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Sample records for amplified drosophila heat

  1. Use of a transfected and amplified Drosophila heat shock promoter construction for inducible production of toxic mouse c-myc proteins in CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After transfection and selection with methotrexate, CHO cell lines were established which contained up to 2000 copies of an expression vector for c-myc protein. The vector contained the Drosophila heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) promoter fused with the coding region of the mouse c-myc gene. Incubation of cells for up to 3 hours at 430C resulted in at least a 100-fold induction of recombinant c-myc mRNA. When cells were shifted back to 370C, within 1 to 4 hours, this RNA was translated into protein to yield about 250 μg per 109 cells. Cells died a few hours later, suggesting that high concentrations of intracellular c-myc are cytotoxic. 47 refs., 5 figs

  2. Use of a transfected and amplified Drosophila heat shock promoter construction for inducible production of toxic mouse c-myc proteins in CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurm, F.M.; Gwinn, K.A.; Papoulas, O.; Pallavicini, M.; Kingston, R.E.

    1987-07-24

    After transfection and selection with methotrexate, CHO cell lines were established which contained up to 2000 copies of an expression vector for c-myc protein. The vector contained the Drosophila heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) promoter fused with the coding region of the mouse c-myc gene. Incubation of cells for up to 3 hours at 43/sup 0/C resulted in at least a 100-fold induction of recombinant c-myc mRNA. When cells were shifted back to 37/sup 0/C, within 1 to 4 hours, this RNA was translated into protein to yield about 250 ..mu..g per 10/sup 9/ cells. Cells died a few hours later, suggesting that high concentrations of intracellular c-myc are cytotoxic. 47 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Heat shock protection against cold stress of Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, V; Mitchell, H K; Young, P.; Petersen, N S

    1988-01-01

    Heat shock protein synthesis can be induced during recovery from cold treatment of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Survival of larvae after a cold treatment is dramatically improved by a mild heat shock just before the cold shock. The conditions which induce tolerance to cold are similar to those which confer tolerance to heat.

  4. Spectral hole-burning and carrier-heating dynamics in quantum-dot amplifiers: Comparison with bulk amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, P.; Langbein, W.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher;

    2001-01-01

    The ultrafast gain dynamics in an electrically pumped InAs/InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot amplifier are measured at room temperature with femtosecond resolution, and compared with results on an InGaAsP bulk amplifier. The role of spectral hole burning and carrier heating in the recovery of the gain...... compression is investigated. Reduced carrier heating for both gain and refractive index dynamics of the quantum-dot device is found, which is a promising prerequisite for high-speed applications....

  5. Status of solid state amplifier application to plasma heating and Klystrode development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radio frequency (RF) systems in fusion plasma heating often use broadcasting transmitter techniques. For example, the RF heating system in JT-60 was built using broadcasting technology. Also, a new, high efficiency UHF power amplifier electron tube, the Klystrode, which was developed in the USA for TV can be used for fusion plasma systems. While Japanese broadcasting engineers had an effort to develop solid state UHF amplifiers with high power, the USA is developing new high power tubes such as the Klystrode. In this paper we will discuss the feasibility of applying a solid state amplifier and Klystrode for fusion plasma heating. (author)

  6. TORC2 mediates the heat stress response in Drosophila by promoting the formation of stress granules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jevtov, Irena; Zacharogianni, Margarita; van Oorschot, Marinke M.; van Zadelhoff, Guus; Aguilera-Gomez, Angelica; Vuillez, Igor; Braakman, Ineke; Hafen, Ernst; Stocker, Hugo; Rabouille, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The kinase TORis found in two complexes, TORC1,which is involved in growth control, and TORC2, whose roles are less well defined. Here, we asked whether TORC2 has a role in sustaining cellular stress. We show that TORC2 inhibition in Drosophila melanogaster leads to a reduced tolerance to heat stres

  7. Photo-heating and supernova feedback amplify each other's effect on the cosmic star formation rate

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlik, Andreas H.; Schaye, Joop

    2008-01-01

    Photo-heating associated with reionisation and kinetic feedback from core-collapse supernovae have previously been shown to suppress the high-redshift cosmic star formation rate. Here we investigate the interplay between photo-heating and supernova feedback using a set of cosmological, smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. We show that photo-heating and supernova feedback mutually amplify each other's ability to suppress the star formation rate. Our results demonstrate the importance o...

  8. [Small heat shock proteins and adaptation to hypertermia in various Drosophila species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, V Iu; Garbuz, D G; Evgen'ev, M B; Zatsepina, O G

    2006-01-01

    Expression level and kinetics of accumulation of small heat shock proteins (21-27 kDa group) have been investigated in three Drosophila species differing significantly by temperature niche and thermosensitivity. It was shown that low-latitude thermotolerant species D. virilis exceeds the high-latitude thermosensitive closely-related species D. lummei as well as distant thermosensitive species D. melanogaster in terms of small heat shock proteins expression and accumulation after temperature elevation. The data obtained enable to postulate an important role of small heat shock proteins in organism basal thermotolerance and general adaptation to adverse conditions of environment. PMID:16637267

  9. Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins of Drosophila: Identification of U1 RNA-associated proteins and their behavior during heat shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieben, E.D.; Pederson, T.

    1982-08-01

    In Drosophila, two nuclear proteins of approximately 26,000 and 14,000 molecular weight are recognized by a human autoimmune antibody for mammalian ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles that contain U1 small nuclear RNA. The antibody-selected Drosophila RNP contains, in addition to these two proteins, a single RNA species that has been identified as U1 by hybridization with a cloned Drosophila U1 DNA probe. Small nuclear RNP isolated from human cells under the same conditions as used for Drosophila and selected by the anti-U1 RNP-specific antibody contains eight proteins, two of which are similar in molecular weight to the two Drosophila U1 RNP proteins. Thus, even though the nucleotide sequences of Drosophila and human U1 RNA are about 72% homologous, and the corresponding RNPs are both recognized by the same human autoantibody, Drosophila U1 RNP appears to have a simpler protein complement that its mammalian counterpart. The two Drosophila U1 RNA-associated proteins are synthesized at normal or slightly increased rates during the heat shock response and are incorporated into antibody-recognizable RNP complexes. This raises the possibility that U1 RNP is an indispensable nuclear element for cell survival during heat shock.

  10. Adult Heat Tolerance Variation in Drosophila melanogaster is Not Related to Hsp70 Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Toft; Cockerell, Fiona Elizabeth; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Rako, Lea; Loeschcke, Volker; McKechnie, Stephen William; Hoffmann, Ary

    Expression of heat-inducible Hsp70 is considered closely linked to thermotolerance in Drosophila melanogaster and other ectotherms. However, intra-specific variation of Hsp70 expression levels and its relationship to heat resistance has only been investigated in a few studies. Although in...... Drosophila larvae Hsp70 expression may be a key determinant of heat tolerance, the evidence for this in adults is equivocal. We therefore examined heat-induced Hsp70 expression and several measurements of adult heat tolerance in three independent collections of D. melanogaster, measured in three laboratories...... correlation between Hsp70 expression and laboratory assays of adult heat tolerance commonly used in Drosophila. When combining data across three studies we had high power to detect associations but the results showed that variation in Hsp70 expression is only likely to explain a small proportion of variation...

  11. Metabolomic profiling of heat stress: hardening and recovery of homeostasis in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Overgaard, Johannes; Bundy, Jacob G.;

    2006-01-01

    Frequent exposure of terrestrial insects to temperature variation has led to the evolution of protective biochemical and physiological mechanisms, such as the heat shock response, which markedly increases the tolerance to heat stress. Insight into such mechanisms has, so far, mainly relied on...... selective studies of specific compounds or characteristics or studies at the genomic or proteomic levels. In the present study, we have used untargeted NMR metabolomic profiling to examine the biological response to heat stress in Drosophila melanogaster. The metabolite profile was analyzed during recovery...... homeostasis after subsequent heat stress. Several metabolites were identified as responsive to heat stress and could be related to known physiological and biochemical responses. The time course of the recovery of metabolite homeostasis mirrored general changes in gene expression, showing that recovery follows...

  12. Metabolomic profiling of heat stress: hardening and recovery of homeostasis in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Overgaard, Johannes; Bundy, Jacob G;

    2006-01-01

    Frequent exposure of terrestrial insects to temperature variation has led to the evolution of protective biochemical and physiological mechanisms, such as the heat shock response, which markedly increases the tolerance to heat stress. Insight into such mechanisms has, so far, mainly relied on...... selective studies of specific compounds or characteristics or studies at the genomic or proteomic levels. In the present study, we have used untargeted NMR metabolomic profiling to examine the biological response to heat stress in Drosophila melanogaster. The metabolite profile was analyzed during recovery...... homeostasis after subsequent heat stress. Several metabolites were identified as responsive to heat stress and could be related to known physiological and biochemical responses. The time course of the recovery of metabolite homeostasis mirrored general changes in gene expression, showing that recovery follows...

  13. Sequence homologies in the 5' regions of four Drosophila heat-shock genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Holmgren, R; Corces, V; Morimoto, R; Blackman, R; Meselson, M

    1981-01-01

    We report nucleotide sequences of the regions surrounding the 5' ends of the genes for Drosophila melanogaster heat-shock proteins hsp83, hsp68, and hsp26, located at chromosome positions 63BC, 95D, and 67B, respectively. As in other eukaryotic genes, the sequence T-A-T-A-A-A-A-T occurs about 30 nucleotides upstream from the sites of mRNA initiation. Three additional sequence homologies and a dyad symmetry were noted at approximately corresponding locations in the three genes and in the gene ...

  14. A family of related proteins is encoded by the major Drosophila heat shock gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At least four proteins of 70,000 to 75,000 molecular weight (70-75K) were synthesized from mRNA which hybridized with a cloned heat shock gene previously shown to be localized to the 87A and 87C heat shock puff sites. These in vitro-synthesized proteins were indistinguishable from in vivo-synthesized heat shock-induced proteins when analyzed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. A comparison of the pattern of this group of proteins synthesized in vivo during a 5-min pulse or during continuous labeling indicates that the 72-75K proteins are probably not kinetic precursors to the major 70K heat shock protein. Partial digestion products generated with V8 protease indicated that the 70-75K heat shock proteins are closely related, but that there are clear differences between them. The partial digestion patterns obtained from heat shock proteins from the Kc cell line and from the Oregon R strain of Drosophila melanogaster are very similar. Genetic analysis of the patterns of 70-75K heat shock protein synthesis indicated that the genes encoding at least two of the three 72-75K heat shock proteins are located outside of the major 87A and 87C puff sites

  15. Multiple inducers of the Drosophila heat shock locus 93D (hsr omega): inducer-specific patterns of the three transcripts

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    The Drosophila hsr omega locus produces one of the largest and most active heat shock puffs, yet it does not encode a heat shock protein. Instead, this locus produces a distinctive set of three transcripts, all from the same start site. The largest transcript, omega 1, is limited to the nucleus and appears to have a role there. A second nuclear transcript, omega 2, is produced by alternative termination and contains the sequence found in the 5' 20-25% of omega 1 (depending on the Drosophila s...

  16. Heat tolerance in Drosophila subobscura along a latitudinal gradient: Contrasting patterns between plastic and genetic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Luis E; Rezende, Enrico L; Santos, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Susceptibility to global warming relies on how thermal tolerances respond to increasing temperatures through plasticity or evolution. Climatic adaptation can be assessed by examining the geographic variation in thermal-related traits. We studied latitudinal patterns in heat tolerance in Drosophila subobscura reared at two temperatures. We used four static stressful temperatures to estimate the thermal death time (TDT) curves, and two ramping assays with fast and slow heating rates. Thermal death time curves allow estimation of the critical thermal maximum (CT(max)), by extrapolating to the temperature that would knock down the flies almost "instantaneously," and the thermal sensitivity to increasing stressful temperatures. We found a positive latitudinal cline for CT(max), but no clinal pattern for knockdown temperatures estimated from the ramping assays. Although high-latitude populations were more tolerant to an acute heat stress, they were also more sensitive to prolonged exposure to less stressful temperatures, supporting a trade-off between acute and chronic heat tolerances. Conversely, developmental plasticity did not affect CT(max) but increased the tolerance to chronic heat exposition. The patterns observed from the TDT curves help to understand why the relationship between heat tolerance and latitude depends on the methodology used and, therefore, these curves provide a more complete and reliable measurement of heat tolerance. PMID:26292981

  17. Extension of Drosophila lifespan by Rosa damascena associated with an increased sensitivity to heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriner, Samuel E; Katoozi, Niki S; Pham, Kevin Q; Gazarian, Maral; Zarban, Asghar; Jafari, Mahtab

    2012-04-01

    Rosa damascena, or Damask rose, is a rose hybrid commonly harvested for rose oil used in perfumery and for rose water used to flavor food. The petal extract of R. damascena was recently found to decrease Drosophila melanogaster mortality without impairing reproductive fitness or metabolic rate. Here, we report that R. damascena extended both mean and maximum lifespan of the fly. The extract also protected against oxidative stress in flies, predominantly in females. However, it did not alter mitochondrial respiration or content, superoxide production, or the major antioxidant defenses, superoxide dismutase and catalase. The extract increased survival in both sexes when exposed to reduced iron, though surprisingly, it sensitized both sexes to heat stress (survival at 37°C), and appeared to down-regulate the major heat shock protein HSP70 and the small mitochondrial heat shock protein HSP22, at 25°C and after heat shock (4 h at 37°C). We hypothesize that R. damascena extends lifespan by protecting against iron, which concomitantly leads to decreased HSP expression and compromising heat tolerance. PMID:21928072

  18. Riluzole increases the amount of latent HSF1 for an amplified heat shock response and cytoprotection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Induction of the heat shock response (HSR and increased expression of the heat shock proteins (HSPs provide mechanisms to ensure proper protein folding, trafficking, and disposition. The importance of HSPs is underscored by the understanding that protein mis-folding and aggregation contribute centrally to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a cell-based hsp70-luciferease reporter gene assay system to identify agents that modulate the HSR and show here that clinically relevant concentrations of the FDA-approved ALS drug riluzole significantly increased the heat shock induction of hsp70-luciferse reporter gene. Immuno-Western and -cytochemical analysis of HSF1 show that riluzole increased the amount of cytosolic HSF1 to afford a greater activation of HSF1 upon heat shock. The increased HSF1 contributed centrally to the cytoprotective activity of riluzole as hsf1 gene knockout negated the synergistic activity of riluzole and conditioning heat shock to confer cell survival under oxidative stress. Evidence of a post-transcriptional mechanism for the increase in HSF1 include: quantitation of mRNA(hsf1 by RT-PCR showed no effect of either heat shock or riluzole treatment; riluzole also increased the expression of HSF1 from a CMV-promoter; analysis of the turnover of HSF1 by pulse chase and immunoprecipitation show that riluzole slowed the decay of [(35S]labeled-HSF1. The effect of riluzole on HSF1 was qualitatively different from that of MG132 and chloroquine, inhibitors of the proteasome and lysosome, respectively, and appeared to involve the chaperone-mediated autophagy pathway as RNAi-mediated knockdown of CMA negated its effect. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that riluzole increased the amount of HSF1 to amplify the HSR for cytoprotection. Our study provides novel insight into the mechanism that regulates HSF1 turnover, and identifies the degradation of HSF1 as a target for

  19. A comprehensive assessment of geographic variation in heat tolerance and hardening capacity in populations of Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sgrò, C M; Overgaard, J; Kristensen, T N;

    2010-01-01

    knockdown temperature increased towards temperate latitudes, probably reflecting a greater capacity of temperate flies to withstand sudden temperature increases during summer in temperate Australia. Larval viability showed a quadratic association with latitude under heat stress. Thus, patterns of heat......We examined latitudinal variation in adult and larval heat tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia. Adults were assessed using static and ramping assays. Basal and hardened static heat knockdown time showed significant linear clines; heat tolerance increased towards the tropics......, particularly for hardened flies, suggesting that tropical populations have a greater hardening response. A similar pattern was evident for ramping heat knockdown time at 0.06 °C min-1 increase. There was no cline for ramping heat knockdown temperature (CTmax) at 0.1 °C min-1 increase. Acute (static) heat...

  20. Comprehensive assessment of geographic variation in heat tolerance and hardening capacity in populations of Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sgro, Carla M.; Overgaard, Johannes; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård;

    2010-01-01

    (static) heat knockdown temperature increased towards temperate latitudes, probably reflecting a greater capacity of temperate flies to withstand sudden temperature increases during summer in temperate Australia. Larval viability showed a quadratic association with latitude under heat stress. Thus......We examined latitudinal variation in adult and larval heat tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia. Adults were assessed using static and ramping assays. Basal and hardened static heat knockdown time showed significant linear clines; heat tolerance increased towards the tropics......, particularly for hardened flies, suggesting that tropical populations have a greater hardening response. A similar pattern was evident for ramping heat knockdown time at 0.06 degrees C min-1 increase. There was no cline for ramping heat knockdown temperature (CTmax) at 0.1 degrees C min-1 increase. Acute...

  1. Spectral hole-burning and carrier-heating dynamics in InGaAs quantum-dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher;

    2000-01-01

    The ultrafast gain and index dynamics in a set of InAs-InGaAs-GaAs quantum-dot (QD) amplifiers are measured at room temperature with femtosecond resolution. The role of spectral hole-burning (SHB) and carrier heating (CH) in the recovery of gain compression is investigated in detail. An ultrafast...... recovery of the spectral hole within ~100 fs is measured, comparable to bulk and quantum-well amplifiers, which is contradicting a carrier relaxation bottleneck in electrically pumped QD devices. The CH dynamics in the QD is quantitatively compared with results on an InGaAsP bulk amplifier. Reduced CH for...... both gain and refractive index dynamics of the QD devices is found, which is a promising prerequisite for high-speed applications. This reduction is attributed to reduced free-carrier absorption-induced heating caused by the small carrier density necessary to provide amplification in these low...

  2. Drosophila melanogaster Hsp22: a mitochondrial small heat shock protein influencing the aging process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve eMorrow

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved in many key cellular processes and therefore need to rely on good protein quality control (PQC. Three types of mechanisms are in place to insure mitochondrial protein integrity: reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging by anti-oxidant enzymes, protein folding/degradation by molecular chaperones and proteases and clearance of defective mitochondria by mitophagy. Drosophila melanogaster Hsp22 is part of the molecular chaperone axis of the PQC and is characterized by its intra-mitochondrial localization and preferential expression during aging. As a stress biomarker, the level of its expression during aging has been shown to partially predict the remaining lifespan of flies. Since over-expression of this small heat shock protein (sHSP increases lifespan and resistance to stress, Hsp22 most likely has a positive effect on mitochondrial integrity. Accordingly, Hsp22 has recently been implicated in the mitochondrial unfolding protein response (mtUPR of flies. This review will summarize the key findings on D. melanogaster Hsp22 and emphasis on its links with the aging process.

  3. Selection of an efficient power supply and heat dissipation of multi-channel power amplifiers in APAA

    OpenAIRE

    Chukhmanov, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    When increasing a range of radar with an active phased antenna array (APAA) it is needed to generate pulses of increased power. To solve this problem, we use the multi-channel power amplifiers (MCPA) with extreme power levels under certain restrictions. Their practical implementation in radar is determined by an appropriate selection of efficient power supply and heat dissipation of the output transistors. From a variety of component units and products, as well as from constructive and techno...

  4. Responses of antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins in drosophila to treatment with a pesticide mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doganlar Oguzhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a mixture of seven pesticides were examined on the expression of antioxidant enzymes, Mn superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione synthetase (GS, and heat shock proteins (HSP 26, 60, 70 and 83 in adult fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster Oregon R. The flies were reared under controlled conditions on artificial diets and treated with a mixture of seven pesticides (molinate, thiobencarb, linuron, phorate, primiphos-methyl, fenvalerate and lambda-cyhalothrin commonly found in water, at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5 and 1 parts per billion (ppb for 1 and 5 days. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis of Mn-SOD, CAT and GS expression revealed that the analyzed markers responded significantly to pesticide-induced oxidative stress, in particular on the 5th day of treatment. On the 1st day of treatment, the relative expression of HSP26 and HSP60 genes increased only after exposure to the highest concentrations of pesticides, whereas HSP70 and HSP83 expression increased after exposure to 0.5 and 1 ppb. After five days of treatment, the expression of all HSP genes was increased after exposure to all pesticide concentrations. A positive correlation was determined between the relative expression levels of some HSPs (except HSP60, and antioxidant genes. The observed changes in antioxidant enzyme and HSP mRNA levels in D. melanogaster suggest that the permissible limits of pesticide concentrations for clean drinking water outlined in the regulations of several countries are potentially cytotoxic. The presented findings lend support for reevaluation of these limits.

  5. Primary sequence of the 5' flanking regions of the Drosophila heat shock genes in chromosome subdivision 67B.

    OpenAIRE

    Ingolia, T D; Craig, E A

    1981-01-01

    The 5' flanking regions of the four small heat shock genes of Drosophila melanogaster from cytological locus 67B have been characterized. Approximately 500 bp of the primary sequence upstream from the proposed site of initiation of translation has been determined and the 5' end of the messenger RNAs have been localized for each gene. Each of the four genes contains an A-T rich sequence, either TATAAATA or TATAAAAG, which is flanked by a G-C rich region. This A-T rich sequence, which ends abou...

  6. QTL for the thermotolerance effect of heat hardening, knowckdown resistance to heat and chill-coma recovery in an intercontinental set of recombinant inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norry, Fabian M.; Scannapieco, Alejandra C.; Sambucetti, Pablo;

    2008-01-01

    The thermotolerance effect of heat hardening (also called short-term acclimation), knockdown resistance to high temperature (KRHT) with and without heat hardening and chill-coma recovery (CCR) are important phenotypes of thermal adaptation in insects and other organisms. Drosophila melanogaster f...

  7. Heat shock response in Chinese hamster (DHFR/sup -/) cells transfected with mouse DHFR and drosophila HSP70 genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the role of the M/sub r/ = 70,000 heat shock protein (hsp70) in mammalian cells in response to heat shock, the authors transfected CHO-DHFR/sup -/ cells with the recombinant vectors pSV2-DHFR (cell lines G and M) or with pSV2-DHFR-hsp70 (cell lines H and L). Both vectors express the DHFR gene, with the latter vector containing all the regulatory, coding and termination sequences for the gene coding for hsp70 from Drosophila melanogaster. The parental cell line (CHO-DHFR/sup -/) shows the induction of several hsps (including hsp70, hsp 68 and hsp110) after a 450C heat shock. Some transfected cell lines (M and L) showed a reduced level of hsp110 and failed to show any detectable hsp68 synthesis after a 450C heat shock. A non-tranfected, methotrexate-resistant CHO cell line that expresses high DHFR activity also fails to express or shows very reduced levels of hsp68 after a heat shock. The authors also tranfected cells (G and H) that do express hsp68 and hsp110 after a heat shock. They are currently investigating the effects of hsp68 and DHFR expression on growth and thermotolerance in these cell lines. The authors conclude that there are sequences present in the vector pSV2-DHFR (possibly the DHFR gene) that may be involved in hsp68 expression

  8. Numerical evaluation of heat deposition in cryogenically cooled multi-slab amplifier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sawicka, Magdalena; Divoký, Martin; Novák, Jakub; Mocek, Tomáš; Rus, Bedřich

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2011 - (Hein, J.; Silva, L.; Korn, G.; Gizz, L.; Edwards, C.), 80800C/1-80800C/6. (Proceedings of the SPIE. 8080). ISBN 9780819486707. [Diode-Pumped High Energy and High Power Lasers; ELI: Ultrarelativistic Laser-Matter Interactions and Petawatt Photonics. Prague (CZ), 18.04.2011-20.04.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027 Grant ostatní: ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : amplifiers * crystals * laser amplifiers * laser crystals * ytterbium Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  9. Extension of Drosophila lifespan by Rosa damascena associated with an increased sensitivity to heat

    OpenAIRE

    Schriner, Samuel E.; Katoozi, Niki S.; Pham, Kevin Q.; Gazarian, Maral; Zarban, Asghar; Jafari, Mahtab

    2011-01-01

    Rosa damascena, or Damask rose, is a rose hybrid commonly harvested for rose oil used in perfumery and for rose water used to flavor food. The petal extract of R. damascena was recently found to decrease Drosophila melanogaster mortality without impairing reproductive fitness or metabolic rate. Here, we report that R. damascena extended both mean and maximum lifespan of the fly. The extract also protected against oxidative stress in flies, predominantly in females. However, it did not alter m...

  10. Design study of a G-band FEL amplifier for application to cyclotron resonant heating in magnetic fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, H. P.; Read, M. E.; Jackson, R. H.; Pershing, D. E.; Taccetti, J. M.

    1995-04-01

    A G-band (140-150 GHz) free-electron laser is described using a coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler. The CHI wiggler is produced by insertion into a solenoid of a central rod and an outer ring composed of alternating ferrite and nonferrite spacers. The position of the spacers is such that the ferrite (nonferrite) spacers on the central rod are opposite the nonferrite (ferrite) spacers on the outer ring. The field is cylindrically symmetric and exhibits minima in the center of the gap providing for enhanced beam focusing. We describe a tapered wiggler amplifier for plasma heating applications. Preliminary design studies using a nonlinear simulation indicates that output powers of 3.5 MW are possible using a 690 kV/40 A electron beam for a total efficiency of 13%. It is important to note that no beam loss was observed even for realistic values of beam energy spread.

  11. Hsp27gene in Drosophila ananassae subgroup was split by a recently acquired intron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LI ZHANG; HAN KANG; SHAN JIN; QING TAO ZENG; YONG YANG

    2016-06-01

    InDrosophila , heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is a critical single-copy intron-free nuclear gene involved in the defense responseagainst fungi and bacteria, and is a regulator of adult lifespan. In the present study, 33 homologousHsp27nucleotide sequencesfrom differentDrosophilaspecies were amplified by PCR and reverse transcription PCR, and the phylogenetic relationshipswere analysed using neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian methods. The phylogenetic topologies from anal-ysis with different algorithms were similar, suggesting that theHsp27gene was split by a recently acquired intron during theevolution of theDrosophila ananassaesubgroup

  12. Thermosensory and Nonthermosensory Isoforms of Drosophila melanogaster TRPA1 Reveal Heat-Sensor Domains of a ThermoTRP Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixian Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialized somatosensory neurons detect temperatures ranging from pleasantly cool or warm to burning hot and painful (nociceptive. The precise temperature ranges sensed by thermally sensitive neurons is determined by tissue-specific expression of ion channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP family. We show here that in Drosophila, TRPA1 is required for the sensing of nociceptive heat. We identify two previously unidentified protein isoforms of dTRPA1, named dTRPA1-C and dTRPA1-D, that explain this requirement. A dTRPA1-C/D reporter was exclusively expressed in nociceptors, and dTRPA1-C rescued thermal nociception phenotypes when restored to mutant nociceptors. However, surprisingly, we find that dTRPA1-C is not a direct heat sensor. Alternative splicing generates at least four isoforms of dTRPA1. Our analysis of these isoforms reveals a 37-amino-acid-long intracellular region (encoded by a single exon that is critical for dTRPA1 temperature responses. The identification of these amino acids opens the door to a biophysical understanding of a molecular thermosensor.

  13. Analyses of promoter-proximal pausing by RNA polymerase II on the hsp70 heat shock gene promoter in a Drosophila nuclear extract.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, B.; Weber, J. A.; Chen, Y; Greenleaf, A L; Gilmour, D S

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of Drosophila cells have revealed that RNA polymerase II is paused in a region 20 to 40 nucleotides downstream from the transcription start site of the hsp70 heat shock gene when the gene is not transcriptionally active. We have developed a cell-free system that reconstitutes this promoter-proximal pausing. The paused polymerase has been detected by monitoring the hyperreactivity of thymines in the transcription bubble toward potassium permanganate. The pattern of permanganate reacti...

  14. Heat-shock puff 93 D from Drosophila melanogaster: accumulation of a RNP-specific antigen associated with giant particles of possible storage function.

    OpenAIRE

    Dangli, A; Grond, C; Kloetzel, P; Bautz, E K

    1983-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody P11 is directed against a 38 000 dalton protein of Drosophila melanogaster. On polytene chromosomes this protein is present in a subset of the RNA polymerase II-containing loci. Here we show by density centrifugation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests that the P11 antigen is part of nuclear ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. Indirect immunofluorescence shows that, after prolonged heat-shock, the P11 antigen is present only in the heat-shock puff 93 D. Identica...

  15. Expression of the major heat shock gene of Drosophila melanogaster in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    de Banzie, J S; Sinclair, L; Lis, J T

    1986-01-01

    A copy of the gene which encodes the major heat shock protein (hsp70) of D. melanogaster was integrated in both orientations into the genome of S. cerevisiae at the leu2 locus. The level of transcript from the D. melanogaster gene was measured under both normal conditions and conditions which are known to give rise to the heat shock response in S. cerevisiae. In both orientations the D. melanogaster gene gave rise to an abundant transcript in uninduced cells. The level of this transcript was ...

  16. Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins of Drosophila: identification of U1 RNA-associated proteins and their behavior during heat shock.

    OpenAIRE

    Wieben, E D; Pederson, T

    1982-01-01

    In Drosophila, two nuclear proteins of approximately 26,000 and 14,000 molecular weight are recognized by a human autoimmune antibody for mammalian ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles that contain U1 small nuclear RNA. The antibody-selected Drosophila RNP contains, in addition to these two proteins, a single RNA species that has been identified as U1 by hybridization with a cloned Drosophila U1 DNA probe. Small nuclear RNP isolated from human cells under the same conditions as used for Drosophi...

  17. Drosophila snRNP associated protein P11 which specifically binds to heat shock puff 93D reveals strong homology with hnRNP core protein A1.

    OpenAIRE

    Hovemann, Bernhard; Dessen, Eliana; Mechler, Hans; Mack, Elke

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated cDNAs coding for a ribonucleoprotein of Drosophila melanogaster that is distinguished by its nearly exclusive presence at only one of the several heat shock puffs in polytene chromosomes of third instar larvae. We determined the nucleotide sequence and deduced the corresponding amino acid sequence. Its coding capacity for a 39 kDa protein is consistent with the size of the protein detected by the monoclonal antibody P11 used for expression cloning. Our results show that the P...

  18. Sex specific effects of heat induced hormesis in Hsf-deficient Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J G; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Kristensen, K V;

    2007-01-01

    In insects mild heat stress early in life has been reported to increase life span and heat resistance later in life, a phenomenon termed hormesis. Here, we test if the induction of the heat shock response by mild heat stress is mediating hormesis in longevity and heat resistance at older age. To...... test this hypothesis we used two heat shock transcription factor (Hsf) mutant stocks. One stock harbours a mutation giving rise to a heat sensitive Hsf which inactivates the heat shock response at high temperature and the other is a rescued mutant giving rise to a wild-type phenotype. We measured...... longevity, heat resistance and expression level of a heat shock protein, Hsp70, in controls and mildly heat treated flies. We found a marked difference between males and females with males showing a beneficial effect of the early heat treatment on longevity and heat resistance later in life in the rescued...

  19. Operational amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Dostal, Jiri

    1993-01-01

    This book provides the reader with the practical knowledge necessary to select and use operational amplifier devices. It presents an extensive treatment of applications and a practically oriented, unified theory of operational circuits.Provides the reader with practical knowledge necessary to select and use operational amplifier devices. Presents an extensive treatment of applications and a practically oriented, unified theory of operational circuits

  20. Aging Will Amplify the Heat-related Mortality Risk under a Changing Climate: Projection for the Elderly in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiantian; Horton, Radley M.; Bader, Daniel A.; Zhou, Maigeng; Liang, Xudong; Ban, Jie; Sun, Qinghua; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-06-01

    An aging population could substantially enhance the burden of heat-related health risks in a warming climate because of their higher susceptibility to extreme heat health effects. Here, we project heat-related mortality for adults 65 years and older in Beijing China across 31 downscaled climate models and 2 representative concentration pathways (RCPs) in the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Under a scenario of medium population and RCP8.5, by the 2080s, Beijing is projected to experience 14,401 heat-related deaths per year for elderly individuals, which is a 264.9% increase compared with the 1980s. These impacts could be moderated through adaptation. In the 2080s, even with the 30% and 50% adaptation rate assumed in our study, the increase in heat-related death is approximately 7.4 times and 1.3 times larger than in the 1980s respectively under a scenario of high population and RCP8.5. These findings could assist countries in establishing public health intervention policies for the dual problems of climate change and aging population. Examples could include ensuring facilities with large elderly populations are protected from extreme heat (for example through back-up power supplies and/or passive cooling) and using databases and community networks to ensure the home-bound elderly are safe during extreme heat events.

  1. Transfection of Chinese hamster ovary DHFR/sup -/ cells with the gene coding for heat shock protein 70 from drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinese hamster ovary DHFR/sup -/ cells (CHO-DHFR/sup -/) were transfected with the plasmid pSV2-dhfr expressing the mouse gene coding for dhfr or with the same plasmid containing the gene coding for the Drosophila melanogaster heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), pSVd-hsp70. Three subcloned cell lines selected for expression of the dhfr gene were shown to contain either the vector sequence (G cells) or varying copies of pSVd-hsp70 (H cells). One line of H cells was shown to contain > 30 copies of the D. melanogaster hsp70 gene and to express the hsp70 RNA at significant levels. No difference between G and H cells was observed in the rate of growth, in the development of thermotolerance, or in the sensitivity of actin microfilament bundles to heat shock. However, H cells containing the transfected hsp70 gene had an altered morphology when compared to the G cells and the parental CHO-DHFR/sup -/ cells being more fibroblastic. The adhesion properties of the H cells was also decreased when compared to the G cells. These results show that insertion of the D. melanogaster gene into CHO cells does not effect growth rates or heat shock responses but may alter cell morphology and adhesion

  2. Aging Will Amplify the Heat-Related Mortality Risk Under a Changing Climate: Projection for the Elderly in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiantian; Horton, Radley M.; Bader, Daniel A.; Zhou, Maigeng; Liang, Xudong; Ban, Jie; Sun, Qinghua; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    An aging population could substantially enhance the burden of heat-related health risks in a warming climate because of their higher susceptibility to extreme heat health effects. Here, we project heatrelated mortality for adults 65 years and older in Beijing China across 31 downscaled climate models and 2 representative concentration pathways (RCPs) in the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Under a scenario of medium population and RCP8.5, by the 2080s, Beijing is projected to experience 14,401 heat-related deaths per year for elderly individuals, which is a 264.9% increase compared with the 1980s. These impacts could be moderated through adaptation. In the 2080s, even with the 30% and 50% adaptation rate assumed in our study, the increase in heat-related death is approximately 7.4 times and 1.3 times larger than in the 1980s respectively under a scenario of high population and RCP8.5. These findings could assist countries in establishing public health intervention policies for the dual problems of climate change and aging population. Examples could include ensuring facilities with large elderly populations are protected from extreme heat (for example through back-up power supplies and/or passive cooling) and using databases and community networks to ensure the home-bound elderly are safe during extreme heat events.

  3. The long-term effects of a life-prolonging heat treatment on the Drosophila melanogaster transcriptome suggest that heat shock proteins extend lifespan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Peter; Loeschcke, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Heat-induced hormesis, i.e. the beneficial effect of mild heat-induced stress, increases the average lifespan of many organisms. This effect, which depends on the heat shock factor, decreases the log mortality rate weeks after the stress has ceased. To identify candidate genes that mediate this l...... conclude that the heat shock response, and Hsp70 in particular, may be central to the heat-induced increase in the average lifespan in flies that are exposed to mild heat stress early in life.......Heat-induced hormesis, i.e. the beneficial effect of mild heat-induced stress, increases the average lifespan of many organisms. This effect, which depends on the heat shock factor, decreases the log mortality rate weeks after the stress has ceased. To identify candidate genes that mediate this...... lifespan-prolonging effect late in life, we treated flies with mild heat stress (34 °C for 2 h) 3 times early in life and compared the transcriptomic response in these flies versus non-heat-treated controls 10–51 days after the last heat treatment. We found significant transcriptomic changes in the heat...

  4. A micropower electrocardiogram amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, L; Misra, V; Sarpeshkar, R

    2009-10-01

    We introduce an electrocardiogram (EKG) preamplifier with a power consumption of 2.8 muW, 8.1 muVrms input-referred noise, and a common-mode rejection ratio of 90 dB. Compared to previously reported work, this amplifier represents a significant reduction in power with little compromise in signal quality. The improvement in performance may be attributed to many optimizations throughout the design including the use of subthreshold transistor operation to improve noise efficiency, gain-setting capacitors versus resistors, half-rail operation wherever possible, optimal power allocations among amplifier blocks, and the sizing of devices to improve matching and reduce noise. We envision that the micropower amplifier can be used as part of a wireless EKG monitoring system powered by rectified radio-frequency energy or other forms of energy harvesting like body vibration and body heat. PMID:23853270

  5. Mild heat stress at a young age in Drosophila melanogaster leads to increased Hsp70 synthesis after stress exposure later in life

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Torsten Nygaard Kristensen; Jesper Givskov Sørensen; Volker Loeschcke

    2003-12-01

    In a number of animal species it has been shown that exposure to low levels of stress at a young age has a positive effect on stress resistance later in life, and on longevity. The positive effects have been attributed to the activation of defence/cleaning systems (heat shock proteins (Hsps), antioxidases, DNA repair) or to effects of a changed metabolic rate, or both. We investigated the effect of mild stress exposures early in life on Hsp70 synthesis after a harder stress exposure later in life in five isofemale lines of Drosophila melanogaster. Female flies were either exposed to repeated bouts of mild heat stress (3 h at 34°C) at a young age (days 2, 4 and 6 post-eclosion) or held under standard laboratory conditions. At 16 and 32 days of adult age, respectively, flies were exposed to a high temperature treatment known to induce Hsp70 in the investigated species (1 h at 37°ºC). Thereafter, the inducible Hsp70 levels were measured. Our data show a tendency towards increased Hsp70 synthesis with increased age for both ‘mild stress’ and ‘no stress’ flies. Moreover, the results show that flies exposed to mild stress at a young age synthesized more Hsp70 upon induction, compared to control flies, and that this difference was accentuated at 32 days compared to 16 days of age. Thus, bouts of mild heat stress at a young age impact on the physiological stress response system later in life. This may be caused by an increased ability to react to future stresses. Alternatively, the mild stress exposure at a young age may actually have caused cellular damages increasing the need for Hsp70 levels after stress exposure later in life. The importance of an Hsp70 upregulation (throughout life) in explaining the phenomenon of hormesis is discussed, together with alternative hypotheses, and suggestions for further studies.

  6. Characterization of novel microsatellites from Drosophila transversa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, L; Roininen, E; Liimatainen, J O

    2009-03-01

    We investigated a partial genomic library of Drosophila transversa for microsatellites and developed 12 markers for genetic analyses. This is the first time that microsatellite primers from the quinaria species group have been described. Four loci were cross-amplified in D. phalerata. Nine out of the 12 microsatellite markers developed are likely to be on the X chromosome. PMID:21564716

  7. Gene expression changes in response to aging compared to heat stress, oxidative stress and ionizing radiation in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Landis, Gary; Shen, Jie; Tower, John

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression changes in response to aging, heat stress, hyperoxia, hydrogen peroxide, and ionizing radiation were compared using microarrays. A set of 18 genes were up-regulated across all conditions, indicating a general stress response shared with aging, including the heat shock protein (Hsp) genes Hsp70, Hsp83 and l(2)efl, the glutathione-S-transferase gene GstD2, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mUPR) gene ref(2)P. Selected gene expression changes were confirmed using q...

  8. Low cost instrumentation amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Amplifier can be used for many applications requiring high input impedance and common mode rejection, low drift, and gain accuracy on order of one percent. Performance of inexpensive amplifier approaches that of some commercial instrumentation amplifiers in many specifications.

  9. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  10. A knock-in model of human epilepsy in Drosophila reveals a novel cellular mechanism associated with heat-induced seizure

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Lei; Gilligan, Jeff; Staber, Cynthia; Schutte, Ryan J; Nguyen, Vivian; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Reenan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Over 40 missense mutations in the human SCN1A sodium channel gene are linked to an epilepsy syndrome termed genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). Inheritance of GEFS+ is dominant but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report knock-in of a GEFS+ SCN1A mutation (K1270T) into the Drosophila sodium channel gene, para, causes a semi-dominant temperature-induced seizure phenotype. Electrophysiological studies of GABAergic interneurons in the brains o...

  11. The Dynamic Nuclear Redistribution of an hnRNP K-homologous Protein during Drosophila Embryo Development and Heat Shock. Flexibility of Transcription Sites In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Buchenau, Peter; Saumweber, Harald; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.

    1997-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Hrb57A has sequence homology to mammalian heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K proteins. Its in vivo distribution has been studied at high resolution by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in embryos injected with fluorescently labeled monoclonal antibody. Injection of antibody into living embryos had no apparent deleterious effects on further development. Furthermore, the antibody-protein complex could be observed for more than 7 cell cycles in vivo, ...

  12. Gain ranging amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gain ranging amplifier system is provided for use in the acquisition of data. Voltage offset compensation is utilized to correct errors in the gain ranging amplifier system caused by thermal drift and temperature dependent voltage offsets, both of which are associated with amplifiers in the gain ranging amplifier system

  13. Amplified Quantum Transforms

    OpenAIRE

    Cornwell, David

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate two new Amplified Quantum Transforms. In particular we create and analyze the Amplified Quantum Fourier Transform (Amplified-QFT) and the Amplified-Haar Wavelet Transform. First, we provide a brief history of quantum mechanics and quantum computing. Second, we examine the Amplified-QFT in detail and compare it against the Quantum Fourier Transform (QFT) and Quantum Hidden Subgroup (QHS) algorithms for solving the Local Period Problem. We calculate the probabiliti...

  14. Portable musical instrument amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, David E. (Danbury, CT)

    1990-07-24

    The present invention relates to a musical instrument amplifier which is particularly useful for electric guitars. The amplifier has a rigid body for housing both the electronic system for amplifying and processing signals from the guitar and the system's power supply. An input plug connected to and projecting from the body is electrically coupled to the signal amplifying and processing system. When the plug is inserted into an output jack for an electric guitar, the body is rigidly carried by the guitar, and the guitar is operatively connected to the electrical amplifying and signal processing system without use of a loose interconnection cable. The amplifier is provided with an output jack, into which headphones are plugged to receive amplified signals from the guitar. By eliminating the conventional interconnection cable, the amplifier of the present invention can be used by musicians with increased flexibility and greater freedom of movement.

  15. Amplifier for nuclear spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopy amplifier model AE-020 is designed to adjust suitable the pulses coming from nuclear radiation detectors. Due to is capacity and specifications, the amplifier can be used together with high and medium resolution spectroscopy system

  16. Evidence for horizontal transfer of Wolbachia by a Drosophila mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy N; Lloyd, Vett K

    2015-07-01

    Mites are common ectoparasites of Drosophila and have been implicated in bacterial and mobile element invasion of Drosophila stocks. The obligate endobacterium, Wolbachia, has widespread effects on gene expression in their arthropod hosts and alters host reproduction to enhance its survival and propagation, often with deleterious effects in Drosophila hosts. To determine whether Wolbachia could be transferred between Drosophila melanogaster laboratory stocks by the mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae, mites were introduced to Wolbachia-infected Drosophila vials. These vials were kept adjacent to mite-free and Wolbachia-uninfected Drosophila stock vials. The Wolbachia infection statuses of the infected and uninfected flies were checked from generation 1 to 5. Results indicate that Wolbachia DNA could be amplified from mites infesting Wolbachia-infected fly stocks and infection in the previously uninfected stocks arose within generation 1 or 2, concomitant with invasion of mites from the Wolbachia-infected stock. A possible mechanism for the transfer of Wolbachia from flies to mites and vice versa, can be inferred from time-lapse photography of fly and mite interactions. We demonstrated that mites ingest Drosophila corpses, including Wolbachia-infected corpses, and Drosophila larva ingest mites, providing possible sources of Wolbachia infection and transfer. This research demonstrated that T. putrescentiae white mites can facilitate Wolbachia transfer between Drosophila stocks and that this may occur by ingestion of infected corpses. Mite-vectored Wolbachia transfer allows for rapid establishment of Wolbachia infection within a new population. This mode of Wolbachia introduction may be relevant in nature as well as in the laboratory, and could have a variety of biological consequences. PMID:25921489

  17. High voltage distributed amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, D.; Bahl, I.; Wirsing, K.

    1991-12-01

    A high-voltage distributed amplifier implemented in GaAs MMIC technology has demonstrated good circuit performance over at least two octave bandwidth. This technique allows for very broadband amplifier operation with good efficiency in satellite, active-aperture radar, and battery-powered systems. Also, by increasing the number of FETs, the amplifier can be designed to match different voltage rails. The circuit does require a small amount of additional chip size over conventional distributed amplifiers but does not require power dividers or additional matching networks. This circuit configuration should find great use in broadband power amplifier design.

  18. Molecular diagnostics of Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Using PCR-RFLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sh S; Tripodi, A D; Johnson, D T; Szalanski, A L

    2014-06-01

    The invasive spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), has become a serious pest in the United States. Identification of immature and poorly preserved specimens can be difficult. A molecular diagnostic method for distinguishing D. suzukii from other Drosophila spp. associated with fruit in the United States was developed. A 709-bp region of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I gene was amplified from D. suzukii collections in the United States and compared with sequences of other Drosophila taxa from GenBank. Based on DNA sequence polymorphisms, a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis using the restriction enzyme Msp-I was found to differentiate D. suzukii from other Drosophila spp. in the United States. This technique can identify field-collected specimens from various sources and specimens regardless of life stage. This molecular diagnostic method will be useful for monitoring the spread of this economically important invasive insect. PMID:25026695

  19. RF Power Amplifier Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    M. Lokay; K. Pelikan

    1993-01-01

    The special program is presented for the demonstration of RF power transistor amplifiers for the purposes of the high-school education in courses of radio transmitters. The program is written in Turbo Pascal 6. 0 and enables to study the waveforms in selected points of the amplifier and to draw the trajectories of the working point in a plot of output transistor characteristics.

  20. Amplifier improvement circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, J.

    1968-01-01

    Stable input stage was designed for the use with a integrated circuit operational amplifier to provide improved performance as an instrumentation-type amplifier. The circuit provides high input impedance, stable gain, good common mode rejection, very low drift, and low output impedance.

  1. Adult Neurogenesis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Fernández-Hernández; Christa Rhiner; Eduardo Moreno

    2013-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been linked to several cognitive functions and neurological disorders. Description of adult neurogenesis in a model organism like Drosophila could facilitate the genetic study of normal and abnormal neurogenesis in the adult brain. So far, formation of new neurons has not been detected in adult fly brains and hence has been thought to be absent in Drosophila. Here, we used an improved lineage-labeling method to show that, surprisingly, adult neurogenesis occurs in the m...

  2. Drosophila egg chamber elongation

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Julie

    2012-01-01

    As tissues and organs are formed, they acquire a specific shape that plays an integral role in their ability to function properly. A relatively simple system that has been used to examine how tissues and organs are shaped is the formation of an elongated Drosophila egg. While it has been known for some time that Drosophila egg elongation requires interactions between a polarized intracellular basal actin network and a polarized extracellular network of basal lamina proteins, how these interac...

  3. Semiconductor optical amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Niloy K

    2013-01-01

    This invaluable look provides a comprehensive treatment of design and applications of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA). SOA is an important component for optical communication systems. It has applications as in-line amplifiers and as functional devices in evolving optical networks. The functional applications of SOAs were first studied in the early 1990's, since then the diversity and scope of such applications have been steadily growing. This is the second edition of a book on Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers first published in 2006 by the same authors. Several chapters and sections rep

  4. RF Power Amplifier Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lokay

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available The special program is presented for the demonstration of RF power transistor amplifiers for the purposes of the high-school education in courses of radio transmitters. The program is written in Turbo Pascal 6. 0 and enables to study the waveforms in selected points of the amplifier and to draw the trajectories of the working point in a plot of output transistor characteristics.

  5. Noise in Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1997-01-01

    Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived.......Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived....

  6. Charge-sensitive amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Startsev V. I.; Yampolsky Ju. S.

    2008-01-01

    The authors consider design and circuit design techniques of reduction of the influence of the pyroelectric effect on operation of the charge sensitive amplifiers. The presented experimental results confirm the validity of the measures taken to reduce the impact of pyroelectric currents. Pyroelectric currents are caused by the influence of the temperature gradient on the piezoelectric sensor and on the output voltage of charge sensitive amplifiers.

  7. E-537 MWPC amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a fast MWPC amplifier for the beam chambers and the absorber chamber is completed and all parts are on order. A prototype 16 channel board has been built and satisfactorily tested. Artwork is completed for the board and out to be photographed. The board fabrication contract has been let. Listed below is a summary of the amplifier characteristics as well as test results obtained with the prototype

  8. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    A lot of research is focused on all-optical signal processing, aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for an efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods, involving high-temperature processes performed in highly pure environment, slow down the fabrication and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, ...

  9. Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation

  10. A vircator amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cavity vircator has demonstrated that formation of a virtual cathode in a cavity can improve microwave production efficiency and narrow the radiation bandwidth. When the virtual cathode radiates the microwave fields grow from noise. For each cavity, there is only one or a limited number of allowable modes for a given frequency. In this paper, a novel device - a vircator amplifier is described. The device consists of a relativistic magnetron and a cavity vircator with both devices powered by a 1 MeV, 3 Ω, 65 ns FWHM pulser. The idea is to inject a signal from the magnetron before and during virtual cathode formation in a cavity. The injected signal should lock the frequency and enhance electron bunching and therefore improve efficiency further. Experiments underway to evaluate the amplifier operating characteristics are discussed. The applicability of vircator amplifiers to the next generation of high-power microwave devices are addressed

  11. Drosophila Rhomboid-1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stříšovský, Kvido

    Amsterdam : Academic Press, 2013 - (Salvesen, G.), s. 3563-3567 ISBN 978-0-12-382219-2 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/1886; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11206 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : rhomboid * intramembrane protease * Drosophila Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  12. Cancer in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Héctor; Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Cancer genomics has greatly increased our understanding of the complexity of the genetic and epigenetic changes found in human tumors. Understanding the functional relationships among these elements calls for the use of flexible genetic models. We discuss the use of Drosophila models to study...

  13. STABILIZED TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, J.B.

    1963-05-01

    A temperature stabilized transistor amplifier having a pair of transistors coupled in cascade relation that are capable of providing amplification through a temperature range of - 100 un. Concent 85% F to 400 un. Concent 85% F described. The stabilization of the amplifier is attained by coupling a feedback signal taken from the emitter of second transistor at a junction between two serially arranged biasing resistances in the circuit of the emitter of the second transistor to the base of the first transistor. Thus, a change in the emitter current of the second transistor is automatically corrected by the feedback adjustment of the base-emitter potential of the first transistor and by a corresponding change in the base-emitter potential of the second transistor. (AEC)

  14. Principal modes in fiber amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Moti; Dubinskii, Mark; Friesem, Asher A; Davidson, Nir

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of the state of polarization in single mode and multimode fiber amplifiers are presented. The experimental results reveal that although the state of polarizations at the output can vary over a large range when changing the temperatures of the fiber amplifiers, the variations are significantly reduced when resorting to the principal states of polarization in single mode fiber amplifiers and principal modes in multimode fiber amplifiers.

  15. Helical Fiber Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Kliner, Dahy; Goldberg, Lew

    2002-12-17

    A multi-mode gain fiber is provided which affords substantial improvements in the maximum pulse energy, peak power handling capabilities, average output power, and/or pumping efficiency of fiber amplifier and laser sources while maintaining good beam quality (comparable to that of a conventional single-mode fiber source). These benefits are realized by coiling the multimode gain fiber to induce significant bend loss for all but the lowest-order mode(s).

  16. Plastic responses to four environmental stresses and cross-resistance in a laboratory population of Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubliy, Oleg A; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Kellermann, Vanessa;

    2012-01-01

    , we tested for cross-resistance using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system.Adult females were assayed for resistance to cold, heat, desiccation and starvation following cold acclimation, heat hardening, desiccation hardening and starvation acclimation, resulting in 12 pretreatment...

  17. Radio Frequency Solid State Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, J

    2015-01-01

    Solid state amplifiers are being increasingly used instead of electronic vacuum tubes to feed accelerating cavities with radio frequency power in the 100 kW range. Power is obtained from the combination of hundreds of transistor amplifier modules. This paper summarizes a one hour lecture on solid state amplifiers for accelerator applications.

  18. Development of 3 kW at 325 MHz solid-state RF power amplifier using four power amplifier modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high power solid-state RF power amplifier of 3 kW at 325 MHz has been developed using only four RF power amplifier modules of 850 W power output each. The design and characterization of RF power modules have been presented. A four way Wilkinson power combiner adds the output of four power amplifier modules with a total transmission loss of less than 6%. The combined power amplifier has a power gain of 20.2 dB at 1-dB compression point, and the corresponding output power is 2.8 kW at 325 MHz. The drain efficiency of the power amplifier is 65.3% at 3 kW. All the harmonics of this amplifier are below −40 dBc. The amplifier has better characteristics like fewer numbers of active devices per kilo watt, high efficiency, high gain, and ruggedness etc for RF accelerator applications. -- Highlights: • High gain power amplifier, power gain at 20 dB. • High efficiency amplifier, efficiency >65%. • Minimum number of modules per kilo watt power output. • Heat sink with modules on both side, high density

  19. Drosophila by the dozen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celniker, Susan E.; Hoskins, Roger A.

    2007-07-13

    This year's conference on Drosophila research illustratedwell the current focus of Drosophila genomics on the comprehensiveidentification of functional elements in the genome sequence, includingmRNA transcripts arising from multiple alternative start sites and splicesites, a multiplicity of noncoding transcripts and small RNAs,identification of binding sites for transcription factors, sequenceconservation in related species and sequence variation within species.Resources and technologies for genetics and functional genomics aresteadily being improved, including the building of collections oftransposon insertion mutants and hairpin constructs for RNA interference(RNAi). The conference also highlighted progress in the use of genomicinformation by many laboratories to study diverse aspects of biology andmodels of human disease. Here we will review a few highlights of especialinterest to readers of Genome Biology.

  20. Olfactory learning in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Nehrkorn, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Animals are able to form associative memories and benefit from past experience. In classical conditioning an animal is trained to associate an initially neutral stimulus by pairing it with a stimulus that triggers an innate response. The neutral stimulus is commonly referred to as conditioned stimulus (CS) and the reinforcing stimulus as unconditioned stimulus (US). The underlying neuronal mechanisms and structures are an intensely investigated topic. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster...

  1. Selective Autophagy in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis P. Nezis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process of cellular self-eating and is a major pathway for degradation of cytoplasmic material by the lysosomal machinery. Autophagy functions as a cellular response in nutrient starvation, but it is also associated with the removal of protein aggregates and damaged organelles and therefore plays an important role in the quality control of proteins and organelles. Although it was initially believed that autophagy occurs randomly in the cell, during the last years, there is growing evidence that sequestration and degradation of cytoplasmic material by autophagy can be selective. Given the important role of autophagy and selective autophagy in several disease-related processes such as neurodegeneration, infections, and tumorigenesis, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms of selective autophagy, especially at the organismal level. Drosophila is an excellent genetically modifiable model organism exhibiting high conservation in the autophagic machinery. However, the regulation and mechanisms of selective autophagy in Drosophila have been largely unexplored. In this paper, I will present an overview of the current knowledge about selective autophagy in Drosophila.

  2. Electronic amplifiers for automatic compensators

    CERN Document Server

    Polonnikov, D Ye

    1965-01-01

    Electronic Amplifiers for Automatic Compensators presents the design and operation of electronic amplifiers for use in automatic control and measuring systems. This book is composed of eight chapters that consider the problems of constructing input and output circuits of amplifiers, suppression of interference and ensuring high sensitivity.This work begins with a survey of the operating principles of electronic amplifiers in automatic compensator systems. The succeeding chapters deal with circuit selection and the calculation and determination of the principal characteristics of amplifiers, as

  3. Simplified design of IC amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Lenk, John

    1996-01-01

    Simplified Design of IC Amplifiers has something for everyone involved in electronics. No matter what skill level, this book shows how to design and experiment with IC amplifiers. For experimenters, students, and serious hobbyists, this book provides sufficient information to design and build IC amplifier circuits from 'scratch'. For working engineers who design amplifier circuits or select IC amplifiers, the book provides a variety of circuit configurations to make designing easier.Provides basics for all phases of practical design.Covers the most popular forms for amplif

  4. Gas cooled disk amplifier approach to solid state average power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disk amplifiers have been used on almost all solid state laser systems of high energy, and, in principle, one simply has to cool the device to operate it at average power. To achieve the desired waste heat removal, gas is flowed across the disk surface. The authors show the basic gas flow geometry. They computationally and experimentally characterize the flow and its optical implications over regimes which far exceed the envisioned operating requirements of a working amplifier

  5. Influence of mode competition on beam quality of fiber amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical and experimental studies of the influence of the mode competition on the output beam quality of fiber amplifiers are presented. Rate equations and modal decomposition method are used in the theoretical model. In the experiment, the output beam-quality factor of a fiber amplifier, which is based on a Yb-doped double-clad large mode area fiber as a function of the seed beam quality and the pump power of the amplifier, is measured. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical analysis. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  6. Building valve amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Building Valve Amplifiers is a unique hands-on guide for anyone working with tube audio equipment--as an electronics hobbyist, audiophile or audio engineer. This 2nd Edition builds on the success of the first with technology and technique revisions throughout and, significantly, a major new self-build project, worked through step-by-step, which puts into practice the principles and techniques introduced throughout the book. Particular attention has been paid to answering questions commonly asked by newcomers to the world of the valve, whether audio enthusiasts tackling their first build or

  7. Wideband amplifier design

    CERN Document Server

    Hollister, Allen L

    2007-01-01

    In this book, the theory needed to understand wideband amplifier design using the simplest models possible will be developed. This theory will be used to develop algebraic equations that describe particular circuits used in high frequency design so that the reader develops a ""gut level"" understanding of the process and circuit. SPICE and Genesys simulations will be performed to show the accuracy of the algebraic models. By looking at differences between the algebraic equations and the simulations, new algebraic models will be developed that include parameters originally left out of the model

  8. REGENERATIVE TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabell, L.J.

    1958-11-25

    Electrical circults for use in computers and the like are described. particularly a regenerative bistable transistor amplifler which is iurned on by a clock signal when an information signal permits and is turned off by the clock signal. The amplifier porforms the above function with reduced power requirements for the clock signal and circuit operation. The power requirements are reduced in one way by employing transformer coupling which increases the collector circuit efficiency by eliminating the loss of power in the collector load resistor.

  9. Quantum entanglement degrees amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Meng, Xiang-Dong; Li, Hong; Zhang, Si-Qi

    2015-01-01

    The quantum entangled degrees of entangled states become smaller with the transmission distance increasing, how to keep the purity of quantum entangled states is the puzzle in quantum communication. In the paper, we have designed a new type entanglement degrees amplifier by one-dimensional photonic crystal, which is similar as the relay station of classical electromagnetic communication. We find when the entangled states of two-photon and three-photon pass through photonic crystal, their entanglement degrees can be magnified, which make the entanglement states can be long range propagation and the quantum communication can be really realized.

  10. CARM and harmonic gyro-amplifier experiments at 17 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menninger, W.L.; Danly, B.G.; Alberti, S.; Chen, C.; Rullier, J.L.; Temkin, R.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center; Giguet, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center]|[Thomson Tubes Electroniques, Velizy (France)

    1993-11-01

    Cyclotron resonance maser amplifiers are possible sources for applications such as electron cyclotron resonance heating of fusion plasmas and driving high-gradient rf linear accelerators. For accelerator drivers, amplifiers or phase locked-oscillators are required. A 17 GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier experiment and a 17 GHz third harmonic gyro-amplifier experiment are presently underway at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Using the SRL/MIT SNOMAD II introduction accelerator to provide a 380 kV, 180 A, 30 ns flat top electron beam, the gyro-amplifier experiment has produced 5 MW of rf power with over 50 dB of gain at 17 GHz. The gyro-amplifier operates in the TE{sub 31} mode using a third harmonic interaction. Because of its high power output, the gyro-amplifier will be used as the rf source for a photocathode rf electron gun experiment also taking place at MIT. Preliminary gyro-amplifier results are presented, including measurement of rf power, gain versus interaction length, and the far-field pattern. A CARM experiment designed to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode is also discussed.

  11. CARM and harmonic gyro-amplifier experiments at 17 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyclotron resonance maser amplifiers are possible sources for applications such as electron cyclotron resonance heating of fusion plasmas and driving high-gradient rf linear accelerators. For accelerator drivers, amplifiers or phase locked-oscillators are required. A 17 GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier experiment and a 17 GHz third harmonic gyro-amplifier experiment are presently underway at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Using the SRL/MIT SNOMAD II introduction accelerator to provide a 380 kV, 180 A, 30 ns flat top electron beam, the gyro-amplifier experiment has produced 5 MW of rf power with over 50 dB of gain at 17 GHz. The gyro-amplifier operates in the TE31 mode using a third harmonic interaction. Because of its high power output, the gyro-amplifier will be used as the rf source for a photocathode rf electron gun experiment also taking place at MIT. Preliminary gyro-amplifier results are presented, including measurement of rf power, gain versus interaction length, and the far-field pattern. A CARM experiment designed to operate in the TE11 mode is also discussed

  12. DIAMOND AMPLIFIED PHOTOCATHODES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY,J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BOHON, J.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; ISAKOVIC, A.; RAO, T.; WU, Q.

    2007-11-26

    High-average-current linear electron accelerators require photoinjectors capable of delivering tens to hundreds of mA average current, with peak currents of hundreds of amps. Standard photocathodes face significant challenges in meeting these requirements, and often have short operational lifetimes in an accelerator environment. We report on recent progress toward development of secondary emission amplifiers for photocathodes, which are intended to increase the achievable average current while protecting the cathode from the accelerator. The amplifier is a thin diamond wafer which converts energetic (few keV) primary electrons into hundreds of electron-hole pairs via secondary electron emission. The electrons drift through the diamond under an external bias and are emitted into vacuum via a hydrogen-terminated surface with negative electron affinity (NEA). Secondary emission gain of over 200 has been achieved. Two methods of patterning diamond, laser ablation and reactive-ion etching (RIE), are being developed to produce the required geometry. A variety of diagnostic techniques, including FTIR, SEM and AFM, have been used to characterize the diamonds.

  13. Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Frank

    1997-01-01

    The Technological Research and Development Authority (TRDA) and NASA-KSC entered into a cooperative agreement in March of 1994 to achieve the utilization and commercialization of a technology development for benefiting both the Space Program and U.S. industry on a "dual-use basis". The technology involved in this transfer is a new, unique Universal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) used in connection with various types of transducers. The project was initiated in partnership with I-Net Corporation, Lockheed Martin Telemetry & Instrumentation (formerly Loral Test and Information Systems) and Brevard Community College. The project consists of designing, miniaturizing, manufacturing, and testing an existing prototype of USCA that was developed for NASA-KSC by the I-Net Corporation. The USCA is a rugged and field-installable self (or remotely)- programmable amplifier that works in combination with a tag random access memory (RAM) attached to various types of transducers. This summary report comprises performance evaluations, TRDA partnership tasks, a project summary, project milestones and results.

  14. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K-170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser. (authors)

  15. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, J. P.; Millet, F.; Divoky, M.; Rus, B.

    2013-11-01

    Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K-170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  16. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perin J.P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz. The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K–170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m−2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  17. Cooling of solid-state amplifiers with supercritical hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study addresses the thermal management of microwave solid-state amplifiers which are potential candidates for power systems at 425 and 850 MHz. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have investigated the cooling of extremely high density packaging of RF amplifier modules with a heat removal requirement of about 200 W/cm2. The technique uses water as a coolant which flows into the microchannels directly imbedded in the chips. The microchannel concept was first proposed by Tuckerman and Pease in 1981 and is capable of removing up to 1 kW/cm2 from silicon integrated circuits using water as the coolant. Previous studies, have demonstrated that on-board supercritical hydrogen can be used to cool solid-state amplifiers. Even though the heat transfer coefficient is lower for hydrogen compared to water, this deficiency is recouped by having a colder heat sink which is hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures

  18. Characterisation Of Low Noise Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    MAULIK B.PATEL; ABHISEK CHOBEY; SUNIL B.PATEL

    2012-01-01

    Amplification is one of the most basic and prevalent microwave circuit functions inmodern RF and microwave systems. Early microwave amplifiers relied on tubes, such asklystrons and traveling-wave tubes, or solid-state reflection amplifiers based on thenegative resistance characteristics of tunnel or varactor diodes. But due to the dramaticimprovements and innovations in solid-state technology that have occurred since the1970s, most RF and microwave amplifiers today use transistor devices such...

  19. Modeling of semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Bischoff, Svend; Berg, Tommy Winther;

    We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed.......We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed....

  20. Amplified leak detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahony, James

    2011-12-15

    Leaks are one of the major concerns for oil and gas producers. But recently, a Calgary-based company developed a tool that can find natural gas leaks in wellbores. This has relieved the oil and gas producers because the optics of finding downhole leaks just got a little brighter. Since then, there have been continuous efforts to broaden and refine fiber optics based methods. This paper presents amplified leak detection using fiber optics to identify even the smallest liquid leaks downhole. At high volumes, detection of downhole leaks in liquids is not a problem but at lower flow rates, the leaks become harder to detect, and at very low flow rates, they might not be detected at all. Hifi Engineering Inc. has developed the LeakSonar fiber optic acoustic sensor array that is specifically designed to detect and locate fluid migration in wellbores, even through multiple strings of casing.

  1. Metatronic transistor amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettiar, Uday K.; Engheta, Nader

    2015-10-01

    Utilizing the notion of metamaterials, in recent years the concept of a circuit and lumped circuit elements have been extended to the optical domains, providing the paradigm of optical metatronics, i.e., metamaterial-inspired optical nanocircuitry, as a powerful tool for design and study of more complex systems at the nanoscale. In this paper we present a design for a new metatronic element, namely, a metatronic transistor that functions as an amplifier. As shown by our analytical and numerical paper here, this metatronic transistor provides gain as well as isolation between the input and output ports of such two-port device. The cascadability and fan-out aspects of this element are also explored.

  2. SUMOylation in Drosophila Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert J. Courey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO, an ~90 amino acid ubiquitin-like protein, is highly conserved throughout the eukaryotic domain. Like ubiquitin, SUMO is covalently attached to lysine side chains in a large number of target proteins. In contrast to ubiquitin, SUMO does not have a direct role in targeting proteins for proteasomal degradation. However, like ubiquitin, SUMO does modulate protein function in a variety of other ways. This includes effects on protein conformation, subcellular localization, and protein–protein interactions. Significant insight into the in vivo role of SUMOylation has been provided by studies in Drosophila that combine genetic manipulation, proteomic, and biochemical analysis. Such studies have revealed that the SUMO conjugation pathway regulates a wide variety of critical cellular and developmental processes, including chromatin/chromosome function, eggshell patterning, embryonic pattern formation, metamorphosis, larval and pupal development, neurogenesis, development of the innate immune system, and apoptosis. This review discusses our current understanding of the diverse roles for SUMO in Drosophila development.

  3. Initial neurogenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenstein, Volker; Wodarz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Early neurogenesis comprises the phase of nervous system development during which neural progenitor cells are born. In early development, the embryonic ectoderm is subdivided by a conserved signaling mechanism into two main domains, the epidermal ectoderm and the neurectoderm. Subsequently, cells of the neurectoderm are internalized and form a cell layer of proliferating neural progenitors. In vertebrates, the entire neurectoderm folds into the embryo to give rise to the neural tube. In Drosophila and many other invertebrates, a subset of neurectodermal cells, called neuroblasts (NBs), delaminates and forms the neural primordium inside the embryo where they divide in an asymmetric, stem cell-like mode. The remainder of the neurectodermal cells that stay behind at the surface loose their neurogenic potential and later give rise to the ventral part of the epidermis. The genetic and molecular analysis of the mechanisms controlling specification and proliferation of NBs in the Drosophila embryo, which played a significant part in pioneering the field of modern developmental neurobiology, represents the topic of this review. PMID:24014455

  4. Genome of Drosophila suzukii, the Spotted Wing Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu, Joanna C.; Jiang, Xuanting; Zhao, Li; Hamm, Christopher A.; Cridland, Julie M; Saelao, Perot; Hamby, Kelly A.; Lee, Ernest K.; Kwok, Rosanna S.; Zhang, Guojie; Frank G. Zalom; Walton, Vaughn M.; Begun, David J

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (spotted wing drosophila) has recently become a serious pest of a wide variety of fruit crops in the United States as well as in Europe, leading to substantial yearly crop losses. To enable basic and applied research of this important pest, we sequenced the D. suzukii genome to obtain a high-quality reference sequence. Here, we discuss the basic properties of the genome and transcriptome and describe patterns of genome evolution in D. suzukii and its close relativ...

  5. Semiconductor DC amplifier AEP 1487

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A semiconductor dc amplifier has been designed with the object of achieving low drift without component selection or special temperature-balancing adjustments. Modulator and ac-amplifier techniques have been adopted in order to avoid the drifts that occur when transistors are directly coupled. The diode-ring modulator described in CREL-902 has been used as the input chopper. (author)

  6. Development of High Power Microwave and Millimeter Wave Gyroklystron Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, W. K.; Baik, S. W.; Lee, S. H.; Choi, J. J.; Park, D. M.; Oh, J. H.; Yang, J. G.; Hwang, S. M.; Temkin, R.

    1999-11-01

    A design study of a 28GHz gyroklystron amplifier for application of ECR plasma heating at Hanbit has been completed. Numerical simulation codes predict that a stable amplifier radiation of 200kW is produced with a 54dB saturated gain and an electronic efficiency of 35 percent from a 70kV and 8.2A high power electron beam. Major experimental equipments including a high power modulator, a 2 Tesla superconducting magnet, and a double-anode magnetro-injection-gun have been procured and are expected to set up in laboratory by this fall. Fabrication of tube components is currently underway. Cold-tests of the rf components are presented. In addition, experiments on a 10GHz gyroklystron amplifier which is a scale-down version of 28GHz gyroklystron amplifier are planned in the near future.

  7. Review: Thermal preference in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon, Michael E.; Wang, George; Garrity, Paul A.; Huey, Raymond B.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental temperature strongly affects physiology of ectotherms. Small ectotherms, like Drosophila, cannot endogenously regulate body temperature so must rely on behavior to maintain body temperature within a physiologically permissive range. Here we review what is known about Drosophila thermal preference. Work on thermal behavior in this group is particularly exciting because it provides the opportunity to connect genes to neuromolecular mechanisms to behavior to fitness in the wild.

  8. Amplification of neural stem cell proliferation by intermediate progenitor cells in Drosophila brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello Bruno C

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mammalian brain, neural stem cells divide asymmetrically and often amplify the number of progeny they generate via symmetrically dividing intermediate progenitors. Here we investigate whether specific neural stem cell-like neuroblasts in the brain of Drosophila might also amplify neuronal proliferation by generating symmetrically dividing intermediate progenitors. Results Cell lineage-tracing and genetic marker analysis show that remarkably large neuroblast lineages exist in the dorsomedial larval brain of Drosophila. These lineages are generated by brain neuroblasts that divide asymmetrically to self renew but, unlike other brain neuroblasts, do not segregate the differentiating cell fate determinant Prospero to their smaller daughter cells. These daughter cells continue to express neuroblast-specific molecular markers and divide repeatedly to produce neural progeny, demonstrating that they are proliferating intermediate progenitors. The proliferative divisions of these intermediate progenitors have novel cellular and molecular features; they are morphologically symmetrical, but molecularly asymmetrical in that key differentiating cell fate determinants are segregated into only one of the two daughter cells. Conclusion Our findings provide cellular and molecular evidence for a new mode of neurogenesis in the larval brain of Drosophila that involves the amplification of neuroblast proliferation through intermediate progenitors. This type of neurogenesis bears remarkable similarities to neurogenesis in the mammalian brain, where neural stem cells as primary progenitors amplify the number of progeny they generate through generation of secondary progenitors. This suggests that key aspects of neural stem cell biology might be conserved in brain development of insects and mammals.

  9. Optogenetics in Drosophila Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemensperger, Thomas; Kittel, Robert J; Fiala, André

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable one to target specific neurons with light-sensitive proteins, e.g., ion channels, ion pumps, or enzymes, and to manipulate their physiological state through illumination. Such artificial interference with selected elements of complex neuronal circuits can help to determine causal relationships between neuronal activity and the effect on the functioning of neuronal circuits controlling animal behavior. The advantages of optogenetics can best be exploited in genetically tractable animals whose nervous systems are, on the one hand, small enough in terms of cell numbers and to a certain degree stereotypically organized, such that distinct and identifiable neurons can be targeted reproducibly. On the other hand, the neuronal circuitry and the behavioral repertoire should be complex enough to enable one to address interesting questions. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a favorable model organism in this regard. However, the application of optogenetic tools to depolarize or hyperpolarize neurons through light-induced ionic currents has been difficult in adult flies. Only recently, several variants of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) have been introduced that provide sufficient light sensitivity, expression, and stability to depolarize central brain neurons efficiently in adult Drosophila. Here, we focus on the version currently providing highest photostimulation efficiency, ChR2-XXL. We exemplify the use of this optogenetic tool by applying it to a widely used aversive olfactory learning paradigm. Optogenetic activation of a population of dopamine-releasing neurons mimics the reinforcing properties of a punitive electric shock typically used as an unconditioned stimulus. In temporal coincidence with an odor stimulus this artificially induced neuronal activity causes learning of the odor signal, thereby creating a light-induced memory. PMID:26965122

  10. Small signal microwave amplifier design

    CERN Document Server

    Grosch, Theodore

    2000-01-01

    This book explains techniques and examples for designing stable amplifiers for high-frequency applications in which the signal is small and the amplifier circuit is linear. An in-depth discussion of linear network theory provides the foundation needed to develop actual designs. Examples throughout the book will show you how to apply the knowledge gained in each chapter leading to the complex design of low noise amplifiers. Many exercises at the end of each chapter will help students to practice their skills. The solutions to these design problems are available in an accompanying solutions book

  11. Fiber amplifiers under thermal loads leading to transverse mode instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mette Marie; Hansen, Kristian Rymann; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard;

    2014-01-01

    Transverse mode instability (TMI) in rare-earth doped fiber amplifiers operating above an average power threshold is caused by intermodal stimulated thermal Rayleigh scattering due to quantum defect heating. We investigate thermally induced longitudinal waveguide perturbations causing power...... operation stability at higher average powers....

  12. International Standardization Activities for Optical Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haruo Okamura

    2003-01-01

    International standardization activities for Optical Amplifiers at IECTC86 and ITU-T SG15 are reviewed. Current discussions include Optical Amplifier safety guideline, Reliability standard, Rest methods of Noise and PMD, Definitions of Raman amplifier parameters and OA classification.

  13. A Transformer Class E Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikolajewski Miroslaw

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In a high-efficiency Class E ZVS resonant amplifier a matching and isolation transformer can replace some or even all inductive components of the amplifier thus simplifying the circuit and reducing its cost. In the paper a theoretical analysis, a design example and its experimental verification for a transformer Class E amplifier are presented. In the experimental amplifier with a transformer as the only inductive component in the circuit high efficiency ηMAX = 0.95 was achieved for supply voltage VI = 36 V, maximum output power POMAX = 100 W and the switching frequency f = 300 kHz. Measured parameters and waveforms showed a good agreement with theoretical predictions. Moreover, the relative bandwidth of the switching frequency was only 19% to obtain output power control from 4.8 W to POMAX with efficiency not less than 0.9 in the regulation range.

  14. TARC: Carlo Rubbia's Energy Amplifier

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1997-01-01

    Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) is Carlo Rubbia's energy amplifier. This CERN experiment demonstrated that long-lived fission fragments, such as 99-TC, can be efficiently destroyed.

  15. New Packaging for Amplifier Slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thorsness, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Suratwala, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Steele, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rogowski, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-03-18

    The following memo provides a discussion and detailed procedure for a new finished amplifier slab shipping and storage container. The new package is designed to maintain an environment of <5% RH to minimize weathering.

  16. Transistor oscillator and amplifier grids

    OpenAIRE

    Weikle, Robert M., II; Kim, Moonil; Hacker, Jonathan B.; De Lisio, Michael P.; Popvić, Zoya B.; Rutledge, David B.

    1992-01-01

    Although quasi-optical techniques are applicable to a large variety of solid-state devices, special attention is given to transistors, which are attractive because they can be used as either amplifiers or oscillators. Experimental results for MESFET bar-grid and planar grid oscillators are presented. A MESFET grid amplifier that receives only vertically polarized waves at the input and radiates horizontally polarized waves at the output is discussed. These planar grids can be scaled for opera...

  17. A KIND OF NEW AMPLIFIER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN XUN-HE; FENG RU-PENG; REN YONG

    2000-01-01

    Chaotic characteristics in the iteration of logistic map (one-dimensional discrete dynamic system) are simulatedand analyzed. The circuit implementation of a kind of chaotic amplifier model is based on the chaotic characteristicsthat chaos is sensitively dependent on its initial conditions, and the circuit simulation result is given using simulationprogram with integrated circuit emphasis for personal computer (PSPICE), and is compared with linear amplifier.Advantages and disadvantages of such a model are indicated.

  18. Casimir force on amplifying bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Sambale, Agnes; Welsch, Dirk-Gunnar; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Dung, Ho Trung

    2009-01-01

    Based on a unified approach to macroscopic QED that allows for the inclusion of amplification in a limited space and frequency range, we study the Casimir force as a Lorentz force on an arbitrary partially amplifying system of linearly locally responding (isotropic) magnetoelectric bodies. We demonstrate that the force on a weakly polarisable/magnetisable amplifying object in the presence of a purely absorbing environment can be expressed as a sum over the Casimir--Polder forces on the excite...

  19. Genome of Drosophila suzukii, the spotted wing drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Joanna C; Jiang, Xuanting; Zhao, Li; Hamm, Christopher A; Cridland, Julie M; Saelao, Perot; Hamby, Kelly A; Lee, Ernest K; Kwok, Rosanna S; Zhang, Guojie; Zalom, Frank G; Walton, Vaughn M; Begun, David J

    2013-12-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (spotted wing drosophila) has recently become a serious pest of a wide variety of fruit crops in the United States as well as in Europe, leading to substantial yearly crop losses. To enable basic and applied research of this important pest, we sequenced the D. suzukii genome to obtain a high-quality reference sequence. Here, we discuss the basic properties of the genome and transcriptome and describe patterns of genome evolution in D. suzukii and its close relatives. Our analyses and genome annotations are presented in a web portal, SpottedWingFlyBase, to facilitate public access. PMID:24142924

  20. Dopamine modulates metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ueno

    Full Text Available Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shi(ts induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine, which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation.

  1. Low-Noise Band-Pass Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    Circuit uses standard components to overcome common limitation of JFET amplifiers. Low-noise band-pass amplifier employs JFET and operational amplifier. High gain and band-pass characteristics are achieved with suitable choice of resistances and capacitances. Circuit should find use as low-noise amplifier, for example as first stage instrumentation systems.

  2. EMI-resilient amplifier circuits

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, Marcel J; Linnenbank, André C

    2014-01-01

    This book enables circuit designers to reduce the errors introduced by the fundamental limitations and electromagnetic interference (EMI) in negative-feedback amplifiers.  The authors describe a systematic design approach for application specific negative-feedback amplifiers, with specified signal-to-error ratio (SER).  This approach enables designers to calculate noise, bandwidth, EMI, and the required bias parameters of the transistors used in  application specific amplifiers in order to meet the SER requirements.   ·         Describes design methods that incorporate electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the design of application specific negative-feedback amplifiers; ·         Provides designers with a structured methodology to avoid the use of trial and error in meeting signal-to-error ratio (SER) requirements; ·         Equips designers to increase EMI immunity of the amplifier itself, thus avoiding filtering at the input, reducing the number of components and avoiding detr...

  3. Spectroscopic amplifier for pin diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photodiode remains the basic choice for the photo-detection and is widely used in optical communications, medical diagnostics and field of corpuscular radiation. In detecting radiation it has been used for monitoring radon and its progeny and inexpensive spectrometric systems. The development of a spectroscopic amplifier for Pin diode is presented which has the following characteristics: canceler Pole-Zero (P/Z) with a time constant of 8 μs; constant gain of 57, suitable for the acquisition system; 4th integrator Gaussian order to waveform change of exponential input to semi-Gaussian output and finally a stage of baseline restorer which prevents Dc signal contribution to the next stage. The operational amplifier used is the TLE2074 of BiFET technology of Texas Instruments with 10 MHz bandwidth, 25 V/μs of slew rate and a noise floor of 17 nv/(Hz)1/2. The integrated circuit has 4 operational amplifiers and in is contained the total of spectroscopic amplifier that is the goal of electronic design. The results show like the exponential input signal is converted to semi-Gaussian, modifying only the amplitude according to the specifications in the design. The total system is formed by the detector, which is the Pin diode, a sensitive preamplifier to the load, the spectroscopic amplifier that is what is presented and finally a pulse height analyzer (Mca) which is where the spectrum is shown. (Author)

  4. Gaussian amplifier for nuclear spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major goals of nuclear spectrometry is the determination of the energy spectrum of a radioactive source. To measure this spectrum with electronic instrumentation one need to use a nuclear spectrometry chain of which the amplifier is part of, and whose filter shaping considerably influences the final energy resolution achieved. The amplifier released accomplishes a 7th order Gaussian filter shape with Taylor series approximation synthesized by the Shifted Companion Form and mounted using only electronic components availablein Brazil. The final version has been tested and the results showed a very good performance and the energy resolution achieved was equivalent to the imported models. (Author)

  5. Metabolomic analysis of the selection response of Drosophila melanogaster to environmental stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Overgaard, Johannes;

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the global metabolite response to artificial selection for tolerance to stressful conditions such as cold, heat, starvation, and desiccation, and for longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. Our findings were compared to data from other levels of biological organization, including gene...

  6. Long-term live cell imaging and automated 4D analysis of drosophila neuroblast lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina C F Homem

    Full Text Available The developing Drosophila brain is a well-studied model system for neurogenesis and stem cell biology. In the Drosophila central brain, around 200 neural stem cells called neuroblasts undergo repeated rounds of asymmetric cell division. These divisions typically generate a larger self-renewing neuroblast and a smaller ganglion mother cell that undergoes one terminal division to create two differentiating neurons. Although single mitotic divisions of neuroblasts can easily be imaged in real time, the lack of long term imaging procedures has limited the use of neuroblast live imaging for lineage analysis. Here we describe a method that allows live imaging of cultured Drosophila neuroblasts over multiple cell cycles for up to 24 hours. We describe a 4D image analysis protocol that can be used to extract cell cycle times and growth rates from the resulting movies in an automated manner. We use it to perform lineage analysis in type II neuroblasts where clonal analysis has indicated the presence of a transit-amplifying population that potentiates the number of neurons. Indeed, our experiments verify type II lineages and provide quantitative parameters for all cell types in those lineages. As defects in type II neuroblast lineages can result in brain tumor formation, our lineage analysis method will allow more detailed and quantitative analysis of tumorigenesis and asymmetric cell division in the Drosophila brain.

  7. A wideband dc-coupled amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described whereby an ac-coupled high-frequency amplifier and a dc-coupled low-frequency amplifier are connected in parallel in order to obtain a dc-coupled wideband amplifier. By using an operational amplifier which compares the output voltage with the input voltage, the low-frequency amplifier contributes to the overall gain only when the gain of the ac-coupled amplifier droops at low frequencies. Thus, no frequency splitting networks are necessary and the excellent low-frequency features of an operational amplifier are added to those of the ac-coupled wideband amplifier. As an example, a low noise amplifier is described which exhibits a hundredfold gain, a bandwidth from dc to 550 MHz, an input bias current of less than 1 nA, and an output voltage range of ±1 V

  8. Characterisation Of Low Noise Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAULIK B.PATEL

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Amplification is one of the most basic and prevalent microwave circuit functions inmodern RF and microwave systems. Early microwave amplifiers relied on tubes, such asklystrons and traveling-wave tubes, or solid-state reflection amplifiers based on thenegative resistance characteristics of tunnel or varactor diodes. But due to the dramaticimprovements and innovations in solid-state technology that have occurred since the1970s, most RF and microwave amplifiers today use transistor devices such as Si or SiGeBJTs, GaAs HBTs, GaAs or InP FETs, or GaAs HEMTs. Microwave transistor amplifiersare rugged, low-cost, reliable, and can be easily integrated in both hybrid andmonolithic integrated circuitry. Transistor amplifiers can be used at frequencies inexcess of 100 GHz in a wide range of applications requiring small size, low-noise figure,broad bandwidth, and low to medium power capacity. Although microwave tubes are stillrequired for very high power and/or very high frequency applications, continuingimprovement in the performance of microwave transistors is steadily reducing the needfor microwave tubes

  9. Dielectric waveguide amplifiers and lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, M.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of semiconductor amplifiers and lasers has made them the preferred choice for optical gain on a micro-chip. In the past few years, we have demonstrated that also rare-earth-ion-doped dielectric waveguides show remarkable performance, ranging from a small-signal gain per unit length o

  10. Drosophila neuroblasts retain the daughter centrosome

    OpenAIRE

    Januschke, Jens; Llamazares, Salud; Reina, Jose; Gonzalez, Cayetano

    2011-01-01

    During asymmetric mitosis, both in male Drosophila germline stem cells and in mouse embryo neural progenitors, the mother centrosome is retained by the self-renewed cell; hence suggesting that mother centrosome inheritance might contribute to stemness. We test this hypothesis in Drosophila neuroblasts (NBs) tracing photo converted centrioles and a daughter-centriole-specific marker generated by cloning the Drosophila homologue of human Centrobin. Here we show that upon asymmetric mitosis, the...

  11. Role of extracellular adenosine in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    FENCKOVÁ, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes several aspects of the role for extracellular adenosine in Drosophila. Reverse genetic, molecular and microscopic methods together with the most forefront Drosophila research techniques have been applied to elucidate the role of adenosine signaling in the regulation of development, physiology and metabolism of Drosophila larvae. The thesis helps to establish the model for extracellular adenosine as a stress-signal for the release of energy stores. It also describes the e...

  12. Signal Propagation in Drosophila Central Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Gouwens, Nathan W.; Wilson, Rachel I.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila is an important model organism for investigating neural development, neural morphology, neurophysiology, and neural correlates of behaviors. However, almost nothing is known about how electrical signals propagate in Drosophila neurons. Here we address these issues in antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs), one of the most well-studied classes of Drosophila neurons. We use morphological and electrophysiological data to deduce the passive membrane properties of these neurons and to b...

  13. Low Cost RF Amplifier for Community TV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch, Syafaruddin; Sasongko, Sudi Mariyanto Al; Made Budi Suksmadana, I.; Mustiko Okta Muvianto, Cahyo; Ariessaputra, Suthami

    2016-01-01

    he capability of television to deliver audio video makes this media become the most effective method to spread information. This paper presents an experiment of RF amplifier design having low-cost design and providing sufficient RF power particularly for community television. The RF amplifier consists of two stages of amplifier. The first stage amplifier was used to leverage output of TV modulator from 11dBm to enable to drive next stage amplifier. CAD simulation and fabrication were run to reach optimum RF amplifier design circuit. The associated circuit was made by determining stability circle, stability gain, and matching impedance. Hence, the average power of first stage RF amplifier was 24.68dBm achieved. The second stage used RF modules which was ready match to 50 ohm for both input and output port. The experiment results show that the RF amplifier may operate at frequency ranging from 174 to 230MHz. The average output power of the 2nd stage amplifier was 33.38 Watt with the overall gain of 20.54dB. The proposed RF amplifier is a cheap way to have a stable RF amplifier for community TV. The total budget for the designed RF amplifier is only a 1/5 compared to local design of final TV amplifier.

  14. Amplifying the evanescent field of free electrons

    OpenAIRE

    So, J.-K.; Ou, J.-Y.; Adamo, G.; García de Abajo, F. J.; MacDonald, K. F.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2013-01-01

    We provide the first experimental demonstration that the evanescent field of free electrons can be amplified by a plasmonic nanolayer in much that same way as optical evanescent fields are amplified in the ‘poor-man’s superlens’.

  15. Amplifying free-electron evanescent fields

    OpenAIRE

    So, J.-K.; Ou, J.-Y.; Adamo, G.; García de Abajo, F. J.; MacDonald, K. F.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2013-01-01

    We show experimentally for the first time that free-electron evanescent fields can be amplified by a plasmonic nanolayer in a manner analogous to the way in which optical fields are amplified in the poor-man's superlens.

  16. Analog circuit design designing high performance amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Feucht, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The third volume Designing High Performance Amplifiers applies the concepts from the first two volumes. It is an advanced treatment of amplifier design/analysis emphasizing both wideband and precision amplification.

  17. Compact dual channel spectroscopy amplifier cum discriminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single width NIM module having two channels of spectroscopy amplifier cum discriminator has been developed for Nuclear Physics experiments at IUAC. Each channel contains a shaping amplifier along with logic circuits to generate the energy and timing information respectively

  18. Integrative Model of Drosophila Flight

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, William B.; Andrew D Straw; Dickinson, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for simulating the flight dynamics and control strategies of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The framework consists of five main components: an articulated rigid-body simulation, a model of the aerodynamic forces and moments, a sensory systems model, a control model, and an environment model. In the rigid-body simulation the fly is represented by a system of three rigid bodies connected by a pair of actuated ball joints. At each instant of th...

  19. Leigh Syndrome in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Da-Rè, Caterina; von Stockum, Sophia; Biscontin, Alberto; Millino, Caterina; Cisotto, Paola; Zordan, Mauro A.; Zeviani, Massimo; Bernardi, Paolo; De Pittà, Cristiano; Costa, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Leigh Syndrome (LS) is the most common early-onset, progressive mitochondrial encephalopathy usually leading to early death. The single most prevalent cause of LS is occurrence of mutations in the SURF1 gene, and LS Surf1 patients show a ubiquitous and specific decrease in the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase, COX). SURF1 encodes an inner membrane mitochondrial protein involved in COX assembly. We established a Drosophila melanogaster model of LS ba...

  20. Sexual Behavior of Drosophila suzukii

    OpenAIRE

    Santosh Revadi; Sébastien Lebreton; Peter Witzgall; Gianfranco Anfora; Teun Dekker; Becher, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    A high reproductive potential is one reason for the rapid spread of Drosophila suzukii in Europe and in the United States. In order to identify mechanisms that mediate mating and reproduction in D. suzukii we studied the fly’s reproductive behavior, diurnal mating activity and sexual maturation. Furthermore, we studied the change of female cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) with age and conducted a preliminary investigation on the role of female-derived chemical signals in male mating behavior. Se...

  1. Visual attention in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Sareen, Preeti

    2012-01-01

    There is such vast amount of visual information in our surroundings at any time that filtering out the important information for further processing is a basic requirement for any visual system. This is accomplished by deploying attention to focus on one source of sensory inputs to the exclusion of others (Luck and Mangun 2009). Attention has been studied extensively in humans and non human primates (NHPs). In Drosophila, visual attention was first demonstrated in 1980 (Wolf and Heisenberg 198...

  2. The Drosophila melanogaster Cajal body

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ji-Long; Murphy, Christine; Buszczak, Michael; Clatterbuck, Sarah; Goodman, Robyn; Gall, Joseph G.

    2006-01-01

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are nuclear organelles that are usually identified by the marker protein p80-coilin. Because no orthologue of coilin is known in Drosophila melanogaster, we identified D. melanogaster CBs using probes for other components that are relatively diagnostic for CBs in vertebrate cells. U85 small CB–specific RNA, U2 small nuclear RNA, the survival of motor neurons protein, and fibrillarin occur together in a nuclear body that is closely associated with the nucleolus. Based on its...

  3. Single conversion stage amplifier - SICAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljusev, P.

    2005-12-15

    This Ph.D. thesis presents a thorough analysis of the so called SICAM - SIngle Converter stage AMplifier approach to building direct energy conversion audio power amplifiers. The mainstream approach for building isolated audio power amplifiers today consists of isolated DC power supply and Class D amplifier, which essentially represents a two stage solution, where each of the components can be viewed as separate and independent part. The proposed SICAM solution strives for direct energy conversion from the mains to the audio output, by dedicating the operation of the components one to another and integrating their functions, so that the final audio power amplifier represents a single-stage topology with higher efficiency, lower volume, less board space, lower component count and subsequently lower cost. The SICAM approach is both applicable to non-isolated and isolated audio power amplifiers, but the problems encountered in these two cases are different. Non-isolated SICAM solutions are intended for both AC mains-connected and battery-powered devices. In non-isolated mains-connected SICAMs the main idea is to simplify the power supply or even provide integrated power factor correction (PFC) functions, while still maintaining low component stress and good audio performance by generally decreasing the input voltage level to the Class D audio power amplifier. On the other hand, non-isolated battery-powered SICAMs have to cope with the ever changing battery voltage and provide output voltage levels which are both lower and higher than the battery voltage, while still being simple and single-stage energy conversion solutions. In isolated SICAMs the isolation transformer adjusts the voltage level on the secondary side to the desired level, so the main challenges here are decreasing the size of the magnetic core and reducing the number and size of bulky reactive components as much as possible. The main focus of this thesis is directed towards the isolated SICAMs and

  4. European Research on THz Vacuum Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, F.; Cojocarua, C.-S.; de Rossi, A.; Di Carlo, A.; Dispenza, M.; Dolfi, D.; Durand, A.; Fiorello, A.; Gohier, A.; Guiset, P.; Korantia, M.; Krozer, V.; Legagneux, P.; Marchesin, R.; Megtert, S.; Bouamrane, F.; Mineo, M.; Paoloni, C.; Pham, K.; Schnell, J.P.; Secchi, A.; Tamburri, E.; Terranova, M.L.; Ulisse, G.; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    The OPTHER (OPtically Driven TeraHertz AmplifiERs) project represents a considerable advancement in the field of high frequency amplification. The design and realization of a THz amplifier within this project is a consolidation of efforts at the international level from the main players of the Eu...... European research, academy and industry in vacuum electronics. This paper describes the status of the project and progress towards the THz amplifier realization....

  5. Improved charge amplifier using hybrid hysteresis compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin-Shahidi, Darya; Trumper, David L.

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel charge amplifier, with a robust feedback circuit and a method for compensating piezoelectric actuator's hysteresis at low frequencies. The amplifier uses a modified feedback circuit which improves robustness to the addition of series load impedance such as in cabling. We also describe a hybrid hysteresis compensation method for enabling the charge amplifier to reduce hysteresis at low frequencies. Experimental results demonstrate the utility of the new amplifier design.

  6. Quantum Theory of Laser Amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Gillian Linda

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. We calculate the input-output characteristics of a below threshold laser amplifier. Expressions are derived for the output second- and fourth-order spectral and temporal correlation functions in terms of the corresponding input quantities, and for the photocount first and second factorial moments for both homodyne and direct detection. The general results are applied to several cases of practical interest, including specific non-classical input states. We show that a maximum of twofold amplification is permitted if squeezing in the input is to survive at the output. Similarly, for preservation of photon antibunching in amplification we show that only very small gains are allowed. The model treated here provides a detailed example of the amplifier noise limitations imposed by quantum mechanics. In particular, we show that minimum noise occurs in a cavity that is asymmetric with respect to the mirror reflectivities. The latter part of this work treats the above threshold laser amplifier. The laser output is back-scattered from a moving target to provide a weak Doppler-shifted signal which re-enters the laser cavity and is amplified. We show that the three-level atomic lasing medium is equivalent to a two-level medium pumped by an inverted bath. We use the methods of quantum statistical analysis to obtain time -evolution equations for the c-number amplitudes of the laser and signal fields. We show that the results may be applied to the below threshold regime for appropriate values of the pump parameter. By considering the amplitude differential gain we show explicitly that the behaviour of the laser around threshold is characteristic of a second -order phase transition. We calculate the output intensity gain appropriate to a heterodyne detection process, and find good agreement between the predicted gain profiles and measured data for both carbon dioxide and argon-ion lasers.

  7. Leigh Syndrome in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da-Rè, Caterina; von Stockum, Sophia; Biscontin, Alberto; Millino, Caterina; Cisotto, Paola; Zordan, Mauro A.; Zeviani, Massimo; Bernardi, Paolo; De Pittà, Cristiano; Costa, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Leigh Syndrome (LS) is the most common early-onset, progressive mitochondrial encephalopathy usually leading to early death. The single most prevalent cause of LS is occurrence of mutations in the SURF1 gene, and LSSurf1 patients show a ubiquitous and specific decrease in the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase, COX). SURF1 encodes an inner membrane mitochondrial protein involved in COX assembly. We established a Drosophila melanogaster model of LS based on the post-transcriptional silencing of CG9943, the Drosophila homolog of SURF1. Knockdown of Surf1 was induced ubiquitously in larvae and adults, which led to lethality; in the mesodermal derivatives, which led to pupal lethality; or in the central nervous system, which allowed survival. A biochemical characterization was carried out in knockdown individuals, which revealed that larvae unexpectedly displayed defects in all complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and in the F-ATP synthase, while adults had a COX-selective impairment. Silencing of Surf1 expression in Drosophila S2R+ cells led to selective loss of COX activity associated with decreased oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve. We conclude that Surf1 is essential for COX activity and mitochondrial function in D. melanogaster, thus providing a new tool that may help clarify the pathogenic mechanisms of LS. PMID:25164807

  8. 'Peer pressure' in larval Drosophila?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewalda, Thomas; Jeske, Ines; Michels, Birgit; Gerber, Bertram

    2014-01-01

    Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on 'peer pressure', that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i) by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii) by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii) by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv) by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila. PMID:24907371

  9. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  10. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound 125I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to 125I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to 125I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development

  11. Compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, H.Z.; Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Levush, B.; Tate, J.; Chen, S.H. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Inst. for Plasma Research

    1995-12-31

    A compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling wave amplifier is being developed. The device is a three-stage tube with the output section running as a fourth harmonic gyro-TWT, the input section running as a fundamental gyro-TWT, and the middle operating at the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. Radiation is suppressed by servers between the sections. The operating beam of the tube is produced by a magnetron injection gun (MIG). A TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit consisting of mode converters and a filter waveguide is employed for both input and output sections to solve the mode competition problem, which is pervasive in gyro-TWT operation. The input section has an input coupler designed as a TE{sub 0n} mode launcher. It excites a signal at the fundamental cyclotron frequency (17.5 GHz), which is amplified in the first TWT interaction region. So far the device is similar to a two-stage harmonic gyro-TWT. The distinction is that in the three-stage device the second section will be optimized not for output power but for fourth harmonic bunching of the beam. A gyroklystron amplifier has also been designed. The configuration is similar to the gyro-TWT but with the traveling wave interaction structures replaced by mode selective special complex cavities. Cold test results of the wideband input coupler and the TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit have been obtained.

  12. SPS RF System Amplifier plant

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows a 2 MW, 200 MHz amplifier plant with feeder lines. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X.

  13. cAMP signalling in mushroom bodies modulates temperature preference behaviour in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Tae; Bang, Sunhoe; Hyun, Seogang; Kang, Jongkyun; Jeong, Kyunghwa; Paik, Donggi; Chung, Jongkyeong; Kim, Jaeseob

    2008-08-01

    Homoiotherms, for example mammals, regulate their body temperature with physiological responses such as a change of metabolic rate and sweating. In contrast, the body temperature of poikilotherms, for example Drosophila, is the result of heat exchange with the surrounding environment as a result of the large ratio of surface area to volume of their bodies. Accordingly, these animals must instinctively move to places with an environmental temperature as close as possible to their genetically determined desired temperature. The temperature that Drosophila instinctively prefers has a function equivalent to the 'set point' temperature in mammals. Although various temperature-gated TRP channels have been discovered, molecular and cellular components in Drosophila brain responsible for determining the desired temperature remain unknown. We identified these components by performing a large-scale genetic screen of temperature preference behaviour (TPB) in Drosophila. In parallel, we mapped areas of the Drosophila brain controlling TPB by targeted inactivation of neurons with tetanus toxin and a potassium channel (Kir2.1) driven with various brain-specific GAL4s. Here we show that mushroom bodies (MBs) and the cyclic AMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway are essential for controlling TPB. Furthermore, targeted expression of cAMP-PKA pathway components in only the MB was sufficient to rescue abnormal TPB of the corresponding mutants. Preferred temperatures were affected by the level of cAMP and PKA activity in the MBs in various PKA pathway mutants. PMID:18594510

  14. European Research on THz Vacuum Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, F.; Cojocarua, C.-S.; de Rossi, A.;

    2010-01-01

    The OPTHER (OPtically Driven TeraHertz AmplifiERs) project represents a considerable advancement in the field of high frequency amplification. The design and realization of a THz amplifier within this project is a consolidation of efforts at the international level from the main players of the Eu...

  15. NASA developments in solid state power amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Regis F.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last ten years, NASA has undertaken an extensive program aimed at development of solid state power amplifiers for space applications. Historically, the program may be divided into three phases. The first efforts were carried out in support of the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) program, which is developing an experimental version of a Ka-band commercial communications system. These first amplifiers attempted to use hybrid technology. The second phase was still targeted at ACTS frequencies, but concentrated on monolithic implementations, while the current, third phase, is a monolithic effort that focusses on frequencies appropriate for other NASA programs and stresses amplifier efficiency. The topics covered include: (1) 20 GHz hybrid amplifiers; (2) 20 GHz monolithic MESFET power amplifiers; (3) Texas Instruments' (TI) 20 GHz variable power amplifier; (4) TI 20 GHz high power amplifier; (5) high efficiency monolithic power amplifiers; (6) GHz high efficiency variable power amplifier; (7) TI 32 GHz monolithic power amplifier performance; (8) design goals for Hughes' 32 GHz variable power amplifier; and (9) performance goals for Hughes' pseudomorphic 60 GHz power amplifier.

  16. Solid state, S-band, power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digrindakis, M.

    1973-01-01

    The final design and specifications for a solid state, S-band, power amplifier is reported. Modifications from a previously proposed design were incorporated to improve efficiency and meet input overdrive and noise floor requirements. Reports on the system design, driver amplifier, power amplifier, and voltage and current limiter are included along with a discussion of the testing program.

  17. Solid state ku-band power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, H. C.; Lockyear, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of two types of IMPATT diode reflection amplifiers and a transmission amplifier are given. The Ku-band IMPATT diode development is discussed. Circuitry and electrical performance of the final version of the Ku-band amplifier is described. Construction details and an outline and mounting drawing are presented.

  18. low pump power photonic crystal fibre amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristian G.; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2003-01-01

    Designs of low pump power optical amplifiers, based on photonic crystal fibres are presented. The potential of these fibre amplifiers is investigated, and it is demonstrated that such amplifiers may deliver gains of more than 15 dB at 1550 nm with less than 1 mW of optical pump power....

  19. Biology and physiology of Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, quickly emerged as a devastating invasive pest of small and stone fruits in the Americas and Europe. To better understand the population dynamics of D. suzukii, we reviewed recent work on juvenile development, adult reproduction, and seasonal variation in...

  20. Radioresistance and radiosensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studying the mechanisms controlling radioresistant in Drosophila the sensibility of four strains of Drosophila melanogaster to sex-linked recessive lethal mutations induced by 5kR Cobalt-60 gamma radiation and 0,006 M EMS or 0,25% of caffeine was determined. (M.A.C.)

  1. Drosophila and Beer: An Experimental Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurvink, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a popular organism for studying genetics and development. Maintaining Drosophila on medium prepared with varying concentrations of beer and evaluating the effects on reproduction, life cycle stages and other factors is one of the exercises that is versatile and applicable to many student levels.

  2. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) will be a new scientific European infrastructure devoted to scientific research in lasers field, dedicated to the investigation and applications of laser-matter interaction at the highest intensity level (more than 6 orders of magnitude higher than today’s laser intensity). The ELI project, a collaboration of 13 European countries, will comprise three branches: Ultra High Field Science that will explore laser-matter interaction, attosecond Laser Science designed to conduct temporal investigation of electron dynamics in atoms, molecules, plasmas and solids at attosecond scale, High Energy Beam Science devoted to the development and usage o f dedicated beam lines with ultra short pulses of high energy radiation. Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-cIass lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YaG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz), The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100K-170K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser. (author)

  3. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) will be a new scientific European infrastructure devoted to scientific research in lasers field, dedicated to the investigation and applications of laser-matter interaction at the highest intensity level (more than 6 orders of magnitude higher than today's laser intensity). The ELI project, a collaboration of 13 European countries, will comprise three branches: Ultra High Field Science that will explore laser-matter interaction, atto-second Laser Science designed to conduct temporal investigation of electron dynamics in atoms, molecules, plasmas and solids at atto-second scale, High Energy Beam Science devoted to the development and usage of dedicated beam lines with ultra short pulses of high energy radiation. Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YaG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K-170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW.m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser. (authors)

  4. Male Drosophila melanogaster flies exposed to hypergravity at young age are protected against a non-lethal heat shock at middle age but not against behavioral impairments due to this shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourg, Eric; Toffin, Etienne; Massé, Antoine

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposing flies to hypergravity (3 or 5 g) for two weeks at young age slightly increases longevity of male flies and survival time at 37 degrees C of both sexes, and delays an age-linked behavioral change. The present experiments tested whether hypergravity could also protect flies from a non-lethal 37 degrees C heat shock applied at young, middle or old age (2, 4 or 6 weeks of age). Various durations of exposure at 37 degrees C had similar deleterious effects on climbing activity, spontaneous locomotor activity and learning in flies that lived or not in hypergravity at young age. Therefore, hypergravity does not protect the behavior of flies from a deleterious non-lethal heat shock. Hypergravity increased longevity of virgin males and decreased that of mated ones; it also increased longevity of virgins at 25 degrees C, the usual rearing temperature, but not at 30 degrees C. Thus, the positive effect of hypergravity on longevity is observed only if flies are not subjected to living conditions decreasing longevity, like mating and high temperature. Finally, 4 weeks-old males that lived in hypergravity at young age lived slightly longer (+ 15%) after a non-lethal heat shock (60 or 90 min at 37 degrees C) than flies that always lived at 1 g, but this positive effect of hypergravity was not observed in females or in older males. Therefore, all these results show that hypergravity exposure can help male middle-aged flies recovering from a heat shock, but does not protect them from behavioral impairments linked to this shock: a mild stress occurring at young age can partially protect from a moderate stress at middle age. PMID:15609107

  5. NIF/LMJ prototype amplifier mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amplifier prototypes for the National Ignition Facility and the Laser Megajoule will be tested at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The prototype amplifier, which is an ensemble of modules from LLNL and Centre d'Etudes de Limeil-Valenton, is cassette-based with bottom access for maintenance. A sealed maintenance transfer vehicle which moves optical cassettes between the amplifier and the assembly cleanroom, and a vacuum gripper which holds laser slabs during cassette assembly will also be tested. The prototype amplifier will be used to verify amplifier optical performance, thermal recovery time, and cleanliness of mechanical operations

  6. An Implantable CMOS Amplifier for Nerve Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Lehmann, Torsten

    In this paper, a low noise high gain CMOS amplifier for minute nerve signals is presented. The amplifier is constructed in a fully differential topology to maximize noise rejection. By using a mixture of weak- and strong inversion transistors, optimal noise suppression in the amplifier is achieved....... A continuous-time current-steering offset-compensation technique is utilized in order to minimize the noise contribution and to minimize dynamic impact on the amplifier input nodes. The method for signal recovery from noisy nerve signals is presented. A prototype amplifier is realized in a standard...

  7. HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department

  8. High temperature charge amplifier for geothermal applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, Scott C.; Maldonado, Frank J.; Henfling, Joseph A.

    2015-12-08

    An amplifier circuit in a multi-chip module includes a charge to voltage converter circuit, a voltage amplifier a low pass filter and a voltage to current converter. The charge to voltage converter receives a signal representing an electrical charge and generates a voltage signal proportional to the input signal. The voltage amplifier receives the voltage signal from the charge to voltage converter, then amplifies the voltage signal by the gain factor to output an amplified voltage signal. The lowpass filter passes low frequency components of the amplified voltage signal and attenuates frequency components greater than a cutoff frequency. The voltage to current converter receives the output signal of the lowpass filter and converts the output signal to a current output signal; wherein an amplifier circuit output is selectable between the output signal of the lowpass filter and the current output signal.

  9. Prototype Small Footprint Amplifier for Piezoelectric Deformable Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputa, Kris; Herriot, Glen; Niebergal, Joel; Zielinski, Adam

    2011-09-01

    AO subsystems of the ELT observatories will incorporate deformable mirrors with an order of magnitude larger number of piezoelectric actuators than the AO systems currently deployed. Simply scaling up the drive electronics that are presently available commercially would substantially drive up the AO cost, pose unacceptably high demands for the supply power and heat dissipation, and occupy large physical volume. We have set out to prototype a high voltage amplifier that is compact enough to allow packaging 100 amplifier channels on a single 6U Eurocard with the goal to have a DM drive channel density of 1200 per 6U VME crate. Individual amplifier circuits should be driven by a multichannel A/D converter, consume no more than 0.5W from the +/-400V power supply, be slew rate limited in hardware, and be short-circuit protected. The component cost should be an order of magnitude less than the integrated circuit high voltage amplifiers currently on the market. We started out with modeling candidate circuits in SPICE, then built physical prototypes using inexpensive off the shelf components. In this paper we present experimental results of exposing several prototype circuits to both normal operating conditions and foreseeable fault conditions. The performance is evaluated against the AO requirements for the output range and bandwidth and the DM actuator safety requirements.

  10. Audio power amplifier design handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Self, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    This book is essential for audio power amplifier designers and engineers for one simple reason...it enables you as a professional to develop reliable, high-performance circuits. The Author Douglas Self covers the major issues of distortion and linearity, power supplies, overload, DC-protection and reactive loading. He also tackles unusual forms of compensation and distortion produced by capacitors and fuses. This completely updated fifth edition includes four NEW chapters including one on The XD Principle, invented by the author, and used by Cambridge Audio. Cro

  11. Cathode-follower power amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In circular accelerators and particularly in storage rings it is essential that the total impedance, as seen by the beam, be kept below some critical value. A model of the accelerating system was built using a single-ended cathode-follower amplifier driving a ferrite-loaded cavity. The system operated at 234.5 kHz with a peak output voltage of +-10 kV on the gap. The dynamic output impedance, as measured on the gap, was < 15 ohms

  12. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  13. Taste processing in Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthi A. Apostolopoulou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The sense of taste allows animals to detect chemical substances in their environment to initiate appropriate behaviors: to find food or a mate, to avoid hostile environments and predators. Drosophila larvae are a promising model organism to study gustation. Their simple nervous system triggers stereotypic behavioral responses, and the coding of taste can be studied by genetic tools at the single cell level. This review briefly summarizes recent progress on how taste information is sensed and processed by larval cephalic and pharyngeal sense organs. The focus lies on several studies, which revealed cellular and molecular mechanisms required to process sugar, salt, and bitter substances.

  14. In Focus: Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, across perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jana C; Bruck, Denny J; Dreves, Amy J; Ioriatti, Claudio; Vogt, Heidrun; Baufeld, Peter

    2011-11-01

    In August 2008, the first detection of the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, to the North America mainland in California caused great concern, as the fly was found infesting a variety of commercial fruits. Subsequent detections followed in Oregon, Washington, Florida and British Columbia in 2009; in Utah, North Carolina, South Carolina, Michigan, and Louisiana in 2010; and in Virginia, Montana, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland and Mexico in 2011. In Europe, it has been detected in Italy and Spain in 2009 and in France in 2010. Economic costs to the grower from D. suzukii include the increased cost of production (increased labor and materials for chemical inputs, monitoring and other management tools) and crop loss. An effective response to the invasion of D. suzukii requires proper taxonomic identification at the initial phase, understanding basic biology and phenology, developing management tools, transferring information and technology quickly to user groups, and evaluating the impact of the research and extension program on an economic, social, and environmental level. As D. suzukii continues to expand its range, steps must be initiated in each new region to educate and inform the public as well as formulate management tactics suitable for the crops and growing conditions in each. PMID:21990168

  15. The Spotted Wing Drosophila Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura, 1931) – Monitoring And First Records In Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Łabanowska Barbara H.; Piotrowski Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) (SWD) monitoring was carried out between 2012-2014 in eight locations. In order to determine the presence of Drosophila suzukii, several types of traps and baits were used. In 2014, Polish (prototype of Drosinal) and Spanish (Cera Trap) traps and baits were used in our study. In each year, traps were placed on the plantations of blueberry, strawberry, raspberry and at a wholesale market at the beginning of July, and monitored once or twice a we...

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome of Drosophila albomicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiongbin; Luo, Xiao; Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Zhen; Yang, Junqing; Bi, Guiqi

    2016-09-01

    Drosophila albomicans has been widely used as an important animal model for chromosome evolution. In this study, the mitochondrial genome sequence of this species is determined and described for the first time. The mitochondrial genome (15 849 bp) encompasses two rRNA, 22 tRNA, and 13 protein-coding genes. Genome content and structure are similar to those reported from other Drosophila mitochondrial genomes. Phylogeny analysis indicates that D. albomicans have a closer genetic relationship with Drosophil aincompta and Drosophil alittoralis. This mitochondrial genome is potentially important for studying molecular evolution and conservation genetics in Drosophila genus. PMID:26358579

  17. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  18. Modeling of the performance of a cryogenic gas cooled Yb:YAG multislab amplifier with a longitudinal doping gradient concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kaibo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Yan, Xiongwei; Li, Min; Jiang, Xinying; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Mingzhong; Zheng, Wanguo; Zheng, Jiangang

    2016-04-01

    A cryogenic helium gas cooled Yb:YAG multislab amplifier with a longitudinal doping gradient concentration was proposed for developing high energy, high average power laser systems. As a comparison, the performance of the gradient doped amplifier was investigated with other constant and stepped doped amplifiers in terms of energy storage capacity, heat deposition, and amplification, based on the theory of quasi-three-level laser ions, Monte Carlo, and ray-tracing approaches. Improved lasing characteristics with more homogenous distributions of gain and heat load and higher efficiency was achieved in the gradient doped multislab amplifier while lower gain medium volume was required. It is shown that at the optimum operating temperature of 200 K, the maximum output energy of 867.76 J in the gradient doped amplifier was obtained, corresponding to an optical-to-optical efficiency of 22.41%.

  19. YANG-MILLS FIELD AMPLIFIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a project of the Yang-Mills amplifier. Amplifier model is a multilayer spherical shell with increasing density towards the center. In the center of the amplifier is the core of high-density material. It is shown that in such a system, the amplitude of the Yang-Mills waves rises from the periphery to the center of several orders of magnitude. The role of the Yang-Mills field in the processes occurring in the nuclei of galaxies, stars and planets is discussed. The data modeling to strengthen the Yang-Mills field in the bowels of the planet, with an atomic explosion, and in some special devices such as the voltaic pile. To describe the mechanism of amplification chromodynamics field used as accurate results in Yang-Mills theory and numerical models developed based on an average and the exact equations as well. Among the exact solutions of the special role played by the centralsymmetric metric describing the contribution of the Yang-Mills field in the speed of recession of galaxies. Among the approximate numerical models can be noted the eight-scalar model we have developed for the simulation of non-linear color oscillations and chaos in the Yang-Mills theory. Earlier models were investigated spatio-temporal oscillations of the YangMills theory in the case of three and eight colors. The results of numerical simulation show that the nonlinear interaction does not lead to a spatial mixing of colors as it might be in the case of turbulent diffusion. Depending on the system parameters there is a suppression of the amplitude of the oscillations the first three by five colors or vice versa. The kinetic energy fluctuations or shared equally between the color components, or dominated by the kinetic energy of repressed groups of colors. In the present study, we found that amplification chromodynamic field leads to a sharp increase in the amplitude of the suppressed color, which can lead to an increase in entropy, excitation of nuclear

  20. Enhanced Gain in Photonic Crystal Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara; Semenova, Elizaveta; Hansen, Per Lunnemann;

    2012-01-01

    study of a 1 QW photonic crystal amplifier. Net gain is achieved which enables laser oscillation in photonic crystal micro cavities. The ability to freely tailor the dispersion in a semiconductor optical amplifier makes it possible to raise the optical gain considerably over a certain bandwidth. These...... results are promising for short and efficient semiconductor optical amplifiers. This effect will also benefit other devices, such as mode locked lasers....

  1. Diverse Roles of Axonemal Dyneins in Drosophila Auditory Neuron Function and Mechanical Amplification in Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, Somdatta; Jacobs, Julie S.; Kittelmann, Maike; Spalthoff, Christian; Katana, Radoslaw; Sivan-Loukianova, Elena; Schon, Michael A.; Kernan, Maurice J.; Eberl, Daniel F.; Göpfert, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    Much like vertebrate hair cells, the chordotonal sensory neurons that mediate hearing in Drosophila are motile and amplify the mechanical input of the ear. Because the neurons bear mechanosensory primary cilia whose microtubule axonemes display dynein arms, we hypothesized that their motility is powered by dyneins. Here, we describe two axonemal dynein proteins that are required for Drosophila auditory neuron function, localize to their primary cilia, and differently contribute to mechanical amplification in hearing. Promoter fusions revealed that the two axonemal dynein genes Dmdnah3 (=CG17150) and Dmdnai2 (=CG6053) are expressed in chordotonal neurons, including the auditory ones in the fly’s ear. Null alleles of both dyneins equally abolished electrical auditory neuron responses, yet whereas mutations in Dmdnah3 facilitated mechanical amplification, amplification was abolished by mutations in Dmdnai2. Epistasis analysis revealed that Dmdnah3 acts downstream of Nan-Iav channels in controlling the amplificatory gain. Dmdnai2, in addition to being required for amplification, was essential for outer dynein arms in auditory neuron cilia. This establishes diverse roles of axonemal dyneins in Drosophila auditory neuron function and links auditory neuron motility to primary cilia and axonemal dyneins. Mutant defects in sperm competition suggest that both dyneins also function in sperm motility. PMID:26608786

  2. Reflection amplifiers in self-regulated learning

    OpenAIRE

    Verpoorten, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Verpoorten, D. (2012). Reflection amplifiers in self-regulated learning. Doctoral thesis. November, 9, 2012, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit (CELSTEC). Datawyse / Universitaire Pers Maastricht.

  3. Dynamics of Soliton Cascades in Fiber Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga-Sierra, F R; Agrawal, Govind P

    2016-01-01

    We study numerically the formation of cascading solitons when femtosecond optical pulses are launched into a fiber amplifier with less energy than required to form a soliton of equal duration. As the pulse is amplified, cascaded fundamental solitons are created at different distances, without soliton fission, as each fundamental soliton moves outside the gain bandwidth through the Raman-induced spectral shifts. As a result, each input pulse creates multiple, temporally separated, ultrashort pulses of different wavelengths at the amplifier output. The number of pulses depends not only on the total gain of the amplifier but also on the width of input pulses.

  4. Ping-pong auto-zero amplifier with glitch reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Mark R.

    2008-01-22

    A ping-pong amplifier with reduced glitching is described. The ping-pong amplifier includes a nulling amplifier coupled to a switching network. The switching network is used to auto-zero a ping amplifier within a ping-pong amplifier. The nulling amplifier drives the output of a ping amplifier to a proper output voltage level during auto-zeroing of the ping amplifier. By being at a proper output voltage level, glitches associated with transitioning between a ping amplifier and a pong amplifier are reduced or eliminated.

  5. Linearisation of RF Power Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Asbeck

    2001-01-01

    linearisation systems with focus on polar modulation feedback, and a chip oriented part focusing on integrating of separate building blocks of the system on a chip. The system oriented part of this thesis deals with analog feedback linearisation systems. The Polar modulation feedback system is compared with the...... more traditional Cartesian modulation feedback system in terms of loop settlement and dependencies between the feedback signals. A method to calculate the distortion functions of the linearisation system (AM/AM and AM/PM)based on the distortion functions of the power amplifier is presented. Also the...... polar loop architecture and it’s suitability to modern digital transmitters is discussed. A proposal of an architecture that is suitable for digital transmitters, which means that it has an interface to the digital back-end, defined by low-pass signals in polar form, is presented. Simulation guidelines...

  6. Transverse pumped laser amplifier architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Manes, Kenneth; Deri, Robert; Erlandson, Al; Caird, John; Spaeth, Mary

    2013-07-09

    An optical gain architecture includes a pump source and a pump aperture. The architecture also includes a gain region including a gain element operable to amplify light at a laser wavelength. The gain region is characterized by a first side intersecting an optical path, a second side opposing the first side, a third side adjacent the first and second sides, and a fourth side opposing the third side. The architecture further includes a dichroic section disposed between the pump aperture and the first side of the gain region. The dichroic section is characterized by low reflectance at a pump wavelength and high reflectance at the laser wavelength. The architecture additionally includes a first cladding section proximate to the third side of the gain region and a second cladding section proximate to the fourth side of the gain region.

  7. Genetic constraints for thermal coadaptation in Drosophila subobscura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascual Marta

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Behaviour has been traditionally viewed as a driver of subsequent evolution because behavioural adjustments expose organisms to novel environments, which may result in a correlated evolution on other traits. In Drosophila subobscura, thermal preference and heat tolerance are linked to chromosomal inversion polymorphisms that show parallel latitudinal clines worldwide, such that "cold-climate" ("warm-climate" chromosome arrangements collectively favour a coherent response to colder (warmer settings as flies carrying them prefer colder (warmer conditions and have lower (higher knock out temperatures. Yet, it is not clear whether a genetic correlation between thermal preference and heat tolerance can partially underlie such response. Results We have analyzed the genetic basis of thermal preference and heat tolerance using isochromosomal lines in D. subobscura. Chromosome arrangements on the O chromosome were known to have a biometrical effect on thermal preference in a laboratory temperature gradient, and also harbour several genes involved in the heat shock response; in particular, the genes Hsp68 and Hsp70. Our results corroborate that arrangements on chromosome O affect adult thermal preference in a laboratory temperature gradient, with cold-climate Ost carriers displaying a lower thermal preference than their warm-climate O3+4 and O3+4+8 counterparts. However, these chromosome arrangements did not have any effect on adult heat tolerance and, hence, we putatively discard a genetic covariance between both traits arising from linkage disequilibrium between genes affecting thermal preference and candidate genes for heat shock resistance. Nonetheless, a possible association of juvenile thermal preference and heat resistance warrants further analysis. Conclusions Thermal preference and heat tolerance in the isochromosomal lines of D. subobscura appear to be genetically independent, which might potentially prevent a coherent

  8. A Drosophila metallophosphoesterase mediates deglycosylation of rhodopsin

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jinguo; Li, Yi; Xia, Wenjing; Reddig, Keith; Hu, Wen; XIE, Wei; Li, Hong-Sheng; Han, Junhai

    2011-01-01

    The glycosylation status of Rhodopsin controls its trafficking and stability, and is hence critical for photoreceptor function. Here, a Drosophila metallophosphoesterase is identified that affects Rhodopsin glycosylation by regulating the activity of an enzyme involved in glycan processing.

  9. Tuberous sclerosis complex: A Drosophila connection

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Arun; Girimaji, SC

    2001-01-01

    Recent findings based on experiments with Drosophila melanogaster significantly advance our understanding of a human disease known as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The present note begins with background information and goes on to explain what these findings are.

  10. Behavioral modification in choice process of Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Shunpeng; (王顺鹏); TANG; Shiming; (唐世明); LI; Yan; (李; 岩); GUO; Aike; (郭爱克)

    2003-01-01

    In visual operant conditioning of Drosophila at the flight simulator, only motor output of flies--yaw torque--is recorded, which is involved in the conditioning process. The current study used a newly-designed data analysis method to study the torque distribution of Drosophila. Modification of torque distribution represents the effects of operant conditioning on flies' behavioral mode. Earlier works[10] showed that, when facing contradictory visual cues, flies could make choices based upon the relative weightiness of different cues, and it was demonstrated that mushroom bodies might play an important role in such choice behavior. The new "torque-position map" method was used to explore the CS-US associative learning and choice behavior in Drosophila from the aspect of its behavioral mode. Finally, this work also discussed various possible neural bases involved in visual associative learning, choice processing and modification processing of the behavioral mode in the visual operant conditioning of Drosophila.

  11. Amplified spontaneous emission and its restraint in a terawatt Ti:sapphire amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and its restraint in a femtosecond Ti: sapphire chirped_pulse amplifier were investigated. The noises arising from ASE were effectively filtered out in the spatial, temporal and spectral domain. Pulses as short as 38 fs were amplified to peak power of 1.4 TW. The power ratio between the amplified femtosecond pulse and the ASE was higher than 106:1.

  12. Distributed feedback laser amplifiers combining the functions of amplifiers and channel filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Z.; Durhuus, T.; Mikkelsen, Benny;

    1994-01-01

    A dynamic model for distributed feedback amplifiers, including the mode coupled equations and the carrier rate equation, is established. The presented mode coupled equations have taken into account the interaction between fast changing optical signal and the waveguide with corrugations. By showin...... the possibility of amplifying 100 ps pulses without pulse broadening, we anticipate that a distributed feedback amplifier can be used as a combined amplifier and channel filter in high bit rate transmission systems....

  13. Genetic Determinants of Phosphate Response in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Clemens Bergwitz; Wee, Mark J.; Sumi Sinha; Joanne Huang; Charles DeRobertis; Mensah, Lawrence B.; Jonathan Cohen; Adam Friedman; Meghana Kulkarni; Yanhui Hu; Arunachalam Vinayagam; Michael Schnall-Levin; Bonnie Berger; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; Mohr, Stephanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphate is required for many important cellular processes and having too little phosphate or too much can cause disease and reduce life span in humans. However, the mechanisms underlying homeostatic control of extracellular phosphate levels and cellular effects of phosphate are poorly understood. Here, we establish Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for the study of phosphate effects. We found that Drosophila larval development depends on the availability of phosphate in the medium. ...

  14. RNA Binding Specificity of Drosophila Muscleblind†

    OpenAIRE

    Goers, Emily S.; Voelker, Rodger B.; Gates, Devika P.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Members of the muscleblind family of RNA binding proteins found in Drosophila and mammals are key players in both the human disease myotonic dystrophy and the regulation of alternative splicing. Recently, the mammalian muscleblind-like protein, MBNL1, has been shown to have interesting RNA binding properties with both endogenous and disease-related RNA targets. Here we report the characterization of RNA binding properties of the Drosophila muscleblind protein Mbl. Mutagenesis of double-strand...

  15. The Digestive Tract of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Bassler, Bl; Lichten, M; Schupbach, G.; Lemaitre, Bruno; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The digestive tract plays a central role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients. Far from being a passive tube, it provides the first line of defense against pathogens and maintains energy homeostasis by exchanging neuronal and endocrine signals with other organs. Historically neglected, the gut of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has recently come to the forefront of Drosophila research. Areas as diverse as stem cell biology, neurobiology, metabolism, and immunity are benefitting ...

  16. The Drosophila cyst stem cell lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Zoller, Richard; Schulz, Cordula

    2012-01-01

    In all animals, germline cells differentiate in intimate contact with somatic cells and interactions between germline and soma are particularly important for germline development and function. In the male gonad of Drosophila melanogaster, the developing germline cells are enclosed by somatic cyst cells. The cyst cells are derived from cyst stem cells (CySCs) of somatic origin and codifferentiate with the germline cells. The fast generation cycle and the genetic tractability of Drosophila has ...

  17. Genetic Determinants of Phosphate Response in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Bergwitz, Clemens; Wee, Mark J.; Sinha, Sumi; Huang, Joanne Hyunjung; DeRobertis, Charles; Mensah, Lawrence; Cohen, Jonathan Brewer; Friedman, Adam Amiel Laufer; Kulkarni, Meghana; Hu, Yanhui; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Berger, Bonnie; Perkins, Lizabeth A; Mohr, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate is required for many important cellular processes and having too little phosphate or too much can cause disease and reduce life span in humans. However, the mechanisms underlying homeostatic control of extracellular phosphate levels and cellular effects of phosphate are poorly understood. Here, we establish Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for the study of phosphate effects. We found that Drosophila larval development depends on the availability of phosphate in the medium. ...

  18. On the Morphology of the Drosophila Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Rotstein; Achim Paululat

    2016-01-01

    The circulatory system of Drosophila melanogaster represents an easily amenable genetic model whose analysis at different levels, i.e., from single molecules up to functional anatomy, has provided new insights into general aspects of cardiogenesis, heart physiology and cardiac aging, to name a few examples. In recent years, the Drosophila heart has also attracted the attention of researchers in the field of biomedicine. This development is mainly due to the fact that several genes causing hum...

  19. Stimulation of the Drosophila immune system alters genome-wide nucleosome occupancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yingxue Ren; Vera, Daniel L.; Kimberly A. Hughes; Dennis, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, nucleosomes participate in all DNA-templated events by regulating access to the underlying DNA sequence. However, nucleosome dynamics during a genome response have not been well characterized [1,2]. We stimulated Drosophila S2 cells with heat-killed Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, and mapped genome-wide nucleosome occupancy at high temporal resolution by MNase-seq using Illumina HiSeq 2500. We show widespread nucleosome occupancy change in S2 cells during the imm...

  20. Induced overexpression of mitochondrial Mn-superoxide dismutase extends the life span of adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jingtao; Folk, Donna; Bradley, Timothy J.; Tower, John

    2002-01-01

    A transgenic system ("FLP-out") based on yeast FLP recombinase allowed induced overexpression of MnSOD enzyme in adult Drosophila melanogaster. With FLP-out a brief heat pulse (HP) of young, adult flies triggered the rearrangement and subsequent expression of a MnSOD transgene throughout the adult life span. Control (no HP) and overexpressing (HP) flies had identical genetic backgrounds. The amount of MnSOD enzyme overexpression achieved varied among six independent transgenic lines, with inc...

  1. Saccadic Body Turns in walking Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart R.H. Geurten

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster structures its optic flow during flight by interspersing translational movements with abrupt body rotations. Whether these ‘body saccades’ are accompanied by steering movements of the head is a matter of debate. By tracking single flies moving freely in an arena, we now discovered that walking Drosophila also perform saccades. Movement analysis revealed that the flies separate rotational from translational movements by quickly turning their bodies by 15 degrees within a tenth of a second. Although walking flies moved their heads by up to 20 degrees about their bodies, their heads moved with the bodies during saccadic turns. This saccadic strategy contrasts with the head saccades reported for e.g. blowflies and honeybees, presumably reflecting optical constraints: modelling revealed that head saccades as described for these latter insects would hardly affect the retinal input in Drosophila because of the lower acuity of its compound eye. The absence of head saccades in Drosophila was associated with the absence of haltere oscillations, which seem to guide head movements in other flies. In addition to adding new twists to Drosophila walking behavior, our analysis shows that Drosophila does not turn its head relative to its body when turning during walking.

  2. A Drosophila Model for Screening Antiobesity Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thanh Men

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although triacylglycerol, the major component for lipid storage, is essential for normal physiology, its excessive accumulation causes obesity in adipose tissue and is associated with organ dysfunction in nonadipose tissue. Here, we focused on the Drosophila model to develop therapeutics for preventing obesity. The brummer (bmm gene in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be homologous with human adipocyte triglyceride lipase, which is related to the regulation of lipid storage. We established a Drosophila model for monitoring bmm expression by introducing the green fluorescent protein (GFP gene as a downstream reporter of the bmm promoter. The third-instar larvae of Drosophila showed the GFP signal in all tissues observed and specifically in the salivary gland nucleus. To confirm the relationship between bmm expression and obesity, the effect of oral administration of glucose diets on bmm promoter activity was analyzed. The Drosophila flies given high-glucose diets showed higher lipid contents, indicating the obesity phenotype; this was suggested by a weaker intensity of the GFP signal as well as reduced bmm mRNA expression. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Drosophila model established in this study is useful for screening antiobesity agents. We also report the effects of oral administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors and some vegetables on the bmm promoter activity.

  3. A Drosophila Model for Screening Antiobesity Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Tran Thanh; Thanh, Duong Ngoc Van; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Hattori, Gen; Arii, Masayuki; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Kamei, Kaeko

    2016-01-01

    Although triacylglycerol, the major component for lipid storage, is essential for normal physiology, its excessive accumulation causes obesity in adipose tissue and is associated with organ dysfunction in nonadipose tissue. Here, we focused on the Drosophila model to develop therapeutics for preventing obesity. The brummer (bmm) gene in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be homologous with human adipocyte triglyceride lipase, which is related to the regulation of lipid storage. We established a Drosophila model for monitoring bmm expression by introducing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene as a downstream reporter of the bmm promoter. The third-instar larvae of Drosophila showed the GFP signal in all tissues observed and specifically in the salivary gland nucleus. To confirm the relationship between bmm expression and obesity, the effect of oral administration of glucose diets on bmm promoter activity was analyzed. The Drosophila flies given high-glucose diets showed higher lipid contents, indicating the obesity phenotype; this was suggested by a weaker intensity of the GFP signal as well as reduced bmm mRNA expression. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Drosophila model established in this study is useful for screening antiobesity agents. We also report the effects of oral administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors and some vegetables on the bmm promoter activity. PMID:27247940

  4. Current Recommendations for Managing Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, in PNW Blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spotted wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, was reported in the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Washington, British Columbia) in 2009. The fly is able to oviposit directly into intact ripe and ripening fruit, so it is of great economic concern to the small fruit industries in region. Fruit i...

  5. Current Recommendations for Managing Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, in PNW Strawberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spotted wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, was reported in the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Washington, British Columbia) in 2009. The fly is able to oviposit directly into intact ripe and ripening fruit, so it is of great economic concern to the small fruit industries in region. Fruit i...

  6. The susceptibility of small fruits and cherries to Spotted Wing Drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: The Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is native to Asia and has been detected in the North American mainland and Europe in 2008-10. SWD is a serious economic pest because it lays eggs within ripening fruit before harvest which can lead to crop loss. The aim ...

  7. Behavioral and antennal responses of spotted wing drosophila, drosophila suzukii, to volatiles from fruit extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Native to Southeast Asia, the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, has become a serious pest of soft-skinned fruit crops since its introduction into North America and Europe in 2008. Current monitoring strategies use baits based on fermentation products; however, to date, no fruit-based vola...

  8. Current Recommendations for Managing Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, in PNW Caneberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spotted wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, was reported in the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Washington, British Columbia) in 2009. The fly is able to oviposit directly into intact ripe and ripening fruit, so it is of great economic concern to the small fruit industries in region. Fruit i...

  9. Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura)(Diptera: drosophilidae), trapped with combinations of wines and vinegars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field trapping experiments evaluated wine and vinegar baits for spotted wing drosophila flies, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), and assessed variance in biat attractiveness with wit type, vinegar type, and bait age. A mixture of apple cider vinegar and a Merlot wine attracted more flies than a mixtur...

  10. A general-purpose pulse amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper proposals are made for using the technique, known from analogue computation, for transforming nuclear pulses to the shape and size desired by the means of ''operational amplifiers''. By using this technique it is possible, by means of one fundamental amplifier but with different feedback networks, to have pre-amplifiers and head-amplifiers with different pulse-handling performances and optimized with respect to the parameter of greatest interest, such as linearity, stability or overloading characteristics. As this technique involves the use of parallel-feedback it is specially suited for pre-amplifiers since most detectors are current-generators. An amplifier fulfilling the requirements necessary for use as an operational amplifier is described. The most important specifications are: 90 db gain from DC-10 kHz, then falling approximately 20 db/decade until 15 MHz (30 db gain). Four tubes are used in the amplifier. For most pulse-handling applications a stabilized power-supply is unnecessary and the stability will depend solely on the stability of the feedback network used. (author)

  11. Self-pulsation in Raman fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated.......Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated....

  12. High efficiency, low magnetic field gyroklystron amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of operating a gyroklystron amplifier at high efficiency and low magnetic field is considered. Two devices are discussed: A two cavity second harmonic TE02 gyroklystron amplifier operating at 19.7 GHz with subharmonic bunching, and a fundamental mode TE01 gyrotwistron at 16 GHz. The nonlinear efficiency is given for both devices

  13. BROADBAND TRAVELLING WAVE SEMICONDUCTOR OPTICAL AMPLIFIER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Broadband travelling wave semiconductor optical amplifier (100, 200, 300, 400, 800) for amplification of light, wherein the amplifier (100, 200, 300, 400, 800) comprises a waveguide region (101, 201, 301, 401, 801) for providing confinement of the light in transverse directions and adapted for...

  14. Waveguide optical amplifier for telecom applications

    OpenAIRE

    Taccheo, Stefano; Zannin, Marcelo; Ennser, Karin; Careglio, Davide; Solé Pareta, Josep; Aracil Rico, Javier

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review progress in optical gain clamped waveguide amplifiers for applications to optical communications. We demonstrate that compact waveguide devices may offer advantages compared to standard fiber amplifiers. In particular we focus on the application of gain clamping and optical burst switching networks where physical impairments may occur due to variation of the input power. Peer Reviewed

  15.     Developmental acclimation affects clinal variation in stress resistance traits in Drosophila buzzatii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Loeschcke, Volker

    2010-01-01

      Patterns of clinal genetic variation in Drosophila are often characterized after rearing at constant temperatures. However, clinal patterns might change after acclimation if populations differ in their plastic response to fluctuating environments. We studied longevity, starvation and heat knock...... temperatures, especially in heat knock-down, for which clinal patterns disappeared when flies were reared at constant temperatures. This result emphasises the importance of determining whether populations originating from different environments differ in their plastic responses to stress....

  16. mm-wave solid state amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfert, P. H.; Crowley, J. D.; Fank, F. B.

    The development of mm-wave amplifiers using InP Gunn diodes is reviewed including a low-noise eight-stage amplifier for replacement of a Ka-band TWTA and a three-stage amplifier for the 42.5 to 44.5 range with an output power of 100 mW and 20 dB associated gain. A detailed description of a three-stage amplifier for the 54 to 58 GHz range is given with 100 mW output power and 15 dB associated gain, a small signal gain of 30 dB and an N.F. of 15.5 to 16.5 dB. The design of a broad band, low-loss V-band circulator, which was used in the amplifier, is described.

  17. Detection of Non-Amplified Genomic DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Corradini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    This book offers a state-of-the-art overview on non amplified DNA detection methods and provides chemists, biochemists, biotechnologists and material scientists with an introduction to these methods. In fact all these fields have dedicated resources to the problem of nucleic acid detection, each contributing with their own specific methods and concepts. This book will explain the basic principles of the different non amplified DNA detection methods available, highlighting their respective advantages and limitations. The importance of non-amplified DNA sequencing technologies will be also discussed. Non-amplified DNA detection can be achieved by adopting different techniques. Such techniques have allowed the commercialization of innovative platforms for DNA detection that are expected to break into the DNA diagnostics market. The enhanced sensitivity required for the detection of non amplified genomic DNA has prompted new strategies that can achieve ultrasensitivity by combining specific materials with specifi...

  18. Semiconductor quantum-dot lasers and amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Borri, Paola; Ledentsov, N. N.;

    2002-01-01

    We have produced GaAs-based quantum-dot edge-emitting lasers operating at 1.16 mu m with record-low transparency current, high output power, and high internal quantum efficiencies. We have also realized GaAs-based quantum-dot lasers emitting at 1.3 mu m, both high-power edge emitters and low-power...... biased to positive net gain. We have further measured gain recovery times in quantum dot amplifiers that are significantly lower than in bulk and quantum-well semiconductor optical amplifiers. This is promising for future demonstration of quantum dot devices with high modulation bandwidth...... surface emitting VCSELs. We investigated the ultrafast dynamics of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers. The dephasing time at room temperature of the ground-state transition in semiconductor quantum dots is around 250 fs in an unbiased amplifier, decreasing to below 50 fs when the amplifier is...

  19. Radiation tolerant isolation amplifiers for temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper concentrates on the selection of radiation tolerant isolation amplifiers, which are suitable for the signal conditioners for cryogenic system in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The evolution and the results of different commercial isolation amplifiers' parameters under neutron and gamma radiation are presented. In most cases, the tested isolation amplifiers' input offset voltage, bias currents and output offset voltage hardly changed during the radiation. The DC gain in input stage was only affected for some isolation amplifiers with a small open loop gain. Transmission coefficient showed decrease for all the tested isolation amplifiers. Also, the DC output voltage increased and the ripple voltage decreased for all the build-in isolated regulators. In addition, results on 1B41 signal conditioner showed that it was tolerant to 7-8x1012 n/cm2, which was 50% higher than the expected dose in the LHC

  20. An Implantable CMOS Amplifier for Nerve Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Lehmann, Torsten

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a low noise high gain CMOS amplifier for minute nerve signals is presented. By using a mixture of weak- and strong inversion transistors, optimal noise suppression in the amplifier is achieved. A continuous-time offset-compensation technique is utilized in order to minimize impact on...... the amplifier input nodes. The method for signal recovery from noisy nerve signals is presented. A prototype amplifier is realized in a standard digital 0.5 μm CMOS single poly, n-well process. The prototype amplifier features a gain of 80 dB over a 3.6 kHz bandwidth, a CMRR of more than 87 dB and a...

  1. Design and performance of the beamlet amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandson, A.C.; Rotter, M.D.; Frank, M.D.; McCracken, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    In future laser systems, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), multi-segment amplifiers (MSAs) will be used to amplify the laser beam to the required levels. As a prototype of such a laser architecture, the authors have designed, built, and tested flash-lamp-pumped, Nd:Glass, Brewster-angle slab MSAs for the Beamlet project. In this article, they review the fundamentals of Nd:Glass amplifiers, describe the MSA geometry, discuss parameters that are important in amplifier design, and present our results on the characterization of the Beamlet MSAs. In particular, gain and beam steering measurements show that the Beamlet amplifiers meet all optical performance specifications and perform close to model predictions.

  2. Qubit readout with a directional parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, K. M.; Abdo, B.; Narla, A.; Shankar, S.; Hatridge, M.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2014-03-01

    Josephson junction based quantum limited parametric amplifiers play an essential role in superconducting qubit measurements. These measurements necessitate circulators and isolators between the amplifier and qubit to add directionality and/or isolation. Unfortunately, this extra hardware limits both quantum measurement efficiency and experimental scalability. Here we present a quantum-limited Josephson-junction-based directional amplifier (JDA) based on a novel coupling between two nominally identical Josephson parametric converters (JPCs). The device achieves a forward gain of 11 dB with a 15 MHz dynamical bandwidth, but higher gains are possible at the expense of bandwidth. We also present measurements of a transmon qubit made with the JDA, and show minimal measurement back-action despite the absence of any isolator or circulator before the amplifier. These results provide a first step toward realizing on-chip integration of qubits and parametric amplifiers. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and NSF.

  3. Design of an 1800nm Raman amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a Raman amplifier that operates at 1810 nm and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser at 1680 nm. Both the pump laser and the Raman amplifier is polarization maintaining. A challenge when scaling Raman amplifiers to longer wavelengths is the increase in...... transmission loss, but also the reduction in the Raman gain coefficient as the amplifier wavelength is increased. Both polarization components of the Raman gain is characterized, initially for linearly co-polarized signal and pump, subsequently linearly polarized orthogonal signal and pump. The noise...... performance of the amplifier is also investigated for both configurations. Our results show an on/off gain exceeding 20 dB at 1810 nm for which the obtained effective noise figure is below 3 dB....

  4. Thermal plasticity in Drosophila melanogaster: A comparison of geographic populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jean R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Populations of Drosophila melanogaster show differences in many morphometrical traits according to their geographic origin. Despite the widespread occurrence of these differences in more than one Drosophila species, the actual selective mechanisms controlling the genetic basis of such variation are not fully understood. Thermal selection is considered to be the most likely cause explaining these differences. Results In our work, we investigated several life history traits (body size, duration of development, preadult survival, longevity and productivity in two tropical and two temperate natural populations of D. melanogaster recently collected, and in a temperate population maintained for twelve years at the constant temperature of 18°C in the laboratory. In order to characterise the plasticity of these life history traits, the populations were grown at 12, 18, 28 and 31.2°C. Productivity was the fitness trait that showed clearly adaptive differences between latitudinal populations: tropical flies did better in the heat but worse in the cold environments with respect to temperate flies. Differences for the plasticity of other life history traits investigated between tropical and temperate populations were also found. The differences were particularly evident at stressful temperatures (12 and 31.2°C. Conclusion Our results evidence a better cold tolerance in temperate populations that seems to have been evolved during the colonisation of temperate countries by D. melanogaster Afrotropical ancestors, and support the hypothesis of an adaptive response of plasticity to the experienced environment.

  5. Determination of gene expression patterns using high-throughput RNA in situ hybridizaion to whole-mount Drosophila embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiszmann, R.; Hammonds, A.S.; Celniker, S.E.

    2009-04-09

    We describe a high-throughput protocol for RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) to Drosophila embryos in a 96-well format. cDNA or genomic DNA templates are amplified by PCR and then digoxigenin-labeled ribonucleotides are incorporated into antisense RNA probes by in vitro transcription. The quality of each probe is evaluated before ISH using a RNA probe quantification (dot blot) assay. RNA probes are hybridized to fixed, mixed-staged Drosophila embryos in 96-well plates. The resulting stained embryos can be examined and photographed immediately or stored at 4oC for later analysis. Starting with fixed, staged embryos, the protocol takes 6 d from probe template production through hybridization. Preparation of fixed embryos requires a minimum of 2 weeks to collect embryos representing all stages. The method has been used to determine the expression patterns of over 6,000 genes throughout embryogenesis.

  6. Loss of l(3)mbt leads to acquisition of the ping-pong cycle in Drosophila ovarian somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Tetsutaro; Sato, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Hitomi; Iwasaki, Yuka W; Siomi, Haruhiko; Siomi, Mikiko C

    2016-07-15

    In Drosophila germ cells, PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are amplified through a PIWI slicer-dependent feed-forward loop termed the ping-pong cycle, yielding secondary piRNAs. However, the detailed mechanism remains poorly understood, largely because an ex vivo model system amenable to biochemical analyses has not been available. Here, we show that CRISPR-mediated loss of function of lethal (3) malignant brain tumor [l(3)mbt] leads to ectopic activation of the germ-specific ping-pong cycle in ovarian somatic cells. Perinuclear foci resembling nuage, the ping-pong center, appeared following l(3)mbt mutation. This activation of the ping-pong machinery in cultured cells will greatly facilitate elucidation of the mechanism underlying secondary piRNA biogenesis in Drosophila. PMID:27474440

  7. The bacterial communities of Drosophila suzukii collected from undamaged cherries

    OpenAIRE

    James Angus Chandler; James, Pamela M.; Guillaume Jospin; Lang, Jenna M.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii is an introduced pest insect that feeds on undamaged, attached fruit. This diet is distinct from the fallen, discomposing fruits utilized by most other species of Drosophila. Since the bacterial microbiota of Drosophila, and of many other animals, is affected by diet, we hypothesized that the bacteria associated with D. suzukii are distinct from that of other Drosophila. Using 16S rDNA PCR and Illumina sequencing, we characterized the bacterial communities of larval and adu...

  8. FlyBase: the Drosophila database. The Flybase Consortium.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    FlyBase is a database of genetic and molecular data concerning Drosophila. FlyBase is maintained as a relational database (in Sybase). The scope of FlyBase includes: genes, alleles (and phenotypes), aberrations, pointers to sequence data, clones, stock lists, Drosophila workers and bibliographic references. FlyBase is also available on CD-ROM for Macintosh systems (Encyclopaedia of Drosophila).

  9. The 60 GHz solid state power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclymonds, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new amplifier architecture was developed during this contract that is superior to any other solid state approach. The amplifier produced 6 watts with 4 percent efficiency over a 2 GHz band at 61.5 GHz. The unit was 7 x 9 x 3 inches in size, 5.5 pounds in weight, and the conduction cooling through the baseplate is suitable for use in space. The amplifier used high efficiency GaAs IMPATT diodes which were mounted in 1-diode circuits, called modules. Eighteen modules were used in the design, and power combining was accomplished with a proprietary passive component called a combiner plate.

  10. Laser Cooled High-Power Fiber Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Nemova, Galina

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model for laser cooled continuous-wave fiber amplifier is presented. The amplification process takes place in the Tm3+-doped core of the fluoride ZBLAN (ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF) glass fiber. The cooling process takes place in the Yb3+:ZBLAN fiber cladding. It is shown that for each value of the pump power and the amplified signal there is a distribution of the concentration of the Tm3+ along the length of the fiber amplifier, which provides its athermal operation. The influence ...

  11. Effect of Soliton Propagation in Fiber Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of optical solitons in fiber amplifiers is discussed by considering a model that includes linear high order dispersion, two-photon absorption, nonlinear high-order dispersion, self-induced Ramam and five-order nonlinear effects. Based on travelling wave method, the solutions of the nonlinear Schrdinger equations, and the influence on soliton propagation as well as high-order effect in the fiber amplifier are discussed in detail. It is found that because of existing five-order nonlinear effect, the solution is not of secant hyperbola type, but shows high gain state of the fiber amplifier which is very favourable to the propagation of solitons.

  12. Noise reduction in AC-coupled amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano Finetti, Roberto Ernesto; Pallàs Areny, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    AC-coupled amplifiers are noisier than dc-coupled amplifiers because of the thermal noise of the resistor(s) in the ac-coupling network and the increased contribution of the amplifier input noise current i(n). Both contributions, however, diminish if the corner frequency f(c) of the high-pass filter observed by the signal is lowered, the cost being a longer transient response. At the same time, the presence of large resistors in the ac-coupling network suggests that the use of FET-input ampli...

  13. Fundamentals of RF and microwave transistor amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Bahl, Inder J

    2009-01-01

    A Comprehensive and Up-to-Date Treatment of RF and Microwave Transistor Amplifiers This book provides state-of-the-art coverage of RF and microwave transistor amplifiers, including low-noise, narrowband, broadband, linear, high-power, high-efficiency, and high-voltage. Topics covered include modeling, analysis, design, packaging, and thermal and fabrication considerations. Through a unique integration of theory and practice, readers will learn to solve amplifier-related design problems ranging from matching networks to biasing and stability. More than 240 problems are included to help read

  14. The Role of PPK26 in Drosophila Larval Mechanical Nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmeng Guo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In Drosophila larvae, the class IV dendritic arborization (da neurons are polymodal nociceptors. Here, we show that ppk26 (CG8546 plays an important role in mechanical nociception in class IV da neurons. Our immunohistochemical and functional results demonstrate that ppk26 is specifically expressed in class IV da neurons. Larvae with mutant ppk26 showed severe behavioral defects in a mechanical nociception behavioral test but responded to noxious heat stimuli comparably to wild-type larvae. In addition, functional studies suggest that ppk26 and ppk (also called ppk1 function in the same pathway, whereas piezo functions in a parallel pathway. Consistent with these functional results, we found that PPK and PPK26 are interdependent on each other for their cell surface localization. Our work indicates that PPK26 and PPK might form heteromeric DEG/ENaC channels that are essential for mechanotransduction in class IV da neurons.

  15. Development of dendrite polarity in Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Sarah E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila neurons have dendrites that contain minus-end-out microtubules. This microtubule arrangement is different from that of cultured mammalian neurons, which have mixed polarity microtubules in dendrites. Results To determine whether Drosophila and mammalian dendrites have a common microtubule organization during development, we analyzed microtubule polarity in Drosophila dendritic arborization neuron dendrites at different stages of outgrowth from the cell body in vivo. As dendrites initially extended, they contained mixed polarity microtubules, like mammalian neurons developing in culture. Over a period of several days this mixed microtubule array gradually matured to a minus-end-out array. To determine whether features characteristic of dendrites were localized before uniform polarity was attained, we analyzed dendritic markers as dendrites developed. In all cases the markers took on their characteristic distribution while dendrites had mixed polarity. An axonal marker was also quite well excluded from dendrites throughout development, although this was perhaps more efficient in mature neurons. To confirm that dendrite character could be acquired in Drosophila while microtubules were mixed, we genetically disrupted uniform dendritic microtubule organization. Dendritic markers also localized correctly in this case. Conclusions We conclude that developing Drosophila dendrites initially have mixed microtubule polarity. Over time they mature to uniform microtubule polarity. Dendrite identity is established before the mature microtubule arrangement is attained, during the period of mixed microtubule polarity.

  16. The genetic covariance among clinal environments after adaptation to an environmental gradient in Drosophila serrata.

    OpenAIRE

    Sgrò, Carla M.; Blows, Mark W.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the genetic basis of clinal adaptation by determining the evolutionary response of life-history traits to laboratory natural selection along a gradient of thermal stress in Drosophila serrata. A gradient of heat stress was created by exposing larvae to a heat stress of 36 degrees for 4 hr for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 days of larval development, with the remainder of development taking place at 25 degrees. Replicated lines were exposed to each level of this stress every second generatio...

  17. Experimental evidence for nutrition regulated stress resistance in Drosophila ananassae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Sisodia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The amount and quality of nutrients consumed by organisms have a strong impact on stress resistance, life-history traits and reproduction. The balance between energy acquisition and expenditure is crucial to the survival and reproductive success of animals. The ability of organisms to adjust their development, physiology or behavior in response to environmental conditions, called phenotypic plasticity, is a defining property of life. One of the most familiar and important examples of phenotypic plasticity is the response of stress tolerance and reproduction to changes in developmental nutrition. Larval nutrition may affect a range of different life-history traits as well as responses to environmental stress in adult. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigate the effect of larval nutrition on desiccation, starvation, chill-coma recovery, heat resistance as well as egg to adult viability, egg production and ovariole number in Drosophila ananassae. We raised larvae on either protein rich diet or carbohydrate rich diet. We found that flies consuming protein rich diet have higher desiccation and heat shock resistance whereas flies developed on carbohydrate rich diet have higher starvation and cold resistance. Egg production was higher in females developed on protein rich diet and we also found trade-off between egg production and Egg to adult viability of the flies. Viability was higher in carbohydrate rich diet. However, sex specific viability was found in different nutritional regimes. Higher Egg production might be due to higher ovariole number in females of protein rich diet. CONCLUSION: Thus, Drosophila ananassae adapts different stress tolerance and life-history strategies according to the quality of the available diet, which are correlated with phenotypic adjustment at anatomical and physiological levels.

  18. Control of Drosophila Type I and Type II central brain neuroblast proliferation by bantam microRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weng, Ruifen; Cohen, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of stem cell self-renewal by microRNAs is emerging as an important mechanism controlling tissue homeostasis. Here, we provide evidence that bantam microRNA controls neuroblast number and proliferation in the Drosophila central brain. Bantam also supports...... proliferation of transit-amplifying intermediate neural progenitor cells in type II neuroblast lineages. The stem cell factors brat and prospero are identified as bantam targets acting on different aspects of these processes. Thus, bantam appears to act in multiple regulatory steps in the maintenance and...

  19. High Energy Single Frequency Resonant Amplifier Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase I project proposes a single frequency high energy resonant amplifier for remote sensing. Current state-of-art technologies can not provide all...

  20. Noise in phase-preserving linear amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Shashank; Jiang, Zhang; Combes, Joshua [Center for Quantum Information and Control, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Caves, Carlton M. [Center for Quantum Information and Control, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA and Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2014-12-04

    The purpose of a phase-preserving linear amplifier is to make a small signal larger, so that it can be perceived by instruments incapable of resolving the original signal, while sacrificing as little as possible in signal-to-noise. Quantum mechanics limits how well this can be done: the noise added by the amplifier, referred to the input, must be at least half a quantum at the operating frequency. This well-known quantum limit only constrains the second moments of the added noise. Here we provide the quantum constraints on the entire distribution of added noise: any phasepreserving linear amplifier is equivalent to a parametric amplifier with a physical state σ for the ancillary mode; σ determines the properties of the added noise.

  1. Noise in phase-preserving linear amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shashank; Jiang, Zhang; Combes, Joshua; Caves, Carlton M.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of a phase-preserving linear amplifier is to make a small signal larger, so that it can be perceived by instruments incapable of resolving the original signal, while sacrificing as little as possible in signal-to-noise. Quantum mechanics limits how well this can be done: the noise added by the amplifier, referred to the input, must be at least half a quantum at the operating frequency. This well-known quantum limit only constrains the second moments of the added noise. Here we provide the quantum constraints on the entire distribution of added noise: any phasepreserving linear amplifier is equivalent to a parametric amplifier with a physical state σ for the ancillary mode; σ determines the properties of the added noise.

  2. Cryogenic Amplifier Based Receivers at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Reck, Theodore and; Schlecht, Erich; Lin, Robert; Deal, William

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based amplifiers has moved well in the submillimeter-wave frequencies over the last couple of years. Working amplifiers with usable gain in waveguide packages has been reported beyond 700 GHz. When cooled cryogenically, they have shown substantial improvement in their noise temperature. This has opened up the real possibility of cryogenic amplifier based heterodyne receivers at submillimeter wavelengths for ground-based, air-borne, and space-based instruments for astrophysics, planetary, and Earth science applications. This paper provides an overview of the science applications at submillimeter wavelengths that will benefit from this technology. It also describes the current state of the InP HEMT based cryogenic amplifier receivers at submillimeter wavelengths.

  3. Edible bird's nest enhances antioxidant capacity and increases lifespan in Drosophila Melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q; Li, G; Yao, H; He, S; Li, H; Liu, S; Wu, Y; Lai, X

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aims to investigate the effects of edible bird's nest (EBN) on anti-aging efficacy. In order to investigate lifespan and mortality rate of flies, we treated flies with various doses of EBN. Besides, fecundity, water content and food are determined and heat-stress test is conducted after flies treating with different medium. Effects of EBN on total antioxidant activity (T-AOC), super-oxide dismutase activity (SOD), catalase activity (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were examined in drosophila melanogaster. Results indicated that flies in EBN treated group illustrated significantly lower mortality rates and longer median and maximum lifespan compared to control group (P<0.05). The fecundity in EBN-treated group was increased compared to control group. SOD levels and CAT activity were significantly increased, and MDA levels decreased in EBN-treated group compared to control group (P<0.01). In conclusion, EBN can extend lifespan, decrease mortality rate and increase survival rate in heat-stress test, and which can also promote SOD and CAT activity and reduce MDA levels. EBN is able to delay drosophila melanogaster aging, attributing to the increasing antioxidant enzyme activities and decreasing content of lipid peroxidation products in drosophila melanogaster. PMID:27188745

  4. Quantum cloning with an optical fiber amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Fasel, Sylvain; Gisin, Nicolas; Ribordy, Grégoire; Scarani, Valerio; Zbinden, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown theoretically that a light amplifier working on the physical principle of stimulated emission should achieve optimal quantum cloning of the polarization state of light. We demonstrate close-to-optimal universal quantum cloning of polarization in a standard fiber amplifier for telecom wavelengths. For cloning 1 --> 2 we find a fidelity of 0.82, the optimal value being 5/6 = 0.83.

  5. Apoptosis in Drosophila: which role for mitochondria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Colin, Jessie; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that the mitochondrion is a central regulator of mammalian cell apoptosis. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, mainly because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and cell death in Drosophila occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins, including RHG proteins and proteins of the Bcl-2 family that are key regulators of Drosophila apoptosis, constitutively or transiently localize in mitochondria. These proteins participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of Diap1, a Drosophila IAP, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. Here, we review these mitochondrial events that might have their counterpart in human. PMID:26679112

  6. Live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster are also used by the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties with regard to keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick, hazy cytoplasm. This article outlines the major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping the cells alive. It describes various imaging and associated techniques best suited to following changes in the distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules in real time in these tissues. Imaging, in general, is a rapidly developing discipline, and recent advances in imaging technology are able to greatly extend what can be achieved with live cell imaging of Drosophila tissues. As far as possible, this article includes the latest technical developments and discusses likely future developments in imaging methods that could have an impact on research using Drosophila. PMID:20360379

  7. Sexual Behavior of Drosophila suzukii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Revadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A high reproductive potential is one reason for the rapid spread of Drosophila suzukii in Europe and in the United States. In order to identify mechanisms that mediate mating and reproduction in D. suzukii we studied the fly’s reproductive behavior, diurnal mating activity and sexual maturation. Furthermore, we studied the change of female cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs with age and conducted a preliminary investigation on the role of female-derived chemical signals in male mating behavior. Sexual behavior in D. suzukii is characterized by distinct elements of male courtship leading to female acceptance for mating. Time of day and age modulate D. suzukii mating activity. As with other drosophilids, female sexual maturity is paralleled by a quantitative increase in CHCs. Neither female CHCs nor other olfactory signals were required to induce male courtship, however, presence of those signals significantly increased male sexual behavior. With this pilot study we hope to stimulate research on the reproductive biology of D. suzukii, which is relevant for the development of pest management tools.

  8. Sexual Behavior of Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revadi, Santosh; Lebreton, Sébastien; Witzgall, Peter; Anfora, Gianfranco; Dekker, Teun; Becher, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    A high reproductive potential is one reason for the rapid spread of Drosophila suzukii in Europe and in the United States. In order to identify mechanisms that mediate mating and reproduction in D. suzukii we studied the fly's reproductive behavior, diurnal mating activity and sexual maturation. Furthermore, we studied the change of female cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) with age and conducted a preliminary investigation on the role of female-derived chemical signals in male mating behavior. Sexual behavior in D. suzukii is characterized by distinct elements of male courtship leading to female acceptance for mating. Time of day and age modulate D. suzukii mating activity. As with other drosophilids, female sexual maturity is paralleled by a quantitative increase in CHCs. Neither female CHCs nor other olfactory signals were required to induce male courtship, however, presence of those signals significantly increased male sexual behavior. With this pilot study we hope to stimulate research on the reproductive biology of D. suzukii, which is relevant for the development of pest management tools. PMID:26463074

  9. Volatile pheromone signalling in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dean P

    2012-03-01

    Once captured by the antenna, 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA) binds to an extracellular binding protein called LUSH that undergoes a conformational shift upon cVA binding. The stable LUSH-cVA complex is the activating ligand for pheromone receptors present on the dendrites of the aT1 neurones, comprising the only neurones that detect cVA pheromone. This mechanism explains the single molecule sensitivity of insect pheromone detection systems. The receptor that recognizes activated LUSH consists of a complex of several proteins, including Or67d, a member of the tuning odourant receptor family, Orco, a co-receptor ion channel, and SNMP, a CD36 homologue that may be an inhibitory subunit. In addition, genetic screens and reconstitution experiments reveal additional factors that are important for pheromone detection. Identification and functional dissection of these factors in Drosophila melanogaster Meigen should permit the identification of homologous factors in pathogenic insects and agricultural pests, which, in turn, may be viable candidates for novel classes of compounds to control populations of target insect species without impacting beneficial species. PMID:24347807

  10. V-band IMPATT power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, S. W.

    1985-09-01

    This program is the result of the continuing demand and future requirement for a high data rate 60-GHz communications link. A reliable solid-state transmitter which delivers the necessary power over a wide bandwidth using the present IMPATT diode technology required the development of combining techniques. The development of a 60-GHz IMPATT power combiner amplifier is detailed. The results form a basis from which future wideband, high-power IMPATT amplifiers may be developed. As a result, several state-of-the-art advancements in millimeter-wave components technology were achieved. Specific achievements for the amplifier integration were: development of a nonresonant divider/combiner circuit; reproducible multiple junction circulator assemblies; and reliable high power 60-GHz IMPATT diodes. The various design approaches and tradeoffs which lead to the final amplifier configuration are discussed. A detailed circuit design is presented for the various amplifier components, and the conical line combiner, radial line combiner, and circulator development are discussed. The performance of the amplifier, the overall achievement of the program, the implications of the results, and an assessment of future development needs and recommendations are examined.

  11. An improved AC-amplifier for electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgovanović Nikola

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the design, simulation and test results of a new AC amplifier for electrophysiological measurements based on a three op-amp instrumentation amplifier (IA. The design target was to increase the common mode rejection ratio (CMRR, thereby improving the quality of the recorded physiological signals in a noisy environment. The new amplifier actively suppresses the DC component of the differential signal and actively reduces the common mode signal in the first stage of the IA. These functions increase the dynamic range of the amplifier's first stage of the differential signal. The next step was the realization of the amplifier in a single chip technology. The design and tests of the new AC amplifier with a differential gain of 79.2 dB, a CMRR of 130 dB at 50 Hz, a high-pass cutoff frequency at 0.01 Hz and common mode reduction in the first stage of the 49.8 dB are presented in this paper.

  12. Drosophila heat shock promoter works in transgenic Bombyx mori

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlířová, Miroslava; Asahina, Masako; Riddiford, L. M.; Jindra, Marek

    Kolymbari : University Kolymbari, 2001. s. 10. [International Workshop on Molecular Biology and Genetics of the Lepidoptera. 00.00.2001, Kolymbari] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : DNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  13. A comparison of inbreeding Depression in Tropical and Widespread Drosophila Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechsgaard, Jesper Smærup; Hoffmann, Ary A; Sgró, Carla;

    2013-01-01

    in 5 widespread and 5 tropical restricted species of Drosophila with aim of testing whether the two species groups suffered differently from inbreeding depression. The traits investigated wwere egg-to-adult viability, develpmental time and resistance to heat, vold and desiccation. Our results showed...... that levels of inbreeding depression were species and trait specific and did not differ between the species groups for stress resistance traits. However, for the life history traits developmental time and egg-to-adult viability, more inbreeding depression was observed in the tropical species. The...... results reported suggest that for life history traits tropical species of Drosophila will suffer more from inbreeding depression than widespread species in case of increases in the rate of inbreeding e.g. due to declines in population sizes....

  14. Contribution of Drosophila TRPA1 to Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung-Eun; Kim, Yunjung; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Do Yup; Lee, Youngseok

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels are highly conserved in humans and insects. Some of these channels are expressed in internal organs and their functions remain incompletely understood. By direct knock-in of the GAL4 gene into the trpA1 locus in Drosophila, we identified the expression of this gene in the subesophageal ganglion (SOGs) region. In addition, the neurites present in the dorsal posterior region as well as the drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (dILP2)-positive neur...

  15. Associations of Yeasts with Spotted-Wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii; Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Cherries and Raspberries

    OpenAIRE

    Hamby, Kelly A.; Hernández, Alejandro; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Frank G. Zalom

    2012-01-01

    A rich history of investigation documents various Drosophila-yeast mutualisms, suggesting that Drosophila suzukii similarly has an association with a specific yeast species or community. To discover candidate yeast species, yeasts were isolated from larval frass, adult midguts, and fruit hosts of D. suzukii. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) technology and decimal dilution plating were used to identify and determine the relative abundance of yeast species present in fr...

  16. Invasion biology of spotted wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii): a global perspective and future priorities

    OpenAIRE

    Asplen, Mark K.; Anfora, Gianfranco; Biondi, Antonio; Choi, Deuk-Soo; Chu, Dong; Daane, Kent M.; Gibert, Patricia; Gutierrez, Andrew P.; Kim A. Hoelmer; Hutchison, William D.; Isaacs, Rufus; Jiang, Zhi-Lin; Karpati, Zsolt; KIMURA, Masahito T.; Pascual, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The Asian vinegar fly Drosophila suzukii (spotted wing Drosophila [SWD]) has emerged as a major invasive insect pest of small and stone fruits in both the Americas and Europe since the late 2000s. While research efforts have rapidly progressed in Asia, North America, and Europe over the past 5 years, important new insights may be gained in comparing and contrasting findings across the regions affected by SWD. In this review, we explore common themes in the invasion biology of SWD by examining...

  17. First record of spotted wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Montenegro

    OpenAIRE

    Snježana Hrnčić; Sanja Radonjić

    2015-01-01

    The spotted wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) is an invasive pest originating from Southeast Asia. It was detected for the first time in Europe in 2008 (Spain and Italy) and subsequently in other European countries. It is a highly polyphagous pest that infests healthy, ripening fruit and presents a serious threat to fruit production, particularly of soft skinned fruit. In the first half of October 2013, a new fruit fly sp...

  18. Efficient ASE control in cryogenic gas cooled Yb:YAG multislab amplifiers with Cr4+:YAG interlayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kaibo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Yan, Xiongwei; Li, Min; Jiang, Xinying; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Mingzhong; Zheng, Wanguo; Zheng, Jiangang

    2016-03-01

    A novel approach based on Cr4+:YAG interlayers to break the transmission paths of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in a cryogenic gas cooled Yb:YAG multislab amplifier geometry was presented for the suppression of ASE in the power scaling of high energy, high average power laser systems. The benefits of Cr4+:YAG interlayers for the overall performance of an amplifier were illustrated with respect to energy storage capacity, heat generation and amplification of the seed pulses based on the theory of quasi-three-level Yb3+ ions and Cr4+:YAG saturable absorption, the Monte Carlo and ray-tracing methods. For the amplifier with optimized Cr4+:YAG interlayers, it was found that the energy storage efficiency was increased from 39.12% to 47.38% in comparison with the amplifier without interlayers. The maximum output energy of 1119.53 J with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 28.91% in the amplifier with interlayers was obtained, while it reduced to 810.61 J with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 20.94% in the amplifier without interlayers. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative characterization of the performance of a cryogenic gas cooled Yb:YAG multislab amplifier with Cr4+:YAG interlayers.

  19. Optimization of regenerator based on semiconductor optical amplifier for degraded differential phase shift keying signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real time phase regeneration is necessary for degraded phase modulation format optical communication systems. A regenerator based on the discrimitive gain effect of a semiconductor optical amplifier was proposed in recent years. In this paper, for this type of regenerator, its optimal working condition is found by solving the dynamic equations which describe the variance of the optical field and carrier density in the semiconductor optical amplifier by the finite difference method. The results show that the optimal improvement of signal Q factor can reach more than 2.2 dB. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  20. Drosophila bitter taste(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice eFrench

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Most animals possess taste receptors neurons detecting potentially noxious compounds. In humans, the ligands which activate these neurons define a sensory space called bitter. By extension, this term has been used in animals and insects to define molecules which induce aversive responses. In this review, based on our observations carried out in Drosophila, we examine how bitter compounds are detected and if the activation of bitter-sensitive neurons respond only to molecules bitter to humans. Like most animals, flies detect bitter chemicals through a specific population of taste neurons, distinct from those responding to sugars or to other modalities. Activating bitter-sensitive taste neurons induce aversive reactions and inhibits feeding. Bitter molecules also contribute to the suppression of sugar-neuron responses and can lead to a complete inhibition of the responses to sugar at the periphery. Since some bitter molecules activate bitter-sensitive neurons and some inhibit sugar detection, bitter molecules are represented by two sensory spaces which are only partially congruent. In addition to molecules which impact feeding, we recently discovered that the activation of bitter-sensitive neurons also induces grooming. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the wings and of the legs can sense chemicals from the gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, thus adding another biological function to these receptors. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the proboscis also respond to inhibitory pheromones such as 7-tricosene. Activating these neurons by bitter molecules in the context of sexual encounter inhibits courting and sexual reproduction, while activating these neurons with 7-tricosene in a feeding context will inhibit feeding. The picture that emerges from these observations is that the taste system is composed of detectors which monitor different categories of ligands, which facilitate or inhibit behaviors depending on the context (feeding, sexual reproduction

  1. Automated measurement of Drosophila wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezey Jason

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies in evolutionary biology and genetics are limited by the rate at which phenotypic information can be acquired. The wings of Drosophila species are a favorable target for automated analysis because of the many interesting questions in evolution and development that can be addressed with them, and because of their simple structure. Results We have developed an automated image analysis system (WINGMACHINE that measures the positions of all the veins and the edges of the wing blade of Drosophilid flies. A video image is obtained with the aid of a simple suction device that immobilizes the wing of a live fly. Low-level processing is used to find the major intersections of the veins. High-level processing then optimizes the fit of an a priori B-spline model of wing shape. WINGMACHINE allows the measurement of 1 wing per minute, including handling, imaging, analysis, and data editing. The repeatabilities of 12 vein intersections averaged 86% in a sample of flies of the same species and sex. Comparison of 2400 wings of 25 Drosophilid species shows that wing shape is quite conservative within the group, but that almost all taxa are diagnosably different from one another. Wing shape retains some phylogenetic structure, although some species have shapes very different from closely related species. The WINGMACHINE system facilitates artificial selection experiments on complex aspects of wing shape. We selected on an index which is a function of 14 separate measurements of each wing. After 14 generations, we achieved a 15 S.D. difference between up and down-selected treatments. Conclusion WINGMACHINE enables rapid, highly repeatable measurements of wings in the family Drosophilidae. Our approach to image analysis may be applicable to a variety of biological objects that can be represented as a framework of connected lines.

  2. The OPTHER Project: Progress toward the THz Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paoloni, C; Brunetti, F; Di Carlo, A;

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the OPTHER (OPtically driven TeraHertz AmplifiERs) project and progress toward the THz amplifier realization. This project represents a considerable advancement in the field of high frequency amplification. The design and realization of a THz amplifier within th...

  3. Pulsed ti: sapphire laser power amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated an all solid state Ti:Sapphire laser system consisting of a power oscillator and single pass amplifier. The electrical-to-optical efficiency far exceeds that of the current CW systems. The pump lasers have lower capital and operating costs than the Argon-ion laser. In the future, we plan to scale the output power to higher levels by adding a fourth pump laser and improving the output power of the current pump lasers. Modeling results suggest that a large increase in efficiency can be realized by improving the beam quality of the pump lasers, even at the cost of reduced output power. We will explore this option by adding apertures to the cavity and/or reducing the rod diameter along with optimizing the resonator design. Other improvements in efficiency which will be investigated include double passing the amplifier for better extraction. To complete this work, the laser system will be converted into a two-stage amplifier. A narrow band, lower power oscillator currently under development will be injected in to the amplifier to study the extraction and efficiency characteristics of the amplifier throughout the tuning range of Ti:Sapphire. Detailed beam quality measurements will also be made. Other work will include doubling the narrow band output for materials processing applications

  4. Second-Order Conditioning in "Drosophila"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in "Drosophila melanogaster" has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning…

  5. Radiation effects on the drosophila melanogaster genoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When DNA of living beings has been damaged, the cells show different responses depending on their physiological state. Repair mechanisms can be classified into two groups: constitutive which are always present in the cells and inductible, which must be stimulated to show themselves. It is suggested that a repair mechanism exists in the drosophila ovules which act upon the damage present in mature spermatozoids. Our aim is to verify whether or not a radiation dosis applied to the female drosophila will modify the frequency of individuals which have lost the paternal sex chromosomes. YW/YW virgin females and XEZ males and fbb-/bS Y y+ y were mated for two days in order to collect radiation treated spermatozoids. The results were consistent as to the parameters being evaluated and lead one to suppose that the radiation applied to the female drosophila produced some changes in the ovule metabolism which reduced the frequency of individuals with lost chromosomes. It is believed that ionizing radiation interferes with the repair mechanisms that are existent and constitutive, retarding and hindering the restoration of chromosome fragments and this brings about death of the zygote or death of the eggs which lessens the frequencies of individuals carriers of chromosomic aberrations. Ionizing radiations applied to the female drosophila modifies the frequency of loss of patternal chromosomes and comes about when the radiation dose to the female is 700 rad. (Author)

  6. Polarity and intracellular compartmentalization of Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henner Astra L

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper neuronal function depends on forming three primary subcellular compartments: axons, dendrites, and soma. Each compartment has a specialized function (the axon to send information, dendrites to receive information, and the soma is where most cellular components are produced. In mammalian neurons, each primary compartment has distinctive molecular and morphological features, as well as smaller domains, such as the axon initial segment, that have more specialized functions. How neuronal subcellular compartments are established and maintained is not well understood. Genetic studies in Drosophila have provided insight into other areas of neurobiology, but it is not known whether flies are a good system in which to study neuronal polarity as a comprehensive analysis of Drosophila neuronal subcellular organization has not been performed. Results Here we use new and previously characterized markers to examine Drosophila neuronal compartments. We find that: axons and dendrites can accumulate different microtubule-binding proteins; protein synthesis machinery is concentrated in the cell body; pre- and post-synaptic sites localize to distinct regions of the neuron; and specializations similar to the initial segment are present. In addition, we track EB1-GFP dynamics and determine microtubules in axons and dendrites have opposite polarity. Conclusion We conclude that Drosophila will be a powerful system to study the establishment and maintenance of neuronal compartments.

  7. A Drosophila Model of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Paululat, Achim; Baccam, Gabriel C; Wallrath, Lori L; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-08-01

    The blistering skin disorder epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) results from dominant mutations in keratin 5 (K5) or keratin 14 (K14) genes, encoding the intermediate filament (IF) network of basal epidermal keratinocytes. The mechanisms governing keratin network formation and collapse due to EBS mutations remain incompletely understood. Drosophila lacks cytoplasmic IFs, providing a 'null' environment to examine the formation of keratin networks and determine mechanisms by which mutant keratins cause pathology. Here, we report that ubiquitous co-expression of transgenes encoding wild-type human K14 and K5 resulted in the formation of extensive keratin networks in Drosophila epithelial and non-epithelial tissues, causing no overt phenotype. Similar to mammalian cells, treatment of transgenic fly tissues with phosphatase inhibitors caused keratin network collapse, validating Drosophila as a genetic model system to investigate keratin dynamics. Co-expression of K5 and a K14(R125C) mutant that causes the most severe form of EBS resulted in widespread formation of EBS-like cytoplasmic keratin aggregates in epithelial and non-epithelial fly tissues. Expression of K14(R125C)/K5 caused semi-lethality; adult survivors developed wing blisters and were flightless due to a lack of intercellular adhesion during wing heart development. This Drosophila model of EBS is valuable for the identification of pathways altered by mutant keratins and for the development of EBS therapies. PMID:25830653

  8. Biological effects of radon in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this investigation, is to study the biological effects of the Radon-222 at low dose in 'Drosophila melanogaster'. It is necessary to mention that these effects will analyze from the genetic point of view for: 1) To evaluate in which form the Radon-222 to low dose it influences in some genetic components of the adaptation in Drosophila, such as: fecundity, viability egg-adult and sex proportion. 2) To evaluate which is the genetic effect that induces the Radon to low dose by means of the SMART technique in Drosophila melanogaster, and this way to try of to identify which is the possible mechanism that causes the genetic damage to somatic level. The carried out investigation was divided in three stages: 1. Tests to the vacuum resistance. 2. Test of somatic mutation, and 3. Determination of the presence of radon daughters on the adult of Drosophila. It is necessary to point out that all the experiments were made by triplicate and in each one of them was placed detectors in preset places. Those obtained results are presented inside the 4 charts included in the present work. (Author)

  9. Drosophila lifespan enhancement by exogenous bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Brummel, Ted; Ching, Alisa; Seroude, Laurent; Simon, Anne F.; Benzer, Seymour

    2004-01-01

    We researched the lifespan of Drosophila under axenic conditions compared with customary procedure. The experiments revealed that the presence of bacteria during the first week of adult life can enhance lifespan, despite unchanged food intake. Later in life, the presence of bacteria can reduce lifespan. Certain long-lived mutants react in different ways, indicating an interplay between bacteria and longevity-enhancing genes.

  10. Organization of descending neurons in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cynthia T; Bhandawat, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Neural processing in the brain controls behavior through descending neurons (DNs) - neurons which carry signals from the brain to the spinal cord (or thoracic ganglia in insects). Because DNs arise from multiple circuits in the brain, the numerical simplicity and availability of genetic tools make Drosophila a tractable model for understanding descending motor control. As a first step towards a comprehensive study of descending motor control, here we estimate the number and distribution of DNs in the Drosophila brain. We labeled DNs by backfilling them with dextran dye applied to the neck connective and estimated that there are ~1100 DNs distributed in 6 clusters in Drosophila. To assess the distribution of DNs by neurotransmitters, we labeled DNs in flies in which neurons expressing the major neurotransmitters were also labeled. We found DNs belonging to every neurotransmitter class we tested: acetylcholine, GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine and octopamine. Both the major excitatory neurotransmitter (acetylcholine) and the major inhibitory neurotransmitter (GABA) are employed equally; this stands in contrast to vertebrate DNs which are predominantly excitatory. By comparing the distribution of DNs in Drosophila to those reported previously in other insects, we conclude that the organization of DNs in insects is highly conserved. PMID:26837716

  11. [Recombination in Drosophila in space flight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, L P; Vaulina, E N; Lapteva, N Sh; Grozdova, T Ia

    1988-04-01

    An experiment with Drosophila melanogaster males was performed aboard the Artificial Satellite "Kosmos-1667". Mutagenic effects of a 7-day space flight on intergene recombination in chromosome 2 were studied. The space flight factors decreased the frequency of recombination. A model experiment on a laboratory centrifuge demonstrated insignificant increase in recombination frequency caused by acceleration. PMID:3135244

  12. Protein and carbohydrate composition of larval food affects tolerance tothermal stress and desiccation in adult Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Laila H; Kristensen, Torsten N; Loeschcke, Volker;

    2010-01-01

    Larval nutrition may affect a range of different life history traits as well as responses to environmental stress in adult insects. Here we test whether raising larvae of fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, on two different nutritional regimes affects resistance to cold, heat and desiccation...

  13. Single mode terahertz quantum cascade amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y., E-mail: yr235@cam.ac.uk; Wallis, R.; Shah, Y. D.; Jessop, D. S.; Degl' Innocenti, R.; Klimont, A.; Kamboj, V.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, CB3 0HE Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    A terahertz (THz) optical amplifier based on a 2.9 THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) structure has been demonstrated. By depositing an antireflective coating on the QCL facet, the laser mirror losses are enhanced to fully suppress the lasing action, creating a THz quantum cascade (QC) amplifier. Terahertz radiation amplification has been obtained, by coupling a separate multi-mode THz QCL of the same active region design to the QC amplifier. A bare cavity gain is achieved and shows excellent agreement with the lasing spectrum from the original QCL without the antireflective coating. Furthermore, a maximum optical gain of ∼30 dB with single-mode radiation output is demonstrated.

  14. Ultrashort pulse amplification in cryogenically cooled amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, Sterling J.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret Mary

    2004-10-12

    A laser amplifier system amplifies pulses in a single "stage" from .about.10.sup.-9 joules to more than 10.sup.-3 joules, with average power of 1-10 watts, and beam quality M.sup.2 <2. The laser medium is cooled substantially below room temperature, as a means to improve the optical and thermal characteristics of the medium. This is done with the medium inside a sealed, evacuated or purged cell to avoid moisture or other materials condensing on the surface. A "seed" pulse from a separate laser is passed through the laser medium, one or more times, in any of a variety of configurations including single-pass, multiple-pass, and regenerative amplifier configurations.

  15. Transistorized pulse amplifiers (A.I.T.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two amplifiers whose design and operation are described in this report have been studied for neutron detection units used in piles. They are designed to allow an important reduction of the volume and of the weight of the detector and its amplifier, and to simplify the operation of the detection assembly. To these characteristics can be added the mechanical and electrical robustness and the very reduced micro-phony. The first transistorized amplifier (AIT.1) is simple, very robust, and can be used for radioprotection installations. The second (AIT.4) has a better performance and makes it possible to replace the APT.2 in most of its applications (it has even been used satisfactorily in an apparatus where the micro-phony and the sensitivity to interference of the APT.2 made this latter unusable). (author)

  16. An automated test facility for neutronic amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutronic amplifiers are used at the Chalk River Laboratory in applications such as neutron flux monitoring and reactor control systems. Routine preventive maintenance of control and safety systems included annual calibration and characterization of the neutronic amplifiers. An investigation into the traditional methods of annual routine maintenance of amplifiers concluded that frequency and phase response measurements in particular were labour intensive and subject to non-repeatable errors. A decision was made to upgrade testing methods and facilities by using programmable test equipment under the control of a computer. In order to verify the results of the routine measurements, expressions for the transfer functions were derived from the circuit diagrams. Frequency and phase responses were then calculated and plotted thus providing a bench-mark to which the test results can be compared. (author)

  17. Genomics of ecological adaptation in cactophilic Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Yolanda; Rius, Núria; Delprat, Alejandra; Williford, Anna; Muyas, Francesc; Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Ràmia, Miquel; Egea, Raquel; Negre, Barbara; Mir, Gisela; Camps, Jordi; Moncunill, Valentí; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Cabrero, Josefa; de Lima, Leonardo G; Dias, Guilherme B; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Kapusta, Aurélie; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G; Torrents, David; Camacho, Juan P; Kuhn, Gustavo C S; Feschotte, Cédric; Clark, Andrew G; Betrán, Esther; Barbadilla, Antonio; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Cactophilic Drosophila species provide a valuable model to study gene-environment interactions and ecological adaptation. Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila mojavensis are two cactophilic species that belong to the repleta group, but have very different geographical distributions and primary host plants. To investigate the genomic basis of ecological adaptation, we sequenced the genome and developmental transcriptome of D. buzzatii and compared its gene content with that of D. mojavensis and two other noncactophilic Drosophila species in the same subgenus. The newly sequenced D. buzzatii genome (161.5 Mb) comprises 826 scaffolds (>3 kb) and contains 13,657 annotated protein-coding genes. Using RNA sequencing data of five life-stages we found expression of 15,026 genes, 80% protein-coding genes, and 20% noncoding RNA genes. In total, we detected 1,294 genes putatively under positive selection. Interestingly, among genes under positive selection in the D. mojavensis lineage, there is an excess of genes involved in metabolism of heterocyclic compounds that are abundant in Stenocereus cacti and toxic to nonresident Drosophila species. We found 117 orphan genes in the shared D. buzzatii-D. mojavensis lineage. In addition, gene duplication analysis identified lineage-specific expanded families with functional annotations associated with proteolysis, zinc ion binding, chitin binding, sensory perception, ethanol tolerance, immunity, physiology, and reproduction. In summary, we identified genetic signatures of adaptation in the shared D. buzzatii-D. mojavensis lineage, and in the two separate D. buzzatii and D. mojavensis lineages. Many of the novel lineage-specific genomic features are promising candidates for explaining the adaptation of these species to their distinct ecological niches. PMID:25552534

  18. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  19. A Quantitative Genomic Approach for Analysis of Fitness and Stress Related Traits in a Drosophila melanogaster Model Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duun Rohde, Palle; Krag, Kristian; Loeschcke, Volker; Overgaard, Johannes; Sørensen, Peter; Nygaard Kristensen, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    The ability of natural populations to withstand environmental stresses relies partly on their adaptive ability. In this study, we used a subset of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, a population of inbred, genome-sequenced lines derived from a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate whether this population harbors genetic variation for a set of stress resistance and life history traits. Using a genomic approach, we found substantial genetic variation for metabolic rate, heat stress resistance, expression of a major heat shock protein, and egg-to-adult viability investigated at a benign and a higher stressful temperature. This suggests that these traits will be able to evolve. In addition, we outline an approach to conduct pathway associations based on genomic linear models, which has potential to identify adaptive genes and pathways, and therefore can be a valuable tool in conservation genomics.

  20. Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, Harold P.; Janos, Alan C.; Uyama, Tadao; Yamada, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

  1. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Perin J.P.; Millet F.; Divoky M.; Rus B.

    2013-01-01

    Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 1...

  2. Transportable setup for amplifier phase fidelity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröbs, M.; Bogan, C.; Barke, S.; Kühn, G.; Reiche, J.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2015-05-01

    One possible laser source for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) consists of an Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier originally developed for inter-satellite communication, seeded by the laser used for the technology demonstrator mission LISA Pathfinder. LISA needs to transmit clock information between its three spacecraft to correct for phase noise between the clocks on the individual spacecraft. For this purpose phase modulation sidebands at GHz frequencies will be imprinted on the laser beams between spacecraft. Differential phase noise between the carrier and a sideband introduced within the optical chain must be very low. We report on a transportable setup to measure the phase fidelity of optical amplifiers.

  3. Optimization of Pr3+:ZBLAN fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, B.; Miniscalco, J. W.; Quimby, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental parameters have been measured and used in a quantitative model of Pr3+-doped fluorozirconate fiber amplifiers. The optimum cutoff wavelength was determined to be 800 nm and the gain for 400 mW of pump was found to increase from 12 to 34 dB if the NA was increased from 0.15 to 0.......25. Lengthening the metastable state lifetime from 110 to 300 μs would significantly improve amplifier performance while concentration quenching can appreciably degrade it...

  4. Beyond nonlinear saturation of backward Raman amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Ido; Toroker, Zeev; Balakin, Alexey A.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-06-01

    Backward Raman amplification is limited by relativistic nonlinear dephasing resulting in saturation of the leading spike of the amplified pulse. Pump detuning is employed to mitigate the relativistic phase mismatch and to overcome the associated saturation. The amplified pulse can then be reshaped into a monospike pulse with little precursory power ahead of it, with the maximum intensity increasing by a factor of two. This detuning can be employed advantageously both in regimes where the group velocity dispersion is unimportant and where the dispersion is important but small.

  5. Operational amplifier circuits analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, J C C

    1995-01-01

    This book, a revised and updated version of the author's Basic Operational Amplifiers (Butterworths 1986), enables the non-specialist to make effective use of readily available integrated circuit operational amplifiers for a range of applications, including instrumentation, signal generation and processing.It is assumed the reader has a background in the basic techniques of circuit analysis, particularly the use of j notation for reactive circuits, with a corresponding level of mathematical ability. The underlying theory is explained with sufficient but not excessive, detail. A range of compu

  6. Altered stress fibers and integrin expression in the Malpighian epithelium of Drosophila type IV collagen mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, András A; Popovics, Nikoletta; Szabó, Gábor; Csiszár, Katalin; Mink, Mátyás

    2016-06-01

    Basement membranes (BMs) are highly specialized extracellular matrices (ECMs) that provide support and polarization cues for epithelial cells. Proper adhesion to the BM is pivotal in epithelial cell function and survival. Type IV collagens are the predominant components of all types of BMs, that form an irregular, polygonal lattice and serve as a scaffold for numerous other BM components and BM-associated cells. Mutations in the ubiquitous human BM components COL4A1 and COL4A2 cause a multisystem disorder involving nephropathy. Affected patients develop renal dysfunction and chronic kidney failure with or without hematuria. Mouse Col4a1 and Col4a2 mutants recapitulate the human symptoms. In vertebrates, excretion is accomplished by the kidneys and by the Malpighian tubules in insects, including the fruit fly Drosophila. Our present results with dominant, temperature-sensitive mutation of the Drosophila col4a1 gene demonstrate altered integrin expression and amplified effects of mechanical stress on the Malpighian epithelial cytoskeleton. PMID:27077087

  7. Organization and evolution of Drosophila terminin: similarities and differences between Drosophila and human telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Daniela Raffa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila lacks telomerase and fly telomeres are elongated by occasional transposition of three specialized retroelements. Drosophila telomeres do not terminate with GC-rich repeats and are assembled independently of the sequence of chromosome ends. Recent work has shown that Drosophila telomeres are capped by the terminin complex, which includes the fast-evolving proteins HOAP, HipHop, Moi and Ver. These proteins are not conserves outside Drosophilidae and localize and function exclusively at telomeres, protecting them from fusion events. Other proteins required to prevent end-to-end fusion in flies include HP1, Eff/UbcD1, ATM, the components of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs (MRN complex, and the Woc transcription factor. These proteins do not share the terminin properties; they are evolutionarily conserved non-fast-evolving proteins that do not accumulate only telomeres and do not serve telomere-specific functions. We propose that following telomerase loss, Drosophila rapidly evolved terminin to bind chromosome ends in a sequence-independent manner. This hypothesis suggests that terminin is the functional analog of the shelterin complex that protects human telomeres. The non-terminin proteins are instead likely to correspond to ancestral telomere-associated proteins that did not evolve as rapidly as terminin because of the functional constraints imposed by their involvement in diverse cellular processes. Thus, it appears that the main difference between Drosophila and human telomeres is in the protective complexes that specifically associate with the DNA termini. We believe that Drosophila telomeres offer excellent opportunities for investigations on human telomere biology. The identification of additional Drosophila genes encoding non-terminin proteins involved in telomere protection might lead to the discovery of novel components of human telomeres.

  8. Thermal effects in high average power optical parametric amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothhardt, Jan; Demmler, Stefan; Hädrich, Steffen; Peschel, Thomas; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) have the reputation of being average power scalable due to the instantaneous nature of the parametric process (zero quantum defect). This Letter reveals serious challenges originating from thermal load in the nonlinear crystal caused by absorption. We investigate these thermal effects in high average power OPAs based on beta barium borate. Absorption of both pump and idler waves is identified to contribute significantly to heating of the nonlinear crystal. A temperature increase of up to 148 K with respect to the environment is observed and mechanical tensile stress up to 40 MPa is found, indicating a high risk of crystal fracture under such conditions. By restricting the idler to a wavelength range far from absorption bands and removing the crystal coating we reduce the peak temperature and the resulting temperature gradient significantly. Guidelines for further power scaling of OPAs and other nonlinear devices are given. PMID:23455291

  9. The first complete Mag family retrotransposons discovered in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhov, I A; Kotnova, A P; Stefanov, Y E; Ilyin, Y V

    2016-01-01

    A retrotransposon of the Mag family was found in the Drosophila simulans genome for the first time. We also identified novel transposable elements representing the Mag family in seven Drosophila species. The high similarity between the 3' and 5' long terminal repeats in the found copies of transposable elements indicates that their retrotransposition has occurred relatively recently. Thus, the Mag family of retrotransposons is quite common for the genus Drosophila. PMID:27025475

  10. Maternal control of the Drosophila dorsal–ventral body axis

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, David S.; Stevens, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathway that generates the dorsal–ventral (DV) axis of the Drosophila embryo has been the subject of intense investigation over the previous three decades. The initial asymmetric signal originates during oogenesis by the movement of the oocyte nucleus to an anterior corner of the oocyte, which establishes DV polarity within the follicle through signaling between Gurken, the Drosophila Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-α homologue secreted from the oocyte, and the Drosophila Epidermal Growt...

  11. Ultra-low Voltage CMOS Cascode Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Torsten; Cassia, Marco

    In this paper, we design a folded cascode operational transconductance amplifier in a standard CMOS process, which has a measured 69 dB DC gain, a 2 MHz bandwidth and compatible input- and output voltage levels at a 1 V power supply. This is done by a novel Current Driven Bulk (CDB) technique...

  12. Compensation techniques for operational amplifier bias current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two techniques are proposed for the compensation of the input current on operational amplifiers that can be used on inverting and non-inverting configurations. A qualitative analysis of temperature drift problems is made, and as a practical application, the construction of a voltage follower for high impedance measurements is presented. (Author)

  13. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, Jussi; Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-12-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants' gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15-65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions. PMID:27551358

  14. Predistortion of a Bidirectional Cuk Audio Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Thomas Hagen; Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold;

    2014-01-01

    using predistortion. This paper suggests linearizing a nonlinear bidirectional Cuk audio amplifier using an analog predistortion approach. A prototype power stage was built and results show that a voltage gain of up to 9 dB and reduction in THD from 6% down to 3% was obtainable using this approach....

  15. Mutants dissecting development and behaviour in drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have traced in this paper the progress in Drosophila genetics research from the 1960s, at the IARI, spearheaded by the visionary insight of M. S. Swaminathan. The work started with the study of indirect effect of radiation and the synergistic interaction of physical and chemical mutagens on chromosomal and genetic changes. This paved the way for the study of single gene mutants in dissecting developmental and behavioural processes. New genes discovered by us have been shown to encode conserved cell signalling molecules controlling developmental and behavioural pathways. With the complete sequencing of the Drosophila genome, in the year 2000, mounting evidence for the homology between Drosophila and human genes controlling genetic disorders became available. This has led to the fly becoming an indispensable tool for studying human diseases as well as a model to test for drugs and pharmaceuticals against human diseases and complex behavioural processes. For example wingless in Drosophila belongs to the conserved Wnt gene family and aberrant WNT signalling is linked to a range of human diseases, most notably cancer. Inhibition as well as activation of WNT signalling form the basis of an effective therapy for some cancers as well as several other clinical conditions. Recent experiments have shown that WNTs might also normally participate in self-renewal, proliferation or differentiation of stem cells and altering WNT signalling might be beneficial to the use of stem cells for therapeutic means. Likewise, the stambhA mutant of Drosophila which was discovered for its temperature-dependent paralytic behaviour is the fly homologue of Phospholipase Cβ. Phospholipase C mediated G protein signalling plays a central role in vital processes controlling epilepsy, vision, taste, and olfaction in animals. Proteins of the G-signalling pathway are of intense research interest since many human diseases involve defects in G-protein signalling pathways. In fact, approximately 50

  16. Control of spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii [Matsumura], Diptera, Drosophilidae) with the emphasis on environmentally acceptable methods

    OpenAIRE

    Bohinc, Tanja; Stanislav TRDAN

    2015-01-01

    Spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) is an economically important insect pest, which causes damage on cultivated and wild-growing fruit plants. The pest, which is placed in A2 EPPO list, occurred in Slovenia since 2010 and it is spreading progressively. Since its first record in Spain and Italy (2008), it is now present in the majority of Mediterranean countries. In the review paper the most important control methods against the spotted wing drosophila are presented. In some parts of ...

  17. Serotonergic neurons of the Drosophila air-puff-stimulated flight circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sufia Sadaf; Gaiti Hasan

    2014-09-01

    Monoaminergic modulation of insect flight is well documented. Recently, we demonstrated that synaptic activity is required in serotonergic neurons for Drosophila flight. This requirement is during early pupal development, when the flight circuit is formed, as well as in adults. Using a Ca2+-activity-based GFP reporter, here we show that serotonergic neurons in both prothoracic and mesothoracic segments are activated upon air-puff-stimulated flight. Moreover ectopic activation of the entire serotonergic system by TrpA1, a heat activated cation channel, induces flight, even in the absence of an air-puff stimulus.

  18. A low concentration of ethanol impairs learning but not motor and sensory behavior in Drosophila larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooks G Robinson

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster has proven to be a useful model system for the genetic analysis of ethanol-associated behaviors. However, past studies have focused on the response of the adult fly to large, and often sedating, doses of ethanol. The pharmacological effects of low and moderate quantities of ethanol have remained understudied. In this study, we tested the acute effects of low doses of ethanol (∼7 mM internal concentration on Drosophila larvae. While ethanol did not affect locomotion or the response to an odorant, we observed that ethanol impaired associative olfactory learning when the heat shock unconditioned stimulus (US intensity was low but not when the heat shock US intensity was high. We determined that the reduction in learning at low US intensity was not a result of ethanol anesthesia since ethanol-treated larvae responded to the heat shock in the same manner as untreated animals. Instead, low doses of ethanol likely impair the neuronal plasticity that underlies olfactory associative learning. This impairment in learning was reversible indicating that exposure to low doses of ethanol does not leave any long lasting behavioral or physiological effects.

  19. Plasticity in the Drosophila larval visual System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abud J Farca-Luna

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable ability of the nervous system to modify its structure and function is mostly experience and activity modulated. The molecular basis of neuronal plasticity has been studied in higher behavioral processes, such as learning and memory formation. However, neuronal plasticity is not restricted to higher brain functions, but may provide a basic feature of adaptation of all neural circuits. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful genetic model to gain insight into the molecular basis of nervous system development and function. The nervous system of the larvae is again a magnitude simpler than its adult counter part, allowing the genetic assessment of a number of individual genetically identifiable neurons. We review here recent progress on the genetic basis of neuronal plasticity in developing and functioning neural circuits focusing on the simple visual system of the Drosophila larva.

  20. [The comeback of mitochondria in Drosophila apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    The role of the mitochondrion in mammalian cell apoptosis has been established since the mid-1990s. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, notably because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and apoptosis in Drosophila cell death occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins that appear key for Drosophila apoptosis regulation constitutively or transiently bind to mitochondria. They participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of an IAP caspase inhibitor, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. The aim of this review is to take stock of these events that might have their counterpart in humans. PMID:27225920

  1. Exquisite light sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster cryptochrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Vinayak

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster shows exquisite light sensitivity for modulation of circadian functions in vivo, yet the activities of the Drosophila circadian photopigment cryptochrome (CRY have only been observed at high light levels. We studied intensity/duration parameters for light pulse induced circadian phase shifts under dim light conditions in vivo. Flies show far greater light sensitivity than previously appreciated, and show a surprising sensitivity increase with pulse duration, implying a process of photic integration active up to at least 6 hours. The CRY target timeless (TIM shows dim light dependent degradation in circadian pacemaker neurons that parallels phase shift amplitude, indicating that integration occurs at this step, with the strongest effect in a single identified pacemaker neuron. Our findings indicate that CRY compensates for limited light sensitivity in vivo by photon integration over extraordinarily long times, and point to select circadian pacemaker neurons as having important roles.

  2. Evidence for transgenerational metabolic programming in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Buescher

    2013-09-01

    Worldwide epidemiologic studies have repeatedly demonstrated an association between prenatal nutritional environment, birth weight and susceptibility to adult diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Despite advances in mammalian model systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear, but might involve programming mechanisms such as epigenetics. Here we describe a new system for evaluating metabolic programming mechanisms using a simple, genetically tractable Drosophila model. We examined the effect of maternal caloric excess on offspring and found that a high-sugar maternal diet alters body composition of larval offspring for at least two generations, augments an obese-like phenotype under suboptimal (high-calorie feeding conditions in adult offspring, and modifies expression of metabolic genes. Our data indicate that nutritional programming mechanisms could be highly conserved and support the use of Drosophila as a model for evaluating the underlying genetic and epigenetic contributions to this phenomenon.

  3. Remembering components of food in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav eDas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Remembering features of past feeding experience can refine foraging and food choice. Insects can learn to associate sensory cues with components of food, such as sugars, amino acids, water, salt, alcohol, toxins and pathogens. In the fruit fly Drosophila some food components activate unique subsets of dopaminergic neurons that innervate distinct functional zones on the mushroom bodies. This architecture suggests that the overall dopaminergic neuron population could provide a potential cellular substrate through which the fly might learn to value a variety of food components. In addition, such an arrangement predicts that individual component memories reside in unique locations. Dopaminergic neurons are also critical for food memory consolidation and deprivation-state dependent motivational control of the expression of food-relevant memories. Here we review our current knowledge of how nutrient-specific memories are formed, consolidated and specifically retrieved in insects, with a particular emphasis on Drosophila.

  4. Remembering Components of Food in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gaurav; Lin, Suewei; Waddell, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Remembering features of past feeding experience can refine foraging and food choice. Insects can learn to associate sensory cues with components of food, such as sugars, amino acids, water, salt, alcohol, toxins and pathogens. In the fruit fly Drosophila some food components activate unique subsets of dopaminergic neurons (DANs) that innervate distinct functional zones on the mushroom bodies (MBs). This architecture suggests that the overall dopaminergic neuron population could provide a potential cellular substrate through which the fly might learn to value a variety of food components. In addition, such an arrangement predicts that individual component memories reside in unique locations. DANs are also critical for food memory consolidation and deprivation-state dependent motivational control of the expression of food-relevant memories. Here, we review our current knowledge of how nutrient-specific memories are formed, consolidated and specifically retrieved in insects, with a particular emphasis on Drosophila. PMID:26924969

  5. Imaging Calcium in Drosophila at Egg Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, Christopher J; York-Andersen, Anna H; Weil, Timothy T

    2016-01-01

    Egg activation is a universal process that includes a series of events to allow the fertilized egg to complete meiosis and initiate embryonic development. One aspect of egg activation, conserved across all organisms examined, is a change in the intracellular concentration of calcium (Ca(2+)) often termed a 'Ca(2+) wave'. While the speed and number of oscillations of the Ca(2+) wave varies between species, the change in intracellular Ca(2+) is key in bringing about essential events for embryonic development. These changes include resumption of the cell cycle, mRNA regulation, cortical granule exocytosis, and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. In the mature Drosophila egg, activation occurs in the female oviduct prior to fertilization, initiating a series of Ca(2+)-dependent events. Here we present a protocol for imaging the Ca(2+) wave in Drosophila. This approach provides a manipulable model system to interrogate the mechanism of the Ca(2+) wave and the downstream changes associated with it. PMID:27584955

  6. Investigation of the amplified spontaneous emission in Nd: glass disk laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model program has been established to investigate the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in the Nd: glass disk amplifier with the Monte Carlo method and rays tracing. The distribution of ASE loading on the edge of a disk is firstly calculated. The effect of disk aspect radio on ASE gain reduction is also investigated. Allowance is made for the effect of different reflectivity under the condition of different incidence on two faces

  7. Structure and Development of Glia in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Hartenstein, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Insect glia represents a conspicuous and diverse population of cells and plays a role in controlling neuronal progenitor proliferation, axonal growth, neuronal differentiation and maintenance, and neuronal function. Genetic studies in Drosophila have elucidated many aspects of glial structure, function and development. Just as in vertebrates, it appears as if different classes of glial cells are specialized for different functions. Based on topology and cell shape, glial cells of the central ...

  8. The development of the Drosophila larval brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenstein, Volker; Spindler, Shana; Pereanu, Wayne; Fung, Siaumin

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we will start out by describing in more detail the progenitors of the nervous system, the neuroblasts and ganglion mother cells. Subsequently we will survey the generic cell types that make up the developing Drosophila brain, namely neurons, glial cells and tracheal cells. Finally, we will attempt a synopsis of the neuronal connectivity of the larval brain that can be deduced from the analysis of neural lineages and their relationship to neuropile compartments. PMID:18683635

  9. Remembering Components of Food in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Gaurav; Lin, Suewei; Waddell, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Remembering features of past feeding experience can refine foraging and food choice. Insects can learn to associate sensory cues with components of food, such as sugars, amino acids, water, salt, alcohol, toxins and pathogens. In the fruit fly Drosophila some food components activate unique subsets of dopaminergic neurons (DANs) that innervate distinct functional zones on the mushroom bodies (MBs). This architecture suggests that the overall dopaminergic neuron population could provide a pote...

  10. Accelerated food source location in aging Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Egenriether, Sada M; Chow, Eileen S.; Krauth, Nathalie; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate energy stores are essential for survival, and sophisticated neuroendocrine mechanisms evolved to stimulate foraging in response to nutrient deprivation. Food search behavior is usually investigated in young animals, and it is not known how aging alters this behavior. To address this question in Drosophila melanogaster, we compared the ability to locate food by olfaction in young and old flies using a food-filled trap. As aging is associated with a decline in motor functions, learning...

  11. Identification of Synaptic Targets of Drosophila Pumilio

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Gengxin; Li, Wanhe; Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Regulski, Michael; Sinha, Nishi; Barditch, Jody; Tully, Tim; Krainer, Adrian R.; Zhang, Michael Q.; Dubnau, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila Pumilio (Pum) protein is a translational regulator involved in embryonic patterning and germline development. Recent findings demonstrate that Pum also plays an important role in the nervous system, both at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and in long-term memory formation. In neurons, Pum appears to play a role in homeostatic control of excitability via down regulation of para, a voltage gated sodium channel, and may more generally modulate local protein synthesis in neurons via t...

  12. Reduced Variation in Drosophila Simulans Mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard, JWO.; Hatzidakis, J.; Karr, T L; Kreitman, M

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the evolutionary dynamics of infection of a Drosophila simulans population by a maternally inherited insect bacterial parasite, Wolbachia, by analyzing nucleotide variability in three regions of the mitochondrial genome in four infected and 35 uninfected lines. Mitochondrial variability is significantly reduced compared to a noncoding region of a nuclear-encoded gene in both uninfected and pooled samples of flies, indicating a sweep of genetic variation. The selective sweep of...

  13. A Drosophila Model to Image Phagosome Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A. Brooks

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis involves the internalization of extracellular material by invagination of the plasma membrane to form intracellular vesicles called phagosomes, which have functions that include pathogen degradation. The degradative properties of phagosomes are thought to be conferred by sequential fusion with endosomes and lysosomes; however, this maturation process has not been studied in vivo. We employed Drosophila hemocytes, which are similar to mammalian professional macrophages, to establish a model of phagosome maturation. Adult Drosophila females, carrying transgenic Rab7-GFP endosome and Lamp1-GFP lysosome markers, were injected with E. coli DH5α and the hemocytes were collected at 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after infection. In wild-type females, E. coli were detected within enlarged Rab7-GFP positive phagosomes at 15 to 45 minutes after infection; and were also observed in enlarged Lamp1-GFP positive phagolysosomes at 45 minutes. Two-photon imaging of hemocytes in vivo confirmed this vesicle morphology, including enlargement of Rab7-GFP and Lamp1-GFP structures that often appeared to protrude from hemocytes. The interaction of endosomes and lysosomes with E. coli phagosomes observed in Drosophila hemocytes was consistent with that previously described for phagosome maturation in human ex vivo macrophages. We also tested our model as a tool for genetic analysis using 14-3-3e mutants, and demonstrated altered phagosome maturation with delayed E. coli internalization, trafficking and/or degradation. These findings demonstrate that Drosophila hemocytes provide an appropriate, genetically amenable, model for analyzing phagosome maturation ex vivo and in vivo.

  14. Visualizing the spindle checkpoint in Drosophila spermatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Rebollo, Elena; González, Cayetano

    2000-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint detects defects in spindle structure or in the alignment of the chromosomes on the metaphase plate and delays the onset of anaphase until defects are corrected. Thus far, the evidence regarding the presence of a spindle checkpoint during meiosis in male Drosophila has been indirect and contradictory. On the one hand, chromosomes without pairing partners do not prevent meiosis progression. On the other hand, some conserved components of the spindle checkpoint ma...

  15. A Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kushner, Rebekah F.; Ryan, Emily L.; Sefton, Jennifer M. I.; Rebecca D Sanders; Lucioni, Patricia Jumbo; Kenneth H Moberg; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2010-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disorder that results from profound impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Despite decades of research, the underlying pathophysiology of classic galactosemia remains unclear, in part owing to the lack of an appropriate animal model. Here, we report the establishment of a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia; this is the first whole-animal genetic model to mimic aspects of the patient phenotype. Analogous t...

  16. Recombineering Homologous Recombination Constructs in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Carreira-Rosario, Arnaldo; Scoggin, Shane; Shalaby, Nevine A.; Williams, Nathan David; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Buszczak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The continued development of techniques for fast, large-scale manipulation of endogenous gene loci will broaden the use of Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model organism for human-disease related research. Recent years have seen technical advancements like homologous recombination and recombineering. However, generating unequivocal null mutations or tagging endogenous proteins remains a substantial effort for most genes. Here, we describe and demonstrate techniques for using recombineeri...

  17. Tools for neuroanatomy and neurogenetics in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Jenett, Arnim; Hammonds, Ann S.; Ngo, Teri-T B.; Misra, Sima; Murphy, Christine; Scully, Audra; Carlson, Joseph W.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Laverty, Todd R.; Mungall, Chris; Svirskas, Rob; Kadonaga, James T.; Doe, Chris Q.; Eisen, Michael B

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of generating thousands of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster lines in which the expression of an exogenous gene is reproducibly directed to distinct small subsets of cells in the adult brain. We expect the expression patterns produced by the collection of 5,000 lines that we are currently generating to encompass all neurons in the brain in a variety of intersecting patterns. Overlapping 3-kb DNA fragments from the flanking noncoding and intronic regions of gene...

  18. Functional neuroanatomy of Drosophila olfactory memory formation

    OpenAIRE

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying Drosophila learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive and aversive reinforcers: (1) Which neurons within the olfactory nervous system mediate the acquisition of memory? (2) What is the complete neural circuitry exten...

  19. Towards a Molecular Understanding of Drosophila Hearing

    OpenAIRE

    Caldwell, Jason C.; Eberl, Daniel F.

    2002-01-01

    The Drosophila auditory system is presented as a powerful new genetic model system for understanding the molecular aspects of development and physiology of hearing organs. The fly’s ear resides in the antenna, with Johnston’s organ serving as the mechanoreceptor. New approaches using electrophysiology and laser vibrometry have provided useful tools to apply to the study of mutations that disrupt hearing. The fundamental developmental processes that generate the peripheral nervous system are f...

  20. Genetics and genomics of Drosophila mating behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Mackay, Trudy F. C.; Heinsohn, Stefanie L.; Lyman, Richard F.; Amanda J Moehring; Morgan, Theodore J; Rollmann, Stephanie M

    2005-01-01

    The first steps of animal speciation are thought to be the development of sexual isolating mechanisms. In contrast to recent progress in understanding the genetic basis of postzygotic isolating mechanisms, little is known about the genetic architecture of sexual isolation. Here, we have subjected Drosophila melanogaster to 29 generations of replicated divergent artificial selection for mating speed. The phenotypic response to selection was highly asymmetrical in the direction of reduced matin...

  1. A Drosophila model of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex

    OpenAIRE

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Paululat, Achim; Baccam, Gabriel C.; Wallrath, Lori L.; Magin, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The blistering skin disorder Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) results from dominant mutations in K5 or K14 genes, encoding the intermediate filament network of basal epidermal keratinocytes. The mechanisms governing keratin network formation and collapse due to EBS mutations remain incompletely understood. Drosophila lacks cytoplasmic intermediate filaments, providing a ‚null’ environment to examine the formation of keratin networks and determine mechanisms by which mutant keratins cause p...

  2. Quantification of Food Intake in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Wong; Matthew D W Piper; Bregje Wertheim; Linda Partridge

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of food intake in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is often necessary for studies of behaviour, nutrition and drug administration. There is no reliable and agreed method for measuring food intake of flies in undisturbed, steady state, and normal culture conditions. We report such a method, based on measurement of feeding frequency by proboscis-extension, validated by short-term measurements of food dye intake. We used the method to demonstrate that (a) female flies feed more ...

  3. The Drosophila EKC/KEOPS complex

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas-Benítez, Diego; Ibar, Consuelo; Glavic, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    The TOR signaling pathway is crucial in the translation of nutritional inputs into the protein synthesis machinery regulation, allowing animal growth. We recently identified the Bud32 (yeast)/PRPK (human) ortholog in Drosophila, Prpk (p53-related protein kinase), and found that it is required for TOR kinase activity. Bud32/PRPK is an ancient and atypical kinase conserved in evolution from Archeae to humans, being essential for Archeae. It has been linked with p53 stabilization in human cell c...

  4. Three-dimensional imaging of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeanne McGurk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The major hindrance to imaging the intact adult Drosophila is that the dark exoskeleton makes it impossible to image through the cuticle. We have overcome this obstacle and describe a method whereby the internal organs of adult Drosophila can be imaged in 3D by bleaching and clearing the adult and then imaging using a technique called optical projection tomography (OPT. The data is displayed as 2D optical sections and also in 3D to provide detail on the shape and structure of the adult anatomy. METHODOLOGY: We have used OPT to visualize in 2D and 3D the detailed internal anatomy of the intact adult Drosophila. In addition this clearing method used for OPT was tested for imaging with confocal microscopy. Using OPT we have visualized the size and shape of neurodegenerative vacuoles from within the head capsule of flies that suffer from age-related neurodegeneration due to a lack of ADAR mediated RNA-editing. In addition we have visualized tau-lacZ expression in 2D and 3D. This shows that the wholemount adult can be stained without any manipulation and that this stain penetrates well as we have mapped the localization pattern with respect to the internal anatomy. CONCLUSION: We show for the first time that the intact adult Drosophila can be imaged in 3D using OPT, also we show that this method of clearing is also suitable for confocal microscopy to image the brain from within the intact head. The major advantage of this is that organs can be represented in 3D in their natural surroundings. Furthermore optical sections are generated in each of the three planes and are not prone to the technical limitations that are associated with manual sectioning. OPT can be used to dissect mutant phenotypes and to globally map gene expression in both 2D and 3D.

  5. ‘Peer pressure’ in larval Drosophila?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Niewalda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on ‘peer pressure’, that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila.

  6. Global patterns of sequence evolution in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marín Ignacio

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing of the genomes of several Drosophila allows for the first precise analyses of how global sequence patterns change among multiple, closely related animal species. A basic question is whether there are characteristic features that differentiate chromosomes within a species or between different species. Results We explored the euchromatin of the chromosomes of seven Drosophila species to establish their global patterns of DNA sequence diversity. Between species, differences in the types and amounts of simple sequence repeats were found. Within each species, the autosomes have almost identical oligonucleotide profiles. However, X chromosomes and autosomes have, in all species, a qualitatively different composition. The X chromosomes are less complex than the autosomes, containing both a higher amount of simple DNA sequences and, in several cases, chromosome-specific repetitive sequences. Moreover, we show that the right arm of the X chromosome of Drosophila pseudoobscura, which evolved from an autosome 10 – 18 millions of years ago, has a composition which is identical to that of the original, left arm of the X chromosome. Conclusion The consistent differences among species, differences among X chromosomes and autosomes and the convergent evolution of X and neo-X chromosomes demonstrate that strong forces are acting on drosophilid genomes to generate peculiar chromosomal landscapes. We discuss the relationships of the patterns observed with differential recombination and mutation rates and with the process of dosage compensation.

  7. Visualizing the spindle checkpoint in Drosophila spermatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollo, Elena; González, Cayetano

    2000-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint detects defects in spindle structure or in the alignment of the chromosomes on the metaphase plate and delays the onset of anaphase until defects are corrected. Thus far, the evidence regarding the presence of a spindle checkpoint during meiosis in male Drosophila has been indirect and contradictory. On the one hand, chromosomes without pairing partners do not prevent meiosis progression. On the other hand, some conserved components of the spindle checkpoint machinery are expressed in these cells and behave as their homologue proteins do in systems with an active spindle checkpoint. To establish whether the spindle checkpoint is active in Drosophila spermatocytes we have followed meiosis progression by time-lapse microscopy under conditions where the checkpoint is likely to be activated. We have found that the presence of a relatively high number of misaligned chromosomes or a severe disruption of the meiotic spindle results in a significant delay in the time of entry into anaphase. These observations provide the first direct evidence substantiating the activity of a meiotic spindle checkpoint in male Drosophila. PMID:11256627

  8. dachshund Potentiates Hedgehog Signaling during Drosophila Retinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Stein; Casares, Fernando; Janody, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Proper organ patterning depends on a tight coordination between cell proliferation and differentiation. The patterning of Drosophila retina occurs both very fast and with high precision. This process is driven by the dynamic changes in signaling activity of the conserved Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which coordinates cell fate determination, cell cycle and tissue morphogenesis. Here we show that during Drosophila retinogenesis, the retinal determination gene dachshund (dac) is not only a target of the Hh signaling pathway, but is also a modulator of its activity. Using developmental genetics techniques, we demonstrate that dac enhances Hh signaling by promoting the accumulation of the Gli transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci) parallel to or downstream of fused. In the absence of dac, all Hh-mediated events associated to the morphogenetic furrow are delayed. One of the consequences is that, posterior to the furrow, dac- cells cannot activate a Roadkill-Cullin3 negative feedback loop that attenuates Hh signaling and which is necessary for retinal cells to continue normal differentiation. Therefore, dac is part of an essential positive feedback loop in the Hh pathway, guaranteeing the speed and the accuracy of Drosophila retinogenesis. PMID:27442438

  9. Plasmonic amplifier of the evanescent field of free electrons

    OpenAIRE

    So, J.-K.; Ou, J.Y.; Adamo, G.; García de Abajo, F. J.; MacDonald, K. F.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2013-01-01

    We show experimentally for the first time that free electron evanescent fields can be amplified by a plasmonic nanolayer in much that same way as optical evanescent fields are amplified in the poor-man's super-lens.

  10. Fundamentals of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Ter-Mikirtychev, Valerii (Vartan)

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the fundamental aspects of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers, and includes a wide range of material from laser physics fundamentals to state-of-the-art topics in this rapidly growing field of quantum electronics. Emphasis is placed on the nonlinear processes taking place in fiber lasers and amplifiers, their similarities, differences to, and their advantages over other solid-state lasers. The reader will learn basic principles of solid-state physics and optical spectroscopy of laser active centers in fibers, main operational laser regimes, and practical recommendations and suggestions on fiber laser research, laser applications, and laser product development. The book will be useful for students, researchers, and professionals who work with lasers, in the optical communications, chemical and biological industries, etc.

  11. High power single-frequency Innoslab amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ke-Zhen; Ning, Jian; Zhang, Bai-Tao; Wang, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Hai-Kun; Nie, Hong-Kun; Sun, Xiao-Li; He, Jing-Liang

    2016-07-10

    A laser diode array (LDA) end-pumped continuous-wave single-frequency Innoslab amplifier has been demonstrated. The Gaussian ray bundle method was used to model the light propagation in the Innoslab amplifier for the first time to the best of our knowledge. With discrete reflectors, the maximum output of 60 W with a linewidth of 44 MHz was achieved under the pump power of 245 W, corresponding to the optical-optical efficiency of 24.5%. The beam quality factor M2 at the output power of 51 W in the horizontal and vertical direction was measured to be 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. The long-term power instability in 2 h was less than 0.25%. PMID:27409308

  12. First lasing of the regenerative amplifier FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regenerative amplifier free-electron laser (RAFEL) is a high-gain RF-linac FEL capable of producing high optical power from a compact design. The combination of a high-gain and small optical feedback enables the FEL to reach saturation and produce a high optical power and high extraction efficiency without the risk of optical damage to the mirrors. This paper summarizes the first lasing of the regenerative amplifier FEL and describes recent experimental results. The highest optical energy achieved thus far at 16.3 μm is 1.7 J over a train of 900 micropulses. We infer pulse energy of 1.9 mJ in each 16 ps micropulse, corresponding to a peak power of 120 MW

  13. Noise Gain Features of Fiber Raman Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgii S. Felinskyi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation dynamics of the optical noise in a silica single mode fiber (SMF as function of the pump power variation in the counter pumped fiber Raman amplifier (FRA is experimentally studied. The ratio between the power of amplified spontaneous emission and the power of incoherent optical noise is quantitatively determined by detailed analysis of experimental data in the pump powers range of 100–300 mW within the full band of Stokes frequencies, including FRA working wavelengths over the C + L transparency windows. It is found out the maximum of Raman gain coefficient for optical noise does not exceed ~60% of corresponding peak at the gain profile maximum of coherent signal. It is shown that the real FRA noise figure may be considerably less than 3 dB over a wide wavelength range (100 nm at a pump power of several hundreds of mW.

  14. SINGLE CONVERSION ISOLATED IMPEDANCE TRANSFORMATION AMPLIFIER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The invention relates to a switch mode power amplifier. A first and a second change-over switch are inserted between a DC voltage supply and a primary side of an isolation transformer. Two secondary windings are connected to a power output terminal. A first and a second secondary side power switch...... are adapted to connect the two secondary windings to the power connector of the power output terminal. The pulse width modulation means is adapted to generate control signals for the driver means of the first and the second change-over switch so as to cause every second pulse to be inverted. The pulse...... width modulation means is also adapted to generate a third and a fourth control signal for said driver means of the power switches of said first and said second secondary. The invention also relates to a method of controlling a switch mode power amplifier...

  15. Spotted wing drosophila: a new invasive pest of Mississippi berries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) Drosophila suzukii, a native fly of Southeast Asia, is a widely reported and highly invasive pest of fruit crops in North America and Mediterranean Europe. Between 2010 and 2011, SWD was confirmed in most States in eastern North America. During this same period, SWD was...

  16. Ionizing radiation causes the stress response in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potentiality of the stress-reaction arising in Drosophila melanogaster under gamma-irradiation of the source with 137Cs (irradiation dose is 10 Gy , radiation dose rate amounts 180 c Gy/min) is studied. It is shown that radiation induces the stress-reaction in Drosophila resulting in alterations in energetic metabolism (biogenic amines metabolic system) and in reproductive function

  17. Application module of universal amplifier in education process

    OpenAIRE

    CHALOUPEK, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the teaching and implementation module for teaching in secondary schools and their role in education. Following the theory being discussed in relation to a valid educational program. Learning amplifier module implemented by the assignment to DPS. The activity of the amplifier module to simulate in Multisim simulation program. Next is made circuitry design in discrete amplifier module. There evaluated the feasibility and simulation of realizations amplifier module in sec...

  18. Noise and saturation properties of semiconductor quantum dot optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of quantum dot optical amplifiers. Due to the presence of a reservoir of wetting layer states, the saturation and noise properties differ markedly from bulk or QW amplifiers and may be significantly improved.......We present a detailed theoretical analysis of quantum dot optical amplifiers. Due to the presence of a reservoir of wetting layer states, the saturation and noise properties differ markedly from bulk or QW amplifiers and may be significantly improved....

  19. Pump to signal noise transfer in parametric fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Hansen, Toke; Rottwitt, Karsten; Peucheret, Christophe; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard; Svane, Ask Sebastian; Andersen, Lasse Mejling; Cristofori, Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Fiber optic parametric amplifiers have been suggested due to their potential low spontaneous emission. However, by nature the parametric amplifier only work in a forward pumped configuration, which result in transfer of relative intensity noise in the pump to the signal.......Fiber optic parametric amplifiers have been suggested due to their potential low spontaneous emission. However, by nature the parametric amplifier only work in a forward pumped configuration, which result in transfer of relative intensity noise in the pump to the signal....

  20. Radiation and particle detector and amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A radiation or charged particle detector is described which incorporates a channel multiplier structure to amplify the detected rays or particles. The channel multiplier structure has a support multiplying element with a longitudinal slot along one side. The element supports a pair of plates positioned contiguous with the slot. The plates funnel the particles or rays to be detected into the slotted aperture and the element, thus creating an effectively wide aperture detector of the windowless type.

  1. Amplifying the Hawking Signal in BECs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Balbinot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider simple models of Bose-Einstein condensates to study analog pair-creation effects, namely, the Hawking effect from acoustic black holes and the dynamical Casimir effect in rapidly time-dependent backgrounds. We also focus on a proposal by Cornell to amplify the Hawking signal in density-density correlators by reducing the atoms’ interactions shortly before measurements are made.

  2. Design and simulation of a gyroklystron amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, M. S., E-mail: mschauhan.rs.ece@iitbhu.ac.in; Swati, M. V.; Jain, P. K. [Centre of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2015-03-15

    In the present paper, a design methodology of the gyroklystron amplifier has been described and subsequently used for the design of a typically selected 200 kW, Ka-band, four-cavity gyroklystron amplifier. This conceptual device design has been validated through the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and nonlinear analysis. Commercially available PIC simulation code “MAGIC” has been used for the electromagnetic study at the different location of the device RF interaction structure for the beam-absent case, i.e., eigenmode study as well as for the electron beam and RF wave interaction behaviour study in the beam present case of the gyroklystron. In addition, a practical problem of misalignment of the RF cavities with drift tubes within the tube has been also investigated and its effect on device performance studied. The analytical and simulation results confirmed the validity of the gyroklystron device design. The PIC simulation results of the present gyroklystron produced a stable RF output power of ∼218 kW for 0% velocity spread at 35 GHz, with ∼45 dB gain, 37% efficiency, and a bandwidth of 0.3% for a 70 kV, 8.2 A gyrating electron beam. The simulated values of RF output power have been found in agreement with the nonlinear analysis results within ∼5%. Further, the PIC simulation has been extended to study a practical problem of misalignment of the cavities axis and drift tube axis of the gyroklystron amplifier and found that the RF output power is more sensitive to misalignments in comparison to the device bandwidth. The present paper, gyroklystron device design, nonlinear analysis, and 3D PIC simulation using commercially available code had been systematically described would be of use to the high-power gyro-amplifier tube designers and research scientists.

  3. Design and simulation of a gyroklystron amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper, a design methodology of the gyroklystron amplifier has been described and subsequently used for the design of a typically selected 200 kW, Ka-band, four-cavity gyroklystron amplifier. This conceptual device design has been validated through the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and nonlinear analysis. Commercially available PIC simulation code “MAGIC” has been used for the electromagnetic study at the different location of the device RF interaction structure for the beam-absent case, i.e., eigenmode study as well as for the electron beam and RF wave interaction behaviour study in the beam present case of the gyroklystron. In addition, a practical problem of misalignment of the RF cavities with drift tubes within the tube has been also investigated and its effect on device performance studied. The analytical and simulation results confirmed the validity of the gyroklystron device design. The PIC simulation results of the present gyroklystron produced a stable RF output power of ∼218 kW for 0% velocity spread at 35 GHz, with ∼45 dB gain, 37% efficiency, and a bandwidth of 0.3% for a 70 kV, 8.2 A gyrating electron beam. The simulated values of RF output power have been found in agreement with the nonlinear analysis results within ∼5%. Further, the PIC simulation has been extended to study a practical problem of misalignment of the cavities axis and drift tube axis of the gyroklystron amplifier and found that the RF output power is more sensitive to misalignments in comparison to the device bandwidth. The present paper, gyroklystron device design, nonlinear analysis, and 3D PIC simulation using commercially available code had been systematically described would be of use to the high-power gyro-amplifier tube designers and research scientists

  4. Design and simulation of a gyroklystron amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, M. S.; Swati, M. V.; Jain, P. K.

    2015-03-01

    In the present paper, a design methodology of the gyroklystron amplifier has been described and subsequently used for the design of a typically selected 200 kW, Ka-band, four-cavity gyroklystron amplifier. This conceptual device design has been validated through the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and nonlinear analysis. Commercially available PIC simulation code "MAGIC" has been used for the electromagnetic study at the different location of the device RF interaction structure for the beam-absent case, i.e., eigenmode study as well as for the electron beam and RF wave interaction behaviour study in the beam present case of the gyroklystron. In addition, a practical problem of misalignment of the RF cavities with drift tubes within the tube has been also investigated and its effect on device performance studied. The analytical and simulation results confirmed the validity of the gyroklystron device design. The PIC simulation results of the present gyroklystron produced a stable RF output power of ˜218 kW for 0% velocity spread at 35 GHz, with ˜45 dB gain, 37% efficiency, and a bandwidth of 0.3% for a 70 kV, 8.2 A gyrating electron beam. The simulated values of RF output power have been found in agreement with the nonlinear analysis results within ˜5%. Further, the PIC simulation has been extended to study a practical problem of misalignment of the cavities axis and drift tube axis of the gyroklystron amplifier and found that the RF output power is more sensitive to misalignments in comparison to the device bandwidth. The present paper, gyroklystron device design, nonlinear analysis, and 3D PIC simulation using commercially available code had been systematically described would be of use to the high-power gyro-amplifier tube designers and research scientists.

  5. Electrically Pumped Vertical-Cavity Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Tine

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the design of electrically pumped vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (eVCAs) for use in a mode-locked external-cavity laser has been developed, investigated and analysed. Four different eVCAs, one top-emitting and three bottom emitting structures, have been designed and...... discussed. The thesis concludes with recommendations for further work towards the realisation of compact electrically pumped mode-locked vertical externalcavity surface emitting lasers....

  6. CMOS RF Power Amplifiers for Wireless Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzin, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    The wireless market has experienced a remarkable development and growth since the introduction of the first modern mobile phone systems, with a steady increase in the number of subscribers, new application areas, and higher data rates. As mobile phones and wireless connectivity have become consumer mass markets, the prime goal of the IC manufacturers is to provide low-cost solutions. The power amplifier (PA) is a key building block in all RF transmitters. To lower the costs and allow full int...

  7. Quantum noise in ideal operational amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Courty, Jean-Michel; Grassia, Francesca; Reynaud, Serge

    1998-01-01

    We consider a model of quantum measurement built on an ideal operational amplifier operating in the limit of infinite gain, infinite input impedance and null output impedance and with a feddback loop. We evaluate the intensity and voltage noises which have to be added to the classical amplification equations in order to fulfill the requirements of quantum mechanics. We give a description of this measurement device as a quantum network scattering quantum fluctuations from input to output ports.

  8. Amplifying youth voices in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotenos, Saori; Rohatgi, Deepti

    2007-01-01

    Low-literacy youth in the slums of Brazil have been historically unequipped to share their ideas on how to improve their lives, because outside of the spoken word, it is difficult for them to express their thoughts persuasively. The Amplifying Voices afterschool video program piloted at Projeto Uerê in Rio de Janeiro shows that youth can leverage technological tools to voice their perspectives on social issues relevant to themselves and their communities. PMID:18271053

  9. X-band magnicon amplifier experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnicon, a ''scanning beam'' microwave amplifier tube related to the gyrocon, is of interest as a possible replacement for klystron amplifiers in future linear accelerators. It consists of a multicavity deflection system, whose purpose is to spin up an electron beam to high transverse momentum (α ≡ υperpendicular / υz approx-gt 1), followed by an output cavity that employs a cyclotron resonant mechanism to extract principally the transverse beam momentum. The deflection cavities are designed to produce an electron beam whose entry point and guiding center rotate in space about the cavity axis at the drive frequency. The output cavity employs a synchronously rotating mode, making possible a highly efficient interaction. This paper presents an overview of magnicon theory and design considerations, and discusses the progress of an experimental program to develop a frequency-doubling magnicon amplifier at X-band. This magnicon will require a sequence of 3 or 4 deflection cavities, in order to generate the required transverse momentum, followed by an output cavity operating at twice the drive frequency. The initial experiment was designed to measure the gain between two such deflection cavities operating in the TM110 mode a 5.7 GHz. These cavities were powered by a 170A, 500 keV electron beam immersed in an 8.1 kG magnetic field. In low power amplifier experiments, a gain of ∼15 dB was observed in the preferred circular polarization, at a frequency shift of approximately -0.18%, and a gain of ∼3 dB in the opposite circular polarization, at a frequency shift of approximately +0.06%. These results are in good agreement with theory and numerical simulation. The complete magnicon experiment is presently under design, and will also be discussed

  10. Amplifier/compressor fiber Raman lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M N; Mollenauer, L F; Stolen, R H; Simpson, J R; Shang, H T

    1987-10-01

    We show that the chirp from cross-phase modulation (XPM) dominates the operation of fiber Raman lasers (FRL's). Thus a FRL in the anomalous group-velocity regime is best described as a XPM-chirped Raman amplifier followed by a linear fiber compressor. While the output of such a laser is generally a narrow pulse with a broad pedestal, we show both experimentally and by computer simulation that negligible background is achievable. PMID:19741882

  11. Quantum, cyclic and particle-exchange heat engines

    OpenAIRE

    Humphrey, T. E.; Linke, H.

    2004-01-01

    Differences between the thermodynamic behavior of the three-level amplifier (a quantum heat engine based on a thermally pumped laser) and the classical Carnot cycle are usually attributed to the essentially quantum or discrete nature of the former. Here we provide examples of a number of classical and semiclassical heat engines, such as thermionic, thermoelectric and photovoltaic devices, which all utilize the same thermodynamic mechanism for achieving reversibility as the three-level amplifi...

  12. The developmental transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Connecticut; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brooks, Angela N.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Duff, Michael O.; Landolin, Jane M.; Yang, Li; Artieri, Carlo G.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Boley, Nathan; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brown, James B.; Cherbas, Lucy; Davis, Carrie A.; Dobin, Alex; Li, Renhua; Lin, Wei; Malone, John H.; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R.; Miller, David; Sturgill, David; Tuch, Brian B.; Zaleski, Chris; Zhang, Dayu; Blanchette, Marco; Dudoit, Sandrine; Eads, Brian; Green, Richard E.; Hammonds, Ann; Jiang, Lichun; Kapranov, Phil; Langton, Laura; Perrimon, Norbert; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Willingham, Aarron; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Yi; Andrews, Justen; Bicke, Peter J.; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Peter; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Oliver, Brian; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-12-02

    Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most well studied genetic model organisms; nonetheless, its genome still contains unannotated coding and non-coding genes, transcripts, exons and RNA editing sites. Full discovery and annotation are pre-requisites for understanding how the regulation of transcription, splicing and RNA editing directs the development of this complex organism. Here we used RNA-Seq, tiling microarrays and cDNA sequencing to explore the transcriptome in 30 distinct developmental stages. We identified 111,195 new elements, including thousands of genes, coding and non-coding transcripts, exons, splicing and editing events, and inferred protein isoforms that previously eluded discovery using established experimental, prediction and conservation-based approaches. These data substantially expand the number of known transcribed elements in the Drosophila genome and provide a high-resolution view of transcriptome dynamics throughout development. Drosophila melanogaster is an important non-mammalian model system that has had a critical role in basic biological discoveries, such as identifying chromosomes as the carriers of genetic information and uncovering the role of genes in development. Because it shares a substantial genic content with humans, Drosophila is increasingly used as a translational model for human development, homeostasis and disease. High-quality maps are needed for all functional genomic elements. Previous studies demonstrated that a rich collection of genes is deployed during the life cycle of the fly. Although expression profiling using microarrays has revealed the expression of, 13,000 annotated genes, it is difficult to map splice junctions and individual base modifications generated by RNA editing using such approaches. Single-base resolution is essential to define precisely the elements that comprise the Drosophila transcriptome. Estimates of the number of transcript isoforms are less accurate than estimates of the number of genes

  13. Gyro-amplifiers modeling with MAGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levush, Baruch; Nguyen, Khanh; Botton, Moti; Vlasov Antonsen, Alexander, Jr.

    1999-11-01

    Recent modeling results of several experiments on gyroklystron amplifier at the Naval Research Laboratory are presented. Modeling was performed using the quasi three-dimensional, self-consistent code MAGY[1] . Amplifiers in both Ka- and W-bands have been studied [2,3]. Using known experimental input parameters, code-predicted salient amplifier performance characteristics, e.g. efficiency, bandwidth, drive curve, have been found to be in good agreement with experimental results. Self-consistent phenomena, such as effects of window reflections on bandwidth and higher-order-mode interaction in uptaper, will also be presented. MAGY has also been used to design gyro-TWTs. The code has been successfully benchmarked against linear theory. Issues such as absolute instability, backward-wave oscillations, and effect of reflection in gyro-TWTs have been investigated. Detailed results of design trade-off studies for a Ka-band gyro-TWT will also be presented and discussed. [1] M. Botton, et al.,IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci.,Vol.26(1998) [3] J.P. Calame, et al.,Phys. of Plasmas,Vol.6(1999) [4] M. Blank, et al.,Submitted to Phys. of Plasmas (1999)

  14. High Power 35GHz Gyroklystron Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin; McCurdy, A.; Wood, F.; Kyser, R.; Danly, B.; Levush, B.; Parker, R.

    1997-05-01

    High power coherent radiation sources at 35GHz are attractive for next generation high gradient particle accelerators. A multi-cavity gyroklystron amplifier is considered a promising candidate for high power millimeter wave generation. Experiments on two-cavity and three cavity gyroklystron amplifiers are underway to demonstrate a 140kW, 35GHz coherent radiation amplification. Though this power is low compared with that needed for colliders, many of the issues associated with the bandwidth of such devices can be addressed in the present experiments. High bandwidth is important to permit the rapid phase shifts required for RF pulse compression schemes presently under investigation. Large signal calculations (P.E. Latham, W. Lawson, V. Irwin, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 804-817, 1994.) predict that the two-cavity gyroklystron produces a peak power of 140kW, corresponding to 33% efficiency. Calculations also show that a stagger tuned three cavity circuit increases a bandwidth to more than 0.7%. Experimental results of the amplifier will be presented and compared with the theory.

  15. The development of DUV chemically amplified resists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thackeray, J.W.; Fedynyshyn, T.H.; Small, R.D. [Shipley Co. Inc., Marlboro, MA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The development of deep ultraviolet (DUV) resists has necessitated the introduction of new concepts in resist materials and chemistry. Successful DUV resist systems now employ the concept of chemical amplification. This catalytic reaction leads to a substantial enhancement in the imaging dose. Another benefit of chemical amplified resists is that they allow the design of materials which can be transparent to DUV exposure wavelengths, yet they can still have high sensitivity. Commercial and prototype positive- and negative-tone resists are now readily available and these resists have been used in pilot production to make the most advanced integrated circuits with {le}0.35 {mu}m design rules. At Shipley, we have undertaken to develop both negative- and positive-tone chemically amplified resists for DUV lithography. These resists are capable of high resolution (0.3 {mu}m), fast photospeed ({le}30 mJ/sq. cm), and excellent etch resistance. This presentation will discuss the chemical and lithographic properties of the Shipley negative- and positive-tone DUV chemically amplified resists. General discussion of the importance of activation energy for the catalytic process, catalytic chain length, and environmental stability will be given.

  16. Charge sensitive amplifies. The state of arts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kunishiro [Clear Pulse Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-07-01

    In the radiation detectors, signals are essentially brought with charges produced by radiation, then it is naturally the best way to use a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) system to extract those signals. The CSA is thought to be the best amplifier suitable to almost all the radiation detectors, if neglecting economical points of view. The CSA has been only applied to special fields like radiation detection because the concept of `charges` is not so universal against the concepts of `voltage` and `current`. The CSA, however, is low in noise and a high speed amplifier and may be applicable not only to radiation measurement but also piezoelectric devices and also bolometers. In this article, noise in the CSA, basic circuit on the CSA, concepts of `equivalent noise charge` (ENC), a method for the ENC, and importance of the `open-loop gain` in the CSA to achieve better performance of it and how to realize in a practical CSA were described. And, characteristics on a counting rate of the CSA, various circuit used in the CSA, and CSAs which are commercially available at present and special purpose CSAs were also introduced. (G.K.)

  17. Polarization of Tapered Semiconductor Travelling-Wave Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Dexiu; Li Hong

    2001-01-01

    The polarization of a tapered semi-conductor travelling-wave amplifier has been investigated with the transfer matrix method based on convective equation. It is shown that the apparent polarization mode competition exists, and polarization-independent tapered semiconductor travellingwave amplifiers can be obtained through the optimization of amplifier parameters.

  18. Digital system provides superregulation of nanosecond amplifier-discriminator circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forges, K. G.

    1966-01-01

    Feedback system employing a digital logic comparator to detect and correct amplifier drift provides stable gain characteristics for nanosecond amplifiers used in counting applications. Additional anticoincidence logic enables application of the regulation circuit to the amplifier and discriminator while they are mounted in an operable circuit.

  19. Detecting novel low-abundant transcripts in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Sanggyu; Bao, Jingyue; Zhou, Guolin; Shapiro, Joshua; Xu, Jinhua; Shi, Run Zhang; Lu, Xuemei; Clark, Terry; Johnson, Deborah; Kim, Yeong C; Wing, Claudia; Tseng, Charles; Sun, Min; Lin, Wei; Wang, Jun; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Du, Wei; Wu, Chung-I; Zhang, Xiuqing; Wang, San Ming

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that low-abundant transcripts may play fundamental roles in biological processes. In an attempt to estimate the prevalence of low-abundant transcripts in eukaryotic genomes, we performed a transcriptome analysis in Drosophila using the SAGE technique. We collected 244......,313 SAGE tags from transcripts expressed in Drosophila embryonic, larval, pupae, adult, and testicular tissue. From these SAGE tags, we identified 40,823 unique SAGE tags. Our analysis showed that 55% of the 40,823 unique SAGE tags are novel without matches in currently known Drosophila transcripts, and...... Drosophila genome. Our study reveals the presence of a significant number of novel low-abundant transcripts in Drosophila, and highlights the need to isolate these novel low-abundant transcripts for further biological studies. Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Jun...

  20. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: ► The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. ► Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). ► EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. ► Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  1. Driver stage RF amplifier manufacture for Decy-13 proton cyclotron using LDMOS BLF578

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driver stage of the RF generator for 13 MeV proton cyclotron has been manufactured. RF generator will be used as a source of alternating voltage accelerating of DECY-13 cyclotron which is has been designing by PTAPB-BATAN. Based on the basic design documents that has been made, the Decy-13 accelerating frequency will work at 77.667 MHz with RF power of ±10 kW. At the previous research it was manufactured an RF exciter using Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS). In order exciter can drive RF power amplifier, a driver stage amplifier is required, which is output should be able to control the RF power output that is expected. RF driver amplifier that currently widely used for accelerator applications is LDMOS transistor technology. After comparing several types of LDMOS transistor prototypes that have been manufactured, it is selected using type of LDMOS transistors BLF578. Test results with a working voltage of the driving amplifier 42 Vdc and output RF power 400 W, it is required DC current of 15.3 A and driving power 1.4 W. After calculating the data of test results, it is obtained a linear correlation coefficient value between input and output with R2 = 0.992, power gain of 23.98 to 24.88, power-added efficiency 62% and the highest heat dissipation of 270 W. From the test results it can be concluded that the prototype of driver stage RF amplifier is already functioning and the results are as expected, but the cooling of transistors BLF578 still need to be refined in order the generated heat during it operation still within limits. (author)

  2. 食用油加热产物的遗传毒性在伴性隐性致死试验中对不同生殖细胞阶段果蝇的影响%The Genotoxic Effects of Products of Heated Edible Cooking Oil on Drosophila Melanogaster of Different Germ Cell Stages using Sex-linked Recessive Lethal Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    厉曙光; 陈科; 张辉; 王力强; 白莉华; 金泰廙

    2006-01-01

    [目的]果蝇伴性隐性致死试验观察食用油烟雾(FEO)和食用油加热剩油(CEO)的致突变作用.[方法]分别用FEO(110、320、960μg/ml)和CEO(416、833、1667μg/ml)的3个不同浓度喂饲果蝇对其细胞的遗传毒性进行研究.[结果]320 μg/ml浓度组的FEO第Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ窝致突变率分别达到0.257%、0.530%和0.506%(P<0.001);110 μg/ml浓度组的第Ⅰ窝和960 μg/mt浓度组的第Ⅰ、Ⅱ窝与对照组相比差异有显著性(P<0.001).所有CEO浓度组的伴性隐性致死试验结果都呈阳性(P<0.001),但未见剂量-反应关系.[结论]FEO和CEO对雄性黑腹果蝇具有较高的毒性作用.%[ Objective ] To observe the effects of the fume of edible cooking oil (FEO) and the cooked edible oil (CEO) to induce mutation using a Sex-Linked Recessive Lethal Test (SLRL test) in Drosophila melanogaster. [ Methods ] Drosophila was fed with the CEO and FEO at three different concentrations as following: 416 μg/ml, 833 μg/ml and 1667 μg/ml for CEO; 110 μg/ml,320 μg/ml and 960 μg/ml for FEO, respectively. [ Results ] The mutagene rates of FEO at 320 tg/ml concentration from first brood to third brood were 0.257%, 0.530% and 0.506%, respectively, and there are same results that of the first brood at 110 μg/ml and the third brood at 320 μg/ml or 960 μg/ml compared with negative control (P < 0.001). The results of CEO in all groups treated produced a positive response in SLRL test (P < 0.001) but there is no dose-response relationship among different groups. [ Conclusion ] Both of FEO and CEO have highly toxic effect on the male Drosophila melanogaster.

  3. Identification and characterization of proteins involved in nuclear organization using Drosophila GFP protein trap lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Rohrbaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Strains from a collection of Drosophila GFP protein trap lines express GFP in the normal tissues where the endogenous protein is present. This collection can be used to screen for proteins distributed in the nucleus in a non-uniform pattern. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed four lines that show peripheral or punctate nuclear staining. One of these lines affects an uncharacterized gene named CG11138. The CG11138 protein shows a punctate distribution in the nuclear periphery similar to that of Drosophila insulator proteins but does not co-localize with known insulators. Interestingly, mutations in Lamin proteins result in alterations in CG11138 localization, suggesting that this protein may be a novel component of the nuclear lamina. A second line affects the Decondensation factor 31 (Df31 gene, which encodes a protein with a unique nuclear distribution that appears to segment the nucleus into four different compartments. The X-chromosome of males is confined to one of these compartments. We also find that Drosophila Nucleoplasmin (dNlp is present in regions of active transcription. Heat shock leads to loss of dNlp from previously transcribed regions of polytene chromosome without redistribution to the heat shock genes. Analysis of Stonewall (Stwl, a protein previously found to be necessary for the maintenance of germline stem cells, shows that Stwl is present in a punctate pattern in the nucleus that partially overlaps with that of known insulator proteins. Finally we show that Stwl, dNlp, and Df31 form part of a highly interactive network. The properties of other components of this network may help understand the role of these proteins in nuclear biology. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results establish screening of GFP protein trap alleles as a strategy to identify factors with novel cellular functions. Information gained from the analysis of CG11138 Stwl, dNlp, and Df31 sets the stage for future studies of these

  4. The influence of temperature and photoperiod on the reproductive diapause and cold tolerance of spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge regarding the reproductive status of spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura)(Diptera: Drosophilidae) is of critical importance in predicting potential infestations of this invasive pest, as eggs are laid in ripe or ripening fruit of several commercially important small frui...

  5. Biological effects of radon in Drosophila; Efectos biologicos del radon en Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel P, A.E.; Tavera D, L.; Cruces M, M.P.; Arceo M, C.; Rosa D, M.E. de la

    1992-04-15

    The main objective of this investigation, is to study the biological effects of the Radon-222 at low dose in 'Drosophila melanogaster'. It is necessary to mention that these effects will analyze from the genetic point of view for: 1) To evaluate in which form the Radon-222 to low dose it influences in some genetic components of the adaptation in Drosophila, such as: fecundity, viability egg-adult and sex proportion. 2) To evaluate which is the genetic effect that induces the Radon to low dose by means of the SMART technique in Drosophila melanogaster, and this way to try of to identify which is the possible mechanism that causes the genetic damage to somatic level. The carried out investigation was divided in three stages: 1. Tests to the vacuum resistance. 2. Test of somatic mutation, and 3. Determination of the presence of radon daughters on the adult of Drosophila. It is necessary to point out that all the experiments were made by triplicate and in each one of them was placed detectors in preset places. Those obtained results are presented inside the 4 charts included in the present work. (Author)

  6. The Spotted Wing Drosophila Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura, 1931 – Monitoring And First Records In Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łabanowska Barbara H.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii (SWD monitoring was carried out between 2012-2014 in eight locations. In order to determine the presence of Drosophila suzukii, several types of traps and baits were used. In 2014, Polish (prototype of Drosinal and Spanish (Cera Trap traps and baits were used in our study. In each year, traps were placed on the plantations of blueberry, strawberry, raspberry and at a wholesale market at the beginning of July, and monitored once or twice a week until mid-December. During 2012 and 2013 there were no flies of the spotted wing drosophila in traps. First flies of this species were captured in 2014 in two locations: Września (3rd week of October and Brzezna (1st week of December – western and southern Poland respectively, in both types of the traps. However, Polish traps were more effective in trapping D. suzukii. In addition, the Polish product has small holes and therefore captures less no target and beneficial insects than Spanish traps. Despite detection of SWD in Poland, damaged fruits were not found.

  7. Physiological Effects of l-Theanine on Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xue

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Green tea has been consumed as the most popular drink in East Asia for centuries, and is believed to have a wide range of health benefits. l-Theanine, the major component of the free amino acids in green tea, has been reported to display neuronal protection and tumor inhibition in vitro, but its physiological effects on animal development and behavior remain elusive. In this report, we used Drosophila melanogaster, the fruit fly, as a model organism to investigate the physiological effects of L-theanine. Flies were fed with three different concentrations of theanine as a dietary supplement after eclosion, and were examined for a variety of physiological parameters at different time points. We found theanine treatment results in significantly increased locomotion and courtship ability, and decreased resistance against wet and dry starvation in males, but not in females. Furthermore, theanine application diminished UV tolerance in females, but not in males. However, we did not perceive distinguishable effect of theanine on animal development, life span, weight, and tolerance of heat and anoxia. This work represents the first comprehensive physiological investigation of L-theanine at the whole animal level, and shall shed light on the mechanistic study of theanine in the future.

  8. Analysis of multipass laser amplifier systems for storage laser media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance characteristics of single pass and multipass storage laser amplifiers are presented and compared. The effects of the multipass amplifier parameters on the extraction characteristics are examined. For a wide range of conditions the multipass amplifier is found to provide high energy gain and high efficiency simultaneously. This is a significant advantage over the single pass laser amplifier. Finally, three specific storage laser amplifier systems, flashlamp pumped V:MgF2, XeF laser pumped Tm:Glass, and photolytically pumped Selenium, are examined. The performance characteristics for each of the three systems are calculated and compared

  9. Analysis of multipass laser amplifier systems for storage laser media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, J.F.

    1980-03-25

    The performance characteristics of single pass and multipass storage laser amplifiers are presented and compared. The effects of the multipass amplifier parameters on the extraction characteristics are examined. For a wide range of conditions the multipass amplifier is found to provide high energy gain and high efficiency simultaneously. This is a significant advantage over the single pass laser amplifier. Finally, three specific storage laser amplifier systems, flashlamp pumped V:MgF/sub 2/, XeF laser pumped Tm:Glass, and photolytically pumped Selenium, are examined. The performance characteristics for each of the three systems are calculated and compared.

  10. Characterization of a Common-Gate Amplifier Using Ferroelectric Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Mitchell; Sayyah, Rana; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the empirical data collected through experiments performed using a FeFET in the common-gate amplifier circuit is presented. The FeFET common-gate amplifier was characterized by varying all parameters in the circuit, such as load resistance, biasing of the transistor, and input voltages. Due to the polarization of the ferroelectric layer, the particular behavior of the FeFET common-gate amplifier presents interesting results. Furthermore, the differences between a FeFET common-gate amplifier and a MOSFET common-gate amplifier are examined.

  11. Characterization of a Common-Source Amplifier Using Ferroelectric Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Mitchell; Sayyah, Rana; MacLeond, Todd C.; Ho, Pat D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents empirical data that was collected through experiments using a FeFET in the established common-source amplifier circuit. The unique behavior of the FeFET lends itself to interesting and useful operation in this widely used common-source amplifier. The paper examines the effect of using a ferroelectric transistor for the amplifier. It also examines the effects of varying load resistance, biasing, and input voltages on the output signal and gives several examples of the output of the amplifier for a given input. The difference between a commonsource amplifier using a ferroelectric transistor and that using a MOSFET is addressed.

  12. First record of spotted wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Hrnčić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spotted wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae is an invasive pest originating from Southeast Asia. It was detected for the first time in Europe in 2008 (Spain and Italy and subsequently in other European countries. It is a highly polyphagous pest that infests healthy, ripening fruit and presents a serious threat to fruit production, particularly of soft skinned fruit. In the first half of October 2013, a new fruit fly species was unexpectedly detected in Tephri traps baited with the three-component female-biased attractant BioLure that is regularly used for monitoring the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata Wiedem. (Diptera: Tephritidae in Montenegro. Brief visual inspection identified the new species as the spotted wing drosophila D. suzukii. The pest was first recorded in several localities on the Montenegrin seacoast around Boka Kotor Bay. After the finding, all Drosophila specimens were collected from traps for further laboratory observation. A quick follow-up monitoring of other Tephri traps was carried out within the next few days on the rest of the seacoast (localities from Tivat to Ulcinj. Additionally, Tephri traps were set up around Lake Skadar and in the city of Podgorica, as well as on fresh fruit markets in Podgorica. The results of this preliminary study showed that D. suzukii was present in all surveyed locations and adults were captured until late December. Both sexes were found in traps with BioLure. Our data show that D. suzukii is present in southern parts of Montenegro and there is a serious threat of its further spreading, particularly towards northern parts of the country where the main raspberry and blueberry production is placed. The results also show that Tephri traps baited with BioLure can be used for detection and monitoring of spotted wing drosophila.

  13. Toll mediated infection response is altered by gravity and spaceflight in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Taylor

    Full Text Available Space travel presents unlimited opportunities for exploration and discovery, but requires better understanding of the biological consequences of long-term exposure to spaceflight. Immune function in particular is relevant for space travel. Human immune responses are weakened in space, with increased vulnerability to opportunistic infections and immune-related conditions. In addition, microorganisms can become more virulent in space, causing further challenges to health. To understand these issues better and to contribute to design of effective countermeasures, we used the Drosophila model of innate immunity to study immune responses in both hypergravity and spaceflight. Focusing on infections mediated through the conserved Toll and Imd signaling pathways, we found that hypergravity improves resistance to Toll-mediated fungal infections except in a known gravitaxis mutant of the yuri gagarin gene. These results led to the first spaceflight project on Drosophila immunity, in which flies that developed to adulthood in microgravity were assessed for immune responses by transcription profiling on return to Earth. Spaceflight alone altered transcription, producing activation of the heat shock stress system. Space flies subsequently infected by fungus failed to activate the Toll pathway. In contrast, bacterial infection produced normal activation of the Imd pathway. We speculate on possible linkage between functional Toll signaling and the heat shock chaperone system. Our major findings are that hypergravity and spaceflight have opposing effects, and that spaceflight produces stress-related transcriptional responses and results in a specific inability to mount a Toll-mediated infection response.

  14. Toll mediated infection response is altered by gravity and spaceflight in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Katherine; Kleinhesselink, Kurt; George, Michael D; Morgan, Rachel; Smallwood, Tangi; Hammonds, Ann S; Fuller, Patrick M; Saelao, Perot; Alley, Jeff; Gibbs, Allen G; Hoshizaki, Deborah K; von Kalm, Laurence; Fuller, Charles A; Beckingham, Kathleen M; Kimbrell, Deborah A

    2014-01-01

    Space travel presents unlimited opportunities for exploration and discovery, but requires better understanding of the biological consequences of long-term exposure to spaceflight. Immune function in particular is relevant for space travel. Human immune responses are weakened in space, with increased vulnerability to opportunistic infections and immune-related conditions. In addition, microorganisms can become more virulent in space, causing further challenges to health. To understand these issues better and to contribute to design of effective countermeasures, we used the Drosophila model of innate immunity to study immune responses in both hypergravity and spaceflight. Focusing on infections mediated through the conserved Toll and Imd signaling pathways, we found that hypergravity improves resistance to Toll-mediated fungal infections except in a known gravitaxis mutant of the yuri gagarin gene. These results led to the first spaceflight project on Drosophila immunity, in which flies that developed to adulthood in microgravity were assessed for immune responses by transcription profiling on return to Earth. Spaceflight alone altered transcription, producing activation of the heat shock stress system. Space flies subsequently infected by fungus failed to activate the Toll pathway. In contrast, bacterial infection produced normal activation of the Imd pathway. We speculate on possible linkage between functional Toll signaling and the heat shock chaperone system. Our major findings are that hypergravity and spaceflight have opposing effects, and that spaceflight produces stress-related transcriptional responses and results in a specific inability to mount a Toll-mediated infection response. PMID:24475130

  15. Low noise amplifier for ZnS(Ag) scintillation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new pulse amplifier that can be used with standard photomultiplier tubes coupled with Zn(Ag) scintillation chamber is presented. The amplifier based on an IC operational amplifier LF 356N consists of a low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier and pulse shaping circuits for optimization of signal to noise ratio. Temperature instability is ≤ 0.05%/oC. Dynamic range for linear output signals is equal +7 V. The presented amplifier is used in a measuring head for 0.17 L Lucas chambers developed in Department of Nuclear Instruments and Methods of the INCT in laboratory investigations aimed to develop methods and instruments for measurement of radon concentration in the air. The amplifier can also be employed for measurement of ionizing radiation by means of other scintillators coupled to PM tube. The amplifier is followed by a pulse discriminator with adjustable discrimination level. The amplifier output signal and discriminator output pulses are fed to external devices. (author)

  16. Design and technological peculiarities of making vacuum integrated circuit of a thermocathode-based AC amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorishin, I. L.; Kotova, I. F.; Mukhurov, N. I.

    1997-02-01

    Despite promising prospects and comprehensive nature of contemporary studies aimed at developing autoemission cathodes, only thermoemitter-based vacuum integrated circuits (VIC) have been realized by now. Here, the results are presented of building and testing, in extreme environment, thermoemission VICs of a RF active oscillator and multivibrator. The microcircuits made have limited functional capabilities. To expand their capabilities the VIC of an AC amplifier was developed. This paper deals with circuit design aspects of making the AC amplifier based on the potentialities and specific features of the process of anodic oxidation of aluminium to form dielectric substrates of cathode-heating assemblies (CHA) and anode-grid assemblies (AGA). Design and technological methods are described that are used to make active (five vacuum microtriodes) and passive (resistors, capacitors, commutation) film elements. As compared to earlier devices, the AC amplifier VIC is more economical and has better characteristics in terms of miniaturization and integration. Its fundamental peculiarities are two-sided obtained through anodizing to form dielectric substrates with microrelief and superfine-structure grids of microtriodes. Some characteristics of the AC amplifier VIC are given and ways of improving them are discussed.

  17. Ion channels to inactivate neurons in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J L Hodge

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are the determinants of excitability; therefore, manipulation of their levels and properties provides an opportunity for the investigator to modulate neuronal and circuit function. There are a number of ways to suppress electrical activity in Drosophila neurons, for instance, over-expression of potassium channels (i.e. Shaker Kv1, Shaw Kv3, Kir2.1 and DORK that are open at resting membrane potential. This will result in increased potassium efflux and membrane hyperpolarisation setting resting membrane potential below the threshold required to fire action potentials. Alternatively over-expression of other channels, pumps or co-transporters that result in a hyperpolarised membrane potential will also prevent firing. Lastly, neurons can be inactivated by, disrupting or reducing the level of functional voltage-gated sodium (Nav1 paralytic or calcium (Cav2 cacophony channels that mediate the depolarisation phase of action potentials. Similarly, strategies involving the opposite channel manipulation should allow net depolarisation and hyperexcitation in a given neuron. These changes in ion channel expression can be brought about by the versatile transgenic (i.e. Gal4/UAS based systems available in Drosophila allowing fine temporal and spatial control of (channel transgene expression. These systems are making it possible to electrically inactivate (or hyperexcite any neuron or neural circuit in the fly brain, and much like an exquisite lesion experiment, potentially elucidate whatever interesting behaviour or phenotype each network mediates. These techniques are now being used in Drosophila to reprogram electrical activity of well-defined circuits and bring about robust and easily quantifiable changes in behaviour, allowing different models and hypotheses to be rapidly tested.

  18. Whole genome phylogenies for multiple Drosophila species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetharam Arun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstructing the evolutionary history of organisms using traditional phylogenetic methods may suffer from inaccurate sequence alignment. An alternative approach, particularly effective when whole genome sequences are available, is to employ methods that don’t use explicit sequence alignments. We extend a novel phylogenetic method based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD to reconstruct the phylogeny of 12 sequenced Drosophila species. SVD analysis provides accurate comparisons for a high fraction of sequences within whole genomes without the prior identification of orthologs or homologous sites. With this method all protein sequences are converted to peptide frequency vectors within a matrix that is decomposed to provide simplified vector representations for each protein of the genome in a reduced dimensional space. These vectors are summed together to provide a vector representation for each species, and the angle between these vectors provides distance measures that are used to construct species trees. Results An unfiltered whole genome analysis (193,622 predicted proteins strongly supports the currently accepted phylogeny for 12 Drosophila species at higher dimensions except for the generally accepted but difficult to discern sister relationship between D. erecta and D. yakuba. Also, in accordance with previous studies, many sequences appear to support alternative phylogenies. In this case, we observed grouping of D. erecta with D. sechellia when approximately 55% to 95% of the proteins were removed using a filter based on projection values or by reducing resolution by using fewer dimensions. Similar results were obtained when just the melanogaster subgroup was analyzed. Conclusions These results indicate that using our novel phylogenetic method, it is possible to consult and interpret all predicted protein sequences within multiple whole genomes to produce accurate phylogenetic estimations of relatedness between

  19. The Drosophila EKC/KEOPS complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Benítez, Diego; Ibar, Consuelo; Glavic, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    The TOR signaling pathway is crucial in the translation of nutritional inputs into the protein synthesis machinery regulation, allowing animal growth. We recently identified the Bud32 (yeast)/PRPK (human) ortholog in Drosophila, Prpk (p53-related protein kinase), and found that it is required for TOR kinase activity. Bud32/PRPK is an ancient and atypical kinase conserved in evolution from Archeae to humans, being essential for Archeae. It has been linked with p53 stabilization in human cell culture and its absence in yeast causes a slow-growth phenotype. This protein has been associated to KEOPS (kinase, putative endopeptidase and other proteins of small size) complex together with Kae1p (ATPase), Cgi-121 and Pcc1p. This complex has been implicated in telomere maintenance, transcriptional regulation, bud site selection and chemical modification of tRNAs (tRNAs). Bud32p and Kae1p have been related with N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A) synthesis, a particular chemical modification that occurs at position 37 of tRNAs that pair A-starting codons, required for proper translation in most species. Lack of this modification causes mistranslations and open reading frame shifts in yeast. The core constituents of the KEOPS complex are present in Drosophila, but their physical interaction has not been reported yet. Here, we present a review of the findings regarding the function of this complex in different organisms and new evidence that extends our recent observations of Prpk function in animal growth showing that depletion of Kae1 or Prpk, in accordance with their role in translation in yeast, is able to induce the unfolded protein response (UPR) in Drosophila. We suggest that EKC/KEOPS complex could be integrating t6A-modified tRNA availability with translational rates, which are ultimately reflected in animal growth. PMID:23823807

  20. Pheromones mediating copulation and attraction in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweck, Hany K M; Ebrahim, Shimaa A M; Thoma, Michael; Mohamed, Ahmed A M; Keesey, Ian W; Trona, Federica; Lavista-Llanos, Sofia; Svatoš, Aleš; Sachse, Silke; Knaden, Markus; Hansson, Bill S

    2015-05-26

    Intraspecific olfactory signals known as pheromones play important roles in insect mating systems. In the model Drosophila melanogaster, a key part of the pheromone-detecting system has remained enigmatic through many years of research in terms of both its behavioral significance and its activating ligands. Here we show that Or47b-and Or88a-expressing olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) detect the fly-produced odorants methyl laurate (ML), methyl myristate, and methyl palmitate. Fruitless (fru(M))-positive Or47b-expressing OSNs detect ML exclusively, and Or47b- and Or47b-expressing OSNs are required for optimal male copulation behavior. In addition, activation of Or47b-expressing OSNs in the male is sufficient to provide a competitive mating advantage. We further find that the vigorous male courtship displayed toward oenocyte-less flies is attributed to an oenocyte-independent sustained production of the Or47b ligand, ML. In addition, we reveal that Or88a-expressing OSNs respond to all three compounds, and that these neurons are necessary and sufficient for attraction behavior in both males and females. Beyond the OSN level, information regarding the three fly odorants is transferred from the antennal lobe to higher brain centers in two dedicated neural lines. Finally, we find that both Or47b- and Or88a-based systems and their ligands are remarkably conserved over a number of drosophilid species. Taken together, our results close a significant gap in the understanding of the olfactory background to Drosophila mating and attraction behavior; while reproductive isolation barriers between species are created mainly by species-specific signals, the mating enhancing signal in several Drosophila species is conserved. PMID:25964351

  1. District heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented at this meeting dealt with an international comparison of district heating, the Swiss district heating network, political aspects of nuclear district heating, nuclear and non-nuclear sources for district heating. 17 figs., 6 tabs

  2. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and spasms due ... that the body is having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - ...

  3. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  4. ‘Peer pressure’ in larval Drosophila?

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Niewalda; Ines Jeske; Birgit Michels; Bertram Gerber

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on ‘peer pressure’, that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group ...

  5. Studying tauopathies in Drosophila: A fruitful model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingkuan; Chen, Liam

    2015-12-01

    Tauopathies are a group of neurodegenerative disorders that include hereditary frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) such as FTD with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), as well as sporadic variants of FTDs like progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), and Pick's disease. These diverse diseases all have in common the presence of abnormally phosphorylated tau aggregates. In this review, we will summarize key features of transgenic Drosophila models of tauopathies and a number of insights into disease mechanisms as well as therapeutic implications gained from the fruit fly models. PMID:25862286

  6. Drosophila suzukii Monitoring in verschiedenen Habitaten 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel, Claudia; Matray, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Die Kirschessigfliege (Drosophila suzukii) wurde 2008 aus Südostasien nach Europa eingeschleppt und verursacht seitdem z.T. massive Ertragsausfälle. Mit ihrem sägeartigen Eiablagestachel ist sie in der Lage, Eier direkt in reifende Weichobstarten, wie z.B. Beeren, Kirschen, Zwetschgen und Trauben abzulegen. Auch viele wilde Pflanzen, wie z.B. Holunder und Schneeball dienen als Wirtspflanzen. Die Larven entwickeln sich in den Früchten und ernähren sich vom Fruchtfleisch. Die befallenen Früchte...

  7. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasu Sheeba

    2008-12-01

    As an experimental model system, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been seminal in shaping our understanding of the circadian clockwork. The wealth of genetic tools at our disposal over the past four decades has enabled discovery of the genetic and molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity. More recently, detailed investigation leading to the anatomical, neurochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the various neuronal subgroups that comprise the circadian machinery has revealed pathways through which these neurons come together to act as a neuronal circuit. Thus the D. melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit presents a relatively simple and attractive model for the study of neuronal circuits and their functions.

  8. Enigma of radiation effects in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear relations between induced mutation and x-ray dose and related inconsistencies are discussed. Some of the inconsistencies are concerned with the frequency of induced sex-linked lethal mutations in ring chromosomes and the frequency of whole-body mutations after irradiation. The hypothesis of totipotency or the developmental competence of a single first-cleavage product after loss of the other by its involvement in chromatid rearrangements suggests that interchanges predominantly involve the chromatids within each of the two nuclei and not between the two nuclei. It is concluded that the hypothesis of totipotency of the cleavage products in Drosophila explains many puzzling results from radiation experiments

  9. A connectionist model of the Drosophila blastoderm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinitz, J. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA). Dept. of Biological Sciences); Mjolsness, E. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Dept. of Computer Science); Sharp, D.H. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA). Theoretical Div.)

    1990-11-01

    The authors present a phenomenological modeling framework for development, and apply it to the network of segmentation genes operating in the blastoderm of Drosophila. Their purpose is to provide a systematic method for discovering and expressing correlations in experimental data on gene expression and other developmental processes. The modeling framework is based on a connectionist or neural net dynamics for biochemical regulators, coupled to grammatical rules which describe certain features of the birth, growth, and death of cells, synapses and other biological entities. They present preliminary numerical results regarding regulatory interactions between the genes Kruppel and knirps that demonstrate the potential utility of the model. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, Wolfgang [BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Mikkelsen, Nils Egil [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Clausen, Anders Ranegaard [Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Soelvegatan 35, SE-22362 Lund (Sweden); Willer, Mette [ZGene A/S, Agern Alle 7, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark); Eklund, Hans [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Gojkovic, Zoran [ZGene A/S, Agern Alle 7, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark); Piskur, Jure, E-mail: Jure.Piskur@cob.lu.se [BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Soelvegatan 35, SE-22362 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 A resolution structure of Dm-dNK in complex with gemcitabine shows that the residues Tyr70 and Arg105 play a crucial role in the firm positioning of gemcitabine by extra interactions made by the fluoride atoms. This explains why gemcitabine is a good substrate for Dm-dNK.

  11. Time amplifying techniques towards atomic time resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High speed imaging technology has opened applications in many fields,such as collision,detonating, high voltage discharge,disintegration and transfer of phonon and exciton in solid,photosynthesis primitive reaction,and electron dynamics inside atom shell.In principle,all of the transient processes need to be explained theoretically and,at the same time,the time amplifying technique is required for observations of these processes.The present review concerns the atomic time amplifying mechanism of optical information and the extremely-high speed imaging methods,which are expressed in terms of the short time amplifying techniques.It is well-known that for extremely-high speed imaging with the converter tube,the temporal resolution is in the order of sub-picosecond of the streak imaging,and the imaging frequency is 6×10 8 ―5×10 9 fps(frame per second)of the frame imaging.On the other hand,for the tubeless extremely-high speed imaging,the imaging frequency is 10 7 ―10 14 fps,and its mechanism of forming high speed and framing could involve a lot of factors of the light under investigation,for instance,light speed,light parallelism,the parameters of light wave such as amplitude,phase,polari- zation and wavelength,and even quantum properties of photon.In the cascaded system of electro- magnetic wave and particle wave,it is possible to simultaneously realize extremely-high resolution in time and space,which is higher than a kite resolution.Then it would be possible to break the limit of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation of the optical frequency band.

  12. Time amplifying techniques towards atomic time resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JingZhen

    2009-01-01

    High speed imaging technology has opened applications in many fields,such as collision,detonating,high voltage discharge,disintegration and transfer of phonon and exciton in solid,photosynthesis primitive reaction,and electron dynamics inside atom shell.In principle,all of the transient processes need to be explained theoretically and,st the same time,the time amplifying technique is required for observations of these processes.The present review concerns the atomic time amplifying mechanism of optical information and the extremely-high speed imaging methods,which are expressed in terms of the short time amplifying techniques.It is well-known that for extremely-high speed imaging with the converter tube,the temporal resolution is in the order of sub-picosecond of the streak imaging,and the imaging frequency is 6×10~8-5×10~9 fps(frame per second)of the frame imaging.On the other hand,for the tubeless extremely-high speed imaging,the imaging frequency is 10~7-10~(14) fps,and its mechanism of forming high speed and framing could involve a lot of factors of the light under investigation,for instance,light speed,light parallelism,the parameters of light wave such as amplitude,phase,polarization and wavelength,and even quantum properties of photon.In the cascaded system of electromagnetic wave and particle wave,it is possible to simultaneously realize extremely-high resolution in time and space,which is higher than a kite resolution.Then it would be possible to break the limit of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation of the optical frequency band.

  13. High sensitivity amplifier/discriminator for PWC's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The facility support group at Fermilab is designing and building a general purpose beam chamber for use in several locations at the laboratory. This pwc has 128 wires per plane spaced 1 mm apart. An initial production of 25 signal planes is anticipated. In proportional chambers, the size of the signal depends exponentially on the charge stored per unit of length along the anode wire. As the wire spacing decreases, the capacitance per unit length decreases, thereby requiring increased applied voltage to restore the necessary charge per unit length. In practical terms, this phenomenon is responsible for difficulties in constructing chambers with less than 2 mm wire spacing. 1 mm chambers, therefore, are frequently operated very near to their breakdown point and/or a high gain gas containing organic compounds such as magic gas is used. This argon/iso-butane mixture has three drawbacks: it is explosive when exposed to the air, it leaves a residue on the wires after extended use and is costly. An amplifier with higher sensitivity would reduce the problems associated with operating chambers with small wire spacings and allow them to be run a safe margin below their breakdown voltage even with an inorganic gas mixture such as argon/CO2, this eliminating the need to use magic gas. Described here is a low cost amplifier with a usable threshold of less than 0.5 μA. Data on the performance of this amplifier/discriminator in operation on a prototype beam chamber are given. This data shows the advantages of the high sensitivity of this design

  14. Feedback analysis of transimpedance operational amplifier circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1993-01-01

    The transimpedance or current feedback operational amplifier (CFB op-amp) is reviewed and compared to a conventional voltage mode op-amp using an analysis emphasizing the basic feedback characteristics of the circuit. With this approach the paradox of the constant bandwidth obtained from CFB op......-amps is explained. It is demonstrated in a simple manner that the constant gain-bandwidth product of the conventional op-amp and the constant bandwidth of the CFB op-amp are both in accordance with basic feedback theory and that the differences between the traditional op-amp and the CFB op-amp are due to...

  15. Undulations from amplified low frequency surface waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the linear scattering of gravity waves in longitudinal inhomogeneous stationary flows. When the flow becomes supercritical, it is known that counterflow propagating shallow waves are blocked and converted into deep waves. Here we show that in the zero-frequency limit, the reflected waves are amplified in such a way that the free surface develops an undulation, i.e., a zero-frequency wave of large amplitude with nodes located at specific places. This amplification involves negative energy waves and implies that flat surfaces are unstable against incoming perturbations of arbitrary small amplitude. The relation between this instability and black hole radiation (the Hawking effect) is established

  16. Undulations from amplified low frequency surface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Coutant, Antonin

    2012-01-01

    We study the scattering of gravity waves in longitudinal stationary flows. When the flow velocity becomes supercritical, counterflow propagating waves are amplified in such a way that, in the zero-frequency limit, the free surface develops an undu- lation, i.e., a zero-frequency wave of large amplitude with nodes located at specific places. From this, we show that the unperturbed flat surface is unstable against perturbations of arbitrary small amplitude. We then show that this instability also appears when treating low frequency waves by a stochastic ensemble. The relation between the generation of undulations and black hole radiation (the Hawking effect) is discussed.

  17. Envelope tracking power amplifiers for wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhancang

    2014-01-01

    Envelope tracking technology is seen as the most promising efficiency enhancement technology for RF power amplifiers for 4G and beyond wireless communications. More and more organizations are investing and researching on this topic with huge potential in academic and commercial areas.This is the first book on the market to offer complete introduction, theory, and design considerations on envelope tracking for wireless communications. This resource presents you with a full introduction to the subject and covers underlying theory and practical design considerations.

  18. Evolution of a Distinct Genomic Domain in Drosophila: Comparative Analysis of the Dot Chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila virilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Wilson; Shaffer, Christopher D.; Cordonnier, Taylor; Wong, Jeannette; Itano, Michelle S.; Slawson Tempel, Elizabeth E.; Kellmann, Elmer; Desruisseau, David Michael; Cain, Carolyn; Carrasquillo, Robert; Chusak, Tien M.; Falkowska, Katazyna; Grim, Kelli D.; Guan, Rui; Honeybourne, Jacquelyn; Khan, Sana; Lo, Louis; McGaha, Rebecca; Plunkett, Jevon; Richner, Justin M.; Richt, Ryan; Sabin, Leah; Shah, Anita; Sharma, Anushree; Singhal, Sonal; Song, Fine; Swope, Christopher; Wilen, Craig B.; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R.; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2010-01-01

    The distal arm of the fourth (“dot”) chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster is unusual in that it exhibits an amalgamation of heterochromatic properties (e.g., dense packaging, late replication) and euchromatic properties (e.g., gene density similar to euchromatic domains, replication during polytenization). To examine the evolution of this unusual domain, we undertook a comparative study by generating high-quality sequence data and manually curating gene models for the dot chromosome of D. virilis (Tucson strain 15010–1051.88). Our analysis shows that the dot chromosomes of D. melanogaster and D. virilis have higher repeat density, larger gene size, lower codon bias, and a higher rate of gene rearrangement compared to a reference euchromatic domain. Analysis of eight “wanderer” genes (present in a euchromatic chromosome arm in one species and on the dot chromosome in the other) shows that their characteristics are similar to other genes in the same domain, which suggests that these characteristics are features of the domain and are not required for these genes to function. Comparison of this strain of D. virilis with the strain sequenced by the Drosophila 12 Genomes Consortium (Tucson strain 15010–1051.87) indicates that most genes on the dot are under weak purifying selection. Collectively, despite the heterochromatin-like properties of this domain, genes on the dot evolve to maintain function while being responsive to changes in their local environment. PMID:20479145

  19. Self-heating and its possible relationship to chromospheric heating in slowly rotating stars

    OpenAIRE

    Rogava, A; Poedts, Stefaan; Osmanov, Zaza

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of nonmodal self-heating by acoustic wave perturbations is examined. Considering different kinds of kinematically complex velocity patterns we show that nonmodal instabilities arising in these inhomogeneous flows may lead to significant amplification of acoustic waves. Subsequently, the presence of viscous dissipation damps these amplified waves and causes the energy transfer back to the background flow in the form of heat; viz. closes the "self-heating" cycle and contributes t...

  20. Development of 650 MHz solid state RF amplifier for proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and development of 30 kW high powers RF source at 650 MHz, using solid RF state technology, has been initiated at RRCAT. The indigenous technology development efforts will be useful for the proposed high power proton accelerators for SNS/ADS applications. In this 650 MHz amplifier scheme, 30 kW CW RF power will be generated using modular combination of 8 kW amplifier units. Necessary studies were carried out for device selection, choice of amplifier architecture and design of high power combiners and dividers. Presently RF amplifier delivering 250 W at 650 MHz has been fabricated and tested. Towards development of high power RF components, design and engineering prototyping of 16-port power combiner, directional coupler and RF dummy loads has been completed. The basic 8 kW amplifier unit is designed to provide power gain of 50 dB, bandwidth of 20 MHz and spurious response below 30 dB from fundamental signal. Based on the results of circuit simulation studies and engineering prototyping of amplifier module, two RF transistor viz. MRF3450 and MRF 61K were selected as solid state active devices. Impedance matching network in amplifier module is designed using balanced push pull configuration with transmission line BALUN. Due to high circulating current near drain side, metal clad RF capacitors were selected which helps in avoiding hot spot from output transmission path, ensuring continuous operation at rated RF power without damage to RF board. 350 W circulator is used to protect the RF devices from reflected power. Based on the prototype design and measured performance, one of these RF transistors will be selected to be used as workhorse for all amplifier modules. Two amplifier modules are mounted on water cooled copper heat-sink ensuring proper operating temperature for reliable and safe operation of amplifier. Also real time control system and data logger has been developed to provide DAQ and controls in each rack. For power combining and power measurement

  1. Effects of mutations at the stambh A locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Kumar; Minu Joseph; Shanti Chandrashekaran

    2001-08-01

    We report novel findings on the cytogenetic location, functional complexity and maternal and germline roles of the stambh A locus of Drosophila melanogaster. stmA is localized to polytene bands 44D1.2 on 2R. stmA mutations are of two types: temperature-sensitive (ts) adult and larval paralytic or unconditional embryonic or larval lethal. Twelve alleles reported in this study fall into two intragenic complementing groups suggesting that stmA is a complex locus with more than one functional domain. Some unconditional embryonic lethal alleles show a ‘neurogenic’ phenotype of cuticle loss accompanied by neural hypertrophy. It is shown that embryos of ts paralytic alleles also show mild neural hypertrophy at permissive temperatures while short exposure to heat induces severe cuticle loss in these embryos. stmA exerts a maternal influence over heat-induced cuticle loss. Unconditional embryonic lethal alleles of stmA are also germline lethal.

  2. Development of 3 kW at 325 MHz solid-state RF power amplifier using four power amplifier modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramarao, B. V.; Sonal, S.; Mishra, J. K.; Pande, M.; Singh, P.; Kumar, G.; Mukherjee, J.

    2014-01-01

    A high power solid-state RF power amplifier of 3 kW at 325 MHz has been developed using only four RF power amplifier modules of 850 W power output each. The design and characterization of RF power modules have been presented. A four way Wilkinson power combiner adds the output of four power amplifier modules with a total transmission loss of less than 6%. The combined power amplifier has a power gain of 20.2 dB at 1-dB compression point, and the corresponding output power is 2.8 kW at 325 MHz. The drain efficiency of the power amplifier is 65.3% at 3 kW. All the harmonics of this amplifier are below -40 dBc. The amplifier has better characteristics like fewer numbers of active devices per kilo watt, high efficiency, high gain, and ruggedness etc for RF accelerator applications.

  3. Genetic effects of plutonium in Drosophila. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This three year project, initiated in 1987, involved the genetic effects of alpha radiations on Drosophila. This document represents the final technical report. Plutonium residue was used as the alpha source of radon gas. Spontaneous mutation frequency in the Drosophila stock was very low. In the experiments using alpha radiation from radon gas, radiation doses as low as 20R induced significant numbers of mutations, with higher numbers of mutations at higher doses. If X-ray induced mutation frequencies reported in the literature are used for comparison, it can be concluded that alpha radiation from radon gas induces at least 2 to 3 time more mutations in Drosophila.

  4. Silicon on Insulator MESFETs for RF Amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Seth J; Balijepalli, Asha; Ervin, Joseph; Lepkowski, William; Thornton, Trevor J

    2010-03-01

    CMOS compatible, high voltage SOI MESFETs have been fabricated using a standard 3.3V CMOS process without any changes to the process flow. A 0.6μm gate length device operates with a cut-off frequency of 7.3GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency of 21GHz. There is no degradation in device performance up to its breakdown voltage, which greatly exceeds that of CMOS devices on the same process. Other figures of merit of relevance to RF front-end design are presented, including the maximum stable gain and noise figure. An accurate representation of the device in SPICE has been developed using the commercially available TOM3 model. Using the SOI MESFET model, a source degenerated low noise RF amplifier targeting operation near 1GHz has been designed. The amplifier was fabricated on a PCB board and operates at 940MHz with a minimum NF of 3.8dB and RF gain of 9.9dB while only consuming 5mW of DC power. PMID:20657816

  5. 35 GHz gyroklystron amplifier development at NRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.J. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States); Ganguly, A.K. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States); Blank, M. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Vacuum Electronics Branch] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Experiments on a two-cavity gyroklystron are underway to demonstrate a 140 kW, 35 GHz gyroklystron amplifier, operating at a fundamental beam cyclotron mode and a TE{sub 011} cylindrical cavity mode. A high power electron beam of 70 kV, 6.6A is produced from a magnetron-injection-gun which is optimally designed for the TE{sub 01} mode at 35 GHz. Drift tubes consisting of lossy ceramic rings (80% BeO, 20% SiC) are designed to suppress undesired oscillations. A drive power is injected into the first cavity through a multi-hole coaxial coupler. A capacitive probe is placed directly before the input cavity to measure the beam velocity ratio. Large signal nonlinear calculations predict a peak efficiency of 30% (extracted power = 140 kW) and a saturated gain of 20dB over a 0.3% bandwidth at {alpha} = 1.5, {Delta}v{sub z}/v{sub z} = 20% at 13.3 kG and Q{sub 1} = Q{sub 2} = 200. Design parameters and initial hot-test results of the amplifier will be presented.

  6. 35 GHz, 4-Cavity Gyroklystron Amplifier Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garven, M.; Calame, J. P.; Danly, B. G.; Levush, B.; Wood, F.

    1998-11-01

    Gyroklystron amplifiers operating in the Ka-band are attractive sources for the next generation of millimeter wave radars and are currently under investigation at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). A four-cavity, 35 GHz gyroklystron experiment has been designed to demonstrate higher saturated gain (50dB) than previous experiments at NRL( J. J. Choi et al, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26(3), 416, 1998.). Non-linear, time-dependent simulations of the 4-cavity gyroklystron amplifier design using MAGYKL(P. E. Latham et al IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 22, 804, 1994.) predict 35% efficiency, 225 kW peak power, 50 dB saturated gain and a -3 dB bandwidth of 0.6%. For this four-cavity gyroklystron, the interaction between the TE_01 mode and a 70 kV, 9 A electron beam was studied with α=1.3 and an rms perpendicular velocity spread of 9%. Initial studies have shown that variations in magnetic field and voltage affect the trade-offs between power, bandwidth and efficiency. Theoretical design studies and experimental progress will be presented.

  7. Ultrastable low-noise current amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Drung, Dietmar; Becker, Ulrich; Scherer, Hansjörg; Ahlers, Franz Josef

    2014-01-01

    An ultrastable low-noise current amplifier (ULCA) is presented. The ULCA is a non-cryogenic instrument based on specially designed operational amplifiers and resistor networks. It involves two stages, the first providing a 1000-fold current gain and the second performing a current-to-voltage conversion via an internal 1 MOhm reference resistor or, optionally, an external standard resistor. The ULCA's transfer coefficient is extremely stable versus time, temperature and current amplitude within the full dynamic range of +/-5 nA. A low noise level of 2.4 fA/sqrt(Hz) helps to keep averaging times low at small input currents. A cryogenic current comparator is used to calibrate both input current gain and output transresistance, providing traceability to the quantum Hall effect. Typically, within one day after calibration, the uncertainty contribution from short-term fluctuations of the transresistance is below one part in 10^7. The long-term stability is expected to be better than one part in 10^5 over a year. A ...

  8. Deconstructing host-pathogen interactions in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan Bier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the cellular mechanisms underlying host responses to pathogens have been well conserved during evolution. As a result, Drosophila can be used to deconstruct many of the key events in host-pathogen interactions by using a wealth of well-developed molecular and genetic tools. In this review, we aim to emphasize the great leverage provided by the suite of genomic and classical genetic approaches available in flies for decoding details of host-pathogen interactions; these findings can then be applied to studies in higher organisms. We first briefly summarize the general strategies by which Drosophila resists and responds to pathogens. We then focus on how recently developed genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screens conducted in cells and flies, combined with classical genetic methods, have provided molecular insight into host-pathogen interactions, covering examples of bacteria, fungi and viruses. Finally, we discuss novel strategies for how flies can be used as a tool to examine how specific isolated virulence factors act on an intact host.

  9. The smell of love in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna B. eZiegler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Odors are key sensory signals for social communication and food search in animals including insects. Drosophila melanogaster, is a powerful neurogenetic model commonly used to reveal molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in odorant detection. Males use olfaction together with other sensory modalities to find their mates. Here, we review known olfactory signals, their related olfactory receptors, and the corresponding neuronal architecture impacting courtship. OR67d receptor detects 11-cis-Vaccenyl Acetate (cVA, a male specific pheromone transferred to the female during copulation. Transferred cVA is able to reduce female attractiveness for other males after mating, and is also suspected to decrease male-male courtship. cVA can also serve as an aggregation signal, maybe through another OR. OR47b was shown to be activated by fly odors, and to enhance courtship depending on taste pheromones. IR84a detects phenylacetic acid (PAA and phenylacetaldehyde. These two odors are not pheromones produced by flies, but are present in various fly food sources. PAA enhances male courtship, acting as a food aphrodisiac. Drosophila males have thus developed complementary olfactory strategies to help them to select their mates.

  10. Genetic analysis of glutamatergic function in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurotransmitters are essential for communication between neurons and hence are vital in the overall integrative functioning of the nervous system. Previous work on acetylcholine metabolism in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has also raised the possibility that transmitter metabolism may play a prominent role in either the achievement or maintenance of the normal structure of the central nervous system in this species. Unfortunately, acetylcholine is rather poorly characterized as a neurotransmitter in Drosophila; consequently, we have begun an analysis of the role of glutamate (probably the best characterized transmitter in this organism) in the formation and/or maintenance of nervous system structure. We present here the results of a series of preliminary analyses. To suggest where glutamatergic function may be localized, an examination of the spatial distribution of high affinity [3H]-glutamate binding sites are presented. We present the results of an analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of enzymatic activities thought to be important in the regulation of transmitter-glutamate pools (i.e., glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenase). To begin to examine whether mutations in any of these functions are capable of affecting glutamatergic activity, we present the results of an initial genetic analysis of one enzymatic function, glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), chosen because of its differential distribution within the adult central nervous system and musculature

  11. Quantification of food intake in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Wong

    Full Text Available Measurement of food intake in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is often necessary for studies of behaviour, nutrition and drug administration. There is no reliable and agreed method for measuring food intake of flies in undisturbed, steady state, and normal culture conditions. We report such a method, based on measurement of feeding frequency by proboscis-extension, validated by short-term measurements of food dye intake. We used the method to demonstrate that (a female flies feed more frequently than males, (b flies feed more often when housed in larger groups and (c fly feeding varies at different times of the day. We also show that alterations in food intake are not induced by dietary restriction or by a null mutation of the fly insulin receptor substrate chico. In contrast, mutation of takeout increases food intake by increasing feeding frequency while mutation of ovo(D increases food intake by increasing the volume of food consumed per proboscis-extension. This approach provides a practical and reliable method for quantification of food intake in Drosophila under normal, undisturbed culture conditions.

  12. Lamin C and chromatin organization in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. V. Gurudatta; L. S. Shashidhara; Veena K. Parnaik

    2010-04-01

    Drosophila lamin C (LamC) is a developmentally regulated component of the nuclear lamina. The lamC gene is situated in the fifth intron of the essential gene tout velu (ttv). We carried out genetic analysis of lamC during development. Phenotypic analyses of RNAi-mediated downregulation of lamC expression as well as targeted misexpression of lamin C suggest a role for lamC in cell survival. Of particular interest in the context of laminopathies is the caspase-dependent apoptosis induced by the overexpression of lamin C. Interestingly, misexpression of lamin C in the central nervous system, where it is not normally expressed, did not affect organization of the nuclear lamina. lamC mutant alleles suppressed position effect variegation normally displayed at near-centromeric and telomeric regions. Further, both downregulation and misexpression of lamin C affected the distribution of heterochromatin protein 1. Our results suggest that Drosophila lamC has a tissue-specific role during development and is required for chromatin organization.

  13. Drosophila Porin/VDAC affects mitochondrial morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeehye Park

    Full Text Available Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC has been suggested to be a mediator of mitochondrial-dependent cell death induced by Ca(2+ overload, oxidative stress and Bax-Bid activation. To confirm this hypothesis in vivo, we generated and characterized Drosophila VDAC (porin mutants and found that Porin is not required for mitochondrial apoptosis, which is consistent with the previous mouse studies. We also reported a novel physiological role of Porin. Loss of porin resulted in locomotive defects and male sterility. Intriguingly, porin mutants exhibited elongated mitochondria in indirect flight muscle, whereas Porin overexpression produced fragmented mitochondria. Through genetic analysis with the components of mitochondrial fission and fusion, we found that the elongated mitochondria phenotype in porin mutants were suppressed by increased mitochondrial fission, but enhanced by increased mitochondrial fusion. Furthermore, increased mitochondrial fission by Drp1 expression suppressed the flight defects in the porin mutants. Collectively, our study showed that loss of Drosophila Porin results in mitochondrial morphological defects and suggested that the defective mitochondrial function by Porin deficiency affects the mitochondrial remodeling process.

  14. Selective anticancer agents suppress aging in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Anton; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Plyusnina, Ekaterina; Kogan, Valeria; Fedichev, Peter; Moskalev, Alexey

    2013-09-01

    Mutations of the PI3K, TOR, iNOS, and NF-κB genes increase lifespan of model organisms and reduce the risk of some aging-associated diseases. We studied the effects of inhibitors of PI3K (wortmannin), TOR (rapamycin), iNOS (1400W), NF-κB (pyrrolidin dithiocarbamate and QNZ), and the combined effects of inhibitors: PI3K (wortmannin) and TOR (rapamycin), NF-κB (pyrrolidin dithiocarbamates) and PI3K (wortmannin), NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamates) and TOR (rapamycin) on Drosophila melanogaster lifespan and quality of life (locomotor activity and fertility). Our data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of PI3K, TOR, NF-κB, and iNOS increases lifespan of Drosophila without decreasing quality of life. The greatest lifespan expanding effect was achieved by a combination of rapamycin (5 μM) and wortmannin (5 μM) (by 23.4%). The bioinformatic analysis (KEGG, REACTOME.PATH, DOLite, and GO.BP) showed the greatest aging-suppressor activity of rapamycin, consistent with experimental data. PMID:24096697

  15. Microarray analysis of immune challenged Drosophila hemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Karin C; Metzendorf, Christoph; Söderhäll, Kenneth

    2005-04-15

    Insect hemocytes play multiple roles in immunity and carry out cellular responses like phagocytosis, encapsulation and melanization as well as producing humoral effector proteins in the first line of defense after injury and invasion of microorganisms. In this work, we used the Drosophila melanogaster hemocyte-like cell line mbn-2 and Affymetrix Drosophila GeneChips to investigate the transcriptome of a single type of immune competent tissue exposed to Gram-negative cell wall components (crude LPS) or high dose infection with live Escherichia coli. We found that gene expression profiles of both treatments overlap but show important differences in expression levels of several genes involved in immunity. In addition, cell morphology during infection was monitored and revealed distinct alterations in cell shape and adhesion. Presence of large numbers of bacteria also increased the number of cells taking on crystal cell fate. Taken together, our results indicate that hemocytes sense and respond differently to purified bacterial surface molecules and infection with live and actively growing bacteria both at the level of gene expression and in cell behavior. PMID:15777795

  16. Behavioural reproductive isolation and speciation in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Punita Nanda; Bashisth Narayan Singh

    2012-06-01

    The origin of premating reproductive isolation continues to help elucidate the process of speciation and is the central event in the evolution of biological species. Therefore, during the process of species formation the diverging populations must acquire some means of reproductive isolation so that the genes from one gene pool are prevented from dispersing freely into a foreign gene pool. In the genus Drosophila, the phenomenon of behavioural reproductive isolation, which is an important type of premating (prezygotic) reproductive isolating mechanisms, has been extensively studied and interesting data have been documented. In many cases incomplete sexual isolation has been observed and the pattern and degree of isolation within and between the species have often been used to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships. The present review documents an overview of speciation mediated through behavioural incompatibility in different species groups of Drosophila with particular reference to the models proposed on the basis of one-sided ethological isolation to predict the direction of evolution. This study is crucial for understanding the mechanism of speciation through behavioural incompatibility and also for an understanding of speciation genetics in future prospects.

  17. Egg-laying rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Manjunatha; Shantala Hari Dass; Vijay Kumar Sharma

    2008-12-01

    Extensive research has been carried out to understand how circadian clocks regulate various physiological processes in organisms. The discovery of clock genes and the molecular clockwork has helped researchers to understand the possible role of these genes in regulating various metabolic processes. In Drosophila melanogaster, many studies have shown that the basic architecture of circadian clocks is multi-oscillatory. In nature, different neuronal subgroups in the brain of D. melanogaster have been demonstrated to control different circadian behavioural rhythms or different aspects of the same circadian rhythm. Among the circadian phenomena that have been studied so far in Drosophila, the egg-laying rhythm is unique, and relatively less explored. Unlike most other circadian rhythms, the egg-laying rhythm is rhythmic under constant light conditions, and the endogenous or free-running period of the rhythm is greater than those of most other rhythms. Although the clock genes and neurons required for the persistence of adult emergence and activity/rest rhythms have been studied extensively, those underlying the circadian egg-laying rhythm still remain largely unknown. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the circadian egg-laying rhythm in D. melanogaster, and the possible molecular and physiological mechanisms that control the rhythmic output of the egg-laying process.

  18. The complexity of Drosophila innate immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Reumer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metazoans rely on efficient mechanisms to oppose infections caused by pathogens. The immediate and first-line defense mechanism(s in metazoans, referred to as the innate immune system, is initiated upon recognition of microbial intruders by germline encoded receptors and is executed by a set of rapid effector mechanisms. Adaptive immunity is restricted to vertebrate species and it is controlled and assisted by the innate immune system.Interestingly, most of the basic signaling cascades that regulate the primeval innate defense mechanism(s have been well conserved during evolution, for instance between humans and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Being devoid of adaptive signaling and effector systems, Drosophila has become an established model system for studying pristine innate immune cascades and reactions. In general, an immune response is evoked when microorganisms pass the fruit fly’s physical barriers (e.g., cuticle, epithelial lining of gut and trachea, and it is mainly executed in the hemolymph, the equivalent of the mammalian blood. Innate immunity in the fruit fly consists of a phenoloxidase (PO response, a cellular response (hemocytes, an antiviral response, and the NF-κB dependent production of antimicrobial peptides referred to as the humoral response. The JAK/STAT and Jun kinase signaling cascades are also implicated in the defence against pathogens.

  19. Computation of three-dimensional temperature distribution in diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Binglin; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2016-06-01

    Combining the kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in static and flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers, a comprehensive physical model with a cyclic iterative approach for calculating the three-dimensional temperature distribution of the vapor cell is established. Taking into account heat generation, thermal conductivity and convection, the excitation of the alkali atoms to high electronic levels, and their losses due to ionization in the gain medium, the thermal features and output characteristics have been simultaneously obtained. The results are in good agreement with those of the measurement in a static rubidium vapor amplifier. Influences of gas velocity on radial and axial temperature profiles are simulated and analyzed. The results have demonstrated that thermal problems in gaseous gain medium can be significantly reduced by flowing the gain medium with sufficiently high velocity.

  20. Associations of yeasts with spotted-wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii; Diptera: Drosophilidae) in cherries and raspberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamby, Kelly A; Hernández, Alejandro; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Zalom, Frank G

    2012-07-01

    A rich history of investigation documents various Drosophila-yeast mutualisms, suggesting that Drosophila suzukii similarly has an association with a specific yeast species or community. To discover candidate yeast species, yeasts were isolated from larval frass, adult midguts, and fruit hosts of D. suzukii. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) technology and decimal dilution plating were used to identify and determine the relative abundance of yeast species present in fruit juice samples that were either infested with D. suzukii or not infested. Yeasts were less abundant in uninfested than infested samples. A total of 126 independent yeast isolates were cultivated from frass, midguts, and fruit hosts of D. suzukii, representing 28 species of yeasts, with Hanseniaspora uvarum predominating. This suggests an association between D. suzukii and H. uvarum that could be utilized for pest management of the highly pestiferous D. suzukii. PMID:22582060

  1. Wilkinson type lumped element combiner-splitter for indigenous amplifier development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    India is developing ITER like Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ICH and CD) RF source in the frequency of 35 to 65 MHz. Three cascaded amplifiers will be used. Tube based driver (∼150 kW) and final (1.7 MW) stage amplifier are driven by a solid state power amplifier (∼ 10 kW). Development of wideband solid state power amplifier in above frequency range is ongoing. The goal is to achieve power level of ∼ 12 kW/CW. 16 pallet amplifier modules, each of ∼ 1kW, will be combined using 16 x 1 wideband combiners. 16 RF signals, with equal phase, will be required to drive each pallet module. 1 x 16 wideband splitter will be used at input side. Study has been carried out on two options mainly coaxial type and lumped element based Wilkinson splitter/combiner. Tentative power level of both input N-type ports of combiner is ∼ 1kW. Design and simulation for coaxial type Wilkinson combiner is done. Quarter wave length for center frequency is ∼ 1500 mm. To reduce mechanical dimension of combiner, PTFE dielectric is used with complicated arrangement. Coaxial combiner required unique fabrication process. Alternate option is proposed as a lumped element based Wilkinson combiner with reduced size, cost and development time. Design and simulation was carried out. Required PCB design and fabrication was done accordingly. Same design will be implemented for splitter as well. Design scheme for the splitter/combiner will be finalized depending on the achieved performance of both the designs. In this paper, detailed design, simulation and test results are presented for both types of combiners. A detailed comparison of combiners is provided. (author)

  2. Development of pre pre-driver amplifier stage for generator of SST-1 ICRH system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Sinh Makwana, Azad; Srinivas, Y. S. S.; Kulkarni, S. V.; ICRH-RF Group

    2010-02-01

    The Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) system for SST1 consists mainly of the cwrf power generator to deliver 1.5MW for 1000sec duration at the frequencies 22.8, 24.3 and 45.6±1MHz, the transmission line and the antenna. This is planned to develop a independent and dedicated cwrf generator that consists of a oscillator, buffer, rf switch, modulator, rf attenuator, directional coupler, three stage solid state low power amplifier and four stage triode & tetrode based high power amplifier with specific performance at 45.6±1MHz including frequencies 22.8 and 24.3±1MHz. The pre pre-driver high power amplifier stage is fabricated about triode 3CX3000A7. The tube has sufficient margin in terms of plate dissipation and grid dissipation that makes it suitable to withstand momentarily load mismatch and to upgrade the source in terms of output power later. This indigenously developed amplifier is integrated inside a radiation resistant rack with all required biasing power supplies, cooling blower, controls, monitors and interlocks for manual or remote control operation. This grounded grid mode amplifier will be operated at plate with 3.8KV/ 800mA in class AB for 1.8KW cwrf output power rating. The input circuit is broadband and the output circuit is tunable with slide variable inductor and a vacuum variable capacitor in the frequency range of 22.8 to 45.6MHz. It is designed for a gain of about 12dB, fabrication completed and undergoing cwrf power testing. This paper presents specifications, design criteria, circuit used, operating parameters, tests conducted and the results obtained.

  3. ANALYSIS OF INTERNALLY GENERATED NOISE OF BIOELECTRIC AMPLIFIERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mashhour Mustafa; Bani Amer

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with internally generated noise of bioelectric amplifiers that are usually used for processing of bioelectric events. The main purpose of this paper is to present a procedure for analysis of the effects of internal noise generated by the active circuits and to evaluate the output noise of the author's new designed bioelectric amplifier that caused by internal effects to the amplifier circuit itself in order to compare it with the noise generated by conventional amplifiers. The obtained analysis results of internally generated noise showed that the total output noise of bioelectric active circuits does not increase when some of their resistors have a larger value. This behavior is caused by the different transfer functions for the signal and the respective noise sources associated with these resistors. Moreover, the new designed bioelectric amplifier has an output noise less than that for conventional amplifiers. The obtained analysis results were also experimentally verified and the final conclusions were drawn.

  4. Gender Differences on the Use of Amplifiers in Academic Writings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申利芬

    2012-01-01

      This study aims to investigate the use of amplifiers in term of gender and disciplinary groups in academic research arti⁃cles, which is based on the British Academic Written English Corpus (BAWE).18 amplifiers were examined across two dimen⁃sions:gender and disciplinary groups. The results show amplifiers are more common in males’ academic writings than in those of females in general, amplifiers are used more often in AH discipline. However, not all amplifiers show significant gender differ⁃ences between men and women. Six words show a significant difference between male and female writers:pretty, by far, perfect⁃ly, quite, a great deal, totally, which are used more often by males. However, the interesting is in LS discipline, most amplifiers are used more often by female than male writers and males tend to use by far more frequently than females.

  5. Self-bias technique improves amplifier gain and noise figure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fithian, Michael J.

    1988-05-01

    A nover self-bias technique, which provides optimum amplifier performance from low-noise GaAs FET amplifiers, is described. The self-bias scheme employs small thin-film substrates to mount packaged FETs to amplifier's main microstrip substrates. The substrates, which feature high dielectric constant, are placed under each FET source lead. The use of self-biased amplifiers results in several benefits. Thus, with a single bias supply, proper bias sequencing is not requried among amplifier stages; in a self-bias layout, the active devices are not damaged by a bias-supply failure; finally, proper self-biasing is not complex, requiring only two resistors per stage. The results of an experimental testing of the self-bias technique, evaluated for a 5.0 to 5.6 GHz low-noise amplifier with the aid of commercially available CAD software, are presented.

  6. Measurement of microdosimetric spectra using an amplifier with logarithmic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3-1/2 decade logarithmic pulse amplifier was developed for use in microdosimetry. A block diagram of the instrument is given. The input shaping amplifier is designed to accept output pulses from a charge sensitive preamplifier with a maximum full scale amplitude of 8 volts. Output of the shaping amplifier is a bipolar, positive lobe leading RC shaped pulse with a maximum linear range approximately 200 millivolts. Following the logarithmic converter is a voltage amplifier which is used to increase the signal level before it is applied through the linear gate to the output buffer-amplifier. The signal at the output connector is a positive pulse compatible with most conventional pulse height analyzers. The gain of the linear amplifier is adjustable over 10 to 1 range by means of front panel controls

  7. Conservation of Olfactory Avoidance in Drosophila Species and Identification of Repellents for Drosophila suzukii

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Krause Pham; Anandasankar Ray

    2015-01-01

    Flying insects use olfaction to navigate towards fruits in complex odor environments with remarkable accuracy. Some fruits change odor profiles substantially during ripening and related species can prefer different stages. In Drosophila species attractive odorants have been studied extensively, but little is understood about the role of avoidance pathways. In order to examine the role of the avoidance cue CO2 emitted from fruit on behavior of two species with different ripening stage preferen...

  8. Acid evaporation property in chemically amplified resists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Shuichi; Itani, Toshiro; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Yamana, Mitsuharu; Samoto, Norihiko; Kasama, Kunihiko

    1997-07-01

    The lithographic performance of a chemically amplified resist system very much depends on the photo-generated acid structure. In a previous paper, we reported the molecular structure dependence of two typical photo-generated acids (aromatic sulfonic acid and alkyl sulfonic acid) from the viewpoints of lithographic performance and acid characteristics such as acid generation efficiency, acid diffusion behavior and acid evaporation property. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of the remaining solvent in a resist film on the acid evaporation property. Four types of two-component chemically amplified positive KrF resists were prepared consisting of tert-butoxycarbonyl (t-BOC) protected polyhydroxystyrene and sulfonic acid derivative photo-acid generator (PAG). Here, a different combination of two types of PAGs [2,4-dimethylbenzenesulfonic acid (aromatic sulfonic acid) derivative PAG and cyclohexanesulfonic acid (alkyl sulfonic acid) derivative PAG] and two types of solvents (propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate; PGMEA and ethyl lactate; EL) were evaluated. The aromatic sulfonic acid was able to evaporate easily during post exposure bake (PEB) treatment, but the alkyl sulfonic acid was not. The higher evaporation property of aromatic sulfonic acid might be due to the higher vapor pressure and the longer acid diffusion length. Furthermore, the amount of aromatic sulfonic acid in the PGMEA resist was reduced by more than that in the EL resist. The amount of acid loss also became smaller at a higher prebake temperature. The concentration of the remaining solvent in the resist film decreased with the increasing prebake temperature. We think that the acid evaporation property was affected by the remaining solvent in the resist, film; the large amount of remaining solvent promoted the acid diffusion and eventually accelerated the acid evaporation from the resist film surface in the PGMEA resist. In summary, the acid evaporation property depends on both the acid

  9. Direct coupled amplifiers using field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of the uni-polar field effect transistor (P.E.T.) was known before the invention of the bi-polar transistor but it is only recently that they have been made commercially. Being produced as yet only in small quantities, their price imposes a restriction on use to circuits where their peculiar properties can be exploited to the full. One such application is described here where the combination of low voltage drift and relatively low input leakage current are necessarily used together. One of the instruments used to control nuclear reactors has a logarithmic response to the mean output current from a polarised ionisation chamber. The logarithmic signal is then differentiated electrically, the result being displayed on a meter calibrated to show the reactor divergence or doubling time. If displayed in doubling time the scale is calibrated reciprocally. Because of the wide range obtained in the logarithmic section and the limited supply voltage, an output of 1 volt per decade change in ionisation current is used. Differentiating this gives a current of 1.5 x 10-8 A for p.s.D. (20 sec. doubling time) in the differentiating amplifier. To overcome some of the problems of noise due to statistical variations in input current, the circuit design necessitates a resistive path to ground at the amplifier input of 20 M.ohms. A schematic diagram is shown. 1. It is evident that a zero drift of 1% can be caused by a leakage current of 1.5 x 10-10 A or an offset voltage of 3 mV at the amplifier input. Although the presently used electrometer valve is satisfactory from the point of view of grid current, there have been sudden changes in grid to grid voltage (the valve is a double triode) of up to 10 m.V. It has been found that a pair of F.E.T's. can be used to replace the electrometer valve so long as care is taken in correct balance of the two devices. An investigation has been made into the characteristics of some fourteen devices to see whether those with very different

  10. The dominant mutation Suppressor of black indicates that de novo pyrimindine biosynthesis is involved in the Drosophila tan pigmentation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Kolbak, D.; Søndergaard, Leif;

    1993-01-01

    Pyrimidines, beta-alanine, cuticle, drosophila, pyrimidine analogs, molecular genetics, rudimentary......Pyrimidines, beta-alanine, cuticle, drosophila, pyrimidine analogs, molecular genetics, rudimentary...

  11. Functional Gustatory Role of Chemoreceptors in Drosophila Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Hussein; Ferveur, Jean-François; Ledger, Neil; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2016-05-17

    Neuroanatomical evidence argues for the presence of taste sensilla in Drosophila wings; however, the taste physiology of insect wings remains hypothetical, and a comprehensive link to mechanical functions, such as flight, wing flapping, and grooming, is lacking. Our data show that the sensilla of the Drosophila anterior wing margin respond to both sweet and bitter molecules through an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Conversely, genetically modified flies presenting a wing-specific reduction in chemosensory cells show severe defects in both wing taste signaling and the exploratory guidance associated with chemodetection. In Drosophila, the chemodetection machinery includes mechanical grooming, which facilitates the contact between tastants and wing chemoreceptors, and the vibrations of flapping wings that nebulize volatile molecules as carboxylic acids. Together, these data demonstrate that the Drosophila wing chemosensory sensilla are a functional taste organ and that they may have a role in the exploration of ecological niches. PMID:27160896

  12. Correction: Serendipitous discovery of Wolbachia genomes in multiple Drosophila species

    OpenAIRE

    Salzberg, Steven L.; Julie C Dunning Hotopp; Delcher, Arthur L; Pop, Mihai; Smith, Douglas R; Eisen, Michael B; Nelson, William C.

    2005-01-01

    A correction to Serendipitous discovery of Wolbachia genomes in multiple Drosophila species by SL Salzberg, JC Dunning Hotopp, AL Delcher, M Pop, DR Smith, MB Eisen and WC Nelson. Genome Biology 2005, 6:R23

  13. Behavioral modification in choice process ofDrosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunpeng; Tang, Shiming; Li, Yan; Guo, Aike

    2003-08-01

    In visual operant conditioning ofDrosophila at the flight simulator, only motor output of flies-yaw torque-is recorded, which is involved in the conditioning process. The current study used a newly-designed data analysis method to study the torque distribution ofDrosophila. Modification of torque distribution represents the effects of operant conditioning on flies' behavioral mode. Earlier works([10]) showed that, when facing contradictory visual cues, flies could make choices based upon the relative weightiness of different cues, and it was demonstrated that mushroom bodies might play an important role in such choice behavior. The new "torque-position map" method was used to explore the CS-US associative learning and choice behavior inDrosophila from the aspect of its behavioral mode. Finally, this work also discussed various possible neural bases involved in visual associative learning, choice processing and modification processing of the behavioral mode in the visual operant conditioning ofDrosophila. PMID:21072612

  14. Is premating isolation in Drosophila overestimated due to uncontrolled factors?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pelayo Casares; Rafael Piñeiro; Maria C. Carracedo

    2005-12-01

    Sexual isolation in Drosophila is typically measured by multiple-choice mating tests. While many environmental variables during such tests are controlled by the researcher, there are some factors that are usually uncontrolled. We demonstrate, using Drosophila melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura flies, that the temperature of rearing, preadult density, and level of consanguinity, can all produce differences in mating propensity between genetically equivalent flies. These differences in mating propensity, in turn, can give rise to statistically significant results in multiple-choice mating tests, leading to positive isolation values and the artifactual inference of sexual isolation between populations. This fact agrees with a nonrandom excess of significant positive tests found in a review of the literature of Drosophila intraspecific mating choice. An overestimate of true cases of sexual isolation in Drosophila in the literature can, therefore, not be ruled out.

  15. Thermodynamic indistinguishability and field state fingerprint of quantum optical amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Perl, Yossi; Band, Yehuda B.; Boukobza, Erez

    2016-01-01

    Dissipation tends to wash out dynamical features observed at early evolution times. In this paper we analyze a resonant single--atom two--photon quantum optical amplifier both dynamically and thermodynamically. A detailed thermodynamic balance shows that the non--linear amplifier is thermodynamically equivalent to the linear amplifier discussed in (Phys. Rev. A, 74 (2006), 063822). However, by calculating the Wigner quasi--probability distribution for various initial field states, we show tha...

  16. A high performance switching audio amplifier using sliding mode control

    OpenAIRE

    Pillonnet, Gael; Cellier, Rémy; Abouchi, Nacer; Chiollaz, Monique

    2008-01-01

    International audience The switching audio amplifiers are widely used in various portable and consumer electronics due to their high efficiency, but suffers from low audio performances due to inherent nonlinearity. This paper presents an integrated class D audio amplifier with low consumption and high audio performances. It includes a power stage and an efficient control based on sliding mode technique. This monolithic class D amplifier is capable of delivering up to 1W into 8Ω load at les...

  17. Design and experimental investigation of charge amplifiers for ultrasonic transducers

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Svein Kristian Esp

    2014-01-01

    Amplifiers are used in all types of electrical circuits to boost signal and there is a huge variety in designs used for different applications. For ultrasonic applications our group has previously used commercial available transimpedance amplifiers that converts a current to a voltage, but these amplifiers have a linear response over its frequency range. To preserve as much information as possible for lower frequencies a flat frequency response is preferable. The main goa...

  18. Modeling and design techniques for RF power amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Raghavan, Arvind; Laskar, Joy

    2008-01-01

    The book covers RF power amplifier design, from device and modeling considerations to advanced circuit design architectures and techniques. It focuses on recent developments and advanced topics in this area, including numerous practical designs to back the theoretical considerations. It presents the challenges in designing power amplifiers in silicon and helps the reader improve the efficiency of linear power amplifiers, and design more accurate compact device models, with faster extraction routines, to create cost effective and reliable circuits.

  19. A Review of High Voltage Drive Amplifiers for Capacitive Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lina; Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the high voltage amplifiers, which are used to drive capacitive actuators. The amplifiers for both piezoelectric and DEAP (dielectric electroactive polymer) actuator are discussed. The suitable topologies for driving capacitive actuators are illustrated in detail......, including linear as well as switched mode amplifiers. In the past much attention has been paid on the driver for piezoelectric actuator. As DEAP is a type of new material, there is not much literature reference for it....

  20. Design of a Broadband Amplifier for High Speed Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Camargo, E.; Virk, R.S.; Hajji, R.; Parker, S; Ohnishi, H

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides comprehensive insight into the design approach followed for an amplifier dedicated to high speed base band signals. To demonstrate the methodology, an amplifier consisting of nine PHEMT cascode cells within a distributed amplifier topology was designed. The resulting frequency response is 40 GHz at the 3-dB point, and the output voltage for a 43 Gbps eye diagram is 7.3 Vpp at the chip terminal.

  1. InP Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor Amplifiers to 255 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radisic, Vesna; Sawdai, Donald; Scott, Dennis; Deal, William; Dang, Linh; Li, Danny; Cavus, Abdullah; To, Richard; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Two single-stage InP heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) amplifiers operate at 184 and 255 GHz, using Northrop Grumman Corporation s InP HBT MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) technology. At the time of this reporting, these are reported to be the highest HBT amplifiers ever created. The purpose of the amplifier design is to evaluate the technology capability for high-frequency designs and verify the model for future development work.

  2. The spectacular human nose: An amplifier of individual quality?

    OpenAIRE

    Åse Kristine Rognmo Mikalsen; Ivar Folstad; Nigel Gilles Yoccoz; Bruno Laeng

    2014-01-01

    Amplifiers are signals that improve the perception of underlying differences in quality. They are cost free and advantageous to high quality individuals, but disadvantageous to low quality individuals, as poor quality is easier perceived because of the amplifier. For an amplifier to evolve, the average fitness benefit to the high quality individuals should be higher than the average cost for the low quality individuals. The human nose is, compared to the nose of most other primates, extraordi...

  3. Loss of Drosophila pheromone reverses its role in sexual communication in Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Teun; Revadi, Santosh; Mansourian, Suzan; Ramasamy, Sukanya; Lebreton, Sebastien; Becher, Paul G; Angeli, Sergio; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Anfora, Gianfranco

    2015-04-01

    The Drosophila pheromone cis-11-octadecenyl acetate (cVA) is used as pheromone throughout the melanogaster group and fulfils a primary role in sexual and social behaviours. Here, we found that Drosophila suzukii, an invasive pest that oviposits in undamaged ripe fruit, does not produce cVA. In fact, its production site, the ejaculatory bulb, is atrophied. Despite loss of cVA production, its receptor, Or67d, and cognate sensillum, T1, which are essential in cVA-mediated behaviours, were fully functional. However, T1 expression was dramatically reduced in D. suzukii, and the corresponding antennal lobe glomerulus, DA1, minute. Behavioural responses to cVA depend on the input balance of Or67d neurons (driving cVA-mediated behaviours) and Or65a neurons (inhibiting cVA-mediated behaviours). Accordingly, the shifted input balance in D. suzukii has reversed cVA's role in sexual behaviour: perfuming D. suzukii males with Drosophila melanogaster equivalents of cVA strongly reduced mating rates. cVA has thus evolved from a generic sex pheromone to a heterospecific signal that disrupts mating in D. suzukii, a saltational shift, mediated through offsetting the input balance that is highly conserved in congeneric species. This study underlines that dramatic changes in a species' sensory preference can result from rather 'simple' numerical shifts in underlying neural circuits. PMID:25716789

  4. Conservation of Olfactory Avoidance in Drosophila Species and Identification of Repellents for Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause Pham, Christine; Ray, Anandasankar

    2015-01-01

    Flying insects use olfaction to navigate towards fruits in complex odor environments with remarkable accuracy. Some fruits change odor profiles substantially during ripening and related species can prefer different stages. In Drosophila species attractive odorants have been studied extensively, but little is understood about the role of avoidance pathways. In order to examine the role of the avoidance cue CO2 emitted from fruit on behavior of two species with different ripening stage preferences, we investigated the CO2-detection pathway in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila suzukii, a harmful pest of fruits. Avoidance to CO2 is not conserved in D. suzukii suggesting a behavioral adaptation that could facilitate attraction to younger fruit with higher CO2 emission levels. We investigated known innate avoidance pathways from five species at different evolutionary distances: D. melanogaster, D. yakuba, D. suzukii, D. pseudoobscura and D. virilis. Surprisingly, only DEET shows strong repellency across all species, whereas CO2, citronellal and ethyl 3-hydroxybutyrate show only limited conservation. These findings guide us to test recently discovered safe DEET substitutes, and we identify one that protects fruits from D. suzukii thus providing a new behavioral strategy for controlling agricultural pests. PMID:26098542

  5. The solid-state Ku-band power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, B. D.

    1975-01-01

    A survey of IMPATT diodes and negative resistance amplifiers is presented. The first phase of the amplifier effort is discussed in which a single diode reflection amplifier delivering 0.5 watt at 15 GHz with 10-dB gain over a 1-GHz band was developed. The design of a dominant mode resonant combiner is described along with the characterization of the IMPATT diodes. Results are given on the complete amplifier and on the thermal and graceful failure characteristics of the unit.

  6. Pulse-distortion in a quantum-dot optical amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, Francis Pascal; Borri, Paola; Mørk, Jesper; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Heinrichsdorff, F.; Mao, M.-H.; Bimberg, Dieter

    2000-01-01

    Distortion of a -150fs optical pulse after propagation through an InAs/InGaAs quantum-dot optical amplifier is measured for different input energies an bias currents. Pulse distortion is observed and compared with results on a bulk amplifier.......Distortion of a -150fs optical pulse after propagation through an InAs/InGaAs quantum-dot optical amplifier is measured for different input energies an bias currents. Pulse distortion is observed and compared with results on a bulk amplifier....

  7. Parametric Amplifiers for Microwave Kinectic Inductance Detector (MKID) Readout Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Find numerical solutions to the non-linear partial differential equations describing our amplifier transmission lines. Optimize periodic choke structure to block...

  8. Multi Carrier Modulation Audio Power Amplifier with Programmable Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Theis; Andersen, Toke Meyer; Knott, Arnold;

    2009-01-01

    amplifiers while keeping the performance measures to excellent levels is therefore of high interest. In this paper a class D audio amplifier utilising Multi Carrier Modulation (MCM) will be analysed, and a prototype Master-Slave Multi Carrier Modulated (MS MCM) amplifier has been constructed and measured for...... performance and out of band spectral amplitudes. The basic principle in MCM is to use programmable logic to combine two or more Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) audio signals at different switching frequencies. In this way the out of band spectrum will be lowered compared with conventional class D amplifiers...

  9. Design of Class-E Radio Frequency Power Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Shahrani, Saad Mohammed

    2000-01-01

    Power amplifiers (PA) are typically the most power-consuming building blocks of RF transceivers. Therefore, the design of a high-efficiency radio frequency power amplifier is the most obvious solution to overcoming the battery lifetime limitation in the portable communication systems. A power amplifierà ­s classes (A, AB, B, C, F, E, etc), and design techniques (Load-pull and large-signal S-parameters techniques) are presented. The design accuracy of class-A power amplifier based on the s...

  10. Modeling a Common-Source Amplifier Using a Ferroelectric Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyah, Rana; Hunt, Mitchell; MacLeond, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model characterizing the behavior of a common-source amplifier using a FeFET. The model is based on empirical data and incorporates several variables that affect the output, including frequency, load resistance, and gate-to-source voltage. Since the common-source amplifier is the most widely used amplifier in MOS technology, understanding and modeling the behavior of the FeFET-based common-source amplifier will help in the integration of FeFETs into many circuits.

  11. Controlling the dynamic range of a Josephson parametric amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the central challenges in the development of parametric amplifiers is the control of the dynamic range relative to its gain and bandwidth, which typically limits quantum limited amplification to signals which contain only a few photons per inverse bandwidth. Here, we discuss the control of the dynamic range of Josephson parametric amplifiers by using Josephson junction arrays. We discuss gain, bandwidth, noise, and dynamic range properties of both a transmission line and a lumped element based parametric amplifier. Based on these investigations we derive useful design criteria, which may find broad application in the development of practical parametric amplifiers. (orig.)

  12. Functional gustatory role of chemoreceptors in drosophila wings

    OpenAIRE

    Raad, Hussein; Ferveur, Jean-François; Ledger, Neil; Capovilla, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Neuroanatomical evidence argues for the presence of taste sensilla in Drosophila wings; however, the taste physiology of insect wings remains hypothetical, and a comprehensive link to mechanical functions, such as flight, wing flapping, and grooming, is lacking. Our data show that the sensilla of the Drosophila anterior wing margin respond to both sweet and bitter molecules through an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ levels. Conversely, genetically modified flies presenting a wing-specific reductio...

  13. Candidate Glutamatergic Neurons in the Visual System of Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Shamprasad Varija Raghu; Alexander Borst

    2011-01-01

    The visual system of Drosophila contains approximately 60,000 neurons that are organized in parallel, retinotopically arranged columns. A large number of these neurons have been characterized in great anatomical detail. However, studies providing direct evidence for synaptic signaling and the neurotransmitter used by individual neurons are relatively sparse. Here we present a first layout of neurons in the Drosophila visual system that likely release glutamate as their major neurotransmitter....

  14. Bazooka mediates secondary axon morphology in Drosophila brain lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Hartenstein Volker; Spindler Shana R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In the Drosophila brain, neural lineages project bundled axon tracts into a central neuropile. Each lineage exhibits a stereotypical branching pattern and trajectory, which distinguish it from other lineages. In this study, we used a multilineage approach to explore the neural function of the Par-complex member Par3/Bazooka in vivo. Drosophila bazooka is expressed in post-mitotic neurons of the larval brain and localizes within neurons in a lineage-dependent manner. The fact that mul...

  15. A development-based compartmentalization of the Drosophila central brain

    OpenAIRE

    Pereanu, Wayne; Kumar, Abilasha; Jennett, Arnim; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The neuropile of the Drosophila brain is subdivided into anatomically discrete compartments. Compartments are rich in terminal neurite branching and synapses; they are the neuropile domains in which signal processing takes place. Compartment boundaries are defined by more or less dense layers of glial cells, as well as long neurite fascicles. These fascicles are formed during the larval period when the approximately 100 neuronal lineages that constitute the Drosophila central brain differenti...

  16. Evolution of Drosophila ribosomal protein gene core promoters

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Xiaotu; Zhang, Kangyu; Li, Xiaoman

    2008-01-01

    The coordinated expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) has been well documented in many species. Previous analyses of RPG promoters focus only on Fungi and mammals. Recognizing this gap and using a comparative genomics approach, we utilize a motif-finding algorithm that incorporates cross-species conservation to identify several significant motifs in Drosophila RPG promoters. As a result, significant differences of the enriched motifs in RPG promoter are found among Drosophila, Fungi, a...

  17. Methods to assess Drosophila heart development, function and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Ocorr, Karen; Vogler, Georg; Bodmer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the Drosophila heart has become an established model of many different aspects of human cardiac disease. This model has allowed identification of disease-causing mechanisms underlying congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies and has permitted the study underlying genetic, metabolic and age-related contributions to heart function. In this review we discuss methods currently employed in the analysis of the Drosophila heart structure and function, such as optical methods to ...

  18. Circadian Organization of Behavior and Physiology in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Allada, Ravi; Chung, Brian Y.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks organize behavior and physiology to adapt to daily environmental cycles. Genetic approaches in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, have revealed widely conserved molecular gears of these 24-h timers. Yet much less is known about how these cell-autonomous clocks confer temporal information to modulate cellular functions. Here we discuss our current knowledge of circadian clock function in Drosophila, providing an overview of the molecular underpinnings of circadian clocks....

  19. Cloning of Drosophila choline acetyltransferase cDNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, N; Slemmon, J.R.; Hawke, D.H.; Williamson, R.; Morita, E.; Itakura, K; Roberts, E; Shively, J. E.; Crawford, G D; Salvaterra, P M

    1986-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.6) is the biosynthetic enzyme for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. To isolate choline acetyltransferase cDNA clones, a cDNA library was constructed from poly(A)+ RNA of Drosophila melanogaster heads, these being one of the richest known sources of the enzyme. By screening the cDNA library with a mixture of three different monoclonal antibodies to Drosophila choline acetyltransferase, we isolated 14 positive clones. Only 1 of these clones was identified t...

  20. Dosage Compensation of the Period Gene in Drosophila Melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, M K; Hamblen-Coyle, M. J.; Liu, X; Rutila, J E; Hall, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The period (per) gene is located on the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Its expression influences biological clocks in this fruit fly, including the one that subserves circadian rhythms of locomotor activity. Like most X-linked genes in Drosophila, per is under the regulatory control of gene dosage compensation. In this study, we assessed the activity of altered or augmented per(+) DNA fragments in transformants. Relative expression levels in male and female adults were inferred from...

  1. FlyBase: a Drosophila database. Flybase Consortium.

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    FlyBase (http://flybase.bio.indiana.edu/) is a comprehensive database of genetic and molecular data concerning Drosophila . FlyBase is maintained as a relational database (in Sybase) and is made available as html documents and flat files. The scope of FlyBase includes: genes, alleles (with phenotypes), aberrations, transposons, pointers to sequence data, gene products, maps, clones, stock lists, Drosophila workers and bibliographic references.

  2. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastien eLebreton; Peter eWitzgall; Marie eOlsson; Becher, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies ...

  3. Genomic and karyotypic variation in Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Gokhman

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830 has served as a model insect for over a century. Sequencing of the 11 additional Drosophila Fallen, 1823 species marks substantial progress in comparative genomics of this genus. By comparison, practically nothing is known about the genome size or genome sequences of parasitic wasps of Drosophila. Here, we present the first comparative analysis of genome size and karyotype structures of Drosophila parasitoids of the Leptopilina Förster, 1869 and Ganaspis Förster, 1869 species. The gametic genome size of Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896 is larger than those of the three Leptopilina species studied. The genome sizes of all parasitic wasps studied here are also larger than those known for all Drosophila species. Surprisingly, genome sizes of these Drosophila parasitoids exceed the average value known for all previously studied Hymenoptera. The haploid chromosome number of both Leptopilina heterotoma (Thomson, 1862 and L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 is ten. A chromosomal fusion appears to have produced a distinct karyotype for L. boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979 (n = 9, whose genome size is smaller than that of wasps of the L. heterotoma clade. Like L. boulardi, the haploid chromosome number for G. xanthopoda is also nine. Our studies reveal a positive, but non linear, correlation between the genome size and total chromosome length in Drosophila parasitoids. These Drosophila parasitoids differ widely in their host range, and utilize different infection strategies to overcome host defense. Their comparative genomics, in relation to their exceptionally well-characterized hosts, will prove to be valuable for understanding the molecular basis of the host-parasite arms race and how such mechanisms shape the genetic structures of insect communities.

  4. Operational characteristics of the NRL gyroklystron amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-energy physics community is considering the development of 1 TeV accelerators. Size and cost of such devices can be greatly reduced by operating at 10 GHz. Present tube technology seems incapable of meeting the power requirements at this frequency. A strong candidate for a drive tube to meet these requirements is a gyroklystron amplifier (GKA) due to its high gain, efficiency and power capabilities. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is presently conducting GKA research to evaluate their performance characteristics. Operation of a 54 kW, 30% efficient, 4.5 GHz 3-cavity GKA is described. Experiments to evaluate the effects on the output phase of varying drive voltage, beam current, magnetic field and drive power and to examine phase-locked oscillator performance are discussed. The results of present GKA experiments serve to emphasize the applicability of the GKA to the next generation of linear accelerators

  5. CARM-klystron amplifier for accelerator applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Steven H.; Fliflet, Arne W.

    2001-05-01

    We consider the possibility of a cyclotron-autoresonance-maser (CARM) klystron configuration for accelerator applications as an alternative to the gyroklystron amplifier. The potential advantages, compared to gyroklystrons, include: 1) comparable efficiencies at lower values of the electron beam pitch ratio α, which should improve the beam quality and make the device substantially more stable against the excitation of parasitic mode, 2) operation far from cutoff, which should reduce the fields at cavity walls, allowing higher power operation, and 3) operation at lower magnetic fields for the same cyclotron harmonic number. However, there are two significant issues associated with the design of efficient, high-power CARMs. First, because of the higher value of kZ, compared to gyroklystrons, CARMs are substantially more sensitive to parallel velocity spread (pitch-angle spread). Second, conventional cavities support a variety of near-cutoff modes, which can compete with the CARM interaction. Therefore, one must consider either Bragg resonators or quasioptical cavity configurations.

  6. Gain Characteristics of Fiber Optical Parametric Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高明义; 姜淳; 胡卫生

    2004-01-01

    The theory model of fiber optical parametric amplifier (FOPA) was introduced, which is based on optical nonlinear effect. And then numerical simulation was done to analyze and discuss the gain spectral characteristics of one-pump and two-pump FOPA. The results show that for one-pump FOPA, when pump wavelength is near to fiber zero-dispersion wavelength(ZDW), the gain flatness is better, and with the increase of the pump power, fiber length and its nonlinear coefficient, the gain value will increase while the gain bandwidth will become narrow. For two-pump FOPA, when the pump central wavelength is near to fiber ZDW, the gain flatness is better. Moreover, by decreasing the space of two pumps wavelength, the gain flatness can be improved. Finally, some problems existing in FOPA were addressed.

  7. New developments in relativistic klystron amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relativistic klystron amplifier that employed cavities with inductively loaded wide gaps and a novel converter has achieved 50% energy efficiency, a significant advance over the previous state of the art of 20%. The new device was immersed in a 3 kG magnetic field and contained two innovations: (1) Wide gaps which include an inductively loaded return current structure that was opaque to the unmodulated beam space charge but transparent to the RF field. (2) A novel converter that was made of a 'leaky' cavity with a radially-converging inductively-loaded structure that was inserted in the output wide-gap. This structure reduced the potential energy residing in the electron beam and maximized RF output energy. (author). 4 figs., 13 refs

  8. Current feedback operational amplifiers and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Senani, Raj; Singh, A K; Singh, V K

    2013-01-01

    This book describes a variety of current feedback operational amplifier (CFOA) architectures and their applications in analog signal processing/generation. Coverage includes a comprehensive survey of commercially available, off-the-shelf integrated circuit CFOAs, as well as recent advances made on the design of CFOAs, including design innovations for bipolar and CMOS CFOAs.  This book serves as a single-source reference to the topic, as well as a catalog of over 200 application circuits which would be useful not only for students, educators and researchers in apprising them about the recent developments in the area but would also serve as a comprehensive repertoire of useful circuits for practicing engineers who might be interested in choosing an appropriate CFOA-based topology for use in a given application.

  9. High-energy regenerative thin disk amplifier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chyla, Michal; Smrž, Martin; Mocek, Tomáš

    Melville: AIP, 2012 - (Osvay, K.; Dombi, P.; Fülöp, J.; Varjú, K.), s. 84-87. (AIP Conference Proceedings. 1462). ISBN 978-0-7354-1066-4. ISSN 0094-243X. [Light at Extreme Intensities 2011. Szeged (HU), 14.11.2011-18.11.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027 Grant ostatní: ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Yb: YAG * thin-disk * regenerative amplifier * high energy * picosecond pulses * CPA Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  10. Environmental temperature and physiological polymorphism of populations. II. The relation of changes in the organismal heat resistance to its initial level during heat acclimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushakov, B.P.; Amosova, I.S.; Chernokozheva, I.S.; Dregolskaya, I.N.; Pashkova, I.M.; Skholl, E.D.

    1977-01-01

    Study was made of the changes in the organismal heat resistance level and average values were obtained for clones and siblings of Hydra oligactis, Asellus acquaticus, Drosophila melanogaster, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis (embryos) and Rana temporaria (tadpoles) during short-term heat acclimation (sibacclimation method). In all the species studied a negative correlation was observed between the initial heat resistance level of clones and siblings and its increase during heat acclimation. Reaction norm during temperature resistance acclimation of poikilotherms depends on the initial organismal heat resistance inherent in each genotype.

  11. Expression of mdr49 and mdr65 multidrug resistance genes in larval tissues of Drosophila melanogaster under normal and stress conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Tapadia, Madhu G.; Lakhotia, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    In situ expression of 2 multidrug resistance genes, mdr49 and mdr65, of Drosophila melanogaster was examined in wild-type third instar larval tissues under physiological conditions and after heat shock or colchicine feeding. Expression of these 2 genes was also examined in tumorous tissues of lethal (2) giant larvae l(2)gl4 mutant larvae. These 2 mdr genes show similar constitutive expression in different larval tissues under physiological conditions. However, they are induced differentially ...

  12. The bacterial communities of Drosophila suzukii collected from undamaged cherries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, James Angus; James, Pamela M; Jospin, Guillaume; Lang, Jenna M

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii is an introduced pest insect that feeds on undamaged, attached fruit. This diet is distinct from the fallen, discomposing fruits utilized by most other species of Drosophila. Since the bacterial microbiota of Drosophila, and of many other animals, is affected by diet, we hypothesized that the bacteria associated with D. suzukii are distinct from that of other Drosophila. Using 16S rDNA PCR and Illumina sequencing, we characterized the bacterial communities of larval and adult D. suzukii collected from undamaged, attached cherries in California, USA. We find that the bacterial communities associated with these samples of D. suzukii contain a high frequency of Tatumella. Gluconobacter and Acetobacter, two taxa with known associations with Drosophila, were also found, although at lower frequency than Tatumella in four of the five samples examined. Sampling D. suzukii from different locations and/or while feeding on different fruits is needed to determine the generality of the results determined by these samples. Nevertheless this is, to our knowledge, the first study characterizing the bacterial communities of this ecologically unique and economically important species of Drosophila. PMID:25101226

  13. The bacterial communities of Drosophila suzukii collected from undamaged cherries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Angus Chandler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila suzukii is an introduced pest insect that feeds on undamaged, attached fruit. This diet is distinct from the fallen, discomposing fruits utilized by most other species of Drosophila. Since the bacterial microbiota of Drosophila, and of many other animals, is affected by diet, we hypothesized that the bacteria associated with D. suzukii are distinct from that of other Drosophila. Using 16S rDNA PCR and Illumina sequencing, we characterized the bacterial communities of larval and adult D. suzukii collected from undamaged, attached cherries in California, USA. We find that the bacterial communities associated with these samples of D. suzukii contain a high frequency of Tatumella. Gluconobacter and Acetobacter, two taxa with known associations with Drosophila, were also found, although at lower frequency than Tatumella in four of the five samples examined. Sampling D. suzukii from different locations and/or while feeding on different fruits is needed to determine the generality of the results determined by these samples. Nevertheless this is, to our knowledge, the first study characterizing the bacterial communities of this ecologically unique and economically important species of Drosophila.

  14. The influence of sterol metabolism upon radiation-induced aneuploidy of Drosophila melanogaster in the yeast-drosophila system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of sterol metabolism upon induced Drosophila melanogaster mutagenesis in an ecology-genetic yeast-drosophila system has been studied. The sterol deficit in fly organism has been created for account of using as food substrate for fremales of biomass of saccharomyces cerevisiae living cells of 9-2-PZ12 train with nyssup(r1) locus mutation which blocks the ergosterol synthesis. It has been found that the Drosophila females content on mutant yeast increases the frequency of losses and non discrepancy of X-chromosomes induced by X-radiation (1000 R). Addition into yeast biomass of 0.1 % cholesterol solution in 10 %-ethanol reduces the oocytes resistance to X-radiation up to control level. Possible hormonal and membrane mechanisms of increasing radiation-induced aneuploidy of Drosophila and the role of sterol metabolism in organism resistance to damaging factors are discussed

  15. Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir NEW Criteria ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  16. Gustatory processing and taste memory in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, Pavel; Keene, Alex C

    2016-06-01

    Taste allows animals to discriminate the value and potential toxicity of food prior to ingestion. Many tastants elicit an innate attractive or avoidance response that is modifiable with nutritional state and prior experience. A powerful genetic tool kit, well-characterized gustatory system, and standardized behavioral assays make the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, an excellent system for investigating taste processing and memory. Recent studies have used this system to identify the neural basis for acquired taste preference. These studies have revealed a role for dopamine-mediated plasticity of the mushroom bodies that modulate the threshold of response to appetitive tastants. The identification of neural circuitry regulating taste memory provides a system to study the genetic and physiological processes that govern plasticity within a defined memory circuit. PMID:27328844

  17. Optogenetic Control of Gene Expression in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yick-Bun Chan

    Full Text Available To study the molecular mechanism of complex biological systems, it is important to be able to artificially manipulate gene expression in desired target sites with high precision. Based on the light dependent binding of cryptochrome 2 and a cryptochrome interacting bHLH protein, we developed a split lexA transcriptional activation system for use in Drosophila that allows regulation of gene expression in vivo using blue light or two-photon excitation. We show that this system offers high spatiotemporal resolution by inducing gene expression in tissues at various developmental stages. In combination with two-photon excitation, gene expression can be manipulated at precise sites in embryos, potentially offering an important tool with which to examine developmental processes.

  18. Quantitative neuroanatomy for connectomics in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Mizell, Casey M; Gerhard, Stephan; Longair, Mark; Kazimiers, Tom; Li, Feng; Zwart, Maarten F; Champion, Andrew; Midgley, Frank M; Fetter, Richard D; Saalfeld, Stephan; Cardona, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal circuit mapping using electron microscopy demands laborious proofreading or reconciliation of multiple independent reconstructions. Here, we describe new methods to apply quantitative arbor and network context to iteratively proofread and reconstruct circuits and create anatomically enriched wiring diagrams. We measured the morphological underpinnings of connectivity in new and existing reconstructions of Drosophila sensorimotor (larva) and visual (adult) systems. Synaptic inputs were preferentially located on numerous small, microtubule-free 'twigs' which branch off a single microtubule-containing 'backbone'. Omission of individual twigs accounted for 96% of errors. However, the synapses of highly connected neurons were distributed across multiple twigs. Thus, the robustness of a strong connection to detailed twig anatomy was associated with robustness to reconstruction error. By comparing iterative reconstruction to the consensus of multiple reconstructions, we show that our method overcomes the need for redundant effort through the discovery and application of relationships between cellular neuroanatomy and synaptic connectivity. PMID:26990779

  19. Heritability of Directional Asymmetry in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Houle

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional asymmetry (DA, the consistent difference between a pair of morphological structures in which the same side is always larger than the other, presents an evolutionary mystery. Although many paired traits show DA, genetic variation for DA has not been unambiguously demonstrated. Artificial selection is a powerful technique for uncovering selectable genetic variation; we review and critique the limited number of previous studies that have been performed to select on DA and present the results of a novel artificial selection experiment on the DA of posterior crossvein location in Drosophila wings. Fifteen generations of selection in two genetically distinct lines were performed and none of the lines showed a significant response to selection. Our results therefore support and reconfirm previous findings; despite apparent natural variation and evolution of DA in nature, DA remains a paradoxical trait that does not respond to artificial selection.

  20. Adaptive genic evolution in the Drosophila genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Joshua A; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Chenhui;

    2007-01-01

    Determining the extent of adaptive evolution at the genomic level is central to our understanding of molecular evolution. A suitable observation for this purpose would consist of polymorphic data on a large and unbiased collection of genes from two closely related species, each having a large and....... melanogaster and its close relatives were adaptive. (iv) This signature of adaptive evolution is observable only in regions of normal recombination. Hence, the low level of polymorphism observed in regions of reduced recombination may not be driven primarily by positive selection. Finally, we discuss the...... sites than expected, hinting at the action of selective sweeps. (ii) The level of polymorphism is negatively correlated with the rate of nonsynonymous divergence across loci. Thus, even under strict neutrality, the ratio of amino acid to silent nucleotide changes (A:S) between Drosophila species is...

  1. Simulation of gene pyramiding in Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Gene pyramiding has been successfully practiced in plant breeding for developing new breeds or lines in which favorable genes from several different lines were integrated.But it has not been used in animal breeding,and some theoretical investigation and simulation analysis with respect to its strategies,feasibility and efficiency are needed before it can be implemented in animals.In this study,we used four different pure fines of Drosophila melanogaster,each of which is homozygous at a specific mutant gene with a visible effect on phenotype,to simulate the gene pyramiding process and analyze the duration and population size required in different pyramiding strategies.We finally got the ideal individuals,which are homozygous at the four target genes simultaneously.This study demonstrates that gene pyramiding is feasible in animal breeding and the interaction between genes may affect the final results.

  2. A Protein Interaction Map of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giot, L.; Bader, J. S.; Brouwer, C.; Chaudhuri, A.; Kuang, B.; Li, Y.; Hao, Y. L.; Ooi, C. E.; Godwin, B.; Vitols, E.; Vijayadamodar, G.; Pochart, P.; Machineni, H.; Welsh, M.; Kong, Y.; Zerhusen, B.; Malcolm, R.; Varrone, Z.; Collis, A.; Minto, M.; Burgess, S.; McDaniel, L.; Stimpson, E.; Spriggs, F.; Williams, J.; Neurath, K.; Ioime, N.; Agee, M.; Voss, E.; Furtak, K.; Renzulli, R.; Aanensen, N.; Carrolla, S.; Bickelhaupt, E.; Lazovatsky, Y.; DaSilva, A.; Zhong, J.; Stanyon, C. A.; Finley, R. L.; White, K. P.; Braverman, M.; Jarvie, T.; Gold, S.; Leach, M.; Knight, J.; Shimkets, R. A.; McKenna, M. P.; Chant, J.; Rothberg, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a proven model system for many aspects of human biology. Here we present a two-hybrid-based protein-interaction map of the fly proteome. A total of 10,623 predicted transcripts were isolated and screened against standard and normalized complementary DNA libraries to produce a draft map of 7048 proteins and 20,405 interactions. A computational method of rating two-hybrid interaction confidence was developed to refine this draft map to a higher confidence map of 4679 proteins and 4780 interactions. Statistical modeling of the network showed two levels of organization: a short-range organization, presumably corresponding to multiprotein complexes, and a more global organization, presumably corresponding to intercomplex connections. The network recapitulated known pathways, extended pathways, and uncovered previously unknown pathway components. This map serves as a starting point for a systems biology modeling of multicellular organisms, including humans.

  3. Neural Mechanisms for Drosophila Contrast Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Armin; Serbe, Etienne; Meier, Matthias; Ammer, Georg; Borst, Alexander

    2015-12-16

    Spatial contrast, the difference in adjacent luminance values, provides information about objects, textures, and motion and supports diverse visual behaviors. Contrast computation is therefore an essential element of visual processing. The underlying mechanisms, however, are poorly understood. In human psychophysics, contrast illusions are means to explore such computations, but humans offer limited experimental access. Via behavioral experiments in Drosophila, we find that flies are also susceptible to contrast illusions. Using genetic silencing techniques, electrophysiology, and modeling, we systematically dissect the mechanisms and neuronal correlates underlying the behavior. Our results indicate that spatial contrast computation involves lateral inhibition within the same pathway that computes motion of luminance increments (ON pathway). Yet motion-blind flies, in which we silenced downstream motion-sensitive neurons needed for optomotor behavior, have fully intact contrast responses. In conclusion, spatial contrast and motion cues are first computed by overlapping neuronal circuits which subsequently feed into parallel visual processing streams. PMID:26673659

  4. Innate immunity in Drosophila: Pathogens and pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shubha Govind

    2008-01-01

    Following in the footsteps of traditional developmental genetics, research over the last 15 years has shown that innate immunity against bacteria and fungi is governed largely by two NF-κB signal transduction pathways, Toll and IMD. Antiviral immunity appears to stem from RNA interference, whereas resistance against parasitoids is conferred by Toll signaling. The identification of these post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and the annotation of most Drosophila immunity genes have derived from functional genomic studies using "model" pathogens, intact animals and cell lines. The D. melanogaster host has thus provided the core information that can be used to study responses to natural microbial and metazoan pathogens as they become identified, as well as to test ideas of selection and evolutionary change. These analyses are of general importance to understanding mechanisms of other insect host-pathogen interactions and determinants of variation in host resistance.

  5. X-Band, 17-Watt Solid-State Power Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittskus, Anthony; Stone, Ernest; Boger, William; Burgess, David; Honda, Richard; Nuckolls, Carl

    2005-01-01

    An advanced solid-state power amplifier that can generate an output power of as much as 17 W at a design operating frequency of 8.4 GHz has been designed and constructed as a smaller, lighter, less expensive alternative to traveling-wave-tube X-band amplifiers and to prior solid-state X-band power amplifiers of equivalent output power. This amplifier comprises a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier module and a power-converter module integrated into a compact package (see Figure 1). The amplifier module contains an input variable-gain amplifier (VGA), an intermediate driver stage, a final power stage, and input and output power monitors (see Figure 2). The VGA and the driver amplifier are 0.5-m GaAs-based metal semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs). The final power stage contains four parallel high-efficiency, GaAs-based pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistors (PHEMTs). The gain of the VGA is voltage-variable over a range of 10 to 24 dB. To provide for temperature compensation of the overall amplifier gain, the gain-control voltage is generated by an operational-amplifier circuit that includes a resistor/thermistor temperature-sensing network. The driver amplifier provides a gain of 14 dB to an output power of 27 dBm to drive the four parallel output PHEMTs, each of which is nominally capable of putting out as much as 5 W. The driver output is sent to the input terminals of the four parallel PHEMTs through microstrip power dividers; the outputs of these PHEMTs are combined by microstrip power combiners (which are similar to the microstrip power dividers) to obtain the final output power of 17 W.

  6. Polyglutamine expansion in Drosophila: thermal stress and Hsp70 as selective agents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brian R Bettencourt; Catherine C Hogan; Mario Nimali

    2007-04-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences that encode polyglutamine tracts are prone to expansion and cause highly deleterious phenotypes of neurodegeneration. Despite this tendency, polyglutamine tracts (``polyQs”) are conserved features of eukaryotic genomes. PolyQs are the most frequent protein-coding homotypic repeat in insect genomes, and are found predominantly in genes encoding transcription factors conserved from Drosophila through human. Although highly conserved across species, polyQ lengths vary widely within species. In D. melanogaster, polyQs in 25 genes have more alleles and higher heterozygosity than all other poly-amino acid tracts. The heat shock protein Hsp70 is a principal suppressor of polyQ expansions and may play a key role in modulating the phenotypes of the alleles that encode them. Hsp70 also promotes tolerance of natural thermal stress in Drosophila and diverse organisms, a role which may deplete the chaperone from buffering against polyQ toxicity. Thus in stressful environments, natural selection against long polyQ alleles more prone to expansion and deleterious phenotypes may be more effective. This hypothesis can be tested by measuring the phenotypic interactions between Hsp70 and polyQ transgenes in D. melanogaster undergoing natural thermal stress, an approach which integrates comparative genomics with experimental and ecological genetics.

  7. Structure and Development of Glia in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenstein, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Insect glia represents a conspicuous and diverse population of cells and plays a role in controlling neuronal progenitor proliferation, axonal growth, neuronal differentiation and maintenance, and neuronal function. Genetic studies in Drosophila have elucidated many aspects of glial structure, function and development. Just as in vertebrates, it appears as if different classes of glial cells are specialized for different functions. Based on topology and cell shape, glial cells of the central nervous system fall into three classes (Fig. 1A–C): (i) surface glia that extend sheath-like processes to wrap around the entire brain; (ii) cortex glia (also called cell body-associated glia) that encapsulate neuronal somata and neuroblasts which form the outer layer (cortex) of the central nervous system; (iii) neuropile glia that are located at the interface between the cortex and the neuropile, the central domain of the nervous system formed by the highly branched neuronal processes and their synaptic contacts. Surface glia is further subdivided into an outer, perineurial layer, and an inner, subperineurial layer. Likewise, neuropile glia comprises a class of cells that remain at the surface of the neuropile (ensheathing glia), and a second class that forms profuse lamellar processes around nerve fibers within the neuropile (astrocyte-like or reticular glia). Glia also surrounds the peripheral nerves and sensory organs; here, one also recognizes perineurial and subperineurial glia, and a third type called “wrapping glia” that most likely corresponds to the ensheathing glia of the central nervous system. Much more experimental work is needed to determine how fundamental these differences between classes of glial cells are, or how and when during development they are specified. To aid in this work the following review will briefly summarize our knowledge of the classes of glial cells encountered in the Drosophila nervous system, and then survey their development from

  8. Identification of Synaptic Targets of Drosophila Pumilio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulski, Michael; Sinha, Nishi; Barditch, Jody; Tully, Tim; Krainer, Adrian R.; Zhang, Michael Q.; Dubnau, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila Pumilio (Pum) protein is a translational regulator involved in embryonic patterning and germline development. Recent findings demonstrate that Pum also plays an important role in the nervous system, both at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and in long-term memory formation. In neurons, Pum appears to play a role in homeostatic control of excitability via down regulation of para, a voltage gated sodium channel, and may more generally modulate local protein synthesis in neurons via translational repression of eIF-4E. Aside from these, the biologically relevant targets of Pum in the nervous system remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that Pum might play a role in regulating the local translation underlying synapse-specific modifications during memory formation. To identify relevant translational targets, we used an informatics approach to predict Pum targets among mRNAs whose products have synaptic localization. We then used both in vitro binding and two in vivo assays to functionally confirm the fidelity of this informatics screening method. We find that Pum strongly and specifically binds to RNA sequences in the 3′UTR of four of the predicted target genes, demonstrating the validity of our method. We then demonstrate that one of these predicted target sequences, in the 3′UTR of discs large (dlg1), the Drosophila PSD95 ortholog, can functionally substitute for a canonical NRE (Nanos response element) in vivo in a heterologous functional assay. Finally, we show that the endogenous dlg1 mRNA can be regulated by Pumilio in a neuronal context, the adult mushroom bodies (MB), which is an anatomical site of memory storage. PMID:18463699

  9. Genetic effects on heavy ions in drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    Drosophila sex-linked recessive lethal mutation test was used to study the dose response relation and relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions. The experiments were performed using the heavy ion beams at BEVALAC of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. These experiments were undertaken according to the proposed milestones and included Ne-20, A-40 and Fe-65 ions with respective energies of 600 MeV, 840 MeV and 850 MeV. At these energies several doses of these radiations ranging from 20 to 1280 R were used. Space radiation exposure to astronauts is supposed to be quite low and therefore very low dose experiments i.e., 20 R, were also performed for the three ions. The mutation response was measured in all germ cell types i.e., spermatozoa, spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia of treated Drosophila males. A linear dose frequency relation was observed for most of the range except at high doses where the saturation effect was observed. Also, a very significant difference was observed among the sensitivity of the four germ cell stages where spermatozoa and spermatids were more sensitive. At the higher doses of this range, most of the spermatogonia and spermatocytes were killed. Although comparative and identical experiments with X-rays or neutrons have not been performed, the compassion of our data with the ones available in literature suggest that the heavy ions have a high rbe and that they are several times more effective than low LET X-rays. The rbe compared to neutrons however appears to be only slightly higher.

  10. Vitrification-based cryopreservation of Drosophila embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreuders, P.D.; Mazur, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Currently, over 30,000 strains of Drosophila melanogaster are maintained by geneticists through regular transfer of breeding stocks. A more cost effective solution is to cryopreserve their embryos. Cooling and warming rates >10,000{degrees}C/min. are required to prevent chilling injury. To avoid the lethal intracellular ice normally produced at such high cooling rates, it is necessary to use {ge}50% (w/w) concentrations of glass-inducing solutes to vitrify the embryos. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to develop and evaluate ethylene glycol and polyvinyl pyrrolidone based vitrification solutions. The resulting solution consists of 8.5M ethylene glycol + 10% polyvinylpyrrolidone in D-20 Drosophila culture medium. A two stage method is used for the introduction and concentration of these solutes within the embryo. The method reduces the exposure time to the solution and, consequently, reduces toxicity. Both DSC and freezing experiments suggest that, while twelve-hour embryos will vitrify using cooling rates >200{degrees}C/min., they will devitrify and be killed with even moderately rapid warming rates of {approximately}1,900{degrees}C/min. Very rapid warming ({approximately}100,000{degrees}C/min.) results in variable numbers of successfully cryopreserved embryos. This sensitivity to warming rite is typical of devitrification. The variability in survival is reduced using embryos of a precisely determined embryonic stage. The vitrification of the older, fifteen-hour, embryos yields an optimized hatching rate of 68%, with 35 - 40% of the resulting larvae developing to normal adults. This Success rite in embryos of this age may reflect a reduced sensitivity to limited devitrification or a more even distribution of the ethylene glycol within the embryo.

  11. The Evolution of Olfactory Gene Families in Drosophila and the Genomic Basis of chemical-Ecological Adaptation in Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Sukanya; Ometto, Lino; Crava, Cristina M.; Revadi, Santosh; Kaur, Rupinder; Horner, David S.; Pisani, Davide; Dekker, Teun; Anfora, Gianfranco; Rota-Stabelli, Omar

    2016-01-01

    How the evolution of olfactory genes correlates with adaption to new ecological niches is still a debated topic. We explored this issue in Drosophila suzukii, an emerging model that reproduces on fresh fruit rather than in fermenting substrates like most other Drosophila. We first annotated the repertoire of odorant receptors (ORs), odorant binding proteins (OBPs), and antennal ionotropic receptors (aIRs) in the genomes of two strains of D. suzukii and of its close relative Drosophila biarmipes. We then analyzed these genes on the phylogeny of 14 Drosophila species: whereas ORs and OBPs are characterized by higher turnover rates in some lineages including D. suzukii, aIRs are conserved throughout the genus. Drosophila suzukii is further characterized by a non-random distribution of OR turnover on the gene phylogeny, consistent with a change in selective pressures. In D. suzukii, we found duplications and signs of positive selection in ORs with affinity for short-chain esters, and loss of function of ORs with affinity for volatiles produced during fermentation. These receptors—Or85a and Or22a—are characterized by divergent alleles in the European and American genomes, and we hypothesize that they may have been replaced by some of the duplicated ORs in corresponding neurons, a hypothesis reciprocally confirmed by electrophysiological recordings. Our study quantifies the evolution of olfactory genes in Drosophila and reveals an array of genomic events that can be associated with the ecological adaptations of D. suzukii. PMID:27435796

  12. Device and packaging considerations for MMIC-based millimeter-wave quasi-optical amplifier arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolias, Nicholas J.; Kazior, Thomas E.; Chen, Yan; Wright, Warren

    1999-11-01

    Practical implementation of millimeter-wave quasi-optical amplifier arrays will require high device uniformity across the array, efficient coupling to and from each gain device, good device-to-device isolation, and efficient heat removal. This paper presents techniques that address these issues for a 44 GHz MMIC-based design. To improve device uniformity, a double selective gate recess approach is introduced which results in a demonstrated 3 - 5X improvement in uniformity when compared to Raytheon's standard production pHEMT process. For packaging, direct backside interconnect technology (DBIT) is introduced as a bondwire-free scheme for connecting each amplifier to the array. This approach significantly reduces interconnect loss by reducing interconnect inductance. Measured insertion loss at 44 GHz for the DBIt transition is 0.35 dB compared to 2.3 dB for a typical bondwire transition produced on a manufacturing automated bonding machine. By eliminating bondwires which tend to radiate at millimeter wave frequencies, the DBIT approach also significantly improves the device-to-device isolation, thereby improving the array stability. The DBIT approach would not be viable if it could not effectively dissipate heat (a typical 25 watt array generates greater than 100 watts of heat). Finite element thermal analysis results are presented which show that the DBIT approach adds a tolerable 15.5 degree(s)C temperature rise over a standard solder-based MMIC die-attach to a heatsink. Thus, the DBIT approach, along with the double selective gate recess process, provides an attractive, low-loss, bondwire-free approach for producing uniform amplifier arrays.

  13. Multi-state Comparison of Attractants for Monitoring Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Blueberries and Caneberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosophila suzukii, also referred to as the spotted wing drosophila, has recently and dramatically expanded its global range with significant consequences for its primary host crops: blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, cherries, and strawberries. D. suzukii populations can increase quickly, and ...

  14. Externally pumped millimeter-wave Josephson-junction parametric amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, M.T; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, Ole;

    1980-01-01

    A unified theory of the singly and doubly degenerate Josephson-junction parametric amplifier is presented. Experiments with single junctions on both amplifier modes at frequencies 10, 35, and 70 GHz are discussed. Low-noise temperature (∼100 K, single sideband (SSB)) and reasonable gain (∼8 dB) w...

  15. Solid-State Power Amplifier For 61.5 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael K.; Mcclymonds, James; Vye, David; Arthur, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Power amplifiers based on impact-avalanche-transit-time (IMPATT) diodes developed for operation in communication systems at frequencies near 60 GHz. Built in seven modular stages, power transferred through sections of waveguide and isolator/circulator assemblies. Intended as replacements for bulkier and heavier traveling-wave-tube amplifiers.

  16. Phase Sensitive Amplifier Based on Ultrashort Pump Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Gershikov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a narrow band phase sensitive amplifier in the pump degenerate configuration which employs ps pump pulses. Control of the amplifier bandwidth is achieved via changes of the pump spectral width. A phase sensitive gain between -6 and 6 decibels, with an overall system gain of 28dB was demonstrated.

  17. Design of vortex fluid amplifiers with asymmetrical flow fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, T. J.; Price, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    Variation of geometric parameters, including supply area, control area, chamber length, and outlet diameter, of a large scale, modular design vortex fluid amplifier with single supply and control jets, has confirmed and extended a previously published design method, developed for vortex amplifiers with symmetric flow fields. This allows application of the method to devices which are more representative of practical, production type components.

  18. Gain characteristics of a saturated fiber optic parametric amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Lorenzen, Michael Rodas; Noordegraaf, Danny;

    2008-01-01

    In this work we discuss saturation performance of a fiber optic parametric amplifier. A simple numerical model is described and applied to specific cases. A system experiment using a saturated amplifier illustrates a 4 dB improvement in required signal to noise ratio for a fixed bit error ratio....

  19. Optically amplifying planar glass waveguides: Laser on a chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldberg-Kjær, Søren Andreas

    The objective of this work was to devlop optically amplifying planar wavguides, using erbium-doped germano-silicate glass films deposited by PECVD (Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition). The waveguides should exhibit enough gain to be useful as optical amplifiers in integrated planar lightw...

  20. Band-Pass Amplifier Without Discrete Reactance Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L.

    1984-01-01

    Inherent or "natural" device capacitance exploited. Band-Pass Circuit has input impedance of equivalent circuit at frequencies much greater than operational-amplifier rolloff frequency. Apparent inductance and capacitance arise from combined effects of feedback and reactive component of amplifier gain in frequency range.