raman amplifier followed by a linear fiber compressor. While the output of such a laser is generally a narrow pulse with a broad pedestal, we show both experimentally and by computer simulation that negligible background is achievable. PMID:19741882

  2. Gyro-amplifiers modeling with MAGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levush, Baruch; Nguyen, Khanh; Botton, Moti; Vlasov Antonsen, Alexander, Jr.

    1999-11-01

    Recent modeling results of several experiments on gyroklystron amplifier at the Naval Research Laboratory are presented. Modeling was performed using the quasi three-dimensional, self-consistent code MAGY[1] . Amplifiers in both Ka- and W-bands have been studied [2,3]. Using known experimental input parameters, code-predicted salient amplifier performance characteristics, e.g. efficiency, bandwidth, drive curve, have been found to be in good agreement with experimental results. Self-consistent phenomena, such as effects of window reflections on bandwidth and higher-order-mode interaction in uptaper, will also be presented. MAGY has also been used to design gyro-TWTs. The code has been successfully benchmarked against linear theory. Issues such as absolute instability, backward-wave oscillations, and effect of reflection in gyro-TWTs have been investigated. Detailed results of design trade-off studies for a Ka-band gyro-TWT will also be presented and discussed. [1] M. Botton, et al.,IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci.,Vol.26(1998) [3] J.P. Calame, et al.,Phys. of Plasmas,Vol.6(1999) [4] M. Blank, et al.,Submitted to Phys. of Plasmas (1999)

  3. High Power 35GHz Gyroklystron Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin; McCurdy, A.; Wood, F.; Kyser, R.; Danly, B.; Levush, B.; Parker, R.

    1997-05-01

    High power coherent radiation sources at 35GHz are attractive for next generation high gradient particle accelerators. A multi-cavity gyroklystron amplifier is considered a promising candidate for high power millimeter wave generation. Experiments on two-cavity and three cavity gyroklystron amplifiers are underway to demonstrate a 140kW, 35GHz coherent radiation amplification. Though this power is low compared with that needed for colliders, many of the issues associated with the bandwidth of such devices can be addressed in the present experiments. High bandwidth is important to permit the rapid phase shifts required for RF pulse compression schemes presently under investigation. Large signal calculations (P.E. Latham, W. Lawson, V. Irwin, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 804-817, 1994.) predict that the two-cavity gyroklystron produces a peak power of 140kW, corresponding to 33% efficiency. Calculations also show that a stagger tuned three cavity circuit increases a bandwidth to more than 0.7%. Experimental results of the amplifier will be presented and compared with the theory.

  4. The development of DUV chemically amplified resists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thackeray, J.W.; Fedynyshyn, T.H.; Small, R.D. [Shipley Co. Inc., Marlboro, MA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The development of deep ultraviolet (DUV) resists has necessitated the introduction of new concepts in resist materials and chemistry. Successful DUV resist systems now employ the concept of chemical amplification. This catalytic reaction leads to a substantial enhancement in the imaging dose. Another benefit of chemical amplified resists is that they allow the design of materials which can be transparent to DUV exposure wavelengths, yet they can still have high sensitivity. Commercial and prototype positive- and negative-tone resists are now readily available and these resists have been used in pilot production to make the most advanced integrated circuits with {le}0.35 {mu}m design rules. At Shipley, we have undertaken to develop both negative- and positive-tone chemically amplified resists for DUV lithography. These resists are capable of high resolution (0.3 {mu}m), fast photospeed ({le}30 mJ/sq. cm), and excellent etch resistance. This presentation will discuss the chemical and lithographic properties of the Shipley negative- and positive-tone DUV chemically amplified resists. General discussion of the importance of activation energy for the catalytic process, catalytic chain length, and environmental stability will be given.

  5. Charge sensitive amplifies. The state of arts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kunishiro [Clear Pulse Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-07-01

    In the radiation detectors, signals are essentially brought with charges produced by radiation, then it is naturally the best way to use a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) system to extract those signals. The CSA is thought to be the best amplifier suitable to almost all the radiation detectors, if neglecting economical points of view. The CSA has been only applied to special fields like radiation detection because the concept of `charges` is not so universal against the concepts of `voltage` and `current`. The CSA, however, is low in noise and a high speed amplifier and may be applicable not only to radiation measurement but also piezoelectric devices and also bolometers. In this article, noise in the CSA, basic circuit on the CSA, concepts of `equivalent noise charge` (ENC), a method for the ENC, and importance of the `open-loop gain` in the CSA to achieve better performance of it and how to realize in a practical CSA were described. And, characteristics on a counting rate of the CSA, various circuit used in the CSA, and CSAs which are commercially available at present and special purpose CSAs were also introduced. (G.K.)

  6. Polarization of Tapered Semiconductor Travelling-Wave Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Dexiu; Li Hong

    2001-01-01

    The polarization of a tapered semi-conductor travelling-wave amplifier has been investigated with the transfer matrix method based on convective equation. It is shown that the apparent polarization mode competition exists, and polarization-independent tapered semiconductor travellingwave amplifiers can be obtained through the optimization of amplifier parameters.

  7. Digital system provides superregulation of nanosecond amplifier-discriminator circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forges, K. G.

    1966-01-01

    Feedback system employing a digital logic comparator to detect and correct amplifier drift provides stable gain characteristics for nanosecond amplifiers used in counting applications. Additional anticoincidence logic enables application of the regulation circuit to the amplifier and discriminator while they are mounted in an operable circuit.

  8. Patterns of growth, axonal extension and axonal arborization of neuronal lineages in the developing Drosophila brain

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Camilla; Shy, Diana; Spindler, Shana R; Fung, Siaumin; Pereanu, Wayne; Younossi -Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila central brain is composed of approximately 100 paired lineages, with most lineages comprising 100–150 neurons. Most lineages have a number of important characteristics in common. Typically, neurons of a lineage stay together as a coherent cluster and project their axons into a coherent bundle visible from late embryo to adult. Neurons born during the embryonic period form the primary axon tracts (PATs) that follow stereotyped pathways in the neuropile. Apoptotic cell death remo...

  9. Ecological and evolutionary significance of novel protist lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, Javier; Guillou, Laure; Hehenberger, Elisabeth; Logares, Ramiro; López-García, Purificación; Massana, Ramon

    2016-08-01

    Environmental molecular surveys targeting protist diversity have unveiled novel and uncultured lineages in a variety of ecosystems, ranging from completely new high-rank lineages, to new taxa moderately related to previously described organisms. The ecological roles of some of these novel taxa have been studied, showing that in certain habitats they may be responsible for critical environmental processes. Moreover, from an evolutionary perspective they still need to be included in a more accurate and wider understanding of the eukaryotic tree of life. These seminal discoveries promoted the development and use of a wide range of more in-depth culture-independent approaches to access this diversity, from metabarcoding and metagenomics to single cell genomics and FISH. Nonetheless, culturing using classical or innovative approaches is also essential to better characterize this new diversity. Ecologists and evolutionary biologists now face the challenge of apprehending the significance of this new diversity within the eukaryotic tree of life. PMID:26996654

  10. A predominantly neolithic origin for European paternal lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Balaresque

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The relative contributions to modern European populations of Paleolithic hunter-gatherers and Neolithic farmers from the Near East have been intensely debated. Haplogroup R1b1b2 (R-M269 is the commonest European Y-chromosomal lineage, increasing in frequency from east to west, and carried by 110 million European men. Previous studies suggested a Paleolithic origin, but here we show that the geographical distribution of its microsatellite diversity is best explained by spread from a single source in the Near East via Anatolia during the Neolithic. Taken with evidence on the origins of other haplogroups, this indicates that most European Y chromosomes originate in the Neolithic expansion. This reinterpretation makes Europe a prime example of how technological and cultural change is linked with the expansion of a Y-chromosomal lineage, and the contrast of this pattern with that shown by maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA suggests a unique role for males in the transition.

  11. Functional Characterization of DNA Methylation in the Oligodendrocyte Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Moyon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes derive from progenitors (OPCs through the interplay of epigenomic and transcriptional events. By integrating high-resolution methylomics, RNA-sequencing, and multiple transgenic lines, this study defines the role of DNMT1 in developmental myelination. We detected hypermethylation of genes related to cell cycle and neurogenesis during differentiation of OPCs, yet genetic ablation of Dnmt1 resulted in inefficient OPC expansion and severe hypomyelination associated with ataxia and tremors in mice. This phenotype was not caused by lineage switch or massive apoptosis but was characterized by a profound defect of differentiation associated with changes in exon-skipping and intron-retention splicing events and by the activation of an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Therefore, loss of Dnmt1 in OPCs is not sufficient to induce a lineage switch but acts as an important determinant of the coordination between RNA splicing and protein synthesis necessary for myelin formation.

  12. Analysis of multipass laser amplifier systems for storage laser media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance characteristics of single pass and multipass storage laser amplifiers are presented and compared. The effects of the multipass amplifier parameters on the extraction characteristics are examined. For a wide range of conditions the multipass amplifier is found to provide high energy gain and high efficiency simultaneously. This is a significant advantage over the single pass laser amplifier. Finally, three specific storage laser amplifier systems, flashlamp pumped V:MgF2, XeF laser pumped Tm:Glass, and photolytically pumped Selenium, are examined. The performance characteristics for each of the three systems are calculated and compared

  13. Analysis of multipass laser amplifier systems for storage laser media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, J.F.

    1980-03-25

    The performance characteristics of single pass and multipass storage laser amplifiers are presented and compared. The effects of the multipass amplifier parameters on the extraction characteristics are examined. For a wide range of conditions the multipass amplifier is found to provide high energy gain and high efficiency simultaneously. This is a significant advantage over the single pass laser amplifier. Finally, three specific storage laser amplifier systems, flashlamp pumped V:MgF/sub 2/, XeF laser pumped Tm:Glass, and photolytically pumped Selenium, are examined. The performance characteristics for each of the three systems are calculated and compared.

  14. Characterization of a Common-Gate Amplifier Using Ferroelectric Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Mitchell; Sayyah, Rana; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the empirical data collected through experiments performed using a FeFET in the common-gate amplifier circuit is presented. The FeFET common-gate amplifier was characterized by varying all parameters in the circuit, such as load resistance, biasing of the transistor, and input voltages. Due to the polarization of the ferroelectric layer, the particular behavior of the FeFET common-gate amplifier presents interesting results. Furthermore, the differences between a FeFET common-gate amplifier and a MOSFET common-gate amplifier are examined.

  15. Characterization of a Common-Source Amplifier Using Ferroelectric Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Mitchell; Sayyah, Rana; MacLeond, Todd C.; Ho, Pat D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents empirical data that was collected through experiments using a FeFET in the established common-source amplifier circuit. The unique behavior of the FeFET lends itself to interesting and useful operation in this widely used common-source amplifier. The paper examines the effect of using a ferroelectric transistor for the amplifier. It also examines the effects of varying load resistance, biasing, and input voltages on the output signal and gives several examples of the output of the amplifier for a given input. The difference between a commonsource amplifier using a ferroelectric transistor and that using a MOSFET is addressed.

  16. Differentiation into Endoderm Lineage: Pancreatic differentiation from Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong Hyeon; Chung, Hyung Min

    2011-01-01

    The endoderm gives rise to digestive and respiratory tracts, thyroid, liver, and pancreas. Representative disease of endoderm lineages is type 1 diabetes resulting from destruction of the insulin-producing β cells. Generation of functional β cells from human embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro can be practical, renewable cell source for replacement cell therapy for type 1 diabetes. It has been achieved by progressive instructive differentiation through each of the developmental stages. In this...

  17. Independent Stem Cell Lineages Regulate Adipose Organogenesis and Adipose Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Yuwei Jiang; Daniel C. Berry; Wei Tang; Jonathan M. Graff

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissues have striking plasticity, highlighted by childhood and adult obesity. Using adipose lineage analyses, smooth muscle actin (SMA)-mural cell-fate mapping, and conditional PPARγ deletion to block adipocyte differentiation, we find two phases of adipocyte generation that emanate from two independent adipose progenitor compartments: developmental and adult. These two compartments are sequentially required for organ formation and maintenance. Although both developmental and adult pr...

  18. Role of LRF/Pokemon in lineage fate decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Lunardi, Andrea; Guarnerio, Jlenia; Wang, Guocan; Maeda, Takahiro; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2013-01-01

    In the human genome, 43 different genes are found that encode proteins belonging to the family of the POK (poxvirus and zinc finger and Krüppel)/ZBTB (zinc finger and broad complex, tramtrack, and bric à brac) factors. Generally considered transcriptional repressors, several of these genes play fundamental roles in cell lineage fate decision in various tissues, programming specific tasks throughout the life of the organism. Here, we focus on functions of leukemia/lymphoma-related factor/POK e...

  19. Newly discovered sister lineage sheds light on early ant evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Rabeling, Christian; Brown, Jeremy M.; Verhaagh, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Ants are the world's most conspicuous and important eusocial insects and their diversity, abundance, and extreme behavioral specializations make them a model system for several disciplines within the biological sciences. Here, we report the discovery of a new ant that appears to represent the sister lineage to all extant ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). The phylogenetic position of this cryptic predator from the soils of the Amazon rainforest was inferred from several nuclear genes, sequenced ...

  20. Incomplete Lineage Sorting: Consistent Phylogeny Estimation From Multiple Loci

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a simple algorithm for reconstructing phylogenies from multiple gene trees in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting, that is, when the topology of the gene trees may differ from that of the species tree. We show that our technique is statistically consistent under standard stochastic assumptions, that is, it returns the correct tree given sufficiently many unlinked loci. We also show that it can tolerate moderate estimation errors.

  1. Histone variant innovation in a rapidly evolving chordate lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen Pascal WTC; Campsteijn Coen; Moosmann Alexandra; Nasrallah Carole; Raasholm Martina; Stunnenberg Henk G; Thompson Eric M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Histone variants alter the composition of nucleosomes and play crucial roles in transcription, chromosome segregation, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Modification of metazoan histone variant lineages occurs on a background of genome architecture that shows global similarities from sponges to vertebrates, but the urochordate, Oikopleura dioica, a member of the sister group to vertebrates, exhibits profound modification of this ancestral architecture. Results: We s...

  2. Anterior dental evolution in the Australopithecus anamensis–afarensis lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Carol V. Ward; Plavcan, J. Michael; Fredrick K. Manthi

    2010-01-01

    Australopithecus anamensis is the earliest known species of the Australopithecus–human clade and is the likely ancestor of Australopithecus afarensis. Investigating possible selective pressures underlying these changes is key to understanding the patterns of selection shaping the origins and early evolution of the Australopithecus–human clade. During the course of the Au. anamensis–afarensis lineage, significant changes appear to occur particularly in the anterior dentition, but also in jaw s...

  3. Braveheart, a Long Noncoding RNA Required for Cardiovascular Lineage Commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Klattenhoff, Carla A.; Scheuermann, Johanna C.; Surface, Lauren E.; Bradley, Robert K.; Fields, Paul A.; Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Ding, Huiming; Torrey, Lillian; Haas, Simon; Abo, Ryan; Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Lee, Richard T.; Burge, Christopher B.; Butty, Vincent; Boyer, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are often expressed in a development-specific manner, yet little is known about their roles in lineage commitment. Here, we identified Braveheart (Bvht), a heart-associated lncRNA in mouse. Using multiple embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation strategies, we show that Bvht is required for progression of nascent mesoderm toward a cardiac fate. We find that Bvht is necessary for activation of a core cardiovascular gene network and functions upstream of mesoderm ...

  4. Beyond clines: lineages and haplotype blocks in hybrid zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedghifar, Alisa; Brandvain, Yaniv; Ralph, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid zones formed between recently diverged populations offer an opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying reproductive isolation and the process of speciation. Here, we use a combination of analytical theory and explicit forward simulations to describe how selection against hybrid genotypes impacts patterns of introgression across genomic and geographic space. By describing how lineages move across the hybrid zone, in a model without coalescence, we add to modern understanding of how clines form and how parental haplotypes are broken up during introgression. Working with lineages makes it easy to see that clines form in about 1/s generations, where s is the strength of selection against hybrids, and linked clines persist over a genomic scale of 1/T, where T is the age, in generations, of the hybrid zone. Locally disadvantageous alleles tend to exist as small families, whose lineages trace back to the side from which they originated at speed s dispersal distances per generation. The lengths of continuous tracts of ancestry provide an additional source of information: blocks of ancestry surrounding incompatibilities can be substantially longer than the genomewide average block length at the same spatial location, an observation that might be used to identify candidate targets of selection. PMID:27148805

  5. Low noise amplifier for ZnS(Ag) scintillation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new pulse amplifier that can be used with standard photomultiplier tubes coupled with Zn(Ag) scintillation chamber is presented. The amplifier based on an IC operational amplifier LF 356N consists of a low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier and pulse shaping circuits for optimization of signal to noise ratio. Temperature instability is ≤ 0.05%/oC. Dynamic range for linear output signals is equal +7 V. The presented amplifier is used in a measuring head for 0.17 L Lucas chambers developed in Department of Nuclear Instruments and Methods of the INCT in laboratory investigations aimed to develop methods and instruments for measurement of radon concentration in the air. The amplifier can also be employed for measurement of ionizing radiation by means of other scintillators coupled to PM tube. The amplifier is followed by a pulse discriminator with adjustable discrimination level. The amplifier output signal and discriminator output pulses are fed to external devices. (author)

  6. Time amplifying techniques towards atomic time resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High speed imaging technology has opened applications in many fields,such as collision,detonating, high voltage discharge,disintegration and transfer of phonon and exciton in solid,photosynthesis primitive reaction,and electron dynamics inside atom shell.In principle,all of the transient processes need to be explained theoretically and,at the same time,the time amplifying technique is required for observations of these processes.The present review concerns the atomic time amplifying mechanism of optical information and the extremely-high speed imaging methods,which are expressed in terms of the short time amplifying techniques.It is well-known that for extremely-high speed imaging with the converter tube,the temporal resolution is in the order of sub-picosecond of the streak imaging,and the imaging frequency is 6×10 8 ―5×10 9 fps(frame per second)of the frame imaging.On the other hand,for the tubeless extremely-high speed imaging,the imaging frequency is 10 7 ―10 14 fps,and its mechanism of forming high speed and framing could involve a lot of factors of the light under investigation,for instance,light speed,light parallelism,the parameters of light wave such as amplitude,phase,polari- zation and wavelength,and even quantum properties of photon.In the cascaded system of electro- magnetic wave and particle wave,it is possible to simultaneously realize extremely-high resolution in time and space,which is higher than a kite resolution.Then it would be possible to break the limit of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation of the optical frequency band.

  7. Time amplifying techniques towards atomic time resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JingZhen

    2009-01-01

    High speed imaging technology has opened applications in many fields,such as collision,detonating,high voltage discharge,disintegration and transfer of phonon and exciton in solid,photosynthesis primitive reaction,and electron dynamics inside atom shell.In principle,all of the transient processes need to be explained theoretically and,st the same time,the time amplifying technique is required for observations of these processes.The present review concerns the atomic time amplifying mechanism of optical information and the extremely-high speed imaging methods,which are expressed in terms of the short time amplifying techniques.It is well-known that for extremely-high speed imaging with the converter tube,the temporal resolution is in the order of sub-picosecond of the streak imaging,and the imaging frequency is 6×10~8-5×10~9 fps(frame per second)of the frame imaging.On the other hand,for the tubeless extremely-high speed imaging,the imaging frequency is 10~7-10~(14) fps,and its mechanism of forming high speed and framing could involve a lot of factors of the light under investigation,for instance,light speed,light parallelism,the parameters of light wave such as amplitude,phase,polarization and wavelength,and even quantum properties of photon.In the cascaded system of electromagnetic wave and particle wave,it is possible to simultaneously realize extremely-high resolution in time and space,which is higher than a kite resolution.Then it would be possible to break the limit of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation of the optical frequency band.

  8. High sensitivity amplifier/discriminator for PWC's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The facility support group at Fermilab is designing and building a general purpose beam chamber for use in several locations at the laboratory. This pwc has 128 wires per plane spaced 1 mm apart. An initial production of 25 signal planes is anticipated. In proportional chambers, the size of the signal depends exponentially on the charge stored per unit of length along the anode wire. As the wire spacing decreases, the capacitance per unit length decreases, thereby requiring increased applied voltage to restore the necessary charge per unit length. In practical terms, this phenomenon is responsible for difficulties in constructing chambers with less than 2 mm wire spacing. 1 mm chambers, therefore, are frequently operated very near to their breakdown point and/or a high gain gas containing organic compounds such as magic gas is used. This argon/iso-butane mixture has three drawbacks: it is explosive when exposed to the air, it leaves a residue on the wires after extended use and is costly. An amplifier with higher sensitivity would reduce the problems associated with operating chambers with small wire spacings and allow them to be run a safe margin below their breakdown voltage even with an inorganic gas mixture such as argon/CO2, this eliminating the need to use magic gas. Described here is a low cost amplifier with a usable threshold of less than 0.5 μA. Data on the performance of this amplifier/discriminator in operation on a prototype beam chamber are given. This data shows the advantages of the high sensitivity of this design

  9. Feedback analysis of transimpedance operational amplifier circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1993-01-01

    The transimpedance or current feedback operational amplifier (CFB op-amp) is reviewed and compared to a conventional voltage mode op-amp using an analysis emphasizing the basic feedback characteristics of the circuit. With this approach the paradox of the constant bandwidth obtained from CFB op......-amps is explained. It is demonstrated in a simple manner that the constant gain-bandwidth product of the conventional op-amp and the constant bandwidth of the CFB op-amp are both in accordance with basic feedback theory and that the differences between the traditional op-amp and the CFB op-amp are due to...

  10. Undulations from amplified low frequency surface waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the linear scattering of gravity waves in longitudinal inhomogeneous stationary flows. When the flow becomes supercritical, it is known that counterflow propagating shallow waves are blocked and converted into deep waves. Here we show that in the zero-frequency limit, the reflected waves are amplified in such a way that the free surface develops an undulation, i.e., a zero-frequency wave of large amplitude with nodes located at specific places. This amplification involves negative energy waves and implies that flat surfaces are unstable against incoming perturbations of arbitrary small amplitude. The relation between this instability and black hole radiation (the Hawking effect) is established

  11. Undulations from amplified low frequency surface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Coutant, Antonin

    2012-01-01

    We study the scattering of gravity waves in longitudinal stationary flows. When the flow velocity becomes supercritical, counterflow propagating waves are amplified in such a way that, in the zero-frequency limit, the free surface develops an undu- lation, i.e., a zero-frequency wave of large amplitude with nodes located at specific places. From this, we show that the unperturbed flat surface is unstable against perturbations of arbitrary small amplitude. We then show that this instability also appears when treating low frequency waves by a stochastic ensemble. The relation between the generation of undulations and black hole radiation (the Hawking effect) is discussed.

  12. Envelope tracking power amplifiers for wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhancang

    2014-01-01

    Envelope tracking technology is seen as the most promising efficiency enhancement technology for RF power amplifiers for 4G and beyond wireless communications. More and more organizations are investing and researching on this topic with huge potential in academic and commercial areas.This is the first book on the market to offer complete introduction, theory, and design considerations on envelope tracking for wireless communications. This resource presents you with a full introduction to the subject and covers underlying theory and practical design considerations.

  13. Development of 3 kW at 325 MHz solid-state RF power amplifier using four power amplifier modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramarao, B. V.; Sonal, S.; Mishra, J. K.; Pande, M.; Singh, P.; Kumar, G.; Mukherjee, J.

    2014-01-01

    A high power solid-state RF power amplifier of 3 kW at 325 MHz has been developed using only four RF power amplifier modules of 850 W power output each. The design and characterization of RF power modules have been presented. A four way Wilkinson power combiner adds the output of four power amplifier modules with a total transmission loss of less than 6%. The combined power amplifier has a power gain of 20.2 dB at 1-dB compression point, and the corresponding output power is 2.8 kW at 325 MHz. The drain efficiency of the power amplifier is 65.3% at 3 kW. All the harmonics of this amplifier are below -40 dBc. The amplifier has better characteristics like fewer numbers of active devices per kilo watt, high efficiency, high gain, and ruggedness etc for RF accelerator applications.

  14. A cell-cycle-stage-related chromosomal X-ray hypersensitivity in larval neuroblasts of Drosophila mei-9 and mei 41 mutants suggesting defective DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have examined the chromosomal X-ray hypersensitivity in relation to the cell cycle in larval neuroblasts of the mutagen-sensitive and excision repair-defective mutant mei-9 and of the mutagen-sensitive and post-replication repair-defective mutant mei-41 of Drosophila melanogaster. When compared to wild-type cells, cells bearing the mei-9L1 allele produced unusually high levels in particular of chromatid deletions and to a lesser extent also of isochromatid deletions, but virtually no exchange aberrations. The chromosomal hypersensitivity is apparent at M1 when cells are irradiated in S or G2 but not when irradiated in G1. On the other hand, following irradiation cells bearing the mei-41D5 allele predominantly produce chromosome deletions. The phases of major sensitivity are the S and G1. Mei-9 and mei-41 mutants have been classified to date as proficient in DNA double-strand break repair. The data presented in this paper revealed an S-independent clastogenic hypersensitivity of mei-9 and mei-41 cells. They are interpreted as indicative evidence for the presence of impaired DNA double-strand break repair. The cell-cycle-related difference in the ratio of chromatid- versus chromosome-type deletions in both mutants suggests repair defects at partially different phases of the cell cycle in mei-9 and mei-41 mutant cells. (author). 47 refs.; 2 figs.; 5 tabs

  15. Silicon on Insulator MESFETs for RF Amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Seth J; Balijepalli, Asha; Ervin, Joseph; Lepkowski, William; Thornton, Trevor J

    2010-03-01

    CMOS compatible, high voltage SOI MESFETs have been fabricated using a standard 3.3V CMOS process without any changes to the process flow. A 0.6μm gate length device operates with a cut-off frequency of 7.3GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency of 21GHz. There is no degradation in device performance up to its breakdown voltage, which greatly exceeds that of CMOS devices on the same process. Other figures of merit of relevance to RF front-end design are presented, including the maximum stable gain and noise figure. An accurate representation of the device in SPICE has been developed using the commercially available TOM3 model. Using the SOI MESFET model, a source degenerated low noise RF amplifier targeting operation near 1GHz has been designed. The amplifier was fabricated on a PCB board and operates at 940MHz with a minimum NF of 3.8dB and RF gain of 9.9dB while only consuming 5mW of DC power. PMID:20657816

  16. 35 GHz gyroklystron amplifier development at NRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.J. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States); Ganguly, A.K. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States); Blank, M. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Vacuum Electronics Branch] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Experiments on a two-cavity gyroklystron are underway to demonstrate a 140 kW, 35 GHz gyroklystron amplifier, operating at a fundamental beam cyclotron mode and a TE{sub 011} cylindrical cavity mode. A high power electron beam of 70 kV, 6.6A is produced from a magnetron-injection-gun which is optimally designed for the TE{sub 01} mode at 35 GHz. Drift tubes consisting of lossy ceramic rings (80% BeO, 20% SiC) are designed to suppress undesired oscillations. A drive power is injected into the first cavity through a multi-hole coaxial coupler. A capacitive probe is placed directly before the input cavity to measure the beam velocity ratio. Large signal nonlinear calculations predict a peak efficiency of 30% (extracted power = 140 kW) and a saturated gain of 20dB over a 0.3% bandwidth at {alpha} = 1.5, {Delta}v{sub z}/v{sub z} = 20% at 13.3 kG and Q{sub 1} = Q{sub 2} = 200. Design parameters and initial hot-test results of the amplifier will be presented.

  17. 35 GHz, 4-Cavity Gyroklystron Amplifier Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garven, M.; Calame, J. P.; Danly, B. G.; Levush, B.; Wood, F.

    1998-11-01

    Gyroklystron amplifiers operating in the Ka-band are attractive sources for the next generation of millimeter wave radars and are currently under investigation at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). A four-cavity, 35 GHz gyroklystron experiment has been designed to demonstrate higher saturated gain (50dB) than previous experiments at NRL( J. J. Choi et al, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26(3), 416, 1998.). Non-linear, time-dependent simulations of the 4-cavity gyroklystron amplifier design using MAGYKL(P. E. Latham et al IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 22, 804, 1994.) predict 35% efficiency, 225 kW peak power, 50 dB saturated gain and a -3 dB bandwidth of 0.6%. For this four-cavity gyroklystron, the interaction between the TE_01 mode and a 70 kV, 9 A electron beam was studied with α=1.3 and an rms perpendicular velocity spread of 9%. Initial studies have shown that variations in magnetic field and voltage affect the trade-offs between power, bandwidth and efficiency. Theoretical design studies and experimental progress will be presented.

  18. Ultrastable low-noise current amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Drung, Dietmar; Becker, Ulrich; Scherer, Hansjörg; Ahlers, Franz Josef

    2014-01-01

    An ultrastable low-noise current amplifier (ULCA) is presented. The ULCA is a non-cryogenic instrument based on specially designed operational amplifiers and resistor networks. It involves two stages, the first providing a 1000-fold current gain and the second performing a current-to-voltage conversion via an internal 1 MOhm reference resistor or, optionally, an external standard resistor. The ULCA's transfer coefficient is extremely stable versus time, temperature and current amplitude within the full dynamic range of +/-5 nA. A low noise level of 2.4 fA/sqrt(Hz) helps to keep averaging times low at small input currents. A cryogenic current comparator is used to calibrate both input current gain and output transresistance, providing traceability to the quantum Hall effect. Typically, within one day after calibration, the uncertainty contribution from short-term fluctuations of the transresistance is below one part in 10^7. The long-term stability is expected to be better than one part in 10^5 over a year. A ...

  19. Patterns of growth, axonal extension and axonal arborization of neuronal lineages in the developing Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Camilla; Shy, Diana; Spindler, Shana R; Fung, Siaumin; Pereanu, Wayne; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-11-15

    The Drosophila central brain is composed of approximately 100 paired lineages, with most lineages comprising 100-150 neurons. Most lineages have a number of important characteristics in common. Typically, neurons of a lineage stay together as a coherent cluster and project their axons into a coherent bundle visible from late embryo to adult. Neurons born during the embryonic period form the primary axon tracts (PATs) that follow stereotyped pathways in the neuropile. Apoptotic cell death removes an average of 30-40% of primary neurons around the time of hatching. Secondary neurons generated during the larval period form secondary axon tracts (SATs) that typically fasciculate with their corresponding primary axon tract. SATs develop into the long fascicles that interconnect the different compartments of the adult brain. Structurally, we distinguish between three types of lineages: PD lineages, characterized by distinct, spatially separate proximal and distal arborizations; C lineages with arborizations distributed continuously along the entire length of their tract; D lineages that lack proximal arborizations. Arborizations of many lineages, in particular those of the PD type, are restricted to distinct neuropile compartments. We propose that compartments are "scaffolded" by individual lineages, or small groups thereof. Thereby, the relatively small number of primary neurons of each primary lineage set up the compartment map in the late embryo. Compartments grow during the larval period simply by an increase in arbor volume of primary neurons. Arbors of secondary neurons form within or adjacent to the larval compartments, resulting in smaller compartment subdivisions and additional, adult specific compartments. PMID:19538956

  20. ANALYSIS OF INTERNALLY GENERATED NOISE OF BIOELECTRIC AMPLIFIERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mashhour Mustafa; Bani Amer

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with internally generated noise of bioelectric amplifiers that are usually used for processing of bioelectric events. The main purpose of this paper is to present a procedure for analysis of the effects of internal noise generated by the active circuits and to evaluate the output noise of the author's new designed bioelectric amplifier that caused by internal effects to the amplifier circuit itself in order to compare it with the noise generated by conventional amplifiers. The obtained analysis results of internally generated noise showed that the total output noise of bioelectric active circuits does not increase when some of their resistors have a larger value. This behavior is caused by the different transfer functions for the signal and the respective noise sources associated with these resistors. Moreover, the new designed bioelectric amplifier has an output noise less than that for conventional amplifiers. The obtained analysis results were also experimentally verified and the final conclusions were drawn.

  1. Gender Differences on the Use of Amplifiers in Academic Writings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申利芬

    2012-01-01

      This study aims to investigate the use of amplifiers in term of gender and disciplinary groups in academic research arti⁃cles, which is based on the British Academic Written English Corpus (BAWE).18 amplifiers were examined across two dimen⁃sions:gender and disciplinary groups. The results show amplifiers are more common in males’ academic writings than in those of females in general, amplifiers are used more often in AH discipline. However, not all amplifiers show significant gender differ⁃ences between men and women. Six words show a significant difference between male and female writers:pretty, by far, perfect⁃ly, quite, a great deal, totally, which are used more often by males. However, the interesting is in LS discipline, most amplifiers are used more often by female than male writers and males tend to use by far more frequently than females.

  2. Self-bias technique improves amplifier gain and noise figure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fithian, Michael J.

    1988-05-01

    A nover self-bias technique, which provides optimum amplifier performance from low-noise GaAs FET amplifiers, is described. The self-bias scheme employs small thin-film substrates to mount packaged FETs to amplifier's main microstrip substrates. The substrates, which feature high dielectric constant, are placed under each FET source lead. The use of self-biased amplifiers results in several benefits. Thus, with a single bias supply, proper bias sequencing is not requried among amplifier stages; in a self-bias layout, the active devices are not damaged by a bias-supply failure; finally, proper self-biasing is not complex, requiring only two resistors per stage. The results of an experimental testing of the self-bias technique, evaluated for a 5.0 to 5.6 GHz low-noise amplifier with the aid of commercially available CAD software, are presented.

  3. Measurement of microdosimetric spectra using an amplifier with logarithmic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3-1/2 decade logarithmic pulse amplifier was developed for use in microdosimetry. A block diagram of the instrument is given. The input shaping amplifier is designed to accept output pulses from a charge sensitive preamplifier with a maximum full scale amplitude of 8 volts. Output of the shaping amplifier is a bipolar, positive lobe leading RC shaped pulse with a maximum linear range approximately 200 millivolts. Following the logarithmic converter is a voltage amplifier which is used to increase the signal level before it is applied through the linear gate to the output buffer-amplifier. The signal at the output connector is a positive pulse compatible with most conventional pulse height analyzers. The gain of the linear amplifier is adjustable over 10 to 1 range by means of front panel controls

  4. Role of LRF/Pokemon in lineage fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardi, Andrea; Guarnerio, Jlenia; Wang, Guocan; Maeda, Takahiro; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2013-04-11

    In the human genome, 43 different genes are found that encode proteins belonging to the family of the POK (poxvirus and zinc finger and Krüppel)/ZBTB (zinc finger and broad complex, tramtrack, and bric à brac) factors. Generally considered transcriptional repressors, several of these genes play fundamental roles in cell lineage fate decision in various tissues, programming specific tasks throughout the life of the organism. Here, we focus on functions of leukemia/lymphoma-related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor, which is probably one of the most exciting and yet enigmatic members of the POK/ZBTB family. PMID:23396304

  5. Signalling and transcriptional regulation of early developmental lineage decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgani, Sophie Maria Christina

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are cell lines isolated from the embryo at a time just prior to implantation into the uterus. In the right cocktail of medium and cytokines, these cell lines can be maintained indefinitely in vitro in a self-renewing state. Initially it was assumed that these cells......’ towards a particular cell fate. These populations are also dynamic in nature, converting from one state to another with fairly rapid kinetics. The main focus of this thesis was to gain a more in depth understanding of the mechanisms regulating heterogeneity and lineage priming in murine ES cells by asking...

  6. Lineage factors and differentiation states in lung cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, W K C; Nguyen, D X

    2015-11-19

    Lung cancer encompasses a heterogeneous group of malignancies. Here we discuss how the remarkable diversity of major lung cancer subtypes is manifested in their transforming cell of origin, oncogenic dependencies, phenotypic plasticity, metastatic competence and response to therapy. More specifically, we review the increasing evidence that links this biological heterogeneity to the deregulation of cell lineage-specific pathways and the transcription factors that ultimately control them. As determinants of pulmonary epithelial differentiation, these poorly characterized transcriptional networks may underlie the etiology and biological progression of distinct lung cancers, while providing insight into innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:25823023

  7. GATA-3 is required for early T lineage progenitor development

    OpenAIRE

    Hosoya, Tomonori; Kuroha, Takashi; Moriguchi, Takashi; Cummings, Dustin; Maillard, Ivan; Lim, Kim-Chew; Engel, James Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Most T lymphocytes appear to arise from very rare early T lineage progenitors (ETPs) in the thymus, but the transcriptional programs that specify ETP generation are not completely known. The transcription factor GATA-3 is required for the development of T lymphocytes at multiple late differentiation steps as well as for the development of thymic natural killer cells. However, a role for GATA-3 before the double-negative (DN) 3 stage of T cell development has to date been obscured both by the ...

  8. Acid evaporation property in chemically amplified resists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Shuichi; Itani, Toshiro; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Yamana, Mitsuharu; Samoto, Norihiko; Kasama, Kunihiko

    1997-07-01

    The lithographic performance of a chemically amplified resist system very much depends on the photo-generated acid structure. In a previous paper, we reported the molecular structure dependence of two typical photo-generated acids (aromatic sulfonic acid and alkyl sulfonic acid) from the viewpoints of lithographic performance and acid characteristics such as acid generation efficiency, acid diffusion behavior and acid evaporation property. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of the remaining solvent in a resist film on the acid evaporation property. Four types of two-component chemically amplified positive KrF resists were prepared consisting of tert-butoxycarbonyl (t-BOC) protected polyhydroxystyrene and sulfonic acid derivative photo-acid generator (PAG). Here, a different combination of two types of PAGs [2,4-dimethylbenzenesulfonic acid (aromatic sulfonic acid) derivative PAG and cyclohexanesulfonic acid (alkyl sulfonic acid) derivative PAG] and two types of solvents (propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate; PGMEA and ethyl lactate; EL) were evaluated. The aromatic sulfonic acid was able to evaporate easily during post exposure bake (PEB) treatment, but the alkyl sulfonic acid was not. The higher evaporation property of aromatic sulfonic acid might be due to the higher vapor pressure and the longer acid diffusion length. Furthermore, the amount of aromatic sulfonic acid in the PGMEA resist was reduced by more than that in the EL resist. The amount of acid loss also became smaller at a higher prebake temperature. The concentration of the remaining solvent in the resist film decreased with the increasing prebake temperature. We think that the acid evaporation property was affected by the remaining solvent in the resist, film; the large amount of remaining solvent promoted the acid diffusion and eventually accelerated the acid evaporation from the resist film surface in the PGMEA resist. In summary, the acid evaporation property depends on both the acid

  9. Direct coupled amplifiers using field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of the uni-polar field effect transistor (P.E.T.) was known before the invention of the bi-polar transistor but it is only recently that they have been made commercially. Being produced as yet only in small quantities, their price imposes a restriction on use to circuits where their peculiar properties can be exploited to the full. One such application is described here where the combination of low voltage drift and relatively low input leakage current are necessarily used together. One of the instruments used to control nuclear reactors has a logarithmic response to the mean output current from a polarised ionisation chamber. The logarithmic signal is then differentiated electrically, the result being displayed on a meter calibrated to show the reactor divergence or doubling time. If displayed in doubling time the scale is calibrated reciprocally. Because of the wide range obtained in the logarithmic section and the limited supply voltage, an output of 1 volt per decade change in ionisation current is used. Differentiating this gives a current of 1.5 x 10-8 A for p.s.D. (20 sec. doubling time) in the differentiating amplifier. To overcome some of the problems of noise due to statistical variations in input current, the circuit design necessitates a resistive path to ground at the amplifier input of 20 M.ohms. A schematic diagram is shown. 1. It is evident that a zero drift of 1% can be caused by a leakage current of 1.5 x 10-10 A or an offset voltage of 3 mV at the amplifier input. Although the presently used electrometer valve is satisfactory from the point of view of grid current, there have been sudden changes in grid to grid voltage (the valve is a double triode) of up to 10 m.V. It has been found that a pair of F.E.T's. can be used to replace the electrometer valve so long as care is taken in correct balance of the two devices. An investigation has been made into the characteristics of some fourteen devices to see whether those with very different

  10. Thermodynamic indistinguishability and field state fingerprint of quantum optical amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Perl, Yossi; Band, Yehuda B.; Boukobza, Erez

    2016-01-01

    Dissipation tends to wash out dynamical features observed at early evolution times. In this paper we analyze a resonant single--atom two--photon quantum optical amplifier both dynamically and thermodynamically. A detailed thermodynamic balance shows that the non--linear amplifier is thermodynamically equivalent to the linear amplifier discussed in (Phys. Rev. A, 74 (2006), 063822). However, by calculating the Wigner quasi--probability distribution for various initial field states, we show tha...

  11. A high performance switching audio amplifier using sliding mode control

    OpenAIRE

    Pillonnet, Gael; Cellier, Rémy; Abouchi, Nacer; Chiollaz, Monique

    2008-01-01

    International audience The switching audio amplifiers are widely used in various portable and consumer electronics due to their high efficiency, but suffers from low audio performances due to inherent nonlinearity. This paper presents an integrated class D audio amplifier with low consumption and high audio performances. It includes a power stage and an efficient control based on sliding mode technique. This monolithic class D amplifier is capable of delivering up to 1W into 8Ω load at les...

  12. Design and experimental investigation of charge amplifiers for ultrasonic transducers

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Svein Kristian Esp

    2014-01-01

    Amplifiers are used in all types of electrical circuits to boost signal and there is a huge variety in designs used for different applications. For ultrasonic applications our group has previously used commercial available transimpedance amplifiers that converts a current to a voltage, but these amplifiers have a linear response over its frequency range. To preserve as much information as possible for lower frequencies a flat frequency response is preferable. The main goa...

  13. Modeling and design techniques for RF power amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Raghavan, Arvind; Laskar, Joy

    2008-01-01

    The book covers RF power amplifier design, from device and modeling considerations to advanced circuit design architectures and techniques. It focuses on recent developments and advanced topics in this area, including numerous practical designs to back the theoretical considerations. It presents the challenges in designing power amplifiers in silicon and helps the reader improve the efficiency of linear power amplifiers, and design more accurate compact device models, with faster extraction routines, to create cost effective and reliable circuits.

  14. A Review of High Voltage Drive Amplifiers for Capacitive Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lina; Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the high voltage amplifiers, which are used to drive capacitive actuators. The amplifiers for both piezoelectric and DEAP (dielectric electroactive polymer) actuator are discussed. The suitable topologies for driving capacitive actuators are illustrated in detail......, including linear as well as switched mode amplifiers. In the past much attention has been paid on the driver for piezoelectric actuator. As DEAP is a type of new material, there is not much literature reference for it....

  15. Design of a Broadband Amplifier for High Speed Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Camargo, E.; Virk, R.S.; Hajji, R.; Parker, S; Ohnishi, H

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides comprehensive insight into the design approach followed for an amplifier dedicated to high speed base band signals. To demonstrate the methodology, an amplifier consisting of nine PHEMT cascode cells within a distributed amplifier topology was designed. The resulting frequency response is 40 GHz at the 3-dB point, and the output voltage for a 43 Gbps eye diagram is 7.3 Vpp at the chip terminal.

  16. InP Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor Amplifiers to 255 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radisic, Vesna; Sawdai, Donald; Scott, Dennis; Deal, William; Dang, Linh; Li, Danny; Cavus, Abdullah; To, Richard; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Two single-stage InP heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) amplifiers operate at 184 and 255 GHz, using Northrop Grumman Corporation s InP HBT MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) technology. At the time of this reporting, these are reported to be the highest HBT amplifiers ever created. The purpose of the amplifier design is to evaluate the technology capability for high-frequency designs and verify the model for future development work.

  17. The spectacular human nose: An amplifier of individual quality?

    OpenAIRE

    Åse Kristine Rognmo Mikalsen; Ivar Folstad; Nigel Gilles Yoccoz; Bruno Laeng

    2014-01-01

    Amplifiers are signals that improve the perception of underlying differences in quality. They are cost free and advantageous to high quality individuals, but disadvantageous to low quality individuals, as poor quality is easier perceived because of the amplifier. For an amplifier to evolve, the average fitness benefit to the high quality individuals should be higher than the average cost for the low quality individuals. The human nose is, compared to the nose of most other primates, extraordi...

  18. The solid-state Ku-band power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, B. D.

    1975-01-01

    A survey of IMPATT diodes and negative resistance amplifiers is presented. The first phase of the amplifier effort is discussed in which a single diode reflection amplifier delivering 0.5 watt at 15 GHz with 10-dB gain over a 1-GHz band was developed. The design of a dominant mode resonant combiner is described along with the characterization of the IMPATT diodes. Results are given on the complete amplifier and on the thermal and graceful failure characteristics of the unit.

  19. Pulse-distortion in a quantum-dot optical amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, Francis Pascal; Borri, Paola; Mørk, Jesper; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Heinrichsdorff, F.; Mao, M.-H.; Bimberg, Dieter

    2000-01-01

    Distortion of a -150fs optical pulse after propagation through an InAs/InGaAs quantum-dot optical amplifier is measured for different input energies an bias currents. Pulse distortion is observed and compared with results on a bulk amplifier.......Distortion of a -150fs optical pulse after propagation through an InAs/InGaAs quantum-dot optical amplifier is measured for different input energies an bias currents. Pulse distortion is observed and compared with results on a bulk amplifier....

  20. Parametric Amplifiers for Microwave Kinectic Inductance Detector (MKID) Readout Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Find numerical solutions to the non-linear partial differential equations describing our amplifier transmission lines. Optimize periodic choke structure to block...

  1. Multi Carrier Modulation Audio Power Amplifier with Programmable Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Theis; Andersen, Toke Meyer; Knott, Arnold;

    2009-01-01

    amplifiers while keeping the performance measures to excellent levels is therefore of high interest. In this paper a class D audio amplifier utilising Multi Carrier Modulation (MCM) will be analysed, and a prototype Master-Slave Multi Carrier Modulated (MS MCM) amplifier has been constructed and measured for...... performance and out of band spectral amplitudes. The basic principle in MCM is to use programmable logic to combine two or more Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) audio signals at different switching frequencies. In this way the out of band spectrum will be lowered compared with conventional class D amplifiers...

  2. Design of Class-E Radio Frequency Power Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Shahrani, Saad Mohammed

    2000-01-01

    Power amplifiers (PA) are typically the most power-consuming building blocks of RF transceivers. Therefore, the design of a high-efficiency radio frequency power amplifier is the most obvious solution to overcoming the battery lifetime limitation in the portable communication systems. A power amplifierà ­s classes (A, AB, B, C, F, E, etc), and design techniques (Load-pull and large-signal S-parameters techniques) are presented. The design accuracy of class-A power amplifier based on the s...

  3. Modeling a Common-Source Amplifier Using a Ferroelectric Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyah, Rana; Hunt, Mitchell; MacLeond, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model characterizing the behavior of a common-source amplifier using a FeFET. The model is based on empirical data and incorporates several variables that affect the output, including frequency, load resistance, and gate-to-source voltage. Since the common-source amplifier is the most widely used amplifier in MOS technology, understanding and modeling the behavior of the FeFET-based common-source amplifier will help in the integration of FeFETs into many circuits.

  4. Controlling the dynamic range of a Josephson parametric amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the central challenges in the development of parametric amplifiers is the control of the dynamic range relative to its gain and bandwidth, which typically limits quantum limited amplification to signals which contain only a few photons per inverse bandwidth. Here, we discuss the control of the dynamic range of Josephson parametric amplifiers by using Josephson junction arrays. We discuss gain, bandwidth, noise, and dynamic range properties of both a transmission line and a lumped element based parametric amplifier. Based on these investigations we derive useful design criteria, which may find broad application in the development of practical parametric amplifiers. (orig.)

  5. Operational characteristics of the NRL gyroklystron amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-energy physics community is considering the development of 1 TeV accelerators. Size and cost of such devices can be greatly reduced by operating at 10 GHz. Present tube technology seems incapable of meeting the power requirements at this frequency. A strong candidate for a drive tube to meet these requirements is a gyroklystron amplifier (GKA) due to its high gain, efficiency and power capabilities. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is presently conducting GKA research to evaluate their performance characteristics. Operation of a 54 kW, 30% efficient, 4.5 GHz 3-cavity GKA is described. Experiments to evaluate the effects on the output phase of varying drive voltage, beam current, magnetic field and drive power and to examine phase-locked oscillator performance are discussed. The results of present GKA experiments serve to emphasize the applicability of the GKA to the next generation of linear accelerators

  6. CARM-klystron amplifier for accelerator applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Steven H.; Fliflet, Arne W.

    2001-05-01

    We consider the possibility of a cyclotron-autoresonance-maser (CARM) klystron configuration for accelerator applications as an alternative to the gyroklystron amplifier. The potential advantages, compared to gyroklystrons, include: 1) comparable efficiencies at lower values of the electron beam pitch ratio α, which should improve the beam quality and make the device substantially more stable against the excitation of parasitic mode, 2) operation far from cutoff, which should reduce the fields at cavity walls, allowing higher power operation, and 3) operation at lower magnetic fields for the same cyclotron harmonic number. However, there are two significant issues associated with the design of efficient, high-power CARMs. First, because of the higher value of kZ, compared to gyroklystrons, CARMs are substantially more sensitive to parallel velocity spread (pitch-angle spread). Second, conventional cavities support a variety of near-cutoff modes, which can compete with the CARM interaction. Therefore, one must consider either Bragg resonators or quasioptical cavity configurations.

  7. Gain Characteristics of Fiber Optical Parametric Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高明义; 姜淳; 胡卫生

    2004-01-01

    The theory model of fiber optical parametric amplifier (FOPA) was introduced, which is based on optical nonlinear effect. And then numerical simulation was done to analyze and discuss the gain spectral characteristics of one-pump and two-pump FOPA. The results show that for one-pump FOPA, when pump wavelength is near to fiber zero-dispersion wavelength(ZDW), the gain flatness is better, and with the increase of the pump power, fiber length and its nonlinear coefficient, the gain value will increase while the gain bandwidth will become narrow. For two-pump FOPA, when the pump central wavelength is near to fiber ZDW, the gain flatness is better. Moreover, by decreasing the space of two pumps wavelength, the gain flatness can be improved. Finally, some problems existing in FOPA were addressed.

  8. New developments in relativistic klystron amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relativistic klystron amplifier that employed cavities with inductively loaded wide gaps and a novel converter has achieved 50% energy efficiency, a significant advance over the previous state of the art of 20%. The new device was immersed in a 3 kG magnetic field and contained two innovations: (1) Wide gaps which include an inductively loaded return current structure that was opaque to the unmodulated beam space charge but transparent to the RF field. (2) A novel converter that was made of a 'leaky' cavity with a radially-converging inductively-loaded structure that was inserted in the output wide-gap. This structure reduced the potential energy residing in the electron beam and maximized RF output energy. (author). 4 figs., 13 refs

  9. Current feedback operational amplifiers and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Senani, Raj; Singh, A K; Singh, V K

    2013-01-01

    This book describes a variety of current feedback operational amplifier (CFOA) architectures and their applications in analog signal processing/generation. Coverage includes a comprehensive survey of commercially available, off-the-shelf integrated circuit CFOAs, as well as recent advances made on the design of CFOAs, including design innovations for bipolar and CMOS CFOAs.  This book serves as a single-source reference to the topic, as well as a catalog of over 200 application circuits which would be useful not only for students, educators and researchers in apprising them about the recent developments in the area but would also serve as a comprehensive repertoire of useful circuits for practicing engineers who might be interested in choosing an appropriate CFOA-based topology for use in a given application.

  10. High-energy regenerative thin disk amplifier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chyla, Michal; Smrž, Martin; Mocek, Tomáš

    Melville: AIP, 2012 - (Osvay, K.; Dombi, P.; Fülöp, J.; Varjú, K.), s. 84-87. (AIP Conference Proceedings. 1462). ISBN 978-0-7354-1066-4. ISSN 0094-243X. [Light at Extreme Intensities 2011. Szeged (HU), 14.11.2011-18.11.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027 Grant ostatní: ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Yb: YAG * thin-disk * regenerative amplifier * high energy * picosecond pulses * CPA Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  11. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) will be a new scientific European infrastructure devoted to scientific research in lasers field, dedicated to the investigation and applications of laser-matter interaction at the highest intensity level (more than 6 orders of magnitude higher than today’s laser intensity). The ELI project, a collaboration of 13 European countries, will comprise three branches: Ultra High Field Science that will explore laser-matter interaction, attosecond Laser Science designed to conduct temporal investigation of electron dynamics in atoms, molecules, plasmas and solids at attosecond scale, High Energy Beam Science devoted to the development and usage o f dedicated beam lines with ultra short pulses of high energy radiation. Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-cIass lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YaG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz), The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100K-170K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser. (author)

  12. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) will be a new scientific European infrastructure devoted to scientific research in lasers field, dedicated to the investigation and applications of laser-matter interaction at the highest intensity level (more than 6 orders of magnitude higher than today's laser intensity). The ELI project, a collaboration of 13 European countries, will comprise three branches: Ultra High Field Science that will explore laser-matter interaction, atto-second Laser Science designed to conduct temporal investigation of electron dynamics in atoms, molecules, plasmas and solids at atto-second scale, High Energy Beam Science devoted to the development and usage of dedicated beam lines with ultra short pulses of high energy radiation. Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YaG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K-170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW.m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser. (authors)

  13. Recent Reticulate Evolution in the Ecologically Dominant Lineage of Coccolithophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendif, El Mahdi; Probert, Ian; Díaz-Rosas, Francisco; Thomas, Daniela; van den Engh, Ger; Young, Jeremy R.; von Dassow, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The coccolithophore family Noëlaerhabdaceae contains a number of taxa that are very abundant in modern oceans, including the cosmopolitan bloom-forming Emiliania huxleyi. Introgressive hybridization has been suggested to account for incongruences between nuclear, mitochondrial and plastidial phylogenies of morphospecies within this lineage, but the number of species cultured to date remains rather limited. Here, we present the characterization of 5 new Noëlaerhabdaceae culture strains isolated from samples collected in the south-east Pacific Ocean. These were analyzed morphologically using scanning electron microscopy and phylogenetically by sequencing 5 marker genes (nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA, plastidial tufA, and mitochondrial cox1 and cox3 genes). Morphologically, one of these strains corresponded to Gephyrocapsa ericsonii and the four others to Reticulofenestra parvula. Ribosomal gene sequences were near identical between these new strains, but divergent from G. oceanica, G. muellerae, and E. huxleyi. In contrast to the clear distinction in ribosomal phylogenies, sequences from other genomic compartments clustered with those of E. huxleyi strains with which they share an ecological range (i.e., warm temperate to tropical waters). These data provide strong support for the hypothesis of past (and potentially ongoing) introgressive hybridization within this ecologically important lineage and for the transfer of R. parvula to Gephyrocapsa. These results have important implications for understanding the role of hybridization in speciation in vast ocean meta-populations of phytoplankton. PMID:27252694

  14. Sequence analysis of four caprine mitochondria DNA lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Hui Ma

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA (16640bp in length was sequenced from four Chinese goat lineages representing the four major mtDNA haplogroups in goats. A total of 124 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were found in encoding regions, and the overall ratio of transitions:transversions was 40:1 revealing a heavy transition/transversion rate in domestic goats. Eighteen non-synonymous sites were found for the total number of SNPs; the sites did not affect the predicted functions of protein for these four goat mtDNA lineages. In the region for coding tRNA and rRNA, SNPs occurred in loops, unstructured single strand and stems that were conformed with the principle of G-U pairing. We came to the conclusion that these substitutions could not change secondary structure of RNAs, and there was no positive selection on goat mitochondrial coding region according to the result of dN/dS (0.0399-0.1529 by comparing the goat with other reported mitochondrial genomes.

  15. Lineage and morphogenetic analysis of the cardiac valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Frederik J; Moorman, Antoon F M; Anderson, Robert H; Männer, Jörg; Soufan, Alexandre T; de Gier-de Vries, Corrie; Schneider, Michael D; Webb, Sandra; van den Hoff, Maurice J B; Christoffels, Vincent M

    2004-09-17

    We used a genetic lineage-labeling system to establish the material contributions of the progeny of 3 specific cell types to the cardiac valves. Thus, we labeled irreversibly the myocardial (alphaMHC-Cre+), endocardial (Tie2-Cre+), and neural crest (Wnt1-Cre+) cells during development and assessed their eventual contribution to the definitive valvar complexes. The leaflets and tendinous cords of the mitral and tricuspid valves, the atrioventricular fibrous continuity, and the leaflets of the outflow tract valves were all found to be generated from mesenchyme derived from the endocardium, with no substantial contribution from cells of the myocardial and neural crest lineages. Analysis of chicken-quail chimeras revealed absence of any substantial contribution from proepicardially derived cells. Molecular and morphogenetic analysis revealed several new aspects of atrioventricular valvar formation. Marked similarities are seen during the formation of the mural leaflets of the mitral and tricuspid valves. These leaflets form by protrusion and growth of a sheet of atrioventricular myocardium into the ventricular lumen, with subsequent formation of valvar mesenchyme on its surface rather than by delamination of lateral cushions from the ventricular myocardial wall. The myocardial layer is subsequently removed by the process of apoptosis. In contrast, the aortic leaflet of the mitral valve, the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve, and the atrioventricular fibrous continuity between these valves develop from the mesenchyme of the inferior and superior atrioventricular cushions. The tricuspid septal leaflet then delaminates from the muscular ventricular septum late in development. PMID:15297379

  16. Pan-Genome Analysis of Brazilian Lineage A Amoebal Mimiviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe L. Assis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the recent discovery of Samba virus, the first representative of the family Mimiviridae from Brazil, prospecting for mimiviruses has been conducted in different environmental conditions in Brazil. Recently, we isolated using Acanthamoeba sp. three new mimiviruses, all of lineage A of amoebal mimiviruses: Kroon virus from urban lake water; Amazonia virus from the Brazilian Amazon river; and Oyster virus from farmed oysters. The aims of this work were to sequence and analyze the genome of these new Brazilian mimiviruses (mimi-BR and update the analysis of the Samba virus genome. The genomes of Samba virus, Amazonia virus and Oyster virus were 97%–99% similar, whereas Kroon virus had a low similarity (90%–91% with other mimi-BR. A total of 3877 proteins encoded by mimi-BR were grouped into 974 orthologous clusters. In addition, we identified three new ORFans in the Kroon virus genome. Additional work is needed to expand our knowledge of the diversity of mimiviruses from Brazil, including if and why among amoebal mimiviruses those of lineage A predominate in the Brazilian environment.

  17. Anterior dental evolution in the Australopithecus anamensis-afarensis lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Carol V; Plavcan, J Michael; Manthi, Fredrick K

    2010-10-27

    Australopithecus anamensis is the earliest known species of the Australopithecus-human clade and is the likely ancestor of Australopithecus afarensis. Investigating possible selective pressures underlying these changes is key to understanding the patterns of selection shaping the origins and early evolution of the Australopithecus-human clade. During the course of the Au. anamensis-afarensis lineage, significant changes appear to occur particularly in the anterior dentition, but also in jaw structure and molar form, suggesting selection for altered diet and/or food processing. Specifically, canine tooth crown height does not change, but maxillary canines and P(3)s become shorter mesiodistally, canine tooth crowns become more symmetrical in profile and P(3)s less unicuspid. Canine roots diminish in size and dimorphism, especially relative to the size of the postcanine teeth. Molar crowns become higher. Tooth rows become more divergent and symphyseal form changes. Dietary change involving anterior dental use is also suggested by less intense anterior tooth wear in Au. afarensis. These dental changes signal selection for altered dietary behaviour and explain some differences in craniofacial form between these taxa. These data identify Au. anamensis not just as a more primitive version of Au. afarensis, but as a dynamic member of an evolving lineage leading to Au. afarensis, and raise intriguing questions about what other evolutionary changes occurred during the early evolution of the Australopithecus-human clade, and what characterized the origins of the group. PMID:20855307

  18. Anterior dental evolution in the Australopithecus anamensis–afarensis lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Carol V.; Plavcan, J. Michael; Manthi, Fredrick K.

    2010-01-01

    Australopithecus anamensis is the earliest known species of the Australopithecus–human clade and is the likely ancestor of Australopithecus afarensis. Investigating possible selective pressures underlying these changes is key to understanding the patterns of selection shaping the origins and early evolution of the Australopithecus–human clade. During the course of the Au. anamensis–afarensis lineage, significant changes appear to occur particularly in the anterior dentition, but also in jaw structure and molar form, suggesting selection for altered diet and/or food processing. Specifically, canine tooth crown height does not change, but maxillary canines and P3s become shorter mesiodistally, canine tooth crowns become more symmetrical in profile and P3s less unicuspid. Canine roots diminish in size and dimorphism, especially relative to the size of the postcanine teeth. Molar crowns become higher. Tooth rows become more divergent and symphyseal form changes. Dietary change involving anterior dental use is also suggested by less intense anterior tooth wear in Au. afarensis. These dental changes signal selection for altered dietary behaviour and explain some differences in craniofacial form between these taxa. These data identify Au. anamensis not just as a more primitive version of Au. afarensis, but as a dynamic member of an evolving lineage leading to Au. afarensis, and raise intriguing questions about what other evolutionary changes occurred during the early evolution of the Australopithecus–human clade, and what characterized the origins of the group. PMID:20855307

  19. Lineage analysis of circulating Trypanosoma cruzi parasites and their association with clinical forms of Chagas disease in Bolivia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona del Puerto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The causative agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi, is divided into 6 Discrete Typing Units (DTU: Tc I, IIa, IIb, IIc, IId and IIe. In order to assess the relative pathogenicities of different DTUs, blood samples from three different clinical groups of chronic Chagas disease patients (indeterminate, cardiac, megacolon from Bolivia were analyzed for their circulating parasites lineages using minicircle kinetoplast DNA polymorphism. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Between 2000 and 2007, patients sent to the Centro Nacional de Enfermedades Tropicales for diagnosis of Chagas from clinics and hospitals in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, were assessed by serology, cardiology and gastro-intestinal examinations. Additionally, patients who underwent colonectomies due to Chagasic magacolon at the Hospital Universitario Japonés were also included. A total of 306 chronic Chagas patients were defined by their clinical types (81 with cardiopathy, 150 without cardiopathy, 100 with megacolon, 144 without megacolon, 164 with cardiopathy or megacolon, 73 indeterminate and 17 cases with both cardiopathy and megacolon. DNA was extracted from 10 ml of peripheral venous blood for PCR analysis. The kinetoplast minicircle DNA (kDNA was amplified from 196 out of 306 samples (64.1%, of which 104 (53.3% were Tc IId, 4 (2.0% Tc I, 7 (3.6% Tc IIb, 1 (0.5% Tc IIe, 26 (13.3% Tc I/IId, 1 (0.5% Tc I/IIb/IId, 2 (1.0% Tc IIb/d and 51 (25.9% were unidentified. Of the 133 Tc IId samples, three different kDNA hypervariable region patterns were detected; Mn (49.6%, TPK like (48.9% and Bug-like (1.5%. There was no significant association between Tc types and clinical manifestations of disease. CONCLUSIONS: None of the identified lineages or sublineages was significantly associated with any particular clinical manifestations in the chronic Chagas patients in Bolivia.

  20. Development of 3 kW at 325 MHz solid-state RF power amplifier using four power amplifier modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high power solid-state RF power amplifier of 3 kW at 325 MHz has been developed using only four RF power amplifier modules of 850 W power output each. The design and characterization of RF power modules have been presented. A four way Wilkinson power combiner adds the output of four power amplifier modules with a total transmission loss of less than 6%. The combined power amplifier has a power gain of 20.2 dB at 1-dB compression point, and the corresponding output power is 2.8 kW at 325 MHz. The drain efficiency of the power amplifier is 65.3% at 3 kW. All the harmonics of this amplifier are below −40 dBc. The amplifier has better characteristics like fewer numbers of active devices per kilo watt, high efficiency, high gain, and ruggedness etc for RF accelerator applications. -- Highlights: • High gain power amplifier, power gain at 20 dB. • High efficiency amplifier, efficiency >65%. • Minimum number of modules per kilo watt power output. • Heat sink with modules on both side, high density

  1. X-Band, 17-Watt Solid-State Power Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittskus, Anthony; Stone, Ernest; Boger, William; Burgess, David; Honda, Richard; Nuckolls, Carl

    2005-01-01

    An advanced solid-state power amplifier that can generate an output power of as much as 17 W at a design operating frequency of 8.4 GHz has been designed and constructed as a smaller, lighter, less expensive alternative to traveling-wave-tube X-band amplifiers and to prior solid-state X-band power amplifiers of equivalent output power. This amplifier comprises a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier module and a power-converter module integrated into a compact package (see Figure 1). The amplifier module contains an input variable-gain amplifier (VGA), an intermediate driver stage, a final power stage, and input and output power monitors (see Figure 2). The VGA and the driver amplifier are 0.5-m GaAs-based metal semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs). The final power stage contains four parallel high-efficiency, GaAs-based pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistors (PHEMTs). The gain of the VGA is voltage-variable over a range of 10 to 24 dB. To provide for temperature compensation of the overall amplifier gain, the gain-control voltage is generated by an operational-amplifier circuit that includes a resistor/thermistor temperature-sensing network. The driver amplifier provides a gain of 14 dB to an output power of 27 dBm to drive the four parallel output PHEMTs, each of which is nominally capable of putting out as much as 5 W. The driver output is sent to the input terminals of the four parallel PHEMTs through microstrip power dividers; the outputs of these PHEMTs are combined by microstrip power combiners (which are similar to the microstrip power dividers) to obtain the final output power of 17 W.

  2. Energy for two: New archaeal lineages and the origin of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F; Neukirchen, Sinje; Zimorski, Verena; Gould, Sven B; Sousa, Filipa L

    2016-09-01

    Metagenomics bears upon all aspects of microbiology, including our understanding of mitochondrial and eukaryote origin. Recently, ribosomal protein phylogenies show the eukaryote host lineage - the archaeal lineage that acquired the mitochondrion - to branch within the archaea. Metagenomic studies are now uncovering new archaeal lineages that branch more closely to the host than any cultivated archaea do. But how do they grow? Carbon and energy metabolism as pieced together from metagenome assemblies of these new archaeal lineages, such as the Deep Sea Archaeal Group (including Lokiarchaeota) and Bathyarchaeota, do not match the physiology of any cultivated microbes. Understanding how these new lineages live in their environment is important, and might hold clues about how mitochondria arose and how the eukaryotic lineage got started. Here we look at these exciting new metagenomic studies, what they say about archaeal physiology in modern environments, how they impact views on host-mitochondrion physiological interactions at eukaryote origin. PMID:27339178

  3. Clonify: unseeded antibody lineage assignment from next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briney, Bryan; Le, Khoa; Zhu, Jiang; Burton, Dennis R

    2016-01-01

    Defining the dynamics and maturation processes of antibody clonal lineages is crucial to understanding the humoral response to infection and immunization. Although individual antibody lineages have been previously analyzed in isolation, these studies provide only a narrow view of the total antibody response. Comprehensive study of antibody lineages has been limited by the lack of an accurate clonal lineage assignment algorithm capable of operating on next-generation sequencing datasets. To address this shortcoming, we developed Clonify, which is able to perform unseeded lineage assignment on very large sets of antibody sequences. Application of Clonify to IgG+ memory repertoires from healthy individuals revealed a surprising lack of influence of large extended lineages on the overall repertoire composition, indicating that this composition is driven less by the order and frequency of pathogen encounters than previously thought. Clonify is freely available at www.github.com/briney/clonify-python. PMID:27102563

  4. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell–specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte–specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte–specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell–regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell–specific transcriptional activity. PMID:26808502

  5. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-03-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell-specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte-specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte-specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell-regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell-specific transcriptional activity. PMID:26808502

  6. Externally pumped millimeter-wave Josephson-junction parametric amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, M.T; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, Ole;

    1980-01-01

    A unified theory of the singly and doubly degenerate Josephson-junction parametric amplifier is presented. Experiments with single junctions on both amplifier modes at frequencies 10, 35, and 70 GHz are discussed. Low-noise temperature (∼100 K, single sideband (SSB)) and reasonable gain (∼8 dB) w...

  7. Solid-State Power Amplifier For 61.5 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael K.; Mcclymonds, James; Vye, David; Arthur, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Power amplifiers based on impact-avalanche-transit-time (IMPATT) diodes developed for operation in communication systems at frequencies near 60 GHz. Built in seven modular stages, power transferred through sections of waveguide and isolator/circulator assemblies. Intended as replacements for bulkier and heavier traveling-wave-tube amplifiers.

  8. CARM and harmonic gyro-amplifier experiments at 17 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menninger, W.L.; Danly, B.G.; Alberti, S.; Chen, C.; Rullier, J.L.; Temkin, R.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center; Giguet, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center]|[Thomson Tubes Electroniques, Velizy (France)

    1993-11-01

    Cyclotron resonance maser amplifiers are possible sources for applications such as electron cyclotron resonance heating of fusion plasmas and driving high-gradient rf linear accelerators. For accelerator drivers, amplifiers or phase locked-oscillators are required. A 17 GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier experiment and a 17 GHz third harmonic gyro-amplifier experiment are presently underway at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Using the SRL/MIT SNOMAD II introduction accelerator to provide a 380 kV, 180 A, 30 ns flat top electron beam, the gyro-amplifier experiment has produced 5 MW of rf power with over 50 dB of gain at 17 GHz. The gyro-amplifier operates in the TE{sub 31} mode using a third harmonic interaction. Because of its high power output, the gyro-amplifier will be used as the rf source for a photocathode rf electron gun experiment also taking place at MIT. Preliminary gyro-amplifier results are presented, including measurement of rf power, gain versus interaction length, and the far-field pattern. A CARM experiment designed to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode is also discussed.

  9. Phase Sensitive Amplifier Based on Ultrashort Pump Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Gershikov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a narrow band phase sensitive amplifier in the pump degenerate configuration which employs ps pump pulses. Control of the amplifier bandwidth is achieved via changes of the pump spectral width. A phase sensitive gain between -6 and 6 decibels, with an overall system gain of 28dB was demonstrated.

  10. Design of vortex fluid amplifiers with asymmetrical flow fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, T. J.; Price, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    Variation of geometric parameters, including supply area, control area, chamber length, and outlet diameter, of a large scale, modular design vortex fluid amplifier with single supply and control jets, has confirmed and extended a previously published design method, developed for vortex amplifiers with symmetric flow fields. This allows application of the method to devices which are more representative of practical, production type components.

  11. Gain characteristics of a saturated fiber optic parametric amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Lorenzen, Michael Rodas; Noordegraaf, Danny;

    2008-01-01

    In this work we discuss saturation performance of a fiber optic parametric amplifier. A simple numerical model is described and applied to specific cases. A system experiment using a saturated amplifier illustrates a 4 dB improvement in required signal to noise ratio for a fixed bit error ratio....

  12. Optically amplifying planar glass waveguides: Laser on a chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldberg-Kjær, Søren Andreas

    The objective of this work was to devlop optically amplifying planar wavguides, using erbium-doped germano-silicate glass films deposited by PECVD (Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition). The waveguides should exhibit enough gain to be useful as optical amplifiers in integrated planar lightw...

  13. Band-Pass Amplifier Without Discrete Reactance Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L.

    1984-01-01

    Inherent or "natural" device capacitance exploited. Band-Pass Circuit has input impedance of equivalent circuit at frequencies much greater than operational-amplifier rolloff frequency. Apparent inductance and capacitance arise from combined effects of feedback and reactive component of amplifier gain in frequency range.

  14. A high performance electrometer amplifier of hybrid design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high performance, reliable, electrometer amplifier of hybrid design for low current measurements in mass spectrometers has been developed. The short term instability with a 5 x 1011 ohms input resistor is less than 1 x 10sup(-15) Amp. The drift is better than 1 mV/hour. The design steps are illustrated with a typical amplifier performance details. (auth.)

  15. Saturation and noise properties of quantum-dot optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Based on extensive numerical calculations, quantum-dot (QD) amplifiers are predicted to offer higher output power and lower noise figure compared to bulk as well as quantum well amplifiers. The underlying physical mechanisms are analyzed in detail, leading to the identification of a few key...

  16. Ultrafast Dynamics of Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2007-01-01

    We report on a series of experiments on the dynamical properties of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers. We show how the amplifier responds to one or several ultrafast (170 fs) pulses in rapid succession and our results demonstrate applicability and ultimate limitations to application of...

  17. Subjective test of class D amplifiers without output filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn T.; Fenger, Lars M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of subjective listening tests designed to determine whether the output filter on class D amplifiers used in active loudspeakers can be omitted without audible errors occurring. The frequency range of the amplifiers was limited to 0-3 kHz corresponding to a woofer...

  18. Advances in Solid Core Photonic Bandgap Fiber Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Petersen, Sidsel Rübner;

    2012-01-01

    We present recent development of photonic crystal fiber amplifiers containing photonic bandgap structures for enhanced spectral and modal filtering functionality.......We present recent development of photonic crystal fiber amplifiers containing photonic bandgap structures for enhanced spectral and modal filtering functionality....

  19. Switching-mode Audio Power Amplifiers with Direct Energy Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljusev, Petar; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new class of switching-mode audio power amplifiers, which are capable of direct energy conversion from the AC mains to the audio output. They represent an ultimate integration of a switching-mode power supply and a Class D audio power amplifier, where the intermediate DC bus...... component count, volume and cost....

  20. Models of reduced-noise, probabilistic linear amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Joshua; Walk, Nathan; Lund, A. P.; Ralph, T. C.; Caves, Carlton M.

    2016-05-01

    We construct an amplifier that interpolates between a nondeterministic, immaculate linear amplifier and a deterministic, ideal linear amplifier and beyond to nonideal linear amplifiers. The construction involves cascading an immaculate linear amplifier that has amplitude gain g1 with a (possibly) nonideal linear amplifier that has gain g2. With respect to normally ordered moments, the device has output noise μ2(G2-1 ) where G =g1g2 is the overall amplitude gain and μ2 is a noise parameter. When μ2≥1 , our devices realize ideal (μ2=1 ) and nonideal (μ2>1 ) linear amplifiers. When 0 ≤μ2devices work effectively only over a restricted region of phase space and with some subunity success probability p✓. We investigate the performance of our μ2 amplifiers in terms of a gain-corrected probability-fidelity product and the ratio of input to output signal-to-noise ratios corrected for success probability.

  1. Ferroelectric Field-Effect Transistor Differential Amplifier Circuit Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2008-01-01

    There has been considerable research investigating the Ferroelectric Field-Effect Transistor (FeFET) in memory circuits. However, very little research has been performed in applying the FeFET to analog circuits. This paper investigates the use of FeFETs in a common analog circuit, the differential amplifier. The two input Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) transistors in a general MOS differential amplifier circuit are replaced with FeFETs. Resistors are used in place of the other three MOS transistors. The FeFET model used in the analysis has been previously reported and was based on experimental device data. Because of the FeFET hysteresis, the FeFET differential amplifier has four different operating modes depending on whether the FeFETs are positively or negatively polarized. The FeFET differential amplifier operation in the different modes was analyzed by calculating the amplifier voltage transfer and gain characteristics shown in figures 2 through 5. Comparisons were made between the FeFET differential amplifier and the standard MOS differential amplifier. Possible applications and benefits of the FeFET differential amplifier are discussed.

  2. A NIM module for efficient amplifier pile-up rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A NIM standard module containing four individual circuits for detecting an amplifier pile-up condition is described. Each circuit can be adjusted to match a wide range of amplifier shaping time-constants. Output with a variable delay are provided for signaling a pile-up reject to the data acquisition system

  3. Frequency-Offset Cartesian Feedback Based on Polyphase Difference Amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Zanchi, Marta G.; Pauly, John M.; Scott, Greig C

    2010-01-01

    A modified Cartesian feedback method called “frequency-offset Cartesian feedback” and based on polyphase difference amplifiers is described that significantly reduces the problems associated with quadrature errors and DC-offsets in classic Cartesian feedback power amplifier control systems.

  4. CARM and harmonic gyro-amplifier experiments at 17 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyclotron resonance maser amplifiers are possible sources for applications such as electron cyclotron resonance heating of fusion plasmas and driving high-gradient rf linear accelerators. For accelerator drivers, amplifiers or phase locked-oscillators are required. A 17 GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier experiment and a 17 GHz third harmonic gyro-amplifier experiment are presently underway at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Using the SRL/MIT SNOMAD II introduction accelerator to provide a 380 kV, 180 A, 30 ns flat top electron beam, the gyro-amplifier experiment has produced 5 MW of rf power with over 50 dB of gain at 17 GHz. The gyro-amplifier operates in the TE31 mode using a third harmonic interaction. Because of its high power output, the gyro-amplifier will be used as the rf source for a photocathode rf electron gun experiment also taking place at MIT. Preliminary gyro-amplifier results are presented, including measurement of rf power, gain versus interaction length, and the far-field pattern. A CARM experiment designed to operate in the TE11 mode is also discussed

  5. Lineage and the Rights of Cloned Child in the Islamic Jurisprudence

    OpenAIRE

    Moeinifar, Mohaddeseh; Ardebeli, Faezeh Azimzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Lineage in the Islamic law is one of the most basic human rights each individual inherits from his family. When modern assisted reproductive technologies appeared in recent decades, the issue of lineage and the child's rights did not encounter serious challenges. But with the advent of these technologies, the issue of the child's lineage resulting from new technologies has become the center of attention. These technologies have a large share in the field of medicine. A new technique known as ...

  6. Selective Lineage Specification by Mab-19 during Caenorhabditis Elegans Male Peripheral Sense Organ Development

    OpenAIRE

    Sutherlin, M. E.; Emmons, S W

    1994-01-01

    The action of the gene mab-19 is required for specification of a subset of Caenorhabditis elegans male peripheral sense organ (ray) lineages. Two mab-19 alleles, isolated in screens for ray developmental mutations, resulted in males that lacked the three most posterior rays. Cell lineage alterations of male-specific divisions of the most posterior lateral hypodermal (seam) blast cell, T, resulted in the ray loss phenotype in mab-19 mutant animals. Postembryonic seam lineage defects were limit...

  7. Acute myelogenous leukemia switch lineage upon relapse to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Arreguin-Gonzalez, Farina; Rodriguez-Osorio, Carlos A; Sadowinski, Stanislaw; Pelayo, Rosana; Medina-Sanson, Aurora

    2009-01-01

    Acute leukemia, the most common form of cancer in children, accounts for approximately 30% of all childhood malignancies, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia being five times more frequent than acute myeloid leukemia. Lineage switch is the term that has been used to describe the phenomenon of acute leukemias that meet the standard French-American-British system criteria for a particular lineage (either lymphoid or myeloid) upon initial diagnosis, but meet the criteria for the opposite lineage a...

  8. Creation of Primary Cell Lines from Lineage-Labeled Mouse Models of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Frequently, it is necessary to isolate pure populations of cancer cells for downstream assays, such as transcriptional analysis, signaling studies, and the creation of noncontaminated primary cell lines. Genetic lineage labeling with fluorescent reporter alleles allows for the identification of epithelial-derived cells within tumors. This protocol describes a method to isolate lineage-labeled pancreatic epithelial cells for ex vivo analysis, but it can be adapted for any type of lineage-labeled tumor. PMID:25934932

  9. Creation of Primary Cell Lines from Lineage-Labeled Mouse Models of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rhim, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Frequently, it is necessary to isolate pure populations of cancer cells for downstream assays, such as transcriptional analysis, signaling studies, and the creation of noncontaminated primary cell lines. Genetic lineage labeling with fluorescent reporter alleles allows for the identification of epithelial-derived cells within tumors. This protocol describes a method to isolate lineage-labeled pancreatic epithelial cells for ex vivo analysis, but it can be adapted for any type of lineage-label...

  10. Multiple lineage specific expansions within the guanylyl cyclase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Halloran Damien M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guanylyl cyclases (GCs are responsible for the production of the secondary messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate, which plays important roles in a variety of physiological responses such as vision, olfaction, muscle contraction, homeostatic regulation, cardiovascular and nervous function. There are two types of GCs in animals, soluble (sGCs which are found ubiquitously in cell cytoplasm, and receptor (rGC forms which span cell membranes. The complete genomes of several vertebrate and invertebrate species are now available. These data provide a platform to investigate the evolution of GCs across a diverse range of animal phyla. Results In this analysis we located GC genes from a broad spectrum of vertebrate and invertebrate animals and reconstructed molecular phylogenies for both sGC and rGC proteins. The most notable features of the resulting phylogenies are the number of lineage specific rGC and sGC expansions that have occurred during metazoan evolution. Among these expansions is a large nematode specific rGC clade comprising 21 genes in C. elegans alone; a vertebrate specific expansion in the natriuretic receptors GC-A and GC-B; a vertebrate specific expansion in the guanylyl GC-C receptors, an echinoderm specific expansion in the sperm rGC genes and a nematode specific sGC clade. Our phylogenetic reconstruction also shows the existence of a basal group of nitric oxide (NO insensitive insect and nematode sGCs which are regulated by O2. This suggests that the primordial eukaryotes probably utilized sGC as an O2 sensor, with the ligand specificity of sGC later switching to NO which provides a very effective local cell-to-cell signalling system. Phylogenetic analysis of the sGC and bacterial heme nitric oxide/oxygen binding protein domain supports the hypothesis that this domain originated from a cyanobacterial source. Conclusion The most salient feature of our phylogenies is the number of lineage specific expansions

  11. Experimental demonstration of high power millimeter wave gyro-amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, M.; Garven, M.; Calame, J. P.; Choi, J. J.; Danly, B. G.; Levush, B.; Nguyen, K.; Pershing, D. E.

    1999-05-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory is currently investigating gyro-amplifiers as high power, broadband sources for millimeter wave radars. A three-cavity Ka-band gyroklystron achieved 225 kW peak output power with 0.82% bandwidth. At W-band, several multi-cavity gyro-amplifiers have been experimentally demonstrated. A four-cavity gyroklystron amplifier has achieved 84 kW peak output power at 34% efficiency with 370 MHz bandwidth. A five-cavity gyroklystron demonstrated 72 kW peak output power with 410 MHz bandwidth and 50 dB saturated gain. For applications requiring greater bandwidth, gyrotwystron amplifiers are also under study. A four section W-band gyrotwystron demonstrated 50 kW peak output power at 925 MHz bandwidth. The results of recent Ka-band and W-band gyro-amplifier experiments and comparisons of measured data with predictions of theory are presented.

  12. A 12 GHz solid state power amplifier, phase 1B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestwick, P. R.

    1986-05-01

    Attempts to develop a balanced amplifier developing 4 W power output at 12.6 GHz, with a gain of 3.5 dB are summarized. Calculation of the device large-signal conjugate match points, measurement of the points, design and tuning of single-ended amplifier, modules, and a bias insertion network are described. A Lange coupler and a termination for it are presented. The performance of the balanced amplifier, and that of a competing Fujitsu amplifier, are analyzed. The differences in device structure between the PRCL 4820 device and the Fujitsu device are assessed. The amplifier developed gives (at 1 dB gain compression) a gain of 2.4 dB and a power output of 3.2 dB. Difficulties stem from the use of the double-cell 4820 device, and of the Lange type quadrature couplers.

  13. Improving Students' Understanding of Lock-In Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    DeVore, Seth; Levy, Jeremy; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    The lock-in amplifier is a versatile instrument frequently used in physics research. However, many students struggle with the basic operating principles of a lock-in amplifier which can lead to a variety of difficulties. To improve students' understanding, we have been developing and evaluating a research-based tutorial which makes use of a computer simulation of a lock-in amplifier. The tutorial allows students to realize their conceptual difficulties by comparing their predictions about how a lock-in amplifier will behave with the outcome of simulated experiments. After being confronted with discrepancies between their predictions and the lock-in amplifier results, the tutorial targets the common difficulties that students have and leads them to develop a deeper understanding of the principles of lock-in amplification.

  14. Coupled Lines Filters for Broadband Impedance Matching of Microwave Amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Lahsaini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a broadband matching technique for the design of low noise amplifiers. This technique is based on the use of coupled lines filters and quarter wave transformers for the adaptation and stabilization of these amplifiers, presenting the theory and the design process of these circuits. The type of transistors used for modeling this amplifier is the HEMT of Alpha Industries®. The results we found show that this amplifier is unconditionally stable with a satisfactory gain of about 20 dB and good impedance matching across the band of interest [10-12] GHz. The amplifier modeled in this work can be integrated in satellite receiving systems and radar systems.

  15. Three reciprocally monophyletic mtDNA lineages elucidate the taxonomic status of Grant's gazelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Eline Deidre; Arctander, Peter; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2008-01-01

    net nucleotide distances of 8-12%. The three lineages-notata, granti and petersii-grouped populations according to their geographic origin, encompassing populations in the north, southwest, and east, respectively. The mtDNA lineages reflected distinct evolutionary trajectories, and the data are...... discussed in reference to the four currently recognised subspecies. We suggest Grant's gazelles be raised to the superspecies Nanger (granti) comprising three taxonomic units corresponding to the three mtDNA lineages. There was no evidence of gene flow between the notata and granti lineages, despite their...

  16. Cross-protective immune responses between genotypically distinct lineages of infectious laryngotracheitis viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Won; Markham, Philip F; Coppo, Mauricio J C; Legione, Alistair R; Shil, Niraj K; Quinteros, José A; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Browning, Glenn F; Hartley, Carol A; Devlin, Joanne M

    2014-03-01

    Recent phylogenetic studies have identified different genotypic lineages of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), and these lineages can recombine in the field. The emergence of virulent recombinant field strains of ILTV by natural recombination between commercial vaccines belonging to different genotypic lineages has been reported recently. Despite the use of attenuated ILTV vaccines, these recombinant viruses were able to spread and cause disease in commercial poultry flocks, raising the question of whether the different lineages of ILTV can induce cross-protective immune responses. This study examined the capacity of the Australian-origin A20 ILTV vaccine to protect against challenge with the class 8 ILTV recombinant virus, the genome of which is predominantly derived from a heterologous genotypic lineage. Following challenge, birds vaccinated via eyedrop were protected from clinical signs of disease and pathological changes in the tracheal mucosa, although they were not completely protected from viral infection or replication. In contrast, the challenge virus induced severe clinical signs and tracheal pathology in unvaccinated birds. This is the first study to examine the ability of a vaccine from the Australian lineage to protect against challenge with a virus from a heterologous lineage. These results suggest that the two distinct genotypic lineages of ILTV can both induce cross-protection, indicating that current commercial vaccines are still likely to assist in control of ILTV in the poultry industry, in spite of the emergence of novel recombinants derived from different genotypic lineages. PMID:24758128

  17. Implementation of envelope tracking for RF solid state amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larter, Thomas Leigh

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is currently in its development stages at Michigan State University. The facility uses a large linear accelerator system to accelerate ionized particles which are then collided with other particles in the hopes of finding rare isotopes of elements. This accelerating action depends on several systems to function, with one of the major systems being superconducting cavity structures. These cavities are driven by high-power RF amplifiers which account for a large portion of the accelerator's power consumption. It is important to maximize the efficiency of these amplifiers in order to keep energy costs for the facility low. One of the ways to increase efficiency is to choose an amplifier topology that is highly efficient. A study was done for FRIB testing the prospect of using amplifiers with the envelope tracking (ET) topology. An amplifier's efficiency relies on its output power and the power supplied to it, which are in turn directly related to the output signal voltage and supply rail voltage. In an ET RF amplifier, the supply voltage is made to closely follow the envelope of the output signal voltage. This tracking action allows the RF amplifier to operate with much improved efficiency at low power levels and nearly constant efficiency at high power levels. The ET tests performed for FRIB attempted to verify the validity of ET efficiency gains for RF amplifiers. These tests included the characterization of an RF amplifier, development and verification of an ET control algorithm, and implementation of an ET test bench using FRIB equipment. These tests should attest to the purported increase in efficiency possible with ET and prove that the power consumption budget for the FRIB will benefit from the use of such amplifiers.

  18. Leveraging Data Lineage to Infer Logical Relationships between Astronomical Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Buddelmeijer, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    A novel method to infer logical relationships between sets is presented. These sets can be any collection of elements, for example astronomical catalogs of celestial objects. The method does not require the contents of the sets to be known explicitly. It combines incomplete knowledge about the relationships between sets to infer a priori unknown relationships. Relationships between sets are represented by sets of Boolean hypercubes. This leads to deductive reasoning by application of logical operators to these sets of hypercubes. A pseudocode for an efficient implementation is described. The method is used in the Astro-WISE information system to infer relationships between catalogs of astronomical objects. These catalogs can be very large and, more importantly, their contents do not have to be available at all times. Science products are stored in Astro-WISE with references to other science products from which they are derived, or their dependencies. This creates full data lineage that links every science pro...

  19. Lineage relationship of effector and memory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restifo, Nicholas P.; Gattinoni, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is characterized by the ability to form long-lived immunological memory. Upon re-exposure to antigen, memory T cells respond more rapidly and robustly than naïve T cells, providing better clearance of pathogens. Recent reviews have reinforced the text-book view that memory T cells arise from effector cells. Although this notion is teleologically appealing, emerging data is more consistent with a model where naïve cells directly develop into memory cells without transitioning through an effector stage. A clear understanding of the lineage relationships between memory and effector cells has profound implications for the design of vaccines and for the development of effective T cell-based therapies. PMID:24148236

  20. RBR ubiquitin ligases: Diversification and streamlining in animal lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Ignacio

    2009-07-01

    The patterns of emergence and disappearance in animal species of genes encoding RBR ubiquitin ligases are described. RBR genes can be classified into subfamilies (Parkin, Ariadne, Dorfin, ARA54, etc.) according to sequence and structural data. Here, I show that most animal-specific RBR subfamilies emerged early in animal evolution, and that ancient animals, before the cnidarian/bilaterian split, had a set of RBR genes, which was as complex as the one currently found in mammals. However, some lineages (nematodes, dipteran insects) have recently suffered multiple losses, leading to a highly simplified set of RBR genes. Genes of a particular RBR subfamily, characterized by containing a helicase domain and so far found only in plants, are present also in some animal species. The meaning of these patterns of diversification and streamlining are discussed at the light of functional data. Extreme evolutionary conservation may be related to gene products having housekeeping functions. PMID:19526189

  1. A solid hydraulically amplified piezoelectric microvalve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a piezoelectrically driven and hydraulically amplified axial polymer microvalve. The microvalve is normally open and is assembled primarily with stereolithographically fabricated polymer components. An incompressible elastomer is used as a solid hydraulic medium to convert the small axial displacement of a piezoelectric actuator into a large valve head stroke while maintaining a large blocking force. Also, the axial design of the microvalve enables densely packed valve arrays. One application of this microvalve is in pneumatic tactile displays, which operates against gas pressure up to approximately 90 kPa and switching speed between 1 and 200 Hz. The current valve design has a maximum static hydraulic amplification ratio of 5 at 30 V driving voltage and a maximum valve head stroke of 37 µm at 150 V. Under a 94.4 kPa differential pressure, the flow rate of the valve and the closing voltage measure are 785 mL min−1 and 150 V, respectively. The function of the microvalve as an on–off switch for a pneumatic microbubble tactile actuator is demonstrated

  2. Efficient and Compact Optical Amplifier Using EYDF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Wadi Harun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An efficient Erbium/Ytterbium doped fiber amplifier (EYDFA is demonstrated using a 1058nm pumping wavelength, where the amplification is assisted by energy transfer between Yb and Er ions. The energy transfer increases the limit of erbium doping concentration that is imposed by concentration quenching in Erbium-doped fiber (EDF. Therefore, the gain and noise figure are severely degraded with 1480 nm pumping, where the energy transfer cannot be achieved. The use of optical isolator improves the small signal gain and noise figure by about 4.8 dB and 1.6 dB, respectively. By employing a double-pass configuration, a higher gain can be obtained with an expense of a noise figure penalty. The gain improvement of 17.0 dB is obtained at 20 mW and -50 dBm of pump and input signal powers. This shows that the double-pass configuration is an important aspect to consider when designing an efficient EYDFA.

  3. Single Ion Quantum Lock-In Amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Kotler, Shlomi; Glickman, Yinnon; Keselman, Anna; Ozeri, Roee

    2011-01-01

    We report on the implementation of a quantum analog to the classical lock-in amplifier. All the lock-in operations: modulation, detection and mixing, are performed via the application of non-commuting quantum operators on the electronic spin state of a single trapped Sr+ ion. We significantly increase its sensitivity to external fields while extending phase coherence by three orders of magnitude, to more than one second. With this technique we measure magnetic fields with sensitivity of 25 pT/sqrt(Hz) and light shifts with an uncertainty below 140 mHz after 1320 seconds of averaging. These sensitivities are limited by quantum projection noise and, to our knowledge, are more than two orders of magnitude better than with other single-spin probe technologies. In fact, our reported sensitivity is sufficient for the measurement of parity non-conservation, as well as the detection of the magnetic field of a single electronic-spin one micrometer from an ion-detector with nanometer resolution. As a first application ...

  4. Amplification uncertainty relation for probabilistic amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiki, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, quantum amplification limit refers to the property of inevitable noise addition on canonical variables when the field amplitude of an unknown state is linearly transformed through a quantum channel. Recent theoretical studies have determined amplification limits for cases of probabilistic quantum channels or general quantum operations by specifying a set of input states or a state ensemble. However, it remains open how much excess noise on canonical variables is unavoidable and whether there exists a fundamental trade-off relation between the canonical pair in a general amplification process. In this paper we present an uncertainty-product form of amplification limits for general quantum operations by assuming an input ensemble of Gaussian-distributed coherent states. It can be derived as a straightforward consequence of canonical uncertainty relations and retrieves basic properties of the traditional amplification limit. In addition, our amplification limit turns out to give a physical limitation on probabilistic reduction of an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen uncertainty. In this regard, we find a condition that probabilistic amplifiers can be regarded as local filtering operations to distill entanglement. This condition establishes a clear benchmark to verify an advantage of non-Gaussian operations beyond Gaussian operations with a feasible input set of coherent states and standard homodyne measurements.

  5. Status Report on the Energy Amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, Carlo

    1994-01-01

    0ne year after its first presentation,the Energy Amplifier (EA) Project holds its promises for a environmentally acceptable form of energy extraction from nuclei, namely to eliminate or at least greatly reduce(i) the environmental impact of the long-lived highly radioactive waste;(ii) the possibility of diversions toward military applications;(iii) the risks of an accidental divergence related to the critical operation of the chain reaction and (iv) make a more efficient use of a fuel which is less radio-toxic to extract and more abundant on Earth than Uranium. In these respects the EA (or equivalent scenarios from Los Alamos and elsewhere) is comparable in performance to Thermonuclear Fusion. Bot h approches offer pratically unl;imited fuel resources: the energetic content of Lithium on the Earth's crust needed by Fusion is estimated to be seven times the one of Thorium and they are both adequate for millions of years of very intensived utilisation.However the EA can be built economically,in a variety of siz...

  6. Novel photoacid generators for chemically amplified resists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Hitoshi; Asakura, Toshikage; Matsumoto, Akira; Ohwa, Masaki

    2002-07-01

    Recently we have developed new class of non-ionic oxime sulfonate PAG. The compounds generate various kinds of sulfonic acids, such as n-propane, n-octane, camphor and p-toluene sulfonic acid under Deep-UV exposure and are applicable for chemically amplified (CA) photoresists. The application-relevant properties of the compounds such as solubility in propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (PGMEA), ethyl lactate, ethyl 3-ethoxypropionate, and 2-heptanone, UV absorption, thermal stability with or without poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS), storage stability in a neat form or in PGMEA solution with or without additives, sensitivity in a model resist formulation, dissolution inhibition efficiency during the development process and volatility were evaluated. The compounds exhibit good solubility in PGMEA, high sensitivity in positive tone CA resist formulations, with Deep-UV exposure, and no significant volatility. Especially it was found that the compounds are superior in terms of thermal stability and storage stability, i.e., high thermal stability up to 188 degree(s)C in a phenolic matrix, and no change during storage in PGMEA at 60 degree(s)C for 5 months.

  7. Gold Nanoparticle Labels Amplify Ellipsometric Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2008-01-01

    The ellipsometric method reported in the immediately preceding article was developed in conjunction with a method of using gold nanoparticles as labels on biomolecules that one seeks to detect. The purpose of the labeling is to exploit the optical properties of the gold nanoparticles in order to amplify the measurable ellipsometric effects and thereby to enable ultrasensitive detection of the labeled biomolecules without need to develop more-complex ellipsometric instrumentation. The colorimetric, polarization, light-scattering, and other optical properties of nanoparticles depend on their sizes and shapes. In the present method, these size-and-shape-dependent properties are used to magnify the polarization of scattered light and the diattenuation and retardance of signals derived from ellipsometry. The size-and-shape-dependent optical properties of the nanoparticles make it possible to interrogate the nanoparticles by use of light of various wavelengths, as appropriate, to optimally detect particles of a specific type at high sensitivity. Hence, by incorporating gold nanoparticles bound to biomolecules as primary or secondary labels, the performance of ellipsometry as a means of detecting the biomolecules can be improved. The use of gold nanoparticles as labels in ellipsometry has been found to afford sensitivity that equals or exceeds the sensitivity achieved by use of fluorescence-based methods. Potential applications for ellipsometric detection of gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules include monitoring molecules of interest in biological samples, in-vitro diagnostics, process monitoring, general environmental monitoring, and detection of biohazards.

  8. Fishing amplifies forage fish population collapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essington, Timothy E.; Moriarty, Pamela E.; Froehlich, Halley E.; Hodgson, Emma E.; Koehn, Laura E.; Oken, Kiva L.; Siple, Margaret C.; Stawitz, Christine C.

    2015-01-01

    Forage fish support the largest fisheries in the world but also play key roles in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to upper trophic-level predators, such as large fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Fishing can, thereby, have far reaching consequences on marine food webs unless safeguards are in place to avoid depleting forage fish to dangerously low levels, where dependent predators are most vulnerable. However, disentangling the contributions of fishing vs. natural processes on population dynamics has been difficult because of the sensitivity of these stocks to environmental conditions. Here, we overcome this difficulty by collating population time series for forage fish populations that account for nearly two-thirds of global catch of forage fish to identify the fingerprint of fisheries on their population dynamics. Forage fish population collapses shared a set of common and unique characteristics: high fishing pressure for several years before collapse, a sharp drop in natural population productivity, and a lagged response to reduce fishing pressure. Lagged response to natural productivity declines can sharply amplify the magnitude of naturally occurring population fluctuations. Finally, we show that the magnitude and frequency of collapses are greater than expected from natural productivity characteristics and therefore, likely attributed to fishing. The durations of collapses, however, were not different from those expected based on natural productivity shifts. A risk-based management scheme that reduces fishing when populations become scarce would protect forage fish and their predators from collapse with little effect on long-term average catches. PMID:25848018

  9. A highly linear power amplifier for WLAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Jin; Jia, Shi; Baoli, Ai; Xuguang, Zhang

    2016-02-01

    A three-stage power amplifier (PA) for WLAN application in 2.4-2.5 GHz is presented. The proposed PA employs an adaptive bias circuit to adjust the operating point of the PA to improve the linearity of the PA. Two methods to short the 2nd harmonic circuit are compared in the area of efficiency and gain of the PA. The PA is taped out in the process of 2 μm InGaP/GaAs HBT and is tested by the evaluation board. The measured results show that 31.5 dB power gain and 29.3 dBm P1dB with an associated 40.4% power added efficiency (PAE) under the single tone stimulus. Up to 26.5 dBm output power can be achieved with an error vector magnitude (EVM) of lower than 3% under the 64QAM/OFDM WLAN stimulus. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61201244) and the Natural Science Fund of SUES (No. E1-0501-14-0168).

  10. Evolution of the MAGUK protein gene family in premetazoan lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Trillo Iñaki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-to-cell communication is a key process in multicellular organisms. In multicellular animals, scaffolding proteins belonging to the family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUK are involved in the regulation and formation of cell junctions. These MAGUK proteins were believed to be exclusive to Metazoa. However, a MAGUK gene was recently identified in an EST survey of Capsaspora owczarzaki, an unicellular organism that branches off near the metazoan clade. To further investigate the evolutionary history of MAGUK, we have undertook a broader search for this gene family using available genomic sequences of different opisthokont taxa. Results Our survey and phylogenetic analyses show that MAGUK proteins are present not only in Metazoa, but also in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis and in the protist Capsaspora owczarzaki. However, MAGUKs are absent from fungi, amoebozoans or any other eukaryote. The repertoire of MAGUKs in Placozoa and eumetazoan taxa (Cnidaria + Bilateria is quite similar, except for one class that is missing in Trichoplax, while Porifera have a simpler MAGUK repertoire. However, Vertebrata have undergone several independent duplications and exhibit two exclusive MAGUK classes. Three different MAGUK types are found in both M. brevicollis and C. owczarzaki: DLG, MPP and MAGI. Furthermore, M. brevicollis has suffered a lineage-specific diversification. Conclusions The diversification of the MAGUK protein gene family occurred, most probably, prior to the divergence between Metazoa+choanoflagellates and the Capsaspora+Ministeria clade. A MAGI-like, a DLG-like, and a MPP-like ancestral genes were already present in the unicellular ancestor of Metazoa, and new gene members have been incorporated through metazoan evolution within two major periods, one before the sponge-eumetazoan split and another within the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, choanoflagellates have suffered an independent MAGUK

  11. Histone variant innovation in a rapidly evolving chordate lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Pascal WTC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone variants alter the composition of nucleosomes and play crucial roles in transcription, chromosome segregation, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Modification of metazoan histone variant lineages occurs on a background of genome architecture that shows global similarities from sponges to vertebrates, but the urochordate, Oikopleura dioica, a member of the sister group to vertebrates, exhibits profound modification of this ancestral architecture. Results We show that a histone complement of 47 gene loci encodes 31 histone variants, grouped in distinct sets of developmental expression profiles throughout the life cycle. A particularly diverse array of 15 male-specific histone variants was uncovered, including a testes-specific H4t, the first metazoan H4 sequence variant reported. Universal histone variants H3.3, CenH3, and H2A.Z are present but O. dioica lacks homologs of macroH2A and H2AX. The genome encodes many H2A and H2B variants and the repertoire of H2A.Z isoforms is expanded through alternative splicing, incrementally regulating the number of acetylatable lysine residues in the functionally important N-terminal "charge patch". Mass spectrometry identified 40 acetylation, methylation and ubiquitylation posttranslational modifications (PTMs and showed that hallmark PTMs of "active" and "repressive" chromatin were present in O. dioica. No obvious reduction in silent heterochromatic marks was observed despite high gene density in this extraordinarily compacted chordate genome. Conclusions These results show that histone gene complements and their organization differ considerably even over modest phylogenetic distances. Substantial innovation among all core and linker histone variants has evolved in concert with adaptation of specific life history traits in this rapidly evolving chordate lineage.

  12. Evidence for a lineage of virulent bacteriophages that target Campylobacter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummings Nicola

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of the dynamics of genome stability versus gene flux within bacteriophage lineages is limited. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the use of bacteriophages as 'therapeutic' agents; a prerequisite for their use in such therapies is a thorough understanding of their genetic complement, genome stability and their ecology to avoid the dissemination or mobilisation of phage or bacterial virulence and toxin genes. Campylobacter, a food-borne pathogen, is one of the organisms for which the use of bacteriophage is being considered to reduce human exposure to this organism. Results Sequencing and genome analysis was performed for two Campylobacter bacteriophages. The genomes were extremely similar at the nucleotide level (≥ 96% with most differences accounted for by novel insertion sequences, DNA methylases and an approximately 10 kb contiguous region of metabolic genes that were dissimilar at the sequence level but similar in gene function between the two phages. Both bacteriophages contained a large number of radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM genes, presumably involved in boosting host metabolism during infection, as well as evidence that many genes had been acquired from a wide range of bacterial species. Further bacteriophages, from the UK Campylobacter typing set, were screened for the presence of bacteriophage structural genes, DNA methylases, mobile genetic elements and regulatory genes identified from the genome sequences. The results indicate that many of these bacteriophages are related, with 10 out of 15 showing some relationship to the sequenced genomes. Conclusions Two large virulent Campylobacter bacteriophages were found to show very high levels of sequence conservation despite separation in time and place of isolation. The bacteriophages show adaptations to their host and possess genes that may enhance Campylobacter metabolism, potentially advantaging both the bacteriophage and its host

  13. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  14. An energy-efficient micropower neural recording amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanapanitch, W; Fee, M; Sarpeshkar, R

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes an ultralow-power neural recording amplifier. The amplifier appears to be the lowest power and most energy-efficient neural recording amplifier reported to date. We describe low-noise design techniques that help the neural amplifier achieve input-referred noise that is near the theoretical limit of any amplifier using a differential pair as an input stage. Since neural amplifiers must include differential input pairs in practice to allow robust rejection of common-mode and power supply noise, our design appears to be near the optimum allowed by theory. The bandwidth of the amplifier can be adjusted for recording either neural spikes or local field potentials (LFPs). When configured for recording neural spikes, the amplifier yielded a midband gain of 40.8 dB and a -3-dB bandwidth from 45 Hz to 5.32 kHz; the amplifier's input-referred noise was measured to be 3.06 muVrms while consuming 7.56 muW of power from a 2.8-V supply corresponding to a noise efficiency factor (NEF) of 2.67 with the theoretical limit being 2.02. When configured for recording LFPs, the amplifier achieved a midband gain of 40.9 dB and a -3-dB bandwidth from 392 mHz to 295 Hz; the input-referred noise was 1.66 muVrms while consuming 2.08 muW from a 2.8-V supply corresponding to an NEF of 3.21. The amplifier was fabricated in AMI's 0.5-mum CMOS process and occupies 0.16 mm(2) of chip area. We obtained successful recordings of action potentials from the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) of an anesthesized zebra finch brain with the amplifier. Our experimental measurements of the amplifier's performance including its noise were in good accord with theory and circuit simulations. PMID:23851668

  15. A modular positive feedback-based gene amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalerao Kaustubh D

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Positive feedback is a common mechanism used in the regulation of many gene circuits as it can amplify the response to inducers and also generate binary outputs and hysteresis. In the context of electrical circuit design, positive feedback is often considered in the design of amplifiers. Similar approaches, therefore, may be used for the design of amplifiers in synthetic gene circuits with applications, for example, in cell-based sensors. Results We developed a modular positive feedback circuit that can function as a genetic signal amplifier, heightening the sensitivity to inducer signals as well as increasing maximum expression levels without the need for an external cofactor. The design utilizes a constitutively active, autoinducer-independent variant of the quorum-sensing regulator LuxR. We experimentally tested the ability of the positive feedback module to separately amplify the output of a one-component tetracycline sensor and a two-component aspartate sensor. In each case, the positive feedback module amplified the response to the respective inducers, both with regards to the dynamic range and sensitivity. Conclusions The advantage of our design is that the actual feedback mechanism depends only on a single gene and does not require any other modulation. Furthermore, this circuit can amplify any transcriptional signal, not just one encoded within the circuit or tuned by an external inducer. As our design is modular, it can potentially be used as a component in the design of more complex synthetic gene circuits.

  16. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs

  17. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In Heon; Kim, Khong Hon; Stock, Larry V.

    1988-01-01

    A XeCl laser pumped iodine laser oscillator was developed which will be incorporated into the Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) system. The developed XeCl laser produces output energy of about 60 mJ per pulse. The pulse duration was about 10 nsec. The kinetic model for the solar-pumped laser was refined and the algorithm for the calculation of a set of rate equations was improved to increase the accuracy and the efficiency of the calculation. The improved algorithm was applied to explain the existing experimental data taken from a flashlamp pumped iodine laser for three kinds of lasants, i-C3F7I, n-C4F9I, and t-C4F9I. Various solid laser materials were evaluated for solar-pumping. The materials studied were Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, and Cr:Nd:GSGG crystals. The slope efficiency of 0.17 percent was measured for the Nd:YLF near the threshold pump intensity which was 211 solar constants (29W/sq cm). The threshold pump intensity of the Nd:YAG was measured to be 236 solar constants (32W/sq cm) and the near-threshold slope efficiency was 0.12 percent. True CW laser operation of Cr:Nd:GSGG was possible only at pump intensities less than or equal to 1,500 solar constants (203 W/sq cm). This fact was attributed to the high thermal focusing effect of the Cr:Nd:GSGG rod.

  18. Metagenomic and whole-genome analysis reveals new lineages of gokushoviruses and biogeographic separation in the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Myriam Labonté

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Much remains to be learned about single-stranded (ss DNA viruses in natural systems, and the evolutionary relationships among them. One of the eight recognized families of ssDNA viruses is the Microviridae, a group of viruses infecting bacteria. In this study we used metagenomic analysis, genome assembly and amplicon sequencing of purified ssDNA to show that bacteriophages belonging to the subfamily Gokushovirinae within the Microviridae are genetically diverse and widespread members of marine microbial communities. Metagenomic analysis of coastal samples from the Gulf of Mexico and British Columbia, Canada, revealed numerous sequences belonging to gokushoviruses and allowed the assembly of five putative genomes with an organization similar to chlamydiamicroviruses. Fragment recruitment to these genomes from different metagenomic data sets is consistent with gokushovirus genotypes being restricted to specific oceanic regions. Conservation among the assembled genomes allowed the design of degenerate primers that target an 800 bp fragment from the gene encoding the major capsid protein. Sequences could be amplified from coastal temperate and subtropical waters, but not from samples collected from the Arctic Ocean, or freshwater lakes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most sequences were distantly related to those from cultured representatives. Moreover, the sequences fell into at least seven distinct evolutionary groups, most of which were represented by one of the assembled metagenomes. Our results greatly expand the known sequence space for gokushoviruses, and reveal biogeographic separation and new evolutionary lineages of gokushoviruses in the oceans.

  19. Metabolic traits of an uncultured archaeal lineage--MSBL1--from brine pools of the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwirichia, Romano; Alam, Intikhab; Rashid, Mamoon; Vinu, Manikandan; Ba-Alawi, Wail; Anthony Kamau, Allan; Kamanda Ngugi, David; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Bajic, Vladimir; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The candidate Division MSBL1 (Mediterranean Sea Brine Lakes 1) comprises a monophyletic group of uncultured archaea found in different hypersaline environments. Previous studies propose methanogenesis as the main metabolism. Here, we describe a metabolic reconstruction of MSBL1 based on 32 single-cell amplified genomes from Brine Pools of the Red Sea (Atlantis II, Discovery, Nereus, Erba and Kebrit). Phylogeny based on rRNA genes as well as conserved single copy genes delineates the group as a putative novel lineage of archaea. Our analysis shows that MSBL1 may ferment glucose via the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. However, in the absence of organic carbon, carbon dioxide may be fixed via the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, Wood-Ljungdahl pathway or reductive TCA cycle. Therefore, based on the occurrence of genes for glycolysis, absence of the core genes found in genomes of all sequenced methanogens and the phylogenetic position, we hypothesize that the MSBL1 are not methanogens, but probably sugar-fermenting organisms capable of autotrophic growth. Such a mixotrophic lifestyle would confer survival advantage (or possibly provide a unique narrow niche) when glucose and other fermentable sugars are not available. PMID:26758088

  20. Limited inter- and intra-patient sequence diversity of the genetic lineage A human metapneumovirus fusion gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde Nordmann; Madsen, Chris D; Pedersen, Anders;

    2005-01-01

    . In this study, the inter- and intra-patient genetic diversity of the lineage A hMPV F gene was investigated. Ten isolates were collected from 10 hMPV infected children. Viral RNA was isolated and amplified, and approximately 10 clones from each isolate were sequenced. Altogether 108 clones were successfully...... sequenced. The average interpatient sequence diversity was 1.68% and 1.64% at nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. The samples were divisible into two groups on the basis of intrapatient sequence diversity. In group 1 (4 children) the intra-patient sequence diversity was low (nt: 0.26-0.39%, aa......: 0.51-0.94%) whereas group 2 (6 children) had a higher intra-patient sequence diversity (nt: 0.85-1.98%, aa: 1.08-2.22%). Phylogenetic analyses showed that the group 1 children harboured sublineage Al only, but interestingly group 2 children harboured both sublineages Al and A2, indicating they had...

  1. Gene expression patterns in primary neuronal clusters of the Drosophila embryonic brain

    OpenAIRE

    Sprecher, Simon G.; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2007-01-01

    The brain of Drosophila is formed by approximately 100 lineages, each lineage being derived from a stem cell-like neuroblast that segregates from the procephalic neurectoderm of the early embryo. A neuroblast map has been established in great detail for the early embryo, and a suite of molecular markers has been defined for all neuroblasts included in this map (Urbach and Technau, 2003a). However, the expression of these markers was not followed into later embryonic or larval stages, mainly d...

  2. An Adaptive Amplifier System for Wireless Sensor Network Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Marqués; Eduardo Romero; Mónica Lovay; Gabriela Peretti

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive amplifier that is part of a sensor node in a wireless sensor network. The system presents a target gain that has to be maintained without direct human intervention despite the presence of faults. In addition, its bandwidth must be as large as possible. The system is composed of a software-based built-in self-test scheme implemented in the node that checks all the available gains in the amplifiers, a reconfigurable amplifier, and a genetic algorithm (GA) for rec...

  3. Experimental demonstration of a W-band gyroklystron amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Blank, M.; Danly, B.; Levush, B.; Latham, P; Pershing, D.

    1997-01-01

    The experimental demonstration of a four cavity W-band (93 GHz) gyroklystron amplifier is reported. The gyroklystron has produced 67 kW peak output power and 28% efficiency in the TE011 mode using a 55 kV, 4.3 A electron beam. The full width at half maximum instantaneous bandwidth is greater than 460 MHz, a significant increase over the bandwidth demonstrated in previous W-band gyroklystron amplifier experiments. The amplifier is unconditionally stable at this operating point. Experimental re...

  4. Experimental Demonstration of a W-Band Gyroklystron Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, M.; Danly, B. G.; Levush, B.; Latham, P. E.; Pershing, D. E.

    1997-12-01

    The experimental demonstration of a four cavity W-band (93 GHz) gyroklystron amplifier is reported. The gyroklystron has produced 67 kW peak output power and 28% efficiency in the TE011 mode using a 55 kV, 4.3 A electron beam. The full width at half maximum instantaneous bandwidth is greater than 460 MHz, a significant increase over the bandwidth demonstrated in previous W-band gyroklystron amplifier experiments. The amplifier is unconditionally stable at this operating point. Experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  5. Introduction to RF power amplifier design and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Eroglu, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Introduction to RF Power Amplifier Design and Simulation fills a gap in the existing literature by providing step-by-step guidance for the design of radio frequency (RF) power amplifiers, from analytical formulation to simulation, implementation, and measurement. Featuring numerous illustrations and examples of real-world engineering applications, this book:Gives an overview of intermodulation and elaborates on the difference between linear and nonlinear amplifiersDescribes the high-frequency model and transient characteristics of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistorsDetails activ

  6. Fast amplifier associated with the Saturne II detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis concerns the nuclear spectroscopy station which is beside the Saturne synchrotron in Saclay, and more particularly the design of the large bandwidth amplifier which aims at bringing the anode signal to a sufficient value to trigger an amplitude discriminator or a coincidence circuit. This amplifier must have a very short rise time in order not to introduce a hold, and its output base line must be as little sensitive as possible to the counting frequency, which implies a continuous link. The author describes in detail the rationale for the use of such an amplifier, and reports the calculated and measured assessment of its different characteristics

  7. MMIC DHBT Common-Base Amplifier for 172 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paidi, Vamsi; Griffith, Zack; Wei, Yun; Dahlstrom, Mttias; Urteaga, Miguel; Rodwell, Mark; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, King Man; Schlecht, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a single-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier in which the gain element is a double-heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) connected in common-base configuration. This amplifier, which has been demonstrated to function well at a frequency of 172 GHz, is part of a continuing effort to develop compact, efficient amplifiers for scientific instrumentation, wide-band communication systems, and radar systems that will operate at frequencies up to and beyond 180 GHz. The transistor is fabricated from a layered structure formed by molecular beam epitaxy in the InP/InGaAs material system. A highly doped InGaAs base layer and a collector layer are fabricated from the layered structure in a triple mesa process. The transistor includes two separate emitter fingers, each having dimensions of 0.8 by 12 m. The common-base configuration was chosen for its high maximum stable gain in the frequency band of interest. The input-matching network is designed for high bandwidth. The output of the transistor is matched to a load line for maximum saturated output power under large-signal conditions, rather than being matched for maximum gain under small-signal conditions. In a test at a frequency of 172 GHz, the amplifier was found to generate an output power of 7.5 mW, with approximately 5 dB of large-signal gain (see Figure 2). Moreover, the amplifier exhibited a peak small-signal gain of 7 dB at a frequency of 176 GHz. This performance of this MMIC single-stage amplifier containing only a single transistor represents a significant advance in the state of the art, in that it rivals the 170-GHz performance of a prior MMIC three-stage, four-transistor amplifier. [The prior amplifier was reported in "MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz" (NPO-30127), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 11 (November 2003), page 49.] This amplifier is the first heterojunction- bipolar-transistor (HBT) amplifier built for medium power operation in this

  8. The Dynamics of Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers – Modeling and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Nielsen, Mads Lønstrup; Berg, Tommy Winther

    2003-01-01

    The importance of semiconductor optical amplifiers is discussed. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is a semiconductor laser with anti-reflection coated facets that amplifies an injected light signal by means of stimulated emission. SOAs have a number of unique properties that open up...... significant opportunities in the area of fast, all-optical signal processing. Integrated SOA-based devices are considered suitable for future all-optical systems because of their compact size, low optical and electrical power consumption, polarization independence and high speed....

  9. FDML swept source at 1060 nm using a tapered amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Sebastian; Klein, Thomas; Wieser, Wolfgang;

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel frequency-swept light source working at 1060nm that utilizes a tapered amplifier as gain medium. These devices feature significantly higher saturation power than conventional semiconductor optical amplifiers and can thus improve the limited output power of swept sources in this...... wavelength range. We demonstrate that a tapered amplifier can be integrated into a fiber-based swept source and allows for high-speed FDML operation. The developed light source operates at a sweep rate of 116kHz with an effective average output power in excess of 30mW. With a total sweep range of 70 nm an...

  10. Recovery of solitons with nonlinear amplifying loop mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabitov, Ildar; Holm, Darryl D.; Luce, Benjamin P.; Mattheus, Arnold

    1995-12-01

    We study the use of nonlinear amplifying loop mirrors to recover soliton pulses nonadiabatically deformed by losses. We approach this problem as a mapping problem of input pulse to output pulse, for segments of fiber followed by a combination of linear and nonlinear amplification. For a wide range of amplifier spacings, we find numerically that a single optimal input pulse of soliton shape exists for each amplifier spacing, which is well recovered at output. The recovered output pulses contain only \\similar 3% continuous radiation.

  11. Class-D audio amplifiers with negative feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Stephen M.; Candy, B. H.

    2006-01-01

    There are many different designs for audio amplifiers. Class-D, or switching, amplifiers generate their output signal in the form of a high-frequency square wave of variable duty cycle (ratio of on time to off time). The square-wave nature of the output allows a particularly efficient output stage, with minimal losses. The output is ultimately filtered to remove components of the spectrum above the audio range. Mathematical models are derived here for a variety of related class-D amplifier d...

  12. 120 nm Bandwidth Erbium-doped Fiber Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜淳; 曾庆济; 肖石林

    2002-01-01

    A new dual band erbium-doped fiber amplifier configuration that provides 120 nm of optical bandwidth is simulated. This configuration employs a split-band architecture in which optical signals are splitted using a 1550/1610 nm port filter into two independent sub-bands which then pass in parallel through separate branches of the optical amplifier. Each branch may be optimized for the sub-band that traverses it. The independent sub-bands are combined and flattened before output, resulting in a 120 nm bandwidth gain-flattened optical amplifier.

  13. Efficient performance simulation of class D amplifier output stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe, Flemming; Risbo, Lars; Andreani, Pietro

    Straightforward simulation of amplifier distortion involves transient simulation of operation on a sine wave input signal, and a subsequent FFT of the output voltage. This approach is very slow on class D amplifiers, since the switching behavior forces simulation time steps that are many orders o...... magnitude smaller than the duration of one period of an audio sine wave. This work presents a method of simulating the amplifier transfer characteristic using a minimum amount of simulation time, and then deriving THD from the results....

  14. A hybrid copper/gold laser pumped dye amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, M. D.; Piper, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of a high average power copper vapour laser pumped dye amplifier which is injected with the 627.8 nm output of a gold vapour laser are reported. In these experiments both the CVL pump and GVL injection signals are obtained from a modified CVL plasma tube. Amplifier gain and efficiency as functions of both the pump and injection power, for a number of dyes and dye mixtures, were investigated. Amplifier efficiencies of 25% are reported for CVL pump powers of 4 W and GVL injection powers of only 50 mW.

  15. Influence of mode competition on beam quality of fiber amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical and experimental studies of the influence of the mode competition on the output beam quality of fiber amplifiers are presented. Rate equations and modal decomposition method are used in the theoretical model. In the experiment, the output beam-quality factor of a fiber amplifier, which is based on a Yb-doped double-clad large mode area fiber as a function of the seed beam quality and the pump power of the amplifier, is measured. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical analysis. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  16. Fiber optical parametric amplifiers in optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marhic, Michel E.; Andrekson, Peter A.; Petropoulos, Periklis;

    2015-01-01

    The prospects for using fiber optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) in optical communication systems are reviewed. Phase-insensitive amplifiers (PIAs) and phase-sensitive amplifiers (PSAs) are considered. Low-penalty amplification at/or near 1 Tb/s has been achieved, for both wavelength- and time...... excess of 14,000 Tb/s x km in realistic wavelength-division multiplexed long-haul networks. Technical challenges remaining to be addressed in order for fiber OPAs to become useful for long-haul communication networks are discussed....

  17. Design procedure for optimizing CMOS low noise operational amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhiyuan; Ye Yizheng; Ma Jianguo

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents and experimentally verifies an optimized design procedure for a CMOS low noise operational amplifier.The design procedure focuses on the noise performance,which is the key requirement for low noise operational amplifiers.Based on the noise level and other specifications such as bandwidth,signal swing,slew rate,and power consumption,the device sizes and the biasing conditions are derived.In order to verify the proposed design procedure,a three-stage operational amplifier has been designed.The device parameters obtained from the proposed design procedure closely agree with the simulated results obtained by using HSPICE.

  18. Fine dissection of human mitochondrial DNA haplogroup HV lineages reveals paleolithic signatures from European Glacial refugia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. De Fanti (Sara); C. Barbieri (Chiara); S. Sarno (Stefania); F. Sevini (Federica); D. Vianello (Dario); E. Tamm (Erika); E. Metspalu (Ene); M. van Oven (Mannis); A. Hübner (Alexander); M. Sazzini (Marco); C. Franceschi (Claudio); D. Pettener (Davide); D. Luiselli (Donata)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGenetic signatures from the Paleolithic inhabitants of Eurasia can be traced from the early divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages still present in contemporary human populations. Previous studies already suggested a pre-Neolithic diffusion of mitochondrial haplogroup HV∗(xH,V) lineages, a

  19. The Earliest Thymic T Cell Progenitors Sustain B Cell and Myeloid Lineage Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Sidinh; Luis, Tiago C.; Boukarabila, Hanane; Macaulay, Iain C.; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Bouriez-Jones, Tiphaine; Lutteropp, Michael; Woll, Petter S.; Loughran, Stephen J.; Mead, Adam J.; Hultquist, Anne; Brown, John; Mizukami, Takuo; Matsuoka, Sahoko; Ferry, Helen; Anderson, Kristina; Duarte, Sara; Atkinson, Deborah; Soneji, Shamit; Domanski, Aniela; Farley, Alison; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Carella, Cintia; Patient, Roger; de Bruijn, Marella; Enver, Tariq; Nerlov, Claus; Blackburn, Clare; Godin, Isabelle; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.

    2012-01-01

    The stepwise commitment from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow (BM) to T lymphocyte-restricted progenitors in the thymus represents a paradigm for understanding the requirement for distinct extrinsic cues during different stages of lineage restriction from multipotent to lineage restricted progenitors. However, the commitment stage at which progenitors migrate from the BM to the thymus remains unclear. Here we provide functional and molecular evidence at the single cell level that the earliest progenitors in the neonatal thymus possessed combined granulocyte-monocyte, T and B lymphocyte, but not megakaryocyte-erythroid lineage potential. These potentials were identical to those of thymus-seeding progenitors in the BM, which were closely related at the molecular level. These findings establish the distinct lineage-restriction stage at which the T lineage commitment transits from the BM to the remote thymus. PMID:22344248

  20. Foetal stem cell derivation & characterization for osteogenic lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mangala Gowri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Mesencymal stem cells (MSCs derived from foetal tissues present a multipotent progenitor cell source for application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The present study was carried out to derive foetal mesenchymal stem cells from ovine source and analyze their differentiation to osteogenic linage to serve as an animal model to predict human applications. Methods: Isolation and culture of sheep foetal bone marrow cells were done and uniform clonally derived MSC population was collected. The cells were characterized using cytochemical, immunophenotyping, biochemical and molecular analyses. The cells with defined characteristics were differentiated into osteogenic lineages and analysis for differentiated cell types was done. The cells were analyzed for cell surface marker expression and the gene expression in undifferentiated and differentiated osteoblast was checked by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT PCR analysis and confirmed by sequencing using genetic analyzer. Results: Ovine foetal samples were processed to obtain mononuclear (MNC cells which on culture showed spindle morphology, a characteristic oval body with the flattened ends. MSC population CD45 - /CD14 - was cultured by limiting dilution to arrive at uniform spindle morphology cells and colony forming units. The cells were shown to be positive for surface markers such as CD44, CD54, integrinβ1, and intracellular collagen type I/III and fibronectin. The osteogenically induced MSCs were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and mineral deposition. The undifferentiated MSCs expressed RAB3B, candidate marker for stemness in MSCs. The osteogenically induced and uninduced MSCs expressed collagen type I and MMP13 gene in osteogenic induced cells. Interpretation & conclusions: The protocol for isolation of ovine foetal bone marrow derived MSCs was simple to perform, and the cultural method of obtaining pure spindle morphology cells was established

  1. Tumor taxonomy for the developmental lineage classification of neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new 'Developmental lineage classification of neoplasms' was described in a prior publication. The classification is simple (the entire hierarchy is described with just 39 classifiers), comprehensive (providing a place for every tumor of man), and consistent with recent attempts to characterize tumors by cytogenetic and molecular features. A taxonomy is a list of the instances that populate a classification. The taxonomy of neoplasia attempts to list every known term for every known tumor of man. The taxonomy provides each concept with a unique code and groups synonymous terms under the same concept. A Perl script validated successive drafts of the taxonomy ensuring that: 1) each term occurs only once in the taxonomy; 2) each term occurs in only one tumor class; 3) each concept code occurs in one and only one hierarchical position in the classification; and 4) the file containing the classification and taxonomy is a well-formed XML (eXtensible Markup Language) document. The taxonomy currently contains 122,632 different terms encompassing 5,376 neoplasm concepts. Each concept has, on average, 23 synonyms. The taxonomy populates 'The developmental lineage classification of neoplasms,' and is available as an XML file, currently 9+ Megabytes in length. A representation of the classification/taxonomy listing each term followed by its code, followed by its full ancestry, is available as a flat-file, 19+ Megabytes in length. The taxonomy is the largest nomenclature of neoplasms, with more than twice the number of neoplasm names found in other medical nomenclatures, including the 2004 version of the Unified Medical Language System, the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terminology, the National Cancer Institute's Thesaurus, and the International Classification of Diseases Oncolology version. This manuscript describes a comprehensive taxonomy of neoplasia that collects synonymous terms under a unique code number and assigns each

  2. Pathology of fatal lineage 1 and 2 West Nile virus infections in horses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June H. Williams

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, West Nile virus (WNV has been reported in South African horses, causing severe neurological signs. All cases were of lineage 2, except for one case that clustered with lineage 1 viruses. In the present study, gross and microscopic lesions of six South African lineage 2-infected horses and the one lineage 1 case are described. Diagnoses were confirmed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR of central nervous system (CNS tissue and one by RT-PCR of a brain virus isolate. The CNS of all cases was negative by RT-PCR or immunohistochemistry (IHC for African horse sickness (AHS, equine encephalosis virus, equine herpes viruses 1 and 4, other zoonotic flaviviruses, alphaviruses, and shunivirus, and either by immunofluorescence or IHC for rabies. Gross visceral lesions were nonspecific but often mimicked those of AHS. The CNS histopathology of WNV lineage 2 cases resembled the nonsuppurative polioencephalomyelitis reported in the Northern Hemisphere lineage 1 and recent Hungarian lineage 2 cases. Occasional meningitis, focal spinal ventral horn poliomalacia, dorsal and lateral horn poliomyelitis, leucomyelitis, asymmetrical ventral motor spinal neuritis and frequent olfactory region involvement were also seen. Lineage 2 cases displayed marked variations in CNS lesion severity, type and distribution, and suggested various viral entry routes into the CNS, based on findings in experimental mice and hamsters. Lineage 1 lesions were comparable to the milder lineage 2 cases. West Nile virus IHC on CNS sections with marked lesions from all cases elicited only two antigen-positive cells in the olfactory cortex of one case. The presence in the CNS of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophage-monocytes was confirmed by cluster of differentiation (CD 3, CD20, multiple myeloma oncogene 1 (MUM1 and macrophage (MAC 387 IHC.

  3. Pathology of fatal lineage 1 and 2 West Nile virus infections in horses in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, June H; van Niekerk, Stephanie; Human, Stacey; van Wilpe, Erna; Venter, Marietjie

    2014-01-01

    Since 2007, West Nile virus (WNV) has been reported in South African horses, causing severe neurological signs. All cases were of lineage 2, except for one case that clustered with lineage 1 viruses. In the present study, gross and microscopic lesions of six South African lineage 2-infected horses and the one lineage 1 case are described. Diagnoses were confirmed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of central nervous system (CNS) tissue and one by RT-PCR of a brain virus isolate. The CNS of all cases was negative by RT-PCR or immunohistochemistry (IHC) for African horse sickness (AHS), equine encephalosis virus, equine herpes viruses 1 and 4, other zoonotic flaviviruses, alphaviruses, and shunivirus, and either by immunofluorescence or IHC for rabies. Gross visceral lesions were nonspecific but often mimicked those of AHS. The CNS histopathology of WNV lineage 2 cases resembled the nonsuppurative polioencephalomyelitis reported in the Northern Hemisphere lineage 1 and recent Hungarian lineage 2 cases. Occasional meningitis, focal spinal ventral horn poliomalacia, dorsal and lateral horn poliomyelitis, leucomyelitis, asymmetrical ventral motor spinal neuritis and frequent olfactory region involvement were also seen. Lineage 2 cases displayed marked variations in CNS lesion severity, type and distribution, and suggested various viral entry routes into the CNS, based on findings in experimental mice and hamsters. Lineage 1 lesions were comparable to the milder lineage 2 cases. West Nile virus IHC on CNS sections with marked lesions from all cases elicited only two antigen-positive cells in the olfactory cortex of one case. The presence in the CNS of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophage-monocytes was confirmed by cluster of differentiation (CD) 3, CD20, multiple myeloma oncogene 1 (MUM1) and macrophage (MAC) 387 IHC. PMID:25686260

  4. Hearing Aids and Personal Sound Amplifiers: Know the Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Hearing Aids and Personal Sound Amplifiers: Know the Difference Share ... or use them as substitutes—for approved hearing aids. "Hearing aids and personal sound amplification products (PSAPS) ...

  5. Experiments of High Power 35GHz Gyro-Klystron Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin; McCurdy, A.; Wood, F.; Kyser, R.; Danly, B.; Levush, B.; Calame, J.; Parker, R.

    1997-11-01

    Experiments on a two-cavity gyroklystron amplifier operating at 35GHz were successfully carried out. The amplifier produced a saturated radiation power of 210kW which corresponds to an efficiency of 37% and a gain of 23.6dB. The experimental results are in good agreement with predicted performance from non-linear gyroklystron codes, MAGYKL and MAGY. Experiments on a staggered tuned three-cavity gyroklystron amplifier is currently underway to demonstrate a high gain and wideband rf amplification. Simulations on the three-cavity gyroklystron circuit predict an instantaneous bandwidth of 0.9% and a gain of 35dB. Experimental results of the amplifiers will be presented.

  6. Development of High Power Microwave and Millimeter Wave Gyroklystron Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, W. K.; Baik, S. W.; Lee, S. H.; Choi, J. J.; Park, D. M.; Oh, J. H.; Yang, J. G.; Hwang, S. M.; Temkin, R.

    1999-11-01

    A design study of a 28GHz gyroklystron amplifier for application of ECR plasma heating at Hanbit has been completed. Numerical simulation codes predict that a stable amplifier radiation of 200kW is produced with a 54dB saturated gain and an electronic efficiency of 35 percent from a 70kV and 8.2A high power electron beam. Major experimental equipments including a high power modulator, a 2 Tesla superconducting magnet, and a double-anode magnetro-injection-gun have been procured and are expected to set up in laboratory by this fall. Fabrication of tube components is currently underway. Cold-tests of the rf components are presented. In addition, experiments on a 10GHz gyroklystron amplifier which is a scale-down version of 28GHz gyroklystron amplifier are planned in the near future.

  7. 1.55 Micron High Peak Power Fiber Amplifier Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal, we propose to demonstrate and build a 1.55 micron single frequency high energy and high peak power fiber amplifier by developing an innovative...

  8. Apparatus and methods for a human de-amplifier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A human de-amplifier system is described for interfacing a human operator and a physical object through a physical plant, wherein the physical object has dimensions in the range of 1 micrometer to 1 mm. The human de-amplifier system uses an inner-feedback loop to increase the equivalent damping of the operating system to stabilize the system when it contacts with the environment and reduces the impact of the environment variation by utilizing a high feedback gain, determined by a root locus sketch. Because the stability of the human de-amplifier system of the present invention is greatly enhanced over that of the prior art, the de-amplifier system is able to manipulate the physical object having dimensions in the range of 1 micrometer to 1 mm with high stability and accuracy. The system also has a monitoring device to monitor the motion of the physical object under manipulation

  9. Gain Variation with Raman Amplifier Parameters and Its Restoration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that gain profile of a distributed Raman amplifier is sensitive to its parameter variation, such as loss/gain coefficients change or partial pump failure. Gain flatness can be restored by adjusting power of pump lasers.

  10. Real burst traffic amplification in optically gain clamped amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Ennser, Karin; Taccheo, Stefano; Careglio, Davide; Solé Pareta, Josep; Aracil Rico, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Optical burst amplification in a gain-stabilized amplifier is theoretically investigated using real burst traffic data. The results show that excellent performance are obtained for WDM transmission with negligible interplay due to burst arrival statistics.

  11. Class D audio amplifiers for high voltage capacitive transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis

    implications of driving the non-linear transducer of the DEAP. 2-level modulated high voltage amplifiers driving the capacitive load of the DEAP transducer are addressed in chapter 4. An amplifier with fourth order output filter and full-state self-oscillating hysteresis based control loop is proposed...... on a silicone film. As a consequence a capacitive transducer emerges, which can be shaped into the loudspeaker membrane itself, rolled up into a transducer driving a membrane or being part of an active suspension system for the membrane. In order to document the full potential of the DEAP transducer, suitable....... Due to the similarities between the electrostatic loudspeaker and the DEAP transducer, the state-of-the-art has a special focus on amplifiers for electrostatic loudspeakers. Amplifiers for other type of capacitive transducers like piezoelectric ones are also considered. Finally the current state...

  12. High current density nanofilament cathodes for microwave amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnell, J-P.; Minoux, E.; Gangloff, L.; Vincent, P.; Legagneux, P.; Dieumegard, D.; David, J.-F.; Peauger, F.; Hudanski, L.; Teo, K.B.K.; Lacerda, R.; Chhowalla, M.; Hasko, D.G.; Ahmed, H.; Amaratunga, G.A.J.; Milne, W.I.; Vila, L.; Dauginet-De Pra, L.; Demoustier-Champagne, S.; Ferain, E.; Legras, R.; Piraux, L.; Gröening, O.; Raedt, H. De; Michielsen, K.

    2004-01-01

    We study high current density nanofilament cathodes for microwave amplifiers. Two different types of aligned nanofilament array have been studied: first, metallic nanowires grown by electrodeposition into nanoporous templates at very low temperature (T

  13. Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers - Physics and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the physics and applications of quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers based on numerical simulations. These devices possess a number of unique properties compared with other types of semiconductor amplifiers, which should allow enhanced performance of semiconductor...... and QW devices and to experiments on quantum dot amplifiers. These comparisons outline the qualitative differences between the different types of amplifiers. In all cases focus is put on the physical processes responsible the differences....... devices in communication systems in the future. The basic properties of quantum dot devices are investigated, especially regarding the potential of realizing amplification and signal processing without introducing pattern dependence. Also the gain recovery of a single short pulse is modeled...

  14. Linear and nonlinear analysis of high-power rf amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a survey of the state variable analysis method the final amplifier for the CBA is analyzed taking into account the real beam waveshape. An empirical method for checking the stability of a non-linear system is also considered

  15. Compression of chirp pulses from a femtosecond fiber based amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Rumi; Takiuchi, Ken-ichi; Tei, Kazuyoku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Enokidani, Jyun; Sumida, Shin

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a single mode fiber based master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) with a single polarization and a fully monolithic design. We have built a passive mode-locked polarization maintaining Yb doped fiber as the master oscillator contains a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror and a chirped fiber Bragg grating for the dispersion management. The net intracavity dispersion was managed to be slightly anomalous. The oscillator generates the 150 fs (sech2) pulses at the center wavelength of 1065 nm, and the repetition rate of 42 MHz. The oscillator output was amplified to 1.4 W from 80 mW in the single stage fiber amplifier which results in pulse shape distortion. The pulse shaping with a band pass filter and a compressor was applied to the amplified pulses. The shaping pulses have the pulse width of 90 fs and the pulse energy of 16 nJ.

  16. Fast terahertz imaging using a quantum cascade amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A terahertz (THz) imaging scheme based on the effect of self-mixing in a 2.9 THz quantum cascade (QC) amplifier has been demonstrated. By coupling an antireflective-coated silicon lens to the facet of a QC laser, with no external optical feedback, the laser mirror losses are enhanced to fully suppress lasing action, creating a THz QC amplifier. The addition of reflection from an external target to the amplifier creates enough optical feedback to initiate lasing action and the resulting emission enhances photon-assisted transport, which in turn reduces the voltage across the device. At the peak gain point, the maximum photon density coupled back leads to a prominent self-mixing effect in the QC amplifier, leading to a high sensitivity, with a signal to noise ratio up to 55 dB, along with a fast data acquisition speed of 20 000 points per second

  17. Compensation of flicker noise in weak-signal amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Makarenko; Tertychny, G. N.

    2007-01-01

    The paper considers the block diagram of a weak-signal low-frequency amplifier, describes its principle of operation, and presents results of the theoretical and experimental investigation in compensation of flicker noise in the new device.

  18. Development of SPND amplifier using hybrid micro circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) is an in-core neutron detector of compact size, rugged construction and long life with a very simple associated signal processing electronics due to absence of high voltage bias. Because of the reasons mentioned above, the SPNDs are being used in large numbers for all types of nuclear reactors. The paper describes the development of SPND amplifier using low power components and hybrid microcircuit with advanced features like on-line detector health monitoring and buffered output among others. This development will be reduced the mechanical size and power requirement of SPND amplifier considerably as compared with earlier developed SPND amplifier using discrete components. The present amplifier design is compact and accommodates two SPND channels in the existing 1 width module. (author)

  19. Distributed Mode Filtering Rod Fiber Amplifier With Improved Mode Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Broeng, Jes;

    2012-01-01

    We report 216W of average output power from a photonic crystal rod fiber amplifier. We demonstrate 44% power improvement before onset of the mode instability by operating the rod fiber in a leaky guiding regime.......We report 216W of average output power from a photonic crystal rod fiber amplifier. We demonstrate 44% power improvement before onset of the mode instability by operating the rod fiber in a leaky guiding regime....

  20. Dynamics of Continuously Pumped Solid-State Regenerative Amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Grishin, Mikhail; Michailovas, Andrejus

    2010-01-01

    Continuously pumped regenerative amplifiers are subject to energy instability at high pulse repetition rates due to period doubling bifurcation. Theoretical concepts representing a generalized picture of operation features have been in-detail worked out in order to differentiate and understand instability effects. Experimental data for Nd:YVO4 regenerative amplifier have been presented; and possible techniques for performance optimization have been analyzed. An increase in the seed pulse ener...

  1. Gas cooled disk amplifier approach to solid state average power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disk amplifiers have been used on almost all solid state laser systems of high energy, and, in principle, one simply has to cool the device to operate it at average power. To achieve the desired waste heat removal, gas is flowed across the disk surface. The authors show the basic gas flow geometry. They computationally and experimentally characterize the flow and its optical implications over regimes which far exceed the envisioned operating requirements of a working amplifier

  2. Efficient development of highly linear MMIC power amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Bignamini, M.; Favre, G.; Meazza, A.; Pagani, M.; Palomba, F.; Sivverini, G.

    2001-01-01

    Highly linear power amplifiers are key components of high capacity radio transmitters. This paper describes the complete procedure we established to develop a family of new MMIC power amplifiers aimed at achieving state-of-the-art performance as needed for a new M-QAM microwave radio. A cost effective approach dedicated to volume production has been addressed. The most important experimental characteristics for each of the developed MMIC PAs are also reported in order to demostrate the effect...

  3. Ultrafast optical signal processing using semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dot amplifiers are discussed on the basis of an extensive theoretical model. These devices show great potential for linear amplification as well as ultrafast signal processing.......The linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dot amplifiers are discussed on the basis of an extensive theoretical model. These devices show great potential for linear amplification as well as ultrafast signal processing....

  4. Amplifying ribbon extensometer for measuring film and fabric strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, V. L., Jr.; Mchatton, A. D.

    1975-01-01

    Variations of a low-cost amplifying linear threshold extensometer are presented in detail for high or low strain applications. Derivations of scale relationships and extraction forces are included with experimental correlations and analyses given on performance, attachment problems, gain selection, gage and base material compatibility, and zero setting techniques. Flight applications of unamplified gages on parawing deployment tests are noted. The amplified gages perform accurately in laboratory tests and further experience is needed on performance under dynamic environments.

  5. On the effect of time delays in negative feedback amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, L. N.; Aguiar, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    Time delays are intrinsic to all existing devices and circuits. For the majority of applications, time delays are so small that their effects can be disregarded. However, when considering feedback amplifiers, depending on open-loop poles and loop gain, the effect of a small time delay inside the feedback path may turn to be of considerable importance. This paper analyzes the frequency response effects associated with time delays in feedback amplifiers, exploiting these effects to achieve band...

  6. DESIGN OF SEQUENTIALLY FED BALANCED AMPLIFYING ANTENNA FOR CIRCULAR POLARIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    S. K. Behera; D. R. Poddar; Mishra, R K

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a sequentially fed balanced amplifying antenna that exhibits circularly polarized radiation. The inherent benefits of good isolation between input and output ports as well as improved matching capabilities of balanced amplifiers provide overall system gain of 8 dBi at frequency 2.36GHz. The planar arrangement of the patch antenna elements are considered to form an array. The phase of the feeding in the array increases progressively from 00 to 2700.Each element in the array...

  7. Analysis and Investigation of Noise Figure of Fiber Raman Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanpreet Kaur; Kirandeep Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Raman amplifiers are widely used for high capacity long haul communication systems. One of the main reason for which it can be used is its improved noise figure. In this paper noise figure of Raman amplifiers is studied and analysed for different pumping schemes. The main sources of noise and their effects on the noise figure are discussed and the methods to reduce the noise figure are proposed.

  8. Characterization of a multimode coplanar waveguide parametric amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We characterize a Josephson parametric amplifier based on a flux-tunable quarter-wavelength resonator. The fundamental resonance frequency is ∼1 GHz, but we use higher modes of the resonator for our measurements. An on-chip tuning line allows for magnetic flux pumping of the amplifier. We investigate and compare degenerate parametric amplification, involving a single mode, and nondegenerate parametric amplification, using a pair of modes. We show that we reach quantum-limited noise performance in both cases

  9. HFSS Simulation of Vacuum Tube RF Power Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Zviagintsev, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    Development and upgrade of rf power amplifiers require comprehensive calculations to predict and optimize various parameters of the system before hardware modifications are applied. ANSOFT HFSS code provides a powerful tool for 3D EM simulation of the amplifier output resonator comprising a vacuum tube as a passive element. Two examples of this kind of simulation applied for upgrade of the TRIUMF Cyclotron rf system are presented in this paper.

  10. A high-power compact regenerative amplifier FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Regenerative Amplifier FEL (RAFEL) is a new FEL approach aimed at achieving the highest optical power from a compact rf-linac FEL. The key idea is to feed back a small fraction (5 in single pass) wiggler to enable the FEL to reach saturation in a few passes. This paper summarizes the design of a high-power compact regenerative amplifier FEL and describes the first experimental demonstration of the RAFEL concept

  11. An amplifier for VUV photomultiplier operating in cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Dahal, S.; Di Giovanni, A.; d`Inzeo, M.; Franchi, G.; Pazos Clemens, L.

    2016-07-01

    We present the characterisation of an amplifier potentially interesting for noble liquid detectors. The design has been conceived considering the requirements of low power consumption (less than 30 mW), low noise, amplification factor of 10 at 100 MHz and use of commercial components. The amplifier has been integrated onto an electronic board with a voltage divider to operate an Hamamatsu R11410 photomultiplier tube (used in XENON1T, Aprile et al. (2014) [1] dark matter experiment).

  12. Behavioral modeling and linearization of RF power amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, John

    2014-01-01

    Wireless voice and data communications have made great improvements, with connectivity now virtually ubiquitous. Users are demanding essentially perfect transmission and reception of voice and data. The infrastructure that supports this wide connectivity and nearly error-free delivery of information is complex, costly, and continually being improved.This resource describes the mathematical methods and practical implementations of linearization techniques for RF power amplifiers for mobile communications. This includes a review of RF power amplifier design for high efficiency operation. Readers

  13. Resonantly phase-matched Josephson junction traveling wave parametric amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Kevin; Macklin, Chris; Siddiqi, Irfan; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We develop a technique to overcome phase-mismatch in Josephson-junction traveling wave parametric amplifiers in order to achieve high gain over a broad bandwidth. Using "resonant phase matching," we design a compact superconducting device consisting of a transmission line with subwavelength resonant inclusions that simultaneously achieves a gain of 20 dB, an instantaneous bandwidth of 3 GHz, and a saturation power of -98 dBm. Such an amplifier is well-suited to cryogenic broadband microwave m...

  14. Design of low noise transimpedance amplifier for intravascular ultrasound

    KAUST Repository

    Reda, Dina

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we study transimpedance amplifiers for capacitive sensing applications with a focus on Intravascular Ultra Sound (IVUS). We employ RF noise cancellation technique on capacitive feedback based transimpedance amplifiers. This technique eliminates the input-referred noise of TIAs completely and enhances the dynamic range of front-end electronics. Simulation results verify the proposed technique used in two different TIA topologies employing shunt-shunt feedback. ©2009 IEEE.

  15. On the dual symmetry between absorbing and amplifying random media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Anantha Ramakrishna

    2004-06-01

    We re-examine the dual symmetry between absorbing and amplifying random media. By analysing the physically allowed choice of the sign of the square root to determine the complex wave vector in a medium, we draw a broad set of conclusions that enables us to resolve the apparent paradox of the dual symmetry and also to anticipate the large local electromagnetic field enhancements in amplifying random media.

  16. Yb:YAG single crystal fiber image amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Peng; Liu, Jian; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang

    2014-02-01

    In the paper, a Yb:YAG single crystal fiber is used for the first time to amplify week image signal. It was longitudinally pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode with a maximum power of 150W at 940 nm. The image amplifier provided low noise and high gain amplification. A spatially uniform amplification gain of up to 10.2 dB at wavelength of 1030 nm was obtained.

  17. Optical Imaging for Stem Cell Differentiation to Neuronal Lineage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Do Won; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    In regenerative medicine, the prospect of stem cell therapy hold great promise for the recovery of injured tissues and effective treatment of intractable diseases. Tracking stem cell fate provides critical information to understand and evaluate the success of stem cell therapy. The recent emergence of in vivo noninvasive molecular imaging has enabled assessment of the behavior of grafted stem cells in living subjects. In this review, we provide an overview of current optical imaging strategies based on cell or tissue specific reporter gene expression and of in vivo methods to monitor stem cell differentiation into neuronal lineages. These methods use optical reporters either regulated by neuron-specific promoters or containing neuron-specific microRNA binding sites. Both systems revealed dramatic changes in optical reporter imaging signals in cells differentiating a yeast GAL4 amplification system or an engineering-enhanced luciferase reported gene. Furthermore, we propose an advanced imaging system to monitor neuronal differentiation during neurogenesis that uses in vivo multiplexed imaging techniques capable of detecting several targets simultaneously.

  18. Optical Imaging for Stem Cell Differentiation to Neuronal Lineage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In regenerative medicine, the prospect of stem cell therapy hold great promise for the recovery of injured tissues and effective treatment of intractable diseases. Tracking stem cell fate provides critical information to understand and evaluate the success of stem cell therapy. The recent emergence of in vivo noninvasive molecular imaging has enabled assessment of the behavior of grafted stem cells in living subjects. In this review, we provide an overview of current optical imaging strategies based on cell or tissue specific reporter gene expression and of in vivo methods to monitor stem cell differentiation into neuronal lineages. These methods use optical reporters either regulated by neuron-specific promoters or containing neuron-specific microRNA binding sites. Both systems revealed dramatic changes in optical reporter imaging signals in cells differentiating a yeast GAL4 amplification system or an engineering-enhanced luciferase reported gene. Furthermore, we propose an advanced imaging system to monitor neuronal differentiation during neurogenesis that uses in vivo multiplexed imaging techniques capable of detecting several targets simultaneously

  19. B-lymphocyte lineage cells and the respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Atsushi; Hulse, Kathryn E; Tan, Bruce K; Schleimer, Robert P

    2013-04-01

    Adaptive humoral immune responses in the airways are mediated by B cells and plasma cells that express highly evolved and specific receptors and produce immunoglobulins of most isotypes. In some cases, such as autoimmune diseases or inflammatory diseases caused by excessive exposure to foreign antigens, these same immune cells can cause disease by virtue of overly vigorous responses. This review discusses the generation, differentiation, signaling, activation, and recruitment pathways of B cells and plasma cells, with special emphasis on unique characteristics of subsets of these cells functioning within the respiratory system. The primary sensitization events that generate B cells responsible for effector responses throughout the airways usually occur in the upper airways, tonsils, and adenoid structures that make up the Waldeyer ring. On secondary exposure to antigen in the airways, antigen-processing dendritic cells migrate into secondary lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes, that drain the upper and lower airways, and further B-cell expansion takes place at those sites. Antigen exposure in the upper or lower airways can also drive expansion of B-lineage cells in the airway mucosal tissue and lead to the formation of inducible lymphoid follicles or aggregates that can mediate local immunity or disease. PMID:23540615

  20. B lymphocyte lineage cells and the respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Atsushi; Hulse, Kathryn E.; Tan, Bruce K.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive humoral immune responses in the airways are mediated by B cells and plasma cells that express highly evolved and specific receptors and produce immunoglobulins of most isotypes. In some cases, such as autoimmune diseases or inflammatory diseases caused by excessive exposure to foreign antigens, these same immune cells can cause disease by virtue of overly vigorous responses. This review discusses the generation, differentiation, signaling, activation and recruitment pathways of B cells and plasma cells, with special emphasis on unique characteristics of subsets of these cells functioning within the respiratory system. The primary sensitization events that generate B cells responsible for effector responses throughout the airways usually occur in the upper airways, in tonsils and adenoid structures that make up Waldeyer’s Ring. Upon secondary exposure to antigen in the airways, antigen-processing dendritic cells migrate into secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph nodes that drain the upper and lower airways and further B cell expansion takes place at those sites. Antigen exposure in the upper or lower airways can also drive expansion of B lineage cells in the airway mucosal tissue and lead to the formation of inducible lymphoid follicles or aggregates that can mediate local immunity or disease. PMID:23540615

  1. Mobile DNA can drive lineage extinction in prokaryotic populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, D J; Bichsel, M; Wagner, A

    2010-11-01

    Natural selection ultimately acts on genes and other DNA sequences. Adaptations that are good for the gene can have adverse effects at higher levels of organization, including the individual or the population. Mobile genetic elements illustrate this principle well, because they can self-replicate within a genome at a cost to their host. As they are costly and can be transmitted horizontally, mobile elements can be seen as genomic parasites. It has been suggested that mobile elements may cause the extinction of their host populations. In organisms with very large populations, such as most bacteria, individual selection is highly effective in purging genomes of deleterious elements, suggesting that extinction is unlikely. Here we investigate the conditions under which mobile DNA can drive bacterial lineages to extinction. We use a range of epidemiological and ecological models to show that harmful mobile DNA can invade, and drive populations to extinction, provided their transmission rate is high and that mobile element-induced mortality is not too high. Population extinction becomes more likely when there are more elements in the population. Even if elements are costly, extinction can still occur because of the combined effect of horizontal gene transfer, a mortality induced by mobile elements. Our study highlights the potential of mobile DNA to be selected at the population level, as well as at the individual level. PMID:20860700

  2. Biomechanical consequences of rapid evolution in the polar bear lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham J Slater

    Full Text Available The polar bear is the only living ursid with a fully carnivorous diet. Despite a number of well-documented craniodental adaptations for a diet of seal flesh and blubber, molecular and paleontological data indicate that this morphologically distinct species evolved less than a million years ago from the omnivorous brown bear. To better understand the evolution of this dietary specialization, we used phylogenetic tests to estimate the rate of morphological specialization in polar bears. We then used finite element analysis (FEA to compare the limits of feeding performance in the polar bear skull to that of the phylogenetically and geographically close brown bear. Results indicate that extremely rapid evolution of semi-aquatic adaptations and dietary specialization in the polar bear lineage produced a cranial morphology that is weaker than that of brown bears and less suited to processing tough omnivorous or herbivorous diets. Our results suggest that continuation of current climate trends could affect polar bears by not only eliminating their primary food source, but also through competition with northward advancing, generalized brown populations for resources that they are ill-equipped to utilize.

  3. Leveraging data lineage to infer logical relationships between astronomical catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddelmeijer, Hugo; Valentijn, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    A novel method to infer logical relationships between sets is presented. These sets can be any collection of elements, for example astronomical catalogs of celestial objects. The method does not require the contents of the sets to be known explicitly. It combines incomplete knowledge about the relationships between sets to infer a priori unknown relationships. Relationships between sets are represented by sets of Boolean hypercubes. This leads to deductive reasoning by application of logical operators to these sets of hypercubes. A pseudo code for an efficient implementation is described. The method is used in the Astro-WISE information system to infer relationships between catalogs of astronomical objects. These catalogs can be very large and, more importantly, their contents do not have to be available at all times. Science products are stored in Astro-WISE with references to other science products from which they are derived, or their dependencies. This creates a full data lineage that links every science product all the way back to the raw data. Catalogs are created in a way that maximizes knowledge about their relationship with their dependencies. The presented algorithm is used to determine which objects a catalog represents by leveraging this information.

  4. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Drougka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST, spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred.

  5. Genetic investigation within Lactococcus garvieae revealed two genomic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Chiara; Ricci, Giovanni; Borgo, Francesca; Rollando, Alessandro; Fortina, Maria Grazia

    2012-07-01

    The diversity of a collection of 49 Lactococcus garvieae strains, including isolates of dairy, fish, meat, vegetable and cereal origin, was explored using a molecular polyphasic approach comprising PCR-ribotyping, REP and RAPD-PCR analyses and a multilocus restriction typing (MLRT) carried out on six partial genes (atpA, tuf, dltA, als, gapC, and galP). This approach allowed high-resolution cluster analysis in which two major groups were distinguishable: one group included dairy isolates, the other group meat isolates. Unexpectedly, of the 12 strains coming from fish, four grouped with dairy isolates, whereas the others with meat isolates. Likewise, strains isolated from vegetables allocated between the two main groups. These findings revealed high variability within the species at both gene and genome levels. The observed genetic heterogeneity among L. garvieae strains was not entirely coherent with the ecological niche of origin of the strains, but rather supports the idea of an early separation of L. garvieae population into two independent genomic lineages. PMID:22568590

  6. ANALYSIS OF INTERNALLY GENERATED NOISE OF BIOELECTRIC AMPLIFIERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MashhourMustafaBaniAmer

    2003-01-01

    This papenr deals with internally generated noise of bioelectric amplifiers that are usually used for processing of bioelectric events.The main purpose of this paper is to present a procedure for analysis of the effects of internal noise generated by the active circuits and to evaluate the output noise of the author's new designed bioelectric amplifier that caused by internal effects to the amplifier circuit itself in order to compare it with the noise generated by conventional amplifiers.The obtained analysis results of internally generated noise showed that the total output noise of bioelectric active circuits does not increase when some of their resitors have a larger value.This behavior is caused by the different transfer functions for the signal and the respective noise sources associated with these resistors.Moreover,the new designed bioelectric amplifier haws an output noise less than that for conventional amplifiers.The obtained analysis results were also experimentally verified and the final conclusions were drawn.

  7. Status of solid-state power amplifiers development in BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various solid-state power amplifiers have been developed to meet the requirements of accelerator needs for BARC and its collaboration projects. These are mainly 352 and 325 MHz RF power amplifiers. The 352 MHz, RF power amplifier have been developed to feed the buncher cavity of the Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA). Whereas 325 MHz 3 kW and 7 kW solid- state power amplifiers have been designed under the IIFC-Fermilab collaboration. The same technologies will also be used for 200 MeV superconducting accelerator of ADS program. The paper present the technology details of the power amplifier modules, power combiners, dividers and sensors etc. The developed SSPAs are of 3 kW, 325 MHz and 10 kW 352 MHz. Both the power amplifiers have been tested on a 50 ohm load. The 3 kW SSPA has the drain efficiency of 65.3%. The four modules have the power output of 850 W each. This SSPA has the figure of merit of SSPAs (number of modules per kW) is 1.2. The 10 kW SSPA is mainly required to feed the buncher cavity of the LEHIPA. It is combination of 16 power modules of 800 W each at 352 MHz. (author)

  8. Frequency-Offset Cartesian Feedback Based on Polyphase Difference Amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Marta G; Pauly, John M; Scott, Greig C

    2010-05-01

    A modified Cartesian feedback method called "frequency-offset Cartesian feedback" and based on polyphase difference amplifiers is described that significantly reduces the problems associated with quadrature errors and DC-offsets in classic Cartesian feedback power amplifier control systems.In this method, the reference input and feedback signals are down-converted and compared at a low intermediate frequency (IF) instead of at DC. The polyphase difference amplifiers create a complex control bandwidth centered at this low IF, which is typically offset from DC by 200-1500 kHz. Consequently, the loop gain peak does not overlap DC where voltage offsets, drift, and local oscillator leakage create errors. Moreover, quadrature mismatch errors are significantly attenuated in the control bandwidth. Since the polyphase amplifiers selectively amplify the complex signals characterized by a +90° phase relationship representing positive frequency signals, the control system operates somewhat like single sideband (SSB) modulation. However, the approach still allows the same modulation bandwidth control as classic Cartesian feedback.In this paper, the behavior of the polyphase difference amplifier is described through both the results of simulations, based on a theoretical analysis of their architecture, and experiments. We then describe our first printed circuit board prototype of a frequency-offset Cartesian feedback transmitter and its performance in open and closed loop configuration. This approach should be especially useful in magnetic resonance imaging transmit array systems. PMID:20814450

  9. Power Amplifier Design for E-band Wireless System Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadziabdic, Dzenan; Krozer, Viktor; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2008-01-01

    E-band wireless communications will become important as the microwave backhaul for high-speed data transmission. One of the most critical components is the front-end power amplifier in this system. The paper analyzes different technologies with potential in the E-band frequency range and present a...... power amplifier design satisfying the E-band system specifications. The designed power amplifier achieves a maximum output power of ges 20 dBm with a state-of-the-art power-added efficiency of 15%. The power is realized using InP DHBT technology. To the best of our knowledge it is the highest output...... power and efficiency reported for an InP HBT power amplifier in this frequency range. The predicted power-added efficiency is higher than that of power amplifiers based on SiGe HBT and GaAs pHEMT technologies. The design shows the capabilities of InP DHBT for power amplifier applications as an...

  10. Quantum noise in Josephson-junction parametric amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossover between thermal and quantum noise in the externally-pumped Josephson-junction parametric amplifiers is theoretically followed. Two different approaches are used for the analysis: Josephson junction is replaced with its RSJ model with the equilibrium source of fluctuations; microscopic theory of the tunnel junctions is used, which takes into account not only thermal and quantum but also shot noise. Because of inconvenience of the noise temperature T /SUB N/ for the amplifier sensitivity characterization in the quantum limit, the authors express their results in terms of the figure theta /SUB N/ which is essentially the amplifier output noise energy, reduced to its input (in the classical limit, theta /SUB N/ =k /SUB B/ T /SUB N/). For the nondegenerate amplifier, the minimum value of theta /SUB N/ equals hω/2 and is due to quantum noise (zeropoint oscillations) in the idle-frequency resonator of the amplifier. For the degenerate amplifier, sensitive to only one quadrature component of the input signal, theta /SUB N/ can be made much less than the above ''quantum limit'' even at operation temperatures much higher than hω/k /SUB B/, if the Josephson junction characteristic frequency ω /SUB c/ is high enough, hω /SUB c/ k /SUB B/ T. An analysis of the experimental situation shows that the values theta /SUB N/ < can be achieved using two-dimensional arrays of a large number (N approx. = 100) single-tunnel-junction interferometers with low inductances, inductively coupled to a microwave cavity

  11. Improving Students' Understanding of Lock-In Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Seth; Gauthier, Alexandre; Levy, Jeremy; Chandralekha, Singh

    2014-03-01

    A lock-in amplifier is a versatile instrument frequently used in physics research. However, many students struggle with the basic operating principles of a lock-in amplifier which can lead to a variety of difficulties. To improve students' understanding, we have been developing and evaluating a research-based tutorial which makes use of a computer simulation of a lock-in amplifier. The tutorial is based on a field-tested approach in which students realize their difficulties after predicting the outcome of simulated experiments involving a lock-in amplifier and check their predictions using the simulated lock-in amplifier. Then, the tutorial guides and helps students develop a coherent understanding of the basics of a lock-in amplifier. The tutorial development involved interviews with physics faculty members and graduate students and iteration of many versions of the tutorial with professors and graduate students. The student difficulties and the development and assessment of the research-based tutorial are discussed. We thank National Science Foundation for award NSF-1124131.

  12. Improving Students' Understanding of Lock-in Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    DeVore, Seth; Levy, Jeremy; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    A lock-in amplifier is a versatile instrument frequently used in physics research. However, many students struggle with the basic operating principles of a lock-in amplifier which can lead to a variety of difficulties. To improve students' understanding, we have been developing and evaluating a research-based tutorial which makes use of a computer simulation of a lock-in amplifier. The tutorial is based on a field-tested approach in which students realize their difficulties after predicting the outcome of simulated experiments involving a lock-in amplifier and check their predictions using the simulated lock-in amplifier. Then, the tutorial guides and helps students develop a coherent understanding of the basics of a lock-in amplifier. The tutorial development involved interviews with physics faculty members and graduate students and iteration of many versions of the tutorial with professors and graduate students. The student difficulties and the development and assessment of the research-based tutorial are d...

  13. Impact of tamoxifen on adipocyte lineage tracing: Inducer of adipogenesis and prolonged nuclear translocation of Cre recombinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risheng Ye

    2015-11-01

    Conclusions: These findings highlight the potential for tamoxifen-induced adipogenesis, and the associated drawbacks of the use of tamoxifen in lineage tracing studies, explaining the discrepancy in lineage tracing results from different systems with temporal control of gene targeting.

  14. Lineage tracking of mesenchymal and endothelial progenitors in BMP-induced bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolind, Mille; Bobyn, Justin D; Matthews, Brya G; Mikulec, Kathy; Aiken, Alastair; Little, David G; Kalajzic, Ivo; Schindeler, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the relative contributions of mesenchymal and endothelial progenitor cells to rhBMP-2 induced bone formation, we examined the distribution of lineage-labeled cells in Tie2-Cre:Ai9 and αSMA-creERT2:Col2.3-GFP:Ai9 reporter mice. Established orthopedic models of ectopic bone formation in the hind limb and spine fusion were employed. Tie2-lineage cells were found extensively in the ectopic bone and spine fusion masses, but co-staining was only seen with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity (osteoclasts) and CD31 immunohistochemistry (vascular endothelial cells), and not alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity (osteoblasts). To further confirm the lack of a functional contribution of Tie2-lineage cells to BMP-induced bone, we developed conditional knockout mice where Tie2-lineage cells are rendered null for key bone transcription factor osterix (Tie2-cre:Osx(fx/fx) mice). Conditional knockout mice showed no difference in BMP-induced bone formation compared to littermate controls. Pulse labeling of mesenchymal cells with Tamoxifen in mice undergoing spine fusion revealed that αSMA-lineage cells contributed to the osteoblastic lineage (Col2.3-GFP), but not to endothelial cells or osteoclast populations. These data indicate that the αSMA+ and Tie2+ progenitor lineages make distinct cellular contributions to bone formation, angiogenesis, and resorption/remodeling. PMID:26141839

  15. Microarray based comparison of two Escherichia coli O157:H7 lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishizaki Hiroshi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has identified the potential for the existence of two separate lineages of Escherichia coli O157:H7. Clinical isolates tended to cluster primarily within one of these two lineages. To determine if there are virulence related genes differentially expressed between the two lineages we chose to utilize microarray technology to perform an initial screening. Results Using a 610 gene microarray, designed against the E. coli O157 EDL 933 transcriptome, targeting primarily virulence systems, we chose 3 representative Lineage I isolates (LI groups mostly clinical isolates and 3 representative Lineage II isolates (LII groups mostly bovine isolates. Using standard dye swap experimental designs, statistically different expression (P in vitro anaerobic growth conditions, there is up-regulation of stx2b, ureD, curli (csgAFEG, and stress related genes (hslJ, cspG, ibpB, ibpA in Lineage I, which may contribute to enhanced virulence or transmission potential. Lineage II exhibits significant up-regulation of type III secretion apparatus, LPS, and flagella related transcripts. Conclusion These results give insight into comparative regulation of virulence genes as well as providing directions for future research. Ultimately, evaluating the expression of key virulence factors among different E. coli O157 isolates has inherent value and the interpretation of such expression data will continue to evolve as our understanding of virulence, pathogenesis and transmission improves.

  16. Integrating extrinsic and intrinsic cues into a minimal model of lineage commitment for hematopoietic progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Palani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Autoregulation of transcription factors and cross-antagonism between lineage-specific transcription factors are a recurrent theme in cell differentiation. An equally prevalent event that is frequently overlooked in lineage commitment models is the upregulation of lineage-specific receptors, often through lineage-specific transcription factors. Here, we use a minimal model that combines cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic elements of regulation in order to understand how both instructive and stochastic events can inform cell commitment decisions in hematopoiesis. Our results suggest that cytokine-mediated positive receptor feedback can induce a "switch-like" response to external stimuli during multilineage differentiation by providing robustness to both bipotent and committed states while protecting progenitors from noise-induced differentiation or decommitment. Our model provides support to both the instructive and stochastic theories of commitment: cell fates are ultimately driven by lineage-specific transcription factors, but cytokine signaling can strongly bias lineage commitment by regulating these inherently noisy cell-fate decisions with complex, pertinent behaviors such as ligand-mediated ultrasensitivity and robust multistability. The simulations further suggest that the kinetics of differentiation to a mature cell state can depend on the starting progenitor state as well as on the route of commitment that is chosen. Lastly, our model shows good agreement with lineage-specific receptor expression kinetics from microarray experiments and provides a computational framework that can integrate both classical and alternative commitment paths in hematopoiesis that have been observed experimentally.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of P5 P-type ATPases, a eukaryotic lineage of secretory pathway pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Annette; Asp, Torben; Holm, Preben Bach;

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotes encompass a remarkable variety of organisms and unresolved lineages. Different phylogenetic analyses have lead to conflicting conclusions as to the origin and associations between lineages and species. In this work, we investigated evolutionary relationship of a family of cation pumps...... far, while P5B ATPases appear to be lost in three eukaryotic lineages; excavates, entamoebas and land plants. A lineage-specific gene expansion of up to four different P5B ATPases is seen in animals....

  18. Differentiation in Stem Cell Lineages and in Life: Explorations in the Male Germ Line Stem Cell Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Margaret T

    2016-01-01

    I have been privileged to work on cellular differentiation during a great surge of discovery that has revealed the molecular mechanisms and genetic regulatory circuitry that control embryonic development and adult tissue maintenance and repair. Studying the regulation of proliferation and differentiation in the male germ line stem cell lineage has allowed us investigate how the developmental program imposes layers of additional controls on fundamental cellular processes like cell cycle progression and gene expression to give rise to the huge variety of specialized cell types in our bodies. We are beginning to understand how local signals from somatic support cells specify self-renewal versus differentiation in the stem cell niche at the apical tip of the testis. We are discovering the molecular events that block cell proliferation and initiate terminal differentiation at the switch from mitosis to meiosis-a signature event of the germ cell program. Our work is beginning to reveal how the developmental program that sets up the dramatic new cell type-specific transcription program that prepares germ cells for meiotic division and spermatid differentiation is turned on when cells become spermatocytes. I have had the privilege of working with incredible students, postdocs, and colleagues who have discovered, brainstormed, challenged, and refined our science and our ideas of how developmental pathways and cellular mechanisms work together to drive differentiation. PMID:26970629

  19. Constrained body shape among highly genetically divergent allopatric lineages of the supralittoral isopod Ligia occidentalis (Oniscidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Carlos A; Mateos, Mariana; DeWitt, Thomas J; Hurtado, Luis A

    2016-03-01

    Multiple highly divergent lineages have been identified within Ligia occidentalis sensu lato, a rocky supralittoral isopod distributed along a ~3000 km latitudinal gradient that encompasses several proposed marine biogeographic provinces and ecoregions in the eastern Pacific. Highly divergent lineages have nonoverlapping geographic distributions, with distributional limits that generally correspond with sharp environmental changes. Crossbreeding experiments suggest postmating reproductive barriers exist among some of them, and surveys of mitochondrial and nuclear gene markers do not show evidence of hybridization. Populations are highly isolated, some of which appear to be very small; thus, the effects of drift are expected to reduce the efficiency of selection. Large genetic divergences among lineages, marked environmental differences in their ranges, reproductive isolation, and/or high isolation of populations may have resulted in morphological differences in L. occidentalis, not detected yet by traditional taxonomy. We used landmark-based geometric morphometric analyses to test for differences in body shape among highly divergent lineages of L. occidentalis, and among populations within these lineages. We analyzed a total of 492 individuals from 53 coastal localities from the southern California Bight to Central Mexico, including the Gulf of California. We conducted discriminant function analyses (DFAs) on body shape morphometrics to assess morphological variation among genetically differentiated lineages and their populations. We also tested for associations between phylogeny and morphological variation, and whether genetic divergence is correlated to multivariate morphological divergence. We detected significant differences in body shape among highly divergent lineages, and among populations within these lineages. Nonetheless, neither lineages nor populations can be discriminated on the basis of body shape, because correct classification rates of cross

  20. Lineage associated expression of virulence traits in bovine-adapted Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Kathleen E; Mitchell, Jennifer; Keane, Orla M

    2016-06-30

    Bovine mastitis is the most costly disease to the dairy industry worldwide with Staphylococcus aureus commonly associated with intramammary infections that are persistent and refractory to treatment. The strains of S. aureus that cause mastitis predominantly belong to a number of well-described bovine-adapted lineages. The objective of this study was to determine if a variety of potential virulence traits were associated with lineage. Bovine-adapted S. aureus isolates (n=120), belonging to lineages CC97, CC151 and ST136, were tested for their ability to adhere to and internalise within cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC), to bind bovine fibronectin, to form a biofilm in TSB, TSB+1% glucose and TSB+4% NaCl, and to induce an immune response from bMEC. There were no significant differences between the lineages in ability to adhere to or internalise within bMEC although there were significant differences between individual isolates. For lineages CC97 and ST136, mammalian cell adherence was correlated with the ability to bind bovine fibronectin, however isolates from CC151 could not bind bovine fibronectin in vitro, but adhered to bMEC in a fibronectin-independent manner. There were significant differences between the lineages in ability to form a biofilm in all three growth media with ST136 forming the strongest biofilm while CC151 formed the weakest biofilm. Lineages also differed in their ability to elicit an immune response from bMEC with CC97 eliciting a stronger immune response than CC151 and ST136. These data indicate the potential for both lineage and strain-specific virulence and a strain-specific response to infection in vivo and caution against extrapolating an effect from a single strain of S. aureus to draw conclusions regarding virulence or the host response to infection in unrelated lineages. PMID:27259823