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Sample records for amphetamine methamphetamine mda

  1. Determination of amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDA and MDMA in human hair by GC-EI-MS after derivatization with perfluorooctanoyl chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Sys Stybe; Jornil, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    ), methamphetamine (MA), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy). An intra-day precision of 3-6% RSD and an inter-day precision of 3-17% RSD were observed. Trueness was between 96 % and 106% for the target compounds. The limit of detection ranged from 0.07 to 0.14 ng...

  2. Enantiomeric separation and quantitation of (+/-)-amphetamine, (+/-)-methamphetamine, (+/-)-MDA, (+/-)-MDMA, and (+/-)-MDEA in urine specimens by GC-EI-MS after derivatization with (R)-(-)- or (S)-(+)-alpha-methoxy-alpha-(trifluoromethy)phenylacetyl chloride (MTPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Buddha D; Jemionek, John; Lesser, David; Jacobs, Aaron; Searles, Douglas A

    2004-09-01

    In drug testing, the presence of methamphetamine in urine is generally confirmed by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. Derivatization of the compound to a perfluoroalkylamide, prior to confirmation, typically yields better chromatographic separation. Once methamphetamine is detected, a second GC-MS test is necessary to distinguish positive results from the use of over-the-counter medication, Vicks inhaler, or from use of a prescription drug, selegiline (Deprenyl). R-(-)-Methamphetamine is the urinary product from legitimate use of these medications. The second GC-MS test is to confirm illicit use of (S)-(+)-methamphetamine. In the procedure, the two methamphetamine isomers are changed to the chromatographically separable diastereomers by a chiral derivatizing agent, (S)-(-)-trifluoroacetylprolyl chloride (TPC). But the method has inherent limitations. Racemization of the reagent produces mixed diastereomers even from pure (S)-(+)-methamphetamine. Instead of using TPC, we utilized (R)-(-)-alpha-methoxy-alpha-(trifluoromethyl)phenylacetyl chloride (MTPA) to prepare the amides of diastereomers of methamphetamine. No racemization was observed with this reagent. The method was extended to resolve GC peaks of (R)-(-)- and (S)-(+)-isomers of amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), N-methyl-MDA (MDMA), and N-ethyl-MDA (MDEA). Three ions from the drug and two ions from the deuterated internal standard were monitored to characterize and quantitate the drugs. For MDEA, only one ion was used. The quantitation was linear over 25 to 5000 ng/mL for MDEA and 25 to 10,000 ng/mL for all other drugs. Correlation coefficients were > 0.996. Precision calculated as the coefficient of variation at the calibrator concentration of 500 ng/mL was within +/- 11% for all drugs. The method was applied to test 43 urine specimens. In 91% of the methamphetamine-positive specimens, only the (S)-(+)-isomer was detected. In all MDMA-positive specimens, the concentrations

  3. Metabolic Precursors to Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, J D

    1993-12-01

    Analysis and interpretation of amphetamine results is a challenging process made difficult by a number of factors. One of the complications comes from determination of the origin of amphetamine or methamphetamine in a sample. Given the relatively rare occasions that either of these two drugs are prescribed, legal prescription of one of these drugs is seldom a reason for positive findings. A number of other precursor compounds are metabolized by the body to amphetamine or methamphetamine, many of which could be used for legitimate reasons. Fourteen different metabolic precursors of amphetamine or methamphetamine are included in this review. They are amphetaminil, benzphetamine, clobenzorex, deprenyl, dimethylamphetamine, ethylamphetamine, famprofazone, fencamine, fenethylline, fenproporex, furfenorex, mefenorex, mesocarb, and prenylamine. Medical use, metabolism, analysis, and interpretation are described to afford sufficient information to evaluate the possible involvement of these drugs in positive amphetamine or methamphetamine results. Copyright © 1993 Central Police University.

  4. Chirality of methamphetamine and amphetamine from workplace urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, B J

    1994-01-01

    Several positive methamphetamine/amphetamine urine samples were reexamined to determine the chirality of the detected drug or drugs. (S)-N-(Trifluoroacetyl)prolyl derivatives were prepared and analyzed using GC/MS. In one case, pure d-isomers of methamphetamine and amphetamine were detected. In the remainder of the samples involving both drugs, skewed racemates were detected, with the l-isomer of methamphetamine and the d-isomer of amphetamine predominating slightly over their enantiomers. In samples involving amphetamine only, 50:50 mixtures of d- and l-isomers were detected. In no instance was pure i-methamphetamine (from a Vicks inhaler) detected.

  5. Methamphetamine and amphetamine derived from the metabolism of selegiline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romberg, R W; Needleman, S B; Snyder, J J; Greedan, A

    1995-11-01

    Routine methamphetamine testing identified a urine specimen with inconsistent screening and confirmation results. The methamphetamine RIA screening test (Diagnostic Products Corporation) indicated a borderline positive specimen, while the achiral confirmatory GC/MS result showed 4690 ng/mL of methamphetamine and 1895 ng/mL of amphetamine. Analysis of the specimen after derivatization with S(-)-N-trifluoroacetylprolyl chloride showed only the presence of 1-amphetamine and 1-methamphetamine. It was later learned that the individual providing the specimen had been taking Selegiline. Selegiline, (-) propynylmethamphetamine, is a monoamine oxidase inhibitor used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. It is sold under the trade name Eldepryl. Its major metabolites are 1-methamphetamine, 1-amphetamine and N-desmethylselegiline. Urine specimens from other Selegiline users were obtained and analyzed. A characteristic metabolic pattern was noted, exemplified by a ratio of 1-methamphetamine to 1-amphetamine of about 2.8. This is in contrast to what is observed in the urine of individuals who ingest pure 1-methamphetamine, such as with Vicks Inhaler, where the 1-methamphetamine to 1-amphetamine ratio in the urine is usually greater than 8. Caution is advised when interpreting methamphetamine results without using a chiral identification technique.

  6. Relationship between discriminative stimulus effects and plasma methamphetamine and amphetamine levels of intramuscular methamphetamine in male rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Matthew L; Smith, Douglas A; Kisor, David F; Poklis, Justin L

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine is a globally abused drug that is metabolized to amphetamine, which also produces abuse-related behavioral effects. However, the contributing role of methamphetamine metabolism to amphetamine in methamphetamine's abuse-related subjective effects is unknown. This preclinical study was designed to determine 1) the relationship between plasma methamphetamine levels and methamphetamine discriminative stimulus effects and 2) the contribution of the methamphetamine metabolite amphetamine in the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine in rhesus monkeys. Adult male rhesus monkeys (n=3) were trained to discriminate 0.18mg/kg intramuscular (+)-methamphetamine from saline in a two-key food-reinforced discrimination procedure. Time course of saline, (+)-methamphetamine (0.032-0.32mg/kg), and (+)-amphetamine (0.032-0.32mg/kg) discriminative stimulus effects were determined. Parallel pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in the same monkeys to determine plasma methamphetamine and amphetamine levels after methamphetamine administration and amphetamine levels after amphetamine administration for correlation with behavior in the discrimination procedure. Both methamphetamine and amphetamine produced full, ≥90%, methamphetamine-like discriminative stimulus effects. Amphetamine displayed a slightly, but significantly, longer duration of action than methamphetamine in the discrimination procedure. Both methamphetamine and amphetamine behavioral effects were related to methamphetamine and amphetamine plasma levels by a clockwise hysteresis loop indicating acute tolerance had developed to the discriminative stimulus effects. Furthermore, amphetamine levels after methamphetamine administration were absent when methamphetamine stimulus effects were greatest and peaked when methamphetamine discriminative stimulus effects returned to saline-like levels. Overall, these results demonstrate the methamphetamine metabolite amphetamine does not contribute to

  7. Relationship between discriminative stimulus effects and plasma methamphetamine and amphetamine levels of intramuscular methamphetamine in male rhesus monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, Matthew L.; Smith, Douglas A.; Kisor, David F.; Poklis, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine is a globally abused drug that is metabolized to amphetamine, which also produces abuse-related behavioral effects. However, the contributing role of methamphetamine metabolism to amphetamine in methamphetamine's abuse-related subjective effects is unknown. This preclinical study was designed to determine 1) the relationship between plasma methamphetamine levels and methamphetamine discriminative stimulus effects and 2) the contribution of the methamphetamine metabolite amphet...

  8. Toxicokinetics of amphetamines: metabolism and toxicokinetic data of designer drugs, amphetamine, methamphetamine, and their N-alkyl derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Thomas; Maurer, Hans H

    2002-04-01

    This paper reviews the toxicokinetics of amphetamines. The designer drugs MDA (methylenedioxy-amphetamine, R,S-1-(3;,4;-methylenedioxyphenyl)2-propanamine), MDMA (R,S-methylenedioxymethamphetamine), and MDE (R,S-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine), as well as BDB (benzodioxolylbutanamine; R,S-1-(1;,3;-benzodioxol-5;-yl)-2-butanamine or R,S-1-(3;,4;-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-butanamine) and MBDB (R,S-N-methyl-benzodioxolylbutanamine), were taken into consideration, as were the following N-alkylated amphetamine derivatives: amphetaminil, benzphetamine, clobenzorex, dimethylamphetamine, ethylamphetamine, famprofazone, fencamine, fenethylline, fenproporex, furfenorex, mefenorex, mesocarb, methamphetamine, prenylamine, and selegiline. English-language publications from 1995 to 2000 were reviewed. Papers describing identification of metabolites or cytochrome P450 isoenzyme-dependent metabolism and papers containing pharmacokinetic/toxicokinetic data were considered and summarized. The implications of toxicokinetics for toxicologic assessment or for interpretation in forensic cases are discussed.

  9. Illegal or legitimate use? Precursor compounds to amphetamine and methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musshoff, F

    2000-02-01

    The interpretation of methamphetamine and amphetamine positive test results in biological samples is a challenge to clinical and forensic toxicology for several reasons. The effects of pH and dilution of urine samples and the knowledge about legitimate and illicit sources have to be taken into account. Besides a potentially legal prescription of amphetamines, many substances metabolize to methamphetamine or amphetamine in the body: amphetaminil, benzphetamine, clobenzorex, deprenyl, dimethylamphetamine, ethylamphetamine, famprofazone, fencamine, fenethylline, fenproporex, furfenorex, mefenorex, mesocarb, and prenylamine. Especially the knowledge of potential origins of methamphetamine and amphetamine turns out to be very important to prevent a misinterpretation of the surrounding circumstances and to prove illegal drug abuse. In this review, potential precursor compounds are described, including their medical use and major clinical effects and their metabolic profiles, as well as some clues which help to identify the sources.

  10. Methamphetamine and the expanding complications of amphetamines.

    OpenAIRE

    Albertson, T E; Derlet, R W; Van Hoozen, B E

    1999-01-01

    During the past 10 years, the use of methamphetamine has increased rapidly in the West and throughout the United States. Because of this increase, our attention has focused on methamphetamine's toxicity. Methamphetamine and related compounds generate many of the same toxic effects as cocaine. Because of methamphetamine's widespread use, clinicians should be familiar with its medical effects and toxicity and with treatment options for acute and long-term effects of methamphetamine abuse.

  11. Stereoselectivity of the TDxADx/FLx Amphetamine/Methamphetamine II amphetamine/methamphetamine immunoassay--response of urine specimens following nasal inhaler use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poklis, A; Moore, K A

    1995-01-01

    The TDxADx/FLx Amphetamine/Methamphetamine II fluorescence polarization immunoassay (Abbott Diagnostic) for the detection of amphetamine and methamphetamine in urine was evaluated for stereoselectivity and response to specimens collected following as recommended and double the recommended dose use of Vicks Nasal Inhaler. The assay is calibrated with d-amphetamine, at cutoff concentration of 300 ng/mL for a positive response. Cross-reactivity studies demonstrated a positive result with 1000 ng/mL l-amphetamine, 300 ng/mL d-methamphetamine, and approximately 2000 ng/mL desoxyephedrine. A good correlation was observed between urines obtained following ingestion of d-amphetamine simultaneously analyzed by TDxADx/FLx Amphetamine/Methamphetamine II and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry: r2 = 0.954, N = 100. However, urine obtained following ingestion of racemic methamphetamine showed no correlation between TDxADx/FLx Amphetamine/Methamphetamine II and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry results: r2 = 0.420, N = 28. Urines collected following as recommended use for five consecutive days of Vicks Nasal Inhaler containing l-desoxyephedrine did not yield positive TDxADx/FLx Amphetamine/Methamphetamine II results. Only two urines from a subject using twice the recommended inhaler dose yielded positive TDxADx/FLx Amphetamine/Methamphetamine II results. These urines contained 1560 and 1530 ng/mL desoxyephedrine when analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Greater than recommended use of Vicks Nasal Inhaler may yield false positive TDxADx/FLx Amphetamine/Methamphetamine II results for amphetamine use when calibrated at 300 ng/mL d-amphetamine. If calibrated at 1000 ng/mL, d-amphetamine, the TDxADx/FLx Amphetamine/Methamphetamine II is unlikely to yield false positive results for amphetamine, even following excessive inhaler use.

  12. 21 CFR 250.101 - Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded... DRUGS New Drug or Prescription Status of Specific Drugs § 250.101 Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs. (a) Recurring reports of abuse and misuse of methamphetamine (also...

  13. Metabolic profile of amphetamine and methamphetamine following administration of the drug famprofazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhill, Brandy; Valtier, Sandra; Cody, John T

    2003-10-01

    There are a several drugs that lead to the production of methamphetamine and/or amphetamine in the body which are subsequently excreted in the urine. These drugs raise obvious concerns when interpreting positive amphetamine drug testing results. Famprofazone is an analgesic found in a multi-ingredient medication (Gewodin) used for pain relief. Two Gewodin tablets (50 mg of famprofazone) were administered orally to healthy volunteers with no history of amphetamine, methamphetamine, or famprofazone use. Following administration, urine samples were collected ad lib for up to six days, and pH, specific gravity, and creatinine values were determined. In order to determine the quantitative excretion profile of amphetamine and methamphetamine, samples were extracted using liquid-liquid extraction, derivatized with heptafluorobutyric anhydride, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The ions monitored were 91, 118, 240 for amphetamine and 254, 210, 118 for methamphetamine. Amphetamine-d(6) and methamphetamine-d(11) were used as internal standards. Peak concentrations for amphetamine ranged from 148 to 2271 ng/mL and for methamphetamine 615 to 7361 ng/mL. Concentrations of both compounds peaked between 3 and 7 h post-dose. Amphetamine and methamphetamine could be detected (limit of detection = 5 ng/mL) at 121 and 143 h post-dose, respectively. Using a cutoff of 500 ng/mL, all subjects had individual urine samples that tested positive. One subject had 14 samples above the cutoff with the last positive being detected over 48 h post-dose. The profile of methamphetamine and amphetamine enantiomers was also determined using liquid-liquid extraction, derivatization with N-trifluoroacetyl-l-prolyl chloride and analysis by GC-MS. Data showed the famprofazone metabolites amphetamine and methamphetamine to be both d- and l-enantiomers. The proportion of l-methamphetamine exceeded that of its d-enantiomer from the first sample collected. Initially, the

  14. The Relative Reinforcing Strength of Methamphetamine and d-Amphetamine in Monkeys Self-Administering Cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Lile, Joshua A.; Charnigo, Richard J.; Nader, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that rates of methamphetamine misuse surpass those of d-amphetamine, but self-administration research in animals and humans has not typically demonstrated differences in their reinforcing effects. The present study used a within-session, exponentially-increasing progressive-ratio schedule and extended-access conditions to assess the relative reinforcing strength of d-amphetamine and methamphetamine in rhesus monkeys (n=5) trained to self-administer cocaine. A ran...

  15. Matrix effect and cross-reactivity of select amphetamine-type substances, designer analogues, and putrefactive amines using the Bio-Quant direct ELISA presumptive assays for amphetamine and methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonio, Luigino G; Whittall, Ian R; Pianca, Dennis J; Kyd, Jennelle M; Maher, William A

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Bio-Quant Direct ELISA assays for amphetamine and methamphetamine in the routine presumptive screening of biological fluids. Standard concentration curves of the target analytes were assayed to assess sensitivity, and known concentrations of common amphetamine-type substances (ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, phentermine), designer analogues (MDA, MDMA, MDEA, MBDB, PMA, 4-MTA, 2CB), and putrefactive amines (phenylethylamine, putrescine, tryptamine, tyramine) were analyzed to determine cross-reactivity. Results of the standard curve studies show the capacity of both Direct ELISA kits to confidently detect down to 3 ng/mL interday (PBS matrix; CVs 6.3-15.5%). Cross-reactivity relative to that of 50 ng/mL preparations of the target compounds demonstrated that the Direct ELISA kit for amphetamine also detected MDA (282%), PMA (265%), 4-MTA (280%), and phentermine (61%), and the Direct ELISA for methamphetamine also assayed positive for MDMA (73%), MDEA (18%), pseudoephedrine (19%), MBDB (8%), and ephedrine (9%). Matrix studies demonstrated that both ELISA kits could be applied to screening of blood, urine, and saliva to a concentration of 6 ng/mL or lower. In conclusion, the Bio-Quant Direct ELISA kits for amphetamine and methamphetamine are fast and accurate and have demonstrated themselves to be useful tools in routine toxicological testing.

  16. The Relative Reinforcing Strength of Methamphetamine and d-Amphetamine in Monkeys Self-Administering Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lile, Joshua A.; Charnigo, Richard J.; Nader, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that rates of methamphetamine misuse surpass those of d-amphetamine, but self-administration research in animals and humans has not typically demonstrated differences in their reinforcing effects. The present study used a within-session, exponentially-increasing progressive-ratio schedule and extended-access conditions to assess the relative reinforcing strength of d-amphetamine and methamphetamine in rhesus monkeys (n=5) trained to self-administer cocaine. A range of doses of methamphetamine (0.003–0.1 mg/kg/injection), d-amphetamine (0.003–0.1 mg/kg/injection) and cocaine (0.003–0.3 mg/kg/injection) was tested to capture the ascending and descending limbs of the dose-effect functions. Each drug functioned as a reinforcer, but the peak number of self-administered d-amphetamine injections was significantly lower compared to methamphetamine and cocaine; the peak number of self-administered injections of cocaine and methamphetamine did not differ. Although differences in availability and other social factors likely impact relative rates of abuse, the present data suggest that the greater reinforcing strength of methamphetamine contributes to its increased use compared to d-amphetamine. PMID:23907377

  17. Comparison of intranasal methamphetamine and d-amphetamine self-administration by humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Gunderson, Erik W.; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Levin, Frances R.; Foltin, Richard W.; Hart, Carl L.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Anecdotally, methamphetamine is considered to have a greater abuse potential compared to d-amphetamine, but there are no studies directly comparing self-administration of these drugs. This study characterized and compared self-administration as well as the mood, performance, and physiological effects of intranasal methamphetamine- and d-amphetamine. Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Setting An outpatient research unit at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. Participants Male recreational methamphetamine users (n = 13). Measurements Five 2-day blocks of sessions were conducted. On the first day of each block, participants “sampled” a single methamphetamine or d-amphetamine dose (0, 12, 50 mg/70 kg) and a monetary reinforcer ($5 or $20). Amphetamines plasma levels, cardiovascular, mood, and psychomotor performance effects were assessed before drug administration and repeatedly thereafter. On the second day of each block, participants chose between the sampled reinforcers (drug or money). Findings There were no significant differences between the drugs on the majority of measures. Under the $5 condition, both amphetamines dose-dependently increased self-administration, whereas under the $20 condition, few drug options were selected. Overall, participants selected more drug choices under the $5 condition compared with the $20 condition (41% versus 17%). Both drugs increased cardiovascular activity and “positive” mood, although methamphetamine produced more prominent effects on some measures (e.g., heart rate and ratings of ‘high’). Conclusions These data are consistent with previous findings suggesting that the two amphetamines produce a similar dose-related profile of acute effects in humans, with methamphetamine producing greater effects on some mood and cardiovascular measures. The amphetamines were self-administered equally indicating their equivalence for abuse potential. PMID:22050030

  18. Oral Fluid with Three Modes of Collection and Plasma Methamphetamine and Amphetamine Enantiomer Concentrations After Controlled Intranasal l-Methamphetamine Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Newmeyer, Matthew N.; Concheiro, Marta; da Costa, Jose Luiz; Flegel, Ronald; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine is included in drug testing programs due to its high abuse potential. d-Methamphetamine is a scheduled potent central nervous system stimulant, while l-methamphetamine is the unscheduled active ingredient in the over-the-counter nasal decongestant Vicks® VapoInhaler™. No data are available in oral fluid (OF) and few in plasma after controlled Vicks VapoInhaler administration. We quantified methamphetamine and amphetamine enantiomers in OF collected with two different devices a...

  19. Fragmentation Pathways of Trifluoroacetyl Derivatives of Methamphetamine, Amphetamine, and Methylenedioxyphenyl alkylamine Designer Drugs by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumazawa, T.; Xiao-Pen, L.; Sato, K.

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA), amphetamine (AM), and the methylenedioxyphenyl alkylamine designer drugs, such as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxy ethylamphetamine (MDEA), N-methyl-1-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-butanamine (MBDB), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), and 3,4-(methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-butanamine (BDB), are widely abused as psychedelics. In this paper, these compounds were derivatized with trifluoroacetic (TFA) anhydride and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using electron ionization in positive mode. Gas chromatographic separation for TFA derivatives of all compounds was successfully resolved using an Equity-5 fused silica capillary column with a poly (5% diphenyl-95% dimethylsiloxane) stationary phase. Base peaks or prominent peaks of MA, AM, MDMA, MDEA, MBDB, MDA, and BDB appeared at m/z 154, 140, 154, 168, 168, 135, and 135, respectively. These occurred due to a-cleavage from the amide nitrogen, splitting into the TFA imine species and benzyl or methylenedioxybenzyl cations. Further prominent fragment ions at m/z 118 for MA and AM, m/z 162 for MDMA, MDEA, and MDA, and m/z 176 for MBDB and BDB were produced by cleavage of the phenylpropane or methylenedioxy propane hydrocarbon radical cation via a hydrogen rearrangement. These fragmentation pathways for the TFA derivatives of all the compounds are summarized and illustrated in this paper.

  20. Recent trends in the availability and use of amphetamine and methamphetamine in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramness, Jørgen G; Reid, Malcolm J; Solvik, Kari Frey; Vindenes, Vigdis

    2015-01-01

    There is a concern about methamphetamine use in Europe. Methamphetamine fatalities have recently occurred in Southern European countries. The aim of this study is to examine Norwegian methamphetamine trends in recent years, comparing different data sources. Data about amphetamines were collected from five different sources; blood samples from drivers suspected of driving under the influence of drugs and apprehended by the police (during the years 2000-2012), urine samples from inmates in Norwegian prisons (during 2000-2012), post-mortem blood samples from medico-legal autopsies (2000-2012), drug seizures (1994-2012) and wastewater samples from a metropolitan/suburban population (2010-2012). The number of cases where methamphetamine was detected has increased during the period studied for the driving under the influence cases, the samples from inmates and from forensic autopsies. The increase seems to be linear up to 2009-2010, with a subsequent stabilisation or even a decline in the market share of methamphetamine for the next few years. The number of methamphetamine seizures has risen from less than 1% in 2000 to approximately 66% in 2009, and a steady share around 60% have been seen between 2010 and 2012. Wastewater samples showed that the share of methamphetamine peaked in 2010-11, before falling. It is difficult to obtain reliable data on illicit drugs. Data from different populations might give indications of changes and trends, but are always prone to different biases. By comparing results from different data sources, a better knowledge of the illicit drug market might be obtained. All our data sources confirmed that methamphetamine became a more prevalent drug during the first decade of the new millennium in Norway, but since approximately 2009 the share of methamphetamine stabilised. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Methamphetamine and amphetamine isomer concentrations in human urine following controlled Vicks VapoInhaler administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael L; Nichols, Daniel C; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A; Flegel, Ron; Gorelick, David A; Newmeyer, Matthew N; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-10-01

    Legitimate use of legal intranasal decongestants containing l-methamphetamine may complicate interpretation of urine drug tests positive for amphetamines. Our study hypotheses were that commonly used immunoassays would produce no false-positive results and a recently developed enantiomer-specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure would find no d-amphetamine or d-methamphetamine in urine following controlled Vicks VapoInhaler administration at manufacturer's recommended doses. To evaluate these hypotheses, 22 healthy adults were each administered one dose (two inhalations in each nostril) of a Vicks VapoInhaler every 2 h for 10 h on Day 1 (six doses), followed by a single dose on Day 2. Every urine specimen was collected as an individual void for 32 h after the first dose and assayed for d- and l-amphetamines specific isomers with a GC-MS method with >99% purity of R-(-)-α-methoxy-α-(trifluoromethyl)phenylacetyl derivatives and 10 µg/L lower limits of quantification. No d-methamphetamine or d-amphetamine was detected in any urine specimen by GC-MS. The median l-methamphetamine maximum concentration was 62.8 µg/L (range: 11.0-1,440). Only two subjects had detectable l-amphetamine, with maximum concentrations coinciding with l-methamphetamine peak levels, and always ≤ 4% of the parent's maximum. Three commercial immunoassays for amphetamines EMIT(®) II Plus, KIMS(®) II and DRI(®) had sensitivities, specificities and efficiencies of 100, 97.8, 97.8; 100, 99.6, 99.6 and 100, 100, 100%, respectively. The immunoassays had high efficiencies, but our first hypothesis was not affirmed. The EMIT(®) II Plus assay produced 2.2% false-positive results, requiring an enantiomer-specific confirmation. Published by Oxford University Press 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Effect of Amphetamine on Adult Male and Female Rats Prenatally Exposed to Methamphetamine

    OpenAIRE

    Romana Šlamberová; Eva Macúchová; Kateryna Nohejlová; Andrea Štofková; Jana Jurčovičová

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the cross-sensitization induced by prenatal methamphetamine (MA) exposure to adult amphetamine (AMP) treatment in male and female rats. Rat mothers received a daily injection of MA (5 mg/kg) or saline throughout the gestation period. Adult male and female offspring (prenatally MA- or saline-exposed) were administered with AMP (5 mg/kg) or saline (1 ml/kg) in adulthood. Behaviour in unknown environment was examined in open field test (Laboras), activ...

  3. Oral fluid with three modes of collection and plasma methamphetamine and amphetamine enantiomer concentrations after controlled intranasal l-methamphetamine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmeyer, Matthew N; Concheiro, Marta; da Costa, Jose Luiz; Flegel, Ronald; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-10-01

    Methamphetamine is included in drug testing programmes due to its high abuse potential. d-Methamphetamine is a scheduled potent central nervous system stimulant, while l-methamphetamine is the unscheduled active ingredient in the over-the-counter nasal decongestant Vicks® VapoInhaler™. No data are available in oral fluid (OF) and few in plasma after controlled Vicks® VapoInhaler™ administration. We quantified methamphetamine and amphetamine enantiomers in OF collected with two different devices and plasma via a fully validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. Additionally, OF were analyzed with an on-site screening device. Sixteen participants received 7 Vicks® VapoInhaler™ doses according to manufacturer's recommendations. Specimens were collected before and up to 32 h after the first dose. No d-methamphetamine or d-amphetamine was detected in any sample. All participants had measurable OF l-methamphetamine with median maximum concentrations 14.8 and 16.1 μg/L in Quantisal™ and Oral-Eze® devices, respectively, after a median of 5 doses. One participant had measurable OF l-amphetamine with maximum concentrations 3.7 and 5.5 μg/L after 6 doses with the Quantisal™ and Oral-Eze® devices, respectively. There were no positive DrugTest® 5000 results. In the cutoff range 20-50 μg/L methamphetamine with amphetamine ≥limit of detection, 3.1-10.1% of specimens were positive; first positive results were observed after 1-4 doses. Two participants had detectable plasma l-methamphetamine, with maximum observed concentrations 6.3 and 10.0 μg/L after 2 and 5 doses, respectively. Positive OF and plasma methamphetamine results are possible after Vicks® VapoInhaler™ administration. Chiral confirmatory analyses are necessary to rule out VapoInhaler™ intake. Implementing a selective d-methamphetamine screening assay can help eliminate false-positive OF results. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in

  4. Disappearance of R/S-methamphetamine and R/S-amphetamine from human scalp hair after discontinuation of methamphetamine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Shen, Baohua; Wu, Hejian; Hu, Jingying; Xu, Huili; Shen, Min; Xiang, Ping

    2018-03-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and amphetamine (AM) are widely abused drugs. These compounds contain a chiral center, and their enantiomers exhibit different pharmacologic, pharmacokinetic, and metabolic properties due to differences in binding affinities to their receptor sites. Until now, there was a lack of information on the decline in the concentration of drugs in hair after abstinence. A simple procedure for the chiral separation and determination of methamphetamine (MA) and its metabolite amphetamine (AM) enantiomers by LC-MS/MS in hair samples has been developed and fully validated. The LODs and LLOQs were 0.02ng/mg and 0.05ng/mg for all analytes, respectively. This method was successfully applied to both real hair specimens from chronic MA users and after the discontinuation of MA. The concentration of total MA, and total AM in fifty-eight authentic hair specimens ranged from 7.8ng/mg to 521.0ng/mg, and from 0.3ng/mg to 84.0ng/mg, respectively. Both enantiomers of MA and/or AM were detected in seven of fifty-eight authentic hair specimens. Hair specimens were from thirteen women with a known history of MA abuse, who went to a rehabilitation center and ceased consuming MA (for 4-5 months). The S-isomers of MA and AM were detected in all the 5-6cm segments. Both enantiomers of MA were detected in nine of the 5-6cm segments and the enantiomers of AM were found in only five of the nine samples. Assuming a hair growth rate of 1cm/month, the mean hair elimination half-lives of S-MA, R-MA, S-AM, and R-AM were 0.64(95% CI, 0.46-0.96), 0.58(95% CI, 0.41-0.93), 0.62(0.49-0.88), and 0.50 months (95% CI, 0.42-0.56), respectively. With the developed method, R/S-MA and R/S-AM could be detected in the hair of former drug users for approximately 4 months after abstinence. S-MA is the most commonly found analyte in hair segments and is principally used by abusers. Our results suggest that to evaluate the discontinuation of MA abuse after a 6-month period of abstinence, a 3-cm

  5. Headspace liquid-phase microextraction of methamphetamine and amphetamine in urine by an aqueous drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yi; Vargas, Angelica; Kang, Youn-Jung

    2007-01-01

    This study developed a headspace liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) method by using a single aqueous drop in combination with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV detection for the determination of methamphetamine (MAP) and amphetamine (AP) in urine samples. The analytes, volatile and basic, were released from sample matrix into the headspace first, and then protonated and dissolved in an aqueous H 3 PO 4 drop hanging in the headspace by a HPLC syringe. After extraction, this drop was directly injected into HPLC. Parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. This method showed good linearity in the investigated concentration range of 1.0-1500 μg L -1 , repeatability of the extraction (R.S.D. -1 for both analytes). Enrichment factors of about 400-fold and 220-fold were achieved for MAP and AP, respectively, at optimum conditions. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by analyzing human urine samples

  6. Response of the Emit II amphetamine/methamphetamine assay to specimens collected following use of Vicks inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poklis, A; Jortani, S A; Brown, C S; Crooks, C R

    1993-09-01

    The possible cross-reactivity of l-methamphetamine (desoxyephedrine) to the Syva Emit II amphetamine/methamphetamine assay was evaluated in urine specimens collected from seven subjects using Vicks Inhalers. The subjects were six males and one female ranging from 24 to 47 years of age. Four subjects used the inhaler every two waking hours for five consecutive days, while three subjects inhaled hourly for three consecutive days. All urine voids were collected, totaling 150 specimens. All specimens were analyzed by the Emit II assay on a Hitachi 717 automatic analyzer with a 1000-ng/mL d-methamphetamine cutoff calibrator. None of the inhaler specimens produced an Emit II response equal to or greater than the cutoff calibrator; all were negative. Specimens producing the highest rates were further analyzed by chiral GC/MS. The highest concentrations of l-methamphetamine were observed in urines from two subjects inhaling hourly: 1390, 1290, and 740 ng/mL. These specimens were collected the evenings of the second and third day. When used as directed or even with double the daily dose, Vicks Inhalers did not cause false-positive results in urine tested with the Emit II Amphetamine/Methamphetamine assay.

  7. Role of d-amphetamine and d-methamphetamine as active metabolites of benzphetamine: Evidence from drug discrimination and pharmacokinetic studies in male rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Matthew L; Snyder, Rodney W; Fennell, Timothy R; Negus, S Stevens

    2017-05-01

    Benzphetamine is a Schedule III anorectic agent that is a prodrug for d-amphetamine and d-methamphetamine and may have utility as an "agonist" medication for cocaine use disorder treatment. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic profile of benzphetamine using a drug discrimination procedure in rhesus monkeys. The potency and time course of cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects were compared for benzphetamine (10-18mg/kg, intramuscular (IM)) and d-amphetamine (0.032-0.32mg/kg, IM) in monkeys (n=3-4) trained to discriminate IM cocaine (0.32mg/kg) from saline in a two-key food-reinforced discrimination procedure. Parallel pharmacokinetic studies in the same monkeys determined plasma benzphetamine, d-methamphetamine and/or d-amphetamine levels for correlation with behavioral effects. d-Amphetamine produced dose-dependent, time-dependent, and full cocaine-like effects, i.e. ≥90% cocaine-appropriate responding, in all monkeys without altering response rates. The time course of d-amphetamine's cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects correlated with plasma d-amphetamine levels. Benzphetamine was 180-fold less potent than d-amphetamine and produced full cocaine-like effects in only 2 of 4 monkeys while significantly decreasing response rates. Benzphetamine administration increased plasma d-methamphetamine (peak at 100min) and d-amphetamine (peak at 24h) levels, but the time course of behavioral effects did not correlate with increased levels of benzphetamine, d-methamphetamine or d-amphetamine. These results suggest that benzphetamine yields d-amphetamine and d-methamphetamine as active metabolites in rhesus monkeys, but generation of these metabolites is not sufficient to account for benzphetamine behavioral effects. The incomplete cocaine substitution profile and protracted d-amphetamine plasma levels suggest that benzphetamine may still warrant further evaluation as a candidate pharmacotherapy for cocaine use disorder treatment. Copyright

  8. Effects of 7-day continuous D-amphetamine, methylphenidate, and cocaine treatment on choice between methamphetamine and food in male rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwienteck, Kathryn L; Banks, Matthew L

    2015-10-01

    Methamphetamine addiction is a significant public health problem for which no Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapies exist. Preclinical drug vs. food choice procedures have been predictive of clinical medication efficacy in the treatment of opioid and cocaine addiction. Whether preclinical choice procedures are predictive of candidate medication effects for other abused drugs, such as methamphetamine, remains unclear. The present study aim was to determine continuous 7-day treatment effects with the monoamine releaser d-amphetamine and the monoamine uptake inhibitor methylphenidate on methamphetamine vs. food choice. In addition, 7-day cocaine treatment effects were also examined. Behavior was maintained under a concurrent schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed-ratio 100 schedule) and methamphetamine injections (0-0.32mg/kg/injection, fixed-ratio 10 schedule) in male rhesus monkeys (n=4). Methamphetamine choice dose-effect functions were determined daily before and during 7-day periods of continuous intravenous treatment with d-amphetamine (0.01-0.1mg/kg/h), methylphenidate (0.032-0.32mg/kg/h), or cocaine (0.1-0.32mg/kg/h). During saline treatment, increasing methamphetamine doses resulted in a corresponding increase in methamphetamine vs. food choice. Continuous 7-day treatments with d-amphetamine, methylphenidate or cocaine did not significantly attenuate methamphetamine vs. food choice up to doses that decreased rates of operant responding. However, 0.1mg/kg/h d-amphetamine did eliminate methamphetamine choice in two monkeys. The present subchronic treatment results support the utility of preclinical methamphetamine choice to evaluate candidate medications for methamphetamine addiction. Furthermore, these results confirm and extend previous results demonstrating differential pharmacological mechanisms between cocaine choice and methamphetamine choice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of 7-day continuous d-amphetamine, methylphenidate, and cocaine treatment on choice between methamphetamine and food in male rhesus monkeys*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwienteck, Kathryn L.; Banks, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine addiction is a significant public health problem for which no Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapies exist. Preclinical drug vs. food choice procedures have been predictive of clinical medication efficacy in the treatment of opioid and cocaine addiction. Whether preclinical choice procedures are predictive of candidate medication effects for other abused drugs, such as methamphetamine, remains unclear. The present study aim was to determine continuous 7-day treatment effects with the monoamine releaser d-amphetamine and the monoamine uptake inhibitor methylphenidate on methamphetamine vs. food choice.In addition, 7-day cocaine treatment effects were also examined. Methods Behavior was maintained under a concurrent schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed-ratio 100 schedule) and methamphetamine injections (0-0.32 mg/kg/injection, fixed-ratio 10 schedule) in male rhesus monkeys (n=4). Methamphetamine choice dose-effect functions were determined daily before and during 7-day periods of continuous intravenous treatment with d-amphetamine (0.01-0.1 mg/kg/h), methylphenidate (0.032-0.32 mg/kg/h), or cocaine (0.1-0.32 mg/kg/h). Results During saline treatment, increasing methamphetamine doses resulted in a corresponding increase in methamphetamine vs. food choice. Continuous 7-day treatments with d-amphetamine, methylphenidate or cocaine did not significantly attenuate methamphetamine vs. food choice up to doses that decreased rates of operant responding. However, 0.1 mg/kg/h d-amphetamine did eliminate methamphetamine choice in two monkeys. Conclusions The present subchronic treatment resultssupport the utility of preclinical methamphetamine choice to evaluate candidate medications for methamphetamine addiction. Furthermore, these results confirm and extend previous results demonstrating differential pharmacological mechanisms between cocaine choice and methamphetamine choice. PMID:26361713

  10. Amphetamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meth mouth") when using methamphetamine mood disturbances and delusions similar to those felt by people with bipolar ... Drug Problem. What Should I Do? School Counselors Cocaine Methamphetamine (Meth) Ketamine Drugs: What to Know View ...

  11. Headspace liquid-phase microextraction of methamphetamine and amphetamine in urine by an aqueous drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Yi [Department of Sciences, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, 445 W 59th Street, New York, NY 10019 (United States)]. E-mail: yhe@jjay.cuny.edu; Vargas, Angelica [Department of Sciences, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, 445 W 59th Street, New York, NY 10019 (United States); Kang, Youn-Jung [Department of Sciences, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, 445 W 59th Street, New York, NY 10019 (United States)

    2007-04-25

    This study developed a headspace liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) method by using a single aqueous drop in combination with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV detection for the determination of methamphetamine (MAP) and amphetamine (AP) in urine samples. The analytes, volatile and basic, were released from sample matrix into the headspace first, and then protonated and dissolved in an aqueous H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} drop hanging in the headspace by a HPLC syringe. After extraction, this drop was directly injected into HPLC. Parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. This method showed good linearity in the investigated concentration range of 1.0-1500 {mu}g L{sup -1}, repeatability of the extraction (R.S.D. < 5%, n = 6), and low detection limits (0.3 {mu}g L{sup -1} for both analytes). Enrichment factors of about 400-fold and 220-fold were achieved for MAP and AP, respectively, at optimum conditions. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by analyzing human urine samples.

  12. Effect of Amphetamine on Adult Male and Female Rats Prenatally Exposed to Methamphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romana Šlamberová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the cross-sensitization induced by prenatal methamphetamine (MA exposure to adult amphetamine (AMP treatment in male and female rats. Rat mothers received a daily injection of MA (5 mg/kg or saline throughout the gestation period. Adult male and female offspring (prenatally MA- or saline-exposed were administered with AMP (5 mg/kg or saline (1 ml/kg in adulthood. Behaviour in unknown environment was examined in open field test (Laboras, active drug-seeking behaviour in conditioned place preference test (CPP, spatial memory in the Morris water maze (MWM, and levels of corticosterone (CORT were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay (EIA. Our data demonstrate that in Laboras test, AMP treatment in adulthood increased general locomotion (time and distance travelled regardless of the prenatal exposure and sex, while AMP increased exploratory activity (rearing only in prenatally MA-exposed animals. AMP induced sensitization only in male rats, but not in females when tested drug-seeking behaviour in the CPP test. In the spatial memory MWM test, AMP worsened the performance only in females, but not in males. On the other hand, males swam faster after chronic AMP treatment regardless of the prenatal drug exposure. EIA analysis of CORT levels demonstrated higher level in females in all measurement settings. In males, prenatal MA exposure and chronic adult AMP treatment decreased CORT levels. Thus, our data demonstrated that adult AMP treatment affects behaviour of adult rats, their spatial memory and stress response in sex-specific manner. The effect is also influenced by prenatal drug exposure.

  13. Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... methamphetamine addiction? The most effective treatments for methamphetamine addiction so far are behavioral therapies, such as: cognitive-behavioral therapy, which helps patients recognize, avoid, and ...

  14. Efficacy and safety of psychostimulants for amphetamine and methamphetamine use disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meha Bhatt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amphetamine and methamphetamine use disorders are associated with severe health and social consequences. No pharmacological therapy has been approved for the treatment of these disorders. Psychostimulants can act as maintenance-like therapies for managing substance use among these patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the literature examining the efficacy and safety of psychostimulant agents for increasing abstinence and treatment retention among patients with amphetamine and methamphetamine use disorders. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo, Cochrane Central, and CINAHL from inception to August 2016. Selection of studies, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were conducted independently by two reviewers. We conducted meta-analyses to provide a pooled summary estimate for included trials and report the review according to PRISMA guidelines. Results We identified and selected 17 studies with 1387 participants. Outcome reporting across trials was inconsistent, and the overall quality of evidence was very low due to high risk of bias and indirectness. A meta-analysis of five trials (642 participants found no effect of psychostimulants for end-of-study abstinence (odds ratio = 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 1.45. Additionally, the pooled estimate from 14 studies (1184 participants showed no effect of psychostimulants for treatment retention (odds ratio = 1.20, 95% confidence interval = 0.91 to 1.58. The incidence of serious adverse events did not differ between intervention and placebo groups based on qualitative reports from trials. Conclusions Quantitative analyses showed no effect of psychostimulants for sustained abstinence or treatment retention. We also identified the need for more rigorous studies in this research area with clinician and patient important outcomes.

  15. Caffeine promotes hyperthermia and serotonergic loss following co-administration of the substituted amphetamines, MDMA ("Ecstasy") and MDA ("Love").

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Ruth; Kerans, Aoife; O'Neill, Barry; Harkin, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The present study determined the effect of caffeine co-administration on the core body temperature response and long-term serotonin (5-HT) loss induced by methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "Ecstasy") and its metabolite methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA; "Love") to rats. In group-housed animals, caffeine (10 mg/kg) enhanced the acute toxicity of MDMA (15 mg/kg) and MDA (7.5 mg/kg), resulting in an exaggerated hyperthermic response (+2 degrees C for 5 h following MDMA and +1.5 degrees C for 3 h following MDA) when compared to MDMA (+1 degree C for 3 h) and MDA (+1 degree C for 1 h) alone. Co-administration of caffeine with MDMA or MDA was also associated with increased lethality. To reduce the risk of lethality, doses of MDMA and MDA were reduced in further experiments and the animals were housed individually. To examine the effects of repeated administration, animals received MDMA (10 mg/kg) or MDA (5 mg/kg) with or without caffeine (10 mg/kg) twice daily for 4 consecutive days. MDMA and MDA alone induced hypothermia (fall of 1 to 2 degrees C) over the 4 treatment days. Co-administration of caffeine with MDMA or MDA resulted in hyperthermia (increase of up to 2.5 degrees C) following acute administration compared to animals treated with caffeine or MDMA/MDA alone. This hyperthermic response to caffeine and MDMA was not observed with repeated administration, unlike caffeine + MDA, where hyperthermia was obtained over the 4 day treatment period. In addition, 4 weeks after the last treatment, co-administration of caffeine with MDA (but not MDMA) induced a reduction in 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations in frontal cortex (to 61% and 58% of control, respectively), hippocampus (48% and 60%), striatum (79% and 64%) and amygdala (63% and 37%). However, when caffeine (10 mg/kg) and MDMA (2.5 mg/kg) were co-administered four times daily for 2 days to group-housed animals, both hyperthermia and hippocampal 5-HT loss were observed (reduced to 68% of

  16. Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... Due to HIV and Methamphetamine Use ( November 2014 ) View more related NIDA Notes Related News Releases Study ...

  17. Sex- and dose-dependency in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of (+)-methamphetamine and its metabolite (+)-amphetamine in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milesi-Halle, Alessandra; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Owens, S. Michael

    2005-01-01

    These studies investigated how (+)-methamphetamine (METH) dose and rat sex affect the pharmacological response to METH in Sprague-Dawley rats. The first set of experiments determined the pharmacokinetics of METH and its pharmacologically active metabolite (+)-amphetamine (AMP) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats after 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg METH doses. The results showed significant sex-dependent changes in METH pharmacokinetics, and females formed significantly lower amounts of AMP. While the area under the serum concentration-time curve in males increased proportionately with the METH dose, the females showed a disproportional increase. The sex differences in systemic clearance, renal clearance, volume of distribution, and percentage of unchanged METH eliminated in the urine suggested dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in female rats. The second set of studies sought to determine the behavioral implications of these pharmacokinetic differences by quantifying locomotor activity in male and female rats after saline, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg METH. The results showed sex- and dose-dependent differences in METH-induced locomotion, including profound differences in the temporal profile of effects at higher dose. These findings show that the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile of METH (slower METH clearance and lower AMP metabolite formation) plays a significant role in the differential pharmacological response to METH in male and female rats

  18. [Determination of amphetamine and methamphetamine in human hair using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Láznicková, J; Dĕdicová, M; Vorel, F

    2000-05-01

    The authors present a procedure of concurrent identification and quantification of amphetamine and metamphetamine in human hair. The method involves rinsing of the hair (distilled water 55 degrees C, 0.1 M hydrochloric acid, distilled water to neutral reaction, methanol) drying in air, homogenization by cutting (1-2 mm long), alkaline hydrolysis (20 mg hair, 1 ml 1 M sodium hydroxide, 55 degrees C, 120 min.), neutralization with 1 M hydrochloric acid to pH = 7, extracting benzoylation with 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (0.3 ml 1 M sodium hydroxide, 4 ml cyclohexane, 30 ul cyclohexylamine in cyclohexane of a concentration of 20 ng/ul--internal standard, 50 ul aqueous solution of triethylamine hydrochloride concentration of 100 mg/ml--reaction catalyst and 10 ul of derivation agent 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzoyl chloride dilution 1:10, shaking for 5 mins. by hand and leaving to stand for 10 mins.), centrifugation (5 mins., 3000 rotations/min.), collection of 2 ml cyclohexane layer, its evaporation at 40 degrees C in nitrogen atmosphere and dilution with 100 ul cyclohexane. The derivated extract was subjected to analysis by the GC-MS method. The procedure was used for segmentation analysis of hair of two subjects abusing metamphetamine for prolonged periods. The revealed concentrations varied within the range of 0.99-5.25 mg/kg metamphetamine and 0.13-0.73 mg/kg amphetamine.

  19. Different oxidative profile and nicotinic receptor interaction of amphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipana, C; García-Ratés, S; Camarasa, J; Pubill, D; Escubedo, E

    2008-02-01

    d-Amphetamine (AMPH) and MDMA increased intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in isolated mouse striatal synaptosomes. MDMA showed a maximal oxidative effect at 50-100 microM. However, for AMPH a double maximum was obtained, the first between 0.1 and 1 microM and the second at 1mM. No oxidative effect was present in synaptosomes from reserpinized mice. Cocaine and l-deprenyl inhibited MDMA and AMPH (0.1 microM) ROS production but not that of AMPH at a higher concentration (1mM). When this high concentration was used, its oxidative effect was abolished by a phospholipase A(2) inhibitor. Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol fully prevented the oxidative effect of AMPH and MDMA, by a CB(1) receptor-independent mechanism, as did it NPC 15437 and genistein. The pro-oxidative effect induced by AMPH and MDMA showed a strong dependence on calcium (extracellular and from internal stores) and also was inhibited by nicotinic receptor (nAChR) antagonists dihydro-beta-erythroidine, methyllycaconitine (MLA) and alpha-bungarotoxin. MDMA displaced [(3)H]epibatidine and [(3)H]MLA binding with higher affinity than AMPH. Both amphetamines competitively displaced [(3)H]epibatidine from heteromeric receptors but results obtained from [(3)H]MLA binding demonstrated a non-competitive profile. Preincubation of PC12 cells with AMPH or MDMA reduced [(3)H]dopamine uptake. For MDMA, this effect was prevented by MLA. To summarize, comparing AMPH and MDMA we have demonstrated that these drugs induce an oxidative effect dependent on drug concentration and also reduce dopamine uptake. Processes that are known to affect dopamine transporter functionality also seem to modulate amphetamine derivatives-induced ROS production. For MDMA, acute effects tested are blocked by nAChR antagonists, which points to the possibility that these antagonists could be used to treat some of the adverse effects described in MDMA abusers. Conversely, no implication of nicotinic receptors has been proved

  20. Substance use -- amphetamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... illegally): dexies, kiddie-speed, pep pills, uppers; black beauty (when combined with amphetamine) Methamphetamine (crystal solid form): ... verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. ...

  1. Rapid identification and quantification of methamphetamine and amphetamine in hair by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry coupled with micropulverized extraction, aqueous acetylation and microextraction by packed sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, Hajime; Iwata, Yuko T; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kuwayama, Kenji; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2009-05-01

    We developed a rapid identification and quantification method for the toxicological analysis of methamphetamine and amphetamine in human hair by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry coupled with a novel combination of micropulverized extraction, aqueous acetylation and microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) named MiAMi-GC/MS. A washed hair sample (1-5 mg) was micropulverized for 5 min in a 2 mL plastic tube with 250 microL of water. An anion-exchange sorbent was added to adsorb anionic interferences. After removing the residue with a membrane-filter unit, sodium carbonate and acetic anhydride was admixed in turn. Acetylation was completed in approximately 20 min at room temperature. The acetylated analytes in the reaction liquid were concentrated to an octadecylsilica sorbent packed in the needle of a syringe by a CombiPAL autosampler. Elution was carried out with 50 microL of methanol, and the entire eluate injected into a gas chromatograph using a programmable temperature vaporizing (PTV) technique. The time required for sample preparation and GC/MS analysis was approximately 1 h from a washed hair sample, and an evaporation process was not required. Ranges for quantification were 0.20-50 (ng/mg) each for methamphetamine and amphetamine using 1 mg of hair. Accuracy and relative standard deviation (RSD) were evaluated intraday and interday at three concentrations, and the results were within the limit of a guidance issued by U.S. Food and Drug Administration. For identification, full-scan mass spectra of methamphetamine and amphetamine were obtained using 5 mg of fortified hair samples at 0.2 ng/mg. The extraction device of MEPS was durable for at least 300 extractions, whereas the liner of the gas chromatograph should be replaced after 20-30 times use. The carry over was estimated to be about 1-2%. This sample-preparation method coupled with GC/MS is fast and labor-saving in comparison with conventional methods.

  2. The fast and furious: Cocaine, amphetamines and harm reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Grund, Jean-Paul; Coffin, Philip; Jauffret-Roustide, Marie; Dijkstra, Minke; Bruin, Dick; Blanken, Peter

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCocaine and amphetamines (‘stimulants’) are distinct central nervous system stimulants with similar effects (Pleuvry, 2009; Holman, 1994). Cocaine is a crystalline tropane alkaloid extracted from coca leaves. Amphetamines are a subclass of phenylethylamines with primarily stimulant effects, including amphetamine, methamphetamine, methcathinone and cathinone and referred to as ‘amphetamines’ in this review (Holman, 1994). MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methamphetamine or ecstasy) is a ...

  3. Development of a targeted GC/MS screening method and validation of an HPLC/DAD quantification method for piperazines–amphetamines mixtures in seized material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Boumrah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Piperazine-related drugs are sold as party pills in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids or powders. These party pills can contain several piperazine derivatives, or even a mixture of piperazines and amphetamine derivatives. This paper describes a screening method using a gas chromatography–mass spectrometry technique allowing the separation and the identification of active components within these mixtures by a combined silylation and acylation derivatization procedure. The studied substances–namely: 1-benzylpiperazine (BZP, 1-(3,4-methylenedioxyben-zylpiperazine (MDBP, 1-(3-trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP, 1-(3-chlorophenyl piperazine (mCPP, 1-(4-methoxyphenyl piperazine (MeOPP, amphetamine, methamphetamine, ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methamphetamine (MDMA, 3,4-methylenedi-oxyamphetamine (MDA, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine (MDEA and N-methyl-1,3-benzodioxolylbutanamine (MBDB–are separated.

  4. Review: Methamphetamine use by pregnant women: Impact on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC)'s 2011 World Drug Report, amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) are the second most widely used illicit drug group. This drug group comprises methamphetamine, amphetamine and ecstasy. Methamphetamine is the most widely manufactured drug in this ...

  5. Hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction of amphetamine-type stimulants in human hair samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento Pantaleão, Lorena; Bismara Paranhos, Beatriz Aparecida Passos; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2012-09-07

    A fast method was optimized and validated in order to quantify amphetamine-type stimulants (amphetamine, AMP; methamphetamine, MAMP; fenproporex, FPX; 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, MDMA; and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, MDA) in human hair samples. The method was based in an initial procedure of decontamination of hair samples (50 mg) with dichloromethane, followed by alkaline hydrolysis and extraction of the amphetamines using hollow-fiber liquid-phase micro extraction (HF-LPME) in the three-phase mode. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for identification and quantification of the analytes. The LoQs obtained for all amphetamines (around 0.05 ng/mg) were below the cut-off value (0.2 ng/mg) established by the Society of Hair Testing (SoHT). The method showed to be simple and precise. The intra-day and inter-day precisions were within 10.6% and 11.4%, respectively, with the use of only two deuterated internal standards (AMP-d5 and MDMA-d5). By using the weighted least squares linear regression (1/x²), the accuracy of the method was satisfied in the lower concentration levels (accuracy values better than 87%). Hair samples collected from six volunteers who reported regular use of amphetamines were submitted to the developed method. Drug detection was observed in all samples of the volunteers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel Selectivity-Based Forensic Toxicological Validation of a Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry Method for the Quantitative Determination of Eight Amphetamines in Whole Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, Sebastiaan F.; Fedick, Patrick W.; Berendsen, Bjorn J. A.; Nielen, Michel W. F.; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Graham Cooks, R.; van Asten, Arian C.

    2017-12-01

    Paper spray tandem mass spectrometry is used to identify and quantify eight individual amphetamines in whole blood in 1.3 min. The method has been optimized and fully validated according to forensic toxicology guidelines, for the quantification of amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxy- N-methylamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxy- N-ethylamphetamine (MDEA), para-methoxyamphetamine (PMA), para-methoxymethamphetamine (PMMA), and 4-fluoroamphetamine (4-FA). Additionally, a new concept of intrinsic and application-based selectivity is discussed, featuring increased confidence in the power to discriminate the amphetamines from other chemically similar compounds when applying an ambient mass spectrometric method without chromatographic separation. Accuracy was within ±15% and average precision was better than 15%, and better than 20% at the LLOQ. Detection limits between 15 and 50 ng/mL were obtained using only 12 μL of whole blood. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Neurotoxicity of drugs of abuse - the case of methylenedioxy amphetamines (MDMA, ecstasy ), and amphetamines

    OpenAIRE

    Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne; Daumann, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Ecstasy (MDMA, 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine) and the stimulants methamphetamine (METH, speed) and amphetamine are popular drugs among young people, particularly in the dance scene. When given in high doses both MDMA and the stimulant amphetamines are clearly neurotoxic in laboratory animals. MDMA causes selective and persistent lesions of central serotonergic nerve terminals, whereas amphetamines damage both the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems. In recent years, the question of ecsta...

  8. Intracellular Methamphetamine Prevents the Dopamine-induced Enhancement of Neuronal Firing*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Kaustuv; Sambo, Danielle; Richardson, Ben D.; Lin, Landon M.; Butler, Brittany; Villarroel, Laura; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2014-01-01

    The dysregulation of the dopaminergic system is implicated in multiple neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson disease and drug addiction. The primary target of psychostimulants such as amphetamine and methamphetamine is the dopamine transporter (DAT), the major regulator of extracellular dopamine levels in the brain. However, the behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of methamphetamine and amphetamine administration are unique from one another, thereby suggesting these two compounds impact dopaminergic neurotransmission differentially. We further examined the unique mechanisms by which amphetamine and methamphetamine regulate DAT function and dopamine neurotransmission; in the present study we examined the impact of extracellular and intracellular amphetamine and methamphetamine on the spontaneous firing of cultured midbrain dopaminergic neurons and isolated DAT-mediated current. In dopaminergic neurons the spontaneous firing rate was enhanced by extracellular application of amphetamine > dopamine > methamphetamine and was DAT-dependent. Amphetamine > methamphetamine similarly enhanced DAT-mediated inward current, which was sensitive to isosmotic substitution of Na+ or Cl− ion. Although isosmotic substitution of extracellular Na+ ions blocked amphetamine and methamphetamine-induced DAT-mediated inward current similarly, the removal of extracellular Cl− ions preferentially blocked amphetamine-induced inward current. The intracellular application of methamphetamine, but not amphetamine, prevented the dopamine-induced increase in the spontaneous firing of dopaminergic neurons and the corresponding DAT-mediated inward current. The results reveal a new mechanism for methamphetamine-induced dysregulation of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:24962577

  9. Crystalline methamphetamine use and methamphetamine-related harms in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenhardt, Louisa; Sara, Grant; McKetin, Rebecca; Roxburgh, Amanda; Dobbins, Timothy; Farrell, Michael; Burns, Lucinda; Hall, Wayne D

    2017-03-01

    Concerns about crystal methamphetamine use and harm have increased in multiple countries. This paper describes how changes in the availability and use of crystal methamphetamine have impacted on methamphetamine-related harms in Australia. Data on methamphetamine use were obtained from population-level surveys, health service data and surveys of drug use among sentinel groups of ecstasy users and people who inject drugs. Data were obtained on seizures, arrests, clandestine laboratory detections, hospital separations, mental health unit admissions, drug telephone helpline calls and drug treatment episodes. Segmented linear regression models were fitted to identify changes in these series using log-transformed data where appropriate. The availability of crystal methamphetamine has increased as evidenced by increased laboratory detections, domestic seizures and purity of the seized drug. Population surveys do not report an increase in the number of people who used at least once in the past year. However, more users report using crystal methamphetamine rather than lower-purity powder methamphetamine and more regular use. Indicators of methamphetamine-related harms have increased in parallel with this change. Amphetamine-related helpline calls, drug treatment, arrests and hospital admissions for amphetamine disorders and psychosis all peaked in the mid-2000s, declined for several years and have increased steeply since 2010. The increased availability and use of crystal methamphetamine have been associated with increased regular use and harms. Treatment is required for those experiencing problems and the capacity of health services to provide care needs to be enhanced.[Degenhardt L, Sara G, Connor JP, McKetin R, Roxburgh A, Dobbins T, Farrell M, Burns L, Hall WD. Crystalline methamphetamine use and methamphetamine-related harms in Australia. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:160-170]. © 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  10. Detection of amphetamine following administration of fenproporex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, J T; Valtier, S

    1996-10-01

    Drugs that are metabolized to amphetamine or methamphetamine are potentially significant concerns in the interpretation of amphetamine-positive drug testing results. A number of different compounds have been reported to produce amphetamine in the urine of users. One of these compounds, fenproporex, has been shown to produce amphetamine. Previous reports indicate that the parent compound can be detected only for a few hours following administration, whereas the amphetamine can be detected for several days. Administration of fenproporex to five healthy volunteers resulted in amphetamine being detected in the urine of all subjects. Peak concentrations of amphetamine were detected at approximately 6-20 h postdose and ranged from approximately 1200 to 2100 ng/mL amphetamine. Amphetamine could be detected (> 5 ng/mL) in the urine for up to 119 h. Analysis of the metabolically produced amphetamine showed the presence of both enantiomers, which can be helpful in the differentiation of some illicit amphetamine use from the use of this precursor drug. More significantly, all samples that contained amphetamine at a concentration of at least 500 ng/mL were shown to also contain measurable amounts of the parent compound.

  11. Methamphetamine-related brainstem haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Zelia K; Bennett, Iwan E; Chan, Patrick; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-10-01

    We report the case of an otherwise healthy 29-year-old woman who presented with a brainstem haemorrhage following intravenous methamphetamine use. Extensive investigation did not reveal an underlying pathology, and the development of symptoms was temporally related to methamphetamine injection. Although intracerebral haemorrhage secondary to methamphetamine use is well documented, this report describes a haemorrhage within the brainstem which is a rare location. While animal studies have demonstrated the potential of methamphetamines to produce brainstem haemorrhages, there has only been one previous report describing a haemorrhage in this location due to amphetamine use in humans. We conclude with a brief discussion of the clinical features and aetiology of methamphetamine-related stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic production of amphetamine following administration of clobenzorex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtier, S; Cody, J T

    1999-01-01

    Many of the anorectic drugs that are metabolized to amphetamine and/or methamphetamine pose significant concerns in the interpretation of amphetamine-positive drug testing results. One of these drugs--clobenzorex--has been shown to produce amphetamine. Thirty milligrams of clobenzorex hydrochloride, in the form of a single Asenlix capsule (Roussel, Mexico), were administered orally to five human volunteers with no history of amphetamine, methamphetamine or clobenzorex use. Following administration, urine samples (total void volume) were collected ad lib for seven days and pH, specific gravity and creatinine values were determined. To determine the excretion profile of amphetamine and parent drug, samples were extracted, derivatized, and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using a standard amphetamine procedure with additional monitoring of ions at m/z 91, 118, 125 and 364 for the detection of clobenzorex. Peak concentrations of amphetamine were detected at 4 to 19 h postdose and ranged from approximately 715 to 2474 ng/mL amphetamine. Amphetamine could be detected (> 5 ng/mL) in the urine in one subject for up to 116 h postdose. GC/MS was also used to determine the enantiomeric composition of the metabolite, amphetamine. This analysis revealed the metabolically derived amphetamine was only the d-enantiomer. This differs from previous literature which indicates clobenzorex is the racemic N-orthochlorobenzyl derivative of amphetamine.

  13. Product ion mass spectra of amphetamine-type substances, designer analogues, and ketamine using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonio, Luigino G; Whittall, Ian R; Pianca, Dennis J; Kyd, Jennelle M; Maher, William A

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the application of ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) technology to separate and identify amphetamine-type substances (amphetamine, methamphetamine), common and novel designer analogues (MDA, MDMA, PMA, 4-MTA, MBDB), and ketamine using Acquity UPLC/Micromass Quattro Micro API mass spectrometer instrumentation (Waters Corporation, USA). From injection of drug reference standards, it was demonstrated that these compounds can be identified by product ion mass spectra in less than 4 min total analysis time, indicating that the technological advancements associated with UPLC/MS/MS allow it to serve as a powerful analytical tool for high-throughput testing. In addition to demonstrating the separation and response of these drug compounds under the stated UPLC/MS/MS conditions, we believe the acquired product ion spectra will be a beneficial reference to laboratories interested in incorporating the use of this technology in the routine analysis of drugs of abuse.

  14. 3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) analogues exhibit differential effects on synaptosomal release of 3H-dopamine and 3H-5-hydroxytryptamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna, D.J.; Guan, X.M.; Shulgin, A.T. (Department of Neurology Neurological Sciences, Stanford University Medical Center, CA (USA))

    1991-03-01

    The effect of various analogues of the neurotoxic amphetamine derivative, MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine) on carrier-mediated, calcium-independent release of 3H-5-HT and 3H-DA from rat brain synaptosomes was investigated. Both enantiomers of the neurotoxic analogues MDA and MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) induce synaptosomal release of 3H-5-HT and 3H-DA in vitro. The release of 3H-5-HT induced by MDMA is partially blocked by 10(-6) M fluoxetine. The (+) enantiomers of both MDA and MDMA are more potent than the (-) enantiomers as releasers of both 3H-5-HT and 3H-DA. Eleven analogues, differing from MDA with respect to the nature and number of ring and/or side chain substituents, also show some activity in the release experiments, and are more potent as releasers of 3H-5-HT than of 3H-DA. The amphetamine derivatives {plus minus}fenfluramine, {plus minus}norfenfluramine, {plus minus}MDE, {plus minus}PCA, and d-methamphetamine are all potent releasers of 3H-5-HT and show varying degrees of activity as 3H-DA releasers. The hallucinogen DOM does not cause significant release of either 3H-monoamine. Possible long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity was assessed by quantifying the density of 5-HT uptake sites in rats treated with multiple doses of selected analogues using 3H-paroxetine to label 5-HT uptake sites. In the neurotoxicity study of the compounds investigated, only (+)MDA caused a significant loss of 5-HT uptake sites in comparison to saline-treated controls. These results are discussed in terms of the apparent structure-activity properties affecting 3H-monoamine release and their possible relevance to neurotoxicity in this series of MDA congeners.

  15. Screening determination of four amphetamine-type drugs in street-grade illegal tablets and urine samples by portable capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Anh Huong; Pham, Thi Ngoc Mai; Ta, Thi Thao; Nguyen, Xuan Truong; Nguyen, Thi Lien; Le, Thi Hong Hao; Koenka, Israel Joel; Sáiz, Jorge; Hauser, Peter C; Mai, Thanh Duc

    2015-12-01

    A simple and inexpensive method for the identification of four substituted amphetamines, namely, 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine (MDMA), methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxy amphetamine (MDA) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine (MDEA) was developed using an in-house constructed semi-automated portable capillary electrophoresis instrument (CE) with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D). Arginine 10mM adjusted to pH4.5 with acetic acid was found to be the optimal background electrolyte for the CE-C(4)D determination of these compounds. The best detection limits achieved with and without a sample preconcentration process were 10ppb and 500ppb, respectively. Substituted amphetamines were found in different seized illicit club drug tablets and urine samples collected from different suspected users. Good agreement between results from CE-C(4)D and those with the confirmation method (GC-MS) was achieved, with correlation coefficients for the two pairs of data of more than 0.99. Copyright © 2015 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Resolution of methamphetamine stereoisomers in urine drug testing: urinary excretion of R(-)-methamphetamine following use of nasal inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, R L; Ramos, J M; Bogema, S C; Poklis, A

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether R(-)-methamphetamine inhaled from nasal inhalers produces positive methamphetamine results in currently used urine drug screening procedures and to present a rapid method for distinguishing the optical isomers of methamphetamine. Urine from three subjects inhaling from a Vicks Nasal Inhaler every 20 min for six hours tested positive for methamphetamine by EMIT, Toxilab, TDx, and GC/MS. The chiral derivatizing reagent N-trifluoroacetyl-L-prolyl chloride (L-TPC) was used to form methamphetamine diastereomers allowing rapid identification of each stereoisomer of methamphetamine present in the urine samples. Urine samples positive for amphetamines during routine drug screening were determined to consist of a racemic mixture of methamphetamine. The isomeric composition of methamphetamine present in a urine sample indicates the probable source of the drug.

  17. Detection and diagnostic interpretation of amphetamines in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Y

    1995-01-05

    A review with 22 references on detection and incorporation of amphetamines in hair is presented. This review deals with the detection, incorporation into hair, behavior in the hair shaft, confirmation of past drug use and diagnosis of dependence mainly regarding amphetamine and methamphetamine, along with methoxyphenamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, bromomethamphetamine, deprenyl, benzphetamine, fenproporex and mefenorex. First, pretreatment, extraction and analytical methods for amphetamines in hair using immunoassay, HPLC and GC/MS are discussed. This is followed by sections describing the animal experiments, incorporation rates of amphetamines from blood to hair and relationship between drug history and drug distribution in hair. Finally, the diagnosis of amphetamine dependence and confirmation of methamphetamine baby by hair analysis is discussed. The paper concludes with a brief outlook.

  18. Amphetamine and fenproporex levels following multidose administration of fenproporex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, J T; Valtier, S; Stillman, S

    1999-01-01

    Drugs that are metabolized to amphetamine or methamphetamine are potentially of significant concern in the interpretation of positive drug-testing results for amphetamines. A number of different drugs have been reported to produce amphetamine in the urine of users. One of these compounds, fenproporex, has been shown to be metabolized to amphetamine, and previous reports indicated the parent compound could be detected at low levels for up to 48 h. Administration of fenproporex for seven days (one 10-mg dose per day) to five healthy volunteers resulted in amphetamine being detected in the urine of all subjects. Peak concentrations of amphetamine ranged from approximately 2850 to 4150 ng/mL. Amphetamine could be detected (> or = 5 ng/mL) in the urine for up to nearly 170 h after the last dose. Analysis of the metabolically produced amphetamine showed the presence of both enantiomers, which can be helpful in the differentiation of some illicit amphetamine use from the use of this precursor drug. In addition, evaluation of the enantiomeric composition of the metabolite (amphetamine) can be a valuable tool in the interpretation of time since last dose. More significantly, all samples that contained amphetamine at a concentration of > or = 500 ng/mL were shown to also contain detectable amounts of the parent compound.

  19. New chlorinated amphetamine-type-stimulants disinfection-by-products formed during drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Fontela, Maria; Pineda, Oriol; Ventura, Francesc; Galceran, Maria Teresa

    2012-06-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated high removal rates of amphetamine-type-stimulants (ATSs) through conventional drinking water treatments; however the behaviour of these compounds through disinfection steps and their transformation into disinfection-by-products (DBPs) is still unknown. In this work, for the first time, the reactivity of some ATSs such as amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) with chlorine has been investigated under simulated and real drinking water treatment conditions in order to evaluate their ability to give rise to transformation products. Two new DBPs from these illicit drugs have been found. A common chlorinated-by-product (3-chlorobenzo)-1,3-dioxole, was identified for both MDA and MDEA while for MDMA, 3-chlorocatechol was found. The presence of these DBPs in water samples collected through drinking water treatment was studied in order to evaluate their formation under real conditions. Both compounds were generated through treatment from raw river water samples containing ATSs at concentration levels ranging from 1 to 15 ng/L for MDA and from 2.3 to 78 ng/L for MDMA. One of them, (3-chlorobenzo)-1,3-dioxole, found after the first chlorination step, was eliminated after ozone and GAC treatment while the MDMA DBP mainly generated after the postchlorination step, showed to be recalcitrant and it was found in final treated waters at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 5.8 ng/L. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of amphetamine-type stimulants in blood and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Mateusz Kacper; Wiergowski, Marek; Aszyk, Justyna; Kubica, Paweł; Namieśnik, Jacek; Biziuk, Marek

    2018-01-30

    Amphetamine, methamphetamine, phentermine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine (MDEA) are the most popular amphetamine-type stimulants. The use of these substances is a serious societal problem worldwide. In this study, a method based on gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) with simple and rapid liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and derivatization was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of the six aforementioned amphetamine derivatives in blood and urine. The detection of all compounds was based on multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions. The most important advantage of the method is the minimal sample volume (as low as 200μL) required for the extraction procedure. The validation parameters, i.e., the recovery (90.5-104%), inter-day accuracy (94.2-109.1%) and precision (0.5-5.8%), showed the repeatability and sensitivity of the method for both matrices and indicated that the proposed procedure fulfils internationally established acceptance criteria for bioanalytical methods The procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of real blood and urine samples examined in 22 forensic toxicological cases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work presenting the use of GC-MS/MS for the determination of amphetamine-type stimulants in blood and urine. In view of the low limits of detection (0.09-0.81ng/mL), limits of quantification (0.26-2.4ng/mL), and high selectivity, the procedure can be applied for drug monitoring in both fatal and non-fatal intoxication cases in routine toxicology analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and validation of a single LC-MS/MS assay following SPE for simultaneous hair analysis of amphetamines, opiates, cocaine and metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, L; Dulaurent, S; Mercerolle, M; Morichon, J; Lachâtre, G; Gaulier, J-M

    2014-01-01

    The two major challenges in hair analysis are the limited amount of samples usually available and the low targeted concentrations. To overcome these limitations, a liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry method (LC-ESI-MS/MS) allowing the simultaneous analysis of 17 amphetamines (amphetamine, BDB, m-CPP, dexfenfluramine, DOB, DOM, ephedrine, MBDB, MDA, MDEA, MDMA, methamphetamine, methylphenidate, 4-MTA, norephedrine, norfenfluramine and PMA), 5 opiates (morphine, codeine, heroin, ethylmorphine, and 6AM), cocaine and 5 metabolites [ecgonine methyl ester (EME), benzoylecgonine (BZE), anhydroecgonine methyl ester (AME), cocaethylene, and norcocaine] has been developed. The validation procedure included linearity, intra-day and inter-day variability and accuracy for 5 days (5 replicates at 3 concentration levels). Proficiency studies were used to check the accuracy of the method. As a result, all amphetamines, opiates and cocaine derivatives were satisfactory identified by 2 MRM transitions in 15 min. Calibration curves were performed by a quadratic 1/X weighted regression. The calibration model fits from 0.05 to 10 ng/mg. The limits of detection (LODs) range between 0.005 and 0.030 ng/mg. Precision has been checked by intra-day and inter-day RSD, and associated relative bias, which were lower than 25% for the limits of quantifications (LOQs) and lower than 20% for the other levels tested. This method was routinely applied to hair samples: two positive results of adult drug addicts are presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of Amphetamine, Amfepramone and Fenproporex in Urine Samples by HPLC-DAD: Application to a Population of Brazilian Truck Drivers

    OpenAIRE

    Takitane, Juliana; Almeida, Rafael M.; Oliveira, Tiago F.; Prado, Natanael V.; Muñoz, Daniel R.; Leyton, Vilma; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available immunoassay tests are designed to detect the presence of amphetamine/methamphetamine or methylenodioxyamphetamines. However, it is known that Brazilian truck drivers also report the use of other illicit amphetamines, such as amfepramone and fenproporex. Thus, a method was developed and validated in order to quantify amphetamine-type stimulants (amphetamine, fenproporex and amfepramone) in urine by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-D...

  3. Methamphetamine Pills

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use include paranoia, hallucinations, repetitive behavior patterns, and delusions of parasites or insects under the skin. People ... Agency (DEA) Related Drugs Methamphetamine (Meth) Prescription Stimulants Cocaine / Crack Caffeine Next Steps Preventing Teen Drug Use: ...

  4. Sex differences in methamphetamine pharmacokinetics in adult rats and its transfer to pups through the placental membrane and breast milk

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rambousek, Lukáš; Kačer, P.; Syslová, K.; Bumba, J.; Bubeníková-Valešová, V.; Šlamberová, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 139, JUN (2014), s. 138-144 ISSN 0376-8716 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : methamphetamine * amphetamine * pharmacokinetics * sex differences * breast feeding milk * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.423, year: 2014

  5. A novel screening method for 64 new psychoactive substances and 5 amphetamines in blood by LC-MS/MS and application to real cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiano, Fabio; Busardò, Francesco P; Palumbo, Diego; Kyriakou, Chrystalla; Fioravanti, Alessia; Catalani, Valeria; Mari, Francesco; Bertol, Elisabetta

    2016-09-10

    Identification and quantification of new psychoactive substances (NPS), both in biological and non-biological samples, represent a hard challenge for forensic toxicologists. NPS are increasingly emerging on illegal drug market. Many cases of co-consumption of NPS and other substances have also been reported. Hence, the development of analytical methods aiming at the detection of a broad-spectrum of compounds (NPS and "traditional" drugs) could be helpful. In this paper, a fully validated screening method in blood for the simultaneous detection of 69 substances, including 64 NPS (28 synthetic cannabinoids, 19 synthetic cathinones, 5 phenethylamines, 3 indanes, 2 piperazines, 2 tryptamines, 2 phencyclidine, methoxetamine, ketamine and its metabolite) and 5 amphetamines (amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDMA, MDA, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine - MDEA-) by a dynamic multiple reaction monitoring analysis through liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is described. This method is very fast, easy to perform and cheap as it only requires the deproteinization of 200μL of blood sample with acetonitrile. The chromatographic separation is achieved with a C18 column. The analysis is very sensitive, with limits of quantification ranging from 0.1 to 0.5ng/mL. The method is linear from 1 to 100ng/mL and the coefficient of determination (R(2)) was always above 0.9900. Precision and accuracy were acceptable at any quality control level and recovery efficiency range was 72-110%. Matrix effects did not negatively affect the analytical sensitivity. This method was successfully applied to three real cases, allowing identification and quantification of: mephedrone and methamphetamine (post-mortem); ketamine, MDMA and MDA (post-mortem); AB-FUBINACA (ante-mortem). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Monolithic silica spin column extraction and simultaneous derivatization of amphetamines and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamines in human urine for gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamoto, Akihiro [Scientific Investigation Laboratory, Hiroshima Prefectural Police Headquarters, Kohnan 2-26-3, Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-0825 (Japan); Nishida, Manami [Hiroshima University Technical Center, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Saito, Takeshi [Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Tokai University School of Medicine, Shimokasuya 143, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-1143 (Japan); Kishiyama, Izumi; Miyazaki, Shota [GL Sciences Inc., Sayamagahara 237-2, Iruma, Saitama 358-0032 (Japan); Murakami, Katsunori [Scientific Investigation Laboratory, Hiroshima Prefectural Police Headquarters, Kohnan 2-26-3, Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-0825 (Japan); Nagao, Masataka [Department of Forensic Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Namura, Akira, E-mail: namera@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Forensic Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan)

    2010-02-19

    A simple, sensitive, and specific method with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for simultaneous extraction and derivatization of amphetamines (APs) and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamines (MDAs) in human urine by using a monolithic silica spin column. All the procedures, such as sample loading, washing, and elution were performed by centrifugation. APs and MDAs in urine were adsorbed on the monolithic silica and derivatized with propyl chloroformate in the column. Methamphetamine-d{sub 5} was used as an internal standard. The linear ranges were 0.01-5.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for methamphetamine (MA) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 0.02-5.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for amphetamine (AP) and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) (coefficient of correlation {>=}0.995). The recovery of APs and MDAs in urine was 84-94%, and the relative standard deviation of the intra- and interday reproducibility for urine samples containing 0.1, 1.0, and 4.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1} of APs and MDAs ranged from 1.4% to 13.6%. The lowest detection limit (signal-to-noise ratio {>=} 3) in urine was 5 ng mL{sup -1} for MA and MDMA and 10 ng mL{sup -1} for AP and MDA. The proposed method can be used to perform simultaneous extraction and derivatization on spin columns that have been loaded with a small quantity of solvent by using centrifugation.

  7. Determination of l-methamphetamine: a case history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, John F; Cody, John T

    2005-10-01

    Methamphetamine was detected in a 77-year-old male who had a history of congestive heart failure. Using a modification of a previously reported method, trifluoroacetyl-l-prolyl chloride was used to derivatize sympathomimetic amines to allow separation and identification of individual enantiomers. The l-enantiomer of methamphetamine and a trace amount of l-amphetamine were found in blood and urine specimens from this case. Further investigation revealed the decedent had bronchial asthma and regularly used a Vicks Inhaler, which contains l-methamphetamine as the active ingredient.

  8. Methamphetamine (Meth)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and severe mental problems, including paranoia, hallucinations, and delusions. Meth users often notice a feeling like insects ... What to Know Dealing With Addiction Bath Salts Cocaine Amphetamines I Think I May Have a Drinking/ ...

  9. Simultaneous use of alcohol with methamphetamine but not ecstasy linked with aggression among young adult stimulant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Ellen M; Smirnov, Andrew; Cherney, Adrian; Wells, Helene; Legosz, Margot; Kemp, Robert; Najman, Jake M

    2017-07-01

    Illicit stimulants are often combined with alcohol in nightlife entertainment districts, an environment where aggressive behaviour commonly occurs. While alcohol and methamphetamine use are each associated with aggressive behaviour, relatively little is known about the impact of the combined use of alcohol and amphetamine-type stimulants (i.e., ecstasy [MDMA] and methamphetamine) on aggression. Analysis of longitudinal data from a population-based sample of Australian young adult amphetamine-type stimulant users (n=248) to examine: (a) prevalence and timing of simultaneous alcohol and amphetamine-type stimulant use and (b) predictors of ecstasy- and methamphetamine-related aggression and hostility. Prediction models of ecstasy- and methamphetamine-related aggression and hostility were developed using multivariate logistic regression. Simultaneous alcohol consumption and amphetamine-type stimulant use was prevalent, with drinking generally occurring before consuming amphetamine-type stimulants and while 'high'. Methamphetamine-related aggression and hostility was significantly associated with recurrent risky simultaneous methamphetamine and alcohol use (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 2.74, 95% CI 1.09-6.89), a high frequency and increasing use methamphetamine trajectory (AOR 7.23, 95% CI 1.27-41.03), and high trait aggression (AOR 5.78, 95% CI 2.53-13.20). In contrast, only trait aggression (moderate: AOR 3.01, 95% CI 1.55-5.84; high: AOR 5.02, 95% CI 2.38-10.61) was associated with ecstasy-related aggression and hostility. These findings indicate a link between risky patterns of simultaneous alcohol and methamphetamine use and methamphetamine-related aggression and hostility, independent of separate use of alcohol, methamphetamine and cannabis, trait aggression, psychosis, and gender. The policy challenges of amphetamine-type stimulant and alcohol use require a targeted, multidisciplinary approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Metabolic production of amphetamine following multidose administration of clobenzorex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, K L; Valtier, S; Cody, J T

    1999-10-01

    The interpretation of urine drug-testing results can have important forensic and legal implications. In particular, drugs that are metabolized to amphetamine or methamphetamine or both pose significant concerns. In this study, clobenzorex, an anorectic drug that is metabolized to d-amphetamine, was administered to five subjects. Each subject took 30 mg daily for seven days, and individual urine samples were collected ad lib for 14 days beginning on the first day the drug was administered. Urine pH, specific gravity, and creatinine values were determined for each sample. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to determine the excretion profile of amphetamine and clobenzorex using a standard procedure for amphetamines with additional monitoring of ions at m/z 118, 125, and 364 for the detection of clobenzorex. Peak concentrations of amphetamine were found at 82 to 168 h after the first dose and ranged from approximately 2900 to 4700 ng/mL amphetamine. The use of a regioisomer (3-Cl-benzylamphetamine) as internal standard allowed for accurate quantitation of the parent drug. Peak concentrations of clobenzorex were found at 50 to 120 h after the first dose and ranged from approximately 8 to 47 ng/mL clobenzorex. However, in many samples, clobenzorex was not detected at all. This analysis revealed that the metabolite, (amphetamine) is present in much higher concentrations than the parent compound, clobenzorex. Yet even at peak amphetamine concentrations, the parent was not always detected (limit of detection 1 ng/mL). Thus, in the interpretation of amphetamine-positive drug-testing results, the absence of clobenzorex in the urine sample does not exclude the possibility of its use.

  11. Research Reports: Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reports » Methamphetamine » Letter from the Director Methamphetamine Email Facebook Twitter Letter from the Director The abuse of methamphetamine—a potent and highly addictive stimulant—remains an extremely serious problem in the ...

  12. Mind Over Matter: Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mind Over Matter Teaching Guide and Series / Methamphetamine Mind Over Matter: Methamphetamine (Meth) Print Order Free Publication ... someday you'll make the next major breakthrough. Mind Over Matter is produced by the National Institute ...

  13. Methamphetamine use and dependence in vulnerable female populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittirattanapaiboon, Phunnapa; Srikosai, Soontaree; Wittayanookulluk, Apisak

    2017-07-01

    The study reviews recent publications on methamphetamine use and dependence women in term of their epidemic, physical health impact, psychosocial impacts, and also in the identified vulnerable issues. Studies of vulnerable populations of women are wide ranging and include sex workers, sexual minorities, homeless, psychiatric patients, suburban women, and pregnant women, in which amphetamine type stimulants (ATSs) are the most commonly reported illicit drug used among them. The prenatal exposure of ATS demonstrated the small for gestational age and low birth weight; however, more research is needed on long-term studies of methamphetamine-exposed children. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is commonly reported by female methamphetamine users as perpetrators and victims. However, statistics and gendered power dynamics suggest that methamphetamine-related IPV indicates a higher chance of femicide. Methamphetamine-abusing women often have unresolved childhood trauma and are introduced to ATS through families or partners. Vulnerable populations of women at risk of methamphetamine abuse and dependence. Impacts on their physical and mental health, IPV, and pregnancy have been reported continuing, which guide that empowering and holistic substance abuse are necessary for specific group.

  14. Barriers to accessing methamphetamine treatment: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Craig; Troeung, Lakkhina; Young, Jesse T; Kelty, Erin; Preen, David B

    2016-11-01

    Methamphetamine use is associated with a range of poor health, social and justice outcomes. In many parts of the world increased methamphetamine use has been identified as a major public health concern. Methamphetamine treatment programmes have been effective in reducing and ceasing use, however a range of barriers have prevented these programmes being widely adopted by methamphetamine users. This review examines the barriers to accessing meth/amphetamine treatment identified in the literature. Databases were systematically searched using relevant terms for peer-reviewed articles describing original research exploring the barriers to accessing treatment for meth/amphetamine use. Reviews and grey literature were excluded. Eleven studies conducted in 5 countries were included in data synthesis; this involved a systematic review of all 11 studies, and meta-analysis of the prevalence of barriers reported in 6 studies that published sufficient quantitative data. Psychosocial/internal barriers to accessing methamphetamine treatment were most prevalent across studies (10/11 studies). Meta-analysis confirmed the four most commonly endorsed barriers to treatment access across studies all psychosocial barriers were embarrassment or stigma (60%, 95% CI: 54-67%); belief that treatment was unnecessary (59%, 95% CI:54-65%); preferring to withdraw alone without assistance (55%, 95% CI:45-65); and privacy concerns (51%, 95% CI:44-59%). The primary barriers to accessing methamphetamine treatment are psychosocial/internal. Services and treatment models that address these barriers are urgently required. There is a growing need for methamphetamine-appropriate treatment services. Further research evaluating treatment engagement and effectiveness for methamphetamine and polysubstance use, including the development of effective pharmacotherapies is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Maintaining class, producing gender: enhancement discourses about amphetamine in entertainment media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Stacey A

    2011-11-01

    Since the 1930s, amphetamine has been used for a variety of socially and medically condoned purposes including personal and performance enhancement. In the contemporary U.S., although amphetamine and its derivatives share a history, similar chemical composition, and physiological and psychiatric effects, they are typically treated and researched as two distinct groups: illegally produced methamphetamine and prescription amphetamine. This study is an examination of the social meanings of these categories and their users as represented in popular media. To complement existing research on drug discourses in popular news media, this study analysed entertainment media: ten novels, three seasons of Breaking Bad, six television episodes, and eight movies. Media were coded inductively and deductively using tenets of critical discourse analysis and rhetorical criticism. The author identified discourses about user subject positions and ideologies pertaining to enhancement-related motivations for use. Two important themes emerged from this analysis that construct amphetamine use and users in ways that reflect, legitimize and reproduce class and gender ideologies. First, discourses illustrate that distinct meanings of methamphetamine versus prescription amphetamine are linked to expectations about the respective socioeconomic class and social status of their users. Second, the discourses reflect gendered values and ideals about productivity and sexuality. In reality, American cultural and political-economic contexts may encourage the use of amphetamine to meet a variety of social expectations and economic needs. However, many policy and prevention efforts surrounding amphetamine use disproportionately target methamphetamine users and women. Because policy and prevention efforts can be influenced as much by social values as by data, it is important to examine the many arenas in which social values are produced and disseminated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  16. A demonstration of the use of ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry [UPLC/MS] in the determination of amphetamine-type substances and ketamine for forensic and toxicological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonio, Luigino G; Pianca, Dennis J; Whittall, Ian R; Maher, William A; Kyd, Jennelle M

    2006-05-19

    We have recently seen the emergence of ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to mass spectrometry as an alternative to traditional high-performance liquid chromatography techniques. The strengths of UPLC technology promote the ability to separate and identify drug compounds with significant gains in resolution and sensitivity and marked reductions in the overall time of analysis. As increased throughput is the desire of the practical toxicology laboratory, the aim of this study was to trial commercially available technology by assessment of the separation of several commonly encountered amphetamine-type substances. From injection of a poly-drug reference standard and whole blood extract, we successfully separated and identified amphetamine, methamphetamine, ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, phentermine, MDA, MDMA, MDEA and ketamine in less than 3 min using the Acquity UPLC-Micromass Quattro Micro API MS instrumentation (Waters Corporation, USA). In addition to this significant reduction in overall run time, all peaks exhibited acceptable resolution using selected ion recording (SIR), with analysis indicating the capability to separate 5-11 peaks in 1.75 min using the current system parameters. From this introductory data, it is therefore indicated that the technological advancements defining ultra-performance liquid chromatography will allow it to serve as a powerful analytical tool for rapid throughput analysis.

  17. Methamphetamine Related Radiculopathy: Case Series and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Foroughipour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peripheral nervous injury and neuromuscular complications from methamphetamine abuse has not been reported. The mechanism is not yet identified. Methods: Eight patients with lower extremity weakness following methamphetamine abuse were reported during December 2009 to May 2010. Results: Patients presented with lower extremity weakness. All patients were co-abusers of methamphetamine and opioids. Other clinical manifestations comprised of distal paresthesia of the lower extremities with progression to proximal portions, with minimal sensory involvement in the distal of the lower extremities. Electrodiagnostic findings were consistent with lumbosacral Radiculopathy. Vital signs were unremarkable and all laboratory tests were within normal limits. Follow-up examination after three months showed improvement of weakness in 3 patients. Conclusion: For patients with a history of illicit drug abuse and acute neuromuscular weakness, methamphetamine or heroin toxicity should be taken into account. Hence, urine morphine and amphetamine/ methamphetamine tests should be performed and serum lead and thallium levels should be evaluated. In addition, rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria should be worked up.

  18. Amphetamine margin in sports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laties, V.G.; Weiss, B.

    1981-10-01

    The amphetamines can enhance athletic performance. That much seem clear from the literature, some of which is reviewed here. Increases in endurance have been demonstrated in both humans and rats. Smith and Beecher, 20 years ago, showed improvement of running, swimming, and weight throwing in highly trained athletes. Laboratory analogs of such performances have also been used and similar enhancement demonstrated. The amount of change induced by the amphetamines is usually small, of the order of a few percent. Nevertheless, since a fraction of a percent improvement can make the difference between fame and oblivion, the margin conferred by these drugs can be quite important.

  19. Distribution and optical purity of methamphetamine found in toxic concentration in a civil aviation accident pilot fatality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Arvind K; Cardona, Patrick S; Soper, John W; Canfield, Dennis V

    2004-07-01

    Toxicological evaluation of postmortem samples collected from a pilot involved in a unique fatal civil aircraft accident is described in this paper. A one-occupant airplane was substantially damaged upon colliding with terrain in poor visibility. Remains of the pilot were found outside the aircraft. Pathological examination revealed multiple blunt force injuries and vascular congestion. The fluorescence polarization immunoassay disclosed 8.0 microg/mL amphetamines in urine. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analyses determined the presence of methamphetamine (1.13 microg/mL in blood and 59.2 microg/mL in urine) and amphetamine (0.022 microg/mL in blood and 1.50 microg/mL in urine). Methamphetamine was distributed throughout the body, including the brain. The amount of methamphetamine in gastric contents was 575-fold higher than that of amphetamine. The (+)- and (-)-forms of methamphetamine were present in equal proportions in gastric contents. The methamphetamine concentration found in blood was in the range sufficient to produce toxic effects, causing performance impairment.

  20. Nociceptin attenuates methamphetamine abstinence-induced withdrawal-like behavior in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Scott M; Baron, Steven; Ding, Zhe; Roth, Christopher; Zaveri, Nurulain; Raffa, Robert B

    2008-06-01

    Planarians display a concentration-related reduction in locomotor activity when amphetamine, cocaine, cannabinoid, or benzodiazepine exposure is abruptly discontinued. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that abrupt discontinuation of methamphetamine would also cause withdrawal-like behavior in planarians and that the withdrawal-like behavior would be prevented by nociceptin, which has been shown to modulate the effects of methamphetamine in mammals. We observed a concentration-related reduction of locomotor behavior when planarians exposed to methamphetamine (0.1-100 microM) were tested in drug-free water. The withdrawal-like behavior was abolished when methamphetamine (10 microM)-exposed planarians were placed into water containing nociceptin (10 microM) or when planarians co-exposed to methamphetamine (10 microM) and nociceptin (10 microM) were placed into drug-free water. The effects of nociceptin were abolished in the presence of a nociceptin receptor antagonist, JTC-801 (1 microM). Planarians did not display a change in locomotor behavior during exposure to nociceptin (10 microM) or JTC-801 (1 microM) by themselves. These results (1) reveal a functional interaction between nociceptin and methamphetamine in planarians and (2) provide evidence that nociceptin blocks methamphetamine-induced withdrawal-like behavior in planarians through a JTC-801-sensitive mechanism.

  1. Cardiovascular Complications of Acute Amphetamine Abuse; Cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Bazmi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate cardiovascular complications among patients who abuse amphetamines. Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between April 2014 and April 2015 among 3,870 patients referred to the Toxicology Emergency Department of Baharlou Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Those with clinical signs of drug abuse and positive urine screening tests were included in the study, while cases of chronic abuse were excluded. Cardiac complications were evaluated via electrocardiography (ECG and transthoracic echocardiography. Results: A total of 230 patients (5.9% had a history of acute amphetamine abuse and positive urine tests. Of these, 32 patients (13.9% were <20 years old and 196 (85.2% were male. In total, 119 (51.7% used amphetamine and methamphetamine compounds while 111 (48.3% used amphetamines with morphine or benzodiazepines. The most common ECG finding was sinus tachycardia (43.0%, followed by sinus tachycardia plus a prolonged QT interval (34.3%. Mean creatine kinase-MB and troponin I levels were 35.9 ± 4.3 U/mL and 0.6 ± 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. A total of 60 patients (26.1% were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. The majority (83.3% of these patients had normal echocardiography results. The mean aortic root diameter (ARD was 27.2 ± 2.8 mm. Abnormalities related to the ARD were found in 10 patients (16.7%, three of whom subsequently died. Conclusion: According to these findings, cardiac complications were common among Iranian patients who abuse amphetamines, although the majority of patients had normal echocardiography and ECG findings.

  2. Simultaneous quantification of amphetamines, caffeine and ketamine in urine by hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-flame ionization detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jun; Chen, Jie; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2010-08-15

    A method of hollow fiber (HF) liquid phase microextraction (LPME) combined with gas chromatography (GC)-flame ionization detection (FID) was developed for the simultaneous quantification of trace amphetamine (AP), methamphetamine (MA), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), caffeine and ketamine (KT) in drug abuser urine samples. The factors affecting on the extraction of six target analytes by HF-LPME were investigated and optimized, and the subsequent analytical performance evaluation and real sample analysis were performed by the extraction of six target analytes in sample solution containing 30% NaCl (pH 12.5) for 20 min with extraction temperature of 30 degrees C and stirring rate of 1000 rpm. Under such optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) for the six target analytes were ranged from 8 microg/L (AP, KT) to 82 microg/L (MDA), with the enrichment factors (EFs) of 5-227 folds, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=7) were in the range of 6.9-14.1%. The correlation coefficients of the calibration for the six target analytes over the dynamic linear range were higher than 0.9958. The application feasibility of HF-LPME-GC-FID in illegal drug monitoring was demonstrated by analyzing drug abuser urine samples, and the recoveries of target drugs for the spiked sample ranging from 75.2% to 119.3% indicated an excellent anti-interference capability of the developed method. The proposed method is simple, effective, sensitive and low-cost, and provides a much more accurate and sensitive detection platform over the conventional analytical techniques (such as immunological assay) for drug abuse analysis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Methamphetamine Use in Club Subcultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian C.; LeClair, Amy; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, methamphetamine developed a peculiar geographic distribution in the United States, with limited diffusion in the Northeast. While use within gay clubs received attention, methamphetamine in club subcultures more broadly remains less clear. Using quantitative and qualitative data, we provide a descriptive assessment of methamphetamine use in club subcultures. Methamphetamine use in club subcultures often has instrumental purposes. The context of initiation into methamphetamine use and its close connection to cocaine shape later patterns of use. Viewing meth solely as a gay party drug misses a significant part of the population and may misguide public health strategies to reduce methamphetamine use in the Northeast. PMID:23848380

  4. Interaction and Transport of Methamphetamine and its Primary Metabolites by Organic Cation and Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David J; Sager, Jennifer E; Duan, Haichuan; Isoherranen, Nina; Wang, Joanne

    2017-07-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most abused illicit drugs with roughly 1.2 million users in the United States alone. A large portion of methamphetamine and its metabolites is eliminated by the kidney with renal clearance larger than glomerular filtration clearance. Yet the mechanism of active renal secretion is poorly understood. The goals of this study were to characterize the interaction of methamphetamine and its major metabolites with organic cation transporters (OCTs) and multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) transporters and to identify the major transporters involved in the disposition of methamphetamine and its major metabolites, amphetamine and para -hydroxymethamphetamine ( p -OHMA). We used cell lines stably expressing relevant transporters to show that methamphetamine and its metabolites inhibit human OCTs 1-3 (hOCT1-3) and hMATE1/2-K with the greatest potencies against hOCT1 and hOCT2. Methamphetamine and amphetamine are substrates of hOCT2, hMATE1, and hMATE2-K, but not hOCT1 and hOCT3. p -OHMA is transported by hOCT1-3 and hMATE1, but not hMATE2-K. In contrast, organic anion transporters 1 and 3 do not interact with or transport these compounds. Methamphetamine and its metabolites exhibited complex interactions with hOCT1 and hOCT2, suggesting the existence of multiple binding sites. Our studies suggest the involvement of the renal OCT2/MATE pathway in tubular secretion of methamphetamine and its major metabolites and the potential of drug-drug interactions with substrates or inhibitors of the OCTs. This information may be considered when prescribing medications to suspected or known abusers of methamphetamine to mitigate the risk of increased toxicity or reduced therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. A fatality from an oral ingestion of methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Elizabeth; Lee, C Jeff; Marinetti, Laureen

    2009-10-01

    The case presented is of a 49-year-old white male decedent who admitted to oral ingestion of methamphetamine. He believed he was being followed by the police while walking his daughter to school in the morning and swallowed the "8-ball of meth," which is known to be one-eighth of an ounce or the equivalent of about 3 g. The following autopsy specimens were analyzed for the presence of methamphetamine and amphetamine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: femoral blood, urine, bile, vitreous fluid, brain, liver, and gastric contents. Blood drawn at the hospital approximately 12 h after ingestion was also analyzed. The methamphetamine concentration in the hospital blood was 3.0 mg/L, and the concentration in the femoral blood from autopsy was 30 mg/L. Other drugs confirmed included tramadol, lorazepam, and 11-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol. The pathologist ruled the cause of death to be cardiac dysrhythmia due to excited delirium as a result of methamphetamine drug effects. Discussion of the timeline from ingestion to death and the clinical presentation of the decedent are included.

  6. Amphetamine-type stimulant use among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Vietnam : Results from a socio-ecological, community-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu, Nga Thi Thu; Holt, Martin; Phan, Huong Thi Thu; Le, Huong Thi; La, Lan Thi; Tran, Gioi Minh; Doan, Tung Thanh; Nguyen, Trang Nhu Nguyen; de Wit, John

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Amphetamine-type-stimulants (ATS) use is associated with HIV-related sexual risk behaviours and is an emergent problem among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Vietnam. The purpose of this study is to describe ATS use patterns and understand the correlates of recent methamphetamine use

  7. Amphetamine-type stimulant use among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Vietnam: Results from a socio-ecological, community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Nga Thi Thu; Holt, Martin; Phan, Huong Thi Thu; Le, Huong Thi; La, Lan Thi; Tran, Gioi Minh; Doan, Tung Thanh; Nguyen, Trang Nhu Nguyen; de Wit, John

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine-type-stimulants (ATS) use is associated with HIV-related sexual risk behaviours and is an emergent problem among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Vietnam. The purpose of this study is to describe ATS use patterns and understand the correlates of recent methamphetamine use from a socio-ecological perspective. From September through December, 2014, 622 MSM were recruited in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. We collected information on demographic characteristics, HIV testing behaviours, use of ATS and other recreational drugs (ever and recently), sexual sensation seeking, depressive mood, experienced and internalized stigma related to homosexuality, social involvement with other MSM, and perceptions of ATS use in MSM networks. We performed descriptive statistics to describe ATS use patterns and multivariate logistic regression to establish independent correlates of recent methamphetamine use. Nearly one-third (30.4%) had ever used ATS, including 23.6% who had used methamphetamine, 4.3% who had used amphetamine ('speed') and 20.9% who had used ecstasy. 20.1% and 11.9% had ever used methamphetamine and ecstasy, respectively, during sex. Eighteen percent of methamphetamine users were classified as engaged in high-risk use. Recent methamphetamine use (in the last 3 months) was associated with participants perceiving more methamphetamine use in their MSM network, recent sex work, and higher sexual sensation seeking scores. ATS use is relatively prevalent among MSM sampled in Vietnam's main cities. Interventions to address methamphetamine are warranted for MSM in Vietnam. Methamphetamine treatments are needed for high-risk users. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative analysis of methamphetamine in hair of children removed from clandestine laboratories--evidence of passive exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassindale, T

    2012-06-10

    In New Zealand many children have been removed from clandestine laboratories following Police intervention. In the last few years it has become standard procedure that these children have hair samples taken and these samples are submitted to the laboratory for analysis. There are various mechanisms for the incorporation of drugs into hair. The hair follicle has a rich blood supply, so any drug that may be circulating in the blood can be incorporated into the growing hair. Another mechanism is via external contamination, such as spilling a drug on the hair or through exposure to fumes or vapours. Hair samples were analysed for methamphetamine and amphetamine. From the 52 cases analysed 38 (73%) were positive for methamphetamine (>0.1 ng/mg) and amphetamine was detected in 34 of these cases. In no case was amphetamine detected without methamphetamine. The hair washes (prior to extraction) were also analysed (quantified in 30 of the positive cases) and only 3 had a wash to hair ratio of >0.1 (all were methamphetamine and are incorporating it into the hair through the blood stream. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Open Label Pilot Study of Modafinil for Methamphetamine Dependence1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Janette; Mancino, Michael J.; Feldman, Zachary; Chopra, Mohit P.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Cargile, Christopher; Oliveto, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine has become a major public health issue in both the US and globally. Despite this, no effective pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine abuse has been developed to date. This 6 week, open-label pilot clinical trial examined the safety and tolerability of modafinil up to 400mg/day in eight methamphetamine dependent individuals. Subjects were inducted onto modafinil at 400 mg/day over three days and remained on 400 mg/day for 4.5 weeks. Participants received weekly blister packs and underwent weekly individual cognitive behavioral therapy. Adjunctive contingency management procedures were used to enhance retention. Vital signs and supervised urine samples were obtained thrice weekly and self-reported drug use and Hamilton Anxiety and Depression ratings were completed once weekly. Eight subjects (50% female, 100% Caucasian, aged 35-52 yrs) were enrolled. Four completed the 6-wk study, 3 completed a portion and one withdrew consent before completing intake. Results showed that systolic blood pressure (t=1.09, p=0.28), diastolic blood pressure, (t=1.18, p=0.24) and heart rate (t=1.55, p=0.13) did not change over time. Scores on the modafinil side effects checklist (t=−2.63, p=0.01), Hamilton Anxiety scale (t=−2.50, p=0.018) and Hamilton Depression scale (t=−3.25, p=0.003) all decreased over time. The proportion of urine positive for amphetamines did not change over time (t=−0.52, p=0.61), whereas self-reported methamphetamine use did (t=−2.86, p<0.005). These results suggest that modafinil at 400 mg/day is safe and tolerable for methamphetamine dependent individuals. PMID:19745650

  10. Boundary Conditions of Methamphetamine Craving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Richard B.; Onyemekwu, Chukwudi; Hart, Carl L.; Ochsner, Kevin N.; Kober, Hedy

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine use has increased significantly and become a global health concern. Craving is known to predict methamphetamine use and relapse following abstinence. Some have suggested that cravings are automatic, generalized, and uncontrollable, but experimental work addressing these claims is lacking. In two exploratory studies we tested the boundary conditions of methamphetamine craving by asking: (1) is craving specific to users’ preferred route of administration? and (2) can craving be regulated by cognitive strategies? Two groups of methamphetamine users were recruited. In Study 1, participants were grouped by their preferred route of administration (intranasal vs. smoking), and rated their craving in response to photographs and movies depicting methamphetamine use (via the intranasal vs. smoking route). In Study 2, methamphetamine smokers implemented cognitive regulation strategies while viewing photographs depicting methamphetamine smoking. Strategies involved either focusing on the positive aspects of smoking methamphetamine or the negative consequences of doing so – the latter strategy based on treatment protocols for addiction. In Study 1, we found a significant interaction between group and route of administration, such that participants who preferred to smoke methamphetamine reported significantly stronger craving for smoking stimuli, whereas those who preferred the intranasal route reported stronger craving for intranasal stimuli. In Study 2, participants reported significantly lower craving when focusing on the negative consequences associated with methamphetamine use. Taken together, these findings suggest that strength of craving for methamphetamine is moderated by users’ route of administration and can be reduced by cognitive strategies. This has important theoretical, methodological, and clinical implications. PMID:26302338

  11. [Acute poisoning with weight-loss dietary supplement falsely suggesting the use of amphetamine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukasik-Głebocka, Magdalena; Sommerfeld, Karina; Tezyk, Artur; Zielińska-Psuja, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of abuse of weight-loss dietary supplement in 27-year-old man, with characteristic for amphetamine sympathomimetic symptoms and positive analysis of this drug in the urine by immunoassay method (FPIA; Axsym, Abbott). However positive result was not confirmed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The patient ate nine tablets of the Thermal Pro with declared composition of caffeine (250 mg), bitter orange (200 mg), beta-phenylethylamine (100 mg), willow bark (75 mg), Cayenne pepper (40 mg), 1,3-dimethyloamyloamine (DMAA, 35 mg), gooseberry extract (20 mg), bergamot orange (20 mg), black pepper (5 mg), after two-month period of regular consumption at dose of 2-3 capsules per day. After 4 hours, during admission to the Department of Toxicology, patient manifested typical sympathomimetic symptoms: anxiety, agitation, pale skin, sweats, tachycardia 120/min, mydriasis. Following the outcome of detecting amphetamine/methamphetamine in the patient's urine at 2377 ng/mL concentration using FPIA method, drug intoxication was suspected. It was considered that the ingestion was intentional or unconscious of adulterated dietary supplement. In view of the strong opposition of the patient, who denied any use of psychoactive substances, it was decided to re-examine collected speciments. The liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method did not confirm the presence of amphetamine in the patient's blood and urine. Based on the composition of dietary supplements for substances which could be responsible for the positive amphetamine result in urine by FPIA method and available literature data, it was concluded that the substances that may react in the immunoassay could be dimethylamyloamine (DMAA, geranamine) or bitter orange components. False positive urinalysis towards amphetamine/methamphetamine by immunoassay and presence of sympathomimetic effects may contribute to a false diagnosis of this drug

  12. 78 FR 67365 - Determination That Adderall (Amphetamine Aspartate; Amphetamine Sulfate; Dextroamphetamine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-1361] Determination That Adderall (Amphetamine Aspartate; Amphetamine Sulfate; Dextroamphetamine Saccharate... No. Drug Applicant NDA 011522 ADDERALL Teva Womens Health (amphetamine Inc., 41 Moores aspartate; Rd...

  13. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopic Sensing of Methamphetamine by a Specific Aptamer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Mashinchian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS is a simple and highly sensitive technique that can be used for evaluation of the aptamer-target interaction even in a label-free approach. Methods: To pursue the effectiveness of EIS, in the current study, the folding properties of specific aptamer for methamphetamine (METH (i.e., aptaMETH were evaluated in the presence of METH and amphetamine (Amph. Folded and unfolded aptaMETH was mounted on the gold electrode surface and the electron charge transfer was measured by EIS. Results: The Ret of methamphetamine-aptaMETH was significantly increased in comparison with other folding conditions, indicating specific detection of METH by aptaMETH. Conclusion: Based on these findings, methamphetamine-aptaMETH on the gold electrode surface displayed the most interfacial electrode resistance and thus the most folding situation. This clearly indicates that the aptaMETH can profoundly and specifically pinpoint METH; as a result we suggest utilization of this methodology for fast and cost-effective identification of METH.

  14. Neuroimmune Basis of Methamphetamine Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftis, Jennifer M.; Janowsky, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Although it is not known which antigen-specific immune responses (or if antigen-specific immune responses) are relevant or required for methamphetamine's neurotoxic effects, it is apparent that methamphetamine exposure is associated with significant effects on adaptive and innate immunity. Alterations in lymphocyte activity and number, changes in cytokine signaling, impairments in phagocytic functions, and glial activation and gliosis have all been reported. These drug-induced changes in immune response, particularly within the CNS, are now thought to play a critical role in the addiction process for methamphetamine dependence as well as for other substance use disorders. In Section 2, methamphetamine's effects on glial cell (e.g., microglia and astrocytes) activity and inflammatory signaling cascades are summarized, including how alterations in immune cell function can induce the neurotoxic and addictive effects of methamphetamine. Section 2 also describes neurotransmitter involvement in the modulation of methamphetamine's inflammatory effects. Section 3 discusses the very recent use of pharmacological and genetic animal models which have helped elucidate the behavioral effects of methamphetamine's neurotoxic effects and the role of the immune system. Section 4 is focused on the effects of methamphetamine on blood–brain barrier integrity and associated immune consequences. Clinical considerations such as the combined effects of methamphetamine and HIV and/or HCV on brain structure and function are included in Section 4. Finally, in Section 5, immune-based treatment strategies are reviewed, with a focus on vaccine development, neuroimmune therapies, and other anti-inflammatory approaches. PMID:25175865

  15. Morning administration of oral methamphetamine dose-dependently disrupts nighttime sleep in recreational stimulant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Evan S; Johnson, Patrick S; Bruner, Natalie R; Vandrey, Ryan; Johnson, Matthew W

    2017-09-01

    Use of amphetamine-type stimulants (e.g., methamphetamine) is associated with acute sleep disruptions. No prior reports have characterized the acute effects of methamphetamine on sleep using polysomnography, the gold standard for objective sleep monitoring. Recreational stimulant users (n=19) completed a baseline assessment, which included questionnaires assessing demographic and substance use characteristics, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), which assesses sleep quality over the past month. Participants were administered 0mg (placebo), 20mg, or 40mg oral methamphetamine at 08:15h on study days, using a double-blind, randomized, within-subjects design. Sleep was monitored using polysomnography from 22:20 that evening until 06:15 the following morning. PSQI scores indicated more than half of participants reported poor sleep quality at baseline. Methamphetamine dose-dependently increased sleep latency, and decreased total sleep time, sleep efficiency, time in NREM 2 sleep, number of REM periods, and total time in REM sleep. Sleep under placebo conditions was consistent with what would be expected from healthy adults. Morning oral administration of methamphetamine produces robust disruptions in nighttime sleep. Future research should examine relations between stimulant use and sleep disruption in naturalistic settings, with regard to both stimulant abuse and licit prescription use. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. [A case of amotivational syndrome as a residual symptom after methamphetamine abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashizawa, T; Saito, T; Yamamoto, M; Shichinohe, S; Ishikawa, H; Maeda, H; Toki, S; Ozawa, H; Watanabe, M; Takahata, N

    1996-10-01

    We had a case of psychiatric evidence who was homeless and exhibited severe abulia and autism on detention for assault and battery. It was thought that his past history of chronic methamphetamine abuse and his familial history played some part in his showing such symptoms. His mother was alcohol dependent. He was an ACOA (adult child of alcoholics), which might have led to his chronic abuse of methamphetamine. On the other hand, it is well-known fact that the amotivational syndrome induced by marijuana abuse is typified by a diminution of ambition, productivity, and motivation. However, it has been contended that amotivational syndrome is induced not only by marijuana but also by amphetamine and its analogs, cocaine and volatile solvents. Since we positively support this view, we diagnosed the case as amotivational syndrome after long-term methamphetamine abuse. This was also a rare criminal case of amotivational state without hallucinations and delusions after methamphetamine abuse. We suggested that the crime committed in this case was closely related to crime induced by economic problems in residual states of schizophrenic offenders. This could be a case of both ACOA and methamphetamine dependence. There were unresolved alcohol- and drug-related problems in this case. Therefore, careful early intervention in a crisis, cooperation with the authorities and the institutions concerned, and comprehensive rehabilitation should be employed to resolve such alcohol- and drug-related problems.

  17. Effects of 7-day repeated treatment with the 5-HT2A inverse agonist/antagonist pimavanserin on methamphetamine vs. food choice in male rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Preclinical drug vs. food choice is an emerging group of drug self-administration procedures that have shown predictive validity to clinical drug addiction. Emerging data suggest that serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors modulate mesolimbic dopamine function, such that 5-HT2A antagonists blunt the abuse-related neurochemical effects of monoamine transporter substrates, such as amphetamine or methamphetamine. Whether subchronic 5-HT2A antagonist treatment attenuates methamphetamine reinforcement in any preclinical drug self-administration procedure is unknown. The study aim was therefore to determine 7-day treatment effects with the 5-HT2A inverse agonist/antagonist pimavanserin on methamphetamine vs. food choice in monkeys. Behavior was maintained under a concurrent schedule of food delivery (1g pellets, fixed-ratio 100 schedule) and intravenous methamphetamine injections (0-0.32 mg/kg/injection, fixed-ratio 10 schedule) in male rhesus monkeys (n=3). Methamphetamine choice dose-effect functions were determined daily before and during 7-day repeated pimavanserin (1.0-10mg/kg/day, intramuscular) treatment periods. Under control conditions, increasing methamphetamine doses resulted in a corresponding increase in methamphetamine vs. food choice. Repeated pimavanserin administration failed to attenuate methamphetamine choice and produce a reciprocal increase in food choice in any monkey up to doses (3.2-10mg/kg) that suppressed rates of operant responding primarily during components where behavior was maintained by food pellets. Repeated 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonist/antagonist treatment did not attenuate methamphetamine reinforcement under a concurrent schedule of intravenous methamphetamine and food presentation in nonhuman primates. Overall, these results do not support the therapeutic potential of 5-HT2A inverse agonists/antagonists as candidate medications for methamphetamine addiction. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights

  18. Boundary conditions of methamphetamine craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Richard B; Onyemekwu, Chukwudi; Hart, Carl L; Ochsner, Kevin N; Kober, Hedy

    2015-12-01

    Methamphetamine use has increased significantly and become a global health concern. Craving is known to predict methamphetamine use and relapse following abstinence. Some have suggested that cravings are automatic, generalized, and uncontrollable, but experimental work addressing these claims is lacking. In 2 exploratory studies, we tested the boundary conditions of methamphetamine craving by asking: (a) is craving specific to users' preferred route of administration?, and (b) can craving be regulated by cognitive strategies? Two groups of methamphetamine users were recruited. In Study 1, participants were grouped by their preferred route of administration (intranasal vs. smoking), and rated their craving in response to photographs and movies depicting methamphetamine use (via the intranasal vs. smoking route). In Study 2, methamphetamine smokers implemented cognitive regulation strategies while viewing photographs depicting methamphetamine smoking. Strategies involved either focusing on the positive aspects of smoking methamphetamine or the negative consequences of doing so-the latter strategy based on treatment protocols for addiction. In Study 1, we found a significant interaction between group and route of administration, such that participants who preferred to smoke methamphetamine reported significantly stronger craving for smoking stimuli, whereas those who preferred the intranasal route reported stronger craving for intranasal stimuli. In Study 2, participants reported significantly lower craving when focusing on the negative consequences associated with methamphetamine use. Taken together, these findings suggest that strength of craving for methamphetamine is moderated by users' route of administration and can be reduced by cognitive strategies. This has important theoretical, methodological, and clinical implications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Methamphetamine psychosis: epidemiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasner-Edwards, Suzette; Mooney, Larissa J

    2014-12-01

    Psychotic symptoms and syndromes are frequently experienced among individuals who use methamphetamine, with recent estimates of up to approximately 40 % of users affected. Although transient in a large proportion of users, acute symptoms can include agitation, violence, and delusions, and may require management in an inpatient psychiatric or other crisis intervention setting. In a subset of individuals, psychosis can recur and persist and may be difficult to distinguish from a primary psychotic disorder such as schizophrenia. Differential diagnosis of primary vs. substance-induced psychotic disorders among methamphetamine users is challenging; nevertheless, with careful assessment of the temporal relationship of symptoms to methamphetamine use, aided by state-of-the art psychodiagnostic assessment instruments and use of objective indicators of recent substance use (i.e., urine toxicology assays), coupled with collateral clinical data gathered from the family or others close to the individual, diagnostic accuracy can be optimized and the individual can be appropriately matched to a plan of treatment. The pharmacological treatment of acute methamphetamine-induced psychosis may include the use of antipsychotic medications as well as benzodiazepines, although symptoms may resolve without pharmacological treatment if the user is able to achieve a period of abstinence from methamphetamine. Importantly, psychosocial treatment for methamphetamine dependence has a strong evidence base and is the optimal first-line treatment approach to reducing rates of psychosis among individuals who use methamphetamines. Prevention of methamphetamine relapse is the most direct means of preventing recurrence of psychotic symptoms and syndromes. Long-term management of individuals presenting with recurrent and persistent psychosis, even in the absence of methamphetamine use, may include both behavioral treatment to prevent resumption of methamphetamine use and pharmacological treatment

  20. Towards an MDA-based development methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gavras, Anastasius; Belaunde, Mariano; Ferreira Pires, Luis; Andrade Almeida, João; Oquendo, Flavio; Warboys, Brian C.; Morrison, Ron

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a development methodology for distributed applications based on the principles and concepts of the Model-Driven Architecture (MDA). The paper identifies phases and activities of an MDA-based development trajectory, and defines the roles and products of each activity in accordance

  1. Individual differences are critical in determining modafinil-induced behavioral sensitization and cross-sensitization with methamphetamine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeiro, Aline da Costa; Moreira, Karin Di Monteiro; Abrahao, Karina Possa; Quadros, Isabel Marian Hartmann; Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Menezes

    2012-08-01

    Modafinil is a non-amphetaminic psychostimulant used therapeutically for sleep and psychiatric disorders. However, some studies indicate that modafinil can have addictive properties. The present study examined whether modafinil can produce behavioral sensitization in mice, an experience and drug-dependent behavioral adaptation, and if individual differences play a role in this process. We further tested context-related factors and cross-sensitization between modafinil and methamphetamine. Important individual differences in the behavioral sensitization of Swiss Albino mice were observed after repeated administration of 50 mg/kg modafinil (Experiment 1), or 1 mg/kg methamphetamine (Experiment 2). Only mice classified as sensitized subgroup developed clear behavioral sensitization to the drugs. After a withdrawal period, mice received challenges of modafinil (Experiment 1), or methamphetamine (Experiment 2) and locomotor activity was evaluated in the activity cages (previous context) and in the open field arena (new context) in order to evaluate the context dependency of behavioral sensitization. The expression of sensitization to modafinil, but not to methamphetamine, was affected by contextual testing conditions, since modafinil-sensitized mice only expressed sensitization in the activity cage, but not in the open field. Subsequently, locomotor cross-sensitization between methamphetamine and modafinil was assessed by challenging modafinil-pretreated mice with 1mg/kg methamphetamine (Experiment 1), and methamphetamine-pretreated mice with 50mg/kg modafinil (Experiment 2). We observed a symmetrical cross-sensitization between the drugs only in those mice that were classified as sensitized subgroup. Our findings indicate that repeated exposure to modafinil induces behavioral sensitization only in some animals by similar neurobiological, but not contextual, mechanisms to those of methamphetamine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Desenvolvimento e validação de um método cromatográfico em fase gasosa para análise da 3,4-metilenodioximetanfetamina (ecstasy e outros derivados anfetamínicos em comprimidos Development and validation of a gas chromatography method for determination of ecstasy and amphetamines derivatives in tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Carvalho Lasmar

    2007-06-01

    laboratories of toxicology of the development countries as Brazil. It was chosen for development and validation a gas chromatography method with flame ionization detection. The analytic validation results for MDMA, MDA and MDEA were linearity range of 1.0 to 500.0 µg/mL, intra and interassay coefficient of variation lower than 9.5% and quantification limit of 1.0 µg/mL. The detection limits were 0.7 µg/mL, 0.8 µg/mL and 0.6 µg/mL respectively to MDMA, MDA and MDEA. The method showed a good seletivity as the epinephrine, cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, acethyl salicilic acid, diethyl barbituric acid, p-aminobenzoyl diethyl barbituric, paracetamol and caffeine presences did not interfere with the measurement of the three analytes.

  3. The prognosis following amphetamine poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwitz, Henrik; Dalhoff, Kim P.; Klemp, Marc

    2017-01-01

    the background population. Results: From August 2006 to December 2013 we identified 1444 patients (70% males) who experienced amphetamine poisoning; 52% of the cases were classified as mixed poisonings and the average age at first contact was 24.8 years (SD 8.6). The prevalence of psychiatric disorders, HIV...

  4. Recent Advances in Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity Mechanisms and Its Molecular Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobin Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a sympathomimetic amine that belongs to phenethylamine and amphetamine class of psychoactive drugs, which are widely abused for their stimulant, euphoric, empathogenic, and hallucinogenic properties. Many of these effects result from acute increases in dopamine and serotonin neurotransmission. Subsequent to these acute effects, METH produces persistent damage to dopamine and serotonin release in nerve terminals, gliosis, and apoptosis. This review summarized the numerous interdependent mechanisms including excessive dopamine, ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction, protein nitration, endoplasmic reticulum stress, p53 expression, inflammatory molecular, D3 receptor, microtubule deacetylation, and HIV-1 Tat protein that have been demonstrated to contribute to this damage. In addition, the feasible therapeutic strategies according to recent studies were also summarized ranging from drug and protein to gene level.

  5. Radiometric Testing of Magnesium Diboride Array (MDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective is to develop a 2-Dimensional Far Infra-Red Magnesium Diboride Array (2D FIR MDA) to use in NASA's future planetary exploration instruments. The array...

  6. Co-occurring amphetamine use and associated medical and psychiatric comorbidity among opioid-dependent adults: results from the Clinical Trials Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blazer DG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Pilowsky1, Li-Tzy Wu2, Bruce Burchett2, Dan G Blazer2, George E Woody3, Walter Ling41Departments of Epidemiology and Psychiatry, Columbia University, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York City, NY; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC; 3Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania and Treatment Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA; 4David Geffen School of Medicine, NPI/Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: In response to the rising rate of treatment admissions related to illicit use of amphetamines (eg, methamphetamine, we examined the prevalence of amphetamine use among treatment-seeking, opioid-dependent adults, explored whether amphetamine users were as likely as nonamphetamine users to enroll in opioid-dependence treatment trials, and determined whether amphetamine users manifested greater levels of medical and psychiatric comorbidity than nonusers.Methods: The sample included 1257 opioid-dependent adults screened for participation in threemultisite studies of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN001-003, which studied the effectiveness of buprenorphine for opioid detoxification under varying treatment conditions. Patients were recruited from 23 addiction treatment programs across the US. Medical and psychiatric comorbidity were examined by past-month amphetamine use (current vs former and route of administration. Five mutually exclusive groups were examined, ie, nonusers, current amphetamine injectors, current amphetamine noninjectors, former amphetamine injectors, and former amphetamine noninjectors.Results: Of the sample (n = 1257, 22.3% had a history of regular amphetamine use. Of the 280 amphetamine users, 30.3% reported injection as their primary route. Amphetamine users were more likely than nonusers to be white and use more

  7. Response of EMIT amphetamine immunoassays to urinary desoxyephedrine following Vicks inhaler use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poklis, A; Moore, K A

    1995-02-01

    The cross-reactivity of l-methamphetamine (l-desoxyephedrine) to the EMIT-d.a.u. class (EC) and EMIT-d.a.u. monoclonal amphetamine/methamphetamine (EM) assays was evaluated in urine specimens collected from six subjects using Vicks inhalers. The subjects were five men and a woman ranging from 27 to 47 years old. Four subjects used the inhaler as recommended by the manufacturer for five consecutive days; two subjects used double this dosage for three consecutive days. All urine voids were collected, totaling 132 specimens. All specimens were analyzed by the EC and EM assays. Specimens yielding a positive response were then analyzed by chiral and achiral gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). No specimen was positive by the EM assay, whereas 17 specimens yielded positive EC results. One subject for form the "as recommended" group had six positive specimens with maximum l-desoxyephedrine of 872 ng/ml. Both subjects using twice the recommended dosage had positive specimens, maximum l-desoxyephedrine of 1,560 ng/ml. No positive specimen contained > 200 ng/ml l-amphetamine.

  8. The effect of methamphetamine on an animal model of erectile function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tar, M T; Martinez, L R; Nosanchuk, J D; Davies, K P

    2014-07-01

    rationale for treating patients that report ED associated with therapeutics-containing methamphetamine or amphetamine with PDE5i. © 2014 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  9. Effects of cocaine, methamphetamine and modafinil challenge on sleep rebound after paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, R.C.S; Andersen, M.L; Shih, M.C; Tufik, S

    2008-01-01

    Sleep loss is both common and critically relevant to our society and might lead to the abuse of psychostimulants such as amphetamines, cocaine and modafinil. Since psychoactive substance abuse often occurs within a scenario of sleep deficit, the purpose of this investigation was to compare the sleep patterns of rats challenged with cocaine (7 mg/kg, ip), methamphetamine (7 mg/kg, ip), or modafinil (100 mg/kg, ip) subsequent to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) for 96 h. Our results show tha...

  10. Neural Correlates of Craving in Methamphetamine Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanak Shahmohammadi

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: This study presented a novel and noninvasive method based on neural correlates to discriminate healthy individuals from methamphetamine drug abusers. This method can be employed in treatment and monitoring of the methamphetamine abuse.

  11. Elevated environmental temperature and methamphetamine neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Diane B.; O'Callaghan, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Amphetamines have been of considerable research interest for the last several decades. More recent work has renewed interest in the role of ambient temperature in both the toxicity and neurotoxicity of these drugs. We have determined that the striatal dopaminergic neurotoxicity observed in the mouse is linked in some fashion to both body and environmental temperature. Most studies of d-methamphetamine (d-METH) neurotoxicity are conducted at standard laboratory ambient temperatures (e.g., ∼21-22 deg. C) and utilizing a repeated dosage regimen (e.g., three to four injections spaced 2 h apart). A lowering of the ambient temperature provides neuro protection, while an elevation increases neurotoxicity. d-METH causes long-term depletions of triatal dopamine (DA) that are accompanied by other changes that are indicative of nerve terminal degeneration. These include argyrophilia, as detected by silver degeneration stains, and an elevation in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of reactive gliosis in response to injury, as well as a long-term decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein levels. here we show that increasing the ambient temperature during and for some time following dosing increases the neurotoxicity of d-METH. Mice (female 57BL6/J) given a single dosage of d-METH (20 mg/kg s.c.) and maintained at the usual laboratory ambient temperature show minimal striatal damage (an ∼15% depletion of DA and an ∼ 86% increase in GFAP). substantial striatal damage (e.g., an ∼70% depletion of DA and an ∼200% elevation in GFAP) was induced by this regimen if mice were maintained at 27 deg. C for 24 or 72 h following dosing. An increase in neurotoxicity was also apparent in mice kept at an elevated temperature for only 5 or 9 h, but keeping animals at 27 deg. C for 24 or 72 h was the most effective in increasing the neurotoxicity of d-METH. Our data show how a relatively minor change in ambient temperature can have a major impact on the degree of

  12. Segmental analysis of amphetamines in hair using a sensitive UHPLC-MS/MS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Gerd; Kronstrand, Robert

    2014-06-01

    A sensitive and robust ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for quantification of amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine in hair samples. Segmented hair (10 mg) was incubated in 2M sodium hydroxide (80°C, 10 min) before liquid-liquid extraction with isooctane followed by centrifugation and evaporation of the organic phase to dryness. The residue was reconstituted in methanol:formate buffer pH 3 (20:80). The total run time was 4 min and after optimization of UHPLC-MS/MS-parameters validation included selectivity, matrix effects, recovery, process efficiency, calibration model and range, lower limit of quantification, precision and bias. The calibration curve ranged from 0.02 to 12.5 ng/mg, and the recovery was between 62 and 83%. During validation the bias was less than ±7% and the imprecision was less than 5% for all analytes. In routine analysis, fortified control samples demonstrated an imprecision <13% and control samples made from authentic hair demonstrated an imprecision <26%. The method was applied to samples from a controlled study of amphetamine intake as well as forensic hair samples previously analyzed with an ultra high performance liquid chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-TOF-MS) screening method. The proposed method was suitable for quantification of these drugs in forensic cases including violent crimes, autopsy cases, drug testing and re-granting of driving licences. This study also demonstrated that if hair samples are divided into several short segments, the time point for intake of a small dose of amphetamine can be estimated, which might be useful when drug facilitated crimes are investigated. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. New Approaches to the Methamphetamine Epidemic

    OpenAIRE

    Zusman, Mara B.

    2004-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse has become an epidemic in the United States. As methamphetamine becomes increasingly available, more and more people are trying – and becoming addicted to – this potent drug. But although methamphetamine is made using over-the-counter (OTC) drugs containing pseudoephedrine, shifting OTC drugs containing pseudoephedrine to prescription status is not the solution to the methamphetamine crisis. Rather, society must adopt a comprehensive...

  14. Methamphetamine psychosis, the efficacy of atypical antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Rezaei Ardani; Azam Motamedi Nasab

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide growing methamphetamine abuse is one of the most serious health problems with several different consequences for victims, especially in developing countries. Chronic methamphetamine abuse is associated with several psychiatric problems in all countries which are faced to epidemic methamphetamine abuse. Methamphetamine-induced psychosis is a major medical challenge for clinical practitioner from both diagnostic and therapeutic viewpoints. Stimulant psychosis commonly occurs in people...

  15. Fenproporex N-dealkylation to amphetamine--enantioselective in vitro studies in human liver microsomes as well as enantioselective in vivo studies in Wistar and Dark Agouti rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Thomas; Pflugmann, Thomas; Bossmann, Michael; Kneller, Nicole M; Peters, Frank T; Paul, Liane D; Springer, Dietmar; Staack, Roland F; Maurer, Hans H

    2004-09-01

    Fenproporex (FP) is known to be N-dealkylated to R(-)-amphetamine (AM) and S(+)-amphetamine. Involvement of the polymorphic cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoform CYP2D6 in metabolism of such amphetamine precursors is discussed controversially in literature. In this study, the human hepatic CYPs involved in FP dealkylation were identified using recombinant CYPs and human liver microsomes (HLM). These studies revealed that not only CYP2D6 but also CYP1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 catalyzed this metabolic reaction for both enantiomers with slight preference for the S(+)-enantiomer. Formation of amphetamine was not significantly changed by quinidine and was not different in poor metabolizer HLM compared to pooled HLM. As in vivo experiments, blood levels of R(-)-amphetamine and S(+)-amphetamine formed after administration of FP were determined in female Dark Agouti rats (fDA), a model of the human CYP2D6 poor metabolizer phenotype (PM), male Dark Agouti rats (mDA), an intermediate model, and in male Wistar rats (WI), a model of the human CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer phenotype. Analysis of the plasma samples showed that fDA exhibited significantly higher plasma levels of both amphetamine enantiomers compared to those of WI. Corresponding plasma levels in mDA were between those in fDA and WI. Furthermore, pretreatment of WI with the CYP2D inhibitor quinine resulted in significantly higher amphetamine plasma levels, which did not significantly differ from those in fDA. The in vivo studies suggested that CYP2D6 is not crucial to the N-dealkylation but to another metabolic step, most probably to the ring hydroxylation. Further studies are necessary for elucidating the role of CYP2D6 in FP hydroxylation.

  16. Stimulant ADHD Medications -- Methylphenidate and Amphetamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prescription stimulants? dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine ® ) dextroamphetamine/amphetamine combination product (Adderall ® ) methylphenidate (Ritalin ® , Concerta ® ). Popular slang terms for prescription ...

  17. Methamphetamine induces the release of endothelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Woo; Jones, Susan M; Hostetter, Trisha A; Iliff, Jeffrey J; West, G Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine is a potent psychostimulant drug of abuse that increases release and blocks reuptake of dopamine, producing intense euphoria, factors that may contribute to its widespread abuse. It also produces severe neurotoxicity resulting from oxidative stress, DNA damage, blood-brain barrier disruption, microgliosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Intracerebral hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke have been reported after intravenous and oral abuse of methamphetamine. Several studies have shown that methamphetamine causes vasoconstriction of vessels. This study investigates the effect of methamphetamine on endothelin-1 (ET-1) release in mouse brain endothelial cells by ELISA. ET-1 transcription as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and transcription were measured following methamphetamine treatment. We also examine the effect of methamphetamine on isolated cerebral arteriolar vessels from C57BL/6 mice. Penetrating middle cerebral arterioles were cannulated at both ends with a micropipette system. Methamphetamine was applied extraluminally, and the vascular response was investigated. Methamphetamine treatment of mouse brain endothelial cells resulted in ET-1 release and a transient increase in ET-1 message. The activity and transcription of eNOS were only slightly enhanced after 24 hr of treatment with methamphetamine. In addition, methamphetamine caused significant vasoconstriction of isolated mouse intracerebral arterioles. The vasoconstrictive effect of methamphetamine was attenuated by coapplication of the endothelin receptor antagonist PD145065. These findings suggest that vasoconstriction induced by methamphetamine is mediated through the endothelin receptor and may involve an endothelin-dependent pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Irreversible brain damage caused by methamphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Moeller

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine is an addictive scene substance usage of which is increasing rapidly. While methamphetamine often causes neuropsychiatric symptoms like anxiety, psychosis and hallucinations, reports of structural ongoing cerebral alterations are rare. We here report a case of this kind of damage caused through methamphetamine use.

  19. Predictors of Hazardous Alcohol Consumption Among Young Adult Amphetamine-Type Stimulant Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M. Leslie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Very high levels of alcohol consumption have been observed in young adult amphetamine-type stimulant (i.e., ecstasy and methamphetamine users. The reasons for this association are poorly understood. Objective: To examine predictors of hazardous alcohol consumption in a sample of young adult amphetamine-type stimulant users after 30 months of follow-up, controlling for potential confounders. Method: Analysis of longitudinal data from a population-derived sample of Australian young adult amphetamine-type stimulant users (n = 292. A prediction model of alcohol use at 30 months was developed using generalized linear latent and mixed modeling (GLLAMM. Results: Concurrently using ecstasy (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 2.67, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = [1.41, 5.07], frequently attending nightclubs (AOR = 2.53, 95% CI = [1.04, 6.16], high baseline alcohol use patterns (AOR = 2.06, 95% CI = [1.32, 3.20], and being male (AOR = 3.60, 95% CI = [1.48, 8.78] were associated with an increased likelihood of hazardous alcohol use at 30 months. Conclusion: Concurrent, but not baseline, ecstasy use was associated with hazardous alcohol use, suggesting that combined use of these substances may have an instrumental role in terms of the social functions of drug use (e.g., increasing capacity to drink. Integration of educational interventions concerning alcohol and stimulants is warranted.

  20. Psychomotor effect differences between l-methamphetamine and d-methamphetamine are independent of murine plasma and brain pharmacokinetics profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Tetsuya; Takahata, Kazue; Kosugi, Yuri; Tanabe, Takaaki; Muraoka, Shizuko

    2017-01-01

    l-Methamphetamine has been occasionally referred to as a stimulant similar to d-methamphetamine, probably owing to insufficient comparative studies. Here, we directly compared psychomotor efficacies and pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine enantiomers in mice. Only d-methamphetamine, but not l-methamphetamine, induced stereotypy and sensitization at 1?10?mg/kg. However, plasma pharmacokinetic parameters of 10?mg/kg l-methamphetamine were ?tenfold those of 1?mg/kg d-methamphetamine. These resul...

  1. Amphetamine enhances endurance by increasing heat dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Ekaterina; Yoo, Yeonjoo; Behrouzvaziri, Abolhassan; Zaretskaia, Maria; Rusyniak, Daniel; Zaretsky, Dmitry; Molkov, Yaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Athletes use amphetamines to improve their performance through largely unknown mechanisms. Considering that body temperature is one of the major determinants of exhaustion during exercise, we investigated the influence of amphetamine on the thermoregulation. To explore this, we measured core body temperature and oxygen consumption of control and amphetamine-trea ted rats running on a treadmill with an incrementally increasing load (both speed and incline). Experimental results showed that rats treated with amphetamine (2 mg/kg) were able to run significantly longer than control rats. Due to a progressively increasing workload, which was matched by oxygen consumption, the control group exhibited a steady increase in the body temperature. The administration of amphetamine slowed down the temperature rise (thus decreasing core body temperature) in the beginning of the run without affecting oxygen consumption. In contrast, a lower dose of amphetamine (1 mg/kg) had no effect on measured parameters. Using a mathematical model describing temperature dynamics in two compartments (the core and the muscles), we were able to infer what physiological parameters were affected by amphetamine. Modeling revealed that amphetamine administration increases heat dissipation in the core. Furthermore, the model predicted that the muscle temperature at the end of the run in the amphetamine-treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. Therefore, we conclude that amphetamine may mask or delay fatigue by slowing down exercise-induced core body temperature growth by increasing heat dissipation. However, this affects the integrity of thermoregulatory system and may result in potentially dangerous overheating of the muscles. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  2. Treatment of Narcolepsy with Methamphetamine

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Merrill M.; Hajdukovic, Roza; Erman, Milton K.

    1993-01-01

    Eight pairs of subjects (each consisting of a narcoleptic and a control matched on the basis of age, sex, educational background and job) were evaluated under the following double-blind, randomized treatment conditions: baseline, placebo, low dose and high dose methamphetamine. Subjects were drug-free for 2 weeks prior to beginning the protocol. Methamphetamine was the only drug taken during the protocol and was given in a single morning dose of 0, 20 or 40–60 mg to narcoleptics and 0, 5 or 1...

  3. Does prenatal methamphetamine exposure affect the drug-seeking behavior of adult male rats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamberová, Romana; Schutová, Barbora; Hrubá, Lenka; Pometlová, Marie

    2011-10-10

    Methamphetamine (MA) is one of the most frequently used illicit drugs worldwide and also one of the most common drugs abused by pregnant women. Repeated administration of psychostimulants induces behavioral sensitization in response to treatment of the same or related drugs in rodents. The effect of prenatal MA exposure on sensitivity to drugs in adulthood is not yet fully determined. Because our most recent studies demonstrated that prenatal MA (5mg/kg) exposure makes adult rats more sensitive to acute injection of the same drug, we were interested whether the increased sensitivity corresponds with the increased drug-seeking behavior. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of prenatal MA exposure on drug-seeking behavior of adult male rats tested in the conditioned place preference (CPP). The following psychostimulant drugs were used as a challenge in adulthood: MA (5mg/kg), amphetamine (5mg/kg) and cocaine (10mg/kg). All psychostimulant drugs induced increased drug-seeking behavior in adult male rats. However, while MA and amphetamine-induced increase in drug-seeking behavior did not differ based on the prenatal drug exposure, prenatally MA-exposed rats displayed tolerance effect to cocaine in adulthood. In addition, prenatally MA-exposed rats had decreased weight gain after administration of MA or amphetamine, while the weight of prenatally MA-exposed rats stayed unchanged after cocaine administration. Defecation was increased by all the drugs (MA, amphetamine and cocaine), while only amphetamine increased the tail temperature. In conclusion, our results did not confirm our hypothesis that prenatal MA exposure increases drug-seeking behavior in adulthood in the CPP test. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Urethralism concomitant with amphetamine abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang-Ping Jiann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethralism is a paraphilia disorder in which a person exhibits the habitual self-insertion of a foreign body into the urethra to achieve sexual gratification. We report a patient who habitually inserted a foreign body into his urethra and abused amphetamines to cope with stress. A 48-year-old man presented at the emergency room because of urine leakage from the penile base. Prior to this incident, he had been admitted to hospital 10 times from 2000 to 2005 for the removal of foreign bodies from the lower urinary tract. The patient also reported repeatedly inhaling a high dose of amphetamine to reach a “high” status prior to inserting a foreign body into his urethra. After the successful removal of the foreign bodies, the patient was referred to a psychiatrist for management in coping with stress and illicit drug withdrawal. Psychiatric support and treatment appeared to have a beneficial effect on his sexual behavior. In the management of a case involving recurrent insertion of a foreign body into the lower urinary tract, clinicians should enquire about a history of drug abuse and consult the psychiatry department regarding stress management and drug abstinence.

  5. Detection of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and amphetamine-type stimulants in oral fluid using the Rapid Stat point-of-collection drug-testing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrich, J; Zörntlein, S; Becker, J; Urban, R

    2010-04-01

    The Rapid Stat assay, a point-of-collection drug-testing device for detection of amphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates, methadone, and benzodiazepines in oral fluid, was evaluated for cannabis and amphetamine-type stimulants. The Rapid Stat tests (n = 134) were applied by police officers in routine traffic checks. Oral fluid and blood samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, amphetamine, methamphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, methylenedioxyethylamphetamine, and methylenedioxyamphetamine. The comparison of GC-MS analysis of oral fluid with the Rapid Stat results for cannabis showed a sensitivity of 85%, a specificity of 87%, and a total confirmation rate of 87%. When compared with serum, the sensitivity of the cannabis assay decreased to 71%, the specificity to 60%, and the total confirmation rate to 66%. These findings were possibly caused by an incorrect reading of the THC test results. Comparison of the Rapid Stat amphetamine assay with GC-MS in oral fluid showed a sensitivity of 94%, a specificity of 97%, and a total confirmation rate of 97%. Compared with serum, a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 90%, and a total confirmation rate of 92% was found. The amphetamine assay must, therefore, be regarded as satisfactory.

  6. On MDA - SOA based Intercloud Interoperability framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Nodehi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing has been one of the latest technologies which assures reliable delivery of on - demand computing services over the Internet. Cloud service providers have established geographically distributed data centers and computing resources, which are available online as service. The clouds operated by different service providers working together in collaboration can open up lots more spaces for innovative scenarios with huge amount of resources provisioning on demand. However, current cloud systems do not support intercloud interoperability. This paper is thus motivated to address Intercloud Interoperabilityby analyzing different methodologies that have been applied to resolve various scenarios of interoperability. Model Driven Architecture (MDA and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA method have been used to address interoperability in various scenarios, which also opens up spaces to address intercloud interoperability by making use of these well accepted methodologies. The focus of this document is to show Intercloud Interoperability can be supported through a Model Driven approach and Service Oriented systems. Moreover, the current state of the art in Intercloud, concept and benefits of MDA and SOA are discussed in the paper. At the same time this paper also proposes a generic architecture for MDA - SOA based framework, which can be useful for developing applications which will require intercloud interoperability. The paper justi fies the usability of the framework by a use - case scenario for dynamic workload migration among heterogeneous clouds.

  7. Rapid Quantitative Chiral Amphetamines Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method in Plasma and Oral Fluid with a Cost-effective Chiral Derivatizing Reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmeyer, Matthew N.; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine is a widely abused psychostimulant containing a chiral center. Consumption of over-the-counter and prescription medications may yield positive amphetamines results, but chiral separation of l- and d- methamphetamine and its metabolite amphetamine can help determine whether the source was licit or illicit. We present the first LC-MS/MS method with precolumn derivatization for methamphetamine and amphetamine chiral resolution in plasma and oral fluid collected with the Oral-Eze® and Quantisal™ devices. To 0.5 mL plasma, 0.75 mL Oral-Eze, or 1 mL Quantisal specimen racemic d11-methamphetamine and amphetamine internal standards were added, followed by protein precipitation. Samples were centrifuged and supernatants loaded onto pre-conditioned Phenomenex® Strata™-XC Polymeric Strong Cation solid phase extraction columns. After washing, analytes were eluted with 5% ammonium hydroxide in methanol. The eluate was evaporated to dryness and reconstituted in water. Derivatization was performed with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl-5-l-alanineamide (Marfey's reagent) and heating at 45°C for 1 h. Derivatized enantiomer separations were performed under isocratic conditions (methanol:water, 60:40) with a Phenomenex® Kinetex® 2.6 μm C18 column. Analytes were identified and quantified by two MRM transitions and their ratio on a 3200 QTrap (AB Sciex) mass spectrometer in ESI negative mode. In all three matrices, the method was linear for all enantiomers from 1-500 μg/L, with imprecision and accuracy of ≤11.3% and 85.3-108%, respectively. Extraction efficiencies ranged from 67.4-117% and matrix effects from -17.0-468%, with variation always ≤19.1%. Authentic plasma and OF specimens were collected from an IRB-approved study that included controlled Vicks® VapoInhaler™ administration. The present method is sensitive, selective, economic and rapid (separations accomplished in <10 min), and improves methamphetamine result interpretation. PMID:25065924

  8. Rapid quantitative chiral amphetamines liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: method in plasma and oral fluid with a cost-effective chiral derivatizing reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmeyer, Matthew N; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-09-05

    Methamphetamine is a widely abused psychostimulant containing a chiral center. Consumption of over-the-counter and prescription medications may yield positive amphetamines results, but chiral separation of l- and d-methamphetamine and its metabolite amphetamine can help determine whether the source was licit or illicit. We present the first LC-MS/MS method with precolumn derivatization for methamphetamine and amphetamine chiral resolution in plasma and oral fluid collected with the Oral-Eze(®) and Quantisal™ devices. To 0.5mL plasma, 0.75mL Oral-Eze, or 1mL Quantisal specimen racemic d11-methamphetamine and amphetamine internal standards were added, followed by protein precipitation. Samples were centrifuged and supernatants loaded onto pre-conditioned Phenomenex(®) Strata™-XC Polymeric Strong Cation solid phase extraction columns. After washing, analytes were eluted with 5% ammonium hydroxide in methanol. The eluate was evaporated to dryness and reconstituted in water. Derivatization was performed with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl-5-l-alanineamide (Marfey's reagent) and heating at 45°C for 1h. Derivatized enantiomer separations were performed under isocratic conditions (methanol:water, 60:40) with a Phenomenex(®) Kinetex(®) 2.6μm C18 column. Analytes were identified and quantified by two MRM transitions and their ratio on a 3200 QTrap (AB Sciex) mass spectrometer in ESI negative mode. In all three matrices, the method was linear for all enantiomers from 1 to 500μg/L, with imprecision and accuracy of ≤11.3% and 85.3-108%, respectively. Extraction efficiencies ranged from 67.4 to 117% and matrix effects from -17.0 to 468%, with variation always ≤19.1%. Authentic plasma and OF specimens were collected from an IRB-approved study that included controlled Vicks(®) VapoInhaler™ administration. The present method is sensitive, selective, economic and rapid (separations accomplished in <10min), and improves methamphetamine result interpretation. Published

  9. Methamphetamine Use and Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOR THE DENTAL PATIENT ... Methamphetamine use and oral health M ethamphetamine is an inexpensive, easy-to-make illicit drug. It is known by several street names: “meth,” “speed,” “ice,” “chalk,” “crank,” “fire,” “ ...

  10. Effects of combined treatment with mephedrone and methamphetamine or 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on serotonin nerve endings of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kane, Michael J; Herrera-Mundo, Nieves; Francescutti, Dina M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2014-02-27

    Mephedrone is a stimulant drug of abuse with close structural and mechanistic similarities to methamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Although mephedrone does not damage dopamine nerve endings it increases the neurotoxicity of amphetamine, methamphetamine and MDMA. The effects of mephedrone on serotonin (5HT) nerve endings are not fully understood, with some investigators reporting damage while others conclude it does not. Presently, we investigate if mephedrone given alone or with methamphetamine or MDMA damages 5HT nerve endings of the hippocampus. The status of 5HT nerve endings in the hippocampus of female C57BL mice was assessed through measures of 5HT by HPLC and by immunoblot analysis of serotonin transporter (SERT) and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), selective markers of 5HT nerve endings. Astrocytosis was assessed through measures of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (immunoblotting) and microglial activation was determined by histochemical staining with Isolectin B4. Mephedrone alone did not cause persistent reductions in the levels of 5HT, SERT or TPH2. Methamphetamine and MDMA alone caused mild reductions in 5HT but did not change SERT and TPH2 levels. Combined treatment with mephedrone and methamphetamine or MDMA did not change the status of 5HT nerve endings to an extent that was different from either drug alone. Mephedrone does not cause toxicity to 5HT nerve endings of the hippocampus. When co-administered with methamphetamine or MDMA, drugs that are often co-abused with mephedrone by humans, toxicity is not increased as is the case for dopamine nerve endings when these drugs are taken together. © 2013.

  11. Effects of cocaine, methamphetamine and modafinil challenge on sleep rebound after paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, R C S; Andersen, M L; Shih, M C; Tufik, S

    2008-01-01

    Sleep loss is both common and critically relevant to our society and might lead to the abuse of psychostimulants such as amphetamines, cocaine and modafinil. Since psychoactive substance abuse often occurs within a scenario of sleep deficit, the purpose of this investigation was to compare the sleep patterns of rats challenged with cocaine (7 mg/kg, ip), methamphetamine (7 mg/kg, ip), or modafinil (100 mg/kg, ip) subsequent to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) for 96 h. Our results show that, immediately after 96 h of PSD, rats (10 per group) that were injected with a psychostimulant presented lower percentages of paradoxical sleep compared to those injected with saline (P sleep (SWS), rats injected with psychostimulants after PSD presented a late rebound (on the second night subsequent to the injection) in the percentage of this phase of sleep when compared to PSD rats injected with saline (P sleep architecture. Home cage control rats injected with modafinil and methamphetamine showed a reduction in SWS compared with the saline group. Methamphetamine affected sleep patterns most, since it significantly reduced paradoxical sleep, SWS and sleep efficiency before and after PSD compared to control (P sleep pattern in relation to those observed after saline injection. Therefore, our results suggest that abuse of these psychostimulants in a PSD paradigm aggravates their impact on sleep patterns.

  12. Amphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for ADHD, which may include counseling and special education. Make sure to follow all of your doctor's ... of an arm or leg motor or verbal tics believing things that are not true feeling unusually ...

  13. Wipe sampling of amphetamine-type stimulants and recreational drugs on selected household surfaces with analysis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madireddy, Sri Bharat; Bodeddula, Vanaja Reddy; Mansani, Sravan Kumar; Wells, Martha J M; Boles, Jeffrey O

    2013-06-15

    Sorption characteristics of eight drugs related to recreational and clandestine activity-amphetamine, cocaine, heroin, N-formyl amphetamine, N-formyl methamphetamine, methamphetamine, 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and pseudoephedrine-were evaluated on selected kitchen countertop surfaces. Methanol-dampened Whatman 40 filter paper wipes were used to collect samples from eleven surfaces including alkyd resin, ceramic tiles, glass, granite, laminate, limestone, marble, quartz compac, quartz real, soap stone, and stainless steel. The filter paper wipes were analyzed by a rapid three-minute UPLC-QTOF method, following ammonium acetate buffer (pH 5.8-6.2) extraction. The average percentage recoveries after 15 h of exposure to the surface materials tested, was found to be highest for cocaine and MDMA and lowest for amphetamine and methamphetamine. Among the eleven countertop surfaces, overall recoveries for marble were observed to be the least, whereas soapstone, quartz compac and stainless steel were among the highest. Scanning electron microscopic images of the surfaces provided a unique view of surface irregularities that potentially influenced drug recovery. Aging, migration, solvent composition, and volatility were examined. The variation in recovery of drugs was attributed to four key factors: compound volatility, surface composition, surface-compound interaction, and solvent composition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychomotor effect differences between l-methamphetamine and d-methamphetamine are independent of murine plasma and brain pharmacokinetics profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tetsuya; Takahata, Kazue; Kosugi, Yuri; Tanabe, Takaaki; Muraoka, Shizuko

    2017-05-01

    l-Methamphetamine has been occasionally referred to as a stimulant similar to d-methamphetamine, probably owing to insufficient comparative studies. Here, we directly compared psychomotor efficacies and pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine enantiomers in mice. Only d-methamphetamine, but not l-methamphetamine, induced stereotypy and sensitization at 1-10 mg/kg. However, plasma pharmacokinetic parameters of 10 mg/kg l-methamphetamine were ≥tenfold those of 1 mg/kg d-methamphetamine. These results clearly indicate that differential psychomotor efficacies of methamphetamine enantiomers are independent of their pharmacokinetic profiles.

  15. Risk for Neurobehavioral Disinhibition in Prenatal Methamphetamine-Exposed Young Children with Positive Hair Toxicology Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Sarah K.; LaGasse, Linda L.; Derauf, Chris; Newman, Elana; Smith, Lynne M.; Arria, Amelia M.; Grotta, Sheri A. Della; Dansereau, Lynne M.; Abar, Beau; Neal, Charles R.; Lester, Barry M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective was to evaluate effects of prenatal methamphetamine exposure (PME) and postnatal drug exposures identified by child hair analysis on neurobehavioral disinhibition at 6.5 years of age. Methods Mother-infant pairs were enrolled in the Infant Development, Environment, and Lifestyle (IDEAL) Study in Los Angeles, Honolulu, Tulsa and Des Moines. PME was determined by maternal self-report and/or positive meconium results. At the 6.5-year follow-up visit, hair was collected and analyzed for methamphetamine, tobacco, cocaine, and cannabinoid markers. Child behavioral and executive function test scores were aggregated to evaluate child neurobehavioral disinhibition. Hierarchical linear regression models assessed the impact of PME, postnatal substances, and combined PME with postnatal drug exposures on the child’s neurobehavioral disinhibition aggregate score. Past year caregiver substance use was compared to child hair results. Results A total of 264 children were evaluated. Significantly more PME children (n=133) had hair positive for methamphetamine/amphetamine (27.1% versus 8.4%) and nicotine/cotinine (38.3% versus 25.2%) than children without PME (n=131). Overall, no significant differences in analyte hair concentrations were noted between groups. Significant differences in behavioral and executive function were observed between children with and without PME. No independent effects of postnatal methamphetamine or tobacco exposure, identified by positive hair test, were noted and no additional neurobehavioral disinhibition was observed in PME children with postnatal drug exposures, as compared to PME children without postnatal exposure. Conclusions Child hair testing offered a non-invasive means to evaluate postnatal environmental drug exposure, although no effects from postnatal drug exposure alone were seen. PME, alone and in combination with postnatal drug exposures, was associated with behavioral and executive function deficits at 6.5 years

  16. Risk of neurobehavioral disinhibition in prenatal methamphetamine-exposed young children with positive hair toxicology results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Sarah K; LaGasse, Linda L; Derauf, Chris; Newman, Elana; Smith, Lynne M; Arria, Amelia M; Della Grotta, Sheri A; Dansereau, Lynne M; Abar, Beau; Neal, Charles R; Lester, Barry M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-08-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effects of prenatal methamphetamine exposure (PME) and postnatal drug exposures identified by child hair analysis on neurobehavioral disinhibition at 6.5 years of age. Mother-infant pairs were enrolled in the Infant Development, Environment, and Lifestyle (IDEAL) Study in Los Angeles, Honolulu, Tulsa, and Des Moines. PME was determined by maternal self-report and/or positive meconium results. At the 6.5-year follow-up visit, hair was collected and analyzed for methamphetamine, tobacco, cocaine, and cannabinoid markers. Child behavioral and executive function test scores were aggregated to evaluate child neurobehavioral disinhibition. Hierarchical linear regression models assessed the impact of PME, postnatal substances, and combined PME with postnatal drug exposures on the child's neurobehavioral disinhibition aggregate score. Past year caregiver substance use was compared with child hair results. A total of 264 children were evaluated. Significantly more PME children (n = 133) had hair positive for methamphetamine/amphetamine (27.1% versus 8.4%) and nicotine/cotinine (38.3% versus 25.2%) than children without PME (n = 131). Overall, no significant differences in analyte hair concentrations were noted between groups. Significant differences in behavioral and executive function were observed between children with and without PME. No independent effects of postnatal methamphetamine or tobacco exposure, identified by positive hair test, were noted and no additional neurobehavioral disinhibition was observed in PME children with postnatal drug exposures, as compared with PME children without postnatal exposure. Child hair testing offered a noninvasive means to evaluate postnatal environmental drug exposure, although no effects from postnatal drug exposure alone were seen. PME, alone and in combination with postnatal drug exposures, was associated with behavioral and executive function deficits at 6.5 years.

  17. Chronic variable stress and intravenous methamphetamine self-administration – role of individual differences in behavioral and physiological reactivity to novelty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S.B.; Watterson, L.R.; Kufahl, P.R.; Nemirovsky, N.E.; Tomek, S.E.; Conrad, C.D.; Olive, M.F.

    2016-01-01

    Stress is a contributing factor to the development and maintenance of addiction in humans. However, few studies have shown that stress potentiates the rewarding and/or reinforcing effects of methamphetamine in rodent models of addiction. The present study assessed the effects of exposure to 14 days of chronic variable stress (CVS), or no stress as a control (CON), on the rewarding and reinforcing effects of methamphetamine in adult rats using the conditioned place preference (Experiment 1) and intravenous self-administration (Experiment 2) paradigms. In Experiment 2, we also assessed individual differences in open field locomotor activity, anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze (EPM), and physiological responses to a novel environment as possible predictors of methamphetamine intake patterns. Exposure to CVS for 14 days did not affect overall measures of methamphetamine conditioned reward or reinforcement. However, analyses of individual differences and direct vs. indirect effects revealed that rats exhibiting high physiological reactivity and locomotor activity in the EPM and open field tests self-administered more methamphetamine and reached higher breakpoints for drug reinforcement than rats exhibiting low reactivity. In addition, CVS exposure significantly increased the proportion of rats that exhibited high reactivity, and high reactivity was significantly correlated with increased levels of methamphetamine intake. These findings suggest that individual differences in physiological and locomotor reactivity to novel environments, as well as their interactions with stress history, predict patterns of drug intake in rodent models of methamphetamine addiction. Such predictors may eventually inform future strategies for implementing individualized treatment strategies for amphetamine use disorders. PMID:27163191

  18. 21 CFR 862.3610 - Methamphetamine test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methamphetamine test system. 862.3610 Section 862....3610 Methamphetamine test system. (a) Identification. A methamphetamine test system is a device intended to measure methamphetamine, a central nervous system stimulating drug, in serum, plasma, and urine...

  19. Which amphetamine-type stimulants can be detected by oral fluid immunoassays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Daniele Z; Boehl, Paula O; Comiran, Eloisa; Prusch, Débora S; Zancanaro, Ivomar; Fuentefria, Alexandre M; Pechansky, Flavio; Duarte, Paulina C A V; De Boni, Raquel B; Fröehlich, Pedro E; Limberger, Renata P

    2012-02-01

    The use of oral fluid for monitoring drug consumption on roads has many advantages over conventional biological fluids; therefore, several immunoassays have been developed for this purpose. In this work, the ability of 3 commercial immunoassays to detect amphetamine-type stimulants (ATSs) in oral fluid was assessed. In addition, it was reviewed the main controlled ATSs available worldwide, as well as the oral fluid immunological screening tests that have been used for identifying ATSs in drivers. The analytical specificity of amphetamine direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), methamphetamine direct ELISA (Immunalysis Corporation), and Oral-View saliva multidrug of abuse test (Alfa Scientific Designs) was evaluated using ATS-spiked oral fluid. Legislation and published articles that report the use of immunological screening tests to detect ATS consumption in conductors were reviewed, including the kit's technical information, project reports, police and drug databases. Even at high concentrations, the tested assays were not able to detect methylphenidate, fenproporex, or diethylpropion, controlled ATSs legally marketed in many countries. This evidences the need to develop new kits that enable one to control the misuse of prescription ATSs on roads through oral fluid immunoassays.

  20. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the analysis of amphetamines in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, María del Mar Ramírez; Samyn, Nele

    2011-10-01

    A fast and selective ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) method for the determination of amphetamines (amphetamine, methamphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, methylenedioxyamphetamine, methylenedioxyethylamphetamine, ephedrine, and p-methoxyamphetamine) in plasma has been developed and validated. Sample preparation was performed by liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate. For optimized chromatographic performance with repeatable retention times, narrow and symmetrical peaks, and focusing all analytes at the column inlet, a gradient start, with acid mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid and methanol was chosen. Positive electrospray ionization MS-MS detection was performed with two multiple reaction monitoring transitions for each analyte. Deuteriumlabeled internal standards were used for five of the analytes. The limit of detection was in the range 0.25-1.25 ng/mL, and the limit of quantification was fixed at the lowest calibrator of 2.5 ng/mL for all of the compounds. The RSD values of the intra- and interassay precision and accuracy were lower than 11% at four concentration levels, including two external quality controls. No or only minor matrix effects were observed, and the extraction method presented recoveries higher than 93% for all the compounds. Total run time, including equilibration, was 12 min. The method is routinely used at the National Institute of Criminalistics and Criminology for quantitative determination of the main amphetamines in plasma from forensic and driving under the influence cases.

  1. Susceptibility to methamphetamine dependence associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Khyber Saify

    2015-09-26

    Sep 26, 2015 ... dence, including alcohol, heroin and methamphetamine [2–. 4,6,10–13]. However, the results were not consistent. Based on our knowledge there was only one study investigating the association between the MAOA VNTR polymorphism and susceptibility to methamphetamine dependence in the Japanese.

  2. Need for Methamphetamine Programming in Extension Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudreault, Amy R.; Miller, Larry E.

    2011-01-01

    The study reported sought to identify the prevention education needs involving methamphetamine through survey methodology. The study focused on a random sample of U.S. states and the Extension Directors within each state, resulting in a 70% response rate (n = 134). Findings revealed that 11% reported they had received methamphetamine user…

  3. Medical Data Architecture (MDA) Project Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, M.; Middour, C.; Gurram, M.; Wolfe, S.; Marker, N.; Winther, S.; Ronzano, K.; Bolles, D.; Toscano, W.; Shaw, T.

    2018-01-01

    The Medical Data Architecture (MDA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk to minimize or reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes and decrements in performance due to in-flight medical capabilities on human exploration missions. To mitigate this risk, the ExMC MDA project addresses the technical limitations identified in ExMC Gap Med 07: We do not have the capability to comprehensively process medically-relevant information to support medical operations during exploration missions. This gap identifies that the current in-flight medical data management includes a combination of data collection and distribution methods that are minimally integrated with on-board medical devices and systems. Furthermore, there are a variety of data sources and methods of data collection. For an exploration mission, the seamless management of such data will enable a more medically autonomous crew than the current paradigm. The medical system requirements are being developed in parallel with the exploration mission architecture and vehicle design. ExMC has recognized that in order to make informed decisions about a medical data architecture framework, current methods for medical data management must not only be understood, but an architecture must also be identified that provides the crew with actionable insight to medical conditions. This medical data architecture will provide the necessary functionality to address the challenges of executing a self-contained medical system that approaches crew health care delivery without assistance from ground support. Hence, the products supported by current prototype development will directly inform exploration medical system requirements.

  4. Methamphetamine initiation among HIV-positive gay and bisexual men

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Nadine; Semple, Shirley J.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes factors associated with methamphetamine initiation in a racially diverse sample of 340 methamphetamine-using, HIV-positive gay and bisexual men. A factor analysis was conducted on reasons for initiation, and four factors were identified: to party, to cope, for energy, and to improve self-esteem. Methamphetamine to party accounted for more than one-third of the variance in the factor analysis. Methamphetamine to cope captured almost 9% of the variance, methamphetamine for ...

  5. The fast and furious : Cocaine, amphetamines and harm reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J-P.C. Grund (Jean-Paul); P. Coffin (Philip); M. Jauffret-Roustide (Marie); M. Dijkstra (Minke); D. de Bruin (Dick); P. Blanken (Peter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCocaine and amphetamines (‘stimulants’) are distinct central nervous system stimulants with similar effects (Pleuvry, 2009; Holman, 1994). Cocaine is a crystalline tropane alkaloid extracted from coca leaves. Amphetamines are a subclass of phenylethylamines with primarily stimulant

  6. Clobenzorex: evidence for amphetamine-like behavioral actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R; Darmani, N A; Elder, E L; Dumas, D; Glennon, R A

    1997-02-01

    Clobenzorex, an optically active N-substituted derivative of (+)amphetamine, has been identified on the illicit market. Because so little is known regarding the pharmacology or abuse potential of this agent, it was examined in tests of stimulus generalization in rats trained to discriminate 1 mg/kg of (+)amphetamine from vehicle to determine if it would produce amphetamine-appropriate responding. Clobenzorex (ED50 = 6.6 mg/kg) substituted for (+)amphetamine (ED50 = 0.3 mg/kg) but was approximately twenty times less potent than the training drug. Clobenzorex was also compared with (+)amphetamine and cocaine for its ability to induce locomotor stimulation and rearing frequency in mice. Clobenzorex was active in both assays but was less potent than either (+)amphetamine or cocaine. It is concluded that, although weaker than (+)amphetamine, clobenzorex constitutes an agent with amphetamine-like central stimulant behavioral properties.

  7. NTP-CERHR EXPERT PANEL REPORT ON THE REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF AMPHETAMINE AND METHAMPHETAMINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A manuscript describes the results of an expert panel meeting of the NTP Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR). The purpose CERHR is to provide timely, unbiased, scientifically sound evaluations of human and experimental evidence for adverse effects ...

  8. Residual methamphetamine in decontaminated clandestine drug laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Glen; Daniell, William; Treser, Charles

    2009-03-01

    This pilot cross-sectional study examined three previously decontaminated residential clandestine drug laboratories (CDLs) in Washington State to determine the distribution and magnitude of residual methamphetamine concentrations relative to the state decontamination standard. A total of 159 discrete random methamphetamine wipe samples were collected from the three CDLs, focusing on the master bedroom, bathroom, living room, and kitchen at each site. Additional samples were collected from specific non-random locations likely to be contacted by future residents (e.g., door knobs and light switches). Samples were analyzed for methamphetamine by EPA method 8270 for semivolatile organic chemicals. Overall, 59% of random samples and 75% of contact point samples contained methamphetamine in excess of the state decontamination standard (0.1 micro g/100 cm(2)). At each site, methamphetamine concentrations were generally higher and more variable in rooms where methamphetamine was prepared and used. Even compared with the less stringent standard adopted in Colorado (0.5 micro g/100cm(2)), a substantial number of samples at each site still demonstrated excessive residual methamphetamine (random samples, 25%; contact samples, 44%). Independent oversight of CDL decontamination in residential structures is warranted to protect public health. Further research on the efficacy of CDL decontamination procedures and subsequent verification of methods is needed.

  9. Delayed emergence of methamphetamine's enhanced cardiovascular effects in nonhuman primates during protracted methamphetamine abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, D B; Schindler, C W; Chefer, S; Belcher, A M; Ahmet, I; Scheidweiler, K B; Huestis, M A; Stein, E A

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine abuse is linked with brain abnormalities, but its peripheral effects constitute an integral aspect of long-term methamphetamine use. Eight male rhesus monkeys with long histories of intravenous methamphetamine self-administration were evaluated 1 day, and 1, 4, 12, 26, and 52 weeks after their last methamphetamine self-administration session. On test days, isoflurane-anesthetized animals received a 0.35 mg/kg IV methamphetamine challenge. A control group consisted of 10 age and gender matched drug naïve monkeys. Cardiovascular responses to methamphetamine were followed for 2.5h. Echocardiograms were acquired at 3 and 12 months of abstinence and in the control animals. No pre-methamphetamine baseline differences existed among 7 physiological measures across all conditions and controls. As expected, methamphetamine increased heart rate and blood pressure in controls. However, immediately following the self-administration period, the blood pressure response to methamphetamine challenge was reduced when compared to control monkeys. The peak and 150-min average heart rate increases, as well as peak blood pressure increases following methamphetamine were significantly elevated between weeks 12 to 26 of abstinence. These data indicate the development of tolerance followed by sensitization to methamphetamine cardiovascular effects. Echocardiography demonstrated decreased left ventricular ejection fraction and cardiac output at 3 months of abstinence. Importantly, both cardiovascular sensitization and cardiotoxicity appeared to be reversible as they returned toward control group levels after 1 year of abstinence. Enhanced cardiovascular effects may occur after prolonged abstinence in addicts relapsing to methamphetamine and may underlie clinically reported acute cardiotoxic events. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Physiological effects of the amphetamines during exercise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oxygen consumption, heart rate, minute ventilation and blood lactate were measured on two champion cyclists at work rates from 45 to 362 W (2 000 - 16 000 ft-Ib / min) on a bicycle ergometer after administration of a placebo and after 10 mg of methamphetamine, without their knowledge of which was given. No differences ...

  11. physiological effects of the amphetamines during exercise

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oxygen consumption, heart rate, minute ventilation and blood lactate were measured on two champion cyclisTs at work rates from 45 to 362 W (2 000 - 16 000 ft-Ib / min) on a bicycle ergometer after administration of a placebo and after 10 mg of methamphetamine, withoUT their know- ledge of which was given.

  12. Antiviral function of grouper MDA5 against iridovirus and nodavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Yang, Ying; Yang, Min; Zhou, Linli; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) is a critical member of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) family which can recognize viral RNA and enhances antiviral response in host cells. In this study, a MDA5 homolog from orange spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) (EcMDA5) was cloned, and its roles on grouper virus infection were characterized. The full-length EcMDA5 cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 982 amino acids with 74% identity with MDA5 homolog from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus). Amino acid alignment analysis indicated that EcMDA5 contained three functional domains: two caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARDs), a DEAD box helicase-like (DExDc) domain, a helicase superfamily C-terminal domain (HELICc), and a C-terminal regulatory domain (RD). Upon challenge with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) or polyinosin-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), the transcript of EcMDA5 was significantly up-regulated especially at the early stage post-injection. Under fluorescence microscopy, we observed that EcMDA5 mostly localized in the cytoplasm of grouper spleen (GS) cells. Interestingly, during virus infection, the distribution pattern of EcMDA5 was significantly altered in SGIV infected cells, but not in red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infected cells, suggested that EcMDA5 might interact with viral proteins during SGIV infection. The ectopic expression of EcMDA5 in vitro obviously delayed virus infection induced cytopathic effect (CPE) progression and significantly inhibited viral gene transcription of RGNNV and SGIV. Moreover, overexpression of EcMDA5 not only significantly increased interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) promoter activities in a dose dependent manner, but also enhanced the expression of IRF3, IRF7 and TRAF6. In addition, the transcription level of the proinflammatory factors, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 were differently altered by EcMDA5 overexpression during SGIV or

  13. On the notion of abstract platform in MDA development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrade Almeida, João; Dijkman, R.M.; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Ferreira Pires, Luis

    2004-01-01

    Although platform-independence is a central property in MDA models, the study of platform-independence has been largely overlooked in MDA. As a consequence, there is a lack of guidelines to select abstraction criteria and modelling concepts for platform-independent design. In addition, there is

  14. Towards an MDA-based development methodology for distributed applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sinderen, Marten J.; Gavras, A.; Belaunde, M.; Ferreira Pires, Luis; Andrade Almeida, João

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a development methodology for distributed applications based on the principles and concepts of the Model-Driven Architecture (MDA). The paper identifies phases and activities of an MDA-based development trajectory, and defines the roles and products of each activity in accordance

  15. physiological effects of the amphetamines during exercise

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF THE AMPHETAMINES DURING EXERCISE* c. H. WYNDHAM, G. G. ROGERS, A. J. S. BENADE AND N. B. STRYDOM, Human Sciences Laboratory, Chamber of. Mines of SOUTh Africa, Johannesburg. SUMMARY. Oxygen consumption, heart rate, minute ventilation and blood lactate were ...

  16. Methamphetamine Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Methamphetamine Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility Email Facebook Twitter March 20, 2014 A new study adds to the copious existing evidence that chronic exposure to addictive drugs alters the brain in ways that make ...

  17. Methamphetamine psychosis, the efficacy of atypical antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Rezaei Ardani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide growing methamphetamine abuse is one of the most serious health problems with several different consequences for victims, especially in developing countries. Chronic methamphetamine abuse is associated with several psychiatric problems in all countries which are faced to epidemic methamphetamine abuse. Methamphetamine-induced psychosis is a major medical challenge for clinical practitioner from both diagnostic and therapeutic viewpoints. Stimulant psychosis commonly occurs in people who abuse stimulants, but it also occurs in some patients taking therapeutic doses of stimulant drugs under medical supervision. The main characteristic of meth psychosis is the presence of prominent hallucinations and delusions. Other drugs, such as cocaine and marijuana, can trigger the onset of psychosis in someone who is already at increased risk because they have “vulnerability”.The current literature review attends to explain several aspects of MIP epidemiologically and clinically. Investigators proposed pharmacologically treatment based on recently published data.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism near CREB1, rs7591784, is associated with pretreatment methamphetamine use frequency and outcome of outpatient treatment for methamphetamine use disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Heinzerling, Keith G.; Demirdjian, Levon; Wu, Yingnian; Shoptaw, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Although stimulant dependence is highly heritable, few studies have examined genetic influences on methamphetamine dependence. We performed a candidate gene study of 52 SNPs and pretreatment methamphetamine use frequency among 263 methamphetamine dependent Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White participants of several methamphetamine outpatient clinical trials in Los Angeles. One SNP, rs7591784 was significantly associated with pretreatment methamphetamine use frequency following Bonferroni correcti...

  19. MDMA, methamphetamine, and CYP2D6 pharmacogenetics: what is clinically relevant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael eDe La Torre

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In vitro human studies show that the metabolism of most amphetamine-like psychostimulants is regulated by the polymorphic cytochrome P450 isozyme CYP2D6. Two compounds, methamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, were selected as archetypes to discuss the translation and clinical significance of in vitro to in vivo findings. Both compounds were chosen based on their differential interaction with CYP2D6 and their high abuse prevalence in society. Methamphetamine behaves as both a weak substrate and competitive inhibitor of CYP2D6, while MDMA acts as a high affinity substrate and potent mechanism-based inhibitor (MBI of the enzyme. The MBI behavior of MDMA on CYP2D6 implies that subjects, irrespective of their genotype/phenotype, are phenocopied to the poor metabolizer phenotype. The fraction of metabolic clearance regulated by CYP2D6 for both drugs is substantially lower than expected from in vitro studies. Other isoenzymes of cytochrome P450 and a relevant contribution of renal excretion play a part in their clearance. These facts tune down the potential contribution of CYP2D6 polymorphism in the clinical outcomes of both substances. Globally, the clinical relevance of CYP2D6 polymorphism is lower than that predicted by in vitro studies.

  20. The preparation of immunochromatographic stripe of methamphetamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jing; Liu Yibing; Zhou Ling; Guo Weizheng

    2004-01-01

    A gold immunochromatographic assay (GICA) is developed for methamphetamine in urine. Colloidal gold is obtained by reducing the gold chloride with sodium citrate, and labeled methamphetamine monoclonal antibody. The drug or metabolite competes with the immobilized drug conjugate in the test area for the limited colloidal gold-labeled antibody complex in which the stripe is made to screen the drug abuser. This method has sensitivity of 1000 μg/L, and without cross-reaction with some drugs

  1. Widespread increases in malondialdehyde immunoreactivity in dopamine-rich and dopamine-poor regions of rat brain following multiple, high doses of methamphetamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Ashley eHorner

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Treatment with multiple high doses of methamphetamine (METH can induce oxidative damage, including dopamine (DA-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, which may contribute to the neurotoxic damage of monoamine neurons and long-term depletion of DA in the caudate putamen (CPu and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc. Malondialdehyde (MDA, a product of lipid peroxidation by ROS, is commonly used as a marker of oxidative damage and treatment with multiple high doses of METH increases MDA reactivity in the CPu of humans and experimental animals. Recent data indicate that MDA itself may contribute to the destruction of DA neurons, as MDA causes the accumulation of toxic intermediates of DA metabolism via its chemical modification of the enzymes necessary for the breakdown of DA. However, it has been shown that in human METH abusers there is also increased MDA reactivity in the frontal cortex, which receives relatively fewer DA afferents than the CPu. These data suggest that METH may induce neuronal damage regardless of the regional density of DA or origin of DA input. The goal of the current study was to examine the modification of proteins by MDA in the DA-rich nigrostriatal and mesoaccumbal systems, as well as the less DA-dense cortex and hippocampus following a neurotoxic regimen of METH treatment. Animals were treated with METH (10 mg/kg every 2h for 6h, sacrificed one week later, and examined using immunocytochemistry for changes in MDA-adducted proteins. Multiple, high doses of METH significantly increased MDA immunoreactivity (MDA-ir in the CPu, SNpc, cortex and hippocampus. Multiple METH administration also increased MDA-ir in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and nucleus accumbens (NAc. Our data indicate that multiple METH treatment can induce persistent and widespread neuronal damage that may not necessarily be limited to the nigrostriatal DA system.

  2. Agmatine: identification and inhibition of methamphetamine, kappa opioid, and cannabinoid withdrawal in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Scott M; Gerber, Kristin; Ding, Zhe; Roth, Christopher; Raffa, Robert B

    2008-12-01

    Agmatine blocks morphine physical dependence in mammals, but its effects on withdrawal signs caused by other abused drugs have been less studied. One of the reasons is that withdrawal to some of these drugs is difficult to quantify in mammals. An alternative to mammals is planarians, a type of flatworm. Planarians possess mammalian-like neurotransmitters and display withdrawal from amphetamines, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, cocaine, and opioids. The withdrawal is manifested as a reduction in locomotor behavior following discontinuation of drug exposure. In the present study, our goal was to identify agmatine in planarians and to determine if planarians exposed to agmatine display withdrawal to methamphetamine, a cannabinoid receptor agonist (WIN 55,212-2), or a kappa-opioid receptor agonist (U-50,488H). Neurochemical experiments revealed that the concentration of agmatine in planarians was 185 +/- 33.7 pmol per mg of planarian weight (dry weight). In behavioral experiments, withdrawal (i.e., reduced locomotor activity) was observed when planarians exposed to each drug (10 microM) for 60 min were placed into water. The withdrawal was attenuated when methamphetamine- or U-50,488H-exposed planarians were tested in agmatine (100 microM). Withdrawal was inhibited similarly when planarians coexposed to agmatine (100 microM) plus methamphetamine (10 microM), WIN 55,212-2 (10 microM), or U-50,488H (10 microM) were tested in water. Arginine, the metabolic precursor to agmatine, was ineffective. Our results identify endogenous agmatine in planarians and demonstrate that agmatine exposure blocks withdrawal to three different drugs in planarians. This suggests that a change in agmatine signaling is a common mechanism in the withdrawal caused by these drugs, at least in planarians.

  3. Effects of cocaine, methamphetamine and modafinil challenge on sleep rebound after paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C.S Martins

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep loss is both common and critically relevant to our society and might lead to the abuse of psychostimulants such as amphetamines, cocaine and modafinil. Since psychoactive substance abuse often occurs within a scenario of sleep deficit, the purpose of this investigation was to compare the sleep patterns of rats challenged with cocaine (7 mg/kg, ip, methamphetamine (7 mg/kg, ip, or modafinil (100 mg/kg, ip subsequent to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD for 96 h. Our results show that, immediately after 96 h of PSD, rats (10 per group that were injected with a psychostimulant presented lower percentages of paradoxical sleep compared to those injected with saline (P < 0.01. Regarding slow wave sleep (SWS, rats injected with psychostimulants after PSD presented a late rebound (on the second night subsequent to the injection in the percentage of this phase of sleep when compared to PSD rats injected with saline (P < 0.05. In addition, the current study has produced evidence of the characteristic effect of each drug on sleep architecture. Home cage control rats injected with modafinil and methamphetamine showed a reduction in SWS compared with the saline group. Methamphetamine affected sleep patterns most, since it significantly reduced paradoxical sleep, SWS and sleep efficiency before and after PSD compared to control (P < 0.05. Cocaine was the psychostimulant causing the least changes in sleep pattern in relation to those observed after saline injection. Therefore, our results suggest that abuse of these psychostimulants in a PSD paradigm aggravates their impact on sleep patterns.

  4. Correlates of shared methamphetamine injection among methamphetamine-injecting treatment seekers: the first report from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrjerdi, Zahra Alam; Abarashi, Zohreh; Noroozi, Alireza; Arshad, Leila; Zarghami, Mehran

    2014-05-01

    Shared methamphetamine injection is an emerging route of drug use among Iranian methamphetamine injectors. It is a primary vector for blood-borne infections. The aim of the current study is to determine the prevalence and correlates of shared methamphetamine injection in a sample of Iranian methamphetamine injecting treatment seekers in the south of Tehran. We surveyed male and female methamphetamine injectors at three drop-in centres and 18 drug-use community treatment programmes. Participants reported socio-demographic characteristics, drug use, high-risk behaviours, current status of viral infections and service use for drug treatment. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to test associations between participants' characteristics and shared methamphetamine injection. Overall, 209 clients were recruited; 90.9% were male; 52.6% reported current methamphetamine injection without any shared injection behaviour and 47.4% reported current shared methamphetamine injection. Shared methamphetamine injection was found to be primarily associated with living with sex partners (AOR 1.25, 95% CI 1.13-1.98), reporting ≥3 years of dependence on methamphetamine injection (AOR 1.61, 95% CI 1.27-2.12), injection with pre-filled syringes in the past 12 months (AOR 1.96, 95% CI 1.47-2.42), homosexual sex without condom use in the past 12 months (AOR 1.85, 95% CI 1.21-2.25), the paucity of NA group participation in the past 12 months (AOR 0.67, 95% CI 0.41-0.99), the paucity of attending psychotherapeutic sessions in the past 12 months (AOR 0.44, 95% CI 0.28-0.96) and positive hepatitis C status (AOR 1.98, 95% CI 1.67-2.83). Deeper exploration of the relationship between shared methamphetamine injection and sexual risk among Iranian methamphetamine injectors would benefit HIV/sexually transmitted infection prevention efforts. In addition, existing psychosocial interventions for methamphetamine-injecting population may need to be adapted to better meet the

  5. Safety of Intravenous Methamphetamine Administration During Ibudilast Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, Dustin Z; Heinzerling, Keith G; Swanson, Aimee-Noelle; Tsuang, John; Furst, Benjamin A; Yi, Yi; Wu, Ying Nian; Moody, David E; Andrenyak, David M; Shoptaw, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    Methamphetamine dependence is a significant public health concern without any approved medications for treatment. We evaluated ibudilast, a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, to assess the safety and tolerability during intravenous methamphetamine administration. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects crossover clinical trial. Participants received ibudilast (20 mg twice daily followed by 50 mg twice daily) and placebo, with order determined by randomization, and then underwent intravenous methamphetamine challenges (15 and 30 mg). We monitored cardiovascular effects, methamphetamine pharmacokinetics, and reported adverse events. Ibudilast treatment had similar rates of adverse events compared with placebo, and there was no significant augmentation of cardiovascular effects of methamphetamine. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed no clinically significant change in maximum concentration or half-life of methamphetamine with ibudilast. Methamphetamine administration during ibudilast treatment was well tolerated without additive cardiovascular effects or serious adverse events, providing initial safety data to pursue ibudilast's effectiveness for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence.

  6. Automated code generation support for BI with MDA TALISMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Sanjuan-Martínez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Model Driven Engineering (MDE is gaining ever more strength due to the fact that with MDE the software development can be much more productive and this is the way to go closer to real software industrialization. With MDA TALISMAN, we have succeeded in creating complex software solutions for food traceability adapted to different customers, ready to be deployed. We rely on the approach to MDE most extended at present, MDA (Model-Driven Development but as we shall see, we also use the main pillars that support the Software Factories, The proposal from Microsoft to MDE. Besides, in this paper we present five cases of success with MDA TALISMAN.

  7. The risk and associated factors of methamphetamine psychosis in methamphetamine-dependent patients in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Said, Mas Ayu; Habil, Mohd Hussain; Rashid, Rusdi; Siddiq, Amer; Guan, Ng Chong; Midin, Marhani; Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei; Sidi, Hatta; Das, Srijit

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the risk of lifetime and current methamphetamine-induced psychosis in patients with methamphetamine dependence. The association between psychiatric co-morbidity and methamphetamine-induced psychosis was also studied. This was a cross-sectional study conducted concurrently at a teaching hospital and a drug rehabilitation center in Malaysia. Patients with the diagnosis of methamphetamine based on DSM-IV were interviewed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) for methamphetamine-induced psychosis and other Axis I psychiatric disorders. The information on sociodemographic background and drug use history was obtained from interview or medical records. Of 292 subjects, 47.9% of the subjects had a past history of psychotic symptoms and 13.0% of the patients were having current psychotic symptoms. Co-morbid major depressive disorder (OR=7.18, 95 CI=2.612-19.708), bipolar disorder (OR=13.807, 95 CI=5.194-36.706), antisocial personality disorder (OR=12.619, 95 CI=6.702-23.759) and heavy methamphetamine uses were significantly associated with lifetime methamphetamine-induced psychosis after adjusted for other factors. Major depressive disorder (OR=2.870, CI=1.154-7.142) and antisocial personality disorder (OR=3.299, 95 CI=1.375-7.914) were the only factors associated with current psychosis. There was a high risk of psychosis in patients with methamphetamine dependence. It was associated with co-morbid affective disorder, antisocial personality, and heavy methamphetamine use. It is recommended that all cases of methamphetamine dependence should be screened for psychotic symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adderall® (amphetamine-dextroamphetamine) toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    The American Psychiatric Association estimates that 3-7% of US school-aged children exhibit attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Adderall(®) (amphetamine dextroamphetamine) and a variety of brand names and generic versions of this combination are available by prescription to treat ADHD and narcolepsy. Both immediate and sustained release products are used as are single agent amphetamine medication. Knowing the exact agent ingested can provide information of dose labeled and length of clinical effects. These drugs are used off label by college students for memory enhancement, test taking ability, and for study marathons. These agents are DEA Schedule II controlled substances with high potential for abuse. For humans with ADHD or narcolepsy, standard recommended dosage is 5-60 mg daily. Amphetamine and its analogues stimulate the release of norepinephrine affecting both α- and β-adrenergic receptor sites. α-Adrenergic stimulation causes vasoconstriction and an increase in total peripheral resistance. β-Adrenergic receptor stimulation leads to an increase in heart rate, stroke volume, and skeletal muscle blood flow. Clinical signs of Adderall(®) overdose in humans and dogs include hyperactivity, hyperthermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, mydriasis, tremors, and seizures. In addition, Adderall intoxication in dogs has been reported to cause hyperthermia, hypoglycemia, hypersegmentation of neutrophils, and mild thrombocytopenia. Diagnosis can be confirmed by detecting amphetamine in stomach contents or vomitus, or by positive results obtained in urine tests for illicit drugs. Treatment is directed at controlling life-threatening central nervous system and cardiovascular signs. Seizures can be controlled with benzodiazepines, phenothiazines, pentobarbital, and propofol. Cardiac tachyarrhythmias can be managed with a β-blocker such as propranolol. Intravenous fluids counter the hyperthermia, assist in maintenance of renal function, and help promote the

  9. Memantine protects against amphetamine derivatives-induced neurotoxic damage in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipana, C; Torres, I; Camarasa, J; Pubill, D; Escubedo, E

    2008-06-01

    We hypothesize that 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine (METH) interact with alpha-7 nicotinic receptors (nAChR). Here we examine whether memantine (MEM), an antagonist of NMDAR and alpha-7 nAChR, prevents MDMA and METH neurotoxicity. MEM prevented both serotonergic injury induced by MDMA in rat and dopaminergic lesion by METH in mice. MEM has a better protective effect in front of MDMA- and METH-induced neurotoxicity than methyllycaconitine (MLA), a specific alpha-7 nAChR antagonist. The double antagonism that MEM exerts on NMDA receptor and on alpha-7 nAChR, probably contributes to its effectiveness. MEM inhibited reactive oxygen species production induced by MDMA or METH in synaptosomes. This effect was not modified by NMDA receptor antagonists, but reversed by alpha-7 nAChR agonist (PNU 282987), demonstrating a preventive effect of MEM as a result of it blocking alpha-7 nAChR. In synaptosomes, MDMA decreased 5-HT uptake by about 40%. This decrease was prevented by MEM and by MLA but enhanced by PNU 282987. A similar pattern was observed when we measured the dopamine transport inhibited by METH. The inhibition of both transporters by amphetamine derivatives seems to be regulated by the calcium incorporation after activation of alpha-7 nAChR. MDMA competitively displaces [(3)H]MLA from rat brain membranes. MEM and METH also displace [(3)H]MLA with non-competitive displacement profiles that fit a two-site model. We conclude that MEM prevents MDMA and METH effects in rodents. MEM may offer neuroprotection against neurotoxicity induced by MDMA and METH by preventing the deleterious effects of these amphetamine derivatives on their respective transporters.

  10. Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for ADHD, which may include counseling and special education. Make sure to follow all of your doctor's ... slow or difficult speech seizures motor or verbal tics believing things that are not true feeling unusually ...

  11. Direct Analysis of Amphetamine Stimulants in a Whole Urine Sample by Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevelin, Eduardo J.; Salami, Fernanda H.; Alves, Marcela N. R.; De Martinis, Bruno S.; Crotti, Antônio E. M.; Moraes, Luiz A. B.

    2016-05-01

    Amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) are among illicit stimulant drugs that are most often used worldwide. A major challenge is to develop a fast and efficient methodology involving minimal sample preparation to analyze ATS in biological fluids. In this study, a urine pool solution containing amphetamine, methamphetamine, ephedrine, sibutramine, and fenfluramine at concentrations ranging from 0.5 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL was prepared and analyzed by atmospheric solids analysis probe tandem mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS/MS) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). A urine sample and saliva collected from a volunteer contributor (V1) were also analyzed. The limit of detection of the tested compounds ranged between 0.002 and 0.4 ng/mL in urine samples; the signal-to-noise ratio was 5. These results demonstrated that the ASAP-MS/MS methodology is applicable for the fast detection of ATS in urine samples with great sensitivity and specificity, without the need for cleanup, preconcentration, or chromatographic separation. Thus ASAP-MS/MS could potentially be used in clinical and forensic toxicology applications.

  12. Determination of amphetamine-type stimulants in oral fluid by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Daniele Z; Boehl, Paula O; Comiran, Eloisa; Mariotti, Kristiane C; Pechansky, Flavio; Duarte, Paulina C A V; De Boni, Raquel; Froehlich, Pedro E; Limberger, Renata P

    2011-06-24

    A method for the simultaneous identification and quantification of amphetamine (AMP), methamphetamine (MET), fenproporex (FEN), diethylpropion (DIE) and methylphenidate (MPH) in oral fluid collected with Quantisal™ device has been developed and validated. Thereunto, in-matrix propylchloroformate derivatization followed by direct immersion solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were employed. Deuterium labeled AMP was used as internal standard for all the stimulants and analysis was performed using the selected ion monitoring mode. The detector response was linear for the studied drugs in the concentration range of 2-256 ng mL(-1) (neat oral fluid), except for FEN, whereas the linear range was 4-256 ng mL(-1). The detection limits were 0.5 ng mL(-1) (MET), 1 ng mL(-1) (MPH) and 2 ng mL(-1) (DIE, AMP, FEN), respectively. Accuracy of quality control samples remained within 98.2-111.9% of the target concentrations, while precision has not exceeded 15% of the relative standard deviation. Recoveries with Quantisal™ device ranged from 77.2% to 112.1%. Also, the goodness-of-fit concerning the ordinary least squares model in the statistical inference of data has been tested through residual plotting and ANOVA. The validated method can be easily automated and then used for screening and confirmation of amphetamine-type stimulants in drivers' oral fluid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Dansyl chloride derivatization of methamphetamine: a method with advantages for screening and analysis of methamphetamine in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hideyuki; Yamahara, Ayako; Yasuda, Satsuki; Abe, Masamiki; Oguri, Kazuta; Fukushima, Sunao; Ikeda-Wada, Sachiko

    2002-01-01

    The screening and quantitation of methamphetamine (MP) in urine using dansyl chloride (DNC) as the derivatization reagent were studied. Urinary MP derivatized with DNC could be detected by visual observation of the fluorescence in a solid-phase extraction column such as a Sep-Pak C18 cartridge to which the whole reaction solution was applied. The DNC-derivatized MP was eluted from the cartridge and then identified and quantitated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In the GC-MS analysis with the MS detector in the electron-impact mode, DNC-derivatized MP and amphetamine (AP), exhibited diagnostic molecular ion peaks. The intensities of the molecular ions were 15% (DNC-MP) and 35% (DNC-AP) of the base peak (a fragment ion because of the loss of dimethylnaphthalene from M+), demonstrating that this method of derivatization has a major advantage for confirming APs by GC-MS. MP derivatized with DNC could be determined by HPLC with ultraviolet detection. Because a good correlation (r = 0.95) between the GC-MS and HPLC method for urinary MP was confirmed, both HPLC and GC-MS appear to be useful tools for determining urinary MP. The intensity of the cartridge fluorescence due to DNC-derivatized MP was approximately related to the urinary content of MP determined by HPLC or GC-MS, although a false positive in the visual fluorescence was observed in some urinary specimens from healthy volunteers. From these results, screening and confirmation/determination following DNC derivatization is proposed as a suitable method for the analysis of MP.

  14. Studies on the metabolism and toxicological detection of the amphetamine-like anorectic fenproporex in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and fluorescence polarization immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, T; Theis, G A; Weber, A A; Maurer, H H

    2000-01-28

    Studies on the metabolism and the toxicological analysis of fenproporex (R,S-3-[(1-phenyl-2-propyl)-amino]-propionitrile, FP) using GC-MS and fluorescence polarization immunoassay are described. The metabolites were identified in urine samples of volunteers by GC-MS after cleavage of conjugates, extraction and acetylation. Besides unchanged FP, fourteen metabolites, including amphetamine, could be identified. Two partially overlapping metabolic pathways could be postulated: ring degradation by one- and two-fold aromatic hydroxylation followed by methylation and side chain degradation by N-dealkylation to amphetamine (AM). A minor pathway leads via beta-hydroxylation of AM to norephedrine. For GC-MS detection, the systematic toxicological analysis procedure including acid hydrolysis, extraction at pH 8-9 and acetylation was suitable (detection limits 50 ng/ml for FP and 100 ng/ml for AM). Excretion studies showed, that only AM but neither FP nor its specific metabolites were detectable 30-60 h after ingestion of 20 mg of FP. Therefore, misinterpretation can occur. The Abbott TDx FPIA amphetamine/methamphetamine II gave positive results up to 58 h. All the positive immunoassay results could be confirmed by the described GC-MS procedure.

  15. Wipe sampling of amphetamine-type stimulants and recreational drugs on selected household surfaces with analysis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madireddy, Sri Bharat; Bodeddula, Vanaja Reddy; Mansani, Sravan Kumar; Wells, Martha J.M.; Boles, Jeffrey O.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Degree of sorption of eight drugs on eleven countertop surfaces was investigated. • Surface composition, volatility and solvent composition played a role in sorption. • Solvent-dependent migration was a key factor of consideration during remediation. • SPME-assisted volatility studies provided evidence for varying degrees of recovery. • Rapid three minute UPLC-QTOF method was developed to quantify the eight compounds. -- Abstract: Sorption characteristics of eight drugs related to recreational and clandestine activity—amphetamine, cocaine, heroin, N-formyl amphetamine, N-formyl methamphetamine, methamphetamine, 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and pseudoephedrine—were evaluated on selected kitchen countertop surfaces. Methanol-dampened Whatman™ 40 filter paper wipes were used to collect samples from eleven surfaces including alkyd resin, ceramic tiles, glass, granite, laminate, limestone, marble, quartz compac, quartz real, soap stone, and stainless steel. The filter paper wipes were analyzed by a rapid three-minute UPLC-QTOF method, following ammonium acetate buffer (pH 5.8–6.2) extraction. The average percentage recoveries after 15 h of exposure to the surface materials tested, was found to be highest for cocaine and MDMA and lowest for amphetamine and methamphetamine. Among the eleven countertop surfaces, overall recoveries for marble were observed to be the least, whereas soapstone, quartz compac and stainless steel were among the highest. Scanning electron microscopic images of the surfaces provided a unique view of surface irregularities that potentially influenced drug recovery. Aging, migration, solvent composition, and volatility were examined. The variation in recovery of drugs was attributed to four key factors: compound volatility, surface composition, surface—compound interaction, and solvent composition

  16. Wipe sampling of amphetamine-type stimulants and recreational drugs on selected household surfaces with analysis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madireddy, Sri Bharat; Bodeddula, Vanaja Reddy; Mansani, Sravan Kumar; Wells, Martha J.M.; Boles, Jeffrey O., E-mail: jboles@tntech.edu

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Degree of sorption of eight drugs on eleven countertop surfaces was investigated. • Surface composition, volatility and solvent composition played a role in sorption. • Solvent-dependent migration was a key factor of consideration during remediation. • SPME-assisted volatility studies provided evidence for varying degrees of recovery. • Rapid three minute UPLC-QTOF method was developed to quantify the eight compounds. -- Abstract: Sorption characteristics of eight drugs related to recreational and clandestine activity—amphetamine, cocaine, heroin, N-formyl amphetamine, N-formyl methamphetamine, methamphetamine, 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and pseudoephedrine—were evaluated on selected kitchen countertop surfaces. Methanol-dampened Whatman™ 40 filter paper wipes were used to collect samples from eleven surfaces including alkyd resin, ceramic tiles, glass, granite, laminate, limestone, marble, quartz compac, quartz real, soap stone, and stainless steel. The filter paper wipes were analyzed by a rapid three-minute UPLC-QTOF method, following ammonium acetate buffer (pH 5.8–6.2) extraction. The average percentage recoveries after 15 h of exposure to the surface materials tested, was found to be highest for cocaine and MDMA and lowest for amphetamine and methamphetamine. Among the eleven countertop surfaces, overall recoveries for marble were observed to be the least, whereas soapstone, quartz compac and stainless steel were among the highest. Scanning electron microscopic images of the surfaces provided a unique view of surface irregularities that potentially influenced drug recovery. Aging, migration, solvent composition, and volatility were examined. The variation in recovery of drugs was attributed to four key factors: compound volatility, surface composition, surface—compound interaction, and solvent composition.

  17. Functional and Structural Brain Changes Associated with Methamphetamine Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce R. Russell

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (MA is a potent psychostimulant drug whose abuse has become a global epidemic in recent years. Firstly, this review article briefly discusses the epidemiology and clinical pharmacology of methamphetamine dependence. Secondly, the article reviews relevant animal literature modeling methamphetamine dependence and discusses possible mechanisms of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. Thirdly, it provides a critical review of functional and structural neuroimaging studies in human MA abusers; including positron emission tomography (PET and functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The effect of abstinence from methamphetamine, both short- and long-term within the context of these studies is also reviewed.

  18. The expression of amphetamine sensitization is dissociable from anxiety and aversive memory: Effect of an acute injection of amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatica, Rafael Ignacio; Pérez-Valenzuela, Enzo; Sierra-Mercado, Demetrio; Fuentealba, José Antonio

    2017-01-18

    The repeated administration of amphetamine can lead to locomotor sensitization. Although the repeated administration of amphetamine has been associated with anxiety and impaired working memory, it is uncertain if expression of amphetamine sensitization is associated with modifications of emotional memories. To address this issue, rats were injected once daily with amphetamine for five consecutive days (1.5mg/kg). After four days of withdrawal, rats were delivered an acute amphetamine injection to assess the expression of sensitization. A single exposure to an elevated plus maze (EPM), 24h after the last injection of amphetamine, showed that amphetamine sensitization is not accompanied by anxiety. Next, aversive memory was assessed using an 11day inter-trial interval between the EPM Trial 1 and EPM Trial 2. Rats administered with saline showed a percentage of open arms time (% OAT) in Trial 2 that was comparable to Trial 1, demonstrating a reduction in the retrieval of aversive memory. However, rats sensitized after the EPM Trial 1 showed a significant decrease in the % OAT in Trial 2. Importantly, a decrease in the % OAT in Trial 2 compared to Trial 1 was also observed after a single injection of amphetamine 24h before Trial 2. These results show a facilitation in the retrieval of aversive memory, and suggest that a previous amphetamine injection is enough to produce a protracted activation of neural circuits necessary for the retrieval of aversive memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of amphetamine-type stimulants in oral fluid by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Daniele Z., E-mail: daniele.dzs@dpf.gov.br [Setor Tecnico-Cientifico, Superintendencia Regional do Departamento de Policia Federal no Rio Grande do Sul, 1365 Ipiranga Avenue, Azenha, Zip Code 90160-093 Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 2752 Ipiranga Avenue, Santana, Zip Code 90610-000 Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Boehl, Paula O.; Comiran, Eloisa; Mariotti, Kristiane C. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 2752 Ipiranga Avenue, Santana, Zip Code 90610-000 Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Pechansky, Flavio [Centro de Pesquisa em Alcool e Drogas (CPAD), Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 2350, Ramiro Barcelos Street, Zip Code 90035-903 Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Duarte, Paulina C.A.V. [Secretaria Nacional de Politicas sobre Drogas (SENAD), Esplanada dos Ministerios, Block ' A' , 5th floor, Zip Code 70050-907 Brasilia, Distrito Federal (Brazil); De Boni, Raquel [Centro de Pesquisa em Alcool e Drogas (CPAD), Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 2350, Ramiro Barcelos Street, Zip Code 90035-903 Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Froehlich, Pedro E.; Limberger, Renata P. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 2752 Ipiranga Avenue, Santana, Zip Code 90610-000 Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil)

    2011-06-24

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > Propylchloroformate derivatization of amphetamine-type stimulants in oral fluid. > Direct immersion solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. > Linear range 2(4)-256 ng mL{sup -1}, detection limits 0.5-2 ng mL{sup -1}. > Accuracy 98-112%, precision <15% of RSD, recovery 77-112%. > Importance of residual evaluation in checking model goodness-of-fit. - Abstract: A method for the simultaneous identification and quantification of amphetamine (AMP), methamphetamine (MET), fenproporex (FEN), diethylpropion (DIE) and methylphenidate (MPH) in oral fluid collected with Quantisal{sup TM} device has been developed and validated. Thereunto, in-matrix propylchloroformate derivatization followed by direct immersion solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were employed. Deuterium labeled AMP was used as internal standard for all the stimulants and analysis was performed using the selected ion monitoring mode. The detector response was linear for the studied drugs in the concentration range of 2-256 ng mL{sup -1} (neat oral fluid), except for FEN, whereas the linear range was 4-256 ng mL{sup -1}. The detection limits were 0.5 ng mL{sup -1} (MET), 1 ng mL{sup -1} (MPH) and 2 ng mL{sup -1} (DIE, AMP, FEN), respectively. Accuracy of quality control samples remained within 98.2-111.9% of the target concentrations, while precision has not exceeded 15% of the relative standard deviation. Recoveries with Quantisal{sup TM} device ranged from 77.2% to 112.1%. Also, the goodness-of-fit concerning the ordinary least squares model in the statistical inference of data has been tested through residual plotting and ANOVA. The validated method can be easily automated and then used for screening and confirmation of amphetamine-type stimulants in drivers' oral fluid.

  20. DARK Classics in Chemical Neuroscience: Methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruscato, Thomas J; Trippier, Paul C

    2018-04-06

    Methamphetamine has the second highest prevalence of drug abuse after cannabis, with estimates of 35 million users worldwide. The ( S)-(+)-enantiomer is the illicit drug, active neurostimulant, and eutomer, while the ( R)-(-)-enantiomer is contained in over the counter decongestants. While designated a schedule II drug in 1970, ( S)-(+)-methamphetamine is available by prescription for the treatment of attention-deficit disorder and obesity. The illicit use of ( S)-(+)-methamphetamine results in the sudden "rush" of stimulation to the motivation, movement, pleasure, and reward centers in the brain, caused by rapid release of dopamine. In this review, we will provide an overview of the synthesis, pharmacology, adverse effects, and drug metabolism of this widely abused psychostimulant that distinguish it as a DARK classic in Chemical Neuroscience.

  1. Modafinil for the Treatment of Methamphetamine Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ann L.; Li, Shou-Hua; Biswas, Kousick; McSherry, Frances; Holmes, Tyson; Iturriaga, Erin; Kahn, Roberta; Chiang, Nora; Beresford, Thomas; Campbell, Jan; Haning, William; Mawhinney, Joseph; McCann, Michael; Rawson, Richard; Stock, Christopher; Weis, Dennis; Yu, Elmer; Elkashef, Ahmed M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Modafinil was tested for efficacy in decreasing use in methamphetamine-dependent participants, compared to placebo. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, with 12 weeks of treatment and a 4-week follow-up. Eight outpatient substance abuse treatment clinics participated in the study. There were 210 treatment-seekers randomized, who all had a DSM-IV diagnosis of methamphetamine dependence; 68 participants to placebo, 72 to modafinil 200mg, and 70 to modafinil 400mg, taken once daily on awakening. Participants came to the clinic three times per week for assessments, urine drug screens, and group psychotherapy. The primary outcome measure was a methamphetamine non-use week, which required all the week's qualitative urine drug screens to be negative for methamphetamine. Results Regression analysis showed no significant difference between either modafinil group (200 or 400mg) and placebo in change in weekly percentage having a methamphetamine non-use week over the 12-week treatment period (p=0.53). Similarly, a number of secondary outcomes did not show significant effects of modafinil. However, an ad-hoc analysis of medication compliance, by urinalysis for modafinil and its metabolite, did find a significant difference in maximum duration of abstinence (23 days vs. 10 days, p=0.003), between those having the top quartile of compliance (>85% urines modafinil +, N=36), and the lower three quartiles of modafinil 200 and 400mg groups (N=106). Conclusions Although these data suggest that modafinil, plus group behavioral therapy, was not effective for decreasing methamphetamine use, the study is probably inconclusive because of inadequate compliance with taking medication. PMID:21840138

  2. Modafinil for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ann L; Li, Shou-Hua; Biswas, Kousick; McSherry, Frances; Holmes, Tyson; Iturriaga, Erin; Kahn, Roberta; Chiang, Nora; Beresford, Thomas; Campbell, Jan; Haning, William; Mawhinney, Joseph; McCann, Michael; Rawson, Richard; Stock, Christopher; Weis, Dennis; Yu, Elmer; Elkashef, Ahmed M

    2012-01-01

    Modafinil was tested for efficacy in decreasing use in methamphetamine-dependent participants, compared to placebo. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, with 12 weeks of treatment and a 4-week follow-up. Eight outpatient substance abuse treatment clinics participated in the study. There were 210 treatment-seekers randomized, who all had a DSM-IV diagnosis of methamphetamine dependence; 68 participants to placebo, 72 to modafinil 200mg, and 70 to modafinil 400mg, taken once daily on awakening. Participants came to the clinic three times per week for assessments, urine drug screens, and group psychotherapy. The primary outcome measure was a methamphetamine non-use week, which required all the week's qualitative urine drug screens to be negative for methamphetamine. Regression analysis showed no significant difference between either modafinil group (200 or 400mg) or placebo in change in weekly percentage having a methamphetamine non-use week over the 12-week treatment period (p=0.53). Similarly, a number of secondary outcomes did not show significant effects of modafinil. However, an ad-hoc analysis of medication compliance, by urinalysis for modafinil and its metabolite, did find a significant difference in maximum duration of abstinence (23 days vs. 10 days, p=0.003), between those having the top quartile of compliance (>85% of urines were positive for modafinil, N=36), and the lower three quartiles of modafinil 200 and 400mg groups (N=106). Although these data suggest that modafinil, plus group behavioral therapy, was not effective for decreasing methamphetamine use, the study is probably inconclusive because of inadequate compliance with taking medication. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Pengaruh Timbal (Pb Terhadap Kadar MDA Serum Tikus Putih Jantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endrinaldi .

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakTimbal (Pb merupakan logam berat bersifat toksik yang konsentrasinya di lingkungan saat ini dipandang sebagai zat berbahaya. Pb dalam bentuk senyawa berasal dari pembakaran bahan bakar kendaraan bermotor, emisi industry dan dari penggunaan cat bangunan yang mengandung Pb. Toksisitas Pb menghambat enzim yang berperan sebagai antioksidan dan merusak sel hati.Tujuan studi ini adalah untuk melihat pengaruh timbal (Pb terhadap kadar malondialdehid (MDA tikus putih jantan. Desain penelitian ini adalah eksperimental menggunakan 25 ekor tikus putih jantan yang dibagi menjadi lima kelompok, yaitu kelompok kontrol, dan kelompok perlakuan dengan pemberian Pb asetat dengan dosis konsentrasi 5, 10, 20 dan 40 mg/kg BB selama 26 hari.Hasil penelitian menunjukkan terjadinya peningkatan rerata kadar MDA serum secara bermakna (p < 0,05, setelah pemberian Pb asetat selama 26 hari. Peningkatan kadar MDA secara bermakna terjadi antara kelompok kontrol dibandingkan dengan kelompok tikus yang diberi dosis 5, 10, 20 dan 40 mg/kg BB.Kesimpulan yang dapat diambil dari studi ini adalah bahwa pemberian Pb asetat meningkatkan kadar MDA serum tikus.Kata kunci: Pb asetat, MDAAbstractLead (Pb is atoxi cheavy metal concentrationsin the environment are now seenas a dangerous substance. Pb in the form of compounds derived from burningmotor vehicle fuel. Pb toxicityinhibitsan enzyme that acts as an antioxidant and liver cell damage.The purpose of this study was to observe the effect of lead (Pb on levels of malondialdehyde (MDA male whiterats. Experimental research design was used 25 white male rats were divided into five groups, namely the control group and the group treated with the administration of Pb acetate at a dose concentration of 5, 10, 20, and 40 mg / kg body weight for 26 days.The results showed an average increase in level of MDA, after administration of Pb acetate for 26 days were significantly (p <0.05. Increase in level of MDA of serum were significantly (p

  4. Nasal Septum Perforation due to Methamphetamine abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Bakhshaee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spontaneous Perforation of the nasal septum is an uncommon condition. Nasal inhalation of substances such as cocaine has long been linked to this Perforation. Case Report: This report describes the case of a 46-year-old woman who was addicted to methamphetamine and who presented with perforation of the nasal septum.This is the first reported case of nasal septal necrosis linked to nasal inhalation of methamphetamine. Conclusions: Patient history and assurance regardingillegal drug consumption and abuse is a key point for fast and accurate diagnosis. The pathophysiology of drug-induced sinunasal disease and a review of the literature are also presented.

  5. Destruction of amphetamine in aqueous solution using gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhuraiji, Turki S.; Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali

    2017-10-01

    Amphetamine-type stimulants are among the most prevalent and widespread commonly abused drugs. Amphetamine and its derivatives were detected in aquatic environment. This study aimed to demonstrate experimentally the ability of γ-irradiation combined with persulfate anions (S2O82-) to degrade and mineralize the amphetamine in aqueous solution. An initial amphetamine concentration of 125 μM in distilled water was completely degraded by a γ-ray dose of 2.8 kGy. Generation of the sulfate radical (SO4•-) from the fast reaction of added S2O82- with hydrated electrons (eaq-; keaq-/S2O82- = 1.1×1010 M-1 s-1) improved the efficiency of amphetamine degradation and mineralization. A γ-ray dose of 0.667 and 0.350 kGy in the absence and presence of S2O82- anions degraded 90% of the amphetamine, respectively. For γ-ray/free O2 and γ-ray/S2O82- systems, 11.5 and 7 kGy was required for 50% amphetamine mineralization, respectively. Addition of HCO3- anions lowered the amphetamine degradation yield, whereas N2 gas, SO42-, and Cl- anions had a negligible effect.

  6. Effects of Circadian Disruption on Methamphetamine Consumption in Methamphetamine-Exposed Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Susan E.; Feng, Hanting; Garber, Garrett; Menaker, Michael; Lynch, Wendy J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale A substantial number of clinical studies indicate associations between sleep abnormalities and drug abuse; however, the role played by the circadian system in the development of addiction is largely unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the effects of experimentally induced chronic jet lag on methamphetamine consumption in a rat model of methamphetamine drinking. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=32) were housed in running wheel cages in a 12:12 light:dark cycle. One group of rats (n=16) was given two weeks of forced methamphetamine consumption (0.01% in drinking water; meth pre-exposed) while a second group (n=16, not pre-exposed) received water only. This was followed by a two week abstinence period during which half of the animals from each group were exposed to 4 consecutive 6-hr advancing phase shifts of the light:dark cycle, while the other half remained on the original light:dark cycle. Methamphetamine consumption was assessed in all rats following the deprivation period using a two-bottle choice paradigm. Results Methamphetamine consumption was initially lower in methamphetamine pre-exposed vs. not pre-exposed rats. However, during the second week following abstinence, consumption was significantly higher in phase shifted rats of the methamphetamine pre-exposed group compared to all other groups. Conclusions These data reveal an effect of circadian rhythm disturbance on methamphetamine consumption, and suggest that dysregulation of the circadian system be considered in the etiology of relapse and addiction. PMID:25543849

  7. Evaluation of Subjective Effects of Aripiprazole and Methamphetamine in Methamphetamine-Dependent Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, T. F.; Reid, M. S.; De La Garza, R.; Mahoney, James J.; Abad, A.; Condos, R.; Palamar, J.; Halkitis, Perry N.; Mojisak, J.; Anderson, A.; Li, S.-H.; Elkashef, A.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of neuropharmacological strategies are being pursued in the search for an effective treatment for methamphetamine addiction. In this study, we investigated the safety and potential efficacy of aripiprazole, an antipsychotic agent acting on both dopamine and serotonin systems. We conducted a double-blind inpatient clinical pharmacology study to assess potential interactions between intravenous (IV) methamphetamine (15mg and 30mg) and oral aripiprazole (15mg). In addition, the effects...

  8. False-Positive TDxFLx urine Amphetamine/Metamphetamine II assay from Ofloxacin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomier, Mahmoud A.; Al-Huseini, Hani K.

    2004-01-01

    Immunoassays are widely used in testing urine for illicit drugs. Ofloaxcin and a number of other quinolones were found to induce false-positive opiates (OP) urine immunoassays. This can result in misleading conclusions in the concept of drug abuse The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of ofloxacin in theraputic doses on the induction of false-positive urine immunoassays for common drugs of abuse in healthy male volunteers. The study was conducted on 6 healthy male volunteers, aging between 35-45 years. Two doses of 400 mg ofloxacin each, were given orally to each volunteer at 12 hours interval and urine samples were collected before ofloaxcin administration and 5-7.5 hours after the second dose. Urine samples were subjected for OP, amphetamine/methamphetamine II (AM/MA II), cocaine and cannabinoids assays on TDxFLx analyzer. Ofloxacin produced significant increase (P cutoff) for AM/MA II assays, were found in all volunteers after ofloaxcin administration. The study recomends strongly the confirmation of positive urine immunoassay results for drugs of abuseby a more specific methodology e.g. gas chromatography/ mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). (author)

  9. Neuronal Nicotinic Receptors as New Targets for Amphetamine-Induced Oxidative Damage and Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Escubedo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Amphetamine derivatives such as methamphetamine (METH and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, “ecstasy” are widely abused drugs in a recreational context. This has led to concern because of the evidence that they are neurotoxic in animal models and cognitive impairments have been described in heavy abusers. The main targets of these drugs are plasmalemmal and vesicular monoamine transporters, leading to reverse transport and increased monoamine efflux to the synapse. As far as neurotoxicity is concerned, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production seems to be one of the main causes. Recent research has demonstrated that blockade of a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR inhibits METH- and MDMA-induced ROS production in striatal synaptosomes which is dependent on calcium and on NO-synthase activation. Moreover, a7 nAChR antagonists (methyllycaconitine and memantine attenuated in vivo the neurotoxicity induced by METH and MDMA, and memantine prevented the cognitive impairment induced by these drugs. Radioligand binding experiments demonstrated that both drugs have affinity to a7 and heteromeric nAChR, with MDMA showing lower Ki values, while fluorescence calcium experiments indicated that MDMA behaves as a partial agonist on a7 and as an antagonist on heteromeric nAChR. Sustained Ca increase led to calpain and caspase-3 activation. In addition, modulatory effects of MDMA on a7 and heteromeric nAChR populations have been found.

  10. Acute Physiological and Behavioral Effects of Intranasal Methamphetamine in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Carl L; Gunderson, Erik W; Perez, Audrey; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Thurmond, Andrew; Comer, Sandra D; Foltin, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    Intranasal methamphetamine abuse has increased dramatically in the past decade, yet only one published study has investigated its acute effects under controlled laboratory conditions. Thus, the current study examined the effects of single-dose intranasal methamphetamine administration on a broad range of behavioral and physiological measures. Eleven nontreatment-seeking methamphetamine abusers (two females, nine males) completed this four-session, in-patient, within-participant, double-blind study. During each session, one of four intranasal methamphetamine doses (0, 12, 25, and 50 mg/70 kg) was administered and methamphetamine plasma concentrations, cardiovascular, subjective, and psychomotor/cognitive performance effects were assessed before drug administration and repeatedly thereafter. Following drug administration, methamphetamine plasma concentrations systematically increased for 4 h postdrug administration then declined. Methamphetamine dose dependently increased cardiovascular measures and ‘positive’ subjective effects, with peaks occurring approximately 5–15 min after drug administration, when plasma levels were still ascending. In addition, cognitive performance on less complicated tasks was improved by all active methamphetamine doses, whereas performance on more complicated tasks was improved only by the intermediate doses (12 and 25 mg). These results show that intranasal methamphetamine produced predictable effects on multiple behavioral and physiological measures before peak plasma levels were observed. Of interest is the dissociation between methamphetamine plasma concentrations with cardiovascular measures and positive subjective effects, which might have important implications for potential toxicity after repeated doses. PMID:17851535

  11. Comparison of concentrations of drugs between blood samples with and without fluoride additive-important findings for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedfeld, Christopher; Krueger, Julia; Skopp, Gisela; Musshoff, Frank

    2018-02-17

    Fluoride is a common stabilizing agent in forensic toxicology to avoid the frequent problem of degradation of drugs in blood samples especially described for cocaine. In cases only samples with addition of fluoride are available, it is a crucial question if also concentrations of common drugs other than cocaine (amphetamines, opiates and cannabinoids) are affected by fluoride. So far, there are only rare literature data available on discrepant results especially for Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In this study, comparative analysis of positive tested paired routine plasma/serum samples (n = 375), collected at the same time point (one device with and one without fluoride), was carried out with special focus on cannabinoids. Samples were measured with validated routine liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods for THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (THC-OH), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, morphine, codeine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine, and results were statistically evaluated. Beside the expected stabilization effect on cocaine and the consequently reduced concentration of ecgonine methyl ester in fluoride samples, benzoylecgonine was elevated compared to respective samples without fluoride. Most importantly, new findings were significantly reduced mean concentrations of THC (- 17%), THC-OH (- 17%), and THC-COOH (- 22%) in fluoride samples. Mean amphetamine concentration was significantly higher in samples with the additive (+ 6%). For the other amphetamine type of drugs as well as for morphine and codeine, no significant differences could be seen. Whenever specified thresholds have been set, such as in most European countries, the use of different blood sample systems may result in a motorist being differently charged or prosecuted. The findings will support forensic toxicologists at the

  12. Does methamphetamine affect bone metabolism?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Masafumi; Katsuyama, Hironobu; Watanabe, Yoko; Okuyama, Toshiko; Fushimi, Shigeko; Ishikawa, Takaki; Nata, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    There is a close relationship between the central nervous system activity and bone metabolism. Therefore, methamphetamine (METH), which stimulates the central nervous system, is expected to affect bone turnover. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of METH in bone metabolism. Mice were divided into 3 groups, the control group receiving saline injections, and the 5 and 10 mg/kg METH groups (n = 6 in each group). All groups received an injection of saline or METH every other day for 8 weeks. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by X-ray computed tomography. We examined biochemical markers and histomorphometric changes in the second cancellous bone of the left femoral distal end. The animals that were administered 5 mg/kg METH showed an increased locomotor activity, whereas those receiving 10 mg/kg displayed an abnormal and stereotyped behavior. Serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations were normal compared to the controls, whereas the serum protein concentration was lower in the METH groups. BMD was unchanged in all groups. Bone formation markers such as alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin significantly increased in the 5 mg/kg METH group, but not in the 10 mg/kg METH group. In contrast, bone resorption markers such as C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b did not change in any of the METH groups. Histomorphometric analyses were consistent with the biochemical markers data. A significant increase in osteoblasts, especially in type III osteoblasts, was observed in the 5 mg/kg METH group, whereas other parameters of bone resorption and mineralization remained unchanged. These results indicate that bone remodeling in this group was unbalanced. In contrast, in the 10 mg/kg METH group, some parameters of bone formation were significantly or slightly decreased, suggesting a low turnover metabolism. Taken together, our results suggest that METH had distinct dose-dependent effects on bone turnover and that

  13. Differentiating Characteristics of Juvenile Methamphetamine Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fass, Daniel; Calhoun, Georgia B.; Glaser, Brian A.; Yanosky, Daniel J., II

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the differences in characteristics and risk behaviors endorsed by detained adolescent methamphetamine users and compared them with other drug users. Subjects completed the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory and a questionnaire in which sociodemographics and behavioral information were explored and compared. Multivariate…

  14. Decline in adolescent treatment admissions for methamphetamine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives. The purpose of this report is to describe the changing trends in adolescent treatment admissions for methamphetamine in Cape Town, and to discuss possible implications. Method. Data were collected on admissions for drug abuse treatment through a regular monitoring system involving drug ...

  15. Monitoring the prevalence of methamphetamine-related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study aimed to determine a demographic profile of methamphetamine (MA)-related admissions to major psychiatric services in Cape Town, obtain a substance use profile from admitted patients, a profile of common MA-related symptoms encountered during the assessment of the patients presenting with ...

  16. In vivo amphetamine action is contingent on αCaMKII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinkellner, Thomas; Mus, Liudmilla; Eisenrauch, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    to amphetamine was markedly reduced. Our findings demonstrate that amphetamine requires the presence of αCaMKII to elicit a full-fledged effect on DAT in vivo: αCaMKII does not only support acute amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux but is also important in shaping the chronic response to amphetamine....

  17. Plasma Malondialdehyde (MDA): an indication of liver damage in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-pregnant women were selected from volunteered members of staff. Malondialdehyde (MDA), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) analyses were determined on collected venous blood sample. Statistical analyses of variables were done using SPSS 17 taking level of significance to be p<0.05.

  18. Harvesting software systems for MDA-based reengineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus, T.; Geers, H.; Van Deursen, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report on a feasibility study in reengineering legacy systems towards a model-driven architecture (MDA). Steps in our approach consist of (1) parsing the source code of the legacy system according to a grammar; (2) mapping the abstract syntax trees thus obtained to a grammar model

  19. Organic Intellectuals in Zakes Mda's The Heart of Redness | Pillay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper applies the concept of organic intellectuals to Zakes Mda's novel, The Heart of Redness (2000). Two characters from the contemporary narrative strand of the novel, Camagu and Qukezwa, can be identified as organic intellectuals according to Gramsci's specifications. Both of them become organisers and agents ...

  20. A formal MDA approach for mobile health systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akehurst, D.H.; Jones, Valerie M.; Rensink, Arend; Ruys, T.C.; Brinksma, Hendrik; van Halteren, Aart

    M-health systems are safety critical systems intended for use by the public and are therefore characterized by especially strict requirements relating to safety, security, correctness, reliability, adaptability and user friendliness. This position paper proposes a methodology which realizes the MDA

  1. Colourless Whiteness in Post Apartheid South Africa: Zakes Mda's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0710377m

    Vol.5 No.1. December 2015. 1. COLOURLESS WHITENESS IN POST APARTHEID SOUTH AFRICA: ZAKES. MDA'S 'ECOLOGICAL CITIZENSHIP' IN THE BELLS OF AMERSFOORT ... events and activities that could provide the needed materials for literary artists in the new .... colonial context” (O. T. Oomen 1997: 25).

  2. Comparison of periodontal manifestations in amphetamine and opioids' consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoome Eivazi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug abuse is one of the most important etiologic and deteriorating factors in periodontal disease. Amphetamines and opioids, the most commonly used drugs worldwide, play an important role in this regard. The aim of this study was to compare the periodontal status of amphetamines and opioids consumers in Kermanshah city, Iran in 1393. Methods: Three drug rehabilitation clinics were selected randomly in Kermanshah. According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, 20 amphetamine consumers and 20 opioid consumers were selected randomly and participated in this study. A questionnaire for drug use and periodontal variables was designed. The collected data were entered into SPSS-18 software and Mann-Whitney and t-test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Pocket depth, gingival index and gingival bleeding in amphetamines users were more than those in opioids consumers (P<0.021. Plaque index and gingival recession in opioids users were more than those of amphetamines consumers (P<0.001. The number of periodontal disease cases in amphetamines group were 13 persons (65% and in opioids group 8 persons (40%. Conclusion: Our study showed that periodontal hygine in amphetamine consumers was worse than opioid consumers.

  3. Methamphetamine Related Radiculopathy: Case Series and Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Foroughipour; Mohammad Farzadfard; Meisam Aghaee; Ali Ghabeli-Juibary; Fariborz Rezaietalab

    2013-01-01

    Background: Peripheral nervous injury and neuromuscular complications from methamphetamine abuse has not been reported. The mechanism is not yet identified. Methods: Eight patients with lower extremity weakness following methamphetamine abuse were reported during December 2009 to May 2010. Results: Patients presented with lower extremity weakness. All patients were co-abusers of methamphetamine and opioids. Other clinical manifestations comprised of distal paresthesia of the lower extremitie...

  4. Effects of methamphetamine dependence and HIV infection on cerebral morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernigan, Terry Lynne; Gamst, Abthony C; Archibald, Sarah L.

    2005-01-01

    increases, and in one of these structures-the nucleus accumbens-there appeared to be a larger effect in younger methamphetamine abusers. Neurocognitive impairment was associated with decreased cortical volumes in HIV-positive participants but with increased cortical volumes in methamphetamine...... the results of the present study provide little information about the specific mechanisms leading to the unexpected methamphetamine effects, they may be related to glial activation or neuritic growth, both of which have been associated with methamphetamine exposure in animal studies. These results have...

  5. Impaired Arterial Smooth Muscle Cell Vasodilatory Function In Methamphetamine Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaemeh Nabaei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Methamphetamine use is a strong risk factor for stroke. This study was designed to evaluate arterial function and structure in methamphetamine users ultrasonographically. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 20 methamphetamine users and 21 controls, aged between 20 and 40years, were enrolled. Common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT marker of early atherogenesis, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD determinants of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, and nitroglycerine-mediated dilatation (NMD independent marker of vasodilation were measured in two groups. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding demographic and metabolic characteristics. The mean (±SD CCA-IMT in methamphetamine users was 0.58±0.09mm, versus 0.59±0.07mm in the controls (p=0.84. Likewise, FMD% was not significantly different between the two groups [7.6±6.1% in methamphetamine users vs. 8.2±5.1% in the controls; p=0.72], nor were peak flow and shear rate after hyperemia. However, NMD% was considerably decreased in the methamphetamine users [8.5±7.8% in methamphetamine users vs. 13.4±6.2% in controls; p=0.03]. Conclusion: According to our results, NMD is reduced among otherwise healthy methamphetamine users, which represents smooth muscle dysfunction in this group. This may contribute to the high risk of stroke among methamphetamine users.

  6. Involvement of PUMA in pericyte migration induced by methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhong; Zhang, Yuan; Bai, Ying; Chao, Jie; Hu, Gang; Chen, Xufeng; Yao, Honghong

    2017-07-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that methamphetamine causes blood-brain barrier damage, with emphasis on endothelial cells. The role of pericytes in methamphetamine-induced BBB damage remains unknown. Our study demonstrated that methamphetamine increased the migration of pericytes from the endothelial basement membrane. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying this process remain poorly understood. Thus, we examined the molecular mechanisms involved in methamphetamine-induced pericyte migration. The results showed that exposure of C3H/10T1/2 cells and HBVPs to methamphetamine increased PUMA expression via activation of the sigma-1 receptor, MAPK and Akt/PI3K pathways. Moreover, methamphetamine treatment resulted in the increased migration of C3H/10T1/2 cells and HBVPs. Knockdown of PUMA in pericytes transduced with PUMA siRNA attenuated the methamphetamine-induced increase in cell migration through attenuation of integrin and tyrosine kinase mechanisms, implicating a role of PUMA in the migration of C3H/10T1/2 cells and HBVPs. This study has demonstrated that methamphetamine-mediated pericytes migration involves PUMA up-regulation. Thus, targeted studies of PUMA could provide insights to facilitate the development of a potential therapeutic approach for alleviation of methamphetamine-induced pericyte migration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Synthesis of polystyrene, poly(styrene/4-vinylpyridine), poly(p-nitrostyrene) and poly(p-aminostyrene)-coated silica and their extraction capabilities for amphetamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Changmei; Zhang Shuanhong [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Ludong University, Yantai, Shandong 264025 (China); Qu Rongjun, E-mail: qurongjun@eyou.com [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Ludong University, Yantai, Shandong 264025 (China); Sun Tao; Zhang Ying; Zhang Xiang; Song Jingyang [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Ludong University, Yantai, Shandong 264025 (China)

    2010-11-01

    Several novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials, including polystyrene-coated silica (SG-PS), poly(styrene/4-vinylpyridine)-coated silica (SG-PVP), poly(p-nitrostyrene)-coated silica (SG-PS-NO{sub 2}) and poly(p-aminostyrene)-coated silica (SG-PS-NH{sub 2}), were synthesized in order to improve the extraction methods of harmful stimulants via solid phase extraction. The materials were characterized using infrared spectra (IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement and thermogravimetric analysis (TG). The application of the new materials in solid phase extraction columns to extract methamphetamine revealed that the extraction capability of poly(styrene/4-vinylpyridine)-coated silica is the best among the four materials, which provides novel supporter materials for extracting amphetamine-derived drugs.

  8. Prevalence and Correlates of Heroin-Methamphetamine Co-Injection Among Persons Who Inject Drugs in San Diego, California, and Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacham, Meredith C; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Rangel, Gudelia; Armenta, Richard F; Gaines, Tommi L; Garfein, Richard S

    2016-09-01

    Although persons who inject drugs (PWID) in the western United States-Mexico border region are known to inject both heroin and methamphetamine, little is known about the prevalence and risks associated with co-injection of this depressant-stimulant combination (also known as "goofball" and "Mexican speedball"). Baseline data from parallel cohort studies of PWID conducted concurrently in San Diego, CA, and Tijuana, Mexico, were used to estimate the prevalence and identify correlates of heroin-methamphetamine co-injection. PWID older than 18 years of age who reported injecting illicit drugs in the past month (N = 1,311; 32.7% female) were recruited in San Diego (n = 576) and Tijuana (n = 735) and completed interviewer-administered questionnaires. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify correlates of heroin-meth-amphetamine co-injection. The prevalence of co-injection in the past 6 months was 39.9% overall and was higher in Tijuana (55.8%) than in San Diego (19.8%). In multivariable analyses adjusting for study cohort, distributive syringe sharing, purchasing syringes prefilled with drugs, finding it hard to get new syringes, reporting great or urgent need for treatment, and younger age were independently associated with co-injection. Past-6-month overdose was significantly associated with higher odds of co-injection in San Diego than in Tijuana. These findings indicate that heroin-methamphetamine co-injection is more common in Tijuana than in San Diego, yet this practice was only associated with overdose in San Diego. Heroin-methamphetamine coinjection was also independently associated with HIV-associated injection risk behaviors. Overdose-prevention interventions should address co-injection of depressants and stimulants.

  9. Amphetamines and pH-shift agents for brain imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Winkler, C.

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a review of the results of experimental and clinical research on both I-amphetamine derivatives and pH-shift agents. Virtually all relevant working groups from the USA and Europe have contributed to this volume. The pharmacology of amphetamine and the corresponding receptor theories are described in detail, whereas other chapters deal with the labeling as well as the metabolic process of this drug. In addition to this, new amphetamine derivatives are presented together with other essential products which play a significant role in scintigraphy of the brain function. Finally, there are two chapters on instrumentation problems followed by eight contributions on the clinical results of amphetamine scintigraphy in cerebral vascular diseases, epilepsy, migraine and brain tumors.

  10. Nicotine Administration Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Novel Object Recognition Deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Brock, Paula L; McFadden, Lisa M; Nielsen, Shannon M; Smith, Misty D; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2015-07-11

    Previous studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine abuse leads to memory deficits and these are associated with relapse. Furthermore, extensive evidence indicates that nicotine prevents and/or improves memory deficits in different models of cognitive dysfunction and these nicotinic effects might be mediated by hippocampal or cortical nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The present study investigated whether nicotine attenuates methamphetamine-induced novel object recognition deficits in rats and explored potential underlying mechanisms. Adolescent or adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received either nicotine water (10-75 μg/mL) or tap water for several weeks. Methamphetamine (4 × 7.5mg/kg/injection) or saline was administered either before or after chronic nicotine exposure. Novel object recognition was evaluated 6 days after methamphetamine or saline. Serotonin transporter function and density and α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density were assessed on the following day. Chronic nicotine intake via drinking water beginning during either adolescence or adulthood attenuated the novel object recognition deficits caused by a high-dose methamphetamine administration. Similarly, nicotine attenuated methamphetamine-induced deficits in novel object recognition when administered after methamphetamine treatment. However, nicotine did not attenuate the serotonergic deficits caused by methamphetamine in adults. Conversely, nicotine attenuated methamphetamine-induced deficits in α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density in the hippocampal CA1 region. Furthermore, nicotine increased α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density in the hippocampal CA3, dentate gyrus and perirhinal cortex in both saline- and methamphetamine-treated rats. Overall, these findings suggest that nicotine-induced increases in α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex might be one mechanism by which novel object recognition deficits are

  11. Methamphetamine Ingestion Misdiagnosed as Centruroides sculpturatus Envenomation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Strommen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a case report of a 17-month-old female child who ingested a large amount of methamphetamine that looked very similar clinically to a scorpion envenomation specific to the southwestern United States by the species Centruroides sculpturatus. The child was initially treated with 3 vials of antivenom specific for that scorpion species and showed a transient, though clinically relevant neurologic improvement. Her clinical course of sympathomimetic toxicity resumed and she was treated with intravenous fluids and benzodiazepines after blood analysis showed significant levels of d-methamphetamine. This case report is to specifically underline the clinical confusion in discerning between these two conditions and the realization of limited and/or expensive resources that may be used in the process.

  12. Methamphetamine Ingestion Misdiagnosed as Centruroides sculpturatus Envenomation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strommen, Joshua; Shirazi, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a case report of a 17-month-old female child who ingested a large amount of methamphetamine that looked very similar clinically to a scorpion envenomation specific to the southwestern United States by the species Centruroides sculpturatus. The child was initially treated with 3 vials of antivenom specific for that scorpion species and showed a transient, though clinically relevant neurologic improvement. Her clinical course of sympathomimetic toxicity resumed and she was treated with intravenous fluids and benzodiazepines after blood analysis showed significant levels of d-methamphetamine. This case report is to specifically underline the clinical confusion in discerning between these two conditions and the realization of limited and/or expensive resources that may be used in the process. PMID:25649670

  13. 360 degree port MDA - a strategy to improve port security

    OpenAIRE

    Leary, Timothy P.

    2006-01-01

    CHDS State/Local Our national security and prosperity depend in part on secure and competitive ports. Effective public and private sector collaboration is needed in a world with myriad security challenges and fierce global competition. Although steps have been taken in the years since 9/11 to realize these twin goals, much more needs to be done. The current maritime domain awareness (MDA) paradigm needs to be expanded to provide comprehensive awareness of intermodal operations in our ports...

  14. Plasma Exchange for Refractory MDA5 Myositis and ILD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 18 APR 2017 1. Your paper, entitled Plasma Exchange for Refractorv MDAS myositis and ILD...submitted for review and approval.) Plasma exchange for refractory MDA5 myositis and ILD 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Plasma ...MDWI 41-,08 PREVIOUS EDITIONS ARE OBSOLETE 50. DATE Page 3 of 3 Pages Sidari CCR Abstract Rough Drafts Title: Plasma exchange for refractory MDAS

  15. Amphetamine, past and present--a pharmacological and clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, David J; Smith, Sharon L; Gosden, Jane; Nutt, David J

    2013-06-01

    Amphetamine was discovered over 100 years ago. Since then, it has transformed from a drug that was freely available without prescription as a panacea for a broad range of disorders into a highly restricted Controlled Drug with therapeutic applications restricted to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. This review describes the relationship between chemical structure and pharmacology of amphetamine and its congeners. Amphetamine's diverse pharmacological actions translate not only into therapeutic efficacy, but also into the production of adverse events and liability for recreational abuse. Accordingly, the balance of benefit/risk is the key challenge for its clinical use. The review charts advances in pharmaceutical development from the introduction of once-daily formulations of amphetamine through to lisdexamfetamine, which is the first d-amphetamine prodrug approved for the management of ADHD in children, adolescents and adults. The unusual metabolic route for lisdexamfetamine to deliver d-amphetamine makes an important contribution to its pharmacology. How lisdexamfetamine's distinctive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile translates into sustained efficacy as a treatment for ADHD and its reduced potential for recreational abuse is also discussed.

  16. Involvement of nicotinic receptors in methamphetamine- and MDMA-induced neurotoxicity: pharmacological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escubedo, E; Camarasa, J; Chipana, C; García-Ratés, S; Pubill, D

    2009-01-01

    During the last years, we have focused on the study of the neurotoxic effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine (METH) on the central nervous system (CNS) and their pharmacological prevention methods. In the process of this research, we have used a semipurified synaptosomal preparation from striatum of mice or rats as a reliable in vitro model to study reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by these amphetamine derivatives, which is well-correlated with their dopaminergic injury in in vivo models. Using this preparation, we have demonstrated that blockade of alpha7 nicotinic receptors with methyllycaconitine (MLA) prevents ROS production induced by MDMA and METH. Consequently, in vivo, MLA significantly prevents MDMA- and METH-induced neurotoxicity at dopaminergic level (mouse striatum), without affecting hyperthermia induced by these amphetamines. Additionally, when neuroprotection was assayed with memantine (MEM), a dual antagonist of NMDA and alpha7 receptors, an effective neuroprotection was obtained also ahead of serotonergic injury induced by MDMA in rats. MEM also prevents MDMA effect on serotonin transporter functionality and METH effect on dopamine transporter (DAT), suggesting that behavioral effects of these psychostimulants can also be modulated by MEM. Finally, we have demonstrated that MEM prevents the impaired memory function induced by MDMA, and also, using binding studies with radioligands, we have characterized the interaction of these substances with nicotinic receptors. Studies at molecular level showed that both MDMA and METH displaced competitively the binding of radioligands with homomeric alpha7 and heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), indicating that they can directly interact with them. In all the cases, MDMA displayed higher affinity than METH and it was higher for heteromeric than for alpha7 subtype. Pre-incubation of differentiated PC12 cells with MDMA or METH induces nAChR upregulation

  17. Chronic wheel running reduces maladaptive patterns of methamphetamine intake: regulation by attenuation of methamphetamine-induced neuronal nitric oxide synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Alexander J.; Aparicio, Mark B.; Kim, Airee; Sobieraj, Jeffery C.; Yuan, Clara J.; Grant, Yanabel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether prior exposure to chronic wheel running (WR) alters maladaptive patterns of excessive and escalating methamphetamine intake under extended access conditions, and intravenous methamphetamine self-administration-induced neurotoxicity. Adult rats were given access to WR or no wheel (sedentary) in their home cage for 6 weeks. A set of WR rats were injected with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to determine WR-induced changes in proliferation (2-h old) and survival (28-day old) of hippocampal progenitors. Another set of WR rats were withdrawn (WRw) or continued (WRc) to have access to running wheels in their home cages during self-administration days. Following self-administration [6 h/day], rats were tested on the progressive ratio (PR) schedule. Following PR, BrdU was injected to determine levels of proliferating progenitors (2-h old). WRc rats self-administered significantly less methamphetamine than sedentary rats during acquisition and escalation sessions, and demonstrated reduced motivation for methamphetamine seeking. Methamphetamine reduced daily running activity of WRc rats compared with that of pre-methamphetamine days. WRw rats self-administered significantly more methamphetamine than sedentary rats during acquisition, an effect that was not observed during escalation and PR sessions. WR-induced beneficial effects on methamphetamine self-administration were not attributable to neuroplasticity effects in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex, but were attributable to WR-induced inhibition of methamphetamine-induced increases in the number of neuronal nitric oxide synthase expressing neurons and apoptosis in the nucleus accumbens shell. Our results demonstrate that WR prevents methamphetamine-induced damage to forebrain neurons to provide a beneficial effect on drug-taking behavior. Importantly, WR-induced neuroprotective effects are transient and continued WR activity is necessary to prevent compulsive methamphetamine intake

  18. Residual effects of intranasal methamphetamine on sleep, mood, and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Audrey; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Gunderson, Erik W.; Marrone, Gina; Silver, Rae; Foltin, Richard W.; Hart, Carl L.

    2008-01-01

    Although intranasal methamphetamine abuse has increased, there are no published data investigating the residual effects of the drug under controlled conditions. Thus, the current study examined the residual effects of single-dose intranasal methamphetamine administration on a broad range of behavioral and physiological measures. Non-treatment seeking methamphetamine abusers (n = 11) completed this two-week, in-patient, within-participant, double-blind study. The study consisted of 4 two-day blocks of sessions; each block was separated by at least 24 hrs. At approximately 1000 hrs, on the first day of each block, participants received one of four intranasal methamphetamine doses (0, 12, 25, 50 mg/70 kg). Lights were turned out at 2300 hrs that evening and sleep measures were assessed. On the morning of the second day of each block, methamphetamine plasma levels, cardiovascular measures, mood, subjective reports of the previous evening's sleep, and psychomotor performance were assessed to determine residual drug effects. The larger methamphetamine doses (25 and 50 mg) markedly disrupted subjective measures of that night's sleep and some indices of next-day mood, but only the largest dose (50 mg) dose decreased objective measures of that night's sleep and increased next-day physiological measures. Methamphetamine did not produce any negative residual effects on early next-day performance. Future studies should assess methamphetamine-related residual effects following repeated doses administered over consecutive days. PMID:18078723

  19. A Qualitative Exploration of Trajectories among Suburban Users of Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeri, Miriam Williams; Harbry, Liam; Gibson, David

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this exploratory study was to gain a better understanding of methamphetamine use among suburban users. We know very little about the mechanisms of initiation and trajectory patterns of methamphetamine use among this under-researched and hidden population. This study employed qualitative methods to examine the drug career of suburban…

  20. Prevention of Methamphetamine Abuse: Can Existing Evidence Inform Community Prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birckmayer, Johanna; Fisher, Deborah A.; Holder, Harold D.; Yacoubian, George S.

    2008-01-01

    Little research exists on effective strategies to prevent methamphetamine production, distribution, sales, use, and harm. As a result, prevention practitioners (especially at the local level) have little guidance in selecting potentially effective strategies. This article presents a general causal model of methamphetamine use and harms that…

  1. School-Related Factors Affecting High School Seniors' Methamphetamine Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jarrod M.; Lo, Celia C.

    2009-01-01

    Data from the 2005 Monitoring the Future survey were used to examine relationships between school-related factors and high school seniors' lifetime methamphetamine use. The study applied logistic regression techniques to evaluate effects of social bonding variables and social learning variables on likelihood of lifetime methamphetamine use. The…

  2. Combined effects of modafinil and d-amphetamine in male Sprague-Dawley rats trained to discriminate d-amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quisenberry, Amanda J; Prisinzano, Thomas; Baker, Lisa E

    2013-09-01

    Modafinil is a novel wake-promoting drug with FDA approval for the treatment of sleep-related disorders that has recently been investigated as a potential agonist replacement therapy for psychostimulant dependence. Previous research in animals and humans indicates modafinil has a lower abuse liability than traditional psychostimulants, although few studies have carefully assessed modafinil's stimulus properties in combination with other psychostimulants. The current study trained male Sprague-Dawley rats to discriminate subcutaneous injections of 0.3 mg/kg (n=8) or 1.0 mg/kg d-amphetamine (n=8) from saline under an FR 20 schedule of food reinforcement and substitution tests were administered with d-amphetamine (0.03-1.0 mg/kg, s.c.), modafinil (32-256 mg/kg, i.g.), and a low modafinil dose (32 mg/kg, i.g.) in combination with d-amphetamine (0.03-1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) to determine if these drugs have additive effects. The selective D2 dopamine agonist, PNU-91356A, was also tested as a positive control and ethanol and morphine were tested as negative controls. Results indicate that modafinil produced dose-dependent and statistically significant d-amphetamine-lever responding in both groups and nearly complete substitution in animals trained to discriminate 1.0 mg/kg d-amphetamine. Modafinil pretreatment slightly increased the discrimination of low d-amphetamine doses in animals trained to discriminate 0.3 mg/kg d-amphetamine. These results support previous findings that modafinil and d-amphetamine may have additive effects. In consideration of recent interests in modafinil as an agonist treatment for psychostimulant dependence, additional preclinical investigations utilizing other methodologies to examine modafinil in combination with other stimulants, such as behavioral sensitization paradigms or drug self-administration, may be of interest. © 2013.

  3. Pharmacotherapeutic agents in the treatment of methamphetamine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Kirsten C; Cornish, Jennifer L; Faingold, Alon; Wood, Katie; Haber, Paul S

    2017-05-01

    Methamphetamine use is a serious public health concern in many countries and is second to cannabis as the most widely abused illicit drug in the world. Effective management for methamphetamine dependence remains elusive and the large majority of methamphetamine users relapse following treatment. Areas covered: Progression in the understanding of the pharmacological basis of methamphetamine use has provided us with innovative opportunities to develop agents to treat dependence. The current review summarizes relevant literature on the neurobiological and clinical correlates associated with methamphetamine use. We then outline agents that have been explored for potential treatments in preclinical studies, human laboratory phase I and phase II trials over the last ten years. Expert opinion: No agent has demonstrated a broad and strong effect in achieving MA abstinence in Phase II trials. Agents with novel therapeutic targets appear promising. Advancement in MA treatment, including translation into practice, faces several clinical challenges.

  4. Correlates of trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-negative heterosexual methamphetamine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Shirley J; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Zians, Jim; Patterson, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    While many studies have examined correlates of trading sex for money, few have examined factors associated with exclusive trading of sex for drugs. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychological correlates of trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-negative heterosexual men and women who were enrolled in a sexual risk reduction intervention in San Diego, California. Of 342 participants, 26% overall (21% of males and 31% of females) reported trading sex for methamphetamine in the past two months. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that recently trading sex for methamphetamine was independently associated with being female, homeless, binging on methamphetamine, sexual victimization in the past two months, engaging in anal sex 24 or more times in the past two months, and higher sexual compulsivity scores. Effective interventions for this high-risk population should consider gender-focused counseling for sexual abuse, motivational enhancement therapy, social-cognitive skills training, as well as enhanced access and utilization of social services, including drug treatment.

  5. Association of Leukocytosis with Amphetamine and Cocaine Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Richards

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Determining the etiology of unexplained leukocytosis in asymptomatic patients may incur unnecessary testing, cost, and prolonged emergency department stay. The objective was to delineate if use of amphetamines and/or cocaine is a factor. Methods. For two years we reviewed all psychiatric patients presenting for medical clearance with exclusions for infection, epilepsy, trauma, or other nonpsychiatric medical conditions. Results. With a total of 1,206 patients, 877 (72.7% amphetamines/cocaine-negative drug screen controls had mean WBC 8.4±2.6×103/µL. The 240 (19.9% amphetamines-positive, cocaine-negative, patients had WBC 9.4±3.3×103/µL (P<0.0001. The 72 (6.0% amphetamines-negative, cocaine-positive, patients had WBC 7.1±1.8×103/µL (P<0.0001. The remaining 17 (1.4% amphetamines/cocaine-positive patients had WBC 10.0±4.2×103/µL (P=0.01. Amphetamines-positive patients had a supranormal WBC ratio significantly higher than controls (23.8% versus 14.8%, P=0.001, whereas only one cocaine-positive patient had a supranormal WBC count, with significantly lower ratio (1.4%, P=0.0003. Conclusion. Use of amphetamines, not cocaine, may be associated with idiopathic leukocytosis. This may be explained by unique pharmacologic, neuroendocrine, and immunomodulatory differences.

  6. Interactions of [3H]amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. II. Active transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; De Souza, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    The accumulation of 5 nM d-[ 3 H]amphetamine (d-[ 3 H]AMPH) into rat brain synaptosomes was examined using physiological buffer conditions. The accumulation of d-[ 3 H]AMPH into striatal synaptosomes was saturable, of high affinity, ouabain-sensitive and temperature-dependent, suggesting an active transport phenomenon. Eadee-Hofstee analysis of striatal d-[ 3 H]AMPH transport (AMT) saturation isotherms indicated an apparent Km of 97 nM and a Vmax of 3.0 fmol/mg tissue/min. Lesion of the striatal dopaminergic innervation led to equivalent decreases of [ 3 H] dopamine (DA) transport and AMT, indicating that AMT occurs in DA terminals. Furthermore, AMT was not evident in cerebral cortex, a brain region with a paucity of DA terminals. In competition studies, AMT was stereospecific; d-AMPH (IC50 = 60 nM) was an 8-fold more potent inhibitor of the transport than its I-isomer (IC50 = 466 nM). DA(IC50 = 257 nM), DA uptake blockers and substrates were found to be potent inhibitors of AMT: GBR12909 IC50 = 5 nM; methamphetamine IC50 = 48 nM; methylphenidate IC50 = 53 nM; and cocaine IC50 = 172 nM. In contrast, serotonin was relatively weak in inhibiting AMT (IC50 = 7.9 microM). There was a highly significant (P less than .001; slope = 1.2) linear correlation between the AMT-inhibiting potencies of AMPH analogs and their potencies in stimulating locomotor activity in rodents. AMT may be important in the low dose effects of AMPH such as increased locomotor activity in rodents and stimulant activity in man. Differences between AMT and d-[ 3 H]AMPH sequestration described earlier, as well as their possible relevance to behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of AMPH administration are also discussed

  7. Interactions of ( sup 3 H)amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. II. Active transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; De Souza, E.B. (Addiction Research Center, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The accumulation of 5 nM d-({sup 3}H)amphetamine (d-({sup 3}H)AMPH) into rat brain synaptosomes was examined using physiological buffer conditions. The accumulation of d-({sup 3}H)AMPH into striatal synaptosomes was saturable, of high affinity, ouabain-sensitive and temperature-dependent, suggesting an active transport phenomenon. Eadee-Hofstee analysis of striatal d-({sup 3}H)AMPH transport (AMT) saturation isotherms indicated an apparent Km of 97 nM and a Vmax of 3.0 fmol/mg tissue/min. Lesion of the striatal dopaminergic innervation led to equivalent decreases of ({sup 3}H) dopamine (DA) transport and AMT, indicating that AMT occurs in DA terminals. Furthermore, AMT was not evident in cerebral cortex, a brain region with a paucity of DA terminals. In competition studies, AMT was stereospecific; d-AMPH (IC50 = 60 nM) was an 8-fold more potent inhibitor of the transport than its I-isomer (IC50 = 466 nM). DA(IC50 = 257 nM), DA uptake blockers and substrates were found to be potent inhibitors of AMT: GBR12909 IC50 = 5 nM; methamphetamine IC50 = 48 nM; methylphenidate IC50 = 53 nM; and cocaine IC50 = 172 nM. In contrast, serotonin was relatively weak in inhibiting AMT (IC50 = 7.9 microM). There was a highly significant (P less than .001; slope = 1.2) linear correlation between the AMT-inhibiting potencies of AMPH analogs and their potencies in stimulating locomotor activity in rodents. AMT may be important in the low dose effects of AMPH such as increased locomotor activity in rodents and stimulant activity in man. Differences between AMT and d-({sup 3}H)AMPH sequestration described earlier, as well as their possible relevance to behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of AMPH administration are also discussed.

  8. Amphetamine enantiomer excretion profile following administration of Adderall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, John T; Valtier, Sandra; Nelson, Stephen L

    2003-10-01

    Amphetamine remains a widely abused drug throughout the world. It is also used therapeutically for weight loss, narcolepsy, and attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADHD). ADHD has grown dramatically recently both in terms of diagnosis and treatment. Increasingly, older individuals are diagnosed and treated for ADHD, and treatment often continues into adulthood. Of the available treatments for ADHD, Adderall is widely prescribed. Despite its widespread use, there are no published data regarding the expected amphetamine excretion profile following its use. This is problematic because, in this case, medical review officers (MRO) and forensic toxicologists are asked to assess results in terms of use pursuant to valid medical prescription without specific data on which to base a sound decision. To address this situation, a study to determine the concentration and enantiomer composition of amphetamine excretion following administration of Adderall was undertaken. Adderall (20 mg) was administered to five healthy subjects with all subsequent ad lib urine samples (total urine void) collected for seven days. Adderall is a 3:1 mixture of d- and l-enantiomers of amphetamine salts. Peak amphetamine concentrations ranged from 2645 to 5948 ng/mL. Samples containing > or = 500 ng/mL of amphetamine (the administrative cutoff for a positive result by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) were seen up to 47:30 h post dose. The number of samples that contained amphetamine concentrations of > or = 500 ng/mL ranged among individuals from 7 to 13. As anticipated, analysis showed the d-enantiomer to be in excess of the l-enantiomer, with the proportion of l-enantiomer increasing over time. Because of the mixture of enantiomers, not all samples that contained > or = 500 ng/mL of amphetamine were positive when tested by immunoassay. The drug concentration profiles were quite variable within and between subjects because of dilution and fluctuations in pH of the samples. These

  9. Effects of amphetamine administration on neurogenesis in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Stępień

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In our study expression of phospho-(Ser-10-histone H3 (pH3S10, a marker for the early stage of neurogenesis, and cellular early response genes were investigated using c-Fos protein as an example of a transcription factor in the neurogenic process in rats. Neurogenesis in the adult brain is regulated by endo- and exogenous factors, which influence the proliferation potential of progenitor cells and accelerate the dendritic development of newborn neurons. D-amphetamine, a psychoactive substance, is one of the exogenous factors able to influence the process of neurogenesis. The rats were injected with D-amphetamine at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg/body weight (b.w. under one administration scheme. Analysis of the pH3S10 and c-Fos expression levels in the group of D-amphetamine administered rats provided evidence of enhanced expression of these proteins in the regions of neurogenesis occurrence in rats. However, conclusions concerning stimulant effects of amphetamine on neurogenesis should be formulated with great caution, taking into account amphetamine dosage and the administration scheme. It should also be remembered that doses of psychoactive substances used in animal models can be lethal to humans.

  10. Amphetamine, past and present – a pharmacological and clinical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sharon L; Gosden, Jane; Nutt, David J

    2013-01-01

    Amphetamine was discovered over 100 years ago. Since then, it has transformed from a drug that was freely available without prescription as a panacea for a broad range of disorders into a highly restricted Controlled Drug with therapeutic applications restricted to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. This review describes the relationship between chemical structure and pharmacology of amphetamine and its congeners. Amphetamine’s diverse pharmacological actions translate not only into therapeutic efficacy, but also into the production of adverse events and liability for recreational abuse. Accordingly, the balance of benefit/risk is the key challenge for its clinical use. The review charts advances in pharmaceutical development from the introduction of once-daily formulations of amphetamine through to lisdexamfetamine, which is the first d-amphetamine prodrug approved for the management of ADHD in children, adolescents and adults. The unusual metabolic route for lisdexamfetamine to deliver d-amphetamine makes an important contribution to its pharmacology. How lisdexamfetamine’s distinctive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile translates into sustained efficacy as a treatment for ADHD and its reduced potential for recreational abuse is also discussed. PMID:23539642

  11. Against professional advice: treatment attrition among pregnant methamphetamine users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terplan M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Brianna Lindsay1, Jennifer Albrecht1, Mishka Terplan1,21Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland, 2Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Pregnant methamphetamine users who leave substance use treatment against professional advice may be at risk of poorer health outcomes. To examine the hypothesis that methamphetamine use during pregnancy may be associated with leaving substance use treatment against professional advice, the 2006 Treatment Episode Data Set was analyzed. A logistic regression adjusting for age, race, service setting, prior substance abuse treatment, criminal justice referral, and education was conducted. Inclusion criteria were met by 18,688 pregnant admissions; 26.4% identified methamphetamines as their primary substance of use. Frequency of use was identified as an effect modifier, therefore results were stratified by less than weekly use and weekly or more use. Methamphetamine use was significantly associated with leaving treatment against professional advice regardless of usage level. However, the odds of leaving treatment were greater among women using methamphetamine less than weekly. Further investigation into this association may be warranted due to the complications that may result from methamphetamine use during pregnancy.Keywords: pregnancy, methamphetamines, treatment, attrition

  12. Sustained reductions in drug use and depression symptoms from treatment for drug abuse in methamphetamine-dependent gay and bisexual men

    OpenAIRE

    Peck, James A.; Reback, Cathy J.; Yang, Xiaowei; Rotheram-Fuller, Erin; Shoptaw, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Methamphetamine abusers often complain of feelings of depression that can complicate accurately diagnosing these individuals during treatments for methamphetamine abuse. This article presents an examination of temporal associations between documented methamphetamine use and reported ratings of depression among 162 gay and bisexual male methamphetamine abusers who participated in a 16-week randomized clinical trial of four behavioral therapies for methamphetamine abuse. Methamphetamine use was...

  13. Attention performance among Brazilian truck drivers and its association with amphetamine use: pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Garcia de Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article was to describe the attention functioning of twenty-two truck drivers and its relationship with amphetamine use. Those drivers who reported using amphetamines in the twelve months previous to the interview had the best performance in a test evaluating sustained attention functioning. Although amphetamine use may initially seem advantageous to the drivers, it may actually impair safe driving. The findings suggest the importance of monitoring the laws regarding amphetamine use in this country.

  14. [Immunohistochemical study on the mechanism of excretion of methamphetamine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajitani, A; Kaiho, M; Mori, A; Okada, Y; Mukaida, M; Ishiyama, I

    1989-06-01

    Many methods of analysis are available to the forensic toxicologist for determining the amount of methamphetamine within human tissues, but few have the potential of histochemistry for enabling the precise site of excretion of methamphetamine to be defined. We have established a method for the demonstration of methamphetamine by immunohistochemistry, and applied this method for showing morphologically the disposition of methamphetamine. The following cells in the tissues of methamphetamine-intoxicated mice gave a strong positive reaction of the localization, which was thought to be the histological evidence of excretion of this drug: epithelial cells of the distal part of the renal tubule and of the collecting tubule, transitional epithelial cells of the bladder, liver parenchymal cells, epithelial cells of the striated duct of the salivary gland, parietal cells of the gastric gland, part of epithelial cells of the distal portion of the large intestine, secretory cells and part of epithelial cells of the ductal portion of the sweat gland, alveolar cells of the mammary gland, secretory cells of the sebaceous gland and hair medulla and cortex. These results indicated passive diffusion of methamphetamine across membranes of the cells of the distal tubule and collecting tubule of the kidney, of the bladder and of the striated duct of the salivary gland. In the parietal cells of the gastric gland, part of epithelial cells of the distal portion of the large intestine and secretory cells of the sweat gland, methamphetamine was thought to be stored and subsequently released. In the mammary gland, methamphetamine was found to be combined with casein and excreted by exocytosis. Accumulation of methamphetamine in the hair was supposed to be chiefly due to the penetration of this drug derived from tissue fluid and sebum.

  15. Desorption of a methamphetamine surrogate from wallboard under remediation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppendieck, Dustin; Morrison, Glenn; Corsi, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Thousands of homes in the United States are found to be contaminated with methamphetamine each year. Buildings used to produce illicit methamphetamine are typically remediated by removing soft furnishings and stained materials, cleaning and sometimes encapsulating surfaces using paint. Methamphetamine that has penetrated into paint films, wood and other permanent materials can be slowly released back into the building air over time, exposing future occupants and re-contaminating furnishings. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of two wallboard remediation techniques for homes contaminated with methamphetamine: 1) enhancing desorption by elevating temperature and relative humidity while ventilating the interior space, and 2) painting over affected wallboard to seal the methamphetamine in place. The emission of a methamphetamine surrogate, N-isopropylbenzylamine (NIBA), from pre-dosed wallboard chambers over 20 days at 32 °C and two values of relative humidity were studied. Emission rates from wallboard after 15 days at 32 °C ranged from 35 to 1400 μg h-1 m-2. Less than 22% of the NIBA was removed from the chambers over three weeks. Results indicate that elevating temperatures during remediation and latex painting of impacted wallboard will not significantly reduce freebase methamphetamine emissions from wallboard. Raising the relative humidity from 27% to 49% increased the emission rates by a factor of 1.4. A steady-state model of a typical home using the emission rates from this study and typical residential building parameters and conditions shows that adult inhalation reference doses for methamphetamine will be reached when approximately 1 g of methamphetamine is present in the wallboard of a house.

  16. Stroke and methamphetamine use in young adults: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Julia M; Darke, Shane; Farrell, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Methamphetamine use and stroke are significant public health problems. Strokes among people aged below 45 years are much less common than in older age groups but have significant mortality and morbidity. Methamphetamine is a putative cause of strokes among younger people. A review of methamphetamine-related strokes was conducted. Bibliographic databases were searched until February 2017 for articles related to methamphetamine and stroke. Both haemorrhagic and ischaemic strokes were considered. Of 370 articles screened, 77 were selected for inclusion. There were 81 haemorrhagic and 17 ischaemic strokes reported in case reports and series. Both types were approximately twice as common in males. Route of administration associated with haemorrhagic stroke was typically oral or injecting, but for ischaemic stroke inhalation was most common. Haemorrhagic stroke was associated with vascular abnormalities in a third of cases. One quarter of individuals completely recovered, and a third died following haemorrhagic stroke. One-fifth completely recovered, and one-fifth died following ischaemic stroke. There is a preponderance of haemorrhagic strokes associated with methamphetamine use in young people, and methamphetamine-related stroke is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Mechanisms of methamphetamine-associated stroke include hypertension, vasculitis, direct vascular toxicity and vasospasm. In a period of rising worldwide methamphetamine use, the incidence of methamphetamine-related stroke will increase, with a consequent increase in the burden of disease contributed by such events. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Argon prevents the development of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine and amphetamine-induced changes in mu opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Hélène N; Dhilly, Martine; Poisnel, Géraldine; Degoulet, Mickael; Meckler, Cédric; Vallée, Nicolas; Blatteau, Jean-Éric; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Lemaire, Marc; Debruyne, Danièle; Abraini, Jacques H

    2014-01-01

    Systemic administration of γ-amino-butyric acid type A (GABA-A) and benzodiazepine receptor agonists has been reported to block the development of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine. Here, we investigated whether the non-anesthetic noble gas argon, shown to possess agonistic properties at these receptors, may block the acquisition of amphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization and mu opioid receptor activation in the nucleus accumbens. Rats were pretreated with saline solution or amphetamine (1 mg/kg) from day 1 to day 3 and then exposed, immediately after injection of amphetamine, to medicinal air or argon at 75 vol% (with the remainder being oxygen). After a 3-day period of withdrawal, rats were challenged with amphetamine on day 7. Rats pretreated with amphetamine and argon had lower locomotor activity (U = 5, P < 0.005) and mu opioid receptor activity in the nucleus accumbens (U = 0, P < 0.001) than rats pretreated with amphetamine and air. In contrast, argon had effect on locomotor and mu receptor activity neither in rats pretreated with saline and challenged with amphetamine (acute amphetamine) nor in rats pretreated and challenged with saline solution (controls). These results indicate that argon inhibits the development of both locomotor sensitization and mu opioid receptor activation induced by repeated administration of amphetamine.

  18. Amphetamines and pH-shift agents for brain imaging: Basic research and clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Winkler, C.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 18 selections. Some of the titles are: Labelling of amphetamines with /sup 123/I: Receptors for amphetamines; New amphetamine derivatives; Potential new approaches for the development of brain imaging agents for single-photon applications; and IM SPECT with the pinhole collimator.

  19. Amphetamines, new psychoactive drugs and the monoamine transporter cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitte, Harald H; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In monoaminergic neurons, the vesicular transporters and the plasma membrane transporters operate in a relay. Amphetamine and its congeners target this relay to elicit their actions: most amphetamines are substrates, which pervert the relay to elicit efflux of monoamines into the synaptic cleft. However, some amphetamines act as transporter inhibitors. Both compound classes elicit profound psychostimulant effects, which render them liable to recreational abuse. Currently, a surge of new psychoactive substances occurs on a global scale. Chemists bypass drug bans by ingenuous structural variations, resulting in a rich pharmacology. A credible transport model must account for their distinct mode of action and link this to subtle differences in activity and undesired, potentially deleterious effects. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Simultaneous derivatization and extraction of amphetamine and methylenedioxyamphetamine in urine with headspace liquid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Jing-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2008-03-21

    A new method is reported for the simultaneous extraction and derivatization of amphetamine (AM) and methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) using headspace hollow fiber protected liquid-phase microextraction (HS-HF-LPME); quantitation is by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The derivatizing reagent, pentafluorobenzaldehyde (PFBAY), was added to the extraction solvent. The analytes, volatile and basic, were released from the sample matrix into the headspace first, then extracted and derivatized in the solvent. After that, 2 microl of extract was directly injected into the GC-MS system. Parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. This method showed good linearity in the concentration range investigated (50-350 ng ml(-1) for AM and 50-700 ng ml(-1) for MDA). Excellent repeatability of the extraction (RSD< or = 4%, n=5), and low limits of quantitation (0.25 ng ml(-1) for AM and 1.00 ng ml(-1) for MDA) were achieved. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by analyzing human urine samples.

  1. Remediation of Manufactured Methamphetamine in Clandestine Laboratories. A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the current literature review was to identify, collect, review, and organize all available information concerning the remediation of methamphetamine found in clandestine laboratories through an analysis of routinely collected data sources. There were numerous peer ...

  2. Effects of methamphetamine dependence and HIV infection on cerebral morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernigan, Terry Lynne; Gamst, Abthony C; Archibald, Sarah L.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined the separate and combined effects of methamphetamine dependence and HIV infection on brain morphology. METHOD: Morphometric measures obtained from magnetic resonance imaging of methamphetamine-dependent and/or HIV-positive participants and their appropriate age......- and education-matched comparison groups were analyzed. Main effects of age, HIV infection, methamphetamine dependence, and the interactions of these factors were examined in analyses of cerebral gray matter structure volumes. RESULTS: Independent of the effect of age, HIV infection was associated with reduced...... volumes of cortical, limbic, and striatal structures. There was also some evidence of an interaction between age and HIV infection such that older HIV-positive participants suffered disproportionate loss. Methamphetamine dependence was surprisingly associated with basal ganglia and parietal cortex volume...

  3. Effects of methamphetamine dependence and HIV infection on cerebral morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernigan, Terry Lynne; Gamst, Abthony C; Archibald, Sarah L.

    2005-01-01

    - and education-matched comparison groups were analyzed. Main effects of age, HIV infection, methamphetamine dependence, and the interactions of these factors were examined in analyses of cerebral gray matter structure volumes. RESULTS: Independent of the effect of age, HIV infection was associated with reduced...... volumes of cortical, limbic, and striatal structures. There was also some evidence of an interaction between age and HIV infection such that older HIV-positive participants suffered disproportionate loss. Methamphetamine dependence was surprisingly associated with basal ganglia and parietal cortex volume...... increases, and in one of these structures-the nucleus accumbens-there appeared to be a larger effect in younger methamphetamine abusers. Neurocognitive impairment was associated with decreased cortical volumes in HIV-positive participants but with increased cortical volumes in methamphetamine...

  4. Modulation of neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors influences the expression of amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference and amphetamine withdrawal anxiety-like behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlinska, J H; Gibula-Bruzda, E; Koltunowska, D; Raoof, H; Suder, P; Silberring, J

    2012-01-01

    Many data indicate that endogenous opioid system is involved in amphetamine-induced behavior. Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) possesses opioid-modulating properties. The aim of the present study was to determine whether pharmacological modulation of NPFF receptors modify the expression of amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) and amphetamine withdrawal anxiety-like behavior, both processes relevant to drug addiction/abuse. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPFF (5, 10, and 20 nmol) inhibited the expression of amphetamine CPP at the doses of 10 and 20 nmol. RF9, the NPFF receptors antagonist, reversed inhibitory effect of NPFF (20 nmol, i.c.v.) at the doses of 10 and 20 nmol and did not show any effect in amphetamine- and saline conditioned rats. Anxiety-like effect of amphetamine withdrawal was measured 24h after the last (14 days) amphetamine (2.5mg/kg, i.p.) treatment in the elevated plus-maze test. Amphetamine withdrawal decreased the percent of time spent by rats in the open arms and the percent of open arms entries. RF9 (5, 10, and 20 nmol, i.c.v.) significantly reversed these anxiety-like effects of amphetamine withdrawal and elevated the percent of time spent by rats in open arms at doses of 5 and 10 nmol, and the percent of open arms entries in all doses used. NPFF (20 nmol) pretreatment inhibited the effect of RF9 (10 nmol). Our results indicated that stimulation or inhibition of NPFF receptors decrease the expression of amphetamine CPP and amphetamine withdrawal anxiety, respectively. These findings may have implications for a better understanding of the processes involved in amphetamine dependence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Comparsion of the Efficacy of Group Psychotherapy Based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and Mindfulness on Craving and Cognitive Emotion Regulation in Methamphetamine Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Kiani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Today, third wave therapies in psychotherapy shift their attention from challenging cognitions to awareness and acceptance of feelings, emotions, cognitions and behaviors. Therefore, this research aimed to compare of efficacy of group psychotherapy based on acceptance and commitment therapy, with mindfulness on craving and cognitive emotion regulation in methamphetamine addicts. Method: Research method was semi experimental research design with pre-post test and follow up. The population of research was included all of methamphetamine addicts in baharestan, Isfahan. Drug abusers was 34 participants that refered to addiction rehabilitation centers and selected by snowball sampling and finaly divided to 2groups by radomization (acceptance and commitment therapy group and mindfulness groups. Each groups recieved treatment in 12 sessions (At First 2 sessions per week and at last 1 session per week. Two groups assessed by craving test (Ekhtiary, 1387 and cognitive emotion regulation (garnefski et al, 2002, in pretest, post test and follow up. Results: The results showed that two treatment groups had significant effect on craving intensity in post test and follow up. In addition, there was no significant difference in comparing of the efficacy of these two treatments on cognitive emotion regulation and it means that both two traetments had same effect on cognitive emotion regulatin. Conclusion: we can say that acceptance and commitmet therapy and mindfulnesshave effect on reduction psychopathology from using amphetamines due to same theraputic factors.

  6. Neural correlates of affect processing and aggression in methamphetamine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Doris E; Lieberman, Matthew D; London, Edythe D

    2011-03-01

    Methamphetamine abuse is associated with high rates of aggression but few studies have addressed the contributing neurobiological factors. To quantify aggression, investigate function in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, and assess relationships between brain function and behavior in methamphetamine-dependent individuals. In a case-control study, aggression and brain activation were compared between methamphetamine-dependent and control participants. Participants were recruited from the general community to an academic research center. Thirty-nine methamphetamine-dependent volunteers (16 women) who were abstinent for 7 to 10 days and 37 drug-free control volunteers (18 women) participated in the study; subsets completed self-report and behavioral measures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed on 25 methamphetamine-dependent and 23 control participants. We measured self-reported and perpetrated aggression and self-reported alexithymia. Brain activation was assessed using fMRI during visual processing of facial affect (affect matching) and symbolic processing (affect labeling), the latter representing an incidental form of emotion regulation. Methamphetamine-dependent participants self-reported more aggression and alexithymia than control participants and escalated perpetrated aggression more following provocation. Alexithymia scores correlated with measures of aggression. During affect matching, fMRI showed no differences between groups in amygdala activation but found lower activation in methamphetamine-dependent than control participants in the bilateral ventral inferior frontal gyrus. During affect labeling, participants recruited the dorsal inferior frontal gyrus and exhibited decreased amygdala activity, consistent with successful emotion regulation; there was no group difference in this effect. The magnitude of decrease in amygdala activity during affect labeling correlated inversely with self-reported aggression in control participants

  7. The impact of age, HIV serostatus and seroconversion on methamphetamine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Jessica L; Cattie, Jordan; Morgan, Erin; Woods, Steven Paul; Cherner, Mariana; Moore, David J; Atkinson, J Hampton; Grant, Igor

    2016-03-01

    Characterizing methamphetamine use in relation to age, HIV serostatus and seroconversion is pertinent given the increasingly older age of the population with HIV and the intertwined epidemics of methamphetamine use and HIV. Study aims were to investigate whether (i) methamphetamine use differs by age and HIV serostatus, and (ii) receiving an HIV diagnosis impacts methamphetamine use among younger and older persons with HIV. This study examined methamphetamine use characteristics among 217 individuals with a lifetime methamphetamine dependence diagnosis who completed an in-person study assessment. Multivariable regressions revealed that HIV serostatus uniquely attenuates methamphetamine use, such that persons with HIV report a smaller cumulative quantity (β = -0.16, p = 0.01) and a fewer number of days (β = -0.18, p = 0.004) of methamphetamine use than persons without HIV. Among the HIV+ sample, all participants persisted in methamphetamine use after receiving an HIV diagnosis, with about 20% initiating use after seroconversion. Repeated measures analysis of variance indicated that density of methamphetamine use (i.e. grams per day used) was greater among the younger, relative to the older, HIV+ group (p = 0.02), and increased for both age groups following seroconversion (p methamphetamine use behaviors, many people with HIV initiate, or persist in, methamphetamine use after receiving an HIV diagnosis. These findings raise the question of whether tailoring of prevention and intervention strategies might reduce the impact of methamphetamine and HIV across the age continuum.

  8. Enantiomeric profiling of chiral drugs in wastewater and receiving waters

    OpenAIRE

    Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara; Baker, D R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the enantiomer-specific fate of chiral drugs during wastewater treatment and in receiving waters. Several chiral drugs were studied: amphetamine-like drugs of abuse (amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDMA, MDA), ephedrines (ephedrine and pseudoephedrine), antidepressant venlafaxine, and beta-blocker atenolol. A monitoring program was undertaken in 7 WWTPs (utilizing mainly activated sludge and trickling filters technologies) and at 6 sampling points in receivin...

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphism near CREB1, rs7591784, is associated with pretreatment methamphetamine use frequency and outcome of outpatient treatment for methamphetamine use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzerling, Keith G; Demirdjian, Levon; Wu, Yingnian; Shoptaw, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Although stimulant dependence is highly heritable, few studies have examined genetic influences on methamphetamine dependence. We performed a candidate gene study of 52 SNPs and pretreatment methamphetamine use frequency among 263 methamphetamine dependent Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White participants of several methamphetamine outpatient clinical trials in Los Angeles. One SNP, rs7591784 was significantly associated with pretreatment methamphetamine use frequency following Bonferroni correction (p methamphetamine urine drug screen results during 12 weeks of outpatient treatment among males with treatment outcome data available (N = 94) and found rs7591784 was significantly associated with methamphetamine use during treatment controlling for pretreatment methamphetamine use. rs7591784 is near CREB1 and in a linkage disequilibrium block with rs2952768, previously shown to influence CREB1 expression. The CREB signaling pathway is involved in gene expression changes related to chronic use of multiple drugs of abuse including methamphetamine and these results suggest that variability in CREB signaling may influence pretreatment frequency of methamphetamine use as well as outcomes of outpatient treatment. Medications targeting the CREB pathway, including phosphodiesterase inhibitors, warrant investigation as pharmacotherapies for methamphetamine use disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of N-acetylcysteine or bupropion on methamphetamine self-administration and methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charntikov, Sergios; Pittenger, Steven T; Pudiak, Cindy M; Bevins, Rick A

    2018-03-28

    N-acetylcysteine and bupropion are two promising candidate medications for treatment of substance use disorder. The effects of N-acetylcysteine or bupropion on methamphetamine self-administration of female rats are not well understood. To fill this gap, this study assessed the effects of N-acetylcysteine (0, 30, 60, or 120 mg/kg) and bupropion (0, 10, 30, and 60 mg/kg) on methamphetamine self-administration of female rats across the natural estrous cycle. Following a completed dose-response curve, responding for methamphetamine self-administration was extinguished and the effects of N-acetylcysteine or bupropion on methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement was evaluated in separate experiments. N-acetylcysteine did not decrease responding maintained by methamphetamine or methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement. Bupropion significantly decreased methamphetamine self-administration and methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement in female rats with highest dose (60 mg/kg) also significantly decreasing general chamber activity. In a companion experiment, testing the effect of bupropion on responding maintained by sucrose, we confirmed non-specificity of bupropion's effects as bupropion also decreased responding for sucrose. Considered together, our findings suggest that while N-acetylcysteine has considerable promise for treatment of cocaine dependence it may not generalize to other stimulants like methamphetamine. Furthermore, although bupropion has been shown to effectively decrease methamphetamine self-administration, and presently methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement, its locomotor and reward suppressing effects warrant further investigation including both sexes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Heroin and Methamphetamine Injection: An Emerging Drug Use Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tayyib, Alia; Koester, Stephen; Langegger, Sig; Raville, Lisa

    2017-07-03

    We sought to describe an emerging drug use pattern characterized by injection of both methamphetamine and heroin. We examined differences in drug injection patterns by demographics, injection behaviors, HIV and HCV status, and overdose. Persons who inject drugs (PWID) were recruited as part of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) system in Denver, Colorado. We used chi-square statistics to assess differences between those who reported only heroin injection, only methamphetamine injection, and combined heroin and methamphetamine injection. We used generalized linear models to estimate unadjusted and adjusted prevalence ratios to describe the association between drug injection pattern and reported nonfatal overdose in 2015. We also examined changes in the drug reported as most frequently injected across previous NHBS cycles from 2005, 2009, and 2012. Of 592 participants who completed the survey in 2015, 173 (29.2%) reported only injecting heroin, 123 (20.8%) reported only injecting methamphetamine, and 296 (50.0%) reported injecting both drugs during the past 12 months. Injecting both heroin and methamphetamine was associated with a 2.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.7, 4.5) fold increase in reported overdose in the past 12 months compared with only injecting heroin. The proportion of those reporting methamphetamine as the most frequently injected drug increased from 2.1% in 2005 to 29.6% in 2015 (p heroin, may have serious public health implications.

  12. Is Cognitive Functioning Impaired in Methamphetamine Users? A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Carl L; Marvin, Caroline B; Silver, Rae; Smith, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    The prevailing view is that recreational methamphetamine use causes a broad range of severe cognitive deficits, despite the fact that concerns have been raised about interpretations drawn from the published literature. This article addresses an important gap in our knowledge by providing a critical review of findings from recent research investigating the impact of recreational methamphetamine use on human cognition. Included in the discussion are findings from studies that have assessed the acute and long-term effects of methamphetamine on several domains of cognition, including visuospatial perception, attention, inhibition, working memory, long-term memory, and learning. In addition, relevant neuroimaging data are reviewed in an effort to better understand neural mechanisms underlying methamphetamine-related effects on cognitive functioning. In general, the data on acute effects show that methamphetamine improves cognitive performance in selected domains, that is, visuospatial perception, attention, and inhibition. Regarding long-term effects on cognitive performance and brain-imaging measures, statistically significant differences between methamphetamine users and control participants have been observed on a minority of measures. More importantly, however, the clinical significance of these findings may be limited because cognitive functioning overwhelmingly falls within the normal range when compared against normative data. In spite of these observations, there seems to be a propensity to interpret any cognitive and/or brain difference(s) as a clinically significant abnormality. The implications of this situation are multiple, with consequences for scientific research, substance-abuse treatment, and public policy. PMID:22089317

  13. Paper Spray and Extraction Spray Mass Spectrometry for the Direct and Simultaneous Quantification of Eight Drugs of Abuse in Whole Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espy, R.D.; Teunissen, S.F.; Manicke, N.E.; Ren, Y.; Ouyang, Z.; van Asten, A.; Cooks, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of eight drugs of abuse in blood has been performed using paper spray or extraction spray mass spectrometry in under 2 min with minimal sample preparation. A method has been optimized for quantification of amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA),

  14. Brain SPECT with 123I-isopropyl amphetamine in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biersack, H.J.; Reske, S.N.; Rasche, A.; Reichmann, K.; Winkler, C.

    1983-01-01

    Ten patients were studied with N-isopropyl I-123 p-iodoamphetamine. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was carried out by hand of a rotating gamma camera system (Gammatome T9000/CGR, high resolution collimator). During 1 rotation (360 0 ) 64 frames (4k matrix) were acquired within 20 min 1 hour after injection of 6.5 mCi I-123 labeled amphetamine. The content of I-124 was less than 2%. After reconstruction of transverse slices coronar and sagittal reconstructions were rapidly performed using an array processor. Nine patients suffered from epilepsy and one from severe migraine. Excellent differentiation between gray and white matter of the cerebral cortex and the basal ganglia was evident in all of the cases. In 2 out of 3 patients with epilepsy and negative CT results SPECT revealed circumscribed areas with increased amphetamine uptake in accordance with the EEG findings. In 4 out of 6 cases with positive CT findings SPECT lesions with diminished amphetamine uptake could be established. One patient with severe migraine showed focal increased amphetamine uptake in accordance with the respective clinical results. (orig.)

  15. Cannabis and Amphetamine Use Among Adolescents in Five Asian Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Peltzer

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Our preliminary results show the importance of personal attributes such as mental distress and environmental stressors on lifetime cannabis and lifetime amphetamine use. Future prospective studies are needed to identify causal relationships among personal attributes, parental attributes, environmental stressors, and illicit substance use.

  16. Amphetamine Containing Dietary Supplements and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Perez-Downes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Weight loss is one of the most researched and marketed topics in American society. Dietary regimens, medications that claim to boost the metabolism, and the constant pressure to fit into society all play a role in our patient’s choices regarding new dietary products. One of the products that are well known to suppress appetite and cause weight loss is amphetamines. While these medications suppress appetite, most people are not aware of the detrimental side effects of amphetamines, including hypertension, tachycardia, arrhythmias, and in certain instances acute myocardial infarction. Here we present the uncommon entity of an acute myocardial infarction due to chronic use of an amphetamine containing dietary supplement in conjunction with an exercise regimen. Our case brings to light further awareness regarding use of amphetamines. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion of use of these substances when young patients with no risk factors for coronary artery disease present with acute arrhythmias, heart failure, and myocardial infarctions.

  17. Do prenatally methamphetamine-exposed adult male rats display general predisposition to drug abuse in the conditioned place preference test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šlamberová, R; Pometlová, M; Schutová, B; Hrubá, L; Macúchová, E; Nová, E; Rokyta, R

    2012-01-01

    Drug abuse of pregnant women is a growing problem. The effect of prenatal drug exposure may have devastating effect on development of the offsprings that may be long-term or even permanent. One of the most common drug abused by pregnant women is methamphetamine (MA), which is also the most frequently abused illicit drug in the Czech Republic. Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal MA exposure alters behavior, cognition, pain and seizures in adult rats in sex-specific manner. Our most recent studies demonstrate that prenatal MA exposure makes adult rats more sensitive to acute injection of the same or related drugs than their controls. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of prenatal MA exposure on drug-seeking behavior of adult male rats tested in the Conditioned place preference (CPP). Adult male rats were divided to: prenatally MA-exposed (5 mg/kg daily for the entire prenatal period), prenatally saline-exposed (1 ml/kg of physiological saline) and controls (without maternal injections). The following drugs were used in the CPP test in adulthood: MA (5 mg/kg), amphetamine (5 mg/kg), cocaine (5 and 10 mg/kg), morphine (5 mg/kg), MDMA (5 mg/kg) and THC (2 mg/kg). Our data demonstrated that prenatally MA-exposed rats displayed higher amphetamine-seeking behavior than both controls. MA as well as morphine induced drug-seeking behavior of adult male rats, however this effect did not differ based on the prenatal MA exposure. In contrast, prenatal MA exposure induced rather tolerance to cocaine than sensitization after the conditioning in the CPP. MDMA and THC did not induce significant effects. Even though the present data did not fully confirmed our hypotheses, future studies are planned to test the drug-seeking behavior also in self-administration test.

  18. [The randomized controlled trial of the prison-based Japanese Matrix Program (J-MAT) for methamphetamine abusers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Takayuki

    2012-12-01

    Methamphetamine use is subject to severe criminal punishment in Japan and approximately 22% of the prison population were confined for violations of the stimulants control law in 2009. Although the high recidivism rate is also a problem, no systematic treatment has been conducted in prison. Therefore, the development of the prison-based treatment program is necessary. In this study, the prison-based program was developed based on the Matrix Model, which is the cognitive-behavioral treatment for amphetamine users developed in the US. The program was tailored in order to address the treatment needs of the Japanese amphetamine users considering Japanese culture and the prison climate. The randomized controlled trial was conducted in order to evaluate the effectiveness the Japanese Matrix program (J-MAT). 60 prisoners were randomly assigned either to the J-MAT or the control groups and those who in the J-MAT group received the program once a week for 12 weeks. The abstinence rate could not be used as the outcome measure because the participants could not be followed after the release from prison due to the legal reasons. Therefore, the psychological variables including coping skills, self-efficacy and motivation were used as outcome measures, which are considered as the important predictive factors of abstinence. 93.3% of the J-MAT participants completed the program. The coping skills of the treated prisoners were improved significantly after treatment comparing to the control (F (1, 27) = 9.03, p < .001), however other psychological variables were not significantly improved. The results suggested the effectiveness of the J-MAT because both treatment completion and coping skills are powerful predictors of abstinence. Further study is required and in which the participants should be followed after the completion of treatment in order to compare the relapse rates between the groups and to measure the long-term treatment gain.

  19. A kinetic account for amphetamine-induced monoamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenhuetl, Peter S; Bhat, Shreyas; Mayer, Felix P; Sitte, Harald H; Freissmuth, Michael; Sandtner, Walter

    2018-02-09

    The plasmalemmal monoamine transporters for dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin (SERT) are targets for amphetamines. In vivo, amphetamines elicit most, if not all, of their actions by triggering monoamine efflux. This is thought to be accomplished by an amphetamine-induced switch from the forward-transport to the substrate-exchange mode. The mechanism underlying this switch has remained elusive; available kinetic models posit that substrates and cosubstrate Na + ions bind either in a random or in a sequential order. Neither can account for all reported experimental observations. We used electrophysiological recordings to interrogate crucial conformational transitions associated with the binding of five different substrates (serotonin, para -chloroamphetamine, and the high-affinity naphthyl-propan-amines PAL-287, PAL-1045, and PAL-1046) to human SERT expressed in HEK293 cells; specifically, we determined the relaxation kinetics of SERT from a substrate-loaded to a substrate-free state at various intracellular and extracellular Na + concentrations. These rates and their dependence on intracellular and extracellular Na + concentrations differed considerably between substrates. We also examined the effect of K + on substrate affinity and found that K + enhanced substrate dissociation. A kinetic model was developed, which allowed for random, but cooperative, binding of substrate and Na + (or K + ). The synthetic data generated by this model recapitulated the experimental observations. More importantly, the cooperative binding model accounted for the releasing action of amphetamines without any digression from alternating access. To the best of our knowledge, this model is the first to provide a mechanistic framework for amphetamine-induced monoamine release and to account for the findings that some substrates are less efficacious than others in promoting the substrate-exchange mode. © 2018 Hasenhuetl et al.

  20. Methamphetamine inhibits antigen processing, presentation, and phagocytosis.

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    Zsolt Tallóczy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (Meth is abused by over 35 million people worldwide. Chronic Meth abuse may be particularly devastating in individuals who engage in unprotected sex with multiple partners because it is associated with a 2-fold higher risk for obtaining HIV and associated secondary infections. We report the first specific evidence that Meth at pharmacological concentrations exerts a direct immunosuppressive effect on dendritic cells and macrophages. As a weak base, Meth collapses the pH gradient across acidic organelles, including lysosomes and associated autophagic organelles. This in turn inhibits receptor-mediated phagocytosis of antibody-coated particles, MHC class II antigen processing by the endosomal-lysosomal pathway, and antigen presentation to splenic T cells by dendritic cells. More importantly Meth facilitates intracellular replication and inhibits intracellular killing of Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, two major AIDS-related pathogens. Meth exerts previously unreported direct immunosuppressive effects that contribute to increased risk of infection and exacerbate AIDS pathology.

  1. Impact of methamphetamine on infection and immunity

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    Sergio A Salamanca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of methamphetamine (METH use is estimated at ~35 million people worldwide, with over 10 million users in the United States. METH use elicits a myriad of social consequences and the behavioral impact of the drug is well understood. However, new information has recently emerged detailing the devastating effects of METH on host immunity, increasing the acquisition of diverse pathogens and exacerbating the severity of disease. These outcomes manifest as modifications in protective physical and chemical defenses, pro-inflammatory responses, and the induction of oxidative stress pathways. Through these processes, significant neurotoxicities arise, and, as such, chronic abusers with these conditions are at a higher risk for heightened consequences. METH use also influences the adaptive immune response, permitting the unrestrained development of opportunistic diseases. In this review, we discuss recent literature addressing the impact of METH on infection and immunity, and identify areas ripe for future investigation.

  2. Presence and Persistence of Psychotic Symptoms in Cocaine- versus Methamphetamine-Dependent Participants

    OpenAIRE

    Mahoney, James J.; Kalechstein, Ari D.; De La Garza, Richard; Newton, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare and contrast psychotic symptoms reported by cocaine and methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Participants included 27 cocaine-dependent and 25 methamphetamine-dependent males, as well as 15 cocaine-dependent and 18 methamphetamine-dependent females. After screening, participants were excluded if they met criteria for any Axis I diagnosis other than nicotine dependence, or methamphetamine or cocaine dependence (ie, participants had to use ei...

  3. An Exploration of the Relationship between the Use of Methamphetamine and Prescription Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamonica, Aukje K.; Boeri, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    This study examines patterns of use of prescription drugs and methamphetamine. We drew our sample from a study about 130 active and inactive methamphetamine users and focused on 16 participants with a recent history of methamphetamine and prescription drug use. We collected in-depth interviews to explore relationships in use trajectory patterns.…

  4. Prevalence of nonmedical methamphetamine use in the United States

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    Barchha Nina

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Illicit methamphetamine use continues to be a public health concern in the United States. The goal of the current study was to use a relatively inexpensive methodology to examine the prevalence and demographic correlates of nonmedical methamphetamine use in the United States. Methods The sample was obtained through an internet survey of noninstitutionalized adults (n = 4,297 aged 18 to 49 in the United States in 2005. Propensity weighting methods using information from the U.S. Census and the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH were used to estimate national-level prevalence rates. Results The overall prevalence of current nonmedical methamphetamine use was estimated to be 0.27%. Lifetime use was estimated to be 8.6%. Current use rates for men (0.32% and women (0.23% did not differ, although men had a higher 3-year prevalence rate (3.1% than women (1.1%. Within the age subgroup with the highest overall methamphetamine use (18 to 25 year olds, non-students had substantially higher methamphetamine use (0.85% current; 2.4% past year than students (0.23% current; 0.79% past year. Methamphetamine use was not constrained to those with publicly funded health care insurance. Conclusion Through the use of an internet panel weighted to reflect U.S. population norms, the estimated lifetime prevalence of methamphetamine use among 18 to 49 year olds was 8.6%. These findings give rates of use comparable to those reported in the 2005 NSDUH. Internet surveys are a relatively inexpensive way to provide complimentary data to telephone or in-person interviews.

  5. Amphetamine and antidepressant drug effects on GABA- and NMDA-related seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, T B; Kirkby, R D; Kokkinidis, L

    1993-01-01

    Research has shown a synergistic relationship between amphetamine sensitization and limbic system kindling. To explore the role of GABA and NMDA receptor activity in modulating the positive effects of amphetamine on epileptogenesis, alterations in GABA- and NMDA-related convulsions were examined after acute and chronic amphetamine administration. A single injection of d-amphetamine (7.5 mg/kg) significantly decreased latencies to generalized motor seizures induced 12 h later by the noncompetitive GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin (10 mg/kg). The increased sensitivity to clonus was specific to acute amphetamine treatment and was not evident following withdrawal from chronic drug exposure. Seizures induced by NMDLA (1,000 mg/kg), on the other hand, were not modified by acute amphetamine injection; however, the latency to clonus was reduced substantially after NMDLA injection to mice chronically preexposed to amphetamine. The short- and long-term amphetamine effects on GABA- and NMDA-associated convulsive activity were not paralleled by similar drug treatment schedules involving acute (20 mg/kg) and chronic administration of desipramine, zimelidine, and buproprion. These results suggest that amphetamine may be acting on inhibitory and excitatory amino acid systems independently of its monoaminergic properties. The implications of these findings were discussed in relation to amphetamine sensitization of mesolimbic functioning.

  6. Adderall produces increased striatal dopamine release and a prolonged time course compared to amphetamine isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, B Matthew; Glaser, Paul E A; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2007-04-01

    Adderall is currently used for the treatment of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and is composed of a novel mixture of approximately 24% L-amphetamine and 76% D-amphetamine salts. There are, however, no investigations of the pharmacological effects of this combination in vivo. The technique of high-speed chronoamperometry using Nafion-coated single carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to study amphetamine-evoked dopamine (DA) release produced by Adderall, D-amphetamine, or D,L-amphetamine in the striatum of anesthetized male Fischer 344 (F344) rats. The amphetamine solutions were locally applied from micropipettes by pressure ejection. Local applications of Adderall resulted in significantly greater DA release signal amplitudes with prolonged time course of dopamine release and re-uptake as compared to D-amphetamine and D,L-amphetamine. These data support the hypothesis that the combination of amphetamine enantiomers and salts in Adderall has effects on DA release, which result in increased and prolonged DA release, compared to D- and D,L-amphetamine.

  7. BDNF deficiency and young-adult methamphetamine induce sex-specific effects on prepulse inhibition regulation

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    Elizabeth E Manning

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, yet its role in the development of specific symptoms is unclear. Methamphetamine (METH users have an increased risk of psychosis and schizophrenia, and METH-treated animals have been used extensively as a model to study the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. We investigated whether METH treatment in BDNF heterozygous mutant mice (HET has cumulative effects on sensorimotor gating, including the disruptive effects of psychotropic drugs. BDNF HETs and WT littermates were treated during young-adulthood with METH and, following a two-week break, prepulse inhibition (PPI was examined. At baseline, BDNF HETs showed reduced PPI compared to WT mice irrespective of METH pre-treatment. An acute challenge with amphetamine (AMPH disrupted PPI but male BDNF HETs were more sensitive to this effect, irrespective of METH pre-treatment. In contrast, female mice treated with METH were less sensitive to the disruptive effects of AMPH, and there were no effects of BDNF genotype. Similar changes were not observed in the response to an acute apomorphine or MK-801 challenge. These results show that genetically-induced reduction of BDNF caused changes in a behavioural endophenotype relevant to the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. However, major sex differences were observed in the effects of a psychotropic drug challenge on this behaviour. These findings suggest sex differences in the effects of BDNF depletion and METH treatment on the monoamine signaling pathways that regulate PPI. Given that these same pathways are thought to contribute to the expression of positive symptoms in schizophrenia, this work suggests that there may be significant sex differences in the pathophysiology underlying these symptoms. Elucidating these sex differences may be important for our understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia and developing better treatments strategies for the

  8. Methamphetamine Consumption Inhibits Pair Bonding and Hypothalamic Oxytocin in Prairie Voles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, Caroline M; Phillips, Tamara J; Ryabinin, Andrey E

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) abuse has been linked to violence, risk-taking behaviors, decreased sexual inhibition, and criminal activity. It is important to understand mechanisms underlying these drug effects for prevention and treatment of MA-associated social problems. Previous studies have demonstrated that experimenter-administered amphetamine inhibits pair bonding and increases aggression in monogamous prairie voles. It is not currently known whether similar effects on social behaviors would be obtained under conditions during which the drug is voluntarily (actively) administered. The current study investigated whether MA drinking affects pair bonding and what neurocircuits are engaged. In Experiment 1, we exposed male and female voles to 4 days each of 20 and 40 mg/L MA under a continuous 2-bottle choice (2BC) procedure. Animals were housed either singly or in mesh-divided cages with a social partner. Voles consumed MA in a drinking solution, but MA drinking was not affected by either sex or housing condition. In Experiment 2, we investigated whether MA drinking disrupts social bonding by measuring aggression and partner preference formation following three consecutive days of 18-hour/day access to 100 mg/L MA in a 2BC procedure. Although aggression toward a novel opposite-sex animal was not affected by MA exposure, partner preference was inhibited in MA drinking animals. Experiment 3 examined whether alterations in hypothalamic neuropeptides provide a potential explanation for the inhibition of partner preference observed in Experiment 2. MA drinking led to significant decreases in oxytocin, but not vasopressin, in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. These experiments are the first investigation into how voluntary pre-exposure to MA affects the development of social attachment in a socially monogamous species and identify potential neural circuits involved in these effects.

  9. Methamphetamine Consumption Inhibits Pair Bonding and Hypothalamic Oxytocin in Prairie Voles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline M Hostetler

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (MA abuse has been linked to violence, risk-taking behaviors, decreased sexual inhibition, and criminal activity. It is important to understand mechanisms underlying these drug effects for prevention and treatment of MA-associated social problems. Previous studies have demonstrated that experimenter-administered amphetamine inhibits pair bonding and increases aggression in monogamous prairie voles. It is not currently known whether similar effects on social behaviors would be obtained under conditions during which the drug is voluntarily (actively administered. The current study investigated whether MA drinking affects pair bonding and what neurocircuits are engaged. In Experiment 1, we exposed male and female voles to 4 days each of 20 and 40 mg/L MA under a continuous 2-bottle choice (2BC procedure. Animals were housed either singly or in mesh-divided cages with a social partner. Voles consumed MA in a drinking solution, but MA drinking was not affected by either sex or housing condition. In Experiment 2, we investigated whether MA drinking disrupts social bonding by measuring aggression and partner preference formation following three consecutive days of 18-hour/day access to 100 mg/L MA in a 2BC procedure. Although aggression toward a novel opposite-sex animal was not affected by MA exposure, partner preference was inhibited in MA drinking animals. Experiment 3 examined whether alterations in hypothalamic neuropeptides provide a potential explanation for the inhibition of partner preference observed in Experiment 2. MA drinking led to significant decreases in oxytocin, but not vasopressin, in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. These experiments are the first investigation into how voluntary pre-exposure to MA affects the development of social attachment in a socially monogamous species and identify potential neural circuits involved in these effects.

  10. Efficacy of psychostimulant drugs for amphetamine abuse or dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mañá, Clara; Castells, Xavier; Torrens, Marta; Capellà, Dolors; Farre, Magi

    2013-09-02

    Amphetamine dependence is a public health problem with medical, psychiatric, cognitive, legal and socioeconomic consequences. To date, no pharmacological treatment has been approved for this disorder, and psychotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment. In recent years, psychostimulants have been investigated as a possible replacement therapy. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of psychostimulant medications for amphetamine abuse or dependence. The influences of type of drug, type of dependence, comorbid disorders, clinical trial risk of bias and publication of data were also studied. Relevant trials were searched in the following sources: PubMed (January 1966 to 6 June 2012), EMBASE (January 1988 to 6 June 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library, Issue 5 of 12, May 2012), PsycINFO (January 1985 to 6 June 2012) and the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Drug and Alcohol Group (June 2012). We also searched the reference lists of retrieved trials, the list of studies citing the included trials and the main electronic registers of ongoing trials (ClinicalTrials.gov, International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and EU Clinical Trials Register). Finally, we contacted investigators to request information about unpublished trials. Searches included non-English language literature. All randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel-group clinical trials investigating the efficacy or safety of psychostimulants for amphetamine dependence or abuse conducted in an outpatient setting. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Eleven studies were included in the review (791 participants). Studied psychostimulants included dexamphetamine, bupropion, methylphenidate and modafinil. No significant differences were found between psychostimulants and placebo for any of the studied efficacy outcomes. Overall retention in studies was low (50.4%). Psychostimulants did not reduce amphetamine use (mean difference (MD) -0.26, 95% confidence interval (CI

  11. Expression of HIV gp120 protein increases sensitivity to the rewarding properties of methamphetamine in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesby, James P.; Hubbard, David T.; Markou, Athina; Semenova, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection induce neuropathological changes in corticolimbic brain areas involved in reward and cognitive function. Little is known about the combined effects of methamphetamine and HIV infection on cognitive and reward processes. The HIV/gp120 protein induces neurodegeneration in mice, similar to HIV-induced pathology in humans. We investigated the effects of gp120 expression on associative learning, preference for methamphetamine and non-drug reinforcers, and sensitivity to the conditioned rewarding properties of methamphetamine in transgenic (tg) mice expressing HIV/gp120 protein (gp120-tg). gp120-tg mice learned the operant response for food at the same rate as non-tg mice. In the two-bottle choice procedure with restricted access to drugs, gp120-tg mice exhibited greater preference for methamphetamine and saccharin than non-tg mice, whereas preference for quinine was similar between genotypes. Under conditions of unrestricted access to methamphetamine, the mice exhibited a decreased preference for increasing methamphetamine concentrations. However, male gp120-tg mice showed a decreased preference for methamphetamine at lower concentrations than non-tg male mice. gp120-tg mice developed methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference at lower methamphetamine doses compared with non-tg mice. No differences in methamphetamine pharmacokinetics were found between genotypes. These results indicate that gp120-tg mice exhibit no deficits in associative learning or reward/motivational function for a natural reinforcer. Interestingly, gp120 expression resulted in increased preference for methamphetamine and a highly palatable non-drug reinforcer (saccharin) and increased sensitivity to methamphetamine-induced conditioned reward. These data suggest that HIV-positive individuals may have increased sensitivity to methamphetamine, leading to high methamphetamine abuse potential in this population. PMID

  12. Solid-phase extraction followed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the sensitive determination of ecstasy compounds and amphetamines in biological samples

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    H. A. Mashayekhi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach for the determination of ecstasy and amphetamines (3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA, 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA and 3,4-methylenedioxypropylamphetamine (MDPA in biological samples is presented. The analytes were extracted from the matrix and transferred to a small volume of a high density, water insoluble solvent using solid-phase extraction (SPE followed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME. This combination not only resulted in a high enrichment factor, but also it could be used in complex matrices (biological samples. Some important extraction parameters, such as sample solution flow rate, sample pH, type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents as well as the salt addition, were studied and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration graphs were linear in the range of 0.5-500 µg L-1 and 1.0-500 µg L-1 with detection limits in the range of 0.1-0.3 µg L-1 and 0.2-0.7 µg L-1 in urine and plasma samples, respectively. The results showed that SPE-DLLME is a suitable method for the determination of ecstasy components and amphetamines in biological and water samples. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v28i3.3

  13. Ovarian cancer targeted adenoviral-mediated mda-7/IL-24 gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahasreshti, PJ; Kataram, M; Wu, HJ; Yalavarthy, LP; Carey, D; Dent, P; Chada, S; Alvarez, RD; Haisma, HJ; Fisher, PB; Curiel, DT

    Objective. We have previously shown that adenoviral-mediated melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7 (Ad.mda-7) therapy induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. However, the apoptosis induction was low and directly correlated with infectivity of Ad.mda-7. The objective of this study was to

  14. A Creative Partnership: The Spiritual and the Sexual in Novels by Zakes Mda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, I.

    2012-01-01

    Spirituality and sexuality are key notions in the novels of Zakes Mda, one of South Africa's leading contemporary authors. In Mda's novels the mysterious interrelatedness of the spiritual and the sexual, in which art and creativity are vital elements, functions as a catalyst in individual and

  15. Digital Droplet Multiple Displacement Amplification (ddMDA for Whole Genome Sequencing of Limited DNA Samples.

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    Minsoung Rhee

    Full Text Available Multiple displacement amplification (MDA is a widely used technique for amplification of DNA from samples containing limited amounts of DNA (e.g., uncultivable microbes or clinical samples before whole genome sequencing. Despite its advantages of high yield and fidelity, it suffers from high amplification bias and non-specific amplification when amplifying sub-nanogram of template DNA. Here, we present a microfluidic digital droplet MDA (ddMDA technique where partitioning of the template DNA into thousands of sub-nanoliter droplets, each containing a small number of DNA fragments, greatly reduces the competition among DNA fragments for primers and polymerase thereby greatly reducing amplification bias. Consequently, the ddMDA approach enabled a more uniform coverage of amplification over the entire length of the genome, with significantly lower bias and non-specific amplification than conventional MDA. For a sample containing 0.1 pg/μL of E. coli DNA (equivalent of ~3/1000 of an E. coli genome per droplet, ddMDA achieves a 65-fold increase in coverage in de novo assembly, and more than 20-fold increase in specificity (percentage of reads mapping to E. coli compared to the conventional tube MDA. ddMDA offers a powerful method useful for many applications including medical diagnostics, forensics, and environmental microbiology.

  16. TRIM65-catalized ubiquitination is essential for MDA5-mediated antiviral innate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tengchuan

    2017-01-01

    MDA5 plays a critical role in antiviral innate immunity by functioning as a cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA sensor that can activate type I interferon signaling pathways, but the mechanism for the activation of MDA5 is poorly understood. Here, we show that TRIM65 specifically interacts with MDA5 and promotes K63-linked ubiquitination of MDA5 at lysine 743, which is critical for MDA5 oligomerization and activation. Trim65 deficiency abolishes MDA5 agonist or encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV)–induced interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) activation and type I interferon production but has no effect on retinoic acid–inducible I (RIG-I), Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), or cyclic GMP-AMP synthase signaling pathways. Importantly, Trim65−/− mice are more susceptible to EMCV infection than controls and cannot produce type I interferon in vivo. Collectively, our results identify TRIM65 as an essential component for the MDA5 signaling pathway and provide physiological evidence showing that ubiquitination is important for MDA5 oligomerization and activation. PMID:28031478

  17. Failure of surgical treatment in methamphetamine body-stuffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami-Motlagh, Hooman; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein; Behnam, Behdad; Arab-Ahmadi, Mehran

    2015-05-01

    Body stuffing is defined as ingestion of unpackaged or packaged illicit drugs in a quick process. The drugs have usually been wrapped loosely in cellophane, plastic bags, paper, or aluminum foil. Methamphetamine toxicity is a dangerous state that occurs during methamphetamine leakage from the ingested packages in the gastrointestinal tract. This is usually occurring with cocaine and heroin, but methamphetamine body stuffing may less commonly happen, as well. Accordingly, management of methamphetamine body-stuffers is an important subject that has remained a controversy in clinical and legal aspects. We have reported two body-stuffer cases who underwent exploratory laparotomy. Although surgery was done, it was not useful to exit packs and even led to severe methamphetamine toxicity. These cases show that surgical treatment may be ineffective and even harmful in body-stuffers. On the other hand, this report suggests that pre and post-operation abdominal CT-scan is necessary for evaluating surgical treatment in patients who are still symptomatic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. Methamphetamine Consumption during Pregnancy - Effects on Child Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinger, Jürgen; Hinner, Patricia; Reichert, Jörg; Rüdiger, Mario

    2017-05-01

    Methamphetamine abuse during pregnancy represents an emerging health care problem. The consequences are not only of relevance to the pregnant women, but also their unborn child. It is associated with an increased risk of preeclampsia and hypertension, fetal demise, preterm delivery, and intrauterine growth restriction. The deleterious effects of prenatal methamphetamine exposure on the developing fetal brain may lead to long-term neuro-developmental and behavioral problems.Given the current evidence, abuse of methamphetamine during pregnancy must be of utmost concern to health care professionals and to policy-makers. As it has been described for neonatal abstinence syndrome, a multi-professional team is required to improve care of affected women and families. A multi-disciplinary approach is needed, including good prenatal care of pregnant women, perinatal care by specialized obstetricians and neonatologists, and psychiatric treatment by an addiction specialist. Furthermore, families should be integrated into appropriate social support networks.For the development of a structured support program for pregnant women with methamphetamine consumption, methamphetamine use disorder should be considered as a disease that requires medical treatment as well as psychological and social support. The pregnancy should be considered as a window of opportunity to provide the required help. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Atheroprotective immunization with malondialdehyde-modified LDL is hapten specific and dependent on advanced MDA adducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonen, Ayelet; Hansen, Lotte; Turner, William W

    2014-01-01

    as an immunogen would be impractical for generalized use. Furthermore, when MDA is used to modify LDL, a wide variety of related MDA adducts are formed, both simple and more complex. To define the relevant epitopes that would reproduce the atheroprotective effects of immunization with MDA-LDL, we sought......Immunization with homologous malondialdehyde (MDA)-modified LDL (MDA-LDL) leads to atheroprotection in experimental models supporting the concept that a vaccine to oxidation-specific epitopes (OSEs) of oxidized LDL could limit atherogenesis. However, modification of human LDL with OSE to use...... responses. We further demonstrate that a T helper (Th) 2-biased hapten-specific humoral and cellular response is sufficient, and thus, MAA-modified homologous albumin is an equally effective immunogen. We further show that such Th2-biased humoral responses per se are not atheroprotective if they do...

  20. Amphetamine-type medicines: a review of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and toxicological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Kristianee C; Rossato, Luciana G; Fröehlich, Pedro E; Limberger, Renata P

    2013-11-01

    Amphetamine-like drugs are sympathomimetic agents with marked central and peripheral stimulant properties. Despite the street illegal drugs such as amphetamine and ecstasy, some amphetamine-like compounds are also legally marketed under medical prescription in the treatment of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (methylphenidate) and obesity/overweight (fenproporex and diethylpropione). However, similar with what happens with their illicit analogues, therapeutic amphetamine-like drugs also share important toxicological risks. Although methylphenidate is considered the first choice in the treatment of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, its high popularity among teenagers and children is raising concern in the medical community. Regarding weight-loss purposes, the use of amphetamine-like compounds are very controversial, though. Thus, the present review will address pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and toxicological aspects of amphetamine-like compounds used with therapeutic aims.

  1. Neuropharmacology of new psychoactive substances (NPS: focus on the rewarding and reinforcing properties of cannabimimetics and amphetamine-like stimulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eMiliano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available New psychoactive substances (NPS are a heterogeneous and rapidly evolving class of molecules available on the global illicit drug market (e.g smart shops, internet, dark net as a substitute for controlled substances. The use of NPS, mainly consumed along with other drugs of abuse and/or alcohol, has resulted in a significantly growing number of mortality and emergency admissions for overdoses, as reported by several poison centers from all over the world. The fact that the number of NPS have more than doubled over the last 10 years, is a critical challenge to governments, the scientific community, and civil society (UNODC, World Drug Report, 2014; EMCDDA, European Drug Report 2014: Trends and developments. The chemical structure (phenethylamines, piperazine, cathinones, tryptamines, synthetic cannabinoids of NPS and their pharmacological and clinical effects (hallucinogenic, anesthetic, dissociative, depressant help classify them into different categories. In the recent past, 50% of newly identified NPS have been classified as synthetic cannabinoids followed by new phenethylamines (17%(WDR, 2014. Besides peripheral toxicological effects, many NPS seem to have addictive properties. Behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological evidence can help in detecting them. This manuscript will review existing literature about the addictive and rewarding properties of the most popular NPS classes: cannabimimetics (JWH, HU, CP series and amphetamine-like stimulants (amphetamine, methamphetamine, methcathinone and MDMA analogues. Moreover, the review will include recent data from our lab which links JWH-018, a CB1 and CB2 agonist more potent than Δ9-THC, to other cannabinoids with known abuse potential, and to other classes of abused drugs that increase dopamine signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc shell. Thus the neurochemical mechanisms that produce the rewarding properties of JWH-018, which most likely contributes to the greater incidence of

  2. Heterocyclic amphetamine derivatives and caffeine on sleep in man

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholson, A. N.; Stone, Barbara M.

    1980-01-01

    1 Effects of the heterocyclic amphetamine derivatives, pemoline (20 and 40 mg), prolintane hydrochloride (5 and 10 mg), methylphenidate hydrochloride (10 and 20 mg) and fencamfamine hydrochloride (10 and 20 mg), and of caffeine anhydrous (100, 200 and 300 mg) on sleep, were compared with placebo in six young adults (20-31 years) using electroencephalography for sleep measures and analogue scales for subjective assessments of well-being and sleep quality. The study was double-blind.

  3. Acute buspirone dosing enhances abuse-related subjective effects of oral methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Erika; Stoops, William W; Rush, Craig R

    There is not an approved pharmacotherapy for treating methamphetamine use disorder. This study sought to determine the effects of acute buspirone treatment on the subjective and cardiovascular effects of oral methamphetamine in order to provide an initial assessment of the utility, safety, and tolerability of buspirone for managing methamphetamine use disorder. We predicted that acute buspirone administration would reduce the subjective effects of methamphetamine. We also predicted that the combination of buspirone and methamphetamine would be safe and well tolerated. Ten subjects completed the protocol, which tested three methamphetamine doses (0, 15, and 30mg) in combination with two buspirone doses (0 and 30mg) across 6 experimental sessions. Subjective effects and physiological measures were collected at regular intervals prior to and after dose administration. Methamphetamine produced prototypical subjective and cardiovascular effects. Acute buspirone administration increased some of the abuse-related subjective effects of methamphetamine and also attenuated some cardiovascular effects. The combination of oral methamphetamine and buspirone was safe and well tolerated. Acute buspirone administration may increase the abuse liability of oral methamphetamine. Chronic buspirone dosing studies remain to be conducted, but given preclinical findings and the outcomes of this work, the utility of buspirone for treating methamphetamine use disorder appears limited. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Emotional traits predict individual differences in amphetamine-induced positive mood in healthy volunteers.

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    Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Goldenson, Nicholas I; Kapadia, Nahel; Kahler, Christopher W; de Wit, Harriet; Swift, Robert M; McGeary, John E; Sussman, Steve; Leventhal, Adam M

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on emotional correlates of individual differences in subjective responses to D-amphetamine has focused on relatively broad personality traits. Yet, emotional functioning is best characterized by several narrow subcomponents, each of which may contribute uniquely to amphetamine response. Here, we examine several specific subdomains of emotional functioning in relation to acute amphetamine response. At a baseline session, healthy stimulant-naive volunteers (N = 97) completed measures of several subdomains of baseline trait emotional functioning and then completed two counterbalanced experimental sessions during which they received a single oral dose of 20 mg D-amphetamine or placebo. Acute subjective drug response measures were completed at repeated intervals before and after drug administration. Data from subjective measures that were significantly modulated by amphetamine were reduced using principal component analysis (amphetamine or placebo) into three higher-order factors of "positive mood," "arousal," and "drug high." Amphetamine did not significantly alter any "negative" subjective states. Separate multiple regression analyses were conducted regressing these three drug factors on baseline trait emotional functioning scales. The combined set of trait emotional functioning indicators accounted for approximately 22 % of the variance in acute amphetamine-induced positive mood changes. Greater anticipatory pleasure and greater anxious distress each uniquely predicted greater amphetamine-induced positive mood. Trait emotional functioning did not significantly predict amphetamine-induced changes in arousal or drug high. Emotional traits appear to moderate drug-induced positive mood but not other dimensions of amphetamine effects. Different facets of emotional functioning may differentially modulate amphetamine's subjective effect profile.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lisdexamfetamine Compared with D-Amphetamine in Healthy Subjects

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    Patrick C. Dolder

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Lisdexamfetamine is a prodrug of D-amphetamine used for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Lisdexamfetamine is thought to have a prolonged pharmacokinetic profile compared with oral D-amphetamine, possibly associated with lower drug liking and a lower risk of oral misuse. However, differences in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lisdexamfetamine and D-amphetamine have not been directly compared.Methods: Equimolar doses of D-amphetamine (40 mg and lisdexamfetamine (100 mg, and placebo were administered in 24 healthy subjects in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Plasma concentrations of amphetamine, subjective effects, and vital signs were repeatedly assessed. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using compartmental modeling.Results: The increase in plasma concentrations of amphetamine had a 0.6 ± 0.6 h (mean ± SD longer lag time and reached peak levels 1.1 ± 1.5 h later after lisdexamfetamine administration compared with D-amphetamine administration, but no differences in maximal concentrations or total exposure (AUC were found between the two treatments. Consistent with the pharmacokinetics, the subjective and cardiovascular stimulant effects of lisdexamfetamine also occurred later compared with D-amphetamine. However, no differences in peak ratings of potentially abuse-related subjective drug effects (e.g., drug liking, drug high, stimulation, happy, well-being, and self-confidence were observed after lisdexamfetamine administration compared with D-amphetamine administration. Lisdexamfetamine and D-amphetamine also produced similar peak increases in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, pupil size, and adverse effects.Conclusion: The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lisdexamfetamine are similar to D-amphetamine administered 1h later. Lisdexamfetamine is likely associated with a similar risk of oral abuse as D-amphetamine

  6. Attention Deficits in Chronic Methamphetamine Users as a Potential Target for Enhancing Treatment Efficacy

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    Zahra Alam Mehrjerdi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (MA is a potent, addictive psychostimulant that has dramatic effects on the central nervous system (CNS. The onset of methamphetamine use has been linked to heightened attention, and chronic methamphetamine use has been associated with deficits in different aspects of attention that can significantly persist into abstinence. Attention deficits in chronic methamphetamine users may be associated with severity of methamphetamine use, craving, relapse, and as a result, poor treatment outcomes. This review summarizes evidence that the continuity of attention deficits, especially during abstinence, should be considered as a potential target during methamphetamine use treatment. Implementing attention rehabilitation techniques during treatment may enhance motivation for treatment in chronic methamphetamine users, and may facilitate treatment adherence, craving control and promote relapse prevention. This issue has important clinical implications for enhancing treatment efficacy and as a result, increasing treatment outcomes.

  7. Chronic wheel running-induced reduction of extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking in methamphetamine dependent rats is associated with reduced number of periaqueductal gray dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieraj, Jeffery C; Kim, Airee; Fannon, McKenzie J; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2016-01-01

    Exercise (physical activity) has been proposed as a treatment for drug addiction. In rodents, voluntary wheel running reduces cocaine and nicotine seeking during extinction, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking triggered by drug-cues. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of chronic wheel running during withdrawal and protracted abstinence on extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking in methamphetamine dependent rats, and to determine a potential neurobiological correlate underlying the effects. Rats were given extended access to methamphetamine (0.05 mg/kg, 6 h/day) for 22 sessions. Rats were withdrawn and were given access to running wheels (wheel runners) or no wheels (sedentary) for 3 weeks after which they experienced extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking. Extended access to methamphetamine self-administration produced escalation in methamphetamine intake. Methamphetamine experience reduced running output, and conversely, access to wheel running during withdrawal reduced responding during extinction and, context- and cue-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking. Immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue demonstrated that wheel running during withdrawal did not regulate markers of methamphetamine neurotoxicity (neurogenesis, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2) and cellular activation (c-Fos) in brain regions involved in relapse to drug seeking. However, reduced methamphetamine seeking was associated with running-induced reduction (and normalization) of the number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the periaqueductal gray (PAG). The present study provides evidence that dopamine neurons of the PAG region show adaptive biochemical changes during methamphetamine seeking in methamphetamine dependent rats and wheel running abolishes these effects. Given that the PAG dopamine neurons project onto the structures of the extended amygdala, the present findings also

  8. Chronic wheel running-induced reduction of extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking in methamphetamine dependent rats is associated with reduced number of periaqueductal gray dopamine neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieraj, Jeffery C.; Kim, Airee; Fannon, McKenzie J.; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise (physical activity) has been proposed as a treatment for drug addiction. In rodents, voluntary wheel running reduces cocaine and nicotine seeking during extinction, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking triggered by drug cues. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of chronic wheel running during withdrawal and protracted abstinence on extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking in methamphetamine dependent rats, and to determine a potential neurobiological correlate underlying the effects. Rats were given extended access to methamphetamine (0.05 mg/kg, 6h/day) for 22 sessions. Rats were withdrawn and were given access to running wheels (wheel runners) or no wheels (sedentary) for three weeks after which they experienced extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking. Extended access to methamphetamine self-administration produced escalation in methamphetamine intake. Methamphetamine experience reduced running output, and conversely, access to wheel running during withdrawal reduced responding during extinction and, context- and cue-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking. Immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue demonstrated that wheel running during withdrawal did not regulate markers of methamphetamine neurotoxicity (neurogenesis, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2) and cellular activation (c-Fos) in brain regions involved in relapse to drug seeking. However, reduced methamphetamine seeking was associated with running-induced reduction (and normalization) of the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactive neurons in the periaqueductal gray (PAG). The present study provides evidence that dopamine neurons of the PAG region show adaptive biochemical changes during methamphetamine seeking in methamphetamine dependent rats and wheel running abolishes these effects. Given that the PAG dopamine neurons project onto the structures of the extended amygdala, the present findings

  9. Amphetamine-Like Analogues in Diabetes: Speeding towards Ketogenesis

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    Natalia M. Branis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is common in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Amphetamine-like analogues comprise the most popular class of weight loss medications. We present a case of a 34-year-old African American female with a history of type 1 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity who developed diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA after starting Diethylpropion for the purpose of weight loss. Shortly after starting Diethylpropion, she developed nausea, vomiting, and periumbilical pain. Blood work revealed glucose of 718 mg/dL, pH 7.32 (7.35–7.45, bicarbonate 16 mmol/L (22–29 mmol/L, and anion gap 19 mmol/L (8–16 mmol/L. Urine analysis demonstrated large amount of ketones. She was hospitalized and successfully treated for DKA. Diethylpropion was discontinued. Amphetamine-like analogues administration leads to norepinephrine release from the lateral hypothalamus which results in the appetite suppression. Peripheral norepinephrine concentration rises as well. Norepinephrine stimulates adipocyte lipolysis and thereby increases nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA availability. It promotes β-oxidation of NEFA to ketone bodies while decreasing metabolic clearance rate of ketones. In the setting of acute insulin deficiency these effects are augmented. Females are more sensitive to norepinephrine effects compared to males. In conclusion, amphetamine-like analogues lead to a release of norepinephrine which can result in a clinically significant ketosis, especially in the setting of insulin deficiency.

  10. Amphetamine-Like Analogues in Diabetes: Speeding towards Ketogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branis, Natalia M; Wittlin, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is common in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Amphetamine-like analogues comprise the most popular class of weight loss medications. We present a case of a 34-year-old African American female with a history of type 1 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity who developed diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) after starting Diethylpropion for the purpose of weight loss. Shortly after starting Diethylpropion, she developed nausea, vomiting, and periumbilical pain. Blood work revealed glucose of 718 mg/dL, pH 7.32 (7.35-7.45), bicarbonate 16 mmol/L (22-29 mmol/L), and anion gap 19 mmol/L (8-16 mmol/L). Urine analysis demonstrated large amount of ketones. She was hospitalized and successfully treated for DKA. Diethylpropion was discontinued. Amphetamine-like analogues administration leads to norepinephrine release from the lateral hypothalamus which results in the appetite suppression. Peripheral norepinephrine concentration rises as well. Norepinephrine stimulates adipocyte lipolysis and thereby increases nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) availability. It promotes β-oxidation of NEFA to ketone bodies while decreasing metabolic clearance rate of ketones. In the setting of acute insulin deficiency these effects are augmented. Females are more sensitive to norepinephrine effects compared to males. In conclusion, amphetamine-like analogues lead to a release of norepinephrine which can result in a clinically significant ketosis, especially in the setting of insulin deficiency.

  11. Prosthodontics treatment considerations for methamphetamine-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantos, Meredith A; Manzotti, Anna; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Afshari, Fatemeh S; Marinis, Aristotelis; Syros, George; Rynn, Michelle Howard; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2015-01-01

    Overt dental disease is a distinguishing comorbidity associated with methamphetamine abuse, necessitating the need for special management to maximize treatment benefits. As this highly addictive stimulant increases in popularity, it has become imperative that clinicians are equipped to thoughtfully provide comprehensive care for these patients. This article reviews the impact of methamphetamine to systemic and oral health and proposes a comprehensive treatment plan and sequence for the methamphetamine-dependent patient. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended. Destructive oral and psychological changes must be identified and controlled. A thorough risk assessment, caries control, and preventative plan should be established before initiating prosthodontic treatment. Patient motivation, support, and a timely recall schedule are integral for dental longevity. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Amphetamine activates Rho GTPase signaling to mediate dopamine transporter internalization and acute behavioral effects of amphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David S.; Underhill, Suzanne M.; Stolz, Donna B.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Thiels, Edda; Romero, Guillermo; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute amphetamine (AMPH) exposure elevates extracellular dopamine through a variety of mechanisms that include inhibition of dopamine reuptake, depletion of vesicular stores, and facilitation of dopamine efflux across the plasma membrane. Recent work has shown that the DAT substrate AMPH, unlike cocaine and other nontransported blockers, can also stimulate endocytosis of the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT). Here, we show that when AMPH enters the cytoplasm it rapidly stimulates DAT internalization through a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent process. This effect, which can be observed in transfected cells, cultured dopamine neurons, and midbrain slices, is mediated by activation of the small GTPase RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA activity with C3 exotoxin or a dominant-negative RhoA blocks AMPH-induced DAT internalization. These actions depend on AMPH entry into the cell and are blocked by the DAT inhibitor cocaine. AMPH also stimulates cAMP accumulation and PKA-dependent inactivation of RhoA, thus providing a mechanism whereby PKA- and RhoA-dependent signaling pathways can interact to regulate the timing and robustness of AMPH’s effects on DAT internalization. Consistent with this model, the activation of D1/D5 receptors that couple to PKA in dopamine neurons antagonizes RhoA activation, DAT internalization, and hyperlocomotion observed in mice after AMPH treatment. These observations support the existence of an unanticipated intracellular target that mediates the effects of AMPH on RhoA and cAMP signaling and suggest new pathways to target to disrupt AMPH action. PMID:26553986

  13. Predictors of young adults' amphetamine use and disorders: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatbakhsh, Mohammad R; Najman, Jake M; Bor, William; Williams, Gail M

    2009-05-01

    Understanding the risk factors that predict amphetamine use and development of amphetamine abuse or dependence (disorder) may help guide preventive interventions. This study aimed to investigate the correlates and predictors of young adults' amphetamine use and use disorders. Prospective cohort, population-based study which started in Brisbane, South East Queensland (Australia) in 1981. The study participants were a cohort of 2042 young adults, followed up from birth to young adulthood. At the 21-year follow-up, amphetamine use was assessed via a self-report questionnaire, and amphetamine use disorder (AUD) was assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI-Auto). Potential predictors (15 risk factors) were assessed between baseline (antenatal visit) and the 21-year follow-up. These included participant's gender, mother's age and education, maternal marital status and quality of marital relationship, maternal tobacco and alcohol consumption, mother-child communication, child mental health and problem behaviours, child smoking and alcohol consumption and child school performance. Young adult amphetamine users were more likely to have concurrent symptoms of mental illness and problem behaviours and to use or abuse cigarettes, cannabis, or other illicit drugs. In multivariate analyses, young adults' amphetamine use and disorder were disproportionately more common among males and those who have prospectively reported aggression/delinquency or smoking at 14 years, or who have experienced childhood sexual abuse. Our findings suggest that problem behaviours, smoking and childhood sexual abuse are predictors of initiation to use of amphetamines and development of amphetamine abuse and dependence.

  14. Treatment utilization and barriers to treatment: Results of a survey of dependent methamphetamine users

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    Lee Nicole K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australia has one of the highest rates of methamphetamine use in the world; however, treatment access for methamphetamine is comparatively low. This descriptive study aimed to identify patterns of treatment utilization and perceived barriers to accessing treatment among dependent methamphetamine users in the hope that such information will enable services to more appropriately respond to this group. Methods One hundred and twenty-six methamphetamine users who had a current or past history of methamphetamine dependence were interviewed about their experiences of, and perceived barriers to, treatment. Results Treatment utilization among methamphetamine users was reportedly low. One of the main reasons cited for not accessing treatment was that methamphetamine users did not perceive their drug use to be a problem (despite apparent levels of dependence. Self-detoxification with the use of other licit and illicit drugs was high among this group. Participants identified a lack of confidence in the ability of treatment services to address methamphetamine dependence and the 'opiate-centric' nature of treatment services as significant blocks to treatment entry. Suggestions for improvement by participants included operating specialist services for methamphetamine users, placing an emphasis on responsiveness and routinely involving case management services for this group. Discussion and Conclusions To improve service delivery, treatment services should reorient their services to better address the needs of methamphetamine users by making small changes such as specific opening times for methamphetamine users or using a dedicated space for methamphetamine treatment. Alternative options such as online treatments and specialist methamphetamine clinics should be considered for methamphetamine users.

  15. Duration effects in contingency management treatment of methamphetamine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, John M; Chudzynski, Joy; Cameron, Jennifer M; Howell, Donelle N; McPherson, Sterling

    2013-09-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether different durations of contingency management (CM) in conjunction with psychosocial treatment produced different rates of abstinence among methamphetamine dependent individuals. Participants were randomized to one of the four 16-week treatment conditions: standard psychosocial treatment or psychosocial treatment plus one of the three durations of CM (one-month, two-month, or four-month). A total of 118 participants were randomized to the four treatment conditions. There were significant differences across treatment conditions for number of consecutive days of methamphetamine abstinence (ptreatment condition (pmethamphetamine abstinence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Suppression of Her2/Neu mammary tumor development in mda-7/IL-24 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You-Jun; Liu, Guodong; Xia, Lei; Xiao, Xiao; Liu, Jeff C; Menezes, Mitchell E; Das, Swadesh K; Emdad, Luni; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B; Archer, Michael C; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Ben-David, Yaacov

    2015-11-10

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24) encodes a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the growth of various tumor types including breast cancer. We previously demonstrated that recombinant adenovirus-mediated mda-7/IL-24 expression in the mammary glands of carcinogen-treated (methylnitrosourea, MNU) rats suppressed mammary tumor development. Since most MNU-induced tumors in rats contain activating mutations in Ha-ras, which arenot frequently detected in humans, we presently examined the effect of MDA-7/IL-24 on Her2/Neu-induced mammary tumors, in which the RAS pathway is induced. We generated tet-inducible MDA-7/IL-24 transgenic mice and crossed them with Her2/Neu transgenic mice. Triple compound transgenic mice treated with doxycycline exhibited a strong inhibition of tumor development, demonstrating tumor suppressor activity by MDA-7/IL-24 in immune-competent mice. MDA-7/IL-24 induction also inhibited growth of tumors generated following injection of Her2/Neu tumor cells isolated from triple compound transgenic mice that had not been treated with doxycycline, into the mammary fat pads of isogenic FVB mice. Despite initial growth suppression, tumors in triple compound transgenic mice lost mda-7/IL-24 expression and grew, albeit after longer latency, indicating that continuous presence of this cytokine within tumor microenvironment is crucial to sustain tumor inhibitory activity. Mechanistically, MDA-7/IL-24 exerted its tumor suppression effect on HER2+ breast cancer cells, at least in part, through PERP, a member of PMP-22 family with growth arrest and apoptosis-inducing capacity. Overall, our results establish mda-7/IL-24 as a suppressor of mammary tumor development and provide a rationale for using this cytokine in the prevention/treatment of human breast cancer.

  17. Chronic treatment of (+)-methamphetamine-induced locomotor effects in rats using one or a combination of two high affinity anti-methamphetamine monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambuchen, Michael D; Rüedi-Bettschen, Daniela; Gunnell, Melinda G; Hendrickson, Howard; Owens, S Michael

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesized that treatment of methamphetamine (METH) effects with a mixture of 2 high affinity anti-METH monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with differing molecular recognition for METH-like structures could increase efficacy compared to treatment with a single mAb. The antibodies studied were mAb7F9 (METH and amphetamine [AMP] KD = 7.7 and 270 nM) and mAb4G9 (16 nM and 110 nM, respectively) in a 50:50 mixture. Adult male Sprague Dawley Rats were treated with iv saline or a loading dose of mAb7F9-mAb4G9 (141 mg/kg of each mAb) followed by 2 weekly doses (70.5 mg/kg total) on days 7 and 14. METH challenge doses (0.56 mg/kg) were administered 4 hrs and 3 days after each mAb7F9-mAb4G9 treatment, and 7 days after the final treatment (day 21). Locomotor activity (0-4 hrs) and serum METH and AMP concentrations (at 5 hrs) were measured after each METH challenge. MAb7F9-mAb4G9 treatment significantly reduced the duration of locomotor activity after 6 of the 7 METH doses (P treatment had negligible effects on the duration of METH-induced locomotor activity. These data were then compared to previous monotherapy data. While mAb7F9-mAb4G9 therapy inhibited the effects of multiple METH challenge doses, the inhibition was not as profound or as long lasting as the effects of mAb7F9 treatment alone. These data demonstrate the importance of both mAb affinity and specificity in the production of effective, long-lasting anti-METH mAb therapies.

  18. Hair analysis for drugs of abuse. XIII. Effect of structural factors on incorporation of drugs into hair: the incorporation rates of amphetamine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Y; Kikura, R

    1996-01-01

    In order to clarify the incorporation mechanism of drugs from blood into hair, seven effects of structural factors on the incorporation rate (ICR) were studied using 32 amphetamine analogs: (1) effect of a straight chained N-alkyl group; (2) effect of benzene and furan ring at N-position; (3) effect of aliphatic and aromatic hydroxy groups; (4) effect of triple bond group at N-position; (5) effect of N-acyl group and ketone group; (6) effect of methylenedioxy and methoxy groups on benzene ring; and (7) comparison between phenyltertiarybutylamines and phenylisopropylamines. After shaving the back hair and i.p. administration of drugs to Dark-Agouti rats (5 mg/kg, 10 days, n = 3), the areas under the concentration versus time curve (AUCs) of drugs in the plasma and the concentrations in hair newly grown for 4 weeks were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The ICRs represented by the ratios of hair concentrations to AUCs were compared with those of amphetamine (AP) and methamphetamine (MA). The ICRs of N-alkyl AP increased depending on the length of carbon branches from proton to propyl (C3 > C2 > C1 > H) at N-position. The compounds containing a benzene or furan ring at the N-position (benzphetamine, clobenzorex, norbenzphetamine, prenylamine, furfenorex, and norfurfenorex) had much higher ICRs than those of AP or MA, suggesting that a benzene or furan ring increases their ICRs. The ICRs of deprenyl, nordeprenyl, and fenproporex were significantly low, implying that triple bonds such as of a propargyl or cyano group serve as a negative factor for the ICRs. An ephedrine group (ephedrine, methylephedrine, phenylpropanolamine) showed slightly lower ICRs than the corresponding amphetamine group. However, a hydroxy group on benzene ring apparently decreased the ICRs. Methoxy and methylenedioxy groups on benzene ring distinctly increased their ICRs. The lack of basicity such as N-formyl MA, N-acetyl AP, and N-acetyl MA dramatically lowered their ICRs to

  19. Prenatal methamphetamine differentially alters myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury in male and female adult hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorabaugh, Boyd R; Seeley, Sarah L; Bui, Albert D; Sprague, Lisanne; D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2016-02-15

    Methamphetamine is one of the most common illicit drugs abused during pregnancy. The neurological effects of prenatal methamphetamine are well known. However, few studies have investigated the potential effects of prenatal methamphetamine on adult cardiovascular function. Previous work demonstrated that prenatal cocaine exposure increases sensitivity of the adult heart to ischemic injury. Methamphetamine and cocaine have different mechanisms of action, but both drugs exert their effects by increasing dopaminergic and adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus the goal of this study was to determine whether prenatal methamphetamine also worsens ischemic injury in the adult heart. Pregnant rats were injected with methamphetamine (5 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or saline throughout pregnancy. When pups reached 8 wk of age, their hearts were subjected to ischemia and reperfusion by means of a Langendorff isolated heart system. Prenatal methamphetamine had no significant effect on infarct size, preischemic contractile function, or postischemic recovery of contractile function in male hearts. However, methamphetamine-treated female hearts exhibited significantly larger infarcts and significantly elevated end-diastolic pressure during recovery from ischemia. Methamphetamine significantly reduced protein kinase Cε expression and Akt phosphorylation in female hearts but had no effect on these cardioprotective proteins in male hearts. These data indicate that prenatal methamphetamine differentially affects male and female sensitivity to myocardial ischemic injury and alters cardioprotective signaling proteins in the adult heart. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Brain site- and transmitter-dependent actions of methamphetamine, morphine and antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tomohisa; Iwase, Yoshiyuki; Murata, Asami; Iwata, Noriyuki; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    While several methamphetamine- and morphine-induced psychotic states are ordinarily treated by antipsychotics, the therapeutic mechanisms of antipsychotic drugs have yet been elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate the mechanisms how antipsychotic drugs suppress the behavioral changes induced by psychoactive drugs in mice. Low to medium doses of methamphetamine produced hyperlocomotion, whereas high dose of methamphetamine induced hypolocomotion. Hyperlocomotion induced by methamphetamine was potently suppressed by clozapine and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists, but not by the intra-accumbens injection of haloperidol. On the other hand, microinjection of haloperidol into the ventrolateral striatum increased locomotor activity with high dose of methamphetamine. In contrast, morphine-induced hyperlocomotion was suppressed by systemic as well as intra-accumbens injection of haloperidol, whereas relatively resistant to clozapine, compared to its effects in the case of methamphetamine. It has been widely believed that methamphetamine-induced psychosis is an animal model of schizophrenia, which is mediated by activation of accumbal dopamine receptors. Our findings suggest that methamphetamine differentially regulate monoaminergic systems (e.g., dopaminergic vs. 5-HTnergic), and accumbal dopamine receptors are not involved in methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in mice. Thus, our findings may lead to a better understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms that underlie the effects of antipsychotic drugs and behavioral effects of methamphetamine and morphine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The advent of a new pseudoephedrine product to combat methamphetamine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeczko, Albert W; Leech, Ronald; Stark, Jeffrey G

    2013-09-01

    The personal and societal effects of methamphetamine abuse are well documented. The ease of accessibility to methamphetamine and the quality of the "high" it produces makes the drug highly desired by its abusers. Over time, many methamphetamine users will also become methamphetamine cooks, where pseudoephedrine in over-the-counter cold products is converted to methamphetamine through a simple, albeit extremely dangerous, process. New laws limiting access to these products have had limited success. No existing commercial pseudoephedrine products offer significant impediments to slow or limit the extraction and conversion of pseudoephedrine in clandestine methamphetamine laboratories. A new pseudoephedrine 30 mg tablet product using Impede technology (Nexafed®) to deter methamphetamine production has recently been introduced into the marketplace. Using methods designed to mimic clandestine laboratory processes, the ability of this product to disrupt extraction and conversion of pseudoephedrine to methamphetamine yet provide therapeutic effectiveness was evaluated. Impede™ technology tablets limited the extraction and/or conversion of pseudoephedrine to methamphetamine when compared to a commercially marketed pseudoephedrine product (Sudafed®). Nexafed® tablets were also shown to be bioequivalent to the same control product, thus ensuring therapeutic equivalence. With the advent of new pseudoephedrine products in the marketplace with features to limit the extraction and conversion of pseudoephedrine to methamphetamine, new tools are now available to minimize the clandestine manufacture of the drug and potentially limit its social impact.

  2. Acute Modafinil Effects on Attention and Inhibitory Control in Methamphetamine-Dependent Humans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Andy C.; Sevak, Rajkumar J.; Monterosso, John R.; Hellemann, Gerhard; Sugar, Catherine A.; London, Edythe D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Individuals who are methamphetamine dependent exhibit higher rates of cognitive dysfunction than healthy people who do not use methamphetamine, and this dysfunction may have a negative effect on the success of behavioral treatments for the disorder. Therefore, a medication that improves cognition, such as modafinil (Provigil), may serve as a useful adjunct to behavioral treatments for methamphetamine dependence. Although cognitive-enhancing effects of modafinil have been reported in several populations, little is known about the effects of modafinil in methamphetamine-dependent individuals. We thus sought to evaluate the effects of modafinil on the cognitive performance of methamphetamine-dependent and healthy individuals. Method: Seventeen healthy subjects and 24 methamphetamine-dependent subjects participated in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Effects of modafinil (200 mg, single oral dose) were assessed on participants’ performance on tests of inhibitory control, working memory, and processing speed/attention. Results: Across subjects, modafinil improved performance on a test of sustained attention, with no significant improvement on any other cognitive tests. However, within the methamphetamine-dependent group only, participants with a high baseline frequency of methamphetamine use demonstrated a greater effect of modafinil on tests of inhibitory control and processing speed than those participants with low baseline use of methamphetamine. Conclusions: Although modafinil produced limited effects across all participants, methamphetamine-dependent participants with a high baseline use of methamphetamine demonstrated significant cognitive improvement on modafinil relative to those with low baseline methamphetamine use. These results add to the findings from a clinical trial that suggested that modafinil may be particularly useful in methamphetamine-dependent subjects who use the drug frequently. PMID:22051208

  3. Methamphetamine-related burns in the cornbelt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Bridget A; Lewis, Robert W; Latenser, Barbara A; Chung, Joseph Y; Willoughby, Clark; Kealey, G Patrick; Wibbenmeyer, Lucy A

    2008-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a highly addictive drug that is easily manufactured from everyday household products and chemicals found at local farm stores. The proliferation of small MA labs has led to a dramatic increase in patients sustaining thermal injury while making and/or using MA. We hypothesized that these patients have larger injuries with longer hospital stays, and larger, nonreimbursed hospital bills compared with burn patients not manufacturing or using MA. In a retrospective case-control study, all burn patients >or=16 years of age admitted to our burn center from January 2002 to December 2005 were stratified into two groups based on urine MA status. Of the 660 burn patients >or=16 years of age admitted during this 4 year period, urine drug screens were obtained at admission on 410 patients (62%); 10% of urine drug screens were MA (+). MA (+) patients have larger burns compared with MA (-) patients (9.3 vs 8.6% body surface area burns), have higher rates of inhalation injuries (20.4 vs 9.3%, P = .015), and more nonthermal trauma (13.0 vs 3.1%, P = .001). When compared with MA (-) patients, MA (+) patients require longer hospital stays (median 9.5 vs 7.0 days, P = .036), accrue greater hospital bills per day (dollars 4292 vs dollars 2797, P = .01), and lack medical insurance (66.7 vs 17.7%, P manufacture mandates that burn centers monitor patients for MA use and develop and institute protocols to ensure proper care of this increasingly costly population.

  4. Methamphetamine use and sexual risk behaviour in Cape Town ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4Department of Psychiatry & Mental Health, University of Cape Town, South Africa. Abstract ... review research conducted in Cape Town on the link between methamphetamine use and sexual risk behaviour. Method: A ... in school, out of school youth, adults in the community, men who have sex with men and sex workers.

  5. Chronic Methamphetamine Abuse and Corticostriatal Deficits Revealed by Neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Edythe D.; Kohno, Milky; Morales, Angelica; Ballard, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite aggressive efforts to contain it, methamphetamine use disorder continues to be major public health problem; and with generic behavioral therapies still the mainstay of treatment for methamphetamine abuse, rates of attrition and relapse remain high. This review summarizes the findings of structural, molecular, and functional neuroimaging studies of methamphetamine abusers, focusing on cortical and striatal abnormalities and their potential contributions to cognitive and behavioral phenotypes that can serve to promote compulsive drug use. These studies indicate that individuals with a history of chronic methamphetamine abuse often display several signs of corticostriatal dysfunction, including abnormal gray- and white-matter integrity, monoamine neurotransmitter system deficiencies, neuroinflammation, poor neuronal integrity, and aberrant patterns of brain connectivity and function, both when engaged in cognitive tasks and at rest. More importantly, many of these neural abnormalities were found to be linked with certain addiction-related phenotypes that may influence treatment response (e.g., poor self-control, cognitive inflexibility, maladaptive decision-making), raising the possibility that they may represent novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25451127

  6. Methamphetamine use and sexual risk behaviour in Cape Town ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Community studies and studies of admissions to drug treatment centers indicate a dramatic increase in the prevalence of methamphetamine use in Cape Town since 2003. There has also been a substantial increase over this time period in the prevalence of HIV infection among women attending public antenatal ...

  7. An Emerging Problem: Methamphetamine Abuse among Treatment Seeking Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Rachel; Ang, Alfonso; McCann, Michael J.; Rawson, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined correlates of methamphetamine (MA) and marijuana (MJ) use and treatment response among treatment-involved youth (N = 4,430) in Los Angeles County, California treated between 2000 and 2005. Of the sample, 912 (21%) were primary MA and 3,518 (79%) were primary MJ users. Correlates of increased MA use included being female, White,…

  8. The mental health experiences and needs of methamphetamine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for the increased rate of psychiatric disturbance in this population.[5] ... About half of the participants met screening criteria for depression and traumatic stress, and there were some indications of ... health and drug treatment services targeting methamphetamine users should include a concerted focus on suicide prevention.

  9. The meth brain: methamphetamines alter brain functions via NMDA receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Proft, Juliane; Weiss, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-3 ISSN 0231-5882 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ion channel * methamphetamine * piriform cortex * NMDA receptor * AMPA receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.892, year: 2015

  10. The mental health experiences and needs of methamphetamine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eligible participants (N=360) completed a computer-assisted assessment and clinical interview, where they provided data on mental health symptoms and treatmentseeking behaviour. ... Mental health and drug treatment services targeting methamphetamine users should include a concerted focus on suicide prevention.

  11. Study on the Mission, Roles, and Structure of the Missile Defense Agency (MDA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Welch, Larry D; Briggs, David L; Bleach, R. D; Canavan, G. H; Clark-Sestak, S. L; Constantine, R. W; Cook, C. W; Fries, M. S; Frost, D. E; Graham, D. R; Keane, D. J; Kramer, S. D; Major, P. L; Primmerman, C. A; Ruddy, J. M; Schneiter, G. R; Seng, J. M; Stein, R. M; Weiner, S. D; Williams, J. D

    2008-01-01

    ...) was tasked by the Department of Defense to carry out an independent study to examine and make recommendations with respect to the long-term missions, roles, and structure of the Missile Defense Agency (MDA...

  12. Effects of Amphetamine and β-Endorphin Fragments on Maze Performance in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, S. de; Bohus, B.

    1990-01-01

    Fragments of β-endorphin and amphetamine cause similar effects in some tests of maze behavior in rats. The present study served to compare the influence of amphetamine and two β-endorphin fragments [β-endorphin (βE)-(2-9) and βE-(2-16)] on maze behavior in more detail. In Experiment I no significant

  13. The relationship of quality and price of the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamine with health care outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunt, Tibor M.; van Laar, Margriet; Niesink, Raymond J. M.; van den Brink, Wim

    2010-01-01

    A major component of the illicit drug market can be subcategorized as the psychostimulant drug market, with cocaine and amphetamine as popular constituents. In The Netherlands, an increase in both health care outcomes addiction treatment and hospital admissions was noted for both amphetamine and

  14. Ab Initio Calculations and Raman and SERS Spectral Analyses of Amphetamine Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Nørbygaard, Thomas; White, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    . The spectra of amphetamine and amphetamine-H+ sampleswere obtained and assigned according to a comparison of the experimental spectra and the ab initio MO calculations, performed using the Gaussian 03W program (Gaussian, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA). The analyses were based on complete geometry minimization...

  15. Amphetamine Elicits Opposing Actions on Readily Releasable and Reserve Pools for Dopamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Dan P.; Juliano, Steven A.; Garris, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Amphetamine, a highly addictive drug with therapeutic efficacy, exerts paradoxical effects on the fundamental communication modes employed by dopamine neurons in modulating behavior. While amphetamine elevates tonic dopamine signaling by depleting vesicular stores and driving non-exocytotic release through reverse transport, this psychostimulant also activates phasic dopamine signaling by up-regulating vesicular dopamine release. We hypothesized that these seemingly incongruent effects arise from amphetamine depleting the reserve pool and enhancing the readily releasable pool. This novel hypothesis was tested using in vivo voltammetry and stimulus trains of varying duration to access different vesicular stores. We show that amphetamine actions are stimulus dependent in the dorsal striatum. Specifically, amphetamine up-regulated vesicular dopamine release elicited by a short-duration train, which interrogates the readily releasable pool, but depleted release elicited by a long-duration train, which interrogates the reserve pool. These opposing actions of vesicular dopamine release were associated with concurrent increases in tonic and phasic dopamine responses. A link between vesicular depletion and tonic signaling was supported by results obtained for amphetamine in the ventral striatum and cocaine in both striatal sub-regions, which demonstrated augmented vesicular release and phasic signals only. We submit that amphetamine differentially targeting dopamine stores reconciles the paradoxical activation of tonic and phasic dopamine signaling. Overall, these results further highlight the unique and region-distinct cellular mechanisms of amphetamine and may have important implications for its addictive and therapeutic properties. PMID:23671560

  16. HIV Risk Behavior among Amphetamine Injectors at U.S. Syringe Exchange Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braine, Naomi; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Goldblatt, Cullen; Zadoretzky, Cathy; Turner, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare HIV risk behaviors of amphetamine and non-amphetamine injectors at syringe exchange programs (SEP) in the United States and to identify factors associated with injection risk. This analysis is based on data from a random cross-section of participants at 13 SEPs in different parts of the country. All interviews…

  17. Altered methamphetamine place conditioning in mice vaccinated with a succinyl-methamphetamine-tetanus-toxoid vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile, Colin N; Kosten, Therese A; Shen, Xiaoyun Y; O'Malley, Patrick W; Winoske, Kevin J; Kinsey, Berma M; Wu, Yan; Huang, Zhen; Lykissa, Ernest D; Naidu, Naga; Cox, Joseph A; Arora, Reetakshi; Kosten, Thomas R; Orson, Frank M

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that an anti-methamphetamine (MA) vaccine attenuated drug-conditioned effects in mice, but it used a carrier protein and adjuvant not available for clinical use. Here we produced a vaccine with the same hapten (succinyl-methamphetamine, SMA) but attached to tetanus toxoid (SMA-TT) and adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide, components approved for use in humans. We then assessed the vaccine's ability to generate anti-MA antibodies, alter acquisition and reinstatement of MA place conditioning, and prevent MA brain penetration. Mice were administered SMA-TT at weeks 0 and 3 and non-vaccinated mice received saline. Anti-MA antibody concentrations were determined at 8 and 12 weeks. Place conditioning began during week 9 in which vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice were divided into groups and conditioned with .5, or 2.0 mg/kg MA. Following acquisition training, mice were extinguished and then a reinstatement test was performed in which mice were administered their original training dose of MA. Separate groups of non-vaccinated and vaccinated mice were administered .5 and 2.0 mg/kg MA and brain MA levels determined. Anti-MA antibody levels were elevated at week 8 and remained so through week 12. The SMA-TT vaccine attenuated acquisition and reinstatement of MA place conditioning. Significantly greater proportions of vaccinated mice during acquisition and reinstatement tests showed conditioned place aversion. Moreover, MA brain levels were decreased in vaccinated mice following administration of both doses of MA. Results support further development of anti-MA vaccines using components approved for use in humans. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  18. 49 CFR 40.137 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? 40.137 Section 40.137 Transportation Office of the... results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? (a) As the MRO, you must verify a confirmed positive test result for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, and/or PCP unless the employee presents a...

  19. MDA Y EL PAPEL DE LOS MODELOS EN EL PROCESO DE DESARROLLO DE SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Bernardo Quintero

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El papel de los modelos es fundamental en el desarrollo de software para potenciar el reúso de los diferentes elementos del software y facilitar la labor de los diferentes roles que participan del proceso. La Arquitectura Dirigida por Modelos (MDA propone un proceso de desarrollo basado en la realización y transformación de modelos. Los principios en los que se fundamenta MDA son la abstracción, la automatización y la estandarización. El proceso central de MDA es la transformación de modelos que parten del espacio del problema (CIM hasta modelos específicos de la plataforma (PSM, pasando por modelos que describen una solución independientemente de la computación (PIM. Para explicar el papel de los modelos en el proceso de desarrollo de software este artículo explora los principales conceptos presentados en la propuesta de MDA.The role of models is critical in software development to enable the reuse of different software elements and to aid the work of several roles involved in the process. Model Driven Architecture (MDA suggests a development process based on models realization and transformation. The principles in which MDA is based are abstraction, automation, and standardization. The central process of MDA is the transformation of models from the problem space (CIM to platform specific models (PSM, passing across models describing a platform independent solution (PIM. In order to explain the model role in the software process development, this paper explores the main concept presented in the MDA proposal.

  20. Repeated administration of D-amphetamine induces loss of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding to striatal dopamine transporters in rat brain: a validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booij, Jan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: j.booij@amc.uva.nl; Bruin, Kora de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gunning, W. Boudewijn [Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Centre Kempenhaeghe, 5590 AB Heeze (Netherlands)

    2006-04-15

    In recent years, several PET and SPECT studies have shown loss of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) binding in amphetamine (AMPH) users. However, the use of DAT SPECT tracers to detect AMPH-induced changes in DAT binding has not been validated. We therefore examined if repeated administration of D-AMPH or methamphetamine (METH) may induce loss of binding to striatal DATs in rats by using an experimental biodistribution study design and a SPECT tracer for the DAT ([{sup 123}I]FP-CIT). Methods: Groups of male rats (n=10 per group) were treated with D-AMPH (10 mg/kg body weight), METH (10 mg/kg body weight), or saline, twice a day for 5 consecutive days. Five days later, [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT was injected intravenously, and 2 h later, the rats were sacrificed and radioactivity was assayed. Results: In D-AMPH but not METH-treated rats, striatal [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT uptake was significantly lower (approximately 17%) than in the control group. Conclusion: These data show that [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT can be used to detect AMPH-induced changes in DAT binding and may validate the use of DAT radiotracers to study AMPH-induced changes in striatal DAT binding in vivo.

  1. The Consumption of New Psychoactive Substances and Methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Elena Gomes; Hannemann, Tessa-Virginia; Atzendorf, Josefine; Kraus, Ludwig; Piontek, Daniela

    2018-01-26

    The abuse of new psychoactive substances (NPS) and methamphetamine has severe adverse effects. Here we provide the first report of regional patterns in NPS and methamphetamine consumption in Germany, on the basis of epidemiologic data from six federal states (Bavaria, Hamburg, Hesse, North Rhine-Westphalia, Saxony, and Thuringia). Data were derived from the 2015 Epidemiological Survey of Substance Abuse (Epidemiologischer Suchtsurvey) and supplemented with additional cases from the federal states that were studied. The numbers of persons included in the representative samples of persons aged 18 to 64 in each state were 1916 (Bavaria), 1125 (Hamburg), 1151 (Hesse), 2008 (North Rhine-Westphalia), 1897 (Saxony), and 1543 (Thuringia). Potential risk factors for the lifetime prevalence of consumption were studied by logistic regression. The lifetime prevalence of methamphetamine consumption in the individual states ranged from 0.3% (North Rhine-Westphalia) to 2.0% (Saxony). Thuringia and Saxony displayed values that were significantly higher than average. For NPS, the figures ranged from 2.2% (Bavaria) to 3.9% (Hamburg), but multivariate analysis revealed no statistically significant differences between the states. Higher age and higher educational level were associated with lower consumption of NPS and methamphetamine, while smoking and cannabis use were each associated with higher consumption. NPS consumption is equally widespread in all of the federal states studied. Methamphetamine is rarely consumed; its consumption appears to be higher in Saxony and Thuringia. The risk factor analysis reported here should be interpreted cautiously in view of the low case numbers with respect to consumption.

  2. Dextro-amphetamine increases phosphoinositol cycle activity in volunteers: an MRS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstone, Peter H; O'Donnell, Tina; Ulrich, Michele; Asghar, Sheila; Hanstock, Christopher C

    2002-12-01

    To help determine the effects of dextro-amphetamine on the phosphoinositol cycle (PI-cycle) in humans, (1)H and (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was utilized in 17 healthy volunteers. This was an open-label study carried out before and after administration of 20 mg oral dextro-amphetamine. Subjects also rated the subjective effects of dextro-amphetamine administration using visual analog scales (VAS). Following dextro-amphetamine administration there was a significant increase in the concentrations of both myo-inositol and phosphomonoesters. These findings are in keeping with suggestions that dextro-amphetamine administration increases the activity of the phosphoinositol cycle, probably via an indirect release of dopamine and noradrenaline. These results are the first time that this has been confirmed in humans. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Amphetamine-like stimulant cessation in an abusing patient treated with bupropion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, S; Poirier, Y; Micallef, J; Blin, O

    2004-01-01

    Bupropion sustained release is considered to be a weak inhibitor of dopamine and serotonin reuptake. We report the case of an amphetamine-abusing patient who self-administered bupropion. Since 30 years, a 52-year-old women used amphetamine derivates. She explained her need for amphetamine use in order to perform daily activities. Recently, she decided to experiment with bupropion. She abruptly stopped taking clobenzorex and simultaneously started taking bupropion (150 mg/day). The seventh day she reported a concomitant intake of clobenzorex; this induced adverse effects. Whilst taking bupropion, she described experiencing an euthymic state without any compulsion to take amphetamine drugs and was able to perform daily activities. After stopping it, no symptoms of withdrawal were reported by the patient. This observation supports an another report suggesting that bupropion may be of help in weaning from amphetamine users and should be confirmed by clinical trials.

  4. Eustress and Malondialdehyde (MDA: Role of Panax Ginseng: Randomized, placebo controlled prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hayder Al-kuraishy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of present study was evaluation the effect of Panax Ginseng on malondialdehyde (MDA serum levels during eustress on normal healthy volunteers. Method: 65 healthy volunteers were recruited from medical students at college of medicine with age range (22.61±3.63 years, the volunteers were divided into two groups, Group A: 35 subjects treated by Panax Ginseng 500mg/day regarded as treated group. Group B: 30 subjects treated by placebo 500mg/day regarded as control group. Baseline data was obtained and then after one month of study for following induction of psychological stress through daily psychomotor performance task and visual working memory accuracy testing while; stress-induced oxidative stress was assessed by malondialdehyde (MDA serum levels. Results: placebo showed significant increases in MDA serum levels p=0.0004 which related with significant increases in perceived stress scale from p<0.0001, while; Panax Ginseng led to significant reduction in MDA serum levels from p<0.01 that related with significant increment in perceived stress scale p=0.02. Conclusion: An MDA serum level is positively correlated with eustress and this association is modulated by   Panax Ginseng therapy that produced significant reduction in MDA and rising of eustress level.

  5. Acute Demyelination in a Person with Amphetamine Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Weis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 31-year-old woman, admitted to the hospital for chest pain, dying a few days later from septic multiorgan failure, and showing at autopsy foci of acute demyelination in the occipital lobe. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of amphetamine in the demyelinated area, which might be considered as the pathogenic agent, since other causes for demyelination could be excluded. This case represents the first report showing a demyelinating process due to a street drug.

  6. Nicotine Modifies Corticostriatal Plasticity and Amphetamine Rewarding Behaviors in Mice123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Granville P.; Heimbigner, Lauren; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Bamford, Nigel S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Corticostriatal signaling participates in sensitized responses to drugs of abuse, where short-term increases in dopamine availability provoke persistent, yet reversible, changes in glutamate release. Prior studies in mice show that amphetamine withdrawal promotes a chronic presynaptic depression in glutamate release, whereas an amphetamine challenge reverses this depression by potentiating corticostriatal activity in direct pathway medium spiny neurons. This synaptic plasticity promotes corticostriatal activity and locomotor sensitization through upstream changes in the activity of tonically active cholinergic interneurons (ChIs). We used a model of operant drug-taking behaviors, in which mice self-administered amphetamine through an in-dwelling catheter. Mice acquired amphetamine self-administration under fixed and increasing schedules of reinforcement. Following a period of abstinence, we determined whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modified drug-seeking behavior and associated alterations in ChI firing and corticostriatal activity. Mice responding to conditioned reinforcement showed reduced ChI and corticostriatal activity ex vivo, which paradoxically increased following an amphetamine challenge. Nicotine, in a concentration that increases Ca2+ influx and desensitizes α4β2*-type nicotinic receptors, reduced amphetamine-seeking behaviors following abstinence and amphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization. Nicotine blocked the depression of ChI firing and corticostriatal activity and the potentiating response to an amphetamine challenge. Together, these results demonstrate that nicotine reduces reward-associated behaviors following repeated amphetamine and modifies the changes in ChIs firing and corticostriatal activity. By returning glutamatergic activity in amphetamine self-administering mice to a more stable and normalized state, nicotine limits the depression of striatal activity in withdrawal and the increase in activity following

  7. Discordant reporting of nonmedical amphetamine use among Adderall-using high school seniors in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamar, Joseph J; Le, Austin

    2017-12-01

    Amphetamine is the most prevalent prescription stimulant in the United States, both medically and nonmedically. Reliable data on nonmedical use is needed to continue to inform prevention. To determine whether adolescents accurately self-report nonmedical amphetamine use, we compared self-reports of nonmedical amphetamine use and nonmedical Adderall use in a national sample. We examined self-reported nonmedical Adderall and amphetamine use in a nationally representative sample of 24,740 high school seniors in the Monitoring the Future study (2010-2015). We examined prevalence and correlates of discordant responses among past-year Adderall users, defined as reporting past-year nonmedical Adderall use, but not reporting past-year nonmedical amphetamine use. While 6.9% reported nonmedical Adderall use and 7.9% reported nonmedical amphetamine use, over a quarter (28.7%) of Adderall users reported no amphetamine use. Those at highest risk for Adderall use tended to be at lower odds of providing a discordant response. Older students (aged ≥18), black students, and those with parents of lower educational attainment were more likely to report no amphetamine use, despite reporting Adderall use. Lifetime use of various drugs was associated with decreased odds of providing a discordant response; however, only nonmedical opioid use was associated with significant decreased odds in multivariable models. Disapproval towards amphetamine use increased odds of providing a discordant response, while higher exposure to users decreased odds of providing a discordant response. Prevalence of nonmedical amphetamine use may be underreported on some surveys, particularly among specific subpopulations. Future surveys must ensure accurate and consistent responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Delayed emergence of methamphetamine’s enhanced cardiovascular effects in nonhuman primates during protracted methamphetamine abstinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, DB; Schindler, CW; Chefer, S; Belcher, AM; Ahmet, I; Scheidweiler, KB; Huestis, MA; Stein, EA

    2015-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine abuse is linked with brain abnormalities, but its peripheral effects constitute an integral aspect of long-term methamphetamine use. Methods Eight male rhesus monkeys with long histories of intravenous methamphetamine self-administration were evaluated 1 day, and 1, 4, 12, 26, and 52 weeks after their last methamphetamine self-administration session. On test days, isoflurane-anesthetized animals received a 0.35 mg/kg IV methamphetamine challenge. A control group consisted of 10 age and gender matched drug naïve monkeys. Cardiovascular responses to methamphetamine were followed for 2.5 h. Echocardiograms were acquired at 3 and 12 months of abstinence and in the control animals. Results No pre-methamphetamine baseline differences existed among 7 physiological measures across all conditions and controls. As expected, methamphetamine increased heart rate and blood pressure in controls. However, immediately following the self-administration period, the blood pressure response to methamphetamine challenge was reduced when compared to control monkeys. The peak and 150-min average heart rate increases, as well as peak blood pressure increases following methamphetamine were significantly elevated between weeks 12 to 26 of abstinence. These data indicate the development of tolerance followed by sensitization to methamphetamine cardiovascular effects. Echocardiography demonstrated decreased left ventricular ejection fraction and cardiac output at 3 months of abstinence. Importantly, both cardiovascular sensitization and cardiotoxicity appeared to be reversible as they returned toward control group levels after 1 year of abstinence. Conclusions Enhanced cardiovascular effects may occur after prolonged abstinence in addicts relapsing to methamphetamine and may underlie clinically reported acute cardiotoxic events. PMID:26775284

  9. Structural factors associated with methamphetamine smoking among female sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Erin E; Gaines, Tommi L; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Brouwer, Kimberly C

    2017-12-07

    Smoking methamphetamine is associated with increased risk of HIV among female sex workers (FSW). The structural context of substance use is an important shaper of individual behaviour; however, structural determinants of methamphetamine use among FSWs are largely unknown. We identified individual, structural and neighbourhood factors associated with smoking methamphetamine among FSWs in the border city of Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. A prospective cohort of 301 FSWs sampled from indoor and outdoor sex work venues throughout Tijuana participated in quantitative surveys on behaviours and mapping of home and work neighbourhoods across three visits. Multinomial logistic regression using generalised estimating equations identified individual, structural and neighbourhood variables associated with smoking methamphetamine. Methamphetamine use, particularly smoking, was highly prevalent among FSWs. Over half (61%) of FSWs had ever used methamphetamine in their lifetime and at baseline, 38% currently smoked methamphetamine. Smoking methamphetamine daily was associated with living in the red light district [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.23-6.02] and with perceived homelessness, but only among women in a good financial situation (AOR = 4.08, 95% CI = 1.58-10.50). Smoking methamphetamine less than daily was associated with older age (AOR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.02-1.10). Our findings point to the important dynamic between the residential environment and more severe methamphetamine use. FSWs may prioritise the purchase of methamphetamine over stable housing if they have the financial means. Given the high prevalence of smoking methamphetamine among FSWs in Tijuana, drug treatment options, especially for women living in the red light district, are needed. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  10. Metabolic changes associated with methionine stress sensitivity in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, Stacey L; Fahrmann, Johannes; Datta, Rupsa; Stringari, Chiara; Grapov, Dmitry; Zeller, Michael; Chen, Yumay; Wang, Ping; Baldi, Pierre; Gratton, Enrico; Fiehn, Oliver; Kaiser, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cancer cells have a unique metabolic requirement for methionine that is not observed in normal, non-tumorigenic cells. This phenotype is described as "methionine dependence" or "methionine stress sensitivity" in which cancer cells are unable to proliferate when methionine has been replaced with its metabolic precursor, homocysteine, in cell culture growth media. We focus on the metabolic response to methionine stress in the triple negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 and its methionine insensitive derivative cell line MDA-MB-468res-R8. Using a variety of techniques including fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and extracellular flux assays, we identified a metabolic down-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation in both MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-468res-R8 cell types when cultured in homocysteine media. Untargeted metabolomics was performed by way of gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry on both cell types cultured in homocysteine media over a period of 2 to 24 h. We determined unique metabolic responses between the two cell lines in specific pathways including methionine salvage, purine/pyrimidine synthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Stable isotope tracer studies using deuterium-labeled homocysteine indicated a redirection of homocysteine metabolism toward the transsulfuration pathway and glutathione synthesis. This data corroborates with increased glutathione levels concomitant with increased levels of oxidized glutathione. Redirection of homocysteine flux resulted in reduced generation of methionine from homocysteine particularly in MDA-MB-468 cells. Consequently, synthesis of the important one-carbon donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) was decreased, perturbing the SAM to S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio in MDA-MB-468 cells, which is an indicator of the cellular methylation potential. This study indicates a differential metabolic response between the methionine sensitive MDA-MB-468 cells and the methionine insensitive

  11. The Comparison of Attentional Bias and Difficulty of Emotional States Regulation and Their Correlation with Craving Severity in Drug Abuser Methamphetamines and Crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Haghiaght

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, within creased substance, type of substance used has changed. Therefore, drug abuse in population of crack to the stimulant drugs (amphetamine particularly crystal is expanding and increasing. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was the comparison of attentional bias and difficulty of emotional states regulation and their correlation with craving severity in drug abuser methamphetamines and crack. Materials and Methods: Type of research was descriptive analytical correlation. Population was total of users with methamphetamines and crack in summer and fall 2011 at the city of Isfahan, and 34 users with crystal with daily at least one year were selected on the basis of the snow ball sampling and 31 users with crack with daily at least one year were selected on the basis of the sample sampling. The difficulties emotion regulation scale (DERS, Stroop test and OCDUS were used as the outcome measures. For findings used of descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA and regression analysis were used. Results: The results of analysis of variance showed that between drug abuser crystal and crack significantly differed of attentional bias and difficulty of emotional states regulation. The greatest differences to components of a lack of transparency, lack of emotional awareness, limit emotional states regulation strategies and of emotional responses. But, only the variable non-acceptance negative emotional of subscale of the difficulty of emotional states regulation was able to craving (as an important indicator of durable use substance in of both crack and crystal predicted. This variable is only 13% of the variance craving in drug abuser crack and crystal can be explained. Other findings showed that although there is no difference between the two groups in the intensity of craving, but attentional bias among drug abuser crack and crystal was a significant difference. Conclusion: Overall, can be said

  12. Modafinil Abrogates Methamphetamine-Induced Neuroinflammation and Apoptotic Effects in the Mouse Striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goitia, Belen; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Krasnova, Irina N.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Urbano, Francisco J.; Bisagno, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine is a drug of abuse that can cause neurotoxic damage in humans and animals. Modafinil, a wake-promoting compound approved for the treatment of sleeping disorders, is being prescribed off label for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. The aim of the present study was to investigate if modafinil could counteract methamphetamine-induced neuroinflammatory processes, which occur in conjunction with degeneration of dopaminergic terminals in the mouse striatum. We evaluated the effect of a toxic methamphetamine binge in female C57BL/6 mice (4×5 mg/kg, i.p., 2 h apart) and modafinil co-administration (2×90 mg/kg, i.p., 1 h before the first and fourth methamphetamine injections) on glial cells (microglia and astroglia). We also evaluated the striatal expression of the pro-apoptotic BAX and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, which are known to mediate methamphetamine-induced apoptotic effects. Modafinil by itself did not cause reactive gliosis and counteracted methamphetamine-induced microglial and astroglial activation. Modafinil also counteracted the decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels and prevented methamphetamine-induced increases in the pro-apoptotic BAX and decreases in the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein expression. Our results indicate that modafinil can interfere with methamphetamine actions and provide protection against dopamine toxicity, cell death, and neuroinflammation in the mouse striatum. PMID:23056363

  13. A review of treatment options for co-occurring methamphetamine use disorders and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellem, Tracy L; Lundberg, Kelly J; Renshaw, Perry F

    2015-01-01

    Co-occurring methamphetamine use and depression interferes with treatment outcomes. Female methamphetamine users are known to have higher rates of depression than male methamphetamine users, although this is also true for the general population. There are limited treatment options for the management of depression among methamphetamine users. In this integrative review, we summarize data on treatment strategies for co-occurring depression and methamphetamine use disorders. English-language articles were identified from PsychINFO, CINAHL, PubMed, and Medline as well as from reference lists of key articles. Search terms included "methamphetamine," "depression," and "treatment." Research articles describing psychological (n = 3), pharmacological (n = 6), nutritional supplement (n = 1), and psychological combined with pharmacological (n = 3) approaches for the treatment of methamphetamine use or withdrawal and/or depression are included in this review. Psychological and combination of psychological with pharmacological approaches have not been shown to be effective in treating these co-occurring conditions. Antidepressants have been determined to be ineffective and/or to introduce side effects. Gender differences with response to treatment were examined in only one of the published studies. There is a large gap in knowledge regarding treatment of co-occurring methamphetamine use disorders and depression. Considering that female methamphetamine users experience higher rates of depression than men, a focus on gender-specific treatment approaches is warranted.

  14. Unique genetic factors influence sensitivity to the rewarding and aversive effects of methamphetamine versus cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubner, Noah R; Reed, Cheryl; McKinnon, Carrie S; Phillips, Tamara J

    2013-11-01

    Genetic factors significantly influence addiction-related phenotypes. This is supported by the successful bidirectional selective breeding of two replicate sets of mouse lines for amount of methamphetamine consumed. Some of the same genetic factors that influence methamphetamine consumption have been previously found also to influence sensitivity to the conditioned rewarding and aversive effects of methamphetamine. The goal of the current studies was to determine if some of the same genetic factors influence sensitivity to the conditioned rewarding and aversive effects of cocaine. Cocaine conditioned reward was examined in methamphetamine high drinking and low drinking line mice using a conditioned place preference procedure and cocaine conditioned aversion was measured using a conditioned taste aversion procedure. In addition, a general sensitivity measure, locomotor stimulant response to cocaine, was assessed in these lines; previous data indicated no difference between the selected lines in sensitivity to methamphetamine-induced stimulation. In contrast to robust differences for methamphetamine, the methamphetamine high and low drinking lines did not differ in sensitivity to either the rewarding or aversive effects of cocaine. They also exhibited comparable sensitivity to cocaine-induced locomotor stimulation. These data suggest that the genetic factors that influence sensitivity to the conditioned rewarding and aversive effects of methamphetamine in these lines of mice do not influence sensitivity to these effects of cocaine. Thus, different genetic factors may influence risk for methamphetamine versus cocaine use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Modafinil abrogates methamphetamine-induced neuroinflammation and apoptotic effects in the mouse striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Raineri

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine is a drug of abuse that can cause neurotoxic damage in humans and animals. Modafinil, a wake-promoting compound approved for the treatment of sleeping disorders, is being prescribed off label for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. The aim of the present study was to investigate if modafinil could counteract methamphetamine-induced neuroinflammatory processes, which occur in conjunction with degeneration of dopaminergic terminals in the mouse striatum. We evaluated the effect of a toxic methamphetamine binge in female C57BL/6 mice (4 × 5 mg/kg, i.p., 2 h apart and modafinil co-administration (2 × 90 mg/kg, i.p., 1 h before the first and fourth methamphetamine injections on glial cells (microglia and astroglia. We also evaluated the striatal expression of the pro-apoptotic BAX and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, which are known to mediate methamphetamine-induced apoptotic effects. Modafinil by itself did not cause reactive gliosis and counteracted methamphetamine-induced microglial and astroglial activation. Modafinil also counteracted the decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels and prevented methamphetamine-induced increases in the pro-apoptotic BAX and decreases in the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein expression. Our results indicate that modafinil can interfere with methamphetamine actions and provide protection against dopamine toxicity, cell death, and neuroinflammation in the mouse striatum.

  16. The Nigrostriatal Dopamine System and Methamphetamine: Roles for Excitoxicity and Environmental, Metabolic and Oxidative Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamamoto, Bryan

    2002-01-01

    .... Similarly, the psychostimulant drug, methamphetamine also produces relatively selective damage to nigrostriatal dopamine neurons and is a widespread problem and drug of abuse throughout the U.S...

  17. The Nigrostriatal Dopamine System and Methamphetamine: Roles for Excitotoxicity and Environmental, Metabolic and Oxidative Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamamoto, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    .... Similarly, the psychostimulant drug, methamphetamine also produces relatively selective damage to nigrostriatal dopamine neurons and is a widespread problem and drug of abuse throughout the U.S...

  18. Protective role for the disulfide isomerase PDIA3 in methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

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    Gurudutt Pendyala

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine abuse continues to be a worldwide problem, damaging the individual user as well as society. Only minimal information exists on molecular changes in the brain that result from methamphetamine administered in patterns typical of human abusers. In order to investigate such changes, we examined the effect of methamphetamine on the transcriptional profile in brains of monkeys. Gene expression profiling of caudate and hippocampus identified protein disulfide isomerase family member A3 (PDIA3 to be significantly up-regulated in the animals treated with methamphetamine as compared to saline treated control monkeys. Methamphetamine treatment of mice also increased striatal PDIA3 expression. Treatment of primary striatal neurons with methamphetamine revealed an up-regulation of PDIA3, showing a direct effect of methamphetamine on neurons to increase PDIA3. In vitro studies using a neuroblastoma cell line demonstrated that PDIA3 expression protects against methamphetamine-induced cell toxicity and methamphetamine-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species production, revealing a neuroprotective role for PDIA3. The current study implicates PDIA3 to be an important cellular neuroprotective mechanism against a toxic drug, and as a potential target for therapeutic investigations.

  19. In vivo ligands of MDA5 and RIG-I in measles virus-infected cells.

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    Simon Runge

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs: RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2 play a major role in the innate immune response against viral infections and detect patterns on viral RNA molecules that are typically absent from host RNA. Upon RNA binding, RLRs trigger a complex downstream signaling cascade resulting in the expression of type I interferons and proinflammatory cytokines. In the past decade extensive efforts were made to elucidate the nature of putative RLR ligands. In vitro and transfection studies identified 5'-triphosphate containing blunt-ended double-strand RNAs as potent RIG-I inducers and these findings were confirmed by next-generation sequencing of RIG-I associated RNAs from virus-infected cells. The nature of RNA ligands of MDA5 is less clear. Several studies suggest that double-stranded RNAs are the preferred agonists for the protein. However, the exact nature of physiological MDA5 ligands from virus-infected cells needs to be elucidated. In this work, we combine a crosslinking technique with next-generation sequencing in order to shed light on MDA5-associated RNAs from human cells infected with measles virus. Our findings suggest that RIG-I and MDA5 associate with AU-rich RNA species originating from the mRNA of the measles virus L gene. Corresponding sequences are poorer activators of ATP-hydrolysis by MDA5 in vitro, suggesting that they result in more stable MDA5 filaments. These data provide a possible model of how AU-rich sequences could activate type I interferon signaling.

  20. Enhanced upregulation of CRH mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens of male rats after a second injection of methamphetamine given thirty days later.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Lud Cadet

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a widely abused amphetamine analog. Few studies have investigated the molecular effects of METH exposure in adult animals. Herein, we determined the consequences of an injection of METH (10 mg/kg on transcriptional effects of a second METH (2.5 mg/kg injection given one month later. We thus measured gene expression by microarray analyses in the nucleus accumbens (NAc of 4 groups of rats euthanized 2 hours after the second injection: saline-pretreated followed by saline-challenged (SS or METH-challenged (SM; and METH-pretreated followed by saline-challenged (MS or METH-challenged (MM. Microarray analyses revealed that METH (2.5 mg/kg produced acute changes (1.8-fold; P<0.01 in the expression of 412 (352 upregulated, 60 down-regulated transcripts including cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript, corticotropin-releasing hormone (Crh, oxytocin (Oxt, and vasopressin (Avp that were upregulated. Injection of METH (10 mg/kg altered the expression of 503 (338 upregulated, 165 down-regulated transcripts measured one month later (MS group. These genes also included Cart and Crh. The MM group showed altered expression of 766 (565 upregulated, 201 down-regulated transcripts including Avp, Cart, and Crh. The METH-induced increased Crh expression was enhanced in the MM group in comparison to SM and MS groups. Quantitative PCR confirmed the METH-induced changes in mRNA levels. Therefore, a single injection of METH produced long-lasting changes in gene expression in the rodent NAc. The long-term increases in Crh, Cart, and Avp mRNA expression suggest that METH exposure produced prolonged activation of the endogenous stress system. The METH-induced changes in oxytocin expression also suggest the possibility that this neuropeptide might play a significant role in the neuroplastic and affiliative effects of this drug.

  1. Comparative symptomatological and evoked potential studies with d-amphetamine, thioridazine, and placebo in hyperkinetic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletu, B; Saletu, M; Simeon, J; Viamontes, G; Itil, T M

    1975-06-01

    In a double-blind study, 62 hyperkinetic children were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of treatment with either placebo, thioridazine, or d-amphetamine. The overall clinical symptomatology improved with all three substances, although d-amphetamine was significantly superior to placebo and thioridazine. Out of eight symptom clusters rated by the parents, two improved significantly with placebo, one with thioridazine, and six with d-amphetamine. The d-amphetamine was superior to placebo in reducing muscular tension and superior to thioridazine in decreasing hyperactive-impulsive behavior, psychosomatic problems, and muscular tension. Out of four teachers' symptom clusters, inattentive-passive behavior was significantly improved by thioridazine (which was also superior to placebo), while hyperactivity was reduced by d-amphetamine. Quantitative evaluation of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) revealed an increase in latencies and decrease in amplitudes during thioridazine treatment. Paradoxically, d-amphetamine also increased latencies, while tending to augment amplitudes. Regression and correlation analysis of clinical symptomatology with VEP variables showed that the shorter the pretreatment latencies and the higher the amplitudes, the more disturbed was the child. Short latencies and small amplitudes in the pretreatment period were predictors of good therapeutic outcome with subsequent thioridazine treatment, while short latencies and high amplitudes were indicative of such with d-amphetamine treatment. During therapy, the greater the drug-induced augmentation of latencies, the greater the clinical improvement. Finally, VEP differences between therapy-responsive and -resistant patients were explored and discussed.

  2. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L powder reduced malondialdehyde (MDA level in cigarette smoke exposed rats

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    Francisca A. Tjakradidjaja

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: To analyze the effect of pomegranate (P. granatum powder consumption for 14 days on lipid peroxidation as shown by  malondialdehyde (MDA level in cigarette smoke exposed rats.Methods: Thirty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into three groups, i.e.: a control group and two treatment groups. The treatment groups either received 5% (R1: 0.351% flavonoids/100g or 10% (R2: 0.566% flavonoids/100g pomegranate extract powder, respectively. The diets in the form of pellets were freely consumed (ad libitum and were given for 14 days. Rats were exposed to cigarette smoke three times per day. Blood samples were taken on day 0, day 8th and 15th for MDA analyses. Comparison of MDA levels was done by ANOVA’s test on normal data.Results: On day 0, the MDA levels were 0.35±0.06 nmol/mL, 0.38±0.06 nmol/mL and 0.38±0.06 nmol/mL for control, 5% and 10% pomegranate powder group, respectively (P=0.65. On day 8th, the MDA levels were 0.70±0.06 nmol/mL, 0.57±0.06 nmol/mL and 0.56±0.06 nmol/mL, and on day 15th, the MDA levels were 1.02 ±0.06 nmol/mL, 0.89±0.06 nmol/mL and 0.80±0.06 nmol/mL in control, 5% and 10% pomegranate powder group, respectively. There was a significant difference (P< 0.001 in MDA levels on day 8th and 15th between groups. The average MDA level for rats consuming control diet was the highest on day 8th and 15th. On the other hand, the lowest average MDA level on day 8th and 15th was observed in rats given 10% pomegranate extract powder. In comparison to MDA level before cigarette smoke exposure, the increases in MDA levels for rats consuming control diet, 5% and 10% pomegranate extract powder were 97%, 52% and 48% on day 8th, and 187%, 137% and 113% on day 15th, respectively. The highest increase in MDA level was observed in control group.Conclusion: The use of pomegranate powder at 5% and 10% concentration was able to prevent the occurrence of lipid peroxidation as shown by the MDA levels and the effect was

  3. Metabolism and disposition of N-(2-cyanoethyl)amphetamine (fenproporex) and amphetamine: study in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, R T; Nazarali, A J; Baker, G B; Pasutto, F M

    1986-06-01

    N-(2-Cyanoethyl)amphetamine (fenproporex, CE-AM) is a clinically used anorexiant claimed to be devoid of the stimulant properties associated with amphetamine (AM). This claim was inconsistent with preliminary studies conducted in our laboratories which indicated that CE-AM is metabolically dealkylated to AM to a considerable extent in the rat. Concentration-time profiles of CE-AM and its metabolites AM and 4-hydroxyamphetamine (4-OH-AM) in the rat brain were constructed after administration of CE-AM. Analyses of CE-AM, AM, and 4-OH-AM were performed by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection using pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (under aqueous conditions) as the derivatizing reagent. The half-life (t1/2) and the maximum concentration (Cmax) of AM after administration of CE-AM were calculated to be 2.04 and 0.56 times the respective t1/2 and Cmax obtained after an equimolar dose of AM. Significant differences in the profiles of 4-OH-AM were also observed. The Cmax of 4-OH-AM in rat brain after administration of CE-AM was nearly 4 times higher and the tmax (time at which concentration is maximum) 4 times lower than the respective Cmax and tmax values of 4-OH-AM observed after an equimolar dose of AM.

  4. Effects of Environmental Manipulations and Treatment with Bupropion and Risperidone on Choice between Methamphetamine and Food in Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical and human laboratory choice procedures have been invaluable in improving our knowledge of the neurobiological mechanisms of drug reinforcement and in the drug development process for candidate medications to treat drug addiction. However, little is known about the neuropharmacological mechanisms of methamphetamine vs food choice. The aims of this study were to develop a methamphetamine vs food choice procedure and determine treatment effects with two clinically relevant compounds: the monoamine uptake inhibitor bupropion and the dopamine antagonist risperidone. Rhesus monkeys (n=6) responded under a concurrent schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed-ratio (FR) 100 schedule) and intravenous methamphetamine injections (0-0.32 mg/kg/injection, FR10 schedule) during 7-day bupropion (0.32-1.8 mg/kg/h) and risperidone (0.001-0.0056 mg/kg/h) treatment periods. For comparison, effects of removing food pellets or methamphetamine injections and FR response requirement manipulations were also examined. Under saline treatment conditions, food was preferred over no methamphetamine or small unit methamphetamine doses (0.01-0.032 mg/kg/injection). Larger methamphetamine doses resulted in greater methamphetamine preference and 0.32 mg/kg/injection methamphetamine maintained near exclusive preference. Removing food availability increased methamphetamine choice, whereas removing methamphetamine availability decreased methamphetamine choice. Methamphetamine choice was not significantly altered when the FR response requirements for food and drug were the same (FR100:FR100 or FR10:FR10). Risperidone treatment increased methamphetamine choice, whereas bupropion treatment did not alter methamphetamine choice up to doses that decreased rates of operant behavior. Overall, these negative results with bupropion and risperidone are concordant with previous human laboratory and clinical trials and support the potential validity of this preclinical methamphetamine vs food

  5. Both RIG-I and MDA5 detect alphavirus replication in concentration-dependent mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhrymuk, Ivan; Frolov, Ilya; Frolova, Elena I., E-mail: evfrolova@UAB.edu

    2016-01-15

    Alphaviruses are a family of positive-strand RNA viruses that circulate on all continents between mosquito vectors and vertebrate hosts. Despite a significant public health threat, their biology is not sufficiently investigated, and the mechanisms of alphavirus replication and virus–host interaction are insufficiently understood. In this study, we have applied a variety of experimental systems to further understand the mechanism by which infected cells detect replicating alphaviruses. Our new data strongly suggest that activation of the antiviral response by alphavirus-infected cells is determined by the integrity of viral genes encoding proteins with nuclear functions, and by the presence of two cellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), RIG-I and MDA5. No type I IFN response is induced in their absence. The presence of either of these PRRs is sufficient for detecting virus replication. However, type I IFN activation in response to pathogenic alphaviruses depends on the basal levels of RIG-I or MDA5. - Highlights: • Both RIG-I and MDA5 detect alphavirus replication. • Alphavirus-induced transcriptional shutoff affects type I IFN induction. • Sensing of alphavirus replication by RIG-I and MDA5 depends on their concentrations. • High basal level of RIG-I and MDA5 allows IFN induction by pathogenic alphaviruses. • This dependence determines the discrepancy between the in vivo and in vitro data.

  6. Differentiation of clobenzorex use from amphetamine abuse using the metabolite 4-hydroxyclobenzorex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtier, S; Cody, J T

    2000-10-01

    Clobenzorex (Asenlix) is an anorectic drug metabolized by the body to amphetamine, thus causing difficulty in the interpretation of amphetamine-positive drug tests. Previous studies have shown the parent drug and several metabolites are excreted in urine. Clobenzorex itself has been detected for as long as 29 h postdose using a detection limit of 1 ng/mL. Despite this fact, several amphetamine-positive samples (> or = 500 ng/mL) contained no detectable clobenzorex. Thus, the absence of clobenzorex in the urine does not exclude the possibility of its use. To more definitively assess the possibility of clobenzorex use, evaluation of another metabolite was considered. One study reported the presence of unidentified hydroxy metabolites of clobenzorex for as long as amphetamine was detected in some subjects. To assess the viability of using a hydroxy metabolite to confirm the use of clobenzorex in samples containing amphetamine, 4-hydroxyclobenzorex was synthesized for this study. This metabolite proved to be easily detected and was typically found at levels higher than amphetamine in amphetamine-positive urines, long after clobenzorex itself was no longer detected. Samples obtained from a controlled single-dose study involving the administration of clobenzorex (30 mg) were analyzed for the presence of the 4-hydroxy metabolite. The analytical procedure used acid hydrolysis followed by liquid-liquid extraction and analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry by monitoring ions at m/z 125, 330, and 364. 4-Hydroxyclobenzorex and its 3-Cl regioisomer were used in the identification and quantitation of the metabolite. Peak concentrations of 4-hydroxyclobenzorex were found at approximately 1:30-5:00 h postdose and ranged from approximately 5705 to 88,410 ng/mL. Most importantly, however, all samples that contained amphetamine at > or = 500 ng/mL also contained detectable amounts of this hydroxy metabolite (LOD 10 ng/mL), making it a valuable tool in differentiating use

  7. A qualitative study of methamphetamine initiation in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobkirk, Andréa L; Watt, Melissa H; Myers, Bronwyn; Skinner, Donald; Meade, Christina S

    2016-04-01

    Despite a significant rise in methamphetamine use in low- and middle-income countries, there has been little empirical examination of the factors that contribute to individuals' initiation of methamphetamine use in these settings. The goal of this study was to qualitatively examine factors associated with methamphetamine initiation in South Africa. In-depth interviews were conducted with 30 active methamphetamine users (13 women and 17 men) in Cape Town, South Africa. Interviews included narrative descriptions of the circumstances surrounding methamphetamine initiation. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and translated. Transcripts were analyzed with document memos, data display matrices, and a constant comparison technique to identify themes. On average, participants began regularly using methamphetamine around age 21 and had used for seven years. Four major themes emerged related to the initiation of methamphetamine use. The prevalence of methamphetamine users and distributors made the drug convenient and highly accessible to first time users. Methamphetamine has increased in popularity and is considered "trendy", which contributes to social pressure from friends, and less often, family members to initiate use. Initiation is further fueled by a lack of opportunities for recreation and employment, which leads to boredom and curiosity about the rumored positive effects of the drug. Young people also turn to methamphetamine use and distribution through gang membership as an attempt to generate income in impoverished communities with limited economic opportunities. Finally, participants described initiating methamphetamine as a means of coping with the cumulative stress and psychological burden provoked by the high rates of violence and crime in areas of Cape Town. The findings highlight the complex nature of methamphetamine initiation in low- and middle-income countries like South Africa. There is a need for community-level interventions to address the

  8. Partial MHC/neuroantigen peptide constructs: a potential neuroimmune-based treatment for methamphetamine addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Loftis

    Full Text Available Relapse rates following current methamphetamine abuse treatments are very high (∼40-60%, and the neuropsychiatric impairments (e.g., cognitive deficits, mood disorders that arise and persist during remission from methamphetamine addiction likely contribute to these high relapse rates. Pharmacotherapeutic development of medications to treat addiction has focused on neurotransmitter systems with only limited success, and there are no Food and Drug Administration approved pharmacotherapies for methamphetamine addiction. A growing literature shows that methamphetamine alters peripheral and central immune functions and that immune factors such as cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules play a role in the development and persistence of methamphetamine induced neuronal injury and neuropsychiatric impairments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new immunotherapy, partial MHC/neuroantigen peptide construct (RTL551; pI-A(b/mMOG-35-55, in treating learning and memory impairments induced by repeated methamphetamine exposure. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to two different methamphetamine treatment regimens (using repeated doses of 4 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg, s.c.. Cognitive performance was assessed using the Morris water maze and CNS cytokine levels were measured by multiplex assay. Immunotherapy with RTL551 improved the memory impairments induced by repeated methamphetamine exposure in both mouse models of chronic methamphetamine addiction. Treatment with RTL551 also attenuated the methamphetamine induced increases in hypothalamic interleukin-2 (IL-2 levels. Collectively, these initial results indicate that neuroimmune targeted therapies, and specifically RTL551, may have potential as treatments for methamphetamine-induced neuropsychiatric impairments.

  9. 5-HT(1A)-like receptor activation inhibits abstinence-induced methamphetamine withdrawal in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Scott M; Shah, Hardik; Ayoub, George; Raffa, Robert B

    2010-10-29

    No pharmacological therapy is approved to treat methamphetamine physical dependence, but it has been hypothesized that serotonin (5-HT)-enhancing drugs might limit the severity of withdrawal symptoms. To test this hypothesis, we used a planarian model of physical dependence that quantifies withdrawal as a reduction in planarian movement. Planarians exposed to methamphetamine (10 μM) for 60 min, and then placed (tested) into drug-free water for 5 min, displayed less movement (i.e., withdrawal) than either methamphetamine-naïve planarians tested in water or methamphetamine-exposed planarians tested in methamphetamine. A concentration-related inhibition of withdrawal was observed when methamphetamine-exposed planarians were placed into a solution containing either methamphetamine and 5-HT (0.1-100 μM) or methamphetamine and the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-N,N-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT) (10, 20 μM). Planarians with prior methamphetamine exposure displayed enhanced withdrawal when tested in a solution of the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY 100635) (1 μM). Methamphetamine-induced withdrawal was not affected by the 5-HT(2B/2C) receptor agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPZ) (0.1-20 μM). These results provide pharmacological evidence that serotonin-enhancing drugs inhibit expression of methamphetamine physical dependence in an invertebrate model of withdrawal, possibly through a 5-HT(1A)-like receptor-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Distribution and pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in the human body: clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.-J.; Shumay, E.; Telang, F.; Thanos, P.; Alexoff, D.

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most toxic of the drugs of abuse, which may reflect its distribution and accumulation in the body. However no studies have measured methamphetamine's organ distribution in the human body. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was used in conjunction with ( 11 C)d-methamphetamine to measure its whole-body distribution and bioavailability as assessed by peak uptake (% Dose/cc), rate of clearance (time to reach 50% peak-clearance) and accumulation (area under the curve) in healthy participants (9 Caucasians and 10 African Americans). Methamphetamine distributed through most organs. Highest uptake (whole organ) occurred in lungs (22% Dose; weight ∼1246 g), liver (23%; weight ∼1677 g) and intermediate in brain (10%; weight ∼1600 g). Kidneys also showed high uptake (per/cc basis) (7%; weight 305 g). Methamphetamine's clearance was fastest in heart and lungs (7-16 minutes), slowest in brain, liver and stomach (>75 minutes), and intermediate in kidneys, spleen and pancreas (22-50 minutes). Lung accumulation of ( 11 C)d-methamphetamine was 30% higher for African Americans than Caucasians (p < 0.05) but did not differ in other organs. The high accumulation of methamphetamine, a potent stimulant drug, in most body organs is likely to contribute to the medical complications associated with methamphetamine abuse. In particular, we speculate that methamphetamine's high pulmonary uptake could render this organ vulnerable to infections (tuberculosis) and pathology (pulmonary hypertension). Our preliminary findings of a higher lung accumulation of methamphetamine in African Americans than Caucasians merits further investigation and questions whether it could contribute to the infrequent use of methamphetamine among African Americans.

  11. Distribution and pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in the human body: clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.-J.; Shumay, E.; Telang, F.; Thanos, P.; Alexoff, D.

    2010-12-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most toxic of the drugs of abuse, which may reflect its distribution and accumulation in the body. However no studies have measured methamphetamine's organ distribution in the human body. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was used in conjunction with [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine to measure its whole-body distribution and bioavailability as assessed by peak uptake (% Dose/cc), rate of clearance (time to reach 50% peak-clearance) and accumulation (area under the curve) in healthy participants (9 Caucasians and 10 African Americans). Methamphetamine distributed through most organs. Highest uptake (whole organ) occurred in lungs (22% Dose; weight {approx}1246 g), liver (23%; weight {approx}1677 g) and intermediate in brain (10%; weight {approx}1600 g). Kidneys also showed high uptake (per/cc basis) (7%; weight 305 g). Methamphetamine's clearance was fastest in heart and lungs (7-16 minutes), slowest in brain, liver and stomach (>75 minutes), and intermediate in kidneys, spleen and pancreas (22-50 minutes). Lung accumulation of [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine was 30% higher for African Americans than Caucasians (p < 0.05) but did not differ in other organs. The high accumulation of methamphetamine, a potent stimulant drug, in most body organs is likely to contribute to the medical complications associated with methamphetamine abuse. In particular, we speculate that methamphetamine's high pulmonary uptake could render this organ vulnerable to infections (tuberculosis) and pathology (pulmonary hypertension). Our preliminary findings of a higher lung accumulation of methamphetamine in African Americans than Caucasians merits further investigation and questions whether it could contribute to the infrequent use of methamphetamine among African Americans.

  12. Ice and the outback: Patterns and prevalence of methamphetamine use in rural Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Ann; McEntee, Alice

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated whether lifetime and recent methamphetamine use (including crystal methamphetamine) differed among city, regional and rural residents and whether particular subpopulations were more at-risk. Secondary analyses of the last three National Drug Strategy Household Surveys and corresponding Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Sets (AODTS NMDS). Australian general population. Australians who completed the 2007 (n = 22 519), 2010 (n = 25 786) and 2013 (n = 23 512) NDSHS (aged 14 + ); and treatment episodes where the principal drug of concern was recorded in the 2006/2007 (n = 139 808), 2009/2010 (n = 139 608) and 2012/2013 (n = 154 489) AODTS NMDS. To determine whether rural Australians were more likely to use methamphetamine than non-rural counterparts. Lifetime and recent methamphetamine and recent crystal methamphetamine use were significantly higher among rural than other Australians. Significantly more rural men and employed rural Australians used methamphetamine than their city, regional or Australian counterparts. Rural Australians aged 18-24 and 25-29 years were significantly more likely to have used methamphetamine in their lifetime than city or Australian residents. Rural Australians aged 18-24 years were significantly more likely to have recently used crystal methamphetamine. Interventions tailored to address the specific and unique circumstances of rural settings are required to reduce and prevent methamphetamine use, particularly crystal methamphetamine. Scope exists to focus prevention efforts on rural workplaces and primary care settings. Greater understanding of the higher prevalence of methamphetamine use in rural areas is required, plus implementation of comprehensive strategies and optimised treatment utilisation. © 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  13. Partial MHC/Neuroantigen Peptide Constructs: A Potential Neuroimmune-Based Treatment for Methamphetamine Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftis, Jennifer M.; Wilhelm, Clare J.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Huckans, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Relapse rates following current methamphetamine abuse treatments are very high (∼40–60%), and the neuropsychiatric impairments (e.g., cognitive deficits, mood disorders) that arise and persist during remission from methamphetamine addiction likely contribute to these high relapse rates. Pharmacotherapeutic development of medications to treat addiction has focused on neurotransmitter systems with only limited success, and there are no Food and Drug Administration approved pharmacotherapies for methamphetamine addiction. A growing literature shows that methamphetamine alters peripheral and central immune functions and that immune factors such as cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules play a role in the development and persistence of methamphetamine induced neuronal injury and neuropsychiatric impairments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new immunotherapy, partial MHC/neuroantigen peptide construct (RTL551; pI-Ab/mMOG-35-55), in treating learning and memory impairments induced by repeated methamphetamine exposure. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to two different methamphetamine treatment regimens (using repeated doses of 4 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg, s.c.). Cognitive performance was assessed using the Morris water maze and CNS cytokine levels were measured by multiplex assay. Immunotherapy with RTL551 improved the memory impairments induced by repeated methamphetamine exposure in both mouse models of chronic methamphetamine addiction. Treatment with RTL551 also attenuated the methamphetamine induced increases in hypothalamic interleukin-2 (IL-2) levels. Collectively, these initial results indicate that neuroimmune targeted therapies, and specifically RTL551, may have potential as treatments for methamphetamine-induced neuropsychiatric impairments. PMID:23460798

  14. Methamphetamine use and treatment in Iran: A systematic review from the most populated Persian Gulf country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam-mehrjerdi, Zahra; Mokri, Azarakhsh; Dolan, Kate

    2015-08-01

    Methamphetamine use is a new health concern in Iran, the most populated Persian Gulf country. However, there is no well-documented literature. The current study objectives were to systematically review all published English and Persian studies of the prevalence of methamphetamine use, the general physical and psychiatric-related harms and the availability of methamphetamine treatment and harm reduction services for adult users in Iran. A comprehensive search of the international peer-reviewed and gray literature was undertaken. Multiple electronic and scientific English and Persian databases were systematically searched from January 2002 to September 2014. Additionally, English and Persian gray literature on methamphetamine use was sought using online gray literature databases, library databases and general online searches over the same period of time. Nineteen thousand and two hundred and eight studies, reports and conference papers were identified but only 42 studies were relevant to the study objectives. They were mainly published in 2010-2014. The search results confirmed the seizures of methamphetamine (six studies), the prevalence of methamphetamine use among the general population (three studies), drug users (four studies), women (nine studies) and opiate users in opiate treatment programs (five studies). In addition, methamphetamine use had resulted in blood-borne viral infections (one study), psychosis and intoxication (ten studies). Different reasons had facilitated methamphetamine use. However, the Matrix Model, community therapy and harm reduction services (four studies) had been provided for methamphetamine users in some cities. The current situation of methamphetamine use necessitates more research on the epidemiology and health-related implications. These studies should help in identifying priorities for designing and implementing prevention and educational programs. More active models of engagement with Persian methamphetamine users and the

  15. Buspirone maintenance does not alter the reinforcing, subjective, and cardiovascular effects of intranasal methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Anna R; Strickland, Justin C; Stoops, William W; Lile, Joshua A; Rush, Craig R

    2017-12-01

    Medications development efforts for methamphetamine-use disorder have targeted central monoamines because these systems are directly involved in the effects of methamphetamine. Buspirone is a dopamine autoreceptor and D3 receptor antagonist and partial agonist at serotonin 1A receptors, making it a logical candidate medication for methamphetamine-use disorder. Buspirone effects on abuse-related behaviors of methamphetamine have been mixed in clinical and preclinical studies. Experimental research using maintenance dosing, which models therapeutic use, is limited. This study evaluated the influence of buspirone maintenance on the reinforcing effects of methamphetamine using a self-administration procedure, which has predictive validity for clinical efficacy. The impact of buspirone maintenance on the subjective and cardiovascular response to methamphetamine was also determined. Eight research participants (1 female) reporting recent illicit stimulant use completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind protocol in which the pharmacodynamic effects of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 15, and 30mg) were assessed after at least 6days of buspirone (0 and 45mg/day) maintenance. Intranasal methamphetamine functioned as a reinforcer and produced prototypical stimulant-like subjective (e.g., increased ratings of Good Effects and Like Drug) and cardiovascular (e.g., elevated blood pressure) effects. These effects of methamphetamine were similar under buspirone and placebo maintenance conditions. Maintenance on buspirone was well tolerated and devoid of effects when administered alone. These data suggest that buspirone is unlikely to be an effective pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine-use disorder. Given the central role of monoamines in methamphetamine-use disorder, it is reasonable for future studies to continue to target these systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characteristics of homeless youth who use cocaine and methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Hudson, Angela; Greengold, Barbara; Leake, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional hepatitis health promotion study (N = 156) was designed to identify correlates of cocaine and methamphetamine use among young, homeless persons living in Los Angeles County. Structured questionnaires were administered at baseline to assess sociodemographic characteristics, drug history, and social support. Unadjusted analysis showed that older age, having a history of incarceration, injection drug use (IDU), 10 or more sexual partners, and sex for money were associated with both cocaine and methamphetamine use. Logistic regression results showed that injection drug users had over seven times greater odds of using each stimulant compared with nonusers of injection drugs; those reporting at least 10 sexual partners and alcohol use in the past 6 months were more likely to use cocaine than their respective counterparts. African Americans were also less likely than Whites to report cocaine use. Understanding of these relationships can guide interventions targeting the multiple challenges faced by this population. Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  17. Amphetamine poisoning in a dog: case report, literature review and veterinary medical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Pedro Paulo V P; Sousa, Marlos G; Gerardi, Daniel G; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela

    2003-12-01

    Amphetamine abuse in human beings has increased, resulting in many reports of toxicity and death. In the US over 4 million people have abused amphetamines at least once, thus small animals are exposed to increased accidental poisoning risk. This report describes an acute amphetamine poisoning in a dog due to ingestion of 15 mg/kg fenproporex, leading to typical signs of catecholamines release and effects in different organ systems. Similar clinical and laboratory findings observed in human beings are reviewed and physiopathogenic mechanisms discussed, as well as the therapeutic approaches available in veterinary medicine.

  18. Nicotine Elicits Methamphetamine-Seeking in Rats Previously Administered Nicotine

    OpenAIRE

    Neugebauer, N. M.; Harrod, S. B.; Bardo, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    Research has indicated a high correlation between psychostimulant use and tobacco cigarette smoking in human substance abusers. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of acute and repeated nicotine administration on responding for intravenous methamphetamine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) in a rodent model of self-administration, as well as the potential of nicotine to induce reinstatement of previously extinguished drug-taking behavior in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, ...

  19. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Prevents Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Castelli, M. Paola; Madeddu, Camilla; Casti, Alberto; Casu, Angelo; Casti, Paola; Scherma, Maria; Fattore, Liana; Fadda, Paola; Ennas, M. Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a potent psychostimulant with neurotoxic properties. Heavy use increases the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), production of peroxynitrites, microglia stimulation, and induces hyperthermia and anorectic effects. Most METH recreational users also consume cannabis. Preclinical studies have shown that natural (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC) and synthetic cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists exert neuroprotective effects on different models of c...

  20. Sex differences in social interaction of methamphetamine-treated rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlamberová, R.; Mikulecká, Anna; Pometlová, M.; Schutová, B.; Hrubá, L.; Deykun, K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 7 (2011), s. 617-623 ISSN 0955-8810 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0517 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0580 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : estrogen * methamphetamine * rat * sex difference * social behavior * testosterone Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.720, year: 2011

  1. Sex differences in methamphetamine seeking in rats: Impact of oxytocin

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Brittney M.; Young, Amy B.; See, Ronald E.; Reichel, Carmela M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous evidence in an animal model of drug self-administration and drug seeking showed that acute oxytocin decreased methamphetamine (meth) seeking in male rats, suggesting potential clinical efficacy for the treatment of psychostimulant addiction. However, based on the well-established role of oxytocin in reproduction and pair bond formation, it is important to know how this effect extrapolates to females. Here, we tested whether oxytocin (1 mg/kg, IP) would decrease meth seeking in female...

  2. Crazy for Ya Ba: methamphetamine use among northern Thai youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Anjalee

    2014-07-01

    Since the mid-1990s, Thailand has been one of the largest per capita consumers of methamphetamine pills (ya ba - "crazy drug") in the world and one of the leading consumers of methamphetamine in Southeast Asia, with its youth comprising the majority of users. This article examines the socio-cultural context of methamphetamine use among young Thai in order to understand its widespread appeal. The study is based on 18 months of ethnographic research in Chiang Mai, northern Thailand, between 2002 and 2006 and a follow-up field trip in 2011. In-depth interviews were carried out with 211 young people aged between 15 and 25 in institutional and non-institutional settings. Many of the findings derive from participant observation and informal interviews with a small sample of 20 people. Chiang Mai youth have transformed methamphetamine from a labourers' drug centred on economic utility to a multi-purpose youth drug primarily consumed for pleasure and performance. Ya ba appeals to many young Thai due to its positive image as a modern and fashionable consumer commodity, with confidence in these synthetic pills drawing on and mirroring a broader faith in modern (western) medicine. The growing demand for ya ba in northern Thailand is in part a reflection of the changing social values that have accompanied rapid urbanisation and modernisation in Thailand. In their overwhelming aspiration to be modern, young Thai are consuming ya ba not to rebel against the dominant culture, but to keep up with the demands and expectations of a modern capitalist society. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hnrnph1 Is A Quantitative Trait Gene for Methamphetamine Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema Yazdani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychostimulant addiction is a heritable substance use disorder; however its genetic basis is almost entirely unknown. Quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping in mice offers a complementary approach to human genome-wide association studies and can facilitate environment control, statistical power, novel gene discovery, and neurobiological mechanisms. We used interval-specific congenic mouse lines carrying various segments of chromosome 11 from the DBA/2J strain on an isogenic C57BL/6J background to positionally clone a 206 kb QTL (50,185,512-50,391,845 bp that was causally associated with a reduction in the locomotor stimulant response to methamphetamine (2 mg/kg, i.p.; DBA/2J < C57BL/6J-a non-contingent, drug-induced behavior that is associated with stimulation of the dopaminergic reward circuitry. This chromosomal region contained only two protein coding genes-heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, H1 (Hnrnph1 and RUN and FYVE domain-containing 1 (Rufy1. Transcriptome analysis via mRNA sequencing in the striatum implicated a neurobiological mechanism involving a reduction in mesolimbic innervation and striatal neurotransmission. For instance, Nr4a2 (nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 2, a transcription factor crucial for midbrain dopaminergic neuron development, exhibited a 2.1-fold decrease in expression (DBA/2J < C57BL/6J; p 4.2 x 10-15. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs-mediated introduction of frameshift deletions in the first coding exon of Hnrnph1, but not Rufy1, recapitulated the reduced methamphetamine behavioral response, thus identifying Hnrnph1 as a quantitative trait gene for methamphetamine sensitivity. These results define a novel contribution of Hnrnph1 to neurobehavioral dysfunction associated with dopaminergic neurotransmission. These findings could have implications for understanding the genetic basis of methamphetamine addiction in humans and the development of novel therapeutics for

  4. Contingency management for the treatment of methamphetamine use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, John M; Petry, Nancy M; Stitzer, Maxine L; Brecht, Mary L; Peirce, Jessica M; McCann, Michael J; Blaine, Jack; MacDonald, Marilyn; DiMaria, Joan; Lucero, Leroy; Kellogg, Scott

    2006-11-01

    Theory and some preliminary evidence suggest that contingency management may be an effective treatment strategy or adjunct to psychosocial treatment for methamphetamine use disorders. An experimentally rigorous investigation on the topic was provided by a large multisite trial conducted under the auspices of the Clinical Trials Network of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The authors report data on 113 participants who were diagnosed with methamphetamine abuse or dependence. They were randomly assigned to receive 12 weeks of either treatment as usual or treatment as usual plus contingency management. Urine samples were tested for illicit drugs, and breath samples were tested for alcohol. The reinforcers for drug-negative samples were plastic chips, some of which could be exchanged for prizes. The number of plastic chips drawn increased with each week of negative samples but was reset to one after a missed or positive sample. The participants in both groups remained in treatment for equivalent times, but those receiving contingency management in addition to usual treatment submitted significantly more negative samples, and they were abstinent for a longer period of time (5 versus 3 weeks). These results suggest that contingency management has promise as a component in treatment strategies for methamphetamine use disorder.

  5. Methamphetamine and MDMA: ‘Safe’ drugs of abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allana M. Krolikowski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine and MDMA have been called safe drugs of abuse. Worldwide there is an increased consumption of these drugs, which has become a focus of research in South Africa. As the number of methamphetamine users has increased in many African countries, it is essential that emergency care practitioners are able to diagnose and manage intoxication with methamphetamine, MDMA, and other derivatives. The most common presentations include restlessness, agitation, hypertension, tachycardia, and headache while hyperthermia, hyponatraemia, and rhabdomyolysis are among the most common serious complications. Most deaths are secondary to hyperthermia complicated by multiple organ failure. A number of laboratory analyses should be obtained if locally available. We provide a review of the current recommended general and specific management approaches. Benzodiazepines are the first line therapy for hyperthermia, agitation, critical hypertension, and seizures. Patients with serious complications are best managed in an intensive care unit if available. Emergency centres should create protocols and/or further train staff in the recognition and management of intoxication with these ‘not so safe’ drugs.

  6. Methamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine interact with central nicotinic receptors and induce their up-regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Rates, Sara; Camarasa, Jordi; Escubedo, Elena; Pubill, David

    2007-01-01

    Previous work from our group indicated that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChR) potentially play a role in methamphetamine (METH) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) neurotoxicity. The aims of the present study were two-fold: (1) to demonstrate the interaction of METH and MDMA with homomeric α7 nAChR ([ 3 H]methyllycaconitine binding) and other heteromeric subtypes ([ 3 H]epibatidine binding); and (2) to show the effects of amphetamine derivative pretreatment on the density of binding sites. METH and MDMA displaced [ 3 H]methyllycaconitine and [ 3 H]epibatidine binding in membranes from NGF-differentiated PC 12 cells and mouse brain, with K i values in the micromolar range, MDMA revealing a greater affinity than METH. In addition, METH and MDMA induced a time- and concentration-dependent increase in [ 3 H]methyllycaconitine and [ 3 H]epibatidine binding; which had already been apparent after 6 h of pretreatment, and which peaked in differentiated PC 12 cells after 48 h. The highest increases were found in [ 3 H]epibatidine binding, with MDMA inducing higher increases than METH. Treatment with METH and MDMA increased B max of high-affinity sites for both radioligands without affecting K d . The heightened binding was inhibited by pretreatment with cycloheximide, suggesting the participation of newly synthesised proteins while inhibition of protein trafficking to plasma membrane did not block up-regulation. The effects of protein kinase and cyclophilin inhibitors on such up-regulation were explored, revealing a rapid, differential and complex regulation, similar to that described for nicotinic ligands. All of these results demonstrate that METH and MDMA have affinity for, and can interact with, nAChR, inducing their up-regulation, specially when higher doses are used. Such effects may have a role in METH- and MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, cholinergic neurotransmission, and in processes related to addiction and dependence

  7. Chlorogenic and Caftaric Acids in Liver Toxicity and Oxidative Stress Induced by Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koriem, Khaled M. M.; Soliman, Rowan E.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine intoxication can cause acute hepatic failure. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids are the major dietary polyphenols present in various foods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of chlorogenic and caftaric acids in liver toxicity and oxidative stress induced by methamphetamine in rats. Thirty-two male albino rats were divided into 4 equal groups. Group 1, which was control group, was injected (i.p) with saline (1 mL/kg) twice a day over seven-day period. Groups 2, 3, and 4 were injected (i.p) with methamphetamine (10 mg/kg) twice a day over seven-day period, where groups 3 and 4 were injected (i.p) with 60 mg/kg chlorogenic acid and 40 mg/kg caftaric acid, respectively, one day before methamphetamine injections. Methamphetamine increased serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. Also, malondialdehyde in serum, liver, and brain and plasma and liver nitric oxide levels were increased while methamphetamine induced a significant decrease in serum total protein, albumin, globulin, albumin/globulin ratio, brain serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine, blood and liver superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids prior to methamphetamine injections restored all the above parameters to normal values. In conclusion, chlorogenic and caftaric acids before methamphetamine injections prevented liver toxicity and oxidative stress where chlorogenic acid was more effective. PMID:25136360

  8. A Multivariate Analysis of the Sociodemographic Predictors of Methamphetamine Production and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Todd A.; Armstrong, Gaylene S.

    2013-01-01

    To date, research testing the community characteristics associated with methamphetamine production and use has found that the community-level sociodemographic predictors of methamphetamine production and use vary from those of drug use in general. In this study, the authors furthered the research in this area using data from all 102 counties in…

  9. Utility of preclinical drug versus food choice procedures to evaluate candidate medications for methamphetamine use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Matthew L

    2017-04-01

    Substance use disorders are diagnosed as a manifestation of inappropriate behavioral allocation toward abused drugs and away from other behaviors maintained by more adaptive nondrug reinforcers (e.g., money and social relationships). Substance use disorder treatment goals include not only decreasing drug-maintained behavior but also promoting behavioral reallocation toward these socially adaptive alternative reinforcers. Preclinical drug self-administration procedures that offer concurrent access to both drug and nondrug reinforcers provide a translationally relevant dependent measure of behavioral allocation that may be useful for candidate medication evaluation. In contrast to other abused drugs, such as heroin or cocaine, preclinical methamphetamine versus food choice procedures have been a more recent development. We hypothesize that preclinical to clinical translatability would be improved by the evaluation of repeated pharmacological treatment effects on methamphetamine self-administration under a methamphetamine versus food choice procedure. In support of this hypothesis, a literature review suggests strong concordance between preclinical pharmacological treatment effects on methamphetamine versus food choice in nonhuman primates and clinical medication treatment effects on methamphetamine self-administration in human laboratory studies or methamphetamine abuse metrics in clinical trials. In conclusion, this literature suggests preclinical methamphetamine versus food choice procedures may be useful in developing innovative pharmacotherapies for methamphetamine use disorder. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Sex differences in the acute locomotor response to methamphetamine in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohia-Nwoko, Odochi; Haile, Colin N; Kosten, Therese A

    2017-06-01

    Women use methamphetamine more frequently than men and are more vulnerable to its negative psychological effects. Rodent models have been an essential tool for evaluating the sex-dependent effects of psychostimulants; however, evidence of sex differences in the behavioral responses to methamphetamine in mice is lacking. In the present study, we investigated acute methamphetamine-induced (1mg/kg and 4mg/kg) locomotor activation in female and male BALB/c mice. We also evaluated whether basal locomotor activity was associated with the methamphetamine-induced locomotor response. The results indicated that female BALB/c mice displayed enhanced methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity compared to males, while basal locomotor activity was positively correlated with methamphetamine-induced activity in males, but not females. This study is the first to show sex-dependent locomotor effects of methamphetamine in BALB/c mice. Our observations emphasize the importance of considering sex when assessing behavioral responses to methamphetamine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Methamphetamine Use among Rural White and Native American Adolescents: An Application of the Stress Process Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitle, David J.; Eitle, Tamela McNulty

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine use has been identified as having significant adverse health consequences, yet we know little about the correlates of its use. Additionally, research has found that Native Americans are at the highest risk for methamphetamine use. Our exploratory study, informed by the stress process model, examines stress and stress buffering…

  12. Combating Methamphetamine Use in the Community: The Efficacy of the Drug Court Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listwan, Shelley Johnson; Shaffer, Deborah Koetzle; Hartman, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine use was historically a problem facing Western states; however, in recent years it has methodically spread throughout the nation. Methamphetamine use impacts communities, families, and the criminal justice system in a variety of ways. As such, many jurisdictions are developing policies to reduce the sale and consumption of this drug…

  13. The Impact of the Media in Influencing Extension's Perceptions of Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudreault, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    The study reported here explored media dependency and moral panic involving methamphetamine perceptions among a national sample of Extension Directors through survey methodology. With a 70.0% response rate, the questionnaire concentrated on demographics; methamphetamine knowledge, information sources, and dependency; and perceptions of the media.…

  14. National Case-Control Study of Homicide Offending and Methamphetamine Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stretesky, Paul B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between methamphetamine use and homicide. To carry out this study, data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse and Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities were combined to create a case-control design. The main exposure measure is methamphetamine use and the…

  15. Demand for Substance Abuse Treatment Related to Use of Crystal Methamphetamine in Ontario: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Bruna; Corea, Larry; Strike, Carol; Singh, Veeran-Anne S.; Behrooz, Renee C.; Rush, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about methamphetamine/crystal methamphetamine (MA) have featured prominently in the Canadian media and on addiction treatment agency agendas. We examined MA admissions at addiction treatment agencies to determine if a service gap existed. In 2006, all addiction treatment agencies (n = 124) in Ontario, Canada were invited to complete an…

  16. During-Treatment Outcomes among Female Methamphetamine-Using Offenders in Prison-Based Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan-Szal, Grace A.; Joe, George W.; Simpson, D. Dwayne; Greener, Jack M.; Vance, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    An increasingly important treatment group is the expanding population of methamphetamine-using female offenders. This study focused on women methamphetamine-using offenders (n = 359) who were treated either in a modified therapeutic community (TC) program ("Clean Lifestyle is Freedom Forever" [CLIFF]-TC: n = 234) designed for non-violent offenders…

  17. Orthostatic hypotension due to suppression of vasomotor outflow after amphetamine intoxication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A. A.; Wieling, W.; Voogel, A. J.; Koster, R. W.; van Zwieten, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Ten hours after ingestion of amphetamines, a previously healthy 17-year-old female adolescent experienced dizziness on standing. Examination revealed pronounced drowsiness and severe orthostatic hypotension. Assessment of arterial baroreflex function suggested that suppressed sympathetic vasomotor

  18. A single social defeat induces short-lasting behavioral sensitization to amphetamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JG; Wasilewski, M; van der Vegt, BJ; Buwalda, B; Koolhaas, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    Repeated, intermittent exposure to psychostimulants or stressors results in long-lasting, progressive sensitization of the behavioral effects of a subsequent amphetamine (AMPH) challenge. Although behavioral sensitization has also been observed following a single drug pretreatment, the sensitizing

  19. Cardiovascular effects of methamphetamine in dogs treated chronically with the amine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, H

    1982-01-01

    Methamphetamine is one of a group of sympathomimetic amines that lower blood pressure upon chronic administration to hypertensive dogs. To determine whether tolerance to the cardiovascular effects of these drugs could play a role in their antihypertensive action, acute blood pressure responses to oral d-methamphetamine were determined in trained conscious renal hypertensive dogs at weekly intervals during treatment with the drug for 2 months. Responses were also obtained in similarly treated normotensive dogs and in normotensive and hypertensive animals receiving l-methamphetamine. Pressor responses to d-methamphetamine in hypertensive dogs remained unchanged throughout treatment, while in all other cases they diminished gradually. Only the dextro isomer reduced blood pressure chronically in the hypertensive group. It was concluded that tolerance is not involved in the antihypertensive effect of methamphetamine and that, considering the stereo specificity of this effect, residual lowering of blood pressure might involve formation of a false mediator metabolite of the amine.

  20. Use of amphetamines to improve the academic performance in students of the University of Manizales, 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo Urrego, Marcela; Arango Orozco, Lisa; Blandón Montoya, Liliana; Buelvas Soto, Liz; Carmona Velasquez, Daybeth Vanesa; Castaño Castrillón, Jose Jaime; Castro Rocha, Betsy Carolina; Serna, Juan Camilo; Trujillo Sandoval, Karol Susana; Arango, César

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Identify the frequency of use of non-medicated amphetamines and othersubstances to improve academic performance in students of the University of Manizales(Manizales, Colombia).Materials and methods: A cross sectional study was realized. The population was of3616 students of all the faculties of the University of Manizales, with a representativesample of 309 students. An anonymous sur5vey was made in order to collect informationwhich allowed to identify the consumption of amphetamin...

  1. Chicken MDA5 senses short double-stranded RNA with implications for antiviral response against avian influenza viruses in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Chiaki; Suzuki, Yasushi; Tanikawa, Taichiro; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian melanoma differentiation-associated gene-5 (MDA5) and retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) selectively sense double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) according to length, as well as various RNA viruses to induce an antiviral response. RIG-I, which plays a predominant role in the induction of antiviral responses against influenza virus infection, has been considered to be lacking in chicken, putting the function of chicken MDA5 (chMDA5) under the spotlight. Here, we show that chMDA5, unlike mammalian MDA5, preferentially senses shorter dsRNA synthetic analogues, poly(I:C), in chicken DF-1 fibroblasts. A requirement for caspase activation and recruitment domains for chMDA5-mediated chicken interferon beta (chIFNβ) induction and its interaction with mitochondrial antiviral signaling proteins were demonstrated. We also found that chMDA5 is involved in chIFNβ induction against avian influenza virus infection. Our findings imply that chMDA5 compensates in part the function of RIG-I in chicken, and highlights the importance of chMDA5 in the innate immune response in chicken. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. A comparison of psychotic symptoms in subjects with methamphetamine versus cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Peter D; Gicas, Kristina M; Willi, Taylor S; Kim, Clara N; Boyeva, Veronika; Procyshyn, Ric M; Smith, Geoff N; Thornton, Allen E; Panenka, William J; Jones, Andrea A; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel; Lang, Donna J; William MacEwan, G; Honer, William G; Barr, Alasdair M

    2017-05-01

    The psychostimulant drugs cocaine and methamphetamine are potent indirect dopamine receptor agonists which act through similar but not identical mechanisms. Studies in humans have observed that a large proportion of those who chronically use these drugs experience psychotic symptoms. However, direct comparisons of psychotic symptom severity between cocaine and methamphetamine users are lacking. The goal of the present study was to directly compare severity of psychotic symptoms between cocaine- and methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Additionally, we sought to determine how concurrent cocaine + methamphetamine dependence would influence psychotic symptoms. We recruited 153 polysubstance-using subjects meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for cocaine dependence, 38 with methamphetamine dependence, and 32 with cocaine + methamphetamine dependence. Psychotic symptoms were assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and analyzed using a five-factor model. All participants were also assessed for physical and mental illnesses as well as recent substance use. Most subjects completed a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. While all three groups exhibited high total PANSS scores, the positive symptom subscale was significantly higher in the methamphetamine-dependent (17.03 ± 6.3) than the cocaine-dependent group (13.51 ± 4.12) and non-significantly higher (p = 0.08) than the cocaine + methamphetamine group (14.44 ± 5.50). Groups also differed on demographic variables, viral infection, and other indices of substance use, which were unlikely to account for the difference in positive symptoms. There were only modest differences between groups in neurocognitive function. Methamphetamine dependence was associated with more severe positive symptoms of psychosis than cocaine dependence. Concurrent cocaine + methamphetamine dependence did not increase psychosis severity.

  3. Methamphetamine differentially affects BDNF and cell death factors in anatomically defined regions of the hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinato, Melissa H.; Orio, Laura; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine exposure reduces hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and neurogenesis and these alterations partially contribute to hippocampal maladaptive plasticity. The potential mechanisms underlying methamphetamine-induced maladaptive plasticity were identified in the present study. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; a regulator of LTP and neurogenesis), and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) were studied in the dorsal and ventral hippocampal tissue lysates in rats that intravenously self-administered methamphetamine in a limited access (1 h/day) or extended access (6 h/day) paradigm for 17 days post baseline sessions. Extended access methamphetamine enhanced expression of BDNF with significant effects observed in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Methamphetamine-induced enhancements in BDNF expression were not associated with TrkB receptor activation as indicated by phospho (p)-TrkB-706 levels. Conversely, methamphetamine produced hypophosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B) at Tyr-1472 in the ventral hippocampus, indicating reduced receptor activation. In addition, methamphetamine enhanced expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and reduced pro-apoptotic protein Bax levels in the ventral hippocampus, suggesting a mechanism for reducing cell death. Analysis of Akt, a pro-survival kinase that suppresses apoptotic pathways and pAkt at Ser-473 demonstrated that extended access methamphetamine reduces Akt expression in the ventral hippocampus. These data reveal that alterations in Bcl-2 and Bax levels by methamphetamine were not associated with enhanced Akt expression. Given that hippocampal function and neurogenesis vary in a subregion-specific fashion, where dorsal hippocampus regulates spatial processing and has higher levels of neurogenesis, whereas ventral hippocampus regulates anxiety-related behaviors, these data suggest that methamphetamine self-administration initiates distinct allostatic changes in

  4. Subchronic apocynin treatment attenuates methamphetamine-induced dopamine release and hyperactivity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dennis K; Oelrichs, Clark E; Sun, Grace Y; Simonyi, Agnes

    2014-03-07

    The effects of methamphetamine are linked to stimulation of dopaminergic neurons, which can be accompanied by production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone) is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase (NOX) inhibitor shown to mitigate oxidative stress in a number of models. The present study aimed at testing whether apocynin suppresses the dopamine-releasing and locomotor-activating properties of methamphetamine. (1) Apocynin (0.01-100μM) was applied to rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine and its efficacy to evoke [(3)H]overflow and to alter methamphetamine (3μM)-evoked [(3)H]overflow was measured. (2) Groups of rats received apocynin (15 or 50mg/kg/day) or vehicle injection for seven consecutive days, and the efficacy and potency of methamphetamine to evoke [(3)H]overflow were determined. (3) Groups of apocynin-treated rats were administered methamphetamine (0.5 or 1mg/kg) or saline to determine the effect of apocynin on stimulant-induced hyperactivity. (1) Apocynin applied to striatal slices did not evoke [(3)H]overflow or alter methamphetamine-evoked [(3)H]overflow. (2) However, subchronic apocynin treatment significantly and dose-dependently decreased methamphetamine's potency and efficacy to evoke [(3)H]overflow. (3) Subchronic apocynin treatment also decreased the locomotor activity evoked by methamphetamine. Subchronic apocynin treatment diminished methamphetamine induced dopamine-release and its locomotor-activating properties. The pattern of results indicates that apocynin is more effective after repeated, rather than after acute, treatment. The findings also suggest that NOX inhibitors or agents suppressing oxidative stress may constitute a new area for research to understand how methamphetamine produces its deleterious and neurotoxic outcomes in the brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of Treatment Targets in a Genetic Mouse Model of Voluntary Methamphetamine Drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T J; Mootz, J R K; Reed, C

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine has powerful stimulant and euphoric effects that are experienced as rewarding and encourage use. Methamphetamine addiction is associated with debilitating illnesses, destroyed relationships, child neglect, violence, and crime; but after many years of research, broadly effective medications have not been identified. Individual differences that may impact not only risk for developing a methamphetamine use disorder but also affect treatment response have not been fully considered. Human studies have identified candidate genes that may be relevant, but lack of control over drug history, the common use or coabuse of multiple addictive drugs, and restrictions on the types of data that can be collected in humans are barriers to progress. To overcome some of these issues, a genetic animal model comprised of lines of mice selectively bred for high and low voluntary methamphetamine intake was developed to identify risk and protective alleles for methamphetamine consumption, and identify therapeutic targets. The mu opioid receptor gene was supported as a target for genes within a top-ranked transcription factor network associated with level of methamphetamine intake. In addition, mice that consume high levels of methamphetamine were found to possess a nonfunctional form of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). The Taar1 gene is within a mouse chromosome 10 quantitative trait locus for methamphetamine consumption, and TAAR1 function determines sensitivity to aversive effects of methamphetamine that may curb intake. The genes, gene interaction partners, and protein products identified in this genetic mouse model represent treatment target candidates for methamphetamine addiction. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Correlates of Validity of Self-Reported Methamphetamine Use Among a Sample of Dependent Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Christopher; Vittinghoff, Eric; Colfax, Grant; Coffin, Phillip O; Santos, Glenn-Milo

    2018-02-20

    Self-reported data are widely used in substance-use research, yet few studies have assessed the validity of self-reported methamphetamine use compared to biological assays. We sought to assess the validity and correlates of validity of self-reported methamphetamine use compared to urine toxicology (UTOX). Using a sample of methamphetamine-dependent individuals enrolled in a randomized controlled pharmacotherapy trial in the United States (n = 327 visits among 90 participants), we calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and the kappa coefficient of self-reported methamphetamine use in the past 3 days compared to UTOX, as well as the NPV of self-reported methamphetamine use over an extended recall period of 1 month. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess correlates of concordance between self-reported methamphetamine use and UTOX. The sensitivity of self-reported methamphetamine use in the past 3 days was 86.7% (95% confidence intervals (95%CI): 81.4%-91.4%), the specificity was 85.3% (77.7-91.3), the PPV was 91.5% (86.9-94.8), and the NPV was 78.0% (69.4-86.1), compared to UTOX (kappa = 0.71). The NPV over the extended recall period was 70.6% (48.0-85.7). In multivariable analyses, validity of self-reported methamphetamine use was higher for older participants but lower during follow-up compared to baseline and when polysubstance use or depressive symptoms were reported. Conclusions/Importance: Our sample of methamphetamine-dependent adults reported recent methamphetamine use with high validity compared to UTOX. Validity increased with age but decreased when participants reported depressive symptoms or polysubstance use as well as later in the study timeline and during longer recall periods.

  7. Combination of modafinil and d-Amphetamine for the treatment of cocaine dependence: A preliminary investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy M Schmitz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Two stimulant medications, modafinil and d-amphetamine, when tested individually, have shown safety and efficacy for treatment of cocaine addiction. We hypothesized that the combination of modafinil and d-amphetamine, at low doses, would show equivalent or greater benefit in reducing cocaine use compared to higher doses of each individual medication or placebo. Methods: Sixteen week, randomized, parallel-group design with four treatment arms comparing placebo to modafinil 400 mg; d-amphetamine 60 mg; modafinil 200 mg plus d-amphetamine 30 mg. Primary outcome variables, retention and cocaine use, were analyzed on the sample of 73 participants who received the first dose of the study medication. Results: Retention rates did not differ between groups and were generally low, with 40% remaining in treatment at week 12 and 20% at week 16. Participants receiving the combination of modafinil and d-amphetamine showed a trend of increased cocaine use over time with a corresponding low Bayesian probability of benefit (33%. Relatively better cocaine outcomes were observed in the placebo and d-amphetamine only groups. The study medications were generally well-tolerated with few adverse effects, yet rates of adherence were suboptimal (≤ 80%. Conclusion: Data from this preliminary investigation fail to provide evidential support for conducting a larger study of this dual-agonist medication combination for treatment of cocaine dependence.

  8. MDA5 Detects the Double-Stranded RNA Replicative Form in Picornavirus-Infected Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Feng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available RIG-I and MDA5 are cytosolic RNA sensors that play a critical role in innate antiviral responses. Major advances have been made in identifying RIG-I ligands, but our knowledge of the ligands for MDA5 remains restricted to data from transfection experiments mostly using poly(I:C, a synthetic dsRNA mimic. Here, we dissected the IFN-α/β-stimulatory activity of different viral RNA species produced during picornavirus infection, both by RNA transfection and in infected cells in which specific steps of viral RNA replication were inhibited. Our results show that the incoming genomic plus-strand RNA does not activate MDA5, but minus-strand RNA synthesis and production of the 7.5 kbp replicative form trigger a strong IFN-α/β response. IFN-α/β production does not rely on plus-strand RNA synthesis and thus generation of the partially double-stranded replicative intermediate. This study reports MDA5 activation by a natural RNA ligand under physiological conditions.

  9. Infectivity enhanced adenoviral-mediated mda-7/IL-24 gene therapy for ovarian carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leath, CA; Kataram, M; Bhagavatula, P; Gopalkrishnan, RV; Dent, P; Fisher, PB; Pereboev, A; Carey, D; Lebedeva, [No Value; Haisma, HJ; Alvarez, RD; Curiel, DT; Mahasreshti, PJ

    Objective. Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 [mda-7/interleukin (IL)-24] has been identified as a novel anti-cancer agent, which specifically induces apoptosis in cancer cells but not in normal epithelial, endothelial and fibroblast cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the

  10. Apoptotic Effect of the Urtica Dioica Plant Extracts on Breast Cancer Cell Line (MDA- MB- 468

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mohammadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Cancer is one of the most causes of mortality in worldwide. Components derived from natural plants that induce apoptosis are used for cancer treatment. Therefore investigation of different herbal components for new anti-cancer drug is one of the main research activities throughout the world. According to low cost, oral consumption and easy access to the public extracts of Urtica dioica, in this study we aimed to investigate the effectiveness of this herb on MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells.   Methods: Cytotoxic effect of Urtica dioica extract was measured using MTT assays. To show induction of apoptosis by this plant TUNEL and DNA Fragmentation test were performed.   Results: In the present study dichloromethane extracts noticeably killed cancer cells. IC50 values related to human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-468 were 29.46±1.05 µg/ml in 24 hours and 15.54±1.04 µg/ml in 48 hours. TUNEL test and DNA Fragmentation assay showed apoptotic characteristic in the extract treated cells.   Conclusion: The results showed that MDA-MB-468 cells after treatment with dichloromethane extract of Urtica dioica, induces apoptosis in MDA-MB-468 cancer cells which may be useful in the treatment of cancer.

  11. Analytical method of CIM to PIM transformation in Model Driven Architecture (MDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kardos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Information system’s models on higher level of abstraction have become a daily routine in many software companies. The concept of Model Driven Architecture (MDA published by standardization body OMG1 since 2001 has become a concept for creation of software applications and information systems. MDA specifies four levels of abstraction: top three levels are created as graphical models and the last one as implementation code model. Many research works of MDA are focusing on the lower levels and transformations between each other. The top level of abstraction, called Computation Independent Model (CIM and its transformation to the lower level called Platform Independent Model (PIM is not so extensive research topic. Considering to a great importance and usability of this level in practice of IS2Keywords: transformation, MDA, CIM, PIM, UML, DFD. development now our research activity is focused to this highest level of abstraction – CIM and its possible transformation to the lower PIM level. In this article we are presenting a possible solution of CIM modeling and its analytic method of transformation to PIM.

  12. CYP1-mediated antiproliferative activity of dietary flavonoids in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P.; Ruparelia, Ketan; Arroo, Randolph R.J.; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2009-01-01

    Among the different mechanisms proposed to explain the cancer-protecting effect of dietary flavonoids, substrate-like interactions with cytochrome P450 CYP1 enzymes have recently been explored. In the present study, the metabolism of the flavonoids chrysin, baicalein, scutellarein, sinensetin and genkwanin by recombinant CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and CYP1A2 enzymes, as well as their antiproliferative activity in MDA-MB-468 human breast adenocarcinoma and MCF-10A normal breast cell lines, were investigated. Baicalein and 6-hydroxyluteolin were the only conversion products of chrysin and scutellarein metabolism by CYP1 family enzymes, respectively, while baicalein itself was not metabolized further. Sinensetin and genkwanin produced a greater number of metabolites and were shown to inhibit strongly in vitro proliferation of MDA-MB-468 cells at submicromolar and micromolar concentrations, respectively, without essentially affecting the viability of MCF-10A cells. Cotreatment of the CYP1 family inhibitor acacetin reversed the antiproliferative activity noticed for the two flavones in MDA-MB-468 cells to 13 and 14 μM respectively. In contrast chrysin, baicalein and scutellarein inhibited proliferation of MDA-MB-468 cells to a lesser extent than sinensetin and genkwanin. The metabolism of genkwanin to apigenin and of chrysin to baicalein was favored by CYP1B1 and CYP1A1, respectively. Taken together the data suggests that CYP1 family enzymes enhance the antiproliferative activity of dietary flavonoids in breast cancer cells, through bioconversion to more active products.

  13. Going Concern Opinions and Management's Forward Looking Disclosures: Evidence from the MD&A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enev, M.; Geiger, Marshall; Gold, A.H.; Wallage, P.

    In this study we examine the relationship between the auditor’s going concern opinion and management’s forward-looking disclosures in the Management’s Discussion and Analysis (MD&A) section of 10-K filings. The research objective is two-fold and addresses whether the presence of a going concern

  14. Collection and measurement of atmospheric contaminants during Skylab AM/MDA unmanned altitude chamber test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The analytical data obtained from both cryogenic and grab sampling of the atmosphere of the Skylab AM/MDA during an 84 hour unmanned chamber run are reported. The level of contaminants found at different points of the test chamber are tabulated. The results indicate that there was no clear trend of increasing or decreasing contaminant levels during the test run.

  15. Enterovirus 2Apro targets MDA5 and MAVS in infected cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Qian; Langereis, Martijn A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304823597; Lork, Marie; Nguyen, Mai; Hato, Stanleyson V; Lanke, Kjerstin; Emdad, Luni; Bhoopathi, Praveen; Fisher, Paul B; Lloyd, Richard E; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156614723

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) MDA5 and RIG-I are key players in the innate antiviral response. Upon recognition of viral RNA, they interact with MAVS, eventually inducing type I interferon production. The interferon induction pathway is commonly targeted by viruses. How enteroviruses

  16. Enterovirus 2Apro targets MDA5 and MAVS in infected cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Q.; Langereis, M.A.; Lork, M.; Nguyen, M.H.; Hato, S.V.; Lanke, K.H.W.; Emdad, L.; Bhoopathi, P.; Fisher, P.B.; Lloyd, R.E.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van

    2014-01-01

    RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) MDA5 and RIG-I are key players in the innate antiviral response. Upon recognition of viral RNA, they interact with MAVS, eventually inducing type I interferon production. The interferon induction pathway is commonly targeted by viruses. How enteroviruses suppress

  17. PENGARUH SUPLEMENTASI MADU KELENGKENG TERHADAP KADAR TSA DAN MDA TIKUS PUTIH YANG DIINDUKSI TIMBAL (Pb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamilatussaniah Kamilatussaniah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Timbal (Pb merupakan salah satu logam berat yang berasal dari emisi pembakaran bahan bakar. Peningkatan penggunaan bahan bakar pada mesin industri dan kendaraan bermotor menyebabkan peningkatan kadar Pb di udara. Masuknya Pb ke dalam tubuh akan mengganggu keseimbangan molekul lain sehingga menjadi radikal bebas. Ketidakseimbangan antara radikal bebas dengan antioksidan menyebabkan stres oksidatif yang ditandai dengan menurunnya total satus antioksidan (TSA dan meningkatnya malondialdehid (MDA. Madu kelengkeng adalah suplemen kesehatan yang mengandung flavonoid, vitamin C, vitamin E dan beta karoten yang berperan sebagai antioksidan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh madu kelengkeng terhadap kadar TSA dan MDA darah tikus putih yang diinduksi Pb. Desain penelitian ini adalah eksperimental dengan 25 ekor tikus putih jantan galur Wistar yang dibagi dalam 5 kelompok, yaitu kelompok A (tikus normal, B (tikus dengan induksi Pb 10 mg/kgBB dan C, D, E merupakan kelompok perlakuan suplementasi madu secara berturut-turut 0,45, 0,9, 1,8 ml/200 gramBB dan induksi Pb 10 mg/kgBB selama 14 hari. Data TSA dan MDA dianalisis menggunakan one way anova dan uji LSD untuk mengetahui perbedaan setiap kelompok. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan madu dengan dosis 1,8 ml/200 gramBB dapat meningkatkan kadar TSA dan menurunkan kadar MDA secara signifikan. Simpulan dari penelitian ini adalah madu dapat meningkatkan kadar TSA dan menurunkan kadar MDA pada tikus putih yang diinduksi Pb. Lead (Pb is heavy metal which comes from waste fuel emissions. Increased use of fuel in industrial machinery and vehicles causes increased levels of lead in the air. The entry of Pb into the body will disturb the ballance other molecules and became a free radicals. The imbalance between free radicals and antioxidants cause oxidative stress which characterized by decreased total antioxidant statue (TAS and increased malondialdehid (MDA. Longan honey is health suplement which

  18. Development and evaluation of a radioimmunoassay for the detection of amphetamine and related compounds in biological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, P.A.; Bal, T.S.; Law, B.; Moffat, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the detection of amphetamine and its analogues in blood and urine without any pretreatment of the samples. It is based on a commercially available antiserum and a [ 125 I] iodinated derivative of amphetamine. The assay can detect low levels of amphetamine (less than 10 ng ml - 1 ) in very small samples (50 μl) of blood and urine. It is cheap (3 pence per test), rapid, simple to perform and is specific for compounds closely related to amphetamine. A high, positive correlation was obtained (r = 0.93) when results of the analyses of urine samples from volunteers who had ingested amphetamine were compared with those produced by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. The assay has proved very useful for the detection of amphetamine and closely related compounds in biological fluids. (author)

  19. Differential effects of the ascorbyl and tocopheryl derivative on the methamphetamine-induced toxic behavior and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Shinobu; Mori, Tomohisa; Kanazawa, Hideko; Sawaguchi, Toshiko

    2007-01-01

    A previous study showed that high doses of methamphetamine induce self-injurious behavior (SIB) in rodents. Furthermore, the combination of methamphetamine and morphine increased lethality in mice. We recently surmised that the rise in SIB and mortality induced by methamphetamine and/or morphine may be related to oxidative stress. The present study was designed to determine whether an antioxidant could inhibit SIB or mortality directly induced by methamphetamine and/or morphine. The SIB induced by 20 mg/kg of methamphetamine was abolished by the administration of Na L-ascorbyl-2-phosphate (APS: 300 mg/kg), but not Na DL-α-tocopheryl phosphate (TPNa: 200 mg/kg). In contrast, APS (300 mg/kg) and TPNa (200 mg/kg) each significantly attenuated the lethality induced by methamphetamine and morphine. The present study showed that the signal intensity of superoxide adduct was increased by 20 mg/kg of methamphetamine in the heart and lungs, and methamphetamine plus morphine tended to increase superoxide adduct in all of the tissues measured by ESR spin trap methods. Adduct signal induced in brain by methamphetamine administration increased in significance, but in mouse administrated methamphetamine plus morphine. There are differential effects of administration of methamphetamine and coadministration of methamphetamine plus morphine on adduct signal. These results suggest that APS and TPNa are effective for reducing methamphetamine-induced toxicity and/or toxicological behavior. While APS and TPNa each affected methamphetamine- and/or morphine-induced toxicology and/or toxicological behavior, indicating that both drugs have antioxidative effects, their effects differed

  20. At the borders, on the edge: use of injected methamphetamine in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Patricia; Patricia, Case; Ramos, Rebeca; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Firestone-Cruz, Michelle; Pollini, Robin A; Fraga, Miguel A; Patterson, Thomas L; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2008-02-01

    Injection drug use is of increasing concern along the US-Mexico border where Tijuana and Ciudad (Cd.) Juarez are located. Methamphetamine has long been manufactured and trafficked through Mexico, with low rates of use within Mexico. With methamphetamine use now considered epidemic in the United States, and with associated individual and community harms such as HIV, STDs, domestic violence and crime, there is concern that rates of methamphetamine in the Northwestern border regions of Mexico may be rising. We conducted a qualitative study to explore the context of injection drug use in Tijuana and Cd. Juarez and included questions about methamphetamine. Guided in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 male and 10 female injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana and 15 male and 8 female IDUs in Cd. Juarez (total N = 43). Topics included types of drug used, injection settings, access to sterile needles and environmental influences. Interviews were taped, transcribed verbatim and translated. Content analysis was conducted to identify themes. The median age of injectors in both cities was 30. Methamphetamine was injected, either alone or in combination with other drugs by injectors in both Tijuana (85%) and Cd. Juarez (17%) in the 6 months previous to interview. Several important themes emerged with respect to methamphetamine use in both cities. IDUs in both cities considered methamphetamine to be widely used in Tijuana and infrequently used in Cd. Juarez, while the converse was true for cocaine. In both cities, stimulant (either cocaine or methamphetamine) use was widespread, with 85% in Tijuana and 83% in Cd. Juarez reporting current use of a stimulant, most often used in combination with heroin. Some injectors reported knowledge of local manufacturing and one had direct experience in making methamphetamine; some cross-border use and trafficking was reported. Injectors reported concerns or experience with serious health effects of methamphetamine such as abscesses or

  1. Examining the role of methamphetamine in permanency: A competing risks analysis of reunification, guardianship, and adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Becci A; Brook, Jody; Lloyd, Margaret H

    2015-03-01

    Parental methamphetamine use has drawn significant attention in recent years. Despite prior research that shows that parental substance abuse is a risk factor for lengthy foster care stay, little is known about the effect of specific types of substance use on permanency. This study sought to compare the impact of parental methamphetamine use to alcohol use, other drug use, and polysubstance use on the timing of 3 types of permanency: reunification, guardianship, and adoption. Using an entry cohort of 16,620 children who had entered foster care during a 5-year period, competing risks event history models were conducted for each permanency type. Findings showed that, after controlling for several case characteristics, parent illicit drug use significantly impacted the timing of the 3 types of permanency, but alcohol use did not. Methamphetamine, other drug, and polysubstance with methamphetamine use were associated with lower rates of reunification and higher rates of adoption. Guardianship was also predicted by other drug and polysubstance use without methamphetamine; however, methamphetamine use was not associated with guardianship. Notably, the methamphetamine groups comprised the youngest children and had the shortest median time to adoption. Results suggest that type of parental substance use is predictive of permanency exits and that parental illicit drug use may require tailored strategies for improving permanency outcomes. Further implications of the findings are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Methamphetamine: An Update on Epidemiology, Pharmacology, Clinical Phenomenology, and Treatment Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Kelly E.; Ray, Lara A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite initial reports of a decline in use in the early 2000s, methamphetamine remains a significant public health concern with known neurotoxic and neurocognitive effects to the user. The goal of this review is to update the literature on methamphetamine use and addiction since its assent to peak popularity in 1990s. Methods Specifically, we first review recent epidemiological reports with a focus on methamphetamine accessibility, changes in use and disorder prevalence rates over time, and accurate estimates of the associated burden of care to the individual and society. Second, we review methamphetamine pharmacology literature with emphasis on the structural and functional neurotoxic effects associated with repeated use of the drug. Third, we briefly outline the findings on methamphetamine-related neurocognitive deficits as assessed via behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms. Lastly, we review the clinical presentation of methamphetamine addiction and the evidence supporting the available psychosocial and pharmacological treatments within the context of an addiction biology framework. Conclusion Taken together, this review provides a broad-based update of the available literature covering methamphetamine research over the past two decades and concludes with recommendations for future research. PMID:25176528

  3. Presence and persistence of psychotic symptoms in cocaine- versus methamphetamine-dependent participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, James J; Kalechstein, Ari D; De La Garza, Richard; Newton, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare and contrast psychotic symptoms reported by cocaine- and methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Participants included 27 cocaine-dependent and 25 methamphetamine-dependent males, as well as 15 cocaine-dependent and 18 methamphetamine-dependent females. After screening, participants were excluded if they met criteria for any Axis I diagnosis other than nicotine dependence, or methamphetamine or cocaine dependence (ie, participants had to use either methamphetamine or cocaine but were excluded if they met dependence criteria for both). The participants were administered the newly developed Psychotic Symptom Assessment Scale (PSAS), which assesses psychotic symptoms. A high proportion of both cocaine- and methamphetamine-dependent men and women reported delusions of paranoia and auditory hallucinations. However, during the abstinent and intoxicated conditions, methamphetamine-dependent men and women were more likely than cocaine-dependent men and women to report psychotic symptoms. Future studies will compare psychotic symptoms reported by non-dependent recreational stimulant users to stimulant-dependent individuals.

  4. Evaluation of methamphetamine-associated socioeconomic status and addictive behaviors, and their impact on oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Niklas; Rohleder, Nils H; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Haertel-Petri, Roland; Kesting, Marco R

    2015-11-01

    Chronic methamphetamine abuse can lead to multiple health hazards. In particular, the substance is associated with devastating effects on oral health including symptoms such as rampant caries, gingiva inflammation, and xerostomia, whereby the term "Meth Mouth" occurs in the current literature. However, "Meth Mouth" pathology is primarily described on the basis of individual cases or has been evaluated without consideration of the mass of potential influencing factors. Therefore, we have conducted a systematic study to investigate the effects of accompanying factors and circumstances on oral health in cases of chronic methamphetamine abuse. In cooperation with two centers for addiction medicine, we assessed the data of 100 chronic methamphetamine users and 100 matched-pair controls between March 2012 and November 2013. We investigated their socioeconomic status, details of methamphetamine consumption behavior, collateral consumption of sugar beverages, nicotine alcohol, and other addictive substances including cannabis, opioids, other stimulants, and hallucinogens, and dental care. We found considerably greater unstable social circumstances, a high collateral consumption of substances with pathogenic potential for the stomatognathic system, and significantly poorer dental care in the methamphetamine-user group. Various factors have to be considered with regard to methamphetamine use and its influence on oral health. These factors can trigger potential damage by the drug methamphetamine possibly leading to the symptoms of "Meth Mouth", and should be considered in prevention and therapy strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Creating visual differences: Methamphetamine users perceptions of anti-meth campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Whitney; Copes, Heith; Linnemann, Travis

    2017-01-01

    Because of increased law enforcement and subsequent media attention, methamphetamine users appear in the public's imagination as diseased, zombie-like White trash. We explore methamphetamine users' perceptions about whether the images, people, and situations in anti-methamphetamine campaigns reflect their own lives and experiences using meth. To explore these perceptions, we used photo-elicitation interviews with 47 people who used methamphetamine (30 former and 17 active). Specifically, we presented participants with images from the Faces of Meth and the Montana Meth Project campaigns to stimulate discussion. We found that participants believed these ads did not reflect their personal experiences and consequently were ineffective at curtailing their own methamphetamine use. They believed that the ads represented a certain type of methamphetamine user, particularly those they defined as dysfunctional users. They created symbolic boundaries between themselves and those portrayed in the ads to show how they differed, which allowed them to believe that the ads were not relevant to their experiences. Findings suggest that there are unintended consequences to inauthentic/dramatic imagery. Participants did not believe they were like those in the ads-thus saw no reason to quit or seek help. Consequently, overly stigmatizing portraits of users may act as barriers to desistence. The findings have implications for designing anti-methamphetamine campaigns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Trends in Production, Trafficking and Consumption of Methamphetamine and Cocaine in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Case, Patricia; Ramos, Rebeca; Magis-Rodríguez, Carlos; Bucardo, Jesus; Patterson, Thomas L.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade, Mexico has experienced a significant increase in trafficking of cocaine and trafficking and production of methamphetamine. An estimated 70% of U.S. cocaine originating in South America passes through the Central America-Mexico corridor. Mexico-based groups are now believed to control 70%–90% of methamphetamine production and distribution in the U.S. Increased availability of these drugs at reduced prices has led to a parallel rise in local drug consumption. Methamphetamine abuse is now the primary reason for seeking drug user treatment in a number of cities, primarily in northwestern Mexico. While cocaine and methamphetamine use have been linked with the sex trade and high risk behaviors such as shooting gallery attendance and unprotected sex in other settings, comparatively little is known about the risk behaviors associated with use of these drugs in Mexico, especially for methamphetamines. We review historical aspects and current trends in cocaine and methamphetamine production, trafficking and consumption in Mexico, with special emphasis on the border cities of Ciudad Juarez and Tijuana. Additionally, we discuss the potential public health consequences of cocaine use and the recent increase in methamphetamine use, especially in regards to the spread of bloodborne and other infections, in an effort to inform appropriate public health interventions. PMID:16603456

  7. Methamphetamine: an update on epidemiology, pharmacology, clinical phenomenology, and treatment literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Kelly E; Ray, Lara A

    2014-10-01

    Despite initial reports of a decline in use in the early 2000s, methamphetamine remains a significant public health concern with known neurotoxic and neurocognitive effects to the user. The goal of this review is to update the literature on methamphetamine use and addiction since its assent to peak popularity in 1990s. We first review recent epidemiological reports with a focus on methamphetamine accessibility, changes in use and disorder prevalence rates over time, and accurate estimates of the associated burden of care to the individual and society. Second, we review methamphetamine pharmacology literature with emphasis on the structural and functional neurotoxic effects associated with repeated use of the drug. Third, we briefly outline the findings on methamphetamine-related neurocognitive deficits as assessed via behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms. Lastly, we review the clinical presentation of methamphetamine addiction and the evidence supporting the available psychosocial and pharmacological treatments within the context of an addiction biology framework. Taken together, this review provides a broad-based update of the available literature covering methamphetamine research over the past two decades and concludes with recommendations for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Review of Methamphetamine Dependence and Withdrawal Treatment: A Focus on Anxiety Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellem, Tracy L

    2016-12-01

    Rates of anxiety disorders among individuals who use methamphetamine are estimated to be as high as 30.2%. The presence of an anxiety disorder in methamphetamine users is associated with higher rates of relapse, non-adherence to treatment and poorer outcomes relative to methamphetamine users without an anxiety disorder. A review investigating current treatment options for methamphetamine dependence or withdrawal from methamphetamine was conducted using PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO. The focus of the review was trials that utilized an intervention and collected anxiety as an outcome measure. Seven studies were included in the review, and five of these studies examined a pharmacotherapy option, one studied a psychosocial intervention and one study investigated exercise as an intervention. Some of the pharmacotherapy studies and the study of exercise were associated with improvements in mood and/or a reduction in methamphetamine use. Concerns of sample size and measurement of anxiety were raised. Future well-designed research with large sample sizes is warranted to examine how to manage anxiety among methamphetamine users. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. HIV Risk Behavior Among Methamphetamine Users Entering Substance Abuse Treatment in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Christina S; Lion, Ryan R; Cordero, Daniella M; Watt, Melissa H; Joska, John A; Gouse, Hetta; Burnhams, Warren

    2016-10-01

    South Africa is experiencing a growing methamphetamine problem, and there is concern that methamphetamine use may accelerate HIV transmission. There has been little research on the HIV prevention needs of methamphetamine users receiving substance abuse treatment in South Africa. This study assessed the prevalence and correlates of HIV risk behaviors among 269 methamphetamine users entering substance abuse treatment in two clinics in Cape Town. The prevalence of sexual risk behaviors was high among sexually active participants: 34 % multiple partners, 26 % unprotected intercourse with a casual partner, and 24 % sex trading for money/methamphetamine. The strongest predictor of all sexual risk behaviors was concurrent other drug use. Over half had not been HIV tested in the past year, and 25 % had never been tested, although attitudes toward HIV testing were overwhelmingly positive. This population of primarily heterosexual, non-injecting methamphetamine users is a high-risk group in need of targeted HIV prevention interventions. Substance abuse treatment is an ideal setting in which to reach methamphetamine users for HIV services.

  10. Treatment outcomes for methamphetamine users receiving outpatient counselling from the Stimulant Treatment Program in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKetin, Rebecca; Dunlop, Adrian J; Holland, Rohan M; Sutherland, Rachel A; Baker, Amanda L; Salmon, Allison M; Hudson, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document treatment outcomes for methamphetamine users receiving outpatient counselling from the Stimulant Treatment Program (STP) in Australia. Clients attending the STP for methamphetamine use (n = 105) were assessed on entry to the service and at 3 (n = 86) and 6 months (n = 83) after starting treatment. At each interview methamphetamine use (days of use, severity of dependence), other drug use and health and social functioning (HIV risk behaviour, crime, disability, psychotic symptoms and hostility) were assessed for the past month. Participants received a median of six counselling sessions (interquartile range 1-11) over a period of 89 days (interquartile range 41-148 days). Past month methamphetamine use fell from 79% at treatment entry to 53% at the 3-month follow-up (P methamphetamine were more common among younger participants, those who had no history of drug treatment and those without concurrent heroin use. Methamphetamine users entering the STP showed reductions in methamphetamine use and improvements in their mental health after treatment. Improved treatment responses are needed to address polydrug use and other harms within in this population. © 2012 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  11. Methamphetamine accelerates cellular senescence through stimulation of de novo ceramide biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Astarita

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine is a highly addictive psychostimulant that causes profound damage to the brain and other body organs. Post mortem studies of human tissues have linked the use of this drug to diseases associated with aging, such as coronary atherosclerosis and pulmonary fibrosis, but the molecular mechanism underlying these findings remains unknown. Here we used functional lipidomics and transcriptomics experiments to study abnormalities in lipid metabolism in select regions of the brain and, to a greater extent, peripheral organs and tissues of rats that self-administered methamphetamine. Experiments in various cellular models (primary mouse fibroblasts and myotubes allowed us to investigate the molecular mechanisms of systemic inflammation and cellular aging related to methamphetamine abuse. We report now that methamphetamine accelerates cellular senescence and activates transcription of genes involved in cell-cycle control and inflammation by stimulating production of the sphingolipid messenger ceramide. This pathogenic cascade is triggered by reactive oxygen species, likely generated through methamphetamine metabolism via cytochrome P450, and involves the recruitment of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB to induce expression of enzymes in the de novo pathway of ceramide biosynthesis. Inhibitors of NF-κB signaling and ceramide formation prevent methamphetamine-induced senescence and systemic inflammation in rats self-administering the drug, attenuating their health deterioration. The results suggest new therapeutic strategies to reduce the adverse consequences of methamphetamine abuse and improve effectiveness of abstinence treatments.

  12. Improved quantification of a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit for measuring anti-MDA5 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gono, Takahisa; Okazaki, Yuka; Murakami, Akihiro; Kuwana, Masataka

    2018-04-09

    To compare the quantitative performance for measuring anti-MDA5 antibody titer of two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) systems: an in-house ELISA and the commercial MESACUP TM anti-MDA5 test. Anti-MDA5 antibody titer was measured in sera from 70 patients with dermatomyositis using an in-house ELISA and the MESACUP TM anti-MDA5 test side-by-side. For the commercial ELISA kit, serum samples diluted 1:101 were used according to the manufacturer's protocol, but serial dilutions of sera were also examined to identify the optimal serum dilution for quantification. The anti-MDA5 antibody titers measured by the in-house and commercial ELISAs were positively correlated with each other (r = 0.53, p = .0001), but the antibody titer measured by the commercial ELISA was less sensitive to change after medical treatment, and 37 (80%) of 46 anti-MDA5-positive sera had antibody titer exceeding the quantification range specified by the manufacturer (≥150 index). Experiments using diluted serum samples revealed that diluting the sera 1:5050 improved the quantitative performance of the MESACUP TM anti-MDA5 test, including a better correlation with the in-house ELISA results and an increased sensitivity to change. We improved the ability of the commercial ELISA kit to quantify anti-MDA5 antibody titer by altering its protocol.

  13. MDA and GSH-Px activity in transition dairy cows under seasonal variations and their relationship with reproductive performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colakoglu Hatice Esra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the blood glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and malondialdehyde (MDA levels under seasonal variations in dairy cows during transition period, and to assess the relationship between chosen reproductive parameters, GSH-Px, and MDA.

  14. Acute lead poisoning in two users of illicit methamphetamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allcott, J.V. III; Barnhart, R.A.; Mooney, L.A.

    1987-07-31

    Acute lead poisoning can present a difficult diagnostic dilemma, with symptoms that mimic those of hepatitis, nephritis, and encephalopathy. The authors report two cases in intravenous methamphetamine users who presented with abnormal liver function values, low hematocrit values, basophilic stippling of red blood cells, and elevated blood lead levels. Both patients excreted large amounts of lead in their urine after treatment with edetic acid, followed by resolution of their symptoms. Lead contamination was proved in one drug sample. Basophilic stippling of the red blood cells was the one key laboratory result that led to the definitive diagnosis in both cases.

  15. Methamphetamine and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Gabriel Zuloaga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychostimulants such as methamphetamine (MA induce significant alterations in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. These changes in HPA axis function are associated with altered stress-related behaviors and might contribute to addictive processes such as relapse. In this mini-review we discuss acute and chronic effects of MA (adult and developmental exposure on the HPA axis, including effects on HPA axis associated genes/proteins, brain regions, and behaviors such as anxiety and depression. A better understanding of the mechanisms through which MA affects the HPA axis may lead to more effective treatment strategies for MA addiction.

  16. Amphetamine use and its associated factors in body builders: a study from Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angoorani, Hooman; Narenjiha, Hooman; Tayyebi, Behnoosh; Ghassabian, Akhgar; Ahmadi, Gelareh; Assari, Shervin

    2012-05-09

    Epidemiological studies on all types of illicit drug use among athletes are essential for both the sport community and drug control achievements. Here, we investigated the prevalence and associated factors of amphetamine use in body builders in Tehran, Iran, 2007. This study is a secondary analysis of a substance use survey done in 103 randomly selected gymnasia in Tehran (capital city of Iran). The survey was conducted from November 2007 to January 2008 and included 843 randomly selected bodybuilders (aged 40 years or less). By interviews via questionnaires the following data were obtained: age, job, marital status, education level, housing status, average monthly family income, number of family members, gymnasium area (m(2)), number of trainers, number of gymnasium members, initiation time (months), weekly duration of the sporting activity (h), monthly cost of the sporting activity, purpose of participating in sporting activity, and history of anabolic steroid and amphetamine use. One hundred twenty (13.3%) body builders reported a history of amphetamine use. According to the results of regression analysis, being married (risk ratio - RR = 0.540), and participating in body building to enhance self-esteem (RR = 0.423) or to enhance sport performance (RR = 0.545) had protective effects on amphetamine use. However, having university qualifications (RR = 1.843), using anabolic steroids (RR = 1.803) and participating in sport to maintain fitness (RR = 2.472) were linked to increased risk of amphetamine use. Well-educated bodybuilders were more likely to use amphetamines, and why this is so needs to be discovered. If further studies show that they are not aware of the dangers associated with amphetamine use, providing them with information should be considered.

  17. Response of CEDIA amphetamines assay after a single dose of bitter orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, DiemThuy T; Bui, Linda T; Ambrose, Peter J

    2006-04-01

    Bitter orange has recently been substituted as an ingredient in many "ephedra-free" dietary supplements used for weight loss. The primary active ingredient in bitter orange is synephrine. Previous reports have documented false-positive results from ephedrine with urine amphetamine assays. Because of the similarity in chemical structure of ephedrine and synephrine, it is hypothesized that ingestion of a bitter orange supplement may have the potential to cause false-positive results with urine amphetamine assays. The purpose of this study was to determine the response of the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay after ingestion of bitter orange. Six healthy adult male volunteers were administered a single oral dose of Nature's Way Bitter Orange, a 900-mg dietary supplement extract standardized to 6% synephrine. Urine specimens were collected at baseline and 3 and 6 hours post-administration. Additional urine specimens were collected from 1 subject at 9, 12, and 15 hours after administration. All specimens were analyzed by the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay. Urine specific gravity and pH also were measured. All urine specimens demonstrated a negative response to the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay. Urine specific gravity ranged from 1.007 to 1.028, and pH ranged from 5.0 to 7.0; thus, reducing the possibility that the negative results were caused by diluted specimens or reduced excretion of synephrine into alkaline urine. This information will be of value when health care providers or those who interpret drug screens are asked to provide consultation regarding the interference of bitter orange supplements with the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay. A single-dose of Nature's Way Bitter Orange was not found to cause a false-positive response to the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay in 6 healthy adult male volunteers.

  18. Genetic variation of the ghrelin signalling system in individuals with amphetamine dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Suchankova

    Full Text Available The development of amphetamine dependence largely depends on the effects of amphetamine in the brain reward systems. Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, activates the reward systems and is required for reward induced by alcohol, nicotine, cocaine and amphetamine in mice. Human genetic studies have shown that polymorphisms in the pre-proghrelin (GHRL as well as GHS-R1A (GHSR genes are associated with high alcohol consumption, increased weight and smoking in males. Since the heritability factor underlying drug dependence is shared between different drugs of abuse, we here examine the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and haplotypes in the GHRL and GHSR, and amphetamine dependence. GHRL and GHSR SNPs were genotyped in Swedish amphetamine dependent individuals (n = 104 and controls from the general population (n = 310. A case-control analysis was performed and SNPs and haplotypes were additionally tested for association against Addiction Severity Interview (ASI composite score of drug use. The minor G-allele of the GHSR SNP rs2948694, was more common among amphetamine dependent individuals when compared to controls (pc  = 0.02. A significant association between the GHRL SNP rs4684677 and ASI composite score of drug use was also reported (pc  = 0.03. The haplotype analysis did not add to the information given by the individual polymorphisms. Although genetic variability of the ghrelin signalling system is not a diagnostic marker for amphetamine dependence and problem severity of drug use, the present results strengthen the notion that ghrelin and its receptor may be involved in the development of addictive behaviours and may thus serve as suitable targets for new treatments of such disorders.

  19. Short-term outcomes of mothers and infants exposed to antenatal amphetamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, J; Abdel-Latif, M E; Clark, R; Craig, F; Lui, K

    2010-01-01

    To determine the short-term outcomes of newborn infants and mothers exposed to antenatal amphetamines in the state of New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory during 2004. Amphetamine exposure was determined retrospectively using ICD-10 AM morbidity code searches of hospital medical records and from records of local drug and alcohol services. Records were reviewed on site. All public hospitals (n = 101) with obstetric services were included. Amphetamines were used by 200 (22.9%) of the 871 identified drug-using mothers. Most women (182, 91%) injected amphetamines intravenously. Compared with the other 669 drug users, amphetamine-using mothers were significantly more likely to use multiple classes of drugs (45.0% vs 7.8%), be subject to domestic violence (32.1% vs 17.5%), be homeless (14.8% vs 4.9%) and be involved with correctional services (19.8% vs 9.7%). The incidence of comorbid psychiatric illnesses were significantly higher (57.4% vs 41.7%) and their infants were more likely to be preterm (29.5% vs 20.4%), notified as children at risk (67.0% vs 32.8%), fostered before hospital discharge (14.5% vs 5.5%) and less likely to be breastfed (27.0% vs 41.6%). Amphetamine-exposed mothers and infants in public hospitals of NSW and the ACT are at significantly higher risk of adverse social and perinatal outcomes even when compared with mothers and infants exposed to other drugs of dependency. Increased vigilance for amphetamine exposure is recommended due to a high prevalence of use, especially in Australia, as a recreational drug.

  20. Neuroadaptations in the dentate gyrus following contextual cued reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Yoshio; Fannon, McKenzie J; Galinato, Melissa H; Steiner, Noah L; An, Michelle; Zemljic-Harpf, Alice E; Somkuwar, Sucharita S; Head, Brian P; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2018-02-13

    Abstinence from unregulated methamphetamine self-administration increases hippocampal dependent, context-driven reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking. The current study tested the hypothesis that alterations in the functional properties of granule cell neurons (GCNs) in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus in concert with altered expression of synaptic plasticity-related proteins and ultrastructural changes in the DG are associated with enhanced context-driven methamphetamine-seeking behavior. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in acute brain slices from methamphetamine naïve (controls) and methamphetamine experienced animals (during acute withdrawal, during abstinence, after extinction and after reinstatement). Spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and intrinsic excitability were recorded from GCNs. Reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking increased sEPSC frequency and produced larger amplitude responses in GCNs compared to controls and all other groups. Reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking reduced spiking capability in GCNs compared to controls, and all other groups, as indicated by reduced intrinsic spiking elicited by increasing current injections, membrane resistance and fast after hyperpolarization. In rats that reinstated methamphetamine seeking, these altered electrophysiological properties of GCNs were associated with enhanced expression of Fos, GluN2A subunits and PSD95 and reduced expression of GABA A subunits in the DG and enhanced expression of synaptic PSD in the molecular layer. The alterations in functional properties of GCNs and plasticity related proteins in the DG paralleled with no changes in structure of microglial cells in the DG. Taken together, our results demonstrate that enhanced reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking results in alterations in intrinsic spiking and spontaneous glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the GCNs and concomitant increases in neuronal activation of GCNs, and expression

  1. Sexual and reproductive health risks amongst female adolescents who use amphetamine-type stimulants and sell sex: a qualitative inquiry in Yunnan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-Dong; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Chai, Jia-Jia; Luo, Jian; Temmerman, Marleen; Luchters, Stanley

    2015-10-16

    China, as other Southeast Asian countries, has witnessed an increased use in amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) amongst urban youth. Amongst female adolescents who both sell sex and use ATS, risk behaviours are compounded resulting in even poorer health outcomes. However, limited knowledge exists on ATS use patterns and ATS-related risk behaviours, particularly in this context. This research aimed to improve the understanding of these issues amongst female adolescents who use ATS and sell sex, and to inform future programming. This study utilised monthly focus group discussions (four in total) with the same study participants in Yunnan, China. From within a drug-treatment programme, female adolescents who reported both a history of drug use and selling sex were purposively enrolled in the study. Participating adolescent females were aged 17-19 years and were all internal-migrants with low literacy. All reported polydrug use (mainly methamphetamine and heroin, whereas ecstasy and ketamine have been infrequently employed). Being less informed about risks of drug use and lack of sexual and reproductive health knowledge seemed to contribute to problematic drug use, rough and prolonged sexual intercourse, inconsistent condom use and ineffective contraceptive practice. For their income, participants largely relied on selling sex, which was frequently coupled with drug sharing services to clients. However, despite the practices, women did not self-identify as sex workers, and therefore did not think that existing intervention services targeting female sex workers were relevant to them. Moreover, criminalization and stigmatisation of drug use and selling sex impeded their access to care services. Current harm reduction and HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention services are unlikely to address the demand of female adolescents engaged in drug use and commercial sex. Our findings highlight that a comprehensive and coordinated harm reduction and sexual and

  2. A comparative study of the effects of methamphetamine on memory in existing and recovering addicts from a South African population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy van Wyk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Memory is a complex of systems by which an organism registers, stores and retrieves exposure toan event or experience. Literature purports that methamphetamine users and dependents havebeen found to exhibits signs of memory impairment. The aim of the research was to establishthe possible existence of significant differences in memory in current methamphetamine users,recovering methamphetamine users, and a matched drug naïve control group. Cognitivefunctioning was assessed via a neurocognitive test battery that examined the memory of14 current methamphetamine users, 17 recovering methamphetamine addicts, and 18 drugnaïve control participants who were matched according to the demographic variables of age,gender and educational status. The results indicated that recovering methamphetamine usersexperienced the greatest impairment in memory in comparison to both the control group andcurrent users of methamphetamine. The current users of methamphetamine also experiencedsome impairment in memory functioning in visual acquisition and retention. The poorperformance of the recovering addicts is explained by the juxtaposition of the stimulatingand supplemental effect of methamphetamine as experienced by the current users versus theneurotransmitter depletion and structural changes in the brain experienced by the recoveringaddicts. The control group showed a superior performance since they did not suffer from theneurotoxic effects of methamphetamine.

  3. Methamphetamine decreases CD4 T cell frequency and alters pro-inflammatory cytokine production in a model of drug abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Mariana M.; Napier, T. Celeste; Graves, Steven M.; Mahmood, Fareeha; Raeisi, Shohreh; Baum, Linda L.

    2015-01-01

    The reason co-morbid methamphetamine use and HIV infection lead to more rapid progression to AIDS is unclear. We used a model of methamphetamine self-administration to measure the effect of methamphetamine on the systemic immune system to better understand the comorbidity of methamphetamine and HIV. Catheters were implanted into the jugular veins of male, Sprague Dawley rats so they could self-administer methamphetamine (n = 18) or be given saline (control; n = 16) for 14 days. One day after the last self-administration session, blood and spleens were collected. We measured serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, intracellular IFN-γand TNF-α, and frequencies of CD4+, CD8+, CD200+ and CD11b/c+ lymphocytes in the spleen. Rats that self-administer methamphetamine had a lower frequency of CD4+ T cells, but more of these cells produced IFN-γ. Methamphetamine did not alter the frequency of TNF-α-producing CD4+ T cells. Methamphetamine using rats had a higher frequency of CD8+ T cells, but fewer of them produced TNF-α. CD11b/c and CD200 expression were unchanged. Serum cytokine levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 in methamphetamine rats were unchanged. Methamphetamine lifetime dose inversely correlated with serum TNF-α levels. Or data suggest that methamphetamine abuse may exacerbate HIV disease progression by activating CD4 T cells, making them more susceptible to HIV infection, and contributing to their premature demise. Methamphetamine may also increase susceptibility to HIV infection, explaining why African American men who have sex with men (MSM) and frequently use methamphetamine are at the highest risk of HIV infection. PMID:25678251

  4. Methamphetamine decreases CD4 T cell frequency and alters pro-inflammatory cytokine production in a model of drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Mariana M; Napier, T Celeste; Graves, Steven M; Mahmood, Fareeha; Raeisi, Shohreh; Baum, Linda L

    2015-04-05

    The reason co-morbid methamphetamine use and HIV infection lead to more rapid progression to AIDS is unclear. We used a model of methamphetamine self-administration to measure the effect of methamphetamine on the systemic immune system to better understand the co-morbidity of methamphetamine and HIV. Catheters were implanted into the jugular veins of male, Sprague Dawley rats so they could self-administer methamphetamine (n=18) or be given saline (control; n=16) for 14 days. One day after the last operant session, blood and spleens were collected. We measured serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, intracellular IFN-γ and TNF-α, and frequencies of CD4(+), CD8(+), CD200(+) and CD11b/c(+) lymphocytes in the spleen. Rats that self-administered methamphetamine had a lower frequency of CD4(+) T cells, but more of these cells produced IFN-γ. Methamphetamine did not alter the frequency of TNF-α-producing CD4(+) T cells. Methamphetamine using rats had a higher frequency of CD8(+) T cells, but fewer of them produced TNF-α. CD11b/c and CD200 expression were unchanged. Serum cytokine levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 in methamphetamine rats were unchanged. Methamphetamine lifetime dose inversely correlated with serum TNF-α levels. Our data suggest that methamphetamine abuse may exacerbate HIV disease progression by activating CD4 T cells, making them more susceptible to HIV infection, and contributing to their premature demise. Methamphetamine may also increase susceptibility to HIV infection, explaining why men who have sex with men (MSM) and frequently use methamphetamine are at the highest risk of HIV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND VASCULAR DAMAGE IN HYPOXIA PROCESSES. MALONDIALDEHYDE (MDA AS BIOMARKER FOR OXIDATIVE DAMAGE

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    Muñiz P

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the levels oxidative stress biomarkers are related with different diseases such as ischemia/reperfusion, cardiovascular, renal, aging, etc. One of these biomarkers is the malondialdehyde (MDA generated as resulted of the process of lipid peroxidation. This biomarker is increased under conditions of the oxidative stress. Their levels, have been frequently used to measure plasma oxidative damage to lipids by their atherogenic potential. Its half-life high and their reactivity allows it to act both inside and outside of cells and interaction with proteins and DNA involve their role in different pathophysiological processes. This paper presents an analysis of the use of MDA as a biomarker of oxidative stress and its implications associated pathologies such as cardiovascular diseases ago.

  6. Applying MDA to SDR for Space to Model Real-time Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaser, Tammy M.

    2007-01-01

    NASA space communications systems have the challenge of designing SDRs with highly-constrained Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) resources. A study is being conducted to assess the effectiveness of applying the MDA Platform-Independent Model (PIM) and one or more Platform-Specific Models (PSM) specifically to address NASA space domain real-time issues. This paper will summarize our experiences with applying MDA to SDR for Space to model real-time issues. Real-time issues to be examined, measured, and analyzed are: meeting waveform timing requirements and efficiently applying Real-time Operating System (RTOS) scheduling algorithms, applying safety control measures, and SWaP verification. Real-time waveform algorithms benchmarked with the worst case environment conditions under the heaviest workload will drive the SDR for Space real-time PSM design.

  7. The effects of d-govadine on conditioned place preference with d-amphetamine or food reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Maya O; Dias, Carine; Phillips, Anthony G

    2017-03-15

    Tetrahydroprotoberberines (THPB) have a high affinity for dopamine (DA) D1 and D2 receptors and may provide a novel treatment for drug addiction. We assessed the effects of the THPB d-govadine on the acquisition, expression, extinction and reinstatement of d-amphetamine-(1.5mg/kg, i.p.) induced conditioned place preference (CPP). Furthermore, the effects of d-govadine on conditioned association between contextual stimuli and a natural reward were examined using food-induced CPP. In separate experiments, rats received d-govadine (0, 0.5 or 1.0mg/kg, i.p.) before a) each d-amphetamine injection during conditioning, b) expression of amphetamine-induced CPP, c) each extinction session, d) amphetamine-induced reinstatement of CPP, or e) placement into a compartment containing food during conditioning. Although d-govadine had no effect on acquisition of amphetamine CPP, treatment with d-govadine during acquisition dose-dependently extinguished a preference for the amphetamine-associated context more quickly than vehicle treatment. Moreover, d-govadine treatment facilitated the extinction of amphetamine CPP when given repeatedly throughout the extinction phase. Although the expression of amphetamine CPP was not affected by d-govadine administered prior to the expression test, amphetamine-induced reinstatement of CPP following an extinction period was blocked by d-govadine (1.0mg/kg). The intermediate dose of d-govadine blocked the acquisition of food CPP, whereas the high dose facilitated extinction of this preference as compared to vehicle-treated animals. Therefore, d-govadine attenuates the maintenance of conditioned associations between contextual stimuli and amphetamine or food reward, as well as amphetamine-induced reinstatement of drug seeking behaviour. As such, d-govadine may be a candidate for further development as a pharmacological treatment of psychostimulant drug dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter activity is dispensable for MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane D Hall

    Full Text Available Calcium uptake through the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU is thought to be essential in regulating cellular signaling events, energy status, and survival. Functional dissection of the uniporter is now possible through the recent identification of the genes encoding for MCU protein complex subunits. Cancer cells exhibit many aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction associated with altered mitochondrial Ca2+ levels including resistance to apoptosis, increased reactive oxygen species production and decreased oxidative metabolism. We used a publically available database to determine that breast cancer patient outcomes negatively correlated with increased MCU Ca2+ conducting pore subunit expression and decreased MICU1 regulatory subunit expression. We hypothesized breast cancer cells may therefore be sensitive to MCU channel manipulation. We used the widely studied MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line to investigate whether disruption or increased activation of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake with specific siRNAs and adenoviral overexpression constructs would sensitize these cells to therapy-related stress. MDA-MB-231 cells were found to contain functional MCU channels that readily respond to cellular stimulation and elicit robust AMPK phosphorylation responses to nutrient withdrawal. Surprisingly, knockdown of MCU or MICU1 did not affect reactive oxygen species production or cause significant effects on clonogenic cell survival of MDA-MB-231 cells exposed to irradiation, chemotherapeutic agents, or nutrient deprivation. Overexpression of wild type or a dominant negative mutant MCU did not affect basal cloning efficiency or ceramide-induced cell killing. In contrast, non-cancerous breast epithelial HMEC cells showed reduced survival after MCU or MICU1 knockdown. These results support the conclusion that MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells do not rely on MCU or MICU1 activity for survival in contrast to previous findings in cells derived from cervical, colon, and

  9. [Dermatomyositis associated with anti-MDA5 antibodies and pneumocystis pneumonia: Two lethal cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymonier, M; Abed, S; Boyé, T; Barazzutti, H; Fournier, B; Morand, J-J

    2017-04-01

    Dermatomyositis associated with anti-MDA-5 autoantibodies is a recently-described clinical entity. Herein we report two lethal cases involving pneumocystis pneumonia. Case n o  1. A 56-year-old male patient developed cutaneous symptoms consistent with dermatomyositis without muscular involvement. Antinuclear antibodies were present and anti-MDA5 auto-antibodies were identified. The scan showed interstitial lung disease without infection. Significant improvement was obtained with corticosteroids. One month later, the patient presented acute respiratory illness (hypoxemia: PaO 2 60mmHg, exacerbation of lung disease evidenced by a scan, and diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia on bronchoalveolar lavage). He died despite appropriate antibiotic therapy and immunosuppressant therapy. Case n o  2. The second case concerned a 52-year-old Vietnamese man who developed more atypical cutaneous symptoms of dermatomyositis without muscular involvement. ANAb responses were positive (1/400) and MDA5 was present. The patient was treated with corticosteroids (40mg/d), hydroxychloroquine, and intravenous immunoglobulin. After significant improvement, the patient developed an acute respiratory illness due to superinfection with pneumocystis and he died despite specific treatment and cyclophosphamide bolus. In dermatomyositis, anti-MDA5 antibody screening is essential for the prognosis since the disease carries a risk of complication with severe lung disease. Bronchial fibroscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage should be considered at the time of diagnosis. Our two cases suggest the need for early screening for pneumocystis pneumonia in the event of respiratory distress and possibly for prophylactic treatment at the start of immunosuppressant therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Amphetamine, clobenzorex, and 4-hydroxyclobenzorex levels following multidose administration of clobenzorex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, J T; Valtier, S

    2001-04-01

    Clobenzorex (Asenlix) is an anorectic drug used as part of a weight-management program. The drug is metabolized by the body to amphetamine, which is then excreted in the urine, thus causing difficulty in interpretation of amphetamine-positive drug tests. Previous studies have shown that the parent drug and several metabolites are excreted in urine. Clobenzorex itself has been detected for as long as 29 h following administration of a single dose. However, the parent drug was not always detected in samples that contained amphetamine at > or =500 ng/mL, the administrative cutoff for a positive result. Consequently, the parent compound clobenzorex is not ideal for ascertaining whether the drug was the origin of the amphetamine. Several metabolites of clobenzorex have been shown to be detected for a longer period of time than the parent. One of these, a hydroxy metabolite, was shown to be detected for an extended period of time. In a study of urine samples provided following administration of a single 30-mg dose of this drug, 4-hydroxyclobenzorex could be detected for up to 91.5 h. More significantly, that study showed all samples that were positive for amphetamine also contained detectable amounts of 4-hydroxyclobenzorex. This metabolite proved to be easily detected and was typically found at higher levels than amphetamine in urine samples positive for amphetamine long after clobenzorex itself could no longer be detected. The present study analyzed samples from a controlled multidose administration (30 mg of clobenzorex daily for seven days) for the presence of 4-hydroxyclobenzorex. The analytical procedure used acid hydrolysis followed by liquid-liquid extraction and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis with monitoring of ions at m/z 125, 330, and 364 for 4-hydroxyclobenzorex and its 3-Cl regioisomer, which was used as an internal standard. Peak concentrations of 4-hydroxyclobenzorex ranged from 17,786 to 99,044 ng/mL. Most importantly, this study also

  11. Eustress and Malondialdehyde (MDA): Role of Panax Ginseng: Randomized Placebo Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kuraishy, Hayder M; Al-Gareeb, Ali I

    2017-07-01

    Objective: The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of Panax Ginseng on malondialdehyde (MDA) serum levels during eustress on healthy volunteers. Method: In this study, 65 healthy volunteers were recruited from students of a medical school, with the mean age of 22.61±3.63 years. The volunteers were divided into 2 groups: Group A included 35 participants who were treated by Panax Ginseng 500 mg/day, which was regarded as the treated group; group B included 30 participants treated by placebo 500 mg/day, which was regarded as the control group. Baseline data were obtained and then one month after the study, the participants were followed with respect to induction of psychological stress through daily psychomotor performance task and visual working memory accuracy testing. Stress was assessed by malondialdehyde (MDA) serum levels. Results: The participants in the control group showed significant increases in MDA serum levels (p = 0.0004), which were related to significant increases in perceived stress scale from pstress scale (p = 0.02). Conclusion: Panax Ginseng produced significant reduction in oxidative stress and augmented eustress level in healthy volunteers 1 month after therapy.

  12. A Knockin Reporter Allows Purification and Characterization of mDA Neurons from Heterogeneous Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ninuo; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Pengbo; Cui, Jun; Tep-Cullison, Chhavy; Hamerley, Tim; Lee, Hyun Joo; Palmer, Theo; Bothner, Brian; Lee, Jin Hyung; Pera, Renee Reijo

    2017-03-07

    Generation of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons from human pluripotent stem cells provides a platform for inquiry into basic and translational studies of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, heterogeneity in differentiation in vitro makes it difficult to identify mDA neurons in culture or in vivo following transplantation. Here, we report the generation of a human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line with a tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-RFP (red fluorescent protein) reporter. We validated that RFP faithfully mimicked TH expression during differentiation. Use of this TH-RFP reporter cell line enabled purification of mDA-like neurons from heterogeneous cultures with subsequent characterization of neuron transcriptional and epigenetic programs (global binding profiles of H3K27ac, H3K4me1, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine [5hmC]) at four different stages of development. We anticipate that the tools and data described here will contribute to the development of mDA neurons for applications in disease modeling and/or drug screening and cell replacement therapies for PD. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Protein Kinase G facilitates EGFR-mediated cell death in MDA-MB-468 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Nicole M.; Ceresa, Brian P., E-mail: brian.ceresa@louisville.edu

    2016-08-15

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase with critical implications in cell proliferation, migration, wound healing and the regulation of apoptosis. However, the EGFR has been shown to be hyper-expressed in a number of human malignancies. The MDA-MB-468 metastatic breast cell line is one example of this. This particular cell line hyper-expresses the EGFR and undergoes EGFR-mediated apoptosis in response to EGF ligand. The goal of this study was to identify the kinases that could be potential intermediates for the EGFR-mediated induction of apoptosis intracellularly. After identifying Cyclic GMP-dependent Protein Kinase G (PKG) as a plausible intermediate, we wanted to determine the temporal relationship of these two proteins in the induction of apoptosis. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in MDA-MB-468 cell viability, which was co-incident with increased PKG activity as measured by VASPSer239 phosphorylation. In addition, we observed a dose dependent decrease in cell viability, as well as an increase in apoptosis, in response to two different PKG agonists, 8-Bromo-cGMP and 8-pCPT-cGMP. MDA-MB-468 cells with reduced PKG activity had attenuated EGFR-mediated apoptosis. These findings indicate that PKG does not induce cell death via transphosphorylation of the EGFR. Instead, PKG activity occurs following EGFR activation. Together, these data indicate PKG as an intermediary in EGFR-mediated cell death, likely via apoptotic pathway.

  14. Isolation of low density lipoprotein (LDL with its modification by Copper ion and Malondialdehyde (MDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doosty M

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDLs is belived to be an important step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. During oxidation, LDL particle undergoes a large number of structural changes that alters its biological properties, so it becomes atherogenic. To study atherogenic proteins, usually two forms of modified LDLs, including Cu2+-oxidized LDL (ox-LDL and malondialdehyde (MDA modified LDL (mal-LDL are used. In this study, LDL was isolated from 72 ml freshly prepared plasma by sequential Floatation Ultracentrifugation (SFU, which resulted in separation of 12.5 mg LDL protein. LDL oxidation was accomplished in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS with 2µM cupric sulfate, and mal-LDL was prepared by incubating LDL in PBS with 0.5 M solution of freshly prepared MDA. These modifications were evaluated by measuring optical density at 234 nm, Thiobarbitoric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS, and electrophoretic mobility at pH 8.6. The increase of 234 nm absorption reflected initiation of LDL oxidation. TBARS of ox-LDL and mal-LDL was 80 Nm MAD/mg LDL protein and 400 nm MDA/mg LDL protein, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility of ox-LDL and mal-LDL, in respect to native LDL (n-LDL, were increased.

  15. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and anti-oxidant status in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumawat, Manjulata; Kharb, Simmi; Singh, Veena; Singh, Neelima; Singh, S K; Nada, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia in diabetes mellitus induce increased lipid peroxidation and peroxyl radical formation is an important mechanism in genesis of micro-angiopathy. We took up a study on oxidative stress as measured by lipid peroxidation marker, malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzyme status in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with and without retinopathy and compared them with a control non-diabetic group. MDA was significantly elevated (p diabetic groups whereas antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH), etc, were significantly decreased (p diabetes mellitus. The study included 100 subjects of age group 50-70 years, out of which 50 patients were non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) with retinopathy and rest 50 age and sex matched apparently healthy individuals (control group). The status of fasting blood sugar (FBS), postprandial blood sugar (PPBS), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (Tg), HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, VLDL- cholesterol, GPx, GR, CAT, SOD, MDA were determined. The results showed significant increase (p predict the risk of diabetic retinopathy.

  16. [Interstitial lung disease-associated with amyopathic dermatomyositis and anti-MDA5 autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerfaud-Valentin, M; Ahmad, K; Piegay, F; Fabien, N; Raphanel, B; Cordier, J-F; Cottin, V

    2014-11-01

    Amyopathic dermatomyositis associated with anti-MDA5 autoantibodies is a rare and very recently described clinical entity. A 58-year-old woman was admitted with subacute onset of dyspnea (NYHA class IV) associated with cough, oligoarthritis of the wrists, myalgia and intermittent fever. Examination demonstrated skin lesions with heliotrope rash, Gottron's papules, "mechanics hands", and basal inspiratory crackles on lung auscultation. Pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive ventilatory defect, with decreased carbon monoxide diffusion capacity and marked hypoxemia (PaO2 61 mmHg). The chest high-resolution computed tomography appearances were consistent with organizing pneumonia. Bronchoalveolar lavage differential cell count demonstrated 22 % neutrophils. Serum creatine kinase and electromyography were normal ; the serum ferritin level was elevated. Antinuclear antibodies were present and anti-MDA5 autoantibodies were identified. Significant improvement was obtained with systemic corticosteroids, later converted to mycophenolate mofetil as a steroid-sparing agent. Amyopathic dermatomyositis associated with anti-MDA5 autoantibodies shares some characteristics with those associated with anti-synthetase antibodies. Muscular involvement may be mild or absent. Early diagnosis and treatment may improve outcome. Copyright © 2014 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Protein Kinase G facilitates EGFR-mediated cell death in MDA-MB-468 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Nicole M.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase with critical implications in cell proliferation, migration, wound healing and the regulation of apoptosis. However, the EGFR has been shown to be hyper-expressed in a number of human malignancies. The MDA-MB-468 metastatic breast cell line is one example of this. This particular cell line hyper-expresses the EGFR and undergoes EGFR-mediated apoptosis in response to EGF ligand. The goal of this study was to identify the kinases that could be potential intermediates for the EGFR-mediated induction of apoptosis intracellularly. After identifying Cyclic GMP-dependent Protein Kinase G (PKG) as a plausible intermediate, we wanted to determine the temporal relationship of these two proteins in the induction of apoptosis. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in MDA-MB-468 cell viability, which was co-incident with increased PKG activity as measured by VASPSer239 phosphorylation. In addition, we observed a dose dependent decrease in cell viability, as well as an increase in apoptosis, in response to two different PKG agonists, 8-Bromo-cGMP and 8-pCPT-cGMP. MDA-MB-468 cells with reduced PKG activity had attenuated EGFR-mediated apoptosis. These findings indicate that PKG does not induce cell death via transphosphorylation of the EGFR. Instead, PKG activity occurs following EGFR activation. Together, these data indicate PKG as an intermediary in EGFR-mediated cell death, likely via apoptotic pathway.

  18. Obesity And Laboratory Diets Affects Tissue Malondialdehyde (MDA) Levels In Obese Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Parimal; Scott, Joseph; Holley, Andy; Hakkak, Reza

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the interaction of obesity and laboratory diets on tissue malondialdehyde levels in rats. Female Zucker obese and lean rats were maintained on either regular grain-based diet or purified casein diet for two weeks, orally gavaged at day 50 with 65 mg/kg DMBA and sacrificed 24 hrs later. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured in blood and harvested tissues. Data were recorded as mean ± SEM and analyzed statistically. Results show that the obese group on purified casein diet had reduction of MDA levels in the brain, duodenum, liver, lung and kidney tissues as compared to lean group, p <0.05. Obese group on grain-based diet showed significant increase in MDA levels only in the duodenum, p <0.05. We conclude that dietary intervention differentially affects the oxidative markers in obese rats. It appears that purified casein diets were more effective than grain-based diet in reduction of oxidative stress in obese rats.

  19. Verbal memory improved by D-amphetamine: influence of the testing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeuws, Inge; Deroost, Natacha; Soetens, Eric

    2010-07-01

    The improvement of long-term retention of verbal memory after an acute administration of D-amphetamine in recall and recognition tasks has been ascribed to an influence of the drug on memory consolidation. Because recent research has demonstrated that intermediate testing is of overriding importance for retention, we investigated whether D-amphetamine modulates the repeated testing effect in verbal long-term recognition. Forty men participated in two double blind placebo controlled studies. In Experiment 1, we manipulated the number of recognition tests and in Experiment 2, we compared repeated with nonrepeated testing of the same items. Drug effects were observed on delayed tests only, leaving immediate recognition unaffected. Number of intermediate recognition tests and repeated testing of the same items were not affected by D-amphetamine. We conclude that the D-amphetamine memory enhancement is not related to the testing effect. This result supports that D-amphetamine modulates other aspects of the consolidation process, probably related to context effects. (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Associations Between Behavioral and Neural Correlates of Inhibitory Control and Amphetamine Reward Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weafer, Jessica; Gorka, Stephanie M; Hedeker, Donald; Dzemidzic, Mario; Kareken, David A; Phan, K Luan; de Wit, Harriet

    2017-08-01

    Poor inhibitory control and sensitivity to drug reward are two significant risk factors for drug abuse. Although the two have been largely viewed as separate and independent risk factors, there is new evidence to suggest that they may be related at both the behavioral and neural level. This study examined associations between behavioral and neural correlates of inhibitory control and sensitivity to the subjective rewarding effects of amphetamine in humans. Healthy volunteers (n=63) first completed the stop signal task, a behavioral measure of inhibitory control. Then they participated in four sessions in which they received amphetamine (20 mg) and placebo in alternating order, providing self-report measures of euphoria and arousal at regular intervals. Finally, a subset of participants (n=38) underwent an fMRI scan to assess neural correlates of inhibitory control. In the first phase of the study, participants with longer stop signal reaction time (SSRT) reported greater amphetamine-induced euphoria and stimulation than those with shorter SSRT. In the second phase, fMRI of response inhibition showed the expected activation in right prefrontal regions. Further, individuals who exhibited less activation in the right middle frontal gyrus during the inhibition task reported more euphoria during the amphetamine sessions. This study is the first to show associations between poor inhibitory control and amphetamine reward sensitivity at both behavioral and neural levels in humans. These findings extend our understanding of risk for drug abuse in individuals with poor inhibitory control and suggest novel targets for prevention efforts.

  1. Behavioral metabolomics analysis identifies novel neurochemical signatures in methamphetamine sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Daniel E.; McClay, Joseph L.; Vunck, Sarah A.; Batman, Angela M.; Vann, Robert E.; Clark, Shaunna L.; Souza, Renan P.; Crowley, James J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.; Beardsley, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization has been widely studied in animal models and is theorized to reflect neural modifications associated with human psychostimulant addiction. While the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is known to play a role, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying behavioral sensitization remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we conducted the first metabolomics analysis to globally characterize neurochemical differences associated with behavioral sensitization. Methamphetamine-induced sensitization measures were generated by statistically modeling longitudinal activity data for eight inbred strains of mice. Subsequent to behavioral testing, nontargeted liquid and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling was performed on 48 brain samples, yielding 301 metabolite levels per sample after quality control. Association testing between metabolite levels and three primary dimensions of behavioral sensitization (total distance, stereotypy and margin time) showed four robust, significant associations at a stringent metabolome-wide significance threshold (false discovery rate < 0.05). Results implicated homocarnosine, a dipeptide of GABA and histidine, in total distance sensitization, GABA metabolite 4-guanidinobutanoate and pantothenate in stereotypy sensitization, and myo-inositol in margin time sensitization. Secondary analyses indicated that these associations were independent of concurrent methamphetamine levels and, with the exception of the myo-inositol association, suggest a mechanism whereby strain-based genetic variation produces specific baseline neurochemical differences that substantially influence the magnitude of MA-induced sensitization. These findings demonstrate the utility of mouse metabolomics for identifying novel biomarkers, and developing more comprehensive neurochemical models, of psychostimulant sensitization. PMID:24034544

  2. Developmental Exposure to Methamphetamine: A Neonatal Model in the Rata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-DA-Silva, J; Silva, M C; Tavares, M A

    1998-05-01

    Taking into account that methamphetamine (MA) is a popular recreational drug among young adult women, i.e., in gestational age, the present model aims to assess the effects of its exposure during development. In this experimental model, MA effects are assessed in the rat during the first month of life, regarding both general growth parameters, and gross morphological effects in the retina as part of the evaluation of sensory systems. Experimental animals were obtained from 60-day-old nulliparous females. Litters were culled to 8 pups (4 males and 4 females, whenever possible), individually marked and weighed every two days. Experimental groups received 10 mg (+)methamphetamine hydrochloride kg body weight/day, subcutaneously, twice daily, from postnatal day (PND) 1 to the day before sacrifice; control groups received isovolumetric doses of saline, in the same protocol. Pups were weaned on PND 21. Groups were sacrificed on PND 5, 7 and 30. Animals exposed to MA presented increased percentage of retinal hemorrhages (18, 7 and 11% on PND 5, 7 and 30, respectively) compared to control groups (2% on PND 7, 0% on PND 5 and 30). On PND 30, the mean body weight of males exposed to MA was 75% of the mean weight of male controls, whereas for females, mean body weights were 70% of those of female controls. These findings support the view that developmental parameters in the rat are deleteriously affected by early exposure to MA.

  3. Exposure to Amphetamines Leads to Development of Amphetamine Type Stimulants Associated Cardiomyopathy (ATSAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari Giv, Mahsa

    2017-01-01

    With rapidly rising prevalence of exposure to Amphetamine Type Stimulants (ATS), novel insights into cardiotoxic effects of this substance are being presented in the literature and remarkably ATS Associated Cardiomyopathy (ATSAC) is emerging as a novel cardiovascular condition with its distinctive pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical features and prognosis. A comprehensive systematic review was performed to explore and analyze the current evidence on the association between ATS exposure and development of cardiomyopathy, biological mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of ATSAC, risk factors, clinical features and course of patients with ATSAC. Several animal studies, case reports, case series and case-control studies support the association between ATS exposure and ATSAC. Oxidative stress, accelerated apoptosis, increased p53 activity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, perfusion defects, fatty acid toxicity, altered gene expression, abnormal cardiac protein synthesis and function in addition to defects in intracellular calcium hemostasis present themselves as likely mechanisms of cardiotoxicity in ATSAC. Majority of patients with ATSAC were found to be male, young and presented late with severe dilated cardiomyopathy. Female ATS users predominantly develop Takotsubo type of ATSAC and in particular its atypical basal variant. Overall, cessation of ATS exposure seems to be associated with some degree of reversibility and recovery in ATSAC sufferers.

  4. Fluoxetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in U.S., Zagam); amphetamines such as amphetamine (in Adderall), dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine, Dextrostat, in Adderall), and methamphetamine (Desoxyn); anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as ...

  5. REGIONALIZATION OF AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT BY USING THE MULTI-DATA APPROACH (MDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bareth

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Regional process-based (agro-ecosystem modelling depends mainly on data availability of land use, weather, soil, and agricultural management. While land use, weather, and soil data are available from official sources or can be captured with monitoring systems, management data are usually derived from official statistics for administrative units. For numerous spatial modeling approaches, these data are not satisfying. Especially for process-based agro-ecosystem modeling on regional scales, spatially disaggregated and land use dependent information on agricultural management is a must. Information about date of sowing, dates of fertilization, dates of weeding etc. are required as input parameters by such models. These models consider nitrogen (N- and carbon (C-matter fluxes but essential amounts of N-/C-input and N-/C-output are determined by crop management. Therefore, in this contribution a RS- and GIS-based approach for regional generation of management data is introduced. The approach is based on the Multi-data Approach (MDA for enhanced land use/land cover mapping. The MDA is a combined RS and GIS approach. The retrieved information from multitemporal and multisensoral remote sensing analysis is integrated into official land use data to enhance both the information level of existing land use data and the quality of the land use classification. The workflow of the MDA to generate enhanced land use and land cover data consists basically of two components: (a the methods and data of the remote sensing analysis and (b the methods and data of the GIS analysis. The MDA results in disaggregated land use data which can be used to link crop management information about the major crops and especially crop rotations like date of sowing, fertilization, irrigation, harvest etc. to the derived land use classes. Consequently, depending on the land use, a distinct management is given in a spatial context on regional scale. In this contribution, three case

  6. Evidence-Based Guidelines for the Pharmacologic Management of Methamphetamine Dependence, Relapse Prevention, Chronic Methamphetamine-Related, and Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders in Post-Acute Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtel-Petri, Roland; Krampe-Scheidler, Anne; Braunwarth, Wolf-Dietrich; Havemann-Reinecke, Ursula; Jeschke, Peter; Looser, Winfried; Mühlig, Stephan; Schäfer, Ingo; Scherbaum, Norbert; Bothe, Lydia; Schaefer, Corinna; Hamdorf, Willem

    2017-05-01

    The increasing abuse of the street drug crystal meth (methamphetamine) in many countries worldwide has resulted in a growing demand to treat patients who have acquired a methamphetamine-related disorder. The results of a systematic literature search which led to the consensus-based recommendations by the Working Group of the German Agency for Quality in Medicine (Ärztliches Zentrum für Qualität in der Medizin - ÄZQ) are presented. Pharmacological treatments were reviewed in 58 out of the 103 publications included. They were mainly randomized controlled trials (RCT). Despite increased research activities, none of the medications studied demonstrated a convincing and consistent effect on abstinence rates, despite some having an impact on craving and retention rates or symptom control. In addition, as yet there is no sufficient evidence available for dopamine analogue treatment ("substitution") after the initial withdrawal-period. Methamphetamine-related, post-acute persistent or comorbid syndromes such as methamphetamine-associated psychosis (MAP), depressive syndromes, anxiety, and sleep disorders are usually treated in a symptom-oriented manner. Risks of interactions with methamphetamine have to be taken in account when prescribing medications with doubtful efficacy. Further research is warranted. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Treatment of Methamphetamine Dependence with Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT in Iran: A Critical Note.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Roshanaei-Moghaddam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This comment article reviews the literature to explore whether the use of ECT for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence can be justified by scientific rationale and/or evidence.This article reviews the literature on the use of ECT in addictive disorders. It describes a patient with methamphetamine dependence treated with ECT. It then offers a historical review of the moral and ethical difficulties encountered in the treatment of addictive disorders. It proposes a dynamic understanding as to why clinicians might deploy such brutal actions in the face of hopeless and emotionally intense encounters.We found no scientific evidence or justification for ECT as a treatment of methamphetamine dependence or as the first line treatment for methamphetamine-induced psychiatric comorbidities.the current available evidence does not support using ECT for the treatment of addictive disorders, and hence is unethical, unacceptable and inhumane and warrants immediate social and political attention.

  8. The Nigrostriatal Dopamine System and Methamphetamine: Roles for Excitotoxicity and Environment, Metabolic and Oxidative Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamamoto, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    .... Similarly, the psycho stimulant drug, methamphetamine also produces relatively selective damage to nigrostriatal dopamine neurons and is rapidly becoming a widespread problem and drug of abuse throughout the U.S...

  9. The Nigrostriatal Dopamine System and Methamphetamine: Roles for Excitotoxicity and Environment, Metabolic and Oxidative Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamamoto, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    .... Similarly, the psychostimulant drug, methamphetamine also produces relatively selective damage to nigrostriatal dopamine neurons and is rapidly becoming a widespread problem and drug of abuse throughout the U.S...

  10. The Comparison of Clinical, Familial, Personality, and Educational Factors in Consumers/non-Consumers of Methamphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Shokrzadeh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare of clinical, familial, personality, and educational factors in consumers/non-consumers of Methamphetamine. Method: The research method was descriptive in kind of causal effect research method. The population was all 15 to 29 years adolescents and young adults in Tehran city. Thus, 300 adolescents and young adults who were addicted to Methamphetamine selected of juvenile institution, a legal practitioner and addiction treatment centers, and 300 adolescents and young adults who do not addicted to Methamphetamine selected by stratified random sampling. Minnesota Multiphase Personality Inventory (MMPI2 and researcher making questionnaire were used as a research instruments. Results: the results showed that Methamphetamine consumers have had higher clinical symptoms, less scores on control and kindliness in their families, and higher scores on anxiety, emotional arousing, aggression and less on responsibility. Conclusion: The research results have practical implications in clinical counseling services and training to families.

  11. The importance of patient compliance in repeated rounds of mass drug administration (MDA) for the elimination of intestinal helminth transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Sam H; Truscott, James E; Anderson, Roy M

    2017-06-12

    Systematic non-compliance to chemotherapeutic treatment among a portion of the eligible population is thought to be a major obstacle to the elimination of helminth infections by mass drug administration (MDA). MDA for helminths is repeated at defined intervals such as yearly or every 2 years, as a consequence of the inability of the human host to develop fully protective immunity to reinfection. As such, how an individual complies to these repeated rounds of MDA can have a significant impact on parasite transmission. The importance of this factor is poorly understood at present. Few epidemiological studies have examined longitudinal trends in compliance in the many communities in areas of endemic helminth infection that are undergoing MDA. Reducing systematic non-compliance will obviously increase the number of individuals treated, but it may also alter the dynamics of parasite transmission. Here we develop an individual-based stochastic model of helminth transmission and MDA treatment to investigate how different patterns of compliance influence the impact of MDA for two groups of helminths, the soil transmitted nematode infections and the schistosome parasites. We study the effect of several alternative treatment and compliance patterns on the dynamics of transmission. We find that the impact of different compliance patterns, ranging from random treatment at each round of chemotherapy to systematic non-compliance by a proportion of the population, is very dependent on both transmission intensity in a defined setting and the type of infection that the treatment is targeted at. Systematic non-compliance has a greater impact on the potential for elimination of Schistosoma mansoni transmission by intensive MDA, than it does on Ascaris lumbricoides. We discuss the implications of our findings for the prioritisation of resources in MDA programmes and for monitoring and evaluation programme design. The key message generated by the analyses is that great care must be

  12. Anti-MDA5 autoantibodies in juvenile dermatomyositis identify a distinct clinical phenotype: a prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to define the frequency and associated clinical phenotype of anti-MDA5 autoantibodies in a large UK based, predominantly Caucasian, cohort of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Methods Serum samples and clinical data were obtained from 285 patients with JDM recruited to the UK Juvenile Dermatomyositis Cohort and Biomarker Study. The presence of anti-MDA5 antibodies was determined by immunoprecipitation and confirmed by ELISA using recombinant MDA5 protein. Results were compared with matched clinical data, muscle biopsies (scored by an experienced paediatric neuropathologist) and chest imaging (reviewed by an experienced paediatric radiologist). Results Anti-MDA5 antibodies were identified in 7.4% of JDM patients and were associated with a distinct clinical phenotype including skin ulceration (P = 0.03) oral ulceration (P = 0.01), arthritis (P <0.01) and milder muscle disease both clinically (as determined by Childhood Myositis Assessment Score (P = 0.03)) and histologically (as determined by a lower JDM muscle biopsy score (P <0.01)) than patients who did not have anti-MDA5 antibodies. A greater proportion of children with anti-MDA5 autoantibodies achieved disease inactivity at two years post-diagnosis according to PRINTO criteria (P = 0.02). A total of 4 out of 21 children with anti-MDA5 had interstitial lung disease; none had rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. Conclusions Anti-MDA5 antibodies can be identified in a small but significant proportion of patients with JDM and identify a distinctive clinical sub-group. Screening for anti-MDA5 autoantibodies at diagnosis would be useful to guide further investigation for lung disease, inform on prognosis and potentially confirm the diagnosis, as subtle biopsy changes could otherwise be missed. PMID:24989778

  13. Hypoinsulinemia regulates amphetamine-induced reverse transport of dopamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Williams

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The behavioral effects of psychomotor stimulants such as amphetamine (AMPH arise from their ability to elicit increases in extracellular dopamine (DA. These AMPH-induced increases are achieved by DA transporter (DAT-mediated transmitter efflux. Recently, we have shown that AMPH self-administration is reduced in rats that have been depleted of insulin with the diabetogenic agent streptozotocin (STZ. In vitro studies suggest that hypoinsulinemia may regulate the actions of AMPH by inhibiting the insulin downstream effectors phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K and protein kinase B (PKB, or Akt, which we have previously shown are able to fine-tune DAT cell-surface expression. Here, we demonstrate that striatal Akt function, as well as DAT cell-surface expression, are significantly reduced by STZ. In addition, our data show that the release of DA, determined by high-speed chronoamperometry (HSCA in the striatum, in response to AMPH, is severely impaired in these insulin-deficient rats. Importantly, selective inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 within the striatum results in a profound reduction in the subsequent potential for AMPH to evoke DA efflux. Consistent with our biochemical and in vivo electrochemical data, findings from functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments reveal that the ability of AMPH to elicit positive blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes in the striatum is significantly blunted in STZ-treated rats. Finally, local infusion of insulin into the striatum of STZ-treated animals significantly recovers the ability of AMPH to stimulate DA release as measured by high-speed chronoamperometry. The present studies establish that PI3K signaling regulates the neurochemical actions of AMPH-like psychomotor stimulants. These data suggest that insulin signaling pathways may represent a novel mechanism for regulating DA transmission, one which may be targeted for the treatment of AMPH abuse and potentially other dopaminergic disorders.

  14. Amphetamine Paradoxically Augments Exocytotic Dopamine Release and Phasic Dopamine Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daberkow, DP; Brown, HD; Bunner, KD; Kraniotis, SA; Doellman, MA; Ragozzino, ME; Garris, PA; Roitman, MF

    2013-01-01

    Drugs of abuse hijack brain reward circuitry during the addiction process by augmenting action potential-dependent phasic dopamine release events associated with learning and goal-directed behavior. One prominent exception to this notion would appear to be amphetamine (AMPH) and related analogs, which are proposed instead to disrupt normal patterns of dopamine neurotransmission by depleting vesicular stores and promoting non-exocytotic dopamine efflux via reverse transport. This mechanism of AMPH action, though, is inconsistent with its therapeutic effects and addictive properties - which are thought to be reliant on phasic dopamine signaling. Here we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in freely moving rats to interrogate principal neurochemical responses to AMPH in the striatum and relate these changes to behavior. First, we showed that AMPH dose-dependently enhanced evoked dopamine responses to phasic-like current pulse trains for up to two hours. Modeling the data revealed that AMPH inhibited dopamine uptake but also unexpectedly potentiated vesicular dopamine release. Second, we found that AMPH increased the amplitude, duration and frequency of spontaneous dopamine transients, the naturally occurring, non-electrically evoked, phasic increases in extracellular dopamine. Finally, using an operant sucrose reward paradigm, we showed that low-dose AMPH augmented dopamine transients elicited by sucrose-predictive cues. However, operant behavior failed at high-dose AMPH, which was due to phasic dopamine hyperactivity and the decoupling of dopamine transients from the reward predictive cue. These findings identify up-regulation of exocytotic dopamine release as a key AMPH action in behaving animals and support a unified mechanism of abused drugs to activate phasic dopamine signaling. PMID:23303926

  15. Prohibition or coffee shops: regulation of amphetamine and methylphenidate for enhancement use by healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubljević, Veljko

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes appropriate public policies for enhancement use of two most important stimulant drugs: Ritalin (methylphenidate) and Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts). The author argues that appropriate regulation of cognition enhancement drugs cannot be a result of a general discussion on cognitive enhancements as such, but has to be made on a case-by-case basis. Starting from the recently proposed taxation approach to cognition enhancement drugs, the author analyzes available, moderately permissive models of regulation. After a thorough analysis of relevant characteristics of methylphenidate and amphetamine, the author concludes that a moderately liberal permissive regulation of enhancement use by healthy adults might be appropriate for extended release forms of methylphenidate. However, due to their danger profile, amphetamine and instant release forms of methylphenidate should not be made readily available to healthy adults and would need to be prohibited.

  16. Effects of modafinil and amphetamine on sleep-wake cycle after sleep deprivation in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Y P; Lin, J S

    1999-09-01

    The effects of modafinil and amphetamine on sleep-wake cycle and cortical power spectrum were assessed in the cats before and after sleep deprivation. The sleep deprivation in the cats was used with the water tank technique. Cats were administrated with modafinil (5 mg.kg-1 p.o.) or amphetamine (1 mg.kg-1) before and after sleep deprivation. The waking effect of 8-10 h induced by modafinil before and after sleep deprivation was similar and was not followed by an increase in sleep rebound. On the contrary, the arousal effect about 8 h evoked by amphetamine after sleep deprivation was less lasting than that of 10-12 h observed in normal conditions and followed by an amplified rebound in both deep slow wave sleep and paradoxical sleep. These results suggest the efficiency of modafinil against somnolence and hypersomnia without increasing subsequent sleep.

  17. Effects of d-Amphetamine and Haloperidol on Modulation of the Human Acoustic Startle Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Kaviani

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective:This study aimed to examine the effects of haloperidol and amphetamine on human startle response modulated by emotionally-toned film clips. "n "n Method:Sixty participants, in two groups (one receiving haloperidol and the other receiving amphetamine were tested using electromyography (EMG to measure eye-blink muscle (orbicular oculi while different emotions were induced by six 2-minute film clips. Results:An affective rating shows the negative and positive effects of the two drugs on emotional reactivity, neither amphetamine nor haloperidol had any impact on the modulation of the startle response. Conclusion: The methodological and theoretical aspects of the study and findings will be discussed.

  18. Application of the ionscan for the detection of methamphetamine and ephedrine in abondoned clandestine laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patricia A.; Comparin, Jeffrey H.

    1995-01-01

    Clandestine methamphetamine laboratories are prevalent in southern California. The most common encountered synthesis results in vapor release, and drug residue being left behind. The suspected manufacturing area can be vacuumed and/or methanol wiped and screened immediately at the lab site using the Ionscan. Positive results are confirmed by obtaining vacuum sweep samples with subsequent analysis at the DEA Laboratory. This procedure has been utilized successfully for identifying methamphetamine and ephedrine from clandestine laboratories that have been abandoned and/or remodeled.

  19. Methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity prevented owing to the neuroprotective effects of salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrash-Williams, Bessy; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S; Bhattacharya, Dwipayan; Ahuja, Manuj; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan

    2016-06-01

    Methamphetamine (Schedule-II drug, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration) is one of the most abused illicit drug following cocaine, marijuana, and heroin in the USA. There are numerous health impairments and substantial economic burden caused by methamphetamine abuse. Salicylic acid, potent anti-inflammatory drug and a known neuroprotectant has shown to protect against toxicity-induced by other dopaminergic neurotoxins. Hence, in this study we investigated the neuroprotective effects of salicylic acid against methamphetamine-induced toxicity in mice. The current study investigated the effects of sodium salicylate and/or methamphetamine on oxidative stress, monoamine oxidase, mitochondrial complex I & IV activities using spectrophotometric and fluorimetric methods. Behavioral analysis evaluated the effect on movement disorders-induced by methamphetamine. Monoaminergic neurotransmitter levels were evaluated using high pressure liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. Methamphetamine caused significant generation of reactive oxygen species and decreased complex-I activity leading to dopamine depletion. Striatal dopamine depletion led to significant behavioral changes associated with movement disorders. Sodium salicylate (50 & 100mg/kg) significantly scavenged reactive oxygen species, blocked mitochondrial dysfunction and exhibited neuroprotection against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. In addition, sodium salicylate significantly blocked methamphetamine-induced behavioral changes related to movement abnormalities. One of the leading causative theories in nigral degeneration associated with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease is exposure to stimulants, drugs of abuse, insecticide and pesticides. These neurotoxic substances can induce dopaminergic neuronal insult by oxidative stress, apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation. Salicylic acid due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects could provide neuroprotection against the

  20. Cognitive deficits associated with combined HIV gp120 expression and chronic methamphetamine exposure in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesby, James P.; Markou, Athina; Semenova, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse is common among individuals infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Neurocognitive outcomes tend to be worse in methamphetamine users with HIV. However, it is unclear whether discrete cognitive domains are susceptible to impairment after combined HIV infection and methamphetamine abuse. The expression of HIV/gp120 protein induces neuropathology in mice similar to HIV-induced pathology in humans. We investigated the separate and combined effects of methamphetamine exposure and gp120 expression on cognitive function in transgenic (gp120-tg) and control mice. The mice underwent an escalating methamphetamine binge regimen and were tested in novel object/location recognition, object-in-place recognition, and Barnes maze tests. gp120 expression disrupted performance in the object-in-place test (i.e., similar time spent with all objects, regardless of location), indicating deficits in associative recognition memory. gp120 expression also altered reversal learning in the Barnes maze, suggesting impairments in executive function. Methamphetamine exposure impaired spatial strategy in the Barnes maze, indicating deficits in spatial learning. Methamphetamine-exposed gp120-tg mice had the lowest spatial strategy scores in the final acquisition trials in the Barnes maze, suggesting greater deficits in spatial learning than all of the other groups. Although HIV infection involves interactions between multiple proteins and processes, in addition to gp120, our findings in gp120-tg mice suggest that humans with the dual insult of HIV infection and methamphetamine abuse may exhibit a broader spectrum of cognitive deficits than those with either factor alone. Depending on the cognitive domain, the combination of both insults may exacerbate deficits in cognitive performance compared with each individual insult. PMID:25476577

  1. Accumulation of gas-phase methamphetamine on clothing, toy fabrics, and skin oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, G; Shakila, N V; Parker, K

    2015-08-01

    To better understand methamphetamine exposure and risk for occupants of former residential clandestine methamphetamine laboratories, we measured the dynamic accumulation of methamphetamine in skin oil, cotton and polyester (PE) clothing, upholstery, and toy fabric (substrates) exposed to 15-30 ppb (91-183 μg/m(3)) neutral methamphetamine in air for up to 60 days. The average equilibrium partition coefficients at 30% RH, in units of μg of methamphetamine per gram of substrate per ppb, are 3.0 ± 0.2 for a PE baby blanket, 5.6 ± 3.5 for a PE fabric toy, 3.7 ± 0.2 for a PE shirt, 18.3 ± 8.0 for a PE/cotton upholstery fabric, and 1200 ± 570 in skin oil. The partition coefficients at 60% RH are 4.5 ± 0.4, 5.2 ± 2.1, 4.5 ± 0.6, 36.1 ± 3.6, and 1600 ± 1100 μg/(g ppb), respectively. There was no difference in the partition coefficient for a clean and skin-oil-soiled cotton shirt [15.3 ± 2.1 μg/(g ppb) @ 42 days]. Partition coefficients for skin oil may be sensitive to composition. 'Mouthing' of cloth is predicted to be the dominant exposure pathway [60 μg/(kg body weight*ppb)] for a toddler in former meth lab, and indoor air concentrations would have to be very low (0.001 ppb) to meet the recommended reference dose for children. Gas-phase methamphetamine transfers to and accumulates on clothing, toys and other fabrics significantly increases risk of ingestion of methamphetamine. Current remediation methods should consider measurement of postremediation gas-phase air concentrations of methamphetamine in addition to surface wipe samples. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Increased amphetamine-induced locomotor activity, sensitization, and accumbal dopamine release in M5 muscarinic receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lene S; Miller, Anthony D; Lester, Deranda B

    2010-01-01

    showed that M(5) receptor knockout (M (5) (-/-) ) mice are less sensitive to the reinforcing properties of addictive drugs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Here, we investigate the role of M(5) receptors in the effects of amphetamine and cocaine on locomotor activity, locomotor sensitization, and dopamine release...... and locomotor sensitization were enhanced in M (5) (-/-) mice, while the effects of cocaine were similar in M (5) (-/-) and wild-type mice. RESULTS: Consistent with the behavioral results, amphetamine-, but not cocaine, -elicited dopamine release in nucleus accumbens was enhanced in M (5) (-/-) mice. DISCUSSION......: The different effects of amphetamine and cocaine in M (5) (-/-) mice may be due to the divergent pharmacological profile of the two drugs, where amphetamine, but not cocaine, is able to release intracellular stores of dopamine. In conclusion, we show here for the first time that amphetamine...

  3. Comparing the effect of buprenorphine and methadone in the reduction of methamphetamine craving: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Razeghian Jahromi, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Background We sought to test the effectiveness of methadone and buprenorphine in the treatment of methamphetamine withdrawal craving over a 17-day treatment period. Methods Patients were randomized into one of two groups. The study sample comprised 40 male subjects dependent on methamphetamine who met criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, for methamphetamine dependence and withdrawal and were seeking treatment. Furthermore, they should have a hi...

  4. Sweet taste liking is associated with subjective response to amphetamine in women but not men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weafer, Jessica; Lyon, Nicholas; Hedeker, Donald; de Wit, Harriet

    2017-11-01

    Preference for sweet taste rewards has been linked to the propensity for drug use in both animals and humans. Here, we tested the association between sweet taste liking and sensitivity to amphetamine reward in healthy adults. We hypothesized that sweet likers would report greater euphoria and stimulation following D-amphetamine (20 mg) compared to sweet dislikers. Men (n = 36) and women (n = 34) completed a sweet taste test in which they rated their liking of various concentrations of sucrose and filtered water (0.05, 0.10, 0.21, 0.42, and 0.83 M). Participants who preferred the highest concentration were classified as "sweet likers." All others were classified as "sweet dislikers." They then completed four sessions in which they received D-amphetamine (20 mg) and placebo in alternating order, providing self-report measures of euphoria and stimulation on the Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI) at regular intervals. We conducted linear mixed effects models to examine relationships between sweet liking and drug-induced euphoria and stimulation. Sweet likers reported significantly greater amphetamine-induced euphoria than did sweet dislikers among women. By contrast, sweet liking was not associated with amphetamine response in men. No associations with stimulation were observed. The association between sweet preference and amphetamine response in women is consistent with animal studies linking sweet taste preference and drug reward and also fits with observations that individuals who use drugs show a preference for sweet tastes. Whether the sex difference is related to circulating hormones, or other variables, remains to be determined.

  5. Serotonin in the ventral hippocampus modulates anxiety-like behavior during amphetamine withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, W; Cook, A; Scholl, J L; Mears, M; Watt, M J; Renner, K J; Forster, G L

    2014-12-05

    Withdrawal from amphetamine is associated with increased anxiety and sensitivity to stressors which are thought to contribute to relapse. Rats undergoing amphetamine withdrawal fail to exhibit stress-induced increases in serotonin (5-HT) release in the ventral hippocampus and show heightened anxiety-like behaviors. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that reducing 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus is a causal mechanism in increasing anxiety-like behaviors during amphetamine withdrawal. First, we tested whether reducing 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus directly increases anxiety behavior. Male rats were bilaterally infused with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) into the ventral hippocampus, which produced a 83% decrease in ventral hippocampus 5-HT content, and were tested on the elevated plus maze (EPM) for anxiety-like behavior. Reducing ventral hippocampus 5-HT levels decreased the time spent in the open arms of the maze, suggesting that diminished ventral hippocampus 5-HT levels increases anxiety-like behavior. Next, we tested whether increasing 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus reverses anxiety behavior exhibited by rats undergoing amphetamine withdrawal. Rats were treated daily with either amphetamine (2.5-mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 2weeks, and at 2weeks withdrawal, were infused with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine (0.5μM) bilaterally into the ventral hippocampus and tested for anxiety-like behavior on the EPM. Rats pre-treated with amphetamine exhibited increased anxiety-like behavior on the EPM. This effect was reversed by ventral hippocampus infusion of paroxetine. Our results suggest that 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus are critical for regulating anxiety behavior. Increasing 5-HT levels during withdrawal may be an effective strategy for reducing anxiety-induced drug relapse. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acceleration of cardiovascular-biological age by amphetamine exposure is a power function of chronological age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Albert Stuart; Norman, Amanda; Hulse, Gary Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Amphetamine abuse is becoming more widespread internationally. The possibility that its many cardiovascular complications are associated with a prematurely aged cardiovascular system, and indeed biological organism systemically, has not been addressed. Radial arterial pulse tonometry was performed using the SphygmoCor system (Sydney). 55 amphetamine exposed patients were compared with 107 tobacco smokers, 483 non-smokers and 68 methadone patients (total=713 patients) from 2006 to 2011. A cardiovascular-biological age (VA) was determined. The age of the patient groups was 30.03±0.51-40.45±1.15 years. This was controlled for with linear regression. The sex ratio was the same in all groups. 94% of amphetamine exposed patients had used amphetamine in the previous week. When the (log) VA was regressed against the chronological age (CA) and a substance-type group in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models, models quadratic in CA were superior to linear models (both p<0.02). When log VA/CA was regressed in a mixed effects model against time, body mass index, CA and drug type, the cubic model was superior to the linear model (p=0.001). Interactions between CA, (CA) 2 and (CA) 3 on the one hand and exposure type were significant from p=0.0120. The effects of amphetamine exposure persisted after adjustment for all known cardiovascular risk factors (p<0.0001). These results show that subacute exposure to amphetamines is associated with an advancement of cardiovascular-organismal age both over age and over time, and is robust to adjustment. That this is associated with power functions of age implies a feed-forward positively reinforcing exacerbation of the underlying ageing process.

  7. Cdk5 Is Essential for Amphetamine to Increase Dendritic Spine Density in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Ferreras

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Psychostimulant drugs of abuse increase dendritic spine density in reward centers of the brain. However, little is known about their effects in the hippocampus, where activity-dependent changes in the density of dendritic spine are associated with learning and memory. Recent reports suggest that Cdk5 plays an important role in drug addiction, but its role in psychostimulant’s effects on dendritic spines in hippocampus remain unknown. We used in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that amphetamine increases dendritic spine density in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Primary cultures and organotypic slice cultures were used for cellular, molecular, pharmacological and biochemical analyses of the role of Cdk5/p25 in amphetamine-induced dendritic spine formation. Amphetamine (two-injection protocol increased dendritic spine density in hippocampal neurons of thy1-green fluorescent protein (GFP mice, as well as in hippocampal cultured neurons and organotypic slice cultures. Either genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Cdk5 activity prevented the amphetamine–induced increase in dendritic spine density. Amphetamine also increased spine density in neurons overexpressing the strong Cdk5 activator p25. Finally, inhibition of calpain, the protease necessary for the conversion of p35 to p25, prevented amphetamine’s effect on dendritic spine density. We demonstrate, for the first time, that amphetamine increases the density of dendritic spine in hippocampal pyramidal neurons in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, we show that the Cdk5/p25 signaling and calpain activity are both necessary for the effect of amphetamine on dendritic spine density. The identification of molecular mechanisms underlying psychostimulant effects provides novel and promising therapeutic approaches for the treatment of drug addiction.

  8. Choosing to Live or Die: Online Narratives of Recovering from Methamphetamine Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obong'o, Christopher O; Alexander, Adam C; Chavan, Prachi P; Dillon, Patrick J; Kedia, Satish K

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to explore motivating factors for recovering from methamphetamine abuse. The source of data was 202 anonymous letters and stories submitted to an online support platform for methamphetamine users. Qualitative data were analyzed in Dedoose software using grounded theory methodology. Ten primary motivating factors for recovering from methamphetamine abuse were identified and mapped onto four constructs from the Health Belief Model: (1) perceived susceptibility (learning from others and learning from self); (2) perceived severity (fear of death and declining health); (3) perceived benefits (reconnecting with family, reconnecting with society, and recovering self-esteem); and (4) cues to action (hitting rock bottom, finding God, and becoming pregnant). By using data from an online support group and categorizing emerging themes within a theoretical framework, findings from this study provide a comprehensive understanding of factors involved in recovery from methamphetamine abuse and offer further insights in developing theoretically informed interventions for methamphetamine users. This study suggests the utility of online platforms for obtaining anonymous but unique experiences about drug abuse and recovery. Findings may benefit healthcare professionals, counselors, and researchers by helping to develop theoretically informed interventions for methamphetamine abuse.

  9. Repeated mirtazapine nullifies the maintenance of previously established methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Robin M; Mickiewicz, Amanda L; Napier, T Celeste

    2011-11-20

    The atypical antidepressant mirtazapine enhances monoaminergic transmission; thus, mirtazapine therapy may counter the hypo-activation of monoamine systems associated with withdrawal from methamphetamine abuse. Human addiction therapy will likely require chronic administration that is given after brain and behavioral maladaptations are established. To emulate this scenario in rats, we ascertained if acute or repeated mirtazapine treatments could antagonize previously established consequences of repeated methamphetamine. Methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) was used, wherein methamphetamine (1mg/kg, i.p.) was administered in a unique environmental context once-daily for three days interposed by saline injections in an alternate context. Subsequently, mirtazapine (5mg/kg, i.p.) was administered in the home cage either as 10 once-daily injections or a single injection. The expression of CPP was determined in drug-free rats three days after the last mirtazapine injection. Expression of methamphetamine-induced CPP was inhibited by 10 home cage administrations of mirtazapine but not by a single injection of mirtazapine. These findings reveal that mirtazapine can inhibit the maintenance of methamphetamine-induced CPP and that treatment duration and/or treatment timing contributes to this effect of mirtazapine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of Cannabinoid Receptor Ligands on Sensitisation to Methamphetamine Effects on Rat Locomotor Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Landa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The repeated administration of various drugs of abuse may lead to a gradually increased behavioural response to these substances, particularly an increase in locomotion and stereotypies may occur. This phenomenon is well known and described as behavioural sensitisation. An increased response to the drug tested, elicited by previous repeated administration of another drug is recognised as cross-sensitisation. Based on our earlier experiences with studies on mice, which confirmed sensitisation to methamphetamine and described cross-sensitisation to methamphetamine after pre-treatment with cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, we focused the present study on the use of another typical laboratory animal - the rat. A biological validity of the sensitisation phenomenon was expected to be enhanced if the results of both mouse and rat studies were conformable. Similar investigation in rats brought very similar results to those described earlier in mice. However, at least some interspecies differences were noted in the rat susceptibility to the development of sensitisation to methamphetamine effects. Comparing to mice, it was more demanding to titrate a dose of methamphetamine producing behavioural sensitisation. Furthermore, we were not able to provoke cross-sensitisation by repeated administration of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist methanandamide and similarly, we did not demonstrate the suppression of cross-sensitisation in rats that were repeatedly given combined pre-treatment with cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM 251 and methamphetamine. Finally, unlike mice, an alternative behavioural change was registered after repeated methamphetamine treatment instead: the occurrence of stereotypic behaviour (nose rubbing.

  11. Sexual Pleasure and Sexual Risk among Women who Use Methamphetamine: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorvick, Jennifer; Bourgois, Philippe; Wenger, Lynn D.; Arreola, Sonya G.; Lutnick, Alexandra; Wechsberg, Wendee M.; Kral, Alex H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The intersection of drug use, sexual pleasure and sexual risk behavior is rarely explored when it comes to poor women who use drugs. This paper explores the relationship between sexual behavior and methamphetamine use in a community-based sample of women, exploring not only risk, but also desire, pleasure and the challenges of overcoming trauma. Methods Quantitative data were collected using standard epidemiological methods (N=322) for community-based studies. In addition, using purposive sampling, qualitative data were collected among a subset of participants (n=34). Data were integrated for mixed methods analysis. Results While many participants reported sexual risk behavior (unprotected vaginal or anal intercourse) in the quantitative survey, sexual risk was not the central narrative pertaining to sexual behavior and methamphetamine use in qualitative findings. Rather, desire, pleasure and disinhibition arose as central themes. Women described feelings of power and agency related to sexual behavior while high on methamphetamine. Findings were mixed on whether methamphetamine use increased sexual risk behavior. Conclusion The use of mixed methods afforded important insights into the sexual behavior and priorities of methamphetamine-using women. Efforts to reduce sexual risk should recognize and valorize the positive aspects of methamphetamine use for some women, building on positive feelings of power and agency as an approach to harm minimization. PMID:22954501

  12. Pampagilas: Methamphetamine in the everyday economic lives of underclass male youths in a Philippine port.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasco, Gideon

    2014-07-01

    Amid growing concerns about methamphetamine use in Southeast Asia, one important lesson from the field is that the drug serves various 'functions' for its users. The current study explores the functions of methamphetamine (locally known as shabu) in the economic and social lives of a community of underclass young men in a Philippine port. Semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 20 young men (aged 18-25), most of whom worked as street vendors. Participant observation was carried out for 12 months. Methamphetamine use led these young men to experience various desirable effects: increased strength and confidence, disinhibition, insomnia, and an overall improvement of mood that facilitates performance at work and social bonding in their peer group. Methamphetamine, in short, is seen as a 'performance enhancer' (pampagilas). While young people were aware of the legal, economic, and physiologic risks of using methamphetamine, these risks were outweighed by the perceived benefits in the context of an informal economy where opportunities are limited. Drug policies and programs in the Philippines must acknowledge the economic and social role of methamphetamine in the daily lives of young men. This group need skills training and opportunities to move out of an informal economy that generates the demand for drugs to enhance performance - necessary in an arena where performance means survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Dexmedetomidine use in the ED for control of methamphetamine-induced agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Rex Pui Kin; Yip, Wai Lam; Wan, Chi Keung; Tsui, Matthew Sik Hon

    2017-04-01

    Chemical restraint is often required to control agitation induced by methamphetamine. Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 adrenergic receptor agonist with sedative, analgesic, and sympatholytic properties. Its use in the emergency department (ED) to control methamphetamine-induced agitation has not been reported. To report two cases of methamphetamine-induced agitation successfully sedated with dexmedetomidine in the ED. The first case was a 42-year-old man with unstable emotion and violent behaviours after smoking methamphetamine. His agitation did not respond to a large cumulative dose of benzodiazepines (10mg of diazepam and 332mg of midazolam) administered over 48h and sedation was achieved with dexmedetomidine. The second case was a 38-year-old methamphetamine user with unstable emotion and recurrent episodes of agitation despite repeated doses of benzodiazepines, whose agitation was controlled with dexmedetomidine infusion. In both cases, dexmedetomidine apparently reduced the dose of benzodiazepines needed to achieve adequate sedation. Transient falls in blood pressure and slowing of the heart rate were noted, which resolved either spontaneously or after reducing the infusion rate without requiring drug treatment. Dexmedetomidine can be considered as an adjunct for chemical restraint when standard treatment fails to control the agitation induced by methamphetamine, but patient's hemodynamic state should be monitored closely during administration. Its efficacy and safety in the ED warrant further evaluation with prospective controlled trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fatal Small Intestinal Ischemia Due to Methamphetamine Intoxication: Report of a Case With Autopsy Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaran, Hamid

    2017-05-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most common abused drugs, so its various effects on different body organs should be familiar to all physicians. Regarding its gastrointestinal sequels, there are few reports of ischemic colitis induced by its vasoconstrictive effects. This is the first report of isolated small intestinal infarction resulting in death following methamphetamine toxicity. A 40-year-old woman with a past history of medical treatment for obesity referred to hospital with severe chest and back pain, perspiration, nausea, agitation, high blood pressure, bradycardia and subsequent lethargy and vasomotor instability. Cardiac evaluations were normal, and a toxicologic urinalysis revealed methamphetamine. Later, abdominal pain predominated, and ultrasonography revealed signs of bowel infarction. She did not consent to surgery and succumbed afterward. At autopsy gangrene and perforation of distal ileum were found. The cause of death was determined as intestinal gangrene following methamphetamine toxicity. Methamphetamine has anorectic effects and so is used in some "diet pills"; Consumers may not even know they are using methamphetamine. Hence in cases of either known MA abuse or those using unknown weight reduction drugs presenting with gastrointestinal complaints or abdominal pain, intestinal ischemia should be kept in mind and if plausible, intervened promptly.

  15. Pavlovian discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi Bolin, B; Singleton, Destiny L; Akins, Chana K

    2014-07-01

    Pavlovian drug discrimination (DD) procedures demonstrate that interoceptive drug stimuli may come to control behavior by informing the status of conditional relationships between stimuli and outcomes. This technique may provide insight into processes that contribute to drug-seeking, relapse, and other maladaptive behaviors associated with drug abuse. The purpose of the current research was to establish a model of Pavlovian DD in male Japanese quail. A Pavlovian conditioning procedure was used such that 3.0 mg/kg methamphetamine served as a feature positive stimulus for brief periods of visual access to a female quail and approach behavior was measured. After acquisition training, generalization tests were conducted with cocaine, nicotine, and haloperidol under extinction conditions. SCH 23390 was used to investigate the involvement of the dopamine D1 receptor subtype in the methamphetamine discriminative stimulus. Results showed that cocaine fully substituted for methamphetamine but nicotine only partially substituted for methamphetamine in quail. Haloperidol dose-dependently decreased approach behavior. Pretreatment with SCH 23390 modestly attenuated the methamphetamine discrimination suggesting that the D1 receptor subtype may be involved in the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine. The findings are discussed in relation to drug abuse and associated negative health consequences. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  16. Methamphetamine treatment outcomes among gay men attending a LGBTI-specific treatment service in Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Toby; Kolstee, Johann; Lambert, Sarah; Ness, Ross; Hannan, Siobhan; Holt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gay and bisexual men (GBM) report higher rates of methamphetamine use compared to heterosexual men, and thus have a heightened risk of developing problems from their use. We examined treatment outcomes among GBM clients receiving outpatient counseling at a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI)-specific, harm reduction treatment service in Sydney, Australia. GBM receiving treatment for methamphetamine use from ACON's Substance Support Service between 2012-15 (n = 101) were interviewed at treatment commencement, and after 4 sessions (n = 60; follow-up 1) and 8 sessions (n = 32; follow-up 2). At each interview, clients completed measures of methamphetamine use and dependence, other substance use, injecting risk practices, psychological distress and quality of life. The median age of participants was 41 years and 56.4% identified as HIV-positive. Participants attended a median of 5 sessions and attended treatment for a median of 112 days. There was a significant reduction in the median days of methamphetamine use in the previous 4 weeks between baseline (4 days), follow-up 1 (2 days) and follow-up 2 (2 days; p = .001). There was a significant reduction in the proportion of participants reporting methamphetamine dependence between baseline (92.1%), follow-up 1 (78.3%) and follow-up 2 (71.9%, p methamphetamine use and improved psychosocial functioning over time, demonstrating the potential effectiveness of a LGBTI-specific treatment service.

  17. Differences in the symptom profile of methamphetamine-related psychosis and primary psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKetin, Rebecca; Baker, Amanda L; Dawe, Sharon; Voce, Alexandra; Lubman, Dan I

    2017-05-01

    We examined the lifetime experience of hallucinations and delusions associated with transient methamphetamine-related psychosis (MAP), persistent MAP and primary psychosis among a cohort of dependent methamphetamine users. Participants were classified as having (a) no current psychotic symptoms, (n=110); (b) psychotic symptoms only when using methamphetamine (transient MAP, n=85); (c) psychotic symptoms both when using methamphetamine and when abstaining from methamphetamine (persistent MAP, n=37), or (d) meeting DSM-IV criteria for lifetime schizophrenia or mania (primary psychosis, n=52). Current psychotic symptoms were classified as a score of 4 or more on any of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale items of suspiciousness, hallucinations or unusual thought content in the past month. Lifetime psychotic diagnoses and symptoms were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Transient MAP was associated with persecutory delusions and tactile hallucinations (compared to the no symptom group). Persistent MAP was additionally associated with delusions of reference, thought interference and complex auditory, visual, olfactory and tactile hallucinations, while primary psychosis was also associated with delusions of thought projection, erotomania and passivity. The presence of non-persecutory delusions and hallucinations across various modalities is a marker for persistent MAP or primary psychosis in people who use methamphetamine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Amphetamine margin in sports. [Effects on performance of highly trained athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laties, V.G.; Weiss, B.

    1980-01-01

    The amphetamines can enhance athletic performance. That much seems clear from the literature, some of which is reviewed here. Increases in endurance have been demonstrated in both man and rat. Smith and Beecher, 20 years ago, showed improvement of running, swimming, and weight throwing in highly trained athletes. Laboratory analogues of such performance have also been used and similar enhancement demonstrated. The amount of change induced by the amphetamines is usually small, of the order of a few percent. Nevertheless, since a fraction of a percent improvement can make the difference between fame and oblivion, the margin conferred by these drugs can be quite important.

  19. The acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine inhibits d-amphetamine-induced psychotic-like behavior in Cebus monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Werge, Thomas; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    allosterically potentiates nicotinic receptor stimulation. To this end, we investigated its ability to antagonize d-amphetamine-induced psychotic-like behavior in extrapyramidal side effects (EPS)-primed Cebus monkeys. Galantamine inhibited d-amphetamine-induced unrest, arousal, and stereotypy. Side effects...... such as emesis, sedation, and EPS were minor or not existing. The results indicate that AChE inhibitors have antipsychotic potentials and suggest that clinical trials investigating antipsychotic effects of AChE inhibitors as monotherapy would be of interest....

  20. The Impact of Illicit Use of Amphetamine on Male Sexual Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Nan-Hua; Huang, Yung-Jui; Jiann, Bang-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Data concerning the impact of amphetamine on male sexual functions are limited, although amphetamine has been used as an aphrodisiac. This cross-sectional study was to assess the impact of illicit use of amphetamine on male sexual functions. Male illicit drug users in a Drug Abstention and Treatment Center were recruited to complete a self-administered questionnaire, and data were compared with age-matched controls. The International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and global assessment questions were used to assess sexual functions. Of 1,159 amphetamine mono-illicit drug users, the mean age was 31.9 ± 7.5 (18-57) years, and mean duration of drug use was 30.7 ± 52.2 (median 9, range 0.1-252) months. Half of them reported that drug use had no impact on their sexual functions. The other half reported drug impacts as reduced erectile rigidity and sexual life satisfaction, enhanced orgasmic intensity, and prolonged ejaculation latency time more often than the opposite effects, while they reported enhanced or reduced effect equally on sexual desire. Dosing frequency of amphetamine was associated with its impact on sexual functions, but duration of its use had little association with that. Compared with 211 age-matched controls, the amphetamine mono-illicit drug users had lower IIEF scores in the domains of erectile function, orgasmic function, and overall satisfaction, but there are no significant differences in intercourse satisfaction and sexual desire scores. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) was significantly higher in the drug users than in the controls (29.3% vs. 11.9%). The odds ratio of ED for amphetamine use was 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.2-3.6) after adjustment for other risk factors. The impact of illicit use of amphetamine on male sexual functions varied among users, and their ED prevalence was higher than the controls. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.