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Sample records for amphipod orchestia cavimana

  1. Ingestion and fragmentation of plastic carrier bags by the amphipod Orchestia gammarellus: Effects of plastic type and fouling load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, D J; Bréchon, A L; Thompson, R C

    2018-02-01

    Inappropriate disposal of plastic debris has led to the contamination of marine habitats worldwide. This debris can be ingested by organisms; however, the extent to which chewing and gut transit modifies plastic debris is unclear. Detritivores, such as amphipods, ingest and shred natural organic matter and are fundamental to its breakdown. Here we examine ingestion and shredding of plastic carrier bags by Orchestia gammarellus. A laboratory experiment showed these amphipods shredded plastic carrier bags, generating numerous microplastic fragments (average diameter 488.59μm). The presence of a biofilm significantly increased the amount of shredding, but plastic type (conventional, degradable and biodegradable) had no effect. Subsequent field observations confirmed similar shredding occurred on the strandline. Rates of shredding will vary according to amphipod density; however, our data indicates that shredding by organisms could substantially accelerate the formation microplastics in the environment. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diet and gut microbiota of two supralittoral amphipods Orchestia montagui and Talitrus saltator living in different microhabitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrhman, Khaled F. A.; Bacci, Giovanni; Nistri, Annamaria; Mengoni, Alessio; Ugolini, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    Talitrus saltator (Montagu) and Orchestia montagui Audouin live in different microhabitats of the same supralittoral belt. T. saltator can be found in the damp sand of beaches with scarce or absent wracked material near the water line. O. montagui is frequently found in the Posidonia banquettes or under wracked material, often in contact with the substrate. This study investigates the effect of diet on species-specific gut microbiota patterns in these talitrid species. Adults were collected and fed with artificial food (commercial fish food and pieces of blotting paper) for 51 days. Gut microbiota were analyzed at five time intervals (0 h, 24 h, 7, 23 and 51 days) by 16S rRNA gene metagenomic analysis and by estimating the relative abundance of cellulases (glycosyl hydrolase gene family 48, GHF48) gene copies. The gut microbiota of O. montagui was more affected than that of T. saltator by diet shift. Although the taxonomic profile of the gut microbiota varied with time in both species, with an increase of Protobacteria in O. montagui and of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes in T. saltator, genes involved in cellulose degradation (GHF48 family) showed a large-scale increase in O. montagui but not in T. saltator. We conclude that the diet variation has different influence on the composition of gut microbiota in the two talitrid species in accordance with their different alimentary habits: the more generalist T. saltator (detritivore, grazer, and scavenger) showed less changes in its gut microbiota composition than the more specialist O. montagui (detritivore and grazer), which strongly modified its gut microbiota composition by the captivity diet.

  3. Diversity and Distribution of Freshwater Amphipod Species in Switzerland (Crustacea: Amphipoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altermatt, Florian; Alther, Roman; Fišer, Cene; Jokela, Jukka; Konec, Marjeta; Küry, Daniel; Mächler, Elvira; Stucki, Pascal; Westram, Anja Marie

    2014-01-01

    Amphipods are key organisms in many freshwater systems and contribute substantially to the diversity and functioning of macroinvertebrate communities. Furthermore, they are commonly used as bioindicators and for ecotoxicological tests. For many areas, however, diversity and distribution of amphipods is inadequately known, which limits their use in ecological and ecotoxicological studies and handicaps conservation initiatives. We studied the diversity and distribution of amphipods in Switzerland (Central Europe), covering four major drainage basins, an altitudinal gradient of>2,500 m, and various habitats (rivers, streams, lakes and groundwater). We provide the first provisional checklist and detailed information on the distribution and diversity of all amphipod species from Switzerland. In total, we found 29 amphipod species. This includes 16 native and 13 non-native species, one of the latter (Orchestia cavimana) reported here for the first time for Switzerland. The diversity is compared to neighboring countries. We specifically discuss species of the genus Niphargus, which are often receiving less attention. We also found evidence of an even higher level of hidden diversity, and the potential occurrence of further cryptic species. This diversity reflects the biogeographic past of Switzerland, and suggests that amphipods are ideally suited to address questions on endemism and adaptive radiations, post-glaciation re-colonization and invasion dynamics as well as biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships in aquatic systems. PMID:25354099

  4. Amphipod family distributions around Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Brix

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphipod crustaceans were collected at all 55 stations sampled with an epibenthic sledge during two IceAGE expeditions (Icelandic marine Animals: Genetics and Ecology in 2011 and 2013. In total, 34 amphipod families and three superfamilies were recorded in the samples. Distribution maps are presented for each taxon along with a summary of the regional taxonomy for the group. Statistical analyses based on presence/absence data revealed a pattern of family distributions that correlated with sampling depth. Clustering according to the geographic location of the stations (northernmost North Atlantic Sea and Arctic Ocean can also be observed. IceAGE data for the Amphilochidae and Oedicerotidae were analysed on species level; in case of the Amphilochidae they were compared to the findings from a previous Icelandic benthic survey, BIOICE (Benthic Invertebrates of Icelandic waters, which also identified a high abundance of amphipod fauna.

  5. (Crustacés, Amphipodes) dans la

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enseignant1

    Fadil, 2006 (Crustacés, Amphipodes) dans la source Tataw (Moyen Atlas, Maroc) ... sous-espèces ou des formes locales multiples dans toute l'Europe centrale [3 - 10]. .... le pH, et la conductivité électrique ont été réalisées sur le terrain à l'aide ...

  6. Genetic connectivity between land and sea: the case of the beachflea Orchestia montagui (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Talitridae) in the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Laura; Tiedemann, Ralph; De Matthaeis, Elvira; Ketmaier, Valerio

    2013-04-25

    We examined patterns of genetic divergence in 26 Mediterranean populations of the semi-terrestrial beachflea Orchestia montagui using mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase subunit I), microsatellite (eight loci) and allozymic data. The species typically forms large populations within heaps of dead seagrass leaves stranded on beaches at the waterfront. We adopted a hierarchical geographic sampling to unravel population structure in a species living at the sea-land transition and, hence, likely subjected to dramatically contrasting forces. Mitochondrial DNA showed historical phylogeographic breaks among Adriatic, Ionian and the remaining basins (Tyrrhenian, Western and Eastern Mediterranean Sea) likely caused by the geological and climatic changes of the Pleistocene. Microsatellites (and to a lesser extent allozymes) detected a further subdivision between and within the Western Mediterranean and the Tyrrhenian Sea due to present-day processes. A pattern of isolation by distance was not detected in any of the analyzed data set. We conclude that the population structure of O. montagui is the result of the interplay of two contrasting forces that act on the species population genetic structure. On one hand, the species semi-terrestrial life style would tend to determine the onset of local differences. On the other hand, these differences are partially counter-balanced by passive movements of migrants via rafting on heaps of dead seagrass leaves across sites by sea surface currents. Approximate Bayesian Computations support dispersal at sea as prevalent over terrestrial regionalism.

  7. Hyperiid amphipods around the seamounts and islands off northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Sampaio de Souza

    Full Text Available Abstract Data collected on large-scale surveys around the seamounts and islands off northeastern Brazil provide information on the hyperiid amphipod populations. Thirty-six species were identified. Most of the species belong to the Infraorder Physocephalata, representing 21 genera and 13 families. Thirteen species (Vibilia australis, L. latissimus, L. macrophthalmus, L. schizogeneios, Phronima atlantica, Phrosina semilunata, Primno brevidens, Eupronoe minuta, Oxycephalus clause, Rhabdosoma whitei, Amphithyrus bispinosus, Leptocotis tenuirostris and Tetrathyrus forcipatus have not previously been recorded in this region. The spatial distribution of the hyperiid amphipods was very patchy. Each area of these amounts and islands off northeastern Brazil has different oceanographic features and can be characterised by a clearly defined group of most abundant species.

  8. Species associations among larval helminths in an amphipod intermediate host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, B S; Giari, L; Poulin, R

    2000-10-01

    Larval helminths that share the same intermediate host may or may not also share the same definitive hosts. If one or more of these helminth species can manipulate the phenotype of the intermediate host, there can be great advantages or severe costs for other helminths resulting from co-occurring with a manipulator, depending on whether they have the same definitive host or not. Among 2372 specimens of the amphipod Echinogammarus stammeri collected from the river Brenta, northern Italy, there was a positive association between two acanthocephalan species with the same fish definitive hosts, the relatively common Pomphorhynchus laevis and the much less prevalent Acanthocephalus clavula. The number of cystacanths of P. laevis per infected amphipod, which ranged from one to five, did not influence the likelihood that the amphipod would also host A. clavula. A third acanthocephalan species, Polymorphus minutus,which matures in birds, showed no association with either of the two other species. These results show that associations among helminth species in intermediate hosts are not random, and are instead the product of selection favouring certain pathways of transmission.

  9. An approach for in situ studies of deep-sea amphipods and their microbial gut flora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannasch, H. W.; Cuhel, R. L.; Wirsen, C. O.; Taylor, C. D.

    1980-10-01

    A technique has been developed and field-tested for the trapping, feeding, and timed incubation of amphipods on the deep-sea floor. Data obtained from experiments using radiolabeled foodstuffs indicate that shifts within the labeled fractions of the major biological polymers make it possible to distinguish between the metabolism of the amphipods and that of their intestinal microflora.

  10. CHRONIC EFFECTS OF THE HERBICIDE DIURON ON FRESHWATER CLADOCERANS,AMPHIPODS,MIDGES,MINNOWS,WORMS, AND SNAILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chronic effects of the herbicide diuron on survival and reproduction of Daphnia pulex, and survival and growth of the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midge Chironomus tentans, juvenile and embro/larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, annelid worms, Lumbriculus variegatus,...

  11. Development of a chronic sediment toxicity test for marine benthic amphipods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWitt, T.H.; Redmond, M.S.; Sewall, J.E.; Swartz, R.C.

    1992-12-01

    The results of the research effort culminated in the development of a research method for assessing the chronic toxicity of contaminated marine and estuarine sediments using the benthic amphipod, Leptocheirus plumulosus. The first chapter describes the efforts at collecting, handling, and culturing four estuarine amphipods from Chesapeake Bay, including L. plumulosus. This chapter includes maps of the distribution and abundance of these amphipods within Chesapeake Bay and methodologies for establishing cultures of amphipods which could be readily adopted by other laboratories. The second chapter reports the development of acute and chronic sediment toxicity test methods for L. plumulosus, its sensitivity to non-contaminant environmental variables, cadmium, two polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and contaminated sediment from Baltimore Harbor, MD. The third chapter reports the authors attempts to develop a chronic sediment toxicity test with Ampelisca abdita

  12. Life history and population dynamics of an estuarine amphipod, Eriopisa chilkensis Chilton (Gammaridae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aravind, N.P.; Sheeba, P.; Nair, K.K.C.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    Life history and Population Dynamics of an Estuarine Amphipod –Eriopisa chilkensis Chilton (Gammaridae) Nisha. P. Aravind, P. Sheeba, K.K.C. Nair and C.T.Achuthankutty* National Institute of Oceanography, Regional Centre, Cochin 682018, India... of laboratory data to the field suggests that E. chilkensis in Cochin estuary has a multivoltine life cycle. Key words: - Eriopisa chilkensis, Amphipoda, life cycle, population dynamics, Cochin estuary, India 2 1. Introduction Life-history traits of 214 amphipod...

  13. Synergistic impacts by an invasive amphipod and an invasive fish explain native gammarid extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggel, S; Brandner, J; Cerwenka, A F; Geist, J

    2016-07-14

    Worldwide freshwater ecosystems are increasingly affected by invasive alien species. In particular, Ponto-Caspian gobiid fishes and amphipods are suspected to have pronounced effects on aquatic food webs. However, there is a lack of systematic studies mechanistically testing the potential synergistic effects of invasive species on native fauna. In this study we investigated the interrelations between the invasive amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus and the invasive fish species Neogobius melanostomus in their effects on the native amphipod Gammarus pulex. We hypothesized selective predation by the fish as a driver for displacement of native species resulting in potential extinction of G. pulex. The survival of G. pulex in the presence of N. melanostomus in relation to the presence of D. villosus and availability of shelter was analyzed in the context of behavioural differences between the amphipod species. Gammarus pulex had a significantly higher susceptibility to predation by N. melanostomus compared to D. villosus in all experiments, suggesting preferential predation by this fish on native gammarids. Furthermore, the presence of D. villosus significantly increased the vulnerability of G. pulex to fish predation. Habitat structure was an important factor for swimming activity of amphipods and their mortality, resulting in a threefold decrease in amphipods consumed with shelter habitat structures provided. Behavioral differences in swimming activity were additionally responsible for higher predation rates on G. pulex. Intraguild predation could be neglected within short experimental durations. The results of this study provide evidence for synergistic effects of the two invasive Ponto-Caspian species on the native amphipod as an underlying process of species displacements during invasion processes. Prey behaviour and monotonous habitat structures additionally contribute to the decline of the native gammarid fauna in the upper Danube River and elsewhere.

  14. Conflict of interest between a nematode and a trematode in an amphipod host: Test of the "sabotage" hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Frédéric; Fauchier, Jerome; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    Microphallus papillorobustus is a manipulative trematode that induces strong behavioural alterations in the gamaridean amphipod Gammarus insensibilis, making the amphipod more vulnerable to predation by aquatic birds (definitive hosts). Conversely, the sympatric nematodeGammarinema gammari uses Gammarus insensibilis as a habitat and a source of nutrition. We investigated the conflict of interest between these two parasite species by studying the consequences of mixed infection on amphipod behaviour associated with the trematode. In the field, some amphipods infected by the trematode did not display the altered behaviour. These normal amphipods also had more nematodes, suggesting that the nematode overpowered the manipulation of the trematode, a strategy that would prolong the nematode's life. We hypothesize that sabotage of the trematode by the nematode would be an adaptive strategy for the nematode consistent with recent speculation about co-operation and conflict in manipulative parasites. A behavioural test conducted in the laboratory from naturally infected amphipods yielded the same result. However, exposing amphipods to nematodes did not negate or decrease the manipulation exerted by the trematode. Similarly, experimental elimination of nematodes from amphipods did not permit trematodes to manipulate behaviour. These experimental data do not support the hypothesis that the negative association between nematodes and manipulation by the trematode is a result of the "sabotage" hypothesis.

  15. Fluoride toxicity and bioaccumulation in the invasive amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus (Sowinsky, 1894): a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Cristina; Camargo, Julio A; Masiero, Luciano; Casellato, Sandra

    2010-11-01

    The tolerance of the invasive amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus to fluoride (F⁻) toxicity was examined via laboratory experiments. 96-h LC₅₀ and 240-h NOEC values were estimated to be 5.8 and 0.95 mg F⁻/L, respectively. Average whole-body fluoride content in control amphipods was 27.6 μg F⁻/g dry weight, whereas in exposed amphipods it ranged from 3,637 to 16,994 μg F⁻/g dry weight. All these results indicate that D. villosus is a very sensitive species to fluoride toxicity. Overall it is concluded that the potential risk of invasion for D. villosus in either natural or polluted freshwater ecosystems, exhibiting relatively high fluoride levels (at least ten-fold higher than the average freshwater background level of 0.15 mg F⁻/L), must be low.

  16. Reproductive biology and adaptability of the invasive alien freshwater Amphipod Crangonyx floridanus (Crustacea: Amphipoda, Crangonyctidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Koji; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Kuranishi, Ryoichi B; Kanada, Shoji

    2010-06-01

    We studied the reproductive biology and adaptability of the alien freshwater crangonyctid amphipod Crangonyx floridanus, currently inhabiting a large portion of Japan, both in the field and under controlled laboratory conditions. In the Chikuma River population of this alien amphipod, egg-bearing individuals were found throughout the year. In terms of egg maturation cycle, egg development (during embryogenesis), and egg count per ovipositional cycle, these amphipods display a very efficient reproductive system. This study also established their adaptability to a wide range of water temperatures (primarily 4-20 degrees C, however in some cases, these individuals are able to survive at up to 30 degrees C). C. floridanus's strong capacity to adapt to broad and variable environmental conditions is certainly contributing to its high rate of population increase, and rapid dispersion throughout Japan.

  17. Low dose TBT exposure decreases amphipod immunocompetence and reproductive fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Therese; Sundelin, Brita; Yang, Gongda; Ford, Alex T

    2011-01-17

    The antifouling agent tributyltin (TBT) is a highly toxic pollutant present in many aquatic ecosystems. Despite of regulations on the usage of TBT, it remains in high concentrations in sediments both in harbors and in off-shore sites. The toxicity of TBT in mollusks is well documented. However, adverse effects in other aquatic organisms, such as crustaceans, are less well known. This study is an effort to assess the effects of environmentally realistic concentrations of TBT on an ecologically important species in Swedish fresh and brackish water ecosystems, the benthic amphipod Monoporeia affinis. Field collected animals were exposed during gonad maturation to TBT (70 and 170 ng/g sediment d wt) for five weeks in static microcosms with natural sediment. Exposure concentrations were chosen to reflect effects at concentrations found in Swedish coastal sediment, but below expected effects on survival. TBT exposure resulted in a statistically significant adverse effect on oocyte viability and a doubling of the prevalence of microsporidian parasites in females, from 17% in the control to 34% in the 170 ng TBT/g sediment d wt exposure. No effects on survival were observed. Borderline significant effects were observed on male sexual maturation in the 70 ng TBT/g d wt exposure and on ecdysteroid levels in the 170 ng/g sediment d wt exposure. Both reproduction and parasite infection effects are of ecological importance since they have the potential to affect population viability in the field. This study gives further evidence to the connection between low dose contaminant exposure and increases in microsporidian parasite infection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genome Reduction in Psychromonas Species within the Gut of an Amphipod from the Ocean's Deepest Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weipeng; Tian, Ren-Mao; Sun, Jin; Bougouffa, Salim; Ding, Wei; Cai, Lin; Lan, Yi; Tong, Haoya; Li, Yongxin; Jamieson, Alan J; Bajic, Vladimir B; Drazen, Jeffrey C; Bartlett, Douglas; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Amphipods are the dominant scavenging metazoan species in the Mariana Trench, the deepest known point in Earth's oceans. Here the gut microbiota of the amphipod Hirondellea gigas collected from the Challenger and Sirena Deeps of the Mariana Trench were investigated. The 11 amphipod individuals included for analyses were dominated by Psychromonas , of which a nearly complete genome was successfully recovered (designated CDP1). Compared with previously reported free-living Psychromonas strains, CDP1 has a highly reduced genome. Genome alignment showed deletion of the trimethylamine N -oxide (TMAO) reducing gene cluster in CDP1, suggesting that the "piezolyte" function of TMAO is more important than its function in respiration, which may lead to TMAO accumulation. In terms of nutrient utilization, the bacterium retains its central carbohydrate metabolism but lacks most of the extended carbohydrate utilization pathways, suggesting the confinement of Psychromonas to the host gut and sequestration from more variable environmental conditions. Moreover, CDP1 contains a complete formate hydrogenlyase complex, which might be involved in energy production. The genomic analyses imply that CDP1 may have developed adaptive strategies for a lifestyle within the gut of the hadal amphipod H. gigas. IMPORTANCE As a unique but poorly investigated habitat within marine ecosystems, hadal trenches have received interest in recent years. This study explores the gut microbial composition and function in hadal amphipods, which are among the dominant carrion feeders in hadal habitats. Further analyses of a dominant strain revealed genomic features that may contribute to its adaptation to the amphipod gut environment. Our findings provide new insights into animal-associated bacteria in the hadal biosphere.

  19. Bioaccumulation of petroleum hydrocarbons in arctic amphipods in the oil development area of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Jerry M; Durell, Gregory S

    2012-04-01

    An objective of a multiyear monitoring program, sponsored by the US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management was to examine temporal and spatial changes in chemical and biological characteristics of the Arctic marine environment resulting from offshore oil exploration and development activities in the development area of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea. To determine if petroleum hydrocarbons from offshore oil operations are entering the Beaufort Sea food web, we measured concentrations of hydrocarbons in tissues of amphipods, Anonyx nugax, sediments, Northstar crude oil, and coastal peat, collected between 1999 and 2006 throughout the development area. Mean concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), saturated hydrocarbons (SHC), and sterane and triterpane petroleum biomarkers (StTr) were not significantly different in amphipods near the Northstar oil production facility, before and after it came on line in 2001, and in amphipods from elsewhere in the study area. Forensic analysis of the profiles (relative composition and concentrations) of the 3 hydrocarbon classes revealed that hydrocarbon compositions were different in amphipods, surface sediments where the amphipods were collected, Northstar crude oil, and peat from the deltas of 4 North Slope rivers. Amphipods and sediments contained a mixture of petrogenic, pyrogenic, and biogenic PAH. The SHC in amphipods were dominated by pristane derived from zooplankton, indicating that the SHC were primarily from the amphipod diet of zooplankton detritus. The petroleum biomarker StTr profiles did not resemble those in Northstar crude oil. The forensic analysis revealed that hydrocarbons in amphipod tissues were not from oil production at Northstar. Hydrocarbons in amphipod tissues were primarily from their diet and from river runoff and coastal erosion of natural diagenic and fossil terrestrial materials, including seep oils, kerogens, and peat. Offshore oil and gas exploration and development

  20. Independent colonization and extensive cryptic speciation of freshwater amphipods in the isolated groundwater springs of Australia's Great Artesian Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nicholas P; Adams, Mark; Austin, Andrew D

    2009-01-01

    The groundwater-dependent springs of the Great Artesian Basin (GAB) in arid inland Australia represent a unique and threatened ecosystem. These incredibly isolated springs support a diverse array of endemic flora and fauna. One of the common faunal groups in the GAB springs is the freshwater amphipods of the family Chiltoniidae. The morphological conservatism and taxonomic uncertainty associated with these amphipods has ensured their true biodiversity, phylogeographical history and evolutionary affinities have remained unknown. We have used mitochondrial DNA and allozyme data to unravel a complicated history of isolation, extinction and dispersal among spring amphipod populations across the GAB. The results provide evidence for multiple independent colonizations in the GAB springs, particularly within the Lake Eyre group of springs. The inclusion of a group of Western Australian (WA) stygobitic amphipods from populations up to 1500 km away found surprising evidence for a shared evolutionary history between stygobitic and GAB spring amphipods. Approximate dating of the diversity found between major clades suggests the majority of lineages originated in the late Miocene, around the time of the aridification of inland Australia. The large number of independent lineages and the close connection between GAB spring and WA stygobitic amphipods suggest that a significantly rich amphipod fauna existed in the much wetter environment that once existed in inland Australia. The results also provide evidence for a gross underestimation of the species diversity within the springs, with 12 putative species identified, a conclusion with significant implications for the ongoing conservation of the GAB springs.

  1. Shoaling of sergestid shrimp Acetes johni (Crustacea Decapoda: Sergestidae) associated with swarming of gammarid amphipods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.

    zooplankton standing stock (5.81 ml.m/3). The sergestid shrimps and gammarid amphipods formed 94.7% of the zooplankton population, the former constituting more than half of the biomass of the sample. Their numerical abundance decreased with depth. The adaptive...

  2. Diversity and distribution of hyperiid amphipods along a latitudinal transect in the Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burridge, A.K.; Tump, M.; Vonk, R.; Goetze, E.; Peijnenburg, K.T.C.A.

    2017-01-01

    As commensals and parasitoids of gelatinous plankton, hyperiid amphipods play unique and important ecological roles in pelagic food webs. Because the diversity and biogeography of this group in oceanic waters is poorly known, we examined diversity and distribution patterns of hyperiids along a

  3. Sympagic occurrence of Eusirid and Lysianassoid amphipods under Antarctic pack ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krapp, Rupert H.; Berge, Jorgen; Flores, Hauke; Gulliksen, Bjorn; Werner, Iris

    2008-01-01

    During three Antarctic expeditions (2004, ANT XXI-4 and XXII-2; 2006, ANT XXIII-6) with the German research icebreaker R/V Polarstern, six different amphipod species were recorded under the pack ice of the Weddell Sea and the Lazarev Sea. These cruises covered Austral autumn (April), summer

  4. Local anthropogenic contamination affects the fecundity and reproductive success of an Arctic amphipod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Lis; Fischer, Astrid; Strand, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    to clean site individuals. These results indicated a cost of living in highly contaminated environments in terms of reduced reproductive success. This study confirms the potential of the benthic amphipod O. pinguis as a bioindicator for assessments of reproductive effects of contaminants in the Arctic...

  5. Local anthropogenic contamination affects the fecundity and reproductive success of an Arctic amphipod

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bach, L.; Fischer, A.; Strand, J.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates whether adaptation to life in contaminated Arctic areas carries a cost for the populations in terms of reduced fecundity and reproductive success. The benthic amphipod, Orchomenella pinguis occurs in huge densities in both clean and contaminated sites. O. pinguis was

  6. Genome Reduction in Psychromonas Species within the Gut of an Amphipod from the Ocean’s Deepest Point

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng

    2018-04-25

    Amphipods are the dominant scavenging metazoan species in the Mariana Trench, the deepest known point in Earth\\'s oceans. Here the gut microbiota of the amphipod Hirondellea gigas collected from the Challenger and Sirena Deeps of the Mariana Trench were investigated. The 11 amphipod individuals included for analyses were dominated by Psychromonas, of which a nearly complete genome was successfully recovered (designated CDP1). Compared with previously reported free-living Psychromonas strains, CDP1 has a highly reduced genome. Genome alignment showed deletion of the trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) reducing gene cluster in CDP1, suggesting that the

  7. Genome Reduction in Psychromonas Species within the Gut of an Amphipod from the Ocean’s Deepest Point

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng; Tian, Ren-Mao; Sun, Jin; Bougouffa, Salim; Ding, Wei; Cai, Lin; Lan, Yi; Tong, Haoya; Li, Yongxin; Jamieson, Alan J.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.; Bartlett, Douglas; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Amphipods are the dominant scavenging metazoan species in the Mariana Trench, the deepest known point in Earth's oceans. Here the gut microbiota of the amphipod Hirondellea gigas collected from the Challenger and Sirena Deeps of the Mariana Trench were investigated. The 11 amphipod individuals included for analyses were dominated by Psychromonas, of which a nearly complete genome was successfully recovered (designated CDP1). Compared with previously reported free-living Psychromonas strains, CDP1 has a highly reduced genome. Genome alignment showed deletion of the trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) reducing gene cluster in CDP1, suggesting that the

  8. Phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of the groundwater-dwelling amphipod genus Pseudoniphargus (Crustacea), with emphasis on the Iberian species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notenboom, Jos

    1988-01-01

    Numerical phylogenetic methods are applied in order to arrive at synapomorphic similarities between species of the stygobiont amphipod genus Pseudoniphargus. Character polarity is assessed by comparison with the relevant outgroups Parapseudoniphargus and Allomelita, within a cluster of presumedly

  9. Patterns in benthic populations in the Milford Haven waterway following the 'Sea Empress' oil spill with special reference to amphipods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitik, Christopher C S; Robinson, Andrew W

    2003-09-01

    The macrobenthic fauna of the Milford Haven Waterway was studied in detail following the 'Sea Empress' oil spill in 1996. Contamination patterns indicated heaviest contamination of sediments by oil to have occurred in the lower reaches of the waterway, although water borne hydrocarbons are likely to have penetrated throughout the Haven. Generally, the communities showed little impact of contamination by oil, although some changes were evident at the population level. A decline in the amphipod fauna was observed throughout the Haven, with the genera Ampelisca and Harpinia and the family Isaeidae particularly affected. This was accompanied by increases in both the diversity and abundance of polychaete populations as opportunist species took advantage of the decline of the amphipod fauna. However, within five years of the spill the amphipod fauna has shown clear signs of recovery. The use of the polychaete/amphipod ratio as an indicator of oil pollution is discussed.

  10. Effects of light pollution on the emergent fauna of shallow marine ecosystems: Amphipods as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Barranco, Carlos; Hughes, Lauren Elizabeth

    2015-05-15

    Light pollution from coastal urban development is a widespread and increasing threat to biodiversity. Many amphipod species migrate between the benthos and the pelagic environment and light seems is a main ecological factor which regulates migration. We explore the effect of artificial lighting on amphipod assemblages using two kind of lights, LED and halogen, and control traps in shallow waters of the Great Barrier Reef. Both types of artificial light traps showed a significantly higher abundance of individuals for all species in comparison to control traps. LED lights showed a stronger effect over the amphipod assemblages, with these traps collecting a higher number of individuals and differing species composition, with some species showing a specific attraction to LED light. As emergent amphipods are a key ecological group in the shallow water environment, the impact of artificial light can affect the broader functioning of the ecosystem. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of two commonly used fungicides on the amphipod Austrochiltonia subtenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Hung T; Keough, Michael J; Long, Sara M; Pettigrove, Vincent J

    2017-03-01

    Fungicides are used widely in agriculture and have been detected in adjacent rivers and wetlands. However, relatively little is known about the potential effects of fungicides on aquatic organisms. The present study investigated the effects of 2 commonly used fungicides, the boscalid fungicide Filan ® and the myclobutanil fungicide Systhane ™ 400 WP, on life history traits (survival, growth, and reproduction) and energy reserves (lipid, protein, and glycogen content) of the amphipod Austrochiltonia subtenuis under laboratory conditions, at concentrations detected in aquatic environments. Amphipods were exposed to 3 concentrations of Filan (1 μg active ingredient [a.i.]/L, 10 μg a.i./L, and 40 μg a.i./L) and Systhane (0.3 μg a.i./L, 3 μg a.i./L, and 30 μg a.i./L) over 56 d. Both fungicides had similar effects on the amphipod at the organism level. Reproduction was the most sensitive endpoint, with offspring produced in controls but none produced in any of the fungicide treatments, and total numbers of gravid females in all fungicide treatments were reduced by up to 95%. Female amphipods were more sensitive than males in terms of growth. Systhane had significant effects on survival at all concentrations, whereas significant effects of Filan on survival were observed only at 10 μg a.i./L and 40 μg a.i./L. The effects of fungicides on energy reserves of the female amphipod were different. Filan significantly reduced amphipod protein content, whereas Systhane significantly reduced the lipid content. The present study demonstrates wide-ranging effects of 2 common fungicides on an ecologically important species that has a key role in trophic transfer and nutrient recycling in aquatic environments. These results emphasize the importance of considering the long-term effects of fungicides in the risk assessment of aquatic ecosystems. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:720-726. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  12. A dataset on the species composition of amphipods (Crustacea) in a Mexican marine national park: Alacranes Reef, Yucatan

    OpenAIRE

    Paz,Carlos; Simões,Nuno; Pech,Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Alacranes Reef was declared as a National Marine Park in 1994. Since then, many efforts have been made to inventory its biodiversity. However, groups such as amphipods have been underestimated or not considered when benthic invertebrates were inventoried. Here we present a dataset that contributes to the knowledge of benthic amphipods ( Crustacea , Peracarida ) from the inner lagoon habitats from the Alacranes Reef National Park, the largest coral reef ecosystem in the Gul...

  13. Studying the effect of CO2-induced acidification on sediment toxicity using acute amphipod toxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basallote, M Dolores; De Orte, Manoela R; DelValls, T Ángel; Riba, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage is increasingly being considered one of the most efficient approaches to mitigate the increase of CO2 in the atmosphere associated with anthropogenic emissions. However, the environmental effects of potential CO2 leaks remain largely unknown. The amphipod Ampelisca brevicornis was exposed to environmental sediments collected in different areas of the Gulf of Cádiz and subjected to several pH treatments to study the effects of CO2-induced acidification on sediment toxicity. After 10 days of exposure, the results obtained indicated that high lethal effects were associated with the lowest pH treatments, except for the Ría of Huelva sediment test. The mobility of metals from sediment to the overlying seawater was correlated to a pH decrease. The data obtained revealed that CO2-related acidification would lead to lethal effects on amphipods as well as the mobility of metals, which could increase sediment toxicity.

  14. Effect of uranium on growth and reproduction of the marine amphipod Allorchestes compressa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahsanullah, M.; Williams, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments on growth of the marine amphipod Allorchestes compressa Dana were carried out over four weeks, and both growth and reproduction were studied over three generations, each of which was exposed to uranium for approximately 10 wk. At 0.1 mg l -1 the uranium increased growth by 23%, as measured by the mean weight after 4 wk, and at 2 mg l -1 growth was reduced by 28% compared with the control. A. compressa accumulated uranium from sea water with a concentration factor of 10. There was no effect of uranium on the survival of amphipods or their progeny in the multiple-generation experiment, but the numbers of males, the sex ratio, and the respiration rate (measured on males only) at 1 mg l -1 were significantly lower than the control. A. compressa is shown to be a convenient species for the study of toxic effects on growth and reproduction using multiple-generation experiments. (orig.)

  15. Influence of bromide on the performance of the amphipod Hyalella azteca in reconstituted waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Chris D.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    Poor performance of the amphipod Hyalella azteca has been observed in exposures using reconstituted waters. Previous studies have reported success in H. azteca water-only exposures with the addition of relatively high concentrations of bromide. The present study evaluated the influence of lower environmentally representative concentrations of bromide on the response ofH. azteca in 42-d water-only exposures. Improved performance of H. azteca was observed in reconstituted waters with >0.02 mg Br/L.

  16. Assessing estuarine quality: A cost-effective in situ assay with amphipods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Haro, Monica; Acevedo, Pelayo; Pais-Costa, Antónia Juliana; Taggart, Mark A; Martins, Irene; Ribeiro, Rui; Marques, João Carlos

    2016-05-01

    In situ assays based on feeding depression can be powerful ecotoxicological tools that can link physiological organism-level responses to population and/or community-level effects. Amphipods are traditional target species for toxicity tests due to their high sensitivity to contaminants, availability in the field and ease of handling. However, cost-effective in situ assays based on feeding depression are not yet available for amphipods that inhabit estuarine ecosystems. The aim of this work was to assess a short-term in situ assay based on postexposure feeding rates on easily quantifiable food items with an estuarine amphipod. Experiments were carried out under laboratory conditions using juvenile Echinogammarus marinus as the target individual. When 60 Artemia franciscana nauplii (as prey) were provided per individual for a period of 30 min in dark conditions, feeding rates could be easily quantified. As an endpoint, postexposure feeding inhibition in E. marinus was more sensitive to cadmium contamination than mortality. Assay calibration under field conditions demonstrated the relevance of sediment particle size in explaining individual feeding rates in uncontaminated water bodies. An evaluation of the 48-h in situ bioassay based on postexposure feeding rates indicated that it is able to discriminate between unpolluted and polluted estuarine sites. Using the harmonized protocol described here, the in situ postexposure feeding assay with E. marinus was found to be a potentially useful, cost-effective tool for assessing estuarine sediment and water quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Drastic underestimation of amphipod biodiversity in the endangered Irano-Anatolian and Caucasus biodiversity hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katouzian, Ahmad-Reza; Sari, Alireza; Macher, Jan N; Weiss, Martina; Saboori, Alireza; Leese, Florian; Weigand, Alexander M

    2016-03-01

    Biodiversity hotspots are centers of biological diversity and particularly threatened by anthropogenic activities. Their true magnitude of species diversity and endemism, however, is still largely unknown as species diversity is traditionally assessed using morphological descriptions only, thereby ignoring cryptic species. This directly limits evidence-based monitoring and management strategies. Here we used molecular species delimitation methods to quantify cryptic diversity of the montane amphipods in the Irano-Anatolian and Caucasus biodiversity hotspots. Amphipods are ecosystem engineers in rivers and lakes. Species diversity was assessed by analysing two genetic markers (mitochondrial COI and nuclear 28S rDNA), compared with morphological assignments. Our results unambiguously demonstrate that species diversity and endemism is dramatically underestimated, with 42 genetically identified freshwater species in only five reported morphospecies. Over 90% of the newly recovered species cluster inside Gammarus komareki and G. lacustris; 69% of the recovered species comprise narrow range endemics. Amphipod biodiversity is drastically underestimated for the studied regions. Thus, the risk of biodiversity loss is significantly greater than currently inferred as most endangered species remain unrecognized and/or are only found locally. Integrative application of genetic assessments in monitoring programs will help to understand the true magnitude of biodiversity and accurately evaluate its threat status.

  18. Salinity modulates thermotolerance, energy metabolism and stress response in amphipods Gammarus lacustris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kseniya P. Vereshchagina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and salinity are important abiotic factors for aquatic invertebrates. We investigated the influence of different salinity regimes on thermotolerance, energy metabolism and cellular stress defense mechanisms in amphipods Gammarus lacustris Sars from two populations. We exposed amphipods to different thermal scenarios and determined their survival as well as activity of major antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase and parameters of energy metabolism (content of glucose, glycogen, ATP, ADP, AMP and lactate. Amphipods from a freshwater population were more sensitive to the thermal challenge, showing higher mortality during acute and gradual temperature change compared to their counterparts from a saline lake. A more thermotolerant population from a saline lake had high activity of antioxidant enzymes. The energy limitations of the freshwater population (indicated by low baseline glucose levels, downward shift of the critical temperature of aerobic metabolism and inability to maintain steady-state ATP levels during warming was observed, possibly reflecting a trade-off between the energy demands for osmoregulation under the hypo-osmotic condition of a freshwater environment and protection against temperature stress.

  19. A dataset on the species composition of amphipods (Crustacea) in a Mexican marine national park: Alacranes Reef, Yucatan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Ríos, Carlos E; Simões, Nuno; Pech, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Alacranes Reef was declared as a National Marine Park in 1994. Since then, many efforts have been made to inventory its biodiversity. However, groups such as amphipods have been underestimated or not considered when benthic invertebrates were inventoried. Here we present a dataset that contributes to the knowledge of benthic amphipods (Crustacea, Peracarida) from the inner lagoon habitats from the Alacranes Reef National Park, the largest coral reef ecosystem in the Gulf of Mexico. The dataset contains information on records collected from 2009 to 2011. Data are available through Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). A total of 110 amphipod species distributed in 93 nominal species and 17 generic species, belonging to 71 genera, 33 families and three suborders are presented here. This information represents the first online dataset of amphipods from the Alacranes Reef National Park. The biological material is currently deposited in the crustacean collection from the regional unit of the National Autonomous University of Mexico located at Sisal, Yucatan, Mexico (UAS-Sisal). The biological material includes 588 data records with a total abundance of 6,551 organisms. The species inventory represents, until now, the richest fauna of benthic amphipods registered from any discrete coral reef ecosystem in Mexico.

  20. Transcriptome-based phylogeny of endemic Lake Baikal amphipod species flock: fast speciation accompanied by frequent episodes of positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, Sergey A; Logacheva, Maria D; Popova, Nina V; Klepikova, Anna V; Penin, Aleksey A; Bazykin, Georgii A; Etingova, Anna E; Mugue, Nikolai S; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Yampolsky, Lev Y

    2017-01-01

    Endemic species flocks inhabiting ancient lakes, oceanic islands and other long-lived isolated habitats are often interpreted as adaptive radiations. Yet molecular evidence for directional selection during species flocks radiation is scarce. Using partial transcriptomes of 64 species of Lake Baikal (Siberia, Russia) endemic amphipods and two nonendemic outgroups, we report a revised phylogeny of this species flock and analyse evidence for positive selection within the endemic lineages. We confirm two independent invasions of amphipods into Baikal and demonstrate that several morphological features of Baikal amphipods, such as body armour and reduction in appendages and sensory organs, evolved in several lineages in parallel. Radiation of Baikal amphipods has been characterized by short phylogenetic branches and frequent episodes of positive selection which tended to be more frequent in the early phase of the second invasion of amphipods into Baikal when the most intensive diversification occurred. Notably, signatures of positive selection are frequent in genes encoding mitochondrial membrane proteins with electron transfer chain and ATP synthesis functionality. In particular, subunits of both the membrane and substrate-level ATP synthases show evidence of positive selection in the plankton species Macrohectopus branickii, possibly indicating adaptation to active plankton lifestyle and to survival under conditions of low temperature and high hydrostatic pressures known to affect membranes functioning. Other functional categories represented among genes likely to be under positive selection include Ca-binding muscle-related proteins, possibly indicating adaptation to Ca-deficient low mineralization Baikal waters. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Faunal diversity of the benthic amphipods (Crustacea of the Magellan region as compared to the Antarctic (preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude de Broyer

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the marine benthic ecosystems of the Magellan region and to compare them with the better known Antarctic systems, three campaigns were recently carried out in this area: the Joint Magellan Victor Hensen Campaign 1994, the Polarstern ANT XIII/4 cruise 1996, and the Vidal Gormaz CIMAR FIORDO II cruise 1996. Numerous and diverse zoobenthos samples were collected mostly with an Agassiz trawl and with a small dredge, an epibenthic sledge, with baited traps or by diving. All gears together gathered more than 132,000 specimens of gammaridean and caprellidean amphipods. 137 species of gammaridean amphipods have been identified from the material to date. About 20% of these species appear to be new for science. This taxonomic work takes place in the framework of a general revision of the Southern Ocean amphipod fauna undertaken by theAntarctic Amphipodologists Network. A complete list of the benthic species of gammaridean and caprellidean amphipods is presented, including the zoogeographical distribution and the new records. The new abundant material collected, still under study, will allow a comparison of faunal diversity, zoogeographical and ecological traits of the Magellan benthic amphipod taxocoenoses with those of the West and East Antarctic benthos.

  2. Mechanisms regulating amphipod population density within macroalgal communities with low predator impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartvig Christie

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In eight mesocosms (land based basins macroalgae communities with associated fauna were transplanted from the sea and established during two years. Then, different doses of nutrients (N and P were added to the basins throughout the following three years. During the period of nutrient addition, macroinvertebrate grazers showed seasonal fluctuations with densities usually between 500,000 and 1 million individuals per mesocosm during summer and to a level of about 100,000 during winter. The macroinvertebrate grazers mainly consisted of about 10 species of amphipods and isopods, among which the amphipod Gammarus locusta dominated strongly by biomass. Although the number of predators was very low, the grazer populations never reached a density where considerable grazing impact could be found on the macroalgae. No increase in grazer density was found in the basins with improved nutrient conditions. Thus food quality may be insufficient for further population growth, or density dependant regulation mechanisms may have prevented the grazers from flourishing and overgrazing the system. In aquarium experiments we showed that G. locusta could grow and reproduce on Fucus serratus, Ulva lactuca, periphyton and detritus, and that cannibalism by adult G. locusta on juveniles may have great impact on the population growth. The basins were run with a water flow through system. Nets were placed in front of the inflow and outflow tubes to measure immigration and emigration. Only few individuals (and no Gammarus sp. were recorded in the inflowing water, while high numbers of both amphipods and isopods were found in the outflowing water. Emigration reached peak values during night-time, and it was then two to three times as high as during day-time. Emigration of mobile grazers from the basins amounted to 1-2% of the standing stock daily. These mechanisms that regulate grazers do contribute to maintenance of the seaweed dominance and thus the stability of the seaweed

  3. Active biomonitoring for assessing effects of metal polluted sediment resuspension on gammarid amphipods during fluvial traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prygiel, E; Billon, G; François, A; Dumoulin, D; Chaumot, A; Geffard, O; Criquet, J; Prygiel, J

    2016-11-01

    The resuspension of polluted sediments by boat traffic could release substantial amounts of metals to the water column, affecting at the same time their bioavailability. In order to characterize the impact of sediment resuspensions on biota, caged amphipods have been deployed on three different channelized watercourses in Northern France. Firstly, the biological responses of transplanted freshwater gammarid amphipods, Gammarus fossarum, described by trace metal accumulation, feeding and reproduction activities were quite similar for the three water courses despite the differences of metal contamination and navigability. Secondly, the concentrations of metals accumulated in gammarids never exceeded the contamination thresholds previously defined for Co, Cu, Cr and Zn. Values were in the same order of magnitude whatever the studied site despite: (i) large differences noticed in the sediment quality and (ii) some concentrations in the overlying waters exceeding the Environmental Quality Standards (EQS) defined by the Water Framework Directive. Conversely, Pb was highly bioaccumulated with values systematically exceeding the threshold value whatever the site. Therefore, the impact of navigation cannot be proved and the difference between the 3 monitoring periods is rather attributed to environmental variability, probably linked to the seasonality. Moreover, this study also confirms that organisms sampled from a local population in the vicinity of the three studied watercourses could be used as test organisms, leading to similar results than the ones obtained with reference gammarids initially used for developing all the biological responses. This would simplify and then promote the development of studies based on gammarid amphipod, G. fossarum, as bioindicators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The subtle effects of sea water acidification on the amphipod Gammarus locusta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We report an investigation of the effects of increases in pCO2 on the survival, growth and molecular physiology of the neritic amphipod Gammarus locusta which has a cosmopolitan distribution in estuaries. Amphipods were reared from juvenile to mature adult in laboratory microcosms at three different levels of pH in nominal range 8.1–7.6. Growth rate was estimated from weekly measures of body length. At sexual maturity the amphipods were sacrificed and assayed for changes in the expression of genes coding for a heat shock protein (hsp70 gene and the metabolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapdh gene. The data show that the growth and survival of this species is not significantly impacted by a decrease in sea water pH of up to 0.5 units. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that there was no significant effect of growth in acidified sea water on the sustained expression of the hsp70 gene. There was a consistent and significant increase in the expression of the gapdh gene at a pH of ~7.5 which, when combined with observations from other workers, suggests that metabolic changes may occur in response to acidification. It is concluded that sensitive assays of tissue physiology and molecular biology should be routinely employed in future studies of the impacts of sea water acidification as subtle effects on the physiology and metabolism of coastal marine species may be overlooked in conventional gross "end-point" studies of organism growth or mortality.

  5. Toxicity of sediment cores collected from the Ashtabula River in northeastern Ohio, USA, to the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Kemble, N.E.; Kunz, J.L.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; MacDonald, D.D.; Smorong, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to support a Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration project associated with the Ashtabula River in Ohio. The objective of the study was to evaluate the chemistry and toxicity of 50 sediment samples obtained from five cores collected from the Ashtabula River (10 samples/core, with each 10-cm-diameter core collected to a total depth of about 150 cm). Effects of chemicals of potential concern (COPCs) measured in the sediment samples were evaluated by measuring whole-sediment chemistry and whole-sediment toxicity in the sediment samples (including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], organochlorine pesticides, and metals). Effects on the amphipod Hyalella azteca at the end of a 28-day sediment toxicity test were determined by comparing survival or length of amphipods in individual sediment samples in the cores to the range of responses of amphipods exposed to selected reference sediments that were also collected from the cores. Mean survival or length of amphipods was below the lower limit of the reference envelope in 56% of the sediment samples. Concentrations of total PCBs alone in some samples or concentrations of total PAHs alone in other samples were likely high enough to have caused the reduced survival or length of amphipods (i.e., concentrations of PAHs or PCBs exceeded mechanistically based and empirically based sediment quality guidelines). While elevated concentrations of ammonia in pore water may have contributed to the reduced length of amphipods, it is unlikely that the reduced length was caused solely by elevated ammonia (i.e., concentrations of ammonia were not significantly correlated with the concentrations of PCBs or PAHs and concentrations of ammonia were elevated both in the reference sediments and in the test sediments). Results of this study show that PAHs, PCBs, and ammonia are the primary COPCs that are likely causing or substantially contributing to the toxicity to

  6. Genome Reduction in Psychromonas Species within the Gut of an Amphipod from the Ocean’s Deepest Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weipeng; Tian, Ren-Mao; Sun, Jin; Bougouffa, Salim; Ding, Wei; Cai, Lin; Lan, Yi; Tong, Haoya; Li, Yongxin; Jamieson, Alan J.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.; Bartlett, Douglas

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Amphipods are the dominant scavenging metazoan species in the Mariana Trench, the deepest known point in Earth’s oceans. Here the gut microbiota of the amphipod Hirondellea gigas collected from the Challenger and Sirena Deeps of the Mariana Trench were investigated. The 11 amphipod individuals included for analyses were dominated by Psychromonas, of which a nearly complete genome was successfully recovered (designated CDP1). Compared with previously reported free-living Psychromonas strains, CDP1 has a highly reduced genome. Genome alignment showed deletion of the trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) reducing gene cluster in CDP1, suggesting that the “piezolyte” function of TMAO is more important than its function in respiration, which may lead to TMAO accumulation. In terms of nutrient utilization, the bacterium retains its central carbohydrate metabolism but lacks most of the extended carbohydrate utilization pathways, suggesting the confinement of Psychromonas to the host gut and sequestration from more variable environmental conditions. Moreover, CDP1 contains a complete formate hydrogenlyase complex, which might be involved in energy production. The genomic analyses imply that CDP1 may have developed adaptive strategies for a lifestyle within the gut of the hadal amphipod H. gigas. IMPORTANCE As a unique but poorly investigated habitat within marine ecosystems, hadal trenches have received interest in recent years. This study explores the gut microbial composition and function in hadal amphipods, which are among the dominant carrion feeders in hadal habitats. Further analyses of a dominant strain revealed genomic features that may contribute to its adaptation to the amphipod gut environment. Our findings provide new insights into animal-associated bacteria in the hadal biosphere. PMID:29657971

  7. Ontogenetic variability in the feeding behavior of a marine amphipod in response to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Samanta; Duarte, Cristian; López, Jorge; Manríquez, Patricio H; Navarro, Jorge M; Bonta, Cesar C; Torres, Rodrigo; Quijón, Pedro A

    2016-11-15

    Global stressors like ocean acidification (OA) are expected to influence the quality or palatability of primary producers like algae. Such changes can trigger a response on algal consumers' feeding strategies, and this response may not necessarily be the same for the consumers during the ontogeny. We used a mesocosm's system to expose algae to current and projected OA conditions (390 and 1000ppm, respectively) and then compared the feeding behavior and absorption efficiency of juvenile and adult stages of the amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata. Specifically, we measured consumption rates (with and without a choice) and absorption efficiency on algae exposed and not exposed to OA. Our results show that OA affect the amphipod's consumption and feeding preferences, and that these effects were related with the analyzed ontogenetic stage (juveniles versus adults). These results support the existence of an ontogenetic change in the response of this species and others similar marine invertebrates to OA, which highlight the need to incorporate different life stages in the study of OA or others global stressors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sediment toxicity testing with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita in Calcasieu Estuary, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, M.S.; Crocker, P.A.; McKenna, K.M.; Petrocelli, E.A.; Scott, K.J.; Demas, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Discharges from chemical and petrochemical manufacturing facilities have contaminated portions of Louisiana's Calcasieu River estuary with a variety of organic and inorganic contaminants. As part of a special study, sediment toxicity testing was conducted to assess potential impact to the benthic community. Ten-day flow-through sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita revealed significant toxicity at 68% (26 of 38) of the stations tested. A. abdita mortality was highest in the effluent-dominated bayous, which are tributaries to the Calcasieu River. Mortality was correlated with total heavy metal and total organic compound concentrations in the sediments. Ancillary experiments showed that sediment interstitial water salinity as low as 2.5 o/o-o did not significantly affect A. abdita's, response in the flow-through system; sediment storage for 7 weeks at 4??C did not significantly affect toxicity. Sediment toxicity to A. abdita was more prevalent than receiving water toxicity using three short-term chronic bioassays. Results suggest that toxicity testing using this amphipod is a valuable tool when assessing sediments containing complex contaminant mixtures and for assessing effects of pollutant loading over time. In conjunction with chemical analyses, the testing indicated that the effluent-dominated, brackish bayous (Bayou d'Inde and Bayou Verdine) were the portions of the estuary most impacted by toxicity.

  9. In situ radionuclide transfers in the deep-sea Lysianassidae amphipod Eurythenes gryllus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmet, D.; Charmasson, S.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies at the NEA dumpsite confirmed the existence of the scavenging amphipod Eurythenes gryllus. The aim of this study was to inquire if, under deep-sea conditions of low temperature and high pressure, this species of crustacean would retain artificial radionuclides in the same organ as those observed in similar coastal species of the same family. This necrophagous species is easily attracted by bait. It can ingest 30 to 60% of its body weight in 30 ± 10 min. In addition, this species can store ingested food for several weeks. Thus, the ingestion of radiolabelled food over a period of several days could be considered as a single-meal contamination experiment. For all these reasons Eurythenes gryllus appeared to be a good test animal to compare laboratory experiments on coastal species with in situ radionuclide retention studies on deep-sea fauna. In order to prevent any disturbance of their physiological conditions, a special device was used to attract and feed the animals with radiolabelled baits, in situ at a depth of 4000 m, rather than recovering amphipods without decompression and keeping them alive aboard ship. Qualitatively speaking results yielded by in situ experiments support those obtained from laboratory studies with coastal animals and the same radionuclides

  10. The diversity and antibiotic properties of actinobacteria associated with endemic deepwater amphipods of Lake Baikal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protasov, Eugenii S; Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V; Rebets, Yuriy V; Voytsekhovskaya, Irina V; Tokovenko, Bogdan T; Shatilina, Zhanna M; Luzhetskyy, Andriy N; Timofeyev, Maxim A

    2017-12-01

    The emergence of pathogenic bacteria resistant to antibiotics increases the need for discovery of new effective antimicrobials. Unique habitats such as marine deposits, wetlands and caves or unexplored biological communities are promising sources for the isolation of actinobacteria, which are among the major antibiotic producers. The present study aimed at examining cultivated actinobacteria strains associated with endemic Lake Baikal deepwater amphipods and estimating their antibiotic activity. We isolated 42 actinobacterial strains from crustaceans belonging to Ommatogammarus albinus and Ommatogammarus flavus. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the isolation and initial characterization of representatives of Micromonospora and Pseudonocardia genera from Baikal deepwater invertebrates. Also, as expected, representatives of the genus Streptomyces were the dominant group among the isolated species. Some correlations could be observed between the number of actinobacterial isolates, the depth of sampling and the source of the strains. Nevertheless, >70% of isolated strains demonstrated antifungal activity. The dereplication analysis of extract of one of the isolated strains resulted in annotation of several known compounds that can help to explain the observed biological activities. The characteristics of ecological niche and lifestyle of deepwater amphipods suggests that the observed associations between crustaceans and isolated actinobacteria are not random and might represent long-term symbiotic interactions.

  11. Phototoxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles to a freshwater benthic amphipod: are benthic systems at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated phototoxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) to a freshwater benthic amphipod (Hyalella azteca) using 48-h and 96-h bioassays. Thorough monitoring of particle interactions with exposure media (Lake Superior water, LSW) and the surface of organisms was p...

  12. Aspects of mast building and the fine structure of “amphipod silk” glands in Dyopedos bispinis (Amphipoda, Dulichiidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neretin, N.Y.; Zhadan, A.E.; Tzetlin, A.B.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the biology of Dyopedos bispinis, a mast-building amphipod that is abundant near the N. Pertsov White Sea Biological Station. To examine the peculiarities of mast building in Dyopedos bispinis, we studied the social structure of individuals inhabiting the masts

  13. Sensitivity of the deep-sea amphipod Eurythenes gryllus to chemically dispersed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Gro Harlaug; Coquillé, Nathalie; Le Floch, Stephane; Geraudie, Perrine; Dussauze, Matthieu; Lemaire, Philippe; Camus, Lionel

    2016-04-01

    In the context of an oil spill accident and the following oil spill response, much attention is given to the use of dispersants. Dispersants are used to disperse an oil slick from the sea surface into the water column generating a cloud of dispersed oil droplets. The main consequence is an increasing of the sea water-oil interface which induces an increase of the oil biodegradation. Hence, the use of dispersants can be effective in preventing oiling of sensitive coastal environments. Also, in case of an oil blowout from the seabed, subsea injection of dispersants may offer some benefits compared to containment and recovery of the oil or in situ burning operation at the sea surface. However, biological effects of dispersed oil are poorly understood for deep-sea species. Most effects studies on dispersed oil and also other oil-related compounds have been focusing on more shallow water species. This is the first approach to assess the sensitivity of a macro-benthic deep-sea organism to dispersed oil. This paper describes a toxicity test which was performed on the macro-benthic deep-sea amphipod (Eurythenes gryllus) to determine the concentration causing lethality to 50% of test individuals (LC50) after an exposure to dispersed Brut Arabian Light (BAL) oil. The LC50 (24 h) was 101 and 24 mg L(-1) after 72 h and 12 mg L(-1) at 96 h. Based on EPA scale of toxicity categories to aquatic organisms, an LC50 (96 h) of 12 mg L(-1) indicates that the dispersed oil was slightly to moderately toxic to E. gryllus. As an attempt to compare our results to others, a literature study was performed. Due to limited amount of data available for dispersed oil and amphipods, information on other crustacean species and other oil-related compounds was also collected. Only one study on dispersed oil and amphipods was found, the LC50 value in this study was similar to the LC50 value of E. gryllus in our study. Since toxicity data are important input to risk assessment and net environmental

  14. Effects of temperature and salinity on the development of the amphipod crustacean Eogammarus sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Suyan; Fang, Jianguang; Zhang, Jihong; Jiang, Zengjie; Mao, Yuze; Zhao, Fazhen

    2013-09-01

    The amphipod crustacean Eogammarus sinensis has useful features that make it suitable for use in the aquaculture of fish and large decapod crustaceans. In this study, we investigated the effects of temperature and salinity on the development, fecundity, survival, and growth rate of E. sinensis. The results show that temperature significantly affected E. sinensis development, but salinity. As temperature increased, the duration of E. sinensis embryonic development decreased. Fecundity was affected significantly by temperature and the combination of temperature and salinity, but by salinity alone. In addition, high temperatures accelerated E. sinensis juvenile growth rates, whereas high salinity reduced it. Therefore, our data suggest that E. sinensis tolerates a wide range of salinities and that temperature has more significant effects than salinity on the embryonic development, fecundity, and growth of E. sinensis. Our results shall be useful for mass production of this species for use in aquaculture.

  15. Studies on the Biology of the Tube-Building Amphipod Microdeutopus gryllotalpa. A Model for Marine Fouling Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    two pairs of chelae to carry the females. But, in addition, males of different genera carry their females in different, but highly stereotyped ways...173 (1980) Shillaker. R. 0. and P. G. Moore: Tube building by the amphipods Lang. K.: The genus Oosaccus Richardson and the brood pouch Lembos...from three genera, has shown that the smaller pair is used. In addition, the use of theme gnathopods is highly stereotyped , and generic-specific

  16. Genetic and life-history trait variation of the amphipod Melita plumulosa from polluted and unpolluted waterways in eastern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Pann Pann; Hyne, Ross V.; Mann, Reinier M.; Ballard, J. William O.

    2008-01-01

    To monitor genetic diversity and environmental contamination in eastern Australia, toxicity studies have employed the sensitive benthic amphipod Melita plumulosa. The goal of this study was to examine the genetic and life-history variability of natural populations of M. plumulosa from the Parramatta (polluted) and Hawkesbury (unpolluted) Rivers. The underlying genetics of the populations in these distinct waterways was examined at one mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)) and one nuclear (ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1)) locus. Seven unique haplotypes for COI were found amongst animals from the Parramatta River, while animals from the Hawkesbury River showed a complete absence of genetic variation at this locus. At ITS1 a total of two sequence variants were found amongst Parramatta River amphipods and three sequence variants among Hawkesbury River animals, with no common variants across the two river systems. To establish whether genetic differences were associated with organismal responses to toxicant exposure, two life-history trait variables (female head length as an estimator of amphipod size and female fecundity) were analyzed. Life-history trait analyses showed that females from the Hawkesbury River were significantly larger and more fecund. These data have critical implications for toxicity tests, the use of laboratory cultures for testing purposes, and environmental contamination in Sydney Harbor

  17. Genetic and life-history trait variation of the amphipod Melita plumulosa from polluted and unpolluted waterways in eastern Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Pann Pann [Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Hyne, Ross V. [Ecotoxicology and Environmental Contaminants Section, NSW Department of Environment and Climate Change, PO Box 29, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Mann, Reinier M. [Centre for Ecotoxicology, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Technology-Sydney, C/-PO Box 29, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Ballard, J. William O. [Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)], E-mail: w.ballard@unsw.edu.au

    2008-09-15

    To monitor genetic diversity and environmental contamination in eastern Australia, toxicity studies have employed the sensitive benthic amphipod Melita plumulosa. The goal of this study was to examine the genetic and life-history variability of natural populations of M. plumulosa from the Parramatta (polluted) and Hawkesbury (unpolluted) Rivers. The underlying genetics of the populations in these distinct waterways was examined at one mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)) and one nuclear (ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1)) locus. Seven unique haplotypes for COI were found amongst animals from the Parramatta River, while animals from the Hawkesbury River showed a complete absence of genetic variation at this locus. At ITS1 a total of two sequence variants were found amongst Parramatta River amphipods and three sequence variants among Hawkesbury River animals, with no common variants across the two river systems. To establish whether genetic differences were associated with organismal responses to toxicant exposure, two life-history trait variables (female head length as an estimator of amphipod size and female fecundity) were analyzed. Life-history trait analyses showed that females from the Hawkesbury River were significantly larger and more fecund. These data have critical implications for toxicity tests, the use of laboratory cultures for testing purposes, and environmental contamination in Sydney Harbor.

  18. Molecular adaptation in the world's deepest-living animal: Insights from transcriptome sequencing of the hadal amphipod Hirondellea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yi; Sun, Jin; Tian, Renmao; Bartlett, Douglas H; Li, Runsheng; Wong, Yue Him; Zhang, Weipeng; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Xu, Ting; He, Li-Sheng; Tabata, Harry G; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2017-07-01

    The Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench is the deepest point in the oceans of our planet. Understanding how animals adapt to this harsh environment characterized by high hydrostatic pressure, food limitation, dark and cold is of great scientific interest. Of the animals dwelling in the Challenger Deep, amphipods have been captured using baited traps. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptome of the amphipod Hirondellea gigas collected at a depth of 10,929 m from the East Pond of the Challenger Deep. Assembly of these sequences resulted in 133,041 contigs and 22,046 translated proteins. Functional annotation of these contigs was made using the go and kegg databases. Comparison of these translated proteins with those of four shallow-water amphipods revealed 10,731 gene families, of which 5659 were single-copy orthologs. Base substitution analysis on these single-copy orthologs showed that 62 genes are positively selected in H. gigas, including genes related to β-alanine biosynthesis, energy metabolism and genetic information processing. For multiple-copy orthologous genes, gene family expansion analysis revealed that cold-inducible proteins (i.e., transcription factors II A and transcription elongation factor 1) as well as zinc finger domains are expanded in H. gigas. Overall, our results indicate that genetic adaptation to the hadal environment by H. gigas may be mediated by both gene family expansion and amino acid substitutions of specific proteins. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Amphipod and Sea Urchin tests to assess the toxicity of Mediterranean sediments: the case of Portmán Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cesar

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The sediment formed by the tailings of an abandoned mine, which discharged into Portmán Bay, Murcia, SE-Spain, was tested to establish a possible gradient of heavy metals. The results were compared with tolerance limits of what was calculated from control sites. Whole sediment toxicity tests were performed on two amphipod species, Gammarus aequicauda and Microdeutopus gryllotalpa, while sediment-water interface and porewater toxicity tests were performed on three sea urchins species, Arbacia lixula, Paracentrotus lividus and Sphaerechinus granularis. The sensitivity of these marine organisms was evaluated by exposure tests using the reference substances: ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, cadmium chloride (CdCl2, potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7, sodium dodecyl sulfate (C12H25NaO4S and zinc sulfate (ZnSO4. The concentration of heavy metals decreased along the pollution gradient. Amphipod 10 day acute toxicity tests clearly demonstrated the gradient of toxicity. The sediment-water interface tests conducted with sea urchins also pointed to a pollution gradient and were more sensitive than the tests involving amphipods.

  20. Differential susceptibility of horizontal and vertical swimming activity to cadmium exposure in a gammaridean amphipod (Gammarus lawrencianus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, W.G.; Estephan, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this study two indices of swimming behavior (horizontal and vertical swimming activity) in a gammaridean amphipod (Gammarus lawrencianus) were examined for their sensitivity to Cd exposure. G. lawrencianus were exposed for 72 h to a variety of Cd concentrations [background (∼12), 62, 125, 250 and 500 μg l -1 ] at 20 ppt. Subsequent to exposure, video surveillance of survivors held within grooved rings or clear boxes was used to assess horizontal swimming activity (percentage of time mobile) and vertical swimming activity (number of surfacings), respectively. Results show that control amphipods were quite active, being mobile ∼61% of the time, with horizontal swimming activity decreasing (P -1 . Vertical swimming activity in amphipods was also impacted by Cd exposure (P -1 ) and 62 μg l -1 (60 versus ∼26 surfacings, respectively), which is approximately four-fold lower than the estimated 72 h LC 50 (250 μg l -1 ) for G. lawrencianus. Based on fluid dynamic considerations, it is speculated that of the two behaviors, vertical swimming activity is more sensitive to Cd exposure because of the presumed greater energetic costs associated with producing enough thrust to attain the lift required to make a vertical ascent into the water

  1. Uptake and effects of americium-241 on a brackish-water amphipod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppenheit, M.; Murray, C.N.; Woodhead, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of experimental work undertaken using the brackish-water amphipod Gammarus duebeni duebeni and the transuranium nuclide americium-241. Data on the accumulation of this actinide showed that the larger fraction of the total body burden is associated with the exoskeleton. It was found that the body burden remained constant in the range pH 8.0-6.5 even though the water concentration changed markedly. It would thus appear that the concept of a concentration factor should be re-examined and it is proposed that a factor should be defined in terms of environmental and chemical parameters which represent the bioavailable fraction of the actinide. The effect of americium on survival and moulting was studied at two activity concentrations; the dose rates and absorbed doses under the experimental conditions employed have been estimated. The differences in survival rates between the control and irradiated groups were statistically analyzed and the significant difference at the higher concentration is believed to be due to a synergism between physiological stress and radiotoxicity of americium rather than the chemical toxicity of the element.

  2. Uptake and effects of americium-241 on a brackish-water amphipod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppenheit, M.; Murray, C.N.; Woodhead, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of experimental work undertaken using the brackish-water amphipod Gammarus duebeni duebeni and the transuranium nuclide americium-241. Data on the accumulation of this actinide showed that the larger fraction of the total body burden is associated with the exoskeleton. It was found that the body burden remained constant in the range pH 8.0-6.5 even though the water concentration changed markedly. It would thus appear that the concept of a concentration factor should be re-examined and it is proposed that a factor should be defined in terms of environmental and chemical parameters which represent the bioavailable fraction of the actinide. The effect of americium on survival and moulting was studied at two activity concentrations; the dose rates and absorbed doses under the experimental conditions employed have been estimated. The differences in survival rates between the control and irradiated groups were statistically analyzed and the significant difference at the higher concentration is believed to be due to a synergism between physiological stress and radiotoxicity of americium rather than the chemical toxicity of the element. (orig.) [de

  3. Increasing temperature decreases the predatory effect of the intertidal shanny Lipophrys pholis on an amphipod prey

    KAUST Repository

    South, J.

    2017-11-15

    Interactions between Lipophrys pholis and its amphipod prey Echinogammarus marinus were used to investigate the effect of changing water temperatures, comparing current and predicted mean summer temperatures. Contrary to expectations, predator attack rates significantly decreased with increasing temperature. Handling times were significantly longer at 19° C than at 17 and 15° C and the maximum feeding estimate was significantly lower at 19° C than at 17° C. Functional-response type changed from a destabilizing type II to the more stabilizing type III with a temperature increase to 19° C. This suggests that a temperature increase can mediate refuge for prey at low densities. Predatory pressure by teleosts may be dampened by a large increase in temperature (here from 15 to 19° C), but a short-term and smaller temperature increase (to 17° C) may increase destabilizing resource consumption due to high maximum feeding rates; this has implications for the stability of important intertidal ecosystems during warming events.

  4. Increasing temperature decreases the predatory effect of the intertidal shanny Lipophrys pholis on an amphipod prey

    KAUST Repository

    South, J.; Welsh, D.; Anton, A.; Sigwart, J. D.; Dick, J. T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between Lipophrys pholis and its amphipod prey Echinogammarus marinus were used to investigate the effect of changing water temperatures, comparing current and predicted mean summer temperatures. Contrary to expectations, predator attack rates significantly decreased with increasing temperature. Handling times were significantly longer at 19° C than at 17 and 15° C and the maximum feeding estimate was significantly lower at 19° C than at 17° C. Functional-response type changed from a destabilizing type II to the more stabilizing type III with a temperature increase to 19° C. This suggests that a temperature increase can mediate refuge for prey at low densities. Predatory pressure by teleosts may be dampened by a large increase in temperature (here from 15 to 19° C), but a short-term and smaller temperature increase (to 17° C) may increase destabilizing resource consumption due to high maximum feeding rates; this has implications for the stability of important intertidal ecosystems during warming events.

  5. Anxiety-like behaviour increases safety from fish predation in an amphipod crustacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot-Minnot, Marie-Jeanne; Banchetry, Loan; Cézilly, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Anxiety is an emotional state generally expressed as sustained apprehension of the environment and elevated vigilance. It has been widely reported in vertebrates and, more recently, in a few invertebrate species. However, its fitness value remains elusive. We investigated anxiety-like behaviour and its consequences in an amphipod crustacean, using electric shock as aversive stimuli, and pharmacological assays. An anxiety-like state induced by electric shocks in Gammarus fossarum was expressed through increased sheltering behaviour in the absence of predation risk, thereby showing the pervasive nature of such behavioural response. Increasing the number of electric shocks both increased refuge use and delayed behavioural recovery. The behavioural effect of electric shock was mitigated by pre-treatment with LY354740, a metabotropic glutamate receptor group II/III agonist. Importantly, we found that this modulation of decision-making under an anxiety-like state resulted in an increased survival to predation in microcosm experiments. This study confirms the interest in taking an evolutionary view to the study of anxiety and calls for further investigation on the costs counterbalancing the survival benefit of an elevated anxiety level evidenced here.

  6. Unsuspected diversity of Niphargus amphipods in the chemoautotrophic cave ecosystem of Frasassi, central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dattagupta Sharmishtha

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sulfide-rich Frasassi caves in central Italy contain a rare example of a freshwater ecosystem supported entirely by chemoautotrophy. Niphargus ictus, the sole amphipod species previously reported from this locality, was recently shown to host the first known case of a freshwater chemoautotrophic symbiosis. Since the habitat of N. ictus is highly fragmented and is comprised of streams and lakes with various sulfide concentrations, we conducted a detailed study to examine the potential genetic diversity of this species within Frasassi. Results By sequencing one nuclear (ITS and two mitochondrial (COI and 12S regions, we show that four partially sympatric Niphargus clades are present in Frasassi. Morphological and behavioral data obtained for three of these clades are perfectly congruent with this molecular delineation and make it possible to distinguish them in the field. Phylogenetic analyses of 28S ribosomal DNA sequences reveal that, among the four clades, only two are closely related to each other. Moreover, these four clades occupy distinct niches that seem to be related to the chemical properties and flow regimes of the various water bodies within Frasassi. Conclusions Our results suggest that four distinct Niphargus species are present in Frasassi and that they originated from three or four independent invasions of the cave system. At least two among the four species harbor Thiothrix epibionts, which paves the way for further studies of the specificity and evolutionary history of this symbiosis.

  7. Effects of two PBDE congeners on the moulting enzymes of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gismondi, Eric; Thomé, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are abundant in aquatic environment. However, only few studies have investigated their impacts on freshwater invertebrates. This work aimed to study the effects of BDE-47 and BDE-99 congeners on the chitobiase and chitinolytic enzymes activities of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex, according to gender, PBDE concentration and time of exposure. In addition, the bioaccumulation of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were measured. Results revealed that females have bioaccumulated more PBDE than males, and BDE-99 was more accumulated than BDE-47. PBDE exposures for 96 h have caused chitobiase and chitinolytic enzymes inhibition. This study not only indicate the importance of taking into account various confounding factors (gender, congeners, concentration) to understand PBDE effects, but underline also disruptions of molting enzymes activities. These disturbances suggest effects on the gammarid development and reproduction, and consequently effects on the gammarid population, and on a larger scale, a dysfunction of the ecosystem. - Highlights: • G. pulex females bioaccumulate more PBDE than males. • PBDE exposure increases enzyme activities involved in moult process. • Gammarid gender, PBDE congener and concentration are confounding factors. - BDE-47 and BDE-99 are accumulated in Gammarus pulex males and females and have impacted the moulting process, since they influenced the moult enzymes activities

  8. Sex-dependent effects of ultraviolet radiation on the marine amphipod Ampithoe valida (Ampithoidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiñas, Macarena S; Helbling, E Walter

    2015-06-01

    The combined effects of solar radiation and diet on the marine amphipod Ampithoe valida were investigated exposing individuals to two solar radiation treatments: PAB (>280 nm, PAR+UV-A+UV-B) and P (>400 nm, only PAR), and three diets: poor (Ulva rigida) and rich (Porphyra columbina) in UV-absorbing compounds (UVAC), and mixed diet: (U. rigida+P. columbina). Females of A. valida showed higher food consumption rates when diets contained P. columbina, and preferred this macroalgae rather than U. rigida, resulting in a higher content of UVAC in their bodies. Moreover, the content of UVAC increased in the PAB treatment, thus suggesting the existence of a mechanism to accumulate these compounds under UVR. Although UVR affected the survival, the highest mortality rates were found in those females fed with poor-UVAC diets, which evidence that UVAC provided partial protection against UVR. Males preferred mixed diet, and did not show preference for any particular macroalgae. No differences in mortality were observed between radiation treatments, indicating that UVR did not affect the survival of males, independently if they accumulated UVAC or not. The vulnerability of females to UVR would be partially determined by the type of food consumed, which in turn would be closely related to the macroalgae composition of the intertidal they inhabiting. These effects could be even more pronounced under a global change scenario. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Monitoring the effectiveness of remediation techniques using sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doe, K.G.; Jackman, P.M.; Lee, K.

    2002-01-01

    The results of a controlled oil release experiment of weathered crude oil was presented. The released oil was applied to a tidal saltwater marsh at Conrod's Beach, Nova Scotia, Canada. The study included 3 replicate blocks which included 2 unoiled treatments and 4 oiled treatments for each block. One unoiled site had no treatment, the second unoiled site had nutrient addition to examine the effect of nutrients. The oiled treatments included natural attenuation, nutrient addition, nutrient addition with plants, and nutrient addition with a garden aerator to introduce oxygen. A standard lab procedure was used to analyze the sediments to determine the effectiveness of the technique as well as the toxic effects on the survival of the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius. Test results indicated that the unoiled sites were non-toxic, with a slight decrease in survival in the treatment with nutrient addition. All the oiled sites were very toxic at first, but toxicity decreased gradually with time. Treatment with nutrient addition with a garden aerator proved to be the most complete and fastest detoxification method. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs

  10. Diversity and distribution of hyperiid amphipods along a latitudinal transect in the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Alice K.; Tump, Marloes; Vonk, Ronald; Goetze, Erica; Peijnenburg, Katja T. C. A.

    2017-11-01

    As commensals and parasitoids of gelatinous plankton, hyperiid amphipods play unique and important ecological roles in pelagic food webs. Because the diversity and biogeography of this group in oceanic waters is poorly known, we examined diversity and distribution patterns of hyperiids along a basin-scale meridional transect in the Atlantic Ocean (Atlantic Meridional Transect cruise 22). Hyperiids were collected from epipelagic and upper mesopelagic depths at 27 stations between 39°N and 45°S. A total of 70 species in 36 genera and 17 families were identified, the majority of which belonged to the epipelagic Physocephalata infraorder. We observed maximum species and genus richness in the equatorial upwelling region (up to 35 species, 27 genera per station; 7°N-8°S), which appeared largely driven by increased diversity in the superfamily Platysceloidea, as well as a significant and positive relationship between species richness and sea surface temperature. Cluster analyses of hyperiid species assemblages along the transect broadly supported a division into gyral, equatorial, transitional, and subantarctic assemblages, congruent with Longhurst's biogeochemical provinces. Steepest transitions in hyperiid species composition occurred at the southern subtropical convergence zone (34-38°S). The majority of zooplankton groups show maximal diversity in subtropical waters, and our observations of equatorial maxima in species and genus richness for hyperiids suggest that the mechanisms controlling diversity in this group are distinct from other zooplanktonic taxa. These patterns may be driven by the distribution and diversity of gelatinous hosts for hyperiids, which remain poorly characterized at ocean basin scales. The data reported here provide new distributional records for epipelagic and upper mesopelagic hyperiids across six major oceanic provinces in the Atlantic Ocean.

  11. Phylogeny as a proxy for ecology in seagrass amphipods: which traits are most conserved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J Best

    Full Text Available Increasingly, studies of community assembly and ecosystem function combine trait data and phylogenetic relationships to gain novel insight into the ecological and evolutionary constraints on community dynamics. However, the key to interpreting these two types of information is an understanding of the extent to which traits are phylogenetically conserved. In this study, we develop the necessary framework for community phylogenetics approaches in a system of marine crustacean herbivores that play an important role in the ecosystem functioning of seagrass systems worldwide. For 16 species of amphipods and isopods, we (1 reconstructed phylogenetic relationships using COI, 16S, and 18S sequences and Bayesian analyses, (2 measured traits that are potentially important for assembling species between and within habitats, and (3 compared the degree to which each of these traits are evolutionarily conserved. Despite poor phylogenetic resolution for the order Amphipoda as a whole, we resolved almost all of the topology for the species in our system, and used a sampling of ultrametric trees from the posterior distribution to account for remaining uncertainty in topology and branch lengths. We found that traits varied widely in their degree of phylogenetic signal. Body mass, fecundity, and tube building showed very strong phylogenetic signal, and temperature tolerance and feeding traits showed much less. As such, the degree of signal was not predictable based on whether the trait is related to environmental filtering or to resource partitioning. Further, we found that even with strong phylogenetic signal in body size, (which may have large impacts on ecosystem function, the predictive relationship between phylogenetic diversity and ecosystem function is not straightforward. We show that patterns of phylogenetic diversity in communities of seagrass mesograzers could lead to a variety of interpretations and predictions, and that detailed study of trait

  12. Assessing mechanisms of toxicant response in the amphipod Melita plumulosa through transcriptomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Sharon E; Osborn, Hannah L; Spadaro, David A; Simpson, Stuart L

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the function of transcripts with altered abundance in the epibenthic amphipod, Melita plumulosa, following whole-sediment exposure to a series of common environmental contaminants. M. plumulosa were exposed for 48 h to sediments spiked and equilibrated with the following contaminants at concentrations predicted to cause sublethal effects to reproduction: porewater ammonia 30 mg L(-1); bifenthrin at 100 μg kg(-1); fipronil at 50 μg kg(-1); 0.6% diesel; 0.3% crude oil; 250 mg Cu kg(-1); 400 mg Ni kg(-1); and 400 mg Zn kg(-1). RNA was extracted and hybridized against a custom Agilent microarray developed for this species. Although the microarray represented a partial transcriptome and not all features on the array could be annotated, unique transcriptomic profiles were generated for each of the contaminant exposures. Hierarchical clustering grouped the expression profiles together by contaminant class, with copper and zinc, the petroleum products and nickel, and the pesticides each forming a distinct cluster. Many of the transcriptional changes observed were consistent with patterns previously described in other crustaceans. The changes in the transcriptome demonstrated that contaminant exposure caused changes in digestive function, growth and moulting, and the cytoskeleton following metal exposure, whereas exposure to petroleum products caused changes in carbohydrate metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism and hormone cycling. Functional analysis of these gene expression profiles can provide a better understanding of modes of toxic action and permits the prediction of mixture effects within contaminated ecosystems. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Habitat and food selection by herbivorous amphipods associated with macroalgal beds on the southeast coast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Rezende Tavares

    Full Text Available The factors that influence the selection of marine macrophytes by meso-herbivores are complex, and may include the nutritional quality of algae, the value of the habitat as a shelter, and the availability of algae in the environment. Here we investigated the existence of differential use of Sargassum filipendula C. Agardh, 1824 (Phaeophyta and Galaxaura stupocaulon Kjellman, 1900 (Rhodophyta as habitats and feeding resources by species of Hyalidae and Ampithoidae, in laboratory manipulation experiments and in an algal bed on the northern coast of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. In the field, 19 fronds were collected from each alga and the associated amphipods were identified and counted. To evaluate food preference and habitat selection by amphipods, we conducted laboratory experiments using containers containing fragments of algae and individuals of Cymadusa filosa Savigny, 1816 or Hyale nigra (Haswell, 1879. In natural conditions, the density of C. filosa was significantly higher on G. stupocaulon, while in the feeding and habitat preference experiment we found a higher density on S. filipendula. The densities of H. nigra did not differ between the algae in both experiments, probably as a result of the variety of food items in its diet, and its high mobility and wide distribution on different substrates. The different results for C. filosa suggest that the pattern of feeding and habitat selection can be affected by external characteristics of the algae; probably, refuge from predation is an important selective force acting on the use of algae by these animals.

  14. Screening differentially expressed genes in an amphipod (Hyalella azteca) exposed to fungicide vinclozolin by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun H; Wu, Tsung M; Hong, Chwan Y; Wang, Yei S; Yen, Jui H

    2014-01-01

    Vinclozolin, a dicarboximide fungicide, is an endocrine disrupting chemical that competes with an androgenic endocrine disruptor compound. Most research has focused on the epigenetic effect of vinclozolin in humans. In terms of ecotoxicology, understanding the effect of vinclozolin on non-target organisms is important. The expression profile of a comprehensive set of genes in the amphipod Hyalella azteca exposed to vinclozolin was examined. The expressed sequence tags in low-dose vinclozolin-treated and -untreated amphipods were isolated and identified by suppression subtractive hybridization. DNA dot blotting was used to confirm the results and establish a subtracted cDNA library for comparing all differentially expressed sequences with and without vinclozolin treatment. In total, 494 differentially expressed genes, including hemocyanin, heatshock protein, cytochrome, cytochrome oxidase and NADH dehydrogenase were detected. Hemocyanin was the most abundant gene. DNA dot blotting revealed 55 genes with significant differential expression. These genes included larval serum protein 1 alpha, E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, mitochondrial protein, proteasome inhibitor, hemocyanin, zinc-finger-containing protein, mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase and epididymal sperm-binding protein. Vinclozolin appears to upregulate stress-related genes and hemocyanin, related to immunity. Moreover, vinclozolin downregulated NADH dehydrogenase, related to respiration. Thus, even a non-lethal concentration of vinclozolin still has an effect at the genetic level in H. azteca and presents a potential risk, especially as it would affect non-target organism hormone metabolism.

  15. Antioxidant responses in the polar marine sea-ice amphipod Gammarus wilkitzkii to natural and experimentally increased UV levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krapp, Rupert H.; Bassinet, Thievery; Berge, Jorgen; Pampanin, Daniela M.; Camus, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    Polar marine surface waters are characterized by high levels of dissolved oxygen, seasonally intense UV irradiance and high levels of dissolved organic carbon. Therefore, the Arctic sea-ice habitat is regarded as a strongly pro-oxidant environment, even though its significant ice cover protects the ice-associated (=sympagic) fauna from direct irradiation to a large extent. In order to investigate the level of resistance to oxyradical stress, we sampled the sympagic amphipod species Gammarus wilkitzkii during both winter and summer conditions, as well as exposed specimens to simulated levels of near-natural and elevated levels of UV irradiation. Results showed that this amphipod species possessed a much stronger antioxidant capacity during summer than during winter. Also, the experimental UV exposure showed a depletion in antioxidant defences, indicating a negative effect of UV exposure on the total oxyradical scavenging capacity. Another sympagic organism, Onisimus nanseni, was sampled during summer conditions. When compared to G. wilkitzkii, the species showed even higher antioxidant scavenging capacity.

  16. Tuluweckelia cernua, a new genus and species of stygobiont amphipod crustacean (Hadziidae) from anchialine caves on the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsinger, John R.

    1990-01-01

    Tuluweckelia cernua, a new genus and species of stygobiont amphipod is described from six anchialine caves near the northeastern coast of the state of Quintana Roo on the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. The new genus is closely allied morphologically with Mayaweckelia Holsinger, which is also recorded

  17. Optimizing the performance of the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, in chronic toxicity tests: Results of feeding studies with various foods and feeding regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is a common organism used for sediment toxicity testing. Standard methods for 10-d and 42-d sediment toxicity tests with H. azteca were last revised and published by USEPA/ASTM in 2000. While Hyalella azteca methods exist for sediment tox...

  18. Testing for the induction of anti-herbivory defences in four Portuguese macroalgae by direct and water-borne cues of grazing amphipods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hee Young; Cruz, Joana; Treitschke, Michaela; Wahl, Martin; Molis, Markus

    2007-09-01

    Herbivory is a key factor in regulating plant biomass, thereby driving ecosystem performance. Algae have developed multiple adaptations to cope with grazers, including morphological and chemical defences. In a series of experiments we investigated whether several species of macroalgae possess anti-herbivore defences and whether these could be regulated to demand, i.e. grazing events. The potential of direct grazing on defence induction was assessed for two brown ( Dictyopteris membranacea, Fucus vesiculosus) and two red seaweeds ( Gelidium sesquipedale, Sphaerococcus coronopifolius) from São Rafael and Ria Formosa, Portugal. Bioassays conducted with live algal pieces and agar-based food containing lipophilic algal extracts were used to detect changes in palatability after exposure to amphipod attacks (=treatment phase). Fucus vesiculosus was the only species significantly reducing palatability in response to direct amphipod-attacks. This pattern was observed in live F. vesiculosus pieces and agar-based food containing a lipophilic extract, suggesting that lipophilic compounds produced during the treatment phase were responsible for the repulsion of grazers. Water-borne cues of grazed F. vesiculosus as well as non-grazing amphipods also reduced palatability of neighbouring conspecifics. However, this effect was only observed in live tissues of F. vesiculosus. This study is the first to show that amphipods, like isopods, are capable to induce anti-herbivory defences in F. vesiculosus and that a seasonally variable effectiveness of chemical defences might serve as a dynamic control in alga-herbivore interactions.

  19. Monitoring the remediation of a near shore waste disposal site in Antarctica using the amphipod Paramoera walkeri and diffusive gradients in thin films (DGTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, Jonathan S. . E-mail jonny.stark@aad.gov.au; Johnstone, Glenn J.; Palmer, Anne S.; Snape, Ian; Larner, Bronwyn L.; Riddle, Martin J.

    2006-01-01

    The water quality of a marine embayment (Brown Bay) was monitored during the remediation of an abandoned waste disposal site at Casey Station, East Antarctica, using a combination of biomonitoring and chemical methods. The Antarctic amphipod Paramoera walkeri, in field mesocosms suspended in the water column, was deployed adjacent to the site and at two reference sites for periods of 14 days, repeated three times during the remediation period (December to February). Diffusive gradients in thin film (DGT) samplers were deployed for the same periods to provide estimates of dissolved metals. No difference in mortality of amphipods was observed between Brown Bay and reference sites. There were significant differences, however, in accumulated metal concentrations between amphipods from Brown Bay and reference sites, with greater concentrations of antimony, copper, cadmium, lead, iron and tin at Brown Bay. The melt water/runoff treatment strategy employed for the remediation was successful in preventing acute toxic effects, but water quality was reduced at Brown Bay, where increased metal bioavailability may have been high enough to induce chronic effects in some biota. DGT samplers were less sensitive than amphipods in detecting differences in metal concentrations between sites, indicating that metals bound to suspended particulates were a potentially significant source of contamination

  20. Acute and chronic toxicity of aluminum to a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) and an amphipod (Hyalella azteca) in water‐only exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Ivey, Chris D.; Brunson, Eric L.; Cleveland, Danielle; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Stubblefield, William A.; Cardwell, Allison S.

    2018-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is reviewing the protectiveness of the national ambient water quality criteria (WQC) for aluminum (Al) and compiling a toxicity data set to update the WQC. Freshwater mussels are one of the most imperiled groups of animals in the world, but little is known about their sensitivity to Al. The objective of the present study was to evaluate acute 96‐h and chronic 28‐d toxicity of Al to a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) and a commonly tested amphipod (Hyalella azteca) at a pH of 6 and water hardness of 100 mg/L as CaCO3. The acute 50% effect concentration (EC50) for survival of both species was >6200 μg total Al/L. The EC50 was greater than all acute values in the USEPA acute Al data set for freshwater species at a pH range of 5.0 to <6.5 and hardness normalized to 100 mg/L, indicating that the mussel and amphipod were insensitive to Al in acute exposures. The chronic 20% effect concentration (EC20) based on dry weight was 163 μg total Al/L for the mussel and 409 μg total Al/L for the amphipod. Addition of the EC20s to the USEPA chronic Al data set for pH 5.0 to <6.5 would rank the mussel (L. siliquoidea) as the fourth most sensitive species and the amphipod (H. azteca) as the fifth most sensitive species, indicating the 2 species were sensitive to Al in chronic exposures. The USEPA‐proposed acute and chronic WQC for Al would adequately protect the mussel and amphipod tested; however, inclusion of the chronic data from the present study and recalculation of the chronic criterion would likely lower the proposed chronic criterion. 

  1. Mayaweckelia troglomorpha, a new subterranean amphipod species from Yucatán state, México (Amphipoda, Hadziidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angyal, Dorottya; Solís, Efraín Chávez; Magaña, Benjamín; Balázs, Gergely; Simoes, Nuno

    2018-01-01

    A detailed description of a new stygobiont species of the amphipod family Hadziidae, Mayaweckelia troglomorpha Angyal, sp. n. is given, based on material collected in four cenotes of Yucatán federal state, México. Morphology was studied under light microscopy and with scanning electron microscopy. Morphological description is complemented with mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences as barcodes, with affinities to the related taxa and with notes on the species' ecology. Using COI Bayesian inference and genetic distance analyses, we show that the closest relative of the new species is M. cenoticola , forming a monophyletic group referring to the genus Mayaweckelia . Based on the available sequences, we also revealed that Mayaweckelia and Tuluweckelia are sister genera, standing close to the third Yucatán subterranean genus, Bahadzia . The data gathered on the habitat, distribution, abundance, and ecology will contribute to the conservation planning for M. troglomorpha Angyal, sp. n.

  2. Assessment of the environmental impacts of ocean acidification (OA) and carbon capture and storage (CCS) leaks using the amphipod Hyale youngi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, T A; De Orte, M R; Szalaj, D; Basallote, M D; DelValls, T A; Cesar, A

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to ascertain the effects of CO 2 induced water acidification and leaks from Carbon Capture and Storage activities on the South American amphipod Hyale youngi. A 10-day acute toxicity test was performed using sediments from two sites located inside the Santos Estuarine System. They were subjected to five pH treatments (8.1, 7.6, 7.0, 6.5, and 6.0). Metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb, Ni and Zn) and the metalloid As were analyzed to determine the influence of their acidification-related mobility on the amphipods mortality. The results showed that mortality becomes significant when compared to control in pH 6.5 in the Canal de Piaçaguera sediment (contaminated) and at pH 6.0 in Ilha das Palmas sediment (reference).

  3. Bioaccumulation of As, Cd, Cr, Hg(II), and MeHg in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from amphipod and worm prey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, Jessica, E-mail: dutton.jess@gmail.com; Fisher, Nicholas S., E-mail: nfisher@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

    2011-08-15

    Elevated metal levels in fish are a concern for the fish themselves, their predators, and possibly humans who consume contaminated seafood. Metal bioaccumulation models often rely on assimilation efficiencies (AEs) of ingested metals and loss rate constants after dietary exposure (k{sub ef}s). These models can be used to better understand processes regulating metal accumulation and can be used to make site-specific predictions of metal concentrations in animal tissues. Fish often consume a varied diet, and prey choice can influence these two parameters. We investigated the trophic transfer of As, Cd, Cr, Hg(II), and methylmercury (MeHg) from a benthic amphipod (Leptocheirus plumulosus) and an oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) to killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) using gamma-emitting radioisotopes. Except for MeHg, AEs varied between prey type. AEs were highest for MeHg (92%) and lowest for Cd (2.9-4.5%) and Cr (0.2-4%). Hg(II) showed the largest AE difference between prey type (14% amphipods, 24% worms). For Cd and Hg(II) k{sub ef}s were higher after consuming amphipods than consuming worms. Tissue distribution data shows that Cd and Hg(II) were mainly associated with the intestine, whereas As and MeHg were transported throughout the body. Calculated trophic transfer factors (TTFs) suggest that MeHg is likely to biomagnify at this trophic step at all ingestion rates, whereas As, Cd, Cr, and Hg(II) will not. Data collected in this study and others indicate that using one prey item to calculate AE and k{sub ef} could lead to an over- or underestimation of these parameters. - Highlights: {yields} We investigated the trophic transfer of metals to killifish from amphipod and worm prey. {yields} Prey choice influences metal accumulation from the diet. {yields} Only MeHg is likely to biomagnify at this trophic step.

  4. Gene expression of benthic amphipods (genus: Diporeia in relation to a circular ssDNA virus across two Laurentian Great Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalia S.I. Bistolas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Circular rep-encoding ssDNA (CRESS-DNA viruses are common constituents of invertebrate viral consortia. Despite their ubiquity and sequence diversity, the effects of CRESS-DNA viruses on invertebrate biology and ecology remain largely unknown. This study assessed the relationship between the transcriptional profile of benthic amphipods of genus Diporeia and the presence of the CRESS-DNA virus, LM29173, in the Laurentian Great Lakes to provide potential insight into the influence of these viruses on invertebrate gene expression. Twelve transcriptomes derived from Diporeia were compared, representing organisms from two amphipod haplotype clades (Great Lakes Michigan and Superior, defined by COI barcode sequencing with varying viral loads (up to 3 × 106 genome copies organism−1. Read recruitment to de novo assembled transcripts revealed 2,208 significantly over or underexpressed contigs in transcriptomes with above average LM29173 load. Of these contigs, 31.5% were assigned a putative function. The greatest proportion of annotated, differentially expressed transcripts were associated with functions including: (1 replication, recombination, and repair, (2 cell structure/biogenesis, and (3 post-translational modification, protein turnover, and chaperones. Contigs putatively associated with innate immunity displayed no consistent pattern of expression, though several transcripts were significantly overexpressed in amphipods with high viral load. Quantitation (RT-qPCR of target transcripts, non-muscular myosin heavy chain, β-actin, and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, corroborated transcriptome analysis and indicated that Lake Michigan and Lake Superior amphipods with high LM29173 load exhibit lake-specific trends in gene expression. While this investigation provides the first comparative survey of the transcriptional profile of invertebrates of variable CRESS-DNA viral load, additional inquiry is required to define the scope of host

  5. Bioaccumulation of trace metals in the Antarctic amphipod Paramoera walkeri (Stebbing, 1906): comparison of two-compartment and hyperbolic toxicokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clason, B.; Duquesne, S.; Liess, M.; Schulz, R.; Zauke, G.-P.

    2003-01-01

    Bioaccumulation of Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn in the Antarctic gammaridean amphipod Paramoera walkeri (Stebbing, 1906) was investigated at Casey station (Australian Antarctic Territory). The main goals were to provide information on accumulation strategies of the organisms tested and to verify toxicokinetic models as a predictive tool. The organisms accumulated metals upon exposure and it was possible to estimate significant model parameters of two-compartment and hyperbolic models. These models were successfully verified in a second toxicokinetic study. However, the application of hyperbolic models appears to be more promising as a predictive tool for metals in amphipods compared to compartment models, which have failed to adequately predict metal accumulation in experiments with increasing external exposures in previous studies. The following kinetic bioconcentration factors (BCFs) for the theoretical equilibrium were determined: 150-630 (Cd), 1600-7000 (Pb), 1700-3800 (Cu) and 670-2400 (Zn). We find decreasing BCFs with increasing external metal dosing but similar results for treatments with and without natural UV radiation and for the combined effect of different exposure regimes (single versus multiple metal exposure) and/or the amphipod collective involved (Beall versus Denison Island). A tentative estimation showed the following sequence of sensitivity of P. walkeri to an increase of soluble metal exposure: 0.2-3.0 μg Cd l -1 , 0.12-0.25 μg Pb l -1 , 0.9-3.0 μg Cu l -1 and 9-26 μg Zn l -1 . Thus, the amphipod investigated proved to be more sensitive as biomonitor compared to gammarids from German coastal waters (with the exception of Cd) and to copepods from the Weddell Sea inferred from literature data

  6. Response of benthic opportunistic polychaetes and amphipods index to different perturbations in coastal oligotrophic areas (Canary archipelago, North East Atlantic Ocean)

    OpenAIRE

    Riera, Rodrigo; de-la-Ossa-Carretero, Jose Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Oligotrophic areas harbour low macrofaunal abundance and patchy distribution. In these areas it is necessary to test the reliability of biological indicators, especially those based on taxonomic sufficiency where the level of identification is balanced against the need for ecological information and could affect the efficiency of bioindicators. The BOPA (benthic opportunistic polychaetes and amphipods) index was applied in five coastal areas subjected to different perturbations (aquaculture, ...

  7. Benthic amphipods (Amphipoda: Gammaridea and Corophiidea) from the Mexican southeast sector of the Gulf of Mexico: checklist, new records and zoogeographic comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Ríos, Carlos E; Ardisson, Pedro-Luis

    2013-01-01

    The southeast region of the Gulf of Mexico is considered to be biologically important, because it is a connection and transition zone between the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico, harboring great marine biodiversity. Nevertheless, benthic amphipods have been poorly studied in the Mexican southeast sector of the Gulf of Mexico with few studies listing species. The aim of this study is to provide an update checklist of species for the Mexican southeast sector (based on literature review and records from the present study) as well as a brief zoogeographical analysis for the Gulf of Mexico amphipod fauna, putting them in context with the fauna on the tropical western Atlantic. Fifty-five species were listed for the Mexican southeast sector; 36 of them showed a geographical extension to the Yucatan continental shelf representing 23 new records for the Mexican southeast sector, nine for the southeast region and four for the Gulf of Mexico. Based on the zoogeographical analysis, there is support of the application of Carolinian and Caribbean zoogeographic provinces to amphipods in the Gulf of Mexico.

  8. Validation of Orchestia gammarellus enzymatic activities in several ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology ... Marine biodiversity is increasingly at risk because of coastal contamination. ... sampled from Mnar to 2.6 ± 0.9 nmol of formed â-naphthol/min/mg of proteins in those taken from Port).

  9. The mechanisms of morph determination in the amphipod Jassa: implications for the evolution of alternative male phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdziel, Josepha P; Knowles, L Lacey

    2002-09-07

    The proximal basis for and the maintenance of alternative male reproductive strategies and tactics are generally not understood in most species, despite the occurrence of male polymorphism across many taxa. In the marine amphipod Jassa marmorata, males differ in morphology as well as behaviour. This dimorphism corresponds to two contrasting reproductive strategies: small sneaker males or 'minors', and large fighter males or 'majors'. This study uses quantitative genetic analyses in conjunction with experimental manipulations to assess the relative importance of genetic versus environmental factors in the determination and maintenance of these alternative mating strategies. Heritability analyses indicated the reproductive phenotypes do not reflect genetic differences between dimorphic males. By contrast, morph determination was significantly affected by diet quality. Majors essentially only developed on high-protein diets. Field studies also identified a strong correlation between seasonal shifts in the relative proportions of morphs and changes in food (i.e. phytoplankton) quantity and composition, corroborating that diet cues the switch between alternative reproductive tactics. Moreover, the comparison of major and minor growth trajectories identified a heterochronic shift in maturation times between morphs, indicating that ecological selective pressures, rather than just sexual selection, may be involved in the maintenance of this conditional strategy.

  10. Characterisation of myosin heavy chain gene variants in the fast and slow muscle fibres of gammarid amphipods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, N M; Magnay, J L; McCleary, S J; Nia, S Khazraee; El Haj, A J; Rock, J

    2010-10-01

    Recent molecular work has revealed a large diversity of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene variants in the abdominal musculature of gammarid amphipods. An unusual truncated MyHC transcript from the loop 1 region (Variant A(3)) was consistently observed in multiple species and populations. The current study aimed to determine whether this MyHC variant is specific to a particular muscle fibre type, as a change in net charge to the loop 1 region of Variant A(3) could be functionally significant. The localisation of different fibre types within the abdominal musculature of several gammarid species revealed that the deep flexor and extensor muscles are fast-twitch muscle fibres. The dorsal superficial muscles were identified as slow fibres and the muscles extrinsic to the pleopods were identified as intermediate fibres. Amplification of loop 1 region mRNA from isolated superficial extensor and deep flexor muscles, and subsequent liquid chromatography and sequence analysis revealed that Variant A(3) was the primary MyHC variant in slow muscles, and the conserved A(1) sequence was the primary variant in fast muscles. The specific role of Variant A(3) in the slow muscles remains to be investigated. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Environmental drivers defining linkages among life-history traits: mechanistic insights from a semiterrestrial amphipod subjected to macroscale gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Julio; Barboza, Francisco R; Defeo, Omar

    2013-10-01

    Determining the existence of interconnected responses among life-history traits and identifying underlying environmental drivers are recognized as key goals for understanding the basis of phenotypic variability. We studied potentially interconnected responses among senescence, fecundity, embryos size, weight of brooding females, size at maturity and sex ratio in a semiterrestrial amphipod affected by macroscale gradients in beach morphodynamics and salinity. To this end, multiple modelling processes based on generalized additive mixed models were used to deal with the spatio-temporal structure of the data obtained at 10 beaches during 22 months. Salinity was the only nexus among life-history traits, suggesting that this physiological stressor influences the energy balance of organisms. Different salinity scenarios determined shifts in the weight of brooding females and size at maturity, having consequences in the number and size of embryos which in turn affected sex determination and sex ratio at the population level. Our work highlights the importance of analysing field data to find the variables and potential mechanisms that define concerted responses among traits, therefore defining life-history strategies.

  12. Toxicity of copper to the marine amphipod Allorchestes compressa in the presence of water- and lipid-soluble ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsanullah, M; Florence, T M

    1984-12-01

    Acute toxicity tests were carried out on the marine amphipod Allorchestes compressa Dana using copper sulfate and some organocopper complexes. For copper sulfate, 96 h LC50 values of 0.11 and 0.5 mg Cu/liter were determined for the juveniles and the adults, respectively. Juveniles were about 4.5 times more sensitive to copper than adults Organocopper complexes were tested on adults only. The three water soluble ligands nitrotriacetic acid, 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfoic acid and tannic acid ameliorated copper toxicity by decreasing the concentration of free ionic copper while lipid-soluble ligands such as oxine and potassium ethylxanthogenate increased copper toxicity, presumably as a result of the complexes diffusing through the cell membrane and participating in injurious reaction. The copper complex with 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline was the most toxic complex tested. It is suggested that the presence of these ligands in the receiving water should be taken into consideration when establishing water quality criteria. 19 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Repeatedly evolved host-specific ectosymbioses between sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and amphipods living in a cave ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bauermeister

    Full Text Available Ectosymbioses between invertebrates and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are widespread in sulfidic marine environments and have evolved independently in several invertebrate phyla. The first example from a freshwater habitat, involving Niphargus ictus amphipods and filamentous Thiothrix ectosymbionts, was recently reported from the sulfide-rich Frasassi caves in Italy. Subsequently, two new Niphargus species, N. frasassianus and N. montanarius, were discovered within Frasassi and found to co-occur with N. ictus. Using a variety of microscopic and molecular techniques, we found that all three Frasassi-dwelling Niphargus species harbor Thiothrix ectosymbionts, which belong to three distinct phylogenetic clades (named T1, T2, and T3. T1 and T3 Thiothrix dominate the N. frasassianus ectosymbiont community, whereas T2 and T3 are prevalent on N. ictus and N. montanarius. Relative distribution patterns of the three ectosymbionts are host species-specific and consistent over different sampling locations and collection years. Free-living counterparts of T1-T3 are rare or absent in Frasassi cave microbial mats, suggesting that ectosymbiont transmission among Niphargus occurs primarily through inter- or intraspecific inoculations. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the Niphargus-Thiothrix association has evolved independently at least two times. While ectosymbioses with T1 and T2 may have been established within Frasassi, T3 ectosymbionts seem to have been introduced to the cave system by Niphargus.

  14. Sequestration of zinc from zinc oxide nanoparticles and life cycle effects in the sediment dweller amphipod Corophium volutator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrega, Julia; Tantra, Ratna; Amer, Aisha; Stolpe, Bjorn; Tomkins, Jordan; Fry, Tony; Lead, Jamie R; Tyler, Charles R; Galloway, Tamara S

    2012-01-17

    We studied the effects of ZnO nanoparticles [ZnO NPs, primary particle size 35 ± 10 nm (circular diameter, TEM)], bulk [160 ± 81 nm (circular diameter, TEM)], and Zn ions (from ZnCl(2)) on mortality, growth, and reproductive endpoints in the sediment dwelling marine amphipod Corophium volutator over a complete lifecycle (100 days). ZnO NPs were characterized by size, aggregation, morphology, dissolution, and surface properties. ZnO NPs underwent aggregation and partial dissolution in the seawater exposure medium, resulting in a size distribution that ranged in size from discrete nanoparticles to the largest aggregate of several micrometers. Exposure via water to all forms of zinc in the range of 0.2-1.0 mg L(-1) delayed growth and affected the reproductive outcome of the exposed populations. STEM-EDX analysis was used to characterize insoluble zinc precipitates (sphaerites) of high sulfur content, which accumulated in the hepatopancreas following exposures. The elemental composition of the sphaerites did not differ for ZnO NP, Zn(2+), and bulk ZnO exposed organisms. These results provide an illustration of the comparable toxicity of Zn in bulk, soluble, and nanoscale forms on critical lifecycle parameters in a sediment dwelling organism.

  15. Chronic copper exposure and fatty acid composition of the amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus: Results from a field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maazouzi, Chafik [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France)], E-mail: maazouzi@univ-metz.fr; Masson, Gerard [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France)], E-mail: masson1@univ-metz.fr; Izquierdo, Maria Soledad [Grupo de Investigacion en Acuicultura, ULPGC and ICCM, P.O. Box 56, 35200 Telde, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)], E-mail: mizquierdo@dbio.ulpgc.es; Pihan, Jean-Claude [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France)], E-mail: pihan@univ-metz.fr

    2008-11-15

    Field study allows assessment of long-term effects on fatty acid (FA) composition of organisms under chronic exposure to metals. One expected effect of copper is peroxidation of lipids and essentially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). FA analysis was established for the amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus subjected to different degrees of copper exposure (4-40 {mu}g Cu L{sup -1}). A previous study in our team showed that this species regulates its body Cu concentration (106-135 mg Cu kg{sup -1} dry weight). Despite the high capacity of bioaccumulation, the absence of a correlation between copper concentration in D. villosus and water prevents its use as bioindicator of copper pollution. Both sexes from the most polluted site showed the lowest total FA content, but the highest PUFA percent, mainly of the long-chained variety (C20-C22). Mechanisms leading to the prevention of lipid peroxidation in this species were discussed (metallothioneins and intracellular granules) and proposed with support from literature data. - Under chronic copper exposure, Dikerogammarus villosus loses in total fatty acids content but increases its essential {omega}3 and {omega}6 PUFA percent.

  16. Oxidized Carbo-Iron causes reduced reproduction and lower tolerance of juveniles in the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, Mirco, E-mail: m.weil@ect.de [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Böttgerstrasse 2-14, 65439 Flörsheim (Germany); Meißner, Tobias, E-mail: tmeiss@gmx.net [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems, Winterbergstrasse 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Springer, Armin, E-mail: armin.springer@nano.tu-dresden.de [Dresden University of Technology, Budapesterstrasse 27, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Bundschuh, Mirco, E-mail: mirco.bundschuh@slu.se [Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Forststrasse 7, 76829 Landau (Germany); Hübler, Lydia, E-mail: lydia.huebler@gmail.com [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Böttgerstrasse 2-14, 65439 Flörsheim (Germany); Schulz, Ralf, E-mail: schulz@uni-landau.de [Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Forststrasse 7, 76829 Landau (Germany); Duis, Karen, E-mail: k-duis@ect.de [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Böttgerstrasse 2-14, 65439 Flörsheim (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Effects on growth, reproduction and survival at ≥12.5 mg of oxidized Carbo-Iron/L were studied. • Carbo-Iron significantly increases sensitivity of offspring from exposed amphipods. • Toxicity is most likely mediated by an impaired uptake of nutrients and energy. - Abstract: For in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated by halogenated hydrocarbons Carbo-Iron{sup ®}, a composite of microscale activated carbon and nano Fe{sup 0}, was developed. Against the background of intended release of Carbo-Iron into the environment in concentrations in the g/L-range, potential ecotoxicological consequences were evaluated in the present study. The nano Fei{sup 0} in Carbo-Iron acts as reducing agent and is oxidized in aqueous systems by chlorinated solvents, groundwater constituents (e.g. dissolved oxygen) and anaerobic corrosion. As Carbo-Iron is generally oxidized rapidly after application into the environment, the oxidized state is environmentally most relevant, and Carbo-Iron was used in its oxidized form in the ecotoxicological tests. The amphipod Hyalella azteca was selected as a surrogate test species for functionally important groundwater crustaceans. Effects of Carbo-Iron on H. azteca were determined in a 10-d acute test, a 7-d feeding activity test and a 42-d chronic test. Additionally, a 56-d life cycle test was performed with a modified design to further evaluate effects of Carbo-Iron on adult H. azteca and their offspring. The size of Carbo-Iron particles in stock and test suspensions was determined via dynamic light scattering. Potential uptake of particles into test organisms was investigated using transmission and scanning electron microscopy. At the termination of the feeding and acute toxicity test (i.e. after 7 and 10 d of exposure, respectively), Carbo-Iron had a significant effect on the weight, length and feeding rate of H. azteca at the highest test concentration of 100 mg/L. While an uptake of Carbo-Iron into the gut was

  17. Phylogeography of the sandy beach amphipod Haustorioides japonicus along the Sea of Japan: Paleogeographical signatures of cryptic regional divergences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yoshitake; Sakuma, Kay; Fujii, Tetsuo; Kojima, Shigeaki

    2018-01-01

    Recent findings of genetic breaks within apparently continuous marine populations challenge the traditional vicariance paradigm in population genetics. Such "invisible" boundaries are sometimes associated with potential geographic barriers that have forced divergence of an ancestral population, habitat discontinuities, biogeographic disjunctions due to environmental gradients, or a combination of these factors. To explore the factors that influence the genetic population structure of apparently continuous populations along the Sea of Japan, the sandy beach amphipod Haustorioides japonicus was examined. We sampled a total of 300 individuals of H. japonicus from the coast of Japan, and obtained partial sequences of the mitochondrial COI gene. The sequences from 19 local populations were clustered into five groups (Northwestern Pacific, Northern, Central, Southern Sea of Japan, and East China Sea) based on a spatial genetic mixture analysis and a minimum-spanning network. AMOVA and pairwise Fst tests further supported the significant divergence of the five groups. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the relationship among the haplotypes of H. japonicus and outgroups, which inferred the northward range expansion of the species. A relaxed molecular-clock Bayesian analysis inferred the early-to middle-Pleistocene divergence of the populations. Among the five clusters, the Central Sea of Japan showed the highest values for genetic diversity indices indicating the existence of a relatively stable and large population there. The hypothesis is also supported by Bayesian Skyline Plots that showed sudden population expansion for all the clusters except for Central Sea of Japan. The present study shows genetic boundaries between the Sea of Japan and the neighboring seas, probably due to geographic isolation during the Pleistocene glacial periods. We further found divergence between the populations along the apparently continuous coast of the Sea of Japan. Historical changes in the

  18. Contaminants in stream sediments from seven United States metropolitan areas: part II—sediment toxicity to the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus dilutus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemble, Nile E.; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Kunz, James L.; Sibley, Paul K.; Calhoun, Daniel L.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Nowell, Lisa H.; Moran, Patrick W.

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between sediment toxicity and sediment chemistry were evaluated for 98 samples collected from seven metropolitan study areas across the United States. Sediment-toxicity tests were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28 day exposures) and with the midge Chironomus dilutus (10 day exposures). Overall, 33 % of the samples were toxic to amphipods and 12 % of the samples were toxic to midge based on comparisons with reference conditions within each study area. Significant correlations were observed between toxicity end points and sediment concentrations of trace elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), or organochlorine (OC) pesticides; however, these correlations were typically weak, and contaminant concentrations were usually below sediment-toxicity thresholds. Concentrations of the pyrethroid bifenthrin exceeded an estimated threshold of 0.49 ng/g (at 1 % total organic carbon) in 14 % of the samples. Of the samples that exceeded this bifenthrin toxicity threshold, 79 % were toxic to amphipods compared with 25 % toxicity for the samples below this threshold. Application of mean probable effect concentration quotients (PECQs) based on measures of groups of contaminants (trace elements, total PAHs, total PCBs,OCpesticides, and pyrethroid pesticides [bifenthrin in particular]) improved the correct classification of samples as toxic or not toxic to amphipods compared with measures of individual groups of contaminants. Sediments are a repository for many contaminants released into surface waters. Because of this, organisms inhabiting sediments may be exposed to a wide range of contaminants (United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) United States Environmental Protection Agency 2000; American Society for Testing and Materials [ASTM] American Society for Testing and Materials International 2012). Contaminants of potential concern in sediments typically include trace elements (metals

  19. Intra-plant differences in seaweed nutritional quality and chemical defenses: Importance for the feeding behavior of the intertidal amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Cristian; Acuña, Karin; Navarro, Jorge M.; Gómez, Iván

    2011-10-01

    As a result of their morphological complexity, large macroalgae show intra-thallus variations in their nutritional composition and secondary metabolite content, which influences the trophic ecology of herbivorous invertebrates, and ultimately their fitness. In this study, we evaluated for the first time the variability in nutritional quality (protein content, carbohydrates, lipids, and total organic matter), secondary metabolites (phlorotannins), and structure (shape and toughness) between blades and stipes of the macroalgae Durvillaea Antarctica. Specifically, we looked at their effect on feeding preference, rate of consumption, absorption efficiency, and growth rate of the amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata, one of the most abundant organisms on Chilean sandy beaches. Proteins, carbohydrates, total organic matter and phlorotannin contents were significantly higher in blades than in stipes. Preference experiments revealed that the amphipods preferred blades when fresh pieces of blades and stipes were offered at the same time. Similar results were found when artificial food (in which structures of both parts of the alga were standardized) was offered, suggesting that shape and toughness of the two different parts of the alga did not influence preference patterns of O. tuberculata. Absorption efficiency of O. tuberculata was higher on blades compared to stipes. When the amphipods were kept with each of the algal parts separately (i.e. no choice), they consumed a significantly higher amount of stipe, which suggests that O. tuberculata used food quantity to compensate for the lower nutritional quality of stipes. The higher nutritional values of blades compared to stipes appears to explain observed preference patterns by O. tuberculata. Phlorotannin content did not appear to inhibit blade consumption, suggesting that the nutritional quality of the food could be more important than chemical defense in determining food choice in O. tuberculata. Growth did not differ

  20. Contrasting morphological and DNA barcode-suggested species boundaries among shallow-water amphipod fauna from the southern European Atlantic coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Jorge; Ferreira, Maria S; Antunes, Ilisa C; Teixeira, Marcos A L; Borges, Luisa M S; Sousa, Ronaldo; Gomes, Pedro A; Costa, Maria Helena; Cunha, Marina R; Costa, Filipe O

    2017-02-01

    In this study we compared DNA barcode-suggested species boundaries with morphology-based species identifications in the amphipod fauna of the southern European Atlantic coast. DNA sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I barcode region (COI-5P) were generated for 43 morphospecies (178 specimens) collected along the Portuguese coast which, together with publicly available COI-5P sequences, produced a final dataset comprising 68 morphospecies and 295 sequences. Seventy-five BINs (Barcode Index Numbers) were assigned to these morphospecies, of which 48 were concordant (i.e., 1 BIN = 1 species), 8 were taxonomically discordant, and 19 were singletons. Twelve species had matching sequences (<2% distance) with conspecifics from distant locations (e.g., North Sea). Seven morphospecies were assigned to multiple, and highly divergent, BINs, including specimens of Corophium multisetosum (18% divergence) and Dexamine spiniventris (16% divergence), which originated from sampling locations on the west coast of Portugal (only about 36 and 250 km apart, respectively). We also found deep divergence (4%-22%) among specimens of seven species from Portugal compared to those from the North Sea and Italy. The detection of evolutionarily meaningful divergence among populations of several amphipod species from southern Europe reinforces the need for a comprehensive re-assessment of the diversity of this faunal group.

  1. Acute and chronic toxicity of aluminum to a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) and an amphipod (Hyalella azteca) in water‐only exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Ivey, Chris D.; Brunson, Eric L.; Cleveland, Danielle; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Stubblefield, William A.; Cardwell, Allison S.

    2018-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is reviewing the protectiveness of the national ambient water quality criteria (WQC) for aluminum (Al) and compiling a toxicity data set to update the WQC. Freshwater mussels are one of the most imperiled groups of animals in the world, but little is known about their sensitivity to Al. The objective of the present study was to evaluate acute 96‐h and chronic 28‐d toxicity of Al to a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) and a commonly tested amphipod (Hyalella azteca) at a pH of 6 and water hardness of 100 mg/L as CaCO3. The acute 50% effect concentration (EC50) for survival of both species was >6200 μg total Al/L. The EC50 was greater than all acute values in the USEPA acute Al data set for freshwater species at a pH range of 5.0 to based on dry weight was 163 μg total Al/L for the mussel and 409 μg total Al/L for the amphipod. Addition of the EC20s to the USEPA chronic Al data set for pH 5.0 to of the chronic data from the present study and recalculation of the chronic criterion would likely lower the proposed chronic criterion. 

  2. Toxicity of chromium (VI) to two mussels and an amphipod in water-only exposures with or without a co-stressor of elevated temperature, zinc, or nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Kunz, James L.; Ivey, Chris D.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Barnhart, M. Christopher; Glidewell, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to develop methods for propagating western pearlshell (Margaritifera falcata) for laboratory toxicity testing and evaluate acute and chronic toxicity of chromium VI [Cr(VI)] to the pearlshell and a commonly tested mussel (fatmucket, Lampsilis siliquoidea at 20 °C or in association with a co-stressor of elevated temperature (27 °C), zinc (50 µg Zn/L), or nitrate (35 mg NO3/L). A commonly tested invertebrate (amphipod, Hyalella azteca) also was tested in chronic exposures. Newly transformed pearlshell (~1 week old) were successfully cultured and tested in acute 96 h Cr exposures (control survival 100%). However, the grow-out of juveniles in culture for chronic toxicity testing was less successful and chronic 28-day Cr toxicity tests started with 4 month-old pearlshell failed due to low control survival (39–68%). Acute median effect concentration (EC50) for the pearlshell (919 µg Cr/L) and fatmucket (456 µg Cr/L) tested at 20 °C without a co-stressor decreased by a factor of > 2 at elevated temperature but did not decrease at elevated Zn or elevated NO3. Chronic 28-day Cr tests were completed successfully with the fatmucket and amphipod (control survival 83–98%). Chronic maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) for fatmucket at 20 °C (26 µg Cr/L) decreased by a factor of 2 at elevated temperature or NO3 but did not decrease at elevated Zn. However, chronic MATC for amphipod at 20 °C (13 µg Cr/L) did not decrease at elevated temperature, Zn, or NO3. Acute EC50s for both mussels tested with or without a co-stressor were above the final acute value used to derive United States Environmental Protection Agency acute water quality criterion (WQC) for Cr(VI); however, chronic MATCs for fatmucket at elevated temperature or NO3 and chronic MATCs for the amphipod at 20 °C with or without elevated Zn or NO3 were about equal to the chronic WQC. The results indicate that (1) the elevated temperature

  3. Phototoxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles to a freshwater benthic amphipod: Are benthic systems at risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shibin; Wallis, Lindsay K.; Ma, Hongbo; Diamond, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated phototoxicity of TiO 2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO 2 ) to a freshwater benthic amphipod (Hyalella azteca) using 48-h and 96-h bioassays. Thorough monitoring of particle interactions with exposure media (Lake Superior water, LSW) and the surface of organisms was performed using dynamic light scattering, UV/Vis spectroscopy, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Large agglomeration and sedimentation (> 77%) in LSW was observed after 0.5 h. A simulated solar radiation (SSR)-favored surface attachment of nanoparticles was observed, indicating enhanced phototoxicity with the increased attachment. A 96-h median lethal concentration (LC50) of 29.9 mg/L in H. azteca was calculated, with a daily 4-h UV exposure of 2.2 W/m 2 . Phototoxicity of nano-TiO 2 under SSR had a 21-fold increase as compared to that under ambient laboratory light. This phototoxicity was also dependent on UV dose, with calculated LC50s around 22.9 (95% CI, 20.5–23.3) Wh/m 2 when exposed to 20 mg/L nano-TiO 2 . Also, H. azteca exhibited negative phototaxis in the presence of shelters, indicating that other factors might play a role in environmental systems. Finally, the environmental implications of nano-TiO 2 to benthic organisms were illustrated, emphasizing the importance of various environmental factors in the ultimate phototoxicity. This increased phototoxicity and its complex interactions with various environmental factors suggest further investigations are needed for future risk assessment of photoactive nanomaterials to benthic organisms. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: •Large aggregation of TiO 2 nanoparticles in Lake Superior water was observed. •Phototoxicity was dependent on the dose of both solar radiation and nanoparticle. •A solar radiation favored surface attachment of nanoparticles was observed. •Hyalella azteca exhibited negative phototaxis in the presence of shelters. •Factors influencing phototoxicity in the real environment were

  4. Calculation and evaluation of sediment effect concentrations for the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus riparius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Haverland, Pamela S.; Brunson, Eric L.; Canfield, Timothy J.; Dwyer, F. James; Henke, Chris; Kemble, Nile E.; Mount, David R.; Fox, Richard G.

    1996-01-01

    Procedures are described for calculating and evaluating sediment effect concentrations (SECs) using laboratory data on the toxicity of contaminants associated with field-collected sediment to the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus riparius. SECs are defined as the concentrations of individual contaminants in sediment below which toxicity is rarely observed and above which toxicity is frequently observed. The objective of the present study was to develop SECs to classify toxicity data for Great Lake sediment samples tested with Hyalella azteca and Chironomus riparius. This SEC database included samples from additional sites across the United States in order to make the database as robust as possible. Three types of SECs were calculated from these data: (1) Effect Range Low (ERL) and Effect Range Median (ERM), (2) Threshold Effect Level (TEL) and Probable Effect Level (PEL), and (3) No Effect Concentration (NEC). We were able to calculate SECs primarily for total metals, simultaneously extracted metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The ranges of concentrations in sediment were too narrow in our database to adequately evaluate SECs for butyltins, methyl mercury, polychlorinated dioxins and furans, or chlorinated pesticides. About 60 to 80% of the sediment samples in the database are correctly classified as toxic or not toxic depending on type of SEC evaluated. ERMs and ERLs are generally as reliable as paired PELs and TELs at classifying both toxic and non-toxic samples in our database. Reliability of the SECs in terms of correctly classifying sediment samples is similar between ERMs and NECs; however, ERMs minimize Type I error (false positives) relative to ERLs and minimize Type II error (false negatives) relative to NECs. Correct classification of samples can be improved by using only the most reliable individual SECs for chemicals (i.e., those with a higher percentage of correct classification). SECs

  5. Impact of oil spill and posterior clean-up activities on wrack-living talitrid amphipods on estuarine beaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Borzone

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A geomorphological and faunistic seasonal study of six estuarine beaches on Paranaguá Bay, Brazil, was abruptly interrupted when the Chilean ship "Vicuña" exploded and sank, spilling 291 tons of bunker fuel oil. The beaches sampled twice before the accident were affected by the oil spill deposition and the posterior clean-up activities. Neither drastic reduction in abundances nor occurrences of oil-covered individuals were registered. Significant variation in both amount of debris and talitrid amphipod densities was directly related to beach clean-up activities. A short (1-3 month manual clean-up of polluted wrack resulted in an increase in talitrid abundances, with the local distribution expansion of one species, Platorchestia monodi, from three to six of the beaches sampled. The active migration and concentration of organisms at sites without wrack during cleaning activities and a massive and continuous recovery of new debris, characteristic of estuarine beaches, may contribute to the findings.Um estudo sazonal da geomorfologia e fauna de seis praias estuarinas na baia de Paranaguá, Brasil, foi interrompido bruscamente pela explosão e posterior afundamento do navio chileno Vicuña, que derramou 291 toneladas de óleo bunker. As praias que foram afetadas pela deposição de óleo e pelas posteriores atividades de limpeza, tinham sido amostradas duas vezes antes do acidente. Nas coletas posteriores ao acidente não foram registradas nem reduções drásticas das abundâncias nem indivíduos impregnados por óleo. As significativas variações tanto da quantidade de detrito quanto nas densidades de anfipodes talitrídeos foram relacionadas às atividades de limpeza. Uma limpeza manual e de curta duração (1 a 3 meses resultou num aumento das abundâncias dos talitrídeos, juntamente com o aumento da distribuição de uma das espécies, Platorchestia monodi, que de três passou a ser encontrada em seis praias amostradas.Os fatores que

  6. Cryptorchestia ruffoi sp. n. from the island of Rhodes (Greece, revealed by morphological and phylogenetic analysis (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Talitridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Davolos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A new Cryptorchestia species, Cryptorchestia ruffoi Latella & Vonk, sp. n. from the island of Rhodes in south-eastern Greece, can be distinguished on the basis of morphological and phylogenetic data. Morphological analysis and DNA sequencing of mitochondrial and nuclear protein-coding genes indicated that this species is related to C. cavimana (Cyprus and C. garbinii (Mediterranean regions, with a recent northward expansion. Results supported a genetic separation between the Cryptorchestia species of the east Mediterranean regions and those of the northeast Atlantic volcanic islands examined in this study (C. canariensis, C. gomeri, C. guancha, and C. stocki from the Canary islands, C. monticola from Madeira, and C. chevreuxi from the Azores. The Mediterranean and Atlantic Cryptorchestia species appear to be also morphologically distinct. Cryptorchestia ruffoi sp. n., C. cavimana, C. garbinii, and C. kosswigi (Turkish coast clearly have a small lobe on the male gnathopod 1 merus. This character was the main diagnostic difference between Cryptorchestia (sensu Lowry, 2013 and Orchestia. However, among the six northeast Atlantic island Cryptorchestia species only C. stocki has a small lobe on the merus of gnathopod 1. Reduction or loss of the lobe in the Atlantic Island species cannot be ruled out; however, molecular phylogenetic analysis leads us to presume that this lobe independently evolved between the east Mediterranean Cryptorchestia species and C. stocki from Gran Canaria.

  7. Bottom-up and top-down triggers of diversification: A new look at the evolutionary ecology of scavenging amphipods in the deep sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermans, Charlotte; Smetacek, Victor

    2018-05-01

    The initial, anthropocentric view of the deep ocean was that of a hostile environment inhabited by organisms rendered lethargic by constant high pressure, low temperature and sparse food supply, hence evolving slowly. This conceptual framework of a spatially and temporally homogeneous, connected, strongly bottom-up controlled habitat implied a strong constraint on, or poor incentive for, speciation. Hence, the discovery in the late 1960s of high species diversity of abyssal benthic invertebrates came as a surprise. Since then, the slow-motion view of deep-sea ecology and evolution has speeded up and diversified in the light of increasing evidence accumulating from in situ visual observations complemented by molecular and other tools. The emerging picture is that of a much livelier, highly diversified and more complex deep-sea fauna than previously assumed. In this review we examine the consequences of the incoming information for developing a broader view of evolutionary ecology in the deep sea, and for scavenging amphipods in particular. We revisit the food supply to the deep-sea floor and hypothesize that the dead bodies of animals, ranging from zooplankton to large fish are likely to be a more important source of food than their friable faeces. Camera observations of baited traps indicate that amphipod carrion-feeders arrive within hours at the bait which continues to draw new individuals for days to months later, presumably by scent trails in tidal currents. We explore the different stages of food acquisition upon which natural selection may have acted, from detection to ingestion, and discuss the possibility of a broader range of food acquisition strategies, including predation and specializations. Although currently neglected in deep-sea ecology, top-down factors are likely to play a more important role in the evolution of deep-sea organisms. Predation on amphipods at baits by bathyal and abyssal fishes, and large predatory crustaceans in the hadal zone, is

  8. The amphipod genus Acidostoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahl, E.

    1964-01-01

    The genus Acidostoma was established by Lilljeborg (1865, p. 24) to receive Anonyx obesus Sp. Bate (1862, p. 74). Afterwards two further species have been added, viz. A. laticorne G. O. Sars (1879, p. 440) and A. nodiferum Stephensen (1923, p. 40). In the present paper it will be shown that A.

  9. La répartition écologique des Amphipodes de la familie des Gammaridés dans les départements français de l’Hérault et des Bouches-du-Rhône

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maren, van Marion J.

    1972-01-01

    The distribution and the autecology of 10 species of the amphipod family Gammaridae in fresh and brackish waters in south-eastern France (départements Hérault and Bouches-du-Rhône) are briefly described.

  10. Description of Pseudingolfiella possessionis n. sp. (Crustacea, Amphipoda) from sub-Antarctic Île de La Possession, Crozet archipelago: the second freshwater amphipod known from the Antarctic biome, a human introduction of Gondwanan ancestry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, Willem H De

    2015-03-31

    A new species of freshwater amphipod, Pseudingolfiella possessionis n. sp. (Senticaudata, Pseudingolfiellidae), is described from the submerged moss vegetation of small brooklets at sub-Antarctic Île de La Possession, Crozet archipelago. It constitutes the second freshwater amphipod species known for the sub-Antarctic and Antarctic region, and the fourth member of the genus. The main characters distinguishing it from all congeners are: the spine on the posterior margin of the dactylus, incisor and lamina mobilis of mandible each with 5 teeth, the setation of the maxilliped, the vestigial second article of pleopod 3 in the female, the undulate and laterally notched posterolateral margin of the external ramus of uropods 1 and 2 in the male, the spinulate dorsomedian projection of the telson.

  11. Relative sensitivity of an amphipod Hyalella azteca, a midge Chironomus dilutus, and a unionid mussel Lampsilis siliquoidea to a toxic sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Kunz, James L.; Hughes, Jamie P.; Wang, Ning; Ireland, D. Scott; Mount, David R.; Hockett, J. Russell; Valenti, Ted W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the relative sensitivity of test organisms in exposures to dilutions of a highly toxic sediment contaminated with metals and organic compounds. One dilution series was prepared using control sand (low total organic carbon [TOC; TOC [∼10% TOC, higher binding capacity for contaminants]). Test organisms included an amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 10-d and 28-d exposures), a midge (Chironomus dilutus; 20-d and 48-d exposures started with <1-h-old larvae, and 13-d and 48-d exposures started with 7-d-old larvae), and a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea; 28-d exposures). Relative species sensitivity depended on the toxicity endpoint and the diluent. All 3 species were more sensitive in sand dilutions than in West Bearskin Lake sediment dilutions. The <1-h-old C. dilutus were more sensitive than 7-d-old C. dilutus, but replicate variability was high in exposures started with the younger midge larvae. Larval biomass and adult emergence endpoints of C. dilutus exhibited a similar sensitivity. Survival, weight, and biomass of H. azteca were more sensitive endpoints in 28-d exposures than in 10-d exposures. Weight and biomass of L. siliquoidea were sensitive endpoints in both sand and West Bearskin Lake sediment dilutions. Metals, ammonia, oil, and other organic contaminants may have contributed to the observed toxicity.

  12. Recovery of ostracod with known ages in differently textured sediments and comparison of toxicity of heavily contaminated sediments with ostracod Heterocypris incongruens and amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, N. Yu; Nikitin, O. V.; Latypova, V. Z.; Vybornova, I. B.; Galieva, G. S.; Okunev, R. V.

    2018-01-01

    The recovery of 1-, 4-, 6,-, and 8-d-old ostracods (Heterocypris incongruens) from sediments with different texture has been evaluated. The recovery of ostracods at all ages has been in agreement with the acceptability criterion of 80% of survival for sediment tests. The recovery of ostracods has turned out to be equal to or more than 80% for sand and silt sediments, respectively. The comparison of survival rates between ostracods and amphipods has shown good convergence in the tests of heavily contaminated sediments (R2=0.75, pquality criteria (TEC) have been exceeded mostly for total petroleum hydrocarbons (100% samples), Cr (100%), Ni (87%), Cu (87%), Pb (47%), and Cd (53%). The content of acid volatile sulfides (AVS) has been significantly higher than that of simultaneously extracted metals (SEM). The obtained results have indicated that, metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Ni, and Pb) are non-bioavailable. Only one sample has exceeded TEC for PAHs (dibenz[a,h]anthracene). It was observed that, no significant correlation between the effect of toxicity and the chemical content.

  13. Polychaete/amphipod ratio as an indicator of environmental impact related to offshore oil and gas production along the Norwegian continental shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Hector; Renaud, Paul E

    2011-12-01

    Benthic faunal data is regularly collected worldwide to assess the ecological quality of marine environments. Recently, there has been renewed interest in developing biological indices able to identify environmental status and potential anthropogenic impacts. In this paper we evaluate the performance of a general polychaete/amphipod ratio along the Norwegian continental shelf as an environmental indicator for offshore oil and gas impacts. Two main trends are apparent: first, a contamination gradient is discernible from where production takes place compared to stations 10,000 m away. Second, the quality of the marine environment has improved over time. These results are consistent with monitoring reports employing a combination of uni- and multi-variate statistics. Thus, we consider this ratio as a relatively simple, useful and potentially cost-effective complement to other more demanding assessment techniques. Because of its strong theoretical basis, it may also be useful for detecting ecological change as a result of other activities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The legacy of a vanished sea: a high level of diversification within a European freshwater amphipod species complex driven by 15 My of Paratethys regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamos, Tomasz; Wattier, Remi; Burzyński, Artur; Grabowski, Michał

    2016-02-01

    The formation of continental Europe in the Neogene was due to the regression of the Tethys Ocean and of the Paratethys Sea. The dynamic geology of the area and repetitious transitions between marine and freshwater conditions presented opportunities for the colonization of newly emerging hydrological networks and diversification of aquatic biota. Implementing mitochondrial and nuclear markers in conjunction with a large-scale sampling strategy, we investigated the impact of this spatiotemporal framework on the evolutionary history of a freshwater crustacean morphospecies. The Gammarus balcanicus species complex is widely distributed in the area previously occupied by the Paratethys Sea. Our results revealed its high diversification and polyphyly in relation to a number of other morphospecies. The distribution of the studied amphipod is generally characterized by very high local endemism and divergence. The Bayesian time-calibrated reconstruction of phylogeny and geographical distribution of ancestral nodes indicates that this species complex started to diversify in the Early Miocene in the central Balkans, partially in the shallow epicontinental sea. It is possible that there were several episodes of inland water colonization by local brackish water lineages. Subsequent diversification within clades and spread to new areas could have been induced by Alpine orogeny in the Miocene/Pliocene and, finally, by Pleistocene glaciations. The present distribution of clades, in many cases, still reflects Miocene palaeogeography of the area. Our results point out that investigations of the historical aspect of cryptic diversity in other taxa may help in a general understanding of the origins of freshwater invertebrate fauna of Europe. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Shifts in the diets of slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in Lake Ontario following the collapse of the burrowing amphipod Diporeia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Randall W.; Dittman, Dawn E.

    2003-01-01

    In Lake Ontario, the diets of slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis shifted from a diet dominated by the burrowing amphipod, Diporeia, and to a lesser extent, Mysis, to a more diverse diet, after Diporeia collapsed, to one dominated by Mysis and prey that were formerly less important or uncommon such as Chironomidae, Oligochaeta, and Ostracoda. Additionally, lake whitefish still preyed on native mollusks like Sphaeriidae and Gastropoda, but also preyed on exotic mollusks, Dreissena spp., which are swallowed intact and subsequently crushed in its muscular stomach. Whether Diporeia was abundant (1992) or scarce (1999), selection indices for Diporeia by slimy sculpins was positive, suggesting that Diporeia was a preferred prey. Unlike lake whitefish, slimy sculpins avoided Dreissena; therefore, energy diverted to Dreissena production was a real loss for slimy sculpins. The shifts in the diet of these benthic fishes corresponded with drastic changes in the benthic community between 1992 and 1999. The collapse of Diporeia, formerly the most abundant macroinvertebrate in the benthic community, along with sharp declines in the abundance of Oligochaeta and Sphaeriidae, coincided with the establishment and rapid expansion of Dreissena bugensis, the quagga mussel, and to a lesser degree Dreissena polymorpha, the zebra mussel. It appears that the Diporeia population first collapsed at depths >70 m in southeastern Lake Ontario by autumn 1992, at shallower depths in the eastern Lake Ontario by 1995, and along the entire south shore line at depths 100 m by 1999. In response to the disappearance of Diporeia, populations of two native benthivores, slimy sculpin and lake whitefish, collapsed in eastern Lake Ontario, perhaps due in part to starvation, because Diporeia was their principal prey. Presently, alternative food resources do not appear sufficient to sustain these two benthivores at their former levels of abundance. We do not expect slimy

  16. UV-irradiation and leaching in water reduce the toxicity of imidacloprid-contaminated leaves to the aquatic leaf-shredding amphipod Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Dominic; Zubrod, Jochen P; Neubauer, Christoph; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2018-05-01

    Systemic neonicotinoid insecticides such as imidacloprid are increasingly applied against insect pest infestations on forest trees. However, leaves falling from treated trees may reach nearby surface waters and potentially represent a neonicotinoid exposure source for aquatic invertebrates. Given imidacloprid's susceptibility towards photolysis and high water solubility, it was hypothesized that the leaves' toxicity might be modulated by UV-irradiation during decay on the forest floor, or by leaching and re-mobilization of the insecticide from leaves within the aquatic ecosystem. To test these hypotheses, the amphipod shredder Gammarus fossarum was fed (over 7 d; n = 30) with imidacloprid-contaminated black alder (Alnus glutinosa) leaves that had either been pre-treated (i.e., leached) in water for up to 7 d or UV-irradiated for 1 d (at intensities relevant during autumn in Central Europe) followed by a leaching duration of 1 d. Gammarids' feeding rate, serving as sublethal response variable, was reduced by up to 80% when consuming non-pretreated imidacloprid-contaminated leaves compared to imidacloprid-free leaves. Moreover, both leaching of imidacloprid from leaves (for 7 d) as well as UV-irradiation reduced the leaves' imidacloprid load (by 46 and 90%) thereby mitigating the effects on gammarids' feeding rate to levels comparable to the respective imidacloprid-free controls. Therefore, natural processes, such as UV-irradiation and re-mobilization of foliar insecticide residues in water, might be considered when evaluating the risks systemic insecticide applications in forests might pose for aquatic organisms in nearby streams. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Combined impact of ultraviolet radiation and increased nutrients supply: A test of the potential anthropogenic impacts on the benthic amphipod Amphitoe valida from Patagonian waters (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena S. Valiñas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted during the Austral Summer of 2014 to determine the effects of increased nutrient input and ultraviolet radiation (UVR on the food consumption rate (FCR and food preference in the amphipod Amphitoe valida. We collected specimens from the Patagonian coast (Argentina, from beaches close (Barrancas Blancas; BB and further away (Cangrejales; C from the Chubut River, which constitutes the potential source of eutrophication. Organisms were exposed to different radiation regimes (full radiation vs. PAR only and fed with different macroalgae diets (i.e., from different geographical location and with different quality in terms on nutrient content. Males collected from C showed food compensation, consuming more food under low-nutrient diets, while no compensation was observed in males from BB. Regardless of their origin, UVR decreased the FCR when males where fed on ambient nutrient diets, but not when males fed on high-quality diets indicating that in the former case, individuals were in worse physiological conditions to cope with UVR; food quality, however, significantly counteracted the deleterious effects of UVR on FCR. Females collected from the two beaches showed similar FCR under high-nutrient diet and had no food compensation when fed in low-nutrient diets. Females were more vulnerable to UVR, since their FCR were lower when exposed to UV radiation independent of the diet. Our results show that under anthropogenic eutrophication and high solar UVR levels an increase in the nutrient input could favor only males of A. valida, by reducing the negative effects of UVR on their FCR. Nevertheless, these nutrient inputs might cause additional problems like anoxia, as a result of an unusual macroalgal growth, thus affecting amphipod’s survival.

  18. In situ study of the autecology of the closely related, co-occurring sandy beach amphipods Bathyporeia pilosa and Bathyporeia sarsi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speybroeck, Jeroen; van Tomme, Joke; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2008-09-01

    Population dynamics and zonation of the amphipods Bathyporeia pilosa and B. sarsi, co-occurring on some beaches, were studied through monthly sampling of eight cross-shore transects along the Belgian coast (October 2003-October 2004). Their biomass and production were assessed for the first time. Abundance and biomass of B. pilosa were ten times higher along western ultra-dissipative transects than along slightly more reflective, eastern transects. For B. sarsi (less prominent), differences between the two westernmost transects (2-5× higher) and all others were observed, whereas P/B ratio was comparable for all. B. pilosa could reach two times higher abundance and biomass and higher levels of production (max B. sarsi = 7,580 g m-2 y-1; max B. pilosa = 16,040 g m-2 y-1), while the species was nearly absent from the eastern transects. Continuous reproduction and recruitment with three relative peaks of the latter (February, July, October) were observed. Fecundity showed parallel temporal variation for both species, peaking in February and September-October. Interestingly, the July relative “recruitment” peak could not be explained by relative abundance of gravid females or fecundity, but was probably caused by adult mortality. Both species displayed comparable gonad production ( B. pilosa: P g = 0.73 mg/ind year; B. sarsi: P g = 0.71 mg/ind year), but B. pilosa produced fewer yet larger embryos. Peak abundances were found at 436 ± 25 SD cm ( B. pilosa) and 357 ± 40 SD cm ( B. sarsi) above MLLWS, corresponding to a 40-62 m cross-shore distance between the peaks of both species. The occupied cross-shore range was larger for B. sarsi than for B. pilosa (35-54 m), for females than for males (15-23 m), and for adults than for juveniles of B. pilosa (5-8 m). Both species displayed many comparable life history features. Differences in abundance and biomass may be related to beach morphodynamics and zonation.

  19. OBSERVATIONS ON THE AMPHIPOD PARATHEMISTO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the period April 1958 to May 1960, matur~ females with eggs or young in the ... ovaries, the ova being ioose and almost ready for extrusion. ... single female can produce and the time necessary for the development of the eggs from the.

  20. Anfípodos hiperídeos (Crustacea: Peracarida del Parque Nacional Isla del Coco, Costa Rica, Pacífico Tropical Oriental Hyperiid amphipods (Crustacea: Peracarida of the Parque Nacional Isla del Coco, Costa Rica, Eastern Tropical Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Gasca

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Los anfípodos hiperídeos son uno de los grupos de crustáceos pelágicos más frecuentemente encontrados y están entre los más diversos del zooplancton marino. Para determinar la composición de especies de anfípodos hipéridos que habitan las aguas alrededor del Parque Nacional Isla del Coco, Costa Rica, se analizaron 12 muestras de zooplancton. Estas fueron recolectadas mediante arrastres verticales y horizontales con una red de plancton con mallas de 200 y 500 micras y 49cm de diámetro en la boca. Se encontró un total de 22 especies pertenecientes a 17 géneros y 12 familias. Se presenta el listado faunístico de este grupo junto con datos acerca de su taxonomía, su distribución en el área de estudio y su distribución general. La mayor parte de las especies registradas en esta zona han sido reportadas en estudios previos referentes a la región del Pacífico Tropical Oriental y en particular en aguas oceánicas de Costa Rica. Encontramos ocho especies que representan nuevos registros para aguas del Pacífico costarricense, lo que incrementa en un 26% (a 38 el número de especies de hipéridos conocidos en Costa Rica. Las especies más frecuentes fueron Lestrigonus shoemakeri, L. bengalensis, Hyperioides sibaginis y Phronimosis spinifera. Se espera que muestreos adicionales tanto de aguas superficiales como profundas expandan el conocimiento de la diversidad del grupo en esta área protegida.Hyperiid amphipods are one of the most frequently encountered pelagic crustaceans and among the most diverse marine zooplankters. To determine the species composition of the hyperiid amphipods dwelling in the waters around Isla del Coco National Park, Pacific Costa Rica, we analyzad 12 zooplankton samples, collected by vertical and horizontals tows with plankton net with mesh sizes of 200 and 500 microns and 49cm mouth diameter. We recorded a total of 22 species belonging to 17 genera and 12 families. A faunistic list of this group is provided

  1. Les Gammaridae (Crustaces, Amphipodes) du Massif Central

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedmakers, Annemarie

    1974-01-01

    Une prospection systématique des eaux courantes du Massif Central a permis de reconnaître le nombre d’espèces des Gammaridés présentes dans cette région. On a trouvé les espèces suivantes: Gammarus pulex (Linnaeus, 1758), G. fossarum Koch, 1835, et G. ibericus Margalef, 1951. G. ibericus, espèce

  2. Science.gov (United States)

    Remmert, Hermann

    1970-06-01

    Limosina brachystoma can be reared even when the food and substratum (dry leaves of Urtica or almost any other plant) are moistened with 15‰ NaCl p.a. or with 15‰ NaCl plus KCl. Orchestia lives about three weeks if kept on a substratum moistened with a solution of 15‰ NaCl (Food: Fucus).H 2 SO 4 , on the other hand, is fatal especially, for Orchestia.Burning oil gives off pollutants into the surrounding water. These pollutants are fatal for all the animals studied even at very low concentrations. But in air (not in water) these pollutants disappear within one week and the substratum may be colonized again.Crude oil which has floated in the sea for a long time is not any longer poisonous to the animals studied. It does not hinder rapid propagation of all species Larvae of the flies and - to a lesser extent - of the amphipodes rummage in their substratum and disperse a big piece of old crude oil into fine parts throughout the petri dish.

  3. Evaluation of toxicity to the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and to the midge, Chironomus dilutus; and bioaccumulation by the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, with exposure to PCB-contaminated sediments from Anniston, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Steevens, Jeffery A.; MacDonald, Donald D.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Coady, Matthew R.; Farrar, J. Daniel; Lotufo, Guilherme R.; Kemble, Nile E.; Kunz, James L.; Stanley, Jacob K.; Sinclair, Jesse A.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Steevens, Jeffery A.; MacDonald, Donald D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) requested that as part of the remedial investigation for the Anniston, Alabama Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Site (Anniston PCB Site), that Pharmacia Corporation and Solutia Inc. (P/S) perform long-term reproduction toxicity tests with the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and the midge, Chironomus dilutus, and bioaccumulation tests with the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, using sediment samples collected from reference locations and from Operable Unit 4 of the Anniston PCB Site. The sediment toxicity testing and sediment bioaccumulation results will be used by ARCADIS U.S., Inc. (ARCADIS) as part of a weight-of-evidence assessment to evaluate risks and establish sediment remediation goals for contaminants to sediment-dwelling organisms inhabiting the Anniston PCB Site. The goal of this study was to characterize relations between sediment chemistry and sediment toxicity and relations between sediment chemistry and sediment bioaccumulation in samples of sediments collected from the Anniston PCB Site. A total of 32 samples were evaluated from six test sites and one reference site to provide a wide range in concentrations of chemicals of potential concern (COPCs) including PCBs in samples of whole sediment. The goal of this study was not to determine the extent of sediment contamination across the Anniston PCB Site. Hence, the test sites or samples collected from within a test site were not selected to represent the spatial extent of sediment contamination across the Anniston PCB Site. Sediment chemistry, pore-water chemistry, and sediment toxicity data were generated for 26 sediment samples from the Anniston PCB Site. All of the samples were evaluated to determine if they qualified as reference sediment samples. Those samples that met the chemical selection criteria and biological selection criteria were identified as reference samples and used to develop the reference envelope for each toxicity test endpoint. Physical

  4. A new phylogeny and environmental DNA insight into paramyxids: an increasingly important but enigmatic clade of protistan parasites of marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Georgia M; Bennett, Martyn; Bateman, Kelly; Stentiford, Grant D; Kerr, Rose; Feist, Stephen W; Williams, Suzanne T; Berney, Cedric; Bass, David

    2016-09-01

    Paramyxida is an order of rhizarian protists that parasitise marine molluscs, annelids and crustaceans. They include notifiable pathogens (Marteilia spp.) of bivalves and other taxa of economic significance for shellfish production. The diversity of paramyxids is poorly known, particularly outside of commercially important hosts, and their phylogenetic position is unclear due to their extremely divergent 18S rDNA sequences. However, novel paramyxean lineages are increasingly being detected in a wide range of invertebrate hosts, and interest in the group is growing, marked by the first 'Paramyxean Working Group' Meeting held in Spain in February 2015. We review the diversity, host affiliations, and geographical ranges of all known paramyxids, present a comprehensive phylogeny of the order and clarify its taxonomy. Our phylogenetic analyses confirm the separate status of four genera: Paramarteilia, Marteilioides, Paramyxa and Marteilia. Further, as including M. granula in Marteilia would make the genus paraphyletic we suggest transferring this species to a new genus, Eomarteilia. We present sequence data for Paramyxa nephtys comb. n., a parasite of polychaete worms, providing morphological data for a clade of otherwise environmental sequences, sister to Marteilioides. Light and electron microscopy analyses show strong similarities with both Paramyxa and Paramyxoides, and we further discuss the validity of those two genera. We provide histological and electron microscopic data for Paramarteilia orchestiae, the type species of that genus originally described from the amphipod Orchestia; in situ hybridisation shows that Paramarteilia also infects crab species. We present, to our knowledge, the first known results of a paramyxid-specific environmental DNA survey of environmental (filtered water, sediment, etc.) and organismally-derived samples, revealing new lineages and showing that paramyxids are associated with a wider range of hosts and habitat types than previously

  5. Coexistence of surface and cave amphipods in an ecotone environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luštrik, R.; Turjak, M.; Kralj-Fišer, S.; Fišer, C.

    2011-01-01

    Interspecific interactions between surface and subterranean species may be a key determinant for species distributions. Until now, the existence of competition (including predation) between these groups has not been tested. To assess the coexistence and potential role of interspecific interactions

  6. Amphipods from Curaçao, Bonaire, Aruba and Margarita

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephensen, K.

    1948-01-01

    The material on which the present paper is based was collected in fresh- and brackish-water habitats on the islands of the Leeward Group, West Indies, in 1936 and 1937. For completeness sake specimens from brackish water and from some isolated salt-water habitats — already studied by the author (K.

  7. Transcriptome of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex hepatopancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gismondi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available So far, ecotoxicological studies used biomarkers of exposure or of effects in order to investigate the impacts of contaminated areas on biota (Peakall, 1994 [6]. However, although these results are important in the ecotoxicological risk assessment, biomarkers are very specific and only provide information on the biological processes or physiological pathways targeted by the biomarkers experimenters choose to test (Monsinjon and Knigge, 2007 [5]. In recent years, proteomics have become a major tool in ecotoxicology, as they provide a global insight into the mechanism of action of pollutants without the need of hypothesis testing or any preconception on the biological processes likely impacted (Gismondi et al., 2015; Trapp et al., 2015 [7]; Truebano, 2016 [8]. However, the analysis of proteomic results is often limited due to the lack of database, especially for non-model organisms, such as Gammarus sp, commonly used as biological model in ecotoxicology (Sornom et al., 2012 [11]; Vellinger et al., 2013 [9]; Gismondi and Thomé, 2014 [1]; Lebrun et al., 2014 [3]. Here, we performed Illumina HiSeq sequencing to total RNA isolated from the hepatopancreas (i.e. detoxification tissue of Gammarus pulex males and females coming from uncontaminated river and contaminated river (e.g. PCB, benzo(apyrene. Approximately 290 M paired-end reads were assembled, filtered and sorted into 39,801 contigs whose 10.878 were similar of proteins available in databases. The assembled contigs could represent a reference hepatopancreas transcriptome for G. pulex, and constitute an important resource for future investigations on the impacts of pollutants on invertebrate biota, since it would improve the understanding of the mechanisms of action involved in toxicity. In addition, the hepatopancreas transcriptome will also allow the identification of new potential biomarkers for the ecotoxicological risk assessments. Assembled contigs were deposited in the European Nucleotide Archive under the BioProject number PRJEB13055, with accession numbers FJVI01000001-FJVI01039801.

  8. Population dynamics of estuarine amphipods in Cochin backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, K.K.C.; Gopalakrishnan, T.C.; Venugopal, P.; Peter, G.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Rao, T.S.S.

    is the most widespread species inhabiting all stations with maximum numerical abundance. The coefficient of correlation of different groups with temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, C/N ratio and phosphorus revealed that representatives of the families...

  9. Salinity tolerance of the South African endemic amphipod ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salinities were prepared using natural seawater and synthetic sea salt. Grandidierella lignorum tolerated all salinities, but showed highest survival at salinities of 7–42. Salinity tolerance was modified by temperature, with highest survival occurring between 10 and 25 °C. These represent the range of conditions at which ...

  10. Under the volcano: phylogeography and evolution of the cave-dwelling Palmorchestia hypogaea (Amphipoda, Crustacea at La Palma (Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oromí Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amphipod crustacean Palmorchestia hypogaea occurs only in La Palma (Canary Islands and is one of the few terrestrial amphipods in the world that have adapted to a strictly troglobitic life in volcanic cave habitats. A surface-dwelling closely related species (Palmorchestia epigaea lives in the humid laurel forest on the same island. Previous studies have suggested that an ancestral littoral Orchestia species colonized the humid forests of La Palma and that subsequent drought episodes in the Canaries reduced the distribution of P. epigaea favouring the colonization of lava tubes through an adaptive shift. This was followed by dispersal via the hypogean crevicular system. Results P. hypogaea and P. epigaea did not form reciprocally monophyletic mitochondrial DNA clades. They showed geographically highly structured and genetically divergent populations with current gene flow limited to geographically close surface locations. Coalescence times using Bayesian estimations assuming a non-correlated relaxed clock with a normal prior distribution of the age of La Palma, together with the lack of association of habitat type with ancestral and recent haplotypes, suggest that their adaptation to cave life is relatively ancient. Conclusion The data gathered here provide evidence for multiple invasions of the volcanic cave systems that have acted as refuges. A re-evaluation of the taxonomic status of the extant species of Palmorchestia is needed, as the division of the two species by habitat and ecology is unnatural. The information obtained here, and that from previous studies on hypogean fauna, shows the importance of factors such as the uncoupling of morphological and genetic evolution, the role of climatic change and regressive evolution as key processes in leading to subterranean biodiversity.

  11. The insecticide imidacloprid causes mortality of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex by interfering with feeding behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maija Nyman

    Full Text Available If an organism does not feed, it dies of starvation. Even though some insecticides which are used to control pests in agriculture can interfere with feeding behavior of insects and other invertebrates, the link from chemical exposure via affected feeding activity to impaired life history traits, such as survival, has not received much attention in ecotoxicology. One of these insecticides is the neonicotinoid imidacloprid, a neurotoxic substance acting specifically on the insect nervous system. We show that imidacloprid has the potential to indirectly cause lethality in aquatic invertebrate populations at low, sublethal concentrations by impairing movements and thus feeding. We investigated feeding activity, lipid content, immobility, and survival of the aquatic arthropod Gammarus pulex under exposure to imidacloprid. We performed experiments with 14 and 21 days duration, both including two treatments with two high, one day pulses of imidacloprid and one treatment with a low, constant concentration. Feeding of G. pulex as well as lipid content were significantly reduced under exposure to the low, constant imidacloprid concentration (15 µg/L. Organisms were not able to move and feed--and this caused high mortality after 14 days of constant exposure. In contrast, feeding and lipid content were not affected by repeated imidacloprid pulses. In these treatments, animals were mostly immobilized during the chemical pulses but did recover relatively fast after transfer to clean water. We also performed a starvation experiment without exposure to imidacloprid which showed that starvation alone does not explain the mortality in the constant imidacloprid exposure. Using a multiple stressor toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic modeling approach, we showed that both starvation and other toxic effects of imidacloprid play a role for determining mortality in constant exposure to the insecticide.

  12. Les Amphipodes du genre Gammarus dans le Bassin d’Arcachon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labourg, P.J.; Pinkster, S.; Stock, J.H.

    1971-01-01

    Five species of the genus Gammarus have been found in and around the Basin of Arcachon (southwestern France). Short notes on the autecology of these species are given. Literature records of G. duebeni and of G. aequicauda from the Basin rest on confusion with other species, as is proved by

  13. A Low Cost Amphipod-Based Feed for Rearing of Ornamental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admpather

    were conducted in pet houses each containing five fish and behavioural ... stimuli from the feed, physical texture and particle size are the most important cues that ..... soybean-meal based diets in order to promote optimal growth and health ...

  14. Population Dynamics and Production of the Amphipod Corophium salmonis in Grays Harbor, Washington,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    tideflats in search of females. Kale -female ratios decreased in the lower intertidal, tod at all stations decreased ratios for mature and ismature C...of the sieved material (e.g. vegetation , wood debris, and fecal pellets) sank, while the Corophium species (as well as many of the other organisms...down to approximately +1.5 m. Beyond that point, the mudflat was largely devoid of vegetation . During spring, summer, and early fall, the tideflat had a

  15. Redescription of the rare amphipod crustacean Pseudaeginella montoucheti (Quitete, 1971) from Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Mariana Baptista; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Masunari, Setuko

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Pseudaeginella montoucheti (Quitete, 1971) is redescribed based on newly collected specimens from red and brown algae and tubiculous polychaete colony that were obtained from shallow waters at Tamboretes Archipelago, Balneário Barra do Sul and Sepultura Beach, Bombinhas, Santa Catarina State, Brazil. Of 10 species of Pseudaeginella so far reported, Pseudaeginella montoucheti is closest to Pseudaeginella sanctipauli Laubitz, 1995, but differs from the latter by having more numerous body spines including ventro-lateral ones over gills on pereonites 3 and 4, and the antenna 1 length measuring half body length. An identification key for Pseudaeginella species and a checklist of Caprellidea occurring along the Brazilian coasts are also presented. PMID:22207787

  16. Stygofauna of the Canary Islands, 9. The amphipod genus Pseudoniphargus (Crustacea) in the Canary Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stock, Jan H.

    1988-01-01

    Pseudoniphargus was known from inland stygohabitats in the Iberian peninsula, the Azores, Madeira, N.W. Africa, and Bermuda, but not from the Canary Islands. Systematic sampling in six of the seven larger islands of the latter archipelago has revealed the presence of the genus in Tenerife (4

  17. Flexible omnivory in Dikerogammarus villosus (Sowinsky, 1894) (Amphipoda) — Amphipod Pilot Species Project (AMPIS) report 5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platvoet, D.; van der Velde, G.; Dick, J.T.A.; Li, S.

    2009-01-01

    Feeding in Dikerogammarus villosus (Sowinsky, 1894) males was observed in the field and recorded on video in the laboratory. The following feeding modes were recognized: detritus feeding, grazing, particle feeding, coprophagy, predation on benthic and free swimming invertebrates, predation on fish

  18. The Insecticide Imidacloprid Causes Mortality of the Freshwater Amphipod Gammarus pulex by Interfering with Feeding Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Anna-Maija; Hintermeister, Anita; Schirmer, Kristin; Ashauer, Roman

    2013-01-01

    If an organism does not feed, it dies of starvation. Even though some insecticides which are used to control pests in agriculture can interfere with feeding behavior of insects and other invertebrates, the link from chemical exposure via affected feeding activity to impaired life history traits, such as survival, has not received much attention in ecotoxicology. One of these insecticides is the neonicotinoid imidacloprid, a neurotoxic substance acting specifically on the insect nervous system. We show that imidacloprid has the potential to indirectly cause lethality in aquatic invertebrate populations at low, sublethal concentrations by impairing movements and thus feeding. We investigated feeding activity, lipid content, immobility, and survival of the aquatic arthropod Gammarus pulex under exposure to imidacloprid. We performed experiments with 14 and 21 days duration, both including two treatments with two high, one day pulses of imidacloprid and one treatment with a low, constant concentration. Feeding of G. pulex as well as lipid content were significantly reduced under exposure to the low, constant imidacloprid concentration (15 µg/L). Organisms were not able to move and feed – and this caused high mortality after 14 days of constant exposure. In contrast, feeding and lipid content were not affected by repeated imidacloprid pulses. In these treatments, animals were mostly immobilized during the chemical pulses but did recover relatively fast after transfer to clean water. We also performed a starvation experiment without exposure to imidacloprid which showed that starvation alone does not explain the mortality in the constant imidacloprid exposure. Using a multiple stressor toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic modeling approach, we showed that both starvation and other toxic effects of imidacloprid play a role for determining mortality in constant exposure to the insecticide. PMID:23690941

  19. Fungal composition on leaves explains pollutant-mediated indirect effects on amphipod feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Kosol, Sujitra; Maltby, Lorraine; Stang, Christoph; Duester, Lars; Schulz, Ralf

    2011-07-01

    The energy stored in coarse particulate organic matter, e.g. leaf litter, is released to aquatic ecosystems by breakdown processes involving microorganisms and leaf shredding invertebrates. The palatability of leaves and thus the feeding of shredders on leaf material are highly influenced by microorganisms. However, implications in the colonization of leaves by microorganisms (=conditioning) caused by chemical stressors are rarely studied. Our laboratory experiments, therefore, investigated for the first time effects of a fungicide on the conditioning process of leaf material by means of food-choice experiments using Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea: Amphipoda). Additionally, microbial analyses were conducted to facilitate the mechanistic understanding of the observed behavior. Gammarids significantly preferred control leaf discs over those conditioned in presence of the fungicide tebuconazole at concentrations of 50 and 500 μg/L. Besides the decrease of fungal biomass with increasing fungicide concentration, also the leaf associated fungal community composition showed that species preferred by gammarids, such as Alatospora acumunata, Clavariopsis aquatica, or Flagellospora curvula, were more frequent in the control. Tetracladium marchalianum, however, which is rejected by gammarids, was abundant in all treatments suggesting an increasing importance of this species for the lower leaf palatability--as other more palatable fungal species were almost absent--in the fungicide treatments. Hence, the food-choice behavior of G. fossarum seems to be a suitable indicator for alterations in leaf associated microbial communities, especially fungal species composition, caused by chemical stressors. Finally, this or similar test systems may be a reasonable supplement to the environmental risk assessment of chemicals in order to achieve its protection goals, as on the one hand, indirect effects may occur far below concentrations known to affect gammarids directly, and on the other hand, the observed shifts in leaf associated microbial communities may have perpetuating implications in leaf shredding invertebrates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of arsenate and cadmium toxicity in a freshwater amphipod (Gammarus pulex)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vellinger, Céline; Parant, Marc; Rousselle, Philippe; Immel, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium is largely documented on freshwater organisms while arsenic, especially arsenate, is rarely studied. The kinetic of the LC50s values for both metals was realized on Gammarus pulex. Physiological [i.e. metal concentration in body tissues, bioconcentration factor (BCF)] effects and behavioural responses (via pleopods beats) were investigated after 240-h exposure. Arsenate LC50 value was 100 fold higher than Cd-LC50 value after 240-h exposure, while concentrations in gammarids were similar for both metals at their respective LC50s. BCF decreased with increasing cadmium concentration while BCF remained stable with increasing arsenate concentration. Moreover, BCF was between 148 and 344 times lower for arsenate than cadmium. A significant hypoventilation was observed for cadmium concentrations exceeding or close to the 240h-LC50 Cd , while gammarids hyperventilated for the lowest arsenate concentrations and hypoventilated for the highest arsenate concentrations. We discussed the relationships between potential action mechanisms of these two metals and observed results. - Highlights: ► First study of arsenate toxicity in a Crustacean gammarid. ► Specific toxicological and behavioural responses to AsV and Cd contamination. ► Each metal led to specific-action mechanisms. ► Different energetic reallocation could explain specific behavioural responses. - This study brings to light the potential relationship between toxicological effects and behavioural responses of G. pulex exposed at both Cadmium and Arsenate.

  1. Status of the amphipod Diporeia ssp. in coastal waters of the Laurentian Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diporeia has historically been the dominant benthic macroinvertebrate in deeper waters of the Laurentian Great Lakes, and its abundance has been proposed as an indicator of ecological condition. In 2010, the USEPA incorporated the Great Lakes into the National Coastal Condition A...

  2. Marine biogeography and evolution : Diversity patterns of planktonic gastropods and amphipods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burridge, A.K.

    2017-01-01

    Current changes in the oceans, including global warming and ocean acidification, are partially caused by human activity, unlike earlier episodes of change throughout geological history. Understanding and forecasting the responses of marine organisms to these changes is top priority for scientists,

  3. Translating bioassay results to field population responses using a Leslie-matrix model for the marine amphipod Corophium volutator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.G.D.; Kater, B.J.; Jak, R.G.; Heuvel-Greve, van den M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Bioassays can be used for the assessment of sediment contamination. The response is classified based on a statistical scale indicating a certain effect percentage being significantly different from the controls (e.g. mortality classes of 0¿10%, 10¿20% etc.). The ecological relevance of this

  4. Examining impacts of current-use pesticides in Southern Ontario using in situ exposures of the amphipod Hyalella azteca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Adrienne J; Struger, John; Grapentine, Lee C; Palace, Vince P

    2016-05-01

    In situ exposures with Hyalella azteca were used to assess impacts of current-use pesticides in Southern Ontario, Canada. Exposures were conducted over 2 growing seasons within areas of high pesticide use: 1 site on Prudhomme Creek and 3 sites on Twenty Mile Creek. Three sites on Spencer Creek, an area of low pesticide use, were added in the second season. Surface water samples were collected every 2 wk to 3 wk and analyzed for a suite of pesticides. Hyalella were exposed in situ for 1 wk every 4 wk to 6 wk, and survival and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were measured. Pesticides in surface waters reflected seasonal use patterns: lower concentrations in spring and fall and higher concentrations during summer months. Organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos, azinphos methyl, diazinon) and acid herbicides (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid [2,4-D], mecoprop) were routinely detected in Prudhomme Creek, whereas neutral herbicides (atrazine, metolachlor) dominated the pesticide signature of Twenty Mile Creek. Spencer Creek contained fewer pesticides, which were measured at lower concentrations. In situ effects also followed seasonal patterns: higher survival and AChE activity in spring and fall, and lower survival and AChE activity during summer months. The highest toxicity was observed at Prudhomme Creek and was primarily associated with organophosphates. The present study demonstrated that current-use pesticides in Southern Ontario were linked to in situ effects and identified sites of concern requiring further investigation. © 2015 Crown in the Right of Canada.

  5. Effects of photoperiod and temperature on the induction and termination of reproductive resting stage in the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca (Saussure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deMarch, B.G.E.

    1977-10-01

    Three experiments, one on the induction of reproductive resting stage and two on its termination, were performed to determine the effects of various combinations of temperature and photoperiod on the induction and termination of reproduction in Hyallella azteca. These showed that only photoperiod determined whether reproduction was continued or discontinued but that temperature influenced the rate of all changes. The 12L--12D photoperiod terminated reproduction for at least 4 months at temperatures between 12 and 25/sup 0/C in animals previously reproducing at a 16L--8D photoperiod. The 12L--12D photoperiod also induced reproduction at temperatures between 16 and 26/sup 0/C in animals previously held in a reproductive resting stage in dim light. In contrast, the 16L--8D photoperiod induced and maintained reproduction consistently, and the 8L--16D photoperiod halted reproduction and maintained a reproductive resting stage consistently. The induction of reproduction occurred faster at higher temperatures. It is believed that although photoperiod is the main cue in the induction and termination of reproduction, active reproduction takes place when environmental temperatures are 20 to 26/sup 0/C, since optimum reproduction and growth rates occur in this range. The adaptive advantage and the biogeographic variability of the photoperiodic response are discussed.

  6. Sediment contamination of residential streams in the metropolitan kansas city area, USA: Part II. whole-sediment toxicity to the amphipod hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kemble, N.E.; Dias, J.R.; Murowchick, J.B.; Welker, G.; Huggins, D.

    2010-01-01

    This is the second part of a study that evaluates the influence of nonpoint sources on the sediment quality of five adjacent streams within the metropolitan Kansas City area, central United States. Physical, chemical, and toxicity data (Hyalella azteca 28-day whole-sediment toxicity test) for 29 samples collected in 2003 were used for this evaluation, and the potential causes for the toxic effects were explored. The sediments exhibited a low to moderate toxicity, with five samples identified as toxic to H. azteca. Metals did not likely cause the toxicity based on low concentrations of metals in the pore water and elevated concentrations of acid volatile sulfide in the sediments. Although individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) frequently exceeded effect-based sediment quality guidelines [probable effect concentrations (PECs)], only four of the samples had a PEC quotient (PEC-Q) for total PAHs over 1.0 and only one of these four samples was identified as toxic. For the mean PEC-Q for organochlorine compounds (chlordane, dieldrin, sum DDEs), 4 of the 12 samples with a mean PEC-Q above 1.0 were toxic and 4 of the 8 samples with a mean PEC-Q above 3.0 were toxic. Additionally, four of eight samples were toxic, with a mean PEC-Q above 1.0 based on metals, PAHs, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organochlorine pesticides. The increase in the incidence of toxicity with the increase in the mean PEC-Q based on organochlorine pesticides or based on metals, PAHs, PCBs, and organochlorine pesticides suggests that organochlorine pesticides might have contributed to the observed toxicity and that the use of a mean PEC-Q, rather than PEC-Qs for individual compounds, might be more informative in predicting toxic effects. Our study shows that stream sediments subject to predominant nonpoint sources contamination can be toxic and that many factors, including analysis of a full suite of PAHs and pesticides of both past and present urban applications and the origins of these organic compounds, are important to identify the causes of toxicity. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  7. A non-diatom plankton bloom controlled by copepod grazing and amphipod predation: Preliminary results from the LOHAFEX iron-fertilisation experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazzocchi, M.G.; Gonzalez, H.E.; Vandromme, P.; Borrione, I.; deAlcala, M.R.; Gauns, M.; Assmy, P.; Fuchs, B.; Klaas, C.; Martin, P.; Montresor, M.; Ramaiah, N.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Smetacek, V.

    ” and is reported to be the main food of the squid Ilex argentinus which is the target of the intense squid fishery along the Patagonian shelf break, prominent in satellite images of the world by night, because lights are used to attract squid. So why does only...

  8. ECDYSTEROID CONCENTRATIONS THROUGH VARIOUS LIFE-STAGES OF THE MEIOBENTHIC HARPACTICOID COPEPOD, AMPHIASCUS TENUIREMIS AND THE BENTHIC ESTUARINE AMPHIPOD, LEPTOCHEIRUS PLUMULOSUS. (R827397)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  9. Preliminary observation on breeding three spotted seahorse, Hippocampus trimaculatus (Leach, 1814), solely fed with wild caught amphipods under ex-situ condition

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murugan, A.; Dhanya, S.; Pawar, H.; Sreepada, R.A.; Rajagopal, S.; Balasubramanian, T.

    male length (HT in mm) 12.5 0.8 12.1 – 13.3 14 Adult female length (HT in mm) 12.7 0.91 12.4 – 13.1 14 Adult male wet weight (g) 7.1 0.59 6.5 – 7.4 14 Adult female wet weight (g) 7.8 0.73 6.7 – 8.2 14 Table 2. Captive breeding of the three spotted...

  10. Testing for the induction of anti-herbivory defences in four Portuguese macroalgae by direct and water-borne cues of grazing amphipods

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, H. Y.; Cruz, J.; Treitschke, M.; Wahl, Martin; Molis, M.

    2007-01-01

    Herbivory is a key factor in regulating plant biomass, thereby driving ecosystem performance. Algae have developed multiple adaptations to cope with grazers, including morphological and chemical defences. In a series of experiments we investigated whether several species of macroalgae possess anti-herbivore defences and whether these could be regulated to demand, i.e. grazing events. The potential of direct grazing on defence induction was assessed for two brown (Dictyopteris membranacea, Fuc...

  11. Stygofauna of the Canary Islands, 4. Liagoceradocus acutus Andres, 1978, a blind anchihaline amphipod from Lanzarote: redescription, taxonomic status and occurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rondé-Broekhuizen, Brigitte L.M.; Stock, Jan H.

    1987-01-01

    Liagoceradocus acutus Andres, 1978, has been found in different localities on Lanzarote, Canary Islands. A redescription is provided and the taxonomic status of the genus Liagoceradocus is discussed. The species shows sexual dimorphism mainly in the morphology of the propodus of gnathopods 1 and 2,

  12. Crustacea; Talitridae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Distribution of the amphipod, Talorchestia capensis (Crustacea; Talitridae) has been studied in a dune-beach system. The majority of amphipods occurred in dune slacks with fewer on the beach. No zonation of size classes existed, both juveniles and adults occurring throughout the slack. Amphipods were concentrated in ...

  13. Acute Toxicity of Tributyltins and Tributyltin Leachates from Marine Antibiofouling Paints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-10

    RO-0184 224 ACUTE TOXICITY OF TRIBUTYLTINS AND TRIBUTYLTIN i/I LEACHATES FROM MARINE ANTIBIOFOULING PAINTS(U) CALIFORNIA UNIV OAKLAND NAVAL...Classification) (U) ACUTE TOXICITY OF TRIBUTYLTINS AND TRIBUTYLTIN LEACHATES FROM MARINE ANTIBIOFOULING PAINTS 12, PERSO A UHR Laugin, Koy"., Linden, Olof and...xins causing acute toxicity or two amphipou species at concentrations as low as 10 g/L . Orchestia traskiana was exposed to bis ( tributyltin ) oxide

  14. Mexorchestia: a new genus of talitrid amphipod (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Talitridae) from the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, with the description of a new species and two new subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildish, David J; Lecroy, Sara E

    2014-08-26

    Two species of supralittoral Tethorchestia were reported by Bousfield (1984) to occur on the shores of the Gulf of Mexico and closely adjacent waters: T. antillensis Bousfield, 1984 from Quintana Roo, Mexico and an undescribed species, Tethorchestia sp. B of Bousfield (1984), from Florida and the U.S. Gulf coast. In this paper, we rediagnose and illustrate the former taxon based on material from Goodland Bay, Florida, which represents a range extension for that species. We examined the latter taxon from many locations throughout the Gulf of Mexico using classical morphology, epidermal pigment pattern recognition and allometry, reinforced by molecular markers (mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I, Radulovici 2012), determining that Tethorchestia sp. B represents a new genus and species, comprising two subspecies. The nominate subspecies, Mexorchestia carpenteri carpenteri n. gen., sp. and subsp., is described from Tiger Tail Beach, Florida, based on conventional morphological criteria and its distinctive epidermal pigment patterns. The Tiger Tail Beach ecotope of M. c. carpenteri n. gen., sp. and subsp. was distinct from that of other locations examined in Florida and was associated with epidermal pigment pattern polymorphism, absent at other locations. A second subspecies, distinguished by differences in size, number of articles in the flagellum of antenna 2, the number of marginal setae on oostegite 2 of the female and the number of distal dorsolateral robust setae on the telson, was found in samples from Belize and Mexico. This subspecies is described from material collected at Turneffe Island, Belize, as Mexorchestia carpenteri raduloviciae n. gen., sp. and subsp. Like M. c. carpenteri n. gen., sp. and subsp., this taxon is also associated with epidermal pigment pattern polymorphism. A key is provided for the three currently described species of Tethorchestia (two extant) and two new subspecies of Mexorchestia n.gen. 

  15. Review of amphipods of the Melita group (Amphipoda: Melitidae) from the coastal waters of Sakhalin Island (Far East of Russia). II. Genera Quasimelita Jarrett & Bousfield, 1996 and Melitoides Gurjanova, 1934.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labay, Vjacheslav S

    2014-10-01

    Based on new material, three new species of the genus Quasimelita are described: Q. tolyza sp. nov., Q. jarettii sp. nov. and Q. serraticoxae sp. nov. from northern shelf of Sakhalin Island and contiguous area. The new species of the genus Melitoides, M. kawaii sp. nov. is described from north-east shelf of Sakhalin Island. Keys to the world species of genera Quasimelita and Melitoides are provided. Cladistic analysis of morphological relationships within genera Quasimelita and Melitoides are implemented.

  16. Toxicity of silicon carbide nanowires to sediment-dwelling invertebrates in water or sediment exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Joseph N.; Wang, Ning; Ritts, Andrew; Kunz, James L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Li, Hao; Deng, Baolin

    2011-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNW) are insoluble in water. When released into an aquatic environment, SiCNW would likely accumulate in sediment. The objective of this study was to assess the toxicity of SiCNW to four freshwater sediment-dwelling organisms: amphipods (Hyalella azteca), midges (Chironomus dilutus), oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus), and mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea). Amphipods were exposed to either sonicated or nonsonicated SiCNW in water (1.0 g/L) for 48 h. Midges, mussels, and oligochaetes were exposed only to sonicated SiCNW in water for 96 h. In addition, amphipods were exposed to sonicated SiCNW in whole sediment for 10 d (44% SiCNW on dry wt basis). Mean 48-h survival of amphipods exposed to nonsonicated SiCNW in water was not significantly different from the control, whereas mean survival of amphipods exposed to sonicated SiCNW in two 48-h exposures (0 or 15% survival) was significantly different from the control (90 or 98% survival). In contrast, no effect of sonicated SiCNW was observed on survival of midges, mussels, or oligochaetes. Survival of amphipods was not significantly reduced in 10-d exposures to sonicated SiCNW either mixed in the sediment or layered on the sediment surface. However, significant reduction in amphipod biomass was observed with the SiCNW either mixed in sediment or layered on the sediment surface, and the reduction was more pronounced for SiCNW layered on the sediment. These results indicated that, under the experimental conditions, nonsonicated SiCNW in water were not acutely toxic to amphipods, sonicated SiCNW in water were acutely toxic to the amphipods, but not to other organisms tested, and sonicated SiCNW in sediment affected the growth but not the survival of amphipods.

  17. Population dynamics of Parhyale hawaiensis (Crustacea: Amphipod) in laboratory culture and life history diferences between laboratory and wild populations = : Dinâmica populacional de Parhyale hawaiensis de uma cultura de laboratório e comparação de historia de vida com uma população natural

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Assanuma Burstin

    2016-01-01

    Resumo: Ramos da ecologia, tal como a teoria da história de vida, podem contribuir para a expansão do espectro de atividades da Ecotoxicologia clássica englobando o poder preditivo de alguns dos princípios da ecologia populacional. Este trabalho se propõe a analisar as estratégias demográficas adotadas pelo crustáceo marinho Parhyale hawaiensis mantido em laboratório, descrevendo seu ciclo de vida, fitness reprodutivo e dinâmica populacional através da construção de tabela de vida tempo-espec...

  18. Chronotoxicity of contaminants (etanol and hezvy metales) in a freshwater teleost Dario rerio (Hamilton, 1882) and marine amphipods Gammarus aequicauda (Martynov, 1931) and Gammarus chevreuxi (Sexton, 1913) = Cronotixicidad de contaminantes (etanol y metales pesados) en el teleósteo de agua dulce Dario rerio (Hamilton, 1822) y los antípodos marinos, Gammarus aequicauda (Martynov, 1931) y Gammarus chevreuxi (Sexton, 1913)

    OpenAIRE

    Bello Marín, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Esta tesis tiene como objetivo investigar los efectos del etanol y metales pesados (cadmio y mercurio) en los patrones diarios de dos especies acuáticas clave: pez cebra (Darío rerio) y anfípodo gammarus (G. aequicauda y G. chevreuxi). La investigación se realizó en dos niveles organizativos: comportamental y molecular. Con este fin, hemos establecido cuatro objetivos específicos: 1. Investigar los efectos al etanol en el pez cebra en función en su ritmo circadiano. 2. Determinar la exi...

  19. Analysis of the gut contents of the needlefish, Hyporhamphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Food items were identified as far as possible. Amphipods and isopods were usually broken up and difficult to separate, and consequently grouped together in the .... Protozoa. Foraminifera. Filamentous algae. Aquatic macrophytes. Ruppia spiralis +. Potamogeton pectinatus. Polychaeta. Crustacea. Ostracoda. Copepoda.

  20. Zooplankton biomass and composition in the western Bay of Bengal during late sw monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.; Madhupratap, M.; Nair, V.R.; Nair, S.R.S.; Rao, T.S.S.

    and neritic regions of the southwestern Bay of Bengal. Other groups like chaetognaths, ostracods, amphipods, euphausiids, fish eggs, fish larvae, polychaetes, cladocerans, planktonic molluscs, etc. contributed to a lesser percentage of the general composition...

  1. Epigean freshwater Gammaridae (Crustacea, Amphipoda) from La Gomera (Canary Islands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, Gabriele; Stock, Jan H.

    1994-01-01

    Description of two new species of freshwater amphipods from La Gomera (Canary Islands), both found in the higher parts of the island: Chaetogammarus chaetocerus n. sp. and Rhipidogammarus gomeranus n. sp. Both species have distinct Afro- Iberian relationships.

  2. Distribution and abundance of benthic macroorganisms in and around Visakhapatnam Harbour on the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Musale, A.S.; Desai, D.V.; Sawant, S.S.; Venkat, K.; Anil, A.C.

    seasonal shift in the occurrence and dominance of macrobenthos. During post-monsoon, Cossura coasta was dominant followed by Nephtys dibranchis and amphipods. Sediment characteristics (sand, silt and clay), organic carbon and dissolved oxygen were...

  3. Temporal variation of the gammaridean fauna (Crustacea, Amphipoda associated with the sponge Mycale angulosa (Porifera, Demospongiae in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Fernandes de Britto Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTMarine sponges are advantageous microhabitats because of their complex architecture. The system of internal canals provides circulation of water and deposition of particulate organic matter, ensuring availability of food and shelter. Diminutive amphipods have little difficulty penetrating the spaces of sponges and remain in their aquiferous systems as one of the most abundant taxa in this association. This study evaluated the temporal variation of the gammaridean amphipod species associated with the sponge Mycale angulosa. Sponge samples were collected every three months over one year at Pontal da Cruz Beach, São Sebastião Channel, southeastern Brazil. The amphipod assembly varied over time, while the amphipod density and sponge biomass remained approximately constant. Six species contributed to the temporal variation infaunal composition, highlighting the importance of the natural history of each species.

  4. The dusky kob Argyrosomus japonicus is a large sciaenid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    and Pool 1991) and in one in Australia (Hall 1986), but all those studies were ... included calanoid copepods, mysids, insects, amphipods and swimming prawns. The impact of reduced ... gives a measure of the energy contribution of that. 138.

  5. Fungal infection in the tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon) and in other crustaceans from the Cochin Backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalan, U.K.; Meenakshikunjamma, P.P.; Purushan, K.S.

    Infection of the two species of fungi (Phycomycetes) in the tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon) and three species in amphipods (Gammarus sp.) and tanaeidaceans (Apseudes sp.) was observed. Of the two pathogens in the shrimp, Leptolegnia marina produced...

  6. Ecological investigation of Hudson River macrozooplankton in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginn, T.C.

    1977-01-01

    Studies were conducted on selected Hudson River macrozooplankton species to determine temporal and spatial distributions and responses to power plant operation. Distinguishing morphological and habitat characteristics were determined for the three gammarid amphipods (Gammarus daiberi, G. tigrinus, and G. fasciatus) occurring in the Hudson River. The oedicerotid amphipod Monoculodes edwardsi and the mysid Neomysis americana, in addition to the gammarid amphipods, displayed characteristic diel and seasonal abundances which affect their potential availability for power plant entrainment. The selected macrozooplankton species were utilized in temperature and chlorine bioassays in order to predict responses to cooling water entrainment. Although amphipods (Gammarus spp. and M. edwardsi) survived typical Indian Point cooling water temperatures, N. americana had high mortalities during a 30-minute, 8.3 0 C ΔT at 25 0 C ambient temperature. The bioassay results were substantiated by generally high survivals of entrained amphipods at the Indian Point plant. Neomysis americana were more heat sensitive, as indicated in bioassays, with average entrainment mortalities ranging from 30 to 60 percent during the summer. All species examined had higher immediate and latent mortalities during plant condenser chlorination. The ability of Gammarus to survive condenser passage and exposure to the Indian Point thermal discharge plume indicates that power plant operation on the lower Hudson River Estuary has no adverse impact on local gammarid amphipod populations. Entrained N. americana experience considerable mortalities; however, the impact on Atlantic Coast populations is minimized by the limited exposure of the population fringe to the Indian Point power plant

  7. Interactions among zebra mussel shells, invertebrate prey, and Eurasian ruffe or yellow perch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, C.S.; Fullerton, A.H.; Martin, K.M.; Lamberti, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    The exotic zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, is established in all of the Laurentian Great Lakes and may affect benthivorous fishes by increasing the complexity of benthic substrates and changing energy flow patterns within the food web. Native yellow perch, Perca flavescens, and the nonindigenous Eurasian ruffe, Gymnocephalus cernuus, are benthivores that may compete for limited food resources. As ruffe spread to areas with more dense zebra mussel populations, the zone of interaction among zebra mussels, yellow perch, and ruffe will increase and intensify. In the laboratory, the effect of zebra mussel shells on the ability of these fishes to forage on amphipods (Gammarus pseudolimnaeus) and chironomids (Chironomus plumosus) was examined in light and darkness. In 12 h, ruffe consumed more amphipods than did similar-sized yellow perch, particularly in darkness on bare cobble, and in light within zebra mussels. Amphipods decreased activity more in the presence of ruffe than yellow perch. More amphipods were found in zebra mussel shells than in bare cobble, whether or not fish were present. In darkness, when ruffe consumed more amphipods on bare cobble, amphipods became more associated with zebra mussel shells. Although ruffe consumed more amphipods than yellow perch, perch consumed more chironomids than ruffe on bare cobble. The presence of zebra mussel shells altered the relative consumption of invertebrates in some substrate-light combinations. Experiments such as these help to improve understanding of the direct and indirect effects of predation between and among native and nonindigenous species that may exert structuring forces on the nearshore communities of the Great Lakes currently or in the future.

  8. Suprabenthic assemblages from the Capbreton area (SE Bay of Biscay). Faunal recovery after a canyon turbidity disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutos, Inmaculada; Sorbe, Jean Claude

    2017-12-01

    In the Capbreton area, suprabenthic assemblages were sampled with a sledge towed over the bottom, at different sites located within the upper part of a 'gouf-type' canyon (8 hauls between 642 m and 797 m, on the axis of the thalweg or on flat perched flank terraces such as site K), on the northern adjacent open slope (2 hauls between 500 and 567 m) and on the northern adjacent shelf margin (2 hauls between 151 m and 158 m). A multivariate analysis carried on the faunal data discriminated different assemblages in this area: a near-canyon shelf assemblage (55 species, mainly amphipods and decapods; 3496 ind./100 m2, 40% mysids; dominant species: Nyctiphanes couchii, Leptomysis gracilis, Weswoodilla rectirostris, Anchialina agilis, Scopelocheirus hopei and Philocheras bispinosus); an open slope assemblage (111 species, mainly amphipods and isopods; 249 ind./100 m2, 36% amphipods; dominant species: Disconectes phalangium, Munnopsurus atlanticus and Boreomysis arctica); a canyon E assemblage (129 species, mainly amphipods, mysids and cumaceans; 1172 ind./100 m2, 58% amphipods; dominant species: Melphidippa sp. B, Chelator insignis); a canyon E' assemblage (107 species, mainly amphipods and mysids; 507 ind./100 m2, 73% amphipods; dominant species: Cleonardopsis carinata, Bonnierella abyssorum, Rhachotropis caeca and Arcturopsis giardi); and a temporary canyon assemblage at site K (34 species, mainly amphipods and mysids; 899 ind./100 m2, 85% amphipods; dominant species: Tmetomyx similis, Caeconyx caeculus, Nebalia sp. A and Cleonardopsis carinata). Site K was sampled only four months after a turbidity event, detected on sediment cores (18 cm thick Bouma sequence) taken during the same cruise and triggered by the violent storm ('ouragan Martin', wind up to 200 km/h) which affected the French Atlantic coast on 27 December 1999. The corresponding suprabenthic assemblage showed evidence of deep structural changes after this catastrophic event, characterized by relative low

  9. Acute toxicity of fire-retardant and foam-suppressant chemicals to yalella azteca (Saussure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Susan F.; Hamilton, Steven J.; Buhl, Kevin J.; Heisinger, James F.

    1997-01-01

    Acute toxicity tests were conducted with Hyalella azteca Saussure (an amphipod) exposed in soft and hard waters to three fire retardants (Fire-Trol GTS-R, Fire-Trol LCG-R, and Phos-Chek D75-F) and two foam suppressants (Phos-Chek WD-881 and Silv-Ex). The chemicals were slightly to moderately toxic to amphipods. The most toxic chemical to amphipods in soft and hard water was Phos-Chek WD-881 (96-h mean lethal concentration [LC50] equal to 10 mg/L and 22 mg/L, respectively), and the least toxic chemical to amphipods in soft water was Fire-Trol GTS-R (96-h LC50 equal to 127 mg/L) and in hard water was Fire-Trol LCG-R (96-h LC50 equal to 535 mg/L). Concentrations of ammonia in tests with the three fire retardants and both water types were greater than reported LC50 values and probably were the major toxic component. Estimated un-ionized ammonia concentrations near the LC50 were frequently less than the reported LC50 ammonia concentrations for amphipods. The three fire retardants were more toxic in soft water than in hard water even though ammonia and un-ionized ammonia concentrations were higher in hard water tests than in soft water tests. The accidental entry of fire-fighting chemicals into aquatic environments could adversely affect aquatic invertebrates, thereby disrupting ecosystem function.

  10. Wetland use and feeding by lesser scaup during spring migration across the upper Midwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anteau, M.J.; Afton, A.D.

    2009-01-01

    Low food availability and forage quality and concomitant decreased lipid reserves of lesser scaup (Aythya affinis; hereafter scaup) during spring migration in the upper Midwest may partially explain reductions in the continental population of scaup. In springs 20042005, we examined wetland use and feeding activity of scaup on 356 randomly-selected wetlands within 6 regions in Iowa, Minnesota, and North Dakota. We examined wetland characteristics that favor high scaup use in 286 of these wetlands. We found that probabilities of wetland use and feeding by scaup increased with turbidity up to 45 and 30 NTU, respectively, but then declined at higher turbidity levels. Wetland use was positively correlated with size of open-water zone and amphipod densities, but was not correlated with chironomid densities. Feeding increased with amphipod density up to 26 m-3 and then declined at higher amphipod densities; scaup seemingly forage most efficiently at amphipod densities above 26 m -3. Wetland use was higher in North Dakota than in southern Minnesota and Iowa. Our results indicate that effective wetland restoration efforts to benefit scaup require maintaining abundant populations of amphipods (generally near 26 m-3 landscape geometric mean) in wetlands with large (> 500 m diameter) open-water zones throughout the upper Midwest, but especially within Iowa and southern Minnesota.

  11. Review of experimental and natural invertebrate hosts of sealworm (Pseudoterranova decipiens and its distribution and abundance in macroinvertebrates in eastern Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Marcogliese

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and natural invertebrate intermediate hosts of sealworm (Pseudoterranova decipiens as well as transmission experiments of sealworm from invertebrates to fish are reviewed and summarized. Experimental hosts include copepods, mysids, cumaceans, isopods, amphipods, decapods, annelids, and molluscs. Invertebrates collected from eastern Canada between 1989 and 1995 were checked for nematode infections by microscopic examination of dissected animals or enzymatic digestion of bulk samples. Third-stage larval sealworm were found in mysids (Neomysis americana, Mysis stenolepis from Passamaquoddy Bay, the Bras d’Or Lakes, inshore Cape Breton, Sable Island and Sable Island Bank. Infected amphipods (Amphiporeia virginiana, Americorchestia megalophthalma, Gammarus spp. were found only on Sable Island. Typical infection rates in macroinvertebrates were 1-4/1000. No sealworm infections were found in approximately 18,000 amphipods examined from Sable Island Bank, the site of the most heavily infected fishes in eastern Canada. In Wallace Lake, a brackish pond on Sable Island, infection rates were much higher in mysids than in amphipods. Estimates of rates of transmission of sealworm from invertebrates to fish were derived from infection levels in Wallace Lake and feeding experiments involving sticklebacks and invertebrate prey. It is concluded that mysids may be much more important than amphipods in transmitting sealworm to fish hosts.

  12. Getting what is served? Feeding ecology influencing parasite-host interactions in invasive round goby Neogobius melanostomus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, Sebastian; Kochmann, Judith; Kuhn, Thomas; Plath, Martin; Klimpel, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are increasingly impacted by alien invasive species which have the potential to alter various ecological interactions like predator-prey and host-parasite relationships. Here, we simultaneously examined predator-prey interactions and parasitization patterns of the highly invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) in the rivers Rhine and Main in Germany. A total of 350 N. melanostomus were sampled between June and October 2011. Gut content analysis revealed a broad prey spectrum, partly reflecting temporal and local differences in prey availability. For the major food type (amphipods), species compositions were determined. Amphipod fauna consisted entirely of non-native species and was dominated by Dikerogammarus villosus in the Main and Echinogammarus trichiatus in the Rhine. However, the availability of amphipod species in the field did not reflect their relative abundance in gut contents of N. melanostomus. Only two metazoan parasites, the nematode Raphidascaris acus and the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus sp., were isolated from N. melanostomus in all months, whereas unionid glochidia were only detected in June and October in fish from the Main. To analyse infection pathways, we examined 17,356 amphipods and found Pomphorhynchus sp. larvae only in D. villosus in the river Rhine at a prevalence of 0.15%. Dikerogammarus villosus represented the most important amphipod prey for N. melanostomus in both rivers but parasite intensities differed between rivers, suggesting that final hosts (large predatory fishes) may influence host-parasite dynamics of N. melanostomus in its introduced range.

  13. Effects of 2 fungicide formulations on microbial and macroinvertebrate leaf decomposition under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elskus, Adria; Smalling, Kelly L.; Hladik, Michelle; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic fungi contribute significantly to the decomposition of leaves in streams, a key ecosystem service. However, little is known about the effects of fungicides on aquatic fungi and macroinvertebrates involved with leaf decomposition. Red maple (Acer rubrum) leaves were conditioned in a stream to acquire microbes (bacteria and fungi), or leached in tap water (unconditioned) to simulate potential reduction of microbial biomass by fungicides. Conditioned leaves were exposed to fungicide formulations QUILT (azoxystrobin + propiconazole) or PRISTINE (boscalid + pyraclostrobin), in the presence and absence of the leaf shredder, Hyalella azteca (amphipods; 7-d old at start of exposures) for 14 d at 23 °C. QUILT formulation (~ 0.3 μg/L, 1.8 μg/L, 8 μg/L) tended to increase leaf decomposition by amphipods (not significant) without a concomitant increase in amphipod biomass, indicating potential increased consumption of leaves with reduced nutritional value. PRISTINE formulation (~ 33 μg/L) significantly reduced amphipod growth and biomass (p<0.05), effects similar to those observed with unconditioned controls. The significant suppressive effects of PRISTINE on amphipod growth, and the trend towards increased leaf decomposition with increasing QUILT concentration, indicate the potential for altered leaf decay in streams exposed to fungicides. Further work is needed to evaluate fungicide effects on leaf decomposition under conditions relevant to stream ecosystems, including temperature shifts and pulsed exposures to pesticide mixtures.

  14. Pathways of CH3Hg and Hg ingestion in benthic organisms: an enriched isotope approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Vivien F; Bugge, Deenie; Jackson, Brian P; Chen, Celia Y

    2014-05-06

    Mercury is a widespread contaminant in marine food webs, and identifying uptake pathways of mercury species, CH3Hg(+) and Hg(2+), into low trophic level organisms is important to understanding its entry into marine food webs. Enriched stable isotope tracers were used to study benthic vs. pelagic pathways of CH3Hg(+) and Hg(2+) uptake via food to the infaunal estuarine amphipod, Leptocheirus plumulosus. Algal cells differentially labeled with isotopically enriched CH3Hg(+) or Hg(2+) were added simultaneously to the sediment and water column of microcosms, and Hg species were monitored in amphipods and in sediment and water compartments. Methylation of Hg(2+) occurred during the course of the experiment, enhancing the uptake of Hg(2+) spikes. Trophic transfer of Hg from algae added to the water column was determined to be the major uptake route for amphipods, suggesting inputs of contaminated organic matter from the pelagic zone are important to mercury bioaccumulation even in organisms living in sediments.

  15. Ocean acidification induces changes in algal palatability and herbivore feeding behavior and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Cristian; López, Jorge; Benítez, Samanta; Manríquez, Patricio H; Navarro, Jorge M; Bonta, Cesar C; Torres, Rodrigo; Quijón, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    The effects of global stressors on a species may be mediated by the stressors' impact on coexisting taxa. For instance, herbivore-algae interactions may change due to alterations in algal nutritional quality resulting from high CO2 levels associated with ocean acidification (OA). We approached this issue by assessing the indirect effects of OA on the trophic interactions between the amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata and the brown alga Durvillaea antarctica, two prominent species of the South-east Pacific coast. We predicted that amphipod feeding behavior and performance (growth rate) will be affected by changes in the palatability of the algae exposed to high levels (1000 ppm) of CO2. We exposed algae to current and predicted (OA) atmospheric CO2 levels and then measured their nutritive quality and amphipod preference in choice trials. We also assessed consumption rates separately in no-choice trials, and measured amphipod absorption efficiency and growth rates. Protein and organic contents of the algae decreased in acidified conditions and amphipods showed low preference for these algae. However, in the no-choice trials we recorded higher grazing rates on algae exposed to OA. Although amphipod absorption efficiency was lower on these algae, growth rates did not differ between treatments, which suggests the occurrence of compensatory feeding. Our results suggest that changes in algal nutritional value in response to OA induce changes in algal palatability and these in turn affect consumers' food preference and performance. Indirect effects of global stressors like OA can be equally or more important than the direct effects predicted in the literature.

  16. United States of America. Report 1 [Marine Radioecology. Current Research and Future Scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, R.E.

    1967-01-01

    Biology Department's aquatic research activities are primarily in freshwater radioecology and not in marine radioecology. The major reason for this lack of marine work is geographical location of our laboratory on the banks of the Columbia River, roughly 300 miles from the ocean. Recently, however, we have completed some preliminary work with 65 Zn metabolism in Anonyx sp., a marine benthic amphipod. Lake some inland laboratories, we have found that limited marine work can be done by hauling in sea water. We have been able to maintain the amphipods in a reasonably healthy state in our laboratory for about four weeks

  17. Patterns of species richness in sandy beaches of South America ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The middle shore is primarily occupied by cirolanids and bivalves, and hippid crabs, bivalves and amphipods dominate the lower beach. Generally, species richness increases from upper to lower beach levels. Studies carried out on exposed sandy beaches of south-central Chile (ca. 40°S) show that different beach states ...

  18. Microphallids in Gammarus insensibilis Stock, 1966 from a Black Sea lagoon: host response to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinova, A; Mavrodieva, R S

    2005-09-01

    We examined the patterns of parasite melanization in Gammarus insensibilis using data on microphallids from Pomorie Lagoon (Black Sea) in the light of 3 predictions associated with host survival: (i) hosts invest more in defence in an environment where the likelihood for infection is higher; (ii) multiple immune challenges exhaust host reserves and result in decreased melanization rates in older hosts; (iii) host immune response is directed against the cerebral metacercariae of Microphallus papillorobustus that alter amphipod behaviour and are most detrimental to the host. G. insensibilis was capable of melanizing the metacercariae of all four species of trematodes found to be hosted by the amphipods. The frequency of melanization and mean abundance of melanized metacercariae were substantially higher than those observed in the same amphipod-gammarid system on the French Mediterranean coast. However, the rate of melanization was low and showed a significant decrease with amphipod size. Although the 4 species were differentially melanized, the host response was largely directed against Microphallus hoffmanni and M. subdolum. We suggest that (i) the lower melanization efficiency with age is due to the mode of infection, probably leading to loss of haemolymph and monopolization of the defence resources for wound healing and (ii) in the French system, host response focuses on the most prevalent and abundant species.

  19. 78 FR 25679 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Revision of Critical Habitat for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... dryopid beetle, Comal Springs riffle beetle, and Peck's cave amphipod from human activity, the degree of... changes to existing water flow regimes; the introduction or augmentation of nonnative species; and..., introduction or augmentation of nonnative species, and physical, biological, or chemical changes to current...

  20. A new species of Hyalella from the Andes in Perú (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Hyalellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Exequiel R; Watling, Les

    2002-06-01

    Hyalella pauperocavae n. sp. from Huancayo, Perú, is described. Five other epigean freshwater amphipods have been described from Peru (excluding Lake Titicaca), but the lack of type material and poor descriptions do not allow the assignment of the species described here to any of the names known for the area.

  1. Spatial and temporal variations of mercury levels in Okefenokee invertebrates: Southeast Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Bagie M.; Batzer, Darold

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of mercury in wetland ecosystems has raised concerns about impacts on wetland food webs. This study measured concentrations of mercury in invertebrates of the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia, focusing on levels in amphipods, odonates, and crayfish. We collected and analyzed total mercury levels in these invertebrates from 32 sampling stations across commonly occurring sub-habitats. Sampling was conducted in December, May, and August over a two-year period. The highest levels of mercury were detected in amphipods, with total mercury levels often in excess of 20 ppm. Bioaccumulation pathways of mercury in invertebrates of the Okefenokee are probably complex; despite being larger and higher in the food chain, levels in odonates and crayfish were much lower than in amphipods. Mercury levels in invertebrates varied temporally with the highest levels detected in May. There was a lack of spatial variation in mercury levels which is consistent with aerial deposition of mercury. - This study measured mercury levels in invertebrates and found the highest levels in amphipods

  2. Spatial and temporal variation in invertebrate consumer diets in forested and herbaceous wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani N. Taylor; Darold P. Batzer

    2010-01-01

    Macroinvertebrates have important functional roles in wetland ecosystems, but these roles are not always well understood. This study assessed which foods invertebrate consumers assimilate within a set of wetland habitats. During 2006 and 2007, non-Tanypodinae chironomid larvae and select crustaceans (Crangonyx amphipods, Caecidotea isopods, Simocephalus cladocerans)...

  3. Partitioning mechanisms of predator interference in different habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffen, Blaine D; Byers, James E

    2006-01-01

    Prey are often consumed by multiple predator species. Predation rates on shared prey species measured in isolation often do not combine additively due to interference or facilitation among the predator species. Furthermore, the strength of predator interactions and resulting prey mortality may change with habitat type. We experimentally examined predation on amphipods in rock and algal habitats by two species of intertidal crabs, Hemigrapsus sanguineus (top predators) and Carcinus maenas (intermediate predators). Algae provided a safer habitat for amphipods when they were exposed to only a single predator species. When both predator species were present, mortality of amphipods was less than additive in both habitats. However, amphipod mortality was reduced more in rock than algal habitat because intermediate predators were less protected in rock habitat and were increasingly targeted by omnivorous top predators. We found that prey mortality in general was reduced by (1) altered foraging behavior of intermediate predators in the presence of top predators, (2) top predators switching to foraging on intermediate predators rather than shared prey, and (3) density reduction of intermediate predators. The relative importance of these three mechanisms was the same in both habitats; however, the magnitude of each was greater in rock habitat. Our study demonstrates that the strength of specific mechanisms of interference between top and intermediate predators can be quantified but cautions that these results may be habitat specific.

  4. SYNTHETIC-BASED DRILLING FLUIDS: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF TOXICANTS IN SEDIMENTS FROM GULF OF MEXICO DRILLING PLATFORMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use of the amphipods, Leptocheirus plumulosus and Ampelisca abdita, in these bioassays presented no major difficulties in the execution of these test protocols. Sensitivity to the toxicants was exhibited by L. plumulosus and survival of control animals was good suggesting the sui...

  5. A fresh look at the higher classification of the Siphonoecetini Just, 1983 (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Ischyroceridae) 12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Jean-Jose Andre Auzimour

    2017-01-01

    With increased knowledge of the Amphipoda Siphonoecetini over the past 30 years, classification of this group of shallow water benthic amphipods is reappraised. The cerapodids and ericthonids are removed from the Siphonoecetini, and two new tribes, Cerapodini and Ericthonini, are diagnosed in the...

  6. Contrasting phylogeography of two Western Palaearctic fish parasites despite similar life cycles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perrot-Minnot, M. J.; Špakulová, M.; Wattier, R.; Kotlík, Petr; Düsen, S.; Aydoğdu, A.; Tougard, C.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2018), s. 101-115 ISSN 0305-0270 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000460 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : amphipod * British Islands * comparative phylogeography * Cyprinidae * Danube Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 4.248, year: 2016

  7. NA phylogeny of Ryukyus Leucothoidae (Crustacea: Amphipoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, K.N.; Reimer, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Commensal leucothoid amphipods collected from sponges, ascidians, and coral rubble from the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan, were investigated using nuclear 18S ribosomal DNA sequences. Analysis of sequences from 21 species in three genera supported the current morphological species designations and the

  8. The benthos of South Lake, St Lucia following a period of stable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haminea petersi; the gastropod Assiminea sp.; the polychaetes. Marphysa macintoshi, Glycera tridactyla and Dendronereis ar-. boriJera; oligochaetes; nemerteans; the crab Hymenosoma or- bicu/are; the tanaid Apseudes digitalis-, the amphipod Grandi- dierella lignorum; cumaceans and the mysid Mesopodopsis africana.

  9. The Status of Benthos in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    The benthic community of Lake Ontario was dominated by an amphipod (Diporeia spp.) prior to the 1990’s. Two dreissenid mussel species D. polymorpha (zebra) and D. bugensis (quagga) were introduced in 1989 and 1991 via ballast water exchange. D. bugensis was observed as deep as 85...

  10. Use of Computed Tomography Imaging for Qualifying Coarse Roots, Rhizomes, Peat, and Particle Densities in Marsh Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging has been used to describe and quantify subtidal, benthic animals such as polychaetes, amphipods, and shrimp. Here, for the first time, CT imaging is used to successfully quantify wet mass of coarse roots, rhizomes, and peat in cores collected from...

  11. The Relationship Between Acoustic Target Strength and Body Length for Atlantic Sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    sturgeon feeding portray them as opportunistic benthivores, feeding primar- ily on mollusks, polychaete worms, amphipods, isopods, shrimp and small bottom...dwelling fishes and insect larvae (Gilbert 1989; Smith 1985). The Atlantic sturgeon is anadromous, entering freshwater rivers to spawn at water...bottom (small rubble, gravel, hard clay, and limestone) is required for successful egg attachment and incubation, while also protecting larvae from

  12. Aspects of the biology of Platorchestia fayetta sp. nov. (Crustacea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amphipods form an important component of coastal fauna and this study is focused on the biology of semi-terres- trial Platorchestia fayetta sp. nov. inhabiting sand and wave-cast algae on the north-eastern coast at Poste La Fayette, Mauritius. The population structure, size class variation, sex ratio and female reproductive ...

  13. Etude du developpement de l’Ostracode marin Sphaeromicola dudichi Klie, 1938

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, H.M.A.

    1968-01-01

    Sphaeromicola dudichi Klie, 1938, acommensal ostracod of the amphipod Chelura terebrans Philippi, 1839, is frequently found in the Mediterranean near Marseille. This ostracod proves to lay its eggs on the brood lamellae of the female, or on the gills of the male of Chelura, more frequently on the

  14. 76 FR 76337 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Lost River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    ... information on the Lost River sucker's and shortnose sucker's biology and habitat, population abundance and... consumed chironomid larvae as well as micro-crustaceans (amphipods, copepods, cladocerans, and ostracods... information above, we identify an abundant food base, including a broad array of chironomids, micro...

  15. Regional Models for Sediment Toxicity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper investigates the use of empirical models to predict the toxicity of sediment samples within a region to laboratory test organisms based on sediment chemistry. In earlier work, we used a large nationwide database of matching sediment chemistry and marine amphipod sedim...

  16. An Integrated Approach to Understand Relationships Between Shallow Water Benthic Community Structure and Ecosystem Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    REFERENCES Aarnio, K., E. Bonsdorff, and N. Rosenback. 1996. Food and feeding habits of juvenile flounder Platichthys flesus (L.), and turbot...physiological and ecological characteristics of higher taxa, such that crustaceans (especially amphipods and harpacticoid copepods) and echinoderms are...control on benthic processes by feeding on primary producers, bacteria, and detritus. They also serve as major sources of food for higher trophic

  17. Inter-lab testing of Hyalella azteca water and sediment methods: 1 background and overview of the 42-d survival, growth and reproduction test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past four years, USEPA-Duluth, USGS-Columbia, the Illinois Natural History Survey, and Environment Canada have been conducting studies to refine the USEPA and ASTM International methods for conducting 10- to 42-d water or sediment toxicity exposures with the amphipod Hya...

  18. The genus Bathyporeia Lindström, 1855, in western Europe (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Pontoporeiidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Udekem d’Acoz, d' C.

    2004-01-01

    The amphipod genus Bathyporeia Lindström, 1855, on the European Atlantic coasts is revised and new identification keys are provided. The importance of new characters such as the morphology of the first uropod is stressed. The following species are fully redescribed and illustrated: B. elegans

  19. Transuranic behaviour in marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.

    1982-01-01

    This document summarizes the following specific studies concerning the transuranic behaviour in marine environment: 1. Radionuclides in deep sea amphipods; 2. Actinides, 55 Fe and 137 Cs in N. pacific water columns; 3. Vertical profile of artificial radionuclide concentrations in the central Arctic Ocean; 4. Bioturbation and the distributions of fallout radionuclides in Pacific Ocean sediments

  20. Optimizing the performance of Hyalella azteca in chronic toxicity tests: Results of feeding studies with various foods and feeding regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca is a common organism used for sediment toxicity testing in the United States and elsewhere. Standard methods for 10-d and 42-d toxicity tests with H. azteca were last revised and published by USEPA/ASTM in 2000. Under the methods in the man...

  1. Impacts of pesticides and natural stressors on leaf litter decomposition in agricultural streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jes; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette

    2012-01-01

    shredding activity was governed by the density of shredders, and the density of shredders was not correlated to pesticide contamination mainly due to high abundances of the amphipod Gammarus pulex at all sites. Our study provides the ¿rst ¿eld based results on the importance of multiple stressors...

  2. Oceanic processes in marine pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, D.J.; Duedall, I.W.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers the following areas: bioaccumulation of Polycyclic Aromatic hydrocarbons in marine environments; behavior of drilling fluid discharges off the coast of California; effects of drilling fluids on marine organisms; and the effects of radioactive waste disposal on marine amphipods

  3. Diptera:Anthomyiidae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ,25 mg dry kelp mg -1 wet larva day -1_ Respiration rate is related to ... sumers of drift kelp than amphipods or isopods, but they pro- mote the decay of wrack beds and are favoured as food by sea-shore birds. S, Afr. J. Zoo/, 1980, 15: 280 - 283.

  4. Light pollution reduces activity, food consumption and growth rates in a sandy beach invertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luarte, T; Bonta, C C; Silva-Rodriguez, E A; Quijón, P A; Miranda, C; Farias, A A; Duarte, C

    2016-11-01

    The continued growth of human activity and infrastructure has translated into a widespread increase in light pollution. Natural daylight and moonlight cycles play a fundamental role for many organisms and ecological processes, so an increase in light pollution may have profound effects on communities and ecosystem services. Studies assessing ecological light pollution (ELP) effects on sandy beach organisms have lagged behind the study of other sources of disturbance. Hence, we assessed the influence of this stressor on locomotor activity, foraging behavior, absorption efficiency and growth rate of adults of the talitrid amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata. In the field, an artificial light system was assembled to assess the local influence of artificial light conditions on the amphipod's locomotor activity and use of food patches in comparison to natural (ambient) conditions. Meanwhile in the laboratory, two experimental chambers were set to assess amphipod locomotor activity, consumption rates, absorption efficiency and growth under artificial light in comparison to natural light-dark cycles. Our results indicate that artificial light have significantly adverse effects on the activity patterns and foraging behavior of the amphipods, resulting on reduced consumption and growth rates. Given the steady increase in artificial light pollution here and elsewhere, sandy beach communities could be negatively affected, with unexpected consequences for the whole ecosystem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronic effects of low levels of hydrogen sulfide on freshwater fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.L. Jr.; Oseid, D.M.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine acute toxicity of H/sub 2/S to brook trout, bluegill, fathead minnow, goldfish and amphipod. The sensitivity of various life history stages are compared and acute toxicity is related to no-effect levels of H/sub 2/S based on long-term tests. 12 references, 7 tables.

  6. Impact of Marine Submergence and Season on Faunal Colonization and Decomposition of Pig Carcasses in the Salish Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gail S; Bell, Lynne S

    2016-01-01

    Pig carcasses, as human proxies, were placed on the seabed at a depth of 300 m, in the Strait of Georgia and observed continuously by a remotely operated camera and instruments. Two carcasses were deployed in spring and two in fall utilizing Ocean Network Canada's Victoria Experimental Network under the Sea (formerly VENUS) observatory. A trial experiment showed that bluntnose sixgill sharks could rapidly devour a carcass so a platform was designed which held two matched carcasses, one fully exposed, the other covered in a barred cage to protect it from sharks, while still allowing invertebrates and smaller vertebrates access. The carcasses were deployed under a frame which supported a video camera, and instruments which recorded oxygen, temperature, salinity, density, pressure, conductivity, sound speed and turbidity at per minute intervals. The spring exposed carcass was briefly fed upon by sharks, but they were inefficient feeders and lost interest after a few bites. Immediately after deployment, all carcasses, in both spring and fall, were very rapidly covered in vast numbers of lyssianassid amphipods. These skeletonized the carcasses by Day 3 in fall and Day 4 in spring. A dramatic, very localized drop in dissolved oxygen levels occurred in fall, exactly coinciding with the presence of the amphipods. Oxygen levels returned to normal once the amphipods dispersed. Either the physical presence of the amphipods or the sudden draw down of oxygen during their tenure, excluded other fauna. The amphipods fed from the inside out, removing the skin last. After the amphipods had receded, other fauna colonized such as spot shrimp and a few Dungeness crabs but by this time, all soft tissue had been removed. The amphipod activity caused major bioturbation in the local area and possible oxygen depletion. The spring deployment carcasses became covered in silt and a black film formed on them and on the silt above them whereas the fall bones remained uncovered and hence

  7. Coastal ecosystems on a tipping point: global warming and parasitism combine to alter community structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Kim N; Sørensen, Mikkel M; Poulin, Robert; Fredensborg, Brian L

    2018-05-16

    Mounting evidence suggests that the transmission of certain parasites is facilitated by increasing temperatures, causing their host population to decline. However, no study has yet addressed how temperature and parasitism may combine to shape the functional structure of a whole host community in the face of global warming. Here, we apply an outdoor mesocosm approach supported by field surveys to elucidate this question in a diverse intertidal community of amphipods infected by the pathogenic microphallid trematode, Maritrema novaezealandensis. Under present temperature (17°C) and level of parasitism, the parasite had little impact on the host community. However, elevating the temperature to 21°C in presence of parasites induced massive structural changes: amphipod abundances decreased species-specifically, affecting epibenthic species but leaving infaunal species largely untouched. In effect, species diversity dropped significantly. In contrast, 4-degree higher temperatures in absence of parasitism had limited influence on the amphipod community. Further elevating temperatures (19-26°C) and parasitism, simulating a prolonged heat-wave scenario, resulted in an almost complete parasite-induced extermination of the amphipod community at 26°C. In addition, at 19°C, just two degrees above the present average, a similar temperature-parasite synergistic impact on community structure emerged as seen at 21°C under lower parasite pressure. The heat-wave temperature of 26°C per se affected the amphipod community in a comparable way: species diversity declined and the infaunal species were favoured at the expense of epibenthic species. Our experimental findings are corroborated by field data demonstrating a strong negative relationship between current amphipod species richness and the level of Maritrema parasitism across 12 sites. Hence, owing to the synergistic impact of temperature and parasitism, our study predicts that coastal amphipod communities will deteriorate

  8. Impact of Marine Submergence and Season on Faunal Colonization and Decomposition of Pig Carcasses in the Salish Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail S Anderson

    Full Text Available Pig carcasses, as human proxies, were placed on the seabed at a depth of 300 m, in the Strait of Georgia and observed continuously by a remotely operated camera and instruments. Two carcasses were deployed in spring and two in fall utilizing Ocean Network Canada's Victoria Experimental Network under the Sea (formerly VENUS observatory. A trial experiment showed that bluntnose sixgill sharks could rapidly devour a carcass so a platform was designed which held two matched carcasses, one fully exposed, the other covered in a barred cage to protect it from sharks, while still allowing invertebrates and smaller vertebrates access. The carcasses were deployed under a frame which supported a video camera, and instruments which recorded oxygen, temperature, salinity, density, pressure, conductivity, sound speed and turbidity at per minute intervals. The spring exposed carcass was briefly fed upon by sharks, but they were inefficient feeders and lost interest after a few bites. Immediately after deployment, all carcasses, in both spring and fall, were very rapidly covered in vast numbers of lyssianassid amphipods. These skeletonized the carcasses by Day 3 in fall and Day 4 in spring. A dramatic, very localized drop in dissolved oxygen levels occurred in fall, exactly coinciding with the presence of the amphipods. Oxygen levels returned to normal once the amphipods dispersed. Either the physical presence of the amphipods or the sudden draw down of oxygen during their tenure, excluded other fauna. The amphipods fed from the inside out, removing the skin last. After the amphipods had receded, other fauna colonized such as spot shrimp and a few Dungeness crabs but by this time, all soft tissue had been removed. The amphipod activity caused major bioturbation in the local area and possible oxygen depletion. The spring deployment carcasses became covered in silt and a black film formed on them and on the silt above them whereas the fall bones remained

  9. Predicting the variation in Echinogammarus marinus at its southernmost limits under global warming scenarios: can the sex-ratio make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Alexandra; Leite, Nuno; Marques, João Carlos; Ford, Alex T; Martins, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the environmental parameters that constrain the distribution of a species at its latitudinal extremes is critical for predicting how ecosystems react to climate change. Our first aim was to predict the variation in the amphipod populations of Echinogammarus marinus from the southernmost limit of its distribution under global warming scenarios. Our second aim was to test whether sex-ratio fluctuations - a mechanism frequently displayed by amphipods - respond to the variations in populations under altered climate conditions. To achieve these aims, scenarios were run with a validated model of E. marinus populations. Simulations were divided into: phase I - simulation of the effect of climate change on amphipod populations, and phase II - simulation of the effect of climate change on populations with male and female proportions. In both phases, temperature (T), salinity (S) and temperature and salinity (T-S) were tested. Results showed that E. marinus populations are highly sensitive to increases in temperature (>2 °C), which has adverse effects on amphipod recruitment and growth. Results from the climate change scenarios coupled with the sex-ratio fluctuations depended largely on the degree of female bias within population. Temperature increase of 2 °C had less impact on female-biased populations, particularly when conjugated with increases in salinity. Male-biased populations were highly sensitive to any variation in temperature and/or salinity; these populations exhibited a long-term decline in density. Simulations in which temperature increased more than 4 °C led to a continuous decline in the E. marinus population. According to this work, E. marinus populations at their southernmost limit are vulnerable to global warming. We anticipate that in Europe, temperature increases of 2 °C will incite a withdrawal of the population of 5°N from the amphipod species located at southernmost geographical borders. This effect is discussed in relation to the

  10. Variable feeding behavior in Orchestoidea tuberculata (Nicolet 1849): Exploring the relative importance of macroalgal traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Cristian; Acuña, Karin; Navarro, Jorge M.; Gómez, Iván; Jaramillo, Eduardo; Quijón, Pedro

    2014-03-01

    The feeding behavior of algal consumers inhabiting sandy beaches and the consequences of this behavior on their performance are poorly understood. Food quality has been shown to influence the food preference of algal consumers. However, food preference can often be altered or subordinated to habitat choice. This study analyzes the feeding behavior (preference and consumption rate), absorption efficiency and growth rates of the talitrid amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata (Nicolet, 1849) in relation to the nutritional characteristics of two of the most common macroalgae stranded in the Chilean north-central region. Our experiments show that these amphipods prefer Macrocystis integrifolia over Lessonia nigrescens when presented with fresh fragments of both algae simultaneously. However, this preference did not match the performance of the amphipods when reared on diets of a single algal species: in that growth rates were not different. These results suggest that M. integrifolia is not a superior food item compared to L. nigrescens. The lower content of proteins and total organic matter found in M. integrifolia supports this interpretation. The preference of the amphipods for L. nigrescens over M. integrifolia when dry powdered algae of each species were provided (artificial food), suggested that some aspect of the physical structure of these two algae determined food preference. When the amphipods were maintained with each of the algal species in no choice experiments, they consumed 2 times more M. integrifolia, but showed higher absorption efficiency on L. nigrescens. These results suggest that food quantity and not absorption efficiency was used to compensate for the lower nutritional quality of M. integrifolia. The feeding behavior documented in this study differs significantly from that observed in populations of the same species inhabiting southern Chile, cautioning against generalizing results obtained even within a single species. Our results suggest that

  11. Evolutionary ecology of driftwood talitrids: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Wildish

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine driftwood, both when floating at the sea surface and after stranding in the supralittoral of a beach, has been inadequately sampled for talitrids throughout the world. It is probable that many more talitrids than the seven currently recognized as driftwood species are extant. Because they are obligate xylophages all seven species are considered to be specialized driftwood talitrids. They contrast with talitrids able to feed on either wrack or driftwood, as has been established experimentally in Platorchestia platensis (Krøyer, 1845. For the best known genus of specialized driftwood talitrids, Macarorchestia, there are two zoogeographic series: Northeast Atlantic: M. microphtalma – M. roffensis –M. martini and Mediterranean: M. remyi – M. pavesiae. Both geographic series are characterized by increasing dwarfism. Experimental studies suggest that dwarfism evolved to allow talitrids to occupy the small burrows made by gribbles (Isopoda, Limnoridae in driftwood, and/or because driftwood was a poor quality food by comparison with wrack. The phylogenetic advantages of talitrids living in driftwood are that: they are protected from shorebird predation, they are provided with a long distance dispersal mechanism, and they have a relatively long term, albeit poorer quality, food source. Molecular genetic studies confirm that both Macarorchestia and Neotenorchestia have evolved by dwarfism from larger Orchestia ancestors.

  12. Arctic sea-ice ridges—Safe heavens for sea-ice fauna during periods of extreme ice melt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradinger, Rolf; Bluhm, Bodil; Iken, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The abundances and distribution of metazoan within-ice meiofauna (13 stations) and under-ice fauna (12 stations) were investigated in level sea ice and sea-ice ridges in the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas and Canada Basin in June/July 2005 using a combination of ice coring and SCUBA diving. Ice meiofauna abundance was estimated based on live counts in the bottom 30 cm of level sea ice based on triplicate ice core sampling at each location, and in individual ice chunks from ridges at four locations. Under-ice amphipods were counted in situ in replicate ( N=24-65 per station) 0.25 m 2 quadrats using SCUBA to a maximum water depth of 12 m. In level sea ice, the most abundant ice meiofauna groups were Turbellaria (46%), Nematoda (35%), and Harpacticoida (19%), with overall low abundances per station that ranged from 0.0 to 10.9 ind l -1 (median 0.8 ind l -1). In level ice, low ice algal pigment concentrations (Turbellaria, Nematoda and Harpacticoida also were observed in pressure ridges (0-200 ind l -1, median 40 ind l -1), although values were highly variable and only medians of Turbellaria were significantly higher in ridge ice than in level ice. Median abundances of under-ice amphipods at all ice types (level ice, various ice ridge structures) ranged from 8 to 114 ind m -2 per station and mainly consisted of Apherusa glacialis (87%), Onisimus spp. (7%) and Gammarus wilkitzkii (6%). Highest amphipod abundances were observed in pressure ridges at depths >3 m where abundances were up to 42-fold higher compared with level ice. We propose that the summer ice melt impacted meiofauna and under-ice amphipod abundance and distribution through (a) flushing, and (b) enhanced salinity stress at thinner level sea ice (less than 3 m thickness). We further suggest that pressure ridges, which extend into deeper, high-salinity water, become accumulation regions for ice meiofauna and under-ice amphipods in summer. Pressure ridges thus might be crucial for faunal survival during periods of

  13. Behavior and reproduction of invertebrate animals during and after a long-term microgravity: space experiments using an Autonomous Biological System (ABS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, K; Mizuno, R; Narita, T; Ohmura, T; Ishikawa, Y; Yamashita, M; Anderson, G; Poynter, J; MacCallum, T

    1998-12-01

    Aquatic invertebrate animals such as Amphipods, Gastropods (pond snails), Ostracods and Daphnia (water flea) were placed in water-filled cylindrical vessels together with water plant (hornwort). The vessels were sealed completely and illuminated with a fluorescent lamp to activate the photosynthesis of the plant for providing oxygen within the vessels. Such ecosystem vessels, specially termed as Autonomous Biological System or ABS units, were exposed to microgravity conditions, and the behavior of the animals and their reproduction capacity were studied. Three space experiments were carried out. The first experiment used a Space shuttle only and it was a 10-day flight. The other two space experiments were carried out in the Space station Mir (Shuttle/Mir mission), and the flight units had been kept in microgravity for 4 months. Daphnia produced their offspring during a 10-day Shuttle flight. In the first Mir experiment, no Daphnia were detected when recovered to the ground. However, they were alive in the second Mir experiment. Daphnia were the most fragile species among the invertebrate animals employed in the present experiments. All the animals, i.e., Amphipods, pond snails, Ostracods and Daphnia had survived for 4 months in space, i.e., they had produced their offspring or repeated their life-cycles under microgravity. For the two Mir experiments, in both the flight and ground control ecosystem units, an inverse relationship was noted between the number of Amphipods and pond snails in each unit. Amphipods at 10 hours after the recovery to the ground frequently exhibited a movement of dropping straight-downward to the bottom of the units. Several Amphipods had their legs bent abnormally, which probably resulted from some physiological alterations during their embryonic development under microgravity. From the analysis of the video tape recorded in space, for Ostracods and Daphnia, a half of their population were looping under microgravity. Such looping animals

  14. Toxicity of oiled sediments treated with bioremediation agents: A shoreline experiment in Delaware, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mearna, A.; Doe, K.; Fisher, W.; Lee, K.; Mueller, C.

    1995-01-01

    Using a randomized complete block design, a battery of five pore water and sediment bioassays were used to monitor and compare toxicity among un-oiled, oiled (light Nigerian crude) and nutrient and bacteria-treated shoreline plots on a sandy beach. Tests included sea urchin fertilization, water and modified-solid phase microtox, 10-day amphipod survival and grass shrimp embryo bioassays. During the 13-week study, bioremediation treatment with nutrients and/or bacteria did not decrease toxicity relative to that in untreated plots. Results from at least one bioassay suggested that, relative to no treatment, treatment may have increased toxicity for several weeks. The least and most sensitive tests were sea urchin fertilization (pore water) and 10-day amphipod test, respectively. Coupled with chemical monitoring, the study produced a large data-base for evaluating toxic concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in sandy sediments

  15. Influence of a Brazilian sewage outfall on the toxicity and contamination of adjacent sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abessa, D.M.S.; Carr, R.S.; Rachid, B.R.F.; Sousa, E.C.P.M.; Hortelani, M.A.; Sarkis, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    The submarine sewage outfall of Santos (SSOS) is situated in the Santos Bay (São Paulo, Brazil) and is potentially a significant source of contaminants to the adjacent marine ecosystem. The present study aimed to assess the influence of SSOS on the sediment toxicity and contamination at Santos Bay. At the disposal site, sediments tended to be finer, organically richer and exhibited higher levels of surfactants and metals, sometimes exceeding the “Threshold Effect Level” values. The SSOS influence was more evident toward the East, where the sediments exhibited higher levels of TOC, total S and metals during the summer 2000 sampling campaign. Sediment toxicity to amphipods was consistently detected in four of the five stations studied. Amphipod survival tended to correlate negatively to Hg, total N and % mud. This work provides evidence that the SSOS discharge affects the quality of sediments from Santos Bay, and that control procedures are warranted.

  16. Food habits of fishes on an exposed sandy beach at Fukiagehama, South-West Kyushu Island, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakane, Yukinori; Suda, Yusuke; Sano, Mitsuhiko

    2011-06-01

    To clarify the feeding habits and major food sources of sandy beach fishes, the gut contents of 55 fish species collected on a sandy beach at Fukiagehama, South-West Kyushu Island, Japan, were examined. Ontogenetic changes in food preference were recognized in nine species ( Hypoatherina valenciennei, Lateolabrax japonicus, Trachurus japonicus, Sillago japonica, Sphyraena japonica, Paralichthys olivaceus, Heteromycteris japonica, Paraplagusia japonica, and Takifugu niphobles). A cluster analysis based on dietary overlaps showed that the sandy beach fish assemblage comprised six trophic groups (mysid, amphipod, zooplankton, juvenile fish, terrestrial insect, and mollusk feeders). Of these, the first three groups were the most abundantly represented, whereas the last two were represented by only a single species. These results indicated that epibenthic macrofauna, such as mysids and gammaridean amphipods, and zooplankton, were important food resources for the fish assemblage at the study site, but infaunal macrobenthos, such as polychaetes and bivalves, being relatively unimportant.

  17. The effect of patch isolation on epifaunal colonization in two different seagrass ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Camilla; Salo, Tiina

    2012-01-01

    The macrofaunal colonization of isolated habitats is affected by many factors, ranging from distance to the nearest source population to the dispersal mechanism of the species. We investigated the initial epifaunal colonization at two sites, one situated in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and the other...... in the Northern Baltic Sea. At each site, artificial seagrass units were placed at 10- and 0-m distances from a continuous seagrass meadow, as well as inside the meadow over a 5-day colonization time. With the exception of amphipods in Gulf of Mexico, patch isolation had a negative effect on colonization...... for the other faunal species, irrespective of the sites. This inverse colonization pattern of amphipods suggests that they are not equally sensitive to patch isolation in different regions. Our results indicate that increasing habitat isolation can have serious consequences for the community composition...

  18. Bioaccumulation of 137Cs in pelagic food webs in the Norwegian and Barents Seas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heldal, Hilde Elise; Foeyn, Lars; Varskog, Per

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge and documentation of the levels of radioactive contamination in fish stocks important to Norwegian fisheries is of major importance to Norwegian consumers and fish export industry. In the present study, the bioaccumulation of caesium-137 ( 137 Cs) has been investigated in marine food webs in the Barents and Norwegian Seas. The contents of 137 Cs in the different organisms were generally low ( -1 wet weight), but a marked bioaccumulation was apparent: The concentration of 137 Cs was about 10-fold higher in the harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena, representing the upper level of the food web, than in the amphipod Themisto sp., representing the lower level of the food web. The Concentration Factors (CF=Bq kg -1 wet weight/Bq l -1 seawater) increased from 10±3 for a mixed sample of krill and amphipods to 165±5 for harbour porpoises

  19. THE DIVERSITY OF THE TURBELLARIAN (PLATHELMINTES: TURBELLARIA AND MALACOSTRACEAN FAUNA (CRUSTACEA: MALACOSTRACA FROM THE NATURAL PARC APUSENI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian PÂRVULESCU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The data from this paper represents a contribution to the knowledge of the diversity of fresh water invertebrates’ fauna from Apuseni Mountains, which are less studied in the aquatic ecosystems from this area. We present some dates concerning the diversity of turbellarian and crustaceans fauna, especially tricladids and malacostraceans orders. As consequence to the examination of many samples collected from various aquatic biotopes, there were identified 5 species of turbellarians, 3 of amphipods and one of decapods.

  20. Marine effect of introduced salmonids: Prey consumption by exotic steelhead and anadromous brown trout in the Patagonian Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancio, J.; Beauchamp, D.A.; Pascual, M.

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of stable isotope analysis, we estimated the marine diet of the most abundant anadromous salmonid species in Patagonian Atlantic basins. The results were coupled with bioenergetic and population models to estimate the consumption of food by salmonids and was compared with that by seabirds, the most abundant top predators in the area. Amphipods were the main salmonid prey, followed by sprat, silversides, squid, and euphausiids. The total consumption, even assuming large anadromous salmonid populations, represented Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  1. Toxicological Effects of Military Smokes and Obscurants on Aquatic Threatened and Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-10

    toxicity WSF water soluble fractions YCT Yeast -Cereal Leaves – Trout xii DRAFT version 2 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The authors thank the Strategic...Before testing, organisms were fed a diet of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Yeast -Cereal Leaves-Trout Chow (YCT) mixture daily at rates recommended... Brewer -Swarz S, and Thoeny WT (1997) A reformulated, reconstituted water for testing the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca. Environ Toxicol & Chem 16

  2. Distributional patterns of the South American species of Hyalella (Amphipoda: Hyalellidae)

    OpenAIRE

    De los Ríos-Escalante, Patricio; Morrone, Juan J; Rivera, Reinaldo

    2012-01-01

    Distributional patterns of the South American species of the freshwater amphipod genus Hyalella were analysed using a panbiogeographic approach. Five generalized tracks were found: (1) northern Andes to Lake Titicaca (H. dielaii, H. meinerti, H. dybowskii, H.jelskii, H. lubominsky, and H. pauperocavae; (2) lake Titicaca (H. armata, H. cuprea, H. latinamus, H. lucifugax, H. montforti, H. neveulemairei, H. robusta, H. tiwanaku, H. simplex simplex, and H. solida); (3) central Andes (H. fossamanc...

  3. Summer Research Program (1992). Summer Faculty Research Program (SFRP) Reports. Volume 6. Arnold Engineering Development Center, Civil Engineering Laboratory, Frank J. Seiler Research Laboratory, Wilford Hall Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    sediment fauna, rhizome and stem biota (amphipods, bivalves and polychaetes), leaf periphyton ( microbiota , anemones, hydroids, ectoprocts, crustaceans...programs, the Air Force should support a small scale experiment which must be unique to the Air Force applications. If results in phase I are fruitful ,Ŕ...dissolved in the melt. This method for preparing a Li-containing neutral melt does not appear to be fruitful . RESULTS AND DISCUSSION After MEIC of acceptable

  4. Effects of triclosan on marine benthic and epibenthic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Monique M; Ho, Kay T; Cantwell, Mark G; Burgess, Robert M; Pelletier, Marguerite C

    2012-08-01

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial compound that has been widely used in consumer products such as toothpaste, deodorant, and shampoo. Because of its widespread use, triclosan has been detected in various environmental media, including wastewater, sewage sludge, surface waters, and sediments. Triclosan is acutely toxic to numerous aquatic organisms, but very few studies have been performed on estuarine and marine benthic organisms. For whole sediment toxicity tests, the sediment-dwelling estuarine amphipod, Ampelisca abdita, and the epibenthic mysid shrimp, Americamysis bahia, are commonly used organisms. In the present study, median lethal concentration values (LC50) were obtained for both of these organisms using water-only and whole sediment exposures. Acute 96-h water-only toxicity tests resulted in LC50 values of 73.4 and 74.3 µg/L for the amphipod and mysid, respectively. For the 7-d whole sediment toxicity test, LC50 values were 303 and 257 mg/kg (dry wt) for the amphipod and mysid, respectively. Using equilibrium partitioning theory, these whole sediment values are equivalent to interstitial water LC50 values of 230 and 190 µg/L for the amphipod and mysid, respectively, which are within a threefold difference of the observed 96-h LC50 water-only values. Triclosan was found to accumulate in polychaete tissue in a 28-d bioaccumulation study with a biota-sediment accumulation factor of 0.23 kg organic carbon/kg lipid. These data provide some of the first toxicity data for triclosan with marine benthic and epibenthic species while also indicating a need to better understand the effects of other forms of sediment carbon, triclosan ionization, and organism metabolism of triclosan on the chemical's behavior and toxicity in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  5. Niche segregation amongst sympatric species at exposed sandy shores with contrasting wrack availabilities illustrated by stable isotopic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bessa, Filipa; Baeta, Alexandra; Marques, João Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Wrack supplies (macroalgae, seagrasses and carrion) are a common feature of sandy beaches worldwide. These allochthonous inputs are a potential high-quality food subsidy for beach fauna, but little is known about the feeding ecology and niche segregation strategies of these species in beaches with limited wrack availabilities. We used stable isotopic ratios of nitrogen and carbon to examine the diets and niche segregation among three sympatric crustaceans, the amphipods Talitrus s...

  6. Assessing Impacts of Navigation Dredging on Atlantic Sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    are known to be opportunistic benthivores, feeding primarily on mollusks, polychaete worms, amphipods, isopods, shrimps and small bottom-dwelling...fishes and insect larvae (Smith 1985, Dadswell 2006). Shallow water shoals located adjacent to both sides of the Federal navigation channel, provide a...and J. Hoeman (1982). Distribution and abundance of the Dungeness crab and Crangon shrimp , and dredging-related mortality of invertebrates and fish

  7. Grandidierella bonnieroides Stephensen, 1948 (Amphipoda, Aoridae)-first record of an established population in the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutto, Sabrina Lo; Iaciofano, Davide; Lubinevsky, Hadas; Galil, Bella S

    2016-03-17

    The first record in the Mediterranean Sea of the invasive aorid amphipod crustacean Grandidierella bonnieroides is presented. A widespread circumtropical species, recorded off the Saudi coast of the Arabian Gulf, the Red Sea and the Suez Canal, it may have been introduced into the Mediterranean through the Suez Canal. This tube-builder species of soft bottoms recently established a population in the polluted Haifa Bay, Israel. Further, this is the first Mediterranean record of the genus.

  8. Development and application of freshwater sediment-toxicity benchmarks for currently used pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Norman, Julia E.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Moran, Patrick W.

    2016-01-01

    Sediment-toxicity benchmarks are needed to interpret the biological significance of currently used pesticides detected in whole sediments. Two types of freshwater sediment benchmarks for pesticides were developed using spiked-sediment bioassay (SSB) data from the literature. These benchmarks can be used to interpret sediment-toxicity data or to assess the potential toxicity of pesticides in whole sediment. The Likely Effect Benchmark (LEB) defines a pesticide concentration in whole sediment above which there is a high probability of adverse effects on benthic invertebrates, and the Threshold Effect Benchmark (TEB) defines a concentration below which adverse effects are unlikely. For compounds without available SSBs, benchmarks were estimated using equilibrium partitioning (EqP). When a sediment sample contains a pesticide mixture, benchmark quotients can be summed for all detected pesticides to produce an indicator of potential toxicity for that mixture. Benchmarks were developed for 48 pesticide compounds using SSB data and 81 compounds using the EqP approach. In an example application, data for pesticides measured in sediment from 197 streams across the United States were evaluated using these benchmarks, and compared to measured toxicity from whole-sediment toxicity tests conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28-d exposures) and the midge Chironomus dilutus (10-d exposures). Amphipod survival, weight, and biomass were significantly and inversely related to summed benchmark quotients, whereas midge survival, weight, and biomass showed no relationship to benchmarks. Samples with LEB exceedances were rare (n = 3), but all were toxic to amphipods (i.e., significantly different from control). Significant toxicity to amphipods was observed for 72% of samples exceeding one or more TEBs, compared to 18% of samples below all TEBs. Factors affecting toxicity below TEBs may include the presence of contaminants other than pesticides, physical

  9. Chesapeake Bay Study. Supplement A. Problem Identification. Supplement B. Public Involvement. Supplement C. The Chesapeake Bay Hydraulic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    Amphipod (5 genera) Canvasback Sand flea Lesser scaup Cnidaria 4’ Grass shrimp 4’ Bufflehead 4 Sand shrimp ** Osprey " Stinging nettle 4’ Xanthid crab (2...thereby decreasing the amounts of available oxygen in the water and, in extreme cases, causing fish kills. In addition, the use of insecticides in...where demands are the greatest. The stinging sea nettle and the closely related comb A-79 f. . . . . . • _ . . ... . .. jellies or ctenophores which

  10. Survey of Biofouling an Australian Navy Ships: Crustacea; Isopoda and Amphipoda; Caprellidea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    amphipod behaviour and predatory strikes by fish . Journal of experimental marine Biology and Ecology 126:173-180, 1989. W. T. Calman. Crustacea. In...Limnoriidea and Sphaeromatidae be used to better reflect their phylogeny . In considering the suitability of maintaining the suborder Flabellifera, it...Caprellidae). Estuarine and Coastal Marine Science 10:225-237, 1979. E. A. Caine. Comparitive functional morphology of feeding in three species of

  11. Long-term change in limnology and invertebrates in Alaskan boreal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, R.M.; Lovvorn, J.R.; Heglund, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Climate change is more pronounced at high northern latitudes, and may be affecting the physical, chemical, and biological attributes of the abundant wetlands in boreal forests. On the Yukon Flats, located in the boreal forest of northeast Alaska, wetlands originally sampled during 1985-1989 were re-sampled for water chemistry and macroinvertebrates in summer 2001-2003. Wetlands sampled lost on average 19% surface water area between these periods. Total nitrogen and most metal cations (Na, Mg, and Ca, but not K) increased between these periods, whereas total phosphorus and chlorophyll a (Chl a) declined. These changes were greater in wetlands that had experienced more drying (decreased surface area). Compared with 1985-1989, densities of cladocerans, copepods, and ostracods in both June and August were much higher in 2002-2003, whereas densities of amphipods, gastropods, and chironomid larvae were generally lower. In comparisons among wetlands in 2002-2003 only, amphipod biomass was lower in wetlands with lower Chl a, which might help explain the decline of amphipods since the late 1980s when Chl a was higher. The decline in Chl a corresponded to greatly increased zooplankton density in June, suggesting a shift in carbon flow from scrapers and deposit-feeders to water-column grazers. Declines in benthic and epibenthic deposit-feeding invertebrates suggest important food web effects of climate change in otherwise pristine wetlands of the boreal forest. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  12. Separate and combined effects of habitat-specific fish predation on the survival of invasive and native gammarids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotta, Jonne; Orav-Kotta, Helen; Herkül, Kristjan

    2010-10-01

    The North-American amphipod Gammarus tigrinus was observed for the first time in the northern Baltic Sea in 2003. The invasive amphipod has been particularly successful in some habitats (e.g. on pebbles) where it has become one of the most abundant gammarid species. We studied experimentally if the dominant fish Gasterosteus aculeatus preyed differentially on the exotic G. tigrinus and the native Gammarus salinus, if predation differed among habitats, and if one gammarid species facilitated predation on the other. The experiment demonstrated that (1) fish preyed more on the exotic G. tigrinus than the native G. salinus. (2) Predation did not differ among habitats. (3) Gammarus tigrinus facilitated the predation on G. salinus and this facilitation varied among habitats with significant effects on pebbles. Thus, the combined effect of habitat-specific fish predation and competition between gammarid amphipods is a possible explanation of the current range of G. tigrinus in the northern Baltic Sea. G. tigrinus seems to establish in habitats where it can significantly increase fish predation on the native gammarids.

  13. Biodegradable and Petroleum-Based Microplastics Do Not Differ in Their Ingestion and Excretion but in Their Biological Effects in a Freshwater Invertebrate Gammarus fossarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Straub

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Research on the uptake and effects of bioplastics by aquatic organisms is still in its infancy. Here, we aim to advance the field by comparing uptake and effects of microplastic particles (MPP of a biodegradable bioMPP (polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB and petroleum-based MPP (polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA in the freshwater amphipod Gammarus fossarum. Ingestion of both MPP in different particle sizes (32–250 µm occurred after 24 h, with highest ingestion of particles in the range 32–63 µm and almost complete egestion after 64 h. A four-week effect-experiment showed a significant decrease of the assimilation efficiency in amphipods exposed to the petroleum-based MPP from week two onwards. The petroleum-based PMMA affected assimilation efficiency significantly in contrast to the biodegradable PHB, but overall differences in direct comparison of MPP types were small. Both MPP types led to a significantly lower wet weight gain relative to the control treatments. After four weeks, differences between both MPP types and silica, used as a natural particle control, were detected. In summary, these results suggest that both MPP types provoke digestive constraints on the amphipods, which go beyond those of natural non-palatable particles. This highlights the need for more detailed research comparing environmental effects of biodegradable and petroleum-based MPP and testing those against naturally occurring particle loads.

  14. Microsporidia parasites disrupt the responses to cadmium exposure in a gammarid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gismondi, Eric; Rigaud, Thierry; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Cossu-Leguille, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Microsporidia parasites are commonly found in amphipods, where they are often asymptomatic, vertically-transmitted and have several effects on host sexuality and behaviour. As amphipods are often used as models in ecotoxicological studies, we investigated the effect of microsporidian infections on energy reserves and defence capacities of Gammarus roeseli under cadmium stress. Only females were infected by two microsporidia parasites: Dictyocoela roeselum or Dictyocoela muelleri. In physiological conditions, microsporidia had no major effect on energy reserves and defence capacities of G. roeseli, while under cadmium exposure, energy reserves and antioxidant defence were weaker in infected females. Moreover, higher malondialdehyde levels detected in infected females revealed that they suffered more cellular damages. Our results suggest that microsporidia may affect gammarid fitness in stressful conditions, when parasitic stress cannot be compensated by the host. Consequently, microsporidia parasites should be a factor necessary to take into account in ecotoxicology studies involving amphipods. - Highlights: ► High prevalence of microsporidian parasites in Gammarus roeseli. ► Microsporidia have no effect on G. roeseli biomarkers in physiological conditions. ► Microsporidia disturb the responses of G. roeseli biomarkers in cadmium stress. ► Microsporidian parasites could be confounding factor in ecotoxicological studies. - The presence of microsporidian parasites increases the toxic effect of cadmium in G. roeseli females.

  15. Gray whale distribution relative to benthic invertebrate biomass and abundance: Northeastern Chukchi Sea 2009-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Amelia A.; Ferguson, Megan C.; Schonberg, Susan V.; Jewett, Stephen C.; Clarke, Janet T.

    2017-10-01

    The shallow continental shelf waters of the Bering and Chukchi seas are the northernmost foraging grounds of North Pacific gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus). Benthic amphipods are considered the primary prey of gray whales in these waters, although no comprehensive quantitative analysis has been performed to support this assumption. Gray whale relative abundance, distribution, and behavior in the northeastern Chukchi Sea (69°-72°N, 155-169°W) were documented during aerial surveys in June-October 2009-2012. Concurrently, vessel-based benthic infaunal sampling was conducted in the area in July-August 2009-10, September 2011, and August 2012. Gray whales were seen in the study area each month that surveys were conducted, with the majority of whales feeding. Statistical analyses confirm that the highest densities of feeding gray whales were associated with high benthic amphipod abundance, primarily within 70 km of shore from Point Barrow to Icy Cape, in water whales were not seen in 40-km×40-km cells containing benthic sampling stations with 85 m-2 or fewer amphipods. Continuing broad-scale aerial surveys in the Chukchi Sea and prey sampling near feeding gray whales will be an important means to monitor and document ongoing and predicted ecosystem changes.

  16. Biodegradable and Petroleum-Based Microplastics Do Not Differ in Their Ingestion and Excretion but in Their Biological Effects in a Freshwater Invertebrate Gammarus fossarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Sandrine; Hirsch, Philipp E.; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Research on the uptake and effects of bioplastics by aquatic organisms is still in its infancy. Here, we aim to advance the field by comparing uptake and effects of microplastic particles (MPP) of a biodegradable bioMPP (polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)) and petroleum-based MPP (polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)) in the freshwater amphipod Gammarus fossarum. Ingestion of both MPP in different particle sizes (32–250 µm) occurred after 24 h, with highest ingestion of particles in the range 32–63 µm and almost complete egestion after 64 h. A four-week effect-experiment showed a significant decrease of the assimilation efficiency in amphipods exposed to the petroleum-based MPP from week two onwards. The petroleum-based PMMA affected assimilation efficiency significantly in contrast to the biodegradable PHB, but overall differences in direct comparison of MPP types were small. Both MPP types led to a significantly lower wet weight gain relative to the control treatments. After four weeks, differences between both MPP types and silica, used as a natural particle control, were detected. In summary, these results suggest that both MPP types provoke digestive constraints on the amphipods, which go beyond those of natural non-palatable particles. This highlights the need for more detailed research comparing environmental effects of biodegradable and petroleum-based MPP and testing those against naturally occurring particle loads. PMID:28703776

  17. Sediment nickel bioavailability and toxicity to estuarine crustaceans of contrasting bioturbative behaviors--an evaluation of the SEM-AVS paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, G Thomas; Schlekat, Christian E; Garman, Emily R; He, Lijian; Washburn, Katherine M; Stewart, Emily R; Ferry, John L

    2014-11-04

    Robust sediment quality criteria require chemistry and toxicity data predictive of concentrations where population/community response should occur under known geochemical conditions. Understanding kinetic and geochemical effects on toxicant bioavailability is key, and these are influenced by infaunal sediment bioturbation. This study used fine-scale sediment and porewater measurement of contrasting infaunal effects on carbon-normalized SEM-AVS to evaluate safe or potentially toxic nickel concentrations in a high-binding Spartina saltmarsh sediment (4%TOC; 35-45 μmol-S2-·g(-1)). Two crustaceans producing sharply contrasting bioturbation--the copepod Amphiascus tenuiremis and amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus--were cultured in oxic to anoxic sediments with SEM[Ni]-AVS, TOC, porewater [Ni], and porewater DOC measured weekly. From 180 to 750 μg-Ni·g(-1) sediment, amphipod bioturbation reduced [AVS] and enhanced porewater [Ni]. Significant amphipod uptake, mortality, and growth-depression occurred at the higher sediment [Ni] even when [SEM-AVS]/foc suggested acceptable risk. Less bioturbative copepods produced higher AVS and porewater DOC but exhibited net population growth despite porewater [Ni] 1.3-1.7× their aqueous [Ni] LOEC. Copepod aqueous tests with/without dissolved organic matter showed significant aqueous DOC protection, which suggests porewater DOC attenuates sediment Ni toxicity. The SEM[Ni]-AVS relationship was predictive of acceptable risk for copepods at the important population-growth level.

  18. Contaminants and habitat choice in the Baltic Sea: Behavioural experiments with the native species, Monoporeia affinis, and the invasive genus, Marenzelleria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin; Vilhelmsson, Sandra; Wiklund, Stig Johan; Eklund, Britta

    2009-01-01

    The invasive polychaete genus, Marenzelleria and the native amphipod, Monoporeia affinis are food and habitat competitors in the Baltic Sea. Previous studies have shown that moderate densities of Marenzelleria can affect the behaviour of M. affinis. To examine the short-term interactive effects of interspecific habitat choice and environmental contaminants a series of habitat colonisation experiments were performed. The contaminants examined included harbor sediments and sediment spiked with the antifouling substances, Cu, Zn and Irgarol. Polychaetes and amphipods were exposed to contaminants in single-species and two-species experiments. In spiked-sediment experiments, M. affinis showed clear dose-dependent response. These experiments verified that behavioural response of M. affinis to different habitats is a sensitive method for testing toxicity under controlled conditions. In experiments with three different harbor sediments and reference sediment both species showed the lowest preference for the reference sediment. This sediment also had the lowest content of quality food, indicating that factors such as food quality and quantity may override the disturbing effects of contaminants in natural sediments. The presence of Marenzelleria spp. did not affect amphipod habitat choice, indicating no short-term effects, which implies that both species can co-exist provided sufficient food is available.

  19. Toxicity of environmental chemicals and their mixtures to selected aquatic organisms. Behaviour, development and biochemistry; Toxizitaet von Umweltchemikalien und deren Mischungen auf ausgewaehlte aquatische Organismen. Verhalten, Entwicklung und Biochemie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienle, Cornelia

    2009-04-28

    In this work, the effects of various single substances (pesticides and metals) as well as binary mixtures of them on zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos and larvae were assessed on biochemical, developmental, and organism levels. The influence of oxygen depletion on the toxicity of substances was included as an additional interacting factor. To analyse complex interactions, the predator-prey behaviour between zebrafish and chironomid larvae (Chironomus riparius) was investigated. Another aspect of this work were studies on complex mixtures of hydrocarbons such as the water accommodated fraction of crude oil, and their effects on the behaviour of marine amphipods (Corophium volutator), as well as semi-field experiments with freshwater amphipods (Gammarus pulex). My investigations showed that effects of various substances in environmentally relevant concentration ranges are exerted on different levels of biological organisation, both in amphipods and fish. It could be shown that abiotic parameters modify the effects of pollutants. When investigating mixtures of substances with similar or different modes of action, additivity occurred in the majority of cases which usually were consistent for all investigated parameters (enzyme activity, locomotor activity, developmental impairment, mortality). Effects of the neurotoxic insecticide chlorpyrifos on the interactions between fish and chironomids could be detected in environmentally relevant concentration ranges. The effects of the water accommodated fraction of crude oil which represents a great risk for aquatic organisms in costal habitats were displayed by alterations in the behaviour of the marine amphipod Corophium volutator. For a continuous monitoring of water quality in monitoring stations, the resident amphipod Gammarus pulex proved to be a suitable and relevant test organism, as it responds sensitive to complex mixtures of pollutants in surface waters. In summary, behavioural parameters proved to be integrative

  20. Development and application of freshwater sediment-toxicity benchmarks for currently used pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowell, Lisa H., E-mail: lhnowell@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, California Water Science Center, Placer Hall, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819 (United States); Norman, Julia E., E-mail: jnorman@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, Oregon Water Science Center, 2130 SW 5" t" h Avenue, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Ingersoll, Christopher G., E-mail: cingersoll@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia Environmental Research Center, 4200 New Haven Road, Columbia, MO 65021 (United States); Moran, Patrick W., E-mail: pwmoran@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, Washington Water Science Center, 934 Broadway, Suite 300, Tacoma, WA 98402 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Sediment-toxicity benchmarks are needed to interpret the biological significance of currently used pesticides detected in whole sediments. Two types of freshwater sediment benchmarks for pesticides were developed using spiked-sediment bioassay (SSB) data from the literature. These benchmarks can be used to interpret sediment-toxicity data or to assess the potential toxicity of pesticides in whole sediment. The Likely Effect Benchmark (LEB) defines a pesticide concentration in whole sediment above which there is a high probability of adverse effects on benthic invertebrates, and the Threshold Effect Benchmark (TEB) defines a concentration below which adverse effects are unlikely. For compounds without available SSBs, benchmarks were estimated using equilibrium partitioning (EqP). When a sediment sample contains a pesticide mixture, benchmark quotients can be summed for all detected pesticides to produce an indicator of potential toxicity for that mixture. Benchmarks were developed for 48 pesticide compounds using SSB data and 81 compounds using the EqP approach. In an example application, data for pesticides measured in sediment from 197 streams across the United States were evaluated using these benchmarks, and compared to measured toxicity from whole-sediment toxicity tests conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28-d exposures) and the midge Chironomus dilutus (10-d exposures). Amphipod survival, weight, and biomass were significantly and inversely related to summed benchmark quotients, whereas midge survival, weight, and biomass showed no relationship to benchmarks. Samples with LEB exceedances were rare (n = 3), but all were toxic to amphipods (i.e., significantly different from control). Significant toxicity to amphipods was observed for 72% of samples exceeding one or more TEBs, compared to 18% of samples below all TEBs. Factors affecting toxicity below TEBs may include the presence of contaminants other than pesticides, physical/chemical characteristics

  1. Development and application of freshwater sediment-toxicity benchmarks for currently used pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Norman, Julia E.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Moran, Patrick W.

    2016-01-01

    Sediment-toxicity benchmarks are needed to interpret the biological significance of currently used pesticides detected in whole sediments. Two types of freshwater sediment benchmarks for pesticides were developed using spiked-sediment bioassay (SSB) data from the literature. These benchmarks can be used to interpret sediment-toxicity data or to assess the potential toxicity of pesticides in whole sediment. The Likely Effect Benchmark (LEB) defines a pesticide concentration in whole sediment above which there is a high probability of adverse effects on benthic invertebrates, and the Threshold Effect Benchmark (TEB) defines a concentration below which adverse effects are unlikely. For compounds without available SSBs, benchmarks were estimated using equilibrium partitioning (EqP). When a sediment sample contains a pesticide mixture, benchmark quotients can be summed for all detected pesticides to produce an indicator of potential toxicity for that mixture. Benchmarks were developed for 48 pesticide compounds using SSB data and 81 compounds using the EqP approach. In an example application, data for pesticides measured in sediment from 197 streams across the United States were evaluated using these benchmarks, and compared to measured toxicity from whole-sediment toxicity tests conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28-d exposures) and the midge Chironomus dilutus (10-d exposures). Amphipod survival, weight, and biomass were significantly and inversely related to summed benchmark quotients, whereas midge survival, weight, and biomass showed no relationship to benchmarks. Samples with LEB exceedances were rare (n = 3), but all were toxic to amphipods (i.e., significantly different from control). Significant toxicity to amphipods was observed for 72% of samples exceeding one or more TEBs, compared to 18% of samples below all TEBs. Factors affecting toxicity below TEBs may include the presence of contaminants other than pesticides, physical/chemical characteristics

  2. Toxicity of contaminants in lagoons and pannes of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, R.; Speelman, J.; Stewart, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Contaminants in water and sediments of lagoons and pannes were 2--90 times greater at sites adjacent to slag and coal piles than those at reference sites. One site (Lagoon-US5) had sediments with very high concentrations of toxic organics (e.g. naphthalene, phenanthrene, dibenzofuran). Although analyses indicated a gradient of contaminant concentration with distance from their sources, toxicity assays were somewhat equivocal. With the exception of less reproduction in Ceriodaphnia at one lagoon site (US3 = 0.55 of reference), survival of fathead minnows and reproduction in Ceriodaphnia in lagoon and panne waters varied independently of the contaminant concentration. In fact, there was better Ceriodaphnia reproduction in water from two contaminated sites (Lagoon-US5, Panne-WP1) than in water from reference sites. Fathead minnow survival, Ceriodaphnia survival, Ceriodaphnia reproduction, amphipod survival, and amphipod growth varied among sites in toxicity assays with sediments, 100% mortality of fatheads at Lagoon-US5, 100% mortality of Ceriodaphnia at Lagoon-US3, and less survival of fathead minnows at Lagoon-US3 indicate possible toxicity from contaminants in sediments at these sites. Of all organisms and end-points tested, Ceriodaphnia survival seemed to be most closely associated with concentrations of contaminants in lagoon water and sediments. Amphipod survival also varied with contaminants in sediments, however, survival in sediments of contaminated sites ranged only from 0.90--0.93 of reference sites. Although the results are not consistent among organisms, toxicity assays indicate that sediments from the lagoon site with the highest contaminants (Lagoon-US5) and possibly those from another contaminated lagoon site (Lagoon-US3) could be toxic to aquatic organisms. Water and sediments from contaminated panne sites do not appear to be toxic to aquatic test organisms

  3. Assessing the Extent of Sediment Contamination Around Creosote-treated Pilings Through Chemical and Biological Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, E. S.

    2008-12-01

    Creosote is a common wood preservative used to treat marine structures, such as docks and bulkheads. Treated dock pilings continually leach polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other creosote compounds into the surrounding water and sediment. Over time, these compounds can accumulate in marine sediments, reaching much greater concentrations than those in seawater. The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of creosote contamination in sediments, at a series of distances from treated pilings. Three pilings were randomly selected from a railroad trestle in Fidalgo Bay, WA and sediment samples were collected at four distances from each: 0 meters, 0.5 meters, 1 meter, and 2 meters. Samples were used to conduct two bioassays: an amphipod bioassay (Rhepoxynius abronius) and a sand dollar embryo bioassay. Grain size and PAH content (using a fluorometric method) were also measured. Five samples in the amphipod bioassay showed significantly lower effective survival than the reference sediment. These consisted of samples closest to the piling at 0 and 0.5 meters. One 0 m sample in the sand dollar embryo bioassay also showed a significantly lower percentage of normal embryos than the reference sediment. Overall, results strongly suggest that creosote-contaminated sediments, particularly those closest to treated pilings, can negatively affect both amphipods and echinoderm embryos. Although chemical data were somewhat ambiguous, 0 m samples had the highest levels of PAHs, which corresponded to the lowest average survival in both bioassays. Relatively high levels of PAHs were found as far as 2 meters away from pilings. Therefore, we cannot say how far chemical contamination can spread from creosote-treated pilings, and at what distance this contamination can still affect marine organisms. These results, as well as future research, are essential to the success of proposed piling removal projects. In addition to creosote-treated pilings, contaminated sediments must

  4. Appendix U: benthic biological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessler, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    Characterization of the biology and standing crop of the benthic organisms is divided into two major categories: (1) those organisms (sessile or with limited mobility) that live on or within the sediment (infauna); and (2) highly mobile organisms that have contact (if only occasionally) with the sediment (benthopelagic organisms). At this time our studies of benthopelagic organisms are restricted to amphipods. The amphipods trapped at MPG-I (30 to 31 0 N, 159 0 W) in 1978 have been sorted to species and compared with those trapped at Climax II (28 0 N, 155 to 156 0 W) in 1977. The species composition is the same at both stations and the numerical representation of the various species appears to be equivalent. Instar categories based on morphological and size criteria have been determined for Eurythenes gryllus. Comparison of the size range of the instar categories, morphological characters and female to male ratio show no detectable differences in E. gryllus from the two areas. Individuals of one of the smaller species of amphipods (Paralicella caperesca) were trapped at 710 m above the sediment, demonstrating that although the primary range of this species is 0-1 m off the bottom, it is capable of wide bathymetric movements. Males mature at a much smaller size (7 cm vs 11.5 cm) than females. Females appear to breed only once while males seem to be reproductively mature for several instars. After attaining maturity, male growth decreases to almost half the previous rate, and the time interval between molts appears to increase substantially. Females approximate a linear growth rate throughout their instar stages. The data are insufficient to determine if a decrease in growth rate occurs at the molt to maturity (female 14). The apparent difference in the time to maturity for males and females results in a high number of mature males present in the population to fertilize relatively few females

  5. Heavy metal accumulation in lizards living near a phosphate treatment plant: possible transfer of contaminants from aquatic to terrestrial food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Intissar; Hammouda, Abdessalam; Hamza, Foued; Zrig, Ahlem; Selmi, Slaheddine

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the accumulation of heavy metals in Bosk's fringe-toed lizards (Acanthodactylus boskianus) living in Gabès region (southeastern Tunisia), in relation to habitat, diet, and distance from the Gabès-Ghannouche factory complex of phosphate treatment. More specifically, we compared the concentrations of cadmium, lead, and zinc in the stomach contents and samples of the liver, kidney, and tail from lizards living in four sites corresponding to different combinations of habitat (coastal dunes vs backshore) and distance from the factory complex (lizards living on the coastal dunes mainly feed on littoral amphipods, while those living in the backshore feed exclusively on terrestrial invertebrates. The concentrations of heavy metals in lizard tissues were overall positively correlated with those in the preys they ingested. Moreover, there was a general tendency towards increased concentrations of cadmium, lead, and zinc in the samples from lizards living on coastal dunes compared to those from the other sites, although some differences still lacked statistical significance. These results suggest that the highest contamination of lizards living on coastal dunes was probably related to the ingestion of contaminated amphipods. Thus, amphipods and Bosk's fringe-toed lizards seem to provide an important link between the marine and terrestrial food webs, with higher concentrations appearing to accumulate from materials released into the sea rather than the terrestrial environment. With regard to metal distribution among tissues, our results were overall in agreement with previous findings in other reptiles. In particular, cadmium was most concentrated in the liver samples, stressing once more the role of the liver as a storage organ of Cd. Moreover, high concentrations of the three assessed metals were found in the kidney samples, showing the role of the kidney as an active site of heavy metal accumulation.

  6. Multi-trophic resilience of boreal lake ecosystems to forest fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tyler L; Lindberg, Mark S; Schmutz, Joel A; Bertram, Mark R

    2014-05-01

    Fires are the major natural disturbance in the boreal forest, and their frequency and intensity will likely increase as the climate warms. Terrestrial nutrients released by fires may be transported to boreal lakes, stimulating increased primary productivity, which may radiate through multiple trophic levels. Using a before-after-control-impact (BACI) design, with pre- and postfire data from burned and unburned areas, we examined effects of a natural fire across several trophic levels of boreal lakes, from nutrient and chlorophyll levels, to macroinvertebrates, to waterbirds. Concentrations of total nitrogen and phosphorus were not affected by the fire. Chlorophyll a levels were also unaffected, likely reflecting the stable nutrient concentrations. For aquatic invertebrates, we found that densities of three functional feeding groups did not respond to the fire (filterers, gatherers, scrapers), while two groups increased (shredders, predators). Amphipods accounted for 98% of shredder numbers, and we hypothesize that fire-mediated habitat changes may have favored their generalist feeding and habitat ecology. This increase in amphipods may, in turn, have driven increased predator densities, as amphipods were the most numerous invertebrate in our lakes and are commonly taken as prey. Finally, abundance of waterbird young, which feed primarily on aquatic invertebrates, was not affected by the fire. Overall, ecosystems of our study lakes were largely resilient to forest fires, likely due to their high initial nutrient concentrations and small catchment sizes. Moreover, this resilience spanned multiple trophic levels, a significant result for ecologically similar boreal regions, especially given the high potential for increased fires with future climate change.

  7. Seagrass habitat complexity and macroinvertebrate abundance in Lakshadweep coral reef lagoons, Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Z. A.; Rivonker, C. U.; Ramani, P.; Parulekar, A. H.

    1991-09-01

    Macrofauna of seagrass community in the five Lakshadweep atolls were studied and compared. The associated epifaunal and infaunal taxa comprising nine major taxonomic groups, showed significant differences in the total number of individuals (1041 8411 m-2) among sites and habitats. The density of macrofauna was directly related to mean macrophytic biomass (405 895 g wet wt. m-2). The fauna was dominated by epifaunal polychaetes, amphipods and isopods in the vegetated areas. When compared with the density of nearby unvegetated areasleft( {bar x = 815{text{m }}^{ - 2} } right), seagrass meadows harbour a denser and richer macroinvertebrate assemblageleft( {bar x = 4023{text{m }}^{ - 2} } right).

  8. Water Quality Criteria for Colored Smokes: Solvent Yellow 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    Wr e. a benthic crustacean (e.g, ostracod, isopod, or amphipod): f. an insect (e.g., mayfly, midge, stonefly)- g. a family in a phylum other than...Arthropoda or Chordata (e.g, Annelida or Mollusca): and h, a family in any order of insect or any phylum not represented. 2. Acute-chronic ratios (see...acute toxicity to freshwater acuatic animals should be used: a. Tests with daphnids and other cladocerans should be started with organisms < 24 hr old

  9. Water Quality Criteria for Colored Smokes: Solvent Green 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    w. • • N ¶; . W i.• •: ; _ . . • V • • ,• •; . L . . W k• • ’ ’I - • e. a berithic crustacean (e.g, ostracod, isopod, or amphipod): f. an insect ...of insect or any phylum not represented. 2. Acute-chronic ratios (see Section 7) for species of aquatic animals in at least three different families...Gi.de- lines for Deriving Numeripal National Water Quality Criteria for the Protection of Acuatic Organisms and Their Uses indicate that (except possibly

  10. Effect on Hyalella azteca after pulse exposure to environmentally realistic concentrations of permethrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe; Palmqvist, Annemette; Forbes, Valery E.

    . H. azteca is widely distributed through North America where it is common as a food source for birds, fish and large invertebrates and is therefore considered as an ecologically important organism. In addition H. azteca has been extensively used as a test organism and is generally sensitive...... realistic pulse exposure and concentration of a pyrethroid pesticide, permethrin, on the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. Permethrin is a pyrethroid insecticide used in mosquito control and to control a wide range of insect pests on various crops and is known to be highly toxic to aquatic invertebrates...

  11. Studies on mountain streams in the English lake district III. Aspects of water chemistry in Brownrigg Well, Whelpside Ghyll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutcliffe, D W; Carrick, T R

    1973-01-01

    Comparisons are made of pH and the concentrations of major ions in streamwater from Brownrigg Well (the source of Whelpside Ghyll) and from the River Duddon. PH in Brownrigg Well is usually >5.7, but the concentrations of sodium, potassium and possibly calcium are near to the minima required to support the amphipod Gammarus pulex. In contrast most insect taxa are not affected by low ionic concentrations. It is postulated that these had a wider distribution in mountain streams prior to the acidification of poorly buffered waters by acid rainfall resulting from large-scale combustion of fossil fuels.

  12. Kelp forest as a habitat for mobile epifauna: case study of Caprella septentrionalis Kröyer, 1838 (Amphipoda, Caprellidae in an Arctic glacial fjord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Ronowicz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Distribution and abundance of the amphipod Caprella septentrionalis in relation to environmental conditions and habitat preferences were investigated in a kelp forest in Hornsund, Spitsbergen. Three sampling sites differed in hydrodynamics, organic and inorganic suspension concentration, and sedimentation rates. None of these abiotic factors or species of a macroalgal host appeared to have a significant influence on C. septentrionalis abundance and size range. An apparent preference towards the blade parts of the algal thalli was observed. These results support the idea of C. septentrionalis as a generalist Arctic–boreal species that takes advantage of the protective nature of kelp forests.

  13. Red Sea Leucothoidae (Crustacea: Amphipoda) including new and re-described species

    KAUST Repository

    White, Kristine N.; Krapp-Schickel, Traudl

    2017-01-01

    Examination of leucothoid amphipods of the Red Sea has revealed seven species not previously reported from this location. Leucothoe minoculis sp. nov., Leucothoe pansa sp. nov., Leucothoe reimeri sp. nov., and Paranamixis sommelieri sp. nov. are described and the range of Leucothoe predenticulata Ledoyer, 1978, L. acutilobata Ledoyer, 1978 and L. squalidens Ledoyer, 1978 is expanded to include the Red Sea. Clarification of reports of L. acanthopus Schellenberg, 1928 and L. bannwarthi (Schellenberg, 1928) is provided and Leucothoe alani sp. nov. is described from outside the Red Sea.

  14. Trophodynamics of suprabenthic fauna on coastal muddy bottoms of the southern Tyrrhenian Sea (western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, E.; Cartes, J. E.; Badalamenti, F.; Rumolo, P.; Sprovieri, M.

    2009-02-01

    The trophodynamics of suprabenthic fauna were analyzed in the Gulf of Castellammare (North-western Sicily, Italy) at depths ranging between 40 and 80 m. Variations in species abundance and biomass together with changes in nitrogen and carbon stable isotope composition were explored at a seasonal scale, from November 2004 to June 2005. Suprabenthos showed maximum biomass and abundance from late winter to summer, while minimum values were found in autumn. The highest abundances of mysids and copepods occurred in March, 1 month after the peak of primary production. Amphipod abundance was higher in summer, likely due to a relative increase in organic matter in the sediments. Statistical analysis provided evidence for separation of sample abundances as a function of season. The best match between suprabenthos abundance and environmental variables was found with Chlorophyll a recorded 3 months before the sampling. Stable isotope analyses suggest a relatively complex food web in the Gulf of Castellammare with several potential food sources. Some suprabenthic species (i.e. mysids and copepods) exhibited depleted values of δ13C, indicating a planktonic source of nutrition. Cumaceans and amphipods displayed more enriched δ13C values, pointing to more detritivorous behaviour. A third group with intermediate δ13C values comprised species with a mixed diet (e.g. Ampelisca spp., Apherusa vexatrix and Harpinia spp.). Assuming a 15N-enrichment of ca. 2.54‰ between consumers and their diet, at least two trophic levels can be distinctly identified: (1) filter feeders/grazers (mysids, copepods), suspension/deposit feeders ( Ampelisca spp., A. vexatrix, small Goneplax rhomboides) and omnivores, alternatively feeding on detritus and small invertebrates such as meiobenthos (the cumacean Leucon mediterraneus or the amphipod Westwoodilla rectirostris); (2) carnivores on small crustaceans and zooplankton (the amphipod Harpinia spp., the gobiid fish Lesuerigobius suerii and the decapod

  15. Bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS): A carrier of heavy metals in the marine food-chain

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhaskar, P.V.; Bhosle, N.B.

    Microbiology, Maier, R.M., Pepper, I.L. and Gerba, C.P., eds., Academic Press, San Diego, 2000. Schlekat, C.E., Decho, A.W. and Chandler, G.T. Dietary assimilation of cadmium associated with bacterial exopolymer sediment coatings by the estuarine amphipod...H environments. Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 55: 1249-1257; 1989. Ford, T.E., Maki, J.S. and Mitchell, R. The role of metal-binding bacterial exopolymers in corrosion processes. Corrosion/87, Paper no. 380, NACE publications, California; 1987. Geesey, G...

  16. Characteristics of fatty acid composition of Gammarus lacustris inhabiting lakes with and without fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhutova, O N; Sharapova, T A; Kalachova, G S; Shulepina, S P; Gladyshev, M I

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a biotic factor--the presence of predatory fish in water--on the composition and content of fatty acids in crustaceans was studied in the populations of the lake amphipod Gammarus lacustris from two lakes with fish and three lakes without fish. It was found that, at an overall increase in the quantity and quality of food resources (namely, increase in the content of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the biomass), the relative rate of DHA accumulation in gammarids in the lakes without fish is higher than in the lake with fish.

  17. First record of the invasive and cryptogenic species Jassa slatteryiConlan, 1990 (Crustacea: Amphipoda) in Italian coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, Andrea; Mancini, Emanuele; Ventura, Daniele

    2018-06-01

    Jassa slatteryi is a cosmopolitan amphipod reported as cryptogenic or invasive species throughout the world. Although it had been signaled in the Mediterranean Sea, it was never found on the Italian coasts. This study represents the first record of J. slatteryi in Italy. A total of 87 specimens were collected on artificial hard substrates in the Port of Civitavecchia (Rome). The presence of this species in the Mediterranean Sea was probably underestimated due to the similar morphological features and ecological requirements of different species of Jassa spp.

  18. Red Sea Leucothoidae (Crustacea: Amphipoda) including new and re-described species

    KAUST Repository

    White, Kristine N.

    2017-05-31

    Examination of leucothoid amphipods of the Red Sea has revealed seven species not previously reported from this location. Leucothoe minoculis sp. nov., Leucothoe pansa sp. nov., Leucothoe reimeri sp. nov., and Paranamixis sommelieri sp. nov. are described and the range of Leucothoe predenticulata Ledoyer, 1978, L. acutilobata Ledoyer, 1978 and L. squalidens Ledoyer, 1978 is expanded to include the Red Sea. Clarification of reports of L. acanthopus Schellenberg, 1928 and L. bannwarthi (Schellenberg, 1928) is provided and Leucothoe alani sp. nov. is described from outside the Red Sea.

  19. Description and proposed life cycle of Maritrema novaezealandensis n. sp. (Microphallidae) parasitic in red-billed gulls, Larus novaehollandiae scopulinus, from Otago Harbor, South Island, New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martorelli, Sergio R; Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Mouritsen, Kim Nørgaard

    2004-01-01

    Maritrema novaezealandensis n. sp. is described from Otago Harbor, South Island, New Zealand, on the basis of adult specimens collected from the Red-billed gull, Larus novaehollandiae scopulinus, and excysted metacercariae obtained from crabs. It belongs to the "eroliae group" and differs from...... snail, Zeacumantus subcarinatus, in which the cercarial stage is produced in sporocysts located within the gonad of the snail. At least 3 crab species (Hemigrapsus crenulatus, Macrophtalmus hirtipes, and Halicarcinus whitei) and several species of amphipods act as second intermediate hosts...

  20. Laboratory experiments examining inducible defense show variable responses of temperate brown and red macroalgae Experimentos de laboratorio para examinar las defensas inducibles muestran respuestas variables en macroalgas pardas y rojas de ambientes templados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EVA ROTHÄUSLER

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Macroalgae can defend themselves against generalist and specialist herbivores via morphological and/or chemical traits. Herein we examined the defensive responses (via relative palatability of two brown (Lessonia nigrescens, Glossophora kunthii and two red algae (Grateloupia doryphora, Chondracanthus chamissoi from the northern-central coast of Chile against selected generalist meso-herbivores. Two laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate whether (i algae can respond generally to grazing pressure of meso-herbivores (amphipods, isopods and juvenile sea urchins and whether (ii these algal responses were inducible. In order to examine palatability and thus effectiveness of responses, feeding assays were run after each experiment using fresh algal pieces and artificial agar-based food. Lessonia nigrescens responded to amphipods but not to sea urchins, and G. kunthii showed inducible response against one species of amphipods. Grateloupia doryphora did not respond against any of the tested grazers, whereas C. chamissoi responded against one species of amphipods and the tested isopod. Our results indicate variable responses of macroalgae against selected generalist meso-herbivores and evidence of an inducible defense in the brown alga G. kunthii.Muchas macroalgas poseen la capacidad de defenderse contra herbívoros generalistas y especialistas utilizando defensas químicas y/o morfológicas. En este trabajo se examinó la respuesta de la palatabilidad ante meso-herbívoros generalistas de dos algas pardas (Lessonia nigrescens, Glossophora kunthii y dos algas rojas (Grateloupia doryphora, Chondracanthus chamissoi de la costa Norte de Chile. Se realizaron dos experimentos de laboratorio para investigar si: (i las algas pueden responder al pastoreo realizado por meso-herbivoros generalistas (anfípodos, isópodos y erizos juveniles y (ii si la respuesta de estas algas es inducible. Para examinar la palatabilidad y de esta forma la efectividad

  1. Short-term bioconcentration studies of Np in freshwater biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, T.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Simmons, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Short-term laboratory exposures were conducted to determine the potential accumulation of Np in aquatic organisms. Concentration factors were highest in green algae. Daphnia magna, a filter-feeding crustacean, accumulated Np at levels one order of magnitude greater than the amphipod Gammarus sp., an omnivorous substrate feeder. Accumulation of Np in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was highest in carcass (generally greater than 78% of the total body burden) and lowest in fillets. Recommended concentration factors for Np, based on fresh weight, were 300 for green algae, 100 for filter-feeding invertebrates, for nonfilter-feeding invertebrates, 10 for whole fish, and one for fish flesh

  2. Biological processes influencing contaminant release from sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reible, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of biological processes, including bioturbation, on the mobility of contaminants in freshwater sediments is described. Effective mass coefficients are estimated for tubificid oligochaetes as a function of worm behavior and biomass density. The mass transfer coefficients were observed to be inversely proportional to water oxygen content and proportional to the square root of biomass density. The sediment reworking and contaminant release are contrasted with those of freshwater amphipods. The implications of these and other biological processes for contaminant release and i n-situ remediation of soils and sediments are summarized. 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. Ecotoxicological study of used lubricating oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, P.K.; Chan, W.L.; Wang, J.; Wong, C.K.

    1995-01-01

    Used lubricating oil is more toxic than crude oil and fuel oil since it contains comparatively high levels of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). No detail toxicological study has been conducted to evaluate the hazards of used lubricating oil to the environment. This study reports a battery of bioassays using bacteria (Microtox test and Mutatox test), algae, amphipod and shrimp larvae to determine the toxicity of water soluble fraction of used lubricating oil. The results will be used to formulate a complete and extensive ecotoxicological assessment of the impacts of used lubricating oil on aquatic environment

  4. Potential for parasite-induced biases in aquatic invertebrate population studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Justin D.L.; Mushet, David M.; Stockwell, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies highlight the need to include estimates of detection/capture probability in population studies. This need is particularly important in studies where detection and/or capture probability is influenced by parasite-induced behavioral alterations. We assessed potential biases associated with sampling a population of the amphipod Gammarus lacustris in the presence of Polymorphus spp. acanthocephalan parasites shown to increase positive phototaxis in their amphipod hosts. We trapped G. lacustris at two water depths (benthic and surface) and compared number of captures and number of parasitized individuals at each depth. While we captured the greatest number of G. lacustris individuals in benthic traps, parasitized individuals were captured most often in surface traps. These results reflect the phototaxic movement of infected individuals from benthic locations to sunlit surface waters. We then explored the influence of varying infection rates on a simulated population held at a constant level of abundance. Simulations resulted in increasingly biased abundance estimates as infection rates increased. Our results highlight the need to consider parasite-induced biases when quantifying detection and/or capture probability in studies of aquatic invertebrate populations.

  5. Latitude, temperature, and habitat complexity predict predation pressure in eelgrass beds across the Northern Hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Pamela L; Stachowicz, John J; Hovel, Kevin; Boström, Christoffer; Boyer, Katharyn; Cusson, Mathieu; Eklöf, Johan S; Engel, Friederike G; Engelen, Aschwin H; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Fodrie, F Joel; Griffin, John N; Hereu, Clara M; Hori, Masakazu; Hanley, Torrance C; Ivanov, Mikhail; Jorgensen, Pablo; Kruschel, Claudia; Lee, Kun-Seop; McGlathery, Karen; Moksnes, Per-Olav; Nakaoka, Masahiro; O'Connor, Mary I; O'Connor, Nessa E; Orth, Robert J; Rossi, Francesca; Ruesink, Jennifer; Sotka, Erik E; Thormar, Jonas; Tomas, Fiona; Unsworth, Richard K F; Whalen, Matthew A; Duffy, J Emmett

    2018-01-01

    Latitudinal gradients in species interactions are widely cited as potential causes or consequences of global patterns of biodiversity. However, mechanistic studies documenting changes in interactions across broad geographic ranges are limited. We surveyed predation intensity on common prey (live amphipods and gastropods) in communities of eelgrass (Zostera marina) at 48 sites across its Northern Hemisphere range, encompassing over 37° of latitude and four continental coastlines. Predation on amphipods declined with latitude on all coasts but declined more strongly along western ocean margins where temperature gradients are steeper. Whereas in situ water temperature at the time of the experiments was uncorrelated with predation, mean annual temperature strongly positively predicted predation, suggesting a more complex mechanism than simply increased metabolic activity at the time of predation. This large-scale biogeographic pattern was modified by local habitat characteristics; predation declined with higher shoot density both among and within sites. Predation rates on gastropods, by contrast, were uniformly low and varied little among sites. The high replication and geographic extent of our study not only provides additional evidence to support biogeographic variation in predation intensity, but also insight into the mechanisms that relate temperature and biogeographic gradients in species interactions. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  6. Morphology-diet relationships in four killifishes (Teleostei, Cyprinodontidae, Orestias) from Lake Titicaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, E; Hubert, N; Sagnes, P; De Mérona, B

    2009-02-01

    This study explores the relationship between morphology and diet in four Andean killifishes (Orestias) from Lake Titicaca that are known to differ in habitat use. Species that fed preferentially on amphipods (Orestias albus) or molluscs (Orestias luteus) separated in multivariate space from other species that feed on cladocera and algae (Orestias agassii and Orestias jussiei). Generally, specimens feeding on cladocera were characterized by a short, blunt nose with a small mouth; whereas, specimens feeding on amphipods exhibited a long snout with a large mouth. Specimens including molluscs in their diet tended to have a larger posterior part of the head and the larger opercles than others; while the occurrence of substratum in gut content was generally related to a short but deep head. The present analysis suggests that the littoral O. jussiei has an intermediate phenotype and diet between the pelagic (O. agassii) and benthic (O. albus and O. luteus) species. Results suggest that resource partitioning was occurring and that several morphological traits relate to characteristics of the diet, and it is inferred that the benthic, the pelagic and the littoral zones in the lake host different prey communities constituting distinct adaptive landscapes.

  7. Widespread Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods and other crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cordaux

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Wolbachia bacteria are obligate intracellular alpha-Proteobacteria of arthropods and nematodes. Although widespread among isopod crustaceans, they have seldom been found in non-isopod crustacean species. Here, we report Wolbachia infection in fourteen new crustacean species. Our results extend the range of Wolbachia infections in terrestrial isopods and amphipods (class Malacostraca. We report the occurrence of two different Wolbachia strains in two host species (a terrestrial isopod and an amphipod. Moreover, the discovery of Wolbachia in the goose barnacle Lepas anatifera (subclass Thecostraca establishes Wolbachia infection in class Maxillopoda. The new bacterial strains are closely related to B-supergroup Wolbachia strains previously reported from crustacean hosts. Our results suggest that Wolbachia infection may be much more widespread in crustaceans than previously thought. The presence of related Wolbachia strains in highly divergent crustacean hosts suggests that Wolbachia endosymbionts can naturally adapt to a wide range of crustacean hosts. Given the ability of isopod Wolbachia strains to induce feminization of genetic males or cytoplasmic incompatibility, we speculate that manipulation of crustacean-borne Wolbachia bacteria might represent potential tools for controlling crustacean species of commercial interest and crustacean or insect disease vectors.

  8. Geoinformation Support and Web Technologies for Problems of Hydrobiological Monitoring of Yenisei River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrianova Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of long-term hydrobiological monitoring for the Yenisei river section from the Krasnoyarsk hydroelectric power station dam to the village Zotino (Turukhansk district of the Krasnoyarsk region are considered. Researching of zoobenthos showed significant changes of its structure after the Krasnoyarsk HPP dam construction. In particular, the proportion of amphipods (crustaceans in the zoobenthos biomass increased by 10 times. In the expeditionary studies, seven species of amphipods were identified, but it should be noted that only two species develop and clearly dominate among them. Data obtained during the hydrobiological research formed the basis of geospatial database developed as a result of the work. The geospatial database with the observation results is available in the ICM SB RAS geoportal. The geoportal services provide data visualization in the form of interactive thematic maps, information about the objects on the map as “tooltips”, information downloading in tabular form, direct access to the data through the web mapping services. Information and analytical support for the monitoring system based on the considered approach can simplify access to the needed information, provide new opportunities for analysis and modeling, promote the development of cross-disciplinary researches.

  9. A new species of Nuuanu (Amphipoda: Gammaridea: Melitidae from shallow sandy bottoms of the Balearic Islands (W Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damià Jaume

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuuanu beatricis n. sp., a new melitid amphipod, is described from shallow-water sandy bottoms on the S and SE coasts of Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Mediterranean. It differs from the rest of its congeners in the combination of: (1 non-geniculate antennule, much longer than antenna; (2 distal segment of mandibular palp shorter than second, armed with both D and E setae; (3 second segment of mandibular palp with 2 setae; (4 posteroventral lobe (sensu Lowry and Watson, 2002 absent from posterior margin of coxa 4; (5 reduced spine present on medial surface of coxa 5; (6 posterior margin of basis of pereopod 5 convex; (7 anterodistal lobe of coxa 7 wanting; (8 posterior margin of basis of pereopod 7 sparsely serrated along proximal half only; (9 pleonites 1-2 lacking dorsodistal spines; (10 anterodistal corner of epimeral plate 1 rounded; (11 exopod of uropod 3 longer than protopod; and (12 telson with terminal spine on each lobe. Although the new amphipod could be an alien species introduced from a distant tropical location with alien Caulerpa algae species, it is here regarded as an ancient Mediterranean element owing to its peracarid condition (i.e. reduced potential for dispersal, regressed visual apparatus, and crevicular-interstitial existence. The presumed presence of sternal gills in Nuuanu is rejected after demonstration of the coxal origin of the spiniform structures interpreted elsewhere as sternal gills.

  10. Effect of Roundup® (glyphosate formulation) in the energy metabolism and reproductive traits of Hyalella castroi (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Dogielinotidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Bibiana Kaiser; Fernandes, Felipe Amorim; Failace, Daniela Motta; Oliveira, Guendalina Turcato

    2011-01-01

    Roundup(®) (glyphosate formulation) is a nonselective and posts emergent herbicide used for controlling aquatic weeds and different concentrations are used in cultures around the world. The objective of this investigation was to examine the effects of Roundup(®) (glyphosate formulation) on the biochemical composition, levels of lipoperoxidation, Na(+)/K(+)ATPase activity and reproductive traits in the Hyalella castroi. Amphipods were collected in summer 2009, in the southern Brazilian highlands. In the laboratory, the animals were kept in aquariums under controlled conditions for 7 days, and after this period they were exposed to 0.36, 0.52, 1.08 and 2.16 mg/l of glyphosate for 7 days. After the period of exposure, the animals were immediately frozen for determination of glycogen, proteins, lipids, triglycerides, cholesterol, levels of lipoperoxidation, and Na(+)/K(+)ATPase activity. During each day of the cultivation reproductive traits (number of reproductive pairs, ovigerous females and eggs in the marsupium) were observed. All concentrations of Roundup(®) induced significant decreases in all biochemical parameters and Na(+)/K(+)ATPase activity, and significant increase in lipoperoxidation levels. Showing this form a potentially toxic effect at very low concentrations, this pattern of results can lead to significant changes in trophic structure of limnic environments because these amphipods are important links in food chain in these habitats.

  11. Alimentação de Bairdiella ronchus (Cuvier (Perciformes, Sciaenidae na Baía de Guaratuba, Paraná, Brasil Feeding of Bairdiella ronchus (Cuvier (Perciformes, Sciaenidae at the Guaratuba Bay, Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Vendel

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal variation of food items of Bairdiella ronchus (Cuvier, 1830 classified by size was analysed based on monthly samples between september/1993 and september/1996 at the Guaratuba Bay, Southern Brazil. The stomach contents of a hundred eighty-two fishes were analysed by the Occunence Frequency Method and Point Count for a Lot Method. The individuais were divided in two groups, smaller and longer than 140mm, and a comparative study of digestive tract and branchial are was performed for these groups. For fishes smaller than 140mm the following sequence of items was obtained matching both methods by using the Preponderance índices: decapods (subdivided in Brachyura, Caridea and Penaeidea, polychaets, isopods, fishes, unidentified material, copepods, amphipods, molluscs and plant material. For fishes longer than or equal to 140mm the sequence was decapods, polychaets, fishes, copepods, amphipods, isopods, molluscs and plant material, in this order. These results suggest that Bairdiella ronchus at the Guaratuba Bay is a carnivorous species using mainly decapod crustaceans as food throughout the year.

  12. Mantacaprella macaronensis, a new genus and species of Caprellidae (Crustacea: Amphipoda) from Canary Islands and Cape Verde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maite, Vázquez-Luis; José M, Guerra-García; Susana, Carvalho; Lydia Png-Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    Mantacaprella macaronensis new genus, new species, is described based on specimens collected from Canary Islands and Cape Verde. Mantacaprella is close to the genera Parambus, Pseudolirius, Propodalirius and Paracaprella, but can be distinguished by the combination of the following characteristics: pereopods 3, 4 and 5 two-articulate; pereopods 6 and 7 six-articulate; mandibular molar present and palp absent; male abdomen with a pair of well-developed appendages. The new species has been found living in Cymodocea nodosa meadows and Caulerpa prolifera beds from 8.8 to 14.6 m depth in Gran Canaria (Canary Islands), and in natural rocky and artificial habitats (shipwrecks) at 25 m in Sal Island (Cape Verde). Even though the new species is one of the dominant amphipods inhabiting meadows of Cymodocea nodosa in Gran Canaria and in Cape Verde, it had not been described so far. This reflects the lack of knowledge on Macaronesian invertebrates, such as amphipods, and the need of further taxonomical studies to better characterise the whole biodiversity of this region and to design adequate programmes of management and conservation.

  13. Comparative toxicity of two oil dispersants, superdispersant-25 and corexit 9527, to a range of coastal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Alan; Galloway, Tamara S; Canty, Martin; Smith, Emma L; Nilsson, Johanna; Rowland, Steven J

    2005-05-01

    The acute toxicity of the oil dispersant Corexit 9527 reported in the literature is highly variable. No peer-reviewed data exist for Superdispersant-25 (SD-25). This study compares the toxicity of the two dispersants to a range of marine species representing different phyla occupying a wide range of niches: The marine sediment-dwelling amphipod Corophium volutator (Pallas), the common mussel Mytilus edulis (L.), the symbiotic snakelocks anemone Anemonia viridis (Forskål), and the seagrass Zostera marina (L.). Organisms were exposed to static dispersant concentrations for 48-h and median lethal concentration (LC50), median effect concentration (EC50), and lowest-observable-effect concentration (LOEC) values obtained. The sublethal effects of 48-h exposures and the ability of species to recover for up to 72 h after exposure were quantified relative to the 48-h endpoints. Results indicated that the anemone lethality test was the most sensitive with LOECs of 20 ppm followed by mussel feeding rate, seagrass photosynthetic index and amphipod lethality, with mussel lethality being the least sensitive with LOECs of 250 ppm for both dispersants. The results were consistent with current theory that dispersants act physically and irreversibly on the respiratory organs and reversibly, depending on exposure time, on the nervous system. Superdispersant-25 was found overall to be less toxic than Corexit 9527 and its sublethal effects more likely to be reversible following short-term exposure.

  14. The use of Ampelisca abdita growth rate as an indicator of sediment quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, D.P.; Thompson, B.

    1995-01-01

    Acute lethal bioassays with amphipod crustaceans are routinely used to assess toxicity of bulk sediments. A study within the San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring Program (RMP) is in progress to develop a chronic bioassay with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita, measuring both survivorship and growth rates. This approach is attractive because depression of growth rate is likely to be a more sensitive indicator of toxic effects than acute lethality, and natural populations of A. abdita exist throughout the Bay. Spiked sediment bioassays, using cadmium and crude oil, were used to demonstrate the relative sensitivity of the standard 10-day lethal test vs. the 30-day growth test. Sediments were also collected from 9 sites throughout the Bay, ranging from areas adjacent to municipal wastewater discharges to areas distant from known point source inputs. These samples were then split, and used for side-by-side comparison of acute (lethal) and chronic (growth) toxicity tests. Survivorship exceeded 90% in all tests, including those sediments collected nearest the wastewater outfalls. Growth rates were contrasted among the various treatments to examine the utility of this end point in discriminating the outfall sites. Data on the spatial distribution, abundance, and size-frequency distribution of native populations was examined within the context of using growth rate as an indicator of toxic effects in natural populations as well

  15. Baseline metal concentrations in Paramoera walkeri from East Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Anne S. . E-mail Anne.Palmer@utas.edu.au; Snape, Ian; Stark, Jonathan S.; Johnstone, Glenn J.; Townsend, Ashley T.

    2006-01-01

    Remediation of the Thala Valley waste disposal site near Casey Station, East Antarctica was conducted in the austral summer of 2003/2004. Biomonitoring of the adjacent marine environment was undertaken using the gammaridean amphipod Paramoera walkeri as a sentinel species [Stark, J.S., Johnstone, G.J., Palmer, A.S., Snape, I., Larner, B.L., Riddle, M.J., in press, doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2006.05.020. Monitoring the remediation of a near shore waste disposal site in Antarctica using the amphipod Paramoera walkeri and diffusive gradients in thin films (DGTs). Marine Pollution Bulletin and references therein]. Determination of uptake of metals and hypothesis testing for differences that could be attributed to contamination required the establishment of baseline metal concentrations in P. walkeri. Baseline metal concentrations from two reference locations in the Windmill Islands are presented here. P. walkeri was a found to be a sensitive bioaccumulating organism that recorded spatial and temporal variability at the reference sites. Measurement of metals in P. walkeri required the development of a simple digestion procedure that used concentrated nitric acid. For the first time, rare earth metals were determined with additional clean procedures required to measure ultra low concentrations using magnetic sector ICP-MS. Certified and in-house reference materials were employed to ensure method reliability

  16. Is reduced benthic flux related to the Diporeia decline? Analysis of spring blooms and whiting events in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, James M.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Crabtree, Darran L.; Walsh, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Benthic monitoring by USGS off the southern shore of Lake Ontario from October 1993 to October 1995 provides a detailed view of the early stages of the decline of the native amphipod Diporeia. A loss of the 1994 and 1995 year classes of Diporeia preceded the disappearance of the native amphipod at sites near Oswego and Rochester at depths from 55 to 130 m. In succeeding years, Diporeia populations continued to decline in Lake Ontario and were nearly extirpated by 2008. Explanations for Diporeia 's decline in the Great Lakes include several hypotheses often linked to the introduction and expansion of exotic zebra and quagga mussels (Dreissena sp.). We compare the timeline of the Diporeia decline in Lake Ontario with trends in two sources of organic matter to the sediments — spring diatom blooms and late summer whiting events. The 1994–95 decline of Diporeia coincided with localized dreissenid effects on phytoplankton in the nearshore and a year (April 1994 to May 1995) of decreased flux of organic carbon recorded by sediment traps moored offshore of Oswego. Later declines of profundal (> 90 m) Diporeia populations in 2003 were poorly associated with trends in spring algal blooms and late summer whiting events. Lake Ontario/Diporeia/Dreissena/remote sensing.

  17. A pilot marine monitoring program in Cook Inlet, Alaska 1993--1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.S.; Boehm, P.D.; Hyland, J.L.; Prest, H.F.

    1995-01-01

    Under the mandate of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA'90) the Cook Inlet Regional Citizens Advisory Council (CIRCAC) sponsored the initiation of a pilot monitoring program in Cook Inlet, Alaska, The objectives of the pilot monitoring program were to provide baseline data on petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments and biota of Cook Inlet, and to evaluate the effectiveness of selected monitoring techniques in detecting petroleum hydrocarbon inputs from industry based sources. A sampling program was initiated in 1993 that included petroleum industry, specific sites and reference sites. Sample measurements included polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in sediments, caged mussels, and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), sediment toxicity using the amphipod, Ampelisca abdita, and estimates of population size and physiological condition of indigenous bivalves. Results of the 1993 sampling program indicated that (1) background levels of petrogenic, pyrogenic, and diagenetic hydrocarbons were present in sediments and indigenous bivalves, and (2) that limited amphipod toxicity and variations in bivalve measurements did not correlate with the hydrocarbons in the sediments. Modifications to the 1993 program were instituted for the 1994 sampling and included, the selection of new industry specific sites, discontinued use of caged bivalves, and design changes to SPMDs to enhance sensitivity. The results of the 1994 sampling program, and comparisons with the 1993 data are presented

  18. Biomonitors and the assessment of ecological impacts: Distribution of herbivorous epifauna in contaminated macroalgal beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, David A.; Johnston, Emma L.; Poore, Alistair G.B.

    2008-01-01

    We determined metal contents of co-occurring algae Padina crassa and Sargassum sp. in Port Jackson (Australia), and relationships between metal levels and the abundance of epifaunal amphipods. Copper, lead and zinc concentrations were amongst the highest yet recorded in these algae. Copper, manganese and lead concentrations were far greater in P. crassa than Sargassum sp., possibly due to the low growth of P. crassa in proximity to contaminated sediments. However, in manipulative experiments the proximity of algae to sediments did not explain these differences. The abundance of herbivorous amphipods correlated negatively with the copper content of P. crassa, but not with the lower concentrations in Sargassum sp. The greater contamination of P. crassa led to patchy distributions of metals in algal beds and recolonisation experiments showed Sargassum sp. acts as a refuge from contaminants for epifauna. The contamination of macroalgae may pose threats to epifauna in harbours around the world. - The accumulation of metals by macroalgae may pose ecological threats to herbivorous epifauna in ports and harbours worldwide

  19. Macrobenthic monitoring in the Milford Haven waterway following the Sea Empress oil spill of February 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, G.; Smith, J.

    1998-03-01

    Surveys were carried out in the Milford Haven waterway between Lawrenny and West Angle Bay in March 1996 and April 1997 as part of a programme to monitor the impact of the Sea Empress spill on the sea bed macrofauna within the Haven. Samples were taken at eleven locations for macrobenthos, sediment particle size analysis and determination of hydrocarbon content. Additional data was obtained from a larger scale survey of the waterway in October 1996 which included nine of the eleven stations designated for this sampling programme and 'baseline' data was taken from a similar survey carried out in October 1993. The most noticeable feature of the post-spill data is the low abundance and diversity of the amphipod fauna of the water compared with the October 1993 'baseline'. Although this cannot be ascribed with certainty to the Sea Empress oil spill due to the 21/2 year interval during which no monitoring occurred, depletion of the amphipod fauna is a consistent feature of many previous post-spill studies where there was definitive analytical evidence of oil contamination of the sediments. This project has provided a sound basis for monitoring the progress of the macrobenthic fauna of the Haven in the years after the incident. The greatest benefit in such programmes will only be realised in the long term and it is recommended that monitoring should continue. (author)

  20. Seven years of macroinfauna monitoring at Ladeira beach (Corrubedo Bay, NW Spain after the Prestige oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Junoy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The exposed sandy beach of Ladeira (Corrubedo Bay, NW Spain was sampledduring seven years (2003-2009 after the Prestige oil spill(winter 2002-03, todetermine interannual variations in the macroinfaunal community in two ways:(i through ecological indices (species richness and abundances, Shannon'sdiversityand Pielou's evenness and (ii through the density of the most representativespecies. A clear zonation pattern was found, consisting of two zones:(i the supralittoral, occupied by talitrid amphipods, isopods and insects,and(ii the intertidal, where marine crustaceans and polychaetes prevailed. Theamphipods Talitrus saltator and Talorchestia deshayesiidominated from the driftline upwards, and isopods (Eurydice spp., polychaetes (Scolelepisspp. andthe amphipod Pontocrates arenarius dominated the intertidal. Univariateindices remained constant throughout the study period in the supralittoral,but they varied widely in the intertidal zone. Multivariate analysis showedthat the Prestige oil spill scarcely affected the macroinfaunalcommunity structure during the study period (2003-2009 and its effect waslimited just to the first campaign (2003, six months after the Prestigeaccident.

  1. On the presence of the Mediterranean endemic Microdeutopus sporadhi Myers, 1969 (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Aoridae in the Gulf of Naples (Italy with a review on its distribution and ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. SCIPIONE

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The species Microdeutopus sporadhi (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Aoridae, endemic of the Mediterranean Sea, was described by Myers in 1969 on material collected from the Aegean Sea in a sheltered environment with high sedimentation rates. A check on the distribution and ecology of M. sporadhi showed that: — although not mentioned in the checklist of amphipods of the Italian seas, it was already found in the central Tyrrhenian Sea in 1983-84 and in the northern Adriatic Sea in 2002-03; — it was rarely found in the Mediterranean Sea, one of the most studied basins as concerns amphipod fauna; but notwithstanding the few records available, the wide ecological spectrum of this species was pointed out. The present study, conducted off the Island of Ischia (Gulf of Naples, Italy, showed the presence of rich and well established populations through time, but only in a peculiar substratum (artificial collectors and environment (low pH values. The species seems to be able to withstand harsh environmental conditions and probably to conceal itself through a cryptic behaviour, escaping traditional sampling methods. The role of rare or hidden species in bio-assessment should be re-evaluated.

  2. Grazer Functional Roles, Induced Defenses, and Indirect Interactions: Implications for Eelgrass Restoration in San Francisco Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey T. Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the individual and interactive roles of consumer species is more than academic when the host plant is a subject of intense conservation interest. In a mesocosm experiment, we compared effects of common invertebrate grazers in San Francisco Bay seagrass (Zostera marina, eelgrass beds, finding that some species (a native opisthobranch, Phyllaplysia taylori; a native isopod, Idotea resecata; and an introduced gastropod, Ilyanassa obsoleta enhanced eelgrass growth through removal of epiphytic algae, as is often predicted for small invertebrate grazers on seagrasses, while one (an introduced caprellid amphipod, Caprella cf. drepanochir had neutral effects. In contrast, the putatively-introduced gammaridean amphipod, Ampithoe valida, had strong negative effects on eelgrass (in addition to epiphytes through consumption, as we had previously observed in the field during restoration programs. We tested whether other common grazer species could influence the effects of the eelgrass-grazing Ampithoe, and found that Idotea induced production of phenolic compounds and limited eelgrass damage by Ampithoe, without affecting Ampithoe abundance. These results have implications for restoration strategies, and contribute to a growing awareness of the importance of trait-mediated indirect grazer interactions through grazer-induced changes in plant traits, providing the first example in a seagrass system.

  3. The functional and physiological status of Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea; Amphipoda) exposed to secondary treated wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P.; Schulz, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Climate change scenarios predict lower flow rates during summer that may lead to higher proportions of wastewater in small and medium sized streams. Moreover, micropollutants (e.g. pharmaceuticals and other contaminants) continuously enter aquatic environments via treated wastewater. However, there is a paucity of knowledge, whether extended exposure to secondary treated wastewater disrupts important ecosystem functions, e.g. leaf breakdown. Therefore, the amphipod shredder Gammarus fossarum was exposed to natural stream water (n = 34) and secondary treated wastewater (n = 32) for four weeks in a semi-static test system under laboratory conditions. G. fossarum exposed to wastewater showed significant reductions in feeding rate (25%), absolute consumption (35%), food assimilation (50%), dry weight (18%) and lipid content (22%). Thus, high proportions of wastewater in the stream flow may affect both the breakdown rates of leaf material and thus the availability of energy for the aquatic food web as well as the energy budget of G. fossarum. - Micropollutants in wastewater cause functional and physiological alteration in a leaf-shredding amphipod.

  4. Relative toxicity of bifenthrin to Hyalella azteca in 10 day versus 28 day exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian S; Phillips, Bryn M; Voorhees, Jennifer P; Petersen, Megan A; Jennings, Lydia L; Fojut, Tessa L; Vasquez, Martice E; Siegler, Catherine; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2015-04-01

    Many watersheds in the Central Valley region of California are listed as impaired due to pyrethroid-associated sediment toxicity. The Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board is developing numeric sediment quality criteria for pyrethroids, beginning with bifenthrin. Criteria are being developed using existing data, along with data from 10 d and 28 d toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca conducted as part of the current study. A single range-finder and 2 definitive tests were conducted for each test duration. Median lethal concentrations (LC50s), as well as LC20s and inhibition concentrations (IC20s) were calculated based on measured whole sediment bifenthrin concentrations and interstitial water concentrations. Sediment LC50s were also corrected for organic C content. Average LC50s were not significantly different in 10 d versus 28 d tests with H. azteca: 9.1 and 9.6 ng/g bifenthrin for 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Average LC20 values were also similar with concentrations at 7.1 and 7.0 for 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Bifenthrin inhibition concentrations (IC20s) based on amphipod growth were variable, particularly in the 28 d tests, where a clear dose-response relationship was observed in only 1 of the definitive experiments. Average amphipod growth IC20s were 3.9 and 9.0 ng/g for 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Amphipod growth calculated as biomass resulted in IC20s of 4.1 and 6.3 ng/g for the 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Lack of a clear growth effect in the longer term test may be related to the lack of food adjustment to account for amphipod mortality in whole sediment exposures. The average C-corrected LC50s were 1.03 and 1.09 μg/g OC for the 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Interstitial water LC50s were determined as the measured dissolved concentration of bifenthrin relative to interstitial water dissolved organic carbon. The average LC50s for dissolved interstitial water bifenthrin were

  5. Evaluation of Metal Toxicity in Streams Affected by Abandoned Mine Lands, Upper Animas River Watershed, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M.; Allert, Ann L.; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; May, Thomas W.; Wang, Ning; Leib, Kenneth J.

    2001-01-01

    water; (3) to develop site-specific thresholds for toxicity of Zn and Cu in stream water; and (4) to develop models of the contributions of Cu and Zn to toxicity of stream water, which may be used to characterize toxicity before and after planned remediation efforts. We evaluated the toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments by conducting sediment toxicity tests with two species of benthic invertebrates, the midge, Chironomus tentans. and the amphipod, Hyalella azteca. Laboratory toxicity tests with both taxa, exposed to fine stream-bed sediments collected in September 1997, showed some evidence of sediment toxicity, as survival of midge larvae in sediments from Cement Creek (C48) and lower Mineral Creek (M34), and growth of amphipods in sediments from these sites and three Animas River sites (A68, Animas at Silverton; A72, Animas below Silverton, and A73, Animas at Elk Park) were significantly reduced compared to a reference site, South Mineral Creek (SMC) . Amphipods were also exposed to site water and fine stream-bed sediment, separately and in combination, during the late summer low flow period (August-September) of 1998. In these studies, stream water, with no sediment present, from all five sites tested (same sites as above, except C48) caused 90% to 100% mortality of amphipods. In contrast, significant reductions in survival of amphipods occurred at two sites (A72 and SMC) in exposures with field-collected sediment plus stream water, and at only one site (A72) in exposures with sediments and clean overlying water. Concentrations of Zn, Pb, Cu, and Cd were high in both sediment and pore water (interstitial water) from most sites tested, but greatest sediment toxicity was apparently associated with greater concentrations of Fe and/or Al in sediments. These results suggest that fine stream-bed sediments of the more contaminated stream reaches of the upper Animas River watershed are toxic to benthic invertebrates, but that these impacts are less serious than tox

  6. Toxicity of sediments potentially contaminated by coal mining and natural gas extraction to unionid mussels and commonly tested benthic invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Kunz, James L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Kane, Cindy M.; Evans, R. Brian; Alexander, Steven; Walker, Craig; Bakaletz, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Sediment toxicity tests were conducted to assess potential effects of contaminants associated with coal mining or natural gas extraction activities in the upper Tennessee River basin and eastern Cumberland River basin in the United States. Test species included two unionid mussels (rainbow mussel, Villosa iris, and wavy-rayed lampmussel, Lampsilis fasciola, 28-d exposures), and the commonly tested amphipod, Hyalella azteca (28-d exposure) and midge, Chironomus dilutus (10-d exposure). Sediments were collected from seven test sites with mussel communities classified as impacted and in proximity to coal mining or gas extraction activities, and from five reference sites with mussel communities classified as not impacted and no or limited coal mining or gas extraction activities. Additional samples were collected from six test sites potentially with high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and from a test site contaminated by a coal ash spill. Mean survival, length, or biomass of one or more test species was reduced in 10 of 14 test samples (71%) from impacted areas relative to the response of organisms in the five reference samples. A higher proportion of samples was classified as toxic to mussels (63% for rainbow mussels, 50% for wavy-rayed lampmussels) compared with amphipods (38%) or midge (38%). Concentrations of total recoverable metals and total PAHs in sediments did not exceed effects-based probable effect concentrations (PECs). However, the survival, length, or biomasses of the mussels were reduced significantly with increasing PEC quotients for metals and for total PAHs, or with increasing sum equilibrium-partitioning sediment benchmark toxic units for PAHs. The growth of the rainbow mussel also significantly decreased with increasing concentrations of a major anion (chloride) and major cations (calcium and magnesium) in sediment pore water. Results of the present study indicated that (1) the findings from laboratory tests were generally

  7. Concentrations of 137Cs and trace elements in zooplankton, and their vertical distributions off Rokkasho, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeriyama, Hideki; Ishii, Toshiaki; Watabe, Teruhisa; Kusakabe, Masashi

    2007-01-01

    Zooplankton samples were collected at about 50 m depth with a large ring net (160-cm mouth diameter, 0.5-mm mesh) in May, June, October 2005 and June 2006 off Rokkasho, Japan where a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant will be in full-scale operation in the near future. Plankters in each sample were separated based on their species. Eight samples were used for the determination of 137 Cs concentration and the other 21 samples were used for the determination of its stable isotope, Cs along with some other trace elements. All the samples were characterized by five dominant species, i.e. euphausiids, chaetognaths, copepods; Neocalanus spp., amphipods; Themisto spp. and Cyphocaris sp. Plankton samples were also taken at three to five discrete depths between the surface and ≤ 1,000 m in depth during daytime and nighttime for analysis of vertical distribution patterns of biomass, and for assessment of daily vertical migration activity. Integrated net zooplankton biomass at nighttime ranged from 0.85 to 8.74 g-DW m -2 in the 0-150 m layer without any appreciable day-night differences in the vertical distribution; below the layer, it decreased significantly. Only in spring, appreciable day-night differences in the vertical distribution were observed at the shallowest station. Concentrations of Cs and Co did not show significant difference among the five species. However, higher concentrations of Sr were observed in two amphipods. It is likely that amphipods had a different biological process in Sr metabolism from others. The concentration of 137 Cs in zooplankton was usually very low and sometimes under the detection limit. In the present study, the highest concentration of 137 Cs in zooplankton was 24 mBq kg-WW -1 , corresponding to the concentration factor (CF) of 14, if the value of 1.7 mBq L -1 was given to the 137 Cs concentration in seawater. The water-column inventory of 137 Cs in a zooplankton community is calculated to be 0.29 to 1.95 mBq m -2 , based on the data on

  8. Chronic toxicity of unresolved complex mixtures (UCM) of hydrocarbons in marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarlett, A.; Galloway, T.S. [Plymouth Univ., Drake Circus (United Kingdom). School of Biological Sciences; Rowland, S.J. [Plymouth Univ., Drake Circus (United Kingdom). School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences

    2007-08-15

    Background, Aim and Scope: Unresolved complex mixtures (UCM) of hydrocarbons, containing many thousands of compounds which cannot be resolved by conventional gas chromatography (GC), are common contaminants of sediments but little is known of their potential to affect sediment-dwelling organisms. Evidence exists for reduced health status in mussels, arising from aqueous exposure to aromatic UCM components acting through a narcotic mode of action. However, UCM contaminants in sediments may not be sufficiently bioavailable to elicit toxic effects. The aim of our study was therefore to measure the sublethal effects of chronic exposure to model UCM-dominated oils at environmentally realistic concentrations and compare this to effects produced by a UCM containing weathered crude oil. A further aim was to determine which, if any, fractions of the oils were responsible for any observed toxicity. Materials and Methods: Whole oils were spiked into estuarine sediment to give nominal concentrations of 500 {mu}g g-1 dry weight. Juveniles of the estuarine amphipod Corophium volutator were exposed to the contaminated sediment for 35 days and their survival, growth rate and reproductive success quantified. Using an effect-directed fractionation approach, the oils were fractionated into aliphatic and two aromatic fractions by open column chromatography and their toxicity assessed by further chronic exposures using juvenile C. volutator. Results: The growth rates of amphipods were reduced following exposure to the oils although this was only statistically significant for the weathered oil; reproductive success was reduced by all oil exposures. Sediment spiked with UCM fractions also caused reduced growth and reproduction but no particular fraction was found to be responsible for the observed toxicity. Survivorship was not affected by any oil or fraction. Discussion: The study showed that chronic exposure to sediments contaminated by UCM-dominated oils could have population level

  9. Assimilation and subcellular partitioning of elements by grass shrimp collected along an impact gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seebaugh, David R.; Wallace, William G.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic exposure to polluted field conditions can impact metal bioavailability in prey and may influence metal transfer to predators. The present study investigated the assimilation of Cd, Hg and organic carbon by grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio, collected along an impact gradient within the New York/New Jersey Harbor Estuary. Adult shrimp were collected from five Staten Island, New York study sites, fed 109 Cd- or 203 Hg-labeled amphipods or 14 C-labeled meals and analyzed for assimilation efficiencies (AE). Subsamples of amphipods and shrimp were subjected to subcellular fractionation to isolate metal associated with a compartment presumed to contain trophically available metal (TAM) (metal associated with heat-stable proteins [HSP - e.g., metallothionein-like proteins], heat-denatured proteins [HDP - e.g., enzymes] and organelles [ORG]). TAM- 109 Cd% and TAM- 203 Hg% in radiolabeled amphipods were ∼64% and ∼73%, respectively. Gradients in AE- 109 Cd% (∼54% to ∼75%) and AE- 203 Hg% (∼61% to ∼78%) were observed for grass shrimp, with the highest values exhibited by shrimp collected from sites within the heavily polluted Arthur Kill complex. Population differences in AE- 14 C% were not observed. Assimilated 109 Cd% partitioned to the TAM compartment in grass shrimp varied between ∼67% and ∼75%. 109 Cd bound to HSP in shrimp varied between ∼15% and ∼47%, while 109 Cd associated with metal-sensitive HDP was ∼17% to ∼44%. Percentages of assimilated 109 Cd bound to ORG were constant at ∼10%. Assimilated 203 Hg% associated with TAM in grass shrimp did not exhibit significant variation. Percentages of assimilated 203 Hg bound to HDP (∼47%) and ORG (∼11%) did not vary among populations and partitioning of 203 Hg to HSP was not observed. Using a simplified biokinetic model of metal accumulation from the diet, it is estimated that site-specific variability in Cd AE by shrimp and tissue Cd burdens in field-collected prey (polychaetes Nereis spp

  10. The Ecology of Parasite-Host Interactions at Montezuma Well National Monument, Arizona - Appreciating the Importance of Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Chris; van Riper, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Although parasites play important ecological roles through the direct interactions they have with their hosts, historically that fact has been underappreciated. Today, scientists have a growing appreciation of the scope of such impacts. Parasites have been reported to dominate food webs, alter predator-prey relationships, act as ecosystem engineers, and alter community structure. In spite of this growing awareness in the scientific community, parasites are still often neglected in the consideration of the management and conservation of resources and ecosystems. Given that at least half of the organisms on earth are probably parasitic, it should be evident that the ecological functions of parasites warrant greater attention. In this report, we explore different aspects of parasite-host relationships found at a desert spring pond within Montezuma Well National Monument, Arizona. In three separate but related chapters, we explore interactions between a novel amphipod host and two parasites. First, we identify how host behavior responds to this association and how this association affects interactions with both invertebrate non-host predators and a vertebrate host predator. Second, we look at the human dimension, investigating how human recreation can indirectly affect patterns of disease by altering patterns of vertebrate host space use. Finally - because parasites and diseases are of increasing importance in the management of wildlife species, especially those that are imperiled or of management concern - the third chapter argues that research would benefit from increased attention to the statistical analysis of wildlife disease studies. This report also explores issues of statistical parasitology, providing information that may better inform those designing research projects and analyzing data from studies of wildlife disease. In investigating the nature of parasite-host interactions, the role that relationships play in ecological communities, and how human

  11. Ecological evaluation of proposed reference sites in the New York Bight, Great South Bay, and Ambrose Light, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The current reference site used in evaluations of dredged material proposed for open water disposal in the New York Bight is the Mud Dump Reference Site. The sediment at this reference site is predominantly sand. The US Army Corps of Engineers New York District is considering designation of a new reference site that (1) includes a fine-grained component, believed to be necessary for adequate amphipod survival in laboratory tests, (2) better reflects the physical characteristics of the fine-grained sediment dredged from the New York/New Jersey Harbor and (3) is further removed from the Mud Dump Site than the current Mud Dump Reference Site. The Battelle Marine Science Laboratory was requested to characterize sediment collected from seven candidate reference sites during two study phases. This report presents the results of physical, chemical, and toxicological characterizations of sediment from these sites in comparisons with those of the original Mud Dump Reference Site.

  12. Feeding habits of Cataetyx alleni (Pisces: Bythitidae in the deep western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Carrassón

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the feeding habits of Cataetyx alleni, the fifth most abundant species below 1000 m depth on the deep slope of the Catalan sea (western Mediterranean, between 1000 and 1800 m depth. Cataetyx alleni is a euryphagic predator, feeding on small epibenthic and endobenthic crustaceans and polychaetes. Predominate prey are small isopods and gammaridean amphipods and, in some cases, endobenthic and epibenthic decapods. Cataetyx alleni has bathymetric changes in diet marked by the capture of different prey-items and also by the reduction in the size of the prey with increasing depth. Seasonal fluctuations in the feeding pattern are clearly seen among the individuals of the same depths.

  13. Macrobenthic community structure in the northern Saudi waters of the Gulf, 14years after the 1991 oil spill

    KAUST Repository

    Joydas, Thadickal Viswanathan

    2012-02-01

    The 1991 Gulf oil spill heavily impacted the coastal areas of the Saudi waters of the Arabian Gulf and recent studies have indicated that even 15. years after the incident, macrobenthos had not completely recovered in the sheltered bays in the affected region such as, Manifa Bay. This study investigates the community conditions of macrobenthos in the open waters in one of the impacted areas, Al-Khafji waters, about 14. years after the spill. Diversity measures and community structure analyses indicate a healthy status of polychaete communities. The BOPA index reveals that oil sensitive amphipods were recolonized in the study area. This confirms that the benthic communities of the oil spill impacted area had taken only <14 years to recover in the open waters of the impacted areas. The study also reveals the existence of three distinct polychaete communities along the depth and sediment gradients. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Status of macrobenthic community of Manifa-Tanajib Bay System of Saudi Arabia based on a once-off sampling event

    KAUST Repository

    Joydas, Thadickal Viswanathan

    2011-06-01

    Shallow water bays located in the western Arabian Gulf experience harsh environmental conditions. Some of these bays, including Manifa-Tanajib Bay System (MTBS), were also exposed to the 1991 oil pollution event. This study investigates the status of the macrobenthos in MTBS during 2006. This bay system is characterized by very shallow inner bays with elevated salinity and temperature compared to the rest of the bay area. As a result mainly of the hyper salinity, the inner bay communities are distinct from the outer bay communities. Overall, fairly high species richness with several rare species was observed. High Shannon-Wiener diversity values and ABC plots indicated the healthy status of the polychaete communities, while BOPA index indicated slightly polluted status in 20% of the stations. The oil sensitive amphipods were not completely re-colonized in 20% of the stations, even after 15. years of recovery from the 1991 oil spill. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Chronic toxicity of contaminated sediments on reproduction and histopathology of the crustacean Gammarus fossarum and relationship with the chemical contamination and in vitro effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurova, Edita; Hilscherova, Klara; Sidlova-Stepankova, Tereza; Blaha, Ludek [Faculty of Science, RECETOX, Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Masaryk Univ., Brno (Czech Republic); Koehler, Heinz R. [Animal Physiological Ecology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Triebskorn, Rita [Steinbeis-Transfer Center for Ecotoxicology and Ecophysiology, Rottenburg (Germany); Jungmann, Dirk [Inst. of Hydrobiology, Dresden Univ. of Tech. (Germany); Giesy, John P. [Dept. of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences and Toxicology Centre, Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Zoology Dept., National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, and Center for Integrative Toxicology Center, and Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Biology and Chemistry Dept., City Univ. of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); School of the Environment, Nanjing Univ. (China)

    2010-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate possible relationships between the sediment contaminants and the occurrence of intersex in situ. Two of the studied sediments were from polluted sites with increased occurrence of intersex crustaceans (Lake Pilnok, black coal mining area in the Czech Republic, inhabited by the crayfish Pontastacus leptodactylus population with 18% of intersex; creek Lockwitzbach in Germany with Gammarus fossarum population with about 7% of intersex). Materials and methods Sediments were studied by a combined approach that included (1) determination of concentrations of metals and traditionally analyzed organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); (2) examination of the in vitro potencies to activate aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), estrogen (ER), and androgen receptor-mediated responses; and (3) in vivo whole sediment exposures during a 12-week reproduction toxicity study with benthic amphipod G. fossarum. (orig.)

  16. Biological effects of simulated discharge plume entrainment at Indian Point Nuclear Power Station, Hudson River estuary, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, G.R.; Lauer, G.J.; Ginn, T.C.; Storm, P.C.; Zubarik, L.; New York Univ., N.Y.

    1975-01-01

    Laboratory and field simulations of the discharge plume entrainment of phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish were carried out at the Indian Point Nuclear Station, Hudson River estuary, USA. Phytoplankton assemblages studied on two dates produced different response patterns measured as photosynthetic activity. Chlorophyll-a levels did not change following simulated entrainment. Possible explanations for the differences are discussed. The two abundant copepods Acartia tonsa and Eurytemorta affinis appear to tolerate exposure to discharge plume ΔT without adverse effects. Copepods subjected to plume entrainment may suffer considerable mortality during periods of condenser chlorination. In general, the amphipod Gammarus spp. did not appear to suffer significant mortality during simulated entrainment. Juvenile striped bass, Morone saxatilis, were not affected by simulated plume transit before and during plant condenser chlorination; however, a simulated ''worst possible case'' plume ΔT produced statistically significant moralities. (author)

  17. Reduced recruitment in Hyalella azteca (Saussure, 1858) exposed to copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, M Shuhaimi; Pascoe, David

    2002-09-01

    Neonates of the amphipod Hyalella azteca were exposed for a 35-day period in the laboratory to a range of copper concentrations, nominally 18 microg/l, 40 microg/l, 70 microg/l and 260 microg/l. The reproductive status of the population was assessed by recording recruitment, the number of precopulatory pairs and number of gravid females. At the end of the experiment, the body lengths of individuals were measured using image analysis. There was a significant decrease in the final population size of H. azteca with increasing copper concentration and compared with the control. Copper significantly reduced recruitment of juveniles and length composition of the final population and there was also a trend toward reduced precopula number with increasing copper concentrations.

  18. Insecticide toxicity to Hyalella curvispina in runoff and stream water within a soybean farm (Buenos Aires, Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugni, H; Ronco, A; Bonetto, C

    2011-03-01

    Toxicity to the locally dominant amphipod Hyalella curvispina was assessed in a first-order stream running through a cultivated farm. Cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, endosulfan and glyphosate were sprayed throughout the studied period. Toxicity was assayed under controlled laboratory conditions with runoff and stream water samples taken from the field under steady state and flood conditions. Ephemeral toxicity pulses were observed as a consequence of farm pesticide applications. After pesticide application, runoff water showed 100% mortality to H. curvispina for 1 month, but no mortality thereafter. Toxicity persistence was shortest in stream water, intermediate in stream sediments and longest in soil samples. Runoff had a more important toxicity effect than the exposure to direct aerial fumigation. The regional environmental features determining fast toxicity dissipation are discussed. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Abundance, distribution and feeding patterns of a temperate reef fish in subtidal environments of the Chilean coast: the importance of understory algal turf Abundancia, distribución y patrones alimentarios de un pez de arrecifes templados en ambientes submareales de la costa de Chile: la importancia de la capa de algas del subdosel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÁLVARO T. PALMA

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheilodactylus variegatus is an abundant carnivorous demersal reef fish that lives in the shallow subtidal of the north-central Chilean coast. Characteristically, these environments are dominated by kelp forests of Lessonia trabeculata. This species preys on a great variety of benthic invertebrates, and shows particularly high consumption rates on amphipod crustaceans. In our study, two widely separated populations of C. variegatus were considered (central and northern Chile. Individuals that form part of these populations show considerable differences in their distribution, abundance and trophic behavior. In the northern zone, the species is abundant and both juveniles and adults are distributed along the whole bathymetric gradient. This contrasts with populations found in central Chile, which are more sparse and lack juveniles. The distribution and abundance patterns appear to be influenced mainly by the great abundance of diverse understory macroalgae in the northern subtidal, which harbors a large number of invertebrates, especially amphipods. In contrast, the understory algal abundance of the central zone is much lower, and does not show a direct relationship with the lesser abundance of amphipods. In general, C. variegatus maintains a high consumption rate on amphipods throughout its ontogeny but it includes several other prey items in later ontogenetic stages. The different understory algal assemblages, and their associated fauna, are likely to be the main factors influencing the patterns of abundance and distribution observed between these two geographically distinct fish populationsCheilodactylus variegatus es un pez demersal abundante que habita el submareal somero de la costa norte y central de Chile. Es característico de estos ambientes el estar dominados por praderas del alga Lessonia trabeculata. Esta especie incorpora en su dieta una variada gama de invertebrados bentónicos, mostrando una tasa particularmente alta de consumo de

  20. Temporal changes in the distribution, methylation, and bioaccumulation of newly deposited mercury in an aquatic ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orihel, Diane M. [Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Freshwater Institute, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N6 (Canada)], E-mail: orihel@ualberta.ca; Paterson, Michael J.; Blanchfield, Paul J.; Bodaly, R.A. [Freshwater Institute, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N6 (Canada); Gilmour, Cynthia C. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, 647 Contees Wharf Road, Edgewater, MD 21037 (United States); Hintelmann, Holger [Department of Chemistry, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, Ontario, K9J 7B8 (Canada)

    2008-07-15

    Our objective was to examine how the behavior of atmospheric mercury (Hg) deposited to boreal lake mesocosms changed over time. We added inorganic Hg enriched in a different stable isotope in each of two years, which allowed us to differentiate between Hg added in the first and second year. Although inorganic Hg and methylmercury (MeHg) continued to accumulate in sediments throughout the experiment, the availability of MeHg to the food web declined within one year. This decrease was detected in periphyton, zooplankton, and water mites, but not in gomphid larvae, amphipods, or fish. We suggest that reductions in atmospheric Hg deposition should lead to decreases in MeHg concentrations in biota, but that changes will be more easily detected in short-lived pelagic species than long-lived species associated with benthic food webs. - Mercury deposited to aquatic ecosystems becomes less available for uptake by biota over time.

  1. Assessment of sediment metal contamination in the Mar Menor coastal lagoon (SE Spain: Metal distribution, toxicity, bioaccumulation and benthic community structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mar Menor coastal lagoon is one of the largest of the Mediterranean Sea. Ancient mining activities in the mountains near its southern basin have resulted in metal contamination in the sediment. The metal bioavailability of these sediments was determined through laboratory toxicity bioassays using three Mediterranean sea urchin species and two amphipod species, and by means of field bioaccumulation measurements involving the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa. The effect of sediment metal contamination on benthic communities was assessed through benthic infaunal analyses, applying classical descriptive parameters and multivariate techniques. The sediments affected by the mining activities presented high levels of toxicity and metals were also accumulated in the seagrass tissues, pointing to metal bioavailability. Although the classical benthic indices were not clear indicators of disturbance, the multivariate techniques applied provided more consistent conclusions.

  2. MACROZOOBENTHIC COMMUNITIES STRUCTURE CHARACTERISTIC OF CERTAIN TRIBUTARIES OF THE SIRET RIVER FROM HARGHITA, MARAMUREŞ AND VRANCEA MOUNTAINS AND MOLDOVEI PLATEAU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Andreea GHIBUŞI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 35 qualitative macrozoobentonic samples were collected in 2011 from many Siret river tributaries coming from the Harghita Mountains (5 stations, Maramureş Mountains (14 stations, Moldavian Plateau (4 stations and Vrancea Mountains (12 stations. Laboratory analysis of samples revealed the existence of the following 15 groups of benthic invertebrates: Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera, Oligochaeta, Diptera (Chironomidae, Simuliidae, Ceratopogonidae, Limoniidae, Gastropoda, Bivalva, Coleoptera, Acarina, Odonata, Hirudinea, Isopoda, Heteroptera, Turbellariata and Collembola. Groups that have the highest frequencies were mayflies and dipterans (each with a frequency of 97.1%, followed by caddisflies (80%, amphipods (68.6%, oligochaetes (57.1% and stoneflies (54.3%. Presence of sensitive groups to water quality degradation (Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera and Plecoptera with high frequency shows good quality water at most stations investigated.

  3. A new species of Hyalella from the Andes in Perú (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Hyalellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Exequiel R González

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyalella pauperocavae n. sp. from Huancayo, Perú, is described. Five other epigean freshwater amphipods have been described from Peru (excluding Lake Titicaca, but the lack of type material and poor descriptions do not allow the assignment of the species described here to any of the names known for the areaSe describe la especie Hyalella pauperocavae n. sp. recolectada en la localidad de Huancayo, Perú. Otras cinco especies de anfípodos epígeos se conocen para el Perú (excluyendo aquellas presentes en el Lago Titicaca. La ausencia de material tipo y descripciones poco claras impidieron la asignación de la especie descrita aquí a alguno de los nombres conocidos para el área

  4. Reduced oxygen at high altitude limits maximum size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, L S; Chapelle, G

    2003-11-07

    The trend towards large size in marine animals with latitude, and the existence of giant marine species in polar regions have long been recognized, but remained enigmatic until a recent study showed it to be an effect of increased oxygen availability in sea water of a low temperature. The effect was apparent in data from 12 sites worldwide because of variations in water oxygen content controlled by differences in temperature and salinity. Another major physical factor affecting oxygen content in aquatic environments is reduced pressure at high altitude. Suitable data from high-altitude sites are very scarce. However, an exceptionally rich crustacean collection, which remains largely undescribed, was obtained by the British 1937 expedition from Lake Titicaca on the border between Peru and Bolivia in the Andes at an altitude of 3809 m. We show that in Lake Titicaca the maximum length of amphipods is 2-4 times smaller than other low-salinity sites (Caspian Sea and Lake Baikal).

  5. Bioaccumulation of sediment-bound Cr-51, Ni-63 and C-14 by benthic invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumblad, L.; Bradshaw, C.; Giled, M.

    2004-01-01

    Sediments in many areas of the Baltic Sea are highly contaminated with particle-reactive trace metals and/or radionuclides. These may be re-mobilised into aquatic food chains by bioaccumulation into benthic organisms. In this study, we examined and compared assimilation efficiencies and bioaccumulation kinetics (rates of uptake and elimination) of sediment-associated Cr-51, Ni-63 and organic-associated C- 14 in three common benthic invertebrates from the Baltic Sea (the bivalve Macoma balthica, the amphipod Monoporeia affinis and the priapulid worm Halicryptus spinulosus). There were differences between animals and radionuclides in both the rate of uptake and elimination and the maximum amount accumulated. Understanding how and to what degree different deposit-feeding benthic invertebrates are exposed to and bio-accumulate sediment-associated metals are important for both ecological risk assessment and management decisions in coastal ecosystems. (author)

  6. The macrofaunal communities in the shallow subtidal areas for the first 3 years after the Hebei Spirit oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jin-Young; Kim, Moonkoo; Lim, Hyun-Sig; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2014-05-15

    In order to detect the early impact of the Hebei Spirit oil spill on the shallow subtidal macrozoobenthic communities, macrobenthic fauna were collected seasonally for 3 years. The alkylated PAHs concentrations within sediments near Mallipo beach remained as high as 129 ng g(-)(1) DW one month after the oil spill, but the concentration decreased below the background level thereafter. The number of species and density decreased in 4 months compared to those before the oil spill. An opportunistic polychaete, Prionospio paradisea, occurred as a dominant species at subtidal area near Mallipo beach in 10 months after the oil spill. Any mass mortality of amphipods and any clear dominance of opportunistic species were not detected except for the stations near Mallipo and Hagampo beaches. The macrobenthic communities at the shallow subtidal stations seemed to have a relatively stable faunal composition, even not fully recovered, in 3 years after the Hebei Spirit oil spill. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intraguild predation reduces redundancy of predator species in multiple predator assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffen, Blaine D; Byers, James E

    2006-07-01

    1. Interference between predator species frequently decreases predation rates, lowering the risk of predation for shared prey. However, such interference can also occur between conspecific predators. 2. Therefore, to understand the importance of predator biodiversity and the degree that predator species can be considered functionally interchangeable, we determined the degree of additivity and redundancy of predators in multiple- and single-species combinations. 3. We show that interference between two invasive species of predatory crabs, Carcinus maenas and Hemigrapsus sanguineus, reduced the risk of predation for shared amphipod prey, and had redundant per capita effects in most multiple- and single-species predator combinations. 4. However, when predator combinations with the potential for intraguild predation were examined, predator interference increased and predator redundancy decreased. 5. Our study indicates that trophic structure is important in determining how the effects of predator species combine and demonstrates the utility of determining the redundancy, as well as the additivity, of multiple predator species.

  8. Two new species of Urothoe (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Gammaridea From The East Johor Islands Archipelago, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Abdul Rahim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of urothoid amphipods from Pulau Sibu and Pulau Tinggi, Johor are described and illustrated. The specimens of Urothoe sibuensis new species were collected by vertical haul plankton net and is distinctively different from other existing Urothoe species by these combination of special characters; similar gnathopods 1–2 with short and stout propodus expanded into poorly defined palms; large eyes and epimeron 3 smooth. Urothoe tinggiensis new species as collected using an airlift suction sampler at seagrass area is characterized by its different gnathopodal configuration with setose dactylus of 5th pereopod; eyes minute; carpus is wider than merus in the 5th pereopod; subquadrate coxa 4; merus and carpus of pereopods 6–7 are linear.

  9. First endemic freshwater Gammarus from Crete and its evolutionary history-an integrative taxonomy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupało, Kamil; Mamos, Tomasz; Wrzesińska, Weronika; Grabowski, Michał

    2018-01-01

    The Mediterranean islands are known as natural laboratories of evolution with a high level of endemic biodiversity. However, most biodiversity assessments have focused mainly on terrestrial and marine fauna, leaving the freshwater animals aside. Crete is one of the largest islands in the Mediterranean Basin, with a long history of isolation from the continental mainland. Gammarid amphipods are often dominant in macrozoobenthic communities in European inland waters. They are widely used in biomonitoring and exotoxicological studies. Herein, we describe Gammarus plaitisi sp. nov., endemic to Cretan streams, based on morphological characters and a set of molecular species delimitation methods using mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I and 16S rRNA genes as well as nuclear 28S rDNA, ITS1 and EF1-alpha genes. The divergence of the new species is strongly connected with the geological history of the island supporting its continental origin.

  10. Bioactive Compounds of Edible Purple Laver Porphyra sp. (Nori).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bito, Tomohiro; Teng, Fei; Watanabe, Fumio

    2017-12-13

    Porphyra sp. (nori) is widely cultivated as an important marine crop. Dried nori contains numerous nutrients, including vitamin B 12 , which is the only vitamin absent from plant-derived food sources. Vegetarian diets are low in iron and vitamin B 12 ; depletion of both causes severe anemia. Nori also contains large amounts of iron compared with other plant-derived foods and eicosapentaenoic acid, which is an important fatty acid found in fish oils. In nori, there are also many bioactive compounds that exhibit various pharmacological activities, such as immunomodulation, anticancer, antihyperlipidemic, and antioxidative activities, indicating that consumption of nori is beneficial to human health. However, Porphyra sp. contains toxic metals (arsenic and cadmiun) and/or amphipod allergens, the levels of which vary significantly among nori products. Further evidence from human studies of such beneficial or adverse effects of nori consumption is required.

  11. Herbivory on macro-algae affects colonization of beach-cast algal wrack by detritivores but not its decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Eereveld

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatial subsidies have increasingly been considered significant sources of matter and energy to unproductive ecosystems. However, subsidy quality may both differ between subsidizing sources and vary over time. In our studies, sub-littoral herbivory by snails or isopods on red or brown macro-algae induced changes in algal tissues that affected colonization of beach-cast algal wrack by supra-littoral detritivores (amphipods. However, microbial decay and decomposition through the joint action of detritivores and microbes of algal wrack in the supra-littoral remained unaffected by whether or not red or brown algae had been fed upon by snails or isopods. Thus, herbivory on marine macro-algae affects the cross-system connection of sub-littoral and supra-littoral food webs transiently, but these effects diminish upon ageing of macro-algal wrack in the supra-littoral zone.

  12. Acute toxicity of emamectin benzoate and its desmethyl metabolite to Eohaustorius estuarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jen-Ni; Buday, Craig; van Aggelen, Graham; Ikonomou, Michael George; Pasternak, John

    2010-08-01

    Emamectin benzoate is one of the active ingredients of the anti-sealice drug SLICE. Ten-day acute sediment lethal tests (10-d LC50) of emamectin benzoate and its desmethyl metabolite (AB1) were conducted to determine LC50 values using a sensitive representative West Coast amphipod crustacean, Eohaustorius estuarius. The 10-d LC50s of emamectin benzoate and AB1 to E. estuarius were 0.185 and 0.019 mg/kg wet weight sediment (0.146 and 0.015 mg/kg dry wt), respectively. The degradation properties of emamectin benzoate and AB1 during the 10-d period were also measured and described. No obvious decay patterns were observed for either emamectin benzoate and AB1 over the 10-d period. Copyright 2010 SETAC

  13. Long term diet differences between morphs in trophically polymorphic Percichthys trucha (Pisces : Percichthyidae) populations from the southern Andes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logan, M.S.; Iverson, S.J.; Ruzzante, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    in resource use by two recently described sympatric morphs of Perichthys trucha, a common freshwater fish of the Andean and Patagonian regions of South America. Because dietary fatty acids are often stored in carnivorous animals with little modification after consumption, they can be used to infer information...... that certain fatty acids were correlated with diet as determined by gut content analysis. Consumption of anisopteran larvae was highly correlated with 14:0 in adipose and muscle tissue; and higher levels of longer chain unsaturated fatty acids (i.e. 20 and 22 carbons) were correlated with the presence of fish...... and also amphipods in the diets. Taken together, the results suggest that there are marked differences in the foraging ecology of the two morphs of P. trucha inhabiting southern Andean lakes. (C) 2000 The Linnean Society of London...

  14. Feeding ecology and trophic relationships of fish species in the lower Guadiana River Estuary and Castro Marim e Vila Real de Santo António Salt Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Rita; Bexiga, Constança; Veiga, Pedro; Vieira, Lina; Erzini, Karim

    2006-10-01

    In this study we analyze the feeding ecology and trophic relationships of some of the main fish species (Soleidae, Moronidae, Mullidae, Sparidae, Mugilidae, and Batrachoididae) of the lower Estuary of the Guadiana River and the Castro Marim e Vila Real de Santo António Salt Marsh. We examined the stomachs of 1415 fish caught monthly between September 2000 and August 2001. Feeding indices and coefficients were determined and used along with the results of multivariate analysis to develop diagrams of trophic interactions (food webs). Results show that these species are largely opportunistic predators. The most important prey items are amphipods, gobies (Gobiidae), shrimps ( Palaemon serratus and Crangon crangon), and polychaete worms. The lower Estuary and associated salt marshes are important nurseries and feeding grounds for the species studied. In this area, it is therefore important to monitor the effects of changes in river runoff, nutrient input, and temperature that result from construction of the Alqueva Dam upstream.

  15. Macrobenthic community structure in the northern Saudi waters of the Gulf, 14years after the 1991 oil spill

    KAUST Repository

    Joydas, Thadickal Viswanathan; Qurban, Mohammad Ali; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.; Krishnakumar, P. K.; Nazeer, Zahid B.; Cali, N. A.

    2012-01-01

    The 1991 Gulf oil spill heavily impacted the coastal areas of the Saudi waters of the Arabian Gulf and recent studies have indicated that even 15. years after the incident, macrobenthos had not completely recovered in the sheltered bays in the affected region such as, Manifa Bay. This study investigates the community conditions of macrobenthos in the open waters in one of the impacted areas, Al-Khafji waters, about 14. years after the spill. Diversity measures and community structure analyses indicate a healthy status of polychaete communities. The BOPA index reveals that oil sensitive amphipods were recolonized in the study area. This confirms that the benthic communities of the oil spill impacted area had taken only <14 years to recover in the open waters of the impacted areas. The study also reveals the existence of three distinct polychaete communities along the depth and sediment gradients. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Maturity, size at age and predator-prey relationships of winter skate Leucoraja ocellata in the southern Gulf of St Lawrence: potentially an undescribed endemic facing extirpation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J T; Hanson, J M

    2013-03-01

    The goals of this study were to document the size and age structure, size at maturity, ovarian fecundity and diet of the endangered population of winter skate Leucoraja ocellata that resides in the southern Gulf of St Lawrence (SGSL). The maximum size observed for SGSL L. ocellata was 68 cm total length (LT ) but >99% of animals caught were 10 mm diameter were ever observed. At 40 cm LT , the diet changed from one dominated by shrimp Crangon septemspinosa and gammarid amphipods to one dominated by fishes (mainly sand lance Ammodytes spp. and rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax) and Atlantic rock crab Cancer irroratus. Sufficient differences were observed between SGSL L. ocellata and other populations in their size-at-maturity pattern and maximum size to propose the taxonomic re-evaluation of the population. © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2013. Journal of Fish Biology © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  17. Recolonization of macrozoobenthos on defaunated sediments in a hypertrophic brackish lagoon: effects of sulfide removal and sediment grain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Gen

    2014-04-01

    Influences of sediment types on recolonization of estuarine macrozoobenthos were tested using enclosures in a hypertrophic lagoon. Three types of azoic sediment, sand (S), sulfide-rich mud (M), and mud removed of sulfide through iron addition (MFe), were set in field for 35 days during a hypoxic period. A total of 14 taxa including opportunistic polychaetes and amphipods occurred. Infaunal community in S treatment was characterized by highest diversity, total density and biomass, and population density of five dominant taxa, while those parameters were lowest in M treatment. Sulfide removal in MFe treatment achieved much higher density, biomass, and population densities of several taxa in the sediment. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that the established community structure was unique to each treatment. These imply that dissolved sulfide level as well as sediment grain size is a key determinant for the community composition and recolonization speed of early colonists in estuarine soft-bottom habitats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic diversity in Monoporeia affinis at polluted and reference sites of the Baltic Bothnian Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guban, Peter; Wennerström, Lovisa; Elfwing, Tina; Sundelin, Brita; Laikre, Linda

    2015-04-15

    The amphipod Monoporeia affinis plays an important role in the Baltic Sea ecosystem as prey and as detritivore. The species is monitored for contaminant effects, but almost nothing is known about its genetics in this region. A pilot screening for genetic variation at the mitochondrial COI gene was performed in 113 individuals collected at six sites in the northern Baltic. Three coastal sites were polluted by pulp mill effluents, PAHs, and trace metals, and two coastal reference sites were without obvious connection to pollution sources. An off-coastal reference site was also included. Contaminated sites showed lower levels of genetic diversity than the coastal reference ones although the difference was not statistically significant. Divergence patterns measured as ΦST showed no significant differentiation within reference and polluted groups, but there was significant genetic divergence between them. The off-coastal sample differed significantly from all coastal sites and also showed lower genetic variation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Food habits of Atlantic sturgeon off the central New Jersey coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. H.; Dropkin, D.S.; Warkentine, B.E.; Rachlin, J.W.; Andrews, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    Limited information exists on the marine diet of the Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus. We examined the food habits of 275 Atlantic sturgeon (total length, 106-203 cm) caught in the commercial fishery off the coast of New Jersey. Stomachs were provided by fishermen. Significantly more stomachs were empty in the spring than in the fall. Sand and organic debris were a major component in the stomachs (26.3-75.4% by weight). Polycheates were the primary pre group consumed, although the isopod Politolana conchorum was the most important individual prey eaten. Mollusks and fish contributed little to the diet. Some prey taxa (i.e., polychaetes, isopods, amphipods) exhibited seasonal variation in importance in the diet of Atlantic sturgeon. Identification of the offshore diet of Atlantic sturgeon is an important step in developing a better understanding of the life history requirements and marine ecology of this species.

  20. Effects of anisakid nematodes Anisakis simplex (s.l.), Pseudoterranova decipiens (s.l.) and Contracaecum osculatum (s.l.) on fish and consumer Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, Kurt; Mehrdana, Foojan

    2016-01-01

    – including euphausiids, copepods and amphipods – feed on these larvae, become infected and serve as intermediate hosts. A range of fish species may serve as transport hosts following ingestion of infected invertebrates and the final stage develops after two additional moults in the stomach of marine mammals......The anisakid nematodes Anisakis simplex (Rudolphi, 1809), Pseudoterranova decipiens (Krabbe, 1878) and Contracaecum osculatum (Rudolphi, 1802) occur as third-stage larvae in marine fish products and may infect consumers ingesting raw or under-cooked fish products. Clinical symptoms associated...... with the infection, termed anisakidosis, vary from irritation of the oesophagus and stomach, via nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea to severe epigastric and abdominal pain. Third-stage larvae of A. simplex are found in the body cavity, musculature and various organs, P. decipiens occur mainly in the fish musculature...

  1. Feeding ecology of non-native Siberian prawns, Palaemon modestus (Heller, 1862) (Decapoda, Palaemonidae), in the lower Snake River, Washington, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Hurst, William

    2016-01-01

    We used both stomach content and stable isotope analyses to describe the feeding ecology of Siberian prawns Palaemon modestus (Heller, 1862), a non-native caridean shrimp that is a relatively recent invader of the lower Snake River. Based on identifiable prey in stomachs, the opossum shrimp Neomysis mercedis Holmes, 1896 comprised up to 34-55% (by weight) of diets of juvenile to adult P. modestus, which showed little seasonal variation. Other predominant items/taxa consumed included detritus, amphipods, dipteran larvae, and oligochaetes. Stable isotope analysis supported diet results and also suggested that much of the food consumed by P. modestus that was not identifiable came from benthic sources — predominantly invertebrates of lower trophic levels and detritus. Palaemon modestus consumption of N. mercedis may pose a competitive threat to juvenile salmon and resident fishes which also rely heavily on that prey.

  2. Environmental status of the Lake Michigan region. Volume 6. Zoobenthos of Lake Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozley, S.C.; Howmiller, R.P.

    1977-09-01

    This report summarizes Lake Michigan zoobenthic studies up to 1974, including reports of power-plant surveys. It describes ecologies of macroinvertebrate species and some microfauna, partly through use of data from other Great Lakes. The following are discussed: methodology of field surveys; zoobenthic indicators of pollution; zoobenthic effects on sediment-water exchanges; and numbers, biomass, and production of total macroinvertebrates. Prominent features of Lake Michigan zoobenthos include predominance of the amphipod Pontoporeia affinis, usefulness of tubificid oligochaetes in mapping environmental quality, and pronounced qualitative gradients in zoobenthos in relation to depth. Further research is needed on sampling methods, energy flow rates and pathways through benthic communities, factors limiting distribution of species near shore, and effects of macroinvertebrates on sediment chemistry and structure.

  3. Two new species of Urothoe (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Gammaridea) from the East Johor Islands Archipelago, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, B A R; Melvin, C W H

    2011-03-24

    Two new species of urothoid amphipods from Pulau Sibu and Pulau Tinggi, Johor are described and illustrated. The specimens of Urothoe sibuensis new species were collected by vertical haul plankton net and is distinctively different from other existing Urothoe species by these combination of special characters; similar gnathopods 1-2 with short and stout propodus expanded into poorly defined palms; large eyes and epimeron 3 smooth. Urothoe tinggiensis new species as collected using an airlift suction sampler at seagrass area is characterized by its different gnathopodal configuration with setose dactylus of 5th pereopod; eyes minute; carpus is wider than merus in the 5th pereopod; subquadrate coxa 4; merus and carpus of pereopods 6-7 are linear.

  4. Acute and chronic toxicity testing of bisphenol A with aquatic invertebrates and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaich, Ellen M; Friederich, Urs; Caspers, Norbert; Hall, A Tilghman; Klecka, Gary M; Dimond, Stephen S; Staples, Charles A; Ortego, Lisa S; Hentges, Steven G

    2009-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA, 4,4'-isopropylidine diphenol) is a commercially important chemical used primarily as an intermediate in the production of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins. Extensive effect data are currently available, including long-term studies with BPA on fish, amphibians, crustaceans, and mollusks. The aim of this study was to perform additional tests with a number of aquatic invertebrates and an aquatic plant. These studies include acute tests with the midge (Chironomus tentans) and the snail (Marisa cornuarietis), and chronic studies with rotifers (Brachionus calyciflorus), amphipods (Hyalella azteca), and plants (Lemna gibba). The effect data on different aquatic invertebrate and plant species presented in this paper correspond well with the effect and no-effect concentrations (NOECs) available from invertebrate studies in the published literature and are within the range found for other aquatic species tested with BPA.

  5. Treatment of atrazine by integrating photocatalytic and biological processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.Y.; Tao, S.; Dawson, R.; Wong, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    This research examines the degradation of atrazine by photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) under different experimental conditions. Deisopropylatrazine, deethylatrazine and deethyldeisopropylatrazine were formed as major intermediates based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The reaction mixture was found to be toxic towards two bioassays, i.e. the Microtox[reg] and amphipods survival tests even when atrazine was completely degraded by PCO within 2 h under optimized conditions. The results indicate that adding H 2 O 2 could significantly enhance the degradation of atrazine by PCO. Ammeline, ammelide and cyanuric acid (CA) became the major intermediates/products as detected by high performance liquid chromatography from 6th to the 40th h of PCO treatment. After 72 h PCO treatment, only CA was detectable in the reaction mixture. Further degradation of CA was carried out by a newly isolated CA-degrading bacterium, Sphingomonas capsulata. The photochemical pretreatment integrated with microbial degradation lead to the complete degradation and detoxification of atrazine

  6. Bioaccumulation of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) in selected species from the Barents Sea food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukås, Marianne; Berger, Urs; Hop, Haakon; Gulliksen, Bjørn; Gabrielsen, Geir W

    2007-07-01

    The present study reports concentrations and biomagnification potential of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) in species from the Barents Sea food web. The examined species included sea ice amphipod (Gammarus wilkitzkii), polar cod (Boreogadus saida), black guillemot (Cepphus grylle) and glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus). These were analyzed for PFAS, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was the predominant of the detected PFAS. Trophic levels and food web transfer of PFAS were determined using stable nitrogen isotopes (delta(15)N). No correlation was found between PFOS concentrations and trophic level within species. However, a non-linear relationship was established when the entire food web was analyzed. Biomagnification factors displayed values >1 for perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), PFOS and SigmaPFAS(7). Multivariate analyses showed that the degree of trophic transfer of PFAS is similar to that of PCB, DDT and PBDE, despite their accumulation through different pathways.

  7. Sediment Chemistry and Toxicity in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey: Pre- and Post- Hurricane Sandy, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanok, Kristin M.; Szabo, Zoltan; Reilly, Timothy J.; Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall in Barnegat Bay, October, 29, 2012, damaging shorelines and infrastructure. Estuarine sediment chemistry and toxicity were investigated before and after to evaluate potential environmental health impacts and to establish post-event baseline sediment-quality conditions. Trace element concentrations increased throughout Barnegat Bay up to two orders of magnitude, especially north of Barnegat Inlet, consistent with northward redistribution of silt. Loss of organic compounds, clay, and organic carbon is consistent with sediment winnowing and transport through the inlets and sediment transport modeling results. The number of sites exceeding sediment quality guidance levels for trace elements tripled post-Sandy. Sediment toxicity post-Sandy was mostly unaffected relative to pre-Sandy conditions, but at the site with the greatest relative increase for trace elements, survival rate of the test amphipod decreased (indicating degradation). This study would not have been possible without comprehensive baseline data enabling the evaluation of storm-derived changes in sediment quality.

  8. Effect of gender on physiological and behavioural responses of Gammarus roeseli (Crustacea Amphipoda) to salinity and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sornom, Pascal; Felten, Vincent; Medoc, Vincent; Sroda, Sophie; Rousselle, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The importance of potentially interacting factors in organisms responses to a stress are often ignored or underestimated in ecotoxicology. In laboratory experiments we investigated how gender, temperature and age influence the behaviour and the physiology of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus roeseli under salinity stress. Our results revealed a significant higher sensitivity of females in survival, ventilation and ionoregulation whereas no inter-age differences were reported. Water temperature also exerted a significant effect in survival and ventilation of G. roeseli. Some of those factors appeared to interact significantly. This study provides evidence that gender can affect organisms responses to a stressor and consequently has to be considered while assessing a stress impact. We discussed the potential relationships between biological and behavioural responses. - Influence of gender, age and temperature in a gammarid responses to a stress.

  9. The isolation and characterization of actinobacteria from dominant benthic macroinvertebrates endemic to Lake Baikal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis; Rebets, Yuriy; Tokovenko, Bogdan; Voytsekhovskaya, Irina; Timofeyev, Maxim; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2016-03-01

    The high demand for new antibacterials fosters the isolation of new biologically active compounds producing actinobacteria. Here, we report the isolation and initial characterization of cultured actinobacteria from dominant benthic organisms' communities of Lake Baikal. Twenty-five distinct strains were obtained from 5 species of Baikal endemic macroinvertebrates of amphipods, freshwater sponges, turbellaria worms, and insects (caddisfly larvae). The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-based phylogenic analysis of obtained strains showed their affiliation to Streptomyces, Nocardia, Pseudonocardia, Micromonospora, Aeromicrobium, and Agromyces genera, revealing the diversity of actinobacteria associated with the benthic organisms of Lake Baikal. The biological activity assays showed that 24 out of 25 strains are producing compounds active against at least one of the test cultures used, including Gram-negative bacteria and Candida albicans. Complete dereplication of secondary metabolite profiles of two isolated strains led to identification of only few known compounds, while the majority of detected metabolites are not listed in existing antibiotic databases.

  10. Indirect effects of predators control herbivore richness and abundance in a benthic eelgrass (Zostera marina) mesograzer community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundrud, Sarah L; Srivastava, Diane S; O'Connor, Mary I

    2015-07-01

    Herbivore communities can be sensitive to changes in predator pressure (top-down effects) and resource availability (bottom-up effects) in a wide range of systems. However, it remains unclear whether such top-down and bottom-up effects reflect direct impacts of predators and/or resources on herbivores, or are indirect, reflecting altered interactions among herbivore species. We quantified direct and indirect effects of bottom-up and top-down processes on an eelgrass (Zostera marina) herbivore assemblage. In a field experiment, we factorially manipulated water column nutrients (with Osmocote(™) slow-release fertilizer) and predation pressure (with predator exclusion cages) and measured the effects on herbivore abundance, richness and beta diversity. We examined likely mechanisms of community responses by statistically exploring the response of individual herbivore species to trophic manipulations. Predators increased herbivore richness and total abundance, in both cases through indirect shifts in community composition. Increases in richness occurred through predator suppression of common gammarid amphipod species (Monocorophium acherusicum and Photis brevipes), permitting the inclusion of rarer gammarid species (Aoroides columbiae and Pontogeneia rostrata). Increased total herbivore abundance reflected increased abundance of a caprellid amphipod species (Caprella sp.), concurrent with declines in the abundance of other common species. Furthermore, predators decreased beta diversity by decreasing variability in Caprella sp. abundance among habitat patches. Osmocote(™) fertilization increased nutrient concentrations locally, but nutrients dissipated to background levels within 3 m of the fertilizer. Nutrient addition weakly affected the herbivore assemblage, not affecting richness and increasing total abundance by increasing one herbivore species (Caprella sp.). Nutrient addition did not affect beta diversity. We demonstrated that assemblage-level effects of

  11. Estuarine resources use by juvenile Flagfin mojarra ( Eucinostomus melanopterus) in an inverse tropical estuary (Sine Saloum, Senegal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gning, Ndombour; Le Loc'h, François; Thiaw, Omar T.; Aliaume, Catherine; Vidy, Guy

    2010-03-01

    The Flagfin mojarra, Eucinostomus melanopterus, is a marine spawner whose young individuals are common in the Sine Saloum inverse estuary (Senegal). The species offers the opportunity to study both the use of the estuarine nursery resources and the impact of the particular environment of the inverse estuary on these resources. This will lead to a better understanding of the functioning of the nursery. We investigated the resources used by juvenile Flagfin mojarra by coupling stomach contents and stable isotopes methods. Young Flagfin mojarra feed on a wide range of invertebrates. Diet changed from copepods in the smallest size class (10-40 mm), to a range of invertebrates including amphipods, insect larvae, polychaetes and mollusc in the medium size class (up to 60 mm) and mainly polychaetes for individuals >60 mm in size. In mangrove habitats with moderate salinity, the diet was dominated by polychaetes and decapod larvae (crabs) whereas in habitats with higher salinity, diet was dominated by amphipods. In very hypersaline areas with scarce mangroves, diet comprised benthic copepods, chironomid larvae and ostracods. This agreed with a clear change in δ13C measured in fish sampled at downstream or upstream sites. Comparison with signatures of primary producers suggested that the local food web exploited by young Flagfin mojarra is mainly based on phytoplankton in the downstream mangrove area, and mainly on benthic microalgae in the upstream hypersaline area. As in many studies considering the food webs in mangrove, mangrove was not identified as a major contributor to the food web exploited by E. melanopterus. This needs further investigation particularly because the exportation of estuarine materials to the sea is limited in an inverse estuary.

  12. Response of an estuarine benthic community to application of the pesticide carbaryl and cultivation of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) in Willapa Bay, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbauld, B R; Brooks, K M; Posey, M H

    2001-10-01

    Oyster culture operations on the West coast of North America have developed into complete farming operations for the introduced Japanese oyster, Crassostrea gigas, which now covers vast areas of the intertidal landscape, particularly in Washington State where the pesticide carbaryl has also been used to control burrowing thalassinid shrimp for more than 30 years. Field experiments were conducted to examine the effects of these habitat modifications on the benthic community in Willapa, Bay Washington (124 degrees 06'W,46 degrees 24'N) where 50% of the state's oyster production occurs. Results indicated that the primary long-term effect of carbaryl application was removal of the two species of thalassinid shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis), which dominated the community at the start of the experiment and clearly influenced community composition themselves. Small peracarid crustaceans like the amphipods Corophium acherusicum and Eohaustorius estuarius experienced the most significant short-term mortalities, but generally recruited back to treated sites within 3 months, and were often more abundant on treated than untreated sites 1 year after carbaryl application. Results for molluscs were mixed, with no significant effect on Macoma spp, but a significant effect on the commensal clam Crytomya californica and mixed results for the cockle Clinocardium nutalli. Polychaetes were the least susceptible to carbaryl and with the exception of a short-term effect on oligochaetes, no significant negative effects were observed. The addition of oysters did not affect the infaunal community in this study, however greater abundance of epifaunal organisms like mussels, scaleworms, and the amphipod Amphithoe valida, which builds tubes in algae attached to shells, was observed. Carbaryl, which is currently applied to roughly 242 ha (oyster culture operations like the addition of oysters themselves to a community often dominated by burrowing thalassinid shrimp

  13. Long-term baited lander experiments at a cold-water coral community on Galway Mound (Belgica Mound Province, NE Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaleye, Marc; Duineveld, Gerard; Bergman, Magda; van den Beld, Inge

    2017-11-01

    A long-term lander employing a baited camera system was developed to study temporal variation in the presence of scavenging fish and invertebrates at a cold-water coral community on Galway Mound (Belgica Mound Province, NE Atlantic). The camera system was tested during two successful long-term deployments for periods of 6 and 12 months respectively. The baited system, consisting of two separate video cameras with infrared lights and a bait dispenser with 24 bait positions, recorded more than 15,500 clips of 17 s, regularly spread over both periods. New bait, consisting of sardines in oil, was offered at regular time intervals, and attracted scavengers over the whole period of deployment, and especially the crab Chaceon affinis did still eat from it till the end of the deployments. However, the attractiveness for some scavengers, i.e. amphipods, diminished quite quickly. In addition to invertebrate scavengers, namely C. affinis, two other crab species, amphipods, a shrimp and a starfish, also 7 species of fish were recorded near the bait, of which Lepidion eques was by far the most common. Though there was no concrete evidence for seasonal patterns, the observations showed substantial temporal variation in the abundance of several species, especially the crabs C. affinis and Bathynectes maravigna and the fish Phycis blennoides. It is concluded that long-term deployments of such a baited camera system can produce novel data. For instance such a system could be employed for monitoring impacts of disturbances on the deep-sea floor (e.g. mining), as we infer that mobile scavengers will be among the first organisms to show a visible reaction to any chemically and physically (noise, vibrations) alteration of the environment similar to a mine canary.

  14. Population biology and diet of Pomadasys corvinaeformis Perciformes: Pomadasyidae in Caraguatatuba Bay, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Regina Denadai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pomadasys corvinaeformis inhabits sandy and rocky bottoms in coastal waters, and is common in trawl samples taken from beaches. The species is very abundant on the Brazilian coast, and is of high economic and ecological importance. This study examined the spatio-temporal distribution, population biology and diet of P. corvinaeformis in Southeastern Brazil. Samples were taken by trawling monthly from August 2003 to October 2004, in two previously selected areas. The Northern area is more exposed to wave activity and is influenced by a river, functioning as a small estuary. In contrast, the Southern area is relatively sheltered from wave energy and influenced to a lesser degree by smaller rivers. The length of the specimens was measured, and the sex and gonadal stage were macroscopically identified. The abundance of this species was compared between areas and among months. The diet was analyzed seasonally by the frequency of occurrence, the percent volume, and the index of alimentary importance. P. corvinaeformis occurred in unequal proportions in the two study areas 86 in the Northern area and 14 in the Southern area and was found most abundant in May 2004, followed by June 2004. The proportion of mature and in-maturation individuals increased gradually from autumn to summer. Nine major groups of food items were recorded in the diet of P. corvinaeformis, and crustaceans comprised five of the categories: unidentified crustacean fragments, zoea larvae, amphipods, copepods and shrimps. In both, fish stomach and intestine, crustacean fragments were the most frequent item. The second most frequent items were shrimp in the stomach, and amphipods in the intestine mainly represented by their tubes. These results demonstrate that P. corvinaeformis can be considered a carnivore, with a preference on benthic organisms.

  15. Biodiversity, Community and Trophic Structure of the Suprabenthos of the Gulf of Cádiz-Guadalquivir Estuary Coupled System: Linking Pelagic-Benthic and Terrestrial-Marine Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, C.

    2016-02-01

    Suprabenthos biodiversity and species densities on both offshore and coastal systems are largely unknown. Main components like mysids, euphasiids or amphipods are omnivorous and constitute a major dietary component for many benthic and pelagic fishes, mammals, cephalopods and decapods. Despite their relevant ecological role linking pelagic-benthic food webs, suprabenthos have been chronically undersampled and their components underrepresented and underestimated in food web models. Many pelagic and demersal species of high commercial and ecological interest at the Gulf of Cádiz (GoC) feed at a bottom scattering layer identified from 0 to 200 m depth and up to 50 km from coast, related to the Guadalquivir Estuary (GE) influence coastal area, and present life history cycles based on a sequential use of habitats from GoC to GE nursery area, may be adapted to match the horizontal migrations of key suprabenthos prey species. In order to understand the ecological mechanisms through which the GE-GoC coupled ecosystem would influence the recruitment of these fishery resources, the suprabenthos was sampled by suprabenthic sldege (200 μm) from the shallow estuary to 75 m depth during June, August and November of 2013. We identified up to 300 species (H index 0.4-2-9 and Beta diversity 0.55), being copepods, molluscs, cumacea, cladocera, poliquets, decapods, mysids and amphipods the most important groups by biomass (mg/m3), finding densities up to 32.9 mg/m3 for copepods, 6 for mysids and up to 100 mg/m3 for decapods. Multivariate analysis determines depth as the most important variable explaining community structure, decreasing biodiversity with depth, while for sites at depths species show seasonal horizontal migrations between GoC and GE, connecting terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

  16. Changes in the deep-water benthos of eastern Lake Erie between 1979 and 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dermott, R.; Kerec, D. [Fisheries and Oceans, Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-06-01

    In order to examine changes of the benthic community and benthic biomass as a result of mussel colonization, a survey of the deep-water benthic fauna in eastern Lake Erie was repeated in 1993 using the same sites and methods as in a 1979 survey. During 1979, the community beyond 30 m was dominated by oligochaete worms and the burrowing amphipod Diporeia, which represented 50 and 40% of the total benthic biomass respectively. By 1993, quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis) formed over 90% of the benthic biomass. Mussels were present at all 13 sites. Densities of individuals >2 mm in length averaged 3,241 mussels m{sup -2}. Of these mussels, 97% were quagga mussels. Total density of all sizes retained on a 180 {mu}m sieve averaged 34,800 mussels m{sup -2} but total biomass decreased from 1.58 to 0.98 g m{sup -2}. The density of the amphipod Diporeia was reduced from 1,844 in 1979 to 218 m{sup -2} in 1993. While present at all sites during 1979, Diporeia remained common only at two sites and were absent at 8 of the 13 sites in 1993. The native fingernail clams, Pisidium spp., were reduced from 327 to 82 m{sup -2}. No significant reduction occurred in the worm and chironomid populations, however the dry biomass of the chironomids was reduced from 0.07 to 0.0008 g m{sup -2}. These reductions may be due to competition with the mussels for freshly settling algae. The meiofauna, which included small nematodes, ostracods, and harpacticoids retained on a 180 {mu}m sieve, all increased in density. Perhaps they benefited from an increase in the detritus deposited as pseudofeces around the mussels.

  17. Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Amélineau

    Full Text Available The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic.

  18. Chemical analysis and genotoxicity of high molecular mass PAH in sediment samples and biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarry, B.E.; Marvin, C.H.; Smith, R.W.; Bryant, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A normal phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) method was used to fractionate the organic extracts of prepared from coal tar-contaminated sediments from hamilton Harbor in Ontario and from Sydney Harbor in Nova Scotia into molecular mass classes. Each PAH fraction up to 302 amu was analyzed by GC-MS and fractions containing PAH with molecular masses greater than 302 amu were analyzed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) LC-MS.Each fraction was also subjected to Ames bioassays using a TA100-like strain of Salmonella typhimurium (YG1025 + S9). The 300/302 amu, 326/328 and 350/352 amu PAH fractions accounted for 25% of the total genotoxic response of the extract; these PAH constitute a substantial genotoxic burden. A number of 300, 302, 326, 350, 374 and 400 amu PAH were identified using APCI LC-MS and comparison with authentic standards. The non-polar aromatic extracts of bottom sediments, suspended sediments and zebra mussels from Hamilton Harbor were also examined by GC-MS, APCI LC-MS and genotoxicity bioassays. The profiles of the priority and high mass PAH in these samples were identical showing that all PAH up to and exceeding 400 amu were readily bioavailable to biota such as Zebra mussels. In addition, the pseudo faeces of the Zebra mussels and amphipod detritivores which fed on the pseudo faeces had chemical profiles identical to the Zebra mussels. Since many sport fish prize amphipods as food, this observation demonstrates a pathway for organic contaminants adsorbed to suspended sediments to enter the food chain of non-bottom-feeding fish in areas infested by Zebra mussels

  19. Toxicity of sediment-associated pesticides to Chironomus dilutus and Hyalella azteca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuping; Weston, Donald P; You, Jing; Rothert, Amanda K; Lydy, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    Two hundred sediment samples were collected and their toxicity evaluated to aquatic species in a previous study in the agriculturally dominated Central Valley of California, United States. Pyrethroid insecticides were the main contributors to the observed toxicity. However, mortality in approximately one third of the toxic samples could not be explained solely by the presence of pyrethroids in the matrices. Hundreds of pesticides are currently used in the Central Valley of California, but only a few dozen are analyzed in standard environmental monitoring. A significant amount of unexplained sediment toxicity may be due to pesticides that are in widespread use that but have not been routinely monitored in the environment, and even if some of them were, the concentrations harmful to aquatic organisms are unknown. In this study, toxicity thresholds for nine sediment-associated pesticides including abamectin, diazinon, dicofol, fenpropathrin, indoxacarb, methyl parathion, oxyfluorfen, propargite, and pyraclostrobin were established for two aquatic species, the midge Chironomus dilutus and the amphipod Hyalella azteca. For midges, the median lethal concentration (LC₅₀) of the pesticides ranged from 0.18 to 964 μg/g organic carbon (OC), with abamectin being the most toxic and propargite being the least toxic pesticide. A sublethal growth endpoint using average individual ash-free dry mass was also measured for the midges. The no-observable effect concentration values for growth ranged from 0.10 to 633 μg/g OC for the nine pesticides. For the amphipods, fenpropathrin was the most toxic, with an LC₅₀ of 1-2 μg/g OC. Abamectin, diazinon, and methyl parathion were all moderately toxic (LC₅₀s 2.8-26 μg/g OC). Dicofol, indoxacarb, oxyfluorfen, propargite, and pyraclostrobin were all relatively nontoxic, with LC₅₀s greater than the highest concentrations tested. The toxicity information collected in the present study will be helpful in decreasing the

  20. Use of zeolite for removing ammonia and ammonia-caused toxicity in marine toxicity identification evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, R M; Perron, M M; Cantwell, M G; Ho, K T; Serbst, J R; Pelletier, M C

    2004-11-01

    Ammonia occurs in marine waters including effluents, receiving waters, and sediment interstitial waters. At sufficiently high concentrations, ammonia can be toxic to aquatic species. Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods provide researchers with tools for identifying aquatic toxicants. For identifying ammonia toxicity, there are several possible methods including pH alteration and volatilization, Ulva lactuca addition, microbial degradation, and zeolite addition. Zeolite addition has been used successfully in freshwater systems to decrease ammonia concentrations and toxicity for several decades. However, zeolite in marine systems has been used less because ions in the seawater interfere with zeolite's ability to adsorb ammonia. The objective of this study was to develop a zeolite method for removing ammonia from marine waters. To accomplish this objective, we performed a series of zeolite slurry and column chromatography studies to determine uptake rate and capacity and to evaluate the effects of salinity and pH on ammonia removal. We also assessed the interaction of zeolite with several toxic metals. Success of the methods was also evaluated by measuring toxicity to two marine species: the mysid Americamysis bahia and the amphipod Ampelisca abdita. Column chromatography proved to be effective at removing a wide range of ammonia concentrations under several experimental conditions. Conversely, the slurry method was inconsistent and variable in its overall performance in removing ammonia and cannot be recommended. The metals copper, lead, and zinc were removed by zeolite in both the slurry and column treatments. The zeolite column was successful in removing ammonia toxicity for both the mysid and the amphipod, whereas the slurry was less effective. This study demonstrated that zeolite column chromatography is a useful tool for conducting marine water TIEs to decrease ammonia concentrations and characterize toxicity.

  1. Influence of pH on the acute toxicity of ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels (fatmucket, Lampsills siliquoidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Erickson, R.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Brunson, E.L.; Augspurger, T.; Barnhart, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of pH on the toxicity of ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels. Acute 96-h ammonia toxicity tests were conducted with 10-d-old juvenile mussels (fatmucket, Lampsilis siliquoidea) at five pH levels ranging from 6.5 to 9.0 in flow-through diluter systems at 20??C. Acute 48-h tests with amphipods (Hyalella azteca) and 96-h tests with oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) were conducted concurrently under the same test conditions to determine the sensitivity of mussels relative to these two commonly tested benthic invertebrate species. During the exposure, pH levels were maintained within 0.1 of a pH unit and ammonia concentrations were relatively constant through time (coefficient of variation for ammonia concentrations ranged from 2 to 30% with a median value of 7.9%). The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of total ammonia nitrogen (N) for mussels were at least two to six times lower than the EC50s for amphipods and oligochaetes, and the EC50s for mussels decreased with increasing pH and ranged from 88 mg N/L at pH 6.6 to 0.96 mg N/L at pH 9.0. The EC50s for mussels were at or below the final acute values used to derive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's acute water quality criterion (WQC). However, the quantitative relationship between pH and ammonia toxicity to juvenile mussels was similar to the average relationship for other taxa reported in the WQC. These results indicate that including mussel toxicity data in a revision to the WQC would lower the acute criterion but not change the WQC mathematical representation of the relative effect of pH on ammonia toxicity. ?? 2008 SETAC.

  2. Cadmium risks to freshwater life: derivation and validation of low-effect criteria values using laboratory and field studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebane, Christopher A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released updated aquatic life criteria for cadmium. Since then, additional data on the effects of cadmium to aquatic life have become available from studies supported by the EPA, Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (IDEQ), and the U.S. Geological Survey, among other sources. Updated data on the effects of cadmium to aquatic life were compiled and reviewed and low-effect concentrations were estimated. Low-effect values were calculated using EPA's guidelines for deriving numerical national water-quality criteria for the protection of aquatic organisms and their uses. Data on the short-term (acute) effects of cadmium on North American freshwater species that were suitable for criteria derivation were located for 69 species representing 57 genera and 33 families. For longer-term (chronic) effects of cadmium on North American freshwater species, suitable data were located for 28 species representing 21 genera and 17 families. Both the acute and chronic toxicity of cadmium were dependent on the hardness of the test water. Hardness-toxicity regressions were developed for both acute and chronic datasets so that effects data from different tests could be adjusted to a common water hardness. Hardness-adjusted effects values were pooled to obtain species and genus mean acute and chronic values, which then were ranked by their sensitivity to cadmium. The four most sensitive genera to acute exposures were, in order of increasing cadmium resistance, Oncorhynchus (Pacific trout and salmon), Salvelinus ('char' trout), Salmo (Atlantic trout and salmon), and Cottus (sculpin). The four most sensitive genera to chronic exposures were Hyalella (amphipod), Cottus, Gammarus (amphipod), and Salvelinus. Using the updated datasets, hardness dependent criteria equations were calculated for acute and chronic exposures to cadmium. At a hardness of 50 mg/L as calcium carbonate, the criterion maximum concentration (CMC, or 'acute

  3. Laboratory toxicity and benthic invertebrate field colonization of Upper Columbia River sediments: finding adverse effects using multiple lines of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, J F; Kemble, N E; Allert, A L; Brumbaugh, W G; Ingersoll, C G; Dowling, B; Gruenenfelder, C; Roland, J L

    2012-07-01

    From 1930 to 1995, the Upper Columbia River (UCR) of northeast Washington State received approximately 12 million metric tons of smelter slag and associated effluents from a large smelter facility located in Trail, British Columbia, approximately 10 km north of the United States-Canadian border. Studies conducted during the past two decades have demonstrated the presence of toxic concentrations of heavy metals in slag-based sandy sediments, including cadmium, copper, zinc, and lead in the UCR area as well as the downstream reservoir portion of Lake Roosevelt. We conducted standardized whole-sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28-day) and the midge Chironomus dilutus (10-day) on 11 samples, including both UCR and study-specific reference sediments. Metal concentrations in sediments were modeled for potential toxicity using three approaches: (1) probable effects quotients (PEQs) based on total recoverable metals (TRMs) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEMs); (2) SEMs corrected for acid-volatile sulfides (AVS; i.e., ∑SEM - AVS); and (3) ∑SEM - AVS normalized to the fractional organic carbon (f(oc)) (i.e., ∑SEM - AVS/f(oc)). The most highly metal-contaminated sample (∑PEQ(TRM) = 132; ∑PEQ(SEM) = 54; ∑SEM - AVS = 323; and ∑SEM - AVS/(foc) = 64,600 umol/g) from the UCR was dominated by weathered slag sediment particles and resulted in 80% mortality and 94% decrease in biomass of amphipods; in addition, this sample significantly decreased growth of midge by 10%. The traditional ∑AVS - SEM, uncorrected for organic carbon, was the most accurate approach for estimating the effects of metals in the UCR. Treatment of the toxic slag sediment with 20% Resinex SIR-300 metal-chelating resin significantly decreased the toxicity of the sample. Samples ∑SEM - AVS > 244 was not toxic to amphipods or midge in laboratory testing, indicating that this value may be an approximate threshold for effects in the UCR. In situ benthic invertebrate

  4. On the trophic ecology of Gammaridea (Crustacea: Amphipoda) in coastal waters: A European-scale analysis of stable isotopes data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    Gammaridean amphipods are found throughout a diverse range of coastal and brackish environments and are generally considered macrophagous herbivores/detritivores. While predation and cannibalism have been shown to be common in freshwater species, motivating a revision of the group functional role, only qualitative information is available on marine Gammaridea. In this study, a survey was conducted of the available literature on stable C and N isotopic signatures of macrophagous, fully aquatic Gammaridea and their potential basal resources in European brackish and coastal environments. The contribution of intra- and inter-specific predation to the signatures of gammarideans was verified by a mixing model procedure where the diet-tissue enrichment constant was not set a priori. Specifically, for each study included in the survey the minimum and maximum diet-tissue nitrogen enrichment factors (Δ15Nmin and Δ15Nmax) providing a non-zero solution were calculated for a range of carbon enrichment factors, assuming that both metrics would increasingly differ from the values expected for a single trophic level as predation and/or cannibalism increased in the diet of the consumer. The minimum enrichment factors Δ15Nmin estimated for a Δ13C of -2.6‰ and +0.5‰ were found to be independent from resource-related artefacts and provided the highest number of successful model runs. Δ15Nmin values were consistent with a diet based on living or decaying primary producers and not compatible with cannibalism or intra-guild predation. However, they showed a bimodal distribution and were on average far below the range found in the literature, matching the enrichment factors of gammarideans measured under laboratory conditions. These results are discussed considering the interaction of the distinctive isotopic features of basal resources in coastal habitats and the biology and ecology of gammaridean amphipods. Particular emphasis is placed on the high variability of nitrogen

  5. Novel species interactions: American black bears respond to Pacific herring spawn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Caroline Hazel; Paquet, Paul Charles; Reimchen, Thomas Edward

    2015-05-26

    In addition to the decline and extinction of the world's species, the decline and eventual loss of species interactions is one of the major consequences of the biodiversity crisis. On the Pacific coast of North America, diminished runs of salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) drive numerous marine-terrestrial interactions, many of which have been intensively studied, but marine-terrestrial interactions driven by other species remain relatively unknown. Bears (Ursus spp.) are major vectors of salmon into terrestrial ecosystems, but their participation in other cross-ecosystem interactions is similarly poorly described. Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), a migratory forage fish in coastal marine ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean and the dominant forage fish in British Columbia (BC), spawn in nearshore subtidal and intertidal zones. Spawn resources (eggs, milt, and spawning adults) at these events are available to coastal predators and scavengers, including terrestrial species. In this study, we investigated the interaction between American black bears (Ursus americanus) and Pacific herring at spawn events in Quatsino Sound, BC, Canada. Using remote cameras to monitor bear activity (1,467 camera days, 29 sites, years 2010-2012) in supratidal and intertidal zones and a machine learning approach, we determined that the quantity of Pacific herring eggs in supratidal and intertidal zones was a leading predictor of black bear activity, with bears positively responding to increasing herring egg masses. Other important predictors included day of the year and Talitrid amphipod (Traskorchestia spp.) mass. A complementary analysis of black bear scats indicated that Pacific herring egg mass was the highest ranked predictor of egg consumption by bears. Pacific herring eggs constituted a substantial yet variable component of the early springtime diet of black bears in Quatsino Sound (frequency of occurrence 0-34%; estimated dietary content 0-63%). Other major dietary items included

  6. Toxicity of five forest insecticides to cutthroat trout and two species of aquatic invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, D.F.; Mauck, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Northern Rocky Mountain region has had scattered infestation of the western spruce budworm Christoneura occidentalis since the early 1900's (U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (USDA) 1976b). On the basis of aerial surveys in 1975, TUNNOCK et al. (1976), estimated that budworm defoliation occurred on 2,278,804 acres of six National Forests in Montana. Since the use of DDT was banned in 1972, there has been a need to develop alternative insecticides with the efficacy of DDT but without its environmental risk. These insecticides must be effective in controlling the budworm, but should not persist in the environment or be toxic to other organisms. The organophosphate and carbamate insecticides are relatively nonpersistent and generally present only a moderate hazard to fish when applied according to label recommendations. The USDA Forest Service has been investigating the effectiveness of these two classes of insecticides against the budworm, and the Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been cooperating with the Forest Service conducted pilot control projects in eastern Montana in 1975 and 1976 to determine the efficacy and environmental impact of acephate, carbaryl, and trichlorfon in controlling the western budworm (USDA 1976 b). In 1975, a similar type project was carried out in Maine with aminocarb, fenitrothion, and trichlorfon (USDA 1976 a).Acephate, fenitrothion, and trichlorfon (organophosphate insecticides) and aminocarb and carbaryl (carbamate insecticides) were selected for toxicity tests against cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki), a stonefly (Pteronarcella badia), and a freshwater amphipod (Gammarus pseudolimnaeus) edemic in streams of the northern Rocky Mountains. Populations of cutthroat trout inhabit lakes and streams in the Rocky Mountains which include some of the most pristine habitat and fisheries in North America. Pteronarcella and Gammarus provide forage for cutthroat trout and feed on decaying

  7. Variability of coastal suprabenthic assemblages from sandy beaches of the Caribbean coast of Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Ortega

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The suprabenthos or hyperbenthos is the macrofaunal assemblage of small-sized organisms that interact for some time in the benthic boundary layer. Information about the taxonomic composition and role of suprabenthic species, especially in littoral zones, is scarce and scattered. This work attempts to contribute alleviate this problem. We analyze the temporal and spatial variations of suprabenthic assemblages in the swash-zone from four beaches of the littoral coast of Venezuela. For each beach, two sites were chosen, and special attention was given to water and sediment characteristics. 12 environmental variables were measured: Dissolved oxygen, oxygen saturation percentage, pH, salinity, surface temperature, total, organic and inorganic suspended solids, total organic carbon, organic matter in sediment, grain size of sediment, and amount of dragged material of sample. All faunal samples were taken on a monthly basis during 2011; these were extracted using a manual suprabenthic sledge towed parallel to the shoreline. Samples were sorted and identified to their lowest possible taxonomic level. A total of 24 141 specimens (mean abundance: 26.16±55.35ind./m² belonging to 21 taxonomic groups were identified. Analysis suggests that seasonality does not explain observed changes either in fauna or environmental variables. It was found that suprabenthic assemblages, total suprabenthos density, richness and environmental variables changed in a dissimilar fashion between months and beaches. The most frequent groups were amphipods and decapods; and at the species/categories level post-larval shrimp (Penaeidae, Grapsidae crab megalopae and Arenaeus cribarius megalopae were common. Dissimilarity between months in each beach was primarily explained by the abundance of amphipods, ctenophores, decapods and mysids. For particular months and selected beaches very high abundances of ctenophores were found. This group dominated the sample even though it is not

  8. Estrutura populacional de Hyale media (Dana (Amphipoda, Gammaridea, Hyalidae, habitante dos fitais de Caiobá, Matinhos, Paraná, Brasil Population structure of the seaweed dweller Hyale media (Dana (Amphipoda, Gammaridea, Hyalidae from Caiobá, Matinhos, Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janete Dubiaski-Silva

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of correlation between the total body length and the somites length was carried out in a population of Hyale media (Dana, 1857, in order to know which somite or group of somites has the highest correlation index with the total body length. As the sum of the length of the first to fourth pereonites showed the highest linear correlation index (Y=0.0764+0.2736X; r=0.9723, this meristic parameter was chosen to describe the population structure of the species. The following aspects were treated: distribution of the body size classes in the various phytals, population composition, seasonal fluctuation of population density. relative frequency of the ovigerous females and correlation between the body length and the number of eggs inside the marsupium of the ovigerous females. The amphipods were obtained from the seasonal collections of six phytals from a rocky seashore of Caiobá, Paraná State: Pterosiphonia pennata (Roth Falkenberg. Gymrogongrus griffithsiae (Turner Martius, Pterocladia capillacea (Gmelin Bornet & Thured, Sargassum cymosum Garth, Gelidium sp and Ulva fasciata Delile; they did not occurred in Padina gymnospora (Kútsing Vickers and Porphyra atropurpurea (Olivi De Toni. The air temperature oscillated from 16ºC (winter and autumn to 23ºC (summer, the surface water temperature from 17ºC (winter to 25ºC (summer and the surface water salinity, from 29.3‰ (autumn to 32.8‰ (winter. The density oi Hyale media varied from 0.20 ind.g-1 (in Ulva to 26.37 ind.g-1 (in Pterosiphonia of alga-substratum weigth, and the population was distributed mainly in branched algae. It was determined three size classes in the population, within a range from 0.01 to 2.99mm of pereonits 1-4 length. Small amphipods prefer finely branched algae like Gymnogongrusand Pterosiphonia, whereas broad-thallii or less branched algae such as Sargassum, Pterocladia, Gelidium and Ulva harbour proporcionally high number of large individuais. The life cycle of

  9. Faunal communities at sites of gas- and oil-bearing fluids in Lake Baikal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemskaya, Tamara I.; Sitnikova, Tatiana Y.; Kiyashko, Sergei I.; Kalmychkov, Gennady V.; Pogodaeva, Tatiana V.; Mekhanikova, Irina V.; Naumova, Tatiana V.; Shubenkova, Olga V.; Chernitsina, Svetlana M.; Kotsar, Oleg V.; Chernyaev, Evgeny S.; Khlystov, Oleg M.

    2012-12-01

    Macro- and meiofaunal communities were examined at four geomorphologically distinct sites with different gas- and oil-bearing fluid characteristics in the northern, central and southern basins of Lake Baikal. All sites had elevated concentrations of bicarbonate, nitrate, sulphate and chloride ions in pore fluids, with highest values at the Frolikha vent. Elevated levels of iron ions were found in pore waters of the St. Petersburg methane seep and the Gorevoy Utes oil seep. The chemical composition of pore waters at the Malenky mud volcano was similar to that reported in earlier work. Consistent with published data, the Frolikha vent (northern basin) and the St. Petersburg methane seep (central basin) were characterised by methane of mixed genesis (thermogenic + biogenic), whereas the methane source was mainly thermogenic at the Gorevoy Utes oil seep (central basin) and biogenic at the Malenky mud volcano (southern basin). In contrast to marine seep ecosystems, the macrofauna was dominated only by amphipods, giant planarians and oligochaetes, whereas bivalves were absent; the meiofauna was similar to its marine counterpart, being dominated by nematodes, cyclops, harpacticoids and ostracods. A statistically significant positive relationship was revealed between faunal abundance and the availability of bacterial mats on seep sediments. Moreover, ANOVA tests showed significant increases in both meiozoobenthic and macrozoobenthic densities at "hot spot" vent/seep sites relative to discharge-free reference sites. The isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen at various trophic levels of these benthic vent/seep communities was found to differ markedly from that reported by earlier studies for the pelagic and other benthic food webs in Lake Baikal. As in marine seeps, the macrofauna had variable isotopic signatures. Light δ13C and δ15N values suggest the utilization of chemosynthetically fixed and/or methane-derived organic matter. By contrast, the heavy δ13C

  10. Early benthic successional processes at implanted substrates in Barkley Submarine Canyon affected by a permanent oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera De Leo, F.; Smith, C. R.; Levin, L. A.; Fleury, A.; Aguzzi, J.

    2016-02-01

    With the advent of cabled observatories scientists are now able to have a permanent presence in the deep-seafloor, being able to reveal previously unseen faunal behavior as well as to track long-term changes in biodiversity and ecosystem function. The Ocean Networks Canada 800-km loop seafloor observatory array (NEPTUNE) located in the NE Pacific has instruments measuring a variety of environmental variables ranging from temperature, salinity, oxygen, currents, turbidity, fluorescence, etc, at multiple and very high temporal resolution scales. High-definition video cameras also monitor benthic communities in multiple deep-sea habitats, all at some extent influenced by an oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). In the present study, whale-bone and wood substrates are being used to evaluate bathymetric, regional and inter-basin variations in benthic biodiversity and connectivity, as well as interactions between biodiversity and ecosystem function. In May of 2014 three humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) rib sections, one 20x20x10 cm block of Douglas Fir (Pseudotsunga meniziesii), and a 30x30x30 block of authigenic carbonate were placed with the use of an ROV at 890 m depth inside Barkley Canyon. The substrate packages were placed concentrically, 45-cm away from a HD video camera. Five-minute videos were captured at 2-hr intervals. Preliminary data analysis from 8 months of deployment showed very distinct early community succession patterns between the two organic substrates (bones and wood) and the authigenic carbonate. Whalebones and wood showed amphipod (Orchomene obtusa) abundance peaks mostly contained during the first 60 days after deployment; Amphipod peak abundance rapid decline coincides with rapid growth of bacterial mat on whalebone and wood surfaces. Low abundance, species richness and substrate degradation rates are in agreement with a low oxygen environment of the OMZ in the canyon. Despite the early stages of data analysis, this experiment demonstrates how

  11. Assessment of sediment toxicity in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy) using a multi-species set of bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, Marco; Bergamin, Martina; Losso, Chiara; Delaney, Eugenia; Arizzi Novelli, Alessandra; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of a Weight of Evidence (WoE) approach, a set of four toxicity bioassays involving the amphipod Corophium volutator (10 d lethality test on whole sediment), the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (fertilization and embryo toxicity tests on elutriate) and the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (embryo toxicity test on elutriate) was applied to sediments from 10 sampling sites of the Venice Lagoon (Italy). Sediments were collected during three campaigns carried out in May 2004 (spring campaign), October 2004 (autumn campaign) and February 2005 (winter campaign). Toxicity tests were performed on all sediment samples. Sediment grain-size and chemistry were measured during spring and autumn campaigns. This research investigated (i) the ability of toxicity tests in discriminating among sites with different contamination level, (ii) the occurrence of a gradient of effect among sampling sites, (iii) the possible correlation among toxicity tests, sediment chemistry, grain size and organic carbon, and (iv) the possible occurrence of toxicity seasonal variability. Sediment contamination levels were from low to moderate. No acute toxicity toward amphipods was observed, while sea urchin fertilization was affected only in few sites in just a single campaign. Short-term effects on larval development of sea urchin and oyster evidenced a clear spatial trend among sites, with increasing effects along the axis connecting the sea-inlets with the industrial area. The set of bioassays allowed the identification of a spatial gradient of effect, with decreasing toxicity from the industrial area toward the sea-inlets. Multivariate data analysis showed that the malformations of oyster embryos were significantly correlated to the industrial contamination (metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, hexachlorobenzene and polychlorinated biphenyls), while sea urchin development to sediment concentrations of As, Cr and organic carbon. Both embryo toxicity tests were

  12. Testing lagoonal sediments with early life stages of the copepod Acartia tonsa (Dana): An approach to assess sediment toxicity in the Venice Lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, Marco; Bergamin, Martina; Delaney, Eugenia; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2018-01-01

    The early-life stages of development of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa from egg to copepodite I is proposed as an endpoint for assessing sediment toxicity by exposing newly released eggs directly onto the sediment-water interface. A preliminary study of 5 sediment samples collected in the lagoon of Venice highlighted that the larval development rate (LDR) and the early-life stages (ELS) mortality endpoints with A. tonsa are more sensitive than the standard amphipod mortality test; moreover LDR resulted in a more reliable endpoint than ELS mortality, due to the interference of the sediment with the recovery of unhatched eggs and dead larvae. The LDR data collected in a definitive study of 48 sediment samples from the Venice Lagoon has been analysed together with the preliminary data to evaluate the statistical performances of the bioassay (among replicate variance and minimum significant difference between samples and control) and to investigate the possible correlation with sediment chemistry and physical properties. The results showed that statistical performances of the LDR test with A. tonsa correspond with the outcomes of other tests applied to the sediment-water interface (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryotoxicity test), sediments (Neanthes arenaceodentata survival and growth test) and porewater (S. purpuratus); the LDR endpoint did, however, show a slightly higher variance as compared with other tests used in the Lagoon of Venice, such as 10-d amphipod lethality test and larval development with sea urchin and bivalves embryos. Sediment toxicity data highlighted the high sensitivity and the clear ability of the larval development to discriminate among sediments characterized by different levels of contamination. The data of the definitive study evidenced that inhibition of the larval development was not affected by grain-size and the organic carbon content of the sediment; in contrast, a strong correlation between inhibition of the larval development

  13. Trophodynamics of the Hanna Shoal Ecosystem (Chukchi Sea, Alaska): Connecting multiple end-members to a rich food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTigue, N. D.; Dunton, K. H.

    2017-10-01

    Predicting how alterations in sea ice-mediated primary production will impact Arctic food webs remains a challenge in forecasting ecological responses to climate change. One top-down approach to this challenge is to elucidate trophic roles of consumers as either specialists (i.e., consumers of predominantly one food resource) or generalists (i.e., consumers of multiple food resources) to categorize the dependence of consumers on each primary producer. At Hanna Shoal in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska, we used stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data to quantify trophic redundancy with standard ellipse areas at both the species and trophic guild levels. We also investigated species-level trophic plasticity by analyzing the varying extents that three end-members were assimilated by the food web using the mixing model simmr (Stable Isotope Mixing Model in R). Our results showed that ice algae, a combined phytoplankton and sediment organic matter composite (PSOM), and a hypothesized microphytobenthos (MPB) component were incorporated by consumers in the benthic food web, but their importance varied by species. Some primary consumers relied heavily on PSOM (e.g, the amphipods Ampelisca sp. and Byblis sp.; the copepod Calanus sp.), while others exhibited generalist feeding and obtained nutrition from multiple sources (e.g., the holothuroidean Ocnus glacialis, the gastropod Tachyrhynchus sp., the sipunculid Golfingia margaritacea, and the bivalves Ennucula tenuis, Nuculana pernula, Macoma sp., and Yoldia hyperborea). Most higher trophic level benthic predators, including the gastropods Buccinum sp., Cryptonatica affinis, and Neptunea sp, the seastar Leptasterias groenlandica, and the amphipod Anonyx sp. also exhibited trophic plasticity by coupling energy pathways from multiple primary producers including PSOM, ice algae, and MPB. Our stable isotope data indicate that consumers in the Hanna Shoal food web exhibit considerable trophic redundancy, while few species were specialists

  14. Effects of temperature changes on groundwater ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebler, Christian; Kellermann, Claudia; Schreglmann, Kathrin; Lueders, Tillmann; Brielmann, Heike; Schmidt, Susanne; Kuntz, David; Walker-Hertkorn, Simone

    2014-05-01

    between 17 and 23°C for selected groundwater amphipodes and 18°C for the isopode Proasellus cavaticus. Extended incubation times dramatically reduced the respective LT50 values way below 20°C for amphipodes and 16°C for the isopode, respectively. Our findings clearly point at an urgent need for further ecological studies with respect to the ecological consequences of geothermal energy use. To avoid the deterioration of groundwater quality and important ecosystem services we propose the development of integrative management concepts for subterranean energy use in the future.

  15. Direct and indirect toxicity of the fungicide pyraclostrobin to Hyalella azteca and effects on leaf processing under realistic daily temperature regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willming, Morgan M.; Maul, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Fungicides in aquatic environments can impact non-target bacterial and fungal communities and the invertebrate detritivores responsible for the decomposition of allochthonous organic matter. Additionally, in some aquatic systems daily water temperature fluctuations may influence these processes and alter contaminant toxicity, but such temperature fluctuations are rarely examined in conjunction with contaminants. In this study, the shredding amphipod Hyalella azteca was exposed to the fungicide pyraclostrobin in three experiments. Endpoints included mortality, organism growth, and leaf processing. One experiment was conducted at a constant temperature (23 °C), a fluctuating temperature regime (18–25 °C) based on field-collected data from the S. Llano River, Texas, or an adjusted fluctuating temperature regime (20–26 °C) based on possible climate change predictions. Pyraclostrobin significantly reduced leaf shredding and increased H. azteca mortality at concentrations of 40 μg/L or greater at a constant 23 °C and decreased leaf shredding at concentrations of 15 μg/L or greater in the fluctuating temperatures. There was a significant interaction between temperature treatment and pyraclostrobin concentration on H. azteca mortality, body length, and dry mass under direct aqueous exposure conditions. In an indirect exposure scenario in which only leaf material was exposed to pyraclostrobin, H. azteca did not preferentially feed on or avoid treated leaf disks compared to controls. This study describes the influence of realistic temperature variation on fungicide toxicity to shredding invertebrates, which is important for understanding how future alterations in daily temperature regimes due to climate change may influence the assessment of ecological risk of contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. - Highlights: • Pyraclostrobin was directly toxic to Hyalella azteca and reduced leaf processing. • Indirect exposure via leaf material did not change H

  16. Habitat structure and zonation patterns of northwestern Mediterranean shoreline strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Mariani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the habitat structure (macrofaunal assemblages and bottom types and zonation patterns of 29 unvegetated shoreline strands along the 900-km coast of Catalonia (NW Mediterranean Sea. Organisms were sampled with grabs, pitfall traps, sticky traps, clam nets and spades to ensure capture of the different proportions of macrofaunal assemblages from the supra-, medio- and infralittoral levels. We collected 211 taxa: 194 animals and 17 algae. The most abundant and dominant organisms collected with van Veen grabs were Nematoda, Oligochaeta and Collembola at the supralittoral level; the polychaetes Saccocirrus spp. and Pisione remota, the amphipod Corophium orientale, Nematoda, and Turbellaria at the mediolittoral level; and Nematoda at the upper infralittoral level. SIMPER analysis revealed great dissimilarity between the organisms inhabiting the supralittoral and the other littoral levels. Regarding the epifauna, the sticky traps used at the supralittoral level mainly collected Collembola, which were nearly absent in pitfall traps. The qualitative study performed with a clam net and a small spade revealed that Nematoda, Saccocirrus spp., Turbellaria, Nemertea and the polychaete P. remota were the most abundant animals at both the medio- and the infralittoral levels and no differences were found between these levels. Different qualitative sampling methodologies showed that in fine sediments the bivalves Donax trunculus and D. semistriatus determined more than 97% of dissimilarity from coarse-sand sites. Richness increased in protected sandy and cobble shores. Littoral level and bottom-type features were only to a certain extent valid indicators of specific biotic components for a specific habitat.

  17. Lake whitefish and Diporeia spp. in the Great lakes: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalepa, Thomas F.; Mohr, Lloyd C.; Henderson, Bryan A.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Schneeberger, Philip J.

    2005-01-01

    Because of growing concern in the Great Lakes over declines in abundance and growth of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) and declines in abundance of the benthic amphipod Diporeia spp., a workshop was held to examine past and current trends, to explore trophic links, and to discuss the latest research results and needs. The workshop was divided into sessions on the status of populations in each of the lakes, bioenergetics and trophic dynamics, and exploitation and management. Abundance, growth, and condition of whitefish populations in Lakes Superior and Erie are stable and within the range of historical means, but these variables are declining in Lakes Michigan and Ontario and parts of Lake Huron. The loss of Diporeia spp., a major food item of whitefish, has been a factor in observed declines, particularly in Lake Ontario, but density-dependent factors also likely played a role in Lakes Michigan and Huron. The loss of Diporeia spp. is temporally linked to the introduction and proliferation of dreissenid mussels, but a direct cause for the negative response of Diporeia spp. has not been established. Given changes in whitefish populations, age-structured models need to be re-evaluated. Other whitefish research needs to include a better understanding of what environmental conditions lead to strong year-classes, improved aging techniques, and better information on individual population (stock) structure. Further collaborations between assessment biologists and researchers studying the lower food web would enhance an understanding of links between trophic levels.

  18. The offshore benthic fish community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantry, Brian F.; Lantry, Jana R.; Weidel, Brian C.; Walsh, Maureen; Hoyle, James A.; Schaner, Teodore; Neave, Fraser B.; Keir, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Lake Ontario’s offshore benthic fish community includes primarily slimy sculpin, lake whitefish, rainbow smelt, lake trout, burbot, and sea lamprey. Of these, lake trout have been the focus of an international restoration effort for more than three decades (Elrod et al. 1995; Lantry and Lantry 2008). The deepwater sculpin and three species of deepwater ciscoes (Coregonus spp.) that were historically important in the offshore benthic zone became rare or were extirpated by the 1960s (Christie 1973; Owens et al. 2003; Lantry et al. 2007b; Roth et al. 2013). Ecosystem changes continue to influence the offshore benthic fish community, including the effects of dreissenid mussels, the near disappearance of burrowing amphipods (Diporeia spp.) (Dermott et al. 2005; Watkins et al. 2007), and the increased abundance and expanded geographic distribution of round goby (see Nearshore Fish Community chapter) (Lantry et al. 2007b). The fish-community objectives for the offshore benthic fish community, as described by Stewart et al. (1999), are:

  19. Temporal and spatial trends in sediment contaminants associated with toxicity in California watersheds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegler, Katie; Phillips, Bryn M.; Anderson, Brian S.; Voorhees, Jennifer P.; Tjeerdema, Ron S.

    2015-01-01

    California's Stream Pollution Trends program (SPoT) assesses long-term water quality trends, using 100 base-of-the-watershed sampling sites. Annual statewide sediment surveys from 2008 to 2012 identified consistent levels of statewide toxicity (19%), using the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. Significant contaminant trends included a decrease in PCBs, stable concentrations of metals and PAHs, and a statewide increase in detections and concentrations of pyrethroid pesticides. The pyrethroid pesticide bifenthrin was detected in 69% of samples (n = 410). Detection of toxicity increased in a subset of samples tested at a more environmentally relevant test temperature (15 °C), and the magnitude of toxicity was much greater, indicating pyrethroid pesticides as a probable cause. Pyrethroid toxicity thresholds (LC50) were exceeded in 83% of samples with high toxicity. Principal components analysis related pyrethroids, metals and total organic carbon to urban land use. - Highlights: • Toxicity and contaminant concentrations were higher in urban dominated watersheds. • Average and range of total pyrethroid concentrations increased between 2008 and 2012. • Pyrethroid toxicity thresholds (LC50) were exceeded in 83% of samples with high toxicity. - Detections and concentrations of current use pesticides are increasing in California urban watersheds, while legacy organochlorine contaminants are decreasing statewide.

  20. Trophic Groups Of Demersal Fish Of Santos Bay And Adjacent Continental Shelf, São Paulo State, Brazil: Temporal And Spatial Comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeti Y. Muto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The temporal and spatial variations of feeding habits and trophic groups of demersal fish species of Santos Bay and the adjacent continental shelf were investigated. The samples were taken in September 2005 and March 2006 by bottom otter trawling. The stomach content analysis of 2,328 specimens of 49 species showed most fish fed on a large range of food items but relied heavily on shrimp, crabs/swimming-crabs, amphipods, mysids, polychaetes, ophiuroids, squids, and teleosteans. The species were classified into ten trophic groups. Shrimp were an important food source in the Santos bay and inner shelf, while ophiuroids were important prey for predators of the middle shelf. Many species relied on crabs/swimming-crabs during the summer, especially on the middle shelf. The spatial and temporal variability in food resource utilization by fish were related to the pattern of distribution and abundance of their prey. The predation on shrimp and crabs/swimming-crabs seems to be related to the water mass dynamics of the region. Intraspecific comparisons demonstrated that most of the species display spatial and/or temporal variation in their diet. The demersal ichtyofauna can also be divided into the more general categories of piscivores, nektonic invertebrate feeders, benthic invertebrate feeders and planktonic invertebrate feeders.

  1. Bioaccumulation of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) in selected species from the Barents Sea food web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukas, Marianne; Berger, Urs; Hop, Haakon; Gulliksen, Bjorn; Gabrielsen, Geir W.

    2007-01-01

    The present study reports concentrations and biomagnification potential of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) in species from the Barents Sea food web. The examined species included sea ice amphipod (Gammarus wilkitzkii), polar cod (Boreogadus saida), black guillemot (Cepphus grylle) and glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus). These were analyzed for PFAS, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was the predominant of the detected PFAS. Trophic levels and food web transfer of PFAS were determined using stable nitrogen isotopes (δ 15 N). No correlation was found between PFOS concentrations and trophic level within species. However, a non-linear relationship was established when the entire food web was analyzed. Biomagnification factors displayed values >1 for perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), PFOS and ΣPFAS(7). Multivariate analyses showed that the degree of trophic transfer of PFAS is similar to that of PCB, DDT and PBDE, despite their accumulation through different pathways. - The first comprehensive survey of fluoroorganic contamination in an European Arctic marine food web

  2. Response of intertidal sandy-beach macrofauna to human trampling: An urban vs. natural beach system approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Martínez, Ma José; Ruíz-Delgado, Ma Carmen; Sánchez-Moyano, Juan Emilio; García-García, Francisco José

    2015-02-01

    Sandy beaches are subjected to intense stressors, which are mainly derived from the increasing pattern of beach urbanization. These ecosystems are also a magnet for tourists, who prefer these locations as leisure and holiday destinations, and such activity further increases the factors that have an adverse effect on beaches. In the study reported here the effect of human trampling on macrofauna assemblages that inhabit intertidal areas of sandy beaches was assessed using a BACI design. For this purpose, three contrasting sectors of the same beach were investigated: an urban area with a high level of visitors, a protected sector with a low density of users, and a transitional area with a high level of human occupancy. The physical variables were constant over time in each sector, whereas differences were found in the intensity of human use between sectors. Density variations and changes in the taxonomic structure of the macrofauna with time were shown by PERMANOVA analysis in the urban and transitional locations whereas the protected sector remained constant throughout the study period. The amphipod Bathyporeia pelagica appears sensitive to human trampling pressure and the use of this species as a bioindicator for these types of impact is recommended. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Predation of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) by freshwater drum in western Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, John R. P.; Bur, Michael T.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Schloesser, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    Environmental and economic problems associated with the colonization of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) in western Lake Erie created a need to investigate control mechanisms. Predation by fishes is one potential means of control, but predation on zebra mussels by native fishes in Lake Erie is unknown. The freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) is the most likely fish predator since it is the only fish with pharyngeal teeth capable of crushing mollusk shells. In 1990, freshwater drum were collected in western Lake Erie from 9 sites near rocky reefs and 13 sites with silt or sand bottoms, and gut contents were examined. Predation on zebra mussels increased as drum size increased. Small drum (200-249 mm in length) fed mainly on dipterans, amphipods, and small fish; small zebra mussels (375 mm in length) fed almost exclusively on zebra mussels (seasons and locations combined). The smallest drum capable of crushing zebra mussel shells was 265 mm. Since freshwater drum over 375 mm feed heavily on zebra mussels, they may become a possible biological control mechanism for mussels in portions of North America.

  4. Comparison of test specific sediment effect concentrations with marine sediment quality assessment guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M.; MacDonald, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    As part of NOAA's National Status and Trends (NS and T) Bioeffects Assessment program and studies conducted by the National Biological Service, numerous sediment quality assessment surveys have recently been conducted along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the US using the sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development tests with pore water. Additional toxicity tests were also conducted in conjunction with most of these studies. The areas that have been sampled include Boston harbor, Massachusetts; Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, and Savannah River, South Carolina; St. Simon Sound, Georgia; Biscayne Bay, Tampa Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Apalachicola Bay, St. Andrew Bay, and Pensacola Bay, Florida; Galveston Bay, Lavaca Bay, and Sabine Lake, Texas, and 200 stations in the vicinity of offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. Sufficient data are now available from this series of surveys to calculate test specific sediment effect concentrations (SECs). Based on these recent studies, SECs were developed for the sea urchin porewater and amphipod tests and compared with existing marine sediment quality assessment guidelines

  5. CTD, nephelometry and currentmeter measurements at the N.E.A. dumpsite during the 1984 Epicea cruise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vangriesheim, A.

    1989-01-01

    In May of 1984, an EPICEA cruise to the N.E.A. dumpsite was conducted aboard the french research vessel LE SUROIT. The site work was jointly sponsored by IFREMER and CEA and followed IFREMER studies over Meriadzek Terrace. The main purposes of this joint cruise included first an exploration of a part of the site with the IFREMER unmanned submersible EPAULARD, including bottom photographs. Biological measurements included baited cameras, fish and amphipod traps, radioactive baited traps and one-year mooring of a bottom-mounted autonomous colonisation module (the M.A.C.). Geological measurements were made with a 3.5 Khz echo sounder. Radiochemistry included water samples. Physical oceanography included a CTD equipped with a nephelometer. Five CTD vertical profiles to the bottom were made over the dumpsite, 4 of them in the area previously covered by the SEABEAM and 1 outside of that to the East. At the end of the cruise, a M.A.C. was equipped with a currentmeter at 10 meters above the bottom, and moored for one year. The results of the CTD, nephelometry and current measurements are presented

  6. On the myths of indicator species: issues and further consideration in the use of static concepts for ecological applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Zettler

    Full Text Available The use of static indicator species, in which species are expected to have a similar sensitivity or tolerance to either natural or human-induced stressors, does not account for possible shifts in tolerance along natural environmental gradients and between biogeographic regions. Their indicative value may therefore be considered at least questionable. In this paper we demonstrate how species responses (i.e. abundance to changes in sediment grain size and organic matter (OM alter along a salinity gradient and conclude with a plea for prudency when interpreting static indicator-based quality indices. Six model species (three polychaetes, one amphipod and two bivalves from the North Sea, Baltic Sea and the Mediterranean Sea region were selected. Our study demonstrated that there were no generic relationships between environment and biota and half of the studied species showed different responses in different seas. Consequently, the following points have to be carefully considered when applying static indicator-based quality indices: (1 species tolerances and preferences may change along environmental gradients and between different biogeographic regions, (2 as environment modifies species autecology, there is a need to adjust indicator species lists along major environmental gradients and (3 there is a risk of including sibling or cryptic species in calculating the index value of a species.

  7. Declining soil Crustacea in a World Heritage Site caused by land nemertean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinobe, Shotaro; Uchida, Shota; Mori, Hideaki; Okochi, Isamu; Chiba, Satoshi

    2017-09-29

    Invasive non-native species are of great concern throughout the world. Potential severity of the impacts of non-native species is assessed for effective conservation managements. However, such risk assessment is often difficult, and underestimating possible harm can cause substantial issues. Here, we document catastrophic decline of a soil ecosystem in the Ogasawara Islands, a UNESCO World Heritage site, due to predation by non-native land nemertine Geonemertes pelaensis of which harm has been previously unnoticed. This nemertine is widely distributed in tropical regions, and no study has shown that it feeds on arthropods. However, we experimentally confirmed that G. pelaensis predates various arthropod groups. Soil fauna of Ogasawara was originally dominated by isopods and amphipods, but our surveys in the southern parts of Hahajima Island showed that these became extremely scarce in the areas invaded by G. pelaensis. Carnivorous arthropods decreased by indirect effects of its predation. Radical decline of soil arthropods since the 1980s on Chichijima Island was also caused by G. pelaensis and was first recorded in 1981. Thus, the soil ecosystem was already seriously damaged in Ogasawara by the nemertine. The present findings raise an issue and limitation in recognizing threats of non-native species.

  8. Biologically-Oriented Processes in the Coastal Sea Ice Zone of the White Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, I. A.

    2002-12-01

    The annual advance and retreat of sea ice is a major physical determinant of spatial and temporal changes in the structure and function of marine coastal biological communities. Sea ice biological data obtained in the tidal zone of Kandalaksha Gulf (White Sea) during 1996-2001 period will be presented. Previous observations in this area were mainly conducted during the ice-free summer season. However, there is little information on the ice-covered winter season (6-7 months duration), and, especially, on the sea-ice biology in the coastal zone within tidal regimes. During the January-May period time-series observations were conducted on transects along shorelines with coastal and fast ice. Trends in the annual extent of sea ice showed significant impacts on ice-associated biological communities. Three types of sea ice impact on kelps, balanoides, littorinas and amphipods are distinguished: (i) positive, when sea ice protects these populations from grinding (ii) negative, when ice grinds both fauna and flora, and (iii) a combined effect, when fast ice protects, but anchored ice grinds plant and animals. To understand the full spectrum of ecological problems caused by pollution on the coastal zone, as well as the problems of sea ice melting caused by global warming, an integrated, long-term study of the physical, chemical, and biological processes is needed.

  9. Temporal variability in epifaunal assemblages associated with temperate gorgonian gardens

    KAUST Repository

    Dias, I.M.; Curdia, Joao; Cunha, M.R.; Santos, M.N.; Carvalho, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The present study is one of the few that investigate the temporal variability of epifaunal assemblages associated with coral species, particularly the octocorals Eunicella gazella and Leptogorgia lusitanica in south Portugal. The results suggest time rather than colony size as a primary driver of the ecological patterns of these assemblages, which were dominated by amphipods, molluscs and polychaetes. Temporal variability was linked to changes in environmental parameters, namely temperature, chlorophyll a and particulate organic carbon. Hence, temporal variability must be taken into account for the design of future biodiversity assessment studies, as different patterns may be observed depending on the sampling time. Associated epifaunal assemblages were consistently dominated by resident species (i.e. species present in all sampling periods) and a peak of rare species was observed in the transition from spring to summer following the increase of seawater temperature. Turnover was particularly high in the transition between the spring and summer periods. In both hosts, turnover was higher in the small sized colonies, which generally harboured less diverse and less abundant assemblages which also differed from those inhabiting larger size colonies. The high levels of diversity associated with gorgonian colonies highlights the need for the conservation of this priority habitat.

  10. Identifying primary stressors impacting macroinvertebrates in the Salinas River (California, USA): Relative effects of pesticides and suspended particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.S.; Phillips, B.M.; Hunt, J.W.; Connor, V.; Richard, N.; Tjeerdema, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory dose-response experiments with organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides, and dose-response experiments with increasing particle loads were used to determine which of these stressors were likely responsible for the toxicity and macroinvertebrate impacts previously observed in the Salinas River. Experiments were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the baetid mayfly Procloeon sp., and the midge Chironomus dilutus (Shobanov, formerly Chironomus tentans). The results indicate the primary stressor impacting H. azteca was pesticides, including chlorpyrifos and permethrin. The mayfly Procloeon sp. was sensitive to chlorpyrifos and permethrin within the range of concentrations of these pesticides measured in the river. Chironomus dilutus were sensitive to chlorpyrifos within the ranges of concentrations measured in the river. None of the species tested were affected by turbidity as high as 1000 NTUs. The current study shows that pesticides are more important acute stressors of macroinvertebrates than suspended sediments in the Salinas River. - Pesticides are the primary stressor impacting macroinvertebrates in sections of the lower Salinas River

  11. Identifying primary stressors impacting macroinvertebrates in the Salinas River (California, USA): Relative effects of pesticides and suspended particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, B.S. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)]. E-mail: anderson@ucdavis.edu; Phillips, B.M. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hunt, J.W. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Connor, V. [Division of Water Quality, State Water Resources Control Board, 1001 I. Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 (United States); Richard, N. [Division of Water Quality, State Water Resources Control Board, 1001 I. Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 (United States); Tjeerdema, R.S. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Laboratory dose-response experiments with organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides, and dose-response experiments with increasing particle loads were used to determine which of these stressors were likely responsible for the toxicity and macroinvertebrate impacts previously observed in the Salinas River. Experiments were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the baetid mayfly Procloeon sp., and the midge Chironomus dilutus (Shobanov, formerly Chironomus tentans). The results indicate the primary stressor impacting H. azteca was pesticides, including chlorpyrifos and permethrin. The mayfly Procloeon sp. was sensitive to chlorpyrifos and permethrin within the range of concentrations of these pesticides measured in the river. Chironomus dilutus were sensitive to chlorpyrifos within the ranges of concentrations measured in the river. None of the species tested were affected by turbidity as high as 1000 NTUs. The current study shows that pesticides are more important acute stressors of macroinvertebrates than suspended sediments in the Salinas River. - Pesticides are the primary stressor impacting macroinvertebrates in sections of the lower Salinas River.

  12. Use of toxicity identification evaluations to determine the pesticide mitigation effectiveness of on-farm vegetated treatment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, John [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Department of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Marine Pollution Studies Laboratory, Granite Canyon, 34500 Highway 1, Monterey, CA 93940 (United States)], E-mail: jwhunt@ucdavis.edu; Anderson, Brian [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Marine Pollution Studies Laboratory, Granite Canyon, 34500 Highway 1, Monterey, CA 93940 (United States)], E-mail: anderson@ucdavis.edu; Phillips, Bryn [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Marine Pollution Studies Laboratory, Granite Canyon, 34500 Highway 1, Monterey, CA 93940 (United States)], E-mail: bmphillips@ucdavis.edu; Tjeerdema, Ron [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Marine Pollution Studies Laboratory, Granite Canyon, 34500 Highway 1, Monterey, CA 93940 (United States)], E-mail: rstjeerdema@ucdavis.edu; Largay, Bryan [Largay Hydrologic Sciences, LLC, 160 Farmer Street Felton, CA 95018-9416 (United States)], E-mail: bryan.largay@sbcglobal.net; Beretti, Melanie [Resources Conservation District of Monterey County, 744-A La Guardia Street, Salinas, CA 93905 (United States)], E-mail: beretti.melanie@rcdmonterey.org; Bern, Amanda [California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Central Coast Region, 895 Aerovista Place, Suite 101, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 (United States)], E-mail: abern@waterboards.ca.gov

    2008-11-15

    Evidence of ecological impacts from pesticide runoff has prompted installation of vegetated treatment systems (VTS) along the central coast of California, USA. During five surveys of two on-farm VTS ponds, 88% of inlet and outlet water samples were toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia. Toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs) indicated water toxicity was caused by diazinon at VTS-1, and chlorpyrifos at VTS-2. Diazinon levels in VTS-1 were variable, but high pulse inflow concentrations were reduced through dilution. At VTS-2, chlorpyrifos concentrations averaged 52% lower at the VTS outlet than at the inlet. Water concentrations of most other pesticides averaged 20-90% lower at VTS outlets. All VTS sediment samples were toxic to amphipods (Hyalella azteca). Sediment TIEs indicated toxicity was caused by cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin at VTS-1, and chlorpyrifos and permethrin at VTS-2. As with water, sediment concentrations were lower at VTS outlets, indicating substantial reductions in farm runoff pesticide concentrations. - Toxicity identification evaluations identified key pesticides in agricultural runoff, and their concentrations were reduced by farmer-installed vegetated treatment systems.

  13. The effects of different oil spill cleanup technologies on body burden and biomarkers in Arctic marine organisms - a laboratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faksness, Liv-Guri; Hansen, Bjorn Henrik; Nordtug, Trond [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry (Norway)], email: livgurif@sintef.no; Borseth, Jan Fredrik; Baussant, Thierry; Tandberg, Anne Helene S.; Ingvarsdottir, Anna; Aarab, Nadia [IRIS Biomiljo (Norway); Altin, Dag [Altins BioTrix (Norway)

    2011-07-01

    This paper studies the effects and toxicity of a water soluble fraction (WSF) of oil versus chemically dispersed oil and also of WSF versus the underlying water after in situ burning (ISB). The applications of exposure concentrations were based on monitoring of WSF in the water column during an offshore field experiment. A continuous flow-through system for the dispersant experiments was set up and an Arctic amphipod was used as the test species. Seawater and gammarids were also used as samples for chemical and biological analyses. Good correlation with the data was presented by chemical analysis of the water samples. However, more PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) were measured in the gammarids exposed to oil mixed with dispersant than in those exposed to oil alone. On the other hand, a system was developed to allow water sampling after ISB and samples of seawater and of oil prior to, and immediately after, ISB were collected and a chemical analysis was conducted. The result of the analysis was that there was no increase in toxicity in the underlying water after ISB.

  14. A comparison of sediment toxicity test methods at three Great Lake Areas of Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, G. Allen; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Burnett, LouAnn C.; Henry, Mary; Hinman, Mark L.; Klaine, Stephen J.; Landrum, Peter F.; Ross, Phillipe; Tuchman, Marc

    1996-01-01

    The significance of sediment contamination is often evaluated using sediment toxicity (bioassay) testing. There are relatively few “standardized” test methods for evaluating sediments. Popular sediment toxicity methods examine the extractable water (elutriate), interstitial water, or whole (bulk) sediment phases using test species spanning the aquatic food chain from bacteria to fish. The current study was designed to evaluate which toxicity tests were most useful in evaluations of sediment contamination at three Great Lake Areas of Concern. Responses of 24 different organisms including fish, mayflies, amphipods, midges, cladocerans, rotifers, macrophytes, algae, and bacteria were compared using whole sediment or elutriate toxicity assays. Sediments from several sites in the Buffalo River, Calumet River (Indiana Harbor), and Saginaw River were tested, as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS) Project. Results indicated several assays to be sensitive to sediment toxicity and able to discriminate between differing levels of toxicity. Many of the assay responses were significantly correlated to other toxicity responses and were similar based on factor analysis. For most applications, a test design consisting of two to three assays should adequately detect sediment toxicity, consisting of various groupings of the following species: Hyalella azteca, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Chironomus riparius, Chironomus tentans, Daphnia magna, Pimephales promelas, Hexagenia bilineata, Diporeia sp., Hydrilla verticillata, or Lemna minor.

  15. Food habits of Arctic staghorn sculpin (Gymnocanthus tricuspis) and shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) in the northeastern Chukchi and western Beaufort Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Benjamin P.; Norcross, Brenda L.; Beaudreau, Anne H.; Blanchard, Arny L.; Seitz, Andrew C.

    2017-01-01

    Arctic staghorn sculpin (Gymnocanthus tricuspis) and shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) belong to Cottidae, the second most abundant fish family in the western Arctic. Although considered important in food webs, little is known about their food habits throughout this region. To address this knowledge gap, we examined and compared the diets of 515 Arctic staghorn sculpin and 422 shorthorn sculpin using stomachs collected over three summers in the northeastern Chukchi Sea (2010-2012) and one summer in the western Beaufort Sea (2011). We used permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) to compare sculpin diets between regions and selected size classes. Differences in mouth morphologies and predator size versus prey size relationships were examined using regression techniques. Arctic staghorn sculpin and shorthorn sculpin diet compositions differed greatly throughout the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Regardless of body size, the smaller-mouthed Arctic staghorn sculpin consumed mostly benthic amphipods and polychaetes, whereas the larger-mouthed shorthorn sculpin shifted from a diet composed of benthic and pelagic macroinvertebrates as smaller individuals to shrimps and fish prey as larger individuals. Within shared habitats, the sculpins appear to partition prey, either by taxa or size, in a manner that suggests no substantial overlap occurs between species. This study increases knowledge of sculpin feeding ecology in the western Arctic and offers regional, quantitative diet information that could support current and future food web modeling efforts.

  16. Feeding Relationships among Six Seagrass-associated Fishes in the Northeastern Gwangyang Bay, Southern Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo Myun; Kwak, Seok Nam; Han, In-Seong

    2018-03-01

    We conducted dietary analyses of six seagrass-associated fish species inhabiting northeastern Gwangyang Bay, Korea. These six species consumed a variety of benthic invertebrates and teleosts, but their preferences for different food resources varied. Although all species consumed crustaceans, the contributions of different crustacean taxa differed among the species' diets. Caridean shrimps and crabs were a significant part of the Hexagrammos agrammus and H. otakii diets, respectively, while amphipods were consumed mainly by Sebastes inermis. Caridean shrimps and prawns were abundant within the Lateolabrax japonicas diet, but were not common prey resources for Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae or S. schlegelii. Polychaetes and ophiurids were ingested by P. yokohamae, and the former prey taxon also made moderate contributions to the diets of H. agrammus and L. japonicus. With the exception of P. yokohamae, the diets of all species included teleosts. Teleosts contributed the largest proportion of the S. schlegelii diet, followed by the S. inermis and L. japonicas diets; however, H. agrammus and H. otakii rarely consumed teleosts. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) ordination plots and permutational analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) revealed the variation in dietary composition among species and the contributions of each prey taxon. These interspecific differences in diet increase the range of food resources available to these fishes, thereby reducing competition for resources within the fish community in this region.

  17. Trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites between aquatic invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco Navarro, V.; Leppänen, M.T.; Kukkonen, J.V.K.; Godoy Olmos, S.

    2013-01-01

    The trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites was studied using Gammarus setosus as a predator and the invertebrates Lumbriculus variegatus and Chironomus riparius as prey. The results obtained by liquid scintillation counting confirmed that the pyrene metabolites produced by the aquatic invertebrates L. variegatus and C. riparius were transferred to G. setosus through the diet. More detailed analyses by liquid chromatography discovered that two of the metabolites produced by C. riparius appeared in the chromatograms of G. setosus tissue extracts, proving their trophic transfer. These metabolites were not present in chromatograms of G. setosus exclusively exposed to pyrene. The present study supports the trophic transfer of PAH metabolites between benthic macroinvertebrates and common species of an arctic amphipod. As some PAH metabolites are more toxic than the parent compounds, the present study raises concerns about the consequences of their trophic transfer and the fate and effects of PAHs in natural environments. - Highlights: ► The trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites between invertebrates was evaluated. ► Biotransformation of pyrene by L. variegatus and C. riparius is different. ► Metabolites produced by L. variegatus and C. riparius are transferred to G. setosus. ► Specifically, two metabolites produced by C. riparius were transferred. - Some of the pyrene metabolites produced by the model invertebrates L. variegatus and C. riparius are transferred to G. setosus through the diet, proving their trophic transfer.

  18. The Hyalella (Crustacea: Amphipoda) species cloud of the ancient Lake Titicaca originated from multiple colonizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowicz, Sarah J; Marinone, María Cristina; Menu-Marque, Silvina; Martin, Jeffrey W; Allen, Daniel C; Pyle, Michelle N; De Los Ríos, Patricio; Sobel, Crystal N; Ibañez, Carla; Pinto, Julio; Witt, Jonathan D S

    2018-08-01

    Ancient lakes are renowned for their exceptional diversity of endemic species. As model systems for the study of sympatric speciation, it is necessary to understand whether a given hypothesized species flock is of monophyletic or polyphyletic origin. Here, we present the first molecular characterization of the Hyalella (Crustacea: Amphipoda) species complex of Lake Titicaca, using COI and 28S DNA sequences, including samples from the connected Small and Large Lakes that comprise Lake Titicaca as well as from a broader survey of southern South American sites. At least five evolutionarily distant lineages are present within Lake Titicaca, which were estimated to have diverged from one another 12-20 MYA. These major lineages are dispersed throughout the broader South American Hyalella phylogeny, with each lineage representing at least one independent colonization of the lake. Moreover, complex genetic relationships are revealed between Lake Titicaca individuals and those from surrounding water bodies, which may be explained by repeated dispersal into and out of the lake, combined with parallel intralacustrine diversification within two separate clades. Although further work in deeper waters will be required to determine the number of species present and modes of diversification, our results strongly indicate that this amphipod species cloud is polyphyletic with a complex geographic history. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nuclear fuel cycle and marine environment. Behavior of the Rhone river effluents in the mediterranean sea and of wastes dumped in the northeast atlantic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charmasson, S.

    1998-01-01

    has been the subject of studies especially as regards the biological compartment. Indeed, the occurrence in abyssal waters of a very motile fauna, i.e. fish (Coryphaenoides armatus) and amphipods (Eurythenes gryllus), able to undertake important vertical migrations into the water column, represents a possible pathway towards the surface for the dumped radionuclides. The ignorance as regards populations inhabiting this site has led to a study of the population structure for the amphipod Eurythenes gryllus. This species is cosmopolite since it is found at all the latitudes in the world ocean both in bathyal and abyssal waters. Well known for its necrophagy and ability to consume baits, it is supposed to feed on carcasses. However, study of a natural radionuclide, i.e. 210 Po, in this species has shown that it is possible that it feeds also on particle fluxes. In order to verify the validity of the data used for the modelling of the radiological assessment of these operations, in situ labelling experiments have been realized on these amphipods as well as on polychaetes from food labelled with radionuclides characterizing the dumped wastes. Though these results are still too few to acknowledge this validity, as expected from studies on coastal species the transfer factors food-organisms are quite low. Analyses carried out for surveillance purposes both on the fish Coryphaenoides armatus and the amphipod Eurythenes gryllus show that in these deep waters the main source of man-made radioactivity is the global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear testing carried out mainly in the sixties. A transfer via the particle fluxes is necessary to explain the concentrations found for 3 H, 137 Cs, 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu. However, 238 Pu/ 239+240 Pu isotopic ratios in some fish samples suggest and influence from the dumped wastes and underline the possible part taken by these necrophagous organisms in the dispersion of radionuclides released form the low and intermediate level

  20. Morphological and ontogenetic stratification of abyssal and hadal Eurythenes gryllus sensu lato (Amphipoda: Lysianassoidea) from the Peru-Chile Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustace, Ryan M.; Ritchie, Heather; Kilgallen, Niamh M.; Piertney, Stuart B.; Jamieson, Alan J.

    2016-03-01

    The globally ubiquitous lysianassoid amphipod, Eurythenes gryllus, has been shown to consist of multiple genetically distinct cryptic taxa, with depth considered a major driver of speciation and morphological divergence. Here we examine morphological variation of E. gryllus sensu lato through a continuous depth distribution that spans from abyssal (3000-6000 m) into hadal depths (>6000 m) in the Peru-Chile Trench (SE Pacific Ocean). Three distinct morphospecies were identified: one was confirmed as being E. magellanicus (4602-5329 m) based on DNA sequence and morphological similarity. The other two morphologically distinct species were named based upon depth of occurrence; Abyssal (4602-6173 m) and Hadal (6173-8074 m). The three Eurythenes morphospecies showed vertical ontogenetic stratification across their bathymetric range, where juveniles were found shallower in their depth range and mature females deeper. Potential ecological and evolutionary drivers that explain the observed patterns of intra and inter-specific structure, such as hydrostatic pressure and topographical isolation, are discussed.

  1. Toxicological evaluation of a lake ecosystem contaminated with crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twigg, D.; Ramey, B.

    1995-01-01

    Winona Lake on the Daniel Boone National Forest in Powell County, Kentucky, was used from the mid 1950's to 1987 as a water source for water-injection oil drilling and as a brine disposal site. The lake was contaminated with excessive amounts of crude oil. A multi phase investigation was conducted, including chemical analysis of water and sediment, water toxicity tests using a cladoceran, Ceriodaphnia dubia, sediment toxicity tests using an amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and a faunal survey of the communities of the lake and stream both above and below the lake. The sediment was laden with petroleum hydrocarbons (4.1 parts per thousand), while the water showed no contamination. The C dubia test results showed no significant water toxicity. The contaminated sediment adjacent to the dam produced 75% mortality in H. azteca. The faunal survey indicated little or no impact on the upstream and downstream communities but the lake community was highly impacted, especially the benthos. Pollution tolerant Chaoborus sp. were the only organisms collected from sediment samples dredged from the lake. Contamination was limited to the sediment within the lake but the impact on the entire lake community was severe

  2. Effects of copper on Gammerus pseudolimneus, Physa integra, and Campeloma decisum in soft water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, J W; Leonard, E N

    1970-01-01

    Three invertebrate species were subjected to acute (96-hr), followed by long-term (6-week) copper exposured under continuous-flow bioassay conditions. Survival, growth, reproduction, and feeding were the responses used for measuring toxicant effects. The average 96-hr median tolerance limits (tlm) values for Campeloma decisum, Physa integra, and Gammarus pseudolimnaeus were 1.7, 0.039, and 0.020 micrograms/liter total copper, respectively. The total copper concentration having no effect after 6 weeks exposure for all three species was between 8.0 and 14.8 micrograms/liter. The newly hatched amphipods obtained from the second 6-week study were exposed to copper for 9 additional weeks, and grew to the adult age only in copper concentrations <4.6 micrograms/liter. After 5 weeks exposure to a water system, survival of newly hatched Gammarus was markedly reduced when copper concentrations were between 12.9 and 6.2 micrograms/liter.

  3. Field and laboratory investigations on the effects of road salt (NaCl) on stream macroinvertebrate communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasius, B.J.; Merritt, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Short-term exposure to road salt did not significantly affect stream macro-invertebrate communities. - Field and laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the effects of road salt (NaCl) on stream macroinvertebrates. Field studies investigated leaf litter processing rates and functional feeding group composition at locations upstream and downstream from point source salt inputs in two Michigan, USA streams. Laboratory studies determined the effects of increasing NaCl concentrations on aquatic invertebrate drift, behavior, and survival. Field studies revealed that leaves were processed faster at upstream reference sites than at locations downstream from road salt point source inputs. However, it was sediment loading that resulted in partial or complete burial of leaf packs, that affected invertebrate activity and confounded normal leaf pack colonization. There were no significant differences that could be attributed to road salt between upstream and downstream locations in the diversity and composition of invertebrate functional feeding groups. Laboratory drift and acute exposure studies demonstrated that drift of Gammarus (Amphipoda) may be affected by NaCl at concentrations greater than 5000 mg/l for a 24-h period. This amphipod and two species of limnephilid caddisflies exhibited a dose response to salt treatments with 96-h LC 50 values of 7700 and 3526 mg NaCl/l, respectively. Most other invertebrate species and individuals were unaffected by NaCl concentrations up to 10,000 mg/l for 24 and 96 h, respectively

  4. Defensive Metabolites from Antarctic Invertebrates: Does Energetic Content Interfere with Feeding Repellence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Pons, Laura; Avila, Conxita

    2014-01-01

    Many bioactive products from benthic invertebrates mediating ecological interactions have proved to reduce predation, but their mechanisms of action, and their molecular identities, are usually unknown. It was suggested, yet scarcely investigated, that nutritional quality interferes with defensive metabolites. This means that antifeedants would be less effective when combined with energetically rich prey, and that higher amounts of defensive compounds would be needed for predator avoidance. We evaluated the effects of five types of repellents obtained from Antarctic invertebrates, in combination with diets of different energetic values. The compounds came from soft corals, ascidians and hexactinellid sponges; they included wax esters, alkaloids, a meroterpenoid, a steroid, and the recently described organic acid, glassponsine. Feeding repellency was tested through preference assays by preparing diets (alginate pearls) combining different energetic content and inorganic material. Experimental diets contained various concentrations of each repellent product, and were offered along with control compound-free pearls, to the Antarctic omnivore amphipod Cheirimedon femoratus. Meridianin alkaloids were the most active repellents, and wax esters were the least active when combined with foods of distinct energetic content. Our data show that levels of repellency vary for each compound, and that they perform differently when mixed with distinct assay foods. The natural products that interacted the most with energetic content were those occurring in nature at higher concentrations. The bioactivity of the remaining metabolites tested was found to depend on a threshold concentration, enough to elicit feeding repellence, independently from nutritional quality. PMID:24962273

  5. Enhanced invertebrate prey production following estuarine restoration supports foraging for multiple species of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Isa; Davis, Melanie; Ellings, Christopher S.; Nakai, Glynnis; Takekawa, John Y.; De La Cruz, Susan

    2018-01-01

    Estuaries provide crucial foraging resources and nursery habitat for threatened populations of anadromous salmon. As such, there has been a global undertaking to restore habitat and tidal processes in modified estuaries. The foraging capacity of these ecosystems to support various species of out-migrating juvenile salmon can be quantified by monitoring benthic, terrestrial, and pelagic invertebrate prey communities. Here, we present notable trends in the availability of invertebrate prey at several sites within a restoring large river delta in Puget Sound, Washington, U.S.A. Three years after the system was returned to tidal influence, we observed substantial additions to amphipod, copepod, and cumacean abundances in newly accessible marsh channels (from 0 to roughly 5,000–75,000 individuals/m2). In the restoration area, terrestrial invertebrate colonization was dependent upon vegetative cover, with dipteran and hymenopteran biomass increasing 3-fold between 1 and 3 years post-restoration. While the overall biodiversity within the restoration area was lower than in the reference marsh, estimated biomass was comparable to or greater than that found within the other study sites. This additional prey biomass likely provided foraging benefits for juvenile Chinook, chum, and coho salmon. Primary physical drivers differed for benthic, terrestrial, and pelagic invertebrates, and these invertebrate communities are expected to respond differentially depending on organic matter exchange and vegetative colonization. Restoring estuaries may take decades to meet certain success criteria, but our study demonstrates rapid enhancements in foraging resources understood to be used for estuary-dependent wildlife.

  6. Epizootiology of the parasitic dinoflagellate Hematodinium sp. in the American blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messick, G A; Shields, J D

    2000-11-14

    Hematodinium sp. is a parasitic dinoflagellate that infects and kills blue crabs Callinectes sapidus. Periodic outbreaks of dinoflagellate infections with subsequent high host mortalities prompted a study of the epizootiology and distribution of the crab pathogen. Hemolymph samples from over 13000 crabs were assessed for infections over 8 yr. Moderate to high prevalences were found at several locations along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. In the coastal bays of Maryland and Virginia, prevalence followed a seasonal pattern, with a sharp peak in late autumn. Infections were significantly more prevalent in crabs measuring less than 30 mm carapace width; host sex did not influence prevalence. Prevalences were highest in crabs collected from salinities of 26 to 30%o; no infected crabs were found in salinities below 11%o. Intensity of infection did not vary among crab sizes, molt stages, or sexes. Naturally and experimentally infected crabs died over 35 and 55 d in captivity, with a mean time to death of approximately 13 and 42 d, respectively. Several other crustaceans, including gammaridean amphipods, xanthid (mud) crabs, and the green crab Carcinus maenus, were found with Hematodinium-like infections. Considering its widespread distribution and high pathogenicity, we suggest that Hematodinium sp. represents a significant threat to blue crab populations in high salinity estuaries along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the USA.

  7. Non-indigenous macroinvertebrate species in Lithuanian fresh waters, Part 2: Macroinvertebrate assemblage deviation from naturalness in lotic systems and the consequent potential impacts on ecological quality assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbačiauskas K.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The biological pressure represented by non-indigenous macroinvertebrate species (NIMS should be addressed in the implementation of EU Water Framework Directive as this can have a direct impact on the ’naturalness’ of the invaded macroinvertebrate assemblage. The biocontamination concept allows assessment of this deviation from naturalness, by evaluation of abundance and disparity contamination of an assemblage. This study aimed to assess the biocontamination of macroinvertebrate assemblages in Lithuanian rivers, thereby revealing the most high-impact non-indigenous species, and to explore the relationship between biocontamination and conventional metrics of ecological quality. Most of the studied rivers appeared to be impacted by NIMS. The amphipods Pontogammarus robustoides, Chelicorophium curvispinum and snail Litoglyphus naticoides were revealed as high-impact NIMS for Lithuanian lotic systems. Metrics of ecological quality which largely depend upon the richness of indicator taxa, such as the biological monitoring working party (BMWP score and Ephemeroptera/Plecoptera/Trichoptera (EPT taxa number, were negatively correlated with biocontamination, implying they could provide unreliable ecological quality estimates when NIMS are present. Routine macroinvertebrate water quality monitoring data are sufficient for generation of the biocontamination assessment and thus can provide supplementary information, with minimal extra expense or effort. We therefore recommend that biocontamination assessment is included alongside established methods for gauging biological and chemical water quality.

  8. The relationship of metals, bifenthrin, physical habitat metrics, grain size, total organic carbon, dissolved oxygen and conductivity to Hyalella sp. abundance in urban California streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lenwood W; Anderson, Ronald D

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between Hyalella sp. abundance in four urban California streams and the following parameters: (1) 8 bulk metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, and Zn) and their associated sediment Threshold Effect Levels (TELs); (2) bifenthrin sediment concentrations; (3) 10 habitat metrics and total score; (4) grain size (% sand, silt and clay); (5) Total Organic Carbon (TOC); (6) dissolved oxygen; and (7) conductivity. California stream data used for this study were collected from Kirker Creek (2006 and 2007), Pleasant Grove Creek (2006, 2007 and 2008), Salinas streams (2009 and 2010) and Arcade Creek (2009 and 2010). Hyalella abundance in the four California streams generally declined when metals concentrations were elevated beyond the TELs. There was also a statistically significant negative relationship between Hyalella abundance and % silt for these 4 California streams as Hyalella were generally not present in silt areas. No statistically significant relationships were reported between Hyalella abundance and metals concentrations, bifenthrin concentrations, habitat metrics, % sand, % clay, TOC, dissolved oxygen and conductivity. The results from this study highlight the complexity of assessing which factors are responsible for determining the abundance of amphipods, such as Hyalella sp., in the natural environment.

  9. Description and proposed life cycle of Maritrema novaezealandensis n. sp. (Microphallidae) parasitic in red-billed gulls, Larus novaehollandiae scopulinus, from Otago Harbor, South Island, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorelli, Sergio R; Fredensborg, Brian L; Mouritsen, Kim N; Poulin, Robert

    2004-04-01

    Maritrema novaezealandensis n. sp. is described from Otago Harbor, South Island, New Zealand, on the basis of adult specimens collected from the Red-billed gull, Larus novaehollandiae scopulinus, and excysted metacercariae obtained from crabs. It belongs to the "eroliae group" and differs from other related species mainly in the shape, size, and patterns of distributions of the spines on the cirrus, the shape of the metraterm, the presence of an unlobed ovary, and the complete ring of the vitelline follicles. Based on morphometric features of metacercariae and adult specimens, the trophic relationships among invertebrate and vertebrate hosts, experimental infections, and previous reports of species of Maritrema with similar transmission patterns, the life cycle of M. novaezealandensis n. sp. is described. A 3-host life cycle is proposed for this parasite. The first intermediate host is the mud snail, Zeacumantus subcarinatus, in which the cercarial stage is produced in sporocysts located within the gonad of the snail. At least 3 crab species (Hemigrapsus crenulatus, Macrophtalmus hirtipes, and Halicarcinus whitei) and several species of amphipods act as second intermediate hosts, with metacercariae encysted in the body cavity of the crustacean host. Finally, the definitive host, the gull, L. n. scopulinus, harbors the adult worms in its intestine.

  10. Defensive Metabolites from Antarctic Invertebrates: Does Energetic Content Interfere with Feeding Repellence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Núñez-Pons

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many bioactive products from benthic invertebrates mediating ecological interactions have proved to reduce predation, but their mechanisms of action, and their molecular identities, are usually unknown. It was suggested, yet scarcely investigated, that nutritional quality interferes with defensive metabolites. This means that antifeedants would be less effective when combined with energetically rich prey, and that higher amounts of defensive compounds would be needed for predator avoidance. We evaluated the effects of five types of repellents obtained from Antarctic invertebrates, in combination with diets of different energetic values. The compounds came from soft corals, ascidians and hexactinellid sponges; they included wax esters, alkaloids, a meroterpenoid, a steroid, and the recently described organic acid, glassponsine. Feeding repellency was tested through preference assays by preparing diets (alginate pearls combining different energetic content and inorganic material. Experimental diets contained various concentrations of each repellent product, and were offered along with control compound-free pearls, to the Antarctic omnivore amphipod Cheirimedon femoratus. Meridianin alkaloids were the most active repellents, and wax esters were the least active when combined with foods of distinct energetic content. Our data show that levels of repellency vary for each compound, and that they perform differently when mixed with distinct assay foods. The natural products that interacted the most with energetic content were those occurring in nature at higher concentrations. The bioactivity of the remaining metabolites tested was found to depend on a threshold concentration, enough to elicit feeding repellence, independently from nutritional quality.

  11. Impact of the Aegean Sea oil spill on the subtidal fine sand macrobenthic community of the Ares-Betanzos Ria (Northwest Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Gesteira, J.L.; Dauvin, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Two sites located in the sublittoral fine-sand macrobenthic community of the Ares-Betanzos Ria were sampled over four years (December 1992-November 1996) in the wake of the Aegean Sea oil spill. This sampling revealed that the petroleum had affected the structure and abundance of this community, as well as the number of taxa present. In this context, the results of the biotic index and the biotic coefficient were insufficient; however, study of the synthetic parameters, particularly through multivariate analysis, showed that the community went through three successive and distinct phases over time. A short period of high mortality in some species, especially amphipods, was followed by a period of low abundance that lasted until the spring of 1995. A period of recovery began in the second half of 1995 and continued through to the end of 1996, when the survey ended. The community showed a gradual evolution back towards the conditions observed immediately after the spill, when abundance of the more resistant species was still high. Despite this similarity, the last period exhibits a new structure, clearly separate from the two previous periods. This study provides information about the short-term effects of the Aegean Sea oil spill on the fine sand bottoms of the sites surveyed in the Ares-Betanzos Ria. This information could also serve as a baseline for identifying the effects of a more recent accident, the Prestige oil spill, in which similar communities in other Galician rias were polluted in 2002-2003. (author)

  12. Physiological and behavioural responses of Gammarus pulex (Crustacea: Amphipoda) exposed to cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felten, V.; Charmantier, G.; Mons, R.; Geffard, A.; Rousselle, P.; Coquery, M.; Garric, J.; Geffard, O.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cadmium on physiological and behavioural responses in Gammarus pulex. In a first experiment, cadmium LC50s for different times were evaluated in 264 h experiment under continuous mode of exposure (LC50 96h = 82.1 μg L -1 , LC50 120h = 37.1 μg L -1 , LC50 168h = 21.6 μg L -1 , LC50 264h = 10.5 μg L -1 ). In a second experiment, the physiological and behavioural responses of the amphipod exposed to cadmium (0, 7.5 and 15 μg L -1 ) were investigated under laboratory conditions. The mortality and the whole body cadmium concentration of organisms exposed to cadmium were significantly higher than in controls. Concerning physiological responses, cadmium exposure exerted a significant decrease on osmolality and haemolymph Ca 2+ concentration, but not on haemolymph Na + and Cl - concentrations, whereas the Na + /K + -ATPase activity was significantly increased. Behavioural responses, such as feeding rate, locomotor and ventilatory activities, were significantly reduced in Cd exposed organisms. Mechanism of cadmium action and consequent energetic reallocation in favour of maintenance functions (i.e., osmoregulation) are discussed. The results of this study indicate that osmolality and locomotor activity in G. pulex could be effective ecophysiological/behavioural markers to monitor freshwater ecosystem and to assess the health of organisms

  13. Zooplankton excretion metabolites stimulate Southern Ocean phytoplankton growth

    KAUST Repository

    Coello-Camba, A.; Llabré s, M.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Agusti, Susana

    2017-01-01

    Warming over Antarctica is leading to changes in the zooplankton communities inhabiting the Southern Ocean. It has been observed that zooplankton not only regulates phytoplankton through grazing, but also through the recycling of nutrients that are essential for phytoplankton growth. In this way, the effects of warming on zooplankton populations will change the amount or proportion at which recycled nutrients are restored. To estimate how the recycled nutrients released by zooplankton populations, dominated by krill (Euphausia superba), amphipods or copepods, affect the phytoplankton uptake and communities, we performed four incubation experiments: two close to the Antarctic Peninsula and two at the Southern Atlantic Ocean. Our results showed a stimulating effect of the addition of metabolites on ammonia removal rates and on the net growth of phytoplankton communities, with different responses amongst the different phytoplankton groups. According to our results, phytoplankton net growth and community composition may be altered if this relevant source of nutrients is lost due to projected changes in the abundance or distribution of these zooplankton populations.

  14. The impact of wave exposure on the meiofauna of Gelidium pristoides (Turner) Kuetzing (Gelidiales: Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, M. J.

    1988-12-01

    The impact of wave exposure on the meiofaunal communities colonising Gelidium pristoides, was examined on five shores around False Bay, South Africa. Under conditions of constant algal structure and mass, and in tufts with similar epiphyte and sediment loads, exposure had a profound impact on meiofaunal communities. Algae on sheltered shores supported significantly greater numbers of animals in the size range 63-280 μm (predominantly copepods, copepod nauplii and ostracods), while those on exposed shores supported a greater number of amphipods and bivalves. Total meiofaunal biomass per tuft remained constant irrespective of shore type. Differences between shores are discussed in terms of algal structure and animal size and morphology. Gelidium tufts are open-plan and offer little resistance to water movement; as the frond diameter is wider than the meiofauna are long, small animals are likely to be flushed more easily from exposed than sheltered shores. Differences in the abundance of permanent meiofauna between shores may, however, reflect ifferences in the organic content of sediments, although this was not examined. It is also suggested that meiofaunal communities on plants from different shores are influenced by the total algal and macrofaunal standing stocks, which act as banks of meiofauna and influence the regularity and magnitude of immigration. Extrapolating these data to the whole shore indicates that while the biomass of meiofauna may be greater on exposed than sheltered shores, the proportional contribution of meiofauna to total secondary production is greater under more sheltered conditions.

  15. Vertical distribution and seasonality of peracarid crustaceans associated with intertidal macroalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-García, J. M.; Baeza-Rojano, E.; Cabezas, M. P.; García-Gómez, J. C.

    2011-02-01

    Spatial patterns and seasonal fluctuations of intertidal peracarids from Tarifa Island, Strait of Gibraltar, were studied over a two-year period (December 2005-December 2007). A total of 25,749 individuals were collected, comprising 46 species. Amphipods were best represented in the total number of species (32) and individuals (89% of numerical abundance) followed by isopods (12 species and 11% abundance) and tanaids (2 species and 1%). The highest number of species was registered in intermediate levels (1-1.5 m) dominated by Corallina elongata, although the highest abundances of peracarids were associated to seaweeds of lower levels (0-1 m) such as Gelidium corneum, Osmundea pinnatifida, Valonia utricularis and a turf of Caulacanthus ustulatus. The most abundant peracarids, Hyale stebbingi, H. schmidti, H. perieri, Stenothoe monoculoides, Caprella penantis, C. grandimana, Dynamene edwardsii and Ischyromene lacazei, were present throughout the whole year during 2006 and 2007. The highest peracarid densities were measured in April-August coinciding with the highest development of seaweeds, just before the maximum values of water temperature measured at the end of summer. Multivariate analyses confirmed a clear zonation of algae and associated peracarids in a vertical gradient, which was maintained stable during the two-year study. Several physical and biological factors may regulate such patterns of peracarid abundance and future experimental studies are necessary to explore the importance of factors such as competition, predation or weather conditions.

  16. Toxicity of carbon nanotubes to freshwater aquatic invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Joseph N.; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Hardesty, Doug K.; Brunson, Eric L.; Li, Hao; Deng, Baolin

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are hydrophobic in nature and thus tend to accumulate in sediments if released into aquatic environments. As part of our overall effort to examine the toxicity of carbon-based nanomaterials to sediment-dwelling invertebrates, we have evaluated the toxicity of different types of CNTs in 14-d water-only exposures to an amphipod (Hyalella azteca), a midge (Chironomus dilutus), an oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus), and a mussel (Villosa iris) in advance of conducting whole-sediment toxicity tests with CNTs. The results of these toxicity tests conducted with CNTs added to water showed that 1.00g/L (dry wt) of commercial sources of CNTs significantly reduced the survival or growth of the invertebrates. Toxicity was influenced by the type and source of the CNTs, by whether the materials were precleaned by acid, by whether sonication was used to disperse the materials, and by species of the test organisms. Light and electron microscope imaging of the surviving test organisms showed the presence of CNTs in the gut as well as on the outer surface of the test organisms, although no evidence was observed to show penetration of CNTs through cell membranes. The present study demonstrated that both the metals solubilized from CNTs such as nickel and the "metal-free" CNTs contributed to the toxicity.

  17. Bioavailability, ecotoxicity, and geological characteristics of trace lead in sediments from two sites on Negro River, Uruguay, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míguez, Diana M; Huertas, Raquel; Carrara, María V; Carnikián, Agustín; Bouvier, María E; Martínez, María J; Keel, Karen; Pioda, Carolina; Darré, Elena; Pérez, Ramiro; Viera, Santiago; Massa, Enrique

    2012-04-01

    Bioassays of two sites along the Rio Negro in Uruguay indicate ecotoxicity, which could be attributable to trace concentrations of lead in river sediments. Monthly samples at two sites at Baygorria and Bonete locations were analyzed for both particle size and lead. Lead was determined by atomic spectrometry in river water and sediment and particle size by sieving and sedimentation. Data showed that Baygorria's sediments have greater percentage of clay than Bonete's (20.4 and 5.8%, respectively). Lead was measurable in Baygorria's sediments, meanwhile in Bonete's, it was always below the detection limit. In water samples, lead was below detection limit at both sites. Bioassays using sub-lethal growth and survival test with Hyalella curvispina amphipod, screening with bioluminescent bacteria Photobacterium leiognathi, and acute toxicity bioassay with Pimephales promelas fish indicated toxicity at Baygorria, with much less effect at Bonete. Even though no lethal effects could be demonstrated, higher sub-lethal toxicity was found in samples from Baygorria site, showing a possible concentration of the contaminant in the clay fraction.

  18. The fine sand Abra alba community of the Bay of Morlaix twenty years after the Amoco Cadiz oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauvin, J.-C. [CNRS-UPRES-A Elico, Wimereux (France). Station Marine de Wimereux

    1998-09-01

    The fine sand Abra alba community from the Bay of Morlaix (western English Channel) was strongly affected by the Amoco Cadiz oil spill of April 1978. The long term changes in the community (1977-1996) show that reconstitution of this community is slow (over 10 yr). A progressive recolonization by amphipod Ampelisca populations constituting the dominant species is observed. The results show that it is necessary to survey the affected communities for a long period of time (> 10 yr) after an event to identify the real ecological impact of an oil spill. The abiotic and biotic factor existing in the Bay of Morlaix are favorable to the establishment and the persistence of stable dominant Ampelisca populations in time. The `climax` concept seems to be applicable to this type of stable environment. The soft-bottom Abra alba community of the Bay of Morlaix may only support a maximal carrying capacity of approximately 10-11 g m{sup -2} (mean annual biomass in decalcified dry weight). The deficit of production during 11 annual cycles may have affected the fish biomass feeding on this community. (author)

  19. The fine sand Abra alba community of the Bay of Morlaix twenty years after the Amoco Cadiz oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauvin, J.-C. [CNRS-UPRES-A Elico, Wimereux (France). Station Marine de Wimereux

    1998-09-01

    The fine sand Abra alba community from the Bay of Morlaix (western English Channel) was strongly affected by the Amoco Cadiz oil spill of April 1978. The long term changes in the community (1977-1996) show that reconstitution of this community is slow (over 10 yr). A progressive recolonization by amphipod Ampelisca populations constituting the dominant species is observed. The results show that it is necessary to survey the affected communities for a long period of time (> 10 yr) after an event to identify the real ecological impact of an oil spill. The abiotic and biotic factor existing in the Bay of Morlaix are favorable to the establishment and the persistence of stable dominant Ampelisca populations in time. The 'climax' concept seems to be applicable to this type of stable environment. The soft-bottom Abra alba community of the Bay of Morlaix may only support a maximal carrying capacity ofapproximately 10-11 g m{sup -2} (mean annual biomass in decalcified dry weight). The deficit of production during 11 annual cycles may have affected the fish biomass feeding on this community. (author)

  20. Trophic interactions in the St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada): Must the blue whale compete for krill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenkoff, C.; Comtois, S.; Chabot, D.

    2013-09-01

    Inverse methodology was used to construct a mass-balance model of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) for the 2008-2010 time period. Our first objective was to make an overall description of community structure, trophic interactions, and the effects of fishing and predation on the vertebrate and invertebrate communities of the ecosystem. A second objective was to identify other important predators of krill, and to assess if these compete with blue whales, listed as endangered under the Canadian Species at Risk Act in 2005 (northwest Atlantic population). The Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence are summer feeding grounds for blue whales and other marine mammals. Blue whales eat only euphausiids (krill) and require dense concentrations of prey to meet their energy requirements, which makes them particularly vulnerable to changes in prey availability. In the LSLE, many species from secondary producers (hyperiid amphipods, other macrozooplankton) to top predators (fish, birds, and marine mammals) consumed euphausiids. Consequently, krill predators were found at all consumer trophic levels. However, our results showed that only about 35% of the estimated euphausiid production was consumed by all predator species combined. Euphausiid did not seem to be a restricted resource in the LSLE ecosystem, at least during the study period. The blue whale did not appear to have to compete for krill in the LSLE.

  1. Use of toxicity identification evaluations to determine the pesticide mitigation effectiveness of on-farm vegetated treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, John; Anderson, Brian; Phillips, Bryn; Tjeerdema, Ron; Largay, Bryan; Beretti, Melanie; Bern, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    Evidence of ecological impacts from pesticide runoff has prompted installation of vegetated treatment systems (VTS) along the central coast of California, USA. During five surveys of two on-farm VTS ponds, 88% of inlet and outlet water samples were toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia. Toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs) indicated water toxicity was caused by diazinon at VTS-1, and chlorpyrifos at VTS-2. Diazinon levels in VTS-1 were variable, but high pulse inflow concentrations were reduced through dilution. At VTS-2, chlorpyrifos concentrations averaged 52% lower at the VTS outlet than at the inlet. Water concentrations of most other pesticides averaged 20-90% lower at VTS outlets. All VTS sediment samples were toxic to amphipods (Hyalella azteca). Sediment TIEs indicated toxicity was caused by cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin at VTS-1, and chlorpyrifos and permethrin at VTS-2. As with water, sediment concentrations were lower at VTS outlets, indicating substantial reductions in farm runoff pesticide concentrations. - Toxicity identification evaluations identified key pesticides in agricultural runoff, and their concentrations were reduced by farmer-installed vegetated treatment systems

  2. Composition and abundance of zooplankton groups from a coral reef lagoon in Puerto Morelos, Quintana Roo, Mexico, during an annual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Cadena, José N; Ordóñez-López, Uriel; Almaral-Mendivil, Alma Rosa; Uicab-Sabido, Amira

    2009-09-01

    Zooplankton sampling was carried out monthly from January to December 1990 at station A near the coastline, and station B near the reef barrier, in a tropical coral reef lagoon in the Mexican Caribbean Sea. Samplings were made at midnight, near surface, with a conical net (mouth 0.40 m, mesh 330 microm) for 10 min. Salinity varied from 35.1 to 36.3 psu and temperature from 26.3 to 30.2 degrees C. The Bray-Curtis test applied to these results has defined two seasons: the dry season from November to May, and the wet season from June to October. A total of 37 zooplankton groups were found. Copepods were the most abundant contributing 49.0% of the total capture with Acartia espinata, Calanopia americana and Farranula gracilis as the most numerous. In the total zooplankton, however, cirripeds captured in only 15 samples of 24 were second in abundance (20.9%). Decapods, present all year-round and more abundant during the wet season, were third and contributed 19.2%. The rest of the groups were scarce and only amphipods (2.4%) and larvaceans (2.0%) were relatively abundant. The abundance of captured organisms correlated with the abiotic factors measured, thus, in the dry season, abundance was lower (mean 7.3 orgs/m3), while in the wet season the mean catch was 36.8 orgs/m3.

  3. Trophic preference and preliminary indication of phylloplane fungal influence on the diet of the non-native Gammarus roeselii Gervais 1835 (Amphipoda, Gammaridae in the sub-lacustrine Ticino river basin (Lombardy, Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Paganelli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gammarids are one of the most successful invaders in freshwater ecosystems due to both their diet plasticity and high reproductive capacity. One such amphipod, Gammarus roeselii, has recently colonised the southern part of the sub-lacustrine Ticino River basin (Northern Italy, where its ecological niche overlaps with the native species Echinogammarus stammeri. In the present paper the food preferences of G. roeselii have been investigated, testing the palatability of different food sources: three macrophytes and three different leaf debris. Moreover, an explorative mycological analysis on the three different leaf debris used in the experiment has been performed. Results of the short-term experiment suggest that aquatic plants are less palatable than allocthonous detritus, probably because they can contain secondary metabolites (i.e. tannins and they have lower nutrient tissues with very high water content. On the contrary, G. roeselii showed a clear preference for the oak leaves, resulted colonized by a more abundant fungal biomass and, therefore, more palatable too.

  4. Impacts of aquatic nonindigenous invasive species on the Lake Erie ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austen, Madeline J.W.; Ciborowski, Jan J.H.; Corkum, Lynda D.; Johnson, Tim B.; MacIsaac, Hugh J.; Metcalfe-Smith, Janice L.; Schloesser, Donald W.; George, Sandra E.

    2002-01-01

    Lake Erie is particularly vulnerable to the introduction and establishment of aquatic nonindigenous invasive species (NIS) populations. A minimum of 144 aquatic NIS have been recorded in the Lake Erie basin including several species [e.g., Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum); zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha); quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis); an amphipod (Echinogammarus ischnus); round goby (Neogobius melanostomus); and sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)] that have had discernible impacts on the lake's ecology. NIS pose threats to the Lake Erie ecosystem for a variety of reasons including their ability to proliferate quickly, compete with native species, and transfer contaminants (e.g., PCBs) and disease through the food web. Six of the 14 beneficial use impairments listed in Annex 2 of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement are impaired in Lake Erie, in part as a result of the introduction of NIS. The Lake Erie Lakewide Management Plan (LaMP) has adopted an ecosystem approach to restore beneficial use impairments in the lake. Furthermore, a research consortium, known as the Lake Erie Millennium Network, is working alongside the LaMP, to address research problems regarding NIS, the loss of habitat, and the role of contaminants in the Lake Erie ecosystem.

  5. Sandhopper solar orientation as a behavioural biomarker of trace metals contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungherese, Giuseppe; Ugolini, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Although many studies have focused on trace metals accumulation, investigations of talitrid amphipods as biomarkers are rare. This study explores the possibility of using the solar orientation capacity of Talitrus saltator as a behavioural marker of exposure to two essential (Cu and Zn) and two non-essential (Cd and Hg) metals. LC 50 analyses performed before the solar orientation tests showed that the 72 h LC 50 for Hg was 0.02 ppm while the 96 h LC 50 values for Cu, Cd and Zn were 13.28 ppm, 27.66 ppm, and 62.74 ppm, respectively. The presence of metals in seawater affects the solar orientation capacity of T. saltator in a concentration-dependent manner and according to the toxicity ranking of the metals (Hg > Cu > Cd > Zn). Therefore, the solar orientation capacity of T. saltator seems to be a promising behavioural marker for exposure to trace metals. - Solar orientation capacity is a promising behavioural marker for exposure to trace metals in sandhoppers

  6. Nuclear fuel cycle and marine environment. Behavior of the Rhone river effluents in the mediterranean sea and of wastes dumped in the northeast atlantic; Cycle du combustible nucleaire et milieu marin. Devenir des effluents rhodaniens en mediterranee et des dechets immerges en atlantique nord-est

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charmasson, S

    1998-07-01

    waste in the North-East Atlantic has been the subject of studies especially as regards the biological compartment. Indeed, the occurrence in abyssal waters of a very motile fauna, i.e. fish (Coryphaenoides armatus) and amphipods (Eurythenes gryllus), able to undertake important vertical migrations into the water column, represents a possible pathway towards the surface for the dumped radionuclides. The ignorance as regards populations inhabiting this site has led to a study of the population structure for the amphipod Eurythenes gryllus. This species is cosmopolite since it is found at all the latitudes in the world ocean both in bathyal and abyssal waters. Well known for its necrophagy and ability to consume baits, it is supposed to feed on carcasses. However, study of a natural radionuclide, i.e. {sup 210}Po, in this species has shown that it is possible that it feeds also on particle fluxes. In order to verify the validity of the data used for the modelling of the radiological assessment of these operations, in situ labelling experiments have been realized on these amphipods as well as on polychaetes from food labelled with radionuclides characterizing the dumped wastes. Though these results are still too few to acknowledge this validity, as expected from studies on coastal species the transfer factors food-organisms are quite low. Analyses carried out for surveillance purposes both on the fish Coryphaenoides armatus and the amphipod Eurythenes gryllus show that in these deep waters the main source of man-made radioactivity is the global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear testing carried out mainly in the sixties. A transfer via the particle fluxes is necessary to explain the concentrations found for {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239+240}Pu. However, {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239+240}Pu isotopic ratios in some fish samples suggest and influence from the dumped wastes and underline the possible part taken by these necrophagous organisms in the dispersion of

  7. Behaviour of Talitrus saltator (Crustacea: Amphipoda) on a rehabilitated sandy beach on the European Atlantic Coast (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, Filipa; Rossano, Claudia; Nourisson, Delphine; Gambineri, Simone; Marques, João Carlos; Scapini, Felicita

    2013-01-01

    Environmental and human controls are widely accepted as the main structuring forces of the macrofauna communities on sandy beaches. A population of the talitrid amphipod Talitrus saltator (Montagu, 1808) was investigated on an exposed sandy beach on the Atlantic coast of Portugal (Leirosa beach) to estimate orientation capabilities and endogenous rhythms in conditions of recent changes in the landscape (artificial reconstruction of the foredune) and beach morphodynamics (stabilization against erosion from the sea). We tested sun orientation of talitrids on the beach and recorded their locomotor activity rhythms under constant conditions in the laboratory. The orientation data were analysed with circular statistics and multiple regression models adapted to angular distributions, to highlight the main factors and variables influencing the variation of orientation. The talitrids used the sun compass, visual cues (landscape and sun visibility) to orient and the precision of orientation varied according to the tidal regime (rising or ebbing tides). A well-defined free-running rhythm (circadian with in addition a bimodal rhythmicity, likely tidal) was highlighted in this population. This showed a stable behavioural adaptation on a beach that has experienced a process of artificial stabilization of the dune through nourishment actions over a decade. Monitoring the conditions of such dynamic environments and the resilience capacity of the inhabiting macroinfauna is a main challenge for sandy beach ecologists.

  8. Relationship between heavy metals pollution and genetic diversity in Mediterranean populations of the sandhopper Talitrus saltator (Montagu) (Crustacea, Amphipoda)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungherese, G.; Mengoni, A.; Somigli, S.; Baroni, D.; Focardi, S.; Ugolini, A.

    2010-01-01

    Trace metals are one of the groups of pollutants that reduce genetic variability in natural populations, causing the phenomenon known as 'genetic erosion'. In this study we evaluate the relationship between trace metals contamination (Hg, Cd and Cu) and genetic variability, assessed using fluorescent Inter-Simple Sequence Repeats (fISSRs). We used eight populations of a well-established biomonitor of trace metals on sandy beaches: the amphipod Talitrus saltator. The trace metals analysis confirmed the ability of sandhoppers to accumulate Hg, Cd and Cu. Moreover, populations from sites with high Hg availability had the lowest values of genetic diversity. Our results validate the use of fISSR markers in genetic studies in sandhoppers and support the 'genetic erosion' hypothesis by showing the negative influence of Hg contamination on sandhopper genetic diversity. Therefore, genetic variability assessed with fISSR markers could be successfully employed as a biomarker of Hg exposure. - Genetic variability of sandhoppers is affected by heavy metals contamination.

  9. Zooplankton excretion metabolites stimulate Southern Ocean phytoplankton growth

    KAUST Repository

    Coello-Camba, A.

    2017-04-24

    Warming over Antarctica is leading to changes in the zooplankton communities inhabiting the Southern Ocean. It has been observed that zooplankton not only regulates phytoplankton through grazing, but also through the recycling of nutrients that are essential for phytoplankton growth. In this way, the effects of warming on zooplankton populations will change the amount or proportion at which recycled nutrients are restored. To estimate how the recycled nutrients released by zooplankton populations, dominated by krill (Euphausia superba), amphipods or copepods, affect the phytoplankton uptake and communities, we performed four incubation experiments: two close to the Antarctic Peninsula and two at the Southern Atlantic Ocean. Our results showed a stimulating effect of the addition of metabolites on ammonia removal rates and on the net growth of phytoplankton communities, with different responses amongst the different phytoplankton groups. According to our results, phytoplankton net growth and community composition may be altered if this relevant source of nutrients is lost due to projected changes in the abundance or distribution of these zooplankton populations.

  10. Longevity enhances selection of environmental sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, J J; Bulmer, M G

    1989-12-01

    Environmental sex determination (ESD) is a mechanism in which an individual develops as male or female largely in response to some environmental effect experienced early in life. Its forms range from sex determination by egg incubation temperature in reptiles to sex determination of photoperiod in amphipods. Previous theoretical work as suggested that ESD is favored by natural selection if the fitness consequences of the early environmental experience differ for males and females, so that an individual benefits by being male under some conditions and female under others. A drawback of ESD is that it enables climatic changes to influence the population sex ratio, and such fluctuations select against ESD. This study employed numerical analyses to investigate the balance between these two opposing forces. The negative impact of climatic fluctuations appears to depend greatly on species longevity: substantial between-year fluctuations are of little consequence in selecting against ESD in long-lived species because annual sex ratio fluctuations tend to cancel and thus alter the total population sex ratio only slightly. Thus, if a species is sufficiently long-lived, extreme ESD can be maintained despite only a weak advantage. This result offers one explanation for the failure to demonstrate an advantage for the extreme forms of ESD observed in reptiles.

  11. Diet composition and feeding habits of the eyespot skate, Atlantoraja cyclophora (Elasmobranchii: Arhynchobatidae, off Uruguay and northern Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago A. Barbini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The eyespot skate, Atlantoraja cyclophora, is an endemic species from the southwestern Atlantic, occurring from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to northern Patagonia, Argentina. The feeding habits of this species, from off Uruguay and north Argentina, were evaluated using a multiple hypothesis modelling approach. In general, the diet was composed mainly of decapod crustaceans, followed by teleost fishes. Molluscs, mysidaceans, amphipods, isopods, lancelets and elasmobranchs were consumed in lower proportion. The consumption of shrimps drecreased with increasing body size of A. cyclophora. On the other hand, the consumption of teleosts increased with body size. Mature individuals preyed more heavily on crabs than immature individuals. Teleosts were consumed more in the south region (34º - 38ºS and crabs in the north region (38º - 41ºS. Shrimps were eaten more in the warm season than in the cold season. Prey size increased with increasing body size of A. cyclophora , but large individuals also consumed small teleosts and crabs. Atlantoraja cyclophora has demersal-benthic feeding habits, shifts its diet with increasing body size and in response to seasonal and regional changes in prey availability and distribution.

  12. Morphology of gill rakers and their ecological function in feeding of the Antarctic fish Notothenia neglecta Nybelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Sant'Anna Rios

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Notothenia neglecta, endemic to the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic regions, is basically carnivorous with a wide dietary spectrum. In order to evaluate the gill rakers' morphology and histological features of gill structures in relation to their feeding habits, specimens were obtained at Admiralty Bay (King George Island, South Shetlands. Their stomach content was identified and measured and the pharyngobranchial apparatus was studied macro and microscopically. The morphology of the gill rakers and the sizes of prey that are present in the stomach of N. neglecta characterize this species as piscivorous but also able to capture other small prey. Gill rakers provided with sharp villiform denticles improve the retention of fish. At the anterior row, gill rakers are flexible and without denticles, allowing continuous breathing during slow ingestion of large prey. Food is selected by size. The distance between gill rakers allows the retention of amphipods, bivalves and gastropods if bigger than 0.17% of the predator standard length. Food is also selected chemically by taste buds and isolated chemical-sensorial cells. Goblet cells produce mucus that covers the preys with a smooth layer, avoiding scratching of the mucosa during ingestion of food and promoting aggregation of smaller food items. N. neglecta is an active feeder that uses different detection and selection mechanisms to survive in an environment where the food composition varies during the year.

  13. Microphallids in Gammarus insensibilis Stock, 1966 from a Black Sea lagoon: manipulation hypothesis going East?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinova, A; Mavrodieva, R S

    2005-09-01

    Patterns of parasite site selection, variation in infection parameters and interspecific associations are examined in the light of new field data on larval microphallids in Gammarus insensibilis from a Black Sea lagoon. These patterns are discussed in relation to the predictions for the manipulative effect of Microphallus papillorobustus and its relationships with the other microphallid species based on studies on the French Mediterranean coast. Four species were recovered: Maritrema subdolum, Microphallus hoffmanni, M. papillorobustus and Levinseniella propinqua. The latter two were located in both corporal and cephalic segments, but the selection of brain appeared stronger for L. propinqua. M. subdolum was the first colonizer of amphipod population recruits, and unequivocally the dominant species in the lagoon. There was a significant positive relationship between the parasite load of all 4 species. Concurrent infections were exceedingly frequent, and no departures from random association were detected. We found no evidence that the cerebral metacercariae of M. papillorobustus consistently predict the parasite load of any of the other species in the system and identify sources for heterogeneity that may account for the differences between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean system: habitat heterogeneity, bird diversity and host-parasite systems used to infer relationships between microphallids.

  14. The fine sand Abra alba community of the Bay of Morlaix twenty years after the Amoco Cadiz oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauvin, J.-C.

    1998-01-01

    The fine sand Abra alba community from the Bay of Morlaix (western English Channel) was strongly affected by the Amoco Cadiz oil spill of April 1978. The long term changes in the community (1977-1996) show that reconstitution of this community is slow (over 10 yr). A progressive recolonization by amphipod Ampelisca populations constituting the dominant species is observed. The results show that it is necessary to survey the affected communities for a long period of time (> 10 yr) after an event to identify the real ecological impact of an oil spill. The abiotic and biotic factor existing in the Bay of Morlaix are favorable to the establishment and the persistence of stable dominant Ampelisca populations in time. The 'climax' concept seems to be applicable to this type of stable environment. The soft-bottom Abra alba community of the Bay of Morlaix may only support a maximal carrying capacity of approximately 10-11 g m -2 (mean annual biomass in decalcified dry weight). The deficit of production during 11 annual cycles may have affected the fish biomass feeding on this community. (author)

  15. Impacts of the 2011 Tsunami on Sediment Characteristics and Macrozoobenthic Assemblages in a Shallow Eutrophic Lagoon, Sendai Bay, Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Kanaya

    Full Text Available A huge tsunami is one of the greatest disturbance events in coastal benthic communities, although the ecological consequences are not fully understood. Here we examined the tsunami-induced changes in the sediment environment and macrozoobenthic assemblage in a eutrophic brackish lagoon in eastern Japan. The 7.2-m-high tsunami completely replaced muddy sediment with drifting sea sand throughout the lagoon, leading to the drastic changes in quantity and quality of sedimental organic matters, sulfide contents, and sediment redox condition. Intensive physical stress devastated the benthic community, but the disappearance of sulfidic muddy bottoms significantly improved the habitat quality for macrozoobenthos. The re-established macrozoobenthic community after 5 months was characterized by (1 a 2-fold higher total density, but sharp declines in species richness, diversity, and evenness; (2 an increased density of opportunistic taxa (e.g., polychaete Pseudopolydora spp. and amphipod Monocorophium uenoi in newly created sandy bottoms; and (3 disappearance of several dominant taxa including bivalves and chironomid larvae. These findings indicate that the sensitivity and recovery potential of macrozoobenthos were highly taxa-specific, which was closely related to the taxa's ecological characteristics, including tolerance to physical disturbance, life-history traits, and life form. Our data revealed the rapid recolonization of opportunistic macrozoobenthos after a huge tsunami, which would contribute to the functional recovery of estuarine soft-bottom habitats shortly after a disturbance event.

  16. Biodiversity and diel variation of the benthohyponeuston: A case study of the Northeast Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchaka, Alexander L.; Anokhina, Ludmila L.

    2015-12-01

    The neustal is a specific habitat of oceans, which significantly differs in abiotic parameters from the waters below. One of the most significant components of the coastal neustonic fauna is the benthohyponeuston migrating diurnally between benthic and neustonic realms. Data on this fauna are fragmentary and contradictory, partly due to lack of the criteria to distinguish benthohyponeuston from other benthopelagic animals diurnally migrating to the bulk water from the seafloor. We propose a criterion to quantify the degree of aggregation/avoidance of the neustal zone, reveal four distinct ecological groups and describe patterns of their overnight dynamics. Benthohyponeuston appears in open water at sunset, its biomass most rapidly increases one hour after sunset. Cumaceans, mysids and polychaetes make significant contribution during first three hours after sunset. Decapods are important around midnight and 3 h later. Amphipods are significant overnight. By analogy with the benthopelagic species, we define the benthohyponeuston as benthic animals, which are associated with the neustal zone at least at one stage of their life cycle. This association is necessary for reproduction, dispersal or feeding - that represent three basic pathways connecting neustonic and benthic/benthopelagic coastal communities below. The data on benthohyponeuston and patterns of its overnight dynamics will help in a better understanding of vertical migrations in the coastal zone and in estimating diurnal fluxes of organic matter.

  17. Biological studies of the U.S. subseabed disposal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, L.S.; Marietta, M.G.; Hessler, R.R.; Smith, K.L. Jr.; Talbert, D.M.; Yayanos, A.A.; Jackson, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP) of the U.S. is assessing the feasibility of emplacing high level radioactive wastes (HLW) within deep-sea sediments and is developing the means for assessing the feasibility of the disposal practices of other nations. This paper discusses the role and status of biological research in the SDP. Studies of the disposal methods and of the conceived barriers (canister, waste form and sediment) suggest that biological knowledge will be principally needed to address the impact of accidental releases of radionuclides. Current experimental work is focusing on the deep-sea ecosystem to determine: (1) the structure of benthic communities, including their microbial component; (2) the faunal composition of deep midwater nekton; (3) the biology of deep-sea amphipods; (4) benthic community metabolism; (5) the rates of bacterial processes; (6) the metabolism of deep-sea animals, and (7) the radiation sensitivity of deep-sea organisms. A multi-compartment model is being developed to assess quantitatively, the impact (on the environment and on man) of releases of radionuclides into the sea

  18. Transgenerational deleterious effects of ocean acidification on the reproductive success of a keystone crustacean (Gammarus locusta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Francisco O; Figueiredo, Cátia; Sampaio, Eduardo; Rosa, Rui; Grilo, Tiago F

    2018-07-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) poses a global threat to marine biodiversity. Notwithstanding, marine organisms may maintain their performance under future OA conditions, either through acclimation or evolutionary adaptation. Surprisingly, the transgenerational effects of high CO 2 exposure in crustaceans are still poorly understood. For the first time, the present study investigated the transgenerational effect of OA, from hatching to maturity, of a key amphipod species (Gammarus locusta). Negative transgenerational effects were observed on survival of the acidified lineage, resulting in significant declines (10-15%) compared to the control groups in each generation. Mate-guarding duration was also significantly reduced under high CO 2 and this effect was not alleviated by transgenerational acclimation, indicating that precopulatory behaviours can be disturbed under a future high CO 2 scenario. Although OA may initially stimulate female investment, transgenerational exposure led to a general decline in egg number and fecundity. Overall, the present findings suggest a potential fitness reduction of natural populations of G. locusta in a future high CO 2 ocean, emphasizing the need of management tools towards species' sustainability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chemical cocktails in aquatic systems: Pesticide effects on the response and recovery of >20 animal taxa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, Jessica; Relyea, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Natural systems are often exposed to individual insecticides or combinations of multiple insecticides. Using an additive and substitutive design, we examined how populations and communities containing >20 animal taxa are affected by four insecticides applied individually and as a mixture for 18 wks in aquatic mesocosms. The four insecticides had distinct lethal effects on the response and recovery of cladocerans, copepods, amphipods, isopods, and amphibians but not snails. The lethal effect on cladocerans and copepods induced trophic cascades that facilitated algal blooms and abiotic changes (higher pH and dissolved oxygen, but lower light transmission). Exposure to endosulfan resulted in a lag effect reducing cladocerans and spring-breeding amphibian abundance. The reduction in spring-breeding amphibian abundance led to cascading indirect effects on summer-breeding amphibians. Finally, the mixture treatment had lethal effects throughout the community that led to long-term effects on amphibian mass and unique indirect consequences on phytoplankton and abiotic variables. - Highlights: • Insecticides had unique direct and indirect effects on response and recovery. • Due to lag effects, endosulfan was more toxic than expected based on 4d tests. • Variation in oviposition phenology led to positive effects on amphibians. • Lethal direct effects of mixtures were pervasive and led to unique indirect effects. - Insecticides applied individually and in a mixture have complex direct and indirect consequences on aquatic system response and recovery

  20. Toxicities of sediments below 10 effluent outfalls to near-coastal areas of the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.; Weber, D.; Stanley, R.

    1995-01-01

    The chemical quality and toxicities of sediments collected in the receiving waters below 10 wastewater outfalls to Northwest Florida coastal areas were evaluated at multiple stations during 1994--1996. Eight types of toxicity tests using 11 test species were used to assess acute and chronic toxicity of the sediments collected below industrial, municipal, power generation and pulp mill outfalls. The primary objectives of the study were to evaluate the relative ability of different assessment procedures to detect toxicity and to provide some much-needed perspective on the impact of major point sources on sediment quality in Gulf of Mexico estuaries. The major chemical contaminants were heavy metals and PAHs. Acute and chronic toxicities were noted. Results of tests with sediment collected at the same location but several months later often differed. The most sensitive species were mysids and an estuarine amphipod. The least sensitive species were fish and macrophyte seedlings. There was poor correlation of effluent toxicity to sediment toxicity in the receiving water. Toxicity of the effluents was greater than that of the sediments. Overall, the unavailability of relevant chronic toxicity methods, uncertain criteria for choice of control stations, lack of guidance on frequency of testing and the dynamic physical and chemical characteristics of sediments are factors that need consideration if sediment monitoring is to be part of the NPDES regulatory process

  1. Seasonal fluctuations of some biological traits of the invader Caprella scaura (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Caprellidae in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermelinda Prato

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Caprella scaura is an epifaunal amphipod crustacean that originates in the western Indian Ocean and has spread throughout the world, but very little is known about fundamental aspects of its biology. This paper is the first presentation of its life history traits in an invaded region. The study was conducted in the Mar Piccolo basin (southern Italy, Ionian Sea, over a one-year period. All biological parameters showed a strong seasonal pattern, breeding peaked twice during the year and the number of eggs in the ventral brood pouch ranged from 5 to 72. The sex ratio was generally close to 1:1. A strong correlation between total length of ovigerous females and number of eggs was observed. The mean length of both mature males and mature females was 10.63 and 7.70 mm, respectively. The results of this study showed that the population dynamics of this species was not dissimilar to that of other caprellids or marine epifaunal Crustacea. This caprellid has given rise to a stable population in the Mar Piccolo; it was present all year round in the study area but its density suggests that it is not yet a strong invader.

  2. Methylmercury bioaccumulation in stream food webs declines with increasing primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, David; D.F. Raikow,; C.R. Hammerschmidt,; M.G. Mehling,; A. Kovach,; J.T. Oris,

    2015-01-01

    Opposing hypotheses posit that increasing primary productivity should result in either greater or lesser contaminant accumulation in stream food webs. We conducted an experiment to evaluate primary productivity effects on MeHg accumulation in stream consumers. We varied light for 16 artificial streams creating a productivity gradient (oxygen production =0.048–0.71 mg O2 L–1 d–1) among streams. Two-level food webs were established consisting of phytoplankton/filter feeding clam, periphyton/grazing snail, and leaves/shredding amphipod (Hyalella azteca). Phytoplankton and periphyton biomass, along with MeHg removal from the water column, increased significantly with productivity, but MeHg concentrations in these primary producers declined. Methylmercury concentrations in clams and snails also declined with productivity, and consumer concentrations were strongly correlated with MeHg concentrations in primary producers. Heterotroph biomass on leaves, MeHg in leaves, and MeHg in Hyalella were unrelated to stream productivity. Our results support the hypothesis that contaminant bioaccumulation declines with stream primary production via the mechanism of bloom dilution (MeHg burden per cell decreases in algal blooms), extending patterns of contaminant accumulation documented in lakes to lotic systems.

  3. Species richness and faunistic affinities of the Gammaridea and Corophiidea (Amphipoda from shallow waters of southern Tierra del Fuego, Argentina: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Luis Chiesa

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Species richness and faunistic affinities of gammaridean and corophiidean amphipods from southern Tierra del Fuego were studied. The material was collected with dredges and grabs at 7 locations (15 sampling stations in a range of 5 to 35 m depth. A total of 61 species belonging to 20 families and 43 genera were identified. The genera Cephalophoxoides, Ceradocopsis and Photis are reported for the first time from the Magellan region and 3 species belonging to Atylus, Ischyrocerus and Photis appear to be new to science. Most of the species collected belong to Phoxocephalidae, whereas most individuals were contained in the Stenothoidae and Lysianassidae s.l. The analysis of the faunistic affinities showed that 16 species (39% are endemic to the Magellan region, 9 species (22% extend to the south, 5 species (12.2% to the north and 5 other species (12.2% to both the north and south. In addition, 6 species extend beyond the Magellan region as far as Oceania.

  4. The effects of different oil spill cleanup technologies on body burden and biomarkers in Arctic marine organisms - a laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faksness, Liv-Guri; Hansen, Bjorn Henrik; Nordtug, Trond; Borseth, Jan Fredrik; Baussant, Thierry; Tandberg, Anne Helene S.; Ingvarsdottir, Anna; Aarab, Nadia; Altin, Dag

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the effects and toxicity of a water soluble fraction (WSF) of oil versus chemically dispersed oil and also of WSF versus the underlying water after in situ burning (ISB). The applications of exposure concentrations were based on monitoring of WSF in the water column during an offshore field experiment. A continuous flow-through system for the dispersant experiments was set up and an Arctic amphipod was used as the test species. Seawater and gammarids were also used as samples for chemical and biological analyses. Good correlation with the data was presented by chemical analysis of the water samples. However, more PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) were measured in the gammarids exposed to oil mixed with dispersant than in those exposed to oil alone. On the other hand, a system was developed to allow water sampling after ISB and samples of seawater and of oil prior to, and immediately after, ISB were collected and a chemical analysis was conducted. The result of the analysis was that there was no increase in toxicity in the underlying water after ISB.

  5. Comparison of macro-gravimetric and micro-colorimetric lipid determination methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Laura S; Lotufo, Guiherme R

    2006-10-15

    In order to validate a method for lipid analysis of small tissue samples, the standard macro-gravimetric method of Bligh-Dyer (1959) [E.G. Bligh, W.J. Dyer, Can. J. Biochem. Physiol. 37 (1959) 911] and a modification of the micro-colorimetric assay developed by Van Handel (1985) [E. Van Handel, J. Am. Mosq. Control Assoc. 1 (1985) 302] were compared. No significant differences were observed for wet tissues of two species of fish. However, limited analysis of wet tissue of the amphipod, Leptocheirusplumulosus, indicated that the Bligh-Dyer gravimetric method generated higher lipid values, most likely due to the inclusion of non-lipid materials. Additionally, significant differences between the methods were observed with dry tissues, with the micro-colorimetric method consistently reporting calculated lipid values greater than as reported by the gravimetric method. This was most likely due to poor extraction of dry tissue in the standard Bligh-Dyer method, as no significant differences were found when analyzing a single composite extract. The data presented supports the conclusion that the micro-colorimetric method described in this paper is accurate, rapid, and minimizes time and solvent use.

  6. The Food Web of Potter Cove (Antarctica): complexity, structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Tomás I.; Salinas, Vanesa; Cordone, Georgina; Campana, Gabriela; Moreira, Eugenia; Deregibus, Dolores; Torre, Luciana; Sahade, Ricardo; Tatián, Marcos; Barrera Oro, Esteban; De Troch, Marleen; Doyle, Santiago; Quartino, María Liliana; Saravia, Leonardo A.; Momo, Fernando R.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of the food web structure and complexity are central to better understand ecosystem functioning. A food-web approach includes both species and energy flows among them, providing a natural framework for characterizing species' ecological roles and the mechanisms through which biodiversity influences ecosystem dynamics. Here we present for the first time a high-resolution food web for a marine ecosystem at Potter Cove (northern Antarctic Peninsula). Eleven food web properties were analyzed in order to document network complexity, structure and topology. We found a low linkage density (3.4), connectance (0.04) and omnivory percentage (45), as well as a short path length (1.8) and a low clustering coefficient (0.08). Furthermore, relating the structure of the food web to its dynamics, an exponential degree distribution (in- and out-links) was found. This suggests that the Potter Cove food web may be vulnerable if the most connected species became locally extinct. For two of the three more connected functional groups, competition overlap graphs imply high trophic interaction between demersal fish and niche specialization according to feeding strategies in amphipods. On the other hand, the prey overlap graph shows also that multiple energy pathways of carbon flux exist across benthic and pelagic habitats in the Potter Cove ecosystem. Although alternative food sources might add robustness to the web, network properties (low linkage density, connectance and omnivory) suggest fragility and potential trophic cascade effects.

  7. Assessment of biofouling community development on test panels submerged in Kudankulam coast with special reference to the Nuclear Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satheesh, S.; Wesley, S. Godwin

    2008-01-01

    Biofouling is known to be one of the common problems in cooling water systems of power plants and several incidents of plant shutdown have been reported from various parts of the world. The settlement of marine organisms on an exposed hard surface depends obviously on the species, which are naturally present at a given site as well as their ability to attach and grow on that surface. Information on the organisms forming the fouling complex is necessary in view of the damages they cause to various marine structures and for devising protective measures. The present paper reports the results of the investigations of biofouling carried out for a period of two years from November 2003 to October 2004 at Kudankulam coast where a mega nuclear power project is under construction. Wooden test panels (10x10x3 cm) were fitted to a raft and submerged in the coastal waters. Total fouling biomass, thickness, coverage and community composition were analysed from the panels. Barnacles, mussels, ascidians, polychaetes, amphipods and seaweeds were the common fouling groups settled on the test panels. The total biomass reached to a maximum of 69.9 g.dm -2 (dry weight) after 330 days of exposure. The fouling thickness reached a maximum of 42.3 mm after 225 days of exposure. Results also showed a strong temporal variation in the fouling community recruitment. Based on the observations, Kudankulam coast could be categorized as a moderate fouling station mainly due to the low abundance of mussels in this region. (author)

  8. Seasonal trophic activity of the aquatic morphotype of Atelognathus patagonicus (Anura, Neobatrachia and prey availability in the littoral benthos of a permanent pond in Argentinean Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Cuello

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The diet of the aquatic morphotype of Atelognathus patagonicus was studied in frogs collected from the Laguna Verde pond (Laguna Blanca National Park, Neuquén, Argentina. The content of 35 gastrointestinal tracts of post-metamorphic specimens from November 2003 to April 2006 was related to the composition of the benthos in their microhabitat. Number, size, occurrence and relative importance of preys, diversity of the diet, trophic niche breadth and electivitywere estimated for each season of the year. The diet consisted of aquatic arthropods. The composition of both the benthos and the food (number and occurrence of organisms in the diet were dominated by the amphipod Hyalella sp. The relative importance (IRI of Hyalella sp. in the diet was over 99% in summer and autumn, and 100% in winter and spring. Diptera and Copepoda in summer, and Dytiscidae and Ostracoda in autumn, had seasonal IRI values ≤ 0.2%. Trophic niche breadth was very low in summer and autumn, and null (= 0 in winter and spring. The mean number of preys per individual was highest in spring (19 preys/frog and lowest in winter (4 preys/frog. Frogs continued with their trophic activity in winter, even when the surface of the pond was frozen. There is a correspondence between the frogs’ main food item and its presence in the benthos.

  9. The importance of biological factors affecting trace metal concentration as revealed from accumulation patterns in co-occurring terrestrial invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickx, Frederik; Maelfait, Jean-Pierre; Bogaert, Nicolas; Tojal, Catarina; Du Laing, Gijs; Tack, Filip M.G.; Verloo, Marc G

    2004-02-01

    As physicochemical properties of the soil highly influence the bioavailable fraction of a particular trace metal, measured metal body burdens in a particular species are often assumed to be more reliable estimators of the contamination of the biota. To test this we compared the Cd, Cu and Zn content of three spiders (generalist predators) and two amphipods (detritivores), co-occurring in seven tidal marshes along the river Schelde, between each other and with the total metal concentrations and the concentrations of four sequential extractions of the soils. Correlations were significant in only one case and significant sitexspecies interactions for all metals demonstrate that factors affecting metal concentration were species and site specific and not solely determined by site specific characteristics. These results emphasize that site and species specific biological factors might be of the utmost importance in determining the contamination of the biota, at least for higher trophic levels. A hypothetical example clarifies these findings. - Site and species specific biological factors are important in determining contamination of biota.

  10. Evaluation of the effects of coal fly ash amendments on the toxicity of a contaminated marine sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, R.M.; Perron, M.M.; Friedman, C.L.; Suuberg, E.M.; Pennell, K.G.; Cantwell, M.G.; Pelletier, M.C.; Ho, K.T.; Serbst, J.R.; Ryba, S.A. [US EPA, Narragansett, RI (USA). Office for Research and Development

    2009-01-15

    Approaches for cleaning up contaminated sediments range from dredging to in situ treatment. In this study, we discuss the effects of amending reference and contaminated sediments with coal fly ash to reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of a field sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Six fly ashes and a coconut charcoal were evaluated in 7-d whole sediment toxicity tests with a marine amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) and mysid (Americamysis bahia). Fly ashes with high carbon content and the coconut charcoal showed proficiency at reducing toxicity. Some of the fly ashes demonstrated toxicity in the reference treatments. It is suspected that some of this toxicity is related to the presence of ammonia associated with fly ashes as a result of postoxidation treatment to reduce nitrous oxide emissions. Relatively simple methods exist to remove ammonia from fly ash before use, and fly ashes with low ammonia content are available. Fly ashes were also shown to effectively reduce overlying water concentrations of several PAHs. No evidence was seen of the release of the metals cadmium, copper, nickel, or lead from the fly ashes. A preliminary 28-d polychaete bioaccumulation study with one of the high-carbon fly ashes and a reference sediment was also performed. Although preliminary, no evidence was seen of adverse effects to worm growth or lipid content or of accumulation of PAHs or mercury from exposure to the fly ash. These data show fly ashes with high carbon content could represent viable remedial materials for reducing the bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediments.

  11. Gauging resource exploitation by juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in restoring estuarine habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Melanie; Ellings, Christopher S.; Woo, Isa; Hodgson, Sayre; Larsen, Kimberly A.; Nakai, Glynnis

    2018-01-01

    In the context of delta restoration and its impact on salmonid rearing, success is best evaluated based on whether out-migrating juvenile salmon can access and benefit from suitable estuarine habitat. Here, we integrated 3 years of post-restoration monitoring data including habitat availability, invertebrate prey biomass, and juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) physiological condition to determine whether individuals profited from the addition of 364 ha of delta habitat in South Puget Sound, Washington, United States. Productivity in the restored mudflat was comparable to reference sites 3 years after dike removal, surpassing a mean total of 6 million kJ energy from invertebrate prey. This resulted from the development of a complex network of tidal channels and a resurgence in dipteran biomass that was unique to the restoration area. Consequently, a notable shift in invertebrate consumption occurred between 2010 and 2011, whereby individuals switched from eating primarily amphipods to dipteran flies; however, dietary similarity to the surrounding habitat did not change from year to year, suggesting that this shift was a result of a change in the surrounding prey communities. Growth rates did not differ between restored and reference sites, but catch weight was positively correlated with prey biomass, where greater prey productivity appeared to offset potential density-dependent effects. These results demonstrate how the realized function of restoring estuarine habitat is functionally dependent. High prey productivity in areas with greater connectivity may support healthy juvenile salmon that are more likely to reach the critical size class for offshore survival.

  12. Decline in the deepwater benthic communities abundance in the Onego Lake under multifactor influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinkina Nataliya Michailovna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of deepwater benthic communities state between 1988 and 2015 was analyzed. In the last decade the decline in the deepwater benthic communities development indicators is observed in Petrozavodskaya Bay and contiguous central area of the Lake Onego. The abundance of benthos decreased by 6-7 times, biomass dropped in 2-4 times. At the same time the changes in sedimentation processes of organic matter, nutrients, iron and manganese are observed in the water ecosystem. This has resulted in an increase in the concentrations of Fe and Mn in the sediment surface layers; in pore waters up to 13 mg Fe/l and 7 mg Mn/l. The sharp increase in the content of iron and manganese in the bottom sediment can be considered as a possible factor of benthos oppression. Another reason of the benthos decrease is the reduction of anthropogenic load. Now Petrozavodskaya bay receives 3 times less light organic substances than 10 years ago. The third possible reason for the reduction of benthic communities is invasion of baikalian amphipods Gmelinoides fasciatus, resulting in the redistribution of organic matter flow from the littoral zone to the pelagic zone and depletion of deepwater benthic food resources.

  13. Habitat recovery in a crude oil-contaminated saltmarsh following biorestoration treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.; Cobanli, S.; Wohlgeschaffen, G.; Venosa, A.D.; Suidan, M.T.; Gauthier, J.; Tremblay, G.H.; Doe, K.

    2002-01-01

    A controlled experiment was performed in a Spartina alterniflora dominated salt marsh in Atlantic Canada in which crude oil was intentionally released. The objective was to assess the feasibility of in situ biostimulation strategies to enhance habitat recovery and to determine the nutrient enrichment in enhancing wetland restoration in the presence and absence of wetland plants. The following four experimental treatments were evaluated: (1) natural attenuation, (2) ammonium nitrate addition with intact plants, (3) ammonium nitrate addition with plants cut back to suppress plant activity, and (4) ammonium nitrate addition with intact plants and with tilling to enrich oxygen penetration. In addition, two unoiled treatments were performed, with and without nutrients. The success of the remedial actions was quantified by determining the rates of oil loss, the recovery of wetland plants and the reduction in interstitial water and sediment toxicity. Results indicated that biodegradation of alkanes and PAHs occurred, but the rates were not greatly enhanced by any of the evaluated treatments. There were other measures of habitat recovery besides the level of residual oil loss. These included alternative methods such as plant recovery, amphipod survival and growth, bacterial activity and physiology. The results were used to determine the total benefit of nutrient enrichment, till and phytoremediation as biorestoration strategies for wetlands impacted by an oil spill. It was concluded that natural attenuation is a feasible spill response option in north-temperate salt marsh environments. 22 refs., 7 figs

  14. Tropical CO2 seeps reveal the impact of ocean acidification on coral reef invertebrate recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ro; Foggo, Andrew; Fabricius, Katharina; Balistreri, Annalisa; Hall-Spencer, Jason M

    2017-11-30

    Rising atmospheric CO 2 concentrations are causing ocean acidification by reducing seawater pH and carbonate saturation levels. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that many larval and juvenile marine invertebrates are vulnerable to these changes in surface ocean chemistry, but challenges remain in predicting effects at community and ecosystem levels. We investigated the effect of ocean acidification on invertebrate recruitment at two coral reef CO 2 seeps in Papua New Guinea. Invertebrate communities differed significantly between 'reference' (median pH7.97, 8.00), 'high CO 2 ' (median pH7.77, 7.79), and 'extreme CO 2 ' (median pH7.32, 7.68) conditions at each reef. There were also significant reductions in calcifying taxa, copepods and amphipods as CO 2 levels increased. The observed shifts in recruitment were comparable to those previously described in the Mediterranean, revealing an ecological mechanism by which shallow coastal systems are affected by near-future levels of ocean acidification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A comparative study on androgen metabolism in three invertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janer, G; LeBlanc, G A; Porte, C

    2005-09-15

    A comparative approach was taken in this study to evaluate androgen (androstenedione and testosterone) metabolism in three invertebrate species: the gastropod Marisa cornuarietis, the amphipod Hyalella azteca, and the echinoderm Paracentrotus lividus. The existence of 17beta/3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and 5alpha-reductase catalyzed reactions was demonstrated in all three species. Androstenedione was primarily converted to 5alpha-androstanedione in M. cornuarietis, while it was primarily metabolized to testosterone in P. lividus and H. azteca. In addition, and consistent with vertebrate findings, tissue specific pathways and sexual dimorphism in androgen metabolism were observed. Namely, testosterone was metabolized to dihydrotestosterone in P. lividus gonads (via 5alpha-reductase), and metabolized to 4-androstene-3beta,17beta-diol in the digestive tube (via 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase). Furthermore, the synthesis of 17beta-reduced metabolites of androstenedione (testosterone and dihydrotestosterone) was 3- to 4-fold higher in males of M. cornuarietis than in females. Organotin compounds, which have been shown to interfere with some aspects of androgen metabolism, had no major effect on testosterone metabolism in any of the three species. Fenarimol enhanced 5alpha-reductase-mediated catalysis in gonads of P. lividus. Overall, results demonstrate the ubiquity of some androgen biotransformation processes in invertebrates and reveals interphyla differences in androgen metabolic pathways, and different sensitivity of these pathways to some xenobiotics.

  16. A new species of Cymadusa Savigny, 1816 (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Ampithoidae from northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz F. Andrade

    Full Text Available A new species of the amphipod family Ampithoidae Stebbing, 1899 is described from the northeastern Brazilian waters. The new described taxon is grouped in the genus Cymadusa Savigny, 1816, since it presents all the diagnostic characteristics of the genus. The examined material was collected by scuba diving in the Rocas Atoll, off Rio Grande do Norte state coast, Camamu Bay and Todos os Santos Bay, Bahia state. The new species described here is close to C. filosa Savigny, 1816, type species of the genus, by presenting anterior margin of gnathopod 1 poorly setose, male gnathopod 2 densely setose, with palmar corner not defined by a spine and dactylus subequal in length to palm, being considered part of the C. filosa complex. Among the species of this complex, the one which most resembles to the new taxon is C. imbroglio Rabindranath, 1972, which is distinguished by the absence of both the trapezoid process in the palm and spine at the palmar corner in the gnathopod 2. This is the second species of the genus Cymadusa recorded from Brazilian waters.

  17. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of sediment-associated contaminants using freshwater invertebrates: A review of methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Ankley, G.T.; Benoit, D.A.; Brunson, E.L.; Burton, G.A.; Dwyer, F.J.; Hoke, R.A.; Landrum, P.F.; Norberg-King, T. J.; Winger, P.V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in methods for evaluating the toxicity and bioaccumulation of contaminants associated with freshwater sediments and summarizes example case studies demonstrating the application of these methods. Over the past decade, research has emphasized development of more specific testing procedures for conducting 10-d toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus tentans. Toxicity endpoints measured in these tests are survival for H. azteca and survival and growth for C. tentans. Guidance has also been developed for conducting 28-d bioaccumulation tests with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus, including determination of bioaccumulation kinetics for different compound classes. These methods have been applied to a variety of sediments to address issues ranging from site assessments to bioavailability of organic and inorganic contaminants using field-collected and laboratory-spiked samples. Survival and growth of controls routinely meet or exceed test acceptability criteria. Results of laboratory bioaccumulation studies with L. variegatus have been confirmed with comparisons to residues (PCBs, PAHs, DDT) present from synoptically collected field populations of oligochaetes. Additional method development is currently underway to develop chronic toxicity tests and to provide additional data-confirming responses observed in laboratory sediment tests with natural benthic populations.

  18. Suspended particles only marginally reduce pyrethroid toxicity to the freshwater invertebrate Gammarus pulex (L.) during pulse exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jes Jessen; Cedergreen, Nina; Kronvang, Brian; Andersen, Maj-Britt Bjergager; Nørum, Ulrik; Kretschmann, Andreas; Strobel, Bjarne Westergaard; Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun

    2016-04-01

    Current ecotoxicological research on particle-associated pyrethroids in freshwater systems focuses almost exclusively on sediment-exposure scenarios and sediment-dwelling macroinvertebrates. We studied how suspended particles influence acute effects of lambda-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin on the epibenthic freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex (L.) using brief pulse exposures followed by a 144 h post exposure recovery phase. Humic acid (HA) and the clay mineral montmorillonite (MM) were used as model sorbents in environmentally realistic concentrations (5, 25 and 125 mg L(-1)). Mortality of G. pulex was recorded during the post exposure recovery phase and locomotor behavior was measured during exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin. We found that HA in concentrations ≥25 mg L(-1) adsorbed the majority of pyrethroids but only reduced mortality of G. pulex up to a factor of four compared to pyrethroid-only treatments. MM suspensions adsorbed a variable fraction of pyrethroids (10% for bifenthrin and 70% for lambda-cyhalothrin) but did not significantly change the concentration-response relationship compared to pure pyrethroid treatments. Behavioral responses and immobilisation rate of G. pulex were reduced in the presence of HA, whereas behavioral responses and immobilisation rate were increased in the presence of MM. This indicates that G. pulex was capable of sensing the bioavailable fraction of lambda-cyhalothrin. Our results imply that suspended particles reduce to only a limited extent the toxicity of pyrethroids to G. pulex and that passive uptake of pyrethroids can be significant even when pyrethroids are adsorbed to suspended particles.

  19. Effects of lambda-cyhalothrin in two ditch microcosm systems of different trophic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessink, Ivo; Arts, Gertie H P; Belgers, J Dick M; Bransen, Fred; Maund, Steve J; Brock, Theo C M

    2005-07-01

    The fate and effects of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin were compared in mesotrophic (macrophyte-dominated) and eutrophic (phytoplankton-dominated) ditch microcosms (approximately 0.5 m3). Lambda-cyhalothrin was applied three times at one-week intervals at concentrations of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 250 ng/L. The rate of dissipation of lambda-cyhalothrin in the water column of the two types of test systems was similar. After 1 d, only 30% of the amount applied remained in the water phase. Initial, direct effects were observed primarily on arthropod taxa. The most sensitive species was the phantom midge (Chaoborus obscuripes). Threshold levels for slight and transient direct toxic effects were similar (10 ng/L) between types of test systems. At treatment levels of 25 ng/L and higher, apparent population and community responses occurred. At treatments of 100 and 250 ng/L, the rate of recovery of the macroinvertebrate community was lower in the macrophyte-dominated systems, primarily because of a prolonged decline of the amphipod Gammarus pulex. This species occurred at high densities only in the macrophyte-dominated enclosures. Indirect effects (e.g., increase of rotifers and microcrustaceans) were more pronounced in the plankton-dominated test systems, particularly at treatment levels of 25 ng/L and higher.

  20. Tracking pyrethroid toxicity in surface water samples: Exposure dynamics and toxicity identification tools for laboratory tests with Hyalella azteca (Amphipoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deanovic, Linda A; Stillway, Marie; Hammock, Bruce G; Fong, Stephanie; Werner, Inge

    2018-02-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are commonly used in pest control and are present at toxic concentrations in surface waters of agricultural and urban areas worldwide. Monitoring is challenging as a result of their high hydrophobicity and low toxicity thresholds, which often fall below the analytical methods detection limits (MDLs). Standard daphnid bioassays used in surface water monitoring are not sensitive enough to protect more susceptible invertebrate species such as the amphipod Hyalella azteca and chemical loss during toxicity testing is of concern. In the present study, we quantified toxicity loss during storage and testing, using both natural and synthetic water, and presented a tool to enhance toxic signal strength for improved sensitivity of H. azteca toxicity tests. The average half-life during storage in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) cubitainers (Fisher Scientific) at 4 °C of 5 pyrethroids (permethrin, bifenthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, and esfenvalerate) and one organophosphate (chlorpyrifos; used as reference) was 1.4 d, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO) proved an effective tool to potentiate toxicity. We conclude that toxicity tests on ambient water samples containing these hydrophobic insecticides are likely to underestimate toxicity present in the field, and mimic short pulse rather than continuous exposures. Where these chemicals are of concern, the addition of PBO during testing can yield valuable information on their presence or absence. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:462-472. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  1. Field and laboratory simulations of storm water pulses: Behavioural avoidance by marine epifauna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, David A.; Johnston, Emma L.; Mueller, Stefanie; Poore, Alistair G.B.

    2008-01-01

    Epifaunal communities associated with macroalgae were exposed to storm water pulses using a custom made irrigation system. Treatments included Millipore freshwater, freshwater spiked with trace metals and seawater controls to allow for the relative importance of freshwater inundation, trace metals and increased flow to be determined. Experimental pulses created conditions similar to those that occur following real storm water events. Brief storm water pulses reduced the abundance of amphipods and gastropods. Freshwater was the causative agent as there were no additional effects of trace metals on the assemblages. Laboratory assays indicated that neither direct nor latent mortality was likely following experimental pulses and that epifauna readily avoid storm water. Indirect effects upon epifauna through salinity-induced changes to algal habitats were not found in field recolonisation experiments. Results demonstrate the importance of examining the effects of pulsed contaminants under realistic exposure conditions and the need to consider ecologically relevant endpoints. - Brief storm water pulses trigger avoidance response in mobile epifauna due to the inundation of freshwater

  2. Hypothesis carbon flow through the deepwater Lake Ontario foodweb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Several accounts in recent years have attempted to conceptualize foodwebs in valuable fishery systems, producing useful heuristic tools to help shape research and management policy. Here a mass balance conceptual model of the Lake Ontario deepwater foodweb is developed to evaluate energy pathways and determine available nutrition for predatory salmonines. A number of different trophic links were defined from phytoplankton, through the various forage species, to the tertiary consumers. Phytoplankton photosynthesis resulted in 178 g C/m/sup 2//yr production at the base of the foodweb. Approximately 60% of primary production was counted as required support for pelagic zooplankton and benthos. Dominant forage fish (alewife, smelt and sculpin) annually appeared to consume all smaller zooplankton carbon production, 93% of mysid production, 66% of most benthic community production, and, more specifically, 94% of amphipod carbon production. The model indicated that approximately 1.22 g C/m/sup 2//yr was available for support of top level predators. Based upon historic fishery records and stocking rates, these predators required approximately half of the annual carbon available as nutritional support. Impacts of trophic rearrangements in the Lake Ontario foodweb are discussed based upon model results

  3. When things don't add up: quantifying impacts of multiple stressors from individual metabolism to ecosystem processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galic, Nika; Sullivan, Lauren L; Grimm, Volker; Forbes, Valery E

    2018-04-01

    Ecosystems are exposed to multiple stressors which can compromise functioning and service delivery. These stressors often co-occur and interact in different ways which are not yet fully understood. Here, we applied a population model representing a freshwater amphipod feeding on leaf litter in forested streams. We simulated impacts of hypothetical stressors, individually and in pairwise combinations that target the individuals' feeding, maintenance, growth and reproduction. Impacts were quantified by examining responses at three levels of biological organisation: individual-level body sizes and cumulative reproduction, population-level abundance and biomass and ecosystem-level leaf litter decomposition. Interactive effects of multiple stressors at the individual level were mostly antagonistic, that is, less negative than expected. Most population- and ecosystem-level responses to multiple stressors were stronger than expected from an additive model, that is, synergistic. Our results suggest that across levels of biological organisation responses to multiple stressors are rarely only additive. We suggest methods for efficiently quantifying impacts of multiple stressors at different levels of biological organisation. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  4. Contaminants in stream sediments from seven United States metropolitan areas: part I: distribution in relation to urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Moran, Patrick W.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Calhoun, Daniel L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Kemble, Nile E.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Phillips, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Organic contaminants and trace elements were measured in bed sediments collected from streams in seven metropolitan study areas across the United States to assess concentrations in relation to urbanization. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, the pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin, and several trace elements were significantly related to urbanization across study areas. Most contaminants (except bifenthrin, chromium, nickel) were significantly related to the total organic carbon (TOC) content of the sediments. Regression models explained 45–80 % of the variability in individual contaminant concentrations using degree of urbanization, sediment-TOC, and study-area indicator variables (which represent the combined influence of unknown factors, such as chemical use or release, that are not captured by available explanatory variables). The significance of one or more study-area indicator variables in all models indicates marked differences in contaminant levels among some study areas, even after accounting for the nationally modeled effects of urbanization and sediment-TOC. Mean probable effect concentration quotients (PECQs) were significantly related to urbanization. Trace elements were the major contributors to mean PECQs at undeveloped sites, whereas organic contaminants, especially bifenthrin, were the major contributors at highly urban sites. Pyrethroids, where detected, accounted for the largest share of the mean PECQ. Part 2 of this series (Kemble et al. 2012) evaluates sediment toxicity to amphipods and midge in relation to sediment chemistry.

  5. Interactive responses of primary producers and grazers to pollution on temperate rocky reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowles, Amelia E; Stuart-Smith, Rick D; Hill, Nicole A; Thomson, Russell J; Strain, Elisabeth M A; Alexander, Timothy J; Kirkpatrick, James; Edgar, Graham J

    2018-06-01

    Macroalgal beds provide important habitat structure and support primary production for rocky reef communities, but are increasingly degraded as a result of human pressures. Various sources of pollution can have both direct and interactive effects on stressed ecosystems. In particular, interactions involving invertebrate grazers could potentially weaken or strengthen the overall impact of pollution on macroalgal beds. Using a paired impact-control experimental design, we tested the effects of multiple pollution sources (fish farms, marinas, sewerage, and stormwater) on translocated and locally established algal assemblages, while also considering the influence of invertebrate grazers. Marinas directly affected algal assemblages and also reduced densities of amphipods and other invertebrate mesograzers. Fish farms and sewerage outfalls tended to directly increase local establishment of foliose and leathery algae without any indication of changes in herbivory. Overall, pollution impacts on algae did not appear to be strongly mediated by changes in grazer abundance. Instead, mesograzer abundance was closely linked to availability of more complex algal forms, with populations likely to decline concurrently with loss of complex algal habitats. Macrograzers, such as sea urchins, showed no signs of a negative impact from any pollution source; hence, the influence of this group on algal dynamics is probably persistent and independent of moderate pollution levels, potentially adding to the direct impacts of pollution on algal beds in urbanised environments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Temporal variability in epifaunal assemblages associated with temperate gorgonian gardens

    KAUST Repository

    Dias, I.M.

    2015-10-19

    The present study is one of the few that investigate the temporal variability of epifaunal assemblages associated with coral species, particularly the octocorals Eunicella gazella and Leptogorgia lusitanica in south Portugal. The results suggest time rather than colony size as a primary driver of the ecological patterns of these assemblages, which were dominated by amphipods, molluscs and polychaetes. Temporal variability was linked to changes in environmental parameters, namely temperature, chlorophyll a and particulate organic carbon. Hence, temporal variability must be taken into account for the design of future biodiversity assessment studies, as different patterns may be observed depending on the sampling time. Associated epifaunal assemblages were consistently dominated by resident species (i.e. species present in all sampling periods) and a peak of rare species was observed in the transition from spring to summer following the increase of seawater temperature. Turnover was particularly high in the transition between the spring and summer periods. In both hosts, turnover was higher in the small sized colonies, which generally harboured less diverse and less abundant assemblages which also differed from those inhabiting larger size colonies. The high levels of diversity associated with gorgonian colonies highlights the need for the conservation of this priority habitat.

  7. Comparing sediment quality in Spanish littoral areas affected by acute (Prestige, 2002) and chronic (Bay of Algeciras) oil spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales-Caselles, C.; Kalman, J.; Riba, I.; DelValls, T.A.

    2007-01-01

    The quality of sediments collected from two areas of the Spanish coast affected by different sources of contaminants has been compared in this study. The areas studied are the coast of Galicia affected by the oil spill from the tanker Prestige (November 2002) and the Gulf of Cadiz which suffers continuous inputs of contaminants from industries located in the area and from oil spills. Contamination by several chemicals (metals, PCBs and PAHs) that bind to sediments was analyzed, and two toxicity tests (Microtox[reg]) and amphipod 10-day bioassay) were conducted. PAHs were identified as the compounds responsible for the toxic effects. Results show differences between an acute impact related to the sinking of the tanker Prestige and the chronic impact associated with continuous oil spills associated with the maritime and industrial activities in the Bay of Algeciras, this being the most polluted part of the two coastal areas studied in this work. - Littoral sediments affected by low or moderated but continuous oil spills are more polluted than those affected by accidental oil spills such as the Prestige

  8. Bruce nuclear power development (BNPD) postoperational aquatic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of three years of postoperational aquatic study conducted between 1979 and 1981 at the Bruce Nuclear Power Development site. An increase in the rate of organic and inorganic sedimentation during the summer was noted, and was possibly related to construction activity at the Bruce GS 'B' intake site. Vertical thermal stratification persisted later in the year at the 7 m contour of Bruce GS 'A' discharge than at other locations sampled. Water quality conditions reflected the oliogtrophic state of Lake Huron. Several changes were noted in the biotic community. The taxonomic composition of attached algae, zooplankton and benthic macroinvertebrates varied between sampling years. The number of common naids, amphipods and the trichopteran Cheumatopsyche increased substantially in the 1981 rock cage collections. The relative abundance of adult walleye, channel catfish and round whitefish in gill nets increased, with the former two species being more abundant (15 fish per net in September, 1980, and 33 fish per net in July, 1981, respectively) at the 3 m contour of the Bruce GS 'A' discharge transect than at other shoreline sampling locations

  9. Import and export fluxes of macrozooplankton are taxa- and season-dependent at Jiuduansha marsh, Yangtze River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Haiming; Sheng, Qiang; Chu, Tianjiang; Wang, Sikai; Wu, Jihua

    2015-09-01

    Macrozooplankton may play important roles in influencing nutrient exchange between salt marsh and nearby estuarine ecosystems through predator-prey interactions and their transport by tidal flows. In this study, macrozooplankton transport through year-round monthly sampling was investigated in a salt marsh creek of the Yangtze River estuary. Twenty-one orders of macrozooplankton were captured. Calanoida and Decapoda were dominant and numerically comprised 59.59% and 37.59% respectively of the total captured macrozooplankton throughout the year. Decapoda mainly occurred in April, May and June. In other months, the Calanoida contributed over 90% of the total individuals. The annual Ferrari index (I) for total individual number of macrozooplankton was 0.27, which generally supports the viewpoint that salt marshes are sources of zooplankton. The salt marsh was mainly a source for decapods and mysids, possibly because of larval release in their breeding seasons. The marsh was also a source for amphipods, probably because some benthic forms became transient planktonic forms during tidal water flushing. Copepods and fish larvae exhibited net import into the salt marsh, which may result from predation from salt marsh settlers or retention in the salt marsh. Monthly Ferrari index (I) estimations revealed that the role of the salt marsh as a sink or source of macrozooplankton was time-dependent, which is related to the life history of animals. This study showed that whether the salt marsh zooplankton act as energy importers or exporters is group/taxa-dependent and time-dependent.

  10. First cellular approach of the effects of global warming on groundwater organisms: a study of the HSP70 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson-Proch, Céline; Morales, Anne; Hervant, Frédéric; Konecny, Lara; Moulin, Colette; Douady, Christophe J

    2010-05-01

    Whereas the consequences of global warming at population or community levels are well documented, studies at the cellular level are still scarce. The study of the physiological or metabolic effects of such small increases in temperature (between +2 degrees C and +6 degrees C) is difficult because they are below the amplitude of the daily or seasonal thermal variations occurring in most environments. In contrast, subterranean biotopes are highly thermally buffered (+/-1 degrees C within a year), and underground water organisms could thus be particularly well suited to characterise cellular responses of global warming. To this purpose, we studied genes encoding chaperone proteins of the HSP70 family in amphipod crustaceans belonging to the ubiquitous subterranean genus Niphargus. An HSP70 sequence was identified in eight populations of two complexes of species of the Niphargus genus (Niphargus rhenorhodanensis and Niphargus virei complexes). Expression profiles were determined for one of these by reverse transcription and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, confirming the inducible nature of this gene. An increase in temperature of 2 degrees C seemed to be without effect on N. rhenorhodanensis physiology, whereas a heat shock of +6 degrees C represented an important thermal stress for these individuals. Thus, this study shows that although Niphargus individuals do not undergo any daily or seasonal thermal variations in underground water, they display an inducible HSP70 heat shock response. This controlled laboratory-based physiological experiment constitutes a first step towards field investigations of the cellular consequences of global warming on subterranean organisms.

  11. Acute toxicity of pyraclostrobin and trifloxystrobin to Hyalella azteca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shane A; McMurry, Scott T; Smith, Loren M; Belden, Jason B

    2013-07-01

    Fungicide application rates on row crop agriculture have increased across the United States, and subsequently, contamination of adjacent wetlands can occur through spray drift or field runoff. To investigate fungicide toxicity, Hyalella azteca amphipods were exposed to 2 fungicide formulations, Headline and Stratego, and their active strobilurin ingredients, pyraclostrobin and trifloxystrobin. Water-only exposures resulted in similar median lethal concentration (LC50; 20-25 µg/L) values for formulations and strobilurin ingredients, suggesting that toxicity is due to strobilurin ingredients. These values were below concentrations that could occur following spray drift over embedded cropland wetlands. When fungicides were added to overlying water of sediment-water microcosms, toxicity was reduced by 500% for Headline and 160% for Stratego, compared with water-only exposures, based on the total amount of fungicide added to the systems. In addition, when fungicides were added to sediment prior to the addition of water, the reduction in toxicity was even greater, with no toxicity occurring at environmentally relevant levels. Differences in toxicity among exposure groups were explained by dissipation from water as toxicity values based on measured water concentrations were within 20% between all systems. The present study reinforces previous studies that Headline and Stratego are toxic to nontarget aquatic organisms. However, the presence of sediment is likely to ameliorate some toxicity of fungicide formulations, especially if spraying occurs prior to wetland inundation. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  12. Sediment contaminants and biological effects in southern California: Use of a multivariate statistical approach to assess biological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxon, C.L.; Barnett, A.M.; Diener, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    This study attempts to predict biological toxicity and benthic community impact in sediments collected from two southern California sites. Contaminant concentrations and grain size were evaluated as predictors using a two-step multivariate approach. The first step used principal component analysis (PCA) to describe contamination type and magnitude present at each site. Four dominant PC vectors, explaining 88% of the total variance, each corresponded to a unique physical and/or chemical signature. The four PC vectors, in decreasing order of importance, were: (1) high molecular weight polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), most likely from combusted or weathered petroleum; (2) low molecular weight alkylated PAH, primarily from weathered fuel product; (3) low molecular weight nonalkylated PAH, indicating a fresh petroleum-related origin; and (4) fine-grained sediments and metals. The second step used stepwise regression analysis to predict individual biological effects (dependent) variables using the four PC vectors as independent variables. Results showed that sediment grain size alone was the best predictor of amphipod mortality. Contaminant vectors showed discrete depositional areas independent of grain size. Neither contaminant concentrations nor PCA vectors were good predictors of biological effects, most likely due to the low concentrations in sediments

  13. GENOTOXICITY OF SHALLOW WATERS NEAR THE BRAZILIAN ANTARCTIC STATION "COMANDANTE FERRAZ" (EACF, ADMIRALTY BAY, KING GEORGE ISLAND, ANTARCTICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur José da Silva Rocha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Series of biomonitoring surveys were undertaken weekly in February 2012 to investigate the genotoxicity of the shallow waters around the Brazilian Antarctic Station "Comandante Ferraz" (EACF. The comet assay was applied to assess the damage to the DNA of hemocytes of the crustacean amphipods Gondogeneia antarctica collected from shallow waters near the Fuel Tanks (FT and Sewage Treatment Outflow (STO of the research station, and compare it to the DNA damage of animals from Punta Plaza (PPL and Yellow Point (YP, natural sites far from the EACF defined as experimental controls. The damage to the DNA of hemocytes of G. antarctica was not significantly different between sites in the biomonitoring surveys I and II. In survey III, the damage to the DNA of animals captured in shallow waters near the Fuel Tanks (FT and Sewage Treatment Outflow (STO was significantly higher than that of the control site of Punta Plaza (PPL. In biomonitoring survey IV, a significant difference was detected only between the FT and PPL sites. Results demonstrated that the shallow waters in front of the station may be genotoxic and that the comet assay and hemocytes of G. antarctica are useful tools for assessing genotoxicity in biomonitoring studies of Antarctic marine coastal habitats.

  14. Remote in vivo stress assessment of aquatic animals with microencapsulated biomarkers for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkov, Anton; Shchapova, Ekaterina; Bedulina, Daria; Baduev, Boris; Borvinskaya, Ekaterina; Meglinski, Igor; Timofeyev, Maxim

    2016-11-01

    Remote in vivo scanning of physiological parameters is a major trend in the development of new tools for the fields of medicine and animal physiology. For this purpose, a variety of implantable optical micro- and nanosensors have been designed for potential medical applications. At the same time, the important area of environmental sciences has been neglected in the development of techniques for remote physiological measurements. In the field of environmental monitoring and related research, there is a constant demand for new effective and quick techniques for the stress assessment of aquatic animals, and the development of proper methods for remote physiological measurements in vivo may significantly increase the precision and throughput of analyses in this field. In the present study, we apply pH-sensitive microencapsulated biomarkers to remotely monitor the pH of haemolymph in vivo in endemic amphipods from Lake Baikal, and we compare the suitability of this technique for stress assessment with that of common biochemical methods. For the first time, we demonstrate the possibility of remotely detecting a change in a physiological parameter in an aquatic organism under ecologically relevant stressful conditions and show the applicability of techniques using microencapsulated biomarkers for remote physiological measurements in environmental monitoring.

  15. Chemical and visual sensory systems in feeding behaviour of the Antarctic fish Ophthalmolycus amberensis (Zoarcidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Fanta

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic eelpout Ophthalmolycus amberensis occurs in Admiralty Bay (King George Island, South Shetlands, at 140-200m depth, where light intensity is low. To assess behavioural and sensory adaptations for feeding under these conditions, laboratory tests were undertaken. Dead krill, fish fillet, and live amphipods were the preferred food items. Feeding responses were mainly induced by chemical stimuli. Visual stimuli were weak elicitors, leading to a long delay in the initiation of feeding behaviour. These fishes present a large olfactory epithelium, a high density of taste buds on the snout and close to the nostrils, and a retina that contained long rods, but no cones. Food selection was observed. Varied types of taste buds were present on the lips and in the oro-pharyngeal cavity. The capacity to use a chemo-sensory system as first elicitor for food detection, either in the absence or presence of light, allows O. amberensis to efficiently exploit different habitats at the sea bottom, in all Antarctic seasons.

  16. Bioassay of Lake Onego bottom sediments toxicity based on their chemical composition and deepwater macrozoobenthos state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinkina Nataliya Michailovna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The bioassay of the toxicity of bottom sediments sampled in different areas of Lake Onega was carried out by crustaceans biotesting (Ceriodaphnia affinis Lillijeborg. It was shown that in the most areas of Lake Onega there are non-toxic bottom sediments. Toxic bottom sediments were found in Kondopogskaya Bay, intensively polluted with pulp-and-paper mill wastewaters. For the first time in the deep central part of Lake Onega the area was revealed where the toxic bottom sediments contain a high content of iron, manganese and other trace elements typical for the central areas of the lake. The mapping of the bottom of Lake Onega was accomplished, and three zones were identified based on the analysis of the data concerning the chemical composition of bottom sediments, bioassay toxicity data and the results of the deepwater macrozoobenthos assessment. For each zone the parameters of the main groups of benthos (Amphipoda, Oligochaeta, Chironomidae were defined. The first zone is located in the area of intensive anthropogenic influence (Kondopogskaya Bay, Petrozavodskaya Bay, Povenets Bay, Kizhi Skerries. The second zone is located mostly in the deep part of Petrozavodskaya Bay, where the most intensive development of amphipods is observed. The third area is identified for the first time: it is located in the central deep part of Lake Onega, where the communities of macrozoobenthos are limited by a natural toxic factor.

  17. Limiting immunopathology: Interaction between carotenoids and enzymatic antioxidant defences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, A; Saciat, C; Teixeira, M; Troussard, J-P; Motreuil, S; Moreau, J; Moret, Y

    2015-04-01

    The release of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) during the inflammatory response generates damages to host tissues, referred to as immunopathology, and is an important factor in ecological immunology. The integrated antioxidant system, comprising endogenous antioxidant enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase SOD, and catalase CAT) and dietary antioxidants (e.g. carotenoids), helps to cope with immune-mediated oxidative stress. Crustaceans store large amounts of dietary carotenoids for yet unclear reasons. While being immunostimulants and antioxidants, the interaction of these pigments with antioxidant enzymes remains unclear. Here, we tested the interaction between dietary supplementation with carotenoids and immune challenge on immune defences and the activity of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT, in the amphipod crustacean Gammarus pulex. Dietary supplementation increased the concentrations of circulating carotenoids and haemocytes in the haemolymph, while the immune response induced the consumption of circulating carotenoids and a drop of haemocyte density. Interestingly, supplemented gammarids exhibited down-regulated SOD activity but high CAT activity compared to control ones. Our study reveals specific interactions of dietary carotenoids with endogenous antioxidant enzymes, and further underlines the potential importance of carotenoids in the evolution of immunity and/or of antioxidant mechanisms in crustaceans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Diet compositions and trophic guild structure of the eastern Chukchi Sea demersal fish community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, George A.; Buckley, Troy W.; Danielson, Seth L.

    2017-01-01

    Fishes are an important link in Arctic marine food webs, connecting production of lower trophic levels to apex predators. We analyzed 1773 stomach samples from 39 fish species collected during a bottom trawl survey of the eastern Chukchi Sea in the summer of 2012. We used hierarchical cluster analysis of diet dissimilarities on 21 of the most well sampled species to identify four distinct trophic guilds: gammarid amphipod consumers, benthic invertebrate generalists, fish and shrimp consumers, and zooplankton consumers. The trophic guilds reflect dominant prey types in predator diets. We used constrained analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) to determine if variation within the composite guild diets could be explained by a suite of non-diet variables. All CAP models explained a significant proportion of the variance in the diet matrices, ranging from 7% to 25% of the total variation. Explanatory variables tested included latitude, longitude, predator length, depth, and water mass. These results indicate a trophic guild structure is present amongst the demersal fish community during summer in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Regular monitoring of the food habits of the demersal fish community will be required to improve our understanding of the spatial, temporal, and interannual variation in diet composition, and to improve our ability to identify and predict the impacts of climate change and commercial development on the structure and functioning of the Chukchi Sea ecosystem.

  19. Ensamble de crustáceos bentónicos en un lago salino tropical Benthic crustaceans assemblage in a tropical, saline lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. del Carmen Hernández

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo reconoce la composición, estructura y distribución espacial del ensamble de crustáceos bentónicos de Alchichica, un lago salino tropical ubicado en el extremo oriental del altiplano mexicano. El lago presenta una riqueza taxonómica de crustáceos bentónicos compuesta por 1 anfípodo (Hyalella azteca, 1 isópodo (Caecidotea williamsi y 2 ostrácodos (Limnocythere inopinata y Candona sp.. Comparada con otros lagos tropicales, la riqueza de especies es reducida. A pesar de lo anterior, es importante mencionar el grado elevado de endemismo representado por C. williamsi, recientemente descrita para el lago Alchichica; adicionalmente, es factible que tanto Candona como H. azteca sean especies nuevas y endémicas del lago. Los crustáceos bentónicos se distribuyen desde la zona litoral hasta la zona más profunda del lago (62 m con abundancias y riqueza taxonómica variables. Los ostrácodos fueron los crustáceos que con mayor frecuencia se recolectaron en el lago, en la zona litoral, en el talud, y en la zona profunda de la que son habitantes exclusivos. Los anfípodos constituyeron el segundo grupo en abundancia de la zona litoral y talud y estuvieron ausentes en la zona profunda. Los isópodos sólo se encuentran asociados a los depósitos de tufa, hábitat característico del lago que se extiende a lo largo del talud, por lo que con las técnicas de muestreo tradicional empleadas en el presente estudio no fueron capturados. En este ensamble de crustáceos predominan las especies de desarrollo directo y con posiciones tróficas que incluyen componentes herbívoros (H. azteca, omnívoros (C. williamsi y bacterívoros (L. inopinata y Candona sp..This work acknowledges the composition, structure and spatial distribution of the benthic crustaceans assemblage of Alchichica, a tropical saline lake located in the easternmost portion of the Mexican highlands. The benthic crustaceans' assemblage was comprised by 1 amphipod

  20. Acoustic discrimination of Southern Ocean zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, Andrew S.; Ward, Peter; Watkins, Jonathan L.; Goss, Catherine

    Acoustic surveys in the vicinity of the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia during a period of exceptionally calm weather revealed the existence of a number of horizontally extensive yet vertically discrete scattering layers in the upper 250 m of the water column. These layers were fished with a Longhurst-Hardy plankton recorder (LHPR) and a multiple-opening 8 m 2 rectangular mid-water trawl (RMT8). Analysis of catches suggested that each scattering layer was composed predominantly of a single species (biovolume>95%) of either the euphausiids Euphausia frigida or Thysanöessa macrura, the hyperiid amphipod Themisto gaudichaudii, or the eucalaniid copepod Rhincalanus gigas. Instrumentation on the nets allowed their trajectories to be reconstructed precisely, and thus catch data to be related directly to the corresponding acoustic signals. Discriminant function analysis of differences between mean volume backscattering strength at 38, 120 and 200 kHz separated echoes originating from each of the dominant scattering layers, and other signals identified as originating from Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba), with an overall correct classification rate of 77%. Using echo intensity data alone, gathered using hardware commonly employed for fishery acoustics, it is therefore possible to discriminate in situ between several zooplanktonic taxa, taxa which in some instances exhibit similar gross morphological characteristics and have overlapping length- frequency distributions. Acoustic signals from the mysid Antarctomysis maxima could also be discriminated once information on target distribution was considered, highlighting the value of incorporating multiple descriptors of echo characteristics into signal identification procedures. The ability to discriminate acoustically between zooplankton taxa could be applied to provide improved acoustic estimates of species abundance, and to enhance field studies of zooplankton ecology, distribution and species interactions.

  1. Pesticide impact study in the peri-urban horticultural area of Gran La Plata, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Loughlin, Tomás M; Peluso, Leticia; Marino, Damián J G

    2017-11-15

    Vegetable production systems are characterized by intense pesticide use, yet the effects on the surrounding environment are largely unknown and need to be studied. Given this knowledge gap, the objective of this work is to determine the impact of horticulture on a representative watercourse by conducting an integrated study of the occurrence and concentration of pesticides in bottom sediments and their relation to lethal and sublethal effects on benthic fauna. Two sampling campaigns were conducted during seasons of low and high pesticide application in five sites along the Carnaval creek, located in the peri-urban area of La Plata City (Buenos Aires, Argentina). The samples were tested for 36 pesticide compounds by GC-MS and LC-MS, and whole-sediment laboratory toxicity tests were performed using the native amphipod Hyalella curvispina. The results showed a general but variable distribution in the concentrations detected along the stream. For each sampling campaign (first/second), the total pesticide loads, measured as the sum of herbicides, insecticides and fungicides, were 1080/2329, 3715/88, and 367/5ngg -1 dw, respectively. Lethal and sublethal effects were observed in both sampling campaigns. In order to correlate both sets of results, data were assessed by multivariate analysis, including principal component analysis. The observed toxicity was considered to be mainly due to insecticides; thus, horticultural practices have an impact on nearby watercourses and can potentially endanger the benthic fauna. This is the first study in Argentina to assess the impact of pesticides on aquatic environments close to horticultural production areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Stable isotope tracing of trout hatchery carbon to sediments and foodwebs of limestone spring creeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurd, Todd M.; Jesic, Slaven; Jerin, Jessica L.; Fuller, Nathan W.; Miller, David

    2008-01-01

    Limestone springs support productive ecosystems and fisheries, yet aquaculture may modify or impair these ecosystems. We determined trout hatchery organic contribution to spring creek sediments and foodwebs with natural abundance stable isotope methods. Hatchery feed, waste, and trout were significantly enriched in δ 13 C relative to autotrophs and wild fish. Spring creek sediments were enriched in δ 13 C toward the hatchery endmember relative to reference streams without hatcheries and relative to a larger larger-order, spring-influenced stream. Contribution of hatchery C to spring creek sediments was greatest during March and associated with greatest sediment %C. Contribution of hatchery C to pollution-tolerant isopod diet was 39-51% in a stream receiving limestone spring water via hatchery effluent. Isopods of one spring creek also relied on hatchery-derived C within one month of hatchery closure. Four years later, less pollution pollution-tolerant amphipods dominated and consumed non-vascular over vascular autotrophs (86%). Isopods of a second spring creek with an active hatchery did not appear to be using hatchery matter directly, but were enriched in δ 34 S relative to a spring creek tributary with no hatchery influence. Isopods in both of these streams were relatively enriched in δ 15 N, indicating general nutrient enrichment from surrounding agricultural land use. The contribution of hatchery vs. wild fish in diet of herons and egrets was traced with δ 13 C of guano. These birds were strongly dependent on stocked trout in a spring creek with a recently closed state trout hatchery, and also near another large, state-run hatchery. Heron dependence on hatchery fish in the spring creek decreased with time since hatchery closure. Use of stable isotope natural abundance techniques in karst spring creeks can reveal stream impairment due to aquaculture, specific C sources to bio-indicating consumers, losses of farmed fish to predation, and potential exposure

  3. Incorporating bioavailability into management limits for copper in sediments contaminated by antifouling paint used in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Stuart L; Spadaro, David A; O'Brien, Dom

    2013-11-01

    Although now well embedded within many risk-based sediment quality guideline (SQG) frameworks, contaminant bioavailability is still often overlooked in assessment and management of contaminated sediments. To optimise management limits for metal contaminated sediments, we assess the appropriateness of a range methods for modifying SQGs based on bioavailability considerations. The impairment of reproduction of the amphipod, Melita plumulosa, and harpacticoid copepod, Nitocra spinipes, was assessed for sediments contaminated with copper from antifouling paint, located below aquaculture cages. The measurement of dilute acid-extractable copper (AE-Cu) was found to provide the most useful means for monitoring the risks posed by sediment copper and setting management limits. Acid-volatile sulfide was found to be ineffective as a SQG-modifying factor as these organisms live mostly at the more oxidised sediment water interface. SQGs normalised to %-silt/organic carbon were effective, but the benefits gained were too small to justify this approach. The effectiveness of SQGs based on AE-Cu was attributed to a small portion of the total copper being present in potentially bioavailable forms (typicallycopper was likely present as paint flakes in the form of copper (I) oxide, the active ingredient of the antifoulant formulation. While the concentrations of paint-associated copper are very high in some sediments, as the transformation of this form of copper to AE-Cu appears slow, monitoring and management limits should assess the more bioavailable AE-Cu forms, and further efforts be made to limit the release of paint particles into the environment. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Composição da fauna cavernícola brasileira, com uma análise preliminar da distribuição dos taxons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Trajano

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available New data on Brazilian cave fauna are added to previous surveys and the relative abundance and distribution of the cavernicolous taxa is discussed. Terrestrial representatives of several arthropod families and genera are common in both tropical and subtropical Brazilian caves: Endecous and Eidmanacris crickets, Reduviidae heteropterans, Carabidae, Catopinae and Ptilodactylidae beetles, dipterans such as the Chironomidae, Keroplatidae, Phoridae and Drosophilidae, Hydropsychidae trichopterans, Pseudonnanolenidae and Chelodesnidae millipedes, Plato, Ctenus, Loxosceles and Blechroscelis spiders, Pachylinae opilionids, Chernetidae pseudoscorpions and acarians such as the Macrochelidae and Uropodidae. Other taxa are mainly or exclusively tropical Blattelidae, Blattidae and BlaberidaE cockroaches, Histeridae beetles, Noctuoidea moths, social insects as termites and ants, Styloniscidae isopods, Migalomorpha spiders, Amblypigi On the other hand, Psauridae spiders, Goniosoma and Tricommatinae opilionids, Elmidae beetles, and Philosciidae isopods seems to be mainly subtropical. Brazilian aquatic cave fauna seems to be less diversified than the terrestrial one. Siluriform fishes such as pimelodids, trichomycterids and loricariids predominate throughout the country, besides decapod (Macrobrachium shrimps, Potamidae crabs, Aegla anomurans, the latter exclusive of subtropical caves and amphipod (Spelaeogammarus, in tropical caves, and Hyalella crustaceans. Insect larvae (e.g. Elmidae coleopterans, Nematocera dipterans, trichopterans and adults (e.g. Veliidae and Naucoridae heteropterans, Dytiscidae coleopterans, oligochaetes and gastropods such as the Hydrobiidae, are also relatively common. Blechroscelis spiders, Goniosoma opilionids, Zelurus heteropterans, Eidmanacris crickets, Keroplatidae dipterans and Macrobrachium shrimps, among others, live next to the entrance zone in the majority of the caves. But, these animals become troglofiles under certain

  5. Comparison of methods for conducting marine and estuarine sediment porewater toxicity tests—extraction, storage, and handling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, R.S.; Chapman, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    A series of studies was conducted to compare different porewater extraction techniques and to evaluate the effects of sediment and porewater storage conditions on the toxicity of pore water, using assays with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata. If care is taken in the selection of materials, several different porewater extraction techniques (pressurized squeezing, centrifugation, vacuum) yield samples with similar toxicity. Where the primary contaminants of concern are highly hydrophobic organic compounds, centrifugation is the method of choice for minimizing the loss of contaminants during the extraction procedure. No difference was found in the toxicity of pore water obtained with the Teflon® and polyvinyl chloride pressurized extraction devices. Different types of filters in the squeeze extraction devices apparently adsorbed soluble contaminants to varying degrees. The amount of fine suspended particulate material remaining in the pore water after the initial extraction varied among the methods. For most of the sediments tested, freezing and thawing did not affect the toxicity of porewater samples obtained by the pressurized squeeze extraction method. Pore water obtained by other methods (centrifugation, vacuum) and frozen without additional removal of suspended particulates by centrifugation may exhibit increased toxicity compared with the unfrozen sample.The toxicity of pore water extracted from refrigerated (4°C) sediments exhibited substantial short-term (days, weeks) changes. Similarly, sediment pore water extracted over time from a simulated amphipod solid-phase toxicity test changed substantially in toxicity. For the sediments tested, the direction and magnitude of change in toxicity of pore water extracted from both refrigerated and solid-phase test sediments was unpredictable.

  6. Lake whitefish diet, condition, and energy density in Lake Champlain and the lower four Great Lakes following dreissenid invasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Seth J.; Marsden, J. Ellen; Lantry, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis support some of the most valuable commercial freshwater fisheries in North America. Recent growth and condition decreases in Lake Whitefish populations in the Great Lakes have been attributed to the invasion of the dreissenid mussels, zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha and quagga mussels D. bugensis, and the subsequent collapse of the amphipod, Diporeia, a once-abundant high energy prey source. Since 1993, Lake Champlain has also experienced the invasion and proliferation of zebra mussels, but in contrast to the Great Lakes, Diporeia were not historically abundant. We compared the diet, condition, and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain after the dreissenid mussel invasion to values for those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario. Lake Whitefish were collected using gill nets and bottom trawls, and their diets were quantified seasonally. Condition was estimated using Fulton's condition factor (K) and by determining energy density. In contrast to Lake Whitefish from some of the Great Lakes, those from Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish did not show a dietary shift towards dreissenid mussels, but instead fed primarily on fish eggs in spring, Mysis diluviana in summer, and gastropods and sphaeriids in fall and winter. Along with these dietary differences, the condition and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain were high compared with those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario after the dreissenid invasion, and were similar to Lake Whitefish from Lake Erie; fish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario consumed dreissenids, whereas fish from Lake Erie did not. Our comparisons of Lake Whitefish populations in Lake Champlain to those in the Great Lakes indicate that diet and condition of Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish were not negatively affected by the dreissenid mussel invasion.

  7. Disentangling the effects of solar radiation, wrack macroalgae and beach macrofauna on associated bacterial assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodil, Iván F; Fernandes, Joana P; Mucha, Ana P

    2015-12-01

    Wrack detritus plays a significant role in shaping community dynamics and food-webs on sandy beaches. Macroalgae is the most abundant beach wrack, and it is broken down by the combination of environmental processes, macrofauna grazing, and microbial degradation before returning to the sea as nutrients. The role of solar radiation, algal species and beach macrofauna as ecological drivers for bacterial assemblages associated to wrack was investigated by experimental manipulation of Laminaria ochroleuca and Sargassum muticum. We examined the effects of changes in solar radiation on wrack-associated bacterial assemblages by using cut-off filters: PAR + UVA + UVB (280-700 nm; PAB), PAR + UVA (320-700 nm; PA), PAR (400-700 nm; P), and a control with no filter (C). Results showed that moderate changes in UVR are capable to promote substantial differences on bacterial assemblages so that wrack patches exposed to full sunlight treatments (C and PAB) showed more similar assemblages among them than compared to patches exposed to treatments that blocked part of the solar radiation (P and PA). Our findings also suggested that specific algal nutrient quality-related variables (i.e. nitrogen, C:N ratio and phlorotannins) are main determinants of bacterial dynamics on wrack deposits. We showed a positive relationship between beach macrofauna, especially the most abundant and active wrack-users, the amphipod Talitrus saltator and the coleopteran Phaleria cadaverina, and both bacterial abundance and richness. Moderate variations in natural solar radiation and shifts in the algal species entering beach ecosystems can modify the role of wrack in the energy-flow of nearshore environments with unknown ecological implications for coastal ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Subcatchment deltas and upland features influence multiscale aquatic ecosystem recovery in damaged landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielstra, Brian W; Arnott, Shelley E; Gunn, John M

    2017-12-01

    Assessing biological recovery in damaged aquatic environments requires the consideration of multiple spatial and temporal scales. Past research has focused on assessing lake recovery from atmospheric or catchment disturbance at regional or catchment levels. Studies have also rarely considered the influences of adjacent terrestrial characteristics on within-lake habitats, such as subcatchment delta confluences. We used Hyalella azteca, a ubiquitous freshwater amphipod, as a sensitive indicator to assess the importance of local subcatchment scale factors in the context of multiscale lake recovery within the metal mining region of Sudbury, Canada following a period of major reductions in atmospheric pollution. At the regional scale, data from repeated surveys of 40 lakes showed higher probabilities of H. azteca occurrence with higher lake water conductivity, alkalinity, and pH and lower metal concentrations. The importance of metals decreased through time and the importance of higher conductivity, alkalinity, and pH increased. At the subcatchment scale, a subset of six lakes sampled across a colonization gradient revealed higher H. azteca abundances at subcatchment delta sites than non-delta sites in early colonization stages, and that abundance at delta sites was correlated with both within-lake habitat and terrestrial subcatchment characteristics. For example, wetland cover reduced the strength of positive associations between H. azteca abundance and macrophyte density. A single lake from this subset also revealed higher abundances at delta sites associated with higher concentrations of terrestrial organic matter and larger subcatchments. Our results demonstrate that factors affecting recovery can change with the scale of study, and that managing terrestrial-aquatic linkages is important for facilitating recovery processes within damaged lake ecosystems. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Combined effects of road salt and an insecticide on wetland communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoler, Aaron B; Walker, Brent M; Hintz, William D; Jones, Devin K; Lind, Lovisa; Mattes, Brian M; Schuler, Matthew S; Relyea, Rick A

    2017-03-01

    As the numbers of chemical contaminants in freshwater ecosystems increase, it is important to understand whether contaminants interact in ecologically important ways. The present study investigated the independent and interactive effects of 2 contaminants that frequently co-occur in freshwater environments among higher latitudes, including a commonly applied insecticide (carbaryl) and road salt (NaCl). The hypothesis was that the addition of either contaminant would result in a decline in zooplankton, an algal bloom, and the subsequent decline of both periphyton and periphyton consumers. Another hypothesis was that combining the contaminants would result in synergistic effects on community responses. Outdoor mesocosms were used with communities that included phytoplankton, periphyton, zooplankton, amphipods, clams, snails, and tadpoles. Communities were exposed to 4 environmentally relevant concentrations of salt (27 mg Cl - L -1 , 77 mg Cl - L -1 , 277 mg Cl - L -1 , and 727 mg Cl - L -1 ) fully crossed with 4 carbaryl treatments (ethanol, 0 µg L -1 , 5 µg L -1 , and 50 µg L -1 ) over 57 d. Contaminants induced declines in rotifer and cladoceran zooplankton, but only carbaryl induced an algal bloom. Consumers exhibited both positive and negative responses to contaminants, which were likely the result of both indirect community interactions and direct toxicity. In contrast to the hypothesis, no synergistic effects were found, although copepod densities declined when high concentrations of both chemicals were combined. The results suggest that low concentrations of salt and carbaryl are likely to have mostly independent effects on aquatic communities. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:771-779. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  10. Behavioural adaptations of two sympatric sandhoppers living on a mesotidal European Atlantic sandy beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, Filipa; Marques, João Carlos; Scapini, Felicita

    2014-06-01

    Behavioural adaptations of supralittoral species on sandy beaches are expressed as responses to environmental changes and constitute a key factor in their survival and evolution. Two sympatric talitrid amphipods (Talitrus saltator and Britorchestia brito) from a mesotidal exposed sandy beach on the European Atlantic coast (Portugal) were compared as regards orientation and littoral zonation patterns under natural conditions. Orientation experiments were carried out during spring and summer 2011 and 2012 at Quiaios beach, a highly dynamic exposed sandy beach. Multiple regression models were fitted to the angular data and the environmental effects on orientation were investigated for each species. Both talitrids were shown to be well orientated towards the shoreline and finely adapted to the mesotidal environment but a different use of local cues and climatic features between the two species was apparent. T. saltator showed a lower precision in the orientation performance (with a bimodal distribution sea- and land-wards), with less dependence on the sun cues and higher dependence on climatic features. In addition, the zonation of T. saltator was across the land-sea axis during both seasons. For B. brito the landscape vision, sun visibility and the tidal range enhanced the orientation to the shoreline. On this mesotidal Atlantic beach, T. saltator appeared to have a more flexible orientation with respect to B. brito, which appeared to be more dependent on the conditions offered by the intertidal zone, a behaviour confirmed by its restricted zonation below the high tide mark. Consequently, T. saltator showed a more flexible behaviour that may be considered an important evolutionary adaptation to dynamic and mesotidal sandy beaches.

  11. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 A of -42-foot project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J A; Word, J Q; Pinza, M R; Mayhew, H L; Barrows, E S; Lefkovitz, L F [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-09-01

    The Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted a study to determine whether dredged sediments from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors were suitable for ocean disposal. Nineteen test treatments, six reference treatments, and three control treatments were tested for physical/chemical parameters, water column effects, dredged- sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation potential. Physical/chemical parameters were analyzed at each site and each composite sediment to a depth of -44 ft MLLW. These parameters included analysis for geological characteristics, conventional sediment measurements (grain size, total volatile solids, total organic carbon, oil and grease, and total petroleum hydrocarbons), metals,, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pesticides, butyltins, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Physical/chemical data were used in support of the toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, but were not used in the decision-making criteria described in the Draft Implementation manual under Tier III testing. To evaluate water column effects, MSL conducted suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) test using the mysid shrimp Holmesimysis sculpta, speckled sanddab citharichtys stigmaeus, and larvae of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Both a 48-h and a 96-h test were performed. The MSL evaluated dredged-sediment toxicity by conducting a total of eight solid-phase toxicity tests using the following organisms: the bivalve clam Macoma nasuta, the polychaete worm Nepthys caecoides, the speckled sanddab C. stigmaeus, and the amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius. Test duration ranged from 10 to 28 days. Bioaccumulation potential was evaluated in the 28-day M. Nasuta and N. caecoides solid-phase exposures by measuring the contaminants of concern present in their tissues after exposure to test, reference, and control sediments. This report contains the data and test results.

  12. The impact of an industrial effluent on the water quality, submersed macrophytes and benthic macroinvertebrates in a dammed river of Central Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Cristina; Camargo, Julio A

    2013-10-01

    This research was conducted in the middle Duratón River (Central Spain), in the vicinity of Burgomillodo Reservoir. An industrial effluent enters the river 300 m downstream from the dam. Fluoride and turbidity levels significantly increased downstream from the effluent, these levels being to some extent affected by differential water releases from the dam. The community of submersed macrophytes exhibited slighter responses and, accordingly, lower discriminatory power than the community of benthic macroinvertebrates, this indicating that metrics and indices based on macroinvertebrates may be more suitable for the biological monitoring of water pollution and habitat degradation in dammed rivers receiving industrial effluents. However, in relation to fluoride bioaccumulation at the organism level, macrophytes (Fontinalis antipyretica and Potamogeton pectinatus) were as suitable bioindicators of fluoride pollution as macroinvertebrates (Ancylus fluviatilis and Pacifastacus leniusculus). Fluoride bioaccumulation in both hard and soft tissues of these aquatic organisms could be used as suitable bioindicator of fluoride pollution (even lower than 1 mg F(-)L(-1)) in freshwater ecosystems. Echinogammarus calvus exhibited a great sensitivity to the toxicity of fluoride ions, with a 96 h LC₅₀ of 7.5 mg F(-)L(-1) and an estimated safe concentration of 0.56 mg F(-)L(-1). The great capacity of E. calvus to take up and retain fluoride during exposures to fluoride ions would be a major cause of its great sensitivity to fluoride toxicity. It is concluded that the observed fluoride pollution might be partly responsible for the absence of this native amphipod downstream from the industrial effluent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Changing patterns in water toxicity associated with current use pesticides in three California agriculture regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian S; Phillips, Bryn M; Voorhees, Jennifer P; Deng, Xin; Geraci, Jeff; Worcester, Karen; Tjeerdema, Ron S

    2018-03-01

    Regulation of agriculture irrigation water discharges in California, USA, is assessed and controlled by its 9 Regional Water Quality Control Boards under the jurisdiction of the California State Water Resources Control Board. Each Regional Water Board has developed programs to control pesticides in runoff as part of the waste discharge requirements implemented through each region's Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program. The present study assessed how pesticide use patterns differ in the Imperial (Imperial County) and the Salinas and Santa Maria (Monterey County) valleys, which host 3 of California's prime agriculture areas. Surface-water toxicity associated with current use pesticides was monitored at several sites in these areas in 2014 and 2015, and results were linked to changes in pesticide use patterns in these areas. Pesticide use patterns appeared to coincide with differences in the way agriculture programs were implemented by the 2 respective Regional Water Quality Control Boards, and these programs differed in the 2 Water Board Regions. Different pesticide use patterns affected the occurrence of pesticides in agriculture runoff, and this influenced toxicity test results. Greater detection frequency and higher concentrations of the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos were detected in agriculture runoff in Imperial County compared to Monterey County, likely due to more rigorous monitoring requirements for growers using this pesticide in Monterey County. Monterey County agriculture runoff contained toxic concentrations of pyrethroid and neonicotinoid pesticides, which impacted amphipods (Hyalella azteca) and midge larvae (Chironomus dilutus) in toxicity tests. Study results illustrate how monitoring strategies need to evolve as regulatory actions affect change in pesticide use and demonstrate the importance of using toxicity test indicator species appropriate for the suite of contaminants in runoff in order to accurately assess environmental risk. Integr

  14. Recent advances in plant-herbivore interactions [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deron E. Burkepile

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant-herbivore interactions shape community dynamics across marine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats. From amphipods to elephants and from algae to trees, plant-herbivore relationships are the crucial link generating animal biomass (and human societies from mere sunlight. These interactions are, thus, pivotal to understanding the ecology and evolution of virtually any ecosystem. Here, we briefly highlight recent advances in four areas of plant-herbivore interactions: (1 plant defense theory, (2 herbivore diversity and ecosystem function, (3 predation risk aversion and herbivory, and (4 how a changing climate impacts plant-herbivore interactions. Recent advances in plant defense theory, for example, highlight how plant life history and defense traits affect and are affected by multiple drivers, including enemy pressure, resource availability, and the local plant neighborhood, resulting in trait-mediated feedback loops linking trophic interactions with ecosystem nutrient dynamics. Similarly, although the positive effect of consumer diversity on ecosystem function has long been recognized, recent advances using DNA barcoding to elucidate diet, and Global Positioning System/remote sensing to determine habitat selection and impact, have shown that herbivore communities are probably even more functionally diverse than currently realized. Moreover, although most diversity-function studies continue to emphasize plant diversity, herbivore diversity may have even stronger impacts on ecosystem multifunctionality. Recent studies also highlight the role of risk in plant-herbivore interactions, and risk-driven trophic cascades have emerged as landscape-scale patterns in a variety of ecosystems. Perhaps not surprisingly, many plant-herbivore interactions are currently being altered by climate change, which affects plant growth rates and resource allocation, expression of chemical defenses, plant phenology, and herbivore metabolism and behavior. Finally

  15. [Feeding habits of sphoeroides testudineus (Perciformes: Tetraodontidae) in the lagoon system of Ria Lagartos, Yucatán, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Espínola, Ariel Adriano; Vega-Cendejas, Maria Eugenia

    2013-06-01

    Sphoeroides testudineus is a dominant species in the coastal systems of Yucatán. Because of its wide distribution, occurrence and abundance performs an important functional role in coastal ecosystems. We assessed the trophic preferences and trophic-level variation in space and time for this species in Ria Lagartos lagoon, an hyperhaline ecosystem located Northwest of Yucatan Peninsula. The specimens were collected bimonthly during two annual periods (2004-2005 and 2007-2008) in 23 sites distributed along the system into four zones (marine, channel, Coloradas West and Coloradas East). Spatial and seasonal trophic variations were evaluated using canonical correspondence analysis (ACC). In a total of 382 individuals, 68 food resources included in 20 trophic groups were obtained. Higher relative importance index values (IIR) were obtained for bivalves, gastropods and macrophytes. Seasonal trophic variation showed that bivalves and gastropods were consumed along the year, while macrophytes were a preferential food during rains and windy seasons. Spatial variation indicates lower gastropods consumption at the inner zone of the system, and the opposite ocurred with bivalves. The consumption ofmacrophytes may be due to their greater abundance during rains and in the channel zone. The ACC showed that spatial trophic variation was due because of the abundance of the preferential preys (bivalves, gastropods), while seasonal differences by the secondary (amphipods, eggs, nematodes, brachyuran, detritus, nematodes). The results contribute to the biological knowledge of the species and highlight the importance and trophic function of S testudineus for the energy transfer from the benthos to higher trophic levels of the food chain.

  16. 3. A Closed Aquatic System for Space and Earth Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slenzka, K.; Duenne, M.; Jastorff, B.; Ranke, J.; Schirmer, M.

    Increased durations in space travel as well as living in extreme environments are requiring reliable life support systems in general and bioregenerative ones in detail. Waste water management, air revitalization and food production are obviously center goals in this research, however, in addition a potential influence by chemicals, drugs etc. released to the closed environment must be considered. On this basis ecotoxicological data become more and more important for CELSS (Closed Ecological Life Support System) development and performance. The experiences gained during the last years in our research group lead to the development of an aquatic habitat, called AquaHab (formerly CBRU), which is a closed, self-sustaining system with a total water volume of 9 liters. In the frame program of a R&D project funded by the state of Bremen and OHB System, AquaHab is under adaptation to become an ecotoxicological research unit containing for example Japanese Medaka or Zebra Fish, amphipods, water snails and water plants. Test runs were standardized and analytical methods were developed. Beside general biological and water chemical parameters, activity measurements of biotransforming enzymes (G6PDH, CytP450-Oxidase, Peroxidase) and cell viability tests as well as residual analysis of the applied substance and respective metabolites were selected as evaluation criteria. In a first series of tests low doses effects of TBT (Tributyltin, 0.1 to 20 μgTBT/l nominal concentration) were analyzed. The AquaHab and data obtained for applied environmental risk assessment will be presented at the assembly.

  17. Feeding Ecology of Northeast Atlantic Mackerel, Norwegian Spring-Spawning Herring and Blue Whiting in the Norwegian Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneko Bachiller

    Full Text Available The Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS herring (Clupea harengus, blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou and Northeast Atlantic (NEA mackerel (Scomber scombrus are extremely abundant pelagic planktivores that feed in the Norwegian Sea (NS during spring and summer. This study investigated the feeding ecology and diet composition of these commercially important fish stocks on the basis of biological data, including an extensive set of stomach samples in combination with hydrographical data, zooplankton samples and acoustic abundance data from 12 stock monitoring surveys carried out in 2005-2010. Mackerel were absent during the spring, but had generally high feeding overlap with herring in the summer, with a diet mainly based on calanoid copepods, especially Calanus finmarchicus, as well as a similar diet width. Stomach fullness in herring diminished from spring to summer and feeding incidence was lower than that of mackerel in summer. However, stomach fullness did not differ between the two species, indicating that herring maintain an equally efficient pattern of feeding as mackerel in summer, but on a diet that is less dominated by copepods and is more reliant on larger prey. Blue whiting tended to have a low dietary overlap with mackerel and herring, with larger prey such as euphausiids and amphipods dominating, and stomach fullness and feeding incidence increasing with length. For all the species, feeding incidence increased with decreasing temperature, and for mackerel so did stomach fullness, indicating that feeding activity is highest in areas associated with colder water masses. Significant annual effects on diet composition and feeding-related variables suggested that the three species are able to adapt to different food and environmental conditions. These annual effects are likely to have an important impact on the predation pressure on different plankton groups and the carrying capacity of individual systems, and emphasise the importance of

  18. DNA barcoding of Arctic Ocean holozooplankton for species identification and recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucklin, Ann; Hopcroft, Russell R.; Kosobokova, Ksenia N.; Nigro, Lisa M.; Ortman, Brian D.; Jennings, Robert M.; Sweetman, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Zooplankton species diversity and distribution are important measures of environmental change in the Arctic Ocean, and may serve as 'rapid-responders' of climate-induced changes in this fragile ecosystem. The scarcity of taxonomists hampers detailed and up-to-date monitoring of these patterns for the rarer and more problematic species. DNA barcodes (short DNA sequences for species recognition and discovery) provide an alternative approach to accurate identification of known species, and can speed routine analysis of zooplankton samples. During 2004-2008, zooplankton samples were collected during cruises to the central Arctic Ocean and Chukchi Sea. A ˜700 base-pair region of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) gene was amplified and sequenced for 82 identified specimens of 41 species, including cnidarians (six hydrozoans, one scyphozoan), arthropod crustaceans (five amphipods, 24 copepods, one decapod, and one euphausiid); two chaetognaths; and one nemertean. Phylogenetic analysis used the Neighbor-Joining algorithm with Kimura-2-Parameter (K-2-P) distances, with 1000-fold bootstrapping. K-2-P genetic distances between individuals of the same species ranged from 0.0 to 0.2; genetic distances between species ranged widely from 0.1 to 0.7. The mtCOI gene tree showed monophyly (at 100% bootstrap value) for each of the 26 species for which more than one individual was analyzed. Of seven genera for which more than one species was analyzed, four were shown to be monophyletic; three genera were not resolved. At higher taxonomic levels, only the crustacean order Copepoda was resolved, with bootstrap value of 83%. The mtCOI barcodes accurately discriminated and identified known species of 10 taxonomic groups of Arctic Ocean holozooplankton. A comprehensive DNA barcode database for the estimated 300 described species of Arctic holozooplankton will allow rapid assessment of species diversity and distribution in this climate-vulnerable ocean ecosystem.

  19. Integrated assessment of the impacts of agricultural drainwater in the Salinas River (California, USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, B.S.; Hunt, J.W.; Phillips, B.M.; Nicely, P.A.; Vlaming, V. de; Connor, V.; Richard, N.; Tjeerdema, R.S

    2003-08-01

    Invertebrate mortality was correlated with levels of water and sediment contaminatioin in the Salinas River. - The Salinas River is the largest of the three rivers that drain into the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary in central California. Large areas of this watershed are cultivated year-round in row crops and previous laboratory studies have demonstrated that acute toxicity of agricultural drainwater to Ceriodaphnia dubia is caused by the organophosphate (OP) pesticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon. In the current study, we used a combination of ecotoxicologic tools to investigate incidence of chemical contamination and toxicity in waters and sediments in the river downstream of a previously uncharacterized agricultural drainage creek system. Water column toxicity was investigated using a cladoceran C. dubia while sediment toxicity was investigated using an amphipod Hyalella azteca. Ecological impacts of drainwater were investigated using bioassessments of macroinvertebrate community structure. The results indicated that Salinas River water downstream of the agricultural drain is acutely toxic to Ceriodaphnia, and toxicity to this species was highly correlated with combined toxic units (TUs) of chlorpyrifos and diazinon. Laboratory tests were used to demonstrate that sediments in this system were acutely toxic to H. azteca, which is a resident genus. Macroinvertebrate community structure was moderately impacted downstream of the agricultural drain input. While the lowest macroinvertebrate abundances were measured at the station demonstrating the greatest water column and sediment toxicity and the highest concentrations of pesticides, macroinvertebrate metrics were more significantly correlated with bank vegetation cover than any other variable. Results of this study suggest that pesticide pollution is the likely cause of laboratory-measured toxicity in the Salinas River samples and that this factor may interact with other factors to impact the

  20. Macroscale patterns in body size of intertidal crustaceans provide insights on climate change effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Jenifer E.; Hubbard, David M.; Contreras, Heraldo; Duarte, Cristian; Acuña, Emilio; Schoeman, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Predicting responses of coastal ecosystems to altered sea surface temperatures (SST) associated with global climate change, requires knowledge of demographic responses of individual species. Body size is an excellent metric because it scales strongly with growth and fecundity for many ectotherms. These attributes can underpin demographic as well as community and ecosystem level processes, providing valuable insights for responses of vulnerable coastal ecosystems to changing climate. We investigated contemporary macroscale patterns in body size among widely distributed crustaceans that comprise the majority of intertidal abundance and biomass of sandy beach ecosystems of the eastern Pacific coasts of Chile and California, USA. We focused on ecologically important species representing different tidal zones, trophic guilds and developmental modes, including a high-shore macroalga-consuming talitrid amphipod (Orchestoidea tuberculata), two mid-shore scavenging cirolanid isopods (Excirolana braziliensis and E. hirsuticauda), and a low-shore suspension-feeding hippid crab (Emerita analoga) with an amphitropical distribution. Significant latitudinal patterns in body sizes were observed for all species in Chile (21° - 42°S), with similar but steeper patterns in Emerita analoga, in California (32°- 41°N). Sea surface temperature was a strong predictor of body size (-4% to -35% °C-1) in all species. Beach characteristics were subsidiary predictors of body size. Alterations in ocean temperatures of even a few degrees associated with global climate change are likely to affect body sizes of important intertidal ectotherms, with consequences for population demography, life history, community structure, trophic interactions, food-webs, and indirect effects such as ecosystem function. The consistency of results for body size and temperature across species with different life histories, feeding modes, ecological roles, and microhabitats inhabiting a single widespread coastal

  1. A new species of Bathymedon Sars, 1892 (Amphipoda: Oedicerotidae from the western Mediterranean bathyal floor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiá Jaume

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Bathymedon longirostris sp. nov. (Amphipoda: Oedicerotidae from the western Mediterranean bathyal suprabenthos is described. It is characterised by the well-developed rostrum; the discrete lateral lobe of head; the elongation of the peduncle segment 3 of the first antenna; the very slender propodus of the second gnathopod, which attains maximum width not at the palm angle, but at about midway along the palm margin; and by the relative length of the carpus of the foregoing limb, sub-equal to propodus. The discovery of a tiny remnant of the 2nd peduncle segment of the first antenna in the new species is commented with regard to the homologation of the peduncle segments in other members of the Family. The new taxon was captured below 593 m over muddy bottoms with pteropod shells and remains of planktonic foraminiferans. It was one of the most common amphipods in the lower slope (below ~ 1000 m, whereas in the depth range comprised between 1250 and 1859 m it was the second dominant species, representing 11.4 % of the total gammarideans captured. The area studied harbours three additional congeneric species, although their populations are mainly concentrated in the upper and middle slope. Over the bottom, adult males of the new species apparently tend to occupy higher levels beyond the water-sediment interface than the rest of demographic categories. The gut content of three individuals revealed a bulk of calcified foraminiferans, a diet in consonance with their massive mandibles. Juvenile individuals were more abundant in winter, whereas adult individuals were clearly dominant in summer, thus suggesting the biological cycle of the species follows some type of periodicity.

  2. A molecular gut content study of Themisto abyssorum (Amphipoda) from Arctic hydrothermal vent and cold seep systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Bernt Rydland; Troedsson, Christofer; Hadziavdic, Kenan; Pedersen, Rolf B; Rapp, Hans Tore

    2014-08-01

    The use of DNA as a marker for prey inside the gut of predators has been instrumental in further understanding of known and unknown interactions. Molecular approaches are in particular useful in unavailable environments like the deep sea. Trophic interactions in the deep sea are difficult to observe in situ, correct deep-sea experimental laboratory conditions are difficult to obtain, animals rarely survive the sampling, or the study organisms feed during the sampling due to long hauls. Preliminary studies of vent and seep systems in the Nordic Seas have identified the temperate-cold-water pelagic amphipod Themisto abyssorum as a potentially important predator in these chemosynthetic habitats. However, the prey of this deep-sea predator is poorly known, and we applied denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) to investigate the predator-prey interactions of T. abyssorum in deep-water vent and seep systems. Two deep-water hydrothermally active localities (The Jan Mayen and Loki's Castle vent fields) and one cold seep locality (The Håkon Mosby mud volcano) in the Nordic Seas were sampled, genomic DNA of the stomachs of T. abyssorum was extracted, and 18S rDNA gene was amplified and used to map the stomach content. We found a wide range of organisms including micro-eukaryotes, metazoans and detritus. Themisto abyssorum specimens from Loki's Castle had the highest diversity of prey. The wide range of prey items found suggests that T. abyssorum might be involved in more than one trophic level and should be regarded as an omnivore and not a strict carnivore as have previously been suggested. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Response of invertebrates from the hyporheic zone of chalk rivers to eutrophication and land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacioglu, Octavian; Moldovan, Oana Teodora

    2016-03-01

    Whereas the response of lotic benthic macroinvertebrates to different environmental stressors is a widespread practice nowadays in assessing the water and habitat quality, the use of hyporheic zone invertebrates is still in its infancy. In this study, classification and regression trees analysis were employed in order to assess the ecological requirements and the potential as bioindicators for the hyporheic zone invertebrates inhabiting four lowland chalk rivers (south England) with contrasting eutrophication levels (based on surface nitrate concentrations) and magnitude of land use (based on percentage of fine sediments load and median interstitial space). Samples of fauna, water and sediment were sampled twice, during low (summer) and high (winter) groundwater level, at depths of 20 and 35 cm. Certain groups of invertebrates (Glossosomatidae and Psychomyiidae caddisflies, and riffle beetles) proved to be good indicators of rural catchments, moderately eutrophic and with high fine sediment load. A diverse community dominated by microcrustaceans (copepods and ostracods) were found as good indicators of highly eutrophic urban streams, with moderate-high fine sediment load. However, the use of other taxonomic groups (e.g. chironomids, oligochaetes, nematodes, water mites and the amphipod Gammarus pulex), very widespread in the hyporheic zone of all sampled rivers, is of limited use because of their high tolerance to the analysed stressors. We recommend the use of certain taxonomic groups (comprising both meiofauna and macroinvertebrates) dwelling in the chalk hyporheic zone as indicators of eutrophication and colmation and, along with routine benthic sampling protocols, for a more comprehensive water and habitat quality assessment of chalk rivers.

  4. Studies on mountain streams in the English lake district I. PH, calcium and the distribution of invertebrates in the River Duddon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutcliffe, D.W.; Carrick, T.R.

    1973-01-01

    The River Duddon and its tributaries rarely exceed pH 7.0. There are three types of acid regime; pH>5.7 and pH<5.7 independent of season or rainfall, and fluctuating acidity with pH<5.7 in winter and wet periods, pH>5.7 in summer or dry periods. PH in the River Duddon fluctuates for most of its length. Ph>5.7 is characteristic of tributaries in the lower drainage basin, but pH<5.7 occurs in the headwaters of two of these tributaries. With five exceptions, pH<5.7 or fluctuating pH are characteristic of tributaries in the upper drainage basin. A very close relationship exists between the pH regime of stream water and the benthis cauna. Apart from oligochaetes and flatworms, streams with pH<5.7 or fluctuating pH are characterized by thirteen common or abundant taxa; six plecoptera, four trichoptera and three diptera. These taxa are also common in streams with pH>5.7 but in addition these streams contain ephemeroptera, the trichopterans wormaldia and hydropsyche, the mollusc Ancylus and the amphipod gammarus. It is concluded that the calcium concentration is less important than the pH-bicarbonate concentrations in limiting the qualitative distribution of benthic invertebrates. The limiting effect of pH<5.7 on an extensive range of taxa in the duddon also occurs in other areas. The affected taxa are generally herbivores. It is suggested that in the case of insects the limiting effects of low pH may indirectly operate through changes in food supply.

  5. Antibiotic mixture effects on growth of the leaf-shredding stream detritivore Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Hahn, Torsten; Gessner, Mark O; Schulz, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    Pharmaceuticals contribute greatly to human and animal health. Given their specific biological targets, pharmaceuticals pose a significant environmental risk by affecting organisms and ecosystem processes, including leaf-litter decomposition. Although litter decomposition is a central process in forest streams, the consequences of exposure to pharmaceuticals remain poorly known. The present study assessed the impact of antibiotics as an important class of pharmaceuticals on the growth of the leaf-shredding amphipod Gammarus fossarum over 24 days. Exposure scenarios involved an antibiotic mixture (i.e. sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, erythromycin-H 2 O, roxithromycin, clarithromycin) at 0, 2 and 200 µg/L to assess impacts resulting from exposure to both water and food. The antibiotics had no effect on either leaf-associated fungal biomass or bacterial abundance. However, modification of leaf quality (e.g. through shifts in leaf-associated microbial communities) may have triggered faster growth of gammarids (assessed in terms of body mass gain) at the low antibiotic concentration relative to the control. At 200 µg/L, however, gammarid growth was not stimulated. This outcome might be due to a modified ability of the gut microflora to assimilate nutrients and carbon. Furthermore, the observed lack of increases in the diameter of the gammarids' peduncles, despite an increase in gammarid mass, suggests antibiotic-induced effects in the moulting cycle. Although the processes responsible for the observed effects have not yet been identified, these results suggest a potential role of food-quality, gammarid gut microflora and alteration in the moulting cycle in mediating impacts of antibiotics on these detritivores and the leaf decomposition process in streams.

  6. DNA metabarcoding reveals diverse diet of the three-spined stickleback in a coastal ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Jakubavičiūtė

    Full Text Available The three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L., hereafter 'stickleback' is a common mesopredatory fish in marine, coastal and freshwater areas. In large parts of the Baltic Sea, stickleback densities have increased >10-fold during the last decades, and it is now one of the dominating fish species both in terms of biomass and effects on lower trophic levels. Still, relatively little is known about its diet-knowledge which is essential to understand the increasing role sticklebacks play in the ecosystem. Fish diet analyses typically rely on visual identification of stomach contents, a labour-intensive method that is made difficult by prey digestion and requires expert taxonomic knowledge. However, advances in DNA-based metabarcoding methods promise a simultaneous identification of most prey items, even from semi-digested tissue. Here, we studied the diet of stickleback from the western Baltic Sea coast using both DNA metabarcoding and visual analysis of stomach contents. Using the cytochrome oxidase (CO1 marker we identified 120 prey taxa in the diet, belonging to 15 phyla, 83 genera and 84 species. Compared to previous studies, this is an unusually high prey diversity. Chironomids, cladocerans and harpacticoids were dominating prey items. Large sticklebacks were found to feed more on benthic prey, such as amphipods, gastropods and isopods. DNA metabarcoding gave much higher taxonomic resolution (median rank genus than visual analysis (median rank order, and many taxa identified using barcoding could not have been identified visually. However, a few taxa identified by visual inspection were not revealed by barcoding. In summary, our results suggest that the three-spined stickleback feeds on a wide variety of both pelagic and benthic organisms, indicating that the strong increase in stickleback populations may affect many parts of the Baltic Sea coastal ecosystem.

  7. Macrofauna associated with Saccorhiza polyschides (Lightfoot Batters 1902 holdfasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Pereira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Distribution patterns of species and the causes driving its distribution have always been central questions in ecology, as well as the mechanisms determining species composition and structure of biological assemblages. In the present work the distribution patterns of the macrofauna associated with Saccorhiza polyschides holdfasts along the western coast of Iberian Peninsula was studied. The aims of this work were to evaluate (i the role of Saccorhiza polyschides holdfasts as suitable habitat for littoral macrofauna, (ii the influence of latitude on the colonization patterns, and (iii to examine the processes determining these colonization patterns. This study took place at three different locations along the western coast of Iberian Peninsula, Ferrol (Galicia, northern Spain, Viana do Castelo (northern Portugal and Figueira da Foz (central Portugal. Sampling of macrofaunal organisms was held by scuba diving and eight samples were collected on the nearshore rocky subtidal zone of each site. All species were identified to the highest taxonomic level possible. Similarity analyses (Cluster and NMDS showed the separation of the sampling sites in two different groups: one corresponding to the northern limits of the study area (Ferrol and another corresponding to the two Portuguese sampling sites (Viana do Castelo and Figueira da Foz. The results showed that Saccorhiza polyschides provides a suitable habitat for 107 species, mainly small crustaceans like amphipods and molluscs. The inner species partitioning of samples suggests the additional influence of the exposure degree of each sampling area. The observed colonization patterns are consistent with habitats with high level of environmental stress, which could be related to the seasonal instability of holdfasts.

  8. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 A of -42-foot project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Lefkovitz, L.F.

    1992-09-01

    The Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted a study to determine whether dredged sediments from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors were suitable for ocean disposal. Nineteen test treatments, six reference treatments, and three control treatments were tested for physical/chemical parameters, water column effects, dredged- sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation potential. Physical/chemical parameters were analyzed at each site and each composite sediment to a depth of -44 ft MLLW. These parameters included analysis for geological characteristics, conventional sediment measurements (grain size, total volatile solids, total organic carbon, oil and grease, and total petroleum hydrocarbons), metals,, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pesticides, butyltins, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Physical/chemical data were used in support of the toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, but were not used in the decision-making criteria described in the Draft Implementation manual under Tier III testing. To evaluate water column effects, MSL conducted suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) test using the mysid shrimp Holmesimysis sculpta, speckled sanddab citharichtys stigmaeus, and larvae of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Both a 48-h and a 96-h test were performed. The MSL evaluated dredged-sediment toxicity by conducting a total of eight solid-phase toxicity tests using the following organisms: the bivalve clam Macoma nasuta, the polychaete worm Nepthys caecoides, the speckled sanddab C. stigmaeus, and the amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius. Test duration ranged from 10 to 28 days. Bioaccumulation potential was evaluated in the 28-day M. Nasuta and N. caecoides solid-phase exposures by measuring the contaminants of concern present in their tissues after exposure to test, reference, and control sediments. This report contains the data and test results

  9. A new bioassay for the ecotoxicological testing of VOCs on groundwater invertebrates and the effects of toluene on Niphargus inopinatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avramov, Maria; Schmidt, Susanne I. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Groundwater Ecology, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Griebler, Christian, E-mail: christian.griebler@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Groundwater Ecology, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► A new bioassay for testing the toxicity of VOCs on groundwater fauna is presented. ► Results on the toxicity of toluene to Niphargus inopinatus are now available. ► Henry equilibrium needs to be considered when bioassays with VOCs are designed. ► Methodological aspects related to “difficult-to-test substances” are discussed. -- Abstract: A protocol was developed for testing the ecotoxicological effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on groundwater invertebrates. Test substance volatility was addressed in a “closed from start to analysis”-design. Since manifestation of toxic effects may be delayed in ‘slower metabolizing’ organisms such as groundwater fauna, a time-independent (TI-) approach was adopted. Toluene was used as a model substance and its toxicity to the groundwater amphipod Niphargus inopinatus was assessed as an example. The method evaluation process considered various methodological issues such as partitioning of the toxicant between the water and the gas phase (Henry equilibrium), the possible depletion of oxygen in closed test vials, as well as microbial biodegradation of the test substance. For N. inopinatus, an LC{sub 50},{sub 14} {sub days} of 46.6 mg L{sup −1} toluene was obtained. The ultimate LC{sub 50} value was estimated at 23.3 mg L{sup −1} toluene. No oxygen depletion occurred in the test vials and Henry equilibrium was found to be established after 6 h. The new test system proposed now awaits broad practical application.

  10. Fraunhofer Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Angewandte Oekologie (IME). Annual report 2012/2013; Fraunhofer Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Angewandte Oekologie (IME). Jahresbericht 2012/2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    The Annual report 2012/2013 of the Fraunhofer Institute for molecular biology and applied ecology includes the following contributions: (A) Molecular Biology: A technology platform for human monoclonal antibodies against malaria antigens. Reducing the cold sweetening of potatoes during cold storage. BY2 cell - free lysate: an alternative eucaryotic in vitro translation system. Automated animal cell culture. Improvement of resource-use efficiency and productivity in crop plants. Optimizing transient protein expression in tobacco using predictive models. Microbial master-cell banks for biopharmaceutical production. Development and implementation of a plant-produced vaccine against yellow fever. Insect antennae as in situ biosensors. Communal and individual immunity - their relationship in Tribolium castaneum. A Drosophila model for aging. Analysis of insect transcriptomes, Biofuels: Hexanol production with Clostridia. Application of Targeted Proteomics for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridia. The Fraunhofer Future Foundation Malaria Project. Characterization and validation of predictive human experimental pain models. FCR Center for Systems Biotechnology business areas progress report. (B) Applied Ecology: Transformation/dissolution testing of silver nanoparticles. Effect of silver nanoparticles in the context of sewage sludge used in agriculture. Feasibility of biotic ligand models for routine monitoring. Estimating reasonable application dates related to BBCH crop development stages. Bioconcentration studies with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. Fish life cycle tests: Static vs. flow-through exposure. Vulnerable fish species for risk assessment of pesticides in Europe. Ecotoxicological testing of armor stones in mesocosms. The effect of wild yeast in traditional wines. Lifestock metabolism studies at Fraunhofer IME. Column generated concentrations of highly-lipophilic test substances.

  11. Heat waves and their significance for a temperate benthic community: A near-natural experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansch, Christian; Scotti, Marco; Barboza, Francisco R; Al-Janabi, Balsam; Brakel, Janina; Briski, Elizabeta; Bucholz, Björn; Franz, Markus; Ito, Maysa; Paiva, Filipa; Saha, Mahasweta; Sawall, Yvonne; Weinberger, Florian; Wahl, Martin

    2018-04-23

    Climate change will not only shift environmental means but will also increase the intensity of extreme events, exerting additional stress on ecosystems. While field observations on the ecological consequences of heat waves are emerging, experimental evidence is rare, and lacking at the community level. Using a novel "near-natural" outdoor mesocosms approach, this study tested whether marine summer heat waves have detrimental consequences for macrofauna of a temperate coastal community, and whether sequential heat waves provoke an increase or decrease of sensitivity to thermal stress. Three treatments were applied, defined and characterized through a statistical analysis of 15 years of temperature records from the experimental site: (1) no heat wave, (2) two heat waves in June and July followed by a summer heat wave in August and (3) the summer heat wave only. Overall, 50% of the species showed positive, negative or positive/negative responses in either abundance and/or biomass. We highlight four possible ways in which single species responded to either three subsequent heat waves or one summer heat wave: (1) absence of a response (tolerance, 50% of species), (2) negative accumulative effects by three subsequent heat waves (tellinid bivalve), (3) buffering by proceeding heat waves due to acclimation and/or shifts in phenology (spionid polychaete) and (4) an accumulative positive effect by subsequent heat waves (amphipod). The differential responses to single or sequential heat waves at the species level entailed shifts at the community level. Community-level differences between single and triple heat waves were more pronounced than those between regimes with vs. without heat waves. Detritivory was reduced by the single heat wave while suspension feeding was less common in the triple heat wave regime. Critical extreme events occur already today and will occur more frequently in a changing climate, thus, leading to detrimental impacts on coastal marine systems.

  12. Introduced brown trout alter native acanthocephalan infections in native fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Rachel A; Townsend, Colin R; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2011-09-01

    1. Native parasite acquisition provides introduced species with the potential to modify native host-parasite dynamics by acting as parasite reservoirs (with the 'spillback' of infection increasing the parasite burdens of native hosts) or sinks (with the 'dilution' of infection decreasing the parasite burdens of native hosts) of infection. 2. In New Zealand, negative correlations between the presence of introduced brown trout (Salmo trutta) and native parasite burdens of the native roundhead galaxias (Galaxias anomalus) have been observed, suggesting that parasite dilution is occurring. 3. We used a multiple-scale approach combining field observations, experimental infections and dynamic population modelling to investigate whether native Acanthocephalus galaxii acquisition by brown trout alters host-parasite dynamics in native roundhead galaxias. 4. Field observations demonstrated higher infection intensity in introduced trout than in native galaxias, but only small, immature A. galaxii were present in trout. Experimental infections also demonstrated that A. galaxii does not mature in trout, although parasite establishment and initial growth were similar in the two hosts. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that trout may serve as an infection sink for the native parasite. 5. However, dynamic population modelling predicts that A. galaxii infections in native galaxias should at most only be slightly reduced by dilution in the presence of trout. Rather, model exploration indicates parasite densities in galaxias are highly sensitive to galaxias predation on infected amphipods, and to relative abundances of galaxias and trout. Hence, trout presence may instead reduce parasite burdens in galaxias by either reducing galaxias density or by altering galaxias foraging behaviour. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2011 British Ecological Society.

  13. Cesium in Arctic char lakes - effects of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammar, J.; Notter, M.; Neumann, G.

    1991-01-01

    Fallout radiocesium from the Chernobyl accident caused extensive contamination in a region of previously well studied alpine lake ecosystems in northern Sweden. Levels of Cs-137 in the barren catchment basins reached 20-50 kBq/m 2 during 1986. The distribution, pathways and major transport mechanisms of radiocesium through the lake ecosystems were studied during 1986-1990. Levels of Cs-137, Cs-134 and K-40 in water, surface sediment, detritus (sediment traps) and different trophic levels of the food chains of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) were monitored in a series of lakes forming a matrix of 4 natural lakes and 3 lake reservoirs, with or without the introduced new fish food organism, Mysis relicta. The reservoirs were found to act as sinks for radiocesium with extensive accumulation recorded in water, detritus, sediment, invertebrates and salmonids. Whereas concentrations in water and biota have declined from the extreme peak levels in 1986-1987, the levels in surface sediment increased extensively until fall of 1988. The concentration of Cs-137 in fish populations feeding on benthic invertebrates, i.e. mysids and amphipods, were significantly higher than in planktivorous fish. During the three first winters a significant increase in levels of Cs-137 in winter active Arctic char were recorded, whereas the levels declined during the succeeding summers. The introduced Mysis relicta were found to enhance the transport of Cs-137 from zooplankton and settling particles to Arctic char and brown trout. The results suggest a successive change in transport of radiocesium from water via zooplankton to planktivorous fish during the early summer of 1986 to post-depositional mobilization via benthic organisms to benthic fish in successive years. (213 refs.) (au)

  14. Integrated assessment of the impacts of agricultural drainwater in the Salinas River (California, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.S.; Hunt, J.W.; Phillips, B.M.; Nicely, P.A.; Vlaming, V. de; Connor, V.; Richard, N.; Tjeerdema, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    Invertebrate mortality was correlated with levels of water and sediment contaminatioin in the Salinas River. - The Salinas River is the largest of the three rivers that drain into the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary in central California. Large areas of this watershed are cultivated year-round in row crops and previous laboratory studies have demonstrated that acute toxicity of agricultural drainwater to Ceriodaphnia dubia is caused by the organophosphate (OP) pesticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon. In the current study, we used a combination of ecotoxicologic tools to investigate incidence of chemical contamination and toxicity in waters and sediments in the river downstream of a previously uncharacterized agricultural drainage creek system. Water column toxicity was investigated using a cladoceran C. dubia while sediment toxicity was investigated using an amphipod Hyalella azteca. Ecological impacts of drainwater were investigated using bioassessments of macroinvertebrate community structure. The results indicated that Salinas River water downstream of the agricultural drain is acutely toxic to Ceriodaphnia, and toxicity to this species was highly correlated with combined toxic units (TUs) of chlorpyrifos and diazinon. Laboratory tests were used to demonstrate that sediments in this system were acutely toxic to H. azteca, which is a resident genus. Macroinvertebrate community structure was moderately impacted downstream of the agricultural drain input. While the lowest macroinvertebrate abundances were measured at the station demonstrating the greatest water column and sediment toxicity and the highest concentrations of pesticides, macroinvertebrate metrics were more significantly correlated with bank vegetation cover than any other variable. Results of this study suggest that pesticide pollution is the likely cause of laboratory-measured toxicity in the Salinas River samples and that this factor may interact with other factors to impact the

  15. Miniature circulatory systems: A new exposure system for ecotoxicological effect assessments in riverine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiner, Mona; Beggel, Sebastian; Geist, Juergen

    2016-11-01

    Long-term effect assessments in ecotoxicological investigations are important, yet there is a lack of suitable exposure systems for these experiments that can be used for riverine species. A cost-efficient miniature circulatory system was developed that was evaluated for its applicability in long-term exposures in 2 stream-dwelling species: brown trout (Salmo trutta) and an amphipod (Gammarus roeseli). In an egg-to-fry exposure of S. trutta, the toxicity of 2 reverse osmosis concentrates was investigated as examples. Control hatching rate of yolk sac fry was 75 ± 7% and thus complies with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development validity criterion (≥66%). The reverse osmosis concentrates did not impair the hatching rate in any tested concentration. In G. roeseli, mortality rates remained below 20% during a 21-d cultivation, fulfilling the common validity criterion in ecotoxicological testing. Mortality was significantly lower when the species was fed with conditioned alder leaves instead of an artificial shrimp food. Finally, a toxicity test on G. roeseli using copper as the test substance revealed median lethal concentration (LC50) values of 156 μg/L after 96 h and 99 μg/L after 264 h, which is in line with literature findings using other accepted exposure units. In conclusion, the miniature circulatory system provides a novel and cost-efficient exposure system for long-term investigations on riverine species that may also be applicable for other species of fishes and macroinvertebrates. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2827-2833. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  16. Utilization of invasive tamarisk by salt marsh consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcraft, Christine R; Levin, Lisa A; Talley, Drew; Crooks, Jeffrey A

    2008-11-01

    Plant invasions of coastal wetlands are rapidly changing the structure and function of these systems globally. Alteration of litter dynamics represents one of the fundamental impacts of an invasive plant on salt marsh ecosystems. Tamarisk species (Tamarix spp.), which extensively invade terrestrial and riparian habitats, have been demonstrated to enter food webs in these ecosystems. However, the trophic impacts of the relatively new invasion of tamarisk into marine ecosystem have not been assessed. We evaluated the trophic consequences of invasion by tamarisk for detrital food chains in the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve salt marsh using litter dynamics techniques and stable isotope enrichment experiments. The observations of a short residence time for tamarisk combined with relatively low C:N values indicate that tamarisk is a relatively available and labile food source. With an isotopic (15N) enrichment of tamarisk, we demonstrated that numerous macroinvertebrate taxonomic and trophic groups, both within and on the sediment, utilized 15N derived from labeled tamarisk detritus. Infaunal invertebrate species that took up no or limited 15N from labeled tamarisk (A. californica, enchytraeid oligochaetes, coleoptera larvae) occurred in lower abundance in the tamarisk-invaded environment. In contrast, species that utilized significant 15N from the labeled tamarisk, such as psychodid insects, an exotic amphipod, and an oniscid isopod, either did not change or occurred in higher abundance. Our research supports the hypothesis that invasive species can alter the trophic structure of an environment through addition of detritus and can also potentially impact higher trophic levels by shifting dominance within the invertebrate community to species not widely consumed.

  17. Functional roles of an engineer species for coastal benthic invertebrates and demersal fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaalali, Aurélie; Brind'Amour, Anik; Dubois, Stanislas F; Le Bris, Hervé

    2017-08-01

    Through their tissues or activities, engineer species create, modify, or maintain habitats and alter the distribution and abundance of many plants and animals. This study investigates key ecological functions performed by an engineer species that colonizes coastal ecosystems. The gregarious tubiculous amphipod Haploops nirae is used as a biological model. According to previous studies, the habitat engineered by H. nirae (i.e., Haploops habitat) could provide food and natural shelter