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Sample records for amp

  1. Assisted Medical Procedures (AMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DOCUMENTATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND PROGRESS The AMP was initially being developed as part the Advanced Integrated Clinical System (AICS)-Guided Medical Procedure System...

  2. Drug AMP Reporting - Quarterly

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drugs that have been reported under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program along with an indication of whether or not the required Average Manufacturer Price (AMP) was...

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  4. Transcriptional regulation by cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montminy, M

    1997-01-01

    A number of hormones and growth factors have been shown to stimulate target cells via second messenger pathways that in turn regulate the phosphorylation of specific nuclear factors. The second messenger cyclic AMP, for example, regulates a striking number of physiologic processes, including intermediary metabolism, cellular proliferation, and neuronal signaling, by altering basic patterns of gene expression. Our understanding of cyclic AMP signaling in the nucleus has expanded considerably over the past decade, owing in large part to the characterization of cyclic AMP-responsive promoter elements, transcription factors that bind them, and signal-dependent coactivators that mediate target gene induction. More importantly, these studies have revealed new insights into biological problems as diverse as biological clocks and long-term memory. The purpose of this review is to describe the components of the cyclic AMP response unit and to analyze how these components cooperate to induce target gene expression in response to hormonal stimulation.

  5. Assisted Medical Procedures (AMP) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Documentation and Development: The AMP was initially being developed as part the Advanced Integrated Clinical System (AICS)-Guided Medical Procedure System for the...

  6. Ru (amp)(bipy)Cl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    [RuV(amp)(bipy)O]+ intermediate complex which leads to the high affinity for hydrogen atom/hydride abstraction. Acknowledgement. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the Department of Science &. Technology, Government of India. We are thankful to Shri Hardyal Singh for his encouragement. Reference.

  7. 3' : 5'-Cyclic AMP-dependent 3'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mato, José M.; Krens, Frans A.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Konijn, Theo M.

    1977-01-01

    Suspensions of 3':5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP)-sensitive cells of Dictyostelium discoideum responded to a cAMP pulse with increased 3':5'-cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels. Under the assay conditions used (2 × 10^8 cells per ml in 10 mM phosphate buffer, pH 6.0) cAMP (5 × 10-8 M final concentration) increased cGMP

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-lactamase induction requires two permeases, AmpG and AmpP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneper Lisa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Enterobacteriaceae, β-lactam antibiotic resistance involves murein recycling intermediates. Murein recycling is a complex process with discrete steps taking place in the periplasm and the cytoplasm. The AmpG permease is critical to this process as it transports N-acetylglucosamine anhydrous N-acetylmuramyl peptides across the inner membrane. In Pseudomonadaceae, this intrinsic mechanism remains to be elucidated. Since the mechanism involves two cellular compartments, the characterization of transporters is crucial to establish the link. Results Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 has two ampG paralogs, PA4218 (ampP and PA4393 (ampG. Topology analysis using β-galactosidase and alkaline phosphatase fusions indicates ampP and ampG encode proteins which possess 10 and 14 transmembrane helices, respectively, that could potentially transport substrates. Both ampP and ampG are required for maximum expression of β-lactamase, but complementation and kinetic experiments suggest they act independently to play different roles. Mutation of ampG affects resistance to a subset of β-lactam antibiotics. Low-levels of β-lactamase induction occur independently of either ampP or ampG. Both ampG and ampP are the second members of two independent two-gene operons. Analysis of the ampG and ampP operon expression using β-galactosidase transcriptional fusions showed that in PAO1, ampG operon expression is β-lactam and ampR-independent, while ampP operon expression is β-lactam and ampR-dependent. β-lactam-dependent expression of the ampP operon and independent expression of the ampG operon is also dependent upon ampP. Conclusions In P. aeruginosa, β-lactamase induction occurs in at least three ways, induction at low β-lactam concentrations by an as yet uncharacterized pathway, at intermediate concentrations by an ampP and ampG dependent pathway, and at high concentrations where although both ampP and ampG play a role, ampG may be of greater

  9. In Vivo Cardiovascular Pharmacology of 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, and 3′-AMP in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Zaichuan

    2013-01-01

    The naturally occurring purine 2′,3′-cAMP is metabolized in vitro to 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP, which are subsequently metabolized to adenosine. Whether in vivo 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, or 3′-AMP are rapidly converted to adenosine and exert rapid effects via adenosine receptors is unknown. To address this question, we compared the cardiovascular and renal effects of 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, 3′,5′-cAMP, 5′-AMP, and adenosine in vivo in the rat. Purines were infused intravenously while monitoring mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output, and renal and mesenteric blood flows. Total peripheral (TPR), renal vascular (RVR), and mesenteric vascular (MVR) resistances were calculated. Urine was collected for determination of urine excretion rate [urine volume (UV)]. When sufficient urine was available, the sodium excretion rate (Na+ER) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were determined. 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, and 3′-AMP dose-dependently and profoundly reduced MABP, HR, TPR, and MVR with efficacy and potency similar to adenosine and 5′-AMP. These effects of 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, and 3′-AMP were attenuated by blockade of adenosine receptors with 1,3-dipropyl-8-(p-sulfophenyl)xanthine. 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, adenosine, and 5′-AMP variably affected RVR, but profoundly (nearly 100%) decreased UV at higher doses. GFR and Na+ER could be measured at the lower doses and were suppressed by 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, and 3′-AMP, but not by adenosine or 5′-AMP. 2′,3′-cAMP increased urinary excretion rates of 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and adenosine. 3′,5′-cAMP exerted no adverse hemodynamic effects yet increased urinary adenosine as efficiently as 2′,3′-cAMP. Conclusions: In vivo 2′,3′-cAMP is rapidly converted to adenosine. Because both cAMPs increase adenosine in the urinary compartment, these agents may provide unique therapeutic opportunities. PMID:23759508

  10. Cyclic AMP in rat pancreatic islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grill, V.; Borglund, E.; Cerasi, E.; Uppsala Univ.

    1977-01-01

    The incorporation of [ 3 H]adenine into cyclic AMP was studied in rat pancreatic islets under varying conditions of labeling. Prolonging the exposure to [ 3 H]adenine progressively augmented the islet cyclic [ 3 H]AMP level. Islets labeled for different periods of time and subsequently incubated (without adenine) in the presence of D-glucose or cholera toxin showed stimulations of intra-islet cyclic [ 3 H]AMP that were proportionate to the levels of radioactive nucleotide present under non-stimulatory conditions. Labeling the islets in a high glucose concentration (27.7 mM) did not modify the nucleotide responses to glucose or cholera toxin. The specific activity of cyclic [ 3 H]AMP, determined by simultaneous assay of cyclic [ 3 H]AMP and total cyclic AMP, was not influenced by glucose or cholera toxin. Glucose had no effect on the specific activity of labeled ATP

  11. cAMP signaling in subcellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2014-09-01

    In the complex microcosm of a cell, information security and its faithful transmission are critical for maintaining internal stability. To achieve a coordinated response of all its parts to any stimulus the cell must protect the information received from potentially confounding signals. Physical segregation of the information transmission chain ensures that only the entities able to perform the encoded task have access to the relevant information. The cAMP intracellular signaling pathway is an important system for signal transmission responsible for the ancestral 'flight or fight' response and involved in the control of critical functions including frequency and strength of heart contraction, energy metabolism and gene transcription. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the cAMP signaling pathway uses compartmentalization as a strategy for coordinating the large number of key cellular functions under its control. Spatial confinement allows the formation of cAMP signaling "hot spots" at discrete subcellular domains in response to specific stimuli, bringing the information in proximity to the relevant effectors and their recipients, thus achieving specificity of action. In this report we discuss how the different constituents of the cAMP pathway are targeted and participate in the formation of cAMP compartmentalized signaling events. We illustrate a few examples of localized cAMP signaling, with a particular focus on the nucleus, the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of interventions designed to perturb specific cAMP cascades locally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Schwann Cells Metabolize Extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    The 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway (3′,5′-cAMP→5′-AMP→adenosine) and the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway (2′,3′-cAMP→2′-AMP/3′-AMP→adenosine) are active in the brain. Oligodendrocytes participate in the brain 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway via their robust expression of 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase; converts 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP). Because Schwann cells also express CNPase, it is conceivable that the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway exists in the peripheral nervous system. To test this and to compare the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway to the 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway in Schwann cells, we examined the metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, 3′,5′-cAMP, and 5′-AMP in primary rat Schwann cells in culture. Addition of 2′,3′-cAMP (3, 10, and 30 µM) to Schwann cells increased levels of 2′-AMP in the medium from 0.006 ± 0.002 to 21 ± 2, 70 ± 3, and 187 ± 10 nM/µg protein, respectively; in contrast, Schwann cells had little ability to convert 2′,3′-cAMP to 3′-AMP or 3′,5′-cAMP to either 3′-AMP or 5′-AMP. Although Schwann cells slightly converted 2′,3′-cAMP and 2′-AMP to adenosine, they did so at very modest rates (e.g., 5- and 3-fold, respectively, more slowly compared with our previously reported studies in oligodendrocytes). Using transected myelinated rat sciatic nerves in culture medium, we observed a time-related increase in endogenous intracellular 2′,3′-cAMP and extracellular 2′-AMP. These findings indicate that Schwann cells do not have a robust 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway but do have a 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway; however, because the pathway mostly involves 2′-AMP formation rather than 3′-AMP, and because the conversion of 2′-AMP to adenosine is slow, metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP mostly results in the accumulation of 2′-AMP. Accumulation of 2′-AMP in peripheral nerves postinjury could have

  13. Intrusion Detection amp Prevention Systems - Sourcefire Snort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Vuppala

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Information security is a challenging issue for all business organizations today amidst increasing cyber threats. While there are many alternative intrusion detection amp prevention systems available to choose from selecting the best solution to implement to detect amp prevent cyber-attacks is a difficult task. The best solution is of the one that gets the best reviews and suits the organizations needs amp budget. In this review paper we summarize various classes of intrusion detection and prevention systems compare features of alternative solutions and make recommendation for implementation of one as the best solution for business organization in Fiji.

  14. Warmer amps for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    CERN is working together with an Italian company to develop superconducting cables that can function at temperatures of up to 25 K (-248°C). This will make it possible to move LHC magnet power supplies out of the tunnel, protecting them from exposure to the showers of very high-energy particles produced by the accelerator.   Figure 1: devices of this type, which measure approximately 10 metres in length, are inserted between the accelerating magnets at different points along the LHC. When it comes to consuming electricity, the magnets that steer particles through large accelerators can be characterised with just one word: greedy. For the LHC, the total current can reach 1.5 million amps. At the present time, this current is brought in via copper cables of up to 10 cm in diameter. In the tunnel, these cables connect the current leads - which provide the transition between the ambient-temperature cables and the magnets in their bath of superfluid helium - to the power supply. In the a...

  15. Interaction of biodegradative threonine dehydratase (TD) of Escherichia coli with 8-azido-AMP, a photoaffinity analog of AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, R.V.; Datta, P.

    1987-01-01

    Stimulation of TD activity by AMP (Ka = 40 μM) is known to accompany the conversion of monomeric form of the enzyme to its tetramer and a decrease in the Km for threonine. In comparison, 8-azido-AMP (N 3 AMP) simulated TD activity only partially, lowered the Km for threonine and stabilized a dimeric form of the protein. Competition experiments revealed that N 3 AMP exerted an apparent dominant effect in counteracting the AMP-mediated enzyme activation, indicating complex mutual interactions between these ligands. UV irradiation of TD with increasing concentrations of 3 H-N 3 AMP (up to 150 μM) resulted in gradual loss of enzyme activity and concomitant incorporation of N 3 AMP into protein; upon complete inactivation, 0.75 mol of N 3 AMP was bound per mol tetramer. The presence of AMP during photolysis reduced the extent of enzyme inactivation as well as the incorporation of N 3 AMP into protein. Photolabeling of TD with 20 μM 3 H-N 3 AMP revealed one labeled tryptic peptide; at higher N 3 AMP concentrations (>300 μM), two labeled peptides were found, one of which was identical to that found with low N 3 AMP concentration. The cumulative results suggest that N 3 AMP can act as an allosteric modifier and that the peptide labeled at low N 3 AMP may represent the AMP binding site on the protein molecule

  16. Down-regulation of Cell Surface Cyclic AMP Receptors and Desensitization of Cyclic AMP-stimulated Adenylate Cyclase by Cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium discoideum. Kinetics and Concentration Dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1987-01-01

    cAMP binds to Dictyostelium discoideum surface receptors and induces a transient activation of adenylate cyclase, which is followed by desensitization. cAMP also induces a loss of detectable surface receptors (down-regulation). Cells were incubated with constant cAMP concentrations, washed free of

  17. Purification, characterization, and sequencing of antimicrobial peptides, Cy-AMP1, Cy-AMP2, and Cy-AMP3, from the Cycad (Cycas revoluta) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Seiya; Kato, Kouji; Koba, Atsuko; Minami, Yuji; Watanabe, Keiichi; Yagi, Fumio

    2008-12-01

    Novel antimicrobial peptides (AMP), designated Cy-AMP1, Cy-AMP2, and Cy-AMP3, were purified from seeds of the cycad (Cycas revoluta) by a CM cellulofine column, ion-exchange HPLC on SP COSMOGEL, and reverse-phase HPLC. They had molecular masses of 4583.2 Da, 4568.9 Da and 9275.8 Da, respectively, by MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Half of the amino acid residues of Cy-AMP1 and Cy-AMP2 were cysteine, glycine and proline, and their sequences were similar. The sequence of Cy-AMP3 showed high homology to various lipid transfer proteins. For Cy-AMP1 and Cy-AMP2, the concentrations of peptides required for 50% inhibition (IC(50)) of the growth of plant pathogenic fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were 7.0-8.9 microg/ml. The Cy-AMP3 had weak antimicrobial activity. The structural and antimicrobial characteristics of Cy-AMP1 and Cy-AMP2 indicated that they are a novel type of antimicrobial peptide belonging to a plant defensin family.

  18. Escherichia coli exports cyclic AMP via TolC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantke, Klaus; Winkler, Karin; Schultz, Joachim E

    2011-03-01

    In Escherichia coli more than 180 genes are regulated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. However, more than 90% of cAMP that is made by intracellular adenylyl cyclases is found in the culture medium. How is cAMP exported from E. coli? In a tolC mutant, 0.03 mM IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) was sufficient to induce β-galactosidase compared to 0.1 mM IPTG in the parent strain. In a cya mutant unable to produce cAMP about 1 mM extracellular cAMP was required to induce β-galactosidase, whereas in a cya tolC mutant 0.1 mM cAMP was sufficient. When cAMP in E. coli cya was generated intracellularly by a recombinant, weakly active adenylyl cyclase from Corynebacterium glutamicum, the critical level of cAMP necessary for induction of maltose degradation was only achieved in a tolC mutant and not in the parent strain. Deletion of a putative cAMP phosphodiesterase of E. coli, CpdA, resulted in a slightly similar, yet more diffuse phenotype. The data demonstrate that export of cAMP via TolC is a most efficient way of E. coli to lower high concentrations of cAMP in the cell and maintain its sensitivity in changing metabolic environments.

  19. The interplay between cyclic AMP and insulin during obesity development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Kamil

    Insulin and cAMP signalling are related to two opposite metabolic responses. Insulin secretion is elicited in response to food availability and trigger catabolic processes like lipogenesis and glycogen synthesis with a purpose of energy storage. On the other hand cAMP signalling is associated...... with stress and starvation and stimulates processes like glycogen degradation and lipolysis to distribute the stored energy through the body. Although in energy preserving tissues insulin inhibit cAMP signalling, in fat precursor cells cAMP potentiates insulin action and promote adipogenesis. Activation...... of exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (Epac) has been shown to be crucial for cAMP mediated potentiation of insulin signaling. In the current study I am trying to answer the question as to how cAMP accelerates adipogenesis in vivo as well as what is the role of Epac in cAMP mediated potentiation...

  20. AMP is an adenosine A1 receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittiner, Joseph E; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P; Frye, Stephen V; Zylka, Mark J

    2012-02-17

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5'-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A(1) receptor (A(1)R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A(2B) receptor (A(2B)R) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A(1)R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A(1)R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A(1)R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A(1)R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine.

  1. AMPS Supporting Research and Technology (SR and T) report. Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas in Space (AMPS) definition study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    A listing of candidate technology areas that require additional study is presented. These candidate tasks, identified during the AMPS Phase B studies, are requisites to the design, development, and operation of the AMPS concept selected for preliminary design.

  2. AMP Deaminase 3 Deficiency Enhanced 5′-AMP Induction of Hypometabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Isadora Susan; O′Brien, William G.; Nath, Vinay; Zhao, Zhaoyang; Lee, Cheng Chi

    2013-01-01

    A hypometabolic state can be induced in mice by 5′-AMP administration. Previously we proposed that an underlying mechanism for this hypometabolism is linked to reduced erythrocyte oxygen transport function due to 5′-AMP uptake altering the cellular adenylate equilibrium. To test this hypothesis, we generated mice deficient in adenosine monophosphate deaminase 3 (AMPD3), the key catabolic enzyme for 5′-AMP in erythrocytes. Mice deficient in AMPD3 maintained AMPD activities in all tissues except erythrocytes. Developmentally and morphologically, the Ampd3−/− mice were indistinguishable from their wild type siblings. The levels of ATP, ADP but not 5′-AMP in erythrocytes of Ampd3−/− mice were significantly elevated. Fasting blood glucose levels of the Ampd3−/− mice were comparable to wild type siblings. In comparison to wild type mice, the Ampd3−/− mice displayed a deeper hypometabolism with a significantly delayed average arousal time in response to 5′-AMP administration. Together, these findings demonstrate a central role of AMPD3 in the regulation of 5′-AMP mediated hypometabolism and further implicate erythrocytes in this behavioral response. PMID:24066180

  3. Antifungal activity of synthetic peptides derived from Impatiens balsamina antimicrobial peptides Ib-AMP1 and Ib-AMP4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thevissen, K.; Francois, E.J.A.; Sijtsma, L.; Amerongen, van A.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Meloen, R.; Posthuma-Trumpie, G.A.; Broekaert, W.F.; Cammue, B.P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Seeds of Impatiens balsamina contain a set of related antimicrobial peptides (Ib-AMPs). We have produced a synthetic variant of Ib-AMP1, oxidized to the bicyclic native conformation, which was fully active on yeast and fungal strains; and four linear 20-mer Ib-AMP variants, including two all-d

  4. The therapeutic applications of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs): a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Kim, Cheolmin; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small molecules with a broad spectrum of antibiotic activities against bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and viruses and cytotoxic activity on cancer cells, in addition to anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Therefore, AMPs have garnered interest as novel therapeutic agents. Because of the rapid increase in drug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms, AMPs from synthetic and natural sources have been developed using alternative antimicrobial strategies. This article presents a broad analysis of patents referring to the therapeutic applications of AMPs since 2009. The review focuses on the universal trends in the effective design, mechanism, and biological evolution of AMPs.

  5. S-AMP: Approximate Message Passing for General Matrix Ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Winther, Ole; Fleury, Bernard H.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel iterative estimation algorithm for linear observation models called S-AMP. The fixed points of S-AMP are the stationary points of the exact Gibbs free energy under a set of (first- and second-) moment consistency constraints in the large system limit. S-AMP extends...... the approximate message-passing (AMP) algorithm to general matrix ensembles with a well-defined large system size limit. The generalization is based on the S-transform (in free probability) of the spectrum of the measurement matrix. Furthermore, we show that the optimality of S-AMP follows directly from its...

  6. modlAMP: Python for antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Alex T; Gabernet, Gisela; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2017-09-01

    We have implemented the lecular esign aboratory's nti icrobial eptides package ( ), a Python-based software package for the design, classification and visual representation of peptide data. modlAMP offers functions for molecular descriptor calculation and the retrieval of amino acid sequences from public or local sequence databases, and provides instant access to precompiled datasets for machine learning. The package also contains methods for the analysis and representation of circular dichroism spectra. The modlAMP Python package is available under the BSD license from URL http://doi.org/10.5905/ethz-1007-72 or via pip from the Python Package Index (PyPI). gisbert.schneider@pharma.ethz.ch. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. 2′,3′-cAMP, 3′-AMP, and 2′-AMP inhibit human aortic and coronary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via A2B receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jin; Gillespie, Delbert G.

    2011-01-01

    Rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from renal microvessels metabolize 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP, and these AMPs are converted to adenosine that inhibits microvascular VSMC proliferation via A2B receptors. The goal of this study was to test whether this mechanism also exists in VSMCs from conduit arteries and whether it is similarly expressed in human vs. rat VSMCs. Incubation of rat and human aortic VSMCs with 2′,3′-cAMP concentration-dependently increased levels of 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP in the medium, with a similar absolute increase in 2′-AMP vs. 3′-AMP. In contrast, in human coronary VSMCs, 2′,3′-cAMP increased 2′-AMP levels yet had little effect on 3′-AMP levels. In all cell types, 2′,3′-cAMP increased levels of adenosine, but not 5′-AMP, and 2′,3′-AMP inhibited cell proliferation. Antagonism of A2B receptors (MRS-1754), but not A1 (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine), A2A (SCH-58261), or A3 (VUF-5574) receptors, attenuated the antiproliferative effects of 2′,3′-cAMP. In all cell types, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 5′-AMP increased adenosine levels, and inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase blocked this effect of 5′-AMP but not that of 2′-AMP nor 3′-AMP. Also, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 5′-AMP, like 2′,3′-cAMP, exerted antiproliferative effects that were abolished by antagonism of A2B receptors with MRS-1754. In conclusion, VSMCs from conduit arteries metabolize 2′,3′-cAMP to AMPs, which are metabolized to adenosine. In rat and human aortic VSMCs, both 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP are involved in this process, whereas, in human coronary VSMCs, 2′,3′-cAMP is mainly converted to 2′-AMP. Because adenosine inhibits VSMC proliferation via A2B receptors, local vascular production of 2′,3′-cAMP may protect conduit arteries from atherosclerosis. PMID:21622827

  8. Fiscal Year 2011 Infrastructure Refactorizations in AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Allu, Srikanth [ORNL; Barai, Pallab [ORNL; Cochran, Bill [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Dilts, Gary A [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    In Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11), the AMP (Advanced MultiPhysics) Nuclear Fuel Performance code [1] went through a thorough review and refactorization based on the lessons-learned from the previous year, in which the version 0.9 of the software was released as a prototype. This report describes the refactorization work that has occurred or is in progress during FY11.

  9. The Monge-Ampère equation

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez, Cristian E

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this monograph explores the Monge-Ampère equation and the latest advances in its study and applications. It provides an essentially self-contained systematic exposition of the theory of weak solutions, including regularity results by L. A. Caffarelli. The geometric aspects of this theory are stressed using techniques from harmonic analysis, such as covering lemmas and set decompositions. An effort is made to present complete proofs of all theorems, and examples and exercises are offered to further illustrate important concepts. Some of the topics considered include generalized solutions, non-divergence equations, cross sections, and convex solutions. New to this edition is a chapter on the linearized Monge-Ampère equation and a chapter on interior Hölder estimates for second derivatives. Bibliographic notes, updated and expanded from the first edition, are included at the end of every chapter for further reading on Monge-Ampère-type equations and their diverse applications in th...

  10. The Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-24

    Increased deployment of new technologies, e.g., renewable generation and electric vehicles, is rapidly transforming electrical power networks by crossing previously distinct spatiotemporal scales and invalidating many traditional approaches for designing, analyzing, and operating power grids. This trend is expected to accelerate over the coming years, bringing the disruptive challenge of complexity, but also opportunities to deliver unprecedented efficiency and reliability. Our Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS) Center will discover, enable, and solve emerging mathematics challenges arising in power systems and, more generally, in complex engineered networks. We will develop foundational applied mathematics resulting in rigorous algorithms and simulation toolboxes for modern and future engineered networks. The AMPS Center deconstruction/reconstruction approach 'deconstructs' complex networks into sub-problems within non-separable spatiotemporal scales, a missing step in 20th century modeling of engineered networks. These sub-problems are addressed within the appropriate AMPS foundational pillar - complex systems, control theory, and optimization theory - and merged or 'reconstructed' at their boundaries into more general mathematical descriptions of complex engineered networks where important new questions are formulated and attacked. These two steps, iterated multiple times, will bridge the growing chasm between the legacy power grid and its future as a complex engineered network.

  11. Copper Regulates Cyclic AMP-Dependent Lipolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi; Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Chan, Jefferson; Kaluarachchi, Harini; Muchenditsi, Abigael; Pendyala, Venkata S.; Jia, Shang; Aron, Allegra T.; Ackerman, Cheri M.; Vander Wal, Mark N.; Guan, Timothy; Smaga, Lukas P.; Farhi, Samouil L.; New, Elizabeth J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Chang, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Cell signaling relies extensively on dynamic pools of redox-inactive metal ions such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc, but their redox-active transition metal counterparts such as copper and iron have been studied primarily as static enzyme cofactors. Here we report that copper is an endogenous regulator of lipolysis, the breakdown of fat, which is an essential process in maintaining the body's weight and energy stores. Utilizing a murine model of genetic copper misregulation, in combination with pharmacological alterations in copper status and imaging studies in a 3T3-L1 white adipocyte model, we demonstrate that copper regulates lipolysis at the level of the second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP), by altering the activity of the cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase PDE3B. Biochemical studies of the copper-PDE3B interaction establish copper-dependent inhibition of enzyme activity and identify a key conserved cysteine residue within a PDE3-specific loop that is essential for the observed copper-dependent lipolytic phenotype. PMID:27272565

  12. Optimal Design for Reactivity Ratio Estimation: A Comparison of Techniques for AMPS/Acrylamide and AMPS/Acrylic Acid Copolymerizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison J. Scott

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble polymers of acrylamide (AAm and acrylic acid (AAc have significant potential in enhanced oil recovery, as well as in other specialty applications. To improve the shear strength of the polymer, a third comonomer, 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS, can be added to the pre-polymerization mixture. Copolymerization kinetics of AAm/AAc are well studied, but little is known about the other comonomer pairs (AMPS/AAm and AMPS/AAc. Hence, reactivity ratios for AMPS/AAm and AMPS/AAc copolymerization must be established first. A key aspect in the estimation of reliable reactivity ratios is design of experiments, which minimizes the number of experiments and provides increased information content (resulting in more precise parameter estimates. However, design of experiments is hardly ever used during copolymerization parameter estimation schemes. In the current work, copolymerization experiments for both AMPS/AAm and AMPS/AAc are designed using two optimal techniques (Tidwell-Mortimer and the error-in-variables-model (EVM. From these optimally designed experiments, accurate reactivity ratio estimates are determined for AMPS/AAm (rAMPS = 0.18, rAAm = 0.85 and AMPS/AAc (rAMPS = 0.19, rAAc = 0.86.

  13. The interplay between cyclic AMP and insulin during obesity development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Kamil

    with stress and starvation and stimulates processes like glycogen degradation and lipolysis to distribute the stored energy through the body. Although in energy preserving tissues insulin inhibit cAMP signalling, in fat precursor cells cAMP potentiates insulin action and promote adipogenesis. Activation...... of exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (Epac) has been shown to be crucial for cAMP mediated potentiation of insulin signaling. In the current study I am trying to answer the question as to how cAMP accelerates adipogenesis in vivo as well as what is the role of Epac in cAMP mediated potentiation...... of insulin signalling. Moreover, I am investigating how increased insulin secretion caused by sucrose consumption, affects insulin signaling in peripheral tissues....

  14. Didactical formulation of the Ampère law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barchiesi, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    The Ampère law is useful to calculate the magnetostatic field in the cases of distributions of current with high degree of symmetry. Nevertheless the magnetic field produced by a thin straight wire carrying a current I requires the Biot–Savart law and the use of the Ampère law leads to a mistake. A didactical formulation of the Ampère law is proposed to prevent misinterpretations. (letters and comments)

  15. AMP Is an Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonist*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittiner, Joseph E.; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5′-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5′-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A1R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A1R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A1R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A1R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine. PMID:22215671

  16. The Diffusion Coefficients Of Cu And Zn In amp913- And amp919- Solid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhurim Hoxha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work the multiphase diffusion in the infinite couple Cu-Zn was studied experimentally. The diffusion couples were prepared by platting technique. The samples were annealed in three different temperatures which were taken below the melting temperature of Zn. For each temperature there were used six different annealing times ranging from 1h up to 32h. In the micrographs provided by light microscopy it can be seen the formation of only two of the three intermetalic phases present in the Cu-Zn phase diagram namely amp949- and amp947-phase. WDX EPMA analysis was used to obtain the concentration profiles of the diffusion layers.he diffusion coefficients of Cu and Zn in amp945- and amp951-solid solutions are calculated using the solutions of second Ficks law for independent concentration case. Since the diffusion coefficients depends only on the temperature of annealing and not on the time of it they must be the same for a given temperature. Therefore the diffusion coefficients were averaged for each temperature. Knowing the diffusion coefficients for each temperature enables the calculation of the activation energies and the frequency factors as well.

  17. A derivative of ascorbic acid modulates cAMP production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordignon, B; Mones, S; Rahman, F; Chiron, J; Peiretti, F; Vidal, N; Fontes, M

    2013-09-13

    We reported, in previous experiments, that AA is a global regulator of cAMP pools. In this study, we demonstrate that K873, an analog of AA we synthesized and presenting antiproliferative properties, has also an impact on cAMP production. However, K873 has no antioxidant activity, at the contrary of AA. It definitively demonstrates that action of AA on the cAMP production is not linked to antioxidant activity. These data suggest that AA, and derivatives of this molecule, could be promising drug acting on biological processes that are under the control of cAMP dependent pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. S-AMP for non-linear observation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Winther, Ole; Fleury, Bernard H.

    2015-01-01

    matrix has zero-mean iid Gaussian entries. Our derivation is based upon 1) deriving expectation-propagation-(EP)-like equations from the stationary-points equations of the Gibbs free energy under first- and second-moment constraints and 2) applying additive free convolution in free probability theory......Recently we presented the S-AMP approach, an extension of approximate message passing (AMP), to be able to handle general invariant matrix ensembles. In this contribution we extend S-AMP to non-linear observation models. We obtain generalized AMP (GAMP) as the special case when the measurement...

  19. Internal gastargets in AmPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaan, A. P.; Postma, O.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van Leeuwen, E.; Doets, M.; Kraan, M.

    1997-05-01

    Internal gas targets in AmPS A.P. Kaan, O. Postma, J.F.J. van den Brand, E. van Leeuwen, M. Doets, M. Kra= an National Institute for Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics; Kruislaan 409; 1098 SJ Amsterdam; Holland In the Amsterdam Puls Stretcher/storage ring AmPS(1 GeV electrons), we designed a set-up in order to accommodate a gas target with a density of 1016 mol/cm2. The storage cell needed for this purpose is a aluminium tube with a length of 40 cm, a diameter of 15 mm and a wall thickness of 25 =B5m. Three sets of conductance limiters on both sides of the target, combined with dry turbopumps are designed to be used as differential pumping stations. These limiters cause discontinuities in the beam path and must therefor be retractable and radio frequency compatible in both positions. Low =B5 materials must be used because of the depolarisation effects of changing magnetic fields. The calculations show that the flow resistance's are sufficient to reduce the load of the getter pumps to a level with which the lifetime of the pump elements remain acceptable. The design of the mechanics and the vacuum system will be explained. Recent results from the measurements after installation in combination with the influence on the lifetime on the beam will be presented

  20. The CytR repressor antagonizes cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP receptor protein activation of the deoCp2 promoter of Escherichia coli K-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, L; Martinussen, J; Møllegaard, N E

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the Escherichia coli deoCp2 promoter by the CytR repressor and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) complexed to cAMP. Promoter regions controlled by these two proteins characteristically contain tandem cAMP-CRP binding sites. Here we show that (i) Cyt...

  1. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated stimulation of adipocyte differentiation requires the synergistic action of Epac- and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller

    2008-01-01

    AMP-dependent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Epac, working via Rap, acted synergistically with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]) to promote adipogenesis. The major role of PKA was to down-regulate Rho and Rho-kinase activity, rather than to enhance CREB phosphorylation. Suppression of Rho......-kinase impaired proadipogenic insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling, which was restored by activation of Epac. This interplay between PKA and Epac-mediated processes not only provides novel insight into the initiation and tuning of adipocyte differentiation, but also demonstrates a new mechanism of c......AMP signaling whereby cAMP uses both PKA and Epac to achieve an appropriate cellular response....

  2. MEK Inhibitors Reverse cAMP-Mediated Anxiety in Zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Pia R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Grant, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphodiesterase (PDE)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) activity is frequently associated with anxiety disorders, but current therapies act by reducing neuronal excitability rather than targeting PDE-cAMP-mediated signaling pathways. Here, we report the novel repositioning of anti-cancer MEK inhibitors...... as anxiolytics in a zebrafish model of anxiety-like behaviors. PDE inhibitors or activators of adenylate cyclase cause behaviors consistent with anxiety in larvae and adult zebrafish. Small-molecule screening identifies MEK inhibitors as potent suppressors of cAMP anxiety behaviors in both larvae and adult...... zebrafish, while causing no anxiolytic behavioral effects on their own. The mechanism underlying cAMP-induced anxiety is via crosstalk to activation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. We propose that targeting crosstalk signaling pathways can be an effective strategy for mental health disorders, and advance...

  3. Selective adsorption properties of Cs for mordenite enclosing Amp microcapsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, Hitoshi; Kanome, Shun; Kato, Mariko; Niibori, Yuichi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Selective separation and recovery of heat-generating nuclide ({sup 137}Cs) from high-level liquid waste (HLLW) containing highly concentrated HNO{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 3} are vital issues in relation to the partitioning of radionuclides and volume reduction of radioactive wastes. This paper deals with the novel preparation method of Cs-selective adsorbents. Amp-M, kind of inorganic and organic composites, was prepared by successive impregnation of Pma (H{sub 3}Mo{sub 12}O{sub 40}P) and kneaded sol (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} and sodium alginate (NALGO) into the macro pores of mordenite. Amp-M composites obtained by 1 to 3 cycles were abbreviated as Amp-M1, Amp-M2 and Amp-M3, respectively.

  4. Synergistic Antipseudomonal Effects of Synthetic Peptide AMP38 and Carbapenems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudilla, Héctor; Fusté, Ester; Cajal, Yolanda; Rabanal, Francesc; Vinuesa, Teresa; Viñas, Miguel

    2016-09-12

    The aim was to explore the antimicrobial activity of a synthetic peptide (AMP38) and its synergy with imipenem against imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The main mechanism of imipenem resistance is the loss or alteration of protein OprD. Time-kill and minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) determinations were carried out by using clinical imipenem-resistant strains. AMP38 was markedly synergistic with imipenem when determined in imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa. MBEC obtained for the combination of AMP38 and imipenem was of 62.5 μg/mL, whereas the MBEC of each antimicrobial separately was 500 μg/mL. AMP38 should be regarded as a promising antimicrobial to fight MDR P. aeruginosa infections. Moreover, killing effect and antibiofilm activity of AMP38 plus imipenem was much higher than that of colistin plus imipenem.

  5. Sleep deprivation impairs cAMP signalling in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecsey, Christopher G; Baillie, George S; Jaganath, Devan; Havekes, Robbert; Daniels, Andrew; Wimmer, Mathieu; Huang, Ted; Brown, Kim M; Li, Xiang-Yao; Descalzi, Giannina; Kim, Susan S; Chen, Tao; Shang, Yu-Ze; Zhuo, Min; Houslay, Miles D; Abel, Ted

    2009-10-22

    Millions of people regularly obtain insufficient sleep. Given the effect of sleep deprivation on our lives, understanding the cellular and molecular pathways affected by sleep deprivation is clearly of social and clinical importance. One of the major effects of sleep deprivation on the brain is to produce memory deficits in learning models that are dependent on the hippocampus. Here we have identified a molecular mechanism by which brief sleep deprivation alters hippocampal function. Sleep deprivation selectively impaired 3', 5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus, reduced cAMP signalling, and increased activity and protein levels of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4), an enzyme that degrades cAMP. Treatment of mice with phosphodiesterase inhibitors rescued the sleep-deprivation-induced deficits in cAMP signalling, synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent memory. These findings demonstrate that brief sleep deprivation disrupts hippocampal function by interfering with cAMP signalling through increased PDE4 activity. Thus, drugs that enhance cAMP signalling may provide a new therapeutic approach to counteract the cognitive effects of sleep deprivation.

  6. Imaging alterations of cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eFroese

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available 3’,5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is an important second messenger which regulates heart function by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Recent years have provided deeper mechanistic insights into compartmentalized cAMP signaling and its link to cardiac disease. In this mini review, we summarize newest developments in this field achieved by cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical techniques. We further compile the data from different studies into a bigger picture of so far uncovered alterations in cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains which occur in compensated cardiac hypertrophy and chronic heart failure. Finally, future research directions and translational perspectives are briefly discussed.

  7. Amped Up! - Volume 1, No. 3, May/June 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-01

    Welcome to the latest issue of our bimonthly newsletter, Amped Up!, highlighting the initiatives, events and technologies in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy that influence change.

  8. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric eBOULARAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors’ signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefly discuss the complexity of cAMP synthesis and degradation in the cardiac context, describe the way to detect it and review the main pharmacological arsenal to modulate its availability.

  9. Microgravity changes in heart structure and cyclic-AMP metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Fine, A.; Kato, K.; Egnor, R.; Cheng, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on cardiac ultrastructure and cyclic AMP metabolism in tissues of rats flown on Spacelab 3 are reported. Light and electron microscope studies of cell structure, measurements of low and high Km phosphodiesterase activity, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and regulatory subunit compartmentation show significant deviations in flight animals when compared to ground controls. The results indicate that some changes have occurred in cellular responses associated with catecholamine receptor interactions and intracellular signal processing.

  10. Effects of electron beam irradiation on inorganic exchanger AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.L.N.; Mathew, C.; Deshpande, R.S.; Jadhav, A.V.; Pande, B.M.; Shukla, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The heteropolyacid salt inorganic exchanger ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) was subjected to an electron dose upto 2 MGy to assess any possible radiation damage. The breakthrough and total exchange capacity of AMP for Cs + from simulated fission product solutions were determined for both control and irradiated samples. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) were deployed to examine any marked microscopic changes taking place in this exchanger. (author). 3 refs., 3 figs

  11. Covalent immobilization of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) onto biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Fabíola; Carvalho, Isabel F; Montelaro, Ronald C; Gomes, P; Martins, M Cristina L

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials remains a major problem in the medical devices field. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are well-known components of the innate immune system that can be applied to overcome biofilm-associated infections. Their relevance has been increasing as a practical alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are declining in effectiveness. The recent interest focused on these peptides can be explained by a group of special features, including a wide spectrum of activity, high efficacy at very low concentrations, target specificity, anti-endotoxin activity, synergistic action with classical antibiotics, and low propensity for developing resistance. Therefore, the development of an antimicrobial coating with such properties would be worthwhile. The immobilization of AMPs onto a biomaterial surface has further advantages as it also helps to circumvent AMPs' potential limitations, such as short half-life and cytotoxicity associated with higher concentrations of soluble peptides. The studies discussed in the current review report on the impact of covalent immobilization of AMPs onto surfaces through different chemical coupling strategies, length of spacers, and peptide orientation and concentration. The overall results suggest that immobilized AMPs may be effective in the prevention of biofilm formation by reduction of microorganism survival post-contact with the coated biomaterial. Minimal cytotoxicity and long-term stability profiles were obtained by optimizing immobilization parameters, indicating a promising potential for the use of immobilized AMPs in clinical applications. On the other hand, the effects of tethering on mechanisms of action of AMPs have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, further studies are recommended to explore the real potential of immobilized AMPs in health applications as antimicrobial coatings of medical devices. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 2',3'-cAMP, 3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine inhibit TNF-α and CXCL10 production from activated primary murine microglia via A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Elizabeth A; Exo, Jennifer L; Verrier, Jonathan D; Jackson, Travis C; Gillespie, Delbert G; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Kochanek, Patrick M; Jackson, Edwin K

    2015-01-12

    Some cells, tissues and organs release 2',3'-cAMP (a positional isomer of 3',5'-cAMP) and convert extracellular 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP plus 3'-AMP and convert these AMPs to adenosine (called the extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway). Recent studies show that microglia have an extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether the extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway could have functional consequences on the production of cytokines/chemokines by activated microglia. Experiments were conducted in cultures of primary murine microglia. In the first experiment, the effect of 2',3'-cAMP, 3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine on LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production was determined. In the next experiment, the first protocol was replicated but with the addition of 1,3-dipropyl-8-p-sulfophenylxanthine (DPSPX) (0.1 μM; antagonist of adenosine receptors). The last experiment compared the ability of 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) (10 μM; selective A1 agonist), 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) (10 μM; agonist for all adenosine receptor subtypes) and CGS21680 (10 μM; selective A2A agonist) to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production. (1) 2',3'-cAMP, 3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine similarly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production; (2) DPSPX nearly eliminated the inhibitory effects of 2',3'-cAMP, 3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine on LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production; (3) CCPA did not affect LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10; (4) NECA and CGS21680 similarly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production. 2',3'-cAMP and its metabolites (3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine) inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production via A2A-receptor activation. Adenosine and its precursors, via A2A receptors, likely suppress TNF-α and CXCL10 production by activated microglia in brain diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 2’,3’-cAMP, 3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and Adenosine Inhibit TNF-α and CXCL10 Production From Activated Primary Murine Microglia via A2A Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Elizabeth A.; Exo, Jennifer L.; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Jackson, Travis C.; Gillespie, Delbert G.; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Some cells, tissues and organs release 2’,3’-cAMP (a positional isomer of 3’,5’-cAMP) and convert extracellular 2’,3’-cAMP to 2’-AMP plus 3’-AMP and convert these AMPs to adenosine (called the extracellular 2’,3’-cAMP-adenosine pathway). Recent studies show that microglia have an extracellular 2’,3’-cAMP-adenosine pathway. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether the extracellular 2’,3’-cAMP-adenosine pathway could have functional consequences on the production of cytokines/chemokines by activated microglia. Methods Experiments were conducted in cultures of primary murine microglia. In the first experiment, the effect of 2’,3’-cAMP, 3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and adenosine on LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production was determined. In the next experiment, the first protocol was replicated but with the addition of 1,3-dipropyl-8-p-sulfophenylxanthine (DPSPX) (0.1 µM; antagonist of adenosine receptors). The last experiment compared the ability of 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) (10 µM; selective A1 agonist), 5’-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) (10 µM; agonist for all adenosine receptor subtypes) and CGS21680 (10 µM; selective A2A agonist) to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production. Results 1) 2’,3’-cAMP, 3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and adenosine similarly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production; 2) DPSPX nearly eliminated the inhibitory effects of 2’,3’-cAMP, 3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and adenosine on LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production; 3) CCPA did not affect LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10; 4) NECA and CGS21680 similarly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production. Conclusions 2’,3’-cAMP and its metabolites (3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and adenosine) inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production via A2A-receptor activation. Adenosine and its precursors, via A2A receptors, likely suppress TNF-α and CXCL10 production by activated microglia in brain diseases. PMID:25451117

  14. The CytR repressor antagonizes cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP receptor protein activation of the deoCp2 promoter of Escherichia coli K-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Martinussen, J; Møllegaard, N E

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the Escherichia coli deoCp2 promoter by the CytR repressor and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) complexed to cAMP. Promoter regions controlled by these two proteins characteristically contain tandem cAMP-CRP binding sites. Here we show that (i) Cyt......R selectively regulated cAMP-CRP-dependent initiations, although transcription started from the same site in deoCp2 in the absence or presence of cAMP-CRP; (ii) deletion of the uppermost cAMP-CRP target (CRP-2) resulted in loss of CytR regulation, but had only a minor effect on positive control by the cAMP...

  15. Neuronal activity promotes myelination via a cAMP pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Misti; Gary, Devin; Yang, In Hong; Miglioretti, Anna; Houdayer, Thierry; Thakor, Nitish; McDonald, John

    2013-06-01

    Neuronal activity promotes myelination in vivo and in vitro. However, the molecular events that mediate activity-dependent myelination are not completely understood. Seven, daily 1 h sessions of patterned electrical stimulation (ESTIM) promoted myelin segment formation in mixed cultures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and oligodendrocytes (OLs); the increase in myelination was frequency-dependent. Myelin segment formation was also enhanced following exposure of DRGs to ESTIM prior to OL addition, suggesting that ESTIM promotes myelination in a manner involving neuron-specific signaling. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in DRGs were increased three-fold following ESTIM, and artificially increasing cAMP mimicked the ability of ESTIM to promote myelination. Alternatively, inhibiting the cAMP pathway suppressed ESTIM-induced myelination. We used compartmentalized, microfluidic platforms to isolate DRG soma from OLs and assessed cell-type specific effects of ESTIM on myelination. A selective increase or decrease in DRG cAMP levels resulted in enhanced or suppressed myelination, respectively. This work describes a novel role for the cAMP pathway in neurons that results in enhanced myelination. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cyclic AMP system in muscle tissue during prolonged hypokinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipenko, Y. A.; Bubeyev, Y. A.; Korovkin, B. F.; Mikhaleva, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Components of the cyclic Adenosine-cyclic-35-monophosphate (AMP) system in the muscle tissue of white rats were studied during 70-75 days of hypokinesia, created by placing the animals in small booths which restricted their movements, and during the readaptation period. In the initial period, cyclic AMP levels and the activities of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase in muscle tissue were increased. The values for these indices were roughly equal for controls and experimental animals during the adaptation period, but on the 70th day of the experiment cAMP levels dropped, phosphodiesterase activity increased, and the stimulative effect of epinephrine on the activity of adenylate cyclase decreased. The indices under study normalized during the readaptation period.

  17. Prevalence and molecular characterization of clinical isolates of Escherichia coli expressing an AmpC phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rikke Lind; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Friis-Møller, Alice

    2010-01-01

    . Hyperproduction of AmpC beta-lactamase was confirmed by isoelectric focusing (IEF). The presence of a plasmid-mediated ampC gene (pAmpC) was detected by multiplex PCR. The promoter and the entire reading frame of the chromosomal ampC gene were sequenced to identify promoter mutations associated...... by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The remaining isolates all had mutations or insertions in the promoter region, which could explain increased expression of the chromosomal AmpC enzyme. Mutations in the ampC gene associated with extended activity were rare and did not cause resistance to cefepime...

  18. Gamma and neutron irradiation tests on commercial IC op amps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.J.; Morris, A.C. Jr.; Su, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results of gamma and neutron irradiation tests on 30 types of integrated-circuit operational amplifiers from 11 manufacturers are presented. All units were low-cost, commercial-grade devices. Op amps were evaluated for changes in offset voltage, input bias current, power supply current, open-loop gain, gain-bandwidth product, slew rate, power-supply and common-mode rejection ratios. Bipolar transistor op amps with resistive collector load resistors for the input stage indicated the best radiation hardness

  19. "cAMP sponge": a buffer for cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Lefkimmiatis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While intracellular buffers are widely used to study calcium signaling, no such tool exists for the other major second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a genetically encoded buffer for cAMP based on the high-affinity cAMP-binding carboxy-terminus of the regulatory subunit RIbeta of protein kinase A (PKA. Addition of targeting sequences permitted localization of this fragment to the extra-nuclear compartment, while tagging with mCherry allowed quantification of its expression at the single cell level. This construct (named "cAMP sponge" was shown to selectively bind cAMP in vitro. Its expression significantly suppressed agonist-induced cAMP signals and the downstream activation of PKA within the cytosol as measured by FRET-based sensors in single living cells. Point mutations in the cAMP-binding domains of the construct rendered the chimera unable to bind cAMP in vitro or in situ. Cyclic AMP sponge was fruitfully applied to examine feedback regulation of gap junction-mediated transfer of cAMP in epithelial cell couplets. CONCLUSIONS: This newest member of the cAMP toolbox has the potential to reveal unique biological functions of cAMP, including insight into the functional significance of compartmentalized signaling events.

  20. Field measurements and interpretation of TMI-2 instrumentation: YM-AMP-7023 and YM-AMP-7025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J E; Smith, J T; Mathis, M V

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the measurement and results of the Loose Part Monitor Channels YM-AMP-7023 and YM-AMP-7025. These instruments consist of an Endevco Model 2276 accelerometer and a model 2652M4 charge amplifier connected to the Loose Parts Monitorng System terminals by approximately 400 feet (500 feet for 7025) of cable. The instruments were being incorporated into a B and W supplied system when the measurements were taken; therefore, the equipment was not expected to be fully operational.

  1. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein signaling system mediates resistance of Vibrio cholerae O1 strains to multiple environmental bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Waise, T M Zaved; Kamruzzaman, M; Ghosh, Amar N; Nair, G Balakrish; Mekalanos, John J; Faruque, Shah M

    2010-07-01

    Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the epidemic diarrheal disease cholera, interacts with diverse environmental bacteriophages. These interactions promote genetic diversity or cause selective enrichment of phage-resistant bacterial clones. To identify bacterial genes involved in mediating the phage-resistant phenotype, we screened a transposon insertion library of V. cholerae O1 El Tor biotype strain C6706 to identify mutants showing altered susceptibility to a panel of phages isolated from surface waters in Bangladesh. Mutants with insertion in cyaA or crp genes encoding adenylate cyclase or cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP), respectively, were susceptible to a phage designated JSF9 to which the parent strain was completely resistant. Application of the cyaA mutant as an indicator strain in environmental phage monitoring enhanced phage detection, and we identified 3 additional phages to which the parent strain was resistant. Incorporation of the cyaA or crp mutations into other V. cholerae O1 strains caused similar alterations in their phage susceptibility patterns, and the susceptibility correlated with the ability of the bacteria to adsorb these phages. Our results suggest that cAMP-CRP-mediated downregulation of phage adsorption may contribute to a mechanism for the V. cholerae O1 strains to survive predation by multiple environmental phages. Furthermore, the cyaA or crp mutant strains may be used as suitable indicators in monitoring cholera phages in the water.

  2. Ecto- and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases in normal and AMP deaminase-deficient human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanisch, Frank; Hellsten, Ylva; Zierz, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is mainly deaminated by AMP deaminase. However, the C34T mutation in the AMPD1 gene severely reduces AMP deaminase activity. Alternatively, intracellular AMP is dephosphorylated to adenosine via cytosolic AMP 5'-nucleotidase (cN-I). In individuals...... with a homozygous C34T mutation, cN-I might be a more important pathway for AMP removal. We determined activities of AMP deaminase, cN-I, total cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (total cN), ecto-5'-nucleotidase (ectoN) and whole homogenate 5'-nucleotidase activity in skeletal muscle biopsies from patients with different...... AMPD1 genotypes [homozygotes for C34T mutation (TT); heterozygotes for C34T mutation (CT); and homozygotes for wild type (CC): diseased controls CC; and normal controls CC]. AMP deaminase activity showed genotype-dependent differences. Total cN activity in normal controls accounted for 57...

  3. Prevalence and molecular characterization of clinical isolates of Escherichia coli expressing an AmpC phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rikke Lind; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Friis-Møller, Alice

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish the prevalence of the AmpC beta-lactamase phenotype in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and characterize the genetic resistance mechanisms causing the observed phenotype. METHODS: Clinical E. coli (n = 74) with reduced susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins...... with hyperproduction and gene mutations associated with extended-spectrum AmpC (ESAC) beta-lactamase activity. RESULTS: Twenty-four isolates exhibited a positive AmpC disc test. IEF confirmed AmpC expression in all isolates except one. Four isolates contained a bla(CMY-2) gene. These were not clonally related....... Sequencing of ampC showed that most isolates were not clonally related. CONCLUSIONS: E. coli expressing an AmpC phenotype occur sporadically and cause significant resistance to cephalosporins. The majority of these are hyperproducing chromosomal ampC although some isolates have acquired pAmpC....

  4. Purification, characterization, and sequencing of novel antimicrobial peptides, Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2, from bulbs of tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Masatoshi; Ideguchi, Mineo; Minami, Yuji; Watanabe, Keiichi; Tadera, Kenjiro

    2004-03-01

    Novel antimicrobial peptides (AMP), designated Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2, were purified from the bulbs of tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.) by chitin affinity chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). They bind to chitin in a reversible way. They were basic peptides having isoelectric points of over 12. Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2 had molecular masses of 4,988 Da and 5,006 Da on MALDI-TOF MS analysis, and their extinction coefficients of 1% aqueous solutions at 280 nm were 3.3 and 3.4, respectively. Half of all amino acid residues of Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2 were occupied by cysteine, arginine, lysine, and proline. The concentrations of peptides required for 50% inhibition (IC(50)) of the growth of plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi were 2 to 20 microg/ml. The structural characteristics of Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2 indicated that they were novel thionin-like antimicrobial peptides, though Tu-AMP 2 was a heterodimer composes of two short peptides joined with disulfide bonds.

  5. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862...

  6. cAMP Regulation of the lactose operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2004-05-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: lactose operon, adenylate cyclase, cAMP, catabolite activator protein (CAP), expression plasmid, lac operator, lac repressor, lactose, glucose, promoter, cis- and trans-acting factors. Copyright © 2004 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Modeling of CO2 absorber using an AMP solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, Jostein; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: An explicit model for carbon dioxide (CO2) solubility in an aqueous solution of 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) has been proposed and an expression for the heat of absorption of CO2 has been developed as a function of loading and temperature. A rate-based steady-state model for CO2...

  8. Detection of Amp C Beta Lactamases in Clinical Isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 81 consecutive non repetitive clinical isolates of Escherichia coli (n=40) and Klebsiella spp. (n=41) were screened for AmpC production by disc diffusion method using cefoxitin (30 Zg) disc and confirmed by inhibitor based test using boronic acid as inhibitor. A total of 16 E.coli isolates (40%) and 16 Klebsiella ...

  9. CMOS technology and current-feedback op-amps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1993-01-01

    Some of the problems related to the application of CMOS technology to current-feedback operational amplifiers (CFB op-amps) are identified. Problems caused by the low device transconductance and by the absence of matching between p-channel and n-channel transistors are examined, and circuit...

  10. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    the role of CREB and BDNF in depression and as targets/mediators of antidepressant action. [Nair A and Vaidya V A 2006 Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Molecules that modulate our mood?; J. Biosci. 31 423–434]. Keywords. Antidepressant; depression; hippocampus ...

  11. 0011-0030.Data Representation amp Computer Arithmetic6 IEEE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; public; Volumes; reso; 021; 01; 0011-0030.Data Representation amp Computer Arithmetic6 IEEE Standard Double Precision FormatIn.pdf. 404! error. The page your are looking for can not be found! Please check the link or use the navigation bar at the top. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News.

  12. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of the Complexes of Silver with Adenine and dAMP

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Cornelis; Hoeben, F.P.; Hoeben, F.P.; Greve, Jan

    1991-01-01

    The behaviour of adenine and 2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate (dAMP) at positive surface potentials of a silver working electrode was investigated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The use of positive potentials in the presence of adenine or dAMP leads to a rapid accumulation of an intense spectrum. It is proposed that complexes of adenine (dAMP) with silver generate the observed spectra. Adenine and dAMP can be distinguished spectroscopically due to various different complexe...

  13. Prevalence and molecular characterization of clinical isolates of Escherichia coli expressing an AmpC phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rikke Lind; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Friis-Møller, Alice

    2010-01-01

    with hyperproduction and gene mutations associated with extended-spectrum AmpC (ESAC) beta-lactamase activity. RESULTS: Twenty-four isolates exhibited a positive AmpC disc test. IEF confirmed AmpC expression in all isolates except one. Four isolates contained a bla(CMY-2) gene. These were not clonally related...

  14. Estimation of cyclic AMP turnover in normal and methylprednisolone-treated dogs: effect of catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issekutz, T B

    1975-08-01

    The turnover rate of plasma cAMP was measured in unanesthetized normal and methylprednisolone (MP)-treated dogs with [8-3H]cAMP. Determination of specific activity was based on saturation of the specific binding protein, thus bypassing the need to know the plasma level of cAMP. In normal dogs the infusion of epinephrine increased plasma glucose by 33% and both the plasma level and rate of appearance (Ra) of cAMP 2.5-fold. Treatment with MP decreased the concentration as well as the turnover rate of cAMP by about 50%. It greatly potentiated not only the hyperglycemic effect (4-fold) of epinephrine but also the rise of plasma cAMP (8.5-fold) and that of Ra (6.8-fold). Norepinephrine infusion increased cAMP only by 50%. This effect was not potentiated by MP treatment and not altered by Na nicotinate. There was a linear correlation between plasma cAMP concentration and the rate of disappearance (Rd) of cAMP. It is concluded that: a) the increase of hepatic glycogenolysis is accompanied by a rise of cAMP output, whereas that of lipolysis is not; b) glucocorticoid treatment affects cAMP turnover; and c) the plasma level of cAMP is controlled by Ra, whereas Rd is the result of the mass-action effect of the concentration.

  15. The modulation of cell surface cAMP receptors from Dictyostelium disscoideum by ammonium sulfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1985-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum cells contain a heterogeneous population of cell surface cAMP receptors with components possessing different affinities (Kd between 15 and 450 nM) and different off-rates of the cAMP-receptor complex (t½ between 0.7 and 150 s). The association of cAMP to the receptor and the

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis have different beta-lactamase expression phenotypes but are homogeneous in the ampC-ampR genetic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, J I; Ciofu, O; Høiby, N

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from 1 of 17 cystic fibrosis patients produced secondary beta-lactamase in addition to the ampC beta-lactamase. Isolates were grouped into three beta-lactamase expression phenotypes: (i) beta-lactam sensitive, low basal levels and inducible beta-lactamase production......; (ii) beta-lactam resistant, moderate basal levels and hyperinducible beta-lactamase production; (iii) beta-lactam resistant, high basal levels and constitutive beta-lactamase production. Apart from a base substitution in the ampR-ampC intergenic region of an isolate with moderate......-basal-level and hyperinducible beta-lactamase production, sensitive and resistant strains were identical in their ampC-ampR genetic regions. Thus, enhanced beta-lactamase expression is due to mutations in regulatory proteins other than AmpR....

  17. Activation of PKA in cell requires higher concentration of cAMP than in vitro: implications for compartmentalization of cAMP signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschinski, Andreas; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2017-10-26

    cAMP is a ubiquitous second messenger responsible for the cellular effects of multiple hormones and neurotransmitters via activation of its main effector, protein kinase A (PKA). Multiple studies have shown that the basal concentration of cAMP in several cell types is about 1 μM. This value is well above the reported concentration of cAMP required to half-maximally activate PKA, which measures in the 100-300 nM range. Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain this apparent discrepancy including inaccurate measurements of intracellular free cAMP, inaccurate measurement of the apparent activation constant of PKA or shielding of PKA from bulk cytosolic cAMP via localization of the enzyme to microdomains with lower basal cAMP concentration. However, direct experimental evidence in support of any of these models is limited and a firm conclusion is missing. In this study we use multiple FRET-based reporters for the detection of cAMP and PKA activity in intact cells and we establish that the sensitivity of PKA to cAMP is almost twenty times lower when measured in cell than when measured in vitro. Our findings have important implications for the understanding of compartmentalized cAMP signalling.

  18. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  19. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shamim Hasan Zahid

    Full Text Available Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP, the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP-cAMP receptor protein (CRP is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  20. Sequence-selective DNA binding to the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J C; Wang, J H

    1989-06-15

    The fluorescence of Trp-226 in the regulatory subunit of bovine type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase is unaffected by the binding of cAMP, but is quenched by the binding of 2'-dansyl-cAMP (DNS-cAMP). Up to 67% of the fluorescence of Trp-226 can be quenched by resonant energy transfer to the DNS-cAMP bound to the first site, and 96% of the fluorescence can be quenched by saturating both sites with DNS-cAMP. The observed efficiencies of energy transfer gave a distance of 16 A between Trp-226 and the DNS-cAMP bound at the first site and a distance of 12.7 A between Trp-226 and the DNS-cAMP bound at second site. The fluorescence of Trp-226 was suppressed by incubation of RII with the self-complementary octanucleotide TGACGTCA (CRE) due to binding of the oligonucleotide to RII. A detailed study of the binding equilibrium showed that each RII(cAMP)2 molecule binds 1 molecule of CRE with Kd = 80 nM. The corresponding Kd value for cAMP-depleted RII was found to be 25-fold higher. RII was also found to bind randomly selected DNA fragments with an average Kd value much higher than that of CRE. These observations show for the first time that the binding of oligonucleotide to RII is cAMP-enhanced and sequence-selective.

  1. Cyclic AMP levels in several macroalgae and their relation to light quantity and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Francisco J L; Segovia, María; López-Figueroa, Félix

    2004-02-01

    Total cAMP levels were measured in the macroalgae Dictyota dichotoma, Gelidium sesquipedale and Ulva rigida under different light conditions in order to study its regulation either by phytochrome or photosynthesis. Incubation in red or far-red light did not promote a phytochrome-like response; instead, it showed a synergistic effect upon cAMP accumulation. cAMP levels seemed to depend on the amount of energy applied. The correlation between photosynthetic oxygen evolution and cAMP variations at sub-saturating white light irradiance pointed to photosynthetic electron transport as involved in the regulation of cAMP accumulation at least in G. sesquipedale and U. rigida. Inhibitors of thylakoidal and mitochondrial electron transport chains reduced cAMP levels in 70 to 99%. We conclude that cAMP accumulation could be regulated by photosynthetic activity rather than phytochrome in the macroalgae studied.

  2. Involvement of intracellular cAMP in epirubicin-induced vascular endothelial cell injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Yamada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the involvement of intracellular cAMP in endothelial cell injury induced by epirubicin. Epirubicin-induced decrease in cell viability and increase in caspase-3/7 activity were reversed by a cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP or an activator of adenylate cyclase forskolin concomitant with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Moreover, epirubicin-induced elevation of lipid peroxide levels was attenuated by DBcAMP. Interestingly, the exposure of epirubicin decreased intracellular cAMP levels before the onset of epirubicin-induced production of lipid peroxidation. These results suggest that intracellular cAMP plays an important role in epirubicin-induced endothelial cell injury.

  3. Aerobic Methane Generation From Plants (AMP)? Yes, Mostly!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiticar, M. J.; Ednie, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    In 2006, Keppler et al. (K) published an intriguing and revolutionary idea that aerobic methane is produced in plants (AMP) and released to the atmosphere. Their initial scaling calculations estimated the amount of AMP fluxing from living plants to range from 62-236 Tg/y and 1-7 Tg/y for plant litter. Houweling et al. (2006) (H) refined this flux to ca. 85 Tg/y PIH and 125 Tg/y present day. More recently, Dueck et al. (2007) (D) challenged the claim of AMP from intact plants. Their experiments cited "...No evidence for substantial aerobic methane emission by terrestrial plants..." (max. 0.4 ng/g h-1). Due to the significance of AMP in understanding present and palaeo-atmospheric budgets (e.g., Whiticar and Schaefer, 2007), we conducted a wide range of experiments to confirm or refute the existence and magnitude of AMP. For explanation, experiments of K were time-series batch samples measured by gas chromatography on purged and ambient samples, whereas D used continuous-flow cuvettes and measured by optical PAS with time series single injections. Our longer-term experiments with corn, wheat, tomato, red cedar, chestnut, moss and lichen (3-97 h, 32 °C) used a plant chamber, flow-through system with a GYRO, an optical spectrometer that enables continuous 1 Hz CH4 measurements with a precision of ca. 1 ppbv. We conducted over 100 chamber experiments on sterilized and non-sterilized (Cs-137 radiation) samples of: 1) intact living plants (IP), 2) fresh leaves (FL) and 3) dried leaves (DL); under both 1) high and 2) low light conditions (HL, LL), and with 1) ambient CH4 (AM, ca. 1.92 ppmv) and 2) purged methane (PM, 10 and 96 ppbv) levels. Our results demonstrate that IP-AMs have CH4 flux rates of 0.74-3.48 ng/g h-1. In contrast, IP-PMs show intense CH4 uptake rates of -28.5 to -57.9 ng/g h-1 (substantially different than K's reported emissions of 12-370 ng/g h-1 values). Our FL-AM-LL have CH4 flux rates of 0.36-2.05 ng/g h-1, whereas FL-AM-HL have significant CH4

  4. Cyclic di-AMP signaling in Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteley, Aaron Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Gram positive facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is both ubiquitous in the environment and is a facultative intracellular pathogen. A high degree of adaptability to different growth niches is one reason for the success of this organism. In this dissertation, two facets of L. monocytogenes, growth and gene expression have been investigated. The first portion examines the function and necessity of the nucleotide second messenger c-di-AMP, and the second portion of thi...

  5. A graphical representation of equivalence classes of AMP chain graphs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roverato, A.; Studený, Milan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 6 (2006), s. 1045-1078 ISSN 1532-4435 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/04/0393 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : chain graph * AMP Markov equivalence * strong equivalence * largest deflagged graph Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.255, year: 2006 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/historie/studeny-0040067.pdf

  6. Covalent immobilization of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) onto biomaterial surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiola Costa; Isabel F Carvalho; Ronald C Montelaro; Gomes, P; Cristina C L Martins

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials remains a major problem in the medical devices field. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPS) are well-known components of the innate immune system that can be applied to over-come biofilm-associated infections. Their relevance has been increasing as a practical alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are declining in effectiveness. The recent interest focused on these peptides can be explained by a group of special features, including a wide spectrum of activi...

  7. AMP-Inspired Deep Networks for Sparse Linear Inverse Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Mark; Schniter, Philip; Rangan, Sundeep

    2017-08-01

    Deep learning has gained great popularity due to its widespread success on many inference problems. We consider the application of deep learning to the sparse linear inverse problem, where one seeks to recover a sparse signal from a few noisy linear measurements. In this paper, we propose two novel neural-network architectures that decouple prediction errors across layers in the same way that the approximate message passing (AMP) algorithms decouple them across iterations: through Onsager correction. First, we propose a "learned AMP" network that significantly improves upon Gregor and LeCun's "learned ISTA." Second, inspired by the recently proposed "vector AMP" (VAMP) algorithm, we propose a "learned VAMP" network that offers increased robustness to deviations in the measurement matrix from i.i.d. Gaussian. In both cases, we jointly learn the linear transforms and scalar nonlinearities of the network. Interestingly, with i.i.d. signals, the linear transforms and scalar nonlinearities prescribed by the VAMP algorithm coincide with the values learned through back-propagation, leading to an intuitive interpretation of learned VAMP. Finally, we apply our methods to two problems from 5G wireless communications: compressive random access and massive-MIMO channel estimation.

  8. Software Design Document for the AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Cochran, Bill [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the design of the AMP nuclear fuel performance code. It provides an overview of the decomposition into separable components, an overview of what those components will do, and the strategic basis for the design. The primary components of a computational physics code include a user interface, physics packages, material properties, mathematics solvers, and computational infrastructure. Some capability from established off-the-shelf (OTS) packages will be leveraged in the development of AMP, but the primary physics components will be entirely new. The material properties required by these physics operators include many highly non-linear properties, which will be replicated from FRAPCON and LIFE where applicable, as well as some computationally-intensive operations, such as gap conductance, which depends upon the plenum pressure. Because there is extensive capability in off-the-shelf leadership class computational solvers, AMP will leverage the Trilinos, PETSc, and SUNDIALS packages. The computational infrastructure includes a build system, mesh database, and other building blocks of a computational physics package. The user interface will be developed through a collaborative effort with the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Capability Transfer program element as much as possible and will be discussed in detail in a future document.

  9. Evidence of cAMP involvement in cellobiohydrolase expression and secretion by Trichoderma reesei in presence of the inducer sophorose

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, Karoline Maria Vieira; Costa, Mariana do Nascimento; de Paula, Renato Graciano; Mendonça-Natividade, Flávia Costa; Ricci-Azevedo, Rafael; Silva, Roberto Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The signaling second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates many aspects of cellular function in all organisms. Previous studies have suggested a role for cAMP in the regulation of gene expression of cellulolytic enzymes in Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina). Methods The effects of cAMP in T. reesei were analyzed through both acti...

  10. Opposing activity changes in AMP deaminase and AMP-activated protein kinase in the hibernating ground squirrel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Lanaspa

    Full Text Available Hibernating animals develop fatty liver when active in summertime and undergo a switch to a fat oxidation state in the winter. We hypothesized that this switch might be determined by AMP and the dominance of opposing effects: metabolism through AMP deaminase (AMPD2 (summer and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK (winter. Liver samples were obtained from 13-lined ground squirrels at different times during the year, including summer and multiples stages of winter hibernation, and fat synthesis and β-fatty acid oxidation were evaluated. Changes in fat metabolism were correlated with changes in AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid (downstream product of AMPD2, as well as changes in AMPK and intrahepatic β-hydroxybutyrate (a marker of fat oxidation. Hepatic fat accumulation occurred during the summer with relatively increased enzymes associated with fat synthesis (FAS, ACL and ACC and decreased enoyl CoA hydratase (ECH1 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A, rate limiting enzymes of fat oxidation. In summer, AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid levels were high and hepatic AMPK activity was low. In contrast, the active phosphorylated form of AMPK and β-hydroxybutyrate both increased during winter hibernation. Therefore, changes in AMPD2 and AMPK activity were paralleled with changes in fat synthesis and fat oxidation rates during the summer-winter cycle. These data illuminate the opposing forces of metabolism of AMP by AMPD2 and its availability to activate AMPK as a switch that governs fat metabolism in the liver of hibernating ground squirrel.

  11. A novel cysteine-rich antifungal peptide ToAMP4 from Taraxacum officinale Wigg. flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafieva, A A; Rogozhin, Eugene A; Andreev, Yaroslav A; Odintsova, T I; Kozlov, S A; Grishin, Eugene V; Egorov, Tsezi A

    2013-09-01

    A novel peptide named ToAMP4 was isolated from Taraxacum officinale Wigg. flowers by a combination of acetic acid extraction and different types of chromatography: affinity, size-exclusion, and RP-HPLC. The amino acid sequence of ToAMP4 was determined by automated Edman degradation. The peptide is basic, consists of 41 amino acids, and incorporates three disulphide bonds. Due to the unusual cysteine spacing pattern, ToAMP4 does not belong to any known plant AMP family, but classifies together with two other antimicrobial peptides ToAMP1 and ToAMP2 previously isolated from the dandelion flowers. To study the biological activity of ToAMP4, it was successfully produced in a prokaryotic expression system as a fusion protein with thioredoxin. The recombinant peptide was shown to be identical to the native ToAMP4 by chromatographic behavior, molecular mass, and N-terminal amino acid sequence. The peptide displays broad-spectrum antifungal activity against important phytopathogens. Two ToAMP4-mediated inhibition strategies depending on the fungus were demonstrated. The results obtained add to our knowledge on the structural and functional diversity of AMPs in plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Anticonvulsant effect of AMP by direct activation of adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzi, Mirko; Coppi, Elisabetta; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Purinergic neurotransmission mediated by adenosine (Ado) type 1 receptors (A1Rs) plays pivotal roles in negative modulation of epileptic seizures, and Ado is thought to be a key endogenous anticonvulsant. Recent evidence, however, indicates that AMP, the metabolic precursor of Ado, also activate A1Rs. Here, we evaluated the antiepileptic effects of AMP adopting in vitro and in vivo models of epilepsy. We report that AMP reversed the increase in population spike (PS) amplitude and the decrease in PS latency induced by a Mg(2+)-free extracellular solution in CA1 neurons of mouse hippocampal slices. The AMP effects were inhibited by the A1R antagonist DPCPX, but not prevented by inhibiting conversion of AMP into Ado, indicating that AMP inhibited per se sustained hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission by directly activating A1Rs. AMP also reduced seizure severity and mortality in a model of audiogenic convulsion. Of note, the anticonvulsant effects of AMP were potentiated by preventing its conversion into Ado and inhibited by DPCPX. When tested in a model of kainate-induced seizure, AMP prolonged latency of convulsions but had no effects on seizure severity and mortality. Data provide the first evidence that AMP is an endogenous anticonvulsant acting at A1Rs. © 2013.

  13. Mechanism of intracellular cAMP sensor Epac2 activation: cAMP-induced conformational changes identified by amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Tsalkova, Tamara; White, Mark A; Mei, Fang C; Liu, Tong; Wang, Daphne; Woods, Virgil L; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2011-05-20

    Epac2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, regulates a wide variety of intracellular processes in response to second messenger cAMP. In this study, we have used peptide amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to probe the solution structural and conformational dynamics of full-length Epac2 in the presence and absence of cAMP. The results support a mechanism in which cAMP-induced Epac2 activation is mediated by a major hinge motion centered on the C terminus of the second cAMP binding domain. This conformational change realigns the regulatory components of Epac2 away from the catalytic core, making the later available for effector binding. Furthermore, the interface between the first and second cAMP binding domains is highly dynamic, providing an explanation of how cAMP gains access to the ligand binding sites that, in the crystal structure, are seen to be mutually occluded by the other cAMP binding domain. Moreover, cAMP also induces conformational changes at the ionic latch/hairpin structure, which is directly involved in RAP1 binding. These results suggest that in addition to relieving the steric hindrance imposed upon the catalytic lobe by the regulatory lobe, cAMP may also be an allosteric modulator directly affecting the interaction between Epac2 and RAP1. Finally, cAMP binding also induces significant conformational changes in the dishevelled/Egl/pleckstrin (DEP) domain, a conserved structural motif that, although missing from the active Epac2 crystal structure, is important for Epac subcellular targeting and in vivo functions. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Nanomolar Inhibitors of AmpC [beta]-Lactamase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morandi, Federica; Caselli, Emilia; Morandi, Stefania; Focia, Pamela J.; Blazquez, Jesus; Shoichet, Brian K.; Prati, Fabio (Degali); (NIH); (NWU); (UCSF)

    2010-03-08

    {beta}-lactamases are the most widespread resistance mechanism to {beta}-lactam antibiotics, such as the penicillins and the cephalosporins. In an effort to combat these enzymes, a combination of stereoselective organic synthesis, enzymology, microbiology, and X-ray crystallography was used to design and evaluate new carboxyphenyl-glycylboronic acid transition-state analogue inhibitors of the class C {beta}-lactamase AmpC. The new compounds improve inhibition by over 2 orders of magnitude compared to analogous glycylboronic acids, with K{sub i} values as low as 1 nM. On the basis of the differential binding of different analogues, the introduced carboxylate alone contributes about 2.1 kcal/mol in affinity. This carboxylate corresponds to the ubiquitous C3(4)' carboxylate of {beta}-lactams, and this energy represents the first thermodynamic measurement of the importance of this group in molecular recognition by class C {beta}-lactamases. The structures of AmpC in complex with two of these inhibitors were determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.72 and 1.83 {angstrom} resolution. These structures suggest a structural basis for the high affinity of the new compounds and provide templates for further design. The highest affinity inhibitor was 5 orders of magnitude more selective for AmpC than for characteristic serine proteases, such as chymotrypsin. This inhibitor reversed the resistance of clinical pathogens to the third generation cephalosporin ceftazidime; it may serve as a lead compound for drug discovery to combat bacterial resistance to {beta}-lactam antibiotics.

  15. Enhancing disease resistance against microbial pathogens by expression of Et-AMPs in Arabidopsis plants

    OpenAIRE

    Amran, Ammar Youssef

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to detect the potency of the novel insect antimicrobial peptides Et-AMP1 and Et-AMP2 derived from drone fly Eristalis tenax to engineer disease resistance in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana against the fungal pathogen grey mold Botrytis cinerea and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000. For the first antimicrobial peptide (Et-AMP1), a protocol for the production of recombinant protein in E. coli expression system was ...

  16. Absorption performance for CO2 capture process using MDEA-AMP aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Kou, Liqing; Li, Chao

    2017-03-01

    The absorption capacity and the absorption rate of CO2 in 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP)-N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) aqueous solution were measured. The temperatures ranged from 303.2K to 323.2K. The mass fractions of AMP and MDEA respectively ranged from 0 to 0.03 and 0.2 to 0.3. The influence of temperature and w AMP on the absorption capacity and absorption rate of CO2 was illustrated.

  17. Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0234 TITLE: Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion PRINCIPAL...14/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...tolerance induction of all types of allografts. In this study, we investigate whether co-infusion of amnion- derived multipotent progenitor ( AMP ) cells

  18. Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase defines a nuclear cAMP microdomain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippin, Jonathan H.; Farrell, Jeanne; Huron, David; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Hess, Kenneth C.; Fischman, Donald A.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase resides, in part, inside the mammalian cell nucleus where it stimulates the activity of nuclear protein kinase A to phosphorylate the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). The existence of this complete and functional, nuclear-localized cAMP pathway establishes that cAMP signals in intracellular microdomains and identifies an alternate pathway leading to CREB activation. PMID:14769862

  19. Impact of AmpC Derepression on Fitness and Virulence: the Mechanism or the Pathway?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Pérez-Gallego

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interplay between antibiotic resistance and bacterial fitness and virulence is essential to guide individual treatments and improve global antibiotic policies. A paradigmatic example of a resistance mechanism is the intrinsic inducible chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC from multiple Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major nosocomial pathogen. The regulation of ampC expression is intimately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, and AmpC-mediated β-lactam resistance is frequently mediated by inactivating mutations in ampD, encoding an N-acetyl-anhydromuramyl-l-alanine amidase, affecting the levels of ampC-activating muropeptides. Here we dissect the impact of the multiple pathways causing AmpC hyperproduction on P. aeruginosa fitness and virulence. Through a detailed analysis, we demonstrate that the lack of all three P. aeruginosa AmpD amidases causes a dramatic effect in fitness and pathogenicity, severely compromising growth rates, motility, and cytotoxicity; the latter effect is likely achieved by repressing key virulence factors, such as protease LasA, phospholipase C, or type III secretion system components. We also show that ampC overexpression is required but not sufficient to confer the growth-motility-cytotoxicity impaired phenotype and that alternative pathways leading to similar levels of ampC hyperexpression and resistance, such as those involving PBP4, had no fitness-virulence cost. Further analysis indicated that fitness-virulence impairment is caused by overexpressing ampC in the absence of cell wall recycling, as reproduced by expressing ampC from a plasmid in an AmpG (muropeptide permease-deficient background. Thus, our findings represent a major step in the understanding of β-lactam resistance biology and its interplay with fitness and pathogenesis.

  20. Primary adenosine monophosphate (AMP) deaminase deficiency in a hypotonic infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Gago, Manuel; Gómez-Lado, Carmen; Pérez-Gay, Laura; Eirís-Puñal, Jesús; Martínez, Elena Pintos; García-Consuegra, Inés; Martín, Miguel Angel

    2011-06-01

    The spectrum of the adenosine monophosphate (AMP) deaminase deficiency ranges from asymptomatic carriers to patients who manifest exercise-induced muscle pain, occasionally rhabdomyolysis, and idiopathic hyperCKemia. However, previous to the introduction of molecular techniques, rare cases with congenital weakness and hypotonia have also been reported. We report a 6-month-old girl with the association of congenital muscle weakness and hypotonia, muscle deficiency of adenosine monophosphate deaminase, and the homozygous C to T mutation at nucleotide 34 of the adenosine monophosphate deaminase-1 gene. This observation indicates the possible existence of a primary adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency manifested by congenital muscle weakness and hypotonia.

  1. ChAMP: 450k Chip Analysis Methylation Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Tiffany J; Butcher, Lee M; Feber, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Chakravarthy, Ankur R; Wojdacz, Tomasz K; Beck, Stephan

    2014-02-01

    The Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip is a new platform for high-throughput DNA methylation analysis. Several methods for normalization and processing of these data have been published recently. Here we present an integrated analysis pipeline offering a choice of the most popular normalization methods while also introducing new methods for calling differentially methylated regions and detecting copy number aberrations. ChAMP is implemented as a Bioconductor package in R. The package and the vignette can be downloaded at bioconductor.org

  2. Buddhism in Čampā Le Bouddhisme au Champa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Valérie Schweyer

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Čampā is a Far East country, whose Māhāyana Buddhism is known from 7th to 14th century. In fact, Sanskrit and Cam Inscriptions mostly attested Tantric practices, belonging to the Vajrāyana Buddhism, mixing Śaiva and Buddhist believes. More precisely, side by side Śiva and the three Buddha’ emanations, Śākyamuni, Amitābha and Vairocana, are honoured in Čampā, alone with the Goddess Prajñāpāramitā, the true substance of the Doctrine, and, secondary, with Vajrapāni, Lokeśvara and Vajrasattva. The confrontation of the epigraphic testimonies with the archaeological remains is very useful to understand the Buddhism of Čampā, crossroads of trade roads between India and China. Therefore, epigraphic and artistic evidences are used to propose a chronological presentation, with a special development on the revival of the 10th century, and especially, the esoteric way.Le Čampā, pays du centre Vietnam, connut un bouddhisme Māhāyana du xe au xive siècle. Les inscriptions en sanskrit et en cam montrent que ce bouddhisme était essentiellement tantrique, relevant du bouddhisme Vajrāyana, mêlant pratiques Śivaïtes et bouddhiques. Plus précisément, le bouddhisme cam montre qu’aux côtés de Śiva sont honorées les trois émanations du Bouddha, Śākyamuni, Amitābha et Vairocana, avec la déesse Prajñāpāramitā, la Vraie Substance de la Connaissance ; on trouve également Vajrapāni, Lokeśvara et Vajrasattva. La confrontation des témoignages épigraphiques et archéologiques permet de mieux appréhender le bouddhisme cam, à la croisée des routes commerciales entre l’Inde et la Chine. Cet article exploite ces témoignages dans une perspective chronologique, avec un développement particulier pour le Bouddhisme ésotérique au xe siècle.

  3. Coronary vasodilatory, spasmolytic and cAMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitory properties of dihydropyranocoumarins and dihydrofuranocoumarins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastrup, Ole; Fjalland, B; Lemmich, J

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-three dihydropyrano- and dihydrofuranocoumarins, most of plant origin, were examined for their effects on the coronary flow of isolated perfused guinea-pig heart, on the Ba2+-induced spasms in isolated guinea-pig ileum, on the cAMP level in guinea-pig heart homogenate and on the cAMP metab...... between the coronary vasodilatory and the cAMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitory activity. The results indicate involvement of cAMP-phosphodiesterase inhibition in coronary vasodilatory effects of acyloxydihydropyrano- and acyloxydihydrofurano-coumarins....

  4. Histamine-induced increases in cyclic AMP levels in bovine adrenal medullary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Marley, P. D.; Thomson, K. A.; Jachno, K.; Johnston, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of histamine on cellular cyclic AMP levels in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells has been studied. 2. Histamine (0.3-30 microM) increased cyclic AMP levels transiently, with a maximal response after 5 min, a smaller response after 20 min, and no increase seen after 80 or 180 min. The EC50 at 5 min was approximately 2 microM. Histamine had no effect on cyclic AMP release from the cells over 5 min, but increased it after 90 min. 3. The cyclic AMP response to 5 microM histamin...

  5. AMP-guided tumour-specific nanoparticle delivery via adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Han, Fajun; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2016-03-01

    Active targeting-ligands have been increasingly used to functionalize nanoparticles for tumour-specific clinical applications. Here we utilize nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a novel ligand to functionalize polymer-based fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for tumour-targeted imaging. We demonstrate that AMP-conjugated NPs (NPs-AMP) efficiently bind to and are following internalized into colon cancer cell CW-2 and breast cancer cell MDA-MB-468 in vitro. RNA interference and inhibitor assays reveal that the targeting effects mainly rely on the specific binding of AMP to adenosine A1 receptor (A1R), which is greatly up-regulated in cancer cells than in matched normal cells. More importantly, NPs-AMP specifically accumulate in the tumour site of colon and breast tumour xenografts and are further internalized into the tumour cells in vivo via tail vein injection, confirming that the high in vitro specificity of AMP can be successfully translated into the in vivo efficacy. Furthermore, NPs-AMP exhibit an active tumour-targeting behaviour in various colon and breast cancer cells, which is positively related to the up-regulation level of A1R in cancer cells, suggesting that AMP potentially suits for more extensive A1R-overexpressing cancer models. This work establishes AMP to be a novel tumour-targeting ligand and provides a promising strategy for future diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor cilostazol induces migraine-like attacks via cyclic AMP increase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    The initiating mechanisms of migraine attacks are very complex but may involve the cyclic AMP signalling pathway. It is unknown whether intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation induces migraine attacks. We investigated whether administration of cilostazol, which causes cyclic AMP accumulation, may...... and that cilostazol-induced attacks responded to their usual migraine treatment. Median time of medication intake was 6 h (range 4-11 h). The present study suggests that intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation plays a crucial role in migraine induction. This knowledge is a further step in our understanding...

  7. TSH-induced cyclic AMP production in an ovine thyroid cell line: OVNIS 5H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayet, G; Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S

    1986-01-06

    The TSH-induced cyclic AMP response was studied using a 3-year-old ovine thyroid cell line TSH-independent for growth: OVNIS 5H. The kinetics of cyclic AMP production was followed both in cell layers and in cell culture media, with or without phosphodiesterase inhibitor. It is noteworthy that following the first wave in cyclic AMP obtained within minutes, we observed later a sustained exponential increase in cyclic AMP during the 5 days following TSH stimulation. A bioassay of TSH was derived allowing measurement of 1 microU/ml TSH from a crude bTSH preparation.

  8. A Universal Stress Protein (USP) in Mycobacteria Binds cAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arka; Adolph, Ramona S.; Gopalakrishnapai, Jayashree; Kleinboelting, Silke; Emmerich, Christiane; Steegborn, Clemens; Visweswariah, Sandhya S.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria are endowed with rich and diverse machinery for the synthesis, utilization, and degradation of cAMP. The actions of cyclic nucleotides are generally mediated by binding of cAMP to conserved and well characterized cyclic nucleotide binding domains or structurally distinct cGMP-specific and -regulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase, and E. coli transcription factor FhlA (GAF) domain-containing proteins. Proteins with cyclic nucleotide binding and GAF domains can be identified in the genome of mycobacterial species, and some of them have been characterized. Here, we show that a significant fraction of intracellular cAMP is bound to protein in mycobacterial species, and by using affinity chromatography techniques, we identify specific universal stress proteins (USP) as abundantly expressed cAMP-binding proteins in slow growing as well as fast growing mycobacteria. We have characterized the biochemical and thermodynamic parameters for binding of cAMP, and we show that these USPs bind cAMP with a higher affinity than ATP, an established ligand for other USPs. We determined the structure of the USP MSMEG_3811 bound to cAMP, and we confirmed through structure-guided mutagenesis, the residues important for cAMP binding. This family of USPs is conserved in all mycobacteria, and we suggest that they serve as “sinks” for cAMP, making this second messenger available for downstream effectors as and when ATP levels are altered in the cell. PMID:25802331

  9. Positive Effect of Carbon Sources on Natural Transformation in Escherichia coli: Role of Low-Level Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein in the Derepression of rpoS

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Mengyue; Wang, Huanyu; Xie, Nengbin; Xie, Zhixiong

    2015-01-01

    Natural plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli is a complex process that occurs strictly on agar plates and requires the global stress response factor σS. Here, we showed that additional carbon sources could significantly enhance the transformability of E. coli. Inactivation of phosphotransferase system genes (ptsH, ptsG, and crr) caused an increase in the transformation frequency, and the addition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) neutralized the promotional effect of carbon sources. This implies a n...

  10. Recent Advances in the Development of Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs): Attempts for Sustainable Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokel, Anne; Torok, Marianna

    2018-01-17

    Since the first isolation of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) they have attracted extensive interest in medicinal chemistry. However, only a few AMP-based drugs are currently available on the market. Despite their effectiveness, biodegradability, and versatile mode of action that is less likely to induce resistance compared to conventional antibiotics, AMPs suffer from major issues that need to be addressed to broaden their use. Notably, AMPs can lack selectivity leading to side effects and cytotoxicity, and also exhibit in vivo instability. Several strategies are being actively considered to overcome the limitations that restrain the success of AMPs. In the current work, recent strategies reported for improving AMPs in the context of drug design and delivery were surveyed, and also their possible impact on patients and the environment was assessed. As a major advantage AMPs possess an easily tunable skeleton offering opportunities to improve their properties. Strategic structural modifications and the beneficial properties of cyclic or branched AMPs in term of stability have been reported. The conjugation of AMPs with nanoparticles has also been explored to increase their in vivo stability. Other techniques such as the coupling of AMPs with specific antibodies aim to increase the selectivity of the potential drug towards the target. These strategies were evaluated for their effect on the environment highlighting green technologies. Although further research is needed taking into account both environmental and human health consequences of novel AMPs several of these compounds are promising drug candidates for use in sustainable medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Genetically-encoded tools for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy M Paramonov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is one of the principal second messengers downstream of a manifold of signal transduction pathways, including the ones triggered by G protein-coupled receptors. Not surprisingly, biochemical assays for cAMP have been instrumental for basic research and drug discovery for decades, providing insights into cellular physiology and guiding pharmaceutical industry. However, despite impressive track record, the majority of conventional biochemical tools for cAMP probing share the same fundamental shortcoming - all the measurements require sample disruption for cAMP liberation. This common bottleneck, together with inherently low spatial resolution of measurements (as cAMP is typically analyzed in lysates of thousands of cells, underpin the ensuing limitations of the conventional cAMP assays: 1 genuine kinetic measurements of cAMP levels over time in a single given sample are unfeasible; 2 inability to obtain precise information on cAMP spatial distribution and transfer at subcellular levels, let alone the attempts to pinpoint dynamic interactions of cAMP and its effectors. At the same time, tremendous progress in synthetic biology over the recent years culminated in drastic refinement of our toolbox, allowing us not only to bypass the limitations of conventional assays, but to put intracellular cAMP life-span under tight control – something, that seemed scarcely attainable before. In this review article we discuss the main classes of modern genetically-encoded tools tailored for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems. We examine the capabilities and weaknesses of these different tools in the context of their operational characteristics and applicability to various experimental set-ups involving living cells, providing the guidance for rational selection of the best tools for particular needs.

  12. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chp Chemosensory System Regulates Intracellular cAMP Levels by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Nanette B.; Holliday, Phillip M.; Klem, Erich; Cann, Martin J.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Multiple virulence systems in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are regulated by the second messenger signaling molecule adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). Production of cAMP by the putative adenylate cyclase enzyme CyaB represents a critical control point for virulence gene regulation. To identify regulators of CyaB, we screened a transposon insertion library for mutants with reduced intracellular cAMP. The majority of insertions resulting in reduced cAMP mapped to the Chp gene cluster encoding a putative chemotaxis-like chemosensory system. Further genetic analysis of the Chp system revealed that it has both positive and negative effects on intracellular cAMP and that it regulates cAMP levels by modulating CyaB activity. The Chp system was previously implicated in the production and function of type IV pili (TFP). Given that cAMP and the cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulator Vfr control TFP biogenesis gene expression, we explored the relationship between cAMP, the Chp system and TFP regulation. We discovered that the Chp system controls TFP production through modulation of cAMP while control of TFP-dependent twitching motility is cAMP-independent. Overall, our data define a novel function for a chemotaxis-like system in controlling cAMP production and establish a regulatory link between the Chp system, TFP and other cAMP-dependent virulence systems. PMID:20345659

  13. A Temporal-Specific and Transient cAMP Increase Characterizes Odorant Classical Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wen; Smith, Andrew; Darby-King, Andrea; Harley, Carolyn W.; McLean, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are proposed to initiate learning in a wide variety of species. Here, we measure changes in cAMP in the olfactory bulb prior to, during, and following a classically conditioned odor preference trial in rat pups. Measurements were taken up to the point of maximal CREB phosphorylation in olfactory…

  14. Model development and process simulation of postcombustion carbon capture technology with aqueous AMP/PZ solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, Mijndert; Arendsen, Richard; Ramirez, Andrea; Faaij, André

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the development, application, and uncertainty analysis of a process simulation model for postcombustion CO2 capture with an AMP/PZ solvent blend based on state of the art knowledge on AMP/PZ solvent technology. The development includes the improvement of the physical property

  15. N6-Methyl-AMP aminohydrolase activates N6-substituted purine acyclic nucleoside phosphonates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schinkmanová, Markéta; Votruba, Ivan; Holý, Antonín

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 9 (2006), s. 1370-1376 ISSN 0006-2952 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS400550501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : N6-methyl- AMP aminohydrolase * me- AMP * cypr-PMEDAP * PMEG Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.581, year: 2006

  16. The cAMP Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways in Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Zhao, X.; Kim, Y.; Xu, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The key components of the well conserved cyclic AMP signaling and MAP kinase pathways have been functionally characterized in the corn smut Ustilago maydis, rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, and a few other fungal pathogens. In general, the cAMP signaling and the MAP kinase cascade homologous to

  17. The effect of mutations in the AmpC promoter region on β-lactam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... lactamase gene can result in AmpC hyper-production. (Martinez-Martinez et al., 2000). Such hyper-production of AmpC β-lactamase contributes to resistance to ampi- cillin, extended-spectrum cephalosporins and β-lactam-β- lactamase inhibitor combinations (Martinez-Martinez et. *Corresponding author: ...

  18. Design of cAMP-CRP-activated promoters in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, P; Holst, B; Søgaard-Andersen, L

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the deoP2 promoter of Escherichia coli to define features that are required for optimal activation by the complex of adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP) and the cAMP receptor protein (CRP). Systematic mutagenesis of deoP2 shows that the distance between the CRP site and the -10...

  19. Global and local missions of cAMP signaling in neural plasticity, learning, and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daewoo

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been a popular model to study cAMP signaling and resultant behaviors due to its powerful genetic approaches. All molecular components (AC, PDE, PKA, CREB, etc) essential for cAMP signaling have been identified in the fly. Among them, adenylyl cyclase (AC) gene rutabaga and phosphodiesterase (PDE) gene dunce have been intensively studied to understand the role of cAMP signaling. Interestingly, these two mutant genes were originally identified on the basis of associative learning deficits. This commentary summarizes findings on the role of cAMP in Drosophila neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and memory. It mainly focuses on two distinct mechanisms (global versus local) regulating excitatory and inhibitory synaptic plasticity related to cAMP homeostasis. This dual regulatory role of cAMP is to increase the strength of excitatory neural circuits on one hand, but to act locally on postsynaptic GABA receptors to decrease inhibitory synaptic plasticity on the other. Thus the action of cAMP could result in a global increase in the neural circuit excitability and memory. Implications of this cAMP signaling related to drug discovery for neural diseases are also described.

  20. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of the Complexes of Silver with Adenine and dAMP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Cornelis; Hoeben, F.P.; Hoeben, F.P.; Greve, Jan

    1991-01-01

    The behaviour of adenine and 2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate (dAMP) at positive surface potentials of a silver working electrode was investigated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The use of positive potentials in the presence of adenine or dAMP leads to a rapid accumulation of an

  1. Acquisition of carbapenem resistance by plasmid-encoded-AmpC-expressing Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tommassen - van Boxtel, Ria; Wattel, Agnes A.; Arenas Busto, Jesus; Goessens, Wil H.F.; Tommassen, J

    2017-01-01

    Although AmpC β-lactamases can barely degrade carbapenems, if at all, they can sequester them and prevent them from reaching their targets. Thus, carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae can result from AmpC production and simultaneous reduction of antibiotic influx

  2. The Cyclic Nucleotide Specificity of Three cAMP Receptors in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Ronald L.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Kimmel, Alan R.; Saxe III, Charles L.; Jastorff, Bernd; Devreotes, Peter N.

    1992-01-01

    cAMP receptors mediate signal transduction pathways during development in Dictyostelium. A cAMP receptor (cAR1) has been cloned and sequenced (Klein, P., Sun, T. J., Saxe, C. L., Kimmel, A. R., Johnson, R. L., and Devreotes, P. N. (1988) Science 241, 1467-1472) and recently several other cAR genes

  3. Targeting brain tumor cAMP: the case for sex-specific therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Warrington

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between cyclic adenosine 3’, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP levels and brain tumor biology has been evident for nearly as long as cAMP and its synthetase, adenylate cyclase (ADCY have been known. The importance of the pathway in brain tumorigenesis has been demonstrated in vitro and in multiple animal models. Recently, we provided human validation for a cooperating oncogenic role for cAMP in brain tumorigenesis when we found that SNPs in ADCY8 were correlated with glioma (brain tumor risk in individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Together, these studies provide a strong rationale for targeting cAMP in brain tumor therapy. However, the cAMP pathway is well known to be sexually dimorphic, and SNPs in ADCY8 affected glioma risk in a sex-specific fashion, elevating the risk for females while protecting males. The cAMP pathway can be targeted at multiple levels in the regulation of its synthesis and degradation. Sex differences in response to drugs that target cAMP regulators indicate that successful targeting of the cAMP pathway for brain tumor patients is likely to require matching specific mechanisms of drug action with patient sex.

  4. Dibutyryl c-AMP as an inducer of sporidia formation: Biochemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... however, increasing concentration of dbc-AMP was deleterious to mycelial growth in liquid culture. A slow increase of mycelial biomass up to 21 days and decline at 30 days in the presence of 2.5 mM dbc-AMP was observed, therefore, this concentration was chosen in subsequent investigations. The inhibitory influence ...

  5. Cyclic AMP signaling restricts activation and promotes maturation and antioxidant defenses in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paco, Sonia; Hummel, Manuela; Plá, Virginia; Sumoy, Lauro; Aguado, Fernando

    2016-04-23

    cAMP signaling produces dramatic changes in astrocyte morphology and physiology. However, its involvement in phenotype acquisition and the transcriptionally mediated mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we analyzed the global transcriptome of cultured astroglial cells incubated with activators of cAMP pathways. A bulk of astroglial transcripts, 6221 annotated genes, were differentially regulated by cAMP signaling. cAMP analogs strongly upregulated genes involved in typical functions of mature astrocytes, such as homeostatic control, metabolic and structural support to neurons, antioxidant defense and communication, whereas they downregulated a considerable number of proliferating and immaturity-related transcripts. Moreover, numerous genes typically activated in reactive cells, such as scar components and immunological mediators, were repressed by cAMP. GSEA analysis contrasting gene expression profiles with transcriptome signatures of acutely isolated astrocytes and in situ evaluation of protein levels in these cells showed that cAMP signaling conferred mature and in vivo-like transcriptional features to cultured astrocytes. These results indicate that cAMP signaling is a key pathway promoting astrocyte maturation and restricting their developmental and activation features. Therefore, a positive modulation of cAMP signaling may promote the normal state of differentiated astrocytes and favor the protection and function of neuronal networks.

  6. Occurrence and detection of AmpC β-lactamases among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soha A. El-Hady

    2015-04-06

    Apr 6, 2015 ... b-lactam antibiotics except cefepime and carbapenems. Aim of the study: We aimed to ... Subjects and methods: 50 AmpC b-lactamase Enterobacteriaceae were analyzed for the presence of AmpC production. ... The prevalence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria has increased continuously over ...

  7. Prevalence of AmpC β-lactamase among Gram-negative bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Infections caused by AmpC-positive bacteria results in high patient morbidity and mortality making their detection clinically important as they cannot be detected in routine susceptibility testing. This study aim to determine the prevalence of AmpC β-lactamase among Gram negative bacteria recovered from clinical ...

  8. Amp: A modular approach to machine learning in atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Alireza; Peterson, Andrew A.

    2016-10-01

    Electronic structure calculations, such as those employing Kohn-Sham density functional theory or ab initio wavefunction theories, have allowed for atomistic-level understandings of a wide variety of phenomena and properties of matter at small scales. However, the computational cost of electronic structure methods drastically increases with length and time scales, which makes these methods difficult for long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations or large-sized systems. Machine-learning techniques can provide accurate potentials that can match the quality of electronic structure calculations, provided sufficient training data. These potentials can then be used to rapidly simulate large and long time-scale phenomena at similar quality to the parent electronic structure approach. Machine-learning potentials usually take a bias-free mathematical form and can be readily developed for a wide variety of systems. Electronic structure calculations have favorable properties-namely that they are noiseless and targeted training data can be produced on-demand-that make them particularly well-suited for machine learning. This paper discusses our modular approach to atomistic machine learning through the development of the open-source Atomistic Machine-learning Package (Amp), which allows for representations of both the total and atom-centered potential energy surface, in both periodic and non-periodic systems. Potentials developed through the atom-centered approach are simultaneously applicable for systems with various sizes. Interpolation can be enhanced by introducing custom descriptors of the local environment. We demonstrate this in the current work for Gaussian-type, bispectrum, and Zernike-type descriptors. Amp has an intuitive and modular structure with an interface through the python scripting language yet has parallelizable fortran components for demanding tasks; it is designed to integrate closely with the widely used Atomic Simulation Environment (ASE), which

  9. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Xiang, Wenpei [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Family Planning Research Institute, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Yinna [Vascular Medicine Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 10051-5A BST 3, 3501 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Zhang, Xiaoying [Department of Medicine/Endocrinology Division, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop St., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Billiar, Timothy R., E-mail: billiartr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  10. Cyclic AMP activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Peraldi, P; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated in response to a large variety of extracellular signals, including growth factors, hormones, and neurotransmitters, which activate distinct intracellular signaling pathways. Their activation by the cAMP-dependent pathway, however, has not been...... reported. In rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, we demonstrate here a stimulation of the MAP kinase isozyme extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) following elevation of intracellular cAMP after exposure of the cells to isobutylmethylxanthine, cholera toxin, forskolin, or cAMP-analogues. cAMP acted...... synergistically with phorbol ester, an activator of protein kinase C, in the stimulation of ERK1. In accordance with this observation, the peptide neurotransmitter pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide 38 (PACAP38), which stimulates cAMP production as well as phosphatidylinositol breakdown in PC12...

  11. The effect of in vitro procedures on cyclic AMP accumulation in human leucocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben; Friis, U G; Rasmussen, A K

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various methodological procedures or protocols on cyclic AMP formation in human leucocytes. The data showed that: (1) ATP content and lactate production was unaffected by hypotonic lysis during leucocyte isolation; (2) there was a linear...... relation between cell number/sample and the production of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP); (3) the interindividual variation markedly affected cAMP production during long observation periods (years), whereas day-to-day variation within a week was less important; (4) whole blood could be stored...... for up to 4 h (at 4 degrees C or 23 degrees C) without affecting cAMP accumulation; (5) isolated MNL could be stored for up to 2 h (at 4 degrees C) without affecting cAMP accumulation; and finally that (6) choice and concentration of phosphodiesterase inhibitors markedly influenced the basal...

  12. Cyclic AMP activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Peraldi, P; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    reported. In rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, we demonstrate here a stimulation of the MAP kinase isozyme extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) following elevation of intracellular cAMP after exposure of the cells to isobutylmethylxanthine, cholera toxin, forskolin, or cAMP-analogues. cAMP acted...... upstream activator of ERK1 in the MAP kinase cascade. Supporting this view, forskolin and a cAMP analogue were found to increase the activity of MAP kinase kinase in PC12 cells, alone as well as in combination with phorbol ester. PACAP38 also stimulated in vivo 32P-labeling of ERK1 and MAP kinase kinase...... activity. Finally, cAMP or PACAP38 increased by 3-fold nerve growth factor-stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cells, which may be correlated with the potentiating effect of these agents on nerve growth factor-stimulated ERK1 activity....

  13. Role of AC-cAMP-PKA Cascade in Antidepressant Action of Electroacupuncture Treatment in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hua Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase (AC-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA cascade is considered to be associated with the pathogenesis and treatment of depression. The present study was conducted to explore the role of the cAMP cascade in antidepressant action of electroacupuncture (EA treatment for chronic mild stress (CMS-induced depression model rats. The results showed that EA improved significantly behavior symptoms in depression and dysfunction of AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway induced by CMS, which was as effective as fluoxetine. Moreover, the antidepressant effects of EA rather than Fluoxetine were completely abolished by H89, a specific PKA inhibitor. Consequently, EA has a significant antidepressant treatment in CMS-induced depression model rats, and AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway is crucial for it.

  14. Cyclic AMP response in cells exposed to electric fields of different frequencies and intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knedlitschek, G. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie; Noszvai-Nagy, M. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie; Meyer-Waarden, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie; Schimmelpfeng, J. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie; Weibezahn, K.F. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie; Dertinger, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie

    1994-04-01

    The action on intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) of therapeutically used 4000-Hz electric fields was investigated and compared with 50-Hz data. Cultured mouse fibroblasts were exposed for 5 minutes to 4000-Hz sine wave internal electric fields between 3 mV/m and 30 V/m applied within culture medium. A statistically significant decrease in cellular cAMP concentration relative to unexposed cells was observed for fields higher than 10 mV/m. The drop in cAMP was ost pronounced at lower field strengths (71% of controls at 30 mV/m) and tended to disappear at higher field strengths. An increase of cAMP content was observed with 50-Hz electric fields, as was also the case when 4000-Hz fields were modulated with certain low frequencies. (orig.)

  15. AMP-Conjugated Quantum Dots: Low Immunotoxicity Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Liu, Lu; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-11-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are engineered nanoparticles that possess special optical and electronic properties and have shown great promise for future biomedical applications. In this work, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), a small biocompatible molecular, was conjugated to organic QDs to produce hydrophilic AMP-QDs. Using macrophage J774A.1 as the cell model, AMP-QDs exhibited both prior imaging property and low toxicity, and more importantly, triggered limited innate immune responses in macrophage, indicating low immunotoxicity in vitro. Using BALB/c mice as the animal model, AMP-QDs were found to be detained in immune organs but did not evoke robust inflammation responses or obvious histopathological abnormalities, which reveals low immunotoxicity in vivo. This work suggests that AMP is an excellent surface ligand with low immunotoxicity, and potentially used in surface modification for more extensive nanoparticles.

  16. Endosomal generation of cAMP in GPCR signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Jean-Alphonse, Frederic G.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that the production of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic AMP, which is mediated by cell surface G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its termination take place exclusively at the plasma membrane. Recent studies reveal that diverse GPCRs do not always follow this conventional paradigm. In the new model, GPCRs mediate G-protein signaling not only from the plasma membrane but also from endosomal membranes. This model proposes that following ligand binding and activation, cell surface GPCRs internalize and redistribute into early endosomes, where trimeric G protein signaling can be maintained for an extended period of time. This Perspective discusses the molecular and cellular mechanistic subtleties as well as the physiological consequences of this unexpected process, which is considerably changing how we think about GPCR signaling and regulation and how we study drugs that target this receptor family. PMID:25271346

  17. Polynomial solutions of the Monge-Ampère equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aminov, Yu A [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Khar' kov (Ukraine)

    2014-11-30

    The question of the existence of polynomial solutions to the Monge-Ampère equation z{sub xx}z{sub yy}−z{sub xy}{sup 2}=f(x,y) is considered in the case when f(x,y) is a polynomial. It is proved that if f is a polynomial of the second degree, which is positive for all values of its arguments and has a positive squared part, then no polynomial solution exists. On the other hand, a solution which is not polynomial but is analytic in the whole of the x, y-plane is produced. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of polynomial solutions of degree up to 4 are found and methods for the construction of such solutions are indicated. An approximation theorem is proved. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  18. Probes of the Mitochondrial cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Jennifer R.; Lawrence, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The development of a fluorescent assay to detect activity of the mitochondrial cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is described. A peptide-based sensor was utilized to quantify the relative amount of PKA activity present in each compartment of the mitochondria (the outer membrane, the intermembrane space, and the matrix). In the process of validating this assay, we discovered that PKA activity is regulated by the protease calpain. Upon exposure of bovine heart mitochondria to digitonin, Ca2+, and a variety of electron transport chain inhibitors, the regulatory subunits of the PKA holoenzyme (R2C2) are digested, releasing active catalytic subunits. This proteolysis is attenuated by calpain inhibitor I (ALLN). PMID:23410952

  19. Emerging Roles of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel

    The cellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated, when the energy balance of the cell decreases. AMPK has been proposed to regulate multiple metabolic processes. However, much of the evidence for these general effects of AMPK relies on investigations in cell systems...... exercise appears to inhibit pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity by an immediate up-regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) protein content. Consequently, this may inhibit glucose oxidation and thereby generate conditions for increased FA oxidation and glycogen resynthesis in skeletal muscle...... be of importance for prioritising energy dissipation, inhibition of lipid storage pathways and regulation of mitochondrial and metabolic proteins, but this needs further investigations. In addition, we provide evidence that AMPK is regulating autophagic signalling in skeletal muscle. Thus, in skeletal muscle AMPK...

  20. Mechanisms of Altered Control of Proliferation by Cyclic Amp/Protein Kinase A During Mammary Tumor Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Imagawa, Walter

    1999-01-01

    We hypothesize that alterations in the regulation of growth by growth factors and cAMP during mammary tumor progression are related to MAP kinase signaling pathways known to be affected by cAMP and pertussis toxin (PT...

  1. cAMP-binding proteins in medullary tubules from rat kidney: effect of ADH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gapstur, S.M.; Homma, S.; Dousa, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    Little is known of the regulatory steps in the cellular action of vasopressin (AVP) on the renal epithelium, subsequent to the cAMP generation. We studied cAMP-binding proteins in the medullary collecting tubule (MCT) and the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (MTAL) microdissected from the rat kidney by use of photoaffinity labeling. Microdissected tubules were homogenized and photoaffinity labeled by incubation with 1 microM 32P-labeled 8-azido-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (N3-8-[32P]-cAMP); the incorporated 32P was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Both in MCT and MTAL preparations, the analyses showed incorporation of N3-8-[32P]cAMP into two bands (Mr = 49,000 and Mr = 55,000) that comigrated with standards of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits RI and RII. In MCT, most of the 32P (80%) was incorporated into RI, whereas in MTAL the 32P incorporated into RI and RII was equivalent. When freshly dissected MCT segments were incubated with 10(-12)-10(-6) M AVP, the subsequent photoaffinity labeling of RI with N3-8-[32P]cAMP was markedly diminished in a dose-dependent manner compared with controls. Our results suggest that cAMP binds in MCT and MTAL to regulatory subunits RI and RII of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, in MCT the dominant type of cAMP-dependent protein kinase appears to be type I. The outlined procedure is suitable to indirectly measure the occupancy of RI by endogenous cAMP generated in MCT cells in response to physiological levels (10(-12) M) of AVP

  2. Differential regulation by AMP and ADP of AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Fiona A; Jensen, Thomas E; Hardie, D Grahame

    2016-01-15

    The γ subunits of heterotrimeric AMPK complexes contain the binding sites for the regulatory adenine nucleotides AMP, ADP and ATP. We addressed whether complexes containing different γ isoforms display different responses to adenine nucleotides by generating cells stably expressing FLAG-tagged versions of the γ1, γ2 or γ3 isoform. When assayed at a physiological ATP concentration (5 mM), γ1- and γ2-containing complexes were allosterically activated almost 10-fold by AMP, with EC50 values one to two orders of magnitude lower than the ATP concentration. By contrast, γ3 complexes were barely activated by AMP under these conditions, although we did observe some activation at lower ATP concentrations. Despite this, all three complexes were activated, due to increased Thr(172) phosphorylation, when cells were incubated with mitochondrial inhibitors that increase cellular AMP. With γ1 complexes, activation and Thr(172) phosphorylation induced by the upstream kinase LKB1 [liver kinase B1; but not calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKKβ)] in cell-free assays was markedly promoted by AMP and, to a smaller extent and less potently, by ADP. However, effects of AMP or ADP on activation and phosphorylation of the γ2 and γ3 complexes were small or insignificant. Binding of AMP or ADP protected all three γ subunit complexes against inactivation by Thr(172) dephosphorylation; with γ2 complexes, ADP had similar potency to AMP, but with γ1 and γ3 complexes, ADP was less potent than AMP. Thus, AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms respond differently to changes in AMP, ADP or ATP. These differences may tune the responses of the isoforms to fit their differing physiological roles. © 2016 Authors.

  3. Sustained signalling by PTH modulates IP3 accumulation and IP3 receptors through cyclic AMP junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Abha; Tovey, Stephen C.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulates adenylyl cyclase through type 1 PTH receptors (PTH1R) and potentiates the Ca2+ signals evoked by carbachol, which stimulates formation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). We confirmed that in HEK cells expressing PTH1R, acute stimulation with PTH(1-34) potentiated carbachol-evoked Ca2+ release. This was mediated by locally delivered cyclic AMP (cAMP), but unaffected by inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA), exchange proteins activated by cAMP, cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs) or substantial inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. Sustained stimulation with PTH(1-34) causes internalization of PTH1R–adenylyl cyclase signalling complexes, but the consequences for delivery of cAMP to IP3R within cAMP signalling junctions are unknown. Here, we show that sustained stimulation with PTH(1-34) or with PTH analogues that do not evoke receptor internalization reduced the potentiated Ca2+ signals and attenuated carbachol-evoked increases in cytosolic IP3. Similar results were obtained after sustained stimulation with NKH477 to directly activate adenylyl cyclase, or with the membrane-permeant analogue of cAMP, 8-Br-cAMP. These responses were independent of PKA and unaffected by substantial inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. During prolonged stimulation with PTH(1-34), hyperactive cAMP signalling junctions, within which cAMP is delivered directly and at saturating concentrations to its targets, mediate sensitization of IP3R and a more slowly developing inhibition of IP3 accumulation. PMID:25431134

  4. cAMP Signaling Compartmentation: Adenylyl Cyclases as Anchors of Dynamic Signaling Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Timothy B; Agarwal, Shailesh R; Harvey, Robert D; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2018-04-01

    It is widely accepted that cAMP signaling is compartmentalized within cells. However, our knowledge of how receptors, cAMP signaling enzymes, effectors, and other key proteins form specific signaling complexes to regulate specific cell responses is limited. The multicomponent nature of these systems and the spatiotemporal dynamics involved as proteins interact and move within a cell make cAMP responses highly complex. Adenylyl cyclases, the enzymatic source of cAMP production, are key starting points for understanding cAMP compartments and defining the functional signaling complexes. Three basic elements are required to form a signaling compartment. First, a localized signal is generated by a G protein-coupled receptor paired to one or more of the nine different transmembrane adenylyl cyclase isoforms that generate the cAMP signal in the cytosol. The diffusion of cAMP is subsequently limited by several factors, including expression of any number of phosphodiesterases (of which there are 24 genes plus spice variants). Finally, signal response elements are differentially localized to respond to cAMP produced within each locale. A-kinase-anchoring proteins, of which there are 43 different isoforms, facilitate this by targeting protein kinase A to specific substrates. Thousands of potential combinations of these three elements are possible in any given cell type, making the characterization of cAMP signaling compartments daunting. This review will focus on what is known about how cells organize cAMP signaling components as well as identify the unknowns. We make an argument for adenylyl cyclases being central to the formation and maintenance of these signaling complexes. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Identification of the Components Involved in Cyclic Di-AMP Signaling in Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Blötz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria often use cyclic dinucleotides as second messengers for signal transduction. While the classical molecule c-di-GMP is involved in lifestyle selection, the functions of the more recently discovered signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP are less defined. For many Gram-positive bacteria, c-di-AMP is essential for growth suggesting its involvement in a key cellular function. We have analyzed c-di-AMP signaling in the genome-reduced pathogenic bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results demonstrate that these bacteria produce c-di-AMP, and we could identify the diadenylate cyclase CdaM (MPN244. This enzyme is the founding member of a novel family of diadenylate cyclases. Of two potential c-di-AMP degrading phosphodiesterases, only PdeM (MPN549 is active in c-di-AMP degradation, whereas NrnA (MPN140 was reported to degrade short oligoribonucleotides. As observed in other bacteria, both the c-di-AMP synthesizing and the degrading enzymes are essential for M. pneumoniae suggesting control of a major homeostatic process. To obtain more insights into the nature of this process, we have identified a c-di-AMP-binding protein from M. pneumoniae, KtrC. KtrC is the cytoplasmic regulatory subunit of the low affinity potassium transporter KtrCD. It is established that binding of c-di-AMP inhibits the KtrCD activity resulting in a limitation of potassium uptake. Our results suggest that the control of potassium homeostasis is the essential function of c-di-AMP in M. pneumoniae.

  6. Positive Effect of Carbon Sources on Natural Transformation in Escherichia coli: Role of Low-Level Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein in the Derepression of rpoS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mengyue; Wang, Huanyu; Xie, Nengbin; Xie, Zhixiong

    2015-10-01

    Natural plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli is a complex process that occurs strictly on agar plates and requires the global stress response factor σ(S). Here, we showed that additional carbon sources could significantly enhance the transformability of E. coli. Inactivation of phosphotransferase system genes (ptsH, ptsG, and crr) caused an increase in the transformation frequency, and the addition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) neutralized the promotional effect of carbon sources. This implies a negative role of cAMP in natural transformation. Further study showed that crp and cyaA mutations conferred a higher transformation frequency, suggesting that the cAMP-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex has an inhibitory effect on transformation. Moreover, we observed that rpoS is negatively regulated by cAMP-CRP in early log phase and that both crp and cyaA mutants show no transformation superiority when rpoS is knocked out. Therefore, it can be concluded that both the crp and cyaA mutations derepress rpoS expression in early log phase, whereby they aid in the promotion of natural transformation ability. We also showed that the accumulation of RpoS during early log phase can account for the enhanced transformation aroused by additional carbon sources. Our results thus demonstrated that the presence of additional carbon sources promotes competence development and natural transformation by reducing cAMP-CRP and, thus, derepressing rpoS expression during log phase. This finding could contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between nutrition state and competence, as well as the mechanism of natural plasmid transformation in E. coli. Escherichia coli, which is not usually considered to be naturally transformable, was found to spontaneously take up plasmid DNA on agar plates. Researching the mechanism of natural transformation is important for understanding the role of transformation in evolution, as well as in the transfer of pathogenicity and antibiotic

  7. Atrazine acts as an endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucka, Marek [Section on Cellular Signaling, Program in Developmental Neuroscience, NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Fa, Svetlana [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Stojilkovic, Stanko S. [Section on Cellular Signaling, Program in Developmental Neuroscience, NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kovacevic, Radmila, E-mail: radmila.kovacevic@dbe.uns.ac.rs [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2012-11-15

    Atrazine, one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, acts as an endocrine disruptor, but the mechanism of its action has not been characterized. In this study, we show that atrazine rapidly increases cAMP levels in cultured rat pituitary and testicular Leydig cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but less effectively than 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a competitive non-specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase)- and probenecid (an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide transporters)-treated cells, but not in 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine-treated cells, atrazine further increased cAMP levels, indicating that inhibition of PDEs accounts for accumulation of cAMP. In contrast to cAMP, atrazine did not alter cGMP levels, further indicating that it inhibits cAMP-specific PDEs. Atrazine-induced changes in cAMP levels were sufficient to stimulate prolactin release in pituitary cells and androgen production in Leydig cells, indicating that it acts as an endocrine disrupter both in cells that secrete by exocytosis of prestored hormones and in cells that secrete by de novo hormone synthesis. Rolipram abolished the stimulatory effect of atrazine on cAMP release in both cell types, suggesting that it acts as an inhibitor of PDE4s, isoforms whose mRNA transcripts dominate in pituitary and Leydig cells together with mRNA for PDE8A. In contrast, immortalized lacto-somatotrophs showed low expression of these mRNA transcripts and several fold higher cAMP levels compared to normal pituitary cells, and atrazine was unable to further increase cAMP levels. These results indicate that atrazine acts as a general endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific PDE4s. -- Highlights: ► Atrazine stimulates cAMP accumulation in pituitary and Leydig cells. ► Atrazine also stimulates PRL and androgens secretion. ► Stimulatory effects of atrazine were abolished in cells with IBMX-inhibited PDEs. ► Atrazine specificity toward cAMP

  8. Intermingled cAMP, cGMP and calcium spatiotemporal dynamics in developing neuronal circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania eAveraimo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available cAMP critically modulates the development of neuronal connectivity. It is involved in a wide range of cellular processes that require independent regulation. However, our understanding of how this single second messenger achieves specific modulation of the signaling pathways involved remains incomplete. The subcellular compartmentalization and temporal regulation of cAMP signals have recently been identified as important coding strategies leading to specificity. Dynamic interactions of this cyclic nucleotide with other second messenger including calcium and cGMP are critically involved in the regulation of spatiotemporal control of cAMP. Recent technical improvements of fluorescent sensors facilitate cAMP monitoring, whereas optogenetic tools permit spatial and temporal control of cAMP manipulations, all of which enabled the direct investigation of spatiotemporal characteristics of cAMP modulation in developing neurons. Focusing on neuronal polarization, neurotransmitter specification, axon guidance, and refinement of neuronal connectivity, we summarize herein the recent advances in understanding the features of cAMP signals and their dynamic interactions with calcium and cGMP involved in shaping the nervous system.

  9. Sustained exposure to catecholamines affects cAMP/PKA compartmentalised signalling in adult rat ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Laura A; Koschinski, Andreas; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2016-07-01

    In the heart compartmentalisation of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signalling is necessary to achieve a specific functional outcome in response to different hormonal stimuli. Chronic exposure to catecholamines is known to be detrimental to the heart and disrupted compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling has been associated to heart disease. However, in most cases it remains unclear whether altered local cAMP signalling is an adaptive response, a consequence of the disease or whether it contributes to the pathogenetic process. We have previously demonstrated that isoforms of PKA expressed in cardiac myocytes, PKA-I and PKA-II, localise to different subcellular compartments and are selectively activated by spatially confined pools of cAMP, resulting in phosphorylation of distinct downstream targets. Here we investigate cAMP signalling in an in vitro model of hypertrophy in primary adult rat ventricular myocytes. By using a real time imaging approach and targeted reporters we find that that sustained exposure to catecholamines can directly affect cAMP/PKA compartmentalisation. This appears to involve a complex mechanism including both changes in the subcellular localisation of individual phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoforms as well as the relocalisation of PKA isoforms. As a result, the preferential coupling of PKA subsets with different PDEs is altered resulting in a significant difference in the level of cAMP the kinase is exposed to, with potential impact on phosphorylation of downstream targets. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. New insight into the binding modes of TNP-AMP to human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xinya; Huang, Yunyuan; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, San; Zhu, Shuaihuan; Qin, Nian; Hong, Zongqin; Wei, Lin; Feng, Jiangtao; Ren, Yanliang; Feng, Lingling; Wan, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) contains two binding sites, a substrate fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) active site and an adenosine monophosphate (AMP) allosteric site. The FBP active site works by stabilizing the FBPase, and the allosteric site impairs the activity of FBPase through its binding of a nonsubstrate molecule. The fluorescent AMP analogue, 2‧,3‧-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5‧-monophosphate (TNP-AMP) has been used as a fluorescent probe as it is able to competitively inhibit AMP binding to the AMP allosteric site and, therefore, could be used for exploring the binding modes of inhibitors targeted on the allosteric site. In this study, we have re-examined the binding modes of TNP-AMP to FBPase. However, our present enzyme kinetic assays show that AMP and FBP both can reduce the fluorescence from the bound TNP-AMP through competition for FBPase, suggesting that TNP-AMP binds not only to the AMP allosteric site but also to the FBP active site. Mutagenesis assays of K274L (located in the FBP active site) show that the residue K274 is very important for TNP-AMP to bind to the active site of FBPase. The results further prove that TNP-AMP is able to bind individually to the both sites. Our present study provides a new insight into the binding mechanism of TNP-AMP to the FBPase. The TNP-AMP fluorescent probe can be used to exam the binding site of an inhibitor (the active site or the allosteric site) using FBPase saturated by AMP and FBP, respectively, or the K247L mutant FBPase.

  11. The cyclic AMP cascade is altered in the fragile X nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FX, the most common heritable cause of mental retardation and autism, is a developmental disorder characterized by physical, cognitive, and behavioral deficits. FX results from a trinucleotide expansion mutation in the fmr1 gene that reduces levels of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. Although research efforts have focused on FMRP's impact on mGluR signaling, how the loss of FMRP leads to the individual symptoms of FX is not known. Previous studies on human FX blood cells revealed alterations in the cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP cascade. We tested the hypothesis that cAMP signaling is altered in the FX nervous system using three different model systems. Induced levels of cAMP in platelets and in brains of fmr1 knockout mice are substantially reduced. Cyclic AMP induction is also significantly reduced in human FX neural cells. Furthermore, cAMP production is decreased in the heads of FX Drosophila and this defect can be rescued by reintroduction of the dfmr gene. Our results indicate that a robust defect in cAMP production in FX is conserved across species and suggest that cAMP metabolism may serve as a useful biomarker in the human disease population. Reduced cAMP induction has implications for the underlying causes of FX and autism spectrum disorders. Pharmacological agents known to modulate the cAMP cascade may be therapeutic in FX patients and can be tested in these models, thus supplementing current efforts centered on mGluR signaling.

  12. Detection of Amp C genes encoding for beta-lactamases in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shanthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Amp C beta-lactamase are Ambler class C enzymes that confer resistance to extended spectrum cephalosporins and are not inhibited by beta-lactamase inhibitors. Their detection is crucial, since the phenotypic tests are not standardised leading to ambiguity in interpretation of results. This study was done to detect the types of Amp C prevalent in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Materials and Methods : Seventy-seven consecutive cefoxitin resistant clinical isolates of E. coli (n = 25 and K. pneumoniae (n = 52 were included in the study. Antibiotic susceptibility testing to various classes of antibiotics was performed by disc diffusion using Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC to cefoxitin, imipenem and meropenem were determined by broth microdilution method. Isolates were screened for production of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL. Multiplex PCR was performed for the detection of Amp C genes after phenotypic testing (Hodge test and inhibitor based test. Results : Cefoxitin Hodge test was positive in 40 isolates which included 20 E. coli and 20 K. pneumoniae. There was zone enhancement with boronic acid in 55 isolates, of which 36 were K. pneumoniae and 19 were E. coli. Multiplex PCR detected Amp C in 11/25 E. coli and 12/52 K. pneumoniae isolates. The Amp C genes detected were CIT (Amp C origin - Citrobacter freundii, DHA (Dhahran Hospital, Saudi Arabia, ACC (Ambler class C, EBC (Amp C origin - Enterobacter cloacae groups. ESBL was co-produced in 54 isolates. Conclusions : Amp C was detected in 29.87% of the study isolates. Majority of them co-produced ESBL. The most common Amp C was the CIT family. Screen tests for cefoxitin resistance may be falsely positive due to production of carbapenamases.

  13. Cyclic AMP regulates the biosynthesis of cellobiohydrolase in Cellulomonas flavigena growing in sugar cane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Herrera, Jesús Antonio; Pérez-Avalos, Odilia; Salgado, Luis M; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa

    2009-10-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena produces a battery of cellulase components that act concertedly to degrade cellulose. The addition of cAMP to repressed C. flavigena cultures released catabolic repression, while addition of cAMP to induced C. flavigena cultures led to a cellobiohydrolase hyperproduction. Exogenous cAMP showed positive regulation on cellobiohydrolase production in C. flavigena grown on sugar cane bagasse. A C. flavigena cellobiohydrolase gene was cloned (named celA), which coded for a 71- kDa enzyme. Upstream, a repressor celR1, identified as a 38 kDa protein, was monitored by use of polyclonal antibodies.

  14. Reflection principle for classical solutions of the homogeneous real Monge–Ampère equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Koskenoja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider reflection principle for classical solutions of the homogeneous real Monge–Ampère equation. We show that both the odd and the even reflected functions satisfy the Monge–Ampère equation if the second-order partial derivatives have continuous limits on the reflection boundary. In addition to sufficient conditions, we give some necessary conditions. Before stating the main results, we present elementary formulas for the reflected functions and study their differentiability properties across the reflection boundary. As an important special case, we finally consider extension of polynomials satisfying the homogeneous Monge–Ampère equation.

  15. A high-speed CMOS current op amp for very low supply voltage operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1994-01-01

    A CMOS implementation of a high-gain current mode operational amplifier (op amp) with a single-ended input and a differential output is described. This configuration is the current mode counterpart of the traditional voltage mode op amp. In order to exploit the inherent potential for high speed......, low voltage operation normally associated with current mode analog signal processing, the op amp has been designed to operate off a supply voltage of 1.5 V, and the signal path has been confined to N-channel transistors. With this design, a gain of 94 dB and a gain-bandwidth product of 65 MHz has been...

  16. Bipolar power sources for the correction magnets of AmPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Es, J.T. van; Luigjes, G.; Trigt, J.H. van.

    1992-01-01

    AmPS consists of many correction magnets which must provide the currents. These currents serve continuously between -3 Amp and +3 Amp. The adjusted current must be stable inside 0,1%. The copper resistance of magnet coils and their wires are ≤ 8 ohm and the self induction is 200 mH. An extended market research on power supplies has enabled the authors to decide to develop it themselves. This development has led to a module system with Bitbus control. (authors). 14 figs., 4 tabs

  17. TNP-AMP Binding to the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase Studied by Infrared Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Man; Barth, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor the conformational change of 2′,3′-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5′-monophosphate (TNP-AMP) binding to the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase. TNP-AMP binding was observed in a competition experiment: TNP-AMP is initially bound to the ATPase but is then replaced by β,γ-iminoadenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPPNP) after AMPPNP release from P3-1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl AMPPNP (caged AMPPNP). The resulting infrared difference spectra are compared to those of...

  18. Analysis of Advanced Modular Power Systems (AMPS) for Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard; Soeder, James F.; Beach, Ray

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Modular Power Systems (AMPS) project is developing a modular approach to spacecraft power systems for exploration beyond Earth orbit. AMPS is intended to meet the need of reducing the cost of design development, test and integration and also reducing the operational logistics cost of supporting exploration missions. AMPS seeks to establish modular power building blocks with standardized electrical, mechanical, thermal and data interfaces that can be applied across multiple exploration vehicles. The presentation discusses the results of a cost analysis that compares the cost of the modular approach against a traditional non-modular approach.

  19. Structural analyses of a constitutively active mutant of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark A; Li, Sheng; Tsalkova, Tamara; Mei, Fang C; Liu, Tong; Woods, Virgil L; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (EPACs) are important allosteric regulators of cAMP-mediated signal transduction pathways. To understand the molecular mechanism of EPAC activation, we have combined site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, and peptide amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) to probe the structural and conformational dynamics of EPAC2-F435G, a constitutively active EPAC2 mutant. Our study demonstrates that conformational dynamics plays a critical role in cAMP-induced EPAC activation. A glycine mutation at 435 position shifts the equilibrium of conformational dynamics towards the extended active conformation.

  20. Structural analyses of a constitutively active mutant of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A White

    Full Text Available Exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (EPACs are important allosteric regulators of cAMP-mediated signal transduction pathways. To understand the molecular mechanism of EPAC activation, we have combined site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, and peptide amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS to probe the structural and conformational dynamics of EPAC2-F435G, a constitutively active EPAC2 mutant. Our study demonstrates that conformational dynamics plays a critical role in cAMP-induced EPAC activation. A glycine mutation at 435 position shifts the equilibrium of conformational dynamics towards the extended active conformation.

  1. DmAMP1, an antifungal plant defensin from dahlia (Dahlia merckii), interacts with sphingolipids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevissen, Karin; François, Isabelle E J A; Takemoto, Jon Y; Ferket, Kathelijne K A; Meert, Els M K; Cammue, Bruno P A

    2003-09-12

    DmAMP1, an antifungal plant defensin from Dahlia merckii, was shown previously to require the presence of sphingolipids for fungicidal action against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sphingolipids may stabilize glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins, which interact with DmAMP1, or they may directly serve as DmAMP1 binding sites. In the present study, we demonstrate that S. cerevisiae disruptants in GPI-anchored proteins showed small or no increased resistance towards DmAMP1 indicating no involvement of these proteins in DmAMP1 action. Further, studies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based binding assay revealed that DmAMP1 interacts directly with sphingolipids isolated from S. cerevisiae and that this interaction is enhanced in the presence of equimolar concentrations of ergosterol. Therefore, DmAMP1 antifungal action involving membrane interaction with sphingolipids and ergosterol is proposed.

  2. Static Load Balancing Algorithms In Cloud Computing Challenges amp Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Shah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cloud computing provides on-demand hosted computing resources and services over the Internet on a pay-per-use basis. It is currently becoming the favored method of communication and computation over scalable networks due to numerous attractive attributes such as high availability scalability fault tolerance simplicity of management and low cost of ownership. Due to the huge demand of cloud computing efficient load balancing becomes critical to ensure that computational tasks are evenly distributed across servers to prevent bottlenecks. The aim of this review paper is to understand the current challenges in cloud computing primarily in cloud load balancing using static algorithms and finding gaps to bridge for more efficient static cloud load balancing in the future. We believe the ideas suggested as new solution will allow researchers to redesign better algorithms for better functionalities and improved user experiences in simple cloud systems. This could assist small businesses that cannot afford infrastructure that supports complex amp dynamic load balancing algorithms.

  3. Hypoxia inhibits colonic ion transport via activation of AMP kinase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal hypoxia is a common endpoint for many pathological processes including ischemic colitis, colonic obstruction and anastomotic failure. Previous studies suggest that hypoxia modulates colonic mucosal function through inhibition of chloride secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation are poorly understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic energy regulator found in a wide variety of cells and has been linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mediated chloride secretion in several different tissues. We hypothesized that AMPK mediates many of the acute effects of hypoxia on human and rat colonic electrolyte transport. METHODS: The fluorescent chloride indicator dye N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide was used to measure changes in intracellular chloride concentrations in isolated single rat colonic crypts. Ussing chamber experiments in human colonic mucosa were conducted to evaluate net epithelial ion transport. RESULTS: This study demonstrates that acute hypoxia inhibits electrogenic chloride secretion via AMPK mediated inhibition of CFTR. Pre-treatment of tissues with the AMPK inhibitor 6-[4-(2-piperidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl)]-3-pyridin-4-yl-pyyrazolo [1,5-a] pyrimidine (compound C) in part reversed the effects of acute hypoxia on chloride secretion. CONCLUSION: We therefore suggest that AMPK is a key component of the adaptive cellular response to mucosal hypoxia in the colon. Furthermore, AMPK may represent a potential therapeutic target in diseased states or in prevention of ischemic intestinal injury.

  4. The cAMP analogue, dbcAMP affects release of steroid hormones by cultured rabbit ovarian cells and their response to FSH, IGF-I and ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrenek, Peter; Grossmann, Roland; Sirotkin, Alexander V

    2010-08-25

    The aim of the present study was to examine possible involvement of cAMP-dependent intracellular mechanisms in control of ovarian cell steroidogenesis and its response to hormonal regulators. For this purpose, we examined the influence of administration of dbcAMP, a cAMP analogue (50 microg/animal) in vivo, on release of progesterone, testosterone and estradiol by isolated ovarian fragments, as well their response to hormonal regulators of ovarian steroidogenesis-FSH, IGF-I and ghrelin (all added at doses of 100 ng/ml). It was observed, that administration of dbcAMP resulted reduction in progesterone and testosterone, but not of estradiol release by isolated ovarian fragments. In ovarian tissue isolated from control animals, additions of hormones were able to reduce release of progesterone (FSH, IGF-I and ghrelin) and increase release of testosterone (ghrelin) but did not change estradiol output. Previous administration of dbcAMP modified action of exogenous hormones: it inverted inhibitory action of FSH, IGF-I and ghrelin on progesterone release to stimulatory action and induced stimulatory action of IGF-I on testosterone release and stimulatory effect of FSH on estradiol output. The present observations confirm involvement of peptide hormones FSH, IGF-I and ghrelin in the control of rabbit ovarian steroid hormones release and demonstrate the involvement of cAMP-dependent intracellular mechanisms in down-regulation of rabbit ovarian steroidogenesis and in modification, but not in mediating effect of FSH, IGF-I and ghrelin on ovarian steroid hormones release. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Faecal carriage of ESBL and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL) - and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase prducing bacteria represent a great concern because there are few therapeutic choices. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of faecal carriage of ESBL ...

  6. Applications of nonvariational finite element methods to Monge--Amp\\`ere type equations

    OpenAIRE

    Pryer, Tristan

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is to illustrate the application of the nonvariational finite element method to a specific Monge--Amp\\`ere type nonlinear partial differential equation. The equation we consider is that of prescribed Gauss curvature.

  7. Selective Phosphonylation of 5'-Adenosine Monophosphate (5'-AMP) via Pyrophosphite [PPi(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Karl; Bryant, David E.; Marriott, Katie E. R.; Ohara, Shohei; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Kee, Terence P.

    2016-11-01

    We describe here experiments which demonstrate the selective phospho-transfer from a plausibly prebiotic condensed phosphorus (P) salt, pyrophosphite [H2P2O5 2-; PPi(III)], to the phosphate group of 5'-adenosine mono phosphate (5'-AMP). We show further that this P-transfer process is accelerated both by divalent metal ions (M2+) and by organic co-factors such as acetate (AcO-). In this specific case of P-transfer from PPi(III) to 5'-AMP, we show a synergistic enhancement of transfer in the combined presence of M2+ & AcO-. Isotopic labelling studies demonstrate that hydrolysis of the phosphonylated 5'-AMP, [P(III)P(V)-5'-AMP], proceeds via nuceophilic attack of water at the Pi(III) terminus.

  8. Aspirin effects on lymphocyte cyclic AMP levels in normal human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, D E; Parker, C W

    1976-01-01

    In purified lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of healthy human subjects who had ingested therapeutic doses of aspirin, there was a significant decrease in resting cyclic AMP levels as well as a partial inhibition of the rise in cyclic AMP with isoproterenol or prostaglandin E1. These changes were seen as early as 30 min after aspirin ingestion and did not appear to result from aspirin effects on lymphocyte recovery, purity, viability, or relative number of thymus- or bone marrow-derived lymphocytes. In contrast, the direct addition of aspirin to suspensions of purified peripheral lymphocytes did not significantly alter their cyclic AMP levels. However, an effect of aspirin could be obtained in vitro if aspirin was added to unprocessed whole blood during the dextran sedimentation phase of the cell purification. Thus the effect of aspirin on lymphocyte cyclic AMP metabolism, may be indirect, through other cells present in the peripheral blood. PMID:182720

  9. Occurrence and detection of AmpC β-lactamases among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -lactam antibiotics except cefepime and carbapenems. Aim of the study: We aimed to evaluate the presence of AmpC β-lactamase among Enterobacteriaceae isolates separated from patients with nosocomial infections, and to detect the ...

  10. Changes in rodent thyroid hormones and cyclic-AMP following treatment with pineal indolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, I; Hirschmann, N; Puder, M; Petrank, J

    1978-05-01

    Treatment of rats with pineal indolic compounds 5-methoxytryptophol, 5-hydroxytryptophol and serotonin brought about a significant increase in serum thyroxine levels, while serotonin and melatonin caused an increase in thyroid cAMP content with corresponding decrease in the gland's hormones. The total quantity of cAMP in the thyroid was also increased by melatonin in the organ culture system. All these findings would indicate that some of the pineal indoleamines elicit a direct action on the thyroid by stimulating the adenyl cyclase activity and intrathyroidal cAMP, bringing about increased release of thyroxine into the blood stream, and that this is usually not accompanied by adequate synthesis in the gland. Our observation that continuous darkness, which stimulates pineal activity, also brought about an increase in cAMP, concours with our finding of a stimulatory effect of the indolic compounds on thyroid hormone release.

  11. Role of the cAMP Pathway in Glucose and Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Madiraju, Anila; Montminy, Marc

    2016-01-01

    3'-5'-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP or cAMP) was first described in 1957 as an intracellular second messenger mediating the effects of glucagon and epinephrine on hepatic glycogenolysis (Berthet et al., J Biol Chem 224(1):463-475, 1957). Since this initial characterization, cAMP has been firmly established as a versatile molecular signal involved in both central and peripheral regulation of energy homeostasis and nutrient partitioning. Many of these effects appear to be mediated at the transcriptional level, in part through the activation of the transcription factor CREB and its coactivators. Here we review current understanding of the mechanisms by which the cAMP signaling pathway triggers metabolic programs in insulin-responsive tissues.

  12. AMP: a science-driven web-based application for the TeraGrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitaszek, M.; Metcalfe, T.; Shorrock, I.

    The Asteroseismic Modeling Portal (AMP) provides a web-based interface for astronomers to run and view simulations that derive the properties of Sun-like stars from observations of their pulsation frequencies. In this paper, we describe the architecture and implementation of AMP, highlighting the lightweight design principles and tools used to produce a functional fully-custom web-based science application in less than a year. Targeted as a TeraGrid science gateway, AMP's architecture and implementation are intended to simplify its orchestration of TeraGrid computational resources. AMP's web-based interface was developed as a traditional standalone database-backed web application using the Python-based Django web development framework, allowing us to leverage the Django framework's capabilities while cleanly separating the user interface development from the grid interface development. We have found this combination of tools flexible and effective for rapid gateway development and deployment.

  13. Vv-AMP1, a ripening induced peptide from Vitis vinifera shows strong antifungal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivier Melané A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Latest research shows that small antimicrobial peptides play a role in the innate defense system of plants. These peptides typically contribute to preformed defense by developing protective barriers around germinating seeds or between different tissue layers within plant organs. The encoding genes could also be upregulated by abiotic and biotic stimuli during active defense processes. The peptides display a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities. Their potent anti-pathogenic characteristics have ensured that they are promising targets in the medical and agricultural biotechnology sectors. Results A berry specific cDNA sequence designated Vv-AMP1, Vitis vinifera antimicrobial peptide 1, was isolated from Vitis vinifera. Vv-AMP1 encodes for a 77 amino acid peptide that shows sequence homology to the family of plant defensins. Vv-AMP1 is expressed in a tissue specific, developmentally regulated manner, being only expressed in berry tissue at the onset of berry ripening and onwards. Treatment of leaf and berry tissue with biotic or abiotic factors did not lead to increased expression of Vv-AMP1 under the conditions tested. The predicted signal peptide of Vv-AMP1, fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP, showed that the signal peptide allowed accumulation of its product in the apoplast. Vv-AMP1 peptide, produced in Escherichia coli, had a molecular mass of 5.495 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry. Recombinant Vv-AMP1 was extremely heat-stable and showed strong antifungal activity against a broad spectrum of plant pathogenic fungi, with very high levels of activity against the wilting disease causing pathogens Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae. The Vv-AMP1 peptide did not induce morphological changes on the treated fungal hyphae, but instead strongly inhibited hyphal elongation. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of Vv-AMP1 might be associated with altering the membrane

  14. A New Therapeutic Strategy for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Activation of AMP Kinase by Metformin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    of the enzyme’s allosteric activator AMP. Renal ischemia produces energy deprivation in renal tubules and is a powerful stimulus leading to the...Magenheimer BS, et al. (2006) Early embryonic renal tubules of wild-type and polycystic kidney disease kidneys respond to cAMP stimulation with cystic...cells, and Pkd1 flox/ and Pkd1/ temperature-sensitive SV40 large T antigen renal proximal tubule cells (Joly et al., 2006; Shibazaki et al., 2008

  15. Coexpression of ESBL, Amp C and MBL in gram negative bacilli

    OpenAIRE

    Ruturaj M. Kolhapure; Ashwin Kumar; HRV Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Resistant bacteria are emerging worldwide as a threat to the favourable outcome of common infections in community and hospital settings. Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBLs), AmpC beta lactamases and Metallo-beta Lactamases (MBL) are the three important mechanism of resistance to beta lactam drugs in the bacteria. The objective of the study was to screen gram negative isolates for co-expression of extended spectrum beta-lactamase, Amp C beta-lactamase and Metallo beta-lactama...

  16. The ever unfolding story of cAMP signalling in trypanosomatids: vive la difference!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nii Aryee Tagoe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kinetoplastids are unicellular, eukaryotic, flagellated protozoans containing the eponymous kinetoplast. Within this order, the family of trypanosomatids are responsible for some of the most serious human diseases, including Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi, sleeping sickness (T. brucei spp. and leishmaniasis (Leishmania spp. Although cAMP is produced during the life cycle stages of these parasites, its signalling pathways are very different from those of mammals. The absence of G-protein-coupled recep¬tors, the presence of structurally different adenylyl cyclases, the paucity of known cAMP effector proteins and the stringent need for regulation of cAMP in the small kinetoplastid cells all suggest a significantly different biochemical pathway and likely cell biology. However, each of the main kinetoplastid parasites express four class 1-type cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEA-D, which have highly similar catalytic domains to that of human PDEs. To date, only TbrPDEB, expressed as two slightly different isoforms TbrPDEB1 and B2, has been found to be essential when ablated. Although the genomes contain reasonably well con¬served genes for catalytic and regulatory domains of pro¬tein kinase A, these have been shown to have varied structural and functional roles in the different species. Recent discovery of a role of cAMP/AMP metabolism in a quorum-sensing signalling pathway in T. brucei, and the identification of downstream cAMP Response Proteins (CARPs whose expression levels correlate with sensitivity to PDE inhibitors, suggests a complex signalling cascade. The interplay between the roles of these novel CARPs and the quorum-sensing signalling pathway on cell division and differentiation makes for intriguing cell biology and a new paradigm in cAMP signal transduction, as well as potential targets for trypanosomatid-specific cAMP pathway-based therapeutics.

  17. Preparation and Characteristics of Corn Straw-Co-AMPS-Co-AA Superabsorbent Hydrogel

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Wei-Min; Hu, Xiang-Ming; Wang, De-Ming; Liu, Guo-Hua

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the corn straw after removing the lignin was grafted with 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPS) to prepare sulfonated cellulose. The grafting copolymerization between the sulfonated cellulose and acrylic acid (AA) was performed using potassium persulfate and N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide as the initiator and crosslinking agent, respectively, to prepare corn straw-co-AMPS-co-AA hydrogels. The structure and properties of the resulting hydrogels were characterized by Four...

  18. Cyclic-AMP mediated regulation of ABCB mRNA expression in mussel haemocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Franzellitti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The multixenobiotic resistance system (MXR allows aquatic organisms to cope with their habitat despite high pollution levels by over-expressing membrane and intracellular transporters, including the P-glycoprotein (Pgp. In mammals transcription of the ABCB1 gene encoding Pgp is under cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation; whether this is true in mollusks is not fully clarified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: cAMP/PKA regulation and ABCB mRNA expression were assessed in haemocytes from Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed in vivo for 1 week to 0.3 ng/L fluoxetine (FX alone or in combination with 0.3 ng/L propranolol (PROP. FX significantly decreased cAMP levels and PKA activity, and induced ABCB mRNA down-regulation. FX effects were abolished in the presence of PROP. In vitro experiments using haemocytes treated with physiological agonists (noradrenaline and serotonin and pharmacological modulators (PROP, forskolin, dbcAMP, and H89 of the cAMP/PKA system were performed to obtain clear evidence about the involvement of the signaling pathway in the transcriptional regulation of ABCB. Serotonin (5-HT decreased cAMP levels, PKA activity and ABCB mRNA expression but increased the mRNA levels for a putative 5-HT1 receptor. Interestingly, 5-HT1 was also over-expressed after in vivo exposures to FX. 5-HT effects were counteracted by PROP. Forskolin and dbcAMP increased PKA activity as well as ABCB mRNA expression; the latter effect was abolished in the presence of the PKA inhibitor H89. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first direct evidence for the cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation of ABCB transcription in mussels.

  19. Constitutive high expression of chromosomal beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by a new insertion sequence (IS1669) located in ampD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N.; Ciofu, O.; Hentzer, Morten

    2002-01-01

    resistant, constitutive beta-lactamase-producing variant contained no mutations in ampD, but a point mutation was observed in ampR, resulting in an Asp-135-->Asn change. An identical mutation of AmpR in Enterobacter cloacae has been reported to cause a 450-fold higher AmpC expression. However, in many...

  20. Detection of AmpC beta-lactamases using sodium salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, Mona T; Yassin, Aymen S; Hosny, Alaa El-Dien M S

    2012-12-01

    AmpC β-lactamases are enzymes that hydrolyze all β-lactam antibiotics except cefipime and imipenem. Currently, there is no standard phenotypic method for detection of such enzymes. This study aims to report the use of sodium salicylate for AmpC β-lactamases detection and to compare its sensitivity and specificity to other commonly known inhibitors. A total of 135 clinical isolates were used to test the effectiveness of sodium salicylate in detection of plasmid- as well as chromosomally encoded AmpC β-lactamases. All isolates were tested by multiplex PCR testing as well as inhibitor-based methods using cloxacillin, phenylboronic acid and sodium salicylate for the detection of AmpC enzymes. Four isolates were confirmed as producers of plasmid-encoded AmpC β-lactamase and a single isolate was confirmed to have both plasmid and chromosomal genes. Cloxacillin and phenylyboronic acid failed to detect most of the plasmid-encoded enzymes. Sodium salicylate was able to detect the Escherichia coli isolates with plasmid-encoded enzymes in addition to few other isolates that were chromosomally mediated. The sensitivity and specificity of sodium salicylate was 50% and 93%, respectively, higher than those of other known inhibitors. We thus conclude that sodium salicylate can be reliably used as an inhibitor in the detection of plasmid-encoded AmpC enzymes in E. coli. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dual mechanism for cAMP-dependent modulation of Ca2+ signalling in articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, P; Paschini, V; Vittur, F

    1996-09-01

    The ability of cAMP to modulate the actions of Ca(2+)-mobilizing agonists was studied in single Fura-2-loaded pig articular chondrocytes in primary culture. Forskolin and 8-Br-cAMP increased both the frequency and amplitude of Ca2+ oscillations induced by ATP, and, in unstimulated cells, induced single Ca2+ transients or even Ca2+ oscillations. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor H89 totally prevented the effect of cAMP-elevating agents on Ca2+ signalling. Forskolin and 8-Br-cAMP promptly increased the rate of Mn2+ quenching, when administered in the presence of ATP, suggesting a potentiation of receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx. In Ca(2+)-free medium, ATP-induced Ca2+ oscillations decreased and stopped after a few cycles: subsequent ATP additions temporarily resumed the activity, an effect that could be mimicked by forskolin. The same agent induced single Ca2+ transients in 42% of the cell population maintained in Ca(2+)-free medium. Thapsigargin prevented Ca2+ responses to both ATP and forskolin. The results indicate a dual mechanism for cAMP-induced potentiation of Ca2+ signalling in articular chondrocytes: an increase of receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx and a positive modulation of intracellular Ca2+ release.

  2. Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signaling controls the human trophoblast fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbaud, Pascale; Taskén, Kjetil; Pidoux, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    During human placentation, mononuclear cytotrophoblasts fuse to form multinucleated syncytia ensuring hormonal production and nutrient exchanges between the maternal and fetal circulation. Syncytial formation is essential for the maintenance of pregnancy and for fetal growth. The cAMP signaling pathway is the major route to trigger trophoblast fusion and its activation results in phosphorylation of specific intracellular target proteins, in transcription of fusogenic genes and assembly of macromolecular protein complexes constituting the fusogenic machinery at the plasma membrane. Specificity in cAMP signaling is ensured by generation of localized pools of cAMP controlled by cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and by discrete spatial and temporal activation of protein kinase A (PKA) in supramolecular signaling clusters inside the cell organized by A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) and by organization of signal termination by protein phosphatases (PPs). Here we present original observations on the available components of the cAMP signaling pathway in the human placenta including PKA, PDE, and PP isoforms as well as AKAPs. We continue to discuss the current knowledge of the spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signaling triggering trophoblast fusion. PMID:26441659

  3. Anoctamin 9/TMEM16J is a cation channel activated by cAMP/PKA signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungsup; Kim, Hyesu; Lee, Jesun; Lee, Byeongjun; Kim, Hee-Ryang; Jung, Jooyoung; Lee, Mi-Ock; Oh, Uhtaek

    2018-05-01

    Anoctamins (ANOs) are multifunctional membrane proteins that consist of 10 homologs. ANO1 (TMEM16A) and ANO2 (TMEM16B) are anion channels activated by intracellular calcium that meditate numerous physiological functions. ANO6 is a scramblase that redistributes phospholipids across the cell membrane. The other homologs are not well characterized. We found ANO9/TMEM16J is a cation channel activated by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). Intracellular cAMP-activated robust currents in whole cells expressing ANO9, which were inhibited by a PKA blocker. A cholera toxin that persistently stimulated adenylate cyclase activated ANO9 as did the application of PKA. The cAMP-induced ANO9 currents were permeable to cations. The cAMP-dependent ANO9 currents were augmented by intracellular Ca 2+ . Ano9 transcripts were predominant in the intestines. Human intestinal SW480 cells expressed high levels of Ano9 transcripts and showed PKA inhibitor-reversible cAMP-dependent currents. We conclude that ANO9 is a cation channel activated by a cAMP/PKA pathway and could play a role in intestine function. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Redox regulation of the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Han

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Redox state is a critical determinant of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death.The aim of this study is to determine if AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, a cellular energy sensor, is activated by oxidants generated by Berberine in endothelial cells (EC.Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC were exposed to Berberine. AMPK activity and reactive oxygen species were monitored after the incubation.In BAEC, Berberine caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of AMPK at Thr172 and acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC at Ser79, a well characterized downstream target of AMPK. Concomitantly, Berberine increased peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant formed by simultaneous generation of superoxide and nitric oxide. Pre-incubation of BAEC with anti-oxidants markedly attenuated Berberine-enhanced phosphorylation of both AMPK and ACC. Consistently, adenoviral expression of superoxide dismutase and pretreatment of L-N(G-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME; a non-selective NOS inhibitor blunted Berberine-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. Furthermore, mitochondria-targeted tempol (mito-tempol pretreatment or expression of uncoupling protein attenuated AMPK activation caused by Berberine. Depletion of mitochondria abolished the effects of Berberine on AMPK in EC. Finally, Berberine significantly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 at Ser307 and gene silencing of LKB1 attenuated Berberine-enhanced AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation in BAEC.Our results suggest that mitochondria-derived superoxide anions and peroxynitrite are required for Berberine-induced AMPK activation in endothelial cells.

  5. Different cAMP sources are critically involved in G protein-coupled receptor CRHR1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Carolina; Dos Santos Claro, Paula A; Bonfiglio, Juan J; Senin, Sergio A; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W; Silberstein, Susana

    2016-07-18

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates G protein-dependent and internalization-dependent signaling mechanisms. Here, we report that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response of CRHR1 in physiologically relevant scenarios engages separate cAMP sources, involving the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). cAMP produced by tmACs and sAC is required for the acute phase of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 activation triggered by CRH-stimulated CRHR1, but only sAC activity is essential for the sustained internalization-dependent phase. Thus, different cAMP sources are involved in different signaling mechanisms. Examination of the cAMP response revealed that CRH-activated CRHR1 generates cAMP after endocytosis. Characterizing CRHR1 signaling uncovered a specific link between CRH-activated CRHR1, sAC, and endosome-based signaling. We provide evidence of sAC being involved in an endocytosis-dependent cAMP response, strengthening the emerging model of GPCR signaling in which the cAMP response does not occur exclusively at the plasma membrane and introducing the notion of sAC as an alternative source of cAMP. © 2016 Inda et al.

  6. The effect of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) on tenderness, microstructure and chemical-physical index of duck breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daoying; Deng, Shaoying; Zhang, Muhan; Geng, Zhiming; Sun, Chong; Bian, Huan; Xu, Weimin; Zhu, Yongzhi; Liu, Fang; Wu, Haihong

    2016-03-30

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) is often used in meat and poultry soups as a flavor enhancer (flavor modifier), or as food additives for specific nutritional purposes. Our previous research as well as evidence from others showed that actomyosin could be dissociated into myosin and actin by AMP in extracted muscle solution. However, there is no report available on the application of AMP to dissociate actomyosin and to improve meat tenderness. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of AMP on duck meat tenderness and other quality traits and to explore the mechanism of the action of AMP on meat tenderness. Duck breast muscle was treated with 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 mmol L(-1) AMP at 5 °C for 10 h and examined for shear force, microstructure, actomyosin dissociation, myofibril fragmentation index (MFI), pH, water content, cooking loss, CIE* color (L*, a*, b*), inosine monophosphate (IMP) and free amino acid (FAA) contents. Results showed that shear force, cooking loss, L* and b* of the muscles significantly decreased after AMP treatment (P 0.05), and muscle shrinkage in transverse and longitudinal directions were restrained after AMP treatment. The results suggest that AMP could notably improve meat tenderness, and this effect was probably mainly through increasing muscle pH, promoting actomyosin dissociation and disrupting the Z-line; meanwhile, the conversion of AMP to IMP may contribute to the flavor of meat. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Relationship between 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-ribotide and AMP-activated protein kinase activity in the perfused mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Frederich, Markus; He, Huamei; Balschi, James A

    2006-03-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor whose activity responds to AMP concentration ([AMP]). An agent that activates AMPK in cells is 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-riboside (AICA-riboside). Phosphorylated AICA-riboside or AICA-ribotide (ZMP) is an AMP analog. It is generally assumed that ZMP accumulation does not alter [AMP]. Additionally, the effect of AICA-riboside on AMPK activity of the heart is uncertain. Two hypotheses were tested in the isolated mouse heart: 1) sufficient ZMP concentration ([ZMP]) forms to increase AMPK activity, and 2) [ZMP] accumulation increases [AMP]. Perfusion of isolated mouse hearts with Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing 0.15-2 mM AICA-riboside concentration resulted in [ZMP] of 2-8 mM. ZMP accumulation reduced phosphocreatine concentration, which increased cytosolic [AMP]. In hearts with [ZMP] less than approximately 3 mM, in vivo AMPK allosteric activity effects of ZMP were observed; AMPK phosphorylation and [AMP] were not increased. With [ZMP] between 3 and 5 mM, in vitro AMPK activity and phosphorylation increased with unchanged [AMP]. This occurred in hearts perfused with 0.25 mM AICA-riboside for 48 min and 0.5 mM AICA-riboside for 24 min. The [ZMP] resulting in 50% AMPK activity (covalent phosphorylation of AMPK) was 4.1 +/- 0.6 mM. Hearts with [ZMP] >5 mM displayed increased [AMP] and AMPK activity that was not different from hearts with similar [AMP] with no [ZMP]; the half-maximal activity of AMP was 5.6 +/- 1.6 microM. Thus, in mouse hearts, AICA-riboside was metabolized to [ZMP] adequately to increase AMPK activity. Higher [ZMP] also increased cytosolic [AMP], which affects AMPK activity.

  8. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Isolated Schwann cells (SCs) respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1). To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC) activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC), a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the uncoupling of signals

  9. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available Isolated Schwann cells (SCs respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1. To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC, a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the

  10. Control of cell volume in the J774 macrophage by microtubule disassembly and cyclic AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melmed, RN; Karanian, PJ; Berlin, RD

    1981-01-01

    We have explored the possibilities that cell volume is regulated by the status of microtubule assembly and cyclic AMP metabolism and may be coordinated with shape change. Treatment of J774.2 mouse macrophages with colchicine caused rapid microtubule disassembly and was associated with a striking increase (from 15-20 to more than 90 percent) in the proportion of cells with a large protuberance at one pole. This provided a simple experimental system in which shape changes occurred in virtually an entire cell population in suspension. Parallel changes in cell volume could then be quantified by isotope dilution techniques. We found that the shape change caused by colchicine was accompanied by a decrease in cell volume of approximately 20 percent. Nocodozole, but not lumicolchicine, caused identical changes in both cell shape and cell volume. The volume loss was not due to cell lysis nor to inhibition of pinocytosis. The mechanism of volume loss was also examined. Colchicine induced a small but reproducible increase in activity of the ouabain-sensitive Na(+), K(+)-dependent ATPase. However, inhibition of this enzyme/transport system by ouabain did not change cell volume nor did it block the colchicines-induced decrease in volume. One the other hand, SITS (4’acetamido, 4-isothiocyano 2,2’ disulfonic acid stilbene), an inhibitor of anion transport, inhibited the effects of colchicines, thus suggesting a role for an anion transport system in cell volume regulation. Because colchicine is known to activate adenylate cyclase in several systems and because cell shape changes are often induced by hormones that elevate cyclic AMP, we also examined the effects of cyclic AMP on cell volume. Agents that act to increase syclic AMP (cholera toxin, which activates adenylate cyclase; IBMX, and inhibitor of phosphodiesterase; and dibutyryl cyclic AMP) all caused a volume decrease comparable to that of colchicine. To define the effective metabolic pathway, we studied two mutants of J

  11. Preserved cardiac function despite marked impairment of cAMP generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Hua Gao

    Full Text Available So many clinical trials of positive inotropes have failed, that it is now axiomatic that agents that increase cAMP are deleterious to the failing heart. An alternative strategy is to alter myocardial Ca(2+ handling or myofilament response to Ca(2+ using agents that do not affect cAMP. Although left ventricular (LV function is tightly linked to adenylyl cyclase (AC activity, the beneficial effects of AC may be independent of cAMP and instead stem from effects on Ca(2+ handling. Here we ask whether an AC mutant molecule that reduces LV cAMP production would have favorable effects on LV function through its effects on Ca(2+ handling alone.We generated transgenic mice with cardiac-directed expression of an AC6 mutant (AC6mut. Cardiac myocytes showed impaired cAMP production in response to isoproterenol (74% reduction; p<0.001, but LV size and function were normal. Isolated hearts showed preserved LV function in response to isoproterenol stimulation. AC6mut expression was associated with increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ uptake and the EC50 for SERCA2a activation was reduced. Cardiac myocytes isolated from AC6mut mice showed increased amplitude of Ca(2+ transients in response to isoproterenol (p = 0.0001. AC6mut expression also was associated with increased expression of LV S100A1 (p = 0.03 and reduced expression of phospholamban protein (p = 0.01.LV AC mutant expression is associated with normal cardiac function despite impaired cAMP generation. The mechanism appears to be through effects on Ca(2+ handling - effects that occur despite diminished cAMP.

  12. Biochemical characterization and cellular imaging of a novel, membrane permeable fluorescent cAMP analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaccolo Manuela

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A novel fluorescent cAMP analog (8-[Pharos-575]- adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate was characterized with respect to its spectral properties, its ability to bind to and activate three main isoenzymes of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA-Iα, PKA-IIα, PKA-IIβ in vitro, its stability towards phosphodiesterase and its ability to permeate into cultured eukaryotic cells using resonance energy transfer based indicators, and conventional fluorescence imaging. Results The Pharos fluorophore is characterized by a Stokes shift of 42 nm with an absorption maximum at 575 nm and the emission peaking at 617 nm. The quantum yield is 30%. Incubation of the compound to RIIα and RIIβ subunits increases the amplitude of excitation and absorption maxima significantly; no major change was observed with RIα. In vitro binding of the compound to RIα subunit and activation of the PKA-Iα holoenzyme was essentially equivalent to cAMP; RII subunits bound the fluorescent analog up to ten times less efficiently, resulting in about two times reduced apparent activation constants of the holoenzymes compared to cAMP. The cellular uptake of the fluorescent analog was investigated by cAMP indicators. It was estimated that about 7 μM of the fluorescent cAMP analog is available to the indicator after one hour of incubation and that about 600 μM of the compound had to be added to intact cells to half-maximally dissociate a PKA type IIα sensor. Conclusion The novel analog combines good membrane permeability- comparable to 8-Br-cAMP – with superior spectral properties of a modern, red-shifted fluorophore. GFP-tagged regulatory subunits of PKA and the analog co-localized. Furthermore, it is a potent, PDE-resistant activator of PKA-I and -II, suitable for in vitro applications and spatial distribution evaluations in living cells.

  13. Photosensitized electron transfer within a self-assembled norharmane-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-monophosphate (dAMP) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, M Micaela; Rasse-Suriani, Federico A O; Franca, Carlos A; Diez, Reinaldo Pis; Gholipour, Yousef; Nonami, Hiroshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Cabrerizo, Franco M

    2012-12-21

    Norharmane is a compound that belongs to a family of alkaloids called β-carbolines (βCs). These alkaloids are present in a wide range of biological systems, playing a variety of significant photo-dependent roles. Upon UV-A irradiation, βCs are able to act as efficient photosensitizers. In this work, we have investigated the photosensitized oxidation of 2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-monophosphate (dAMP) by norharmane in an aqueous phase, upon UV-A (350 nm) irradiation. The effect of the pH was evaluated on both the interactions between norharmane and dAMP in the ground and electronic excited states, and on the dAMP photosensitized oxidation. A quite strong static interaction between norharmane and dAMP was observed, especially under those pH conditions where the protonated form of the alkaloid is present (pH dAMP complex is the operative mechanism in the dAMP photosensitization.

  14. FRET biosensor uncovers cAMP nano-domains at ?-adrenergic targets that dictate precise tuning of cardiac contractility

    OpenAIRE

    Surdo, Nicoletta C.; Berrera, Marco; Koschinski, Andreas; Brescia, Marcella; Machado, Matias R.; Carr, Carolyn; Wright, Peter; Gorelik, Julia; Morotti, Stefano; Grandi, Eleonora; Bers, Donald M.; Pantano, Sergio; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Compartmentalized cAMP/PKA signalling is now recognized as important for physiology and pathophysiology, yet a detailed understanding of the properties, regulation and function of local cAMP/PKA signals is lacking. Here we present a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensor, CUTie, which detects compartmentalized cAMP with unprecedented accuracy. CUTie, targeted to specific multiprotein complexes at discrete plasmalemmal, sarcoplasmic reticular and myofilament sites, reveals ...

  15. The Cyclic AMP-Vfr Signaling Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Inhibited by Cyclic Di-GMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almblad, Henrik; Harrison, Joe J; Rybtke, Morten

    2015-01-01

    : Our work suggests that cross talk between c-di-GMP and cAMP signaling pathways results in downregulation of acute virulence factors in P. aeruginosa biofilm infections. Knowledge about this cross-regulation adds to our understanding of virulence traits and immune evasion by P. aeruginosa in chronic......AMP), which is decreased in response to a high level of c-di-GMP. Mutations that cause reversion of the RSCV phenotype concomitantly reactivate Vfr-cAMP signaling. Attempts to uncover the mechanism underlying the observed c-di-GMP-mediated lowering of cAMP content provided evidence that it is not caused...

  16. Effect of cholera toxin on cAMP levels and Na/sup +/ influx in isolated intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, C.S.; Kimmich, G.A.

    1982-09-01

    Freshly isolated chicken intestinal cells contain approximately 20 pmol adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/mg cellular protein. Incubation with 3 ..mu..g/ml cholera toxin (CT) at 37/sup 0/C induces an elevation of cellular cAMP beginning 10-15 min after initial exposure. The response is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eightfold increase over control levels at steady state. Dibutyryl cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Na/sup +/ influx into the isolated enterocytes. Chlorpromazine completely abolishes the toxin-induced elevation of cAMP in the isolated cells and also reverses the effect on Na/sup +/ entry. The data provide evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal cell Na/sup +/ uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na/sup +/ during induction of intestinal secretory activity. Studies on the time-dependent effects of chlorpromazine on both intracellular cAMP concentration and Na/sup +/ influx suggest that the reactivation of the Na/sup +/ transport system after cAMP-induced inhibition is slow relative to the disappearance of cAMP.

  17. Different cAMP sources are critically involved in G protein?coupled receptor CRHR1 signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Inda, Carolina; dos Santos Claro, Paula A.; Bonfiglio, Juan J.; Senin, Sergio A.; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W.; Silberstein, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates G protein-dependent and internalization-dependent signaling mechanisms. Here, we report that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response of CRHR1 in physiologically relevant scenarios engages separate cAMP sources, involving the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). cAMP produced by tmACs and sAC is required for the acute phase of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 activation trigg...

  18. Effect of cholera toxin on cAMP levels and Na+ influx in isolated intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.S.; Kimmich, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Freshly isolated chicken intestinal cells contain approximately 20 pmol adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/mg cellular protein. Incubation with 3 μg/ml cholera toxin (CT) at 37 0 C induces an elevation of cellular cAMP beginning 10-15 min after initial exposure. The response is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eightfold increase over control levels at steady state. Dibutyryl cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Na + influx into the isolated enterocytes. Chlorpromazine completely abolishes the toxin-induced elevation of cAMP in the isolated cells and also reverses the effect on Na + entry. The data provide evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal cell Na + uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na + during induction of intestinal secretory activity. Studies on the time-dependent effects of chlorpromazine on both intracellular cAMP concentration and Na + influx suggest that the reactivation of the Na + transport system after cAMP-induced inhibition is slow relative to the disappearance of cAMP

  19. Adenylate Kinase and AMP Signaling Networks: Metabolic Monitoring, Signal Communication and Body Energy Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Terzic

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Adenylate kinase and downstream AMP signaling is an integrated metabolic monitoring system which reads the cellular energy state in order to tune and report signals to metabolic sensors. A network of adenylate kinase isoforms (AK1-AK7 are distributed throughout intracellular compartments, interstitial space and body fluids to regulate energetic and metabolic signaling circuits, securing efficient cell energy economy, signal communication and stress response. The dynamics of adenylate kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer regulates multiple intracellular and extracellular energy-dependent and nucleotide signaling processes, including excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, cell and ciliary motility, nuclear transport, energetics of cell cycle, DNA synthesis and repair, and developmental programming. Metabolomic analyses indicate that cellular, interstitial and blood AMP levels are potential metabolic signals associated with vital functions including body energy sensing, sleep, hibernation and food intake. Either low or excess AMP signaling has been linked to human disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recent studies indicate that derangements in adenylate kinase-mediated energetic signaling due to mutations in AK1, AK2 or AK7 isoforms are associated with hemolytic anemia, reticular dysgenesis and ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, hormonal, food and antidiabetic drug actions are frequently coupled to alterations of cellular AMP levels and associated signaling. Thus, by monitoring energy state and generating and distributing AMP metabolic signals adenylate kinase represents a unique hub within the cellular homeostatic network.

  20. Rac1 controls Schwann cell myelination through cAMP and NF2/merlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Moon, Chandra; Niehaus, Karen; Zheng, Yi; Ratner, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    During peripheral nervous system development, Schwann cells (SCs) surrounding single large axons differentiate into myelinating SCs. Previous studies implicate RhoGTPases in SC myelination, but the mechanisms involved in RhoGTPase regulation of SC myelination are unknown. Here, we show that SC myelination is arrested in Rac1 conditional knockout (Rac1-CKO) mice. Rac1 knockout abrogated phosphorylation of the effector p21-activated kinase (PAK) and decreased NF2/merlin phosphorylation. Mutation of NF2/merlin rescued the myelin deficit in Rac1-CKO mice in vivo, and the shortened processes in cultured Rac1-CKO SCs in vitro. Mechanistically, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and E-cadherin expression were decreased in the absence of Rac1, and both were restored by mutation of NF2/merlin. Reduced cAMP is a cause of the myelin deficiency in Rac1-CKO mice, as elevation of cAMP by rolipram in Rac1-CKO mice in vivo allowed myelin formation. Thus NF2/merlin and cAMP function downstream of Rac1 signaling in SC myelination, and cAMP levels control Rac1-regulated SC myelination. PMID:23197717

  1. AMP and adenosine are both ligands for adenosine 2B receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holien, Jessica K; Seibt, Benjamin; Roberts, Veena; Salvaris, Evelyn; Parker, Michael W; Cowan, Peter J; Dwyer, Karen M

    2018-01-15

    Adenosine is considered the canonical ligand for the adenosine 2B receptor (A 2B R). A 2B R is upregulated following kidney ischemia augmenting post ischemic blood flow and limiting tubular injury. In this context the beneficial effect of A 2B R signaling has been attributed to an increase in the pericellular concentration of adenosine. However, following renal ischemia both kidney adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and adenosine levels are substantially increased. Using computational modeling and calcium mobilization assays, we investigated whether AMP could also be a ligand for A 2B R. The computational modeling suggested that AMP interacts with more favorable energy to A 2B R compared with adenosine. Furthermore, AMPαS, a non-hydrolyzable form of AMP, increased calcium uptake by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the human A 2B R, indicating preferential signaling via the G q pathway. Therefore, a putative AMP-A 2B R interaction is supported by the computational modeling data and the biological results suggest this interaction involves preferential G q activation. These data provide further insights into the role of purinergic signaling in the pathophysiology of renal IRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential regulation by AMP and ADP of AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Fiona A; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Hardie, D Grahame

    2016-01-01

    The g subunits of heterotrimeric AMPK complexes contain the binding sites for the regulatory adenine nucleotides AMP, ADP and ATP. We addressed whether complexes containing different g isoforms display different responses to adenine nucleotides by generating cells stably expressing FLAG-tagged ve......The g subunits of heterotrimeric AMPK complexes contain the binding sites for the regulatory adenine nucleotides AMP, ADP and ATP. We addressed whether complexes containing different g isoforms display different responses to adenine nucleotides by generating cells stably expressing FLAG......-tagged versions of the g1, g2 or g3 isoform. When assayed at a physiological ATP concentration (5 mM), g1- and g2-containing complexes were allosterically activated almost 10-fold by AMP, with EC50 values one to two orders of magnitude lower than the ATP concentration. By contrast, g3 complexes were barely...... activated by AMP under these conditions, although we did observe some activation at lower ATP concentrations. Despite this, all three complexes were activated, due to increased Thr172 phosphorylation, when cells were incubated with mitochondrial inhibitors that increase cellular AMP. With g1 complexes...

  3. Neurological basis of AMP-dependent thermoregulation and its relevance to central and peripheral hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzi, Mirko; Blasi, Francesco; Masi, Alessio; Coppi, Elisabetta; Traini, Chiara; Felici, Roberta; Pittelli, Maria; Cavone, Leonardo; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Moroni, Flavio; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is of relevance to treatment of increased body temperature and brain injury, but drugs inducing selective, rapid, and safe cooling in humans are not available. Here, we show that injections of adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), an endogenous nucleotide, promptly triggers hypothermia in mice by directly activating adenosine A1 receptors (A1R) within the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus. Inhibition of constitutive degradation of brain extracellular AMP by targeting ecto 5′-nucleotidase, also suffices to prompt hypothermia in rodents. Accordingly, sensitivity of mice and rats to the hypothermic effect of AMP is inversely related to their hypothalamic 5′-nucleotidase activity. Single-cell electrophysiological recording indicates that AMP reduces spontaneous firing activity of temperature-insensitive neurons of the mouse POA, thereby retuning the hypothalamic thermoregulatory set point towards lower temperatures. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate also suppresses prostaglandin E2-induced fever in mice, having no effects on peripheral hyperthermia triggered by dioxymetamphetamine (ecstasy) overdose. Together, data disclose the role of AMP, 5′-nucleotidase, and A1R in hypothalamic thermoregulation, as well and their therapeutic relevance to treatment of febrile illness. PMID:23093068

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpR: an acute–chronic switch regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most intractable human pathogens that pose serious clinical challenge due to extensive prevalence of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates. Armed with abundant virulence and antibiotic resistance mechanisms, it is a major etiologic agent in a number of acute and chronic infections. A complex and intricate network of regulators dictates the expression of pathogenicity factors in P. aeruginosa. Some proteins within the network play key roles and control multiple pathways. This review discusses the role of one such protein, AmpR, which was initially recognized for its role in antibiotic resistance by regulating AmpC β-lactamase. Recent genomic, proteomic and phenotypic analyses demonstrate that AmpR regulates expression of hundreds of genes that are involved in diverse pathways such as β-lactam and non-β-lactam resistance, quorum sensing and associated virulence phenotypes, protein phosphorylation, and physiological processes. Finally, ampR mutations in clinical isolates are reviewed to shed light on important residues required for its function in antibiotic resistance. The prevalence and evolutionary implications of AmpR in pathogenic and nonpathogenic proteobacteria are also discussed. A comprehensive understanding of proteins at nodal positions in the P. aeruginosa regulatory network is crucial in understanding, and ultimately targeting, the pathogenic stratagems of this organism. PMID:25066236

  5. Cyclic AMP Pathway Activation and Extracellular Zinc Induce Rapid Intracellular Zinc Mobilization in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellerup, Lasse; Winther, Anne-Marie L.; Wilson, Duncan; Fuglsang, Anja T.

    2018-01-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient, required for a range of zinc-dependent enzymes and transcription factors. In mammalian cells, zinc serves as a second messenger molecule. However, a role for zinc in signaling has not yet been established in the fungal kingdom. Here, we used the intracellular zinc reporter, zinbo-5, which allowed visualization of zinc in the endoplasmic reticulum and other components of the internal membrane system in Candida albicans. We provide evidence for a link between cyclic AMP/PKA- and zinc-signaling in this major human fungal pathogen. Glucose stimulation, which triggers a cyclic AMP spike in this fungus resulted in rapid intracellular zinc mobilization and this “zinc flux” could be stimulated with phosphodiesterase inhibitors and blocked via inhibition of adenylate cyclase or PKA. A similar mobilization of intracellular zinc was generated by stimulation of cells with extracellular zinc and this effect could be reversed with the chelator EDTA. However, zinc-induced zinc flux was found to be cyclic AMP independent. In summary, we show that activation of the cyclic AMP/PKA pathway triggers intracellular zinc mobilization in a fungus. To our knowledge, this is the first described link between cyclic AMP signaling and zinc homeostasis in a human fungal pathogen. PMID:29619016

  6. Cesium absorption from acidic solutions using ammonium molybdophosphate on a polyacrylonitrile support (AMP-PAN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.J.; Olson, A.L.; Johnson, C.K.

    1995-01-01

    Recent efforts at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) have included evaluation of cesium removal technologies as applied to ICPP acidic radioactive waste streams. Ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) immobilized on a polyacrylonitrile support (AMP-PAN) has been studied as an ion exchange agent for cesium removal from acidic waste solutions. Capacities, distribution coefficients, elutability, and kinetics of cesium-extraction have been evaluated. Exchange breakthrough curves using small columns have been determined from 1M HNO 3 and simulated waste solutions. The theoretical capacity of AMP is 213 g Cs/kg AMP. The average experimental capacity in batch contacts with various acidic solutions was 150 g Cs/kg AMP. The measured cesium distribution coefficients from actual waste solutions were 3287 mL/g for dissolved zirconia calcines, and 2679 mL/g for sodium-bearing waste. The cesium in the dissolved alumina calcines was analyzed for; however, the concentration was below analytical detectable limits resulting in inconclusive results. The reaction kinetics are very rapid (2-10 minutes). Cesium absorption appears to be independent of acid concentration over the range tested (0.1 M to 5 M HNO 3 )

  7. Proteomic signatures implicate cAMP in light and temperature responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Thomas, Ludivine

    2013-05-01

    The second messenger 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, are increasingly recognized as important signaling molecules in a number of physiological responses in higher plants. Here we used proteomics to identify cAMP-dependent protein signatures in Arabidopsis thaliana and identify a number of differentially expressed proteins with a role in light- and temperature-dependent responses, notably photosystem II subunit P-1, plasma membrane associated cation-binding protein and chaperonin 60 β. Based on these proteomics results we conclude that, much like in cyanobacteria, algae and fungi, cAMP may have a role in light signaling and the regulation of photosynthesis as well as responses to temperature and we speculate that ACs could act as light and/or temperature sensors in higher plants. Biological significance: This current study is significant since it presents the first proteomic response to cAMP, a novel and key second messenger in plants. It will be relevant to researchers in plant physiology and in particular those with an interest in second messengers and their role in biotic and abiotic stress responses. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  8. cAMP signaling in skeletal muscle adaptation: hypertrophy, metabolism, and regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Randi

    2012-01-01

    Among organ systems, skeletal muscle is perhaps the most structurally specialized. The remarkable subcellular architecture of this tissue allows it to empower movement with instructions from motor neurons. Despite this high degree of specialization, skeletal muscle also has intrinsic signaling mechanisms that allow adaptation to long-term changes in demand and regeneration after acute damage. The second messenger adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) not only elicits acute changes within myofibers during exercise but also contributes to myofiber size and metabolic phenotype in the long term. Strikingly, sustained activation of cAMP signaling leads to pronounced hypertrophic responses in skeletal myofibers through largely elusive molecular mechanisms. These pathways can promote hypertrophy and combat atrophy in animal models of disorders including muscular dystrophy, age-related atrophy, denervation injury, disuse atrophy, cancer cachexia, and sepsis. cAMP also participates in muscle development and regeneration mediated by muscle precursor cells; thus, downstream signaling pathways may potentially be harnessed to promote muscle regeneration in patients with acute damage or muscular dystrophy. In this review, we summarize studies implicating cAMP signaling in skeletal muscle adaptation. We also highlight ligands that induce cAMP signaling and downstream effectors that are promising pharmacological targets. PMID:22354781

  9. cAMP signaling in skeletal muscle adaptation: hypertrophy, metabolism, and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdeaux, Rebecca; Stewart, Randi

    2012-07-01

    Among organ systems, skeletal muscle is perhaps the most structurally specialized. The remarkable subcellular architecture of this tissue allows it to empower movement with instructions from motor neurons. Despite this high degree of specialization, skeletal muscle also has intrinsic signaling mechanisms that allow adaptation to long-term changes in demand and regeneration after acute damage. The second messenger adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) not only elicits acute changes within myofibers during exercise but also contributes to myofiber size and metabolic phenotype in the long term. Strikingly, sustained activation of cAMP signaling leads to pronounced hypertrophic responses in skeletal myofibers through largely elusive molecular mechanisms. These pathways can promote hypertrophy and combat atrophy in animal models of disorders including muscular dystrophy, age-related atrophy, denervation injury, disuse atrophy, cancer cachexia, and sepsis. cAMP also participates in muscle development and regeneration mediated by muscle precursor cells; thus, downstream signaling pathways may potentially be harnessed to promote muscle regeneration in patients with acute damage or muscular dystrophy. In this review, we summarize studies implicating cAMP signaling in skeletal muscle adaptation. We also highlight ligands that induce cAMP signaling and downstream effectors that are promising pharmacological targets.

  10. Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Pyrene by Biosurfactant-Producing Bacteria Gordonia cholesterolivorans AMP 10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Handayani Kurniati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrene degradation and biosurfactant activity by a new strain identified as Gordonia cholesterolivorans AMP 10 were studied. The strain grew well and produced effective biosurfactants in the presence of glucose, sucrose, and crude oil. The biosurfactants production was detected by the decreased surface tension of the medium and emulsification activity.  Analysis of microbial growth parameters showed that AMP10 grew best at 50 µg mL-1 pyrene concentration, leading to 96 % degradation of pyrene within 7 days. The result of nested PCR analysis revealed that this isolate possessed the nahAc gene which encodes dioxygenase enzyme for initial degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH. Observation of both tensio-active and emulsifying activities indicated that biosurfactants which produced by AMP 10 when grown on glucose could lower the surface tension of medium from 71.3 mN/m to 24.7 mN/m and formed a stable emulsion in used lubricant oil with an emulsification index (E24 of 74%. According to the results, it is suggested that the bacterial isolates G. cholesterolivorans AMP10 are suitable candidates for bioremediation of PAH-contaminated environments.How to CiteKurniati, T. H.,  Rusmana, I. Suryani, A. & Mubarik, N. R. (2016. Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Pyrene by Biosurfactant-Producing Bacteria Gordonia cholesterolivorans AMP 10. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(3, 336-343. 

  11. cAMP level modulates scleral collagen remodeling, a critical step in the development of myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijin Tao

    Full Text Available The development of myopia is associated with decreased ocular scleral collagen synthesis in humans and animal models. Collagen synthesis is, in part, under the influence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP. We investigated the associations between cAMP, myopia development in guinea pigs, and collagen synthesis by human scleral fibroblasts (HSFs. Form-deprived myopia (FDM was induced by unilateral masking of guinea pig eyes. Scleral cAMP levels increased selectively in the FDM eyes and returned to normal levels after unmasking and recovery. Unilateral subconjunctival treatment with the adenylyl cyclase (AC activator forskolin resulted in a myopic shift accompanied by reduced collagen mRNA levels, but it did not affect retinal electroretinograms. The AC inhibitor SQ22536 attenuated the progression of FDM. Moreover, forskolin inhibited collagen mRNA levels and collagen secretion by HSFs. The inhibition was reversed by SQ22536. These results demonstrate a critical role of cAMP in control of myopia development. Selective regulation of cAMP to control scleral collagen synthesis may be a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing and treating myopia.

  12. Improved molecular toolkit for cAMP studies in live cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicol Xavier

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background cAMP is a ubiquitous second messenger involved in a wide spectrum of cellular processes including gene transcription, cell proliferation, and axonal pathfinding. Precise spatiotemporal manipulation and monitoring in live cells are crucial for investigation of cAMP-dependent pathways, but existing tools have several limitations. Findings We have improved the suitability of cAMP manipulating and monitoring tools for live cell imaging. We attached a red fluorescent tag to photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PACα that enables reliable visualization of this optogenetic tool for cAMP manipulation in target cells independently of its photoactivation. We show that replacement of CFP/YFP FRET pair with GFP/mCherry in the Epac2-camps FRET probe reduces photobleaching and stabilizes the noise level during imaging experiments. Conclusions The modifications of PACα and Epac2-camps enhance these tools for in vitro cAMP studies in cultured living cells and in vivo studies in live animals in a wide range of experiments, and particularly for long term time-lapse imaging.

  13. cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase (PKA) Signaling Is Impaired in the Diabetic Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockus, Lee B; Humphries, Kenneth M

    2015-12-04

    Diabetes mellitus causes cardiac dysfunction and heart failure that is associated with metabolic abnormalities and autonomic impairment. Autonomic control of ventricular function occurs through regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The diabetic heart has suppressed β-adrenergic responsiveness, partly attributable to receptor changes, yet little is known about how PKA signaling is directly affected. Control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were therefore administered 8-bromo-cAMP (8Br-cAMP) acutely to activate PKA in a receptor-independent manner, and cardiac hemodynamic function and PKA signaling were evaluated. In response to 8Br-cAMP treatment, diabetic mice had impaired inotropic and lusitropic responses, thus demonstrating postreceptor defects. This impaired signaling was mediated by reduced PKA activity and PKA catalytic subunit content in the cytoplasm and myofilaments. Compartment-specific loss of PKA was reflected by reduced phosphorylation of discrete substrates. In response to 8Br-cAMP treatment, the glycolytic activator PFK-2 was robustly phosphorylated in control animals but not diabetics. Control adult cardiomyocytes cultured in lipid-supplemented media developed similar changes in PKA signaling, suggesting that lipotoxicity is a contributor to diabetes-induced β-adrenergic signaling dysfunction. This work demonstrates that PKA signaling is impaired in diabetes and suggests that treating hyperlipidemia is vital for proper cardiac signaling and function. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Mitochondrial cAMP-PKA signaling: What do we really know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ould Amer, Yasmine; Hebert-Chatelain, Etienne

    2018-04-23

    Mitochondria are key organelles for cellular homeostasis. They generate the most part of ATP that is used by cells through oxidative phosphorylation. They also produce reactive oxygen species, neurotransmitters and other signaling molecules. They are important for calcium homeostasis and apoptosis. Considering the role of this organelle, it is not surprising that most mitochondrial dysfunctions are linked to the development of pathologies. Various mechanisms adjust mitochondrial activity according to physiological needs. The cAMP-PKA signaling emerged in recent years as a direct and powerful mean to regulate mitochondrial functions. Multiple evidence demonstrates that such pathway can be triggered from cytosol or directly within mitochondria. Notably, specific anchor proteins target PKA to mitochondria whereas enzymes necessary for generation and degradation of cAMP are found directly in these organelles. Mitochondrial PKA targets proteins localized in different compartments of mitochondria, and related to various functions. Alterations of mitochondrial cAMP-PKA signaling affect the development of several physiopathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases. It is however difficult to discriminate between the effects of cAMP-PKA signaling triggered from cytosol or directly in mitochondria. The specific roles of PKA localized in different mitochondrial compartments are also not completely understood. The aim of this work is to review the role of cAMP-PKA signaling in mitochondrial (patho)physiology. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase (PKA) Signaling Is Impaired in the Diabetic Heart*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockus, Lee B.; Humphries, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus causes cardiac dysfunction and heart failure that is associated with metabolic abnormalities and autonomic impairment. Autonomic control of ventricular function occurs through regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The diabetic heart has suppressed β-adrenergic responsiveness, partly attributable to receptor changes, yet little is known about how PKA signaling is directly affected. Control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were therefore administered 8-bromo-cAMP (8Br-cAMP) acutely to activate PKA in a receptor-independent manner, and cardiac hemodynamic function and PKA signaling were evaluated. In response to 8Br-cAMP treatment, diabetic mice had impaired inotropic and lusitropic responses, thus demonstrating postreceptor defects. This impaired signaling was mediated by reduced PKA activity and PKA catalytic subunit content in the cytoplasm and myofilaments. Compartment-specific loss of PKA was reflected by reduced phosphorylation of discrete substrates. In response to 8Br-cAMP treatment, the glycolytic activator PFK-2 was robustly phosphorylated in control animals but not diabetics. Control adult cardiomyocytes cultured in lipid-supplemented media developed similar changes in PKA signaling, suggesting that lipotoxicity is a contributor to diabetes-induced β-adrenergic signaling dysfunction. This work demonstrates that PKA signaling is impaired in diabetes and suggests that treating hyperlipidemia is vital for proper cardiac signaling and function. PMID:26468277

  16. Renal Epithelial Cyst Formation and Enlargement in vitro: Dependence on cAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangoo-Karim, Roberto; Uchic, Marie; Lechene, Claude; Grantham, Jared J.

    1989-08-01

    Cysts, a common abnormality of kidneys, are collections of urine-like fluid enclosed by a continuous layer of epithelial cells. Renal cysts derive from nephrons and collecting ducts and progressively enlarge as a consequence of epithelial proliferation and transepithelial fluid secretion. The initiation of cyst formation and the factors that control cyst enlargement are unknown. We used an in vitro model of renal cysts to explore the role of the cAMP signal transduction system in the formation and expansion of cysts. MDCK cells, cultured in hydrated-collagen gel, produced polarized monolayered epithelial cysts when intracellular cAMP was increased by prostaglandin E1, arginine vasopressin, cholera toxin, forskolin, or 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. All agonists were potentiated by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitor. The cell proliferation component of cyst enlargement was accelerated by cAMP agonists, as shown by the increased growth of MDCK cells in subconfluent monolayers. The fluid secretion component, reflected by the transepithelial movement of fluid across polarized monolayers of MDCK cells grown on permeable supports, was stimulated by cAMP agonists in the basolateral medium. Chloride levels were higher in the cyst fluid and the secreted fluid than in the bathing medium. We conclude that the development of MDCK cysts is dependent on cAMP. This signal transduction system may be an important modulator of epithelial cell proliferation and transepithelial fluid secretion in the kidney.

  17. Changes in cAMP reception in the cytosol of the developing rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenina, M.N.; Solenov, E.I.; Ivanova, L.N.

    1986-01-01

    The age dynamics of the cAMP-receptor activity of the cytosol of the renal papilla was investigated in intact rats and in animals with an experimentally induced lag in the development of the concentration function of the kidneys as a result of administration of hydrocortisone during the early postnatal period. The nature of the age dynamics of the specific reception of cAMP in the experimental rats was substantially changed in comparison with the intact and control (sham-injected) animals. It is suggested that the decrease in the rates of development of the kidney in the experimental animals is associated with a change in the processes of hormonal regulation of the differentiation of the kidney tissue, in which a definite role is evidently played by the intracellular cAMP receptors as well, or it is due to a weakening of the stimulating action of endogenous cAMP on the function of the genome as a result of a shortage of cAMP receptors in the cell

  18. Microwave assisted coating of bioactive amorphous magnesium phosphate (AMP) on polyetheretherketone (PEEK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yufu; Sikder, Prabaha; Lin, Boren; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2018-04-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) with great thermal and chemical stability, desirable mechanical properties and promising biocompatibility is being widely used as orthopedic and dental implant materials. However, the bioinert surface of PEEK can hinder direct osseointegration between the host tissue and PEEK based implants. The important signatures of this paper are as follows. First, we report for the formation of osseointegrable amorphous magnesium phosphate (AMP) coating on PEEK surface using microwave energy. Second, coatings consist of nano-sized AMP particles with a stacked thickness of 800nm. Third, coatings enhance bioactivity in-vitro and induce significantly high amount of bone-like apatite coating, when soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF). Fourth, the as-deposited AMP coatings present no cytotoxicity effects and are beneficial for cell adhesion at early stage. Finally, the high levels of expression of osteocalcin (OCN) in cells cultured on AMP coated PEEK samples indicate that AMP coatings can promote new bone formation and hence osseointegration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. cAMP-Signalling Regulates Gametocyte-Infected Erythrocyte Deformability Required for Malaria Parasite Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghania Ramdani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Blocking Plasmodium falciparum transmission to mosquitoes has been designated a strategic objective in the global agenda of malaria elimination. Transmission is ensured by gametocyte-infected erythrocytes (GIE that sequester in the bone marrow and at maturation are released into peripheral blood from where they are taken up during a mosquito blood meal. Release into the blood circulation is accompanied by an increase in GIE deformability that allows them to pass through the spleen. Here, we used a microsphere matrix to mimic splenic filtration and investigated the role of cAMP-signalling in regulating GIE deformability. We demonstrated that mature GIE deformability is dependent on reduced cAMP-signalling and on increased phosphodiesterase expression in stage V gametocytes, and that parasite cAMP-dependent kinase activity contributes to the stiffness of immature gametocytes. Importantly, pharmacological agents that raise cAMP levels in transmissible stage V gametocytes render them less deformable and hence less likely to circulate through the spleen. Therefore, phosphodiesterase inhibitors that raise cAMP levels in P. falciparum infected erythrocytes, such as sildenafil, represent new candidate drugs to block transmission of malaria parasites.

  20. Modulation of adhesion-dependent cAMP signaling by echistatin and alendronate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, J. H.; Ingber, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    We measured intracellular cAMP levels in cells during attachment and spreading on different extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Increases in cAMP were observed within minutes when cells attached to fibronectin, vitronectin, and a synthetic RGD-containing fibronectin peptide (Petite 2000), but not when they adhered to another integrin alpha nu beta 3 ligand, echistatin. Because echistatin also inhibits bone resorption, we measured the effects of adding another osteoporosis inhibitor, alendronate, in this system. Alendronate inhibited the cAMP increase induced by ligands that primarily utilize integrin alpha nu beta 3 (vitronectin, Peptite 2000), but not by fibronectin which can also use integrin alpha 5 beta 1. These results show that cell adhesion to ECM can increase intracellular cAPM levels and raise the possibility that inhibitors of osteoporosis may act, in part, by preventing activation of this pathway by integrins.

  1. ChAMP: updated methylation analysis pipeline for Illumina BeadChips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuan; Morris, Tiffany J; Webster, Amy P; Yang, Zhen; Beck, Stephan; Feber, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2017-12-15

    The Illumina Infinium HumanMethylationEPIC BeadChip is the new platform for high-throughput DNA methylation analysis, effectively doubling the coverage compared to the older 450 K array. Here we present a significantly updated and improved version of the Bioconductor package ChAMP, which can be used to analyze EPIC and 450k data. Many enhanced functionalities have been added, including correction for cell-type heterogeneity, network analysis and a series of interactive graphical user interfaces. ChAMP is a BioC package available from https://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/ChAMP.html. a.teschendorff@ucl.ac.uk or s.beck@ucl.ac.uk or a.feber@ucl.ac.uk. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Development of Op-Amp Based Piezoelectric Rectifier for Low Power Energy Harvesting Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syazmie Bin Sepeeh Muhamad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the development of operational amplifier (op-amp based rectifier for piezoelectric energy harvesting applications was studied. The two stage op-amp full wave rectifier was used to convert the AC signal to DC signal voltage received by piezoelectric devices. The inverted half wave rectifier integrated with full wave rectifier were designed and simulated using MultiSIM software. The circuit was then fabricated onto a printed circuit board (PCB, using standard fabrication process. The achievement of this rectifier was able to boost up the maximum voltage of 5 V for input voltage of 800 mV. The output of the rectifier was in DC signal after the rectification by the op-amp. In term of power, the power dissipation was reduced consequently the waste power decreases. Future work includes optimization of the rectifying circuit to operate more efficiently can be made to increase the efficiency of the devices.

  3. Ultraviolet light induction of skin carcinoma in the mouse; influence of cAMP modifying agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajdela, F.; Latarjet, R.

    1978-01-01

    A short review of pathogenic factors in U.V. light skin carcinogenesis in the mouse is presented. Caffeine and theophylline applied locally during U.V. irradiation caused a 50% reduction of skin tumour induction in Swiss mice. These two chemicals are inhibitors of DNA postreplication repair, but they also raise the intracellular level of cyclic AMP by inhibiting cAMP phosphodiesterase with, as a consequence, a possible slowing down of cellular growth. Control experiments using three different chemicals capable of raising the cAMP level in epidermal cells gave negative results. These experimental data are compatible with our original hypothesis according to which production of skin cancers by U.V. radiation is in same way related to DNA repair which helps the cell to survive but allows or favours the occurence of errors in cellular DNA

  4. The effects of Chinese medicines on cAMP/PKA signaling in central nervous system dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Fan, Xiang; Zhang, Xi-Ting; Yue, Shao-Qian; Sun, Zuo-Yan; Zhu, Jin-Qiang; Zhang, Jun-Hua; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Han

    2017-06-01

    Neuropathological injury in the mammalian adult central nervous system (CNS) may cause axon disruption, neuronal death and lasting neurological deficits. Failure of axon regeneration is one of the major challenges for CNS functional recovery. Recently, the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway has been proven to be a critical regulator for neuronal regeneration, neuroplasticity, learning and memory. Also, previous studies have shown the effects of Chinese medicines on the prevention and treatment of CNS dysfunction mediated in part by cAMP/PKA signaling. In this review, the authors discuss current knowledge of the role of cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in neuronal regeneration and provide an overview of the Chinese medicines that may enable CNS functional recovery via this signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. cAMP-dependent signaling regulates the adipogenic effect of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller; Liaset, Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    -adipogenic action of n-6 PUFAs was dependent on a cAMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated induction of cyclooxygenase expression and activity. We show that n-6 PUFAs were pro-adipogenic when combined with a high carbohydrate diet, but non-adipogenic when combined with a high protein diet in mice. The high protein...... diet increased the glucagon/insulin ratio, leading to elevated cAMP-dependent signaling and induction of cyclooxygenase-mediated prostaglandin synthesis. Mice fed the high protein diet had a markedly lower feed efficiency than mice fed the high carbohydrate diet. Yet, oxygen consumption and apparent...... heat production were similar. Mice on a high protein diet had increased hepatic expression of PGC-1alpha (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha) and genes involved in energy-demanding processes like urea synthesis and gluconeogenesis. We conclude that cAMP signaling...

  6. Cyclic AMP synergizes with butyrate in promoting β-defensin 9 expression in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Zeng, Xiangfang; Curtis, Amanda R; Zhang, Guolong

    2014-02-01

    Host defense peptides (HDP) have both microbicidal and immunomodulatory properties. Specific induction of endogenous HDP synthesis has emerged as a novel approach to antimicrobial therapy. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and butyrate have been implicated in HDP induction in humans. However, the role of cAMP signaling and the possible interactions between cAMP and butyrate in regulating HDP expression in other species remain unknown. Here we report that activation of cAMP signaling induces HDP gene expression in chickens as exemplified by β-defensin 9 (AvBD9). We further showed that, albeit being weak inducers, cAMP agonists synergize strongly with butyrate or butyrate analogs in AvBD9 induction in macrophages and primary jejunal explants. Additionally, oral supplementation of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase agonist in the form of a Coleus forskohlii extract, was found to induce AvBD9 expression in the crop of chickens. Furthermore, feeding with both forskolin and butyrate showed an obvious synergy in triggering AvBD9 expression in the crop and jejunum of chickens. Surprisingly, inhibition of the MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway augmented the butyrate-FSK synergy, whereas blocking JNK or p38 MAPK pathway significantly diminished AvBD9 induction in chicken macrophages and jejunal explants in response to butyrate and FSK individually or in combination. Collectively, these results suggest the potential for concomitant use of butyrate and cAMP signaling activators in enhancing HDP expression, innate immunity, and disease resistance in both animals and humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional desensitization to isoproterenol without reducing cAMP production in canine failing cardiocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, C E; Cardinal, R; Rousseau, G; Vermeulen, M; Bouchard, C; Wilkinson, M; Armour, J A; Bouvier, M

    2001-02-01

    To corroborate alterations in the functional responses to beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) stimulation with changes in beta-AR signaling in failing cardiomyocytes, contractile and L-type Ca(2+) current responses to isoproterenol along with stimulated cAMP generation were compared among cardiomyocytes isolated from canines with tachycardia-induced heart failure or healthy hearts. The magnitude of shortening of failing cardiomyocytes was significantly depressed (by 22 +/- 4.4%) under basal conditions, and the maximal response to isoproterenol was significantly reduced (by 45 +/- 18%). Similar results were obtained when the responses in the rate of contraction and rate of relaxation to isoproterenol were considered. The L-type Ca(2+) current amplitude measured in failing cardiomyocytes under basal conditions was unchanged, but the responses to isoproterenol were significantly reduced compared with healthy cells. Isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP generation was similar in sarcolemmal membranes derived from the homogenates of failing (45 +/- 6.8) and healthy cardiomyocytes (52 +/- 8.5 pmol cAMP. mg protein(-1). min(-1)). However, stimulated cAMP generation was found to be significantly reduced when the membranes were derived from the homogenates of whole tissue (failing: 67 +/- 8.1 vs. healthy: 140 +/- 27.8 pmol cAMP. mg protein(-1). min(-1)). Total beta-AR density was not reduced in membranes derived from either whole tissue or isolated cardiomyocyte homogenates, but the beta(1)/beta(2) ratio was significantly reduced in the former (failing: 45/55 vs. healthy: 72/28) without being altered in the latter (failing: 72/28, healthy: 77/23). We thus conclude that, in tachycardia-induced heart failure, reduction in the functional responses of isolated cardiomyocytes to beta-AR stimulation may be attributed to alterations in the excitation-contraction machinery rather than to limitation of cAMP generation.

  8. Immobilization of glucose isomerase onto radiation synthesized P(AA-co-AMPS hydrogel and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kamal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Isomerization of glucose to fructose was carried out using Glucose isomerase (GI that immobilized by entrapment into Poly(acrylic acid P(AA and Poly(acrylic acid-co-2-Acrylamido 2-methyl Propane sulfonic acid P(AA-co-AMPS polymer networks, the enzyme carriers were prepared by radiation induced copolymerization in the presence of (Methylene-bisacrylamide (MBAA as a crosslinking agent. The maximum gel fraction of pure P(AA and P(AA-co-AMPS hydrogel was found to be 95.2% and 89.6% for P(AA and P(AA-co-AMPS, respectively at a total dose of 20 kGy. Effects of immobilization conditions such as radiation dose, MBAA concentration, comonomer composition and amount of GI were investigated. The influence of reaction conditions on the activity of immobilized GI were studied, the optimum pH value of the reaction solution is 7.5 and reaction temperature is 65 °C. The immobilized GI into P(AA-co-AMPS and P(AA polymer networks retained 81% and 69%, respectively of its initial activity after recycled for 15 times while it retained 87% and 71%, respectively of its initial activity after stored at 4 °C for 48 days. The Km values of free and immobilized GI onto P(AA-co-AMPS and onto P(AA matrices were found to be 34, 29.2 and 14.5 mg/mL, respectively while the Vmax Values calculated to be 3.87, 1.6 and 0.79 mg/mL min, respectively. GI entrapped into P(AA-co-AMPS hydrogel show promising behavior that may be useful as the newly glucose isomerase reactor in biomedical applications.

  9. cAMP potentiates InsP3-induced Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in blowfly salivary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walz Bernd

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serotonin induces fluid secretion from Calliphora salivary glands by the parallel activation of the InsP3/Ca2+ and cAMP signaling pathways. We investigated whether cAMP affects 5-HT-induced Ca2+ signaling and InsP3-induced Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Results Increasing intracellular cAMP level by bath application of forskolin, IBMX or cAMP in the continuous presence of threshold 5-HT concentrations converted oscillatory [Ca2+]i changes into a sustained increase. Intraluminal Ca2+ measurements in the ER of β-escin-permeabilized glands with mag-fura-2 revealed that cAMP augmented InsP3-induced Ca2+ release in a concentration-dependent manner. This indicated that cAMP sensitized the InsP3 receptor Ca2+ channel for InsP3. By using cAMP analogs that activated either protein kinase A (PKA or Epac and the application of PKA-inhibitors, we found that cAMP-induced augmentation of InsP3-induced Ca2+ release was mediated by PKA not by Epac. Recordings of the transepithelial potential of the glands suggested that cAMP sensitized the InsP3/Ca2+ signaling pathway for 5-HT, because IBMX potentiated Ca2+-dependent Cl- transport activated by a threshold 5-HT concentration. Conclusion This report shows, for the first time for an insect system, that cAMP can potentiate InsP3-induced Ca2+ release from the ER in a PKA-dependent manner, and that this crosstalk between cAMP and InsP3/Ca2+ signaling pathways enhances transepithelial electrolyte transport.

  10. cAMP biosensors applied in molecular pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a common second messenger that mediates numerous biological responses. Intracellular cAMP levels are increased by activation of G(s)-coupled G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and decreased by activation of G(i)-coupled GPCRs via the adenylyl cyclase. Many...... is characterized in the 384-well plate format and used for measuring the signaling of the G(s)-coupled ß(2)-adrenergic receptor. The procedures described may be applied for other FRET-based biosensors in terms of characterization and conversion to the 384-well plate format....

  11. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Tsong-Long, E-mail: htl@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Tang, Ming-Chi [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Liang-Mou [Department of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Chia-Yi, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wen-De; Chung, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ya-Wen; Fang, Yao-Ching [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-04-15

    Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation.

  12. Biophysical Techniques for Detection of cAMP and cGMP in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav O. Nikolaev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are ubiquitous second messengers which regulate myriads of functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. Their intracellular effects are often mediated via discrete subcellular signaling microdomains. In this review, we will discuss state-of-the-art techniques to measure cAMP and cGMP in biological samples with a particular focus on live cell imaging approaches, which allow their detection with high temporal and spatial resolution in living cells and tissues. Finally, we will describe how these techniques can be applied to the analysis of second messenger dynamics in subcellular signaling microdomains.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis have different beta-lactamase expression phenotypes but are homogeneous in the ampC-ampR genetic region.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, J I; Ciofu, O; Høiby, N

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from 1 of 17 cystic fibrosis patients produced secondary beta-lactamase in addition to the ampC beta-lactamase. Isolates were grouped into three beta-lactamase expression phenotypes: (i) beta-lactam sensitive, low basal levels and inducible beta-lactamase production; (ii) beta-lactam resistant, moderate basal levels and hyperinducible beta-lactamase production; (iii) beta-lactam resistant, high basal levels and constitutive beta-lactamase production. Apart from...

  14. The cAMP phosphodiesterase-4D7 (PDE4D7) is downregulated in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells and mediates proliferation by compartmentalising cAMP at the plasma membrane of VCaP prostate cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.P. Henderson (D. J P); A. Byrne (A.); K. Dulla (K.); G.W. Jenster (Guido); R. Hoffmann (R.); G.S. Baillie (G.); M.D. Houslay (M.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Isoforms of the PDE4 family of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are expressed in a cell type-dependent manner and contribute to underpinning the paradigm of intracellular cAMP signal compartmentalisation. Here we identify the differential regulation of the PDE4D7

  15. Molecular relatedness of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli from humans, animals, food and the enviroment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorado-Garcia, Alejandro; Smid, J.H.; Pelt, Van Wilfrid; Bonten, M.J.M.; Fluit, A.C.; Bunt, van den Gerrita; Wagenaar, J.A.; Hordijk, J.; Dierikx, C.M.; Veldman, K.T.; Koeijer, de A.A.; Dohmen, W.; Schmitt, H.; Liakopoulos, A.; Pacholewicz, Ewa; Lam, T.J.G.M.; Velthuis, Annet; Heuvelink, A.; Gonggrijp, Maaike; Duijkeren, van E.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Roda Husman, de A.N.; Blaak, H.; Havelaar, A.H.; Mevius, D.J.; Heederik, D.J.J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: In recent years, ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli ESBL/AmpC-EC) have been isolated with increasing frequency from animals, food, environmental sources and humans. With incomplete and scattered evidence, the contribution to the human carriage burden from these reservoirs remains

  16. Molecular relatedness of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli from humans, animals, food and the environment : a pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorado-García, Alejandro|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372621023; Smid, Joost H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313996458; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Bonten, Marc J M; Fluit, Ad C; van den Bunt, Gerrita; Wagenaar, Jaap A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126613354; Hordijk, Joost|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314839542; Dierikx, Cindy M; Veldman, Kees T; de Koeijer, Aline; Dohmen, Wietske|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/333690451; Schmitt, Heike|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831042; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Pacholewicz, Ewa; Lam, Theo J G M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/14686820X; Velthuis, Annet G J; Heuvelink, Annet; Gonggrijp, Maaike A; van Duijkeren, Engeline; van Hoek, Angela H A M; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/139498281; Blaak, Hetty; Havelaar, Arie H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072306122; Mevius, Dik J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/079677347; Heederik, Dick J J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542

    Background: In recent years, ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL/AmpC-EC) have been isolated with increasing frequency from animals, food, environmental sources and humans. With incomplete and scattered evidence, the contribution to the human carriage burden from these reservoirs remains

  17. Glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibitor AMP-DNM lowers plasma cholesterol levels by promoting fecal cholesterol excretion without inhibiting cholesterol absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrins, Carlos L. J.; Bietrix, Florence; Lombardo, Elisa; van Roomen, Cindy P. A. A.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Aerts, Johannes M.

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of glycosphingolipid synthesis with iminosugar N-(5'-adamantane-1'-yl-methoxy)-pentyl-1-deoxynojirimycin (AMP-DNM) increases fecal neutral sterol output in mice. To investigate which pathways were involved in this increase, C57BI/6J mice were treated with AMP-DNM and/or ezetimibe. Fecal

  18. A low-offset low-voltage CMOS Op Amp with rail-to-rail input and output ranges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzmann, Peter J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Gierkink, Sander L.J.; Wassenaar, R.F.; Stroet, Peter; Stroet, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    A low voltage CMOS op amp is presented. The circuit uses complementary input pairs to achieve a rail-to-rail common mode input voltage range. Special attention has been given to the reduction of the op amp's systematic offset voltage. Gain boost amplifiers are connected in a special way to provide

  19. High prevalence of fecal carriage of extended spectrum beta-lactamase/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae in cats and dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.; Schoormans, A.; Kwakernaak, M.; Duim, B.; Broens, E.; Dierikx, C.M.; Mevius, D.J.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Extended-spectrum-ß-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC producing Enterobacteriaceae have been reported worldwide amongst isolates obtained from humans, food-producing animals, companion animals, and environmental sources. However, data on prevalence of fecal carriage of ESBL/AmpC producing Enterobacteriaceae in

  20. High prevalence of fecal carriage of extended spectrum β-lactamase/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae in cats and dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, Joost; Schoormans, Anky; Kwakernaak, Mandy; Duim, Birgitta; Broens, Els; Dierikx, Cindy; Mevius, Dik; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2013-01-01

    Extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC producing Enterobacteriaceae have been reported worldwide amongst isolates obtained from humans, food-producing animals, companion animals, and environmental sources. However, data on prevalence of fecal carriage of ESBL/AmpC producing Enterobacteriaceae in

  1. Effect of drugs on lipid methylation, receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling and cyclic AMP secretion in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Waarde, Aren; Van Haastert, P.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Intercellular communication in Dictyostelium discoldeum takes place by means of cyclic AMP-induced cyclic AMP-synthesis and secretion. Since phospholipid methylation has been suggested to play a role in receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling, we examined the effects of transmethylation inhibitors on

  2. ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae in households with children of preschool age : prevalence, risk factors and co-carriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, G.; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Mevius, D J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/079677347; Geurts, Y; Fluit, Ad C; Bonten, Marc J M; Mughini-Gras, L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413306046; van Pelt, W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326056645

    OBJECTIVES: ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae are an emerging public health concern. As households with preschool children may substantially contribute to the community burden of antimicrobial resistance, we determined the prevalence, risk factors and co-carriage of ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria

  3. PDE2A2 regulates mitochondria morphology and apoptotic cell death via local modulation of cAMP/PKA signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterisi, Stefania; Lobo, Miguel J; Livie, Craig; Castle, John C; Weinberger, Michael; Baillie, George; Surdo, Nicoletta C; Musheshe, Nshunge; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Gottlieb, Eyal; Maizels, Rory; Bortolozzi, Mario; Micaroni, Massimo; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2017-05-02

    cAMP/PKA signalling is compartmentalised with tight spatial and temporal control of signal propagation underpinning specificity of response. The cAMP-degrading enzymes, phosphodiesterases (PDEs), localise to specific subcellular domains within which they control local cAMP levels and are key regulators of signal compartmentalisation. Several components of the cAMP/PKA cascade are located to different mitochondrial sub-compartments, suggesting the presence of multiple cAMP/PKA signalling domains within the organelle. The function and regulation of these domains remain largely unknown. Here, we describe a novel cAMP/PKA signalling domain localised at mitochondrial membranes and regulated by PDE2A2. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches combined with real-time FRET imaging and high resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that in rat cardiac myocytes and other cell types mitochondrial PDE2A2 regulates local cAMP levels and PKA-dependent phosphorylation of Drp1. We further demonstrate that inhibition of PDE2A, by enhancing the hormone-dependent cAMP response locally, affects mitochondria dynamics and protects from apoptotic cell death.

  4. The role of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A in bile canalicular plasma membrane biogenesis in hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojtal, Kacper Andrze

    2007-01-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase A is one of the most important enzymes in the eukaryotic cell. The function of this protein is strictly in a close relation to the signaling pathways, which trigger the production of intracellular secondary messenger –cAMP. As a consequence of PKA activation numerous

  5. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in brain is dependent on method of sacrifice and tissue preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Matthew T.; Mackiewicz, Miroslaw; Naidoo, Nirinjini; O'Callaghan, James P.; Pack, Allan I.

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase is activated when the catalytic α subunit is phosphorylated on Thr172 and therefore, phosphorylation of the α subunit is used as a measure of activation. However, measurement of α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in vivo can be technically challenging. To determine the most accurate method for measuring α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in the mouse brain, we compared different methods of sacrifice and tissue preparation. We found that freeze/thawing samples after homogenization on ice dramatically increased α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in mice sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Sacrifice of mice by focused microwave irradiation, which rapidly heats the brain and causes enzymatic inactivation, prevented the freeze/thaw-induced increase in α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and similar levels of phosphorylation were observed compared to mice sacrificed with cervical dislocation without freeze/thawing of samples. Sonication of samples in hot 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate blocked the freeze/thaw-induced increase in α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, but phosphorylation was higher in mice sacrificed by cervical dislocation compared to mice sacrificed by focused microwave irradiation. These results demonstrate that α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation is dependent on method of sacrifice and tissue preparation and that α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation can increase in a manner that does not reflect biological alterations. PMID:18088373

  6. Extended-spectrum-ß-lactamase- and AmpC-ß-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in Dutch broilers and broiler farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierikx, C.M.; Goot, van der J.A.; Fabri, T.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Smith, H.E.; Mevius, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)- and AmpC ß-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli at Dutch broiler farms and in farmers and to compare ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates from farmers and their animals. Methods Twenty-five to 41

  7. Evaluation of different phenotypic methods for detection of amp c beta-lactamase producing bacteria in clinical isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.; Usman, J.; Kalim, F.; Gill, M.M.; Khalid, A.; Iqbal, M.; Ingram, P.

    2013-01-01

    To compare the sensitivity and specificity of different phenotypic methods for detection of Amp C betalactamase producing bacteria. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College / National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad, Pakistan, from June 2010 to December 2010. Methodology: A total of 150 clinical isolates were screened for presence of Amp C beta-lactamase by using the cefoxitin disc. The confirmatory methods evaluated were inhibitor based assay (boronic acid), Amp C disc test and Amp C Etest. Three dimensional enzyme extract assay was used as the reference method for determining the sensitivity and specificity. Results: Among the total isolates tested, 62.8% bacteria showed the presence of Amp C beta-lactamase by standard three dimensional enzyme extract assay. Among the three methods compared, boronic acid disk test found out to be highly sensitive (88%) and specific (92%) for the detection of Amp C beta-lactamase producing bacteria. Conclusion: Detection of Amp C production is crucial in order to establish the antibiotic therapy and to attain the favourable clinical outcomes. Implementation of simple tests like boronic acid disk tests in the laboratories will help to alleviate the spread of Amp C beta-lactamase harboring organisms. (author)

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cAMP Receptor Protein (Rv3676) Differs from the Escherichia coli Paradigm in Its cAMP Binding and DNA Binding Properties and Transcription Activation Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Melanie; Haq, Ihtshamul; Hunt, Debbie M.; Arnvig, Kristine B.; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Buxton, Roger S.; Green, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces a burst of cAMP upon infection of macrophages. Bacterial cyclic AMP receptor proteins (CRP) are transcription factors that respond to cAMP by binding at target promoters when cAMP concentrations increase. Rv3676 (CRPMt) is a CRP family protein that regulates expression of genes (rpfA and whiB1) that are potentially involved in M. tuberculosis persistence and/or emergence from the dormant state. Here, the CRPMt homodimer is shown to bind two molecules of cAMP (one per protomer) at noninteracting sites. Furthermore, cAMP binding by CRPMt was relatively weak, entropy driven, and resulted in a relatively small enhancement in DNA binding. Tandem CRPMt-binding sites (CRP1 at −58.5 and CRP2 at −37.5) were identified at the whiB1 promoter (PwhiB1). In vitro transcription reactions showed that CRP1 is an activating site and that CRP2, which was only occupied in the presence of cAMP or at high CRPMt concentrations in the absence of cAMP, is a repressing site. Binding of CRPMt to CRP1 was not essential for open complex formation but was required for transcription activation. Thus, these data suggest that binding of CRPMt to the PwhiB1 CRP1 site activates transcription at a step after open complex formation. In contrast, high cAMP concentrations allowed occupation of both CRP1 and CRP2 sites, resulting in inhibition of open complex formation. Thus, M. tuberculosis CRP has evolved several distinct characteristics, compared with the Escherichia coli CRP paradigm, to allow it to regulate gene expression against a background of high concentrations of cAMP. PMID:20028978

  9. AMP Affects Intracellular Ca2+ Signaling, Migration, Cytokine Secretion and T Cell Priming Capacity of Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panther, Elisabeth; Dürk, Thorsten; Ferrari, Davide; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Grimm, Melanie; Sorichter, Stephan; Cicko, Sanja; Herouy, Yared; Norgauer, Johannes; Idzko, Marco; Müller, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide adenosine-5′-monophosphate (AMP) can be released by various cell types and has been shown to elicit different cellular responses. In the extracellular space AMP is dephosphorylated to the nucleoside adenosine which can then bind to adenosine receptors. However, it has been shown that AMP can also activate A1 and A2a receptors directly. Here we show that AMP is a potent modulator of mouse and human dendritic cell (DC) function. AMP increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration in a time and dose dependent manner. Furthermore, AMP stimulated actin-polymerization in human DCs and induced migration of immature human and bone marrow derived mouse DCs, both via direct activation of A1 receptors. AMP strongly inhibited secretion of TNF-α and IL-12p70, while it enhanced production of IL-10 both via activation of A2a receptors. Consequently, DCs matured in the presence of AMP and co-cultivated with naive CD4+CD45RA+ T cells inhibited IFN-γ production whereas secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 was up-regulated. An enhancement of Th2-driven immune response could also be observed when OVA-pulsed murine DCs were pretreated with AMP prior to co-culture with OVA-transgenic naïve OTII T cells. An effect due to the enzymatic degradation of AMP to adenosine could be ruled out, as AMP still elicited migration and changes in cytokine secretion in bone-marrow derived DCs generated from CD73-deficient animals and in human DCs pretreated with the ecto-nucleotidase inhibitor 5′-(alpha,beta-methylene) diphosphate (APCP). Finally, the influence of contaminating adenosine could be excluded, as AMP admixed with adenosine desaminase (ADA) was still able to influence DC function. In summary our data show that AMP when present during maturation is a potent regulator of dendritic cell function and point out the role for AMP in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders. PMID:22624049

  10. The chitin-binding capability of Cy-AMP1 from cycad is essential to antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Seiya; Iida, Yuto; Kawasaki, Yousuke; Minami, Yuji; Watanabe, Keiichi; Yagi, Fumio

    2009-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are important components of the host innate immune responses by exerting broad-spectrum microbicidal activity against pathogenic microbes. Cy-AMP1 found in the cycad (Cycas revoluta) seeds has chitin-binding ability, and the chitin-binding domain was conserved in knottin-type and hevein-type antimicrobial peptides. The recombinant Cy-AMP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to study the role of chitin-binding domain. The mutants of Cy-AMP1 lost chitin-binding ability completely, and its antifungal activity was markedly decreased in comparison with native Cy-AMP1. However, the antimicrobial activities of the mutant peptides are nearly identical to that of native one. It was suggested that the chitin-binding domain plays an essential role in antifungal, but not antimicrobial, activity of Cy-AMP1.

  11. Structural insights into Cn-AMP1, a short disulfide-free multifunctional peptide from green coconut water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Mábio J; de Oliveira, Aline L; Queiroz Júnior, Luiz H K; Mandal, Santi M; Matos, Carolina O; Dias, Renata de O; Franco, Octavio L; Lião, Luciano M

    2015-02-27

    Multifunctional and promiscuous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can be used as an efficient strategy to control pathogens. However, little is known about the structural properties of plant promiscuous AMPs without disulfide bonds. CD and NMR were used to elucidate the structure of the promiscuous peptide Cn-AMP1, a disulfide-free peptide isolated from green coconut water. Data here reported shows that peptide structure is transitory and could be different according to the micro-environment. In this regard, Cn-AMP1 showed a random coil in a water environment and an α-helical structure in the presence of SDS-d25 micelles. Moreover, deuterium exchange experiments showed that Gly4, Arg5 and Met9 residues are less accessible to solvent, suggesting that flexibility and cationic charges seem to be essential for Cn-AMP1 multiple activities. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Different roles of GNAS and cAMP signaling during early and late stages of osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S; Kaplan, F S; Shore, E M

    2012-09-01

    Progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH) and fibrous dysplasia (FD) are genetic diseases of bone formation at opposite ends of the osteogenic spectrum: imperfect osteogenesis of the skeleton occurs in FD, while heterotopic ossification in skin, subcutaneous fat, and skeletal muscle forms in POH. POH is caused by heterozygous inactivating germline mutations in GNAS, which encodes G-protein subunits regulating the cAMP pathway, while FD is caused by GNAS somatic activating mutations. We used pluripotent mouse ES cells to examine the effects of Gnas dysregulation on osteoblast differentiation. At the earliest stages of osteogenesis, Gnas transcripts Gsα, XLαs and 1A are expressed at low levels and cAMP levels are also low. Inhibition of cAMP signaling (as in POH) by 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine enhanced osteoblast differentiation while conversely, increased cAMP signaling (as in FD), induced by forskolin, inhibited osteoblast differentiation. Notably, increased cAMP was inhibitory for osteogenesis only at early stages after osteogenic induction. Expression of osteogenic and adipogenic markers showed that increased cAMP enhanced adipogenesis and impaired osteoblast differentiation even in the presence of osteogenic factors, supporting cAMP as a critical regulator of osteoblast and adipocyte lineage commitment. Furthermore, increased cAMP signaling decreased BMP pathway signaling, indicating that G protein-cAMP pathway activation (as in FD) inhibits osteoblast differentiation, at least in part by blocking the BMP-Smad pathway, and suggesting that GNAS inactivation as occurs in POH enhances osteoblast differentiation, at least in part by stimulating BMP signaling. These data support that differences in cAMP levels during early stages of cell differentiation regulate cell fate decisions. Supporting information available online at http:/www.thieme-connect.de/ejournals/toc/hmr. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. cAMP-dependent cell differentiation triggered by activated CRHR1 in hippocampal neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Carolina; Bonfiglio, Juan José; Dos Santos Claro, Paula A; Senin, Sergio A; Armando, Natalia G; Deussing, Jan M; Silberstein, Susana

    2017-05-16

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Both cAMP sources were shown to be required for the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 triggered by activated G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) CRHR1 in neuronal and neuroendocrine contexts. Here, we show that activated CRHR1 promotes growth arrest and neurite elongation in neuronal hippocampal cells (HT22-CRHR1 cells). By characterising CRHR1 signalling mechanisms involved in the neuritogenic effect, we demonstrate that neurite outgrowth in HT22-CRHR1 cells takes place by a sAC-dependent, ERK1/2-independent signalling cascade. Both tmACs and sAC are involved in corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-mediated CREB phosphorylation and c-fos induction, but only sAC-generated cAMP pools are critical for the neuritogenic effect of CRH, further highlighting the engagement of two sources of cAMP downstream of the activation of a GPCR, and reinforcing the notion that restricted cAMP microdomains may regulate independent cellular processes.

  14. Convergent Transcriptional Programs Regulate cAMP Levels in C. elegans GABAergic Motor Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Wang, Xiaolin; Wei, Shuai; Fu, Tao; Dzakah, Emmanuel Enoch; Waqas, Ahmed; Walthall, Walter W; Shan, Ge

    2017-10-23

    Both transcriptional regulation and signaling pathways play crucial roles in neuronal differentiation and plasticity. Caenorhabditis elegans possesses 19 GABAergic motor neurons (MNs) called D MNs, which are divided into two subgroups: DD and VD. DD, but not VD, MNs reverse their cellular polarity in a developmental process called respecification. UNC-30 and UNC-55 are two critical transcription factors in D MNs. By using chromatin immunoprecipitation with CRISPR/Cas9 knockin of GFP fusion, we uncovered the global targets of UNC-30 and UNC-55. UNC-30 and UNC-55 are largely converged to regulate over 1,300 noncoding and coding genes, and genes in multiple biological processes, including cAMP metabolism, are co-regulated. Increase in cAMP levels may serve as a timing signal for respecification, whereas UNC-55 regulates genes such as pde-4 to keep the cAMP levels low in VD. Other genes modulating DD respecification such as lin-14, irx-1, and oig-1 are also found to affect cAMP levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MAP-Motivated Carrier Synchronization of GMSK Based on the Laurent AMP Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M. K.

    1998-01-01

    Using the MAP estimation approach to carrier synchronization of digital modulations containing ISI together with a two pulse stream AMP representation of GMSK, it is possible to obtain an optimum closed loop configuration in the same manner as has been previously proposed for other conventional modulations with ISI.

  16. 0011-0030.IEEE Floating Point Addition amp MultiplicationPlease ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; public; Volumes; reso; 021; 01; 0011-0030.IEEE Floating Point Addition amp MultiplicationPlease.pdf. 404! error. The page your are looking for can not be found! Please check the link or use the navigation bar at the top. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on ...

  17. Fueling the engine: induction of AMP-activated protein kinase in trout skeletal muscle by swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnoni, L.J.; Palstra, A.P.; Planas, J.V.

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is well known to be induced by exercise and to mediate important metabolic changes in the skeletal muscle of mammals. Despite the physiological importance of exercise as a modulator of energy use by locomotory muscle, the regulation of this enzyme by swimming has

  18. Modification of radiation-induced division delay by caffeine analogues and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimler, B.F.; Leeper, D.B.; Snyder, M.H.; Rowley, R.; Schneiderman, M.H. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Hospital)

    1982-01-01

    The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was utilized to investigate the concentration-dependent modification of x-radiation-induced division delay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by methyl xanthines (caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine) and by dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The methyl xanthines (concentrations from 0.5 to 1000 ..mu..g/ml) all reduced radiation-induced division delay with the effect being linear between approximately 100 and 1000 ..mu..g/ml. After doses of 100-300 rad, delay was reduced by 75, 94 or 83 per cent at 1000 ..mu..g/ml for each drug, respectively. However, the addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP had an opposite effect: radiation-induced delay was increased by the concentration range of 0.3 to 300 ..mu..g/ml. These results indicate that in mammalian cells the control of cell cycle progression and the modification of radiation-induced division delay are not simply related to intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Rather, there appear to be at least two competing mechanisms which are differentially affected by caffeine analogues or by direct addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The direct effect of caffeine and the methyl xanthines on membrane calcium permeability is considered.

  19. Some design aspects of a two-stage rail-to-rail CMOS op amp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gierkink, Sander L.J.; Holzmann, Peter J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Wassenaar, R.F.

    1999-01-01

    A two-stage low-voltage CMOS op amp with rail-to-rail input and output voltage ranges is presented. The circuit uses complementary differential input pairs to achieve the rail-to-rail common-mode input voltage range. The differential pairs operate in strong inversion, and the constant

  20. Plurifinely Plurisubharmonic Functions and the Monge Ampère Operator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Kadiri, M.; Wiegerinck, J.

    2014-01-01

    We will define the Monge-Ampère operator on finite (weakly) plurifinely plurisubharmonic functions in plurifinely open sets U ⊂ ℂ n and show that it defines a positive measure. Ingredients of the proof include a direct proof for bounded strongly plurifinely plurisubharmonic functions, which is based

  1. How pancreatic beta-cells discriminate long and short timescale cAMP signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peercy, Bradford E; Sherman, Arthur S

    2010-07-21

    The translocation of catalytic protein kinase A (cPKA) in response to cyclic-adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP) depends on the pattern of stimulus applied to the cell. Experiments with IBMX have shown that 1), sustained cAMP elevation is more effective than oscillations of cAMP at getting cPKA into the nucleus; and 2), cPKA enters the nucleus by diffusion. We constructed mathematical models of cAMP activation of cPKA and their diffusion in order to study nuclear translocation of cPKA, and conclude that hindered diffusion of cPKA through the nuclear membrane by a rapid-binding process, but not globally reduced diffusion, can explain the experimental data. Perturbation analysis suggests that normal physiological oscillations of glucose would not result in nuclear translocation, but chronically high glucose that produces extended calcium plateaus and/or chronic glucagonlike peptide-1 stimulation could result in elevated levels of nuclear cPKA. Copyright (c) 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dibutyryl c-AMP as an inducer of sporidia formation: Biochemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Variations of proteins during different stages of T. indica grown in the presence and absence of dbc-AMP suggested the expression of stage-specific proteins .... The antigenic preparations were injected into two female rabbits. The emulsified antigen(s) (0⋅5 ml/rabbit) containing either 500 µg of mycelial antigen or 2 × 105.

  3. Experimental validation of a rate-based model for CO2 capture using an AMP solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, Jostein; Svendsen, H. F.; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2007-01-01

    Detailed experimental data, including temperature profiles over the absorber, for a carbon dioxide (CO"2) absorber with structured packing in an integrated laboratory pilot plant using an aqueous 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) solution are presented. The experimental gas-liquid material balance...

  4. 'n Sosiaal-wetenskaplike ondersoek na die 'amp' van die ouderling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'n Sosiaal-wetenskaplike ondersoek na die 'amp' van die ouderling in die Nuwe Testament. E van Eck. Abstract. A social-scientific study of the 'office' of the elder in the New Testament. After discussing the state of the current debate concerning the 'office' of the elder is given, the author presents his own hypothesis, namely ...

  5. 7 CFR 772.10 - Transfer and assumption-AMP loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the present market value of the loan security; (5) The transferee documents the ability to pay the AMP... of any other lienholder, if applicable. (2) A current balance sheet and cash flow statement. (d... present borrower is unable or unwilling to accomplish the objectives of the loan; (2) The transfer will...

  6. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  7. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-01

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells

  8. Hippocampal cAMP/PKA/CREB is required for neuroprotective effect of acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian-Qian; Shi, Guang-Xia; Yang, Jing-Wen; Li, Zhao-Xin; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; He, Tian; Wang, Jing; Liu, Li-Ying; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-02-01

    Acupuncture has beneficial effects in vascular dementia (VaD) patients. The underlying mechanism, however, remains unknown. The present study was designed to investigate whether the cAMP/PKA/CREB cascade is involved in the mechanism of acupuncture in cerebral multi-infarction rats. In this study, cerebral multi-infarction was modeled in adult Wistar rats by homologous blood clot emboli. After a two-week acupuncture treatment at Zusanli (ST36), hippocampal-dependent memory was tested by employing a radial arm maze test. The hippocampus was isolated for analyses of cAMP concentration, phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity and CREB/pCREB and ERK/pERK expressions. The Morris water maze (MWM) task and CREB phosphorylation were evaluated in the presence of PKA-selective peptide inhibitor (H89). The radial arm maze test results demonstrated that acupuncture treatment at ST36 reversed hippocampal-dependent memory in impaired animals. Compared to those of the impaired group, cAMP concentration, PKA activity and pCREB and pERK expressions were increased following acupuncture therapy. Finally, the blockade of PKA reversed the increase in CREB phosphorylation and the improvement in recognitive function induced by acupuncture treatment. These results suggest that acupuncture could improve hippocampus function by modulating the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway, which represents a molecular mechanism of acupuncture for recognitive function in cerebral multi-infarction rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exercise in rats does not alter hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Nielsen, Jakob Nis

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the hypothalamus is involved in the regulation of food intake. Because exercise is known to influence appetite and cause substrate depletion, it may also influence AMPK in the hypothalamus. Male rats that either rested o...

  10. Fecal Carriage of Extended-spectrum Beta-lactamase and AmpC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in community and to investigate cefotaxime-M (CTX-M) genes ... trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole, and carbapenems were 31.2%, 33.3%, and. 0%, respectively. Conclusion: .... with phenotypic AmpC beta-lactamase were resistant to ceftazidime and CTX and ...

  11. Pattern formation of Dictystelium discoideum in the presence of laminar flow and cAMP pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Azam; Steinbock, Oliver; Zykov, Vladimir; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum (D.d) amobae undergo starvation-induced multicellular development in which single cells aggregate chemotactically towards cAMP signals emitted periodically from an aggregation center. We are investigating spatiotemporal pattern formation of D.d. cells under the presence of a laminar flow. Starved cells are loaded into a straight millifluidic device with an external flow and cell response to the signaling molecule cAMP is monitored indirectly using dark-field microscopy. The observed contraction waves develop simultaneously over the entire channel, are propagating only in flow direction, and have curved wave fronts resembling the parabolic flow profile. The wave dynamics analysis shows that the wave velocity is locked to the flow velocity and yields a wave period of T0 6 min, which matches the typical oscillation period of extracellular cAMP in spatial homogeneous, well-stirred systems. We apply a small cAMP perturbation at the inlet region of the channel and observe the spatiotemporal response of the cells as the pulse is propagating down the channel. The results show that D.d. cells are in the oscillatory regime and the system can be forced within resonance tongue. We compared our results with analytical and numerical analysis of Goldbeter model.

  12. Regulation of cyclic AMP by extracellular ATP in cultured brain capillary endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Zubeya; Albert, Jennifer L; Gubby, Sharon E; Boyle, John P; Roberts, Jonathon A; Webb, Tania E; Boarder, Michael R

    1999-01-01

    In primary unpassaged rat brain capillary endothelial cell cultures (RBECs), using reverse-transcriptase PCR with primers specific for P2Y receptor subtypes, we detected mRNA for P2Y2, P2Y4 and P2Y6, but not P2Y1 receptors.None of the various nucleotides tested reduced forskolin elevated cyclic AMP levels in RBECs. ATP and ATPγS, as well as adenosine, enhanced cyclic AMP accumulation in the presence of forskolin.Comparison of the concentration response curves to ATPγS with those for ATP and adenosine, at different incubation times, indicated that the response to purine nucleotides was not wholly dependent on conversion to adenosine. Adenosine deaminase abolished the response to adenosine but only reduced the response to ATP by about 50%. These results suggest the participation of a receptor responsive to nucleotides.Isobutylmethylxanthine and 8-sulphophenyltheophylline prevented the cyclic AMP response, while neither 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine nor SCH58261 were effective antagonists. 2-chloradenosine gave a robust response, but neither 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine nor CGS 21680 were agonists.These results show that adenosine and ATP can elevate the cyclic AMP levels of brain endothelial cells by acting on receptors which have a pharmacology apparently distinct from known P2Y and adenosine receptors. PMID:10510459

  13. Overexpression of the cAMP Receptor 1 in Growing Dictyostelium Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Ronald L.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Caterina, Michael J.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Devreotes, Peter N.

    1991-01-01

    cAR1, the cAMP receptor expressed normally during the early aggregation stage of the Dictyostelium developmental program, has been expressed during the growth stage, when only low amounts of endogenous receptors are present. Transformants expressing cAR1 have 7-40 times over growth stage and

  14. The Monge-Ampère equation: Hamiltonian and symplectic structures, recursions, and hierarchies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, P.H.M.; Krasil'shchik, I.; Verbovetsky, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    Using methods of geometry and cohomology developed recently, we study the Monge-Ampère equation, arising as the first nontrivial equation in the associativity equations, or WDVV equations. We describe Hamiltonian and symplectic structures as well as recursion operators for this equation in its

  15. Dibutyryl c-AMP as an inducer of sporidia formation: Biochemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    development and differentiation of T. indica. In the pre- sent study attempts were made to study the influence of dbc-. AMP on induction of sporidia formation and biochemical and antigenic changes associated during sporidiation. 2. Materials and methods. 2.1 Culture of T. indica. The monoteliosporic culture of T. indica was ...

  16. Identification of variant alleles at AmpFlSTR SGM Plus STR loci in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... It is therefore important that forensic science community shares information on the occurrence of these variants and reduces complications during STR typing. In this study, we report 5 variant alleles at AmpFlSTR SGM. Plus loci in a sample population of Bangladesh. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Samples ...

  17. Regulation of laminin and entactin mRNA levels by retinoic acid and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durkin, M.E.; Phillips, S.L.; Carlin, B.E.; Merlie, J.P.; Chung, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    Retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP induced F9 embryonal carcinoma cells to differentiate to parietal endoderm; the morphological changes were accompanied by the increased synthesis of the basement membrane glycoproteins laminin and entactin. cDNA clones have been isolated for the A (400 kD), B1 (220 kD), and B2 (205 kD) chains of laminin. Northern blot analysis indicated that the A, B1, and B2 chains were encoded by RNA species of 9.8, 6.0, and 8.0 kb, respectively. The kinetics of induction of the laminin mRNAs were studied by dot-blotting dilutions of RNA extracted from F9 cells cultured in retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP for increasing amounts of time and hybridizing to 32 P-labeled recombinant plasmids. Very low levels of the A and B chain RNAs were found in uninduced cells, and a large increase occurred between 48 and 72 hr of growth in retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP. A cDNA clone was also obtained for entactin, a 150 kD glycoprotein that forms a complex with laminin. Retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP treatment also increased the amount of entactin RNA in F9 cells. These results suggested that a common mechanism may exist for the coordinate regulation of the 4 basement membrane protein genes during differentiation

  18. The effect of mutations in the AmpC promoter region on β-lactam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of the ampC promoter and attenuator regions of the isolate showed that the isolate had mutations in the promoter region and this included insertions of nucleotides in ... The insertion of an extra nucleotide in the spacer region between the -10 and -35 boxes affects the resistance of bacteria to β-lactam antibiotics.

  19. Dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cAMP-PKA signaling and filamentous and invasive growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aun, Anu; Tamm, Tiina; Sedman, Juhan

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is targeted by conserved signaling pathways that mediate external information to the cell. However, less is known about whether mitochondrial dysfunction interferes with signaling and thereby modulates the cellular response to environmental changes. In this study, we analyzed defective filamentous and invasive growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that have a dysfunctional mitochondrial genome (rho mutants). We found that the morphogenetic defect of rho mutants was caused by specific downregulation of FLO11, the adhesin essential for invasive and filamentous growth, and did not result from general metabolic changes brought about by interorganellar retrograde signaling. Transcription of FLO11 is known to be regulated by several signaling pathways, including the filamentous-growth-specific MAPK and cAMP-activated protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathways. Our analysis showed that the filamentous-growth-specific MAPK pathway retained functionality in respiratory-deficient yeast cells. In contrast, the cAMP-PKA pathway was downregulated, explaining also various phenotypic traits observed in rho mutants. Thus, our results indicate that dysfunctional mitochondria modulate the output of the conserved cAMP-PKA signaling pathway.

  20. Role of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treebak, Jonas Thue; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F. P.

    2008-01-01

    5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is recognized as an important intracellular energy sensor, shutting down energy-consuming processes and turning on energy-generating processes. Discovery of target proteins of AMPK has dramatically increased in the past 10 years. Historically, AMPK was first...

  1. CO2 capture. Two new structures in the 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) – water – CO2 system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhl, Kenny; Neerup, Randi; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2016-01-01

    studied the 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) and the AMP-water phase diagramand its ability for CO2 capture. The first crystal structure in the AMP – water system has been solved from powder diffraction data: AMP trihydrate (triclinic, P-1, a = 6.5897(3), b = 6.399 (2), c = 6.3399(2) Å and α = 92.40 (3...

  2. Salbutamol delays human eosinophil apoptosis via a cAMP-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaanranta, Hannu; Parkkonen, Jouni; Ilmarinen-Salo, Pinja; Giembycz, Mark A; Moilanen, Eeva

    2011-08-01

    Eosinophils play a major role in asthma. One described mechanism leading to the impaired clearance of these cells from the lung is the delay in their programmed cell death (apoptosis). β(2)-Adrenoceptor agonists have been shown to prolong survival and delay apoptosis of eosinophils. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the mechanisms, especially the role of cAMP pathway, in the prolongation of human eosinophil survival by a selective β(2)-agonist salbutamol. Isolated human peripheral blood eosinophils were cultured in the absence or presence of a β(2)-agonist salbutamol and the indicated antagonists/inhibitors under sterile conditions. Apoptosis was measured by using the relative DNA fragmentation assay and Annexin-V binding. Salbutamol prolonged survival of human eosinophils and it was inhibited by a β-receptor antagonist propranolol and mimicked by cell-permeant cAMP analogues dibutyryl- and 8-bromo-cAMP. Pharmacological inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase (SQ-22,536) and protein kinase A (Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS) antagonized the effects of salbutamol. The survival-prolonging action of salbutamol was potentiated by a phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram (EC(50) for the salbutamol effect was 13.6 ± 4.0 and 8.1 ± 3.1 nM in the absence and presence of rolipram, respectively; p=0.0142, n=10). In contrast, inhibition of Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-channels by apamin, charybdotoxin, iberiotoxin or paxilline did not affect the ability of salbutamol to prolong eosinophil survival. Taken together, the present results suggest that salbutamol at clinically relevant concentrations decreases apoptosis in human eosinophils by activating the cannonical β(2)-receptor-adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Structure of a PKA RIα Recurrent Acrodysostosis Mutant Explains Defective cAMP-Dependent Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruystens, Jessica Gh; Wu, Jian; Fortezzo, Audrey; Del Rio, Jason; Nielsen, Cole; Blumenthal, Donald K; Rock, Ruth; Stefan, Eduard; Taylor, Susan S

    2016-12-04

    Most disease-related mutations that impair cAMP protein kinase A (PKA) signaling are present within the regulatory (R) PKA RI alpha-subunit (RIα). Although mutations in the PRKAR1A gene are linked to Carney complex (CNC) disease and, more recently, to acrodysostosis-1 (ACRDYS1), the two diseases show contrasting phenotypes. While CNC mutations cause increased PKA activity, ACRDYS1 mutations result in decreased PKA activity and cAMP resistant holoenzymes. Mapping the ACRDYS1 disease mutations reveals their localization to the second of two tandem cAMP-binding (CNB) domains (CNB-B), and here, we characterize a recurrent deletion mutant where the last 14 residues are missing. The crystal structure of a monomeric form of this mutant (RIα92-365) bound to the catalytic (C)-subunit reveals the dysfunctional regions of the RIα subunit. Beyond the missing residues, the entire capping motif is disordered (residues 357-379) and explains the disrupted cAMP binding. Moreover, the effects of the mutation extend far beyond the CNB-B domain and include the active site and N-lobe of the C-subunit, which is in a partially open conformation with the C-tail disordered. A key residue that contributes to this crosstalk, D267, is altered in our structure, and we confirmed its functional importance by mutagenesis. In particular, the D267 interaction with Arg241, a residue shown earlier to be important for allosteric regulation, is disrupted, thereby strengthening the interaction of D267 with the C-subunit residue Arg194 at the R:C interface. We see here how the switch between active (cAMP-bound) and inactive (holoenzyme) conformations is perturbed and how the dynamically controlled crosstalk between the helical domains of the two CNB domains is necessary for the functional regulation of PKA activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and cAMP/PKA pathway mediated Zn-induced hepatic lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu-Feng; Hogstrand, Christer; Wei, Chuan-Chuan; Wu, Kun; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Luo, Zhi

    2017-09-01

    The present study was performed to determine the effect of Zn exposure influencing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, explore the underlying molecular mechanism of Zn-induced hepatic lipolysis in a fish species of significance for aquaculture, yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. We found that waterborne Zn exposure evoked ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), and activated cAMP/PKA pathway, and up-regulated hepatic lipolysis. The increase in ER stress and lipolysis were associated with activation of cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Zn also induced an increase in intracellular Ca 2+ level, which could be partially prevented by dantrolene (RyR receptor inhibitor) and 2-APB (IP3 receptor inhibitor), demonstrating that the disturbed Ca 2+ homeostasis in ER contributed to ER stress and dysregulation of lipolysis. Inhibition of ER stress by PBA attenuated UPR, inhibited the activation of cAMP/PKA pathway and resulted in down-regulation of lipolysis. Inhibition of protein kinase RNA-activated-like ER kinase (PERK) by GSK2656157 and inositol-requiring enzyme (IRE) by STF-083010 differentially influenced Zn-induced changes of lipid metabolism, indicating that PERK and IRE pathways played different regulatory roles in Zn-induced lipolysis. Inhibition of PKA by H89 blocked the Zn-induced activation of cAMP/PKA pathway with a concomitant inhibition of ER stress-mediated lipolysis. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of the ER stress-cAMP/PKA axis in Zn-induced lipolysis, which provides new insights into Zn toxicology in fish and probably in other vertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. FimL regulates cAMP synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki F Inclan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacteria found in diverse ecological niches, is an important cause of acute infections in immunocompromised individuals and chronic infections in patients with Cystic Fibrosis. One signaling molecule required for the coordinate regulation of virulence factors associated with acute infections is 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, (cAMP, which binds to and activates a catabolite repressor homolog, Vfr. Vfr controls the transcription of many virulence factors, including those associated with Type IV pili (TFP, the Type III secretion system (T3SS, the Type II secretion system, flagellar-mediated motility, and quorum sensing systems. We previously identified FimL, a protein with histidine phosphotransfer-like domains, as a regulator of Vfr-dependent processes, including TFP-dependent motility and T3SS function. In this study, we carried out genetic and physiologic studies to further define the mechanism of action of FimL. Through a genetic screen designed to identify suppressors of FimL, we found a putative cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (CpdA, suggesting that FimL regulates cAMP levels. Inactivation of CpdA increases cAMP levels and restores TFP-dependent motility and T3SS function to fimL mutants, consistent with in vivo phosphodiesterase activity. By constructing combinations of double and triple mutants in the two adenylate cyclase genes (cyaA and cyaB, fimL, and cpdA, we show that ΔfimL mutants resemble ΔcyaB mutants in TM defects, decreased T3SS transcription, and decreased cAMP levels. Similar to some of the virulence factors that they regulate, we demonstrate that CyaB and FimL are polarly localized. These results reveal new complexities in the regulation of diverse virulence pathways associated with acute P. aeruginosa infections.

  6. ABCC5 is required for cAMP-mediated hindgut invagination in sea urchin embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Lauren E; Hill, Rose Z; Moy, Gary W; Gökırmak, Tufan; Hamdoun, Amro

    2015-10-15

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are evolutionarily conserved proteins that pump diverse substrates across membranes. Many are known to efflux signaling molecules and are extensively expressed during development. However, the role of transporters in moving extracellular signals that regulate embryogenesis is largely unexplored. Here, we show that a mesodermal ABCC (MRP) transporter is necessary for endodermal gut morphogenesis in sea urchin embryos. This transporter, Sp-ABCC5a (C5a), is expressed in pigment cells and their precursors, which are a subset of the non-skeletogenic mesoderm (NSM) cells. C5a expression depends on Delta/Notch signaling from skeletogenic mesoderm and is downstream of Gcm in the aboral NSM gene regulatory network. Long-term imaging of development reveals that C5a knockdown embryos gastrulate, but ∼90% develop a prolapse of the hindgut by the late prism stage (∼8 h after C5a protein expression normally peaks). Since C5a orthologs efflux cyclic nucleotides, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (Sp-CAPK/PKA) is expressed in pigment cells, we examined whether C5a could be involved in gastrulation through cAMP transport. Consistent with this hypothesis, membrane-permeable pCPT-cAMP rescues the prolapse phenotype in C5a knockdown embryos, and causes archenteron hyper-invagination in control embryos. In addition, the cAMP-producing enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is expressed in pigment cells, and its inhibition impairs gastrulation. Together, our data support a model in which C5a transports sAC-derived cAMP from pigment cells to control late invagination of the hindgut. Little is known about the ancestral functions of ABCC5/MRP5 transporters, and this study reveals a novel role for these proteins in mesoderm-endoderm signaling during embryogenesis. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Regulation of cyclic AMP metabolism by prostaglandins in rabbit cortical collecting tubule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenburg, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    In the rabbit cortical collecting tubule (RCCT), prostaglandin E 1 (PGE 1 ) and prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) at 1 nM inhibit arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-induced water reabsorption, while 100 nM PGE 1 and PGE 2 alone stimulate water reabsorption. Reported here are studies designed to investigate the molecular basis for the biphasic physiological action of PGE 1 and PGE 2 in the collecting duct. In freshly isolated RCCT cells, PGE 1 , PGE 2 , and 16,16-dimethyl-PGE 2 (DM-PGE 2 ) stimulated cAMP synthesis at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 M. Other prostaglandins including the synthetic PGE 2 analogue, sulprostone, failed to stimulate cAMP synthesis. Moreover, sulprostone did not antagonize PGE 2 -stimulated cAMP formation. In contrast, PGE 2 and sulprostone at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 nM, inhibited AVP-induced cAMP accumulation in freshly isolated RCCT cells. PGE 2 , PGE 1 , DM-PGE 2 and sulprostone at 100 nM were equally effective in inhibiting AVP-induced cAMP formation. Moreover sulprostone inhibited AVP-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results suggest that PGE derivatives mediate either inhibition or activation of adenylate cyclase by stimulating different PGE receptors. To further test this concept, PGE 2 binding to freshly isolated RCCT cell membranes was characterized. Two different classes of PGE 2 binding were detected. / 3 H/PGE 2 binding to the high affinity class of sites was increased by the GTP-analogue, GTP S, while pertussis toxin pretreatment blocked the stimulatory action. In contrast, / 3 H/ PGE 2 binding to the low affinity class of sites was decreased by GTP S; this inhibitory effect was not blocked by pertussis toxin pretreatment

  8. The Hippo pathway mediates inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tomomi E; Duggirala, Aparna; Smith, Madeleine C; White, Stephen; Sala-Newby, Graciela B; Newby, Andrew C; Bond, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation by intracellular cAMP prevents excessive neointima formation and hence angioplasty restenosis and vein-graft failure. These protective effects are mediated via actin-cytoskeleton remodelling and subsequent regulation of gene expression by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Here we investigated the role of components of the growth-regulatory Hippo pathway, specifically the transcription factor TEAD and its co-factors YAP and TAZ in VSMC. Elevation of cAMP using forskolin, dibutyryl-cAMP or the physiological agonists, Cicaprost or adenosine, significantly increased phosphorylation and nuclear export YAP and TAZ and inhibited TEAD-luciferase report gene activity. Similar effects were obtained by inhibiting RhoA activity with C3-transferase, its downstream kinase, ROCK, with Y27632, or actin-polymerisation with Latrunculin-B. Conversely, expression of constitutively-active RhoA reversed the inhibitory effects of forskolin on TEAD-luciferase. Forskolin significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of the pro-mitogenic genes, CCN1, CTGF, c-MYC and TGFB2 and this was reversed by expression of constitutively-active YAP or TAZ phospho-mutants. Inhibition of YAP and TAZ function with RNAi or Verteporfin significantly reduced VSMC proliferation. Furthermore, the anti-mitogenic effects of forskolin were reversed by overexpression of constitutively-active YAP or TAZ. Taken together, these data demonstrate that cAMP-induced actin-cytoskeleton remodelling inhibits YAP/TAZ-TEAD dependent expression of pro-mitogenic genes in VSMC. This mechanism contributes novel insight into the anti-mitogenic effects of cAMP in VSMC and suggests a new target for intervention. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. 77 FR 14446 - Changes to the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report Revision 2 AMP XI.M41, “Buried and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ...) Report Revision 2 AMP XI.M41, ``Buried and Underground Piping and Tanks'' AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...), LR- ISG-2011-03, ``Changes to GALL Report Revision 2 Aging Management Program (AMP) XI.M41, `Buried... Report Revision 2 AMP XI.M41 based on the staff's review of several license renewal applications' buried...

  10. Prevalence and risk factors for extended-spectrum β-lactamase or AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in organic dairy herds in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santman-Berends, I.M.G.A.; Gonggrijp, M.A.; Hage, J.J.; Heuvelink, A.E.; Velthuis, A.; Lam, T.J.G.M.; van Schaik, G.

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase and AmpC-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL/AmpC) are an emerging problem and are hypothesized to be associated with antimicrobial use (AMU), and more specifically with the use of third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins. Whether ESBL/AmpC also occur in organic dairy

  11. Prevalence and risk factors for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase or AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in organic dairy herds in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santman - Berends, Inge; Gonggrijp, M A; Heuvelink, A E; Velthuis, A; Lam, T J G M; van Schaik, Gerdien; Hage, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase and AmpC-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL/AmpC) are an emerging problem and are hypothesized to be associated with antimicrobial use (AMU), and more specifically with the use of third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins. Whether ESBL/AmpC also occur in organic dairy

  12. Regulation of the MAP kinase cascade in PC12 cells: B-Raf activates MEK-1 (MAP kinase or ERK kinase) and is inhibited by cAMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peraldi, P; Frödin, M; Barnier, J V

    1995-01-01

    In PC12 cells, cAMP stimulates the MAP kinase pathway by an unknown mechanism. Firstly, we examined the role of calcium ion mobilization and of protein kinase C in cAMP-stimulated MAP kinase activation. We show that cAMP stimulates p44mapk independently of these events. Secondly, we studied the r...

  13. Serosal Zn2+ inhibits 8-Br-cAMP stimulated chloride secretion in piglet small intestinal epithelium in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Dorthe; Sehested, Jakob; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard

    2010-01-01

    -bromoadenosine 3,5-clyclic monophosphate; cAMP analogue), 5-HT (serotonin) and forskolin (FSK; increases cAMP by activation of AC) induced secretion was studied. In addition, the effect of blocking cAMP dependent K+ channels by chromanol (293B) on FSK induced secretion was studied. Dietary zinc significantly...

  14. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) enhances cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation and phospho-CREB interaction with the mouse steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Brian F; Hudson, Elizabeth A; Clark, Barbara J

    2005-03-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transcription is regulated through cAMP-protein kinase A-dependent mechanisms that involve multiple transcription factors including the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) family members. Classically, binding of phosphorylated CREB to cis-acting cAMP-responsive elements (5'-TGACGTCA-3') within target gene promoters leads to recruitment of the coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP). Herein we examined the extent of CREB family member phosphorylation on protein-DNA interactions and CBP recruitment with the StAR promoter. Immunoblot analysis revealed that CREB, cAMP-responsive element modulator (CREM), and activating transcription factor (ATF)-1 are expressed in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells, yet only CREB and ATF-1 are phosphorylated. (Bu)2cAMP treatment of MA-10 cells increased CREB phosphorylation approximately 2.3-fold within 30 min but did not change total nuclear CREB expression levels. Using DNA-affinity chromatography, we now show that CREB and ATF-1, but not CREM, interact with the StAR promoter, and this interaction is dependent on the activator protein-1 (AP-1) cis-acting element within the cAMP-responsive region. In addition, (Bu)2cAMP-treatment increased phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) association with the StAR promoter but did not influence total CREB interaction. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated CREB binding to the StAR proximal promoter is independent of (Bu)2cAMP-treatment, confirming our in vitro analysis. However, (Bu)2cAMP-treatment increased P-CREB and CBP interaction with the StAR promoter, demonstrating for the first time the physical role of P-CREB:DNA interactions in CBP recruitment to the StAR proximal promoter.

  15. High glucose enhances cAMP level and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in Chinese hamster ovary cell: Usage of Br-cAMP in foreign protein β-galactosidase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiao-Hsien; Lee, Tsung-Yih; Liu, Ting-Wei; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2017-07-01

    Glucose is a carbon source for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell growth, while low growth rate is considered to enhance the production of recombinant proteins. The present study reveals that glucose concentrations higher than 1 g/L reduce the growth rate and substantially increase in cAMP (∼300%) at a high glucose concentration (10 g/L). High glucose also enhances the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p27 kip by Western blot analysis. To determine whether the phosphorylation of ERK is involved in the mechanism, a cyclic-AMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (H-8) or MEK (MAPKK) inhibitor (PD98059) was added to block ERK phosphorylation. We show that both the high glucose-induced ERK phosphorylation and growth rate return to baseline levels. These results suggest that the cAMP/PKA and MAP signaling pathways are involved in the abovementioned mechanism. Interestingly, the direct addition of 8-bromo-cAMP (Br-cAMP), a membrane-permeable cAMP analog, can mimic the similar effects produced by high glucose. Subsequently Br-cAMP could induce β-galactosidase (β-Gal) recombinant protein expression by 1.6-fold. Furthermore, Br-cAMP can additionally enhance the β-Gal production (from 2.8- to 4.5-fold) when CHO cells were stimulated with glycerol, thymidine, dimethyl sulfoxide, pentanoic acid, or sodium butyrate. Thus, Br-cAMP may be used as an alternative agent in promoting foreign protein expression for CHO cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. REVIEW: Role of cyclic AMP signaling in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cells express the proglucagon gene (gcg) and thereby produce the peptide hormone glucagon, which stimulates hepatic glucose production and thereby increases blood glucose levels. The same gcg gene is also expressed in the intestinal endocrine L cells and certain neural cells in the brain. In the gut, gcg expression leads to the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). This incretin hormone stimulates insulin secretion when blood glucose level is high. In addition, GLP-1 stimulates pancreatic cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. Today, a long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist has been developed as a drug in treating diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. Extensive investigations have shown that the expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP signaling, and the crosstalk between PKA and Wnt signaling pathway, are also involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg expression and GLP-1 production. Furthermore, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic cells are mainly mediated by cAMP-PKA, cAMP-Epac and Wnt signaling pathways as well.

  17. Activation of PKA and Epac proteins by cyclic AMP depletes intracellular calcium stores and reduces calcium availability for vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuíñas, Andrea; García-Morales, Verónica; Viña, Dolores; Gil-Longo, José; Campos-Toimil, Manuel

    2016-06-15

    We investigated the implication of PKA and Epac proteins in the endothelium-independent vasorelaxant effects of cyclic AMP (cAMP). Cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) was measured by fura-2 imaging in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC). Contraction-relaxation experiments were performed in rat aortic rings deprived of endothelium. In extracellular Ca(2+)-free solution, cAMP-elevating agents induced an increase in [Ca(2+)]c in RASMC that was reproduced by PKA and Epac activation and reduced after depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) reservoirs. Arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-evoked increase of [Ca(2+)]c and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) were inhibited by cAMP-elevating agents, PKA or Epac activation in these cells. In aortic rings, the contractions induced by phenylephrine in absence of extracellular Ca(2+) were inhibited by cAMP-elevating agents, PKA or Epac activation. In these conditions, reintroduction of Ca(2+) induced a contraction that was inhibited by cAMP-elevating agents, an effect reduced by PKA inhibition and reproduced by PKA or Epac activators. Our results suggest that increased cAMP depletes intracellular, thapsigargin-sensitive Ca(2+) stores through activation of PKA and Epac in RASMC, thus reducing the amount of Ca(2+) released by IP3-generating agonists during the contraction of rat aorta. cAMP rise also inhibits the contraction induced by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+), an effect mediated by reduction of SOCE after PKA or Epac activation. Both effects participate in the cAMP-induced endothelium-independent vasorelaxation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. RhoE is regulated by cyclic AMP and promotes fusion of human BeWo choriocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin P Collett

    Full Text Available Fusion of placental villous cytotrophoblasts with the overlying syncytiotrophoblast is essential for the maintenance of successful pregnancy, and disturbances in this process have been implicated in pathological conditions such as pre-eclampsia and intra-uterine growth retardation. In this study we examined the role of the Rho GTPase family member RhoE in trophoblast differentiation and fusion using the BeWo choriocarcinoma cell line, a model of villous cytotrophoblast fusion. Treatment of BeWo cells with the cell permeable cyclic AMP analogue dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP resulted in a strong upregulation of RhoE at 24 h, coinciding with the onset of fusion. Using the protein kinase A (PKA-specific cAMP analogue N(6-phenyl-cAMP, and a specific inhibitor of PKA (14-22 amide, PKI, we found that upregulation of RhoE by cAMP was mediated through activation of PKA signalling. Silencing of RhoE expression by RNA interference resulted in a significant decrease in dbcAMP-induced fusion. However, expression of differentiation markers human chorionic gonadotrophin and placental alkaline phosphatase was unaffected by RhoE silencing. Finally, we found that RhoE upregulation by dbcAMP was significantly reduced under hypoxic conditions in which cell fusion is impaired. These results show that induction of RhoE by cAMP is mediated through PKA and promotes BeWo cell fusion but has no effect on functional differentiation, supporting evidence that these two processes may be controlled by separate or diverging pathways.

  19. Effect of cAMP on macromolecule synthesis in the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilvani O. Santos

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available Macromolecule synthesis of Trypanosoma cruzi in culture was monitored using radioactive tracers. Cells of different days in culture displayed a preferential incorporation of precursors as follows: 1 day for (³H-thymidine cells; 3 days for (³H-uridine cells, and 4 days for (³H-leucine cells. Autoradiographic studies showed that (³H-thymidine was incorporated in the DNA of both kinetoplast and nucleus in this order. Shifts in the intracellular content of cAMP either by addition of dibutyryl-cAMP or by stimulation of the adenylcyclase by isoproterenol, caused an inhibition in the synthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins. Addition to the T. cruzi cultures of these agents which elevate the intracellular content ofcAMP provoked an interruption of cell proliferation as a result of the impairment of macromolecule synthesis. A discrimination was observed among the stereoisomers of isoproterenol, the L configuration showing to be most active.A síntese de macromoléculas de T. cruzi em cultura foi monitorada usando traçadores radioativos. Células de diferentes dias em cultura mostraram uma incorporação preferencial de precursores comco se seguez: 1 dia para (3H-timidina; 3 dias para (3H-uridina e 4 dias para (3H-leucina. Estudos autoradiográficos mostraram que (3H-leucina. Estudos autoradiográficos mostraram que (3H-timidina foi incorporada no DNA de ambos, cinetoplasto e núcleo, nesta ordem. Alterações no conteúdo intracelular de cAMP seja por adição de dibutiril-cAMP ou por estimulação de adenilciclase por isoproterenol, causav am inibição na síntese de DNA, RNA e proteínas. A adição destes agentes que elevam o conteúdo intracelular de cAMP em culturas de T.cruzi provocou inibição de crescimento, com resultado da síntese macromolecular imperfeita. Foi observada uma discriminação entre os estereoisômeros de isoproterenol, sendo a configuração L, a mais ativa.

  20. Plasmid-Encoded AmpC (pAmpC in Enterobacteriaceae: epidemiology of microorganisms and resistance markers ß-lactamasas de tipo AmpC de codificación plasmídica (pAmpC en Enterobacteriaceae: epidemiología de los microorganismos y de los marcadores de resistencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cejas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CMY-2 ß-lactamase is an important cause of ß-lactam resistance in Enterobacteriaceae and constitutes the most widespread pAmpC. Although CMY-2 has been previously recognized in our region, the real prevalence and epidemiology of this resistance marker was uncertain. During August-October 2009, we conducted a multicenter, prospective study to determine pAmpC prevalence and to characterize CMY-2 producing Escherichia coli associated plasmids. Plasmid-encoded AmpC prevalence was 0.9 % in enterobacteria in this period, being CMY- 2 prevalent and to a lesser extent DHA. Molecular typing of CMY-2- producing Escherichia coli isolates showed several lineages. Moreover, replicon typing of cmy-2- containing plasmids displayed a broad diversity in Inc/cmy- 2 links. Therefore, association of cmy-2 with specific transposon elements may be responsible for the spread of this resistance marker in Enterobacteriaceae.La ß-lactamasa de tipo AmpC de codificación plasmídica CMY-2 es la de mayor diseminación a nivel mundial en Enterobacteriaceae. Esta ha sido comunicada esporádicamente en nuestro país. Entre agosto y octubre de 2009 se llevó a cabo un estudio prospectivo y multicéntrico con el objetivo de determinar la prevalencia de pAmpC en nuestro medio y de caracterizar a los microorganismos productores y a los plásmidos portadores de estos marcadores de resistencia. La prevalencia de pAmpC plasmídicas en enterobacterias en este período fue de 0,9 %. La ß-lactamasa CMY-2 fue la enzima prevalente y, en menor medida, la DHA. La tipificación molecular de los aislamientos de Escherichia coli productores de CMY-2 mostró la presencia de distintos linajes, y los plásmidos portadores de cmy-2 pertenecieron a una amplia diversidad de grupos de incompatibilidad. Se determinó la asociación corriente arriba de cmy-2 con ISEcp1, el cual podría ser responsable de la amplia diseminación de este marcador de resistencia en Enterobacteriaceae.

  1. Proton conducting semi-IPN based on Nafion and crosslinked poly(AMPS) for direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Ki-Yun; Jung, Ho-Young; Shin, Seung-Shik; Choi, Nam-Soon; Sung, Shi-Joon; Park, Jung-Ki; Choi, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyung-Won; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2004-01-01

    For direct methanol fuel cell, the proton conducting membrane based on semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) of Nafion and crosslinked poly(AMPS) was prepared and characterized. The modification of Nafion with crosslinked poly(AMPS) such as hydrocarbon polymer changed the state of water in membranes. Without a significant increase of the membrane resistance, the semi-IPNs demonstrated a reduction of the methanol permeability, comparing to the native Nafion. And the maximum power density of AMPS60 increased as much as 22.2% compared with Nafion

  2. Inhibition of cAMP-Activated Intestinal Chloride Secretion by Diclofenac: Cellular Mechanism and Potential Application in Cholera

    OpenAIRE

    Pongkorpsakol, Pawin; Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Srimanote, Potjanee; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl- secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl- secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl- secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84) cells with IC50 of ∼ 20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell...

  3. Protective features of resveratrol on human spermatozoa cryopreservation may be mediated through 5' AMP-activated protein kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani Nashtaei, M; Amidi, F; Sedighi Gilani, M A; Aleyasin, A; Bakhshalizadeh, Sh; Naji, M; Nekoonam, S

    2017-03-01

    Biochemical and physical modifications during the freeze-thaw process adversely influence the restoration of energy-dependent sperm functions required for fertilization. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, has been introduced to activate 5' AMP-activated protein kinase which is a cell energy sensor and a cell metabolism regulator. The cryoprotection of resveratrol on sperm cryoinjury via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase also remains to be elucidated. Our aim, thus, was to investigate: (i) the presence and intracellular localization of AMP-activated protein kinase protein; (ii) whether resveratrol may exert a protective effect on certain functional properties of fresh and post-thaw human spermatozoa through modulation of AMP-activated protein kinase. Spermatozoa from normozoospermic men were incubated with or without different concentrations of Compound C as an AMP-activated protein kinase inhibitor or resveratrol as an AMP-activated protein kinase activator for different lengths of time and were then cryopreserved. AMP-activated protein kinase is expressed essentially in the entire flagellum and the post-equatorial region. Viability of fresh spermatozoa was not significantly affected by the presence of Compound C or resveratrol. However, although Compound C caused a potent inhibition of spermatozoa motility parameters, resveratrol did not induce negative effect, except a significant reduction in motility at 25 μm for 1 h. Furthermore, resveratrol significantly increased AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased reactive oxygen species and apoptosis-like changes in frozen-thawed spermatozoa. Nevertheless, it was not able to compensate decreased sperm viability and motility parameters following cryopreservation. In contrast, Compound C showed opposite effects to resveratrol on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis-like changes, mitochondrial membrane potential, and

  4. Utility of the ceftazidime-imipenem antagonism test (CIAT to detect and confirm the presence of inducible AmpC beta-lactamases among enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlademir Vicente Cantarelli

    Full Text Available Detection of AmpC beta-lactamase production by enterobacteria has been problematic. Contrary to ESBLs, no specific guidelines are available for detection and confirmation of AmpC production by clinical relevant microorganisms. Moreover, some bacterial species may produce inducible AmpC beta-lactamases that can be easily overlooked by routine susceptibility tests. We reported here a new test based on the strong inducible effect of imipenem on AmpC genes and the consequent antagonism with ceftazidime. This test is very simple and proved to be helpful in detecting AmpC-inducible enzymes among several species of clinical isolates.

  5. Extracellular cAMP activates molecular signalling pathways associated with sperm capacitation in bovines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Carlos Agustín I; Osycka-Salut, Claudia E; Castellano, Luciana; Cesari, Andreína; Di Siervi, Nicolás; Mutto, Adrián; Johannisson, Anders; Morrell, Jane M; Davio, Carlos; Perez-Martinez, Silvina

    2017-08-01

    Is extracellular cAMP involved in the regulation of signalling pathways in bovine sperm capacitation? Extracellular cAMP induces sperm capacitation through the activation of different signalling pathways that involve phospholipase C (PLC), PKC/ERK1-2 signalling and an increase in sperm Ca2+ levels, as well as soluble AC and cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signalling. In order to fertilize the oocyte, ejaculated spermatozoa must undergo a series of changes in the female reproductive tract, known as capacitation. This correlates with a number of membrane and metabolic modifications that include an increased influx of bicarbonate and Ca2+, activation of a soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) to produce cAMP, PKA activation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and the development of hyperactivated motility. We previously reported that cAMP efflux by Multidrug Resistance Protein 4 (MRP4) occurs during sperm capacitation and the pharmacological blockade of this inhibits the process. Moreover, the supplementation of incubation media with cAMP abolishes the inhibition and leads to sperm capacitation, suggesting that extracellular cAMP regulates crucial signalling cascades involved in this process. Bovine sperm were selected by the wool glass column method, and washed by centrifugation in BSA-Free Tyrode's Albumin Lactate Pyruvate (sp-TALP). Pellets were resuspended then diluted for each treatment. For in vitro capacitation, 10 to 15 × 106 SPZ/ml were incubated in 0.3% BSA sp-TALP at 38.5°C for 45 min under different experimental conditions. To evaluate the role of extracellular cAMP on different events associated with sperm capacitation, 10 nM cAMP was added to the incubation medium as well as different inhibitors of enzymes associated with signalling transduction pathways: U73122 (PLC inhibitor, 10 μM), Gö6983 (PKC inhibitor, 10 μM), PD98059 (ERK-1/2 inhibitor, 30 μM), H89 and KT (PKA inhibitors, 50 μM and 100 nM, respectively), KH7 (sAC inhibitor, 10 μM), BAPTA

  6. Constitutive high expression of chromosomal beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by a new insertion sequence (IS1669) located in ampD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Hentzer, Morten

    2002-01-01

    resistant, constitutive beta-lactamase-producing variant contained no mutations in ampD, but a point mutation was observed in ampR, resulting in an Asp-135-->Asn change. An identical mutation of AmpR in Enterobacter cloacae has been reported to cause a 450-fold higher AmpC expression. However, in many...... of the isolates expressing high levels of chromosomal beta-lactamase, no changes were found in either ampD, ampR, or in the promoter region of ampD, ampR, or ampC. Our results suggest that multiple pathways may exist leading to increased antimicrobial resistance due to chromosomal beta-lactamase.......The expression of chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is negatively regulated by the activity of an amidase, AmpD. In the present study we examined resistant clinical P. aeruginosa strains and several resistant variants isolated from in vivo and in vitro biofilms for mutations...

  7. FRET biosensor uncovers cAMP nano-domains at β-adrenergic targets that dictate precise tuning of cardiac contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdo, Nicoletta C; Berrera, Marco; Koschinski, Andreas; Brescia, Marcella; Machado, Matias R; Carr, Carolyn; Wright, Peter; Gorelik, Julia; Morotti, Stefano; Grandi, Eleonora; Bers, Donald M; Pantano, Sergio; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2017-04-20

    Compartmentalized cAMP/PKA signalling is now recognized as important for physiology and pathophysiology, yet a detailed understanding of the properties, regulation and function of local cAMP/PKA signals is lacking. Here we present a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensor, CUTie, which detects compartmentalized cAMP with unprecedented accuracy. CUTie, targeted to specific multiprotein complexes at discrete plasmalemmal, sarcoplasmic reticular and myofilament sites, reveals differential kinetics and amplitudes of localized cAMP signals. This nanoscopic heterogeneity of cAMP signals is necessary to optimize cardiac contractility upon adrenergic activation. At low adrenergic levels, and those mimicking heart failure, differential local cAMP responses are exacerbated, with near abolition of cAMP signalling at certain locations. This work provides tools and fundamental mechanistic insights into subcellular adrenergic signalling in normal and pathological cardiac function.

  8. Ampère–Maxwell law for a conducting wire: a topological perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J M; Anacleto, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    The integral form of Ampère–Maxwell's law for an arbitrarily-shaped wire is recast from a topological perspective, eliminating the need to use conduction current and displacement current terms to determine the magnetic field circulation around an arbitrarily-shaped loop. A generalized flux of the electric field is defined, enabling Ampère–Maxwell's law for magnetic field circulation to be written in a form which parallels that in the absence of conduction current. It is hoped that this work has educational interest since it provides an example of how topology can simplify the formulation of physical laws. The ideas presented herein are primarily intended for undergraduate students of electromagnetism, but may also be of interest to graduate students and teachers. (paper)

  9. Cyclic AMP agonist inhibition increases at low levels of histamine release from human basophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, R.S.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    The relationship between the intensity of the signal for antigen-induced immunoglobulin E-mediated histamine release from human basophils and the concentration of agonist needed to inhibit release has been determined. The agonists, prostaglandin E1, dimaprit, fenoterol, isobutylmethylxanthine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, all act by increasing the cyclic AMP level. Each agonist was 10- to 1000-fold more potent (relative ID50) at low levels of histamine release (5-10% of total histamine) than at high levels (50-80%). Thus, the inhibitory potential of a drug is a function of the concentration of antigen used to initiate the response. Our results are now more in accord with the inhibitory profile of these drugs in human lung tissue. It is suggested that in vivo release is likely to be low and that this is the level at which to evaluate drugs in vitro.

  10. Export of cyclic AMP by avian red cells and inhibition by prostaglandin A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heasley, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism by which PGA 1 inhibits cAMP export by avian red cells was studied, to provide details on the molecular mechanism of a prostaglandin action and on the process of cAMP export itself. The interaction of PGA 1 with pigeon red cells is a multi-step process of uptake, metabolism and secretion. [ 3 H]PGA rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized (V/sub max/ ≥ 1 nmol/min/10 7 cells) to a compound (5) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethyl acetate extraction. Chromatographic analyses, amino acid content and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry reveal that the polar metabolite is conjugated with glutathione (PGA 1 -GSH) at C-11 via a thioether bond and is largely (80%) reduced to the C-9 hydroxyl derivative

  11. Small-angle neutron scattering from poly(NIPA-co-AMPS) gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travas-Sejdic, J.; Easteal, A.; Knott, R.

    2000-01-01

    was reversed; that is the lower cross-link density, the higher the scattered intensity. Therefore, the role of cross-links at high temperature was to suppress microphase separation. The fitting of the experimental data with the Rabin and Panyukov theory indicated qualitative agreement.......The microstructure of the poly( N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamido- 2-methyl-1-propane sulphonic acid) gel, poly( NIPA-co-AMPS), was investigated as a function of temperature and cross-link density using the small angle neutron scattering technique. The sample temperature was varied in the range...... 30 to 55C. Two different behaviours of poly( NIPA-co-AMPS) gels were observed. At low temperature (30C), the magnitude of the scattered intensity increased with cross-link density suggesting that additional cross-links introduced more inhomogeneities in the gel network. At high temperatures the trend...

  12. IL-4 induces cAMP and cGMP in human monocytic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dugas

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Human monocytes, preincubated with IFN-γ respond to IL-4 by a cGMP increase through activation of an inducible NO synthase. Here, IL-4 was found to induce an accumulation of cGMP (1 – 3 min and cAMP (20 – 25 min in unstimulated monocytes. This was impaired with NOS inhibitors, but also with EGTA and calcium/calmodulin inhibitors. These results suggest that: (1 IL-4 may stimulate different NOS isoforms in resting and IFN-γ activated monocytes, and (2 cAMP accumulation may be partially dependent on the NO pathway. By RT-PCR, a type III constitutive NOS mRNA was detected in U937 monocytic cells. IL-4 also increased the [Ca2+]i in these cells. Different NOS may thus be expressed in monocytic cells depending on their differentiation and the signals they receive.

  13. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of a brain inositol trisphosphate receptor decreases its release of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supattapone, S.; Danoff, S.K.; Theibert, A.; Joseph, S.K.; Steiner, J.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report the stoichiometric phosphorylation of an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-binding protein from rat brain by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase but not by protein kinase C or Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. This phosphorylation event does not markedly alter [ 3 H]inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-binding characteristics. However, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate is only 10% as potent in releasing 45 Ca 2+ from phosphorylated, as compared with native, cerebellar microsomes. Phosphorylation of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-binding protein by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase may provide a biochemical substrate for second-messenger cross talk

  14. Spatial resolution of cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldieri, Giusi

    2016-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptor signaling starts at the plasma membrane and continues at endosomal stations. In this issue, Inda et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201512075) show that different forms of adenylyl cyclase are activated at the plasma membrane versus endosomes, providing a rationale for the spatial encoding of cAMP signaling. PMID:27402955

  15. Confirmation of Dynamical Characterization to Chaotic Double Scroll playing out Nonlinear Circuit used Op・Amp

    OpenAIRE

    深谷, 義勝; 朱, 伯銘; 紫藤, 進; 鈴木, 郊宇

    1991-01-01

    Many studies on the chaotic phenomena in nonlinear dynamical systems has appaeared recentry. In these research works, the double scroll chaotic attractor be well-known to electronic circuit which has been experimentally observed on oscillating with a negative resistance circuit synthesized by using an Op・Amp. Now, this chaotic behavior aries from complicated interactions between the instantaneous electric energy stored in the capacitors and the instantaneous magnetic energy stored in the indu...

  16. Retinoic acid and cAMP inhibit rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and enhance cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionta, M. [Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Alfenas MG (Brazil); Departamento de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo SP (Brazil); Rosa, M.C.; Almeida, R.B.; Freitas, V.M.; Rezende-Teixeira, P.; Machado-Santelli, G.M. [Departamento de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third highest cause of cancer death worldwide. In general, the disease is diagnosed at an advanced stage when potentially curative therapies are no longer feasible. For this reason, it is very important to develop new therapeutic approaches. Retinoic acid (RA) is a natural derivative of vitamin A that regulates important biological processes including cell proliferation and differentiation. In vitro studies have shown that RA is effective in inhibiting growth of HCC cells; however, responsiveness to treatment varies among different HCC cell lines. The objective of the present study was to determine if the combined use of RA (0.1 µM) and cAMP (1 mM), an important second messenger, improves the responsiveness of HCC cells to RA treatment. We evaluated the proliferative behavior of an HCC cell line (HTC) and the expression profile of genes related to cancer signaling pathway (ERK and GSK-3β) and liver differentiation [E-cadherin, connexin 26 (Cx26), and connexin 32 (Cx32)]. RA and cAMP were effective in inhibiting the proliferation of HTC cells independently of combined use. However, when a mixture of RA and cAMP was used, the signals concerning the degree of cell differentiation were increased. As demonstrated by Western blot, the treatment increased E-cadherin, Cx26, Cx32 and Ser9-GSK-3β (inactive form) expression while the expression of Cx43, Tyr216-GSK-3β (active form) and phosphorylated ERK decreased. Furthermore, telomerase activity was inhibited along treatment. Taken together, the results showed that the combined use of RA and cAMP is more effective in inducing differentiation of HTC cells.

  17. cAMP and extrarenal vasopressin V2 receptors in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liard, J F

    1992-12-01

    The effect of vasopressin analogues on plasma adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) concentration was examined in a group of five conscious dogs instrumented for the measurement of arterial pressure and cardiac output (electromagnetic flowmeter). These dogs were infused for 20 min with a selective antidiuretic (V2) agonist, desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP, 10 ng.kg-1 x min-1). This infusion was repeated on another day in the presence of the combined V1-V2 antagonist d(CH2)5-D-Tyr(Et)-4-valine,8-arginine vasopressin. The dogs also received an infusion of the selective V1 agonist 2-phenylalanine,8-ornithine oxytocin (Phe-OrnOT) at a rate of 10 ng.kg-1 x min-1. The effect of these infusions was compared with those of an isotonic saline infusion. Plasma cAMP measured in the aorta remained unchanged during all infusions but that of the selective V2 agonist DDAVP alone, during which it increased significantly from 22.4 +/- 0.8 to 32.6 +/- 4.6 and 37.0 +/- 4.1 pmol/ml after 10 and 20 min, respectively. In the plasma sampled from the inferior vena cava caudal to the renal veins, cAMP increased during DDAVP infusion from 22.2 +/- 2.5 to 39.2 +/- 3.8 and 36.0 +/- 4.0 pmol/ml after 10 and 20 min, respectively. The infusion of DDAVP was later given to the same dogs under anesthesia after bilateral nephrectomy, which did not modify the effect of DDAVP on arterial plasma cAMP. In another group of four conscious dogs, infusion of DDAVP at the same rate did not induce significant changes in plasma catecholamines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Adenine Nucleotide Metabolism and a Role for AMP in Modulating Flagellar Waveforms in Mouse Sperm1

    OpenAIRE

    Vadnais, Melissa L.; Cao, Wenlei; Aghajanian, Haig K.; Haig-Ladewig, Lisa; Lin, Angel M.; Al-Alao, Osama; Gerton, George L.

    2014-01-01

    While most ATP, the main energy source driving sperm motility, is derived from glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, the metabolic demands of the cell require the efficient use of power stored in high-energy phosphate bonds. In times of high energy consumption, adenylate kinase (AK) scavenges one ATP molecule by transphosphorylation of two molecules of ADP, simultaneously yielding one molecule of AMP as a by-product. Either ATP or ADP supported motility of detergent-modeled cauda epididym...

  19. Adenine nucleotide metabolism and a role for AMP in modulating flagellar waveforms in mouse sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadnais, Melissa L; Cao, Wenlei; Aghajanian, Haig K; Haig-Ladewig, Lisa; Lin, Angel M; Al-Alao, Osama; Gerton, George L

    2014-06-01

    While most ATP, the main energy source driving sperm motility, is derived from glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, the metabolic demands of the cell require the efficient use of power stored in high-energy phosphate bonds. In times of high energy consumption, adenylate kinase (AK) scavenges one ATP molecule by transphosphorylation of two molecules of ADP, simultaneously yielding one molecule of AMP as a by-product. Either ATP or ADP supported motility of detergent-modeled cauda epididymal mouse sperm, indicating that flagellar AKs are functional. However, the ensuing flagellar waveforms fueled by ATP or ADP were qualitatively different. Motility driven by ATP was rapid but restricted to the distal region of the sperm tail, whereas ADP produced slower and more fluid waves that propagated down the full flagellum. Characterization of wave patterns by tracing and superimposing the images of the flagella, quantifying the differences using digital image analysis, and computer-assisted sperm analysis revealed differences in the amplitude, periodicity, and propagation of the waves between detergent-modeled sperm treated with either ATP or ADP. Surprisingly, addition of AMP to the incubation medium containing ATP recapitulated the pattern of sperm motility seen with ADP alone. In addition to AK1 and AK2, which we previously demonstrated are present in outer dense fibers and mitochondrial sheath of the mouse sperm tail, we show that another AK, AK8, is present in a third flagellar compartment, the axoneme. These results extend the known regulators of sperm motility to include AMP, which may be operating through an AMP-activated protein kinase. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  20. Deciphering the actions of antiparkinsonian and antipsychotic drugs on cAMP/DARPP-32 signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto eFisone

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia are affected by several neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, many of which are treated with drugs acting on the dopamine system. For instance, the loss of dopaminergic input to the striatum, which is the main pathological feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD, is counteracted by administering the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA. Furthermore, psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia, are treated with drugs that act as antagonists at the D2-type of dopamine receptor (D2R. The use of L-DOPA and typical antipsychotic drugs, such as haloperidol, is limited by the emergence of motor side effects, particularly after prolonged use. Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs represent an ideal tool to investigate the molecular changes implicated in these conditions. MSNs receive a large glutamatergic innervation from cortex, thalamus and limbic structures, which is controlled by dopaminergic projections originating in the midbrain. There are two large populations of striatal MSNs, which differ based on their connectivity to the output nuclei of the basal ganglia and on their ability to express dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs or D2Rs. Administration of L-DOPA promotes cAMP signaling and activates the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32 in the D1R-expressing MSNs, which form the striatonigral, direct pathway. Conversely, haloperidol activates the cAMP/DARPP-32 cascade in D2R-expressing MSNs, which form the striatopallidal, indirect pathway. This review describes the effects produced on downstream effector proteins by stimulation of cAMP/DARPP-32 signaling in these two groups of MSNs. Particular emphasis is given to the regulation of the GluR1 subunit of the AMPA glutamate receptor, the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK, focusing on functional role and potential pathological relevance.

  1. Deciphering the Actions of Antiparkinsonian and Antipsychotic Drugs on cAMP/DARPP-32 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Feyder, Michael; Fisone, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    The basal ganglia are affected by several neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, many of which are treated with drugs acting on the dopamine system. For instance, the loss of dopaminergic input to the striatum, which is the main pathological feature of Parkinson's disease, is counteracted by administering the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA. Furthermore, psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia, are treated with drugs that act as antagonists at the D2-type of dopamine receptor (D2R). The use of L-DOPA and typical antipsychotic drugs, such as haloperidol, is limited by the emergence of motor side-effects, particularly after prolonged use. Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) represent an ideal tool to investigate the molecular changes implicated in these conditions. MSNs receive a large glutamatergic innervation from cortex, thalamus, and limbic structures, and are controlled by dopaminergic projections originating in the midbrain. There are two large populations of striatal MSNs, which differ based on their connectivity to the output nuclei of the basal ganglia and on their ability to express dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) or D2Rs. Administration of L-DOPA promotes cAMP signaling and activates the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) in the D1R-expressing MSNs, which form the striatonigral, or direct pathway. Conversely, haloperidol activates the cAMP/DARPP-32 cascade in D2R-expressing MSNs, which form the striatopallidal, or indirect pathway. This review describes the effects produced on downstream effector proteins by stimulation of cAMP/DARPP-32 signaling in these two groups of MSNs. Particular emphasis is given to the regulation of the GluR1 subunit of the α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate glutamate receptor, the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2, focusing on functional role and potential pathological relevance.

  2. Mining frequent patterns for AMP-activated protein kinase regulation on skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qingfeng; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has emerged as a significant signaling intermediary that regulates metabolisms in response to energy demand and supply. An investigation into the degree of activation and deactivation of AMPK subunits under exercise can provide valuable data for understanding AMPK. In particular, the effect of AMPK on muscle cellular energy status makes this protein a promising pharmacological target for disease treatment. As more AMPK regulation data ar...

  3. Production and degradation of AMP in cultured rat skeletal and heart muscle: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoref-Shani, E.; Kessler-Icekson, G.; Shainberg, A.; Sperling, O.

    1986-01-01

    The authors clarify the mechanisms operating in the skeletal and heart muscles to produce and degrade AMP. Rat myotube and cardiomyocyte cultures were prepared and purine synthesis was gauged by the rate of C 14-formate incorporation into purines. It is shown that the cell cultures exhibited capacity for de novo purine synthesis, indicated by incorporation of C 14-formate into purines. The rate of C 14-formate into the cardiomyocyte purines was markedly lower than that in the skeletal muscle myotubes

  4. Separation of radio cesium from PUREX feed solution by sorption on composite ammonium molybdo phosphate (AMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, I.J.; Achuthan, P.V.; Jain, S.; Janardanan, C.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Wattal, P.K.; Ramanujam, A.

    2001-01-01

    Composite AMP exchanger was developed and evaluated for separation of radio cesium from dissolver solutions of PUREX process using a column experiment. The composite shows excellent sorption of radio cesium from dissolver solutions without any loss of plutonium and uranium. The removal of radio cesium from dissolver solutions will help in lowering the degradation of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in the solvent extraction process and will also help in reducing the radiation related problems. (author)

  5. Cryptochrome mediates circadian regulation of cAMP signaling and hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Eric E; Liu, Yi; Dentin, Renaud; Pongsawakul, Pagkapol Y; Liu, Andrew C; Hirota, Tsuyoshi; Nusinow, Dmitri A; Sun, Xiujie; Landais, Severine; Kodama, Yuzo; Brenner, David A; Montminy, Marc; Kay, Steve A

    2010-10-01

    During fasting, mammals maintain normal glucose homeostasis by stimulating hepatic gluconeogenesis. Elevations in circulating glucagon and epinephrine, two hormones that activate hepatic gluconeogenesis, trigger the cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (Creb) and dephosphorylation of the Creb-regulated transcription coactivator-2 (Crtc2)--two key transcriptional regulators of this process. Although the underlying mechanism is unclear, hepatic gluconeogenesis is also regulated by the circadian clock, which coordinates glucose metabolism with changes in the external environment. Circadian control of gene expression is achieved by two transcriptional activators, Clock and Bmal1, which stimulate cryptochrome (Cry1 and Cry2) and Period (Per1, Per2 and Per3) repressors that feed back on Clock-Bmal1 activity. Here we show that Creb activity during fasting is modulated by Cry1 and Cry2, which are rhythmically expressed in the liver. Cry1 expression was elevated during the night-day transition, when it reduced fasting gluconeogenic gene expression by blocking glucagon-mediated increases in intracellular cAMP concentrations and in the protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of Creb. In biochemical reconstitution studies, we found that Cry1 inhibited accumulation of cAMP in response to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation but not to forskolin, a direct activator of adenyl cyclase. Cry proteins seemed to modulate GPCR activity directly through interaction with G(s)α. As hepatic overexpression of Cry1 lowered blood glucose concentrations and improved insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant db/db mice, our results suggest that compounds that enhance cryptochrome activity may provide therapeutic benefit to individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  6. Nitric oxide switches on glycolysis through the AMP protein kinase and 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida Parra, Ángeles; Moncada, Salvador; Bolaños Hernández, Juan Pedro

    2004-01-01

    El óxido nítrico activa la glucolisis en los astrocitos a través de una cascada de señalización en la que interviene la AMP kinasa, que fosforila (y activa) la fosfofructokinasa-2, enzima responsable de la biosíntesis de fructosa-2, 6-bisfosfato, efector alostérico positivo de la fosfofructokinasa-1. Este mecanismo es citoprotector.

  7. c-di-AMP: An Essential Molecule in the Signaling Pathways that Regulate the Viability and Virulence of Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Tazin; Port, Gary C; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2017-08-07

    Signal transduction pathways enable organisms to monitor their external environment and adjust gene regulation to appropriately modify their cellular processes. Second messenger nucleotides including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c-GMP), cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), and cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) play key roles in many signal transduction pathways used by prokaryotes and/or eukaryotes. Among the various second messenger nucleotides molecules, c-di-AMP was discovered recently and has since been shown to be involved in cell growth, survival, and regulation of virulence, primarily within Gram-positive bacteria. The cellular level of c-di-AMP is maintained by a family of c-di-AMP synthesizing enzymes, diadenylate cyclases (DACs), and degradation enzymes, phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Genetic manipulation of DACs and PDEs have demonstrated that alteration of c-di-AMP levels impacts both growth and virulence of microorganisms. Unlike other second messenger molecules, c-di-AMP is essential for growth in several bacterial species as many basic cellular functions are regulated by c-di-AMP including cell wall maintenance, potassium ion homeostasis, DNA damage repair, etc. c-di-AMP follows a typical second messenger signaling pathway, beginning with binding to receptor molecules to subsequent regulation of downstream cellular processes. While c-di-AMP binds to specific proteins that regulate pathways in bacterial cells, c-di-AMP also binds to regulatory RNA molecules that control potassium ion channel expression in Bacillus subtilis . c-di-AMP signaling also occurs in eukaryotes, as bacterially produced c-di-AMP stimulates host immune responses during infection through binding of innate immune surveillance proteins. Due to its existence in diverse microorganisms, its involvement in crucial cellular activities, and its stimulating activity in host immune responses, c-di-AMP signaling pathway has become

  8. Continuous and Lp estimates for the complex Monge-Ampère equation on bounded domains in ℂn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick W. Darko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous solutions with continuous data and Lp solutions with Lp data are obtained for the complex Monge-Ampère equation on bounded domains, without requiring any smoothness of the domains.

  9. β-Keto and β-hydroxyphosphonate analogs of biotin-5’-AMP are inhibitors of holocarboxylase synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittiwong, Wantanee; Cordonier, Elizabeth L.; Zempleni, Janos; Dussault, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the covalent attachment of biotin to cytoplasmic and mitochondrial carboxylases, nuclear histones, and over a hundred human proteins. Nonhydrolyzable ketophosphonate (β-ketoP) and hydroxyphosphonate (β-hydroxyP) analogs of biotin-5′-AMP inhibit holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) with IC50 values of 39.7 μM and 203.7 μM. By comparison, an IC50 value of 7 μM was observed with the previously reported biotinol-5'-AMP. The Ki values, 3.4 μM and 17.3 μM, respectively, are consistent with the IC50 results, and close to the Ki obtained for biotinol-5'-AMP (7 μM). The β-ketoP and β-hydroxyP molecules are competitive inhibitors of HLCS while biotinol-5'-AMP inhibited HLCS by a mixed mechanism. PMID:25466176

  10. β-Keto and β-hydroxyphosphonate analogs of biotin-5'-AMP are inhibitors of holocarboxylase synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittiwong, Wantanee; Cordonier, Elizabeth L; Zempleni, Janos; Dussault, Patrick H

    2014-12-15

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the covalent attachment of biotin to cytoplasmic and mitochondrial carboxylases, nuclear histones, and over a hundred human proteins. Nonhydrolyzable ketophosphonate (β-ketoP) and hydroxyphosphonate (β-hydroxyP) analogs of biotin-5'-AMP inhibit holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) with IC50 values of 39.7 μM and 203.7 μM. By comparison, an IC50 value of 7 μM was observed with the previously reported biotinol-5'-AMP. The Ki values, 3.4 μM and 17.3 μM, respectively, are consistent with the IC50 results, and close to the Ki obtained for biotinol-5'-AMP (7 μM). The β-ketoP and β-hydroxyP molecules are competitive inhibitors of HLCS while biotinol-5'-AMP inhibited HLCS by a mixed mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Validation of the AmpFlSTR« SEfiler Plus(TM) PCR Amplification kit for forensic STR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund, Stine Frisk; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Morling, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Validation of the AmpFlSTR« SEfiler Plus(TM) PCR Amplification kit with 29 and 30 PCR cycles for forensic STR analysis demonstrated that the kit had fewer artefacts than the AmpFlSTR« SGM Plus(TM) kit (28 PCR cycles). The SEfiler Plus kit was more sensitive and devoid of colour artefacts, but sho......Validation of the AmpFlSTR« SEfiler Plus(TM) PCR Amplification kit with 29 and 30 PCR cycles for forensic STR analysis demonstrated that the kit had fewer artefacts than the AmpFlSTR« SGM Plus(TM) kit (28 PCR cycles). The SEfiler Plus kit was more sensitive and devoid of colour artefacts...

  12. Development of a 300 Amp-hr high rate lithium thionyl chloride cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Gerard H.

    1991-05-01

    The development of a high-rate lithium thionyl chloride cylindrical cell with parallel plate electrodes is discussed. The development was divided into three phases: phase 1, a 150 Amp/hour low rate (1 mA/sq cm) design; phase 2, a 25 Amp/hour high rate (5 mA/sq cm) design; and phase 3, a 300 Amp/hour high rate (5 mA/sq cm) design. The basic design is the same for all three cells. The electrodes are perpendicular to the axis of the cylinder. Multiple electrodes are bussed up the side of the cylinder, 180 deg apart allowing excellent anode and cathode utilization. It is a lithium limited design with excess electrolyte. The cathode is Shawinigan or Gulf Acetylene black with no catalyst. The electrolyte is 1.8 Molar lithium tetrachloroaluminate (LiAlCl4) in thionyl chloride. All cell cases are 304L Stainless Steel with a BS&B burst disc.

  13. Seizure Suppression by High Temperature via cAMP Modulation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saras, Arunesh; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Bang-sensitive (BS) Drosophila mutants display characteristic seizure-like activity (SLA) and paralysis after mechanical shock . After high-frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) of the brain, they generate robust seizures at very low threshold voltage. Here we report an important phenomenon, which effectively suppresses SLA in BS mutants. High temperature causes seizure suppression in all BS mutants (parabss1, eas, sda) examined in this study. This effect is fully reversible and flies show complete recovery from BS paralysis once the temperature effect is nullified. High temperature induces an increase in seizure threshold after a brief pulse of heat shock (HS). By genetic screening, we identified the involvement of cAMP in the suppression of seizures by high temperature. We propose that HS induces adenylyl cyclase which in turn increases cAMP concentration which eventually suppresses seizures in mutant flies. In summary, we describe an unusual phenomenon, where high temperature can suppress SLA in flies by modulating cAMP concentration. PMID:27558668

  14. Posttranslational processing of SREBP-1 in rat hepatocytes is regulated by insulin and cAMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellaturu, Chandrahasa R.; Deng Xiong; Cagen, Lauren M.; Wilcox, Henry G.; Park, Edwards A.; Raghow, Rajendra; Elam, Marshall B.

    2005-01-01

    Insulin and cAMP have opposing effects on de novo fatty acid synthesis in liver and in cultured hepatocytes mediated by sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP). To determine whether these agents regulate the cleavage of full-length SREBP to generate the transcriptionally active N-terminal fragment (nSREBP) in primary rat hepatocytes, an adenoviral vector (Ad-SREBP-1a) was constructed to constitutively express full-length SREBP-1a. Insulin increased, and dibutyryl (db)-cAMP inhibited, generation of nSREBP-1a from its full-length precursor. Insulin stimulated processing of SREBP-1a within 1 h, and the effect was sustained for at least 24 h. The initial stimulation of SREBP processing by insulin preceded measurable reduction in Insig-2 mRNA levels. Rat hepatocytes were also infected with an adenovirus expressing the nuclear form of SREBP-1c (Ad-nSREBP-1c). Insulin increased the half-life of constitutively expressed nSREBP-1c, and this effect of insulin was also inhibited by db-cAMP

  15. Cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart muscle of rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednieks, Maija I.; Popova, Irina A.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    The cellular compartmentalization of the cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart ventricular tissue obtained from rats flown on the Cosmos 1887 is determined. Photoaffinity labeling of soluble and particular cell fractions with a (32P)-8-azido analog of cyclic AMP is followed by electrophoretic separation of the proteins and by autoradiographic identification of the labeled isoforms of cAPK R subunits. It is shown that RII in the particulate subcellular fraction was significantly decreased in heart cells from rats in the flight group when compared to controls. Protein banding patterns in both the cytoplasmic fraction and in a fraction enriched in chromatin-bound proteins exhibited some variability in tissues of individual animals, but showed no changes that could be directly attributed to flight conditions. No significant change was apparent in the distribution of RI or RII cyclic AMP binding in the soluble fractions. It is inferred that the cardiac cell integrity or its protein content is not compromised under flight conditions.

  16. Development of a 300 Amp-hr high rate lithium thionyl chloride cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Gerard H.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a high-rate lithium thionyl chloride cylindrical cell with parallel plate electrodes is discussed. The development was divided into three phases: phase 1, a 150 Amp/hour low rate (1 mA/sq cm) design; phase 2, a 25 Amp/hour high rate (5 mA/sq cm) design; and phase 3, a 300 Amp/hour high rate (5 mA/sq cm) design. The basic design is the same for all three cells. The electrodes are perpendicular to the axis of the cylinder. Multiple electrodes are bussed up the side of the cylinder, 180 deg apart allowing excellent anode and cathode utilization. It is a lithium limited design with excess electrolyte. The cathode is Shawinigan or Gulf Acetylene black with no catalyst. The electrolyte is 1.8 Molar lithium tetrachloroaluminate (LiAlCl4) in thionyl chloride. All cell cases are 304L Stainless Steel with a BS&B burst disc.

  17. Evaluation of in silico algorithms for use with ACMG/AMP clinical variant interpretation guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Oak, Ninad; Plon, Sharon E

    2017-11-28

    The American College of Medical Genetics and American College of Pathologists (ACMG/AMP) variant classification guidelines for clinical reporting are widely used in diagnostic laboratories for variant interpretation. The ACMG/AMP guidelines recommend complete concordance of predictions among all in silico algorithms used without specifying the number or types of algorithms. The subjective nature of this recommendation contributes to discordance of variant classification among clinical laboratories and prevents definitive classification of variants. Using 14,819 benign or pathogenic missense variants from the ClinVar database, we compared performance of 25 algorithms across datasets differing in distinct biological and technical variables. There was wide variability in concordance among different combinations of algorithms with particularly low concordance for benign variants. We also identify a previously unreported source of error in variant interpretation (false concordance) where concordant in silico predictions are opposite to the evidence provided by other sources. We identified recently developed algorithms with high predictive power and robust to variables such as disease mechanism, gene constraint, and mode of inheritance, although poorer performing algorithms are more frequently used based on review of the clinical genetics literature (2011-2017). Our analyses identify algorithms with high performance characteristics independent of underlying disease mechanisms. We describe combinations of algorithms with increased concordance that should improve in silico algorithm usage during assessment of clinically relevant variants using the ACMG/AMP guidelines.

  18. Numerical simulation of Ge solar cells using D-AMPS-1D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Marcela, E-mail: barrera@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida General Paz 1499, San Martin 1650, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Rubinelli, Francisco [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (INTEC)-CONICET, Gueemes 3450, Santa Fe 3000 (Argentina); Rey-Stolle, Ignacio [Instituto de Energia Solar, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Avenida Complutense 30, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Pla, Juan [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida General Paz 1499, San Martin 1650, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    A solar cell is a solid state device that converts the energy of sunlight directly into electricity by the photovoltaic effect. When light with photon energies greater than the band gap is absorbed by a semiconductor material, free electrons and free holes are generated by optical excitation in the material. The main characteristic of a photovoltaic device is the presence of internal electric field able to separate the free electrons and holes so they can pass out of the material to the external circuit before they recombine. Numerical simulation of photovoltaic devices plays a crucial role in their design, performance prediction, and comprehension of the fundamental phenomena ruling their operation. The electrical transport and the optical behavior of the solar cells discussed in this work were studied with the simulation code D-AMPS-1D. This software is an updated version of the one-dimensional (1D) simulation program Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Devices (AMPS) that was initially developed at The Penn State University, USA. Structures such as homojunctions, heterojunctions, multijunctions, etc., resulting from stacking layers of different materials can be studied by appropriately selecting characteristic parameters. In this work, examples of cells simulation made with D-AMPS-1D are shown. Particularly, results of Ge photovoltaic devices are presented. The role of the InGaP buffer on the device was studied. Moreover, a comparison of the simulated electrical parameters with experimental results was performed.

  19. Balanced phono-amps an extension to the 'the sound of silence' editions

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    In 12 chapters (Part I) this extension to the two 'The Sound of Silence' editions covers the development, calculation, construction and measurement of the fully differential (= balanced) phono-amp solution 'RIAA Phono-Amp Engine II'. Additionally, the balanced measurement amplifiers & measurement tools, the discussion on BJT gain stages, the 1/f noise calculation methods for BJTs, the calculation of fully-differential amplifiers, the numerous Mathcad worksheets, and the presentation of test and calibration records fill a further 10 chapters of Part II with essential knowhow that will equip the reader to develop his/her own phono-amp solution in the most balanced way - and of course, as low-noise as possible. Engine II offers eight different amplifying paths from the Engine's input to its output - solid-state as well as valve driven. To expand the input possibilities via an additional external input, any kind of other linear input amplifiers can be connected. Further, a selection of six highly diverse exte...

  20. PKA-mediated Golgi remodeling during cAMP signal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavillard, Fabiola; Hidalgo, Josefina; Megias, Diego; Levitsky, Kostantin L; Velasco, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) is part of the set of signaling proteins that are stably associated to the cytosolic surface of Golgi membranes in mammalian cells. In principle, Golgi-associated PKA could participate in either signal transduction events and/or the coordination of Golgi transport activities. Here, we show data indicating that although Golgi-associated PKA is activated fast and efficiently during cell stimulation by an extracellular ligand it does not contribute significantly to cAMP signal transmission to the nucleus. Instead, most of the PKA catalytic subunits Calphaderived from the Golgi complex remain localized in the perinuclear cytoplasm where they induce changes in Golgi structural organization. Thus, in stimulated cells the Golgi complex appears collapsed, showing increased colocalization of previously segregated markers and exhibiting merging of different proximal cisternae within a single stack. In contrast, the trans-Golgi network remains as a separate compartment. Consequently, the rate of protein transport is increased whereas glycan processing is not severely affected. This remodeling process requires the presence of PKA activity associated to the Golgi membranes. Together these data indicate that Golgi-associated PKA activity is involved in the adaptation of Golgi dynamic organization to extracellular signaling events.

  1. Nobiletin Stimulates Chloride Secretion in Human Bronchial Epithelia via a cAMP/PKA-Dependent Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Hao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid isolated from tangerines, alters ion transport functions in intestinal epithelia, and has antagonistic effects on eosinophilic airway inflammation of asthmatic rats. The present study examined the effects of nobiletin on basal short-circuit current (ISC in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-, and characterized the signal transduction pathways that allowed nobiletin to regulate electrolyte transport. Methods: The ISC measurement technique was used for transepithelial electrical measurements. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i and cAMP were also quantified. Results: Nobiletin stimulated a concentration-dependent increase in ISC, which was due to Cl- secretion. The increase in ISC was inhibited by a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator inhibitor (CFTRinh-172, but not by 4,4'-diisothiocyano-stilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS, Chromanol 293B, clotrimazole, or TRAM-34. Nobiletin-stimulated ISC was also sensitive to a protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor, H89, and an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, MDL-12330A. Nobiletin could not stimulate any increase in ISC in a cystic fibrosis (CF cell line, CFBE41o-, which lacked a functional CFTR. Nobiletin stimulated a real-time increase in cAMP, but not [Ca2+]i. Conclusion: Nobiletin stimulated transepithelial Cl- secretion across human bronchial epithelia. The mechanisms involved activation of adenylate cyclase- and cAMP/PKA-dependent pathways, leading to activation of apical CFTR Cl- channels.

  2. Prostaglandin A1 metabolism and inhibition of cyclic AMP extrusion by avian erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heasley, L.E.; Brunton, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) inhibit active cyclic AMP export from pigeon red cells, PGA1 and PGA2 most potently. To probe the mechanism of this action of PGA1, the authors have studied the interaction of [ 3 H]PGA1 with suspensions of pigeon red cells. The interaction of PGA1 with pigeon red cells is a multistep process of uptake, metabolism, and secretion. [ 3 H] PGA1 rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized to a compound(s) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethylacetate extraction. The glutathione-depleting agent, diamide, inhibits formation of the PGA1 metabolite. The red cells secrete the polar metabolite of PGA1 by a saturable mechanism that lowered temperatures inhibit. Because uptake and metabolism progress with much greater rates than metabolite secretion, red cells transiently concentrate the polar compound intracellularly. Onset and reversal of inhibition of cyclic AMP export by PGA1 coincide with accumulation and secretion of PGA1 metabolite, suggesting that the polar metabolite acts at an intracellular site to inhibit cyclic AMP efflux

  3. Beyond AICA riboside: in search of new specific AMP-activated protein kinase activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigas, Bruno; Sakamoto, Kei; Taleux, Nellie; Reyna, Sara M; Musi, Nicolas; Viollet, Benoit; Hue, Louis

    2009-01-01

    5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside (AICA riboside) has been extensively used in vitro and in vivo to activate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic sensor involved in both cellular and whole body energy homeostasis. However, it has been recently highlighted that AICA riboside also exerts AMPK-independent effects, mainly on AMP-regulated enzymes and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), leading to the conclusion that new compounds with reduced off target effects are needed to specifically activate AMPK. Here, we review recent findings on newly discovered AMPK activators, notably on A-769662, a nonnucleoside compound from the thienopyridone family. We also report that A-769662 is able to activate AMPK and stimulate glucose uptake in both L6 cells and primary myotubes derived from human satellite cells. In addition, A-769662 increases AMPK activity and phosphorylation of its main downstream targets in primary cultured rat hepatocytes but, by contrast with AICA riboside, does neither affect mitochondrial OXPHOS nor change cellular AMP:ATP ratio. We conclude that A-769662 could be one of the new promising chemical agents to activate AMPK with limited AMPK-independent side effects.

  4. The CREB coactivator TORC2 functions as a calcium- and cAMP-sensitive coincidence detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screaton, Robert A; Conkright, Michael D; Katoh, Yoshiko; Best, Jennifer L; Canettieri, Gianluca; Jeffries, Shawn; Guzman, Ernesto; Niessen, Sherry; Yates, John R; Takemori, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhiro; Montminy, Marc

    2004-10-01

    Elevations in circulating glucose and gut hormones during feeding promote pancreatic islet cell viability in part via the calcium- and cAMP-dependent activation of the transcription factor CREB. Here, we describe a signaling module that mediates the synergistic effects of these pathways on cellular gene expression by stimulating the dephosphorylation and nuclear entry of TORC2, a CREB coactivator. This module consists of the calcium-regulated phosphatase calcineurin and the Ser/Thr kinase SIK2, both of which associate with TORC2. Under resting conditions, TORC2 is sequestered in the cytoplasm via a phosphorylation-dependent interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. Triggering of the calcium and cAMP second messenger pathways by glucose and gut hormones disrupts TORC2:14-3-3 complexes via complementary effects on TORC2 dephosphorylation; calcium influx increases calcineurin activity, whereas cAMP inhibits SIK2 kinase activity. Our results illustrate how a phosphatase/kinase module connects two signaling pathways in response to nutrient and hormonal cues.

  5. Preparation and Characteristics of Corn Straw-Co-AMPS-Co-AA Superabsorbent Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Min Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the corn straw after removing the lignin was grafted with 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPS to prepare sulfonated cellulose. The grafting copolymerization between the sulfonated cellulose and acrylic acid (AA was performed using potassium persulfate and N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide as the initiator and crosslinking agent, respectively, to prepare corn straw-co-AMPS-co-AA hydrogels. The structure and properties of the resulting hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and dynamic rheometry. The effects of initiator, crosslinker, monomer neutralization degree, and temperature on the swelling ratio of the hydrogels were studied. The water retention, salt resistance, and recyclability of the corn straw-co-AMPS-co-AA hydrogels were also investigated. The optimum water absorptivity of the corn straw hydrogels was obtained at a polymerization temperature of 50 °C with 1.2% crosslinker, 1:7 ratio of the pretreated corn straw and AA, 2% initiator, and 50% neutralized AA.

  6. Cross-talk between signaling pathways can generate robust oscillations in calcium and cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siso-Nadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers increases substantially through their interaction. In our model of a non-excitable cell, both cAMP and calcium concentrations can oscillate. If mutually inhibitory, cross-talk between the two second messengers can increase the range of agonist concentrations for which oscillations occur. If mutually activating, cross-talk decreases the oscillation range, but can generate 'bursting' oscillations of calcium and may enable better filtering of noise. CONCLUSION: We postulate that this increased dynamical complexity allows the cell to encode more information, particularly if both second messengers encode signals. In their native environments, it is unlikely that cells are exposed to one stimulus at a time, and cross-talk may help generate sufficiently complex responses to allow the cell to discriminate between different combinations and concentrations of extracellular agonists.

  7. Assessment of AmpC Beta-Lactamase Genes among Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HedrooshaMolla Agha-Mirzaeie

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: AmpC bta lactamases play a significant role in creating resistance to third generation cephalosporins worldwide. They mostly express on chromosome of Enterobacteriaceae especially Escherichia coli and cause consequential problem inclinical treatment and lead to failure in diagnosis and phenotypic test recommended byClinical and Laboratory Standards Institute.Methods:Totally 200 E. coli isolates from different hospitals of Tehran were collected. The isolates were screened by disk diffusion method according to the CLSI guidelines. The profiles and prevalence surveys of AmpC (Dha, CITM, Mox and FOX-type β-lactamase genes in clinical isolates of E. coli by phenotypic and molecular methods.  Results:Out of 200 Ecoli isolated, 115 (89.8% and 13 (10.2% isolates were identified as ESBL- and AmpC- beta-lactamase producers, respectively. Among mpC producers, 13 (100% and 5 (38.5% isolates was reported by PCR assay as bla-CITM and Dha respectively. Mox and FOX genes were not detected in any sample.Conclusions:Our results highlight the importance of using molecular detection methods to identify β-lactamase-producer that have resistance to antibiotics. 

  8. Cyclic-AMP regulates postnatal development of neural and behavioral responses to NaCl in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jie; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Heck, Gerard L; DeSimone, John A; West, David; Mahavadi, Sunila; Hojati, Deanna; Murthy, Karnam S; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Spielman, Andrew I; Özdener, Mehmet Hakan; Lyall, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    During postnatal development rats demonstrate an age-dependent increase in NaCl chorda tympani (CT) responses and the number of functional apical amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs) in salt sensing fungiform (FF) taste receptor cells (TRCs). Currently, the intracellular signals that regulate the postnatal development of salt taste have not been identified. We investigated the effect of cAMP, a downstream signal for arginine vasopressin (AVP) action, on the postnatal development of NaCl responses in 19-23 day old rats. ENaC-dependent NaCl CT responses were monitored after lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP) under open-circuit conditions and under ±60 mV lingual voltage clamp. Behavioral responses were tested using 2 bottle/24h NaCl preference tests. The effect of [deamino-Cys1, D-Arg8]-vasopressin (dDAVP, a specific V2R agonist) was investigated on ENaC subunit trafficking in rat FF TRCs and on cAMP generation in cultured adult human FF taste cells (HBO cells). Our results show that in 19-23 day old rats, the ENaC-dependent maximum NaCl CT response was a saturating sigmoidal function of 8-CPT-cAMP concentration. 8-CPT-cAMP increased the voltage-sensitivity of the NaCl CT response and the apical Na+ response conductance. Intravenous injections of dDAVP increased ENaC expression and γ-ENaC trafficking from cytosolic compartment to the apical compartment in rat FF TRCs. In HBO cells dDAVP increased intracellular cAMP and cAMP increased trafficking of γ- and δ-ENaC from cytosolic compartment to the apical compartment 10 min post-cAMP treatment. Control 19-23 day old rats were indifferent to NaCl, but showed clear preference for appetitive NaCl concentrations after 8-CPT-cAMP treatment. Relative to adult rats, 14 day old rats demonstrated significantly less V2R antibody binding in circumvallate TRCs. We conclude that an age-dependent increase in V2R expression produces an AVP-induced incremental increase in cAMP that modulates

  9. Cyclic-AMP regulates postnatal development of neural and behavioral responses to NaCl in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Qian

    Full Text Available During postnatal development rats demonstrate an age-dependent increase in NaCl chorda tympani (CT responses and the number of functional apical amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs in salt sensing fungiform (FF taste receptor cells (TRCs. Currently, the intracellular signals that regulate the postnatal development of salt taste have not been identified. We investigated the effect of cAMP, a downstream signal for arginine vasopressin (AVP action, on the postnatal development of NaCl responses in 19-23 day old rats. ENaC-dependent NaCl CT responses were monitored after lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP under open-circuit conditions and under ±60 mV lingual voltage clamp. Behavioral responses were tested using 2 bottle/24h NaCl preference tests. The effect of [deamino-Cys1, D-Arg8]-vasopressin (dDAVP, a specific V2R agonist was investigated on ENaC subunit trafficking in rat FF TRCs and on cAMP generation in cultured adult human FF taste cells (HBO cells. Our results show that in 19-23 day old rats, the ENaC-dependent maximum NaCl CT response was a saturating sigmoidal function of 8-CPT-cAMP concentration. 8-CPT-cAMP increased the voltage-sensitivity of the NaCl CT response and the apical Na+ response conductance. Intravenous injections of dDAVP increased ENaC expression and γ-ENaC trafficking from cytosolic compartment to the apical compartment in rat FF TRCs. In HBO cells dDAVP increased intracellular cAMP and cAMP increased trafficking of γ- and δ-ENaC from cytosolic compartment to the apical compartment 10 min post-cAMP treatment. Control 19-23 day old rats were indifferent to NaCl, but showed clear preference for appetitive NaCl concentrations after 8-CPT-cAMP treatment. Relative to adult rats, 14 day old rats demonstrated significantly less V2R antibody binding in circumvallate TRCs. We conclude that an age-dependent increase in V2R expression produces an AVP-induced incremental increase in cAMP

  10. The Initial and Neumann Boundary Value Problem for a Class Parabolic Monge-Ampère Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the existence, uniqueness, and asymptotic behavior of a classical solution to the initial and Neumann boundary value problem for a class nonlinear parabolic equation of Monge-Ampère type. We show that such solution exists for all times and is unique. It converges eventually to a solution that satisfies a Neumann type problem for nonlinear elliptic equation of Monge-Ampère type.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF P2-PURINOCEPTOR MEDIATED CYCLIC-AMP FORMATION IN MOUSE C2C12 MYOTUBES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENNING, RH; DUIN, M; DENHERTOG, A; NELEMANS, A

    1 The formation of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3), induced by ATP and other nucleotides was investigated in mouse C2Cl2 myotubes. 2 ATP (100 muM) and ATPgammaS (100 muM) caused a sustained increase in cyclic AMP content of the cells,

  12. An Investigation of the Prevalence of AmpC-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Clinical Samples in Zahedan City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Adabi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: AmpC beta-lactamases are among cephalosporinases encoded on the chromosomes of many Enterobacteriaceae. In many bacteria, induction of AmpC enzymes can be made at a very high level by numerous mutations. In this study, the prevalence of chromosomal AmpC genes, was investigated in the isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from teaching hospitals in Zahedan city in 2015. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 100 P. aeruginosa isolates were isolated from 391 clinical samples using biochemical and conventional methods. cefoxitin (30μg disk diffusion method was used to isolate AmpC-producing strains, and multiplex PCR was used to identify chromosomal AmpC genes. ESBL containing strains was assessed using ceftazidime (30μg and cefotaxime/clavulanic acid (30μg/10μg disk diffusion tests. Data analysis was performed using χ2 test. Results: In primary phenotypic screening, out of 100 P. aeruginosa isolated, 88 isolates were ESBL producers and 20 isolates (20% were AmpC beta-lactamase producers. Among 20 phenotypically identified AmpC producing isolates, 19 isolates (95% had FOX gene, 7 isolates (35% had EBC gene, 4 isolates (20% had ACC gene, and 15 isolates isolates (75% had DHA gene, which were detected by multiPlex PCR assay. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that the presence of AmpC leads to resistance of bacteria to many cephalosporins. Also, use of multiplex PCR yields the best results in the group identification of these genes.

  13. Validation of the AmpFlSTR« SEfiler Plus(TM) PCR Amplification kit for forensic STR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund, Stine Frisk; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Morling, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Validation of the AmpFlSTR« SEfiler Plus(TM) PCR Amplification kit with 29 and 30 PCR cycles for forensic STR analysis demonstrated that the kit had fewer artefacts than the AmpFlSTR« SGM Plus(TM) kit (28 PCR cycles). The SEfiler Plus kit was more sensitive and devoid of colour artefacts, but sho......, but showed more stutters, drop-ins, drop-outs and allelic imbalances...

  14. Presence of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in the broiler production pyramid: a descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy M Dierikx

    Full Text Available Broilers and broiler meat products are highly contaminated with extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL or plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and are considered to be a source for human infections. Both horizontal and vertical transmission might play a role in the presence of these strains in broilers. As not much is known about the presence of these strains in the whole production pyramid, the epidemiology of ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli in the Dutch broiler production pyramid was examined. Cloacal swabs of Grandparent stock (GPS birds (one-/two-days (breed A and B, 18 and 31 weeks old (breed A, one-day old Parent stock birds (breed A and B and broiler chickens of increasing age (breed A were selectively cultured to detect ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates. ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates were found at all levels in the broiler production pyramid in both broiler breeds examined. Prevalence was already relatively high at the top of the broiler production pyramid. At broiler farms ESBL/AmpC producing E. coli were still present in the environment of the poultry house after cleaning and disinfection. Feed samples taken in the poultry house also became contaminated with ESBL/AmpC producing E. coli after one or more production weeks. The prevalence of ESBL/AmpC-positive birds at broiler farms increased within the first week from 0-24% to 96-100% independent of the use of antibiotics and stayed 100% until slaughter. In GPS breed A, prevalence at 2 days, 18 weeks and 31 weeks stayed below 50% except when beta-lactam antibiotics were administered. In that case prevalence increased to 100%. Interventions minimizing ESBL/AmpC contamination in broilers should focus on preventing horizontal and vertical spread, especially in relation to broiler production farms.

  15. Biochemical studies on the DNA binding function of the cyclic-amp reactor protein of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is an allosteric protein in which binding of cAMP effects a conformational change with a consequent increased affinity for DNA. Binding of double-stranded deoxyribopolynucleotides and calf thymus DNA by cAMP-CRP confers protection against attack by trypsin, subtilisin, Staph. aureus V8 protease and clostripain. Of the single-stranded deoxy- and ribopolynucleotides tested, only r(I)/sub n/ and r(A)/sub n/ gave significant protection against attack by these proteases. In the absence of cAMP, CRP is resistant to proteolysis. Incubation of CRP-DNA with trypsin results in the accumulation of two novel fragments. CRP-DNA is partially sensitive to digestion by chymotrypsin but resistant to attack by subtilisin, the Staph. aureus V8 protease and clostripain. Cleavage of CRP-DNA to fragments is accompanied by the loss of /sup 3/H-cAMP binding activity. Modification of the arginines with phenylglyoxal or butanedione results in loss of DNA binding activity. cAMP-CRP incorporates more /sup 14/C-phenylglyoxal than unliganded CRP. Titration of the arginines with /sup 14/C-phenylglyoxal to where over 90% of the DNA binding activity is lost results in incorporation of one mole of reagent per mole of subunit.

  16. Bronchodilator responses after methacholine and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) challenges in children with asthma: their relationships with eosinophil markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Young; Seo, Sung Chul; Kim, Young Il; Chung, Bo Hyun; Song, Dae Jin; Choung, Ji Tae

    2012-09-01

    Bronchodilator responsiveness (BDR) and eosinophilic inflammation are characteristic features of asthma. Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the relationships of BDR after methacholine challenge or adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) challenge to blood eosinophil markers in children with asthma. Methacholine and AMP challenges were performed on 69 children with mild intermittent to moderate persistent asthma. BDR was calculated as the change in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, expressed as percentage change of the value immediately after the each challenge and the value after inhalation of salbutamol. Serum total IgE levels, blood eosinophil counts, and serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) levels were determined for each subject. A positive relationship between serum total IgE levels and BDR was found only after the AMP challenge (R(2) = 0.345, p = .001) rather than after the methacholine challenge (R(2) = 0.007, p = .495). Peripheral blood eosinophil counts correlated more significantly with BDR after AMP challenge (R(2) = 0.212, p = .001) than BDR after methacholine challenge (R(2) = 0.002, p = .724). Both BDR after methacholine challenge (R(2) = 0.063, p = .038) and BDR after AMP challenge (R(2) = 0.192, p = .001) were significantly correlated with serum ECP levels. BDR after AMP challenge may be more closely related to eosinophilic inflammation, compared with that after methacholine challenge.

  17. Formation of a covalent complex between the terminal protein of pneumococcal bacteriophage Cp-1 and 5'-dAMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, P.; Hermoso, J.M.; Garcia, J.A.; Garcia, E.; Lopez, R.; Salas, M.

    1986-04-01

    Incubation of extracts of Cp-1-infected Streptococcus pneumoniae with (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)dATP produced a labeled protein with the electrophoretic mobility of the Cp-1 terminal protein. The reaction product was resistant to treatment with micrococcal nuclease and sensitive to treatment with proteinase K. Incubation of the /sup 32/P-labeled protein with 5 M piperidine for 4 h at 50/sup 0/C released 5'-dAMP, indicating that a covalent complex between the terminal protein and 5'-dAMP was formed in vitro. When the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates were included in the reaction mixture, a labeled complex of slower electrophoretic mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels than the terminal protein-dAMP complex was also found, indicating that the Cp-1 terminal protein-dAMP complex can be elongated and, therefore, that it is an initiation complex. Treatment of the /sup 32/P-labeled terminal protein-dAMP complex with 5.8 M HCl at 110/sup 0/C for 2 h yielded phosphothreonine. These results, together with the resistance of the terminal protein-DNA linkage to hydroxylamine, suggest that the Cp-1 terminal protein is covalently linked to the DNA through a phosphoester bond between L-threonine and 5'-dAMP, namely, a O-5'-deoxyadenylyl-L-threonine bond.

  18. Formation of a covalent complex between the terminal protein of pneumococcal bacteriophage Cp-1 and 5'-dAMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, P.; Hermoso, J.M.; Garcia, J.A.; Garcia, E.; Lopez, R.; Salas, M.

    1986-01-01

    Incubation of extracts of Cp-1-infected Streptococcus pneumoniae with [α- 32 P]dATP produced a labeled protein with the electrophoretic mobility of the Cp-1 terminal protein. The reaction product was resistant to treatment with micrococcal nuclease and sensitive to treatment with proteinase K. Incubation of the 32 P-labeled protein with 5 M piperidine for 4 h at 50 0 C released 5'-dAMP, indicating that a covalent complex between the terminal protein and 5'-dAMP was formed in vitro. When the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates were included in the reaction mixture, a labeled complex of slower electrophoretic mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels than the terminal protein-dAMP complex was also found, indicating that the Cp-1 terminal protein-dAMP complex can be elongated and, therefore, that it is an initiation complex. Treatment of the 32 P-labeled terminal protein-dAMP complex with 5.8 M HCl at 110 0 C for 2 h yielded phosphothreonine. These results, together with the resistance of the terminal protein-DNA linkage to hydroxylamine, suggest that the Cp-1 terminal protein is covalently linked to the DNA through a phosphoester bond between L-threonine and 5'-dAMP, namely, a O-5'-deoxyadenylyl-L-threonine bond

  19. Subcellular compartmentation, interdependency and dynamics of the cyclic AMP-dependent PKA subunits during pathogenic differentiation in rice blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Poonguzhali; Tham, Hong Fai; Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Naqvi, Naweed I

    2017-08-01

    The cAMP-dependent PKA signalling plays a central role in growth, asexual development and pathogenesis in fungal pathogens. Here, we functionally characterised RPKA, the regulatory subunit of cAMP/PKA and studied the dynamics and organisation of the PKA subunits in the rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. The RPKA subunit was essential for proper vegetative growth, asexual sporulation and surface hydrophobicity in M. oryzae. A spontaneous suppressor mutation, SMR19, that restored growth and conidiation in the RPKA deletion mutant was isolated and characterised. SMR19 enhanced conidiation and appressorium formation but failed to suppress the pathogenesis defects in rpkAΔ. The PKA activity was undetectable in the mycelial extracts of SMR19, which showed a single mutation (val242leu) in the highly conserved active site of the catalytic subunit (CPKA) of cAMP/PKA. The two subunits of cAMP/PKA showed different subcellular localisation patterns with RpkA being predominantly nucleocytoplasmic in conidia, while CpkA was largely cytosolic and/or vesicular. The CpkA anchored RpkA in cytoplasmic vesicles, and localisation of PKA in the cytoplasm was governed by CpkA in a cAMP-dependant or independent manner. We show that there exists a tight regulation of PKA subunits at the level of transcription, and the cAMP signalling is differentially compartmentalised in a stage-specific manner in rice blast. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. An international study of intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 (iAMP21): cytogenetic characterization and outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, CJ; Moorman, AV; Schwab, C; Carroll, AJ; Raetz, EA; Devidas, M; Strehl, S; Nebral, K; Harbott, J; Teigler-Schlegel, A; Zimmerman, M; Dastuge, N; Baruchel, A; Soulier, J; Auclerc, M-F; Attarbaschi, A; Mann, G; Stark, B; Cazzaniga, G; Chilton, L; Vandenberghe, P; Forestier, E; Haltrich, I; Raimondi, SC; Parihar, M; Bourquin, J-P; Tchinda, J; Haferlach, C; Vora, A; Hunger, SP; Heerema, NA; Haas, OA

    2014-01-01

    Intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 (iAMP21) defines a distinct cytogenetic subgroup of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL). To date, fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), with probes specific for the RUNX1 gene, provides the only reliable detection method (five or more RUNX1 signals per cell). Patients with iAMP21 are older (median age 9 years) with a low white cell count. Previously, we demonstrated a high relapse risk when these patients were treated as standard risk. Recent studies have shown improved outcome on intensive therapy. In view of these treatment implications, accurate identification is essential. Here we have studied the cytogenetics and outcome of 530 iAMP21 patients that highlighted the association of specific secondary chromosomal and genetic changes with iAMP21 to assist in diagnosis, including the gain of chromosome X, loss or deletion of chromosome 7, ETV6 and RB1 deletions. These iAMP21 patients when treated as high risk showed the same improved outcome as those in trial-based studies regardless of the backbone chemotherapy regimen given. This study reinforces the importance of intensified treatment to reduce the risk of relapse in iAMP21 patients. This now well-defined patient subgroup should be recognised by World Health Organisation (WHO) as a distinct entity of BCP-ALL. PMID:24166298

  1. Hemocompatible poly(NIPAm-MBA-AMPS) colloidal nanoparticles as carriers of anti-inflammatory cell penetrating peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Rush L; Medow, Matthew R; Panitch, Alyssa; Seal, Brandon

    2012-04-09

    Anionic copolymer systems containing sulfated monomers have great potential for delivery of cationic therapeutics, but N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) copolymer nanoparticles have seen limited characterization to date with regard to physical properties relevant to loading and release of therapeutics. Characterization of polymeric nanoparticles incorporating AMPS showed an increased size and decreased thermodynamic swelling ratios of AMPS containing particles as compared to NIPAm nanoparticles lacking AMPS. Particles with increasing AMPS addition showed an increased propensity for uniformity, intraparticle colloidal stability, and drug loading capacity. Peptide encapsulated in particles was shielded from peptide degradation in serum. Particles were shown not impede blood coagulation or to cause hemolysis. This study has demonstrated that AMPS incorporation into traditional NIPAm nanoparticles presents a tunable parameter for changing particle LCST, size, swelling ratio, ζ potential, and cationic peptide loading potential. This one-pot synthesis results in a thermosensitive anionic nanoparticle system that is a potentially useful platform to deliver cationic cell penetrating peptides.

  2. Timing is critical for effective glucocorticoid receptor mediated repression of the cAMP-induced CRH gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siem van der Laan

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid negative feedback of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis is mediated in part by direct repression of gene transcription in glucocorticoid receptor (GR expressing cells. We have investigated the cross talk between the two main signaling pathways involved in activation and repression of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH mRNA expression: cyclic AMP (cAMP and GR. We report that in the At-T20 cell-line the glucocorticoid-mediated repression of the cAMP-induced human CRH proximal promoter activity depends on the relative timing of activation of both signaling pathways. Activation of the GR prior to or in conjunction with cAMP signaling results in an effective repression of the cAMP-induced transcription of the CRH gene. In contrast, activation of the GR 10 minutes after onset of cAMP treatment, results in a significant loss of GR-mediated repression. In addition, translocation of ligand-activated GR to the nucleus was found as early as 10 minutes after glucocorticoid treatment. Interestingly, while both signaling cascades counteract each other on the CRH proximal promoter, they synergize on a synthetic promoter containing 'positive' response elements. Since the order of activation of both signaling pathways may vary considerably in vivo, we conclude that a critical time-window exists for effective repression of the CRH gene by glucocorticoids.

  3. Selective enhancement of wnt4 expression by cyclic AMP-associated cooperation between rat central astrocytes and microglia

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    Ohnishi, Masatoshi, E-mail: ohnishi@fupharm.fukuyama-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Urasaki, Tomoka [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Ochiai, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Kohei; Takeo, Shin; Harada, Tomoki; Ohsugi, Yoshihito [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Inoue, Atsuko [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan)

    2015-11-13

    The wnt protein family has important members involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and plasticity expression; however, little is known about its biosynthesis processes. On the other hand, an increase in the intracerebral cyclic adenosine 3′, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP) level leads to synaptic plasticity via the de novo synthesis of any protein. Here, the effect of dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP), a membrane permeability cAMP analog, on the wnt family was investigated in rat primary-cultured glial cells containing astrocytes and microglia. Among wnt3a, 4, 5a, 7a and 11 mRNA, only wnt4 expression was increased by longer treatment (24 h), compared with short treatment (2 h), with dbcAMP in a concentration-dependent manner, and its effect reached statistical significance at 1 mM. In cultures of isolated astrocytes or microglia, wnt4 expression was not affected by 1 mM dbcAMP for 24 h, and microglial wnt4 protein was undetectable even when cells were treated with the drug. Mixed glial cells treated for 24 h with 1 mM dbcAMP showed significantly increased wnt4 protein, as well as mRNA. Immunofluorescence manifested that cells that expressed wnt4 protein were astrocytes, but not microglia. Intraperitoneal injection of 1.25 mg/kg rolipram, a phosphodiesterase (PDE) IV inhibitor that can pass through the blood brain barrier and inhibits cAMP degradation specifically, showed a tendency to increase wnt4 expression in the adult rat brain after 24 h, and the increases in wnt4 mRNA and protein levels reached statistical significance in the hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This is the first finding to help elucidate the selective biosynthesis of central wnt4 through cAMP-stimulated microglia and astrocytes interaction. - Highlights: • Dibutyryl cAMP increased wnt4, but not wnt3a, 5a, 7a and 11, mRNA in mixed glia. • Wnt4 protein increased in astrocytes co-cultivated with microglia. • It took a long time to robustly increase wnt4 expression. • Rolipram

  4. Selective enhancement of wnt4 expression by cyclic AMP-associated cooperation between rat central astrocytes and microglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Masatoshi; Urasaki, Tomoka; Ochiai, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Kohei; Takeo, Shin; Harada, Tomoki; Ohsugi, Yoshihito; Inoue, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    The wnt protein family has important members involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and plasticity expression; however, little is known about its biosynthesis processes. On the other hand, an increase in the intracerebral cyclic adenosine 3′, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP) level leads to synaptic plasticity via the de novo synthesis of any protein. Here, the effect of dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP), a membrane permeability cAMP analog, on the wnt family was investigated in rat primary-cultured glial cells containing astrocytes and microglia. Among wnt3a, 4, 5a, 7a and 11 mRNA, only wnt4 expression was increased by longer treatment (24 h), compared with short treatment (2 h), with dbcAMP in a concentration-dependent manner, and its effect reached statistical significance at 1 mM. In cultures of isolated astrocytes or microglia, wnt4 expression was not affected by 1 mM dbcAMP for 24 h, and microglial wnt4 protein was undetectable even when cells were treated with the drug. Mixed glial cells treated for 24 h with 1 mM dbcAMP showed significantly increased wnt4 protein, as well as mRNA. Immunofluorescence manifested that cells that expressed wnt4 protein were astrocytes, but not microglia. Intraperitoneal injection of 1.25 mg/kg rolipram, a phosphodiesterase (PDE) IV inhibitor that can pass through the blood brain barrier and inhibits cAMP degradation specifically, showed a tendency to increase wnt4 expression in the adult rat brain after 24 h, and the increases in wnt4 mRNA and protein levels reached statistical significance in the hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This is the first finding to help elucidate the selective biosynthesis of central wnt4 through cAMP-stimulated microglia and astrocytes interaction. - Highlights: • Dibutyryl cAMP increased wnt4, but not wnt3a, 5a, 7a and 11, mRNA in mixed glia. • Wnt4 protein increased in astrocytes co-cultivated with microglia. • It took a long time to robustly increase wnt4 expression. • Rolipram

  5. Cyclic di-AMP Acts as an Extracellular Signal That ImpactsBacillus subtilisBiofilm Formation and Plant Attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsley, Loni; Yannarell, Sarah M; Huynh, Tuanh Ngoc; Woodward, Joshua J; Shank, Elizabeth A

    2018-03-27

    There is a growing appreciation for the impact that bacteria have on higher organisms. Plant roots often harbor beneficial microbes, such as the Gram-positive rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis , that influence their growth and susceptibility to disease. The ability to form surface-attached microbial communities called biofilms is crucial for the ability of B. subtilis to adhere to and protect plant roots. In this study, strains harboring deletions of the B. subtilis genes known to synthesize and degrade the second messenger cyclic di-adenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP) were examined for their involvement in biofilm formation and plant attachment. We found that intracellular production of c-di-AMP impacts colony biofilm architecture, biofilm gene expression, and plant attachment in B. subtilis We also show that B. subtilis secretes c-di-AMP and that putative c-di-AMP transporters impact biofilm formation and plant root colonization. Taken together, our data describe a new role for c-di-AMP as a chemical signal that affects important cellular processes in the environmentally and agriculturally important soil bacterium B. subtilis These results suggest that the "intracellular" signaling molecule c-di-AMP may also play a previously unappreciated role in interbacterial cell-cell communication within plant microbiomes. IMPORTANCE Plants harbor bacterial communities on their roots that can significantly impact their growth and pathogen resistance. In most cases, however, the signals that mediate host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions within these communities are unknown. A detailed understanding of these interaction mechanisms could facilitate the manipulation of these communities for agricultural or environmental purposes. Bacillus subtilis is a plant-growth-promoting bacterium that adheres to roots by forming biofilms. We therefore began by exploring signals that might impact its biofilm formation. We found that B. subtilis secretes c-di-AMP and that the

  6. cAMP promotes the synthesis in early G1 of gp115, a yeast glycoprotein containing glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandori, R; Popolo, L; Vai, M; Alberghina, L

    1990-08-25

    The glycoprotein gp115 (Mr = 115,000, pI 4.8-5) is localized in the plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and maximally expressed during G1 phase. To gain insight on the mechanism regulating its synthesis, we have examined various conditions of cell proliferation arrest. We used pulse-labeling experiments with [35S]methionine and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis, which allow the detection of the well characterized 100-kDa precursor of gp115 (p100). In the cAMP-requiring mutant cyr1, p100 synthesis is active during exponential growth, shut off by cAMP removal, and induced when growth is restored by cAMP readdition. The inhibition of p100 synthesis also occurs in TS1 mutant cells (ras1ras2-ts1) shifted from 24 to 37 degrees C. During nitrogen starvation of rca1 cells, a mutant permeable to cAMP, p100 synthesis is also inhibited. cAMP complements the effect of ammonium deprivation, promoting p100 synthesis, even when added to cells which have already entered G0. Experiments with the bcy1 and cyr1bcy1 mutants have indicated the involvement of the cAMP-dependent protein kinases in the control of p100 synthesis. Moreover, the synthesis of p100 was unaffected in A364A cells, terminally arrested at START B by alpha-factor. These results indicate that the switch operating on p100 synthesis is localized in early G1 (START A) and is one of the multiple events controlled by the cAMP pathway.

  7. Inhibition of cAMP-activated intestinal chloride secretion by diclofenac: cellular mechanism and potential application in cholera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongkorpsakol, Pawin; Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Srimanote, Potjanee; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl- secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl- secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl- secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84) cells with IC50 of ∼ 20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell monolayers to diclofenac, either in apical or basolateral solutions, produced similar degree of inhibitions. Analyses of the apical Cl- current showed that diclofenac reversibly inhibited CFTR Cl- channel activity (IC50 ∼ 10 µM) via mechanisms not involving either changes in intracellular cAMP levels or CFTR channel inactivation by AMP-activated protein kinase and protein phosphatase. Of interest, diclofenac had no effect on Na(+)-K(+) ATPases and Na(+)-K(+)-Cl- cotransporters, but inhibited cAMP-activated basolateral K(+) channels with IC50 of ∼ 3 µM. In addition, diclofenac suppressed Ca(2+)-activated Cl- channels, inwardly rectifying Cl- channels, and Ca(2+)-activated basolateral K(+) channels. Furthermore, diclofenac (up to 200 µM; 24 h of treatment) had no effect on cell viability and barrier function in T84 cells. Importantly, cholera toxin (CT)-induced Cl- secretion across T84 cell monolayers was effectively suppressed by diclofenac. Intraperitoneal administration of diclofenac (30 mg/kg) reduced both CT and Vibrio cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion by ∼ 70% without affecting intestinal fluid absorption in mice. Collectively, our results indicate that diclofenac inhibits both cAMP-activated and Ca(2+)-activated Cl- secretion by inhibiting both apical Cl- channels and basolateral K+ channels in intestinal epithelial cells. Diclofenac may be useful in the treatment of cholera and other types of secretory diarrheas resulting from intestinal

  8. Inhibition of cAMP-activated intestinal chloride secretion by diclofenac: cellular mechanism and potential application in cholera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawin Pongkorpsakol

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl- secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl- secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl- secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84 cells with IC50 of ∼ 20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell monolayers to diclofenac, either in apical or basolateral solutions, produced similar degree of inhibitions. Analyses of the apical Cl- current showed that diclofenac reversibly inhibited CFTR Cl- channel activity (IC50 ∼ 10 µM via mechanisms not involving either changes in intracellular cAMP levels or CFTR channel inactivation by AMP-activated protein kinase and protein phosphatase. Of interest, diclofenac had no effect on Na(+-K(+ ATPases and Na(+-K(+-Cl- cotransporters, but inhibited cAMP-activated basolateral K(+ channels with IC50 of ∼ 3 µM. In addition, diclofenac suppressed Ca(2+-activated Cl- channels, inwardly rectifying Cl- channels, and Ca(2+-activated basolateral K(+ channels. Furthermore, diclofenac (up to 200 µM; 24 h of treatment had no effect on cell viability and barrier function in T84 cells. Importantly, cholera toxin (CT-induced Cl- secretion across T84 cell monolayers was effectively suppressed by diclofenac. Intraperitoneal administration of diclofenac (30 mg/kg reduced both CT and Vibrio cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion by ∼ 70% without affecting intestinal fluid absorption in mice. Collectively, our results indicate that diclofenac inhibits both cAMP-activated and Ca(2+-activated Cl- secretion by inhibiting both apical Cl- channels and basolateral K+ channels in intestinal epithelial cells. Diclofenac may be useful in the treatment of cholera and other types of secretory diarrheas resulting from intestinal

  9. Mutations in β-Lactamase AmpC Increase Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates to Antipseudomonal Cephalosporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrazeg, M; Jeannot, K; Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Broutin, I; Loeffert, S; Fournier, D; Plésiat, P

    2015-10-01

    Mutation-dependent overproduction of intrinsic β-lactamase AmpC is considered the main cause of resistance of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins. Analysis of 31 AmpC-overproducing clinical isolates exhibiting a greater resistance to ceftazidime than to piperacillin-tazobactam revealed the presence of 17 mutations in the β-lactamase, combined with various polymorphic amino acid substitutions. When overexpressed in AmpC-deficient P. aeruginosa 4098, the genes coding for 20/23 of these AmpC variants were found to confer a higher (2-fold to >64-fold) resistance to ceftazidime and ceftolozane-tazobactam than did the gene from reference strain PAO1. The mutations had variable effects on the MICs of ticarcillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, aztreonam, and cefepime. Depending on their location in the AmpC structure and their impact on β-lactam MICs, they could be assigned to 4 distinct groups. Most of the mutations affecting the omega loop, the R2 domain, and the C-terminal end of the protein were shared with extended-spectrum AmpCs (ESACs) from other Gram-negative species. Interestingly, two new mutations (F121L and P154L) were predicted to enlarge the substrate binding pocket by disrupting the stacking between residues F121 and P154. We also found that the reported ESACs emerged locally in a variety of clones, some of which are epidemic and did not require hypermutability. Taken together, our results show that P. aeruginosa is able to adapt to efficacious β-lactams, including the newer cephalosporin ceftolozane, through a variety of mutations affecting its intrinsic β-lactamase, AmpC. Data suggest that the rates of ESAC-producing mutants are ≥1.5% in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. The camp analogue, dbcAMP can stimulate rabbit reproductive functions: I. Effect on ovarian folliculogenesis, ovulation and embryo production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrenek P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to examine the influence of administration of N6,2’-dibutyryladenosine 3’5’-cyclic monophosphate (dbcAMP, a cAMP agonist, on ovarian folliculogenesis and atresia, as well as on reproductive efficiency in rabbits, whose ovarian cycle and ovulation was induced by gonadotropins. Ovarian cycle and ovulation of control rabbits were induced by 20 IU/kg PMSG followed by 35 IU/kg hCG administration. Experimental animals received PMSG and hCG together with dbcAMP (at 5, 25 or 50 μg/animal. After ovulation and insemination, the animals were sacrificed. Ovaries were weighted, histological sections of ovaries were prepared, and the presence of ovulated and not ovulated follicles and different stages of atresia was evaluated by light microscopy. The eggs were flushed from the oviducts after insemination and cultured up to blastocyst cell stage. Numbers of ovarian Corpora lutea, ovulated oocytes and oocyte-derived zygotes and embryos reaching hatched blastocyst stage were determined. Administration of dbcAMP (at doses 25 or 50 μg/animal, but not at 5 μg/animal was able to increase the proportion of follicles with cystic and luteinization-related atresia. Furthermore, dbcAMP (50 μg/animal, but not lower doses increased the ovarian mass, number of Corpora lutea, number of harvested oocytes, zygotes and embryos at blastocyst stage derived from these zygotes after culture. These data demonstrate that dbcAMP can stimulate rabbit ovarian follicle atresia, ovulation, oocyte, zygote and embryo yield and development. Furthermore, they confirm in the involvement of cyclic nucleotide-dependent intracellular mechanisms in the control of rabbit reproductive functions and potential practical usefulness of dbcAMP in improving animal reproduction and fertility.

  11. The differential importance of mutations within AmpD in cephalosporin resistance of Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babouee Flury, Baharak; Ellington, Matthew J; Hopkins, Katie L; Turton, Jane F; Doumith, Michel; Woodford, Neil

    2016-11-01

    Mechanisms leading to carbapenem and cephalosporin resistance were sought in Enterobacter aerogenes isolates that were highly resistant to carbapenems but had no known carbapenemase. Results were compared with recent work examining carbapenem-resistant Enterobacter cloacae. Eighteen carbapenem-resistant E. aerogenes were screened for known β-lactamase and carbapenemase genes, and novel carbapenemases were sought in whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of the three most resistant isolates. For all isolates, ampC, ampR, ampD and the porin genes omp35 and omp36 were investigated by Sanger sequencing or from available WGS data. Expression of ampC and porin genes was measured in comparison with cephalosporin- and carbapenem-susceptible control strains by reverse transcriptase PCR, with porin translation also detected by SDS-PAGE. Loss of Omp35, primarily due to decreased transcription (up to 250×), was observed in ertapenem-resistant isolates (MICs ≥ 2 mg/L), whereas meropenem resistance (MICs ≥ 4 mg/L) was observed in those isolates also showing decreased or no production of Omp36. Loss of Omp36 was due to combinations of premature translation termination or reduced transcription. In contrast to E. cloacae, cephalosporin resistance in E. aerogenes was not associated with lesions in AmpD. High-level cefepime resistance (MIC = 32 mg/L) was caused by a novel modification in the H-10 helix of AmpC in one isolate. The differential importance of AmpD lesions in cephalosporin resistance in E. cloacae and E. aerogenes underlines the differences between these contrasting members of the Enterobacter genus. Porin loss resulted in high-level carbapenem resistance with gradual loss of Omp36, which led to high-level meropenem resistance. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High prevalence of fecal carriage of Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae in cats and dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost eHordijk

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ESBL/AmpC producing Enterobacteriaceae have been reported worldwide amongst isolates obtained from humans, food-producing animals, companion animals and environmental sources. However, data on prevalence of fecal carriage of ESBL/AmpC producing Enterobacteriaceae in healthy companion animals is limited. This pilot study describes the prevalence of ESBL/AmpC encoding genes in healthy cats and dogs, and cats and dogs with diarrhea. Twenty fecal samples of each group were cultured on MacConkey agar supplemented with 1 mg/L cefotaxime and in LB-enrichment broth supplemented with 1 mg/L cefotaxime, which was subsequently inoculated on MacConkey agar supplemented with 1 mg/L cefotaxime. ESBL/AmpC genes were identified using the Check-Points CT103 micro array kit and subsequently by sequencing analysis. Chromosomal ampC promoter mutations were detected by PCR and sequencing analysis. From the healthy and diarrheic dogs, respectively 45% and 55% were positive for E. coli with reduced susceptibility for cefotaxime. From the healthy and diarrheic cats, the estimated prevalence was respectively 0% and 25%. One diarrheic cat was positive for both reduced susceptible E. coli and P. mirabilis. The ESBL/AmpC genes found in this study were mainly blaCTX-M-1, but also blaCTX-M-14, blaCTX-M-15, blaTEM-52-StPaul, blaSHV-12 and blaCMY-2 were detected. This pilot study showed that the prevalence of ESBL/AmpC producing Enterobacteriaceae in healthy and diarrheic dogs, and diarrheic cats was relatively high. Furthermore the genes found were similar to those found in isolates of both human and food producing animal origin. However, since the size of this study was relatively small, extrapolation of the data to the general population of cats and dogs should be done with great care.

  13. Inhibition of renal brush border phosphate transport and stimulation of renal gluconeogenesis by cyclic amp and parathyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempson, S A; Kowalski, J C; Puschett, J B

    1983-05-01

    The aims of the study were to determine whether 8-bromo-cyclic AMP (8BcAMP) in vivo mimics the inhibitory action of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on phosphate transport across the brush border membrane (BBM) of the renal proximal tubule, and to examine whether changes in BBM transport are accompanied by changes in the rate of renal gluconeogenesis. Thyroparathyroidectomized dogs were anesthetized and equilibrated, and control urine collections were obtained prior to removing the left kidney. Subsequent intravenous infusion of 8BcAMP at 50 mg/hr for 2 hr increased fractional excretion of phosphate from 4 +/- 1 (controls) to 29 +/- 4% (P less than 0.001) without changing glomerular filtration. In BBM vesicles isolated from the renal cortex, the initial Na+-dependent transport of phosphate was decreased from 747 +/- 135 (controls) to 564 +/- 126 pmoles per mg per 0.25 min after 8BcAMP (P less than 0.025), but Na+-independent phosphate uptake and Na+-dependent L-proline uptake were not changed significantly. Renal gluconeogenesis in the same animals was increased from 2.5 +/- 0.3 (controls) to 5.3 +/- 0.5 mumoles glucose per g tissue per hr after infusion of 8BcAMP (P less than 0.001). Infusion of PTH, like 8BcAMP, inhibited BBM phosphate transport and stimulated renal gluconeogenesis. We conclude that the inhibitory action of cyclic AMP and PTH on BBM phosphate transport is accompanied by stimulation of gluconeogenesis which suggests, indirectly, that changes in gluconeogenesis may be part of the intracellular mechanism for regulating BBM phosphate uptake in response to certain stimuli.

  14. The phorbol ester TPA potentiates cholera toxin- and isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP-synthesis in primary astrocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebicke-Haerter, P J; Seregi, A; Schobert, A; Hertting, G

    1994-01-01

    Cellular responses to changes in the extracellular environment are mediated by intracellular signaling systems. One of the most extensively studied systems is adenylate cyclase which generates the second messenger molecule cAMP. Another one is the phosphatidylinositol (PI) second messenger system giving rise to IP3 and diacylglycerol, the latter stimulating protein kinase C. Recently, a third potential signaling system has attracted increased scientific attention: the phospholipase A2 system which generates arachidonic acid. This substance may be used for eicosanoid synthesis or serve as a second messenger molecule. The present report gives more evidence about mechanisms how these signaling pathways interact in cultured astrocytes. Substances commonly used for stimulation of arachidonic acid release and prostaglandin synthesis in these cultures (A23187, TPA) had no influence on intracellular cAMP levels. Pertussis toxin that had previously been shown to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, had no influence on cAMP levels either. Cholera toxin, however, raised intracellular cAMP significantly, although much less than the beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol. Cholera toxin also caused a marked change in astroglial morphology even at reduced concentrations (1-10 ng/ml). A23187 used in combination with Ctx had a moderate stimulatory effect on cAMP synthesis. In contrast, in the presence of Ctx, the PKC-activating phorbol ester TPA synergistically stimulated cAMP production, raising cAMP levels as high as isoproterenol-stimulated levels. The TPA effect was concentration-dependent. It was also dependent on an intact PKC since preincubation of cells with the phorbol ester completely abolished the synergistic effect. The synergistic effect of the phorbol ester was also observed at subthreshold concentrations of isoproterenol. The data reveal that the sole activation of most Gs molecules is a necessary but not sufficient prerequisite to achieve maximal adenylate cyclase

  15. Guanosine exerts antiplatelet and antithrombotic properties through an adenosine-related cAMP-PKA signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Francisco; Alarcón, Marcelo; Badimon, Lina; Fuentes, Manuel; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Vilahur, Gemma; Kachler, Sonja; Padró, Teresa; Palomo, Iván; Fuentes, Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    Guanosine is a natural product and an endogenous nucleoside that has shown to increase during myocardial ischemia. Platelets are critically involved in ischemic coronary events. It remains unknown, however, whether guanosine may affect platelet activation and function. We sought to investigate the potential antiplatelet and antithrombotic properties of guanosine and decipher the mechanisms behind. We firstly assessed the effects of guanosine on platelet activation/aggregation upon stimulation with several platelet agonists including adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen, arachidonic acid (AA), and TRAP-6. Guanosine antithrombotic potential was also evaluated both in vitro (Badimon perfusion chamber) and in vivo (murine model). In addition we assessed any potential effect on bleeding. At a mechanistic level we determined the release of thromboxane B2, intraplatelet cAMP levels, the binding affinity on platelet membrane, and the activation/phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA), phospholipase C (PLC) and PKC. Guanosine markedly inhibited platelet activation/aggregation-challenged by ADP and, although to a lesser extent, also reduced platelet aggregation challenged by collagen, AA and TRAP-6. Guanosine significantly reduced thrombus formation both in vitro and in vivo without significantly affects bleeding. Guanosine antiplatelet effects were associated with the activation of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway, and a reduction in thromboxane B2 levels and PLC and PKC phosphorylation. The platelet aggregation and binding affinity assays revealed that guanosine effects on platelets were mediated by adenosine. Guanosine effectively reduces ADP-induced platelet aggregation and limits thrombotic risk. These antithrombotic properties are associated with the activation of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6 is linked to JNK-signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushijima, Hironori [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1, Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Shiwagun, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Maeda, Masatomo, E-mail: mmaeda@iwate-med.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1, Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Shiwagun, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of a JNK activator anisomycin on the proteolysis was examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anisomycin stimulated the export of nuclear GATA-6 into the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK activated the CRM1 mediated nuclear export of GATA-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK further stimulated slowly the degradation of GATA-6 by cytoplasmic proteasomes. -- Abstract: A JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6 by proteasomes around its IC50. We further examined the effects of SP600125 on the degradation of GATA-6 in detail, since an activator of JNK (anisomycin) is available. Interestingly, anisomycin immediately stimulated the export of nuclear GATA-6 into the cytoplasm, and then the cytoplasmic content of GATA-6 decreased slowly through degradation by proteasomes. Such an effect of anisomycin was inhibited by SP600125, indicating that the observed phenomenon might be linked to the JNK signaling pathway. The inhibitory effect of SP600125 could not be ascribed to the inhibition of PKA, since phosphorylation of CREB occurred in the presence of dbcAMP and SP600125. The nuclear export of GATA-6 was inhibited by leptomycin B, suggesting that CRM1-mediated export could be activated by anisomycin. Furthermore, it seems likely that the JNK activated by anisomycin may stimulate not only the nuclear export of GATA-6 through CRM1 but also the degradation of GATA-6 by cytoplasmic proteasomes. In contrast, A-kinase might activate only the latter process through JNK.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide Compromises Human Sperm Function by Reducing Intracellular cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Dahu; He, Yuanqiao; Ding, Zhiyong; Mao, Fei; Luo, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    A worldwide decline in the quality of human semen is currently occurring. In mammals, sperm are produced from diploid stem-cell spermatogonia by spermatogenesis in testes and become mature in epididymis. Nevertheless, these biological processes can be affected by Gram-negative bacterial infection mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major endotoxin of Gram-negative bacteria. It is well known that LPS can disturb spermatogenesis and affect sperm maturation and quality in vivo. However, the effect of LPS on the ejaculated mature sperm in vitro remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to assess the in vitro toxicity of LPS on human sperm function and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Human sperm were incubated with LPS (0.1-100 μg/ml) for 1-12 h in vitro and, subsequently, sperm viability, motility and capacitation, and the acrosome reaction were examined. LPS dose-dependently inhibited total and progressive motility and the ability to move through a viscous medium of the sperm but did not affect sperm viability, capacitation, and the acrosome reaction. To explore the underlying mechanism of LPS's actions, we examined the effects of LPS on the intracellular concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) and protein-tyrosine phosphorylation of human sperm, which are key regulators of human sperm function. LPS decreased intracellular cAMP dose-dependently but had no effect on [Ca(2+)]i and protein-tyrosine phosphorylation of human sperm. These findings suggest that LPS inhibits human sperm motility by decreasing intracellular cAMP.

  18. Bactericidal properties of the antimicrobial peptide Ib-AMP4 from Impatiens balsamina produced as a recombinant fusion-protein in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaobo; Schäfer, Holger; Reichling, Jürgen; Wink, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent a novel class of powerful natural antimicrobial agents. As AMPs are bactericidal, production of AMPs in recombinant bacteria is far from trivial. We report the production of Impatiens balsamina antimicrobial peptide 4 (Ib-AMP4, originally isolated from Impatiens balsamina) in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein and investigate Ib-AMP4's antimicrobial effects on human pathogens. A plasmid vector pET32a-Trx-Ib-AMP4 was constructed and transferred into E. coli. After induction, a soluble fusion protein was expressed successfully. The Ib-AMP4 peptide was obtained with a purity of over 90% after nickel affinity chromatography, ultrafiltration, enterokinase cleavage and sephadex size exclusion chromatography. For maximum activity, Ib-AMP4, which possesses two disulfide bonds, required activation with 5 μg/mL H2 O2 . Antimicrobial assays showed that Ib-AMP4 could efficiently target clinical multiresistant isolates including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli. Time kill experiments revealed that Ib-AMP4 is bactericidal within 10 min after application. Haemolysis and cytotoxicity assays implied selectivity towards bacteria, an important prerequisite for clinical applications. Ib-AMP4 might be an interesting candidate for clinical studies involving patients with septicemia or for coating clinical devices, such as catheters. The method described here may be applicable for expression and purification of other AMPs with multiple disulfide bridges. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Characterizations of cross-bridges in the presence of saturating concentrations of MgAMP-PNP in rabbit permeabilized psoas muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbie, S M; Xu, S; Chalovich, J M; Yu, L C

    1998-06-01

    Several earlier studies have led to different conclusions about the complex of myosin with MgAMP-PNP. It has been suggested that subfragment 1 of myosin (S1)-MgAMP-PNP forms an S1-MgADP-like state, an intermediate between the myosin S1-MgATP and myosin S1-MgADP states or a mixture of cross-bridge states. We suggest that the different states observed result from the failure to saturate S1 with MgAMP-PNP. At saturating MgAMP-PNP, the interaction of myosin S1 with actin is very similar to that which occurs in the presence of MgATP. 1) At 1 degrees C and 170 mM ionic strength the equatorial x-ray diffraction intensity ratio I11/I10 decreased with an increasing MgAMP-PNP concentration and leveled off by approximately 20 mM MgAMP-PNP. The resulting ratio was the same for MgATP-relaxed fibers. 2) The two dimensional x-ray diffraction patterns from MgATP-relaxed and MgAMP-PNP-relaxed bundles are similar. 3) The affinity of S1-MgAMP-PNP for the actin-tropomyosin-troponin complex in solution in the absence of free calcium is comparable with that of S1-MgATP. 4) In the presence of calcium, I11/I10 decreased toward the relaxed value with increasing MgAMP-PNP, signifying that the affinity between cross-bridge and actin is weakened by MgAMP-PNP. 5) The degree to which the equatorial intensity ratio decreases as the ionic strength increases is similar in MgAMP-PNP and MgATP. Therefore, results from both fiber and solution studies suggest that MgAMP-PNP acts as a non hydrolyzable MgATP analogue for myosin.

  20. AMPS sciences objectives and philosophy. [Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas-in-Space project on Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerling, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Shuttle will open a new era in the exploration of earth's near-space environment, where the weight and power capabilities of Spacelab and the ability to use man in real time add important new features. The Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas-in-Space project (AMPS) is conceived of as a facility where flexible core instruments can be flown repeatedly to perform different observations and experiments. The twin thrusts of remote sensing of the atmosphere below 120 km and active experiments on the space plasma are the major themes. They have broader implications in increasing our understanding of plasma physics and of energy conversion processes elsewhere in the universe.

  1. A cAMP-Regulated Chloride Channel in Lymphocytes that is Affected in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jennifer H.; Schulman, Howard; Gardner, Phyllis

    1989-02-01

    A defect in regulation of a chloride channel appears to be the molecular basis for cystic fibrosis (CF), a common lethal genetic disease. It is shown here that a chloride channel with kinetic and regulatory properties similar to those described for secretory epithelial cells is present in both T and B lymphocyte cell lines. The regulation of the channels by adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)--dependent protein kinase in transformed B cells from CF patients is defective. Thus, lymphocytes may be an accessible source of CF tissue for study of this defect, for cloning of the chloride channel complex, and for diagnosis of the disease.

  2. Cefotaximase and AmpC-producing Shigella flexneri in case of dysentery from southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Oommen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhoea and dysentery caused by Shigella spp. are major public health concerns. Emerging multidrug resistance (MDR in this pathogen further complicates this disease. Extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs have been described in this pathogen, which significantly compromises the treatment options for shigellosis. The usual ESBLs seen are sulfhydryl variable (SHV-type; cefotaximases (CTX-M are very uncommonly detected. Here, we report a CTX-M type and AmpC-producing Shigella flexneri from a three-year-old boy residing in Central Kerala, South India.

  3. Desain dan Implementasi Virtual Laboratory Materi Osilator Analog berbasis IC OP-AMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYIFAUL FUADA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Laboratorium virtual merupakan salah satu platform laboratorium modern yang dapat mendukung kegiatan praktikum yang berjalan secara tradisional (Hand-on Laboratory.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendesain dan mengimplementasikan Virtual Laboratory pada materi pembangkit sinyal dengan subtopik: Wien Bridge sebagai osilator RC, Hartley dan Colpitts sebagai osilator LC dan Astable Multivibrator sebagai osilator relaksasi,yang dibangun berbasis IC Operational Amplifier (OP-AMP.Jenis penelitian ini merupakan R&Dyang terdiri dari enam tahapan, yaitu:konsep, desain, pengumpulan bahan, pembuatan, pengujian dan pendistribusian. Aplikasi perangkat lunak berbasis dekstop ini telah diuji secara fungsional dengan 6 (enam aspek parameter yakni:uji polaritas kapastor; uji wiring; uji mode frekuensi dan mode perioda pada alat ukur frequency generator; uji specific decission pada trainer kit osilator hartley dan colpitts; uji kesesuaian antara frekuensi ouput dari masing-masing osilator dengan perhitungan teorema dan hasil percobaan sesungguhnya; dan uji kualitas media. Hasil secara keseluruhan telah sesuai dengan ekspektasi didalam story board. Kata kunci: IC OP-AMP, Osilator analog, Laboratorium virtual ABSTRACT The Virtual Laboratory is as one of modern laboratory platform which able to supportthe hand-on worklab. The goal of this research are for designing and implementing a Virtual Laboratory of signal generator material with subtopics i.e. the Wien Bridge as an RC oscillator, the Hartley and Colpitts as LC oscillator and the astable multivibrator as relaxation oscillator which assembled based on Operational Amplifier Integrated Circuit (OP-AMP.This research is R&D type which consists of six stages, i.e. concept, design, materials collection, assembling, testing and distribution. This desktop-based software application has been functionally tested with six aspect of parameters such as: capacitor polarity testing; wiring testing; testing of frequency

  4. Between Indian Law and Qullasuyu Nationalism. Gregorio Titiriku and the Making of AMP Indigenous Activists, 1921-1964

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waskar Ari-Chachaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1921, when hard-line Liberal regimes ended in Bolivia, Gregorio Titiriku, an Uru-Aymara Indian from the shores of lake Titikaka (La Paz, started 50 years of Indian intellectual activism among the Alcaldes Mayores Particulares (AMP, a 450 cell network of indigenous intellectuals. Titiriku struggled against internal colonialism and was a crucial participant in the making of AMP subaltern nationalism.  Titiriku’s ideas became a crucial part of AMP discourse, known during this time as Indian Law.  This discourse promoted the worship of Pachamama (mother earth and Achachillas (the spirit of the grandparents in the high hills of the Andes.  AMP discourse sought to rename the nation of Qullas (currently known as Aymara-Quechuas. Titiriku was especially good at creating ideas for mobilization among the AMP, such as qullasuyun wawapa (the children of the Qulla tribes in order to promote "jaqi" pride (indigenous peoples pride, and bayeta camisas (people who dress in “bayeta” in order to promote an Indian dress-code as part of a politics of identity. These ideas provide us with a privileged field for understanding of the relationship between alternative modernities and public spheres. Titiriku thus used AMP discourse to contest segregation policies and to resist mainstream civilization projects. The particularities of Indian Law and its strategic nationalism reveal the existence of alternative discourses of modernity largely forgotten in Bolivia. The analysis of AMP discourse helps us understand the longstanding presence of struggle for autonomy and hegemonic projects in Bolivia and provides us with a better comprehension of how internal colonialism and public audiences interact historically.En 1921, cuando concluyó el periodo de gobiernos liberales en Bolivia, Gregorio Titiriku, indio uru-aymara originario de las orillas del lago Titikaka (La Paz, inició cincuenta años de activismo intelectual indio entre los Alcaldes Mayores Particulares

  5. The pde2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is allelic to rca1 and encodes a phosphodiesterase which protects the cell from extracellular cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R B; Renault, G; Jacquet, M; Tatchell, K

    1993-07-05

    The high affinity cAMP phosphodiesterase, encoded by PDE2, is an important component of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase signaling system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An unexpected phenotype of pde2 mutants is sensitivity to external cAMP. This trait has been found independently for rca1 mutants and has been used to monitor the effects of cAMP on several biological processes. We demonstrate here that RCA1 is identical to PDE2. Further analysis of the phenotype of pde2 deletions reveal that exogenously added cAMP results in an increase in the internal level of cAMP. This increase slows down the rate of cell division by increasing the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle and leads to increased cell volume. Also, cells with a disrupted PDE2 gene previously arrested by nutrient starvation rapidly lose thermotolerance when incubated with exogenous cAMP. From these observations we propose that a role of the PDE2-encoded phosphodiesterase may be to help insulate the internal cAMP pools from the external environment. This protective role might also be important in other eukaryotic organisms where cAMP is a key second messenger.

  6. cAMP dependent and independent regulation of thyroglobulin synthesis by two clones of the OVNIS 6H thyroid cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1987-07-01

    The hormonal regulation of thyroglobulin synthesis has been studied using two independent clones of the OVNIS 6H cell line. Insulin, hydrocortisone and TSH were able to stimulate thyroglobulin synthesis, whereas transferrin, somatostatin and glycyl-histidyl-lysine were without effect. Insulin stimulated thyroglobulin synthesis without affecting cAMP production. Hydrocortisone, when combined with insulin was a stimulator too; this stimulation was not accompanied by an increase in cAMP. TSH alone was unable to stimulate either cAMP or thyroglobulin synthesis. The stimulatory effect of TSH on thyroglobulin synthesis took place only when combined with insulin or insulin plus hydrocortisone, and was mediated by cAMP. Consequently, insulin and hydrocortisone stimulated thyroglobulin synthesis by cAMP-independent mechanisms, whereas TSH acted via the cAMP system. Forskolin mimicked TSH effects on cAMP and thyroglobulin synthesis. Calf serum inhibited cAMP and thyroglobulin production. Optimal cAMP and thyroglobulin synthesis as well as TSH responsiveness were obtained in serum-free medium supplemented with 5 micrograms/ml insulin, 100 nM hydrocortisone and 1 mU/ml TSH.

  7. Release from Xenopus oocyte prophase I meiotic arrest is independent of a decrease in cAMP levels or PKA activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Nancy; Courjaret, Raphael; Dib, Maya; Kulkarni, Rashmi P; Machaca, Khaled

    2016-06-01

    Vertebrate oocytes arrest at prophase of meiosis I as a result of high levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA) activity. In Xenopus, progesterone is believed to release meiotic arrest by inhibiting adenylate cyclase, lowering cAMP levels and repressing PKA. However, the exact timing and extent of the cAMP decrease is unclear, with conflicting reports in the literature. Using various in vivo reporters for cAMP and PKA at the single-cell level in real time, we fail to detect any significant changes in cAMP or PKA in response to progesterone. More interestingly, there was no correlation between the levels of PKA inhibition and the release of meiotic arrest. Furthermore, we devised conditions whereby meiotic arrest could be released in the presence of sustained high levels of cAMP. Consistently, lowering endogenous cAMP levels by >65% for prolonged time periods failed to induce spontaneous maturation. These results argue that the release of oocyte meiotic arrest in Xenopus is independent of a reduction in either cAMP levels or PKA activity, but rather proceeds through a parallel cAMP/PKA-independent pathway. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Novel mechanisms and signaling pathways of esophageal ulcer healing: the role of prostaglandin EP2 receptors, cAMP, and pCREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Baatar, Dolgor; Jones, Michael K; Tarnawski, Andrzej S

    2014-09-15

    Clinical studies indicate that prostaglandins of E class (PGEs) may promote healing of tissue injury e.g., gastroduodenal and dermal ulcers. However, the precise roles of PGEs, their E-prostanoid (EP) receptors, signaling pathways including cAMP and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and their relation to VEGF and angiogenesis in the tissue injury healing process remain unknown, forming the rationale for this study. Using an esophageal ulcer model in rats, we demonstrated that esophageal mucosa expresses predominantly EP2 receptors and that esophageal ulceration triggers an increase in expression of the EP2 receptor, activation of CREB (the downstream target of the cAMP signaling), and enhanced VEGF gene expression. Treatment of rats with misoprostol, a PGE1 analog capable of activating EP receptors, enhanced phosphorylation of CREB, stimulated VEGF expression and angiogenesis, and accelerated esophageal ulcer healing. In cultured human esophageal epithelial (HET-1A) cells, misoprostol increased intracellular cAMP levels (by 163-fold), induced phosphorylation of CREB, and stimulated VEGF expression. A cAMP analog (Sp-cAMP) mimicked, whereas an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (Rp-cAMP) blocked, these effects of misoprostol. These results indicate that the EP2/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway mediates the stimulatory effect of PGEs on angiogenesis essential for tissue injury healing via the induction of CREB activity and VEGF expression.

  9. Inhibition of human cAMP-phosphodiesterase as a mechanism of the spasmolytic effect of Matricaria recutita L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschi, Omar; Cero, Esther Dal; Galli, Germana V; Caruso, Donatella; Bosisio, Enrica; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2008-07-09

    Mechanisms underlying the spasmolytic activity of chamomile still remain unclear. Inhibition of cAMP- and cGMP-phosphodiesterases (PDE) is one of the mechanisms operated by spasmolytic drugs. In this study, the effect of chamomile on PDE was investigated. Human platelet cAMP-PDE and recombinant PDE5A1 were assayed in the presence of infusions prepared from sifted flowers and capitula. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis showed different compositions in infusions made with sifted flowers and capitula. Chamomile inhibited cAMP-PDE activity (IC50 = 17.9-40.5 microg/mL), while cGMP-PDE5 was less affected (-15% at 50 microg/mL). Among the individual compounds tested, only flavonoids showed an inhibitory effect (IC50 = 1.3-14.9 microM), contributing to around 39% of the infusion inhibition; other compounds responsible for cAMP-PDE inhibition still remain unknown. Although experimental evidence supporting the use of chamomile for gastrointestinal minor spasms dates back to the fifties, cAMP-PDE inhibition as a likely mechanism underlying the spasmolytic activity is reported for the first time.

  10. Uptake of 3H-cAMP by retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moredock Steve

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bluegill sunfish, the melanin-containing pigment granules of the retinal pigment epithelium undergo cyclic movements in response both to ambient lighting and circadian cues. Pigment granules aggregate into the cell body at night (in the dark, and disperse into apical processes during the day (in the light. Regulation of pigment granule aggregation in a number of fishes depends on modulating the intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Results Here we show isolated RPE takes up cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP in a saturable manner, exogenously applied cAMP induces pigment granule aggregation in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill, and aggregation induced in this manner is inhibited by treatment with probenecid, an organic anion transport inhibitor. Conclusion Our results raise the possibility that cAMP functions as a messenger secreted from the neural retina to signal darkness to the RPE, which takes it up. It further suggests that organic anion transport systems are the route by which cAMP crosses RPE cell membranes since probenecid inhibits extracellular cAMP from causing pigment granule aggregation.

  11. Control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae catalase T gene (CTT1) expression by nutrient supply via the RAS-cyclic AMP pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, P H; Wieser, R; Hamilton, B; Ruis, H

    1989-03-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, lack of nutrients triggers a pleiotropic response characterized by accumulation of storage carbohydrates, early G1 arrest, and sporulation of a/alpha diploids. This response is thought to be mediated by RAS proteins, adenylate cyclase, and cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinases. This study shows that expression of the S. cerevisiae gene coding for a cytoplasmic catalase T (CTT1) is controlled by this pathway: it is regulated by the availability of nutrients. Lack of a nitrogen, sulfur, or phosphorus source causes a high-level expression of the gene. Studies with strains with mutations in the RAS-cAMP pathway and supplementation of a rca1 mutant with cAMP show that CTT1 expression is under negative control by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase and that nutrient control of CTT1 gene expression is mediated by this pathway. Strains containing a CTT1-Escherichia coli lacZ fusion gene have been used to isolate mutants with mutations in the pathway. Mutants characterized in this investigation fall into five complementation groups. Both cdc25 and ras2 alleles were identified among these mutants.

  12. Hypothermia in mouse is caused by adenosine A1 and A3 receptor agonists and AMP via three distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Jain, Shalini; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Wan, Tina C; Tosh, Dilip K; Xiao, Cuiying; Auchampach, John A; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gavrilova, Oksana; Reitman, Marc L

    2017-03-01

    Small mammals have the ability to enter torpor, a hypothermic, hypometabolic state, allowing impressive energy conservation. Administration of adenosine or adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) can trigger a hypothermic, torpor-like state. We investigated the mechanisms for hypothermia using telemetric monitoring of body temperature in wild type and receptor knock out (Adora1 -/- , Adora3 -/- ) mice. Confirming prior data, stimulation of the A 3 adenosine receptor (AR) induced hypothermia via peripheral mast cell degranulation, histamine release, and activation of central histamine H 1 receptors. In contrast, A 1 AR agonists and AMP both acted centrally to cause hypothermia. Commonly used, selective A 1 AR agonists, including N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), N 6 -cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), and MRS5474, caused hypothermia via both A 1 AR and A 3 AR when given intraperitoneally. Intracerebroventricular dosing, low peripheral doses of Cl-ENBA [(±)-5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-N 6 -endo-norbornyladenosine], or using Adora3 -/- mice allowed selective stimulation of A 1 AR. AMP-stimulated hypothermia can occur independently of A 1 AR, A 3 AR, and mast cells. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP cause regulated hypothermia that was characterized by a drop in total energy expenditure, physical inactivity, and preference for cooler environmental temperatures, indicating a reduced body temperature set point. Neither A 1 AR nor A 3 AR was required for fasting-induced torpor. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP trigger regulated hypothermia via three distinct mechanisms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Properties of the luminal membrane of isolated perfused rat pancreatic ducts. Effect of cyclic AMP and blockers of chloride transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Greger, R

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate by what transport mechanism does HCO-3 cross the luminal membrane of pancreatic duct cells, and how do the cells respond to stimulation with dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP). For this purpose a newly developed preparation of isolated and perfused intra......) hyperpolarized PDbl by 10.3 +/- 1.7 mV (n = 10); and SITS hyperpolarized PDbl by 7.8 +/- 0.9 mV (n = 4). Stimulation of the ducts with db-cAMP in the presence of bath HCO-3/CO2 resulted in depolarization of PDbl, the ductal lumen became more negative and the fractional resistance of the luminal membrane...... decreased. Together with forskolin (10(-6) M), db-cAMP (10(-4) M) caused a fast depolarization of PDbl by 33.8 +/- 2.5 mV (n = 6). When db-cAMP (5 x 10(-4) M) was given alone in the presence of bath HCO-3/CO2, PDbl depolarized by 25.3 +/- 4.2 mV (n = 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  14. Roles of Intracellular Cyclic AMP Signal Transduction in the Capacitation and Subsequent Hyperactivation of Mouse and Boar Spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARAYAMA, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    It is not until accomplishment of a variety of molecular changes during the transit through the female reproductive tract that mammalian spermatozoa are capable of exhibiting highly activated motility with asymmetric whiplash beating of the flagella (hyperactivation) and undergoing acrosomal exocytosis in the head (acrosome reaction). These molecular changes of the spermatozoa are collectively termed capacitation and promoted by bicarbonate, calcium and cholesterol acceptors. Such capacitation-promoting factors can stimulate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal transduction in the spermatozoa. Meanwhile, hyperactivation and the acrosome reaction are essential to sperm fertilization with oocytes and are apparently triggered by a sufficient increase of intracellular Ca2+ in the sperm flagellum and head, respectively. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the relationship between cAMP signal transduction and calcium signaling cascades in the spermatozoa for the purpose of understanding the molecular basis of capacitation. In this review, I cover updated insights regarding intracellular cAMP signal transduction, the acrosome reaction and flagellar motility in mammalian spermatozoa and then account for possible roles of intracellular cAMP signal transduction in the capacitation and subsequent hyperactivation of mouse and boar spermatozoa. PMID:24162806

  15. cAMP levels in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle after an acute bout of aerobic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, A.; Booth, F. W.; Kirby, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    The present study examined whether exercise duration was associated with elevated and/or sustained elevations of postexercise adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) by measuring cAMP levels in skeletal muscle for up to 4 h after acute exercise bouts of durations that are known to either produce (60 min) or not produce (10 min) mitochondrial proliferation after chronic training. Treadmill-acclimatized, but untrained, rats were run at 22 m/min for 0 (control), 10, or 60 min and were killed at various postexercise (0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h) time points. Fast-twitch white and red (quadriceps) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles were quickly excised, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and assayed for cAMP with a commercial kit. Unexpectedly, cAMP contents in all three muscles were similar to control (nonexercise) at most (21 of 30) time points after a single 10- or 60-min run. Values at 9 of 30 time points were significantly different from control (P < 0.05); i.e., 3 time points were significantly higher than control and 6 were significantly less than control. These data suggest that the cAMP concentration of untrained skeletal muscle after a single bout of endurance-type exercise is not, by itself, associated with exercise duration.

  16. Region-selective effects of long-term lithium and carbamazepine administration on cyclic AMP levels in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiborg, Ove; Krueger, Tanja; Jakosen, Soeren N.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of lithium and carbamazepine in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder is well established. Althougt a number of biochemical effects have been found, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying their therapeutic actions have not been elucidated nor are the target regions in the brain identified. Taken into account the important role of the cyclic AMP second messenger system in the regulation of neuronal exitability and the indications of its involvement in the pathophysiology of bipolar affective disorder, we have focused on the drug effects on cyclic AMP levels. The objectives of this investigation were to measure the effects on basal cyclic AMP levels, and to locate target regions within the rat brain after long-term administration of lithium and carbamazepine. Drug treatments were carried out for a period of 28 days. After either drug treatment the cyclic AMP level was increased 3-4 times in frontal cortex but unchanged in hippocampus, hypothalamus, thalamus, amygdala and in cerebellum. In neostratum the cyclic AMP level was decreased to about 30% after treatment with lithium. We suggest the common region-selective effect, observed for both drugs in frontal cortex, to be essential for the therapeutic actions of lithium and carbamazepine. (au)

  17. Plasticity of regulation of mannitol phosphotransferase system operon by CRP-cAMP complex in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan Yan; Zhang, Hong Zhi; Liang, Wei Li; Zhang, Li Juan; Zhu, Jun; Kan, Biao

    2013-10-01

    The complex of the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and cAMP is an important transcriptional regulator of numerous genes in prokaryotes. The transport of mannitol through the phosphotransferase systems (PTS) is regulated by the CRP-cAMP complex. The aim of the study is to investigate how the CRP-cAMP complex acting on the mannitol PTS operon mtl of the Vibrio cholerae El Tor biotype. The crp mutant strain was generated by homologous recombination to assess the need of CRP to activate the mannitol PTS operon of V. cholerae El Tor. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and the reporter plasmid pBBRlux were used to confirm the role that the CRP-cAMP complex playing on the mannitol PTS operon mtl. In this study, we confirmed that CRP is strictly needed for the activation of the mtl operon. We further experimentally identified five CRP binding sites within the promoter region upstream of the mannitol PTS operon mtl of the Vibrio cholerae El Tor biotype and found that these sites display different affinities for CRP and provide different contributions to the activation of the operon. The five binding sites collectively confer the strong activation of mannitol transfer by CRP in V. cholerae, indicating an elaborate and subtle CRP activation mechanism. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  18. Phorbol esters inhibit chondrogenesis in limb mesenchyme by mechanisms independent of PGE sub 2 or cyclic AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddulph, D.M.; Dozier, M.M. (Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States))

    1989-12-01

    Effects of the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on chondrogenesis and concentrations of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) were investigated in micromass cultures of chick limb mesenchyme derived from the distal tip of stage 25 limb buds. TPA completely inhibited chondrogenesis during the first 4 days of culture; however, a few small cartilage nodules formed by day 6. Relative to control cultures, both PGE{sub 2} and cAMP concentrations were altered by TPA treatment during the 6-day period of cell culture. Concentrations of both compounds increased in control cells during the first 24 hours of culture and then declined during the remaining 5 days. In TPA-treated cells both PGE{sub 2} and cAMP levels increased progressively during the 6 days of cell culture, each being elevated at day 6 by twofold over control cells. The results suggest the presence of regulatory pathways important in chondrogenesis which occur independent of those initiated by PGE{sub 2} and the cAMP system.

  19. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP are reduced in lymphocytes from alcoholic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, I.; Wrubel, B.; Estrin, W.; Gordon, A.

    1987-01-01

    Alcoholism causes serious neurologic disease that may be due, in part, to the ability of ethanol to interact with neural cell membranes and change neuronal function. Adenosine receptors are membrane-bound proteins that appear to mediate some of the effects of ethanol in the brain. Human lymphocytes also have adenosine receptors, and their activation causes increases in cAMP levels. To test the hypothesis that basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels in lymphocytes might be abnormal in alcoholism, the authors studied lymphocytes from 10 alcoholic subjects, 10 age- and sex-matched normal individuals, and 10 patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were reduced 75% in lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects. Also, there was a 76% reduction in ethanol stimulation of cAMP accumulation in lymphocytes from alcoholics. Similar results were demonstrable in isolated T cells. Unlike other laboratory tests examined, these measurements appeared to distinguish alcoholics from normal subjects and from patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Reduced basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP in lymphocytes from alcoholics may reflect a change in cell membranes due either to chronic alcohol abuse or to a genetic predisposition unique to alcoholic subjects

  20. Management of cesium loaded AMP- Part I preparation of 137Cesium concentrate and cementation of secondary wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, I.J.; Sathi Sasidharan, N.; Yalmali, Vrunda S.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Wattal, P.K.

    2005-11-01

    Separation of 137 cesium from High Level Waste can be achieved by use of composite-AMP, an engineered form of Ammonium Molybdo-Phosphate(AMP). Direct vitrification of cesium loaded composite AMP in borosilicate glass matrix leads to separation of water soluble molybdate phase. A proposed process describes two different routes of selective separation of molybdates and phosphate to obtain solutions of cesium concentrates. Elution of 137 Cesium from composite-AMP by decomposing it under flow conditions using saturated barium hydroxide was investigated. This method leaves molybdate and phosphate embedded in the column but only 70% of total cesium loaded on column could be eluted. Alternatively composite-AMP was dissolved in sodium hydroxide and precipitation of barium molybdate-phosphate from the resultant solution, using barium nitrate was investigated by batch methods. The precipitation technique gave over 99.9% of 137 Cesium activity in solutions, free of molybdates and phosphates, which is ideally suited for immobilization in borosilicate glass matrix. Detailed studies were carried out to immobilize secondary waste of 137 Cesium contaminated barium molybdate-phosphate precipitates in the slag cement matrix using vermiculite and bentonite as admixtures. The cumulative fraction of 137 Cs leached from the cement matrix blocks was 0.05 in 140 days while the 137 Cs leach rate was 0.001 gm/cm 2 /d. (author)

  1. Effect of electrolytes concentration on recovery of cesium from AMP-PAN by Electrodialysis-Ion Exchange (EDIX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahendra, Ch.; Rajan, K.K.; SatyaSai, P.M.; Anand Babu, C.

    2014-01-01

    Cesium from the simulated acidic waste solution was separated using Ammonium Molybdophosphate (AMP) - Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) ion exchange resin in column operations. Electrodialysis - Ion exchange (EDIX) has been tried for the recovery of cesium from the AMP-PAN which was saturated with cesium. The electrodialysis setup consists of three compartments; cesium loaded AMP-PAN is placed in the middle compartment and is separated from the anode and cathode compartments by cation exchange membranes. Ammonium sulphate was used as anolyte and HNO 3 as catholyte. 0.1N HNO 3 was circulated in the middle compartment containing AMP-PAN to keep the resin in acidic form. On application of potential, the ammonium ions from the anode compartment migrate towards cathode through the middle compartment where they exchange with cesium ions on the resin and the exchanged cesium ions migrate towards cathode to get concentrated. Some part of cesium is recovered in the middle compartment due to convection. Cesium recovery from the AMP-PAN in the electrodialysis setup was studied at different anolyte and catholyte concentrations. All the experiments were carried out at constant current density of 40 mA/cm 2 for 15h. It was found that more than 50% of cesium recovery was observed for all the experiments studied and recovery percentage increased with increasing the anolyte concentration. It was observed that the electrolytes concentration affects the voltage drop across the cell

  2. Effect of beta-ADrenergic Agonist on Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Because it seems logical that these agonists exert their action on muscle through stimulation of cAMP synthesis, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax levels were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. In addition, the EC50 values for isoproterenol, cimaterol, clenbuterol, epinephrine, and albuterol were 360 nM, 630 nM, 900 nM, 2,470 nM, and 3,650 nM, respectively. Finally, dose response curves show that the concentrations of cimaterol and clenbuterol in culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals had no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP accumulation in chicken skeletal muscle cells.

  3. Pseudohyphal growth is induced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a combination of stress and cAMP signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, O; Gancedo, J M

    2000-08-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae pseudohyphae formation may be triggered by nitrogen deprivation and is stimulated by cAMP. It was observed that even in a medium with an adequate nitrogen supply, cAMP can induce pseudohyphal growth when S. cerevisiae uses ethanol as carbon source. This led us to investigate the effects of the carbon source and of a variety of stresses on yeast morphology. Pseudohyphae formation and invasive growth were observed in a rich medium (YP) with poor carbon sources such as lactate or ethanol. External cAMP was required for the morphogenetic transition in one genetic background, but was dispensable in strain sigma 1278b which has been shown to have an overactive Ras2/cAMP pathway. Pseudohyphal growth and invasiveness also took place in YPD plates when the yeast was subjected to different stresses: a mild heat-stress (37 degrees C), an osmotic stress (1 m NACl), or addition of compounds which affect the lipid bilayer organization of the cell membrane (aliphatic alcohols at 2%) or alter the glucan structure of the cell wall (Congo red). We conclude that pseudohyphal growth is a physiological response not only to starvation but also to a stressful environment; it appears to require the coordinate action of a MAP kinase cascade and a cAMP-dependent pathway.

  4. Lipid composition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase mutants of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernejc, Katarina; Bencina, Mojca

    2003-08-29

    Lipid composition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) Aspergillus niger mutants with overexpressed or deleted genes for either regulatory and/or the catalytic subunit of PKA was analyzed. Disruption of the gene encoding the PKA regulatory subunit resulted in 20% less total lipids, 30% less neutral lipids, four times more glycolipids and two-fold higher triacylglycerol lipase activity compared to the control strain. Concomitantly a five-fold decrease in phosphatidylcholine, accompanied with 1.5-, 1.8- and 2.8-fold increases in phosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol, was determined, respectively. The lack of PKA activity, due to the disruption of a gene encoding the PKA catalytic subunit, resulted in a 1.6-times increase in total lipids with two times more neutral lipids associated with lower triacylglycerol lipase activity and a decrease in phospholipids. The mutants with unrestricted PKA activity synthesized twice as much citric acid as the control strain and three times more than strains lacking PKA activity. The results indicate the involvement of cAMP-mediated PKA activity in regulation of lipid biosynthesis as well as citric acid synthesis.

  5. Differential amplicons (ΔAmp)-a new molecular method to assess RNA integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, J; Švec, D; Lott, E; Kubista, M; Sjöback, R

    2016-01-01

    Integrity of the mRNA in clinical samples has major impact on the quality of measured expression levels. This is independent of the measurement technique being next generation sequencing (NGS), Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or microarray profiling. If mRNA is highly degraded or damaged, measured data will be very unreliable and the whole study is likely a waste of time and money. It is therefore common strategy to test the quality of RNA in samples before conducting large and costly studies. Most methods today to assess the quality of RNA are ignorant to the nature of the RNA and, therefore, reflect the integrity of ribosomal RNA, which is the dominant species, rather than of mRNAs, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, which usually are the species of interest. Here, we present a novel molecular approach to assess the quality of the targeted RNA species by measuring the differential amplification (ΔAmp) of an Endogenous RNase Resistant (ERR) marker relative to a reference gene, optionally combined with the measurement of two amplicons of different lengths. The combination reveals any mRNA degradation caused by ribonucleases as well as physical, chemical or UV damage. ΔAmp has superior sensitivity to common microfluidic electrophoretic methods, senses the integrity of the actual targeted RNA species, and allows for a smoother and more cost efficient workflow.

  6. Cl- transport pathways regulated by Ca++, cAMP, and pH in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.; Gruenstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    Under basal conditions Cl - efflux from human fibroblasts occurs with a rate constant of permeability of 0.08 min -1 . 50% of the basal efflux is due to Cl - /anion exchange and is DIDS inhibitable, 25% is due to Na + /K + /Cl - cotransport and is furosemide inhibitable, and 20% is due to an electrically conductive pathway. Increasing intracellular Ca ++ with A23187 stimulates Cl - efflux by 30%. This increase appears to occur entirely via an electrically conducting pathway, but unlike basal Cl - conductance, it is DIDS sensitive. Exposure of the cells to dibutyryl cAMP stimulates Cl - efflux by 15%. They do not yet know whether the cAMP stimulated pathway is electrically conductive, but the stimulation is additive with that caused by elevated Ca ++ suggesting that different pathways are activated. Elevation of intracellular pH by any of several standard methods increases Cl - efflux by as much as 700%. The pH effect appears to be mediated by a Cl - /anion exchange pathway since it is DIDS sensitive and electroneutral. Previous work from this laboratory describing a transient rapid efflux of Cl - followed by a slower efflux phase can now be explained as the result of a transient alkalinization of cells rather than as 2 subcellular Cl - compartments. This alkalinization occurs when cells are transferred from a 5% CO 2 atmosphere during 36 Cl - load to ambient CO 2 for efflux

  7. Global Bifurcation from Intervals for the Monge-Ampère Equations and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenguo Shen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We shall establish the global bifurcation results from the trivial solutions axis or from infinity for the Monge-Ampère equations: det(D2u=λm(x-uN+m(xf1(x,-u,-u′,λ+f2(x,-u,-u′,λ, in B, u(x=0, on ∂B, where D2u=(∂2u/∂xi∂xj is the Hessian matrix of u, where B is the unit open ball of RN, m∈C(B¯,[0,+∞ is a radially symmetric weighted function and m(r:=m(x≢0 on any subinterval of [0,1], λ is a positive parameter, and the nonlinear term f1,f2∈C(B¯×R+3,R+, but f1 is not necessarily differentiable at the origin and infinity with respect to u, where R+=[0,+∞. Some applications are given to the Monge-Ampère equations and we use global bifurcation techniques to prove our main results.

  8. Crystal structures of carbamate kinase from Giardia lamblia bound with citric acid and AMP-PNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kap Lim

    Full Text Available The parasite Giardia lamblia utilizes the L-arginine dihydrolase pathway to generate ATP from L-arginine. Carbamate kinase (CK catalyzes the last step in this pathway, converting ADP and carbamoyl phosphate to ATP and ammonium carbamate. Because the L-arginine pathway is essential for G. lamblia survival and absent in high eukaryotes including humans, the enzyme is a potential target for drug development. We have determined two crystal structures of G. lamblia CK (glCK with bound ligands. One structure, in complex with a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog, adenosine 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP, was determined at 2.6 Å resolution. The second structure, in complex with citric acid bound in the postulated carbamoyl phosphate binding site, was determined in two slightly different states at 2.1 and 2.4 Å resolution. These structures reveal conformational flexibility of an auxiliary domain (amino acid residues 123-170, which exhibits open or closed conformations or structural disorder, depending on the bound ligand. The structures also reveal a smaller conformational change in a region associated the AMP-PNP adenine binding site. The protein residues involved in binding, together with a model of the transition state, suggest that catalysis follows an in-line, predominantly dissociative, phosphotransfer reaction mechanism, and that closure of the flexible auxiliary domain is required to protect the transition state from bulk solvent.

  9. AMP deaminase histochemical activity and immunofluorescent isozyme localization in rat skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. L.; Sabina, R. L.; Ogasawara, N.; Riley, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The cellular distribution of AMP deaminase (AMPda) isozymes was documented for rat soleus and plantaris muscles, utilizing immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoprecipitation methods. AMPda is a ubiquitous enzyme existing as three distinct isozymes, A, B and C, which were initially purified from skeletal muscle, liver (and kidney), and heart, respectively. AMPda-A is primarily concentrated subsarcolemmally and intermyofibrillarly within muscle cells, while isozymes B and C are concentrated within non-myofiber elements of muscle tissue. AMPda-B is principally associated with connective tissues surrounding neural elements and the muscle spindle capsule, and AMPda-C is predominantly associated with circulatory elements, such as arterial and venous walls, capillary endothelium, and red blood cells. These specific localizations, combined with documented differences in kinetic properties, suggest multiple functional roles for the AMPda isozymes or temporal segregation of similar AMPda functions. Linkage of the AMPda substrate with adenosine production pathways at the AMP level and the localization of isozyme-C in vascular tissue suggest a regulatory role in the microcirculation.

  10. Structural insights into the architecture and allostery of full-length AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Yi-Jiong; Zhao, Jing; Ji, Shang-Rong; Wu, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yi

    2011-04-13

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric complex composed of α catalytic subunit, β scaffolding subunit, and γ regulatory subunit with critical roles in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. However, the molecular architecture of the intact complex and the allostery associated with the adenosine binding-induced regulation of kinase activity remain unclear. Here, we determine the three-dimensional reconstruction and subunit organization of the full-length rat AMPK (α1β1γ1) through single-particle electron-microscopy. By comparing the structures of AMPK in ATP- and AMP-bound states, we are able to visualize the sequential conformational changes underlying kinase activation that transmits from the adenosine binding sites in the γ subunit to the kinase domain of the α subunit. These results not only make substantial revision to the current model of AMPK assembly, but also highlight a central role of the linker sequence of the α subunit in mediating the allostery of AMPK. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. NRSF causes cAMP-sensitive suppression of sodium current in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, H.; Lester, H. A.

    2002-01-01

    The neuron restrictive silencer factor (NRSF/REST) has been shown to bind to the promoters of many neuron-specific genes and is able to suppress transcription of Na(+) channels in PC12 cells, although its functional effect in terminally differentiated neurons is unknown. We constructed lentiviral vectors to express NRSF as a bicistronic message with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and followed infected hippocampal neurons in culture over a period of 1-2 wk. NRSF-expressing neurons showed a time-dependent suppression of Na(+) channel function as measured by whole cell electrophysiology. Suppression was reversed or prevented by the addition of membrane-permeable cAMP analogues and enhanced by cAMP antagonists but not affected by increasing protein expression with a viral enhancer. Secondary effects, including altered sensitivity to glutamate and GABA and reduced outward K(+) currents, were duplicated by culturing GFP-infected control neurons in TTX. The striking similarity of the phenotypes makes NRSF potentially useful as a genetic "silencer" and also suggests avenues of further exploration that may elucidate the transcription factor's in vivo role in neuronal plasticity.

  12. Acquisition of Carbapenem Resistance by Plasmid-Encoded-AmpC-Expressing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, Ria; Wattel, Agnes A; Arenas, Jesús; Goessens, Wil H F; Tommassen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Although AmpC β-lactamases can barely degrade carbapenems, if at all, they can sequester them and prevent them from reaching their targets. Thus, carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae can result from AmpC production and simultaneous reduction of antibiotic influx into the periplasm by mutations in the porin genes. Here we investigated the route and genetic mechanisms of acquisition of carbapenem resistance in a clinical E. coli isolate carrying bla CMY-2 on a plasmid by selecting for mutants that are resistant to increasing concentrations of meropenem. In the first step, the expression of OmpC, the only porin produced in the strain under laboratory conditions, was lost, leading to reduced susceptibility to meropenem. In the second step, the expression of the CMY-2 β-lactamase was upregulated, leading to resistance to meropenem. The loss of OmpC was due to the insertion of an IS1 element into the ompC gene or to frameshift mutations and premature stop codons in this gene. The bla CMY-2 gene was found to be located on an IncIγ plasmid, and overproduction of the CMY-2 enzyme resulted from an increased plasmid copy number due to a nucleotide substitution in the inc gene. The clinical relevance of these genetic mechanisms became evident from the analysis of previously isolated carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates, which appeared to carry similar mutations. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by natural and synthetic activators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Grahame Hardie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is a sensor of cellular energy status that is almost universally expressed in eukaryotic cells. While it appears to have evolved in single-celled eukaryotes to regulate energy balance in a cell-autonomous manner, during the evolution of multicellular animals its role has become adapted so that it also regulates energy balance at the whole body level, by responding to hormones that act primarily on the hypothalamus. AMPK monitors energy balance at the cellular level by sensing the ratios of AMP/ATP and ADP/ATP, and recent structural analyses of the AMPK heterotrimer that have provided insight into the complex mechanisms for these effects will be discussed. Given the central importance of energy balance in diseases that are major causes of morbidity or death in humans, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and inflammatory disorders, there has been a major drive to develop pharmacological activators of AMPK. Many such activators have been described, and the various mechanisms by which these activate AMPK will be discussed. A particularly large class of AMPK activators are natural products of plants derived from traditional herbal medicines. While the mechanism by which most of these activate AMPK has not yet been addressed, I will argue that many of them may be defensive compounds produced by plants to deter infection by pathogens or grazing by insects or herbivores, and that many of them will turn out to be inhibitors of mitochondrial function.

  14. Isolation of 137-Cs in tuna fish by ammonium phosphomolybdate (AMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumiarti; Surtipanti, S.

    1988-01-01

    The isolation of 137-Cs in tuna fish (Neithunnus macroptenus) has been carried out using AMP. The energy of 137-Cs was measure using NaI(T1) detector connected to a Multi Channel Analyzer (MCA). In standard solution of 137-Cs with activity 160.74 and 80.37 pCi, the addition of 120 mg AMP and 7 hours of absorption time, caused 97% of 137-Cs in the solution was absorbed. The destruction of tuna fish was carried out using two methods namely by wet destruction with sulfuric acid, nitrit acid and hydrogen peroxid mixture and by wet destruction with hydrogen peroxide. The applications of this technique of tuna fish was carried out by spiking 137-Cs standard into the fish before being destructed. The recovery obtained from wet destruction with H2O2 was about 80%, while from destruction with acid mixtures and H2O2 was only about 47%. (authors). 3 refs, 3 tabs

  15. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamases among Enterobacteriaceae in Algiers hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iabadene, Hassen; Messai, Yamina; Ammari, Houria; Alouache, Souhila; Verdet, Charlotte; Bakour, Rabah; Arlet, Guillaume

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and diversity of plasmid-mediated AmpC cephalosporinases (PAcBLs) in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae collected between 2003 and 2007 from three Algiers hospitals. Antibiograms were determined on Mueller-Hinton agar plates using the disk diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined by Etest. Isolates resistant to cefoxitin or ceftazidime were screened for bla(CMY), bla(DHA), bla(FOX) and bla(ACC) as well as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR products were sequenced by the Sanger method. Plasmid incompatibility grouping was conducted by PCR-based replicon typing. The prevalence of PAcBLs was 2.18% (11/505), comprising 8 CMY-2 and 3 DHA-1 enzymes. CTX-M-15 was co-produced with CMY-2 in three isolates and with DHA-1 in one isolate; the two remaining DHA-1-producers co-expressed SHV-12 ESBL. This is the first report of plasmid-mediated AmpC from Algeria, with the first detection of DHA-1 in Enterobacter cloacae.

  16. ampR Gene Mutations That Greatly Increase Class C β-Lactamase Activity in Enterobacter cloacae

    OpenAIRE

    Kuga, Akio; Okamoto, Ryoichi; Inoue, Matsuhisa

    2000-01-01

    The ampC and ampR genes of Enterobacter cloacae GN7471 were cloned into pMW218 to yield pKU403. Four mutant plasmids derived from pKU403 (pKU404, pKU405, pKU406, and pKU407) were isolated in an AmpD mutant of Escherichia coli ML4953 by selection with ceftazidime or aztreonam. The β-lactamase activities expressed by pKU404, pKU405, pKU406, and pKU407 were about 450, 75, 160, and 160 times higher, respectively, than that expressed by the original plasmid, pKU403. These mutant plasmids all carri...

  17. Antimicrobial peptide (Cn-AMP2) from liquid endosperm of Cocos nucifera forms amyloid-like fibrillar structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gour, Shalini; Kaushik, Vibha; Kumar, Vijay; Bhat, Priyanka; Yadav, Subhash C; Yadav, Jay K

    2016-04-01

    Cn-AMP2 is an antimicrobial peptide derived from liquid endosperm of coconut (Cocos nucifera). It consists of 11 amino acid residues and predicted to have high propensity for β-sheet formation that disposes this peptide to be amyloidogenic. In the present study, we have examined the amyloidogenic propensities of Cn-AMP2 in silico and then tested the predictions under in vitro conditions. The in silico study revealed that the peptide possesses high amyloidogenic propensity comparable with Aβ. Upon solubilisation and agitation in aqueous buffer, Cn-AMP2 forms visible aggregates that display bathochromic shift in the Congo red absorbance spectra, strong increase in thioflavin T fluorescence and fibrillar morphology under transmission electron microscopy. All these properties are typical of an amyloid fibril derived from various proteins/peptides including Aβ. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of CREB target genes reveals a core promoter requirement for cAMP responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkright, Michael D; Guzmán, Ernesto; Flechner, Lawrence; Su, Andrew I; Hogenesch, John B; Montminy, Marc

    2003-04-01

    We have employed a hidden Markov model (HMM) based on known cAMP responsive elements to search for putative CREB target genes. The best scoring sites were positionally conserved between mouse and human orthologs, suggesting that this parameter can be used to enrich for true CREB targets. Target validation experiments revealed a core promoter requirement for transcriptional induction via CREB; TATA-less promoters were unresponsive to cAMP compared to TATA-containing genes, despite comparable binding of CREB to both sets of genes in vivo. Indeed, insertion of a TATA box motif rescued cAMP responsiveness on a TATA-less promoter. These results illustrate a mechanism by which subsets of target genes for a transcription factor are differentially regulated depending on core promoter configuration.

  19. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Directly Phosphorylates and Destabilizes Hedgehog Pathway Transcription Factor GLI1 in Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Hsing Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (Hh pathway regulates cell differentiation and proliferation during development by controlling the Gli transcription factors. Cell fate decisions and progression toward organ and tissue maturity must be coordinated, and how an energy sensor regulates the Hh pathway is not clear. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is an important sensor of energy stores and controls protein synthesis and other energy-intensive processes. AMPK is directly responsive to intracellular AMP levels, inhibiting a wide range of cell activities if ATP is low and AMP is high. Thus, AMPK can affect development by influencing protein synthesis and other processes needed for growth and differentiation. Activation of AMPK reduces GLI1 protein levels and stability, thus blocking Sonic-hedgehog-induced transcriptional activity. AMPK phosphorylates GLI1 at serines 102 and 408 and threonine 1074. Mutation of these three sites into alanine prevents phosphorylation by AMPK. This leads to increased GLI1 protein stability, transcriptional activity, and oncogenic potency.

  20. Regulation of cyclic AMP formation in cultures of human foetal astrocytes by beta 2-adrenergic and adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, M D; Freshney, R I; Ball, S G; Vaughan, P F

    1989-09-01

    Two cell cultures, NEP2 and NEM2, isolated from human foetal brain have been maintained through several passages and found to express some properties of astrocytes. Both cell cultures contain adenylate cyclase stimulated by catecholamines with a potency order of isoprenaline greater than adrenaline greater than salbutamol much greater than noradrenaline, which is consistent with the presence of beta 2-adrenergic receptors. This study reports that the beta 2-adrenergic-selective antagonist ICI 118,551 is approximately 1,000 times more potent at inhibiting isoprenaline stimulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) formation in both NEP2 and NEM2 than the beta 1-adrenergic-selective antagonist practolol. This observation confirms the presence of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in these cell cultures. The formation of cAMP in NEP2 is also stimulated by 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine (NECA) more potently than by either adenosine or N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)adenosine (L-PIA), which suggests that this foetal astrocyte expresses adenosine A2 receptors. Furthermore, L-PIA and NECA inhibit isoprenaline stimulation of cAMP formation, a result suggesting the presence of adenosine A1 receptors on NEP2. The presence of A1 receptors is confirmed by the observation that the A1-selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine reverses the inhibition of isoprenaline stimulation of cAMP formation by L-PIA and NECA. Additional evidence that NEP2 expresses adenosine receptors linked to the adenylate cyclase-inhibitory GTP-binding protein is provided by the finding that pretreatment of these cells with pertussis toxin reverses the adenosine inhibition of cAMP formation stimulated by either isoprenaline or forskolin.

  1. Methacholine and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) responsiveness, and the presence and degree of atopy in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong I; Lee, Ju K; Kim, Chang K; Koh, Young Y

    2011-02-01

    The relationship between atopy and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), both key features of asthma, remains to be clarified. BHR is commonly evaluated by bronchial challenges using direct and indirect stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of BHR to methacholine (direct stimulus) and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) (indirect stimulus) according to the presence and degree of atopy in children with asthma. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 120 children presenting with a diagnosis of asthma. These children were characterized by skin-prick tests (SPTs), spirometry and bronchial challenges with methacholine and AMP. Atopy was defined by at least one positive reaction to SPTs, and its degree was measured using serum total IgE levels, number of positive SPTs and atopic scores (sum of graded wheal size). A provocative concentration causing a 20% decline in FEV(1) (PC(20) ) was determined for each challenge. Patients with atopy(n=94) had a significantly lower AMP PC(20) than non-atopic patients (n=26), whereas methacholine PC(20) was not different between the two groups. Among the patients with atopy, there was no association between methacholine PC(20) and any atopy parameter. In contrast, a significant association was found between AMP PC(20) and the degree of atopy reflected in serum total IgE, number of positive SPTs and atopic scores (anova trend test, p=0.002, 0.001, 0.003, respectively). AMP responsiveness was associated with the presence and degree of atopy, whereas such a relationship was not observed for methacholine responsiveness. These findings suggest that atopic status may be better reflected by bronchial responsiveness assessed by AMP than by methacholine. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Synergistic reactivation of latent HIV-1 provirus by PKA activator dibutyryl-cAMP in combination with an HDAC inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hoyong; Kim, Kyung-Chang; Son, Junseock; Shin, Younghyun; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Kang, Chun; Choi, Byeong-Sun

    2017-01-02

    HIV-1 reservoirs remain a major barrier to HIV-1 eradication. Although combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) can successfully reduce viral replication, it cannot reactivate HIV-1 provirus in this reservoir. Therefore, HIV-1 provirus reactivation strategies by cell activation or epigenetic modification are proposed for the eradication of HIV-1 reservoirs. Although treatment with the protein kinase A (PKA) activator cyclic AMP (cAMP) or epigenetic modifying agents such as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) alone can induce HIV-1 reactivation in latently infected cells, the synergism of these agents has not been fully evaluated. In the present study, we observed that treatment with 500μM of dibutyryl-cAMP, 1μM of vorinostat, or 1μM of trichostatin A alone effectively reactivated HIV-1 in both ACH2 and NCHA1 cells latently infected with HIV-1 without cytotoxicity. In addition, treatment with the PKA inhibitor KT5720 reduced the increased HIV-1 p24 level in the supernatant of these cells. After dibutyryl-cAMP treatment, we found an increased level of the PKA substrate phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. When we treated cells with a combination of dibutyryl-cAMP and vorinostat or trichostatin A, the levels of HIV-1 p24 in the supernatant and levels of intracellular HIV-1 p24 were dramatically increased in both ACH2 and NCHA1 cells compared with those treated with a single agent. These results suggest that combined treatment with a PKA activator and an HDACi is effective for reactivating HIV-1 in latently infected cells, and may be an important approach to eradicate HIV-1 reservoirs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. cAMP-CRP acts as a key regulator for the viable but non-culturable state in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosho, Kazuki; Fukushima, Hiroko; Asai, Takehiro; Nishio, Masahiro; Takamaru, Reiko; Kobayashi-Kirschvink, Koseki Joseph; Ogawa, Tetsuhiro; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko

    2018-03-01

    A variety of bacteria, including Escherichia coli, are known to enter the viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state under various stress conditions. During this state, cells lose colony-forming activities on conventional agar plates while retaining signs of viability. Diverse environmental stresses including starvation induce the VBNC state. However, little is known about the genetic mechanism inducing this state. Here, we aimed to reveal the genetic determinants of the VBNC state of E. coli. We hypothesized that the VBNC state is a process wherein specific gene products important for colony formation are depleted during the extended period of stress conditions. If so, higher expression of these genes would maintain colony-forming activities, thereby restraining cells from entering the VBNC state. From an E. coli plasmid-encoded ORF library, we identified genes that were responsible for maintaining high colony-forming activities after exposure to starvation condition. Among these, cpdA encoding cAMP phosphodiesterase exhibited higher performance in the maintenance of colony-forming activities. As cpdA overexpression decreases intracellular cAMP, cAMP or its complex with cAMP-receptor protein (CRP) may negatively regulate colony-forming activities under stress conditions. We confirmed this using deletion mutants lacking adenylate cyclase or CRP. These mutants fully maintained colony-forming activities even after a long period of starvation, while wild-type cells lost most of this activity. Thus, we concluded that the lack of cAMP-CRP effectively retains high colony-forming activities, indicating that cAMP-CRP acts as a positive regulator necessary for the induction of the VBNC state in E. coli.

  4. Cyclic AMP-dependent regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and immunofluorescence levels in rat retinal precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Pierre; Bernard, Marianne

    2013-05-01

    Stimulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene transcription by cyclic AMP (cAMP) has been clearly established in adrenal medula cells and neural-crest-derived cell lines but information on this mechanism is still lacking in dopaminergic neurons. Because they are easily amenable to in vitro experiments, dopaminergic amacrine cells of the retina might constitute a valuable model system to study this mechanism. We have used real-time reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction to quantify TH mRNA levels in the rat retina during post-natal development and in retinal precursor cells obtained from neonatal rats and cultured for 3 days in serum-free medium. Whereas the TH mRNA concentration remains consistantly low in control cultures, treatment with cAMP-increasing agents (forskolin, membrane depolarization, phosphodiesterase inhibitors) is sufficient to raise it to the level observed in adult retina (15-fold increase). Treatment of the cultured cells can be delayed by up to 2 days with identical results at the TH mRNA level, thus ruling out a survival-promoting effect of cAMP. TH immunofluorescence has confirmed cAMP-dependent regulation of TH expression at the protein level and indicates that the frequency of TH-positive cells in the cultures is similar to that observed in the adult retina. Selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors suggest that PDE4 is the major subtype involved in the dopaminergic amacrine cell response. Our data clearly establish the cAMP-dependent regulation of TH mRNA and immunofluorescence levels in retinal precursor cells. The possible role of this regulation mechanism in the developmental activation of TH gene expression is discussed.

  5. Cyclic AMP induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells and inhibits tumor development in a mouse myeloma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follin-Arbelet, Virginie; Hofgaard, Peter O; Hauglin, Harald; Naderi, Soheil; Sundan, Anders; Blomhoff, Rune; Bogen, Bjarne; Blomhoff, Heidi K

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable disease requiring the development of effective therapies which can be used clinically. We have elucidated the potential for manipulating the cAMP signaling pathway as a target for inhibiting the growth of multiple myeloma cells. As a model system, we primarily used the murine multiple myeloma cell line MOPC315 which can be grown both in vivo and in vitro. Human multiple myeloma cell lines U266, INA-6 and the B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Reh were used only for in vitro studies. Cell death was assessed by flow cytometry and western blot analysis after treatment with cAMP elevating agents (forskolin, prostaglandin E2 and rolipram) and cAMP analogs. We followed tumor growth in vivo after forskolin treatment by imaging DsRed-labelled MOPC315 cells transplanted subcutaneously in BALB/c nude mice. In contrast to the effect on Reh cells, 50 μM forskolin more than tripled the death of MOPC315 cells after 24 h in vitro. Forskolin induced cell death to a similar extent in the human myeloma cell lines U266 and INA-6. cAMP-mediated cell death had all the typical hallmarks of apoptosis, including changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and cleavage of caspase 3, caspase 9 and PARP. Forskolin also inhibited the growth of multiple myeloma cells in a mouse model in vivo. Elevation of intracellular levels of cAMP kills multiple myeloma cells in vitro and inhibits development of multiple myeloma in vivo. This strongly suggests that compounds activating the cAMP signaling pathway may be useful in the field of multiple myeloma

  6. [Expression optimization and characterization of Tenebrio molitor antimicrobiol peptides TmAMP1m in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimu, Reyihanguli; Mao, Xinfang; Liu, Zhongyuan

    2013-06-01

    To improve the expression level of tmAMP1m gene from Tenebrio molitor in Escherichia coli, we studied the effects of expression level and activity of the fusion protein HIS-TmAMP1m by conditions, such as culture temperature, inducing time and the final concentration of inductor Isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). We analyzed the optimum expression conditions by Tricine-SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, meanwhile, detected its antibacterial activity by using agarose cavity diffusion method. The results suggest that when inducing the recombinant plasmid with a final IPTG concentration of 0.1 mmol/L at 37 degrees C for 4 h, there was the highest expression level of fusion protein HIS-TmAMP1m in Escherichia coli. Under these conditions, the expression of fusion protein accounted for 40% of the total cell lysate with the best antibacterial activity. We purified the fusion protein HIS-TmAMPlm with nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) metal-affinity chromatography matrices. Western blotting analysis indicates that the His monoclonal antibody could be specifically bound to fusion protein HIS-TmAMPlm. After expression by inducing, the fusion protein could inhibit the growth of host cell transformed by pET30a-tmAMP1m. The fusion protein HIS-TmAMP1m had better stability and remained higher antibacterial activities when incubated at 100 degrees C for 10 h, repeated freeze thawing at -20 degrees C, dissolved in strong acid and alkali, or treated by organic solvents and protease. Moreover, the minimum inhibitory concentration results demonstrated that the fusion protein HIS-TmAMP1m has a good antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus sp., Corynebacterium glutamicum, Bacillus thuringiensis, Corynebacterium sp. This study laid the foundation to promote the application of insect antimicrobial peptides and further research.

  7. Performance of ACMG-AMP Variant-Interpretation Guidelines among Nine Laboratories in the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Laura M; Jarvik, Gail P; Leo, Michael C; McLaughlin, Heather M; Akkari, Yassmine; Amaral, Michelle D; Berg, Jonathan S; Biswas, Sawona; Bowling, Kevin M; Conlin, Laura K; Cooper, Greg M; Dorschner, Michael O; Dulik, Matthew C; Ghazani, Arezou A; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Green, Robert C; Hart, Ragan; Horton, Carrie; Johnston, Jennifer J; Lebo, Matthew S; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Ou, Jeffrey; Pak, Christine M; Patel, Ronak Y; Punj, Sumit; Richards, Carolyn Sue; Salama, Joseph; Strande, Natasha T; Yang, Yaping; Plon, Sharon E; Biesecker, Leslie G; Rehm, Heidi L

    2016-06-02

    Evaluating the pathogenicity of a variant is challenging given the plethora of types of genetic evidence that laboratories consider. Deciding how to weigh each type of evidence is difficult, and standards have been needed. In 2015, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) and the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) published guidelines for the assessment of variants in genes associated with Mendelian diseases. Nine molecular diagnostic laboratories involved in the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium piloted these guidelines on 99 variants spanning all categories (pathogenic, likely pathogenic, uncertain significance, likely benign, and benign). Nine variants were distributed to all laboratories, and the remaining 90 were evaluated by three laboratories. The laboratories classified each variant by using both the laboratory's own method and the ACMG-AMP criteria. The agreement between the two methods used within laboratories was high (K-alpha = 0.91) with 79% concordance. However, there was only 34% concordance for either classification system across laboratories. After consensus discussions and detailed review of the ACMG-AMP criteria, concordance increased to 71%. Causes of initial discordance in ACMG-AMP classifications were identified, and recommendations on clarification and increased specification of the ACMG-AMP criteria were made. In summary, although an initial pilot of the ACMG-AMP guidelines did not lead to increased concordance in variant interpretation, comparing variant interpretations to identify differences and having a common framework to facilitate resolution of those differences were beneficial for improving agreement, allowing iterative movement toward increased reporting consistency for variants in genes associated with monogenic disease. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Aging has the opposite effect on cAMP and cGMP circadian variations in rat Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Andric, Silvana A; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2017-05-01

    The Leydig cell physiology displays a circadian rhythm driven by a complex interaction of the reproductive axis hormones and circadian system. The final output of this regulatory process is circadian pattern of steroidogenic genes expression and testosterone production. Aging gradually decreases robustness of rhythmic testosterone secretion without change in pattern of LH secretion. Here, we analyzed effect of aging on circadian variation of cAMP and cGMP signaling in Leydig cells. Results showed opposite effect of aging on cAMP and cGMP daily variation. Reduced amplitude of cAMP circadian oscillation was probably associated with changed expression of genes involved in cAMP production (increased circadian pattern of Adcy7, Adcy9, Adcy10 and decreased Adcy3); cAMP degradation (increased Pde4a, decreased Pde8b, canceled rhythm of Pde4d, completely reversed circadian pattern of Pde7b and Pde8a); and circadian expression of protein kinase A subunits (Prkac/PRKAC and Prkar2a). Aging stimulates expression of genes responsible for cGMP production (Nos2, Gucy1a3 and Gucy1b3/GUCYB3) and degradation (Pde5a, Pde6a and Pde6h) but the overall net effect is elevation of cGMP circadian oscillations in Leydig cells. In addition, the expression of cGMP-dependent kinase, Prkg1/PRKG1 is up-regulated. It seems that aging potentiate cGMP- and reduce cAMP-signaling in Leydig cells. Since both signaling pathways affect testosterone production and clockwork in the cells, further insights into these signaling pathways will help to unravel disorders linked to the circadian timing system, aging and reproduction.

  9. The cAMP effectors PKA and Epac activate endothelial NO synthase through PI3K/Akt pathway in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Verónica; Luaces-Regueira, María; Campos-Toimil, Manuel

    2017-12-01

    3',5'-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) exerts an endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant action by stimulating endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity, and the subsequent NO release, through cAMP protein kinase (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) activation in endothelial cells. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which the cAMP-Epac/PKA pathway activates eNOS. cAMP-elevating agents (forskolin and dibutyryl-cAMP) and the joint activation of PKA (6-Bnz-cAMP) and Epac (8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP) increased cytoplasmic Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] c ) in ≤30% of fura-2-loaded isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). However, these drugs did not modify [Ca 2+ ] c in fluo-4-loaded HUVEC monolayers. In DAF-2-loaded HUVEC monolayers, forskolin, PKA and Epac activators significantly increased NO release, and the forskolin effect was reduced by inhibition of PKA (Rp-cAMPs), Epac (ESI-09), eNOS (L-NAME) or phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K; LY-294,002). On the other hand, inhibition of CaMKII (KN-93), AMPK (Compound C), or total absence of Ca 2+ , was without effect. In Western blot experiments, Serine 1177 phosphorylated-eNOS was significantly increased in HUVEC by cAMP-elevating agents and PKA or Epac activators. In isolated rat aortic rings LY-294,002, but not KN-93 or Compound C, significantly reduced the vasorelaxant effects of forskolin in the presence of endothelium. Our results suggest that Epac and PKA activate eNOS via Ser 1177 phosphorylation by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway, and independently of AMPK or CaMKII activation or [Ca 2+ ] c increase. This action explains, in part, the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant effect of cAMP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Proteomic and Metabolic Analyses of S49 Lymphoma Cells Reveal Novel Regulation of Mitochondria by cAMP and Protein Kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilderman, Andrea; Guo, Yurong; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Perkins, Guy; Zhang, Lingzhi; Murphy, Anne N; Taylor, Susan S; Insel, Paul A

    2015-09-04

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), acting via protein kinase A (PKA), regulates many cellular responses, but the role of mitochondria in such responses is poorly understood. To define such roles, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of mitochondria-enriched fractions and performed functional and morphologic studies of wild-type (WT) and kin(-) (PKA-null) murine S49 lymphoma cells. Basally, 75 proteins significantly differed in abundance between WT and kin(-) S49 cells. WT, but not kin(-), S49 cells incubated with the cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine cAMP (CPT-cAMP) for 16 h have (a) increased expression of mitochondria-related genes and proteins, including ones in pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and (b) increased maximal capacity of respiration on branched-chain keto acids and fatty acids. CPT-cAMP also regulates the cellular rate of ATP-utilization, as the rates of both ATP-linked respiration and proton efflux are decreased in WT but not kin(-) cells. CPT-cAMP protected WT S49 cells from glucose or glutamine deprivation, In contrast, CPT-cAMP did not protect kin(-) cells or WT cells treated with the PKA inhibitor H89 from glutamine deprivation. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial structure of WT and kin(-) S49 cells is similar. Treatment with CPT-cAMP produced apoptotic changes (i.e. decreased mitochondrial density and size and loss of cristae) in WT, but not kin(-) cells. Together, these findings show that cAMP acts via PKA to regulate multiple aspects of mitochondrial function and structure. Mitochondrial perturbation thus likely contributes to cAMP/PKA-mediated cellular responses. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Relation between Expression of the las Quorum-Sensing System in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Expression of Efflux Pump and ampC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MohammadReza Pourmand

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quorum-sensing systems regulate expression of several virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This study investigated the relation between expression of the las quorum-sensing system and expression of mexY and ampC in35 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.Methods: Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the disc diffusion method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Expression of genes including lasI, lasR, mexY, ampC and ampR was assessed by real time RT-PCR.Results: Twenty eight isolates with elevated expression of mexY and ampC (compared to  P. aeruginosa PAO1 were resistance to ceftazidime, imipenem, ciprofloxacin and amikacin. Also these isolates demonstrated increased expression of lasI and lasR. The remaining seven isolates showed intermediate resistance to ciprofloxacin and amikacin. These seven isolates with elevated ampR expression demonstrated decreased expression of mexY, ampC, lasI and lasR.Conclusion: In contrast to previous study, current study demonstrated that the expression pattern of ampC was identical to the lasI expression pattern among clinical isolates. Furthermore according to previous study we expected that AmpR positively regulated ampC expression but in our study, some of the isolates with elevated ampR expression showed decreased ampC expression. The expression pattern of lasR and mexY was identical in all of the isolates. It seems there was a direct or indirect relation between expression of lasR and mexY expression in P. aeruginosa.

  12. Inhibition of human platelet aggregation by dihydropyrano- and dihydrofuranocoumarins, a new class of cAMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastrup, Ole; Knudsen, J B; Lemmich, J

    1985-01-01

    Certain esters of dihydropyranocoumarin and dihydrofuranocoumarin alcohols have previously been shown to inhibit the cAMP-phosphodiesterase from bovine heart. We now report that these naturally occurring coumarins inhibit the high affinity (Km = 1.1 microM) cAMP-phosphodiesterase from human...... platelets with activities that closely correlate with those obtained using phosphodiesterase from bovine heart tissue. Additionally the coumarins inhibit the aggregation of human platelets induced with ADP, adrenaline and collagen with activities comparable to those of dipyridamole. A lack of significant...

  13. Induction of phenotypic changes in SCLC cell lines in vitro by hexamethylene bisacetamide, sodium butyrate, and cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Z; Freshney, R I; McNicol, A M; Murray, A M

    1993-06-01

    Hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), sodium butyrate (NaBt), and cyclic AMP (cAMP) have been shown to induce differentiation, which may regulate tumour growth differently from conventional cytotoxic drugs. It was the intention in the present study to determine whether alterations could be induced in the phenotype of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines with HMBA, NaBt and cAMP, and whether these alterations would correlate with reduced growth in vivo, implying a phenotypic shift from malignancy towards differentiation. The cell lines were NCI-H69, H187 and H128. The activity of dopa decarboxylase (DDC), the BB isozyme of creatine kinase (CK-BB), the synthesis of bombesin-like peptide (BLI), and the presence of neurone specific enolase (NSE) and chromogranin were used as markers of the small cell phenotype. Clonogenicity in suspension in agar, and growth as xenografts in nude mice, were used as malignancy-associated properties. Cell proliferation in vitro was determined by cell counting and growth curve analysis. HMBA, NaBt and cAMP were found to be reversibly cytostatic in liquid culture and pre-exposure reduced the cloning efficiency in agar by 60%-80%. Growth as xenografts was inhibited (three- to five-fold increase in the tumour doubling time), most significantly by NaBt. Effects of phenotypic markers were more complex. The most significant were a two-fold reduction in DDC with NaBt and HMBA, a 50% increase in CK-BB with cAMP, and a 70%-100% increase in secreted BLI with HMBA and cAMP, in NCI-H69 cells. No significant effects were seen on NSE and chromogranin. There was little sign of an interaction with adriamycin and vincristine, although a slight increase was observed in the ID50 of VP-16 following treatment with cAMP. NaBt, HMBA and cAMP were cytostatic and inhibited tumour growth, but there was no coordinated response in marker expression that would confirm phenotypic alteration indicative of differentiation. The problem of defining differentiation in

  14. Induction of a Torpor-Like State by 5’-AMP Does Not Depend on H2S Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugbartey, George J.; Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Boerema, Ate S.; Henning, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia is used to reduce ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) during organ transplantation and major surgery, but does not fully prevent organ injury. Interestingly, hibernating animals undergo repetitive periods of low body temperature called ‘torpor’ without signs of organ injury. Recently, we identified an essential role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in entrance into torpor and preservation of kidney integrity during hibernation. A torpor-like state can be induced pharmacologically by injecting 5’-Adenosine monophosphate (5’-AMP). The mechanism by which 5’-AMP leads to the induction of a torpor-like state, and the role of H2S herein, remains to be unraveled. Therefore, we investigated whether induction of a torpor-like state by 5-AMP depends on H2S production. Methods To study the role of H2S on the induction of torpor, amino-oxyacetic acid (AOAA), a non-specific inhibitor of H2S, was administered before injection with 5'-AMP to block endogenous H2S production in Syrian hamster. To assess the role of H2S on maintenance of torpor induced by 5’-AMP, additional animals were injected with AOAA during torpor. Key Results During the torpor-like state induced by 5’-AMP, the expression of H2S- synthesizing enzymes in the kidneys and plasma levels of H2S were increased. Blockade of these enzymes inhibited the rise in the plasma level of H2S, but neither precluded torpor nor induced arousal. Remarkably, blockade of endogenous H2S production was associated with increased renal injury. Conclusions Induction of a torpor-like state by 5’-AMP does not depend on H2S, although production of H2S seems to attenuate renal injury. Unraveling the mechanisms by which 5’-AMP reduces the metabolism without organ injury may allow optimization of current strategies to limit (hypothermic) IRI and improve outcome following organ transplantation, major cardiac and brain surgery. PMID:26295351

  15. Standing on shaky ground- US patent-eligibility of isolated DNA and genetic diagnostics after AMP v. USPTO - Part IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Schwartz, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    review (5). Why a potential Supreme Court review of AMP v. USPTO would indeed be a much welcomed and necessary development was analyzed in Part III. This part elaborated on the myriad of unsolved questions raised by both AMP v. USPTO and a bulk of subsequent case law addressing the patent...... to recent European developments (7). This provides the basis for summarizing conclusions (8). This final part, which was completed, reviewed and accepted for publication in February 2012, also incorporates new developments that can be expected in the coming months, such as the pending certiorari decision...

  16. Action of the complex Monge-Ampère operator on piecewise-linear functions and exponential tropical varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazarnovskii, B Ya

    2014-01-01

    We consider exponential tropical varieties, which appear as analogues of algebraic tropical varieties when we pass from algebraic varieties to varieties given by zero sets of systems of exponential sums. We describe a construction of exponential tropical varieties arising from the action of the complex Monge-Ampère operator on piecewise-linear functions and show that every such variety can be obtained in this way. As an application, we deduce a criterion for the vanishing of the value of the mixed Monge-Ampère operator. This is an analogue and generalization of the criterion for the vanishing of the mixed volume of convex bodies

  17. β-Keto and β-hydroxyphosphonate analogs of biotin-5’-AMP are inhibitors of holocarboxylase synthetase

    OpenAIRE

    Sittiwong, Wantanee; Cordonier, Elizabeth L.; Zempleni, Janos; Dussault, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the covalent attachment of biotin to cytoplasmic and mitochondrial carboxylases, nuclear histones, and over a hundred human proteins. Nonhydrolyzable ketophosphonate (β-ketoP) and hydroxyphosphonate (β-hydroxyP) analogs of biotin-5′-AMP inhibit holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) with IC50 values of 39.7 μM and 203.7 μM. By comparison, an IC50 value of 7 μM was observed with the previously reported biotinol-5'-AMP. The Ki values, 3.4 μM and 17.3 μM, r...

  18. Reduction of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase- and AmpC-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli through processing in two broiler chicken slaughterhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacholewicz, Ewa; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Swart, Arno; Gortemaker, Betty; Dierikx, Cindy; Havelaar, Arie; Schmitt, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Whilst broilers are recognised as a reservoir of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)- and AmpC-β-lactamase (AmpC)-producing Escherichia coli, there is currently limited knowledge on the effect of slaughtering on its concentrations on poultry meat. The aim of this study was to establish the

  19. Reduction of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase- and AmpC-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli through processing in two broiler chicken slaughterhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacholewicz, Ewa; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Swart, Arno; Gortemaker, Betty; Dierikx, Cindy; Havelaar, Arie; Schmitt, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Whilst broilers are recognised as a reservoir of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)- and AmpC-β-lactamase (AmpC)-producing Escherichia coli, there is currently limited knowledge on the effect of slaughtering on its concentrations on poultry meat. The aim of this study was to establish the

  20. Modulation of agonist-induced phosphoinositide metabolism, Ca 2+ signalling and contraction of airway smooth muscle by cyclic AMP-dependent mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoiting, B.H; Meurs, Herman; Schuiling, M; Kuipers, R; Elzinga, C.R S; Zaagsma, Hans

    1 The effects of increased cellular cyclic AMP levels induced by isoprenaline, forskolin and 8-bromo-adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cyclic AMP) on phosphoinositide metabolism and changes in intracellular Ca2+ elicited by methacholine and histamine were examined in bovine isolated

  1. 77 FR 21813 - Changes to the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report Revision 2 AMP XI.M41, “Buried and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0055] Changes to the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report Revision 2 AMP XI.M41, ``Buried and Underground Piping and Tanks'' AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Guidance (LR-ISG), LR-ISG-2011-03, ``Changes to GALL Report Revision 2 Aging Management Program (AMP) XI...

  2. A low-voltage Op Amp with rail-to-rail constant-gm input stage and a class AB rail-to-rail output stage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, J.H.; Wassenaar, R.F.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper a low-voltage two-stage Op Amp is presented. The Op Amp features rail-to-rail operation and has an @put stage with a constant transconductance (%) over the entire common-mode input range. The input stage consists of an n- and a PMOS differential pair connected in parallel. The constant

  3. Transiently increasing cAMP levels selectively in hippocampal excitatory neurons during sleep deprivation prevents memory deficits caused by sleep loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havekes, Robbert; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; Tudor, Jennifer C.; Ferri, Sarah L.; Baumann, Arnd; Meerlo, Peter; Abel, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is particularly sensitive to sleep loss. Although previous work has indicated that sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal cAMP signaling, it remains to be determined whether the cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation are caused by attenuated cAMP signaling in the

  4. An AP-2 element acts synergistically with the cyclic AMP- and Phorbol ester-inducible enhancer of the human proenkephalin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyman, S.E.; Comb, M.; Pearlberg, J.; Goodman, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    An enhancer with two DNA elements, one containing the sequence CGTCA, is required for cyclic AMP-and phorbol ester-inducible transcription of the human proenkephalin gene. The authors report that an AP-2 element located adjacent to the enhancer acts synergistically with it to confer maximal response to cyclic AMP and phorbol esters.

  5. Increasing prevalence and diversity of ESBL/AmpC-type ß-lactamase genes in Escherichia coli isolated from veal calves from 1997 to 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Giessen, van de A.; Dierikx, C.M.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Veldman, K.; Kant, A.; Mevius, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Several studies on faecal carriage of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli have been performed in cattle, but little is known about faecal carriage in veal calves. This study describes the prevalence and molecular characteristics of ESBL/AmpC genes in E.

  6. Constitutive high expression of chromosomal beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by a new insertion sequence (IS1669) located in ampD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Hentzer, Morten

    2002-01-01

    The expression of chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is negatively regulated by the activity of an amidase, AmpD. In the present study we examined resistant clinical P. aeruginosa strains and several resistant variants isolated from in vivo and in vitro biofilms for mutations...... in ampD to find evidence for the genetic changes leading to high-level expression of chromosomal beta-lactamase. A new insertion sequence, IS1669, was found located in the ampD genes of two clinical P. aeruginosa isolates and several biofilm-isolated variants. The presence of IS1669 in ampD resulted...... in the expression of high levels of AmpC beta-lactamase. Complementation of these isolates with ampD from the reference P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 caused a dramatic decrease in the expression of AmpC beta-lactamase and a parallel decrease of the MIC of ceftazidime to a level comparable to that of PAO1. One highly...

  7. Angiotensin II potentiates prostaglandin stimulation of cyclic AMP levels in intact bovine adrenal medulla cells but not adenylate cyclase in permeabilized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarder, M R; Plevin, R; Marriott, D B

    1988-10-25

    The level of cyclic AMP in primary cultures of bovine adrenal medulla cells is elevated by prostaglandin E1. Angiotensin II is commonly reported to act on receptors linked to phosphoinositide metabolism or to inhibition of adenylate cyclase. We have investigated the effect of angiotensin II on prostaglandin E1-stimulated cyclic AMP levels in these primary cultures. Rather than reducing cyclic AMP levels, we have found that angiotensin II powerfully potentiates prostaglandin E1-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in intact cells, both in the presence and absence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors. The 50% maximal response was similar to that for stimulation of phosphoinositide breakdown by angiotensin II in these cultures. The potentiation of stimulated cyclic AMP levels was seen, although to a smaller maximum, with the protein kinase C (Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme) activating phorbol ester tetradecanoyl phorbolacetate and with the synthetic diacylglycerol 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol; pretreatment (24 h) with active phorbol ester, which would be expected to diminish protein kinase C levels, attenuated the angiotensin II potentiation of cyclic AMP. Using digitonin-permeabilized cells we showed that adenylate cyclase activity was stimulated by prostaglandin E1 with the same dose-response relationship as was cyclic AMP accumulation in intact cells, but the permeabilized cells showed no response to angiotensin II. The results are discussed with respect to the hypothesis that the angiotensin II influence on cyclic AMP levels is mediated, in part, by diacylglycerol stimulation of protein kinase C.

  8. Distinct effects of cAMP and mitogenic signals on CREB-binding protein recruitment impart specificity to target gene activation via CREB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Bernhard M.; Canettieri, Gianluca; Montminy, Marc R.

    2001-01-01

    Ser-133 phosphorylation of the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is sufficient to induce cellular gene expression in response to cAMP, but additional promoter-bound factors are required for target gene activation by CREB in response to mitogen/stress signals. To compare the relative effects of different signals on recruitment of the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) to CREB in living cells, we developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. cAMP promoted the interaction of CREB with CBP in a phosphorylation-dependent manner by FRET analysis, but mitogen/stress signals were far less effective in stimulating complex formation even though they induced comparable levels of Ser-133 phosphorylation. cAMP and non-cAMP stimuli were comparably active in promoting this interaction in the cytosol; the formation of CREB⋅CBP complexes in response to non-cAMP signals was specifically inhibited in the nucleus. Non-cAMP signals had no effect on intrinsic CREB- or CBP-binding activities by Far Western blot assay, thereby supporting the presence of a distinct CREB⋅CBP antagonist. Our studies indicate that the relative effects of cAMP and mitogen/stress signals on CREB⋅CBP complex formation impart selectivity to gene activation through CREB phosphorylated at Ser-133. PMID:11535812

  9. Coordinated induction of GST and MRP2 by cAMP in Caco-2 cells: Role of protein kinase A signaling pathway and toxicological relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, Maite Rocío; Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Domizi, Pablo; Arias, Agostina; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Ruiz, María Laura

    2015-01-01

    The cAMP pathway is a universal signaling pathway regulating many cellular processes including metabolic routes, growth and differentiation. However, its effects on xenobiotic biotransformation and transport systems are poorly characterized. The effect of cAMP on expression and activity of GST and MRP2 was evaluated in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelium. Cells incubated with the cAMP permeable analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 1,10,100 μM) for 48 h exhibited a dose–response increase in GST class α and MRP2 protein expression. Incubation with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, confirmed the association between intracellular cAMP and upregulation of MRP2. Consistent with increased expression of GSTα and MRP2, db-cAMP enhanced their activities, as well as cytoprotection against the common substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors totally abolished upregulation of MRP2 and GSTα induced by db-cAMP. In silico analysis together with experiments consisting of treatment with db-cAMP of Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter construct containing CRE and AP-1 sites evidenced participation of these sites in MRP2 upregulation. Further studies involving the transcription factors CREB and AP-1 (c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF2) demonstrated increased levels of total c-JUN and phosphorylation of c-JUN and ATF2 by db-cAMP, which were suppressed by a PKA inhibitor. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assay studies demonstrated that db-cAMP increased c-JUN/ATF2 interaction, with further recruitment to the region of the MRP2 promoter containing CRE and AP-1 sites. We conclude that cAMP induces GSTα and MRP2 expression and activity in Caco-2 cells via the PKA pathway, thus regulating detoxification of specific xenobiotics. - Highlights: • cAMP positively modulates the expression and activity of GST and MRP2 in Caco-2 cells. • Such induction resulted in increased cytoprotection against chemical injury. • PKA

  10. Coordinated induction of GST and MRP2 by cAMP in Caco-2 cells: Role of protein kinase A signaling pathway and toxicological relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Maite Rocío, E-mail: arana@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás, E-mail: gtocchetti@live.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Domizi, Pablo, E-mail: domizi@ibr-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Arias, Agostina, E-mail: agoarias@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Rigalli, Juan Pablo, E-mail: jprigalli@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Ruiz, María Laura, E-mail: ruiz@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); and others

    2015-09-01

    The cAMP pathway is a universal signaling pathway regulating many cellular processes including metabolic routes, growth and differentiation. However, its effects on xenobiotic biotransformation and transport systems are poorly characterized. The effect of cAMP on expression and activity of GST and MRP2 was evaluated in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelium. Cells incubated with the cAMP permeable analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 1,10,100 μM) for 48 h exhibited a dose–response increase in GST class α and MRP2 protein expression. Incubation with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, confirmed the association between intracellular cAMP and upregulation of MRP2. Consistent with increased expression of GSTα and MRP2, db-cAMP enhanced their activities, as well as cytoprotection against the common substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors totally abolished upregulation of MRP2 and GSTα induced by db-cAMP. In silico analysis together with experiments consisting of treatment with db-cAMP of Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter construct containing CRE and AP-1 sites evidenced participation of these sites in MRP2 upregulation. Further studies involving the transcription factors CREB and AP-1 (c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF2) demonstrated increased levels of total c-JUN and phosphorylation of c-JUN and ATF2 by db-cAMP, which were suppressed by a PKA inhibitor. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assay studies demonstrated that db-cAMP increased c-JUN/ATF2 interaction, with further recruitment to the region of the MRP2 promoter containing CRE and AP-1 sites. We conclude that cAMP induces GSTα and MRP2 expression and activity in Caco-2 cells via the PKA pathway, thus regulating detoxification of specific xenobiotics. - Highlights: • cAMP positively modulates the expression and activity of GST and MRP2 in Caco-2 cells. • Such induction resulted in increased cytoprotection against chemical injury. • PKA

  11. IP{sub 3}-dependent intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release is required for cAMP-induced c-fos expression in hippocampal neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenting; Tingare, Asmita; Ng, David Chi-Heng [Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Johnson, Hong W.; Schell, Michael J. [Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda (United States); Lord, Rebecca L. [Department of Biology, University of York (United Kingdom); Chawla, Sangeeta, E-mail: sangeeta.chawla@york.ac.uk [Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Department of Biology, University of York (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP-induced c-fos expression in hippocampal neurons requires a submembraneous Ca{sup 2+} pool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The submembraneous Ca{sup 2+} pool derives from intracellular ER stores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of IP{sub 3}-metabolizing enzymes inhibits cAMP-induced c-fos expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SRE-mediated and CRE-mediated gene expression is sensitive to IP{sub 3}-metabolizing enzymes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release is required for cAMP-induced nuclear translocation of TORC1. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP are widely used in concert by neurons to relay signals from the synapse to the nucleus, where synaptic activity modulates gene expression required for synaptic plasticity. Neurons utilize different transcriptional regulators to integrate information encoded in the spatiotemporal dynamics and magnitude of Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signals, including some that are Ca{sup 2+}-responsive, some that are cAMP-responsive and some that detect coincident Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signals. Because Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP can influence each other's amplitude and spatiotemporal characteristics, we investigated how cAMP acts to regulate gene expression when increases in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} are buffered. We show here that cAMP-mobilizing stimuli are unable to induce expression of the immediate early gene c-fos in hippocampal neurons in the presence of the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} buffer BAPTA-AM. Expression of enzymes that attenuate intracellular IP{sub 3} levels also inhibited cAMP-dependent c-fos induction. Synaptic activity induces c-fos transcription through two cis regulatory DNA elements - the CRE and the SRE. We show here that in response to cAMP both CRE-mediated and SRE-mediated induction of a luciferase reporter gene is attenuated by IP{sub 3} metabolizing enzymes. Furthermore, cAMP-induced nuclear translocation of the CREB coactivator TORC1 was inhibited

  12. Cyclic AMP-binding capacities and histone kinase activation in subcellular components of neocortical tissue. Differential responses to three neurohumoural agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jitendra; Newman, Michael; McIlwain, Henry

    1981-01-01

    1. Noradrenaline and histamine, when added to superfused guinea-pig cerebral-cortical tissues, increased both cyclic AMP-dependent and -independent histone kinase activities of some, but not of all, subsequently isolated subcellular fractions, and decreased their cyclic [3H]AMP-binding capacity, which was concluded to be due to an increase in endogenously bound cyclic AMP. 2. Adenosine and 2-chloroadenosine also diminished the cyclic [3H]AMP-binding capacities, but did not affect the histone kinase activities. 3. DEAE-cellulose chromatography and stability to KCl additions showed that the greater part of the histone kinase of the present preparations corresponded to the type II enzyme [of Corbin, Keely & Park (1975) J. Biol. Chem. 250, 218–225], with a lesser amount of type I activity. Different sites of cyclic AMP accumulation in relation to these or other kinases are considered in interpreting the differential tissue responses to the neurohumoural agents examined. PMID:6118136

  13. Inhibition of Na/Ca exchange by external Ni in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes at 37 degrees C, dialysed internally with cAMP-free and cAMP-containing solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, A K; Perchenet, L; Hobai, I A; Levi, A J; Hancox, J C

    1999-04-01

    In many mammalian tissue types an integral membrane protein--the sodium/calcium (Na/Ca) exchanger--plays a key role in intracellular Ca homeostasis, and evidence suggests that Na/Ca exchange function can be modulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. External Nickel (Ni) ions are used widely to inhibit the exchange but little is known about the mode of Ni action. In guinea-pig ventricular myocytes, we investigated inhibition of Na/Ca exchange by external Ni under phosphorylated (cells dialysed with cAMP) and non-phosphorylated conditions. Ventricular myocytes were isolated from adult guinea-pig hearts, recordings were made at 37 degrees C using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Internal and external solutions were used which allowed Na/Ca exchange current (INaCa) to be measured during a descending voltage ramp protocol (+80 to -120 mV) applied from a holding potential of -40 mV. The application of 10 mM Ni caused a maximal block of INaCa since inhibition was identical to that when a Na- and Ca-free (0Na/0Ca) solution was superfused externally. Kinetics of Ni-block of INaCa were assessed using applications of different external [Ni] to cells dialysed internally with cAMP-free and 100 microM cAMP-containing solutions. At +60 mV, Ni inhibited INaCa in cells dialysed with a cAMP-free solution with a dissociation constant (KD) of 0.29 +/- 0.03 mM and the data were fitted with a Hill coefficient of 0.89 +/- 0.07 (n = 9 cells). In cells dialysed with 100 microM cAMP the exchange was inhibited by Ni with a KD of 0.16 +/- 0.05 mM, the Hill coefficient was 0.82 +/- 0.16 (n = 6-7 cells). The KD and Hill coefficient values obtained in cells dialysed with cAMP-free and cAMP-containing solutions were not significantly different. Inhibition of INaCa by Ni did not appear to be voltage-dependent, was maximal within 3-4 s of application and was rapidly reversible. With cAMP-free internal dialysate, inhibition was 'mixed' showing competition with external Ca and a degree of non

  14. Regularity theory for quasilinear elliptic systems and Monge—Ampère equations in two dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, Friedmar

    1990-01-01

    These lecture notes have been written as an introduction to the characteristic theory for two-dimensional Monge-Ampère equations, a theory largely developed by H. Lewy and E. Heinz which has never been presented in book form. An exposition of the Heinz-Lewy theory requires auxiliary material which can be found in various monographs, but which is presented here, in part because the focus is different, and also because these notes have an introductory character. Self-contained introductions to the regularity theory of elliptic systems, the theory of pseudoanalytic functions and the theory of conformal mappings are included. These notes grew out of a seminar given at the University of Kentucky in the fall of 1988 and are intended for graduate students and researchers interested in this area.

  15. Total biosynthesis of the cyclic AMP booster forskolin from Coleus forskohlii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pateraki, Irini; Andersen-Ranberg, Johan; Jensen, Nils Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    Forskolin is a unique structurally complex labdane type diterpenoid used in the treatment of glaucoma and heart failure based on its activity as a cyclic AMP booster. Commercial production of forskolin relies exclusively on extraction from its only known natural source, the plant Coleus forskohlii......, in which forskolin accumulates in the root cork. Here we report the discovery of five cytochrome P450s and two acetyltransferases which catalyze a cascade of reactions converting the forskolin precursor 13R-manoyl oxide into forskolin and a diverse array of additional labdane-type diterpenoids. A minimal...... set of three P450s in combination with a single acetyl transferase was identified that catalyzes the conversion of 13R-manoyl oxide into forskolin as demonstrated by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The entire pathway for forskolin production from glucose encompassing expression of nine...

  16. A Novel Indirect Sequence Readout Component in the E. coli Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2014-01-01

    binding sites in the E. coli genome, but the exact role of the N6 region in CRP interaction has not previously been systematic examined. Here we employ an in vitro selection system based on a randomized N6 spacer region to demonstrate that CRP binding to the lacP1 site may be enhanced up to 14-fold......The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) from Escherichia coli has been extensively studied for several decades. In particular, a detailed characterization of CRP interaction with DNA has been obtained. The CRP dimer recognizes a consensus sequence AANTGTGANNNNNNTCACANTT through direct amino acid...... nucleobase interactions in the major groove of the two operator half-sites. Crystal structure analyses have revealed that the interaction results in two strong kinks at the TG/CA steps closest to the 6-base-pair spacer (N6). This spacer exhibits high sequence variability among the more than 100 natural...

  17. AMP kinase expression and activity in human skeletal muscle: effects of immobilization, retraining, and creatine supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eijnde, Bert O.; Derave, Wim; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    The effects of leg immobilization and retraining in combination with oral creatine intake on muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein expression and phosphorylation status were investigated. A double-blind trial was performed in young healthy volunteers (n = 22). A cast immobilized...... the right leg for 2 wk, whereafter the knee-extensor muscles of that leg were retrained for 6 wk. Half of the subjects received creatine monohydrate throughout the study (Cr; from 15 g down to 2.5 g daily), and the others ingested placebo (P; maltodextrin). Before and after immobilization and retraining...... that immobilization-induced muscle inactivity for 2 wk does not alter AMPK a1-, a2-, and ß2-subunit expression or a-AMPK phosphorylation status. Furthermore, the present observations indicate that AMPK probably is not implicated in the previously reported beneficial effects of oral creatine supplementation on muscle...

  18. Molecular mechanism by which AMP-activated protein kinase activation promotes glycogen accumulation in muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Roger W; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE During energy stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) promotes glucose transport and glycolysis for ATP production, while it is thought to inhibit anabolic glycogen synthesis by suppressing the activity of glycogen synthase (GS) to maintain the energy balance in muscle. Paradoxically......, chronic activation of AMPK causes an increase in glycogen accumulation in skeletal and cardiac muscles, which in some cases is associated with cardiac dysfunction. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which AMPK activation promotes muscle glycogen accumulation. RESEARCH DESIGN...... caused a modest inactivation of GS, it stimulated muscle glycogen synthesis that was accompanied by increases in glucose transport and intracellular [G6P]. These effects of AICAR required the catalytic activity of AMPK. Strikingly, AICAR-induced glycogen synthesis was completely abolished in G6P...

  19. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by LKB1 and CaMKK in adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gormand, Amélie; Henriksson, Emma; Ström, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cellular and whole body energy homeostasis. In adipose tissue, activation of AMPK has been demonstrated in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli. However, the upstream kinase that activates AMPK in adipocytes...... remains elusive. Previous studies have identified LKB1 as a major AMPK kinase in muscle, liver, and other tissues. In certain cell types, Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) has been shown to activate AMPK in response to increases of intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Our aim...... was to investigate if LKB1 and/or CaMKK function as AMPK kinases in adipocytes. We used adipose tissue and isolated adipocytes from mice in which the expression of LKB1 was reduced to 10-20% of that of wild-type (LKB1 hypomorphic mice). We show that adipocytes from LKB1 hypomorphic mice display a 40% decrease...

  20. A LVDT conditioner for the beam profile monitors of the AmPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Es, J.T. van; Trigt, J.H. van.

    1991-01-01

    A LVDT (Linear Variable Differential Transformer) is a transducer for localization. Because of its applied materials, its construction and the absence of bearings etc. the instrument is suitable to be applied in locations where radioactive radiation is present. In order to obtain information about the position of the iron core in the transducer, a conditioner is needed. In 1977 by Digel a conditioner has been developed for the beam profile monitors (moving wire) of MEA because the 'market' could not meet the requirements then. Nowadays the 'market' offers i.c.'s which can take over the work of the Eurocard developed then. Digel has investigated them in order to see if they are applicable for the beam profile monitors of AmPS. (author). 5 refs.; 7 figs.; 13 tabs

  1. Dissecting the role of AMP-activated protein kinase in human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, known as a sensor and a master of cellular energy balance, integrates various regulatory signals including anabolic and catabolic metabolic processes. Accompanying the application of genetic methods and a plethora of AMPK agonists, rapid progress has identified AMPK as an attractive therapeutic target for several human diseases, such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and neurodegenerative disease. The role of AMPK in metabolic and energetic modulation both at the intracellular and whole body levels has been reviewed elsewhere. In the present review, we summarize and update the paradoxical role of AMPK implicated in the diseases mentioned above and put forward the challenge encountered. Thus it will be expected to provide important clues for exploring rational methods of intervention in human diseases.

  2. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase: An Ubiquitous Signaling Pathway With Key Roles in the Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, Ian P; Hardie, D Grahame

    2017-05-26

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of cellular and whole-body energy homeostasis, which acts to restore energy homoeostasis whenever cellular energy charge is depleted. Over the last 2 decades, it has become apparent that AMPK regulates several other cellular functions and has specific roles in cardiovascular tissues, acting to regulate cardiac metabolism and contractile function, as well as promoting anticontractile, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic actions in blood vessels. In this review, we discuss the role of AMPK in the cardiovascular system, including the molecular basis of mutations in AMPK that alter cardiac physiology and the proposed mechanisms by which AMPK regulates vascular function under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Increased expression levels of chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase in clinical Escherichia coli isolates and their effect on susceptibility to extended-spectrum cephalosporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltansing, Sunita; Kraakman, Margriet; van Boxtel, Ria; Kors, Ivo; Wessels, Els; Goessens, Wil; Tommassen, Jan; Bernards, Alexandra

    2015-02-01

    Forty-nine clinical Escherichia coli isolates, both extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) negative and ESBL positive, were studied to investigate whether increased AmpC expression is a mechanism involved in cefoxitin resistance and if this influences the third-generation cephalosporin activity. Nine of 33 (27.2%) cefoxitin-resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] >8 mg/L) isolates showed hyperproduction of chromosomal AmpC (c-AmpC) based on (1) at least two positive tests using AmpC inhibitors, (2) mutations in the promoter/attenuator regions, and (3) a 6.1- to 163-fold increase in c-ampC expression by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In ESBL-negative isolates, MICs of ceftazidime and cefotaxime were mostly above the wild-type (WT) level, but below the S/I breakpoint (EUCAST guideline), except for one isolate with MICs of 4 mg/L. No plasmid-mediated AmpCs were found. Periplasmic extracts of nine c-AmpC hyperproducers were preincubated with or without cefuroxime or ceftazidime and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Cefuroxime and ceftazidime were stable to hydrolysis but acted as inhibitors of the enzyme. None of these isolates showed loss of porins. Thus, cefoxitin resistance has low specificity for detecting upregulated c-AmpC production. c-AmpC hyperproducing E. coli is mostly still susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins but less than WT E. coli. Surveillance of cefoxitin-resistant E. coli to monitor developments in the activity of third-generation cephalosporins against c-AmpC hyperproducers is warranted.

  4. Increased cAMP levels modulate transforming growth factor-beta/Smad-induced expression of extracellular matrix components and other key fibroblast effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Meinhard; Dennler, Sylviane; Anderegg, Ulf; Kokot, Agatha; Simon, Jan C; Luger, Thomas A; Mauviel, Alain; Böhm, Markus

    2010-01-01

    cAMP is a key messenger of many hormones and neuropeptides, some of which modulate the composition of extracellular matrix. Treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with dibutyryl cyclic AMP and forskolin antagonized the inductive effects of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) on the expression of collagen, connective tissue growth factor, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, and plasminogen activator inhibitor type I, four prototypical TGF-beta-responsive genes. Increased intracellular cAMP prevented TGF-beta-induced Smad-specific gene transactivation, although TGF-beta-mediated Smad phosphorylation and nuclear translocation remained unaffected. However, increased cAMP levels abolished TGF-beta-induced interaction of Smad3 with its transcriptional co-activator cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300. Overexpression of the transcriptional co-activator CBP/p300 rescued Smad-specific gene transcription in the presence of cAMP suggesting that sequestration of limited amounts of CBP/p300 by the activated cAMP/CREB pathway is the molecular basis of this inhibitory effect. These findings were extended by two functional assays. Increased intracellular cAMP levels suppressed the inductive activity of TGF-beta to contract mechanically unloaded collagen lattices and resulted in an attenuation of fibroblast migration of mechanically induced cell layer wounds. Of note, cAMP and TGF-beta synergistically induced hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) expression and hyaluronan secretion, presumably via putative CREB-binding sites adjacent to Smad-binding sites within the HAS2 promoter. Our findings identify the cAMP pathway as a potent but differential and promoter-specific regulator of TGF-beta-mediated effects involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis.

  5. Theoretical Analysis of Allosteric and Operator Binding for Cyclic-AMP Receptor Protein Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einav, Tal; Duque, Julia; Phillips, Rob

    2018-02-01

    Allosteric transcription factors undergo binding events both at their inducer binding sites as well as at distinct DNA binding domains, and it is often difficult to disentangle the structural and functional consequences of these two classes of interactions. In this work, we compare the ability of two statistical mechanical models - the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) and the Koshland-N\\'emethy-Filmer (KNF) models of protein conformational change - to characterize the multi-step activation mechanism of the broadly acting cyclic-AMP receptor protein (CRP). We first consider the allosteric transition resulting from cyclic-AMP binding to CRP, then analyze how CRP binds to its operator, and finally investigate the ability of CRP to activate gene expression. In light of these models, we examine data from a beautiful recent experiment that created a single-chain version of the CRP homodimer, thereby enabling each subunit to be mutated separately. Using this construct, six mutants were created using all possible combinations of the wild type subunit, a D53H mutant subunit, and an S62F mutant subunit. We demonstrate that both the MWC and KNF models can explain the behavior of all six mutants using a small, self-consistent set of parameters. In comparing the results, we find that the MWC model slightly outperforms the KNF model in the quality of its fits, but more importantly the parameters inferred by the MWC model are more in line with structural knowledge of CRP. In addition, we discuss how the conceptual framework developed here for CRP enables us to not merely analyze data retrospectively, but has the predictive power to determine how combinations of mutations will interact, how double mutants will behave, and how each construct would regulate gene expression.

  6. Functionalized collagen scaffold implantation and cAMP administration collectively facilitate spinal cord regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Han, Jin; Zhao, Yannan; Ding, Wenyong; Wei, Jianshu; Li, Jiayin; Han, Sufang; Shang, Xianping; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Xiao, Zhifeng; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that several mechanisms, including numerous inhibitory molecules, weak neurotrophic stimulation and deficient intrinsic regenerative responses, collectively contribute to the failure of mature spinal cord axon regeneration. Thus, combinatorial therapies targeting multiple mechanisms have attracted much attention. In the present study, a porous collagen scaffold was used to support neuronal attachment and bridge axonal regeneration. The scaffold was specifically functionalized using neutralizing proteins (CBD-EphA4LBD, CBD-PlexinB1LBD and NEP1-40) and collagen-binding neurotrophic factors (CBD-BDNF and CBD-NT3) to simultaneously antagonize myelin inhibitory molecules (ephrinB3, Sema4D and Nogo) and exert neurotrophic protection and stimulation. Cerebellar granular neurons cultured on the functionalized collagen scaffold promoted neurite outgrowth in the presence of myelin. Furthermore, a full combinatorial treatment comprising functionalized scaffold implantation and cAMP administration was developed to evaluate the synergistic repair ability in a rat T10 complete removal spinal cord injury model. The results showed that full combinatorial therapy exhibited the greatest advantage in reducing the volume of cavitation, facilitating axonal regeneration, and promoting neuronal generation. The newborn neurons generated in the lesion area could form the neuronal relay and enhance the locomotion recovery after severe spinal cord injury. A porous collagen scaffold was specifically functionalized with neutralizing proteins and neurotrophic factors to antagonize the myelin inhibitory molecules and exert neurotrophic protection and stimulation for spinal cord regeneration. Cerebellar granular neurons seeded on the functionalized collagen scaffold showed enhanced neurite outgrowth ability in vitro. The functionalized scaffold implantation combined with cAMP administration exhibited synergistic repair ability for rat T10 complete spinal cord

  7. Regulation of proximal tubule vacuolar H+-ATPase by PKA and AMP-activated protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-bataineh, Mohammad M.; Gong, Fan; Marciszyn, Allison L.; Myerburg, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) mediates ATP-driven H+ transport across membranes. This pump is present at the apical membrane of kidney proximal tubule cells and intercalated cells. Defects in the V-ATPase and in proximal tubule function can cause renal tubular acidosis. We examined the role of protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the regulation of the V-ATPase in the proximal tubule as these two kinases coregulate the V-ATPase in the collecting duct. As the proximal tubule V-ATPases have different subunit compositions from other nephron segments, we postulated that V-ATPase regulation in the proximal tubule could differ from other kidney tubule segments. Immunofluorescence labeling of rat ex vivo kidney slices revealed that the V-ATPase was present in the proximal tubule both at the apical pole, colocalizing with the brush-border marker wheat germ agglutinin, and in the cytosol when slices were incubated in buffer alone. When slices were incubated with a cAMP analog and a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, the V-ATPase accumulated at the apical pole of S3 segment cells. These PKA activators also increased V-ATPase apical membrane expression as well as the rate of V-ATPase-dependent extracellular acidification in S3 cell monolayers relative to untreated cells. However, the AMPK activator AICAR decreased PKA-induced V-ATPase apical accumulation in proximal tubules of kidney slices and decreased V-ATPase activity in S3 cell monolayers. Our results suggest that in proximal tubule the V-ATPase subcellular localization and activity are acutely coregulated via PKA downstream of hormonal signals and via AMPK downstream of metabolic stress. PMID:24553431

  8. The Deacylation Mechanism of AmpC [beta]-Lactamase at Ultrahigh Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu; Minasov, George; Roth, Tomer A.; Prati, Fabio; Shoichet, Brian K. (Degli); (NWU); (UCSF)

    2010-03-05

    {beta}-Lactamases confer bacterial resistance to {beta}-lactam antibiotics, such as penicillins. The characteristic class C {beta}-lactamase AmpC catalyzes the reaction with several key residues including Ser64, Tyr150, and Lys67. Here, we describe a 1.07 {angstrom} X-ray crystallographic structure of AmpC {beta}-lactamase in complex with a boronic acid deacylation transition-state analogue. The high quality of the electron density map allows the determination of many proton positions. The proton on the Tyr150 hydroxyl group is clearly visible and is donated to the boronic oxygen mimicking the deacylation water. Meanwhile, Lys67 hydrogen bonds with Ser64O{gamma}, Asn152O{delta}1, and the backbone oxygen of Ala220. This suggests that this residue is positively charged and has relinquished the hydrogen bond with Tyr150 observed in acyl-enzyme complex structures. Together with previous biochemical and NMR studies, these observations indicate that Tyr150 is protonated throughout the reaction coordinate, disfavoring mechanisms that involve a stable tyrosinate as the general base for deacylation. Rather, the hydroxyl of Tyr150 appears to be well positioned to electrostatically stabilize the negative charge buildup in the tetrahedral high-energy intermediate. This structure, in itself, appears consistent with a mechanism involving either Tyr150 acting as a transient catalytic base in conjunction with a neutral Lys67 or the lactam nitrogen as the general base. Whereas mutagenesis studies suggest that Lys67 may be replaced by an arginine, disfavoring the conjugate base mechanism, distinguishing between these two hypotheses may ultimately depend on direct determination of the pKa of Lys67 along the reaction coordinate.

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase-independent inhibition of hepatic mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by AICA riboside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigas, Bruno; Taleux, Nellie; Foretz, Marc; Detaille, Dominique; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Viollet, Benoit; Hue, Louis

    2007-06-15

    AICA riboside (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside) has been extensively used in cells to activate the AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase), a metabolic sensor involved in cell energy homoeostasis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of AICA riboside on mitochondrial oxidative; phosphorylation. AICA riboside was found to dose-dependently inhibit the oligomycin-sensitive JO2 (oxygen consumption rate) of isolated rat hepatocytes. A decrease in P(i) (inorganic phosphate), ATP, AMP and total adenine nucleotide contents was also observed with AICA riboside concentrations >0.1 mM. Interestingly, in hepatocytes from mice lacking both alpha1 and alpha2 AMPK catalytic subunits, basal JO2 and expression of several mitochondrial proteins were significantly reduced compared with wild-type mice, suggesting that mitochondrial biogenesis was perturbed. However, inhibition of JO2 by AICA riboside was still present in the mutant mice and thus was clearly not mediated by AMPK. In permeabilized hepatocytes, this inhibition was no longer evident, suggesting that it could be due to intracellular accumulation of Z nucleotides and/or loss of adenine nucleotides and P(i). ZMP did indeed inhibit respiration in isolated rat mitochondria through a direct effect on the respiratory-chain complex I. In addition, inhibition of JO2 by AICA riboside was also potentiated in cells incubated with fructose to deplete adenine nucleotides and P(i). We conclude that AICA riboside inhibits cellular respiration by an AMPK-independent mechanism that likely results from the combined intracellular P(i) depletion and ZMP accumulation. Our data also demonstrate that the cellular effects of AICA riboside are not necessarily caused by AMPK activation and that their interpretation should be taken with caution.

  10. Mapping of the bovine genes of the de novo AMP synthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bønsdorff, T; Gautier, M; Farstad, W; Rønningen, K; Lingaas, F; Olsaker, I

    2004-12-01

    Summary The purine nucleotides adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and guanosine monophosphate (GMP) are critical for energy metabolism, cell signalling and cell reproduction. Despite their essential function, little is known about the regulation and in vivo expression pattern of the genes involved in the de novo purine synthesis pathway. The complete coding region of the bovine phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase gene (PAICS), which catalyses steps 6 and 7 of the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway, as well as bovine genomic sequences of the six other genes in the pathway producing inosine monophosphate (IMP) and AMP [phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase (PPAT), phosphoribosylglycinamide formyltransferase (GART), phosphoribosylformylglycinamidine synthase (PFAS), adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL), 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/IMP cyclohydrolase (ATIC) and adenylosuccinate synthase (ADSS)], were identified. The genes were mapped to segments of six different bovine chromosomes using a radiation hybrid (RH) cell panel. The gene PPAT, coding for the presumed rate-limiting enzyme of the purine de novo pathway was closely linked to PAICS on BTA6. These, and the other bovine locations i.e. GART at BTA1, PFAS at BTA19, ADSL at BTA5, ATIC at BTA2 and ADSS at BTA16, are in agreement with published comparative maps of cattle and man. PAICS and PPAT genes are known to be closely linked in human, rat and chicken. Previously, an expressed sequence fragment of PAICS (Bos taurus corpus luteum, BTCL9) was mapped to BTA13. By isolation and characterization of a BAC clone, we have now identified a PAICS processed pseudogene sequence (psiPAICS) on BTA13. Processed pseudogene sequences of PAICS and other genes of the purine biosynthesis pathway were identified in several mammalian species, indicating that the genes of this pathway have been susceptible to retrotransposition. The seven bovine genes are expressed at a higher level in testicular and

  11. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27144291

  12. Immunohistochemical distribution of cAMP- and cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes in the human prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uckert, Stefan; Oelke, Matthias; Stief, Christian G.; Andersson, K.-E.; Jonas, Udo; Hedlund, Petter

    2006-01-01

    With the introduction of sildenafil citrate (Viagra), the concept of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition has gained tremendous interest in the field of urology. Cyclic nucleotide second messengers cGMP and cAMP have been assumed to be involved in the control of the normal function of the prostate.

  13. Mass Spectrometry Imaging Reveals Elevated Glomerular ATP/AMP in Diabetes/obesity and Identifies Sphingomyelin as a Possible Mediator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Miyamoto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is suppressed in diabetes and may be due to a high ATP/AMP ratio, however the quantitation of nucleotides in vivo has been extremely difficult. Via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI to localize renal nucleotides we found that the diabetic kidney had a significant increase in glomerular ATP/AMP ratio. Untargeted MALDI-MSI analysis revealed that a specific sphingomyelin species (SM(d18:1/16:0 accumulated in the glomeruli of diabetic and high-fat diet-fed mice compared with wild-type controls. In vitro studies in mesangial cells revealed that exogenous addition of SM(d18:1/16:0 significantly elevated ATP via increased glucose consumption and lactate production with a consequent reduction of AMPK and PGC1α. Furthermore, inhibition of sphingomyelin synthases reversed these effects. Our findings suggest that AMPK is reduced in the diabetic kidney due to an increase in the ATP/AMP ratio and that SM(d18:1/16:0 could be responsible for the enhanced ATP production via activation of the glycolytic pathway.

  14. A Note on the Asymptotic Behavior of Parabolic Monge-Ampère Equations on Riemannian Manifolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Ru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the asymptotic behavior of the parabolic Monge-Ampère equation in , in , where is a compact complete Riemannian manifold, λ is a positive real parameter, and is a smooth function. We show a meaningful asymptotic result which is more general than those in Huisken, 1997.

  15. Bronchoprotection by salmeterol: cell stabilization or functional antagonism? Comparative effects on histamine- and AMP-induced bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solèr, M; Joos, L; Bolliger, C T; Elsasser, S; Perruchoud, A P

    1994-11-01

    Salmeterol provides bronchoprotection against a number of constrictor stimuli for more than 12 h after a single dose. This effect could be due either to functional antagonism at the level of airway smooth muscle or to cell-stabilizing effects of the compound. In this study, we attempted to clarify this mechanism by comparing the effects of salmeterol (50 micrograms), salbutamol (200 micrograms) and placebo on the airway responsiveness to histamine (to assess functional antagonism), and to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) (to assess additional cell-stabilizing effects), 14 h after drug treatment. Thirteen patients with mild allergic asthma were studied in a double-blind, randomized protocol on 6 days, at least 48 h apart. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was measured before and 15 min after inhalation of the study medication. Then, 14 h later (8 a.m. the following morning), a bronchoprovocation test with histamine or AMP was performed. We found that 14 h after inhalation, salmeterol still had a significant effect on FEV1 in comparison to placebo and salbutamol. The provocative dose producing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PD20histamine) was significantly increased after salmeterol, whilst the increase in PD20AMP did not reach significance. The shift in PD20 (in doubling dose steps) induced by salmeterol pretreatment was not different between histamine and AMP. We conclude that the prolonged protective effect of salmeterol occurs via an extended bronchodilating and functional antagonistic action and not via a cell-stabilizing effect.

  16. Interaction of cationic vesicle with ribonucleotides (AMP, ADP, and ATP) and physicochemical characterization of DODAB/ribonucleotides complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuhua; Lu, Gongxuan

    2007-04-01

    The interaction between ribonucleotides (AMP, ADP, and ATP) and cationic vesicles prepared from dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) were investigated in detail. The physicochemical properties of ribonucleotides/cationic lipid complexes were present. Gel exclusion-UV spectroscopic results showed that all the charge ratios of DODAB/ribonucleotides (AMP, ADP, and ATP) are 2:1 when the maximal ribonucleotides were adsorbed onto DODAB, while the molar ratios were different, e.g., 2:1 for DODAB/AMP, 4:1 for DODAB/ADP and 6:1 for DODAB/ATP. These differences may be attributed to the different anion charges of AMP, ADP and ATP. The results demonstrated that ribonucleotides combined with DODAB vesicles with the electrostatic attraction in the complexation of DODAB and ribonucleotides. Transmission electron microscopic results revealed the different extents of aggregation of cationic vesicles in the complexation process of ribonucleotides with cationic lipid. The variation dependence of zeta-potentials or electrophoretic mobilities on vesicle size was also different. The zeta-potentials and electrophoretic mobilities of the DODAB vesicles (0.01 and 0.02 mM) gradually decreased when the ribonucleotide concentration increased. However, the mean diameters of the DODAB vesicles (0.1 and 0.5 mM) gradually increased when the ribonucleotide concentration increased.

  17. Designing Higher Education Curriculum to Increase Graduate Outcomes and Work Readiness: The Assessment and Mentoring Program (AMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Kate A.; Benson, Amanda C.

    2016-01-01

    Pre-service teacher programs have a responsibility to equip graduating students with more than the minimum skill sets required by governing bodies. The Assessment and Mentoring Program (AMP) is a four-way collaborative mentoring learning community underpinned by social constructivism. Conducted in Victoria, Australia during the 2014-2016 academic…

  18. COUPLING OF THE ANTIVIRAL DRUG ARA-AMP TO LACTOSAMINATED ALBUMIN LEADS TO SPECIFIC UPTAKE IN RAT AND HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSEN, RW; KRUIJT, JK; VANBERKEL, TJC; MEIJER, DKF

    We covalently coupled 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine 5'-monophosphate (ara-AMP) to the carrier molecule lactosaminated human serum albumin using a water-soluble carbodiimide with a two-step conjugation method (pH 4.5 and pH 7.5) instead of the commonly used single-step conjugation at pH 7.5. This

  19. cAMP levels in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle after an acute bout of aerobic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, A.; Booth, F. W.; Kirby, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    The present study examined whether exercise duration was associated with elevated and/or sustained elevations of postexercise adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) by measuring cAMP levels in skeletal muscle for up to 4 h after acute exercise bouts of durations that are known to either produce (60 min) or not produce (10 min) mitochondrial proliferation after chronic training. Treadmill-acclimatized, but untrained, rats were run at 22 m/min for 0 (control), 10, or 60 min and were killed at various postexercise (0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h) time points. Fast-twitch white and red (quadriceps) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles were quickly excised, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and assayed for cAMP with a commercial kit. Unexpectedly, cAMP contents in all three muscles were similar to control (nonexercise) at most (21 of 30) time points after a single 10- or 60-min run. Values at 9 of 30 time points were significantly different from control (P exercise is not, by itself, associated with exercise duration.

  20. Biochemical, Crystallographic and Mutagenic Characterization of Hint, the AMP-Lysine Hydrolase, with Novel Substrates and Inhibitors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Pace, Helen C.; Blackburn, G. Michael; Adams, Martina; Mekhalfia, Abdelaziz; Kaczmarek, Renata; Baraniak, Janina; Stec, Wojciech J.; Brenner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Hint, histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein, is a universally conserved enzyme that hydrolyzes AMP linked to lysine and, in yeast, functions as a positive regulator of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain kinase, Kin28. To explore the biochemical and structural bases for the adenosine phosphoramidate hydrolase activity of rabbit Hint, we synthesized novel substrates linking a p-nitroaniline group to adenylate (AMP-pNA) and inhibitors that consist of an adenosine group and 5′ sulfamoyl (AdoOSO2NH2) or N-ethylsulfamoyl (AdoOSO2NHCH2CH3) groups. AMP-pNA is a suitable substrate for Hint that allowed characterization of the inhibitors: titration of each inhibitor into AMP-pNA assays revealed their Ki values. The N-ethylsulfamoyl derivative has a 13-fold binding advantage over the sulfamoyl adenosine. The 1.8 Å co-crystal structure of rabbit Hint with N-ethylsulfamoyl adenosine revealed a binding site for the ethyl group against Trp123, a residue that reaches across the Hint dimer interface to interact with the alkyl portion of the inhibitor and, presumably, the alkyl portion of a lysyl substrate. Ser107 is positioned to donate a hydrogen bond to the leaving group nitrogen. Consistent with a role in acid-base catalysis, the Hint S107A mutant protein displayed depressed catalytic activity. PMID:14982931

  1. Cyclic AMP counteracts mitogen-induced inositol phosphate generation and increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in human lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tits, L. J.; Michel, M. C.; Motulsky, H. J.; Maisel, A. S.; Brodde, O. E.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of increases in intracellular adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) on mitogen-induced generation of inositol phosphates and increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration were investigated in human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (MNL). 2. The mitogens concanavalin

  2. Mechanically induced c-fos expression is mediated by cAMP in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    In serum-deprived MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts, mechanical stimulation caused by mild (287 x g) centrifugation induced a 10-fold increase in mRNA levels of the proto-oncogene, c-fos. Induction of c-fos was abolished by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor H-89, suggesting that the transient c-fos mRNA increase is mediated by cAMP. Down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity by chronic TPA treatment failed to significantly reduce c-fos induction, suggesting that TPA-sensitive isoforms of PKC are not responsible for c-fos up-regulation. In addition, 287 x g centrifugation increased intracellular prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels 2.8-fold (Pprostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can induce c-fos expression via a cAMP-mediated mechanism, we asked whether the increase in c-fos mRNA was due to centrifugation-induced PGE2 release. Pretreatment with the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin and flurbiprofen did not hinder the early induction of c-fos by mechanical stimulation. We conclude that c-fos expression induced by mild mechanical loading is dependent primarily on cAMP, not PKC, and initial induction of c-fos is not necessarily dependent on the action of newly synthesized PGE2.

  3. Essential role for cyclic-AMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB) in the survival of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sligte, Naomi E.; Kampen, Kim R.; ter Elst, Arja; Scherpen, Frank J. G.; Meeuwsen-de Boer, Tiny G. J.; Guryev, Victor; van Leeuwen, Frank N.; Kornblau, Steven M.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) relapse remains a leading cause of cancer related death in children, therefore, new therapeutic options are needed. Recently, we showed that a peptide derived from Cyclic-AMP Responsive Element Binding Protein (CREB) was highly phosphorylated in pediatric

  4. Regulation of Mg2+ Reabsorption and Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin Type 6 Activity by cAMP Signaling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanchard, M.G.; Kittikulsuth, W.; Nair, A.V.; Baaij, J.H.F. de; Latta, F.; Genzen, J.R.; Kohan, D.E.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 (TRPM6) epithelial Mg(2+) channels participate in transcellular Mg(2+) transport in the kidney and intestine. Previous reports suggested a hormonal cAMP-dependent regulation of Mg(2+) reabsorption in the kidney. The molecular details of this process

  5. Imaging cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase-4 in human brain with R-[11C]rolipram and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DaSilva, Jean N.; Lourenco, Celia M.; Meyer, Jeffrey H.; Houle, Sylvain; Hussey, Douglas; Potter, William Z.

    2002-01-01

    Evidence of disruptions in cAMP-mediated signaling in several neuropsychiatric disorders has led to the development of R-[ 11 C]rolipram for imaging phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) enzymes with positron emission tomography (PET). The high-affinity PDE4 inhibitor rolipram was previously reported to have an antidepressant effect in humans. PDE4 is abundant in the brain, and it hydrolyzes cAMP produced following stimulation of various neurotransmitter systems. PDE4 is regulated by intracellular cAMP levels. This paper presents the first PET study of R-[ 11 C]rolipram in living human brain. Consistent with the wide distribution of PDE4, high radioactivity retention was observed in all regions representing the gray matter. Rapid metabolism was observed, and kinetic analysis demonstrated that the data fit in a two-tissue compartment model. R-[ 11 C]Rolipram is thus suitable for imaging PDE4 and possibly cAMP signal transduction in the living human brain with PET. (orig.)

  6. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 is an exercise-induced hepatokine in humans, regulated by glucagon and cAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodil Ingerslev

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The data suggest that exercise-induced ANGPTL4 is secreted from the liver and driven by a glucagon-cAMP-PKA pathway in humans. These findings link the liver, insulin/glucagon, and lipid metabolism together, which could implicate a role of ANGPTL4 in metabolic diseases.

  7. The Phosphorylation Status of a Cyclic AMP-Responsive Activator Is Modulated via a Chromatin-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Laura F.; Asahara, Hiroshi; Shulman, Andrew I.; Kraus, W. Lee; Montminy, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) stimulates the expression of numerous genes via the protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133. Ser133 phosphorylation, in turn, promotes recruitment of the coactivator CREB binding protein and its paralog p300, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that have been proposed to mediate target gene activation, in part, by destabilizing promoter bound nucleosomes and thereby allowing assembly of the transcriptional apparatus. Here we show that although histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors potentiate target gene activation via cAMP, they do not stimulate transcription over the early burst phase, during which CREB phosphorylation and CBP/p300 recruitment are maximal. Rather, HDAC inhibitors augment CREB activity during the late attenuation phase by prolonging CREB phosphorylation on chromosomal but, remarkably, not on extrachromosomal templates. In reconstitution studies, assembly of periodic nucleosomal arrays on a cAMP-responsive promoter template potently inhibited CREB phosphorylation by PKA, and acetylation of these template-bound nucleosomes by p300 partially rescued CREB phosphorylation by PKA. Our results suggest a novel regulatory mechanism by which cellular HATs and HDACs modulate the phosphorylation status of nuclear activators in response to cellular signals. PMID:10669737

  8. "Molecular-imprinting" of AMP utilising the polyion complex formation process as detected by a QCM system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanekiyo, Yasumasa; Inoue, K.; Ono, Yoshiyuki; Sano, Masahito; Reinhoudt, David; Shinkai, Seiji

    1999-01-01

    The formation of a polyion complex was applied for molecular imprinting of AMP on a QCM resonator surface. The gold electrode on the resonator surface was modified with anionic thiols. Subsequently, layers of polycations and boronic acid-containing polyanions were adsorbed onto the QCM anionic

  9. Characterization of the MKS1 gene, a new negative regulator of the Ras-cyclic AMP pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, A; Anraku, Y

    1993-04-01

    In order to isolate genes that function downstream of the Ras-cAMP pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a YEp13-based genomic library was screened for clones that inhibit growth of cells with diminished A-kinase activity. One such gene, MKS1, was found to encode a hydrophilic 52 kDa protein that shares weak homology with the yeast SPT2/SIN1 gene product. Three lines of evidence suggest that the MKS1 gene product is a negative regulator downstream of the Ras-cAMP pathway: (i) overexpression of MKS1 inhibits growth of cyr1 disruptant cells on YPD medium containing a low concentration of cAMP; (ii) overexpression of MKS1 does not affect TPK1 expression; and (iii) the temperature-sensitive cyr1-230 mutation is partially suppressed by mks1 disruption. The mks1 mutant shows similar phenotypes to gal11/spt13, i.e., it cannot grow on YPGal containing ethidium bromide at 25 degrees C, or on YPGly or SGal at 37 degrees C. The mks1 gal11 double mutant shows more marked phenotypic changes than the single mutants. These results suggest that MKS1 is involved in transcriptional regulation of several genes by cAMP.

  10. Within-farm dynamics of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in veal calves: a longitudinal approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.; Mevius, D.J.; Kant, A.; Bos, M.E.H.; Graveland, H.; Bosman, A.B.; Hartskeerl, M.; Heederik, D.J.J.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the within-farm dynamics of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in veal calves. METHODS: Three veal-calf fattening farms were screened. Faecal samples from all calves within a compartment (109-150 per farm) were taken upon arrival on the farm

  11. Within-farm dynamics of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in veal calves: a longitudinal approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.; Mevius, D.J.; Kant, A.; Bos, M.E.H.; Graveland, H.; Bosman, A.B.; Hartskeerl, C.M.; Heederik, D.J.J.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the within-farm dynamics of extended-spectrum b-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in veal calves. Methods: Three veal-calf fattening farms were screened. Faecal samples from all calves within a compartment (109–150 per farm)were taken upon arrival on the farm

  12. Presence of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in the broiler production pyramid: a descriptive study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierikx, C.M.; Goot, van der J.A.; Smith, H.E.; Kant, A.; Mevius, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Broilers and broiler meat products are highly contaminated with extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) or plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and are considered to be a source for human infections. Both horizontal and vertical transmission might play a role in the

  13. Leptin interferes with 3',5'-Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP signaling to inhibit steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HoYuen Basil

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of female infertility. Leptin, an adipocytokine which is elevated during obesity, may influence gonadal function through modulating steroidogenesis in granulosa cells. Methods The effect of leptin on progesterone production in simian virus 40 immortalized granulosa (SVOG cells was examined by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The effect of leptin on the expression of the steroidogenic enzymes (StAR, P450scc, 3betaHSD in SVOG cells was examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The mRNA expression of leptin receptor isoforms in SVOG cells were examined by using PCR. SVOG cells were co-treated with leptin and specific pharmacological inhibitors to identify the signaling pathways involved in leptin-reduced progesterone production. Silencing RNA against leptin receptor was used to determine that the inhibition of leptin on cAMP-induced steroidogenesis acts in a leptin receptor-dependent manner. Results and Conclusion In the present study, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying leptin-regulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. We show that leptin inhibits 8-bromo cAMP-stimulated progesterone production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that leptin inhibits expression of the cAMP-stimulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein, the rate limiting de novo protein in progesterone synthesis. Leptin induces the activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK but only the ERK1/2 (PD98059 and p38 (SB203580 inhibitors attenuate the leptin-induced inhibition of cAMP-stimulated StAR protein expression and progesterone production. These data suggest that the leptin-induced MAPK signal transduction pathway interferes with cAMP/PKA-stimulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. Moreover, siRNA mediated knock-down of the endogenous leptin receptor attenuates the effect of leptin on cAMP-induced StAR protein expression and progesterone

  14. Role of cAMP in the promotion of colorectal cancer cell growth by Prostaglandin E2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio Ignacio

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a product of the cyclooxygenase (COX reaction, stimulates the growth of colonic epithelial cells. It is inferred that the abrogation of prostaglandins' growth-promoting effects as a result of COX inhibition underlies the advantageous effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in colorectal carcinoma (CRC. Despite this appreciation, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure since cell culture studies have yielded discrepant results regarding PGE2's mitogenicity. Methods We have employed several alternative approaches to score cell proliferation and apoptosis of 4 CRC cell lines exposed to PGE2 under various conditions. To investigate the role of cAMP in PGE2's functions, activation of the cAMP pathway was assessed at different levels (changes in cAMP levels and PKA activity in cells subjected to specific manipulations including the use of specific inhibitors or prostanoid receptor-selective agonists/antagonists. Results Our data document that the dose-response curve to PGE2 is 'bell-shaped', with nano molar concentrations of PGE2 being more mitogenic than micro molar doses. Remarkably, mitogenicity inversely correlates with the ability of PGE2 doses to raise cAMP levels. Consistent with a major role for cAMP, cAMP raising agents and pertussis toxin revert the mitogenic response to PGE2. Accordingly, use of prostanoid receptor-selective agonists argues for the involvement of the EP3 receptor and serum deprivation of HT29 CRC cells specifically raises the levels of Gi-coupled EP3 splice variants. Conclusion The present data indicate that the mitogenic action of low PGE2 doses in CRC cells is mediated via Gi-proteins, most likely through the EP3 receptor subtype, and is superimposed by a second, cAMP-dependent anti-proliferative effect at higher PGE2 doses. We discuss how these findings contribute to rationalize conflictive literature data on the proliferative action of PGE2.

  15. Evaluation of Amnion-derived Multipotent Progenitor (AMP) Cells and Amnion-derived Cellular Cytokine Solution (ST266) in Promoting Craniomaxillofacial Regenerative Bone Healing in Critical Size Calvarial Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-10

    NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH UNIT SAN ANTONIO EVALUATION OF AMNION-DERIVED MULTIPOTENT PROGENITOR ( AMP ) CELLS AND AMNION-DERIVED...Care International AMP Amnion-derived multipotent progenitor BCA Bicinchoninic acid BS/BV Bone surface/bone volume BV/TV Bone volume/tissue... AMP ) cells release ST266, a secretome of biomolecules identified as integral to the process of bone regeneration and angiogenesis. The AMP cells

  16. Relationships of methacholine and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) responsiveness to the postbronchodilator FEV₁/FVC ratio in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong In; Choi, Sun Hee; Lee, Ju Kyung; Kim, Jin-Tack; Koh, Young Yull

    2011-05-01

    Airway remodeling has been assumed to cause bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR). A low postbronchodilator FEV₁/FVC ratio has been suggested to be a functional surrogate marker of airway remodeling in asthma. BHR is commonly assessed by bronchial challenges using direct or indirect stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare BHR to methacholine and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) with regard to their relationship with a marker of airway remodeling in children with asthma. Methacholine and AMP challenge tests were performed in 129 children with asthma, aged 12 years, and a provocative concentration causing a 20% fall in FEV₁ (PC₂₀) was calculated for each challenge. All subjects also underwent pre- and postbronchodilator spirometry. A postbronchodilator FEV₁/FVC ratio below the lower limits of normal was used as a marker of airway remodeling. A low postbronchodilator FEV₁/FVC ratio was found in 17 subjects (13.2%). These subjects had a significantly lower methacholine PC₂₀ (geometric mean: 0.63 mg/mL, range of 1 SD: 0.17-2.29) than those (n = 112) with a normal postbronchodilator FEV₁/FVC ratio (2.42 mg/mL, 0.57-10.32, p = .000), whereas AMP PC₂₀ was similar between the two groups (22.1 mg/mL, 3.9-125.9 vs. 27.7 mg/mL, 4.2-183.5, p = .231). In the whole group of subjects, methacholine PC₂₀, but not AMP PC₂₀, correlated significantly with the postbronchodilator FEV₁/FVC ratio (r = 0.340, p = .000, and r = 0.056, p = .526, respectively). Our results provide evidence, though indirect, that BHR to methacholine is related to airway remodeling in children with asthma and suggest that BHR to methacholine may be a better marker of airway remodeling than BHR to AMP.

  17. Ecto-5’-nucleotidase (CD73) inhibits nociception by hydrolyzing AMP to adenosine in nociceptive circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowa, Nathaniel A.; Taylor-Blake, Bonnie; Zylka, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Ecto-5’-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) is a membrane-anchored protein that hydrolyzes extracellular adenosine 5’-monophosphate (AMP) to adenosine in diverse tissues but has not been directly studied in nociceptive neurons. We found that NT5E was located on peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptive neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and on axon terminals in lamina II (the substantia gelatinosa) of spinal cord. NT5E was also located on epidermal keratinocytes, cells of the dermis and on nociceptive axon terminals in the epidermis. Following nerve injury, NT5E protein and AMP histochemical staining were coordinately reduced in lamina II. In addition, AMP hydrolytic activity was reduced in DRG neurons and spinal cord of Nt5e−/− mice. The antinociceptive effects of AMP, when combined with the adenosine kinase inhibitor 5-iodotubericidin, were reduced by ~50% in Nt5e−/− mice and were eliminated in Adenosine A1 receptor (A1R, Adora1) knockout mice. Additionally, Nt5e−/− mice displayed enhanced sensitivity in the tail immersion assay, in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) model of inflammatory pain and in the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain. Collectively, our data indicate that the ectonucleotidase NT5E regulates nociception by hydrolyzing AMP to adenosine in nociceptive circuits and represents a new molecular target for the treatment of chronic pain. Moreover, our data suggest NT5E is well localized to regulate nucleotide signaling between skin cells and sensory axons. PMID:20147550

  18. The role of a cAMP-dependent pathway in the uterine relaxant action of relaxin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S J; Hollingsworth, M; Elliott, K R

    1997-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the adenylyl cyclase pathway, and in particular cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A, in the relaxant action of relaxin in the isolated uterus of the nonpregnant rat. The purportedly selective inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A N-[2-(methylamino) ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride (H-8) (at 100 mumol l-7) antagonized relaxin, salbutamol (an agonist at beta-adrenoceptors) and levcromakalim (a K+ channel opener) to a similar extent (by factors of 3.1, 1.9 and 2.8, respectively), demonstrating that it is not a selective inhibitor. Relaxin and levcromakalim were less potent and had smaller, maximal, relaxant effects in longitudinal myometrium than in intact uterus cut in the longitudinal plane. By contrast, nifedipine (a Ca2+ channel blocker) was equipotent in the two preparations and salbutamol only slightly less potent in the longitudinal myometrium. Relaxin did not alter the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A activity ratio in longitudinal myometrium, but did increase the activity ratio by a factor of 2.0 +/- 0.2 in the intact uterus. Salbutamol, the positive control, increased this activity ratio in both longitudinal myometrium (by 1.9 +/- 0.3 times) and in the intact uterus (by 3.8 +/- 0.3 times), whereas the negative control levcromakalim had no effect. Relaxin seems to act as a relaxant of longitudinal myometrium by a cyclic AMP-independent mechanism but possibly interacts with the circular myometrium or endometrium to release a relaxant factor via a cyclic-AMP-dependent mechanism.

  19. BSA-AuNPs@Tb-AMP metal-organic frameworks for ratiometric fluorescence detection of DPA and Hg2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Keying; Zeng, Mulan; Liu, Fenfen; Liu, Nan; Huang, Zhenzhong; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li

    2017-11-01

    An easy and effective strategy for synthesizing a ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor has been demonstrated in this work. Novel fluorescent BSA-AuNPs@Tb-AMP (BSA, bovine serum albumin; AMP, adenosine 5'-monophosphate; AuNPs, Au nanoparticles) metal-organic framework (MOF) nanostructures were synthesized by encapsulating BSA-AuNPs into Tb-AMP MOFs for the detection of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (DPA) and Hg 2+ . DPA could strongly co-ordinate with Tb 3+ to replace water molecules from the Tb 3+ center and accordingly enhanced the fluorescence of Tb-AMP MOFs. The fluorescence of BSA-AuNPs at 405 nm remained constant. While the fluorescence of BSA-AuNPs at 635 nm was quenched after Hg 2+ was added, the fluorescence of Tb-AMP MOFs remained constant. Accordingly, a ratiometric fluorescence nanosensor was constructed for detection of DPA and Hg 2+ . The ratiometric nanosensor exhibited good selectivity to DPA over other substances. The F 545 /F 405 linearly increased with increase of DPA concentration in the range of 50 nM to 10 μM with a detection limit as low as 17.4 nM. F 635 /F 405 increased linearly with increase of Hg 2+ concentration ranging from 50 nM to 1 μM with a detection limit as low as 20.9 nM. Additionally, the nanosensor could be successfully applied for the determination of DPA and Hg 2+ in running water. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The cAMP-PKA Signaling Pathway Regulates Pathogenicity, Hyphal Growth, Appressorial Formation, Conidiation, and Stress Tolerance in Colletotrichum higginsianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenjun; Zhou, Man; Xiong, Zeyang; Peng, Fang; Wei, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. Understanding the mechanisms of the cruciferous plant- C. higginsianum interactions will be important in facilitating efficient control of anthracnose diseases. The cAMP-PKA signaling pathway plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. C. higginsianum contains two genes, ChPKA1 and ChPKA2 , that encode the catalytic subunits of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). To analyze the role of cAMP signaling pathway in pathogenicity and development in C. higginsianum , we characterized ChPKA1 and ChPKA2 genes, and adenylate cyclase ( ChAC ) gene. The ChPKA1 and ChAC deletion mutants were unable to cause disease and significantly reduced in hyphal growth, tolerance to cell wall inhibitors, conidiation, and appressorial formation with abnormal germ tubes, but they had an increased tolerance to elevated temperatures and exogenous H 2 O 2 . In contrast, the ChPKA2 mutant had no detectable alteration of phenotypes, suggesting that ChPKA1 contributes mainly to PKA activities in C. higginsianum . Moreover, we failed to generate Δ ChPKA1ChPKA2 double mutant, indicating that deletion of both PKA catalytic subunits is lethal in C. higginsianum and the two catalytic subunits possibly have overlapping functions. These results indicated that ChPKA1 is the major PKA catalytic subunit in cAMP-PKA signaling pathway and plays significant roles in hyphal growth, pathogenicity, appressorial formation, conidiation, and stress tolerance in C. higginsianum .